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Sample records for human physiologically based

  1. Human insulin dynamics in women: a physiologically based model.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Michael; Tura, Andrea; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Pacini, Giovanni; D'Argenio, David Z

    2016-02-01

    Currently available models of insulin dynamics are mostly based on the classical compartmental structure and, thus, their physiological utility is limited. In this work, we describe the development of a physiologically based model and its application to data from 154 patients who underwent an insulin-modified intravenous glucose tolerance test (IM-IVGTT). To determine the time profile of endogenous insulin delivery without using C-peptide data and to evaluate the transcapillary transport of insulin, the hepatosplanchnic, renal, and peripheral beds were incorporated into the circulatory model as separate subsystems. Physiologically reasonable population mean estimates were obtained for all estimated model parameters, including plasma volume, interstitial volume of the peripheral circulation (mainly skeletal muscle), uptake clearance into the interstitial space, hepatic and renal clearance, as well as total insulin delivery into plasma. The results indicate that, at a population level, the proposed physiologically based model provides a useful description of insulin disposition, which allows for the assessment of muscle insulin uptake. PMID:26608654

  2. Complexity analysis of human physiological signals based on case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, Maia; Holloway, Philip; Ellis, Jason

    2015-04-01

    This work focuses on methods for investigation of physiological time series based on complexity analysis. It is a part of a wider programme to determine non-invasive markers for healthy ageing. We consider two case studies investigated with actigraphy: (a) sleep and alternations with insomnia, and (b) ageing effects on mobility patterns. We illustrate, using these case studies, the application of fractal analysis to the investigation of regulation patterns and control, and change of physiological function. In the first case study, fractal analysis techniques were implemented to study the correlations present in sleep actigraphy for individuals suffering from acute insomnia in comparison with healthy controls. The aim was to investigate if complexity analysis can detect the onset of adverse health-related events. The subjects with acute insomnia displayed significantly higher levels of complexity, possibly a result of too much activity in the underlying regulatory systems. The second case study considered mobility patterns during night time and their variations with age. It showed that complexity metrics can identify change in physiological function with ageing. Both studies demonstrated that complexity analysis can be used to investigate markers of health, disease and healthy ageing.

  3. PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR HUMAN EXPOSURES TO METHYL TERTIARY-BUTYL ETHER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans can be exposed by inhalation, ingestion, or dermal absorption to methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE), an oxygenated fuel additive, from contaminated water sources. The purpose of this research was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model describing in human...

  4. Validation of Human Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Vinyl Acetate Against Human Nasal Dosimetry Data

    SciTech Connect

    Hinderliter, Paul M.; Thrall, Karla D.; Corley, Rick A.; Bloemen, Louis J.; Bogdanffy, M S.

    2005-05-01

    Vinyl acetate has been shown to induce nasal lesions in rodents in inhalation bioassays. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for vinyl acetate has been used in human risk assessment, but previous in vivo validation was conducted only in rats. Controlled human exposures to vinyl acetate were conducted to provide validation data for the application of the model in humans. Five volunteers were exposed to 1, 5, and 10 ppm 13 C1 , 13 C2 vinyl acetate via inhalation. A probe inserted into thenasopharyngeal region sampled both 13 C1 , 13 C2 vinyl acetate and the major metabolite 13 C1 , 13 C2 acetaldehyde during rest and light exercise. Nasopharyngeal air concentrations were analyzed in real time by ion trap mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Experimental concentrations of both vinyl acetate and acetaldehyde were then compared to predicted concentrations calculated from the previously published human model. Model predictions of vinyl acetate nasal extraction compared favorably with measured values of vinyl acetate, as did predictions of nasopharyngeal acetaldehyde when compared to measured acetaldehyde. The results showed that the current PBPK model structure and parameterization are appropriate for vinyl acetate. These analyses were conducted from 1 to 10 ppm vinyl acetate, a range relevant to workplace exposure standards but which would not be expected to saturate vinyl acetate metabolism. Risk assessment based on this model further concluded that 24 h per day exposures up to 1 ppm do not present concern regarding cancer or non-cancer toxicity. Validation of the vinyl acetate human PBPK model provides support for these conclusions.

  5. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models in human exposure assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, K.

    1995-12-31

    The potential dose received by an individual during defined exposure situations can be determined using personal dosimeters or estimated by combining information on exposure scenarios with the environmental concentration (C.) of chemicals. With the latter approach, not only the potential dose but also the internal dose (i.e., amount of chemical that has been absorbed and available for interaction with receptors) and biologically-effective dose (i.e., amount of chemical that actually reaches the cellular sites where interaction with macromolecules occur) can be estimated if C. is provided as an input to PBPK models. These models are mathematical representations of the interrelationships among the critical determinants of the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of chemicals in biota. Since the compartments in this model correspond to biologically relevant tissues or tissue groups, the amount of chemical reaching specific target organ(s) can be estimated. Further, the PBPK models permit the use of biological monitoring data such as urinary levels of metabolites, hemoglobin adduct levels, and alveolar air concentrations, to reconstruct the exposure levels and scenarios for specific subgroups of populations. These models are also useful in providing estimates of target tissue dose in humans simultaneously exposed to chemicals in various media (air, water, soil, food) by different routes (oral, dermal, inhalation). Several examples of exposure assessment for volatile organic chemicals using PBPK models for mammals will be presented, and the strategies for development of these models for other classes of chemicals highlighted.

  6. USE OF PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODELS TO QUANTIFY THE IMPACT OF HUMAN AGE AND INTERINDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY PERTINENT TO RISK (FINAL REPORT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This final report, Use of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Models to Quantify the Impact of Human Age and Interindividual Differences in Physiology and Biochemistry Pertinent to Risk Final R...

  7. Human physiology in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, J.

    1996-01-01

    The universality of gravity (1 g) in our daily lives makes it difficult to appreciate its importance in morphology and physiology. Bone and muscle support systems were created, cellular pumps developed, neurons organised and receptors and transducers of gravitational force to biologically relevant signals evolved under 1g gravity. Spaceflight provides the only microgravity environment where systematic experimentation can expand our basic understanding of gravitational physiology and perhaps provide new insights into normal physiology and disease processes. These include the surprising extent of our body's dependence on perceptual information, and understanding the effect and importance of forces generated within the body's weightbearing structures such as muscle and bones. Beyond this exciting prospect is the importance of this work towards opening the solar system for human exploration. Although both appear promising, we are only just beginning to taste what lies ahead.

  8. Development of a human physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for dermal permeability for lindane.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Megan E; Evans, Marina V; Wilson, Charles A; Beesley, Lauren J; Leon, Lider S; Eklund, Chris R; Croom, Edward L; Pegram, Rex A

    2016-03-14

    Lindane is a neurotoxicant used for the treatment of lice and scabies present on human skin. Due to its pharmaceutical application, an extensive pharmacokinetic database exists in humans. Mathematical diffusion models allow for calculation of lindane skin permeability coefficients using human kinetic data obtained from in vitro and in vivo experimentation as well as a default compound-specific calculation based on physicochemical characteristics used in the absence of kinetic data. A dermal model was developed to describe lindane diffusion into the skin, where the skin compartment consisted of homogeneous dermal tissue. This study utilized Fick's law of diffusion along with chemical binding to protein and lipids to determine appropriate dermal absorption parameters which were then incorporated into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to describe in vivo kinetics. The estimation of permeability coefficients using chemical binding in combination with in vivo data demonstrates the advantages of combining physiochemical properties with a PBPK model to predict dermal absorption. PMID:26794662

  9. AN EXAMPLE OF MODEL STRUCTURE DIFFERENCES USING SENSITIVITY ANALYSES IN PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an industrial chemical and an environmental contaminant. TCE and its metabolites may be carcinogenic and affect human health. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models that differ in compartmentalization are developed for TCE metabo...

  10. Screening of chemicals for human bioaccumulative potential with a physiologically based toxicokinetic model.

    PubMed

    Tonnelier, Arnaud; Coecke, Sandra; Zaldívar, José-Manuel

    2012-03-01

    Human bioaccumulative potential is an important element in the risk assessment of chemicals. Due to the high number of synthetic chemicals, there exists the need to develop prioritisation strategies. The purpose of this study was to develop a predictive tool for human bioaccumulation risk assessment that incorporates not only the chemical properties of the compounds, but also the processes that tend to decrease the concentration of the compound such as metabolisation. We used a generic physiologically based toxicokinetic model that based on in vitro human liver metabolism data, minimal renal excretion and a constant exposure was able to assess the bioaccumulative potential of a chemical. The approach has been analysed using literature data on well-known bioaccumulative compounds and liver metabolism data from the ECVAM database and a subset of the ToxCast phase I chemical library-in total 94 compounds covering pharmaceuticals, plant protection products and industrial chemicals. Our results provide further evidence that partitioning properties do not allow for a reliable screening criteria for human chemical hazard. Our model, based on a 100% intestinal absorption assumption, suggests that metabolic clearance, plasma protein-binding properties and renal excretion are the main factors in determining whether bioaccumulation will occur and its amount. It is essential that in vitro metabolic clearance tests with metabolic competent cell lines as well as plasma protein-binding assays be performed for suspected bioaccumulative compounds. PMID:22089525

  11. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for assessment of human exposure to bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Doerge, Daniel R; Teeguarden, Justin G; Fisher, Jeffrey W

    2015-12-15

    A previously developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for bisphenol A (BPA) in adult rhesus monkeys was modified to characterize the pharmacokinetics of BPA and its phase II conjugates in adult humans following oral ingestion. Coupled with in vitro studies on BPA metabolism in the liver and the small intestine, the PBPK model was parameterized using oral pharmacokinetic data with deuterated-BPA (d6-BPA) delivered in cookies to adult humans after overnight fasting. The availability of the serum concentration time course of unconjugated d6-BPA offered direct empirical evidence for the calibration of BPA model parameters. The recalibrated PBPK adult human model for BPA was then evaluated against published human pharmacokinetic studies with BPA. A hypothesis of decreased oral uptake was needed to account for the reduced peak levels observed in adult humans, where d6-BPA was delivered in soup and food was provided prior to BPA ingestion, suggesting the potential impact of dosing vehicles and/or fasting on BPA disposition. With the incorporation of Monte Carlo analysis, the recalibrated adult human model was used to address the inter-individual variability in the internal dose metrics of BPA for the U.S. general population. Model-predicted peak BPA serum levels were in the range of pM, with 95% of human variability falling within an order of magnitude. This recalibrated PBPK model for BPA in adult humans provides a scientific basis for assessing human exposure to BPA that can serve to minimize uncertainties incurred during extrapolations across doses and species. PMID:26522835

  12. Simulation of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics in humans using a minimal physiologically based model.

    PubMed

    Li, Linzhong; Gardner, Iain; Dostalek, Miroslav; Jamei, Masoud

    2014-09-01

    Compared to small chemical molecules, monoclonal antibodies and Fc-containing derivatives (mAbs) have unique pharmacokinetic behaviour characterised by relatively poor cellular permeability, minimal renal filtration, binding to FcRn, target-mediated drug disposition, and disposition via lymph. A minimal physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to describe the pharmacokinetics of mAbs in humans was developed. Within the model, the body is divided into three physiological compartments; plasma, a single tissue compartment and lymph. The tissue compartment is further sub-divided into vascular, endothelial and interstitial spaces. The model simultaneously describes the levels of endogenous IgG and exogenous mAbs in each compartment and sub-compartment and, in particular, considers the competition of these two species for FcRn binding in the endothelial space. A Monte-Carlo sampling approach is used to simulate the concentrations of endogenous IgG and mAb in a human population. Existing targeted-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) models are coupled with the minimal PBPK model to provide a general platform for simulating the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic antibodies using primarily pre-clinical data inputs. The feasibility of utilising pre-clinical data to parameterise the model and to simulate the pharmacokinetics of adalimumab and an anti-ALK1 antibody (PF-03446962) in a population of individuals was investigated and results were compared to published clinical data. PMID:25004823

  13. A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of squalene-containing adjuvant in human vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tegenge, Million A; Mitkus, Robert J

    2013-10-01

    Squalene is used in the oil phase of certain emulsion vaccine adjuvants, but its fate as a vaccine component following intramuscular (IM) injection in humans is unknown. In this study, we constructed a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for intramuscularly injected squalene-in-water (SQ/W) emulsion, in order to make a quantitative estimation of the tissue distribution of squalene following a single IM injection in humans. The PBPK model incorporates relevant physicochemical properties of squalene; estimates of the time course of cracking of a SQ/W emulsion; anatomical and physiological parameters at the injection site and beyond; and local, preferential lymphatic transport. The model predicts that a single dose of SQ/W emulsion will be removed from human deltoid muscle within six days following IM injection. The major proportion of the injected squalene will be distributed to draining lymph nodes and adipose tissues. The model indicates slow decay from the latter compartment most likely due to partitioning into neutral lipids and a low rate of squalene biotransformation there. Parallel pharmacokinetic modeling for mouse muscle suggests that the kinetics of SQ/W emulsion correspond to the immunodynamic time course of a commercial squalene-containing adjuvant reported in that species. In conclusion, this study makes important pharmacokinetic predictions of the fate of a squalene-containing emulsion in humans. The results of this study may be relevant for understanding the immunodynamics of this new class of vaccine adjuvants and may be useful in future quantitative risk analyses that incorporate mode-of-action data. PMID:23912214

  14. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of ethyl acetate and ethanol in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Crowell, S R; Smith, J N; Creim, J A; Faber, W; Teeguarden, J G

    2015-10-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed and applied to a metabolic series approach for the ethyl series (i.e., ethyl acetate, ethanol, acetaldehyde, and acetate). This approach bases toxicity information on dosimetry analyses for metabolically linked compounds using pharmacokinetic data for each compound and toxicity data for parent or individual compounds. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies of ethyl acetate and ethanol were conducted in rats following IV and inhalation exposure. Regardless of route, ethyl acetate was rapidly converted to ethanol. Blood concentrations of ethyl acetate and ethanol following both IV bolus and infusion suggested linear kinetics across blood concentrations from 0.1 to 10 mM ethyl acetate and 0.01-0.8 mM ethanol. Metabolic parameters were optimized and evaluated based on available pharmacokinetic data. The respiratory bioavailability of ethyl acetate and ethanol were estimated from closed chamber inhalation studies and measured ventilation rates. The resulting ethyl series model successfully reproduces blood ethyl acetate and ethanol kinetics following IV administration and inhalation exposure in rats, and blood ethanol kinetics following inhalation exposure to ethanol in humans. The extrapolated human model was used to derive human equivalent concentrations for the occupational setting of 257-2120 ppm ethyl acetate and 72-517 ppm ethyl acetate for continuous exposure, corresponding to rat LOAELs of 350 and 1500 ppm. PMID:26297692

  15. Physiologically based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of 1,4-Dioxane in Rats, Mice, and Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Lisa M.; Thrall, Karla D.; Poet, Torka S.; Corley, Rick; Weber, Thomas J.; Locey, B. J.; Clarkson, Jacquelyn; Sager, S.; Gargas, M. L.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT 1,4-Dioxane (CAS No. 123-91-1) is used primarily as a solvent or as a solvent stabilizer. It can cause lung, liver and kidney damage at sufficiently high exposure levels. Two physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models of 1,4-dioxane and its major metabolite, hydroxyethoxyacetic acid (HEAA), were published in 1990. These models have uncertainties and deficiencies that could be addressed and the model strengthened for use in a contemporary cancer risk assessment for 1,4-dioxane. Studies were performed to fill data gaps and reduce uncertainties pertaining to the pharmacokinetics of 1,4-dioxane and HEAA in rats, mice, and humans. Three types of studies were performed:partition coefficient measurements, blood time course in mice, and in vitro pharmacokinetics using rat, mouse, and human hepatocytes. Updated PBPK models were developed based on these new data and previously available data. The optimized rate of metabolism for the mouse was significantly higher than the value previously estimated. The optimized rat kinetic parameters were similar to those in the 1990 models. Only two human studies were identified. Model predictions were consistent with one study, but did not fit the second as well. In addition, a rat nasal exposure was completed. The results confirmed water directly contacts rat nasal tissues during drinking water under bioassays. Consistent with previous PBPK models, nasal tissues were not specifically included in the model. Use of these models will reduce the uncertainty in future 1,4-dioxane risk assessments.

  16. Development of a Human Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Toolkit for Environmental Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Patricia; Ray, Meredith; Fisher, Jeffrey; Mumtaz, Moiz

    2011-01-01

    Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models can be used to determine the internal dose and strengthen exposure assessment. Many PBPK models are available, but they are not easily accessible for field use. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has conducted translational research to develop a human PBPK model toolkit by recoding published PBPK models. This toolkit, when fully developed, will provide a platform that consists of a series of priority PBPK models of environmental pollutants. Presented here is work on recoded PBPK models for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and metals. Good agreement was generally obtained between the original and the recoded models. This toolkit will be available for ATSDR scientists and public health assessors to perform simulations of exposures from contaminated environmental media at sites of concern and to help interpret biomonitoring data. It can be used as screening tools that can provide useful information for the protection of the public. PMID:22174611

  17. MRI-based three-dimensional thermal physiological characterization of thyroid gland of human body.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chao; He, Zhi Zhu; Yang, Yang; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    This article is dedicated to present a MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) based three-dimensional finite element modeling on the thermal manifestations relating to the pathophysiology of thyroid gland. An efficient approach for identifying the metabolic dysfunctions of thyroid has also been demonstrated through tracking the localized non-uniform thermal distribution or enhanced dynamic imaging. The temperature features over the skin surface and thyroid domain have been characterized using the numerical simulation and experimental measurement which will help better interpret the thermal physiological mechanisms of the thyroid under steady-state or water-cooling condition. Further, parametric simulations on the hypermetabolism symptoms of hyperthyroidism and thermal effects within thyroid domain caused by varying breathing airflow in the trachea and blood-flow in artery and vein were performed. It was disclosed that among all the parameters, the airflow volume has the largest effect on the total heat flux of thyroid surface. However, thermal contributions caused by varying the breathing frequency and blood-flow velocity are negligibly small. The present study suggests a generalized way for simulating the close to reality physiological behavior or process of human thyroid, which is of significance for disease diagnosis and treatment planning. PMID:23999383

  18. Human-on-a-chip design strategies and principles for physiologically based pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Shuler, Michael L

    2015-04-01

    Advances in maintaining multiple human tissues on microfluidic platforms has led to a growing interest in the development of microphysiological systems for drug development studies. Determination of the proper design principles and scaling rules for body-on-a-chip systems is critical for their strategic incorporation into physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) model-aided drug development. While the need for a functional design considering organ-organ interactions has been considered, robust design criteria and steps to build such systems have not yet been defined mathematically. In this paper, we first discuss strategies for incorporating body-on-a-chip technology into the current PBPK modeling-based drug discovery to provide a conceptual model. We propose two types of platforms that can be involved in the different stages of PBPK modeling and drug development; these are μOrgans-on-a-chip and μHuman-on-a-chip. Then we establish the design principles for both types of systems and develop parametric design equations that can be used to determine dimensions and operating conditions. In addition, we discuss the availability of the critical parameters required to satisfy the design criteria, consider possible limitations for estimating such parameter values and propose strategies to address such limitations. This paper is intended to be a useful guide to the researchers focused on the design of microphysiological platforms for PBPK/PD based drug discovery. PMID:25739725

  19. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Triadimefon and Triadimenol in Rats and Humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for the conazole fungicide triadimefon and its primary metabolite, triadimenol. Rat tissue:blood partition coefficients and metabolic constants were measured in vitro for both compounds. Kinetic time course data...

  20. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of deltamethrin: Development of a rat and human diffusion-limited model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mirfazaelian et al. (2006) developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for the pyrethroid pesticide deltamethrin in the rat. This model describes gastrointestinal tract absorption as a saturable process mediated by phase III efflux transporters which pump delta...

  1. A Human Life-Stage Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Model for Chlorpyrifos: Development and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jordan N.; Hinderliter, Paul M.; Timchalk, Charles; Bartels, M. J.; Poet, Torka S.

    2014-08-01

    Sensitivity to chemicals in animals and humans are known to vary with age. Age-related changes in sensitivity to chlorpyrifos have been reported in animal models. A life-stage physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was developed to computationally predict disposition of CPF and its metabolites, chlorpyrifos-oxon (the ultimate toxicant) and 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), as well as B-esterase inhibition by chlorpyrifos-oxon in humans. In this model, age-dependent body weight was calculated from a generalized Gompertz function, and compartments (liver, brain, fat, blood, diaphragm, rapid, and slow) were scaled based on body weight from polynomial functions on a fractional body weight basis. Blood flows among compartments were calculated as a constant flow per compartment volume. The life-stage PBPK/PD model was calibrated and tested against controlled adult human exposure studies. Model simulations suggest age-dependent pharmacokinetics and response may exist. At oral doses ≥ 0.55 mg/kg of chlorpyrifos (significantly higher than environmental exposure levels), 6 mo old children are predicted to have higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and higher levels of red blood cell cholinesterase inhibition compared to adults from equivalent oral doses of chlorpyrifos. At lower doses that are more relevant to environmental exposures, the model predicts that adults will have slightly higher levels of chlorpyrifos-oxon in blood and greater cholinesterase inhibition. This model provides a computational framework for age-comparative simulations that can be utilized to predict CPF disposition and biological response over various postnatal life-stages.

  2. Evaluation of human interindividual variation in bioactivation of estragole using physiologically based biokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Punt, Ans; Jeurissen, Suzanne M; Boersma, Marelle G; Delatour, Thierry; Scholz, Gabriele; Schilter, Benoît; van Bladeren, Peter J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2010-02-01

    The present study investigates interindividual variation in liver levels of the proximate carcinogenic metabolite of estragole, 1'-hydroxyestragole, due to variation in two key metabolic reactions involved in the formation and detoxification of this metabolite, namely 1'-hydroxylation of estragole and oxidation of 1'-hydroxyestragole. Formation of 1'-hydroxyestragole is predominantly catalyzed by P450 1A2, 2A6, and 2E1, and results of the present study support that oxidation of 1'-hydroxyestragole is catalyzed by 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (17beta-HSD2). In a first approach, the study defines physiologically based biokinetic (PBBK) models for 14 individual human subjects, revealing a 1.8-fold interindividual variation in the area under the liver concentration-time curve (AUC) for 1'-hydroxyestragole within this group of human subjects. Variation in oxidation of 1'-hydroxyestragole by 17beta-HSD2 was shown to result in larger effects than those caused by variation in P450 enzyme activity. In a second approach, a Monte Carlo simulation was performed to evaluate the extent of variation in liver levels of 1'-hydroxyestragole that could occur in the population as a whole. This analysis could be used to derive a chemical-specific adjustment factor (CSAF), which is defined as the 99th percentile divided by the 50th percentile of the predicted distribution of the AUC of 1'-hydroxyestragole in the liver. The CSAF was estimated to range between 1.6 and 4.0, depending on the level of variation that was taken into account for oxidation of 1'-hydroxyestragole. Comparison of the CSAF to the default uncertainty factor of 3.16 for human variability in biokinetics reveals that the default uncertainty factor adequately protects 99% of the population. PMID:19920071

  3. Possible range of dioxin concentration in human tissues: simulation with a physiologically based model.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Wakae; Yoshida, Kikuo; Tanaka, Takayuki; Nakanishi, Junko

    2002-12-27

    In risk evaluation of dioxins, monitoring chemical concentrations in human tissues is an important step, and these concentration data can be utilized along with animal toxicity data for extrapolation of human manifestation. However large differences in dioxin concentrations usually exist even among individuals who have never been accidentally exposed to high quantities of dioxin, and this may cause problems in risk analysis. Body size, age, and history of food consumption are factors responsible for these interindividual differences in addition to exposure levels. Using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, the influence of differences in body weight, gastrointestinal absorption, and half-life and intake of dioxin were examined on tissue chemical concentration. Dioxin concentrations over a 40-yr time course in human liver, kidneys, fat, blood, muscle and richly perfused tissue were simulated for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (CoPCBs). Model parameters such as tissue-blood partition coefficients for CoPCBs were prepared, and sensitivity analysis was also performed on these parameters. The range of tissue concentrations was approximately 0.17 to 4.1 times the standard concentration, which was calculated using standard model parameters. The simulated ranges included more than 80% of the individual anatomical data for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, 1,2,3,7,-pentachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, and 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl in liver, fat, and blood. These results suggest that differences in body weight, gastrointestinal absorption, and food intake behavior may partially explain variation in tissue concentrations among individuals, and the possible interindividual uncertainty, which is approximately 24 for the general Japanese population. PMID:12515586

  4. Sensing human physiological response using wearable carbon nanotube-based fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Long; Loh, Kenneth J.; Koo, Helen S.

    2016-04-01

    Flexible and wearable sensors for human monitoring have received increased attention. Besides detecting motion and physical activity, measuring human vital signals (e.g., respiration rate and body temperature) provide rich data for assessing subjects' physiological or psychological condition. Instead of using conventional, bulky, sensing transducers, the objective of this study was to design and test a wearable, fabric-like sensing system. In particular, multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-latex thin films of different MWCNT concentrations were first fabricated using spray coating. Freestanding MWCNT-latex films were then sandwiched between two layers of flexible fabric using iron-on adhesive to form the wearable sensor. Second, to characterize its strain sensing properties, the fabric sensors were subjected to uniaxial and cyclic tensile load tests, and they exhibited relatively stable electromechanical responses. Finally, the wearable sensors were placed on a human subject for monitoring simple motions and for validating their practical strain sensing performance. Overall, the wearable fabric sensor design exhibited advances such as flexibility, ease of fabrication, light weight, low cost, noninvasiveness, and user comfort.

  5. Breath-based meditation: A mechanism to restore the physiological and cognitive reserves for optimal human performance

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Kirtigandha Salwe; Carter III, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Stress can be associated with many physiological changes resulting in significant decrements in human performance. Due to growing interests in alternative and complementary medicine by Westerners, many of the traditions and holistic yogic breathing practices today are being utilized as a measure for healthier lifestyles. These state-of-the-art practices can have a significant impact on common mental health conditions such as depression and generalized anxiety disorder. However, the potential of yogic breathing on optimizing human performance and overall well-being is not well known. Breathing techniques such as alternate nostril, Sudarshan Kriya and bhastrika utilizes rhythmic breathing to guide practitioners into a deep meditative state of relaxation and promote self-awareness. Furthermore, yogic breathing is physiologically stimulating and can be described as a natural “technological” solution to optimize human performance which can be categorized into: (1) cognitive function (i.e., mind, vigilance); and (2) physical performance (i.e., cardiorespiratory, metabolism, exercise, whole body). Based on previous studies, we postulate that daily practice of breathing meditation techniques play a significant role in preserving the compensatory mechanisms available to sustain physiological function. This preservation of physiological function may help to offset the time associated with reaching a threshold for clinical expression of chronic state (i.e., hypertension, depression, dementia) or acute state (i.e., massive hemorrhage, panic attic) of medical conditions. However, additional rigorous biomedical research is needed to evaluate the physiological mechanisms of various forms of meditation (i.e., breath-based, mantra, mindfulness) on human performance. These efforts will help to define how compensatory reserve mechanisms of cardiovascular and immune systems are modulated by breath-based meditation. While it has been suggested that breath-based meditation is easier

  6. Breath-based meditation: A mechanism to restore the physiological and cognitive reserves for optimal human performance.

    PubMed

    Carter, Kirtigandha Salwe; Carter, Robert

    2016-04-16

    Stress can be associated with many physiological changes resulting in significant decrements in human performance. Due to growing interests in alternative and complementary medicine by Westerners, many of the traditions and holistic yogic breathing practices today are being utilized as a measure for healthier lifestyles. These state-of-the-art practices can have a significant impact on common mental health conditions such as depression and generalized anxiety disorder. However, the potential of yogic breathing on optimizing human performance and overall well-being is not well known. Breathing techniques such as alternate nostril, Sudarshan Kriya and bhastrika utilizes rhythmic breathing to guide practitioners into a deep meditative state of relaxation and promote self-awareness. Furthermore, yogic breathing is physiologically stimulating and can be described as a natural "technological" solution to optimize human performance which can be categorized into: (1) cognitive function (i.e., mind, vigilance); and (2) physical performance (i.e., cardiorespiratory, metabolism, exercise, whole body). Based on previous studies, we postulate that daily practice of breathing meditation techniques play a significant role in preserving the compensatory mechanisms available to sustain physiological function. This preservation of physiological function may help to offset the time associated with reaching a threshold for clinical expression of chronic state (i.e., hypertension, depression, dementia) or acute state (i.e., massive hemorrhage, panic attic) of medical conditions. However, additional rigorous biomedical research is needed to evaluate the physiological mechanisms of various forms of meditation (i.e., breath-based, mantra, mindfulness) on human performance. These efforts will help to define how compensatory reserve mechanisms of cardiovascular and immune systems are modulated by breath-based meditation. While it has been suggested that breath-based meditation is easier for

  7. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of hydrogen cyanide levels in human breath.

    PubMed

    Stamyr, Kristin; Mörk, Anna-Karin; Johanson, Gunnar

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is a potent and fast-acting toxin increasingly recognized as an important cause of death in fire victims. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of cyanide poisoning are essential to avoid fatalities. Unfortunately, there are at present few rapid diagnostic methods. A noninvasive methodology would be to use HCN in exhaled air as a marker for systemic exposure. To explore this possibility, we developed a preliminary physiologically based pharmacokinetic model. The model suggests that breath HCN levels following inhalation exposure at near-lethal and lethal conditions are 0.1-1 ppm, i.e., one to two orders of magnitude higher than the background breath level of about 0.01 ppm in unexposed subjects. Hence, our results imply that breath analysis may be used as a rapid diagnostic method for cyanide poisoning. PMID:25069802

  8. The bioaccessibility of soil-based mercury as determined by physiological based extraction tests and human biomonitoring in children.

    PubMed

    Safruk, Adam M; Berger, Robert G; Jackson, Blair J; Pinsent, Celine; Hair, Alan T; Sigal, Elliot A

    2015-06-15

    Environmental contaminants associated with soil particles are generally less bioavailable than contaminants associated with other exposure media where chemicals are often found in more soluble forms. In vitro methods, such as Physiological Based Extraction Tests (PBET), can provide estimates of bioaccessibility for soil-based contaminants. The results of these tests can be used to predict exposure to contaminants from soil ingestion pathways within human health risk assessment (HHRA). In the current investigation, an HHRA was conducted to examine the risks associated with elevated concentrations of mercury in soils in the northern Canadian smelter community of Flin Flon, Manitoba. A PBET was completed for residential soils and indicated mean bioaccessibilities of 1.2% and 3.0% for total mercury using gastric phase and gastric+intestinal phase methodologies, respectively. However, as many regulators only allow for the consideration of in vitro results for lead and arsenic in the HHRA process, in vitro bioaccessibility results for mercury were not utilized in the current HHRA. Based on the need to assume 100% bioaccessibility for inorganic mercury in soil, results from the HHRA indicated the need for further assessment of exposure and risk. A biomonitoring study was undertaken for children between 2 and 15 years of age in the community to examine urinary inorganic mercury concentrations. Overall, 375 children provided valid urine samples for analysis. Approximately 50% of urine samples had concentrations of urinary inorganic mercury below the limit of detection (0.1 μg/L), with an average creatinine adjusted concentration of 0.11 μg/g. Despite high variability in mercury soil concentrations within sub-communities, soil concentrations did not appear to influence urinary mercury concentrations. The results of the current investigation indicate that mercury bioaccessibility in residential soils in the Flin Flon area was likely limited and that HHRA estimates would

  9. Development of a Physiologically Based Model to Describe the Pharmacokinetics of Methylphenidate in Juvenile and Adult Humans and Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Morris, Suzanne M.; Gearhart, Jeffery M.; Ruark, Christopher D.; Paule, Merle G.; Slikker, William; Mattison, Donald R.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Twaddle, Nathan C.; Doerge, Daniel R.; Young, John F.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    The widespread usage of methylphenidate (MPH) in the pediatric population has received considerable attention due to its potential effect on child development. For the first time a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model has been developed in juvenile and adult humans and nonhuman primates to quantitatively evaluate species- and age-dependent enantiomer specific pharmacokinetics of MPH and its primary metabolite ritalinic acid. The PBPK model was first calibrated in adult humans using in vitro enzyme kinetic data of MPH enantiomers, together with plasma and urine pharmacokinetic data with MPH in adult humans. Metabolism of MPH in the small intestine was assumed to account for the low oral bioavailability of MPH. Due to lack of information, model development for children and juvenile and adult nonhuman primates primarily relied on intra- and interspecies extrapolation using allometric scaling. The juvenile monkeys appear to metabolize MPH more rapidly than adult monkeys and humans, both adults and children. Model prediction performance is comparable between juvenile monkeys and children, with average root mean squared error values of 4.1 and 2.1, providing scientific basis for interspecies extrapolation of toxicity findings. Model estimated human equivalent doses in children that achieve similar internal dose metrics to those associated with pubertal delays in juvenile monkeys were found to be close to the therapeutic doses of MPH used in pediatric patients. This computational analysis suggests that continued pharmacovigilance assessment is prudent for the safe use of MPH. PMID:25184666

  10. Development of a physiologically based model to describe the pharmacokinetics of methylphenidate in juvenile and adult humans and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Morris, Suzanne M; Gearhart, Jeffery M; Ruark, Christopher D; Paule, Merle G; Slikker, William; Mattison, Donald R; Vitiello, Benedetto; Twaddle, Nathan C; Doerge, Daniel R; Young, John F; Fisher, Jeffrey W

    2014-01-01

    The widespread usage of methylphenidate (MPH) in the pediatric population has received considerable attention due to its potential effect on child development. For the first time a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model has been developed in juvenile and adult humans and nonhuman primates to quantitatively evaluate species- and age-dependent enantiomer specific pharmacokinetics of MPH and its primary metabolite ritalinic acid. The PBPK model was first calibrated in adult humans using in vitro enzyme kinetic data of MPH enantiomers, together with plasma and urine pharmacokinetic data with MPH in adult humans. Metabolism of MPH in the small intestine was assumed to account for the low oral bioavailability of MPH. Due to lack of information, model development for children and juvenile and adult nonhuman primates primarily relied on intra- and interspecies extrapolation using allometric scaling. The juvenile monkeys appear to metabolize MPH more rapidly than adult monkeys and humans, both adults and children. Model prediction performance is comparable between juvenile monkeys and children, with average root mean squared error values of 4.1 and 2.1, providing scientific basis for interspecies extrapolation of toxicity findings. Model estimated human equivalent doses in children that achieve similar internal dose metrics to those associated with pubertal delays in juvenile monkeys were found to be close to the therapeutic doses of MPH used in pediatric patients. This computational analysis suggests that continued pharmacovigilance assessment is prudent for the safe use of MPH. PMID:25184666

  11. Development of a Human Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetics (PBPK) Model For Dermal Permeability for Lindane

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lindane is a neurotoxicant used for the treatment of lice and scabies present on human skin. Due to its pharmaceutical application, an extensive pharmacokinetic database exists in humans. Mathematical diffusion models allow for calculation of lindane skin permeability coefficient...

  12. Physiologically based kinetic modeling of bioactivation and detoxification of the alkenylbenzene methyleugenol in human as compared with rat

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Subeihi, Ala' A.A.; Spenkelink, Bert; Punt, Ans; Boersma, Marelle G.; Bladeren, Peter J. van; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.

    2012-05-01

    This study defines a physiologically based kinetic (PBK) model for methyleugenol (ME) in human based on in vitro and in silico derived parameters. With the model obtained, bioactivation and detoxification of methyleugenol (ME) at different doses levels could be investigated. The outcomes of the current model were compared with those of a previously developed PBK model for methyleugenol (ME) in male rat. The results obtained reveal that formation of 1′-hydroxymethyleugenol glucuronide (1′HMEG), a major metabolic pathway in male rat liver, appears to represent a minor metabolic pathway in human liver whereas in human liver a significantly higher formation of 1′-oxomethyleugenol (1′OME) compared with male rat liver is observed. Furthermore, formation of 1′-sulfooxymethyleugenol (1′HMES), which readily undergoes desulfonation to a reactive carbonium ion (CA) that can form DNA or protein adducts (DA), is predicted to be the same in the liver of both human and male rat at oral doses of 0.0034 and 300 mg/kg bw. Altogether despite a significant difference in especially the metabolic pathways of the proximate carcinogenic metabolite 1′-hydroxymethyleugenol (1′HME) between human and male rat, the influence of species differences on the ultimate overall bioactivation of methyleugenol (ME) to 1′-sulfooxymethyleugenol (1′HMES) appears to be negligible. Moreover, the PBK model predicted the formation of 1′-sulfooxymethyleugenol (1′HMES) in the liver of human and rat to be linear from doses as high as the benchmark dose (BMD{sub 10}) down to as low as the virtual safe dose (VSD). This study shows that kinetic data do not provide a reason to argue against linear extrapolation from the rat tumor data to the human situation. -- Highlights: ► A PBK model is made for bioactivation and detoxification of methyleugenol in human. ► Comparison to the PBK model in male rat revealed species differences. ► PBK results support linear extrapolation from high to low

  13. Development of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Triadimefon and its Metabolite Triandimenol in Rats and Humans

    EPA Science Inventory

    physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed for the conazole fungicide triadimefon and its primary metabolite, triadimenol. Rat tissue:blood partition coefficients and metabolic constants were measured in vitro for both compounds. Pharmacokinetic data for par...

  14. Physiological cross-sectional area of human leg muscles based on magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukunaga, T.; Roy, R. R.; Shellock, F. G.; Hodgson, J. A.; Day, M. K.; Lee, P. L.; Kwong-Fu, H.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging techniques were used to determine the physiological cross-sectional areas (PCSAs) of the major muscles or muscle groups of the lower leg. For 12 healthy subjects, the boundaries of each muscle or muscle group were digitized from images taken at 1-cm intervals along the length of the leg. Muscle volumes were calculated from the summation of each anatomical CSA (ACSA) and the distance between each section. Muscle length was determined as the distance between the most proximal and distal images in which the muscle was visible. The PCSA of each muscle was calculated as muscle volume times the cosine of the angle of fiber pinnation divided by fiber length, where published fiber length:muscle length ratios were used to estimate fiber lengths. The mean volumes of the major plantarflexors were 489, 245, and 140 cm3 for the soleus and medial (MG) and lateral (LG) heads of the gastrocnemius. The mean PCSA of the soleus was 230 cm2, about three and eight times larger than the MG (68 cm2) and LG (28 cm2), respectively. These PCSA values were eight (soleus), four (MG), and three (LG) times larger than their respective maximum ACSA. The major dorsiflexor, the tibialis anterior (TA), had a muscle volume of 143 cm2, a PCSA of 19 cm2, and an ACSA of 9 cm2. With the exception of the soleus, the mean fiber length of all subjects was closely related to muscle volume across muscles. The soleus fibers were unusually short relative to the muscle volume, thus potentiating its force potential.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  15. The optimized PWM driving for the lighting system based on physiological characteristic of human vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping-Chieh; Uang, Chii-Maw; Hong, Yi-Jian; Ho, Zu-Sheng

    2011-10-01

    Saving energy, White-light LED plays a main role in solid state lighting system. Find the best energy saving driven solution is the engineer endless hard work. Besides DC and AC driving, LED using Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) operation is also a valuable research topic. The most important issue for this work is to find the drive frequency and duty for achieving both energy saving and better feeling on the human vision sensation. In this paper, psychophysics of human vision response to the lighting effect, including Persistence of vision, Bloch's Law, Broca-Sulzer Law, Ferry-Porter Law, Talbot-Plateau Law, and Contrast Sensitivity, will be discussed and analyzed. From the human vision system, we found that there are three factors: the flash sensitivity, the illumination intensity and the background environment illumination, that are used to decide the frequency and duty of the PWM driving method. A set of controllable LED lamps with adjustable frequency and duty is fitted inside a non-closed box is constructed for this experiment. When the background environment illumination intensity is high, the variation of the flash sensitivity and illumination intensity is not easy to observe. Increasing PWM frequency will eliminate flash sensitivity. When the duty is over 70%, the vision sensitivity is saturated. For warning purpose, the better frequency range is between 7Hz to 15Hz and the duty cycle can be lower down to 70%. For general lighting, the better frequency range is between 200Hz to 1000Hz and the duty cycle can also be lower down to 70%.

  16. PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) models attempt to provide both a realistic anatomic description of the animal to which a drug or toxic chemical has been administered and a biologically accurate representation of the physiological pathways for chemical storage, metab...

  17. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for methyl mercury (MeHg) in monkey and human

    SciTech Connect

    Gearhart, J.M.; Clewall, H.J. III; Shipp, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    A PBPK model for MeHg was developed which coherently describes MeHg pharmacokinetics in the adult rat, monkey and man, and predicts fetal levels of MeHg from in utero exposure. The model includes a description of enterohepatic recirculation of MeHg, conversion to inorganic mercury in tissues and intestinal flora, slowly reversible incorporation of mercury in tissues, and excretion of both organic and inorganic mercury into urine, feces, and hair. The adult submodel includes compartments representing the red blood tells (RBC), plasma, brain, liver, kidney, gut intestinal lumen, gut tissue, hair, richly and slowly perfused tissues, and placenta. The fetal submodel includes compartments representing RBC`s, plasma, brain, and remaining body mass. Two features of the model structure which are critical to prediction of the kinetics of MeHg in different species is the use of separate RBC and plasma compartments, allowing the use of species specific RBC/plasma ratios, and biliary excretion with enterohepatic recirculation. Published tissue and blood MeHg concentrations were used to derive the partition coefficients and RBC/plasma ratios to adjust for species differences in MeHg distribution. Validation involved comparing the model simulations with data from repeated dosing studies in animals and humans, and from accidental human exposures. The model will be used to investigate maternal MeHg intake as it relates to measured blood and hair MeHg concentrations, and to fetal exposure.

  18. A DYNAMIC PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED TOXICOKINETIC (DPBTK) MODEL FOR SIMULATION OF COMPLEX TOLUENE EXPOSURE SCENARIOS IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A GENERAL PHYSIOLOGICAL AND TOXICOKINETIC (GPAT) MODEL FOR SIMULATION OF COMPLEX TOLUENE EXPOSURE SCENARIOS IN HUMANS. E M Kenyon1, T Colemen2, C R Eklund1 and V A Benignus3. 1U.S. EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, PKB, RTP, NC, USA; 2Biological Simulators, Inc., Jackson MS, USA, 3U.S. EP...

  19. Physiologically based modeling of the pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen and its major metabolites in humans using a Bayesian population approach.

    PubMed

    Zurlinden, Todd J; Reisfeld, Brad

    2016-06-01

    The principal aim of this study was to develop, validate, and demonstrate a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict and characterize the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of acetaminophen (APAP) in humans. A PBPK model was created that included pharmacologically and toxicologically relevant tissue compartments and incorporated mechanistic descriptions of the absorption and metabolism of APAP, such as gastric emptying time, cofactor kinetics, and transporter-mediated movement of conjugated metabolites in the liver. Through the use of a hierarchical Bayesian framework, unknown model parameters were estimated using a large training set of data from human pharmacokinetic studies, resulting in parameter distributions that account for data uncertainty and inter-study variability. Predictions from the model showed good agreement to a diverse test set of data across several measures, including plasma concentrations over time, renal clearance, APAP absorption, and pharmacokinetic and exposure metrics. The utility of the model was then demonstrated through predictions of cofactor depletion, dose response of several pharmacokinetic endpoints, and the relationship between APAP biomarker levels in the plasma and those in the liver. The model addressed several limitations in previous PBPK models for APAP, and it is anticipated that it will be useful in predicting the pharmacokinetics of APAP in a number of contexts, such as extrapolating across doses, estimating internal concentrations, quantifying population variability, assessing possible impacts of drug coadministration, and, when coupled with a suitable pharmacodynamic model, predicting toxicity. PMID:25636597

  20. A first-generation physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of alpha-tocopherol in human influenza vaccine adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Tegenge, Million A; Mitkus, Robert J

    2015-04-01

    Alpha (α)-tocopherol is a component of a new generation of squalene-containing oil-in-water (SQ/W) emulsion adjuvants that have been licensed for use in certain influenza vaccines. Since regulatory pharmacokinetic studies are not routinely required for influenza vaccines, the in vivo fate of this vaccine constituent is largely unknown. In this study, we constructed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for emulsified α-tocopherol in human adults and infants. An independent sheep PBPK model was also developed to inform the local preferential lymphatic transfer and for the purpose of model evaluation. The PBPK model predicts that α-tocopherol will be removed from the injection site within 24h and rapidly transfer predominantly into draining lymph nodes. A much lower concentration of α-tocopherol was estimated to peak in plasma within 8h. Any systemically absorbed α-tocopherol was predicted to accumulate slowly in adipose tissue, but not in other tissues. Model evaluation and uncertainty analyses indicated acceptable fit, with the fraction of dose taken up into the lymphatics as most influential on plasma concentration. In summary, this study estimates the in vivo fate of α-tocopherol in adjuvanted influenza vaccine, may be relevant in explaining its immunodynamics in humans, and informs current regulatory risk-benefit analyses. PMID:25683773

  1. Impact of human emotions on physiological characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partila, P.; Voznak, M.; Peterek, T.; Penhaker, M.; Novak, V.; Tovarek, J.; Mehic, Miralem; Vojtech, L.

    2014-05-01

    Emotional states of humans and their impact on physiological and neurological characteristics are discussed in this paper. This problem is the goal of many teams who have dealt with this topic. Nowadays, it is necessary to increase the accuracy of methods for obtaining information about correlations between emotional state and physiological changes. To be able to record these changes, we focused on two majority emotional states. Studied subjects were psychologically stimulated to neutral - calm and then to the stress state. Electrocardiography, Electroencephalography and blood pressure represented neurological and physiological samples that were collected during patient's stimulated conditions. Speech activity was recording during the patient was reading selected text. Feature extraction was calculated by speech processing operations. Classifier based on Gaussian Mixture Model was trained and tested using Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficients extracted from the patient's speech. All measurements were performed in a chamber with electromagnetic compatibility. The article discusses a method for determining the influence of stress emotional state on the human and his physiological and neurological changes.

  2. Development of physiologically based toxicokinetic models for improving the human indoor exposure assessment to water contaminants: trichloroethylene and trihalomethanes.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Sami; Tardif, Ginette-Charest; Tardif, Robert

    2006-12-01

    Generally, ingestion is the only route of exposure that is considered in the risk assessment of drinking water contaminants. However, it is well known that a number of these contaminants are volatile and lipophilic and therefore highly susceptible to being absorbed through other routes, mainly inhalation and dermal. The objective of this study was to develop physiologically based human toxicokinetic (PBTK) models for trihalomethanes (THM) and trichloroethylene (TCE) that will facilitate (1) the estimation of internal exposure to these chemicals for various multimedia indoor exposure scenarios, and (2) consideration of the impact of biological variability in the estimation of internal doses. Five PBTK models describing absorption through ingestion, inhalation and skin were developed for these contaminants. Their concentrations in ambient air were estimated from their respective tap water concentrations and their physicochemical characteristics. Algebraic descriptions of the physiological parameters, varying as a function of age, gender and diverse anthropometric parameters, allow the prediction of the influence of interindividual variations on absorbed dose and internal dosimetry. Simulations for various scenarios were done for a typical human (i.e., 70 kg, 1.7 m) as well as for humans of both genders varying in age from 1 to 90 years. Simulations show that ingestion contributes to less than 50% of the total absorbed dose or metabolized dose for all chemicals. This contribution to internal dosimetry, such as maximal venous blood concentrations (Cmax) and the area under the venous blood concentration time curve (AUC), decreases markedly (e.g., as low as 0.9% of Cmax for bromodichloromethane). The importance of this contribution varies mainly as a function of shower duration. Moreover, model simulations indicate that multimedia exposure is more elevated in children than adults (i.e., up to 200% of the adult internal dose). The models developed in this study allow

  3. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic modeling of the temperature-dependent dermal absorption of chloroform by humans following bath water exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Rick A. ); Gordon, Syd M.; Wallace, Lance A.

    2000-01-14

    The kinetics of chloroform in the exhaled breath of human volunteers exposed skin-only via bath water (concentrations < 100 ppb) were analyzed using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Significant increases in exhaled chloroform (and thus bioavailability) were observed as exposure temperatures were increased from 30 to 40?C. The blood flows to the skin and effective skin permeability coefficients (Kp) were both varied to reflect the temperature-dependent changes in physiology and exhalation kinetics. At 40?C, no differences were observed between males and females. Therefore, Kp?s were determined ({approx}0.06 cm/hr) at a skin blood flow rate of 18% of the cardiac output. At 30 and 35?C, males exhaled more chloroform than females resulting in lower effective Kp?s calculated for females. At these lower temperatures, the blood flow to the skin was also reduced. Total amounts of chloroform absorbed averaged 41.9 and 43.6 mg for males and 11.5 and 39.9 mg for females exposed at 35 and 40?C, respectively. At 30?C, only 2/5 males and 1/5 females had detectable concentrations of chloroform in their exhaled breath. For perspective, the total intake of chloroform would have ranged from 79 - 194 mg if the volunteers had consumed 2 L of water orally at the concentrations used in this study. Thus, the relative contribution of dermal uptake of chloroform to the total body burdens associated with bathing for 30 min and drinking 2 L of water (ignoring contributions from inhalation exposures) was predicted to range from 1-28% depending on the temperature of the bath.

  4. Virtual physiological human: training challenges.

    PubMed

    Lawford, Patricia V; Narracott, Andrew V; McCormack, Keith; Bisbal, Jesus; Martin, Carlos; Bijnens, Bart; Brook, Bindi; Zachariou, Margarita; Freixa, Jordi Villà I; Kohl, Peter; Fletcher, Katherine; Diaz-Zuccarini, Vanessa

    2010-06-28

    The virtual physiological human (VPH) initiative encompasses a wide range of activities, including structural and functional imaging, data mining, knowledge discovery tool and database development, biomedical modelling, simulation and visualization. The VPH community is developing from a multitude of relatively focused, but disparate, research endeavours into an integrated effort to bring together, develop and translate emerging technologies for application, from academia to industry and medicine. This process initially builds on the evolution of multi-disciplinary interactions and abilities, but addressing the challenges associated with the implementation of the VPH will require, in the very near future, a translation of quantitative changes into a new quality of highly trained multi-disciplinary personnel. Current strategies for undergraduate and on-the-job training may soon prove insufficient for this. The European Commission seventh framework VPH network of excellence is exploring this emerging need, and is developing a framework of novel training initiatives to address the predicted shortfall in suitably skilled VPH-aware professionals. This paper reports first steps in the implementation of a coherent VPH training portfolio. PMID:20478909

  5. Population Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling for the Human Lactational Transfer of PCB 153 with Consideration of Worldwide Human Biomonitoring Results

    SciTech Connect

    Redding, Laurel E.; Sohn, Michael D.; McKone, Thomas E.; Wang, Shu-Li; Hsieh, Dennis P. H.; Yang, Raymond S. H.

    2008-03-01

    We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of PCB 153 in women, and predict its transfer via lactation to infants. The model is the first human, population-scale lactational model for PCB 153. Data in the literature provided estimates for model development and for performance assessment. Physiological parameters were taken from a cohort in Taiwan and from reference values in the literature. We estimated partition coefficients based on chemical structure and the lipid content in various body tissues. Using exposure data in Japan, we predicted acquired body burden of PCB 153 at an average childbearing age of 25 years and compare predictions to measurements from studies in multiple countries. Forward-model predictions agree well with human biomonitoring measurements, as represented by summary statistics and uncertainty estimates. The model successfully describes the range of possible PCB 153 dispositions in maternal milk, suggesting a promising option for back estimating doses for various populations. One example of reverse dosimetry modeling was attempted using our PBPK model for possible exposure scenarios in Canadian Inuits who had the highest level of PCB 153 in their milk in the world.

  6. Design Projects in Human Anatomy & Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polizzotto, Kristin; Ortiz, Mary T.

    2008-01-01

    Very often, some type of writing assignment is required in college entry-level Human Anatomy and Physiology courses. This assignment can be anything from an essay to a research paper on the literature, focusing on a faculty-approved topic of interest to the student. As educators who teach Human Anatomy and Physiology at an urban community college,…

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A HUMAN PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL FOR INORGANIC ARSENIC AND ITS MONO- AND DI-METHYLATED METABOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to estimate levels of arsenic and its metabolites in human tissues and urine after oral exposure to either arsenate (AsV) or arsnite (AsIII). The model consists of interconnected individual ...

  8. A Novel Physiology-Based Mathematical Model to Estimate Red Blood Cell Lifespan in Different Human Age Groups.

    PubMed

    An, Guohua; Widness, John A; Mock, Donald M; Veng-Pedersen, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Direct measurement of red blood cell (RBC) survival in humans has improved from the original accurate but limited differential agglutination technique to the current reliable, safe, and accurate biotin method. Despite this, all of these methods are time consuming and require blood sampling over several months to determine the RBC lifespan. For situations in which RBC survival information must be obtained quickly, these methods are not suitable. With the exception of adults and infants, RBC survival has not been extensively investigated in other age groups. To address this need, we developed a novel, physiology-based mathematical model that quickly estimates RBC lifespan in healthy individuals at any age. The model is based on the assumption that the total number of RBC recirculations during the lifespan of each RBC (denoted by N max) is relatively constant for all age groups. The model was initially validated using the data from our prior infant and adult biotin-labeled red blood cell studies and then extended to the other age groups. The model generated the following estimated RBC lifespans in 2-year-old, 5-year-old, 8-year-old, and 10-year-old children: 62, 74, 82, and 86 days, respectively. We speculate that this model has useful clinical applications. For example, HbA1c testing is not reliable in identifying children with diabetes because HbA1c is directly affected by RBC lifespan. Because our model can estimate RBC lifespan in children at any age, corrections to HbA1c values based on the model-generated RBC lifespan could improve diabetes diagnosis as well as therapy in children. PMID:27215601

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR ETHYLENE GLYCOL AND ITS MAJOR METABOLITE, GLYCOLIC ACID, IN RATS AND HUMANS

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Rick A.; Bartels, M J.; Carney, E W.; Weitz, Karl K.; Soelberg, Jolen J.; Gies, Richard A.; Thrall, Karla D.

    2005-05-19

    An extensive database on the toxicity and modes of action of the major industrial chemical, ethylene glycol (EG), has been developed over the past several decades. These studies have consistently identified the kidney as a primary target organ, with rats being more sensitive than mice and males more sensitive than females following chronic exposure. Renal toxicity has been associated with the terminal metabolite, oxalic acid which can precipitate with calcium to form crystals. EG also induces developmental toxicity, although these effects appear to require high-doses or accelerated dose-rates, and have been reported only in rats and mice. The developmental toxicity of EG has been attributed to the intermediate metabolite, glycolic acid (GA). The developmental toxicity of EG has been the subject of extensive research and regulatory review in recent years. Therefore, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to integrate the extensive mode of action and pharmacokinetic data on EG and GA for use in developmental risk assessment. Metabolic rate constants and partition coefficients for EG and GA were estimated from in vitro studies. Other biochemical constants were optimized from appropriate in vivo pharmacokinetic studies. The resulting PBPK model includes inhalation, oral, dermal, intravenous and subcutaneous routes of administration. Metabolism of EG and GA were described in the liver with elimination via the kidneys. Several rat and human metabolism studies were used to validate the resulting PBPK model. Consistent with these studies, simulations indicated that the metabolism of EG to GA was essentially first-order (linear) up to 2500 mg/kg/day while the metabolism of GA saturated between bolus ethylene glycol doses of 200 and 1000 mg/kg/day. This saturation results in non-linear increases in blood GA concentrations, correlating with the developmental toxicity of EG. Pregnancy had no effect on maternal EG and GA kinetics over a broad dose

  10. HUMAN--A Comprehensive Physiological Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Thomas G.; Randall, James E.

    1983-01-01

    Describes computer program (HUMAN) used to simulate physiological experiments on patient pathology. Program (available from authors, including versions for microcomputers) consists of dynamic interactions of over 150 physiological variables and integrating approximations of cardiovascular, renal, lung, temperature regulation, and some hormone…

  11. Cognitive and physiological responses in humans exposed to a TETRA base station signal in relation to perceived electromagnetic hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Denise; Eltiti, Stacy; Ridgewell, Anna; Garner, Kelly; Russo, Riccardo; Sepulveda, Francisco; Walker, Stuart; Quinlan, Terence; Dudley, Sandra; Maung, Sithu; Deeble, Roger; Fox, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    Terrestrial Trunked Radio (TETRA) technology ("Airwave") has led to public concern because of its potential interference with electrical activity in the brain. The present study is the first to examine whether acute exposure to a TETRA base station signal has an impact on cognitive functioning and physiological responses. Participants were exposed to a 420 MHz TETRA signal at a power flux density of 10 mW/m(2) as well as sham (no signal) under double-blind conditions. Fifty-one people who reported a perceived sensitivity to electromagnetic fields as well as 132 controls participated in a double-blind provocation study. Forty-eight sensitive and 132 control participants completed all three sessions. Measures of short-term memory, working memory, and attention were administered while physiological responses (blood volume pulse, heart rate, skin conductance) were monitored. After applying exclusion criteria based on task performance for each aforementioned cognitive measure, data were analyzed for 36, 43, and 48 sensitive participants for these respective tasks and, likewise, 107,125, and 129 controls. We observed no differences in cognitive performance between sham and TETRA exposure in either group; physiological response also did not differ between the exposure conditions. These findings are similar to previous double-blind studies with other mobile phone signals (900-2100 MHz), which could not establish any clear evidence that mobile phone signals affect health or cognitive function. PMID:21647932

  12. Successful Implementation of Inquiry-Based Physiology Laboratories in Undergraduate Major and Nonmajor Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casotti, G.; Rieser-Danner, L.; Knabb, M. T.

    2008-01-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated that inquiry-based physiology laboratories improve students' critical- and analytical-thinking skills. We implemented inquiry-based learning into three physiology courses: Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (majors), Human Physiology (majors), and Human Anatomy and Physiology (nonmajors). The aims of our curricular…

  13. Human plasma concentrations of five cytochrome P450 probes extrapolated from pharmacokinetics in dogs and minipigs using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Shida, Satomi; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cytochrome P450 probes in humans can be extrapolated from corresponding data in cynomolgus monkeys using simplified physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. In the current study, despite some species difference in drug clearances, this modeling methodology was adapted to estimate human plasma concentrations of P450 probes based on data from commonly used medium-sized experimental animals, namely dogs and minipigs. Using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data, the observed plasma concentrations of slowly eliminated caffeine and warfarin and rapidly eliminated omeprazole, metoprolol and midazolam in two young dogs were scaled to human oral monitoring equivalents. Using the same approach, the previously reported pharmacokinetics of the five P450 probes in minipigs was also scaled to human monitoring equivalents. The human plasma concentration profiles of the five P450 probes estimated by the simplified human PBPK models based on observed/reported pharmacokinetics in dogs/minipigs were consistent with previously published pharmacokinetic data in humans. These results suggest that dogs and minipigs, in addition to monkeys, could be suitable models for humans during research into new drugs, especially when used in combination with simple PBPK models. PMID:26652678

  14. Gravitational Effects on Human Physiology.

    PubMed

    Atomi, Yoriko

    2015-01-01

    Physical working capacity decreases with age and also in microgravity. Regardless of age, increased physical activity can always improve the physical adaptability of the body, although the mechanisms of this adaptability are unknown. Physical exercise produces various mechanical stimuli in the body, and these stimuli may be essential for cell survival in organisms. The cytoskeleton plays an important role in maintaining cell shape and tension development, and in various molecular and/or cellular organelles involved in cellular trafficking. Both intra and extracellular stimuli send signals through the cytoskeleton to the nucleus and modulate gene expression via an intrinsic property, namely the "dynamic instability" of cytoskeletal proteins. αB-crystallin is an important chaperone for cytoskeletal proteins in muscle cells. Decreases in the levels of αB-crystallin are specifically associated with a marked decrease in muscle mass (atrophy) in a rat hindlimb suspension model that mimics muscle and bone atrophy that occurs in space and increases with passive stretch. Moreover, immunofluorescence data show complete co-localization of αB-crystallin and the tubulin/microtubule system in myoblast cells. This association was further confirmed in biochemical experiments carried out in vitro showing that αB-crystallin acts as a chaperone for heat-denatured tubulin and prevents microtubule disassembly induced by calcium. Physical activity induces the constitutive expression of αB-crystallin, which helps to maintain the homeostasis of cytoskeleton dynamics in response to gravitational forces. This relationship between chaperone expression levels and regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics observed in slow anti-gravitational muscles as well as in mammalian striated muscles, such as those in the heart, diaphragm and tongue, may have been especially essential for human evolution in particular. Elucidation of the intrinsic properties of the tubulin/microtubule and chaperone

  15. Development and evaluation of a harmonized physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for perchloroethylene toxicokinetics in mice, rats, and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Ginsberg, Gary L.

    2011-06-15

    reconciles the disparity between those previously published PBPK models that concluded low perc metabolism in humans and those that predicted high perc metabolism in humans. In essence, both conclusions are consistent with the data if augmented with some additional qualifications: in humans, oxidative metabolism is low, while GSH conjugation metabolism may be high or low, with uncertainty and/or interindividual variability spanning three orders of magnitude. More direct data on the internal kinetics of perc GSH conjugation, such as trichlorovinyl glutathione or tricholorvinyl cysteine in blood and/or tissues, would be needed to better characterize the uncertainty and variability in GSH conjugation in humans. - Research Highlights: >We analyze perchloroethylene (perc) toxicokinetics with a physiological model. >Results from previous analyses lumping metabolic pathways are inconsistent. >Separately tracking oxidation and conjugation pathways reconciles these results. >Available data are adequate for predicting perc blood levels and oxidation by P450. >High uncertainty remains for human conjugation of perc with glutathione.

  16. Evaluation of the interindividual human variation in bioactivation of methyleugenol using physiologically based kinetic modeling and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Al-Subeihi, Ala A A; Alhusainy, Wasma; Kiwamoto, Reiko; Spenkelink, Bert; van Bladeren, Peter J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Punt, Ans

    2015-03-01

    The present study aims at predicting the level of formation of the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of methyleugenol, 1'-sulfooxymethyleugenol, in the human population by taking variability in key bioactivation and detoxification reactions into account using Monte Carlo simulations. Depending on the metabolic route, variation was simulated based on kinetic constants obtained from incubations with a range of individual human liver fractions or by combining kinetic constants obtained for specific isoenzymes with literature reported human variation in the activity of these enzymes. The results of the study indicate that formation of 1'-sulfooxymethyleugenol is predominantly affected by variation in i) P450 1A2-catalyzed bioactivation of methyleugenol to 1'-hydroxymethyleugenol, ii) P450 2B6-catalyzed epoxidation of methyleugenol, iii) the apparent kinetic constants for oxidation of 1'-hydroxymethyleugenol, and iv) the apparent kinetic constants for sulfation of 1'-hydroxymethyleugenol. Based on the Monte Carlo simulations a so-called chemical-specific adjustment factor (CSAF) for intraspecies variation could be derived by dividing different percentiles by the 50th percentile of the predicted population distribution for 1'-sulfooxymethyleugenol formation. The obtained CSAF value at the 90th percentile was 3.2, indicating that the default uncertainty factor of 3.16 for human variability in kinetics may adequately cover the variation within 90% of the population. Covering 99% of the population requires a larger uncertainty factor of 6.4. In conclusion, the results showed that adequate predictions on interindividual human variation can be made with Monte Carlo-based PBK modeling. For methyleugenol this variation was observed to be in line with the default variation generally assumed in risk assessment. PMID:25549870

  17. Physiological basis for human autonomic rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    Oscillations of arterial pressures, heart periods, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity have been studied intensively in recent years to explore otherwise obscure human neurophysiological mechanisms. The best-studied rhythms are those occurring at breathing frequencies. Published evidence indicates that respiratory fluctuations of muscle sympathetic nerve activity and electrocardiographic R-R intervals result primarily from the action of a central 'gate' that opens during expiration and closes during inspiration. Parallel respiratory fluctuations of arterial pressures and R-R intervals are thought to be secondary to arterial baroreflex physiology: changes in systolic pressure provoke changes in the R-R interval. However, growing evidence suggests that these parallel oscillations result from the influence of respiration on sympathetic and vagal-cardiac motoneurones rather than from baroreflex physiology. There is a rapidly growing literature on the use of mathematical models of low- and high-frequency (respiratory) R-R interval fluctuations in characterizing instantaneous 'sympathovagal balance'. The case for this approach is based primarily on measurements made with patients in upright tilt. However, the strong linear relation between such measures as the ratio of low- to high-frequency R-R interval oscillations and the angle of the tilt reflects exclusively the reductions of the vagal (high-frequency) component. As the sympathetic component does not change in tilt, the low- to high-frequency R-R interval ratio provides no proof that sympathetic activity increases. Moreover, the validity of extrapolating from measurements performed during upright tilt to measurements during supine rest has not been established. Nonetheless, it is clear that measures of heart rate variability provide important prognostic information in patients with cardiovascular diseases. It is not known whether reduced heart rate variability is merely a marker for the severity of disease or a

  18. Physiological basis for human autonomic rhythms.

    PubMed

    Eckberg, D L

    2000-07-01

    Oscillations of arterial pressures, heart periods, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity have been studied intensively in recent years to explore otherwise obscure human neurophysiological mechanisms. The best-studied rhythms are those occurring at breathing frequencies. Published evidence indicates that respiratory fluctuations of muscle sympathetic nerve activity and electrocardiographic R-R intervals result primarily from the action of a central 'gate' that opens during expiration and closes during inspiration. Parallel respiratory fluctuations of arterial pressures and R-R intervals are thought to be secondary to arterial baroreflex physiology: changes in systolic pressure provoke changes in the R-R interval. However, growing evidence suggests that these parallel oscillations result from the influence of respiration on sympathetic and vagal-cardiac motoneurones rather than from baroreflex physiology. There is a rapidly growing literature on the use of mathematical models of low- and high-frequency (respiratory) R-R interval fluctuations in characterizing instantaneous 'sympathovagal balance'. The case for this approach is based primarily on measurements made with patients in upright tilt. However, the strong linear relation between such measures as the ratio of low- to high-frequency R-R interval oscillations and the angle of the tilt reflects exclusively the reductions of the vagal (high-frequency) component. As the sympathetic component does not change in tilt, the low- to high-frequency R-R interval ratio provides no proof that sympathetic activity increases. Moreover, the validity of extrapolating from measurements performed during upright tilt to measurements during supine rest has not been established. Nonetheless, it is clear that measures of heart rate variability provide important prognostic information in patients with cardiovascular diseases. It is not known whether reduced heart rate variability is merely a marker for the severity of disease or a

  19. Evaluation of the interindividual human variation in bioactivation of methyleugenol using physiologically based kinetic modeling and Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Subeihi, Ala' A.A.; Alhusainy, Wasma; Kiwamoto, Reiko; Spenkelink, Bert; Bladeren, Peter J. van; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.; Punt, Ans

    2015-03-01

    The present study aims at predicting the level of formation of the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of methyleugenol, 1′-sulfooxymethyleugenol, in the human population by taking variability in key bioactivation and detoxification reactions into account using Monte Carlo simulations. Depending on the metabolic route, variation was simulated based on kinetic constants obtained from incubations with a range of individual human liver fractions or by combining kinetic constants obtained for specific isoenzymes with literature reported human variation in the activity of these enzymes. The results of the study indicate that formation of 1′-sulfooxymethyleugenol is predominantly affected by variation in i) P450 1A2-catalyzed bioactivation of methyleugenol to 1′-hydroxymethyleugenol, ii) P450 2B6-catalyzed epoxidation of methyleugenol, iii) the apparent kinetic constants for oxidation of 1′-hydroxymethyleugenol, and iv) the apparent kinetic constants for sulfation of 1′-hydroxymethyleugenol. Based on the Monte Carlo simulations a so-called chemical-specific adjustment factor (CSAF) for intraspecies variation could be derived by dividing different percentiles by the 50th percentile of the predicted population distribution for 1′-sulfooxymethyleugenol formation. The obtained CSAF value at the 90th percentile was 3.2, indicating that the default uncertainty factor of 3.16 for human variability in kinetics may adequately cover the variation within 90% of the population. Covering 99% of the population requires a larger uncertainty factor of 6.4. In conclusion, the results showed that adequate predictions on interindividual human variation can be made with Monte Carlo-based PBK modeling. For methyleugenol this variation was observed to be in line with the default variation generally assumed in risk assessment. - Highlights: • Interindividual human differences in methyleugenol bioactivation were simulated. • This was done using in vitro incubations, PBK modeling

  20. Estimating human-equivalent no observed adverse-effect levels for VOCs (volatile organic compounds) based on minimal knowledge of physiological parameters. Technical paper

    SciTech Connect

    Overton, J.H.; Jarabek, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. EPA advocates the assessment of health-effects data and calculation of inhaled reference doses as benchmark values for gauging systemic toxicity to inhaled gases. The assessment often requires an inter- or intra-species dose extrapolation from no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) exposure concentrations in animals to human equivalent NOAEL exposure concentrations. To achieve this, a dosimetric extrapolation procedure was developed based on the form or type of equations that describe the uptake and disposition of inhaled volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) models. The procedure assumes allometric scaling of most physiological parameters and that the value of the time-integrated human arterial-blood concentration must be limited to no more than to that of experimental animals. The scaling assumption replaces the need for most parameter values and allows the derivation of a simple formula for dose extrapolation of VOCs that gives equivalent or more-conservative exposure concentrations values than those that would be obtained using a PB-PK model in which scaling was assumed.

  1. A simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic model evaluating the effect of anti-nicotine antibodies on nicotine disposition in the brains of rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Saylor, Kyle; Zhang, Chenming

    2016-09-15

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling was applied to investigate the effects of anti-nicotine antibodies on nicotine disposition in the brains of rats and humans. Successful construction of both rat and human models was achieved by fitting model outputs to published nicotine concentration time course data in the blood and in the brain. Key parameters presumed to have the most effect on the ability of these antibodies to prevent nicotine from entering the brain were selected for investigation using the human model. These parameters, which included antibody affinity for nicotine, antibody cross-reactivity with cotinine, and antibody concentration, were broken down into different, clinically-derived in silico treatment levels and fed into the human PBPK model. Model predictions suggested that all three parameters, in addition to smoking status, have a sizable impact on anti-nicotine antibodies' ability to prevent nicotine from entering the brain and that the antibodies elicited by current human vaccines do not have sufficient binding characteristics to reduce brain nicotine concentrations. If the antibody binding characteristics achieved in animal studies can similarly be achieved in human studies, however, nicotine vaccine efficacy in terms of brain nicotine concentration reduction is predicted to meet threshold values for alleviating nicotine dependence. PMID:27473014

  2. Comparative Risks of Aldehyde Constituents in Cigarette Smoke Using Transient Computational Fluid Dynamics/Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models of the Rat and Human Respiratory Tracts.

    PubMed

    Corley, Richard A; Kabilan, Senthil; Kuprat, Andrew P; Carson, James P; Jacob, Richard E; Minard, Kevin R; Teeguarden, Justin G; Timchalk, Charles; Pipavath, Sudhakar; Glenny, Robb; Einstein, Daniel R

    2015-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is well suited for addressing species-specific anatomy and physiology in calculating respiratory tissue exposures to inhaled materials. In this study, we overcame prior CFD model limitations to demonstrate the importance of realistic, transient breathing patterns for predicting site-specific tissue dose. Specifically, extended airway CFD models of the rat and human were coupled with airway region-specific physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) tissue models to describe the kinetics of 3 reactive constituents of cigarette smoke: acrolein, acetaldehyde and formaldehyde. Simulations of aldehyde no-observed-adverse-effect levels for nasal toxicity in the rat were conducted until breath-by-breath tissue concentration profiles reached steady state. Human oral breathing simulations were conducted using representative aldehyde yields from cigarette smoke, measured puff ventilation profiles and numbers of cigarettes smoked per day. As with prior steady-state CFD/PBPK simulations, the anterior respiratory nasal epithelial tissues received the greatest initial uptake rates for each aldehyde in the rat. However, integrated time- and tissue depth-dependent area under the curve (AUC) concentrations were typically greater in the anterior dorsal olfactory epithelium using the more realistic transient breathing profiles. For human simulations, oral and laryngeal tissues received the highest local tissue dose with greater penetration to pulmonary tissues than predicted in the rat. Based upon lifetime average daily dose comparisons of tissue hot-spot AUCs (top 2.5% of surface area-normalized AUCs in each region) and numbers of cigarettes smoked/day, the order of concern for human exposures was acrolein > formaldehyde > acetaldehyde even though acetaldehyde yields were 10-fold greater than formaldehyde and acrolein. PMID:25858911

  3. Comparative Risks of Aldehyde Constituents in Cigarette Smoke Using Transient Computational Fluid Dynamics/Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models of the Rat and Human Respiratory Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Jacob, Richard E.; Minard, Kevin R.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Timchalk, Charles; Pipavath, Sudhakar; Glenny, Robb; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is well suited for addressing species-specific anatomy and physiology in calculating respiratory tissue exposures to inhaled materials. In this study, we overcame prior CFD model limitations to demonstrate the importance of realistic, transient breathing patterns for predicting site-specific tissue dose. Specifically, extended airway CFD models of the rat and human were coupled with airway region-specific physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) tissue models to describe the kinetics of 3 reactive constituents of cigarette smoke: acrolein, acetaldehyde and formaldehyde. Simulations of aldehyde no-observed-adverse-effect levels for nasal toxicity in the rat were conducted until breath-by-breath tissue concentration profiles reached steady state. Human oral breathing simulations were conducted using representative aldehyde yields from cigarette smoke, measured puff ventilation profiles and numbers of cigarettes smoked per day. As with prior steady-state CFD/PBPK simulations, the anterior respiratory nasal epithelial tissues received the greatest initial uptake rates for each aldehyde in the rat. However, integrated time- and tissue depth-dependent area under the curve (AUC) concentrations were typically greater in the anterior dorsal olfactory epithelium using the more realistic transient breathing profiles. For human simulations, oral and laryngeal tissues received the highest local tissue dose with greater penetration to pulmonary tissues than predicted in the rat. Based upon lifetime average daily dose comparisons of tissue hot-spot AUCs (top 2.5% of surface area-normalized AUCs in each region) and numbers of cigarettes smoked/day, the order of concern for human exposures was acrolein > formaldehyde > acetaldehyde even though acetaldehyde yields were 10-fold greater than formaldehyde and acrolein. PMID:25858911

  4. The Importance of the Ionic Product for Water to Understand the Physiology of the Acid-Base Balance in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Adeva-Andany, María M.; Carneiro-Freire, Natalia; Donapetry-García, Cristóbal; Rañal-Muíño, Eva; López-Pereiro, Yosua

    2014-01-01

    Human plasma is an aqueous solution that has to abide by chemical rules such as the principle of electrical neutrality and the constancy of the ionic product for water. These rules define the acid-base balance in the human body. According to the electroneutrality principle, plasma has to be electrically neutral and the sum of its cations equals the sum of its anions. In addition, the ionic product for water has to be constant. Therefore, the plasma concentration of hydrogen ions depends on the plasma ionic composition. Variations in the concentration of plasma ions that alter the relative proportion of anions and cations predictably lead to a change in the plasma concentration of hydrogen ions by driving adaptive adjustments in water ionization that allow plasma electroneutrality while maintaining constant the ionic product for water. The accumulation of plasma anions out of proportion of cations induces an electrical imbalance compensated by a fall of hydroxide ions that brings about a rise in hydrogen ions (acidosis). By contrast, the deficiency of chloride relative to sodium generates plasma alkalosis by increasing hydroxide ions. The adjustment of plasma bicarbonate concentration to these changes is an important compensatory mechanism that protects plasma pH from severe deviations. PMID:24877130

  5. The use of team-based, guided inquiry learning to overcome educational disadvantages in learning human physiology: a structural equation model

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    The study of human bioscience is viewed as a crucial curriculum in allied health. Nevertheless, bioscience (and particularly physiology) is notoriously difficult for undergraduates, particularly academically disadvantaged students. So endemic are the high failure rates (particularly in nursing) that it has come to be known as “the human bioscience problem.” In the present report, we describe the outcomes for individual success in studying first-year human physiology in a subject that emphasises team-based active learning as the major pedagogy for mastering subject learning outcomes. Structural equation modeling was used to develop a model of the impact team learning had on individual performance. Modeling was consistent with the idea that students with similar academic abilities (as determined by tertiary entrance rank) were advantaged (scored higher on individual assessment items) by working in strong teams (teams that scored higher in team-based assessments). Analysis of covariance revealed that students who studied the subject with active learning as the major mode of learning activities outperformed students who studied the subject using the traditional didactic teaching format (lectures and tutorials, P = 0.000). After adjustment for tertiary entrance rank (via analysis of covariance) on two individual tests (the final exam and a late-semester in-class test), individual student grades improved by 8% (95% confidence interval: 6–10%) and 12% (95% confidence interval: 10–14%) when students engaged in team-based active learning. These data quantitatively support the notion that weaker students working in strong teams can overcome their educational disadvantages. PMID:25179611

  6. A physiology-based inverse dynamic analysis of human gait using sequential convex programming: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    De Groote, F; Demeulenaere, B; Swevers, J; De Schutter, J; Jonkers, I

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an enhanced version of the previously proposed physiological inverse approach (PIA) to calculate musculotendon (MT) forces and evaluates the proposed methodology in a comparative study. PIA combines an inverse dynamic analysis with an optimisation approach that imposes muscle physiology and optimises performance over the entire motion. To solve the resulting large-scale, nonlinear optimisation problem, we neglected muscle fibre contraction speed and an approximate quadratic optimisation problem (PIA-QP) was formulated. Conversely, the enhanced version of PIA proposed in this paper takes into account muscle fibre contraction speed. The optimisation problem is solved using a sequential convex programing procedure (PIA-SCP). The comparative study includes PIA-SCP, PIA-QP and two commonly used approaches from the literature: static optimisation (SO) and computed muscle control (CMC). SO and CMC make simplifying assumptions to limit the computational time. Both methods minimise an instantaneous performance criterion. Furthermore, SO does not impose muscle physiology. All methods are applied to a gait cycle of six control subjects. The relative root mean square error averaged over all subjects, ε(RMS), between the joint torques simulated from the optimised activations and the joint torques obtained from the inverse dynamic analysis was about twice as large for SO (ε(RMS) = 86) as compared with CMC (ε(RMS) = 39) and PIA-SCP (ε(RMS) = 50). ε(RMS) was at least twice as large for PIA-QP (ε(RMS) = 197) than for all other methods. As compared with CMC, muscle activation patterns predicted by PIA-SCP better agree with experimental electromyography (EMG). This study shows that imposing muscle physiology as well as globally optimising performance is important to accurately calculate MT forces underlying gait. PMID:21878002

  7. Molecular physiology of weight regulation in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Leibel, RL

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary considerations relating to efficiency in reproduction, and survival in hostile environments, suggest that body energy stores are sensed and actively regulated, with stronger physiological and behavioral responses to loss than gain of stored energy. Many physiological studies support this inference, and suggest that a critical axis runs between body fat and the hypothalamus. The molecular cloning of leptin and its receptor—projects based explicitly on the search for elements in this axis—confirmed the existence of this axis and provided important tools with which to understand its molecular physiology. Demonstration of the importance of this soma-brain reciprocal connection in body weight regulation in humans has been pursued using both classical genetic approaches and studies of physiological responses to experimental weight perturbation. This paper reviews the history of the rationale and methodology of the cloning of leptin (Lep) and the leptin receptor (Lepr), and describes some of the clinical investigation characterizing this axis. PMID:19136999

  8. DigitalHuman (DH): An Integrative Mathematical Model ofHuman Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hester, Robert L.; Summers, Richard L.; lIescu, Radu; Esters, Joyee; Coleman, Thomas G.

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical models and simulation are important tools in discovering the key causal relationships governing physiological processes and improving medical intervention when physiological complexity is a central issue. We have developed a model of integrative human physiology called DigitalHuman (DH) consisting of -5000 variables modeling human physiology describing cardiovascular, renal, respiratory, endocrine, neural and metabolic physiology. Users can view time-dependent solutions and interactively introduce perturbations by altering numerical parameters to investigate new hypotheses. The variables, parameters and quantitative relationships as well as all other model details are described in XML text files. All aspects of the model, including the mathematical equations describing the physiological processes are written in XML open source, text-readable files. Model structure is based upon empirical data of physiological responses documented within the peer-reviewed literature. The model can be used to understand proposed physiological mechanisms and physiological interactions that may not be otherwise intUitively evident. Some of the current uses of this model include the analyses of renal control of blood pressure, the central role of the liver in creating and maintaining insulin resistance, and the mechanisms causing orthostatic hypotension in astronauts. Additionally the open source aspect of the modeling environment allows any investigator to add detailed descriptions of human physiology to test new concepts. The model accurately predicts both qualitative and more importantly quantitative changes in clinically and experimentally observed responses. DigitalHuman provides scientists a modeling environment to understand the complex interactions of integrative physiology. This research was supported by.NIH HL 51971, NSF EPSCoR, and NASA

  9. Leptin in human physiology and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Magkos, Faidon; Brinkoetter, Mary; Sienkiewicz, Elizabeth; Dardeno, Tina A.; Kim, Sang-Yong; Hamnvik, Ole-Petter R.; Koniaris, Anastasia

    2011-01-01

    Leptin, discovered through positional cloning 15 years ago, is an adipocyte-secreted hormone with pleiotropic effects in the physiology and pathophysiology of energy homeostasis, endocrinology, and metabolism. Studies in vitro and in animal models highlight the potential for leptin to regulate a number of physiological functions. Available evidence from human studies indicates that leptin has a mainly permissive role, with leptin administration being effective in states of leptin deficiency, less effective in states of leptin adequacy, and largely ineffective in states of leptin excess. Results from interventional studies in humans demonstrate that leptin administration in subjects with congenital complete leptin deficiency or subjects with partial leptin deficiency (subjects with lipoatrophy, congenital or related to HIV infection, and women with hypothalamic amenorrhea) reverses the energy homeostasis and neuroendocrine and metabolic abnormalities associated with these conditions. More specifically, in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea, leptin helps restore abnormalities in hypothalamic-pituitary-peripheral axes including the gonadal, thyroid, growth hormone, and to a lesser extent adrenal axes. Furthermore, leptin results in resumption of menses in the majority of these subjects and, in the long term, may increase bone mineral content and density, especially at the lumbar spine. In patients with congenital or HIV-related lipoatrophy, leptin treatment is also associated with improvements in insulin sensitivity and lipid profile, concomitant with reduced visceral and ectopic fat deposition. In contrast, leptin's effects are largely absent in the obese hyperleptinemic state, probably due to leptin resistance or tolerance. Hence, another emerging area of research pertains to the discovery and/or usefulness of leptin sensitizers. Results from ongoing studies are expected to further increase our understanding of the role of leptin and the potential clinical

  10. Development of a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model of 2-phenoxyethanol and its metabolite phenoxyacetic acid in rats and humans to address toxicokinetic uncertainty in risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Troutman, John A; Rick, David L; Stuard, Sharon B; Fisher, Jeffrey; Bartels, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    2-Phenoxyethanol (PhE) has been shown to induce hepatotoxicity, renal toxicity, and hemolysis at dosages ≥ 400 mg/kg/day in subchronic and chronic studies in multiple species. To reduce uncertainty associated with interspecies extrapolations and to evaluate the margin of exposure (MOE) for use of PhE in cosmetics and baby products, a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of PhE and its metabolite 2-phenoxyacetic acid (PhAA) was developed. The PBPK model incorporated key kinetic processes describing the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of PhE and PhAA following oral and dermal exposures. Simulations of repeat dose rat studies facilitated the selection of systemic AUC as the appropriate dose metric for evaluating internal exposures to PhE and PhAA in rats and humans. Use of the PBPK model resulted in refinement of the total default UF for extrapolation of the animal data to humans from 100 to 25. Based on very conservative assumptions for product composition and aggregate product use, model-predicted exposures to PhE and PhAA resulting from adult and infant exposures to cosmetic products are significantly below the internal dose of PhE observed at the NOAEL dose in rats. Calculated MOEs for all exposure scenarios were above the PBPK-refined UF of 25. PMID:26188115

  11. The Virtual Physiological Human: Ten Years After.

    PubMed

    Viceconti, Marco; Hunter, Peter

    2016-07-11

    Biomedical research and clinical practice are struggling to cope with the growing complexity that the progress of health care involves. The most challenging diseases, those with the largest socioeconomic impact (cardiovascular conditions; musculoskeletal conditions; cancer; metabolic, immunity, and neurodegenerative conditions), are all characterized by a complex genotype-phenotype interaction and by a "systemic" nature that poses a challenge to the traditional reductionist approach. In 2005 a small group of researchers discussed how the vision of computational physiology promoted by the Physiome Project could be translated into clinical practice and formally proposed the term Virtual Physiological Human. Our knowledge about these diseases is fragmentary, as it is associated with molecular and cellular processes on the one hand and with tissue and organ phenotype changes (related to clinical symptoms of disease conditions) on the other. The problem could be solved if we could capture all these fragments of knowledge into predictive models and then compose them into hypermodels that help us tame the complexity that such systemic behavior involves. In 2005 this was simply not possible-the necessary methods and technologies were not available. Now, 10 years later, it seems the right time to reflect on the original vision, the results achieved so far, and what remains to be done. PMID:27420570

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR PROPYLENE GLYCOL MONOMETHYL ETHER AND ITS ACETATE IN RATS AND HUMANS

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Rick A.; Gies, Richard A.; Wu, Hong; Weitz, Karl K.

    2005-03-05

    Propylene glycol monomethyl ether (PM), along with its acetate, is the most widely used of the propylene glycol ether family of solvents. The most common toxic effects of PM observed in animal studies include sedation, very slight alpha2u globulin-mediated nephropathy (male rats only) and hepatomegally at high exposures (typically >1000 ppm). Sedation in animal studies usually resolves within a few exposures to 3000 ppm (the highest concentration used in subchronic and chronic inhalation studies) due to the induction of metabolizing enzymes. Data from a variety of pharmacokinetic and mechanistic studies have been incorporated into a PBPK model for PM and its acetate in rats and mice. Published controlled exposure and workplace biomonitoring studies have also been included for comparisons of the internal dosimetry of PM and its acetate between laboratory animals and humans. PM acetate is rapidly hydrolyzed to PM, which is further metabolized to either glucuronide or sulphate conjugates (minor pathways) or propylene glycol (major pathway). In vitro half-lives for PM acetate range from 14-36 min depending upon the tissue and species. In vivo half-lives are considerably faster, reflecting the total contributions of esterases in the blood and tissues of the body, and are on the order of just a few minutes. Thus, very little PM acetate is found in vivo and, other than potential portal of entry irritation, the toxicity of PM acetate is related to PM. Regardless of the source for PM (either PM or its acetate), rats were predicted to have a higher Cmax and AUC for PM in blood than humans, especially at concentrations greater than the current ACGIH TLV of 100 ppm. This would indicate that the major systemic effects of PM would be expected to be less severe in humans than rats at comparable inhalation exposures.

  13. Columbus payload requirements in human physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegemann, Juergen

    1993-03-01

    Most of the biological feedback loops in the human body are interrelated. This means that several different parameters have to be recorded simultaneously to understand the interrelationship of different subsystems within the body when fast and slow adaptation processes are to be studied. This determines the requirements for the payload in the Columbus module. In 1988 ESA asked some European scientists in different fields of physiology to provide a 'science study' for the Columbus payload requirements. Their report was the basis of a phase A study completed in December 1991, concerning the 'ANTHROLAB', a laboratory that covers all presently known research challenges in this area. Anthrolab is more or less an improvement of the Anthrorack to be flown on the German Spacelab mission D-2 and on the Columbus precursor flight E-1. Beside the present Anthrorack design, Anthrolab will also provide subelements for vestibular, neurophysiological, and biomechanical research.

  14. The Use of Team-Based, Guided Inquiry Learning to Overcome Educational Disadvantages in Learning Human Physiology: A Structural Equation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathner, Joseph A.; Byrne, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    The study of human bioscience is viewed as a crucial curriculum in allied health. Nevertheless, bioscience (and particularly physiology) is notoriously difficult for undergraduates, particularly academically disadvantaged students. So endemic are the high failure rates (particularly in nursing) that it has come to be known as "the human…

  15. Physiologically based quantitative modeling of unihemispheric sleep.

    PubMed

    Kedziora, D J; Abeysuriya, R G; Phillips, A J K; Robinson, P A

    2012-12-01

    Unihemispheric sleep has been observed in numerous species, including birds and aquatic mammals. While knowledge of its functional role has been improved in recent years, the physiological mechanisms that generate this behavior remain poorly understood. Here, unihemispheric sleep is simulated using a physiologically based quantitative model of the mammalian ascending arousal system. The model includes mutual inhibition between wake-promoting monoaminergic nuclei (MA) and sleep-promoting ventrolateral preoptic nuclei (VLPO), driven by circadian and homeostatic drives as well as cholinergic and orexinergic input to MA. The model is extended here to incorporate two distinct hemispheres and their interconnections. It is postulated that inhibitory connections between VLPO nuclei in opposite hemispheres are responsible for unihemispheric sleep, and it is shown that contralateral inhibitory connections promote unihemispheric sleep while ipsilateral inhibitory connections promote bihemispheric sleep. The frequency of alternating unihemispheric sleep bouts is chiefly determined by sleep homeostasis and its corresponding time constant. It is shown that the model reproduces dolphin sleep, and that the sleep regimes of humans, cetaceans, and fur seals, the latter both terrestrially and in a marine environment, require only modest changes in contralateral connection strength and homeostatic time constant. It is further demonstrated that fur seals can potentially switch between their terrestrial bihemispheric and aquatic unihemispheric sleep patterns by varying just the contralateral connection strength. These results provide experimentally testable predictions regarding the differences between species that sleep bihemispherically and unihemispherically. PMID:22960411

  16. The application of global sensitivity analysis in the development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for m-xylene and ethanol co-exposure in humans

    PubMed Central

    Loizou, George D.; McNally, Kevin; Jones, Kate; Cocker, John

    2015-01-01

    Global sensitivity analysis (SA) was used during the development phase of a binary chemical physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model used for the analysis of m-xylene and ethanol co-exposure in humans. SA was used to identify those parameters which had the most significant impact on variability of venous blood and exhaled m-xylene and urinary excretion of the major metabolite of m-xylene metabolism, 3-methyl hippuric acid. This analysis informed the selection of parameters for estimation/calibration by fitting to measured biological monitoring (BM) data in a Bayesian framework using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation. Data generated in controlled human studies were shown to be useful for investigating the structure and quantitative outputs of PBPK models as well as the biological plausibility and variability of parameters for which measured values were not available. This approach ensured that a priori knowledge in the form of prior distributions was ascribed only to those parameters that were identified as having the greatest impact on variability. This is an efficient approach which helps reduce computational cost. PMID:26175688

  17. The application of global sensitivity analysis in the development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for m-xylene and ethanol co-exposure in humans.

    PubMed

    Loizou, George D; McNally, Kevin; Jones, Kate; Cocker, John

    2015-01-01

    Global sensitivity analysis (SA) was used during the development phase of a binary chemical physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model used for the analysis of m-xylene and ethanol co-exposure in humans. SA was used to identify those parameters which had the most significant impact on variability of venous blood and exhaled m-xylene and urinary excretion of the major metabolite of m-xylene metabolism, 3-methyl hippuric acid. This analysis informed the selection of parameters for estimation/calibration by fitting to measured biological monitoring (BM) data in a Bayesian framework using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation. Data generated in controlled human studies were shown to be useful for investigating the structure and quantitative outputs of PBPK models as well as the biological plausibility and variability of parameters for which measured values were not available. This approach ensured that a priori knowledge in the form of prior distributions was ascribed only to those parameters that were identified as having the greatest impact on variability. This is an efficient approach which helps reduce computational cost. PMID:26175688

  18. A dynamic model of human physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Melissa; Kaplan, Carolyn; Oran, Elaine; Boris, Jay

    2010-11-01

    To study the systems-level transport in the human body, we develop the Computational Man (CMAN): a set of one-dimensional unsteady elastic flow simulations created to model a variety of coupled physiological systems including the circulatory, respiratory, excretory, and lymphatic systems. The model systems are collapsed from three spatial dimensions and time to one spatial dimension and time by assuming axisymmetric vessel geometry and a parabolic velocity profile across the cylindrical vessels. To model the actions of a beating heart or expanding lungs, the flow is driven by user-defined changes to the equilibrium areas of the elastic vessels. The equations are then iteratively solved for pressure, area, and average velocity. The model is augmented with valves and contractions to resemble the biological structure of the different systems. CMAN will be used to track material transport throughout the human body for diagnostic and predictive purposes. Parameters will be adjustable to match those of individual patients. Validation of CMAN has used both higher-dimensional simulations of similar geometries and benchmark measurement from medical literature.

  19. Incorporation of Therapeutic Interventions in Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Human Clinical Case Reports of Accidental or Intentional Overdosing with Ethylene Glycol

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Rick A.; McMartin, K. E.

    2005-05-16

    Ethylene glycol is a high production volume chemical used in the manufacture of resins and fibers, antifreeze, deicing fluids, heat transfer and hydraulic fluids. Although occupational uses of ethylene glycol have not been associated with adverse effects, there are case reports where humans have either intentionally or accidentally ingested large quantities of ethylene glycol, primarily from antifreeze. The acute toxicity of ethylene glycol in humans and animals and can proceed through three stages, each associated with a different metabolite: central nervous system depression (ethylene glycol), cardiopulmonary effects associated with metabolic acidosis (glycolic acid) and ultimately renal toxicity (oxalic acid), depending upon the total amounts consumed and effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model developed in a companion paper (Corley et al., 2004) was refined in this study to include clinically relevant treatment regimens for ethylene glycol poisoning such as hemodialysis or metabolic inhibition with either ethanol or fomepizole. Such modifications enabled the model to describe several human case reports which included analysis of ethylene glycol and/or glycolic acid. Such data and model simulations provide important confirmation that the PBPK model developed previously can adequately describe the pharmacokinetics of ethylene glycol in humans following low, occupational or environmentally relevant inhalation exposures, as well as massive oral doses even under conditions where treatments have been employed that markedly affect the disposition of ethylene glycol and glycolic acid. By integrating the case report data sets with controlled studies in this PBPK model, it was demonstrated that fomepizole, if administered early enough in a clinical situation, can be more effective than ethanol or hemodialysis in preventing the metabolism of ethylene glycol to more toxic metabolites. Hemodialysis remains an

  20. [Research progress on emotion recognition based on physiological signals].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; Wan, Baikun; Ming, Dong

    2015-02-01

    Emotion recognition will be prosperious in multifarious applications, like distance education, healthcare, and human-computer interactions, etc. Emotions can be recognized from the behavior signals such as speech, facial expressions, gestures or the physiological signals such as electroencephalogram and electrocardiogram. Contrast to other methods, the physiological signals based emotion recognition can achieve more objective and effective results because it is almost impossible to be disguised. This paper introduces recent advancements in emotion research using physiological signals, specified to its emotion model, elicitation stimuli, feature extraction and classification methods. Finally the paper also discusses some research challenges and future developments. PMID:25997298

  1. Human biofluid concentrations of mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate extrapolated from pharmacokinetics in chimeric mice with humanized liver administered with di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Koichiro; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Murayama, Norie; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) is a reproductive toxicant in male rodents. The aim of the current study was to extrapolate the pharmacokinetics and toxicokinetics of mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (MEHP, a primary metabolite of DEHP) in humans by using data from oral administration of DEHP to chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes. MEHP and its glucuronide were detected in plasma from control mice and chimeric mice after single oral doses of 250mg DEHP/kg body weight. Biphasic plasma concentration-time curves of MEHP and its glucuronide were seen only in control mice. MEHP and its glucuronide were extensively excreted in urine within 24h in mice with humanized liver. In contrast, fecal excretion levels of MEHP glucuronide were high in control mice compared with those with humanized liver. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents from chimeric mice studies were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Estimated urine MEHP concentrations in humans were consistent with reported concentrations. This research illustrates how chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes in combination with a simple PBPK model can assist evaluations of pharmacokinetics or toxicokinetics of the primary or secondary metabolites of DEHP. PMID:25867688

  2. Structural physiology based on electron crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    There are many questions in brain science, which are extremely interesting but very difficult to answer. For example, how do education and other experiences during human development influence the ability and personality of the adult? The molecular mechanisms underlying such phenomena are still totally unclear. However, technological and instrumental advancements of electron microscopy have facilitated comprehension of the structures of biological components, cells, and organelles. Electron crystallography is especially good for studying the structure and function of membrane proteins, which are key molecules of signal transduction in neural and other cells. Electron crystallography is now an established technique to analyze the structures of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, which are close to their natural biological environment. By utilizing cryo-electron microscopes with helium cooled specimen stages, which were developed through a personal motivation to understand functions of neural systems from a structural point of view, structures of membrane proteins were analyzed at a resolution higher than 3 Å. This review has four objectives. First, it is intended to introduce the new research field of structural physiology. Second, it introduces some of the personal struggles, which were involved in developing the cryo-electron microscope. Third, it discusses some of the technology for the structural analysis of membrane proteins based on cryo-electron microscopy. Finally, it reviews structural and functional analyses of membrane proteins. PMID:21416541

  3. Human Physiology in an Aquatic Environment.

    PubMed

    Pendergast, David R; Moon, Richard E; Krasney, John J; Held, Heather E; Zamparo, Paola

    2015-10-01

    Water covers over 70% of the earth, has varying depths and temperatures and contains much of the earth's resources. Head-out water immersion (HOWI) or submersion at various depths (diving) in water of thermoneutral (TN) temperature elicits profound cardiorespiratory, endocrine, and renal responses. The translocation of blood into the thorax and elevation of plasma volume by autotransfusion of fluid from cells to the vascular compartment lead to increased cardiac stroke volume and output and there is a hyperperfusion of some tissues. Pulmonary artery and capillary hydrostatic pressures increase causing a decline in vital capacity with the potential for pulmonary edema. Atrial stretch and increased arterial pressure cause reflex autonomic responses which result in endocrine changes that return plasma volume and arterial pressure to preimmersion levels. Plasma volume is regulated via a reflex diuresis and natriuresis. Hydrostatic pressure also leads to elastic loading of the chest, increasing work of breathing, energy cost, and thus blood flow to respiratory muscles. Decreases in water temperature in HOWI do not affect the cardiac output compared to TN; however, they influence heart rate and the distribution of muscle and fat blood flow. The reduced muscle blood flow results in a reduced maximal oxygen consumption. The properties of water determine the mechanical load and the physiological responses during exercise in water (e.g. swimming and water based activities). Increased hydrostatic pressure caused by submersion does not affect stroke volume; however, progressive bradycardia decreases cardiac output. During submersion, compressed gas must be breathed which introduces the potential for oxygen toxicity, narcosis due to nitrogen, and tissue and vascular gas bubbles during decompression and after may cause pain in joints and the nervous system. PMID:26426465

  4. Physiologically based predictions of the impact of inhibition of intestinal and hepatic metabolism on human pharmacokinetics of CYP3A substrates.

    PubMed

    Fenneteau, Frederique; Poulin, Patrick; Nekka, Fahima

    2010-01-01

    The first objective of the present study was to predict the pharmacokinetics of selected CYP3A substrates administered at a single oral dose to human. The second objective was to predict pharmacokinetics of the selected drugs in presence of inhibitors of the intestinal and/or hepatic CYP3A activity. We developed a whole-body physiologically based pharmacokinetics (WB-PBPK) model accounting for presystemic elimination of midazolam (MDZ), alprazolam (APZ), triazolam (TRZ), and simvastatin (SMV). The model also accounted for concomitant administration of the above-mentioned drugs with CYP3A inhibitors, namely ketoconazole (KTZ), itraconazole (ITZ), diltiazem (DTZ), saquinavir (SQV), and a furanocoumarin contained in grape-fruit juice (GFJ), namely 6',7'-dihydroxybergamottin (DHB). Model predictions were compared to published clinical data. An uncertainty analysis was performed to account for the variability and uncertainty of model parameters when predicting the model outcomes. We also briefly report on the results of our efforts to develop a global sensitivity analysis and its application to the current WB-PBPK model. Considering the current criterion for a successful prediction, judged satisfied once the clinical data are captured within the 5th and 95th percentiles of the predicted concentration-time profiles, a successful prediction has been obtained for a single oral administration of MDZ and SMV. For APZ and TRZ, however, a slight deviation toward the 95th percentile was observed especially for C(max) but, overall, the in vivo profiles were well captured by the PBPK model. Moreover, the impact of DHB-mediated inhibition on the extent of intestinal pre-systemic elimination of MDZ and SMV has been accurately predicted by the proposed PBPK model. For concomitant administrations of MDZ and ITZ, APZ and KTZ, as well as SMV and DTZ, the in vivo concentration-time profiles were accurately captured by the model. A slight deviation was observed for SMV when

  5. Geomagnetic Indices Variations And Human Physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, S.

    2007-12-01

    A group of 86 volunteers was examined on each working day in autumn 2001 and in spring 2002. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) were registered. Pulse pressure (PP) was calculated. Data about subjective psycho-physiological complaints (SPPC) were also gathered. Altogether 2799 recordings were obtained. ANOVA was employed to check the significance of influence of daily amplitude of H-component of local geomagnetic field, daily planetary Ap-index and hourly planetary Dst-index on the physiological parameters examined. Post hoc analysis was performed to elicit the significance of differences in the factors levels. Average values of SBP, DBP, PP and SPPC of the group were found to increase statistically significantly and biologically considerably with the increase of geomagnetic indices.

  6. Human Adaptation to Space: Space Physiology and Countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews human physiological responses to spaceflight, and the countermeasures taken to prevent adverse effects of manned space flight. The topics include: 1) Human Spaceflight Experience; 2) Human Response to Spaceflight; 3) ISS Expeditions 1-16; 4) Countermeasure; and 5) Biomedical Data;

  7. Telescience testbed in human space physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoru; Seo, Hisao; Iwase, Satoshi; Tanaka, Masafumi; Kaneko, Sayumi; Mano, Tadaaki; Matsui, Nobuo; Foldager, Niels; Bondepetersen, Flemming; Yamashita, Masamichi; Shoji, Takatoshi; Sudoh, Hideo

    The present telescience testbed study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of physiological experimentation under restricted conditions such as during simulated weightlessness induced by using a water immersion facility, a reduced capacity of laboratory facilities, a delay and desynchronization of communication between investigator and operator, restrictions of different kinds of experiments practiced by only one operator following a limited time line and so on. The three day's experiments were carried out following the same protocols. The operators were changed every day, but was the same the first and the third day. The operators were both medical doctors but not all round experts in the physiological experimentation. The experimental objectives were: 1) ECG changes by changing water immersion levels, 2) blood pressure changes, 3) ultrasonic Echo-cardiographic changes, 4) laser Doppler skin blood flowmetry in a finger, 5) blood sampling to examine blood electrolytic and humoral changes. The effectiveness of the testbed experiment was assessed by evaluating the quality of the obtained data and estimating the friendliness of the operation of the telescience to investigators and operators.

  8. Effect of Light on Human Circadian Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Jeanne F.; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis The circadian system in animals and humans, being near but not exactly 24-hours in cycle length, must be reset on a daily basis in order to remain in synchrony with external environmental time. This process of entrainment is achieved in most mammals through regular exposure to light and darkness. In this chapter, we review the results of studies conducted in our laboratory and others over the past 25 years in which the effects of light on the human circadian timing system were investigated. These studies have revealed, how the timing, intensity, duration, and wavelength of light affect the human biological clock. Our most recent studies also demonstrate that there is much yet to learn about the effects of light on the human circadian timing system. PMID:20161220

  9. EVOKED POTENTIALS, PHYSIOLOGICAL METHODS WITH HUMAN APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of tests and test batteries have been developed and implemented for detecting potential neurotoxicity in humans. n some cases test results may suggest specific dysfunction. hile tests in laboratory animals are often used to project the potential for adverse health effect...

  10. Modeling physiological and pathological human neurogenesis in the dish

    PubMed Central

    Broccoli, Vania; Giannelli, Serena G.; Mazzara, Pietro G.

    2014-01-01

    New advances in directing the neuronal differentiation of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs, abbreviation intended to convey both categories of pluripotent stem cells) have promoted the development of culture systems capable of modeling early neurogenesis and neural specification at some of their critical milestones. The hPSC-derived neural rosette can be considered the in vitro counterpart of the developing neural tube, since both structures share a virtually equivalent architecture and related functional properties. Epigenetic stimulation methods can modulate the identity of the rosette neural progenitors in order to generate authentic neuronal subtypes, as well as a full spectrum of neural crest derivatives. The intrinsic capacity of induced pluripotent cell-derived neural tissue to self-organize has become fully apparent with the emergence of innovative in vitro systems that are able to shape the neuronal differentiation of hPSCs into organized tissues that develop in three dimensions. However, significant hurdles remain that must be completely solved in order to facilitate the use of hPSCs in modeling (e.g., late-onset disorders) or in building therapeutic strategies for cell replacement. In this direction, new procedures have been established to promote the maturation and functionality of hPSC-derived neurons. Meanwhile, new methods to accelerate the aging of in vitro differentiating cells are still in development. hPSC-based technology has matured enough to offer a significant and reliable model system for early and late neurogenesis that could be extremely informative for the study of the physiological and pathological events that occur during this process. Thus, full exploitation of this cellular system can provide a better understanding of the physiological events that shape human brain structures, as well as a solid platform to investigate the pathological mechanisms at the root of human diseases. PMID:25104921

  11. Physiological Based Simulator Fidelity Design Guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnell, Thomas; Hamel, Nancy; Postnikov, Alex; Hoke, Jaclyn; McLean, Angus L. M. Thom, III

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of the role of flight simulation has reinforced assumptions in aviation that the degree of realism in a simulation system directly correlates to the training benefit, i.e., more fidelity is always better. The construct of fidelity has several dimensions, including physical fidelity, functional fidelity, and cognitive fidelity. Interaction of different fidelity dimensions has an impact on trainee immersion, presence, and transfer of training. This paper discusses research results of a recent study that investigated if physiological-based methods could be used to determine the required level of simulator fidelity. Pilots performed a relatively complex flight task consisting of mission task elements of various levels of difficulty in a fixed base flight simulator and a real fighter jet trainer aircraft. Flight runs were performed using one forward visual channel of 40 deg. field of view for the lowest level of fidelity, 120 deg. field of view for the middle level of fidelity, and unrestricted field of view and full dynamic acceleration in the real airplane. Neuro-cognitive and physiological measures were collected under these conditions using the Cognitive Avionics Tool Set (CATS) and nonlinear closed form models for workload prediction were generated based on these data for the various mission task elements. One finding of the work described herein is that simple heart rate is a relatively good predictor of cognitive workload, even for short tasks with dynamic changes in cognitive loading. Additionally, we found that models that used a wide range of physiological and neuro-cognitive measures can further boost the accuracy of the workload prediction.

  12. User Interactive Software for Analysis of Human Physiological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William; Taylor, Bruce C.; Acharya, Soumydipta

    2006-01-01

    Ambulatory physiological monitoring has been used to study human health and performance in space and in a variety of Earth-based environments (e.g., military aircraft, armored vehicles, small groups in isolation, and patients). Large, multi-channel data files are typically recorded in these environments, and these files often require the removal of contaminated data prior to processing and analyses. Physiological data processing can now be performed with user-friendly, interactive software developed by the Ames Psychophysiology Research Laboratory. This software, which runs on a Windows platform, contains various signal-processing routines for both time- and frequency- domain data analyses (e.g., peak detection, differentiation and integration, digital filtering, adaptive thresholds, Fast Fourier Transform power spectrum, auto-correlation, etc.). Data acquired with any ambulatory monitoring system that provides text or binary file format are easily imported to the processing software. The application provides a graphical user interface where one can manually select and correct data artifacts utilizing linear and zero interpolation and adding trigger points for missed peaks. Block and moving average routines are also provided for data reduction. Processed data in numeric and graphic format can be exported to Excel. This software, PostProc (for post-processing) requires the Dadisp engineering spreadsheet (DSP Development Corp), or equivalent, for implementation. Specific processing routines were written for electrocardiography, electroencephalography, electromyography, blood pressure, skin conductance level, impedance cardiography (cardiac output, stroke volume, thoracic fluid volume), temperature, and respiration

  13. LINKING 'OMIC AND GENETIC DATA TO PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC MODELING TO ENHANCE ECOLOGICAL AND HUMAN HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A great deal of academic, private sector, and government research has been initiated to apply advanced molecular biological methods to the discovery of toxicity pathways in wildlife and humans. One aim is the prediction of health outcomes based on the combination of refined chemi...

  14. Development of a Physiological Model for the Human Spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvitnitsky, Michael; Thangam, Siva

    2011-11-01

    The intervertebral disc in a human spine is a complex structure consisting of three distinct parts: the nucleus pulposus, the annulus fibrosus, and the cartilaginous end-plates. The Nucleus Pulposus is centrally located within the disc surrounded by annulus fibrosus. It consists of a loose network of fibers and cells in a proteoglycan gel, which merges indistinctly at its outer margin with the annulus fibrosus. A viscoelastic constitutive model is proposed for the nucleus pulposus of the human spine to facilitate the development of a flexible intervetebral device designed for application in the thoraco-lumbar region of the human spine during surgery. A novel experimental set up was designed to establish application limits of the design concept for different approaches in spinal surgery. Both static and fatigue mechanical tests based on the ASTM standards provided a basis for the comparison with some existing clinically successful spinal implants designed for similar applications. Also, these mechanical tests and in-vitro comparison with normal spine provided the application limits of this design in surgery to maintain physiologic functional performance at the affected spinal level. The model is used to investigate the effect of the various design parameters on the biomechanical environment of the spine segment.

  15. Drawing on student knowledge in human anatomy and physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slominski, Tara Nicole

    Prior to instruction, students may have developed alternative conceptions about the mechanics behind human physiology. To help students re-shape these ideas into correct reasoning, the faulty characteristics reinforcing the alternative conceptions need to made explicit. This study used student-generated drawings to expose alternative conceptions Human Anatomy and Physiology students had prior to instruction on neuron physiology. Specifically, we investigated how students thought about neuron communication across a synapse (n=355) and how neuron activity can be modified (n=311). When asked to depict basic communication between two neurons, at least 80% of students demonstrated incorrect ideas about synaptic transmission. When targeting spatial and temporal summation, only eleven students (3.5%) were able to accurately depict at least one form of summation. In response to both drawing questions, student drawings revealed multiple alternative conceptions that resulted in a deeper analysis and characterization of the wide variation of student ideas.

  16. Colonic Fermentation: A Neglected Topic in Human Physiology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valeur, Jorgen; Berstad, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Human physiology textbooks tend to limit their discussion of colonic functions to those of absorbing water and electrolytes and storing waste material. However, the colon is a highly active metabolic organ, containing an exceedingly complex society of microbes. By means of fermentation, gastrointestinal microbes break down nutrients that cannot be…

  17. Physiological roles of acid-base sensors.

    PubMed

    Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Acid-base homeostasis is essential for life. The macromolecules upon which living organisms depend are sensitive to pH changes, and physiological systems use the equilibrium between carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, and protons to buffer their pH. Biological processes and environmental insults are constantly challenging an organism's pH; therefore, to maintain a consistent and proper pH, organisms need sensors that measure pH and that elicit appropriate responses. Mammals use multiple sensors for measuring both intracellular and extracellular pH, and although some mammalian pH sensors directly measure protons, it has recently become apparent that many pH-sensing systems measure pH via bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase. PMID:25340964

  18. Linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis with human physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Megan; Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    We here review the existing evidence linking adult hippocampal neurogenesis and human brain function in physiology and disease. Furthermore, we aim to point out where evidence is missing, highlight current promising avenues of investigation, and suggest future tools and approaches to foster the link between life-long neurogenesis and human brain function. Developmental Dynamics 245:702-709, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26890418

  19. Human inhalation exposures to toluene, ethylbenzene, and m-xylene and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of exposure biomarkers in exhaled air, blood, and urine.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Axelle; Aranda-Rodriguez, Rocio; Tardif, Robert; Nong, Andy; Haddad, Sami

    2015-04-01

    Urinary biomarkers of exposure are used widely in biomonitoring studies. The commonly used urinary biomarkers for the aromatic solvents toluene (T), ethylbenzene (E), and m-xylene (X) are o-cresol, mandelic acid, and m-methylhippuric acid. The toxicokinetics of these biomarkers following inhalation exposure have yet to be described by physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. Five male volunteers were exposed for 6 h in an inhalation chamber to 1/8 or 1/4 of the time-weighted average exposure value (TWAEV) for each solvent: toluene, ethylbenzene, and m-xylene were quantified in blood and exhaled air and their corresponding urine biomarkers were measured in urine. Published PBPK model for parent compounds was used and simulations were compared with experimental blood and exhaled air concentration data. If discrepancies existed, Vmax and Km were optimized. Urinary excretion was modeled using parameters found in literature assuming simply stoichiometric yields from parent compound metabolism and first-order urinary excretion rate. Alternative models were also tested for (1) the possibility that CYP1A2 is the only enzyme implicated in o-cresol and (2) a 2-step model for describing serial metabolic steps for mandelic acid. Models adapted in this study for urinary excretion will be further used to interpret urinary biomarker kinetic data from mixed exposures of these solvents. PMID:25601989

  20. HuPSON: the human physiology simulation ontology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Large biomedical simulation initiatives, such as the Virtual Physiological Human (VPH), are substantially dependent on controlled vocabularies to facilitate the exchange of information, of data and of models. Hindering these initiatives is a lack of a comprehensive ontology that covers the essential concepts of the simulation domain. Results We propose a first version of a newly constructed ontology, HuPSON, as a basis for shared semantics and interoperability of simulations, of models, of algorithms and of other resources in this domain. The ontology is based on the Basic Formal Ontology, and adheres to the MIREOT principles; the constructed ontology has been evaluated via structural features, competency questions and use case scenarios. The ontology is freely available at: http://www.scai.fraunhofer.de/en/business-research-areas/bioinformatics/downloads.html (owl files) and http://bishop.scai.fraunhofer.de/scaiview/ (browser). Conclusions HuPSON provides a framework for a) annotating simulation experiments, b) retrieving relevant information that are required for modelling, c) enabling interoperability of algorithmic approaches used in biomedical simulation, d) comparing simulation results and e) linking knowledge-based approaches to simulation-based approaches. It is meant to foster a more rapid uptake of semantic technologies in the modelling and simulation domain, with particular focus on the VPH domain. PMID:24267822

  1. EPM - The European Facility for human physiology research on ISS.

    PubMed

    Rieschel, Mats; Nasca, Rosario; Junk, Peter; Gerhard, Ingo

    2002-07-01

    The European Physiology Modules (EPM) Facility is one of the four major Space Station facilities being developed within the framework of ESA's Microgravity Facilities for Columbus (MFC) programme. In order to allow a wide spectrum of physiological studies in weightlessness conditions, the facility provides the infrastructure to accommodate a variable set of scientific equipment. The initial EPM configuration supports experiments in the fields of neuroscience, bone & muscle research, cardiovascular research and metabolism. The International Space Life Science Working Group (ISLSWG) has recommended co-locating EPM with the 2 NASA Human Research Facility racks. PMID:15002609

  2. Physiological Bases of Bulimia, and Antidepressant Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getzfeld, Andrew R.

    This paper reviews the literature on the physiological causes of bulimia and investigates the rationale behind the usage of antidepressant medication in the treatment of bulimia nervosa. No definite conclusions can be stated regarding the physiology of bulimia, but a number of hypotheses are suggested. It appears that the hypothalamus is involved…

  3. Physiological correlates and emotional specificity of human piloerection.

    PubMed

    Benedek, Mathias; Kaernbach, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Piloerection is known as an indicator of strong emotional experiences. However, little is known about the physiological and emotional specificity of this psychophysiological response. In the presented study, piloerection was elicited by audio stimuli taken from music and film episodes. The physiological response accompanying the incidence of piloerection was recorded with respect to electrodermal, cardiovascular and respiratory measures and compared to a matched control condition. The employment of an optical recording system allowed for a direct and objective assessment of visible piloerection. The occurrence of piloerection was primarily accompanied by an increase of phasic electrodermal activity and increased respiration depth as compared to a matched control condition. This physiological response pattern is discussed in the context of dominant theories of human piloerection. Consideration of all available evidence suggests that emotional piloerection represents a valuable indicator of the state of being moved or touched. PMID:21276827

  4. Physiological correlates and emotional specificity of human piloerection

    PubMed Central

    Benedek, Mathias; Kaernbach, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Piloerection is known as an indicator of strong emotional experiences. However, little is known about the physiological and emotional specificity of this psychophysiological response. In the presented study, piloerection was elicited by audio stimuli taken from music and film episodes. The physiological response accompanying the incidence of piloerection was recorded with respect to electrodermal, cardiovascular and respiratory measures and compared to a matched control condition. The employment of an optical recording system allowed for a direct and objective assessment of visible piloerection. The occurrence of piloerection was primarily accompanied by an increase of phasic electrodermal activity and increased respiration depth as compared to a matched control condition. This physiological response pattern is discussed in the context of dominant theories of human piloerection. Consideration of all available evidence suggests that emotional piloerection represents a valuable indicator of the state of being moved or touched. PMID:21276827

  5. Human Physiological Responses to Acute and Chronic Cold Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocks, Jodie M.; Taylor, Nigel A. S.; Tipton, Michael J.; Greenleaf, John E.

    2001-01-01

    When inadequately protected humans are exposed to acute cold, excessive body heat is lost to the environment and unless heat production is increased and heat loss attenuated, body temperature will decrease. The primary physiological responses to counter the reduction in body temperature include marked cutaneous vasoconstriction and increased metabolism. These responses, and the hazards associated with such exposure, are mediated by a number of factors which contribute to heat production and loss. These include the severity and duration of the cold stimulus; exercise intensity; the magnitude of the metabolic response; and individual characteristics such as body composition, age, and gender. Chronic exposure to a cold environment, both natural and artificial, results in physiological alterations leading to adaptation. Three quite different, but not necessarily exclusive, patterns of human cold adaptation have been reported: metabolic, hypothermic, and insulative. Cold adaptation has also been associated with an habituation response, in which there is a desensitization, or damping, of the normal response to a cold stress. This review provides a comprehensive analysis of the human physiological and pathological responses to cold exposure. Particular attention is directed to the factors contributing to heat production and heat loss during acute cold stress, and the ability of humans to adapt to cold environments.

  6. Sunspot Dynamics Are Reflected in Human Physiology and Pathophysiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrushesky, William J. M.; Sothern, Robert B.; Du-Quiton, Jovelyn; Quiton, Dinah Faith T.; Rietveld, Wop; Boon, Mathilde E.

    2011-03-01

    Periodic episodes of increased sunspot activity (solar electromagnetic storms) occur with 10-11 and 5-6 year periodicities and may be associated with measurable biological events. We investigated whether this sunspot periodicity characterized the incidence of Pap smear-determined cervical epithelial histopathologies and human physiologic functions. From January 1983 through December 2003, monthly averages were obtained for solar flux and sunspot numbers; six infectious, premalignant and malignant changes in the cervical epithelium from 1,182,421 consecutive, serially independent, screening Pap smears (59°9"N, 4°29"E); and six human physiologic functions of a healthy man (oral temperature, pulse, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respiration, and peak expiratory flow), which were measured ∼5 times daily during ∼34,500 self-measurement sessions (44°56"N, 93°8"W). After determining that sunspot numbers and solar flux, which were not annually rhythmic, occurred with a prominent 10-year and a less-prominent 5.75-year periodicity during this 21-year study span, each biological data set was analyzed with the same curve-fitting procedures. All six annually rhythmic Pap smear-detected infectious, premalignant and malignant cervical epithelial pathologies showed strong 10-year and weaker 5.75-year cycles, as did all six self-measured, annually rhythmic, physiologic functions. The phases (maxima) for the six histopathologic findings and five of six physiologic measurements were very near, or within, the first two quarters following the 10-year solar maxima. These findings add to the growing evidence that solar magnetic storm periodicities are mirrored by cyclic phase-locked rhythms of similar period length or lengths in human physiology and pathophysiology.

  7. Helmet-based physiological signal monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youn Sung; Baek, Hyun Jae; Kim, Jung Soo; Lee, Haet Bit; Choi, Jong Min; Park, Kwang Suk

    2009-02-01

    A helmet-based system that was able to monitor the drowsiness of a soldier was developed. The helmet system monitored the electrocardiogram, electrooculogram and electroencephalogram (alpha waves) without constraints. Six dry electrodes were mounted at five locations on the helmet: both temporal sides, forehead region and upper and lower jaw strips. The electrodes were connected to an amplifier that transferred signals to a laptop computer via Bluetooth wireless communication. The system was validated by comparing the signal quality with conventional recording methods. Data were acquired from three healthy male volunteers for 12 min twice a day whilst they were sitting in a chair wearing the sensor-installed helmet. Experimental results showed that physiological signals for the helmet user were measured with acceptable quality without any intrusions on physical activities. The helmet system discriminated between the alert and drowsiness states by detecting blinking and heart rate variability (HRV) parameters extracted from ECG. Blinking duration and eye reopening time were increased during the sleepiness state compared to the alert state. Also, positive peak values of the sleepiness state were much higher, and the negative peaks were much lower than that of the alert state. The LF/HF ratio also decreased during drowsiness. This study shows the feasibility for using this helmet system: the subjects' health status and mental states could be monitored without constraints whilst they were working. PMID:19002707

  8. Prediction of a potentially effective dose in humans for BAY 60–5521, a potent inhibitor of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) by allometric species scaling and combined pharmacodynamic and physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modelling

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Olaf; Willmann, Stefan; Bischoff, Hilmar; Li, Volkhart; Vakalopoulos, Alexandros; Lustig, Klemens; Hafner, Frank-Thorsten; Heinig, Roland; Schmeck, Carsten; Buehner, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    AIMS The purpose of this work was to support the prediction of a potentially effective dose for the CETP-inhibitor, BAY 60–5521, in humans. METHODS A combination of allometric scaling of the pharmacokinetics of the CETP-inhibitor BAY 60–5521 with pharmacodynamic studies in CETP-transgenic mice and in human plasma with physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling was used to support the selection of the first-in-man dose. RESULTS The PBPK approach predicts a greater extent of distribution for BAY 60–5521 in humans compared with the allometric scaling method as reflected by a larger predicted volume of distribution and longer elimination half-life. The combined approach led to an estimate of a potentially effective dose for BAY 60–5521 of 51 mg in humans. CONCLUSION The approach described in this paper supported the prediction of a potentially effective dose for the CETP-inhibitor BAY 60–5521 in humans. Confirmation of the dose estimate was obtained in a first-in-man study. PMID:21762205

  9. Effects of weightlessness on human fluid and electrolyte physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Philip C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Skylab and Spacelab data on changes occurring in human fluid and electrolyte physiology during the acute and adaptive phases of adaptation to spaceflight are summarized. The combined results for all three Spacelab studies show that hyponatremia developed within 20 h after the onset of weightlessness and continued throughout the flights, and hypokalemia developed by 40 h. Antidiuretic hormone was increased in plasma throughout the flights. Aldosterone decreased by 40 h, but after 7 days it had reached preflight levels.

  10. Teaching renal physiology in the 21st century: focus on acid–base physiology

    PubMed Central

    Leehey, David J.; Daugirdas, John T.

    2016-01-01

    A thorough understanding of renal physiology, and in particular acid–base physiology, is essential for an understanding of nephrology. Difficulties in both teaching and learning this material are major impediments to attracting medical trainees into nephrology. Approaches to teaching renal physiology include collaborative learning, computer-based learning and laboratory-based learning. Computer-based learning applications are becoming increasingly popular and can be useful, but are most successful when they incorporate interactive components. Students also note that the presence of a live instructor remains desirable. Some concepts of renal and in particular acid–base physiology can be taught using structured self-experimentation, a practice with a long tradition that possibly should be revitalized. PMID:26985388

  11. Physiologically based synthetic models of hepatic disposition.

    PubMed

    Hunt, C Anthony; Ropella, Glen E P; Yan, Li; Hung, Daniel Y; Roberts, Michael S

    2006-12-01

    Current physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are inductive. We present an additional, different approach that is based on the synthetic rather than the inductive approach to modeling and simulation. It relies on object-oriented programming. A model of the referent system in its experimental context is synthesized by assembling objects that represent components such as molecules, cells, aspects of tissue architecture, catheters, etc. The single pass perfused rat liver has been well described in evaluating hepatic drug pharmacokinetics (PK) and is the system on which we focus. In silico experiments begin with administration of objects representing actual compounds. Data are collected in a manner analogous to that in the referent PK experiments. The synthetic modeling method allows for recognition and representation of discrete event and discrete time processes, as well as heterogeneity in organization, function, and spatial effects. An application is developed for sucrose and antipyrine, administered separately and together. PBPK modeling has made extensive progress in characterizing abstracted PK properties but this has also been its limitation. Now, other important questions and possible extensions emerge. How are these PK properties and the observed behaviors generated? The inherent heuristic limitations of traditional models have hindered getting meaningful, detailed answers to such questions. Synthetic models of the type described here are specifically intended to help answer such questions. Analogous to wet-lab experimental models, they retain their applicability even when broken apart into sub-components. Having and applying this new class of models along with traditional PK modeling methods is expected to increase the productivity of pharmaceutical research at all levels that make use of modeling and simulation. PMID:17051440

  12. Introduction to anatomy and physiology of human conception.

    PubMed

    Kably, A; Barroso, G

    2000-01-01

    Anatomical and physiological concepts of human reproduction currently in use have been developed over generations, following clinical and basic research guidelines that preceded modern technology. The application of new forms of research over recent decades, as in the case of molecular biology, has contributed to a more in-depth and accurate understanding of the interaction of each of the inter- and intracellular structures in the mechanics of human physiology. On the other hand the use of non-human primate models has provided invaluable information in the reproductive field. The information obtained through models and techniques that have changed over time has led to concepts that continue to have the same validity as when they were first described. The principal objective of this review is to develop an understanding of the physiological processes applied in the anatomical sphere, taking as a reference the fact that it is impossible to understand reproductive mechanics in terms of static phenomena, but rather they should be understood as dynamic and changing processes adaptable to the conditions of each individual's surroundings. PMID:12804191

  13. Teaching Acid/Base Physiology in the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friis, Ulla G.; Plovsing, Ronni; Hansen, Klaus; Laursen, Bent G.; Wallstedt, Birgitta

    2010-01-01

    Acid/base homeostasis is one of the most difficult subdisciplines of physiology for medical students to master. A different approach, where theory and practice are linked, might help students develop a deeper understanding of acid/base homeostasis. We therefore set out to develop a laboratory exercise in acid/base physiology that would provide…

  14. Strategies for improving the physiological relevance of human engineered tissues

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Kaplan, David L

    2015-01-01

    This review examines important robust methods for sustained, steady state, in vitro culture. To achieve ‘physiologically relevant’ tissues in vitro additional complexity must be introduced to provide suitable transport, cell signaling, and matrix support for cells in 3D environments to achieve stable readouts of tissue function. Most tissue engineering systems draw conclusions on tissue functions such as responses to toxins, nutrition or drugs based on short term outcomes with in vitro cultures (2–14 days). However, short term cultures limit insight with physiological relevance, as the cells and tissues have not reached a steady state. PMID:25937289

  15. A PC-based graphical simulator for physiological pharmacokinetic models.

    PubMed

    Wada, D R; Stanski, D R; Ebling, W F

    1995-04-01

    Since many intravenous anesthetic drugs alter blood flows, physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models describing drug disposition may be time-varying. Using the commercially available programming software MATLAB, a platform to simulate time-varying physiological pharmacokinetic models was developed. The platform is based upon a library of pharmacokinetic blocks which mimic physiological structure. The blocks can be linked together flexibly to form models for different drugs. Because of MATLAB's additional numerical capabilities (e.g. non-linear optimization), the platform provides a complete graphical microcomputer-based tool for physiologic pharmacokinetic modeling. PMID:7656558

  16. How Do Humans Control Physiological Strain during Strenuous Endurance Exercise?

    PubMed Central

    Esteve-Lanao, Jonathan; Lucia, Alejandro; deKoning, Jos J.; Foster, Carl

    2008-01-01

    Background Distance running performance is a viable model of human locomotion. Methodology/Principal Findings To evaluate the physiologic strain during competitions ranging from 5–100 km, we evaluated heart rate (HR) records of competitive runners (n = 211). We found evidence that: 1) physiologic strain (% of maximum HR (%HRmax)) increased in proportional manner relative to distance completed, and was regulated by variations in running pace; 2) the %HRmax achieved decreased with relative distance; 3) slower runners had similar %HRmax response within a racing distance compared to faster runners, and despite differences in pace, the profile of %HRmax during a race was very similar in runners of differing ability; and 4) in cases where there was a discontinuity in the running performance, there was evidence that physiologic effort was maintained for some time even after the pace had decreased. Conclusions/Significance The overall results suggest that athletes are actively regulating their relative physiologic strain during competition, although there is evidence of poor regulation in the case of competitive failures. PMID:18698405

  17. Thermogenic potential and physiological relevance of human epicardial adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Chechi, K; Richard, D

    2015-01-01

    Epicardial adipose tissue is a unique fat depot around the heart that shares a close anatomic proximity and vascular supply with the myocardium and coronary arteries. Its accumulation around the heart, measured using various imaging modalities, has been associated with the onset and progression of coronary artery disease in humans. Epicardial adipose tissue is also the only fat depot around the heart that is known to express uncoupling protein 1 at both mRNA and protein levels in the detectable range. Recent advances have further indicated that human epicardial fat exhibits beige fat-like features. Here we provide an overview of the physiological and pathophysiological relevance of human epicardial fat, and further discuss whether its thermogenic properties can serve as a target for the therapeutic management of coronary heart disease in humans. PMID:27152172

  18. Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Underlying recent developments in health care and new treatments for disease are advances in basic medical sciences. This edition of "Webwatch" focuses on sites dealing with basic medical sciences, with particular attention given to physiology. There is a vast amount of information on the web related to physiology. The sites that are included here…

  19. Is Lutein a Physiologically Important Ligand for Transthyretin in Humans?

    SciTech Connect

    Liwei Chen

    2003-05-31

    Lutein and zeaxanthin are the only carotenoids accumulated in the macula of the human retina and are known as the macular pigments (MP). These pigments account for the yellow color of the macula and appear to play an important role in protecting against age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The uptake of lutein and zeaxanthin in human eyes is remarkably specific. It is likely that specific transport or binding proteins are involved. The objective is to determine whether transthyretin (TTR) is a transport protein in human plasma and could thus deliver lutein from the blood to the retina. In this study, they used a biosynthetic {sup 13}C-lutein tracer and gas chromatography-combustion interfaced-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GCC-IRMS) to gain the requisite sensitivity to detect the minute amounts of lutein expected as a physiological ligand for human transthyretin. The biosynthetic {sup 13}C-labeled lutein tracer was purified from algae. Healthy women (n = 4) each ingested 1 mg of {sup 13}C-labeled lutein daily for 3 days and a blood sample was collected 24 hours after the final dose. Plasma TTR was isolated by retinol-binding protein (RBP)-sepharose affinity chromatography and extracted with chloroform. The {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio in the TTR extract was measured by GCC-IRMS. There was no {sup 13}C-lutein enrichment in the pure TTR extract. This result indicated that lutein is not associated with TTR in human plasma after ingestion in physiological amounts. Some hydrophobic compounds with yellow color may bind to human TTR in the plasma. However, this association needs to be further proved by showing specificity. The study provides a new approach for carotenoid-binding protein studies using a stable isotope tracer method combined with the high precision of GCC-IRMS. The mechanism of selective transport, uptake, and accumulation of lutein in human macula remain to be determined.

  20. Applications of minimal physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yanguang

    2012-01-01

    Conventional mammillary models are frequently used for pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis when only blood or plasma data are available. Such models depend on the quality of the drug disposition data and have vague biological features. An alternative minimal-physiologically-based PK (minimal-PBPK) modeling approach is proposed which inherits and lumps major physiologic attributes from whole-body PBPK models. The body and model are represented as actual blood and tissue usually total body weight) volumes, fractions (fd) of cardiac output with Fick’s Law of Perfusion, tissue/blood partitioning (Kp), and systemic or intrinsic clearance. Analyzing only blood or plasma concentrations versus time, the minimal-PBPK models parsimoniously generate physiologically-relevant PK parameters which are more easily interpreted than those from mam-millary models. The minimal-PBPK models were applied to four types of therapeutic agents and conditions. The models well captured the human PK profiles of 22 selected beta-lactam antibiotics allowing comparison of fitted and calculated Kp values. Adding a classical hepatic compartment with hepatic blood flow allowed joint fitting of oral and intravenous (IV) data for four hepatic elimination drugs (dihydrocodeine, verapamil, repaglinide, midazolam) providing separate estimates of hepatic intrinsic clearance, non-hepatic clearance, and pre-hepatic bioavailability. The basic model was integrated with allometric scaling principles to simultaneously describe moxifloxacin PK in five species with common Kp and fd values. A basic model assigning clearance to the tissue compartment well characterized plasma concentrations of six monoclonal antibodies in human subjects, providing good concordance of predictions with expected tissue kinetics. The proposed minimal-PBPK modeling approach offers an alternative and more rational basis for assessing PK than compartmental models. PMID:23179857

  1. Physiological effects of light on the human circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanahan, T. L.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    The physiology of the human circadian pacemaker and its influence and on the daily organization of sleep, endocrine and behavioral processes is an emerging interest in science and medicine. Understanding the development, organization and fundamental properties underlying the circadian timing system may provide insight for the application of circadian principles to the practice of clinical medicine, both diagnostically (interpretation of certain clinical tests are dependent on time of day) and therapeutically (certain pharmacological responses vary with the time of day). The light-dark cycle is the most powerful external influence acting upon the human circadian pacemaker. It has been shown that timed exposure to light can both synchronize and reset the phase of the circadian pacemaker in a predictable manner. The emergence of detectable circadian rhythmicity in the neonatal period is under investigation (as described elsewhere in this issue). Therefore, the pattern of light exposure provided in the neonatal intensive care setting has implications. One recent study identified differences in both amount of sleep time and weight gain in infants maintained in a neonatal intensive care environment that controlled the light-dark cycle. Unfortunately, neither circadian phase nor the time of day has been considered in most clinical investigations. Further studies with knowledge of principles characterizing the human circadian timing system, which governs a wide array of physiological processes, are required to integrate these findings with the practice of clinical medicine.

  2. Evaluation of Interindividual Human Variation in Bioactivation and DNA Adduct Formation of Estragole in Liver Predicted by Physiologically Based Kinetic/Dynamic and Monte Carlo Modeling.

    PubMed

    Punt, Ans; Paini, Alicia; Spenkelink, Albertus; Scholz, Gabriele; Schilter, Benoit; van Bladeren, Peter J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2016-04-18

    Estragole is a known hepatocarcinogen in rodents at high doses following metabolic conversion to the DNA-reactive metabolite 1'-sulfooxyestragole. The aim of the present study was to model possible levels of DNA adduct formation in (individual) humans upon exposure to estragole. This was done by extending a previously defined PBK model for estragole in humans to include (i) new data on interindividual variation in the kinetics for the major PBK model parameters influencing the formation of 1'-sulfooxyestragole, (ii) an equation describing the relationship between 1'-sulfooxyestragole and DNA adduct formation, (iii) Monte Carlo modeling to simulate interindividual human variation in DNA adduct formation in the population, and (iv) a comparison of the predictions made to human data on DNA adduct formation for the related alkenylbenzene methyleugenol. Adequate model predictions could be made, with the predicted DNA adduct levels at the estimated daily intake of estragole of 0.01 mg/kg bw ranging between 1.6 and 8.8 adducts in 10(8) nucleotides (nts) (50th and 99th percentiles, respectively). This is somewhat lower than values reported in the literature for the related alkenylbenzene methyleugenol in surgical human liver samples. The predicted levels seem to be below DNA adduct levels that are linked with tumor formation by alkenylbenzenes in rodents, which were estimated to amount to 188-500 adducts per 10(8) nts at the BMD10 values of estragole and methyleugenol. Although this does not seem to point to a significant health concern for human dietary exposure, drawing firm conclusions may have to await further validation of the model's predictions. PMID:26952143

  3. A Method of Ground Simulation of Physiological Effects of Hypogravity on Humans.

    PubMed

    Baranov, M V; Katuntsev, V P; Shpakov, A V; Baranov, V M

    2016-01-01

    A novel method of ground simulation in humans of physiological effects induced by the stay on the surface of celestial bodies with hypogravity was developed and successfully tested. This method is based on the change of gravity force angle, which decreases the gravitational component of the blood hydrostatic pressure characteristic of human vertical posture on the Earth and the load-weight onto the locomotor apparatus to the lower values expected at celestial bodies with hypogravity. The methodological requirements for ground simulation of the physiological effects of lunar gravity on human body are specified and substantiated by theoretical calculations. The experimental study revealed redistribution of liquid media in the human organism, functional changes in the cardiorespiratory system, and a decrease in the load-weight applied to the locomotor apparatus. PMID:26742752

  4. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED TOXICOKINETIC MODEL FOR LAKE TROUT (SALVELINUS NAMAYCUSH)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based toxicokinetic (PB-TK) model for fish, incorporating chemical exchange at the gill and accumulation in five tissue compartments, was used to examine the effect of natural variability in physiological, morphological, and physico-chemical parameters on model ...

  5. A review of the current state of the art of physiologically-based tests for measuring human dermal in vitro bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in soil.

    PubMed

    Beriro, Darren J; Cave, Mark R; Wragg, Joanna; Thomas, Russell; Wills, Gareth; Evans, Frank

    2016-03-15

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons are classed as Persistent Organic Pollutants, a large group of compounds that share similar characteristics. They are lipophilic, resistant to degradation in the environment and harmful to human and environmental health. Soil has been identified as the primary reservoir for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the United Kingdom. This study reviews the literature associated with, or is relevant to, the measurement and modelling of dermal absorption of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons from soils. The literature illustrates the use of in vivo, in vitro and in silico methods from a wide variety of scientific disciplines including occupational and environmental exposure, medical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic research and associated mathematical modelling. The review identifies a number of practical shortcomings which must be addressed if dermal bioavailability tests are to be applied to laboratory analysis of contaminated soils for human health risk assessment. PMID:26686483

  6. Human Physiology and the Environment in Health and Disease: Readings from Scientific American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1976

    This anthology of articles is designed to supplement standard texts for courses in human physiology, environmental physiology, anatomy and physiology, pathobiology, general biology, and environmental medicine. It focuses on the influences of the external environment on the body, the physiological responses to environmental challenges, and the ways…

  7. Characterizing uncertainty and population variability in the toxicokinetics of trichloroethylene and metabolites in mice, rats, and humans using an updated database, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, and Bayesian approach

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Okino, Miles S.; Evans, Marina V.

    2009-11-15

    We have developed a comprehensive, Bayesian, PBPK model-based analysis of the population toxicokinetics of trichloroethylene (TCE) and its metabolites in mice, rats, and humans, considering a wider range of physiological, chemical, in vitro, and in vivo data than any previously published analysis of TCE. The toxicokinetics of the 'population average,' its population variability, and their uncertainties are characterized in an approach that strives to be maximally transparent and objective. Estimates of experimental variability and uncertainty were also included in this analysis. The experimental database was expanded to include virtually all available in vivo toxicokinetic data, which permitted, in rats and humans, the specification of separate datasets for model calibration and evaluation. The total combination of these approaches and PBPK analysis provides substantial support for the model predictions. In addition, we feel confident that the approach employed also yields an accurate characterization of the uncertainty in metabolic pathways for which available data were sparse or relatively indirect, such as GSH conjugation and respiratory tract metabolism. Key conclusions from the model predictions include the following: (1) as expected, TCE is substantially metabolized, primarily by oxidation at doses below saturation; (2) GSH conjugation and subsequent bioactivation in humans appear to be 10- to 100-fold greater than previously estimated; and (3) mice had the greatest rate of respiratory tract oxidative metabolism as compared to rats and humans. In a situation such as TCE in which there is large database of studies coupled with complex toxicokinetics, the Bayesian approach provides a systematic method of simultaneously estimating model parameters and characterizing their uncertainty and variability. However, care needs to be taken in its implementation to ensure biological consistency, transparency, and objectivity.

  8. Bayesian analysis of physiologically based toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Hack, C Eric

    2006-04-17

    Physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) and toxicodynamic (TD) models of bromate in animals and humans would improve our ability to accurately estimate the toxic doses in humans based on available animal studies. These mathematical models are often highly parameterized and must be calibrated in order for the model predictions of internal dose to adequately fit the experimentally measured doses. Highly parameterized models are difficult to calibrate and it is difficult to obtain accurate estimates of uncertainty or variability in model parameters with commonly used frequentist calibration methods, such as maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) or least squared error approaches. The Bayesian approach called Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis can be used to successfully calibrate these complex models. Prior knowledge about the biological system and associated model parameters is easily incorporated in this approach in the form of prior parameter distributions, and the distributions are refined or updated using experimental data to generate posterior distributions of parameter estimates. The goal of this paper is to give the non-mathematician a brief description of the Bayesian approach and Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis, how this technique is used in risk assessment, and the issues associated with this approach. PMID:16466842

  9. An overview of artificial gravity. [effects on human performance and physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The unique characteristics of artificial gravity that affect human performance and physiology in an artificial gravity environment are reviewed. The rate at which these unique characteristics change decreases very rapidly with increasing radius of a rotating vehicle used to produce artificial gravity. Reducing their influence on human performance or physiology by increasing radius becomes a situation of very rapidly diminishing returns. A review of several elements of human performance has developed criteria relative to the sundry characteristics of artificial gravity. A compilation of these criteria indicates that the maximum acceptable rate of rotation, leg heaviness while walking, and material handling are the factors that define the minimum acceptable radius. The ratio of Coriolis force to artificial weight may also be significant. Based on current knowledge and assumptions for the various criteria, a minimum radius between 15.2 and 16.8 m seems desirable.

  10. Molecular bases of circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Bonny, Olivier; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Gumz, Michelle L; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2013-10-01

    The physiological processes that maintain body homeostasis oscillate during the day. Diurnal changes characterize kidney functions, comprising regulation of hydro-electrolytic and acid-base balance, reabsorption of small solutes and hormone production. Renal physiology is characterized by 24-h periodicity and contributes to circadian variability of blood pressure levels, related as well to nychthemeral changes of sodium sensitivity, physical activity, vascular tone, autonomic function and neurotransmitter release from sympathetic innervations. The circadian rhythmicity of body physiology is driven by central and peripheral biological clockworks and entrained by the geophysical light/dark cycle. Chronodisruption, defined as the mismatch between environmental-social cues and physiological-behavioral patterns, causes internal desynchronization of periodic functions, leading to pathophysiological mechanisms underlying degenerative, immune related, metabolic and neoplastic diseases. In this review we will address the genetic, molecular and anatomical elements that hardwire circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and subtend disarray of time-dependent changes in renal pathology. PMID:23901050

  11. Examination of Duct Physiology in the Human Mammary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Dixie; Gomberawalla, Ameer; Gordon, Eva J.; Tondre, Julie; Nejad, Mitra; Nguyen, Tinh; Pogoda, Janice M.; Rao, Jianyu; Chatterton, Robert; Henning, Susanne; Love, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The human breast comprise several ductal systems, or lobes, which contain a small amount of fluid containing cells, hormones, proteins and metabolites. The complex physiology of these ducts is likely a contributing factor to the development of breast cancer, especially given that the vast majority of breast cancers begin in a single lobular unit. Methods We examined the levels of total protein, progesterone, estradiol, estrone sulfate, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and macrophages in ductal fluid samples obtained from 3 ducts each in 78 women, sampled twice over a 6 month period. Samples were processed for both cytological and molecular analysis. Intraclass correlation coefficients and mixed models were utilized to identify significant data. Results We found that the levels of these ductal fluid components were generally uncorrelated among ducts within a single breast and over time, suggesting that each lobe within the breast has a distinct physiology. However, we also found that estradiol was more correlated in women who were nulliparous or produced nipple aspirate fluid. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that the microenvironment of any given lobular unit is unique to that individual unit, findings that may provide clues about the initiation and development of ductal carcinomas. PMID:27073976

  12. Has cervical smooth muscle any physiological role in the human?

    PubMed

    Bryman, I; Norström, A; Lindblom, B

    1985-01-01

    Strips of human cervical tissue were obtained by needle biopsy and contractile activity was registered isometrically in a tissue chamber perfused by Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer. The most frequently encountered pattern of contractile activity was high frequency-short duration. Prostaglandin (PG)E2, PGI2 and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha had an inhibitory effect on the muscular activity. Cervical muscle from pregnant women was more sensitive to PGE2 than specimens from non-pregnant women. PGF2 alpha had no apparent effect on cervical contractility in non-pregnant and early pregnant patients. In late pregnancy, however, PGF2 alpha inhibited muscle contractions. The present results point to a physiological role of the cervical muscles for the control of cervical competence during pregnancy. The inhibitory effect of PGs on the muscle activity may promote cervical dilatation and retraction. PMID:3893038

  13. Physiological and biomechanical considerations for a human Mars mission.

    PubMed

    Hawkey, Adam

    2005-01-01

    Evolving on Earth has made humans perfectly adapted, both physiologically and biomechanically, to its gravity and atmospheric conditions. Leaving the Earth and its protective environment, therefore, results in the degradation of a number of human systems. Long-duration stays on the International Space Station (ISS) are accompanied by significant effects on crew's cardiovascular, vestibular and musculoskeletal systems. Bone loss and muscle atrophy are experienced at a rate of 1-3% and 5% per month respectively, while VO2 (oxygen consumption) measurements are reduced by approximately 25% after a few weeks in space. If these figures are simply extrapolated, a future human mission to Mars will be seriously jeopardised and crews may find they cross the threshold of bone and muscle loss and aerobic fitness--ultimately with them being unable to return to Earth. When arriving on Mars, considerable biomechanical alterations will also occur. Optimum walking speeds will be approximately 30% lower and transitioning from a walk to a run will occur at a speed 25% slower. Peak vertical forces will be reduced by as much as 50%, while stride length, stride time and airborne time will all increase. On Mars, half as much energy will be required to travel the equivalent distance on Earth and it will be 65% more economical to run rather than to walk. PMID:15852539

  14. Physiological and Biomechanical Considerations for a Human Mars Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkey, A.

    Evolving on Earth has made humans perfectly adapted, both physiologically and biomechanically, to its gravity and atmospheric conditions. Leaving the Earth and its protective environment, therefore, results in the degradation of a number of human systems. Long-duration stays on the International Space Station (ISS) are accompanied by significant effects on crew's cardiovascular, vestibular and musculoskeletal systems. Bone loss and muscle atrophy are experienced at a rate of 1-3% and 5% per month respectively, while VO2 (oxygen consumption) measurements are reduced by approximately 25% after a few weeks in space. If these figures are simply extrapolated, a future human mission to Mars will be seriously jeopardised and crews may find they cross the threshold of bone and muscle loss and aerobic fitness - ultimately with them being unable to return to Earth. When arriving on Mars, considerable biomechanical alterations will also occur. Optimum walking speeds will be approximately 30% lower and transitioning from a walk to a run will occur at a speed 25% slower. Peak vertical forces will be reduced by as much as 50%, while stride length, stride time and airborne time will all increase. On Mars, half as much energy will be required to travel the equivalent distance on Earth and it will be 65% more economical to run rather than to walk.

  15. Anatomical and physiological development of the human inner ear.

    PubMed

    Lim, Rebecca; Brichta, Alan M

    2016-08-01

    We describe the development of the human inner ear with the invagination of the otic vesicle at 4 weeks gestation (WG), the growth of the semicircular canals from 5 WG, and the elongation and coiling of the cochlea at 10 WG. As the membranous labyrinth takes shape, there is a concomitant development of the sensory neuroepithelia and their associated structures within. This review details the growth and differentiation of the vestibular and auditory neuroepithelia, including synaptogenesis, the expression of stereocilia and kinocilia, and innervation of hair cells by afferent and efferent nerve fibres. Along with development of essential sensory structures we outline the formation of crucial accessory structures of the vestibular system - the cupula and otolithic membrane and otoconia as well as the three cochlea compartments and the tectorial membrane. Recent molecular studies have elaborated on classical anatomical studies to characterize the development of prosensory and sensory regions of the fetal human cochlea using the transcription factors, PAX2, MAF-B, SOX2, and SOX9. Further advances are being made with recent physiological studies that are beginning to describe when hair cells become functionally active during human gestation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled . PMID:26900072

  16. Physiological Health Challenges for Human Missions to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norsk, Peter

    2015-01-01

    During the next decades, manned space missions are expected to be aiming at the Lagrange points, near Earth asteroids, and Mars flyby and/or landing. The question is therefore: Are we ready to go? To answer this with a yes, we are currently using the International Space Station to develop an integrated human physiological countermeasure suite. The integrated countermeasure suite will most likely encounter: 1) Exercise devices for aerobic, dynamic and resistive exercise training; 2) sensory-motor computer training programs and anti-motion sickness medication for preparing EVAs and G-transitions; 3) lower limb bracelets for preventing and/or treating the VIIP (vision impairment and intracranial pressure) syndrome; 4) nutritional components for maintenance of bone, muscle, the cardiovascular system and preventing oxidative stress and damage and immune deficiencies (e. g. omega-3 fatty acids, PRO/K, anti-oxidants and less salt and iron); 5) bisphosphonates for preventing bone degradation.; 6) lower body compression garment and oral salt and fluid loading for landing on a planetary surface to combat orthostatic intolerance; 7) laboratory analysis equipment for individualized monitoring of biomarkers in blood, urine and saliva for estimation of health status in; 8) advanced ultrasound techniques for monitoring bone and cardiovascular health; and 9) computer modeling programs for individual health status assessments of efficiency and subsequent adjustments of countermeasures. In particular for future missions into deep space, we are concerned with the synergistic effects of weightlessness, radiation, operational constraints and other spaceflight environmental factors. Therefore, increased collaboration between physiological, behavioral, radiation and space vehicle design disciplines are strongly warranted. Another venue we are exploring in NASA's Human Research Program is the usefulness of artificial gravity for mitigating the health risks of long duration weightlessness.

  17. Plasma levels of human neurotensin: methodological and physiological considerations.

    PubMed

    Ferris, C F; George, J K; Eastwood, G; Potegal, M; Carraway, R E

    1991-01-01

    The ingestion of a meal high in fat content is known to increase circulating levels of neurotensin (NT) in humans. However, the magnitude of the postprandial rise of NT in the general circulation and its physiological significance have been subject of much debate. The present study examines circulating levels of NT in male volunteers prior to and following each of their three daily meals (ca. 31 g fat/meal). The response observed are also compared to that elicited by the direct instillation of intralipid (ca. 44 g fat) into the duodenum. NT levels were determined by radioimmunoassay of acid/acetone extracted plasma fractionated by high pressure liquid chromatography. Meals caused a significant but modest increase in NT levels, with the largest increment (ca. 4 fmol/ml) occurring after breakfast. In contrast, NT levels increased ca. 20 fmol/ml with intraduodenal instillation of lipid. The meal-stimulated increases in circulating NT measured here are 4- to 5-fold less than those reported by others, the difference most likely reflecting the lesser amount of lipid ingested. Previous studies provided subjects with single meals containing in excess of 120 g of fat; the 30 g of fat ingested by our subjects, ca. 33% of total caloric intake, is near that recommended by the U.S. Senate, Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs. These data show that diets with a reasonable fat content have only a modest effect on circulating levels of NT. PMID:2067972

  18. The physiology and pathophysiology of human breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, Peter; Lundgren, Claes E G

    2009-01-01

    This is a brief overview of physiological reactions, limitations, and pathophysiological mechanisms associated with human breath-hold diving. Breath-hold duration and ability to withstand compression at depth are the two main challenges that have been overcome to an amazing degree as evidenced by the current world records in breath-hold duration at 10:12 min and depth of 214 m. The quest for even further performance enhancements continues among competitive breath-hold divers, even if absolute physiological limits are being approached as indicated by findings of pulmonary edema and alveolar hemorrhage postdive. However, a remarkable, and so far poorly understood, variation in individual disposition for such problems exists. Mortality connected with breath-hold diving is primarily concentrated to less well-trained recreational divers and competitive spearfishermen who fall victim to hypoxia. Particularly vulnerable are probably also individuals with preexisting cardiac problems and possibly, essentially healthy divers who may have suffered severe alternobaric vertigo as a complication to inadequate pressure equilibration of the middle ears. The specific topics discussed include the diving response and its expression by the cardiovascular system, which exhibits hypertension, bradycardia, oxygen conservation, arrhythmias, and contraction of the spleen. The respiratory system is challenged by compression of the lungs with barotrauma of descent, intrapulmonary hemorrhage, edema, and the effects of glossopharyngeal insufflation and exsufflation. Various mechanisms associated with hypoxia and loss of consciousness are discussed, including hyperventilation, ascent blackout, fasting, and excessive postexercise O(2) consumption. The potential for high nitrogen pressure in the lungs to cause decompression sickness and N(2) narcosis is also illuminated. PMID:18974367

  19. Dissimilarity measure based on ordinal pattern for physiological signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Shang, Pengjian; Shi, Wenbin; Cui, Xingran

    2016-08-01

    Complex physiologic signals may carry information of their underlying mechanisms. In this paper, we introduce a dissimilarity measure to capture the features of underlying dynamics from various types of physiologic signals based on rank order statistics of ordinal patterns. Simulated 1/f noise and white noise are used to evaluate the effect of data length, embedding dimension and time delay on this measure. We then apply this measure to different physiologic signals. The method can successfully characterize the unique underlying patterns of subjects at similar physiologic states. It can also serve as a good discriminative tool for the healthy young, healthy elderly, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrilation and white noise groups. Furthermore, when investigated into the details of underlying ordinal patterns for each group, it is found that the distributions of ordinal patterns varies significantly for healthy and pathologic states, as well as aging.

  20. Molecular bases of circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Bonny, Olivier; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Gumz, Michelle L.; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2013-01-01

    The physiological processes that maintain body homeostasis oscillate during the day. Diurnal changes characterize kidney functions, comprising regulation of hydro-electrolytic and acid-base balance, reabsorption of small solutes and hormone production. Renal physiology is characterized by 24-h periodicity and contributes to circadian variability of blood pressure levels, related as well to nychthemeral changes of sodium sensitivity, physical activity, vascular tone, autonomic function and neurotransmitter release from sympathetic innervations. The circadian rhythmicity of body physiology is driven by central and peripheral biological clockworks and entrained by the geophysical light/dark cycle. Chronodisruption, defined as the mismatch between environmental–social cues and physiological–behavioral patterns, causes internal desynchronization of periodic functions, leading to pathophysiological mechanisms underlying degenerative, immune related, metabolic and neoplastic diseases. In this review we will address the genetic, molecular and anatomical elements that hardwire circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and subtend disarray of time–dependent changes in renal pathology. PMID:23901050

  1. Auditory analysis for speech recognition based on physiological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Woojay; Juang, Biing-Hwang

    2001-05-01

    To address the limitations of traditional cepstrum or LPC based front-end processing methods for automatic speech recognition, more elaborate methods based on physiological models of the human auditory system may be used to achieve more robust speech recognition in adverse environments. For this purpose, a modified version of a model of the primary auditory cortex featuring a three dimensional mapping of auditory spectra [Wang and Shamma, IEEE Trans. Speech Audio Process. 3, 382-395 (1995)] is adopted and investigated for its use as an improved front-end processing method. The study is conducted in two ways: first, by relating the model's redundant representation to traditional spectral representations and showing that the former not only encompasses information provided by the latter, but also reveals more relevant information that makes it superior in describing the identifying features of speech signals; and second, by observing the statistical features of the representation for various classes of sound to show how different identifying features manifest themselves as specific patterns on the cortical map, thereby becoming a place-coded data set on which detection theory could be applied to simulate auditory perception and cognition.

  2. Mathematical modeling of acid-base physiology

    PubMed Central

    Occhipinti, Rossana; Boron, Walter F.

    2015-01-01

    pH is one of the most important parameters in life, influencing virtually every biological process at the cellular, tissue, and whole-body level. Thus, for cells, it is critical to regulate intracellular pH (pHi) and, for multicellular organisms, to regulate extracellular pH (pHo). pHi regulation depends on the opposing actions of plasma-membrane transporters that tend to increase pHi, and others that tend to decrease pHi. In addition, passive fluxes of uncharged species (e.g., CO2, NH3) and charged species (e.g., HCO3− , NH4+) perturb pHi. These movements not only influence one another, but also perturb the equilibria of a multitude of intracellular and extracellular buffers. Thus, even at the level of a single cell, perturbations in acid-base reactions, diffusion, and transport are so complex that it is impossible to understand them without a quantitative model. Here we summarize some mathematical models developed to shed light onto the complex interconnected events triggered by acids-base movements. We then describe a mathematical model of a spherical cell–which to our knowledge is the first one capable of handling a multitude of buffer reaction–that our team has recently developed to simulate changes in pHi and pHo caused by movements of acid-base equivalents across the plasma membrane of a Xenopus oocyte. Finally, we extend our work to a consideration of the effects of simultaneous CO2 and HCO3− influx into a cell, and envision how future models might extend to other cell types (e.g., erythrocytes) or tissues (e.g., renal proximal-tubule epithelium) important for whole-body pH homeostasis. PMID:25617697

  3. Physiology-based model of cell viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, José J; Albo, Santiago

    2013-07-01

    The measured viscoelastic properties of biological tissues is the result of the passive and active response of the cells. We propose an evolution law of the remodeling process in the cytoskeleton which is able to mimic the viscous properties of biological cellular tissues. Our model is based on dynamical changes of the resting length. We show that under the small strain regime, the linear rheology models are recovered, with the relaxation time being replaced by the cell resistance to remodel. We implement the one-dimensional model into network systems of two and three dimensions, and show that the same conclusions may be drawn for those systems. PMID:23944493

  4. Smart Sensors and Virtual Physiology Human Approach as a Basis of Personalized Therapies in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Fernández Peruchena, Carlos M; Prado-Velasco, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) has a growing incidence and prevalence in modern societies, pushed by the aging and change of life styles. Despite the huge resources dedicated to improve their quality of life, mortality and morbidity rates, these are still very poor. In this work, DM pathology is revised from clinical and metabolic points of view, as well as mathematical models related to DM, with the aim of justifying an evolution of DM therapies towards the correction of the physiological metabolic loops involved. We analyze the reliability of mathematical models, under the perspective of virtual physiological human (VPH) initiatives, for generating and integrating customized knowledge about patients, which is needed for that evolution. Wearable smart sensors play a key role in this frame, as they provide patient’s information to the models. A telehealthcare computational architecture based on distributed smart sensors (first processing layer) and personalized physiological mathematical models integrated in Human Physiological Images (HPI) computational components (second processing layer), is presented. This technology was designed for a renal disease telehealthcare in earlier works and promotes crossroads between smart sensors and the VPH initiative. We suggest that it is able to support a truly personalized, preventive, and predictive healthcare model for the delivery of evolved DM therapies. PMID:21625646

  5. Derivation of a human equivalent concentration for n-butanol using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for n-butyl acetate and metabolites n-butanol and n-butyric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Deisinger, P. J.; Poet, Torka S.; English, J C.; Faber, W D.; Barton, H. A.; Corley, Rick A.; Clewell, III, H. J.

    2005-05-01

    The metabolic series (family) approach for risk assessment uses a dosimetry-based analysis to develop toxicity information for a group of metabolically linked compounds using pharmacokinetic (PK) data for each compound and toxicity data for the parent compound. An initial physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to support the implementation of the metabolic series approach for n-butyl acetate and its subsequent metabolites, n-butanol, and n-butyric acid (the butyl series) (Barton et al. 2000). In conjunction with pilot pharmacokinetic studies, the model was used to design the definitive intravenous (i.v.) PK studies. Rats were implanted with dual indwelling cannulae and administered test compounds by i.v. bolus dose, i.v. infusion, or by inhalation in a recirculating closed chamber. Hepatic, vascular and extravascular metabolic constants for metabolism were estimated by fitting the model to the blood time course data from these experiments. The respiratory bioavailability of n-butyl acetate and n-butanol was estimated from closed chamber inhalation studies and measured ventilation rates. The resulting butyl series PBPK model successfully reproduces the blood time course of these compounds following i.v. administration, and inhalation exposure to n-butyl acetate and n-butanol. A fully scaled human version of the model successfully reproduces arterial blood n-butanol kinetics following inhalation exposure to n-butanol. These validated i.v (rat) and inhalation route models (rat, butyl acetate, n-butanol; human, butanol only) can be used to support species and dose-route extrapolations required for risk assessment of butyl series family of compounds. Further, this work demonstrates the usefulness of i.v. kinetic data for parameterization of systemic metabolism and the value of collaboration between experimentalists and kineticists in the development of PBPK models. The product of this effort, validated rat and human PBPK models for the butyl

  6. Matters of Taste: Bridging Molecular Physiology and the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rangachari, P. K.; Rangachari, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Taste perception was the focus of an undergraduate course in the health sciences that bridged the sciences and humanities. A problem-based learning approach was used to study the biological issues, whereas the cultural transmutations of these molecular mechanisms were explored using a variety of resources (novels, cookbooks, and films). Multiple…

  7. The Physiological Period Length of the Human Circadian Clock In Vivo Is Directly Proportional to Period in Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Moriggi, Ermanno; Revell, Victoria L.; Hack, Lisa M.; Lockley, Steven W.; Arendt, Josephine; Skene, Debra J.; Meier, Fides; Izakovic, Jan; Wirz-Justice, Anna; Cajochen, Christian; Sergeeva, Oksana J.; Cheresiz, Sergei V.; Danilenko, Konstantin V.; Eckert, Anne; Brown, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Diurnal behavior in humans is governed by the period length of a circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the brain hypothalamus. Nevertheless, the cell-intrinsic mechanism of this clock is present in most cells of the body. We have shown previously that for individuals of extreme chronotype (“larks” and “owls”), clock properties measured in human fibroblasts correlated with extreme diurnal behavior. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we have measured circadian period in human primary fibroblasts taken from normal individuals and, for the first time, compared it directly with physiological period measured in vivo in the same subjects. Human physiological period length was estimated via the secretion pattern of the hormone melatonin in two different groups of sighted subjects and one group of totally blind subjects, each using different methods. Fibroblast period length was measured via cyclical expression of a lentivirally delivered circadian reporter. Within each group, a positive linear correlation was observed between circadian period length in physiology and in fibroblast gene expression. Interestingly, although blind individuals showed on average the same fibroblast clock properties as sighted ones, their physiological periods were significantly longer. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that the period of human circadian behaviour is mostly driven by cellular clock properties in normal individuals and can be approximated by measurement in peripheral cells such as fibroblasts. Based upon differences among sighted and blind subjects, we also speculate that period can be modified by prolonged unusual conditions such as the total light deprivation of blindness. PMID:21042402

  8. Effects of Weightlessness on Human Fluid and Electrolyte Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Philip C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The changes that occur in human fluid and electrolyte physiology during the acute and adaptive phases of adaptation to spaceflight are summarized. A number of questions remain to be answered. At a time when plasma volume and extracellular fluid volume are contracted and salt and water intake is unrestricted. ADH does not correct the volume deficit and serum sodium decreases. Change in secretion or activity of a natriuretic factor during spaceflight is one possible explanation. Recent identification of a polypeptide hormone produced in cardiac muscle cells which is natiuretic, is hypotensive, and has an inhibitory effect on renin and aldosterone secretion has renewed interest in the role of a natriuretic factor. The role of this atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in both long- and short-term variation in extracellular volumes and in the inability of the kidney to bring about an escape from the sodium-retaining state accompanying chronic cardiac dysfunction makes it reasonable to look for a role of ANF in the regulation of sodium during exposure to microgravity. Prostaglandin-E is another hormone that may antagonize the action of ADH. Assays of these hormones will be performed on samples from crew members in the future.

  9. Functional Neuroimaging Insights into the Physiology of Human Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Schabus, Manuel; Desseilles, Martin; Sterpenich, Virginie; Bonjean, Maxime; Maquet, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    -Vu TT; Schabus M; Desseilles M; Sterpenich V; Bonjean M; Maquet P. Functional neuroimaging insights into the physiology of human sleep. SLEEP 2010;33(12):1589-1603. PMID:21120121

  10. Physiological Characterisation of Human iPS-Derived Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro Fernandes, Hugo J.; Vowles, Jane; James, William S.; Cowley, Sally A.; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) offer the potential to study otherwise inaccessible cell types. Critical to this is the directed differentiation of hiPSCs into functional cell lineages. This is of particular relevance to research into neurological disease, such as Parkinson’s disease (PD), in which midbrain dopaminergic neurons degenerate during disease progression but are unobtainable until post-mortem. Here we report a detailed study into the physiological maturation over time of human dopaminergic neurons in vitro. We first generated and differentiated hiPSC lines into midbrain dopaminergic neurons and performed a comprehensive characterisation to confirm dopaminergic functionality by demonstrating dopamine synthesis, release, and re-uptake. The neuronal cultures include cells positive for both tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and G protein-activated inward rectifier potassium channel 2 (Kir3.2, henceforth referred to as GIRK2), representative of the A9 population of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) neurons vulnerable in PD. We observed for the first time the maturation of the slow autonomous pace-making (<10 Hz) and spontaneous synaptic activity typical of mature SNc dopaminergic neurons using a combination of calcium imaging and electrophysiology. hiPSC-derived neurons exhibited inositol tri-phosphate (IP3) receptor-dependent release of intracellular calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum in neuronal processes as calcium waves propagating from apical and distal dendrites, and in the soma. Finally, neurons were susceptible to the dopamine neuron-specific toxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) which reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and altered mitochondrial morphology. Mature hiPSC-derived dopaminergic neurons provide a neurophysiologically-defined model of previously inaccessible vulnerable SNc dopaminergic neurons to bridge the gap between clinical PD and animal models. PMID:24586273

  11. Physiological characterisation of human iPS-derived dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Hartfield, Elizabeth M; Yamasaki-Mann, Michiko; Ribeiro Fernandes, Hugo J; Vowles, Jane; James, William S; Cowley, Sally A; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) offer the potential to study otherwise inaccessible cell types. Critical to this is the directed differentiation of hiPSCs into functional cell lineages. This is of particular relevance to research into neurological disease, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), in which midbrain dopaminergic neurons degenerate during disease progression but are unobtainable until post-mortem. Here we report a detailed study into the physiological maturation over time of human dopaminergic neurons in vitro. We first generated and differentiated hiPSC lines into midbrain dopaminergic neurons and performed a comprehensive characterisation to confirm dopaminergic functionality by demonstrating dopamine synthesis, release, and re-uptake. The neuronal cultures include cells positive for both tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and G protein-activated inward rectifier potassium channel 2 (Kir3.2, henceforth referred to as GIRK2), representative of the A9 population of substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) neurons vulnerable in PD. We observed for the first time the maturation of the slow autonomous pace-making (<10 Hz) and spontaneous synaptic activity typical of mature SNc dopaminergic neurons using a combination of calcium imaging and electrophysiology. hiPSC-derived neurons exhibited inositol tri-phosphate (IP3) receptor-dependent release of intracellular calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum in neuronal processes as calcium waves propagating from apical and distal dendrites, and in the soma. Finally, neurons were susceptible to the dopamine neuron-specific toxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) which reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and altered mitochondrial morphology. Mature hiPSC-derived dopaminergic neurons provide a neurophysiologically-defined model of previously inaccessible vulnerable SNc dopaminergic neurons to bridge the gap between clinical PD and animal models. PMID:24586273

  12. Application of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Models in Chemical Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Mumtaz, Moiz; Fisher, Jeffrey; Blount, Benjamin; Ruiz, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Post-exposure risk assessment of chemical and environmental stressors is a public health challenge. Linking exposure to health outcomes is a 4-step process: exposure assessment, hazard identification, dose response assessment, and risk characterization. This process is increasingly adopting “in silico” tools such as physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to fine-tune exposure assessments and determine internal doses in target organs/tissues. Many excellent PBPK models have been developed. But most, because of their scientific sophistication, have found limited field application—health assessors rarely use them. Over the years, government agencies, stakeholders/partners, and the scientific community have attempted to use these models or their underlying principles in combination with other practical procedures. During the past two decades, through cooperative agreements and contracts at several research and higher education institutions, ATSDR funded translational research has encouraged the use of various types of models. Such collaborative efforts have led to the development and use of transparent and user-friendly models. The “human PBPK model toolkit” is one such project. While not necessarily state of the art, this toolkit is sufficiently accurate for screening purposes. Highlighted in this paper are some selected examples of environmental and occupational exposure assessments of chemicals and their mixtures. PMID:22523493

  13. A probabilistic model of human variability in physiology for future application to dose reconstruction and QIVIVE

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Kevin; Loizou, George D.

    2015-01-01

    The risk assessment of environmental chemicals and drugs is undergoing a paradigm shift in approach which seeks the full replacement of animal testing with high throughput, mechanistic, in vitro systems. This new approach will be reliant on the measurement in vitro, of concentration-dependent responses where prolonged excessive perturbations of specific biochemical pathways are likely to lead to adverse health effects in an intact organism. Such an approach requires a framework, into which disparate data generated by in vitro, in silico, and in chemico systems can be integrated and utilized for quantitative in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation (QIVIVE), ultimately to the human population level. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are ideally suited to this and are needed to translate in vitro concentration- response relationships to an exposure or dose, route and duration regime in human populations. Thus, a realistic description of the variation in the physiology of the human population being modeled is critical. Whilst various studies in the past decade have made progress in describing human variability, the algorithms are typically coded in computer programs and as such are unsuitable for reverse dosimetry. In this report we overcome this limitation by developing a hierarchical statistical model using standard probability distributions for the specification of a virtual US and UK human population. The work draws on information from both population databases and cadaver studies. PMID:26528180

  14. A Physiologically Based Model for Methylmercury in Female American Kestrels

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) model was developed to describe the uptake, distribution, and elimination of methylmercury (CH3Hg) in female American kestrels. The model consists of six tissue compartments corresponding to the brain, liver, kidney, gut, red blood cel...

  15. Human lead metabolism: Chronic exposure, bone lead and physiological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, David Eric Berkeley

    Exposure to lead is associated with a variety of detrimental health effects. After ingestion or inhalation, lead may be taken up from the bloodstream and retained by bone tissue. X-ray fluorescence was used to make in vivo measurements of bone lead concentration at the tibia and calcaneus for 367 active and 14 retired lead smelter workers. Blood lead levels following a labour disruption were used in conjunction with bone lead readings to examine the endogenous release of lead from bone. Relations between bone lead and a cumulative blood lead index differed depending on time of hiring. This suggests that the transfer of lead from blood to bone has changed over time, possibly as a result of varying exposure conditions. A common polymorphism in the δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD) enzyme may influence the distribution of lead in humans. Blood lead levels were higher for smelter workers expressing the more rare ALAD2 allele. Bone lead concentrations, however, were not significantly different. This implies that a smaller proportion of lead in blood is distributed to tissue for individuals expressing the ALAD2 allele. The O'Flaherty physiological model of lead metabolism was modified slightly and tested with input from the personal exposure histories of smelter workers. The model results were consistent with observation in tern of endogenous exposure to lead and accumulation of lead in cortical bone. Modelling the calcaneus as a trabecular bone site did not reproduce observed trends. variations in lead metabolism between different trabecular sites may therefore be significant. The model does not incorporate a genetic component, and its output did not reflect observed differences in this respect. This result provides further support for the influence of the ALAD polymorphism on lead metabolism. Experimental trials with a digital spectrometer revealed superior energy resolution and count throughput relative to the conventional X-ray fluorescence system. The associated

  16. Human plasma kallikrein-kinin system: Physiological and biochemical parameters

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, J.W.; Shariat-Madar, z

    2016-01-01

    The plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) plays a critical role in human physiology. The KKS encompasses coagulation factor XII (FXII), the complex of prekallikrein (PK) and high molecular weight kininogen (HK). The conversion of plasma to kallikrein by the activated FXII and in response to numerous different stimuli leads to the generation of bradykinin (BK) and activated HK (HKa, an antiangiogenic peptide). BK is a proinflammatory peptide, a pain mediator and potent vasodilator, leading to robust accumulation of fluid in the interstitium. Systemic production of BK, HKa with the interplay between BK bound-BK receptors and the soluble form of HKa are key to angiogenesis and hemodynamics. KKS has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammation, hypertension, endotoxemia, and coagulopathy. In all these cases increased BK levels is the hallmark. In some cases, the persistent production of BK due to the deficiency of the blood protein C1-inhibitor, which controls FXII, is detrimental to the survival of the patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE). In others, the inability of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) to degrade BK leads to elevated BK levels and edema in patients on ACE inhibitors. Thus, the mechanisms that interfere with BK liberation or degradation would lead to blood pressure dysfunction. In contrast, anti-kallikrein treatment could have adverse effects in hemodynamic changes induced by vasoconstrictor agents. Genetic models of kallikrein deficiency are needed to evaluate the quantitative role of kallikrein and to validate whether strategies designed to activate or inhibit kallikrein may be important for regulating whole-body BK sensitivity. PMID:19689262

  17. Human thermal physiological and psychological responses under different heating environments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaojun; Ning, Haoran; Ji, Yuchen; Hou, Juan; He, Yanan

    2015-08-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that many residents of severely cold areas of China who use floor heating (FH) systems feel warmer but drier compared to those using radiant heating (RH) systems. However, this phenomenon has not been verified experimentally. In order to validate the empirical hypothesis, and research the differences of human physiological and psychological responses in these two asymmetrical heating environments, an experiment was designed to mimic FH and RH systems. The subjects participating in the experiment were volunteer college-students. During the experiment, the indoor air temperature, air speed, relative humidity, globe temperature, and inner surface temperatures were measured, and subjects' heart rate, blood pressure and skin temperatures were recorded. The subjects were required to fill in questionnaires about their thermal responses during testing. The results showed that the subjects' skin temperatures, heart rate and blood pressure were significantly affected by the type of heating environment. Ankle temperature had greatest impact on overall thermal comfort relative to other body parts, and a slightly cool FH condition was the most pleasurable environment for sedentary subjects. The overall thermal sensation, comfort and acceptability of FH were higher than that of RH. However, the subjects of FH felt drier than that of RH, although the relative humidity in FH environments was higher than that of the RH environment. In future environmental design, the thermal comfort of the ankles should be scrutinized, and a FH cool condition is recommended as the most comfortable thermal environment for office workers. Consequently, large amounts of heating energy could be saved in this area in the winter. The results of this study may lead to more efficient energy use for office or home heating systems. PMID:26267512

  18. Physiological characterization of human muscle acetylcholine receptors from ALS patients

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Eleonora; Inghilleri, Maurizio; Conti, Luca; Deflorio, Cristina; Frasca, Vittorio; Manteca, Alessia; Pichiorri, Floriana; Roseti, Cristina; Torchia, Gregorio; Limatola, Cristina; Grassi, Francesca; Miledi, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by progressive degeneration of motor neurons leading to muscle paralysis. Research in transgenic mice suggests that the muscle actively contributes to the disease onset, but such studies are difficult to pursue in humans and in vitro models would represent a good starting point. In this work we show that tiny amounts of muscle from ALS or from control denervated muscle, obtained by needle biopsy, are amenable to functional characterization by two different technical approaches: “microtransplantation” of muscle membranes into Xenopus oocytes and culture of myogenic satellite cells. Acetylcholine (ACh)-evoked currents and unitary events were characterized in oocytes and multinucleated myotubes. We found that ALS acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) retain their native physiological characteristics, being activated by ACh and nicotine and blocked by α-bungarotoxin (α-BuTX), d-tubocurarine (dTC), and galantamine. The reversal potential of ACh-evoked currents and the unitary channel behavior were also typical of normal muscle AChRs. Interestingly, in oocytes injected with muscle membranes derived from ALS patients, the AChRs showed a significant decrease in ACh affinity, compared with denervated controls. Finally, riluzole, the only drug currently used against ALS, reduced, in a dose-dependent manner, the ACh-evoked currents, indicating that its action remains to be fully characterized. The two methods described here will be important tools for elucidating the role of muscle in ALS pathogenesis and for developing drugs to counter the effects of this disease. PMID:22128328

  19. Estimating psycho-physiological state of a human by speech analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronzhin, A. L.

    2005-05-01

    Adverse effects of intoxication, fatigue and boredom could degrade performance of highly trained operators of complex technical systems with potentially catastrophic consequences. Existing physiological fitness for duty tests are time consuming, costly, invasive, and highly unpopular. Known non-physiological tests constitute a secondary task and interfere with the busy workload of the tested operator. Various attempts to assess the current status of the operator by processing of "normal operational data" often lead to excessive amount of computations, poorly justified metrics, and ambiguity of results. At the same time, speech analysis presents a natural, non-invasive approach based upon well-established efficient data processing. In addition, it supports both behavioral and physiological biometric. This paper presents an approach facilitating robust speech analysis/understanding process in spite of natural speech variability and background noise. Automatic speech recognition is suggested as a technique for the detection of changes in the psycho-physiological state of a human that typically manifest themselves by changes of characteristics of voice tract and semantic-syntactic connectivity of conversation. Preliminary tests have confirmed that the statistically significant correlation between the error rate of automatic speech recognition and the extent of alcohol intoxication does exist. In addition, the obtained data allowed exploring some interesting correlations and establishing some quantitative models. It is proposed to utilize this approach as a part of fitness for duty test and compare its efficiency with analyses of iris, face geometry, thermography and other popular non-invasive biometric techniques.

  20. A Web-based course of lectures in respiratory physiology.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2011-09-01

    A complete course of respiratory physiology suitable for first-year medical and graduate students has been placed on the Web for our own students and for other educational institutions. There are several reasons for doing this. The first is that the modern-day student uses a variety of options for acquiring knowledge. These include attending lectures, reading texts, iPod downloads, and surfing the internet. This Web-based course is another option that may be preferable for some students. A second reason is that it is becoming increasingly difficult for some medical schools to find faculty members who are willing and able to teach the principles of respiratory physiology. This is a potentially serious problem because a sound knowledge of respiratory physiology will always be necessary for the intelligent practice of medicine. Schools with limited faculty may find it useful to use these Web-based lectures followed by a discussion session with students. Another reason is that some schools have moved away from systematic lectures to case-based discussions, with the possibility that students will not be exposed to some of the principles of respiratory physiology. The hope is that this comprehensive course of lectures will help students to assimilate this important material as the medical school curriculum continues to expand at a rapid rate. PMID:21908832

  1. Molecular clocks and the human condition: approaching their characterization in human physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, G A; Yang, G; Paschos, G K; Liang, X; Skarke, C

    2015-09-01

    Molecular clockworks knit together diverse biological networks and compelling evidence from model systems infers their importance in metabolism, immunological and cardiovascular function. Despite this and the diurnal variation in many aspects of human physiology and the phenotypic expression of disease, our understanding of the role and importance of clock function and dysfunction in humans is modest. There are tantalizing hints of connection across the translational divide and some correlative evidence of gene variation and human disease but most of what we know derives from forced desynchrony protocols in controlled environments. We now have the ability to monitor quantitatively ex vivo or in vivo the genome, metabolome, proteome and microbiome of humans in the wild. Combining this capability, with the power of mobile telephony and the evolution of remote sensing, affords a new opportunity for deep phenotyping, including the characterization of diurnal behaviour and the assessment of the impact of the clock on approved drug function. PMID:26332979

  2. An Earth-Based Model of Microgravity Pulmonary Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschl, Ronald B.; Bull, Joseph L.; Grothberg, James B.

    2004-01-01

    There are currently only two practical methods of achieving micro G for experimentation: parabolic flight in an aircraft or space flight, both of which have limitations. As a result, there are many important aspects of pulmonary physiology that have not been investigated in micro G. We propose to develop an earth-based animal model of micro G by using liquid ventilation, which will allow us to fill the lungs with perfluorocarbon, and submersing the animal in water such that the density of the lungs is the same as the surrounding environment. By so doing, we will eliminate the effects of gravity on respiration. We will first validate the model by comparing measures of pulmonary physiology, including cardiac output, central venous pressures, lung volumes, and pulmonary mechanics, to previous space flight and parabolic flight measurements. After validating the model, we will investigate the impact of micro G on aspects of lung physiology that have not been previously measured. These will include pulmonary blood flow distribution, ventilation distribution, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, ventilation-perfusion matching, and pleural pressures and flows. We expect that this earth-based model of micro G will enhance our knowledge and understanding of lung physiology in space which will increase in importance as space flights increase in time and distance.

  3. Optimizing nanomedicine pharmacokinetics using physiologically based pharmacokinetics modelling

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Darren Michael; Siccardi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutic agents is characterized by numerous challenges including poor absorption, low penetration in target tissues and non-specific dissemination in organs, leading to toxicity or poor drug exposure. Several nanomedicine strategies have emerged as an advanced approach to enhance drug delivery and improve the treatment of several diseases. Numerous processes mediate the pharmacokinetics of nanoformulations, with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (ADME) being poorly understood and often differing substantially from traditional formulations. Understanding how nanoformulation composition and physicochemical properties influence drug distribution in the human body is of central importance when developing future treatment strategies. A helpful pharmacological tool to simulate the distribution of nanoformulations is represented by physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) modelling, which integrates system data describing a population of interest with drug/nanoparticle in vitro data through a mathematical description of ADME. The application of PBPK models for nanomedicine is in its infancy and characterized by several challenges. The integration of property–distribution relationships in PBPK models may benefit nanomedicine research, giving opportunities for innovative development of nanotechnologies. PBPK modelling has the potential to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning nanoformulation disposition and allow for more rapid and accurate determination of their kinetics. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of nanomedicine distribution and the use of PBPK modelling in the characterization of nanoformulations with optimal pharmacokinetics. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Nanomedicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-17 PMID:24467481

  4. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of POPs in Greenlanders.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Christian; Gustavson, Kim; Rigét, Frank F; Dietz, Rune; Krüger, Tanja; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva C

    2014-03-01

    Human exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and the potential health impact in the Arctic far from the emission sources have been highlighted in numerous studies. As a supplement to human POP biomonitoring studies, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was set up to estimate the fate of POPs in Greenlandic Inuit's liver, blood, muscle and adipose tissue following long-term exposure to traditional Greenlandic diet. The PBPK model described metabolism, excretion and POP accumulation on the basis of their physicochemical properties and metabolic rates in the organisms. Basic correlations between chemically analyzed blood POP concentrations and calculated daily POP intake from food questionnaire of 118 middle age (18-35years) Greenlandic Inuits from four cities in West Greenland (Qaanaaq: n=40; Qeqertarsuaq: n=36; Nuuk: n=20; Narsaq: n=22) taken during 2003 to 2006 were analyzed. The dietary items included were polar bear, caribou, musk oxen, several marine species such as whales, seals, bird and fish as well as imported food. The contaminant concentrations of the dietary items as well as their chemical properties, uptake, biotransformation and excretion allowed us to estimate the POP concentration in liver, blood, muscle and adipose tissue following long-term exposure to the traditional Greenlandic diet using the PBPK model. Significant correlations were found between chemically analyzed POP blood concentrations and calculated daily intake of POPs for Qeqertarsuaq, Nuuk and Narsaq Inuit but not for the northernmost settlement Qaanaaq, probably because the highest blood POP level was found in this district which might mask the interview-based POP calculations. Despite the large variation in circulating blood POP concentrations, the PBPK model predicted blood concentrations of a factor 2-3 within the actual measured values. Moreover, the PBPK model showed that estimated blood POP concentration increased significantly after consumption of meals

  5. Toward Scalable Trustworthy Computing Using the Human-Physiology-Immunity Metaphor

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, Lee M; Sheldon, Frederick T

    2011-01-01

    The cybersecurity landscape consists of an ad hoc patchwork of solutions. Optimal cybersecurity is difficult for various reasons: complexity, immense data and processing requirements, resource-agnostic cloud computing, practical time-space-energy constraints, inherent flaws in 'Maginot Line' defenses, and the growing number and sophistication of cyberattacks. This article defines the high-priority problems and examines the potential solution space. In that space, achieving scalable trustworthy computing and communications is possible through real-time knowledge-based decisions about cyber trust. This vision is based on the human-physiology-immunity metaphor and the human brain's ability to extract knowledge from data and information. The article outlines future steps toward scalable trustworthy systems requiring a long-term commitment to solve the well-known challenges.

  6. Sex Differences in Human Fatigability: Mechanisms and Insight to Physiological Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Sandra K.

    2014-01-01

    Sex-related differences in physiology and anatomy are responsible for profound differences in neuromuscular performance and fatigability between men and women. Women are usually less fatigable than men for similar intensity isometric fatiguing contractions. This sex difference in fatigability, however, is task specific because different neuromuscular sites will be stressed when the requirements of the task are altered, and the stress on these sites can differ for men and women. Task variables that can alter the sex difference in fatigue include the type, intensity and speed of contraction, the muscle group assessed, and the environmental conditions. Physiological mechanisms that are responsible for sex-based differences in fatigability may include activation of the motor neuron pool from cortical and subcortical regions, synaptic inputs to the motor neuron pool via activation of metabolically-sensitive small afferent fibres in the muscle, muscle perfusion, and skeletal muscle metabolism and fibre type properties. Non-physiological factors such as the sex bias of studying more males than females in human and animal experiments can also mask a true understanding of the magnitude and mechanisms of sex-based differences in physiology and fatigability. Despite recent developments, there is a tremendous lack of understanding of sex differences in neuromuscular function and fatigability, the prevailing mechanisms and the functional consequences. This review emphasises the need to understand sex-based differences in fatigability in order to shed light on the benefits and limitations that fatigability can exert for men and women during daily tasks, exercise performance, training and rehabilitation in both health and disease. PMID:24433272

  7. Inferring Nonlinear Neuronal Computation Based on Physiologically Plausible Inputs

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, James M.; Cui, Yuwei; Butts, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    The computation represented by a sensory neuron's response to stimuli is constructed from an array of physiological processes both belonging to that neuron and inherited from its inputs. Although many of these physiological processes are known to be nonlinear, linear approximations are commonly used to describe the stimulus selectivity of sensory neurons (i.e., linear receptive fields). Here we present an approach for modeling sensory processing, termed the Nonlinear Input Model (NIM), which is based on the hypothesis that the dominant nonlinearities imposed by physiological mechanisms arise from rectification of a neuron's inputs. Incorporating such ‘upstream nonlinearities’ within the standard linear-nonlinear (LN) cascade modeling structure implicitly allows for the identification of multiple stimulus features driving a neuron's response, which become directly interpretable as either excitatory or inhibitory. Because its form is analogous to an integrate-and-fire neuron receiving excitatory and inhibitory inputs, model fitting can be guided by prior knowledge about the inputs to a given neuron, and elements of the resulting model can often result in specific physiological predictions. Furthermore, by providing an explicit probabilistic model with a relatively simple nonlinear structure, its parameters can be efficiently optimized and appropriately regularized. Parameter estimation is robust and efficient even with large numbers of model components and in the context of high-dimensional stimuli with complex statistical structure (e.g. natural stimuli). We describe detailed methods for estimating the model parameters, and illustrate the advantages of the NIM using a range of example sensory neurons in the visual and auditory systems. We thus present a modeling framework that can capture a broad range of nonlinear response functions while providing physiologically interpretable descriptions of neural computation. PMID:23874185

  8. Emotion recognition based on physiological changes in music listening.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonghwa; André, Elisabeth

    2008-12-01

    Little attention has been paid so far to physiological signals for emotion recognition compared to audiovisual emotion channels such as facial expression or speech. This paper investigates the potential of physiological signals as reliable channels for emotion recognition. All essential stages of an automatic recognition system are discussed, from the recording of a physiological dataset to a feature-based multiclass classification. In order to collect a physiological dataset from multiple subjects over many weeks, we used a musical induction method which spontaneously leads subjects to real emotional states, without any deliberate lab setting. Four-channel biosensors were used to measure electromyogram, electrocardiogram, skin conductivity and respiration changes. A wide range of physiological features from various analysis domains, including time/frequency, entropy, geometric analysis, subband spectra, multiscale entropy, etc., is proposed in order to find the best emotion-relevant features and to correlate them with emotional states. The best features extracted are specified in detail and their effectiveness is proven by classification results. Classification of four musical emotions (positive/high arousal, negative/high arousal, negative/low arousal, positive/low arousal) is performed by using an extended linear discriminant analysis (pLDA). Furthermore, by exploiting a dichotomic property of the 2D emotion model, we develop a novel scheme of emotion-specific multilevel dichotomous classification (EMDC) and compare its performance with direct multiclass classification using the pLDA. Improved recognition accuracy of 95\\% and 70\\% for subject-dependent and subject-independent classification, respectively, is achieved by using the EMDC scheme. PMID:18988943

  9. Physiological cognitive state assessment: applications for designing effective human-machine systems.

    PubMed

    Estepp, Justin R; Christensen, James C

    2011-01-01

    Significant growth in the field of neuroscience has occurred over the last decade such that new application areas for basic research techniques are opening up to practitioners in many other areas. Of particular interest to many is the principle of neuroergonomics, by which the traditional work in neuroscience and its related topics can be applied to non-traditional areas such as human-machine system design. While work in neuroergonomics certainly predates the use of the term in the literature (previously identified by others as applied neuroscience, operational neuroscience, etc.), there is great promise in the larger framework that is represented by the general context of the terminology. Here, we focus on the very specific concept that principles in brain-computer interfaces, neural prosthetics and the larger realm of machine learning using physiological inputs can be applied directly to the design and implementation of augmented human-machine systems. Indeed, work in this area has been ongoing for more than 25 years with very little cross-talk and collaboration between clinical and applied researchers. We propose that, given increased interest in augmented human-machine systems based on cognitive state, further progress will require research in the same vein as that being done in the aforementioned communities, and that all researchers with a vested interest in physiologically-based machine learning techniques can benefit from increased collaboration. We thereby seek to describe the current state of cognitive state assessment in human-machine systems, the problems and challenges faced, and the tightly-coupled relationship with other research areas. This supports the larger work of the Cognitive State Assessment 2011 Competition by setting the stage for the purpose of the session by showing the need to increase research in the machine learning techniques used by practitioners of augmented human-machine system design. PMID:22255837

  10. Physiology and biochemistry of human subjects during entrapment.

    PubMed

    Agapiou, A; Mikedi, K; Karma, S; Giotaki, Z K; Kolostoumbis, D; Papageorgiou, C; Zorba, E; Spiliopoulou, C; Amann, A; Statheropoulos, M

    2013-03-01

    A classification of various categories of entrapped people under the ruins of collapsed buildings after earthquakes, technical failures or explosions is proposed. Type and degree of injury at the moment of building collapse and duration of entrapment are the two basic parameters in this classification. The aim is to provide sources and types of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that can be used for establishing a new method for locating entrapped victims based on human chemical signatures. Potential target compounds, among others, are ammonia, acetone, isoprene, dimethylsulfide, dimethyldisulfide and trimethylamine. In this context, the possible neuroendocrine, metabolic and physical responses of potential victims during the different types of entrapment are correlated with the sources of VOCs such as expired air, urine, blood and sweat. The proposed classification scheme was developed as part of an integrated research project which investigates the use of combined audio, video and chemical methods for the early location of entrapped people under the ruins of collapsed buildings. PMID:23318246

  11. An investigative laboratory course in human physiology using computer technology and collaborative writing.

    PubMed

    FitzPatrick, Kathleen A

    2004-12-01

    Active investigative student-directed experiences in laboratory science are being encouraged by national science organizations. A growing body of evidence from classroom assessment supports their effectiveness. This study describes four years of implementation and assessment of an investigative laboratory course in human physiology for 65 second-year students in sports medicine and biology at a small private comprehensive college. The course builds on skills and abilities first introduced in an introductory investigations course and introduces additional higher-level skills and more complex human experimental models. In four multiweek experimental modules, involving neuromuscular, reflex, and cardiovascular physiology, by use of computerized hardware/software with a variety of transducers, students carry out self-designed experiments with human subjects and perform data collection and analysis, collaborative writing, and peer editing. In assessments, including standard course evaluations and the Salgains Web-based evaluation, student responses to this approach are enthusiastic, and gains in their skills and abilities are evident in their comments and in improved performance. PMID:15319194

  12. Dynamic OCT for physiological functions of micro organs in human fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruna, Masamitsu; Ohmi, Masato; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Fuji, Toshie; Yamada, Akihiro; Saigusa, Hiroyuki; Kuwabara, Mitsuo

    2007-11-01

    OCT is a powerful tool for detection of physiological functions of micro organs underneath the human skin surface, besides the clinical application to ophthalmology, as recently demonstrated by the authors' group. In particular, dynamics of peripheral vessels and eccrin sweat glands can be observed clearly in the time-sequential OCT images. The physiological functions of these micro organs, sweating and blood circulation, are controlled by the skin sympathetic nerve in response to externally applied stress. In this paper, we present microscopically analytical results based on the dynamic OCT of the micro organs in human fingers. In sweating dynamics, it is found that a spiral sweat duct is expanded by abrupt increase of sweat due to application of stress to a volunteer, resulting in remarkable increase of the reflection light intensity of the spiral duct in OCT. Mental-stress-induced sweating in each eccrin sweat gland, therefore, is analyzed quantitatively. Furthermore, dynamic OCT observation of peripheral vessels is interesting. A small vein of a human finger is observed clearly by the TD-OCT, where the vein expands and contracts repeatedly even in the resting state for temperature control on the fingertip. A change in the cross-sectional area of the vein exceeds 80 % for a young volunteer. The dynamic OCT will allow us to propose novel diagnoses of excessive sweating and diseases related to the sympathetic nerve.

  13. The role of VEGF pathways in human physiologic and pathologic angiogenesis.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In pre-clinical models VEGF is a potent stimulant of both physiologic and pathologic angiogenesis. Conversely, anti-VEGF regimens have successfully inhibited angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. We hypothesized that VEGF would stimulate both physiologic and pathologic angiogenesis in a human-ba...

  14. An Earth-based Model of Microgravity Pulmonary Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschl, Ronald B.; Bull, Joseph L.; Grotberg, James B.

    2004-01-01

    There are currently only two practical methods of achieving microgravity for experimentation: parabolic flight in an aircraft or space flight, both of which have limitations. As a result, there are many important aspects of pulmonary physiology that have not been investigated in microgravity. We propose to develop an earth-based animal model of microgravity by using liquid ventilation, which will allow us to fill the lungs with perfluorocarbon, and submersing the animal in water such that the density of the lungs is the same as the surrounding environment. By so doing, we will eliminate the effects of gravity on respiration. We will first validate the model by comparing measures of pulmonary mechanics, to previous space flight and parabolic flight measurements. After validating the model, we will investigate the impact of microgravity on aspects of lung physiology that have not been previously measured. These will include pulmonary blood flow distribution, ventillation distribution, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, ventilation-perfusion matching and pleural pressures and flows. We expect that this earth-based model of microgravity will enhance our knowledge and understanding of lung physiology in space which will increase in importance as space flights increase in time and distance.

  15. The physiologic sclerotic dentin: A literature-based hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Kabartai, F; Hoffmann, T; Hannig, C

    2015-12-01

    Despite the many hypotheses trying to explain how the physiologic sclerotic dentin is formed, there has been so far no convincing explanation for all of its observations. In this review, we tried to make a hypothesis based on the facts published to date. We found that the apoptosis of odontoblasts, which takes place after the formation of the apical constriction, may be the key-factor for the development of physiologic sclerotic dentin, because the resulting apoptotic bodies cannot be eliminated through phagocytosis and become trapped within the dentinal tubules due to the continuous formation of secondary dentin. The apoptotic bodies suffer later from a secondary or apoptotic necrosis leading to the release of the internal contents of pyrophosphate and hydrogen phosphate. Pyrophosphate can dehydrate the dentin and hydrogen phosphate can demineralize it, leading to the release of Ca(2+) ions which then contribute to the intratubular mineralization. PMID:26404871

  16. Matters of taste: bridging molecular physiology and the humanities.

    PubMed

    Rangachari, P K; Rangachari, Usha

    2015-12-01

    Taste perception was the focus of an undergraduate course in the health sciences that bridged the sciences and humanities. A problem-based learning approach was used to study the biological issues, whereas the cultural transmutations of these molecular mechanisms were explored using a variety of resources (novels, cookbooks, and films). Multiple evaluation procedures were used: problem summaries and problem-solving exercises (tripartite problem-solving exercise) for the problem-based learning component and group tasks and individual exercises for the cultural issues. Self-selected groups chose specific tasks from a prescribed list of options (setting up a journal in molecular gastronomy, developing an electronic tongue, designing a restaurant for synesthetes, organizing a farmers' market, marketing a culinary tour, framing hedonic scales, exploring changing tastes through works of art or recipe books, and crafting beers for space travel). Individual tasks were selected from a menu of options (book reviews, film reviews, conversations, creative writing, and oral exams). A few guest lecturers (wine making, cultural anthropology, film analysis, and nutritional epidemiology) added more flavor. The course was rated highly for its learning value (8.5 ± 1.2, n = 62) and helped students relate biological mechanisms to cultural issues (9.0 ± 0.9, n = 62). PMID:26628651

  17. Predicting physiological capacity of human load carriage - a review.

    PubMed

    Drain, Jace; Billing, Daniel; Neesham-Smith, Daniel; Aisbett, Brad

    2016-01-01

    This review article aims to evaluate a proposed maximum acceptable work duration model for load carriage tasks. It is contended that this concept has particular relevance to physically demanding occupations such as military and firefighting. Personnel in these occupations are often required to perform very physically demanding tasks, over varying time periods, often involving load carriage. Previous research has investigated concepts related to physiological workload limits in occupational settings (e.g. industrial). Evidence suggests however, that existing (unloaded) workload guidelines are not appropriate for load carriage tasks. The utility of this model warrants further work to enable prediction of load carriage durations across a range of functional workloads for physically demanding occupations. If the maximum duration for which personnel can physiologically sustain a load carriage task could be accurately predicted, commanders and supervisors could better plan for and manage tasks to ensure operational imperatives were met whilst minimising health risks for their workers. PMID:26360198

  18. The physiological basis of human sexual arousal: neuroendocrine sexual asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Motofei, Ion G; Rowland, David L

    2005-04-01

    Normal sexual arousal and response suppose an integrated process involving both physiological and psychological processes. However, the current understanding of sexual arousal does not provide a coherent model that accounts for the integration of multiple physiological systems that subsequently generate a coordinated sexual response at both the spinal peripheral and cerebral central levels. Herein we suggest a model that involves both sympathetic and parasympathetic activation during sexual arousal via the two classes of gonadal hormones, androgens and oestrogens. We discuss the manner in which gonadal hormones may activate such a system, transforming pre-pubertal (non-erotic) genital stimulation to post-pubertal erogenization of stimulation and subsequent sexual arousal. Finally, we indicate that the different balance of androgens and oestrogens in men and women may generate asymmetric effects on each of the components of the autonomic nervous system, thereby explaining some of the differences in patterns of sexual arousal and the responses cycle across the sexes. PMID:15811068

  19. Cluster-based analysis for personalized stress evaluation using physiological signals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qianli; Nwe, Tin Lay; Guan, Cuntai

    2015-01-01

    Technology development in wearable sensors and biosignal processing has made it possible to detect human stress from the physiological features. However, the intersubject difference in stress responses presents a major challenge for reliable and accurate stress estimation. This research proposes a novel cluster-based analysis method to measure perceived stress using physiological signals, which accounts for the intersubject differences. The physiological data are collected when human subjects undergo a series of task-rest cycles, incurring varying levels of stress that is indicated by an index of the State Trait Anxiety Inventory. Next, a quantitative measurement of stress is developed by analyzing the physiological features in two steps: 1) a k -means clustering process to divide subjects into different categories (clusters), and 2) cluster-wise stress evaluation using the general regression neural network. Experimental results show a significant improvement in evaluation accuracy as compared to traditional methods without clustering. The proposed method is useful in developing intelligent, personalized products for human stress management. PMID:25561450

  20. Geo-Effective Heliophysical Variations and Human Physiological State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, S.

    2006-03-01

    A group of 86 volunteers was examined on each working day in autumn 2001 and in spring 2002. These periods were chosen because of maximal expected geomagnetic activity. There were 26 persons in the group on a drug treatment, mainly because of hypertension. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate were registered. Pulse pressure was calculated. Data about subjective psycho-physiological complaints of the persons examined were also gathered. Altogether 2799 recordings were obtained and analyzed. MANOVA was employed to check the significance of the influence of three factors on the physiological parameters under consideration. The factors were as follows: 1) geomagnetic activity estimated by H-component of the local geomagnetic field and divided into five levels; 2) gender - males and females; 3) presence of medication. Post hoc analysis was performed to elicit the significance of differences in the factors' levels. The average arterial blood pressure, pulse pressure and the percentage of the persons in the group with subjective psycho-physiological complaints were found to increase significantly with the increase of geomagnetic activity. The maximal increment of systolic and diastolic blood pressure was 10-11% and for pulse pressure 13.6%. Analyses revealed that females and persons on a medication were more sensitive to the increase of geomagnetic activity than respectively males and persons with no medication.

  1. Variability in cardiac electrophysiology: Using experimentally-calibrated populations of models to move beyond the single virtual physiological human paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Muszkiewicz, Anna; Britton, Oliver J.; Gemmell, Philip; Passini, Elisa; Sánchez, Carlos; Zhou, Xin; Carusi, Annamaria; Quinn, T. Alexander; Burrage, Kevin; Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso; Rodriguez, Blanca

    2016-01-01

    Physiological variability manifests itself via differences in physiological function between individuals of the same species, and has crucial implications in disease progression and treatment. Despite its importance, physiological variability has traditionally been ignored in experimental and computational investigations due to averaging over samples from multiple individuals. Recently, modelling frameworks have been devised for studying mechanisms underlying physiological variability in cardiac electrophysiology and pro-arrhythmic risk under a variety of conditions and for several animal species as well as human. One such methodology exploits populations of cardiac cell models constrained with experimental data, or experimentally-calibrated populations of models. In this review, we outline the considerations behind constructing an experimentally-calibrated population of models and review the studies that have employed this approach to investigate variability in cardiac electrophysiology in physiological and pathological conditions, as well as under drug action. We also describe the methodology and compare it with alternative approaches for studying variability in cardiac electrophysiology, including cell-specific modelling approaches, sensitivity-analysis based methods, and populations-of-models frameworks that do not consider the experimental calibration step. We conclude with an outlook for the future, predicting the potential of new methodologies for patient-specific modelling extending beyond the single virtual physiological human paradigm. PMID:26701222

  2. Trait-based approaches to conservation physiology: forecasting environmental change risks from the bottom up

    PubMed Central

    Chown, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    Trait-based approaches have long been a feature of physiology and of ecology. While the latter fields drifted apart in the twentieth century, they are converging owing at least partly to growing similarities in their trait-based approaches, which have much to offer conservation biology. The convergence of spatially explicit approaches to understanding trait variation and its ecological implications, such as encapsulated in community assembly and macrophysiology, provides a significant illustration of the similarity of these areas. Both adopt trait-based informatics approaches which are not only providing fundamental biological insights, but are also delivering new information on how environmental change is affecting diversity and how such change may perhaps be mitigated. Such trait-based conservation physiology is illustrated here for each of the major environmental change drivers, specifically: the consequences of overexploitation for body size and physiological variation; the impacts of vegetation change on thermal safety margins; the consequences of changing net primary productivity and human use thereof for physiological variation and ecosystem functioning; the impacts of rising temperatures on water loss in ectotherms; how hemisphere-related variation in traits may affect responses to changing rainfall regimes and pollution; and how trait-based approaches may enable interactions between climate change and biological invasions to be elucidated. PMID:22566671

  3. The human cerebellum: a review of physiologic neuroanatomy.

    PubMed

    Roostaei, Tina; Nazeri, Arash; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali; Minagar, Alireza

    2014-11-01

    The cerebellum resides in the posterior cranial fossa dorsal to the brainstem and has diverse connections to the cerebrum, brain stem, and spinal cord. It is anatomically and physiologically divided into distinct functional compartments and is composed of highly regular arrays of neuronal units, each sharing the same basic cerebellar microcircuitry. Its circuitry is critically involved in motor control and motor learning, and its role in nonmotor cognitive and affective functions is becoming increasingly recognized. This article describes the cerebellar gross and histologic neuroanatomy in relation to its function, and the relevance of cerebellar circuitry and firing patterns to motor learning. PMID:25439284

  4. A physiologically based toxicokinetic model for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush).

    PubMed

    Lien, G J; McKim, J M; Hoffman, A D; Jenson, C T

    2001-01-01

    A physiologically based toxicokinetic (PB-TK) model for fish, incorporating chemical exchange at the gill and accumulation in five tissue compartments, was parameterized and evaluated for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush). Individual-based model parameterization was used to examine the effect of natural variability in physiological, morphological, and physico-chemical parameters on model predictions. The PB-TK model was used to predict uptake of organic chemicals across the gill and accumulation in blood and tissues in lake trout. To evaluate the accuracy of the model, a total of 13 adult lake trout were exposed to waterborne 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (TCE), pentachloroethane (PCE), and hexachloroethane (HCE), concurrently, for periods of 6, 12, 24 or 48 h. The measured and predicted concentrations of TCE, PCE and HCE in expired water, dorsal aortic blood and tissues were generally within a factor of two, and in most instances much closer. Variability noted in model predictions, based on the individual-based model parameterization used in this study, reproduced variability observed in measured concentrations. The inference is made that parameters influencing variability in measured blood and tissue concentrations of xenobiotics are included and accurately represented in the model. This model contributes to a better understanding of the fundamental processes that regulate the uptake and disposition of xenobiotic chemicals in the lake trout. This information is crucial to developing a better understanding of the dynamic relationships between contaminant exposure and hazard to the lake trout. PMID:11090894

  5. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling to investigate regional brain distribution kinetics in rats.

    PubMed

    Westerhout, Joost; Ploeger, Bart; Smeets, Jean; Danhof, Meindert; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2012-09-01

    One of the major challenges in the development of central nervous system (CNS)-targeted drugs is predicting CNS exposure in human from preclinical data. In this study, we present a methodology to investigate brain disposition in rats using a physiologically based modeling approach aiming at improving the prediction of human brain exposure. We specifically focused on quantifying regional diffusion and fluid flow processes within the brain. Acetaminophen was used as a test compound as it is not subjected to active transport processes. Microdialysis probes were implanted in striatum, for sampling brain extracellular fluid (ECF) concentrations, and in lateral ventricle (LV) and cisterna magna (CM), for sampling cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations. Serial blood samples were taken in parallel. These data, in addition to physiological parameters from literature, were used to develop a physiologically based model to describe the regional brain pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen. The concentration-time profiles of brain ECF, CSF(LV), and CSF(CM) indicate a rapid equilibrium with plasma. However, brain ECF concentrations are on average fourfold higher than CSF concentrations, with average brain-to-plasma AUC(0-240) ratios of 121%, 28%, and 35% for brain ECF, CSF(LV), and CSF(CM), respectively. It is concluded that for acetaminophen, a model compound for passive transport into, within, and out of the brain, differences exist between the brain ECF and the CSF pharmacokinetics. The physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling approach is important, as it allowed the prediction of human brain ECF exposure on the basis of human CSF concentrations. PMID:22588644

  6. Acute Physiological and Behavioral Effects of Intranasal Methamphetamine in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Carl L; Gunderson, Erik W; Perez, Audrey; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Thurmond, Andrew; Comer, Sandra D; Foltin, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    Intranasal methamphetamine abuse has increased dramatically in the past decade, yet only one published study has investigated its acute effects under controlled laboratory conditions. Thus, the current study examined the effects of single-dose intranasal methamphetamine administration on a broad range of behavioral and physiological measures. Eleven nontreatment-seeking methamphetamine abusers (two females, nine males) completed this four-session, in-patient, within-participant, double-blind study. During each session, one of four intranasal methamphetamine doses (0, 12, 25, and 50 mg/70 kg) was administered and methamphetamine plasma concentrations, cardiovascular, subjective, and psychomotor/cognitive performance effects were assessed before drug administration and repeatedly thereafter. Following drug administration, methamphetamine plasma concentrations systematically increased for 4 h postdrug administration then declined. Methamphetamine dose dependently increased cardiovascular measures and ‘positive’ subjective effects, with peaks occurring approximately 5–15 min after drug administration, when plasma levels were still ascending. In addition, cognitive performance on less complicated tasks was improved by all active methamphetamine doses, whereas performance on more complicated tasks was improved only by the intermediate doses (12 and 25 mg). These results show that intranasal methamphetamine produced predictable effects on multiple behavioral and physiological measures before peak plasma levels were observed. Of interest is the dissociation between methamphetamine plasma concentrations with cardiovascular measures and positive subjective effects, which might have important implications for potential toxicity after repeated doses. PMID:17851535

  7. Gastrointestinal Physiology During Head Down Tilt Bedrest in Human Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaksman, Z.; Guthienz, J.; Putcha, L.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Gastrointestinal (GI) motility plays a key role in the physiology and function of the GI tract. It directly affects absorption of medications and nutrients taken by mouth, in addition to indirectly altering GI physiology by way of changes in the microfloral composition and biochemistry of the GI tract. Astronauts have reported nausea, loss of appetite and constipation during space flight all of which indicate a reduction in GI motility and function similar to the one seen in chronic bed rest patients. The purpose of this study is to determine GI motility and bacterial proliferation during -6 degree head down tilt bed rest (HTD). Methods: Healthy male and female subjects between the ages of 25-40 participated in a 60 day HTD study protocol. GI transit time (GITT) was determined using lactulose breath hydrogen test and bacterial overgrowth was measured using glucose breath hydrogen test. H. Pylori colonization was determined using C13-urea breath test (UBIT#). All three tests were conducted on 9 days before HDT, and repeated on HDT days 2, 28, 58, and again on day 7 after HDT. Results: GITT increased during HTD compared to the respective ambulatory control values; GITT was significantly lower on day 7 after HTD. A concomitant increase in bacterial colonization was also noticed during HDT starting after approximately 28 days of HDT. However, H. Pylori proliferation was not recorded during HDT as indicated by UBIT#. Conclusion: GITT significantly decreased during HDT with a concomitant increase in the proliferation of GI bacterial flora but not H. pylori.

  8. Audited credential delegation: a usable security solution for the virtual physiological human toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Haidar, Ali N.; Zasada, Stefan J.; Coveney, Peter V.; Abdallah, Ali E.; Beckles, Bruce; Jones, Mike A. S.

    2011-01-01

    We present applications of audited credential delegation (ACD), a usable security solution for authentication, authorization and auditing in distributed virtual physiological human (VPH) project environments that removes the use of digital certificates from end-users' experience. Current security solutions are based on public key infrastructure (PKI). While PKI offers strong security for VPH projects, it suffers from serious usability shortcomings in terms of end-user acquisition and management of credentials which deter scientists from exploiting distributed VPH environments. By contrast, ACD supports the use of local credentials. Currently, a local ACD username–password combination can be used to access grid-based resources while Shibboleth support is underway. Moreover, ACD provides seamless and secure access to shared patient data, tools and infrastructure, thus supporting the provision of personalized medicine for patients, scientists and clinicians participating in e-health projects from a local to the widest international scale. PMID:22670214

  9. Audited credential delegation: a usable security solution for the virtual physiological human toolkit.

    PubMed

    Haidar, Ali N; Zasada, Stefan J; Coveney, Peter V; Abdallah, Ali E; Beckles, Bruce; Jones, Mike A S

    2011-06-01

    We present applications of audited credential delegation (ACD), a usable security solution for authentication, authorization and auditing in distributed virtual physiological human (VPH) project environments that removes the use of digital certificates from end-users' experience. Current security solutions are based on public key infrastructure (PKI). While PKI offers strong security for VPH projects, it suffers from serious usability shortcomings in terms of end-user acquisition and management of credentials which deter scientists from exploiting distributed VPH environments. By contrast, ACD supports the use of local credentials. Currently, a local ACD username-password combination can be used to access grid-based resources while Shibboleth support is underway. Moreover, ACD provides seamless and secure access to shared patient data, tools and infrastructure, thus supporting the provision of personalized medicine for patients, scientists and clinicians participating in e-health projects from a local to the widest international scale. PMID:22670214

  10. Thermal imaging to detect physiological indicators of stress in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Carl B.; Skipper, Julie A.; Petkie, Douglas T.

    2013-05-01

    Real-time, stand-off sensing of human subjects to detect emotional state would be valuable in many defense, security and medical scenarios. We are developing a multimodal sensor platform that incorporates high-resolution electro-optical and mid-wave infrared (MWIR) cameras and a millimeter-wave radar system to identify individuals who are psychologically stressed. Recent experiments have aimed to: 1) assess responses to physical versus psychological stressors; 2) examine the impact of topical skin products on thermal signatures; and 3) evaluate the fidelity of vital signs extracted from thermal imagery and radar signatures. Registered image and sensor data were collected as subjects (n=32) performed mental and physical tasks. In each image, the face was segmented into 29 non-overlapping segments based on fiducial points automatically output by our facial feature tracker. Image features were defined that facilitated discrimination between psychological and physical stress states. To test the ability to intentionally mask thermal responses indicative of anxiety or fear, subjects applied one of four topical skin products to one half of their face before performing tasks. Finally, we evaluated the performance of two non-contact techniques to detect respiration and heart rate: chest displacement extracted from the radar signal and temperature fluctuations at the nose tip and regions near superficial arteries to detect respiration and heart rates, respectively, extracted from the MWIR imagery. Our results are very satisfactory: classification of physical versus psychological stressors is repeatedly greater than 90%, thermal masking was almost always ineffective, and accurate heart and respiration rates are detectable in both thermal and radar signatures.

  11. Carbon-based ocean productivity and phytoplankton physiology from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrenfeld, Michael J.; Boss, Emmanuel; Siegel, David A.; Shea, Donald M.

    2005-03-01

    Ocean biogeochemical and ecosystem processes are linked by net primary production (NPP) in the ocean's surface layer, where inorganic carbon is fixed by photosynthetic processes. Determinations of NPP are necessarily a function of phytoplankton biomass and its physiological status, but the estimation of these two terms from space has remained an elusive target. Here we present new satellite ocean color observations of phytoplankton carbon (C) and chlorophyll (Chl) biomass and show that derived Chl:C ratios closely follow anticipated physiological dependencies on light, nutrients, and temperature. With this new information, global estimates of phytoplankton growth rates (μ) and carbon-based NPP are made for the first time. Compared to an earlier chlorophyll-based approach, our carbon-based values are considerably higher in tropical oceans, show greater seasonality at middle and high latitudes, and illustrate important differences in the formation and demise of regional algal blooms. This fusion of emerging concepts from the phycological and remote sensing disciplines has the potential to fundamentally change how we model and observe carbon cycling in the global oceans.

  12. A Modified Team-Based Learning Physiology Course

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Gary M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To implement and assess an interactive, clinically applicable first-year physiology course using team-based learning. Design. The course was designed on a team-based learning backbone using 6 modules, pre-class preparation, a readiness-assurance process, and in-class application. Integrative cases were used to review concepts prior to examinations. Various assessment methods were used to measure changes, including course evaluations, an attitudinal survey tool, and a knowledge examination. Assessment. Course evaluations indicated a higher perception of active learning in the revised format compared with that of the previous year's course format. There also were notable differences in opportunities to promote communication skills, work as part of a team, and collaborate with diverse individuals. The assessment of content knowledge indicated that students who completed the revised format course outperformed the previous year's students in both foundational knowledge and application-type questions. Conclusion. Using more team-based learning within a physiology course had a favorable impact on student retention of material and attitudes toward the course. PMID:22345723

  13. Nutrition and human physiological adaptations to space flight.

    PubMed

    Lane, H W; LeBlanc, A D; Putcha, L; Whitson, P A

    1993-11-01

    Space flight provides a model for the study of healthy individuals undergoing unique stresses. This review focuses on how physiological adaptations to weightlessness may affect nutrient and food requirements in space. These adaptations include reductions in body water and plasma volume, which affect the renal and cardiovascular systems and thereby fluid and electrolyte requirements. Changes in muscle mass and function may affect requirements for energy, protein and amino acids. Changes in bone mass lead to increased urinary calcium concentrations, which may increase the risk of forming renal stones. Space motion sickness may influence putative changes in gastro-intestinal-hepatic function; neurosensory alterations may affect smell and taste. Some or all of these effects may be ameliorated through the use of specially designed dietary countermeasures. PMID:8237860

  14. Nutrition and human physiological adaptations to space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, H. W.; LeBlanc, A. D.; Putcha, L.; Whitson, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Space flight provides a model for the study of healthy individuals undergoing unique stresses. This review focuses on how physiological adaptations to weightlessness may affect nutrient and food requirements in space. These adaptations include reductions in body water and plasma volume, which affect the renal and cardiovascular systems and thereby fluid and electrolyte requirements. Changes in muscle mass and function may affect requirements for energy, protein and amino acids. Changes in bone mass lead to increased urinary calcium concentrations, which may increase the risk of forming renal stones. Space motion sickness may influence putative changes in gastro-intestinal-hepatic function; neurosensory alterations may affect smell and taste. Some or all of these effects may be ameliorated through the use of specially designed dietary countermeasures.

  15. Physiological bases of bone regeneration I. Histology and physiology of bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tresguerres-Hernández-Gil, Isabel; Alobera-Gracia, Miguel Angel; del-Canto-Pingarrón, Mariano; Blanco-Jerez, Luis

    2006-01-01

    Bone is the only body tissue capable of regeneration, allowing the restitutio ad integrum following trauma. In the event of a fracture or bone graft, new bone is formed, which following the remodeling process is identical to the pre-existing. Bone is a dynamic tissue in constant formation and resorption. This balanced phenomena, known as the remodeling process, allows the renovation of 5-15% of the total bone mass per year under normal conditions. Bone remodeling consists of the resorption of a certain amount of bone by osteoclasts, likewise the formation of osteoid matrix by osteoblasts, and its subsequent mineralization. This phenomenon occurs in small areas of the cortical bone or the trabecular surface, called Basic Multicellular Units (BMU). Treatment in Traumatology, Orthopedics, Implantology, and Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, is based on the biologic principals of bone regeneration, in which cells, extracellular matrix, and osteoinductive signals are involved. The aim of this paper is to provide an up date on current knowledge on the biochemical and physiological mechanisms of bone regeneration, paying particular attention to the role played by the cells and proteins of the bone matrix. PMID:16388294

  16. Physiologically Based Models in Regulatory Submissions: Output From the ABPI/MHRA Forum on Physiologically Based Modeling and Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, T; Scott, G; Cole, S; Nordmark, A; Bouzom, F

    2015-01-01

    Under the remit of the Ministerial Industry Strategy Group (MISG), the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry (ABPI) and Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) hosted a meeting to explore physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and simulation, focusing on the clinical component of regulatory applications. The meeting took place on 30 June 2014 with international representatives from industry, academia, and regulatory agencies. Discussion topics were selected to be complementary to those discussed at an earlier US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) meeting. This report summarizes the meeting outcomes, focusing on the European regulatory perspective. PMID:26225245

  17. Physiologically Based Models in Regulatory Submissions: Output From the ABPI/MHRA Forum on Physiologically Based Modeling and Simulation.

    PubMed

    Shepard, T; Scott, G; Cole, S; Nordmark, A; Bouzom, F

    2015-04-01

    Under the remit of the Ministerial Industry Strategy Group (MISG), the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry (ABPI) and Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) hosted a meeting to explore physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and simulation, focusing on the clinical component of regulatory applications. The meeting took place on 30 June 2014 with international representatives from industry, academia, and regulatory agencies. Discussion topics were selected to be complementary to those discussed at an earlier US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) meeting. This report summarizes the meeting outcomes, focusing on the European regulatory perspective. PMID:26225245

  18. Elaboration of a new culture medium for physiological studies on human sperm motility and capacitation.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, D

    1986-06-01

    The formulation of a new medium based upon published data on human tubal fluid and blood plasma is described. Sperm motility was well maintained for periods of up to 6 h in this 'synthetic tubal fluid' (STF), and movement characteristics (velocity of progression and amplitude of lateral head displacement) were quantitatively and qualitatively similar to values previously reported for other complex media. STF also supported human sperm capacitation and the spontaneous acrosome reaction as determined using the zona-free hamster egg penetration test. Spermatozoa pre-incubated in STF containing blood plasma levels of taurine (86 microM) for 3 h penetrated significantly more oocytes than parallel sperm populations pre-incubate in STF lacking taurine (P less than 0.001). This difference was no longer significant after 5 h of pre-incubation. These findings indicate a possible role for taurine in human sperm capacitation, and demonstrate the potential value of STF for performing more physiological invitro studies on human sperm function. PMID:3558765

  19. [Physiological basis of human mechanics and its application in the design of pressure suit].

    PubMed

    Jia, S G; Chen, J S

    1999-12-01

    Objective. To discuss the necessity that human mechanics and its physiological basis as applied to the research of human motion in many areas. Method. The motion performance of two aerospace [correction of areospace] pressure suit were studied. Human mechanics and its physiological basis was applied in the design of one suit only. Result. The result showed that good performance was obtained with the suit designed according to this principle which the stipulated actions couldn't be well performanced when wearing the suit not so designed. Conclusion. The research of the application of human mechanics and its physiological basis is necessary and it has better reality and is more scientific than applying biomechanics and robotics. PMID:12434811

  20. Study of Physiological Responses to Acute Carbon Monoxide Exposure with a Human Patient Simulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cesari, Whitney A.; Caruso, Dominique M.; Zyka, Enela L.; Schroff, Stuart T.; Evans, Charles H., Jr.; Hyatt, Jon-Philippe K.

    2006-01-01

    Human patient simulators are widely used to train health professionals and students in a clinical setting, but they also can be used to enhance physiology education in a laboratory setting. Our course incorporates the human patient simulator for experiential learning in which undergraduate university juniors and seniors are instructed to design,…

  1. Low-field MRI for studies of human pulmonary physiology and traumatic brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Alyssa; Devience, Stephen; Rosen, Matthew; Walsworth, Ronald

    2011-05-01

    We describe recent progress on the development of an open-access low-magnetic-field MRI system for studies of human pulmonary physiology and traumatic brain injury. Low-field MRI benefits from reduced magnetic susceptibility effects and can provide high-resolution images of the human body when used with hyperpolarized media such as 3He and 129Xe.

  2. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for bisphenol A in pregnant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamoto, Yuko; Matsuyama, Wakoto; Wada, Masahiro; Hishikawa, Junko; Chan, Melissa Pui Ling; Nakayama, Aki; Morisawa, Shinsuke

    2007-10-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a weakly estrogenic monomer used to produce polymers for food contact and other applications, so there is potential for oral exposure of humans to trace amounts via ingestion. To date, no physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model has been located for BPA in pregnant mice with or without fetuses. An estimate by a mathematical model is essential since information on humans is difficult to obtain experimentally. The PBPK model was constructed based on the pharmacokinetic data of our experiment following single oral administration of BPA to pregnant mice. The risk assessment of bisphenol A (BPA) on the development of human offspring is an important issue. There have been limited data on the exposure level of human fetuses to BPA (e.g. BPA concentration in cord blood) and no information is available on the pharmacokinetics of BPA in humans with or without fetuses. In the present study, we developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model describing the pharmacokinetics of BPA in a pregnant mouse with the prospect of future extrapolation to humans. The PBPK model was constructed based on the pharmacokinetic data of an experiment we executed on pregnant mice following single oral administration of BPA. The model could describe the rapid transfer of BPA through the placenta to the fetus and the slow disappearance from fetuses. The simulated time courses after three-time repeated oral administrations of BPA by the constructed model fitted well with the experimental data, and the simulation for the 10 times lower dose was also consistent with the experiment. This suggested that the PBPK model for BPA in pregnant mice was successfully verified and is highly promising for extrapolation to humans who are expected to be exposed more chronically to lower doses.

  3. Physiology and relevance of human adaptive thermogenesis response.

    PubMed

    Celi, Francesco S; Le, Trang N; Ni, Bin

    2015-05-01

    In homoeothermic organisms, the preservation of core temperature represents a primal function, and its costs in terms of energy expenditure can be considerable. In modern humans, the endogenous thermoregulation mechanisms have been replaced by clothing and environmental control, and the maintenance of thermoneutrality has been successfully achieved by manipulation of the micro- and macroenvironment. The rediscovery of the presence and activity of brown adipose tissue in adult humans has renewed the interest on adaptive thermogenesis (AT) as a means to facilitate weight loss and improve carbohydrate metabolism. The aim of this review is to describe the recent advancements in the study of this function, and to assess the potential and limitations of exploiting AT for environmental/behavioral, and pharmacological interventions. PMID:25869212

  4. Physiologically Based In vitro Models to Predict the Oral Dissolution and Absorption of a Solid Drug Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziqiang; He, Xin

    2015-01-01

    To understand the sophisticated dynamic behaviors of drug elution and permeation in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), researchers have tried to reemerge it by employing various in vitro experimental models. However, official in vitro apparatuses routinely used for quality control purposes, employ simple, non-physiologic buffers, and hydrodynamics conditions, and can not accurately perform continuous, dynamic in vivo pharmacokinetics (PK) behaviors. Therefore, different angles of GI physiology information are incorporate into novel models to forecast the dissolution and permeation of drug solid dosage forms. This review, in general, discusses some related studies of physiologically-based mechanical models to predict human absorption following oral administration in four sections. First the GIT, taken out of a complex physiological environment, where the drug is absorbed, distributed, metabolized and excreted (ADME) in the human body, is considered as the physiological basis for active pharmaceutics ingredients (API) dissolved and permeated through the epithelial cell. The second part embodies the theoretical foundation of in vitro models to predict human absorption and the corresponding in vitro.in vivo correlations (IVIVC). The third section summarizes physiologically based dissolution models developed recently, ranging from dynamic compartmental dissolution models, to biorelevant dissolution models based on certain physiological factors, to biphasic dissolution models. The last part is devoted to combined dissolution and absorption models that can be employed to simulate the continuous, dynamic behavior of oral drug delivery being dissolved and subsequently permeated across the GIT. Along with physiologically-based mechanically models spring up, pharmaceutical researchers will harvest better level A IVIVC for oral drug delivery systems, especially for sustained and controlled release preparations. On the other way hand, it will successively promote more effective

  5. Physiology-based diagnosis algorithm for arteriovenous fistula stenosis detection.

    PubMed

    Yeih, Dong-Feng; Wang, Yuh-Shyang; Huang, Yi-Chun; Chen, Ming-Fong; Lu, Shey-Shi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a diagnosis algorithm for arteriovenous fistula (AVF) stenosis is developed based on auscultatory features, signal processing, and machine learning. The AVF sound signals are recorded by electronic stethoscopes at pre-defined positions before and after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) treatment. Several new signal features of stenosis are identified and quantified, and the physiological explanations for these features are provided. Utilizing support vector machine method, an average of 90% two-fold cross-validation hit-rate can be obtained, with angiography as the gold standard. This offers a non-invasive easy-to-use diagnostic method for medical staff or even patients themselves for early detection of AVF stenosis. PMID:25571021

  6. Study of physiological responses to acute carbon monoxide exposure with a human patient simulator.

    PubMed

    Cesari, Whitney A; Caruso, Dominique M; Zyka, Enela L; Schroff, Stuart T; Evans, Charles H; Hyatt, Jon-Philippe K

    2006-12-01

    Human patient simulators are widely used to train health professionals and students in a clinical setting, but they also can be used to enhance physiology education in a laboratory setting. Our course incorporates the human patient simulator for experiential learning in which undergraduate university juniors and seniors are instructed to design, conduct, and present (orally and in written form) their project testing physiological adaptation to an extreme environment. This article is a student report on the physiological response to acute carbon monoxide exposure in a simulated healthy adult male and a coal miner and represents how 1) human patient simulators can be used in a nonclinical way for experiential hypothesis testing; 2) students can transition from traditional textbook learning to practical application of their knowledge; and 3) student-initiated group investigation drives critical thought. While the course instructors remain available for consultation throughout the project, the relatively unstructured framework of the assignment drives the students to create an experiment independently, troubleshoot problems, and interpret the results. The only stipulation of the project is that the students must generate an experiment that is physiologically realistic and that requires them to search out and incorporate appropriate data from primary scientific literature. In this context, the human patient simulator is a viable educational tool for teaching integrative physiology in a laboratory environment by bridging textual information with experiential investigation. PMID:17108253

  7. Trace elements in human physiology and pathology: zinc and metallothioneins.

    PubMed

    Tapiero, Haim; Tew, Kenneth D

    2003-11-01

    Zinc is one of the most abundant nutritionally essential elements in the human body. It is found in all body tissues with 85% of the whole body zinc in muscle and bone, 11% in the skin and the liver and the remaining in all the other tissues. In multicellular organisms, virtually all zinc is intracellular, 30-40% is located in the nucleus, 50% in the cytoplasm, organelles and specialized vesicles (for digestive enzymes or hormone storage) and the remainder in the cell membrane. Zinc intake ranges from 107 to 231 micromol/d depending on the source, and human zinc requirement is estimated at 15 mg/d. Zinc has been shown to be essential to the structure and function of a large number of macromolecules and for over 300 enzymic reactions. It has both catalytic and structural roles in enzymes, while in zinc finger motifs, it provides a scaffold that organizes protein sub-domains for the interaction with either DNA or other proteins. It is critical for the function of a number of metalloproteins, inducing members of oxido-reductase, hydrolase ligase, lyase family and has co-activating functions with copper in superoxide dismutase or phospholipase C. The zinc ion (Zn(++)) does not participate in redox reactions, which makes it a stable ion in a biological medium whose potential is in constant flux. Zinc ions are hydrophilic and do not cross cell membranes by passive diffusion. In general, transport has been described as having both saturable and non-saturable components, depending on the Zn(II) concentrations involved. Zinc ions exist primarily in the form of complexes with proteins and nucleic acids and participate in all aspects of intermediary metabolism, transmission and regulation of the expression of genetic information, storage, synthesis and action of peptide hormones and structural maintenance of chromatin and biomembranes. PMID:14652165

  8. Human physiological responses to cold exposure: Acute responses and acclimatization to prolonged exposure.

    PubMed

    Castellani, John W; Young, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Cold exposure in humans causes specific acute and chronic physiological responses. This paper will review both the acute and long-term physiological responses and external factors that impact these physiological responses. Acute physiological responses to cold exposure include cutaneous vasoconstriction and shivering thermogenesis which, respectively, decrease heat loss and increase metabolic heat production. Vasoconstriction is elicited through reflex and local cooling. In combination, vasoconstriction and shivering operate to maintain thermal balance when the body is losing heat. Factors (anthropometry, sex, race, fitness, thermoregulatory fatigue) that influence the acute physiological responses to cold exposure are also reviewed. The physiological responses to chronic cold exposure, also known as cold acclimation/acclimatization, are also presented. Three primary patterns of cold acclimatization have been observed, a) habituation, b) metabolic adjustment, and c) insulative adjustment. Habituation is characterized by physiological adjustments in which the response is attenuated compared to an unacclimatized state. Metabolic acclimatization is characterized by an increased thermogenesis, whereas insulative acclimatization is characterized by enhancing the mechanisms that conserve body heat. The pattern of acclimatization is dependent on changes in skin and core temperature and the exposure duration. PMID:26924539

  9. Synchronization Analysis of Language and Physiology in Human Dyads.

    PubMed

    Orsucci, Franco F; Musmeci, Nicolò; Aas, Benjamin; Schiepek, Günter; Reda, Mario A; Canestri, Luca; Giuliani, Alessandro; de Felice, Giulio

    2016-04-01

    We studied the synchronization dynamics of a therapist and patient during a psychotherapy session. This investigation was developed in order to explore a new possible perspective and methodology for studying the expression of emotions. More specifically, literature concerning synchronization of in-session non-verbal variables emphasises its positive correlation with empathy and therapeutic outcomes. We compared the dynamics of galvanic skin response (GSR) and linguistic prosody, chosen as indicators of emotional expression in different domains. We studied their synchronization through complementary methodologies: Recurrence Quantification Analysis (RQA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Markov Transition Matrix (MTM) and Cross-Recurrence Quantification Analysis (CRQA). We investigated the nonlinearity of GSR in terms of self-similarity and power-law, as emerged in autocorrelation functions and signal variations. We considered time-lagged correlations as a measure of dynamical systems' memory. This article concludes by highlighting the importance of a deeper study of all variables related to the psychotherapeutic process and their synchronization in order to extend our knowledge of general human dynamics. PMID:27033132

  10. Human colorectal mucosal microbiota correlates with its host niche physiology revealed by endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ai-Hua; Li, Ming; Li, Chang-Qing; Kou, Guan-Jun; Zuo, Xiu-Li; Li, Yan-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The human gut microbiota plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of health, but how the microbiota interacts with the host at the colorectal mucosa is poorly understood. We proposed that confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) might help to untangle this relationship by providing in vivo physiological information of the mucosa. We used CLE to evaluate the in vivo physiology of human colorectal mucosa, and the mucosal microbiota was quantified using 16 s rDNA pyrosequencing. The human mucosal microbiota agglomerated to three major clusters dominated by Prevotella, Bacteroides and Lactococcus. The mucosal microbiota clusters did not significantly correlate with the disease status or biopsy sites but closely correlated with the mucosal niche physiology, which was non-invasively revealed by CLE. Inflammation tilted two subnetworks within the mucosal microbiota. Infiltration of inflammatory cells significantly correlated with multiple components in the predicted metagenome, such as the VirD2 component of the type IV secretory pathway. Our data suggest that a close correlation exists between the mucosal microbiota and the colorectal mucosal physiology, and CLE is a clinically available tool that can be used to facilitate the study of the in vivo correlation between colorectal mucosal physiology and the mucosal microbiota. PMID:26916597

  11. Thermoregulatory responses in exercising rats: methodological aspects and relevance to human physiology

    PubMed Central

    Wanner, Samuel Penna; Prímola-Gomes, Thales Nicolau; Pires, Washington; Guimarães, Juliana Bohnen; Hudson, Alexandre Sérvulo Ribeiro; Kunstetter, Ana Cançado; Fonseca, Cletiana Gonçalves; Drummond, Lucas Rios; Damasceno, William Coutinho; Teixeira-Coelho, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Rats are used worldwide in experiments that aim to investigate the physiological responses induced by a physical exercise session. Changes in body temperature regulation, which may affect both the performance and the health of exercising rats, are evident among these physiological responses. Despite the universal use of rats in biomedical research involving exercise, investigators often overlook important methodological issues that hamper the accurate measurement of clear thermoregulatory responses. Moreover, much debate exists regarding whether the outcome of rat experiments can be extrapolated to human physiology, including thermal physiology. Herein, we described the impact of different exercise intensities, durations and protocols and environmental conditions on running-induced thermoregulatory changes. We focused on treadmill running because this type of exercise allows for precise control of the exercise intensity and the measurement of autonomic thermoeffectors associated with heat production and loss. Some methodological issues regarding rat experiments, such as the sites for body temperature measurements and the time of day at which experiments are performed, were also discussed. In addition, we analyzed the influence of a high body surface area-to-mass ratio and limited evaporative cooling on the exercise-induced thermoregulatory responses of running rats and then compared these responses in rats to those observed in humans. Collectively, the data presented in this review represent a reference source for investigators interested in studying exercise thermoregulation in rats. In addition, the present data indicate that the thermoregulatory responses of exercising rats can be extrapolated, with some important limitations, to human thermal physiology. PMID:27227066

  12. Thermoregulatory responses in exercising rats: methodological aspects and relevance to human physiology.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Samuel Penna; Prímola-Gomes, Thales Nicolau; Pires, Washington; Guimarães, Juliana Bohnen; Hudson, Alexandre Sérvulo Ribeiro; Kunstetter, Ana Cançado; Fonseca, Cletiana Gonçalves; Drummond, Lucas Rios; Damasceno, William Coutinho; Teixeira-Coelho, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Rats are used worldwide in experiments that aim to investigate the physiological responses induced by a physical exercise session. Changes in body temperature regulation, which may affect both the performance and the health of exercising rats, are evident among these physiological responses. Despite the universal use of rats in biomedical research involving exercise, investigators often overlook important methodological issues that hamper the accurate measurement of clear thermoregulatory responses. Moreover, much debate exists regarding whether the outcome of rat experiments can be extrapolated to human physiology, including thermal physiology. Herein, we described the impact of different exercise intensities, durations and protocols and environmental conditions on running-induced thermoregulatory changes. We focused on treadmill running because this type of exercise allows for precise control of the exercise intensity and the measurement of autonomic thermoeffectors associated with heat production and loss. Some methodological issues regarding rat experiments, such as the sites for body temperature measurements and the time of day at which experiments are performed, were also discussed. In addition, we analyzed the influence of a high body surface area-to-mass ratio and limited evaporative cooling on the exercise-induced thermoregulatory responses of running rats and then compared these responses in rats to those observed in humans. Collectively, the data presented in this review represent a reference source for investigators interested in studying exercise thermoregulation in rats. In addition, the present data indicate that the thermoregulatory responses of exercising rats can be extrapolated, with some important limitations, to human thermal physiology. PMID:27227066

  13. Coursera's Introductory Human Physiology Course: Factors That Characterize Successful Completion of a MOOC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engle, Deborah; Mankoff, Chris; Carbrey, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Since Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are accessible by anyone in the world at no cost, they have large enrollments that are conducive to educational research. This study examines students in the Coursera MOOC, Introductory Human Physiology. Of the 33,378 students who accessed the course, around 15,000 students responded to items on the…

  14. An Investigative Laboratory Course in Human Physiology Using Computer Technology and Collaborative Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FitzPatrick, Kathleen A.

    2004-01-01

    Active investigative student-directed experiences in laboratory science are being encouraged by national science organizations. A growing body of evidence from classroom assessment supports their effectiveness. This study describes four years of implementation and assessment of an investigative laboratory course in human physiology for 65…

  15. Physiological responses to prolonged bed rest in humans: A compendium of research, 1981-1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luu, Phuong B.; Ortiz, Vanessa; Barnes, Paul R.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1990-01-01

    Clinical observations and results form more basic studies that help to elucidate the physiological mechanisms of the adaptation of humans to prolonged bed rest. If the authors' abstract or summary was appropriate, it was included. In some cases a more detailed synopsis was provided under the subheadings of purpose, methods, results, and conclusions.

  16. Understanding Protein Synthesis: A Role-Play Approach in Large Undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturges, Diana; Maurer, Trent W.; Cole, Oladipo

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of role play in a large undergraduate science class. The targeted population consisted of 298 students enrolled in 2 sections of an undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology course taught by the same instructor. The section engaged in the role-play activity served as the study group, whereas the section…

  17. A wireless capsule system with ASIC for monitoring the physiological signals of the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Yan, Guozheng; Zhao, Kai; Lu, Li; Gao, Jinyang; Liu, Gang

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the design of a wireless capsule system for monitoring the physiological signals of the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The primary components of the system include a wireless capsule, a portable data recorder, and a workstation. Temperature, pH, and pressure sensors; an RF transceiver; a controlling and processing application specific integrated circuit (ASIC); and batteries were applied in a wireless capsule. Decreasing capsule size, improving sensor precision, and reducing power needs were the primary challenges; these were resolved by employing micro sensors, optimized architecture, and an ASIC design that include power management, clock management, a programmable gain amplifier (PGA), an A/D converter (ADC), and a serial peripheral interface (SPI) communication unit. The ASIC has been fabricated in 0.18- μm CMOS technology with a die area of 5.0 mm × 5.0 mm. The wireless capsule integrating the ASIC controller measures Φ 11 mm × 26 mm. A data recorder and a workstation were developed, and 20 cases of human experiments were conducted in hospitals. Preprocessing in the workstation can significantly improve the quality of the data, and 76 original features were determined by mathematical statistics. Based on the 13 optimal features achieved in the evaluation of the features, the clustering algorithm can identify the patients who lack GI motility with a recognition rate reaching 83.3%. PMID:25608285

  18. Physiological evidence for a human-induced landscape of fear in brown bears (Ursus arctos).

    PubMed

    Støen, Ole-Gunnar; Ordiz, Andres; Evans, Alina L; Laske, Timothy G; Kindberg, Jonas; Fröbert, Ole; Swenson, Jon E; Arnemo, Jon M

    2015-12-01

    Human persecution is a major cause of mortality for large carnivores. Consequently, large carnivores avoid humans, but may use human-dominated landscapes by being nocturnal and elusive. Behavioral studies indicate that certain ecological systems are "landscapes of fear", driven by antipredator behavior. Because behavior and physiology are closely interrelated, physiological assessments may provide insight into the behavioral response of large carnivores to human activity. To elucidate changes in brown bears' (Ursus arctos) behavior associated with human activity, we evaluated stress as changes in heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) in 12 GPS-collared, free-ranging bears, 7 males and 5 females, 3-11 years old, using cardiac-monitoring devices. We applied generalized linear regression models with HR and HRV as response variables and chest activity, time of day, season, distance traveled, and distance to human settlements from GPS positions recorded every 30 min as potential explanatory variables. Bears exhibited lower HRV, an indication of stress, when they were close to human settlements and especially during the berry season, when humans were more often in the forest, picking berries and hunting. Our findings provide evidence of a human-induced landscape of fear in this hunted population of brown bears. PMID:26476156

  19. Changing undergraduate human anatomy and physiology laboratories: perspectives from a large-enrollment course.

    PubMed

    Griff, Edwin R

    2016-09-01

    In the present article, a veteran lecturer of human anatomy and physiology taught several sections of the laboratory component for the first time and shares his observations and analysis from this unique perspective. The article discusses a large-enrollment, content-heavy anatomy and physiology course in relationship to published studies on learning and student self-efficacy. Changes in the laboratory component that could increase student learning are proposed. The author also points out the need for research to assess whether selective curricular changes could increase the depth of understanding and retention of learned material. PMID:27503898

  20. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling in Pediatric Oncology Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Rioux, Nathalie; Waters, Nigel J

    2016-07-01

    Childhood cancer represents more than 100 rare and ultra-rare diseases, with an estimated 12,400 new cases diagnosed each year in the United States. As such, this much smaller patient population has led to pediatric oncology drug development lagging behind that for adult cancers. Developing drugs for pediatric malignancies also brings with it a number of unique trial design considerations, including flexible enrollment approaches, age-appropriate formulation, acceptable sampling schedules, and balancing the need for age-stratified dosing regimens, given the smaller patient populations. The regulatory landscape for pediatric pharmacotherapy has evolved with U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) legislation such as the 2012 FDA Safety and Innovation Act. In parallel, regulatory authorities have recommended the application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling, for example, in the recently issued FDA Strategic Plan for Accelerating the Development of Therapies for Pediatric Rare Diseases. PBPK modeling provides a quantitative and systems-based framework that allows the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on drug exposure to be modeled in a mechanistic fashion. The application of PBPK modeling in drug development for pediatric cancers is relatively nascent, with several retrospective analyses of cytotoxic therapies, and latterly for targeted agents such as obatoclax and imatinib. More recently, we have employed PBPK modeling in a prospective manner to inform the first pediatric trials of pinometostat and tazemetostat in genetically defined populations (mixed lineage leukemia-rearranged and integrase interactor-1-deficient sarcomas, respectively). In this review, we evaluate the application of PBPK modeling in pediatric cancer drug development and discuss the important challenges that lie ahead in this field. PMID:26936973

  1. Ultrasound-based lectures on cardiovascular physiology and reflexes for medical students.

    PubMed

    Paganini, M; Rubini, A

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasound has become a widely used diagnostic technique. While its role in patient evaluation is well known, its utility during preclinical courses such as anatomy and physiology is becoming increasingly recognized. The aim of the present study was to assess the feasibility/utility of integrating ultrasound-based sessions into conventional undergraduate medical school programs of physiology of the cardiovascular system and cardiovascular reflexes and to evaluate student perceptions of an ultrasound-based didactic session. Second-year medical students enrolled in the University of Padova attended a didactic session during which basic concepts regarding ultrasound instrumentation, image production, and spatial orientation were presented. Five anatomic sectors (the heart, aorta, neck vessels, inferior vena cava, and femoral veins) were then examined on a volunteer. Student perceptions of the images that were projected, the usefulness of the presentation, and the reproducibility of the experience were assessed at the end of the lecture with an anonymous questionnaire consisting of positive and negative items that were rated using a 5-point Likert scale and with two questions. One hundred eleven students attended the lecture; 99% of them found it very interesting, and none considered it boring or a waste of time. More than 96% thought it helped them to gain a better comprehension of the subject and would recommend it to a colleague. In conclusion, as ultrasound has been found to be a valuable resource for the teaching of physiology of the cardiovascular system and cardiovascular reflexes, efforts should be made to integrate ultrasound sessions into the traditional human physiology curriculum. PMID:27161816

  2. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models for everolimus and sorafenib in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pawaskar, Dipti K.; Straubinger, Robert M.; Fetterly, Gerald J.; Hylander, Bonnie H.; Repasky, Elizabeth A.; Ma, Wen W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Everolimus is a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor approved as an immunosuppressant and for second-line therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor used as first-line therapy in HCC and RCC. This study assessed the pharmacokinetics (PK) of everolimus and sorafenib alone and in combination in plasma and tissues, developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models in mice, and assessed the possibility of PK drug interactions. Methods Single and multiple oral doses of everolimus and sorafenib were administered alone and in combination in immunocompetent male mice and to severe combined immune-deficient (SCID) mice bearing low-passage, patient-derived pancreatic adenocarcinoma in seven different studies. Plasma and tissue samples including tumor were collected over a 24-h period and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). Distribution of everolimus and sorafenib to the brain, muscle, adipose, lungs, kidneys, pancreas, spleen, liver, GI, and tumor was modeled as perfusion rate-limited, and all data from the diverse studies were fitted simultaneously using a population approach. Results PBPK models were developed for everolimus and sorafenib. PBPK analysis showed that the two drugs in combination had the same PK as each drug given alone. A twofold increase in sorafenib dose increased tumor exposure tenfold, thus suggesting involvement of transporters in tumor deposition of sorafenib. Conclusions The developed PBPK models suggested the absence of PK interaction between the two drugs in mice. These studies provide the basis for pharmacodynamic evaluation of these drugs in patient-derived primary pancreatic adenocarcinomas explants. PMID:23455451

  3. Identification of differences in human and great ape phytanic acid metabolism that could influence gene expression profiles and physiological functions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It has been proposed that anatomical differences in human and great ape guts arose in response to species-specific diets and energy demands. To investigate functional genomic consequences of these differences, we compared their physiological levels of phytanic acid, a branched chain fatty acid that can be derived from the microbial degradation of chlorophyll in ruminant guts. Humans who accumulate large stores of phytanic acid commonly develop cerebellar ataxia, peripheral polyneuropathy, and retinitis pigmentosa in addition to other medical conditions. Furthermore, phytanic acid is an activator of the PPAR-alpha transcription factor that influences the expression of genes relevant to lipid metabolism. Results Despite their trace dietary phytanic acid intake, all great ape species had elevated red blood cell (RBC) phytanic acid levels relative to humans on diverse diets. Unlike humans, chimpanzees showed sexual dimorphism in RBC phytanic acid levels, which were higher in males relative to females. Cultured skin fibroblasts from all species had a robust capacity to degrade phytanic acid. We provide indirect evidence that great apes, in contrast to humans, derive significant amounts of phytanic acid from the hindgut fermentation of plant materials. This would represent a novel reduction of metabolic activity in humans relative to the great apes. Conclusion We identified differences in the physiological levels of phytanic acid in humans and great apes and propose this is causally related to their gut anatomies and microbiomes. Phytanic acid levels could contribute to cross-species and sex-specific differences in human and great ape transcriptomes, especially those related to lipid metabolism. Based on the medical conditions caused by phytanic acid accumulation, we suggest that differences in phytanic acid metabolism could influence the functions of human and great ape nervous, cardiovascular, and skeletal systems. PMID:20932325

  4. Physiological Effects Associated with Quinoa Consumption and Implications for Research Involving Humans: a Review.

    PubMed

    Simnadis, Thomas George; Tapsell, Linda C; Beck, Eleanor J

    2015-09-01

    Quinoa is a pseudo-grain consumed as a dietary staple in South America. In recent years, consumer demand for quinoa in the developed world has grown steadily. Its perceived health benefits have been cited as a driving force behind this trend, but there are very few human studies investigating the impact of quinoa consumption. The aim of this review was to identify physiological effects of quinoa consumption with potential for human health. A critical evaluation of animal model studies was conducted. The quality of identified studies was assessed using a methodological quality assessment tool and summative conclusions were drawn to guide the direction of future human research. The majority of studies were of fair quality. Purported physiological effects of quinoa consumption included decreased weight gain, improved lipid profile and improved capacity to respond to oxidative stress. These physiological effects were attributed to the presence of saponins, protein and 20-hydroxyecdysone in the quinoa seed. The implications of these findings are that human studies should investigate the impact of quinoa consumption on weight gain and lipid levels. The role of quinoa as an antioxidant is still unclear and requires further elucidation in animal models. PMID:26249220

  5. Performance-based and physiological measures of situational awareness.

    PubMed

    Vidulich, M A; Stratton, M; Crabtree, M; Wilson, G

    1994-05-01

    Several situational awareness (SA) and workload measurement techniques were investigated in simulated air-to-ground missions. These techniques included measures of effectiveness, subjective ratings, performance measures, and physiological measures. The results demonstrated strengths and weaknesses in all of these techniques. Measures of effectiveness and subjective ratings suggested that the experimental manipulations were effective in altering SA. The performance measures produced mixed results. Physiological measures detected some intriguing effects in the EEG. Overall, the complexity of the relationship between SA and workload encourages the use of multiple tools in any SA evaluation. PMID:8018083

  6. Ultrasensitive, passive and wearable sensors for monitoring human muscle motion and physiological signals.

    PubMed

    Cai, Feng; Yi, Changrui; Liu, Shichang; Wang, Yan; Liu, Lacheng; Liu, Xiaoqing; Xu, Xuming; Wang, Li

    2016-03-15

    Flexible sensors have attracted more and more attention as a fundamental part of anthropomorphic robot research, medical diagnosis and physical health monitoring. Here, we constructed an ultrasensitive and passive flexible sensor with the advantages of low cost, lightness and wearability, electric safety and reliability. The fundamental mechanism of the sensor is based on triboelectric effect inducing electrostatic charges on the surfaces between two different materials. Just like a plate capacitor, current will be generated while the distance or size of the parallel capacitors changes caused by the small mechanical disturbance upon it and therefore the output current/voltage will be produced. Typically, the passive sensor unambiguously monitors muscle motions including hand motion from stretch-clench-stretch, mouth motion from open-bite-open, blink and respiration. Moreover, this sensor records the details of the consecutive phases in a cardiac cycle of the apex cardiogram, and identify the peaks including percussion wave, tidal wave and diastolic wave of the radial pulse wave. To record subtle human physiological signals including radial pulsilogram and apex cardiogram with excellent signal/noise ratio, stability and reproducibility, the sensor shows great potential in the applications of medical diagnosis and daily health monitoring. PMID:26520253

  7. Widespread seasonal gene expression reveals annual differences in human immunity and physiology.

    PubMed

    Dopico, Xaquin Castro; Evangelou, Marina; Ferreira, Ricardo C; Guo, Hui; Pekalski, Marcin L; Smyth, Deborah J; Cooper, Nicholas; Burren, Oliver S; Fulford, Anthony J; Hennig, Branwen J; Prentice, Andrew M; Ziegler, Anette-G; Bonifacio, Ezio; Wallace, Chris; Todd, John A

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal variations are rarely considered a contributing component to human tissue function or health, although many diseases and physiological process display annual periodicities. Here we find more than 4,000 protein-coding mRNAs in white blood cells and adipose tissue to have seasonal expression profiles, with inverted patterns observed between Europe and Oceania. We also find the cellular composition of blood to vary by season, and these changes, which differ between the United Kingdom and The Gambia, could explain the gene expression periodicity. With regards to tissue function, the immune system has a profound pro-inflammatory transcriptomic profile during European winter, with increased levels of soluble IL-6 receptor and C-reactive protein, risk biomarkers for cardiovascular, psychiatric and autoimmune diseases that have peak incidences in winter. Circannual rhythms thus require further exploration as contributors to various aspects of human physiology and disease. PMID:25965853

  8. Widespread seasonal gene expression reveals annual differences in human immunity and physiology

    PubMed Central

    Dopico, Xaquin Castro; Evangelou, Marina; Ferreira, Ricardo C.; Guo, Hui; Pekalski, Marcin L.; Smyth, Deborah J.; Cooper, Nicholas; Burren, Oliver S.; Fulford, Anthony J.; Hennig, Branwen J.; Prentice, Andrew M.; Ziegler, Anette-G.; Bonifacio, Ezio; Wallace, Chris; Todd, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal variations are rarely considered a contributing component to human tissue function or health, although many diseases and physiological process display annual periodicities. Here we find more than 4,000 protein-coding mRNAs in white blood cells and adipose tissue to have seasonal expression profiles, with inverted patterns observed between Europe and Oceania. We also find the cellular composition of blood to vary by season, and these changes, which differ between the United Kingdom and The Gambia, could explain the gene expression periodicity. With regards to tissue function, the immune system has a profound pro-inflammatory transcriptomic profile during European winter, with increased levels of soluble IL-6 receptor and C-reactive protein, risk biomarkers for cardiovascular, psychiatric and autoimmune diseases that have peak incidences in winter. Circannual rhythms thus require further exploration as contributors to various aspects of human physiology and disease. PMID:25965853

  9. A Web-Based Course of Lectures in Respiratory Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, John B.

    2011-01-01

    A complete course of respiratory physiology suitable for first-year medical and graduate students has been placed on the Web for our own students and for other educational institutions. There are several reasons for doing this. The first is that the modern-day student uses a variety of options for acquiring knowledge. These include attending…

  10. Piloting Exercise Physiology in the Web-Based Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankey, Robert B.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the development of an exercise physiology class offered via the Internet at Texas A&M University Corpus Christi. Topics include cognitive evaluations, laboratory assignments, student interactions, differences in examination scores with traditional lecture classes, post-class surveys, and the need for training educators and providing…

  11. High-Throughput Physiologically Based Toxicokinetic Models for ToxCast Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) models aid in predicting exposure doses needed to create tissue concentrations equivalent to those identified as bioactive by ToxCast. We have implemented four empirical and physiologically-based toxicokinetic (TK) models within a new R ...

  12. EVALUATING A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR USE IN RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EVALUATING A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR USE IN RISK ASSESSMENT. L H Clark1, H A Barton1, and R W Setzer1. 1US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.

    Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are increasingly being used in eva...

  13. Physiological modes of action of fluoxetine and its human metabolites in algae.

    PubMed

    Neuwoehner, Judith; Fenner, Kathrin; Escher, Beate I

    2009-09-01

    Fluoxetine, the active ingredient of many antidepressants, was identified as specifically toxic toward algae in a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis with literature data for algae, daphnia, and fish. The goal of this study was to elucidate the mode of action in algae and to evaluate the toxicity of the major human metabolites of fluoxetine using two different algae tests. The time dependence and sensitivity of thedifferenteffectendpointsyield information on the physiological mode of action. Baseline toxicity was predicted with QSARs based on measured liposome-water partition coefficients. The ratio of predicted baseline toxicity to experimental toxicity (toxic ratio TR) gives information on the intrinsic potency (extent of specificity of effect). The metabolite p-trifluoromethylphenol was classified to act as baseline toxicant Fluoxetine (TR 60-150) and its pharmacologically active metabolite norfluoxetine (TR 10-80) exhibited specific toxicity. By comparison with reference compounds we conclude that fluoxetine and norfluoxetine have an effect on the energy budget of algal cells since the time pattern of these two compounds is most similar to that observed for norflurazon, but they act less specifically as indicated by lower TR values and the similarity of the effect pattern to baseline toxicants. The mixture toxicity of fluoxetine and its human metabolites norfluoxetine and p-TFMP can be predicted using the model of concentration addition for practical purposes of risk assessment despite small deviations from this model for the specific endpoints like PSII inhibition because the integrative endpoints like growth rate and reproduction in all cases gave agreement with the predictions for concentration addition. PMID:19764256

  14. A potential role for tissue kallikrein-related peptidases in human cervico-vaginal physiology.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Julie L V; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2008-06-01

    Human tissue kallikrein-related peptidases (KLK) are a family of 15 genes located on chromosome 19q13.4 that encode secreted serine proteases with trypsin- and/or chymotrypsin-like activity. Relatively large levels of many KLKs are present in human cervico-vaginal fluid (CVF) and in the supernatant of cultured human vaginal epithelial cells. Many KLKs are also hormonally regulated in vaginal epithelial cells, particularly by glucocorticoids and estrogens. The physiological role of KLK in the vagina is currently unknown; however, analysis of the CVF proteome has revealed clues for potential KLK functions in this environment. Here, we detail potential roles for KLKs in cervico-vaginal physiology. First, we suggest that KLKs play a role in the vagina similar to their role in skin physiology: (1) in the desquamation of vaginal epithelial cells, similar to their activity in the desquamation of skin corneocytes; and (2) in their ability to activate antimicrobial proteins in CVF as they do in sweat. Consequently, we hypothesize that dysregulated KLK expression in the vagina could lead to the development of pathological conditions such as desquamative inflammatory vaginitis. Second, we propose that KLKs may play a role in premature rupture of membranes and pre-term birth through their cleavage of fetal membrane extracellular matrix proteins. PMID:18627298

  15. Addressing Early Life Sensitivity Using Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling and In Vitro to In Vivo Extrapolation

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Miyoung; Clewell, Harvey J.

    2016-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling can provide an effective way to utilize in vitro and in silico based information in modern risk assessment for children and other potentially sensitive populations. In this review, we describe the process of in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) to develop PBPK models for a chemical in different ages in order to predict the target tissue exposure at the age of concern in humans. We present our on-going studies on pyrethroids as a proof of concept to guide the readers through the IVIVE steps using the metabolism data collected either from age-specific liver donors or expressed enzymes in conjunction with enzyme ontogeny information to provide age-appropriate metabolism parameters in the PBPK model in the rat and human, respectively. The approach we present here is readily applicable to not just to other pyrethroids, but also to other environmental chemicals and drugs. Establishment of an in vitro and in silico-based evaluation strategy in conjunction with relevant exposure information in humans is of great importance in risk assessment for potentially vulnerable populations like early ages where the necessary information for decision making is limited. PMID:26977255

  16. Engineering physiologically stiff and stratified human cartilage by fusing condensed mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    For a long time, clinically sized and mechanically functional cartilage could be engineered from young animal chondrocytes, but not from adult human mesenchymal stem cells that are of primary clinical interest. The approaches developed for primary chondrocytes were not successful when used with human mesenchymal cells. The method discussed here was designed to employ a mechanism similar to pre-cartilaginous condensation and fusion of mesenchymal stem cells at a precisely defined time. The formation of cartilage was initiated by press-molding the mesenchymal bodies onto the surface of a bone substrate. By image-guided fabrication of the bone substrate and the molds, the osteochondral constructs were engineered in anatomically precise shapes and sizes. After 5 weeks of cultivation, the cartilage layer assumed physiologically stratified histomorphology, and contained lubricin at the surface, proteoglycans and type II collagen in the bulk phase, collagen type X at the interface with the bone substrate, and collagen type I within the bone phase. For the first time, the Young’s modulus and the friction coefficient of human cartilage engineered from mesenchymal stem cells reached physiological levels for adult human cartilage. We propose that this method can be effective for generating human osteochondral tissue constructs. PMID:25828645

  17. Low physiological levels of prostaglandins E2 and F2α improve human sperm functions.

    PubMed

    Rios, Mariana; Carreño, Daniela V; Oses, Carolina; Barrera, Nelson; Kerr, Bredford; Villalón, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) have been reported to be present in the seminal fluid and cervical mucus, affecting different stages of sperm maturation from spermatogenesis to the acrosome reaction. This study assessed the effects of low physiological PGE2 and PGF2α concentrations on human sperm motility and on the ability of the spermatozoa to bind to the zona pellucida (ZP). Human spermatozoa were isolated from seminal samples with normal concentration and motility parameters and incubated with 1μM PGE2, 1μM PGF2α or control solution to determine sperm motility and the ability to bind to human ZP. The effects of both PGs on intracellular calcium levels were determined. Incubation for 2 or 18h with PGE2 or PGF2α resulted in a significant (P<0.05) increase in the percentage of spermatozoa with progressive motility. In contrast with PGF2α, PGE2 alone induced an increase in sperm intracellular calcium levels; however, the percentage of sperm bound to the human ZP was doubled for both PGs. These results indicate that incubation of human spermatozoa with low physiological levels of PGE2 or PGF2α increases sperm functions and could improve conditions for assisted reproduction protocols. PMID:25123052

  18. A Physiology-Based Model Describing Heterogeneity in Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Anne H.; Rozendaal, Yvonne J. W.; van Pul, Carola; Hilbers, Peter A. J.; Cottaar, Ward J.; Haak, Harm R.; van Riel, Natal A. W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Current diabetes education methods are costly, time-consuming, and do not actively engage the patient. Here, we describe the development and verification of the physiological model for healthy subjects that forms the basis of the Eindhoven Diabetes Education Simulator (E-DES). E-DES shall provide diabetes patients with an individualized virtual practice environment incorporating the main factors that influence glycemic control: food, exercise, and medication. Method: The physiological model consists of 4 compartments for which the inflow and outflow of glucose and insulin are calculated using 6 nonlinear coupled differential equations and 14 parameters. These parameters are estimated on 12 sets of oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) data (226 healthy subjects) obtained from literature. The resulting parameter set is verified on 8 separate literature OGTT data sets (229 subjects). The model is considered verified if 95% of the glucose data points lie within an acceptance range of ±20% of the corresponding model value. Results: All glucose data points of the verification data sets lie within the predefined acceptance range. Physiological processes represented in the model include insulin resistance and β-cell function. Adjusting the corresponding parameters allows to describe heterogeneity in the data and shows the capabilities of this model for individualization. Conclusion: We have verified the physiological model of the E-DES for healthy subjects. Heterogeneity of the data has successfully been modeled by adjusting the 4 parameters describing insulin resistance and β-cell function. Our model will form the basis of a simulator providing individualized education on glucose control. PMID:25526760

  19. Metabolism and physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of flumioxazin in pregnant animals

    SciTech Connect

    Takaku, Tomoyuki Nagahori, Hirohisa; Sogame, Yoshihisa

    2014-06-15

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed to predict the concentration of flumioxazin, in the blood and fetus of pregnant humans during a theoretical accidental intake (1000 mg/kg). The data on flumioxazin concentration in pregnant rats (30 mg/kg po) was used to develop the PBPK model in pregnant rats using physiological parameters and chemical specific parameters. The rat PBPK model developed was extrapolated to a human model. Liver microsomes of female rats and a mixed gender of humans were used for the in vitro metabolism study. To determine the % of flumioxazin absorbed after administration at a dose of 1000 mg/kg assuming maximum accidental intake, the biliary excretion study of [phenyl-U-{sup 14}C]flumioxazin was conducted in bile duct-cannulated female rats (Crl:CD (SD)) to collect and analyze the bile, urine, feces, gastrointestinal tract, and residual carcass. The % of flumioxazin absorbed at a dose of 1000 mg/kg in rats was low (12.3%) by summing up {sup 14}C of the urine, bile, and residual carcass. The pregnant human model that was developed demonstrated that the maximum flumioxazin concentration in the blood and fetus of a pregnant human at a dose of 1000 mg/kg po was 0.86 μg/mL and 0.68 μg/mL, respectively, which is much lower than K{sub m} (202.4 μg/mL). Because the metabolism was not saturated and the absorption rate was low at a dose of 1000 mg/kg, the calculated flumioxazin concentration in pregnant humans was thought to be relatively low, considering the flumioxazin concentration in pregnant rats at a dose of 30 mg/kg. For the safety assessment of flumioxazin, these results would be useful for further in vitro toxicology experiments. - Highlights: • A PBPK model of flumioxazin in pregnant humans was developed. • Simulated flumioxazin concentration in pregnant humans was relatively low. • The results would be useful for further in vitro toxicology experiments.

  20. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Model for Biodistribution of Radiolabeled Peptides in Patients with Neuroendocrine Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Gospavic, Radovan; Knoll, Peter; Mirzaei, Siroos; Popov, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The objectives of this work was to assess the benefits of the application of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models in patients with different neuroendocrine tumours (NET) who were treated with Lu-177 DOTATATE. The model utilises clinical data on biodistribution of radiolabeled peptides (RLPs) obtained by whole body scintigraphy (WBS) of the patients. Methods: The blood flow restricted (perfusion rate limited) type of the PBPK model for biodistribution of radiolabeled peptides (RLPs) in individual human organs is based on the multi-compartment approach, which takes into account the main physiological processes in the organism: absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME). The approach calibrates the PBPK model for each patient in order to increase the accuracy of the dose estimation. Datasets obtained using WBS in four patients have been used to obtain the unknown model parameters. The scintigraphic data were acquired using a double head gamma camera in patients with different neuroendocrine tumours who were treated with Lu-177 DOTATATE. The activity administered to each patient was 7400 MBq. Results: Satisfactory agreement of the model predictions with the data obtained from the WBS for each patient has been achieved. Conclusion: The study indicates that the PBPK model can be used for more accurate calculation of biodistribution and absorbed doses in patients. This approach is the first attempt of utilizing scintigraphic data in PBPK models, which was obtained during Lu-177 peptide therapy of patients with NET. PMID:27408897

  1. Emotional contagion: dogs and humans show a similar physiological response to human infant crying.

    PubMed

    Yong, Min Hooi; Ruffman, Ted

    2014-10-01

    Humans respond to an infant crying with an increase in cortisol level and heightened alertness, a response interpreted as emotional contagion, a primitive form of empathy. Previous results are mixed when examining whether dogs might respond similarly to human distress. We examined whether domestic dogs, which have a long history of affiliation with humans, show signs of emotional contagion, testing canine (n=75) and human (n=74) responses to one of three auditory stimuli: a human infant crying, a human infant babbling, and computer-generated "white noise", with the latter two stimuli acting as controls. Cortisol levels in both humans and dogs increased significantly from baseline only after listening to crying. In addition, dogs showed a unique behavioral response to crying, combining submissiveness with alertness. These findings suggest that dogs experience emotional contagion in response to human infant crying and provide the first clear evidence of a primitive form of cross-species empathy. PMID:25452080

  2. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling of target-mediated drug disposition of bortezomib in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Mager, Donald E

    2015-10-01

    Bortezomib is a reversible proteasome inhibitor with potent antineoplastic activity that exhibits dose- and time-dependent pharmacokinetics (PK). Proteasome-mediated bortezomib disposition is proposed as the primary source of its nonlinear and apparent nonstationary PK behavior. Single intravenous (IV) doses of bortezomib (0.25 and 1 mg/kg) were administrated to BALB/c mice, with blood and tissue samples obtained over 144 h, which were analyzed by LC/MS/MS. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model incorporating tissue drug-target binding was developed to test the hypothesis of proteasome-mediated bortezomib disposition. The final model reasonably captured bortezomib plasma and tissue PK profiles, and parameters were estimated with good precision. The rank-order of model estimated tissue target density correlated well with experimentally measured proteasome concentrations reported in the literature, supporting the hypothesis that binding to proteasome influences bortezomib disposition. The PBPK model was further scaled-up to humans to assess the similarity of bortezomib disposition among species. Human plasma bortezomib PK profiles following multiple IV dosing (1.3 mg/m(2)) on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 were simulated by appropriately scaling estimated mouse parameters. Simulated and observed bortezomib concentrations after multiple dosing were in good agreement, suggesting target-mediated bortezomib disposition is likely for both mice and humans. Furthermore, the model predicts that renal impairment should exert minimal influence on bortezomib exposure in humans, confirming that bortezomib dose adjustment is not necessary for patients with renal impairment. PMID:26391023

  3. A Mathematical Model of Human Semicircular Canal Geometry: A New Basis for Interpreting Vestibular Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Curthoys, Ian S.; Todd, Michael J.; Magnussen, John S.; Taubman, David S.; Aw, Swee T.; Halmagyi, G. Michael

    2009-01-01

    We report a precise, simple, and accessible method of mathematically measuring and modeling the three-dimensional (3D) geometry of semicircular canals (SCCs) in living humans. Knowledge of this geometry helps understand the development and physiology of SCC stimulation. We developed a framework of robust techniques that automatically and accurately reconstruct SCC geometry from computed tomography (CT) images and are directly validated using micro-CT as ground truth. This framework measures the 3D centroid paths of the bony SCCs allowing direct comparison and analysis between ears within and between subjects. An average set of SCC morphology is calculated from 34 human ears, within which other geometrical attributes such as nonplanarity, radius of curvature, and inter-SCC angle are examined, with a focus on physiological implications. These measurements have also been used to critically evaluate plane fitting techniques that reconcile many of the discrepancies in current SCC plane studies. Finally, we mathematically model SCC geometry using Fourier series equations. This work has the potential to reinterpret physiology and pathophysiology in terms of real individual 3D morphology. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10162-009-0195-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:19949828

  4. Physiological activity of irradiated green tea polyphenol on the human skin.

    PubMed

    An, Bong-Jeun; Kwak, Jae-Hoon; Son, Jun-Ho; Park, Jung-Mi; Lee, Jin-Young; Park, Tae Soon; Kim, So-Yeun; Kim, Yeoung-Sun; Jo, Cheorun; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2005-01-01

    Physiological activity of irradiated green tea polyphenol on the human skin was investigated for further industrial application. The green tea polyphenol was separated and irradiated at 40 kGy by y-ray. For an anti-wrinkle effect, the collagenase inhibition effect was higher in the irradiated sample (65.3%) than that of the non-irradiated control (56.8%) at 200 ppm of the concentration (p < 0.05). Collagen biosynthesis rates using a human fibroblast were 19.4% and 16.3% in the irradiated and the non-irradiated polyphenols, respectively. The tyrosinase inhibition effect, which is related to the skin-whitening effect, showed a 45.2% and 42.9% in the irradiated and the non-irradiated polyphenols, respectively, at a 100 ppm level. A higher than 90% growth inhibition on skin cancer cells (SK-MEL-2 and G361) was demonstrated in both the irradiated and the non-irradiated polyphenols. Thus, the irradiation of green tea polyphenol did not change and even increased its anti-wrinkle, skin-whitening and anticancer effects on the human skin. The results indicated that irradiated green tea polyphenol can be used as a natural ingredient with excellent physiological functions for the human skin through cosmetic or food composition. PMID:16173528

  5. Mammalian Rest/Activity Patterns Explained by Physiologically Based Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, A. J. K.; Fulcher, B. D.; Robinson, P. A.; Klerman, E. B.

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are fundamental to life. In mammals, these rhythms are generated by pacemaker neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. The SCN is remarkably consistent in structure and function between species, yet mammalian rest/activity patterns are extremely diverse, including diurnal, nocturnal, and crepuscular behaviors. Two mechanisms have been proposed to account for this diversity: (i) modulation of SCN output by downstream nuclei, and (ii) direct effects of light on activity. These two mechanisms are difficult to disentangle experimentally and their respective roles remain unknown. To address this, we developed a computational model to simulate the two mechanisms and their influence on temporal niche. In our model, SCN output is relayed via the subparaventricular zone (SPZ) to the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH), and thence to ventrolateral preoptic nuclei (VLPO) and lateral hypothalamus (LHA). Using this model, we generated rich phenotypes that closely resemble experimental data. Modulation of SCN output at the SPZ was found to generate a full spectrum of diurnal-to-nocturnal phenotypes. Intriguingly, we also uncovered a novel mechanism for crepuscular behavior: if DMH/VLPO and DMH/LHA projections act cooperatively, daily activity is unimodal, but if they act competitively, activity can become bimodal. In addition, we successfully reproduced diurnal/nocturnal switching in the rodent Octodon degu using coordinated inversions in both masking and circadian modulation. Finally, the model correctly predicted the SCN lesion phenotype in squirrel monkeys: loss of circadian rhythmicity and emergence of ∼4-h sleep/wake cycles. In capturing these diverse phenotypes, the model provides a powerful new framework for understanding rest/activity patterns and relating them to underlying physiology. Given the ubiquitous effects of temporal organization on all aspects of animal behavior and physiology, this study sheds light on the physiological

  6. Measurements, modeling, control and simulation - as applied to the human left ventricle for purposeful physiological monitoring.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghista, D. N.; Rasmussen, D. N.; Linebarger, R. N.; Sandler, H.

    1971-01-01

    Interdisciplinary engineering research effort in studying the intact human left ventricle has been employed to physiologically monitor the heart and to obtain its 'state-of-health' characteristics. The left ventricle was selected for this purpose because it plays a key role in supplying energy to the body cells. The techniques for measurement of the left ventricular geometry are described; the geometry is effectively displayed to bring out the abnormalities in cardiac function. Methods of mathematical modeling, which make it possible to determine the performance of the intact left ventricular muscle, are also described. Finally, features of a control system for the left ventricle for predicting the effect of certain physiological stress situations on the ventricle performance are discussed.

  7. Cortisol as a Biomarker of Stress in Term Human Labor: Physiological and Methodological Issues

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Edward R.; Tanner, Charles J.; Heitkemper, Margaret M.

    2013-01-01

    Literature on the use of plasma cortisol to quantify psychophysiological stress in humans is extensive. However, in parturition at term gestation the use of cortisol as a biomarker of stress is particularly complex. Plasma cortisol levels increase as labor progresses. This increase seems to be important for maintenance of maternal/fetal wellbeing and facilitation of normal labor progress. Unique physiological and methodological issues involved in the use of cortisol as a biomarker of stress in labor present challenges for researchers. This review examines these issues, suggests mixed methods and within-subject repeated measures designs, and offers recommendations for assay procedures for parturient sampling. Documentation of clinical interventions and delivery outcomes may elucidate relationships among psychophysiological stressors, cortisol and normal labor progress. With attention to these methodological issues, analysis of plasma cortisol may lead to clinical interventions that support normal labor physiology. PMID:23338011

  8. Critical review evaluating the pig as a model for human nutritional physiology.

    PubMed

    Roura, Eugeni; Koopmans, Sietse-Jan; Lallès, Jean-Paul; Le Huerou-Luron, Isabelle; de Jager, Nadia; Schuurman, Teun; Val-Laillet, David

    2016-06-01

    The present review examines the pig as a model for physiological studies in human subjects related to nutrient sensing, appetite regulation, gut barrier function, intestinal microbiota and nutritional neuroscience. The nutrient-sensing mechanisms regarding acids (sour), carbohydrates (sweet), glutamic acid (umami) and fatty acids are conserved between humans and pigs. In contrast, pigs show limited perception of high-intensity sweeteners and NaCl and sense a wider array of amino acids than humans. Differences on bitter taste may reflect the adaptation to ecosystems. In relation to appetite regulation, plasma concentrations of cholecystokinin and glucagon-like peptide-1 are similar in pigs and humans, while peptide YY in pigs is ten to twenty times higher and ghrelin two to five times lower than in humans. Pigs are an excellent model for human studies for vagal nerve function related to the hormonal regulation of food intake. Similarly, the study of gut barrier functions reveals conserved defence mechanisms between the two species particularly in functional permeability. However, human data are scant for some of the defence systems and nutritional programming. The pig model has been valuable for studying the changes in human microbiota following nutritional interventions. In particular, the use of human flora-associated pigs is a useful model for infants, but the long-term stability of the implanted human microbiota in pigs remains to be investigated. The similarity of the pig and human brain anatomy and development is paradigmatic. Brain explorations and therapies described in pig, when compared with available human data, highlight their value in nutritional neuroscience, particularly regarding functional neuroimaging techniques. PMID:27176552

  9. PEG-based thermogels: applicability in physiological media.

    PubMed

    Badi, Nezha; Lutz, Jean-François

    2009-12-16

    Novel biocompatible thermogels have been synthesized and characterized. The hydrogelators were synthesized by atom transfer radical copolymerization of 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate (MEO(2)MA) and oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (OEGMA(475), M(n)=475 g mol(-1) or OEGMA(300), M(n)=300 g mol(-1)) in the presence of a 4-arm star poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) macroinitiator. The formed macromolecules possess a permanently hydrophilic PEG core and thermoresponsive P(MEO(2)MA-co-OEGMA) outer-blocks. These star-block architectures exhibit an inverse thermogelation behavior in aqueous medium. Typically, above their lower critical solution temperature (LCST), the thermoresponsive P(MEO(2)MA-co-OEGMA) precipitate, thus forming physical crosslinks, which are stabilized in water by hydrophilic PEG bridges. This thermo-induced sol-gel transition can be adjusted within a near-physiological range of temperature by simply varying the composition of the thermoresponsive segments. Moreover, these novel hydrogelators formed free-standing gels in various buffer solutions (e.g., PBS, Tris, MOPS, bicine and HEPES) and in cell culture media. In saline solutions, a weak salting-out effect was observed. However, other components of physiological media (e.g., buffering agents, amino acids, vitamins, proteins) did not hinder the thermogelation process. Hence, these novel thermogels appear as highly attractive candidates for applications in biosciences. PMID:19376170

  10. On the role of numerical simulations in studies of reduced gravity-induced physiological effects in humans. Results from NELME.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Poch, Antoni

    Computer simulations are becoming a promising research line of work, as physiological models become more and more sophisticated and reliable. Technological advances in state-of-the-art hardware technology and software allow nowadays for better and more accurate simulations of complex phenomena, such as the response of the human cardiovascular system to long-term exposure to microgravity. Experimental data for long-term missions are difficult to achieve and reproduce, therefore the predictions of computer simulations are of a major importance in this field. Our approach is based on a previous model developed and implemented in our laboratory (NELME: Numercial Evaluation of Long-term Microgravity Effects). The software simulates the behaviour of the cardiovascular system and different human organs, has a modular archi-tecture, and allows to introduce perturbations such as physical exercise or countermeasures. The implementation is based on a complex electrical-like model of this control system, using inexpensive development frameworks, and has been tested and validated with the available experimental data. The objective of this work is to analyse and simulate long-term effects and gender differences when individuals are exposed to long-term microgravity. Risk probability of a health impairement which may put in jeopardy a long-term mission is also evaluated. . Gender differences have been implemented for this specific work, as an adjustment of a number of parameters that are included in the model. Women versus men physiological differences have been therefore taken into account, based upon estimations from the physiology bibliography. A number of simulations have been carried out for long-term exposure to microgravity. Gravity varying continuosly from Earth-based to zero, and time exposure are the two main variables involved in the construction of results, including responses to patterns of physical aerobic ex-ercise and thermal stress simulating an extra