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Sample records for human renal allograft

  1. Extramedullary hematopoiesis in renal allograft

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guilan; Ali, Reza; Shuldberg, Mark M.; Bastani, Bahar; Brink, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH), defined as the presence of hematopoietic elements outside of the medullary cavity of bone, has been reported in patients with various hematopoietic neoplasms including myelofibrosis. EMH commonly occurs in the liver and spleen (resulting in hepatosplenomegaly) and uncommonly involves the kidney. EMH involving the allograft kidney has not been reported in English literature. Herein, we report the first case of EMH in allograft kidney in a patient with myelofibrosis. The clinical and pathological findings are described. Through comparison of the medullary neoplastic infiltrate with the renal allograft infiltrate, we postulate the neoplastic nature of the infiltrate in the allograft kidney. PMID:26120442

  2. Nitration and Inactivation of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase in Chronic Rejection of Human Renal Allografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMillan-Crow, L. A.; Crow, John P.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Beckman, Joseph S.; Thompson, John A.

    1996-10-01

    Inflammatory processes in chronic rejection remain a serious clinical problem in organ transplantation. Activated cellular infiltrate produces high levels of both superoxide and nitric oxide. These reactive oxygen species interact to form peroxynitrite, a potent oxidant that can modify proteins to form 3-nitrotyrosine. We identified enhanced immunostaining for nitrotyrosine localized to tubular epithelium of chronically rejected human renal allografts. Western blot analysis of rejected tissue demonstrated that tyrosine nitration was restricted to a few specific polypeptides. Immunoprecipitation and amino acid sequencing techniques identified manganese superoxide dismutase, the major antioxidant enzyme in mitochondria, as one of the targets of tyrosine nitration. Total manganese superoxide dismutase protein was increased in rejected kidney, particularly in the tubular epithelium; however, enzymatic activity was significantly decreased. Exposure of recombinant human manganese superoxide dismutase to peroxynitrite resulted in a dose-dependent (IC50 = 10 μ M) decrease in enzymatic activity and concomitant increase in tyrosine nitration. Collectively, these observations suggest a role for peroxynitrite during development and progression of chronic rejection in human renal allografts. In addition, inactivation of manganese superoxide dismutase by peroxynitrite may represent a general mechanism that progressively increases the production of peroxynitrite, leading to irreversible oxidative injury to mitochondria.

  3. Monocyte procoagulant activity and plasminogen activator. Role in human renal allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.H.; Cardella, C.J.; Schulman, J.; Levy, G.A.

    1985-10-01

    Currently the mechanism of renal allograft rejection is not well understood. This study was designed to determine whether induction of monocyte procoagulant activity (MCPA) is important in the pathogenesis of renal allograft rejection. The MPCA assay was performed utilizing a one stage clotting assay both in normal and in factor-VII-deficient plasma. There was no increase in spontaneous MPCA in 20 patients with endstage renal failure and in 10 patients following abdominal or orthopedic operation, as compared with 20 normal controls. MPCA was assessed daily in 18 patients who had received renal allografts. Rejection episodes (RE) were predicted on the basis of persistent elevation in MPCA as compared with pretransplant levels. Rejection was diagnosed clinically and treated on the basis of standard criteria. Treated RE were compared with those predicted by elevated MPCA, and 3 patients were assessed as having no RE by MPCA and by standard criteria. In 8 RE, MPCA correlated temporally with RE (same day) when compared with standard criteria. In 12 RE, MPCA was predictive of rejection preceding standard criteria by at least 24 hr. There were 7 false-positive predictions on the basis of MPCA; however, there was only 1 false negative. MPCA was shown to be a prothrombinase by its dependence only on prothrombin and fibrinogen for full activity. MPCA may be important in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection, and additionally it may be a useful adjunct in the clinical management of this disease.

  4. Emphysema in the renal allograft

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J.L.; Sullivan, B.M.; Fluornoy, J.G.; Gerza, C.

    1985-04-01

    Two diabetic patients in whom emphysematous pyelonephritis developed after renal transplantation are described. Clinical recognition of this unusual and serious infection is masked by the effects of immunosuppression. Abdominal radiographic, ultrasound, and computed tomography findings are discussed. The clinical presentation includes urinary tract infection, sepsis, and acute tubular malfunction of the allograft in insulin-dependent diabetics.

  5. Leiomyoma in a Renal Allograft.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan Jun; Siriwardana, Amila Rohan; Symons, James Lawrence Penn; O'Neill, Gordon Francis; Qiu, Min Ru; Furlong, Timothy John

    2016-01-01

    Leiomyomas are smooth muscle tumours that are rarely found in the kidney. There is one report of a leiomyoma in a kidney transplant in a paediatric recipient. Here, we report an adult renal transplant recipient who developed an Epstein-Barr virus-positive leiomyoma in his allograft 15 years after transplantation. The patient was converted to everolimus for posttransplant immunosuppression management and there was no sign of progression over a year. PMID:27195169

  6. Leiomyoma in a Renal Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan Jun; Siriwardana, Amila Rohan; Symons, James Lawrence Penn; O'Neill, Gordon Francis; Qiu, Min Ru; Furlong, Timothy John

    2016-01-01

    Leiomyomas are smooth muscle tumours that are rarely found in the kidney. There is one report of a leiomyoma in a kidney transplant in a paediatric recipient. Here, we report an adult renal transplant recipient who developed an Epstein-Barr virus-positive leiomyoma in his allograft 15 years after transplantation. The patient was converted to everolimus for posttransplant immunosuppression management and there was no sign of progression over a year. PMID:27195169

  7. Renal allograft rejection: sonography and scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, A.; Cohen, W.N.

    1980-07-01

    A total of 30 renal allograft patients who had sonographic B scanning and radionuclide studies of the transplant was studied as to whether: (1) the allograft rejection was associated with any consistent and reliable sonographic features and (2) the sonograms complemented the radionuclide studies. Focal areas of decreased parenchymal echogenicity were the most striking and consistent sonographic finding in chymal echogenicity were the most striking and consistens sonographic finding in allograft rejection. This was observed in most of the patients exhibiting moderate or severe rejection, but was frequently absent with mild rejection. Areas of decreased parenchymal echogenicity were not seen during episodes of acute tubular necrosis. Therefore, sonography showing zones of decreased parenchymal echogenicity was complementary to radionuclide studies in the diagnosis of allograft rejection versus acute tubular necrosis. Corticomedullary demarcation was difficult to interpret because of technical variables, and was inconsistently related to rejection in this series.

  8. Zygomycosis in a renal allograft recipient

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayana, G.; Rajesh, R.; Kurian, G.; Unni, V. N.

    2009-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections can cause considerable morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Zygomycosis is a type of invasive fungal infection with a rapid course and grave prognosis. Renal transplant recipients with concomitant diabetes mellitus are most susceptible to this infection. We report here a case of disseminated zygomycosis (Rhizopus sp.) in a renal allograft recipient with posttransplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM). This is the first reported case of zygomycosis caused by Rhizopus species. PMID:20352010

  9. Urinary Calprotectin and Posttransplant Renal Allograft Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bistrup, Claus; Marcussen, Niels; Pagonas, Nikolaos; Seibert, Felix S.; Arndt, Robert; Zidek, Walter; Westhoff, Timm H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Current methods do not predict the acute renal allograft injury immediately after kidney transplantation. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of urinary calprotectin for predicting immediate posttransplant allograft injury. Methods In a multicenter, prospective-cohort study of 144 incipient renal transplant recipients, we postoperatively measured urinary calprotectin using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) after 4 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months. Results We observed a significant inverse association of urinary calprotectin concentrations and eGFR 4 weeks after transplantation (Spearman r = −0.33; P<0.001). Compared to the lowest quartile, patients in the highest quartile of urinary calprotectin had an increased risk for an eGFR less than 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 four weeks after transplantation (relative risk, 4.3; P<0.001; sensitivity, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.98; specificity, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.31 to 0.66). Higher urinary calprotectin concentrations predicted impaired kidney function 4 weeks after transplantation, as well as 6 months and 12 months after transplantation. When data were analyzed using the urinary calprotectin/creatinine-ratio similar results were obtained. Urinary calprotectin was superior to current use of absolute change of plasma creatinine to predict allograft function 12 months after transplantation. Urinary calprotectin predicted an increased risk both in transplants from living and deceased donors. Multivariate linear regression showed that higher urinary calprotectin concentrations and older donor age predicted lower eGFR four weeks, 6 months, and 12 months after transplantation. Conclusions Urinary calprotectin is an early, noninvasive predictor of immediate renal allograft injury after kidney transplantation. PMID:25402277

  10. Use of local allograft irradiation following renal transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Halperin, E.C.; Delmonico, F.L.; Nelson, P.W.; Shipley, W.U.; Cosimi, A.B.

    1984-07-01

    Over a 10 year period, 67 recipients of 71 renal allografts received graft irradiation following the diagnosis of rejection. The majority of kidneys were treated with a total dose of 600 rad, 150 rad per fraction, in 4 daily fractions. Fifty-three kidneys were irradiated following the failure of standard systemic immunosuppression and maximally tolerated antirejection measures to reverse an episode of acute rejection. Twenty-two (42%) of these allografts were noted to have stable (i.e. no deterioration) or improved function 1 month following the treatment with irradiation. Eleven (21%) of these allografts maintained function 1 year following transplantation. Biopsies were obtained of 41 allografts. Of the 24 renal allografts with predominantly cellular rejection, 10 (42%) had the process reversed or stabilized at 1 month following irradiation. Five (21%) of these allografts were functioning at 1 year following irradiation. Rejection was reversed or stabilized in 6 of 17 (35%) allografts at 1 month when the histologic features of renal biopsy suggested predominantly vascular rejection. Local graft irradiation has helped maintain a limited number of allografts in patients whose rejection has failed to respond to systemic immunosuppression. Irradiation may also benefit patients with ongoing rejection in whom further systemic immunosuppression is contra-indicated.

  11. Targeting Sirtuin-1 prolongs murine renal allograft survival and function.

    PubMed

    Levine, Matthew H; Wang, Zhonglin; Xiao, Haiyan; Jiao, Jing; Wang, Liqing; Bhatti, Tricia R; Hancock, Wayne W; Beier, Ulf H

    2016-05-01

    Current immunosuppressive medications used after transplantation have significant toxicities. Foxp3(+) T-regulatory cells can prevent allograft rejection without compromising protective host immunity. Interestingly, inhibiting the class III histone/protein deacetylase Sirtuin-1 can augment Foxp3(+) T-regulatory suppressive function through increasing Foxp3 acetylation. Here we determined whether Sirtuin-1 targeting can stabilize biological allograft function. BALB/c kidney allografts were transplanted into C57BL/6 recipients with a CD4-conditional deletion of Sirtuin-1 (Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre)) or mice treated with a Sirtuin-1-specific inhibitor (EX-527), and the native kidneys removed. Blood chemistries and hematocrit were followed weekly. Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre) recipients showed markedly longer survival and improved kidney function. Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre) recipients exhibited donor-specific tolerance, accepted BALB/c, but rejected third-party C3H cardiac allografts. C57BL/6 recipients of BALB/c renal allografts that were treated with EX-527 showed improved survival and renal function at 1, but not 10 mg/kg/day. Pharmacologic inhibition of Sirtuin-1 also improved renal allograft survival and function with dosing effects having relevance to outcome. Thus, inhibiting Sirtuin-1 can be a useful asset in controlling T-cell-mediated rejection. However, effects on non-T cells that could adversely affect allograft survival and function merit consideration. PMID:27083279

  12. Renal Cell Carcinoma Arising From Renal Allograft Detected by 18F-FDG PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuehong; Wang, Tie

    2016-05-01

    Renal cell carcinoma arising from renal allograft is a rare condition. A 56-year-old man with a history of 3 renal transplantation due to renal failure presented poor appetite and weight loss for 3 months. Possibility of tumor of unknown origin was suspected. For this reason, an FDG PET/CT was performed, and the images showed a hypermetabolic focus in the lower pole of the left renal transplant, suggestive of a malignant lesion. Subsequent pathological examination following allograft nephrectomy confirmed grade 4 renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26825198

  13. Renal allograft transplant recipient with ruptured hydatid native kidney.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Riyaz Ahmad; Wani, Imtiyaz; Khan, Imran; Wani, Muzaffar

    2014-07-01

    Echinococcosis of the kidneys in a renal transplant recipient is extremely rare and its occurrence being related to immunosuppression is a possibility which needs further characterisation. Ruptured renal hydatid in a renal transplant recipient is not reported so far to our best knowledge. We present a 42-year-old renal allograft receipient who presented one year after transplant with left flank pain, palpable left lumbar mass and gross hydatiduria. Investigations revealed a ruptured native hydatid kidney. Patient was managed with a combination of chemotherapy and left native nephrectomy and discharged in a satisfactory condition. PMID:25125908

  14. Imaging-based diagnosis of acute renal allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Schuette-Nuetgen, Katharina; Kentrup, Dominik; Pawelski, Helga; Reuter, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best available treatment for patients with end stage renal disease. Despite the introduction of effective immunosuppressant drugs, episodes of acute allograft rejection still endanger graft survival. Since efficient treatment of acute rejection is available, rapid diagnosis of this reversible graft injury is essential. For diagnosis of rejection, invasive core needle biopsy of the graft is the “gold-standard”. However, biopsy carries the risk of significant graft injury and is not immediately feasible in patients taking anticoagulants. Therefore, a non-invasive tool assessing the whole organ for specific and fast detection of acute allograft rejection is desirable. We herein review current imaging-based state of the art approaches for non-invasive diagnostics of acute renal transplant rejection. We especially focus on new positron emission tomography-based as well as targeted ultrasound-based methods. PMID:27011915

  15. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin in renal allografts

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rabadi, Laith; Francis, Jean M.; Henderson, Joel; Ghai, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Glomerulopathy due to dysproteinemia can have a wide spectrum of pathologic and clinical features based on specific characteristics of the abnormal protein and the response induced within the parenchymal tissue. Monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) deposition can manifest as a different glomerular disease. Proliferative glomerulonephritis (GN) with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) is a unique entity mimicking immune complex GN that does not conform to any of those subtypes. IgG monoclonal granular deposition in the glomeruli with a pattern similar to immune complex disease suggested by C3 and C1q deposition should prompt consideration of PGNMID. Literature is scarce in terms of recurrence of disease in renal allografts. In this article we present the clinical–pathologic features of three cases of PGNMID in the renal allograft showing the variable course and manifestation of the disease. PMID:26613031

  16. Significance of urinary proteome pattern in renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Suhail, Sufi M

    2014-01-01

    Urinary proteomics is developing as a platform of urinary biomarkers of immense potential in recent years. The definition of urinary proteome in the context of renal allograft and characterization of different proteome patterns in various graft dysfunctions have led to the development of a distinct science of this noninvasive tool. Substantial numbers of studies have shown that different renal allograft disease states, both acute and chronic, could portray unique urinary proteome pattern enabling early diagnosis of graft dysfunction and proper manipulation of immunosuppressive strategy that could impact graft prognosis. The methodology of the urinary proteome is nonetheless not more complex than that of other sophisticated assays of conventional urinary protein analysis. Moreover, the need for a centralized database is also felt by the researchers as more and more studies have been presenting their results from different corners and as systems of organizing these newly emerging data being developed at international and national levels. In this context concept of urinary proteomics in renal allograft recipients would be of significant importance in clinical transplantation. PMID:24757556

  17. Significance of Urinary Proteome Pattern in Renal Allograft Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Suhail, Sufi M.

    2014-01-01

    Urinary proteomics is developing as a platform of urinary biomarkers of immense potential in recent years. The definition of urinary proteome in the context of renal allograft and characterization of different proteome patterns in various graft dysfunctions have led to the development of a distinct science of this noninvasive tool. Substantial numbers of studies have shown that different renal allograft disease states, both acute and chronic, could portray unique urinary proteome pattern enabling early diagnosis of graft dysfunction and proper manipulation of immunosuppressive strategy that could impact graft prognosis. The methodology of the urinary proteome is nonetheless not more complex than that of other sophisticated assays of conventional urinary protein analysis. Moreover, the need for a centralized database is also felt by the researchers as more and more studies have been presenting their results from different corners and as systems of organizing these newly emerging data being developed at international and national levels. In this context concept of urinary proteomics in renal allograft recipients would be of significant importance in clinical transplantation. PMID:24757556

  18. De novo C3 glomerulonephritis in a renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Nahm, Ji Hae; Song, Seung Hwan; Kim, Yu Seun; Cheong, Hae-Il; Lim, Beom Jin; Kim, Beom Seok; Jeong, Hyeon Joo

    2016-01-01

    C3 glomerulonephritis (C3GN) is a recently described, rare glomerular disease characterized by predominant or sole glomerular C3 deposits. Morphologic features of C3GN are similar to those of dense deposit disease (DDD); however, ribbon-like intramembranous electron-dense deposits are absent in the former. We report a case of de novo C3GN in a renal allograft with morphologic transformation to DDD. A 6-year-old boy presented with congenital left renal agenesis and right ureteropelvic junction obstruction. The patient underwent pyeloplasty but experienced recurrent urinary tract infections. At the age of 22 years, he received a renal allograft from a living related donor. C3GN was diagnosed after 1 year of transplantation; initial histology showed minimal mesangiopathy and this progressed to mesangial proliferation and membranoproliferative features over the next 7 years. Serum creatinine levels were stabilized with anti-rejection treatments for combating repeated episodes of acute rejection; however, glomerular and tubular band-like electron-dense deposits became evident. PMID:26986539

  19. MicroRNA-10b downregulation mediates acute rejection of renal allografts by derepressing BCL2L11

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaoyou; Dong, Changgui; Jiang, Zhengyao; Wu, William K.K.; Chan, Matthew T.V.; Zhang, Jie; Li, Haibin; Qin, Ke; Sun, Xuyong

    2015-04-10

    Kidney transplantation is the major therapeutic option for end-stage kidney diseases. However, acute rejection could cause allograft loss in some of these patients. Emerging evidence supports that microRNA (miRNA) dysregulation is implicated in acute allograft rejection. In this study, we used next-generation sequencing to profile miRNA expression in normal and acutely rejected kidney allografts. Among 75 identified dysregulated miRNAs, miR-10b was the most significantly downregulated miRNAs in rejected allografts. Transfecting miR-10b inhibitor into human renal glomerular endothelial cells recapitulated key features of acute allograft rejection, including endothelial cell apoptosis, release of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor α, interferon-γ, and chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 2) and chemotaxis of macrophages whereas transfection of miR-10b mimics had opposite effects. Downregulation of miR-10b directly derepressed the expression of BCL2L11 (an apoptosis inducer) as revealed by luciferase reporter assay. Taken together, miR-10b downregulation mediates many aspects of disease pathogenicity of acute kidney allograft rejection. Restoring miR-10b expression in glomerular endothelial cells could be a novel therapeutic approach to reduce acute renal allograft loss. - Highlights: • miR-10b was the most downregulated microRNAs in acutely rejected renal allografts. • miR-10b downregulation triggered glomerular endothelial cell apoptosis. • miR-10b downregulation induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. • miR-10b downregulation derepressed its pro-apoptotic target BCL2L11.

  20. Scedosporium apiospermum causing brain abscess in a renal allograft recipient.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Amit; Singh, Divya

    2015-11-01

    Scedosporium apiospermum is the asexual form of a rare fungus Pseudallescheria boydii that is usually present in the soil, sewage and dirty water. In immunocompromised patients, it is a rare infection involving multiple organs. We present a case of renal allograft recipient who developed fever two weeks post renal transplant. He was initially found to have dengue fever. After five days, he became drowsy and developed right-sided hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed multiple irregular masses with associated edema consistent with fungal brain abscesses. Left parietal abscess was drained and he was started on voriconazole. His cyclosporine was stopped. Drained pus revealed fungal hyphae on potassium hydroxide stain and Scedosporium apiospermum on culture. Unfortunately, the patient died after five days. Scedosporium infections should be kept as a possibility in transplant recipients with disseminated infections, especially with a brain abscess. Despite antifungal therapy and surgical drainage, mortality rates are high. PMID:26586067

  1. Anti-huCD20 Antibody Therapy for Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Renal Allografts in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Toyofumi; Ishii, Daisuke; Gorbacheva, Victoria; Kohei, Naoki; Tsuda, Hidetoshi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Dvorina, Nina; Nonomura, Norio; Takahara, Shiro; Valujskikh, Anna; Baldwin, William M.; Fairchild, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    We have reported that B6.CCR5−/− mice reject renal allografts with high serum donor-specific antibody (DSA) titers and marked C4d deposition in grafts, features consistent with AMR. B6.huCD20/CCR5−/− mice, where human CD20 expression is restricted to B cells, rejected A/J renal allografts by day 26 post-transplant with DSA first detected in serum on day 5 post-transplant and increased thereafter. Recipient treatment with anti-huCD20 mAb prior to the transplant and weekly up to 7 weeks post-transplant promoted long-term allograft survival (> 100 days) with low DSA titers. To investigate the effect of B cell depletion at the time serum DSA was first detected, recipients were treated with anti-huCD20 mAb on days 5, 8 and 12 post-transplant. This regimen significantly reduced DSA titers and graft inflammation on day 15 post-transplant and prolonged allograft survival > 60 days. However, DSA returned to the titers observed in control treated recipients by day 30 post-transplant and histological analyses on day 60 post-transplant indicated severe interstitial fibrosis. These results indicate that anti-huCD20 mAb had the greatest effect as a prophylactic treatment and that the distinct kinetics of DSA responses accounts for acute renal allograft failure versus the development of fibrosis. PMID:25731734

  2. Recurrence of ANCA-negative renal-limited pauci-immune glomerulonephritis in the renal allograft

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, Venkatesh; Gowda, Kiran Krishne; Jha, Vivekanand; Kohli, Harbir Singh; Kumar, Vivek; Ramachandran, Raja

    2013-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) due to pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis (PICGN). A small subgroup of patients with PICGN are anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) negative. We report a case of a patient with ANCA-negative renal-limited form of PICGN who developed ESRD despite treatment. He underwent live-related renal allograft transplantation after 12 months on haemodialysis. In the eighth post-transplant month, he developed graft dysfunction, which on evaluation turned out to be a graft recurrence of the basic disease in the form of PICGN. He received treatment with methylprednisolone, cyclophosphamide and plasmapheresis. However, his renal functions did not improve and he developed graft loss in the 11th post-transplant month and was started on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. We report a rare recurrence of renal-limited PICGN in the allograft. Patients with PICGN undergoing renal transplantation should be followed up carefully, and an early biopsy should be performed in the case of graft dysfunction to deal with this potentially graft-threatening complication. PMID:26064517

  3. Renal medullary changes in renal allograft recipients with raised serum creatinine

    PubMed Central

    Sis, B; Sarioglu, S; Celik, A; Kasap, B; Yildiz, S; Kavukcu, S; Gulay, H; Camsari, T

    2006-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that the renal medulla may reflect rejection related changes and thus have a predictive value in the assessment of acute renal allograft rejection or chronic graft damage. Methods 75 post‐transplant biopsies from 57 patients were scored according to the Banff 1997 scheme. The biopsies with adequate cortical and medullary tissue (n = 23) were selected and medullary tissues were reviewed for rejection related lesions except intimal arteritis. Chronic damage was determined by image analysis depending on periodic acid‐methenamine silver (PAMS)‐Masson trichrome (MT) staining. Medullary and cortical changes were compared. Results Interstitial inflammation and tubulitis were more frequent and severe in the cortex (p<0.001). Medullary tubulitis was associated with intimal arteritis (p = 0.003, r = 0.598). Medullary interstitial inflammation (n = 8) and tubulitis (n = 4) were associated with cortical borderline changes (n = 5) or allograft rejection (n = 3). The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of medullary inflammatory changes in predicting cortical allograft rejection were 43%, 69%, 37%, and 73%, respectively. A significant association was observed between medullary MT‐SAP and cortical PAMS‐SAP values (p = 0.02, R2 = 0.23). Conclusions Acute rejection related lesions are more common and severe in the cortex, and the renal medulla does not sufficiently reflect cortical rejection. The positive and negative predictive values of medullary changes for allograft rejection are low, and medullary inflammation is not a reliable indicator of allograft rejection. Increased medullary fibrosis is correlated with chronic cortical damage. PMID:16461569

  4. Neopterin and interferon gamma serum levels in renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Khoss, A E; Balzar, E; Steger, H; Howanietz, H; Wladika, W; Hamilton, G; Woloszczuk, W

    In the follow-up of children receiving renal allografts the early differential diagnosis of infections and rejection episodes is the main problem. Serum levels of neopterin (N), a pteridine released from stimulated macrophages, was determined by radioimmunoassay. Also interferon-gamma (IF) serum levels, a marker of T lymphocyte activity, were determined with an immunoradiometric assay in 19 kidney-transplanted children. Both, infections and rejection episodes, are accompanied by distinct increases in N. The IF are elevated 1-3 days earlier than N, the median values during infections being significantly (p less than or equal to 0.001) higher than those during rejection crises. The routine measurement of N and IF allow the simple, quick and reliable monitoring of the immune status, which seems to be of a high relevance for the daily monitoring of transplant recipients. PMID:3150820

  5. Rational clinical trial design for antibody mediated renal allograft injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandal, Shaifali; Zand, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody mediated renal allograft rejection is a significant cause of acute and chronic graft loss. Recent work has revealed that AMR is a complex processes, involving B and plasma cells, donor-specific antibodies, complement, vascular endothelial cells, NK cells, Fc receptors, cytokines and chemokines. These insights have led to the development of numerous new therapies, and adaptation of others originally developed for treatment of hemetologic malignancies, autoimmune and complement mediated conditions. Here we review emerging insights into the pathophysiology of AMR as well as current and emerging therapies for both acute and chronic AMR. Finally, we discuss rational clinical trial design in light of antibody and B cell immunobiology, as well as appropriate efficacy metrics to identify robust protocols and therapeutic agents. PMID:25553476

  6. Rational clinical trial design for antibody mediated renal allograft injury.

    PubMed

    Sandal, Shaifali; Zand, Martin S

    2015-01-01

    Antibody mediated renal allograft rejection is a significant cause of acute and chronic graft loss. Recent work has revealed that AMR is a complex processes, involving B and plasma cells, donor-specific antibodies, complement, vascular endothelial cells, NK cells, Fc receptors, cytokines and chemokines. These insights have led to the development of numerous new therapies, and adaptation of others originally developed for treatment of hemetologic malignancies, autoimmune and complement mediated conditions. Here we review emerging insights into the pathophysiology of AMR as well as current and emerging therapies for both acute and chronic AMR. Finally, we discuss rational clinical trial design in light of antibody and B cell immunobiology, as well as appropriate efficacy metrics to identify robust protocols and therapeutic agents. PMID:25553476

  7. Recurrent and de novo disease after renal transplantation: a report from the Renal Allograft Disease Registry.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Sundaram; Savin, Virginia J

    2004-08-01

    Recurrent and de novo disease is an increasing problem and is known to negatively impact transplant graft survival. Immunosuppressive medications have not had an impact on the prevalence of recurrent and de novo disease. Renal Allograft Disease Registry (RADR) was established to study the prevalence, impact and risk factors for the development of recurrent and de novo disease. Retrospective and prospective study on recurrent disease is discussed in this manuscript. PMID:15265160

  8. Iatrogenic Arteriovenous Fistula in a Renal Allograft: The Result of a TAD Guidewire Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Lee-Elliott, Catherine; Khaw, Kok-Tee; Belli, Anna-Maria; Patel, Uday

    2000-07-15

    A case is presented of an iatrogenic arteriovenous fistula developing in a renal allograft following guidewire manipulation during transplant renal artery angioplasty. Hyperdynamic flow through the fistula was causing a shunt of blood away from the renal cortex as demonstrated on sonography and scintigraphy. Selective embolization was performed, correcting the maldistribution of flow to the peripheral renal cortex. The diagnosis and difficulty in management of asymptomatic renal arteriovenous fistulae is also discussed.

  9. Necroptosis and parthanatos are involved in remote lung injury after receiving ischemic renal allografts in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hailin; Ning, Jiaolin; Lemaire, Alexandre; Koumpa, Foteini-Stefania; Sun, James J; Fung, Anthony; Gu, Jianteng; Yi, Bin; Lu, Kaizhi; Ma, Daqing

    2015-04-01

    Early renal graft injury could result in remote pulmonary injury due to kidney-lung cross talk. Here we studied the possible role of regulated necrosis in remote lung injury in a rat allogeneic transplantation model. In vitro, human lung epithelial cell A549 was challenged with TNF-α and conditioned medium from human kidney proximal tubular cells (HK-2) after hypothermia-hypoxia insults. In vivo, the Brown-Norway rat renal grafts were extracted and stored in 4 °C Soltran preserving solution for up to 24 h and transplanted into Lewis rat recipients, and the lungs were harvested on day 1 and day 4 after grafting for further analysis. Ischemia-reperfusion injury in the renal allograft caused pulmonary injury following engraftment. PARP-1 (marker for parthanatos) and receptor interacting protein kinase 1 (Rip1) and Rip3 (markers for necroptosis) expression was significantly enhanced in the lung. TUNEL assays showed increased cell death of lung cells. This was significantly reduced after treatment with necrostatin-1 (nec-1) or/and 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB). Acute immune rejection exacerbated the remote lung injury and 3-AB or/and Nec-1 combined with cyclosporine A conferred optimal lung protection. Thus, renal graft injury triggered remote lung injury, likely through regulated necrosis. This study could provide the molecular basis for combination therapy targeting both pathways of regulated necrosis to treat such complications after renal transplantation. PMID:25517913

  10. Renal Allograft Compartment Syndrome: Is It Possible to Prevent?

    PubMed

    Damiano, G; Maione, C; Maffongelli, A; Ficarella, S; Carmina, L; Buscemi, S; Palumbo, V D; De Luca, S; Spinelli, G; Lo Monte, A I; Buscemi, G

    2016-03-01

    Renal allograft compartment syndrome (RACS) is a complication characterized by increased pressure over 15 to 20 mm Hg of the iliac fossa site of transplanted kidney that can lead to a reduction of the blood supply to the graft, resulting in organ ischemia. This study aims to evaluate, through a review of the literature, the incidence, detection, treatment, and possible prevention of RACS. The incidence of this complication, which appears generally in the immediate post-transplantation period, is currently approximately 1% to 2% and is underestimated because of poor nosography for the presence of symptoms common to other post-transplantation complications. Doppler ultrasound is indispensable to evaluate the graft function in the immediate postoperative period and in the following days. The onset of RACS involves a surgical decompression of the graft and the subsequent closure of the abdominal wall with tension-free technique. Several authors agree that only the immediate surgical decompression following an early diagnosis can ensure a recovery of the graft. Early detection of the RACS is the key to preventing the loss of the graft. It is desirable to prevent this syndrome by reducing the discrepancy in weight between donor and recipient by 17%. However the shortage of organs makes such a selection not easy; therefore, in cases at risk for RACS, a close instrumental and clinical monitoring of the patient during post-transplantation recovery is recommended, so a prompt surgical decompression can be performed if RACS is suspected. PMID:27109951

  11. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    van der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-04-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Furthermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfusion of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion or irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted.

  12. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-04-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Futhermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfuson of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion of irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted.

  13. Transduction of interleukin-10 through renal artery attenuates vascular neointimal proliferation and infiltration of immune cells in rat renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jingxin; Li, Xueyi; Meng, Dan; Liang, Qiujuan; Wang, Xinhong; Wang, Li; Wang, Rui; Xiang, Meng; Chen, Sifeng

    2016-08-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal failure. Although acute rejection is not a major issue anymore, chronic rejection, especially vascular rejection, is still a major factor that might lead to allograft dysfunction on the long term. The role of the local immune-regulating cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) in chronic renal allograft is unclear. Many clinical observations showed that local IL-10 level was negatively related to kidney allograft function. It is unknown this negative relationship was the result of immunostimulatory property or insufficient immunosuppression property of local IL-10. We performed ex vivo transduction before transplantation through artery of the renal allograft using adeno-associated viral vectors carrying IL-10 gene. Twelve weeks after transplantation, we found intrarenal IL-10 gene transduction significantly inhibited arterial neointimal proliferation, the number of occluded intrarenal artery, interstitial fibrosis, peritubular capillary congestion and glomerular inflammation in renal allografts compared to control allografts receiving PBS or vectors carrying YFP. IL-10 transduction increased serum IL-10 level at 4 weeks but not at 8 and 12 weeks. Renal IL-10 level increased while serum creatinine decreased significantly in IL-10 group at 12 weeks compared to PBS or YFP controls. Immunohistochemical staining showed unchanged total T cells (CD3) and B cells (CD45R/B220), decreased cytotoxic T cells (CD8), macrophages (CD68) and increased CD4+ and FoxP3+ cells in IL-10 group. In summary, intrarenal IL-10 inhibited the allograft rejection while modulated immune response. PMID:27317647

  14. Urothelial carcinoma of the allograft kidney developed in a renal transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Gökçe, Mehmet İlker; Kocaay, Akın Fırat; Aktürk, Serkan; Tüzüner, Acar

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the best option in the treatment of end-stage renal disease However these patients are under the risk of developing malignancies particularly due to effects of immune supression. These malignancies tend to be more agressive compared to the general population. Here, we present a case of urothelial carcinoma develoing in the ureter of allograft kidney.

  15. Detection and measurement of tubulitis in renal allograft rejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, John B.; Chen, Qi; Jin, Jesse S.; Wang, Yung; Yong, James L. C.

    1997-04-01

    Tubulitis is one of the most reliable signs of acute renal allograft rejection. It occurs when mononuclear cells are localized between the lining tubular epithelial cells with or without disruption of the tubular basement membrane. It has been found that tubulitis takes place predominantly in the regions of the distal convoluted tubules and the cortical collecting system. The image processing tasks are to find the tubule boundaries and to find the relative location of the lymphocytes and epithelial cells and tubule boundaries. The requirement for accuracy applies to determining the relative locations of the lymphocytes and the tubule boundaries. This paper will show how the different sizes and grey values of the lymphocytes and epithelial cells simplify their identification and location. Difficulties in finding the tubule boundaries image processing will be illustrated. It will be shown how proximate location of epithelial cells and the tubule boundary leads to distortion in determination of the calculated boundary. However, in tubulitis the lymphocytes and the tubule boundaries are proximate.In these cases the tubule boundary is adequately resolved and the image processing is satisfactory to determining relativity in location. An adaptive non-linear anisotropic diffusion process is presented for image filtering and segmentation. Multi-layer analysis is used to extract lymphocytes and tubulitis from images. This paper will discuss grading of tissue using the Banff system. The ability to use computer to use computer processing will be argued as obviating problems of reproducability of values for this classification. This paper will also feature discussion of alternative approaches to image processing and provide an assessment of their capability for improving the identification of the tubule boundaries.

  16. Successful treatment of renal allograft and bladder malakoplakia with minimization of immunosuppression and prolonged antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Graves, Angela L; Texler, Michael; Manning, Laurens; Kulkarni, Hemant

    2014-04-01

    Malakoplakia is an unusual granulomatous inflammatory disorder associated with diminished bactericidal action of leucocytes that occurs in immunosuppressed hosts. Cases of renal allograft malakoplakia are generally associated with a poor graft and patient survival. We present the case of a 56-year-old female with allograft and bladder malakoplakia occurring two years after renal transplantation complicated by an early antibody mediated rejection. Following a number of symptomatic urinary tract infections caused by resistant Gram-negative bacilli, a diagnosis of malakoplakia was made by biopsy of a new mass lesion of the renal allograft. Cystoscopy also revealed malakoplakia of the bladder wall. Immunosuppressant regimen was modified. Mycophenolate mofetil was ceased, prednisolone reduced to 5 mg/day and tacrolimus concentrations were carefully monitored to maintain trough serum concentrations of 2-4 μg/L. Concurrently, she received a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics followed by 13 months of dual oral antibiotic therapy with fosfomycin and faropenem. This joint approach resulted in almost complete resolution of allograft malakoplakia lesions and sustained regression of bladder lesions on cystoscopy with histological resolution in bladder lesions. Her renal function has remained stable throughout the illness. If treated with sustained antimicrobial therapy and reduction of immunosuppression, cases of allograft malakoplakia may not necessarily be associated with poor graft survival. PMID:24460630

  17. Can pre-implantation biopsies predict renal allograft function in pediatric renal transplant recipients?

    PubMed Central

    Kari, Jameela A.; Ma, Alison L.; Dufek, Stephanie; Mohamed, Ismail; Mamode, Nizam; Sebire, Neil J.; Marks, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the utility of pre-implantation renal biopsy (PIB) to predict renal allograft outcomes. Methods: This is a retrospective review of all patients that underwent PIB from January 2003 to December 2011 at the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London, United Kingdom. Thirty-two male patients (56%) aged 1.5-16 years (median: 10.2) at the time of transplantation were included in the study and followed-up for 33 (6-78) months. The results were compared with 33 controls. Results: The PIB showed normal histopathological findings in 13 patients (41%), mild chronic vascular changes in 8 (25%), focal tubular atrophy in one, moderate to severe chronic vascular change in 3, mild to moderate acute tubular damage in 6, and tissue was inadequate in one subject. Delayed graft function (DGF) was observed in 3 patients; 2 with vascular changes in PIB, and one with normal histopathological findings. Two subjects with PIB changes lost their grafts. The estimated glomerular filtration rate at 3-, and 6-months post-transplantation was lower in children with abnormal PIB changes compared with those with normal PIB. There was one case of DGF in the control group, and 4 children lost their grafts including the one with DGF. Conclusion: Pre-implantation renal biopsy can provide important baseline information of the graft with implications on subsequent medical treatment for pediatric renal transplant recipients. PMID:26593162

  18. Accumulation of p53 is associated with tumour progression in cutaneous lesions of renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Stark, L. A.; Arends, M. J.; McLaren, K. M.; Benton, E. C.; Shahidullah, H.; Hunter, J. A.; Bird, C. C.

    1994-01-01

    Renal allograft recipients suffer from a markedly increased susceptibility to premalignant and malignant cutaneous lesions. Although various aetiological factors have been implicated, little is known of the associated genetic events. In this study we initially employed immunocytochemical techniques to investigate the prevalence and localisation of accumulated p53 in over 200 cutaneous biopsies (including 56 squamous cell carcinomas) from renal allograft recipients and immunocompetent controls. In renal allograft recipients accumulated p53 was present in 24% of uninvolved skin samples, 14% of viral warts, 41% of premalignant keratoses, 65% of intraepidermal carcinomas and 56% of squamous cell carcinomas [squamous cell carcinoma and intraepidermal carcinoma differed significantly from uninvolved skin (P < 0.005) and viral warts (P < 0.01)]. A similar trend was revealed in immunocompetent patients (an older, chronically sun-exposed population) but with lower prevalence of p53 immunoreactivity: 25% of uninvolved skin samples, 0% of viral warts, 25% of keratoses, 53% of intraepidermal carcinomas and 53% of squamous cell carcinomas. These differences were not statistically significant. Morphologically, p53 immunoreactivity strongly associated with areas of epidermal dysplasia and the abundance of staining correlated positively with the severity of dysplasia. These data suggest that p53 plays a role in skin carcinogenesis and is associated with progression towards the invasive state. No correlation was observed between accumulated p53 and the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in any of the lesions. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis (exons 5-8) was used to determine the frequency of mutated p53 in 28 malignancies with varying degrees of immunopositivity. p53 mutations were found in 5/9 (56%) malignancies with p53 staining in > 50% of cells, reducing to 1/6 (17%) where 10-50% of cells were positively stained and none where < 10% of cells were

  19. Renal failure due to granulomatous interstitial nephritis in native and allograft renal biopsies: experience from a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pallav; Rana, D S; Bhalla, A K; Gupta, Ashwini; Malik, Manish; Gupta, Anurag; Bhargava, Vinant

    2014-10-01

    Granulomatous interstitial nephritis is a rare cause of renal failure in both native and allograft renal biopsies. Drugs and sarcoidosis are the commonest causes of granulomatous interstitial nephritis as reported in Western countries. Unlike the west, tuberculosis is the commonest cause of granulomatous interstitial nephritis in Indian subcontinent. The etiological factors, clinical course, glomerular and tubulointerstitial changes associated with granulomatous interstitial nephritis have been analyzed in the present study along with the outcome in patients with granulomatous interstitial nephritis. PMID:25155448

  20. Improved pregnancy outcome in a patient with renal allograft nephropathy undergoing temporary hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Jayyousi, R; Carr, S; Hodgett, S; Scudamore, I; Howarth, E; Singlehurst, A; Brunskill, N

    2003-12-01

    We report a case of a woman with a poorly functioning renal allograft and a positive anti-cardiolipin antibody who was dialysis-independent and conceived 18 months following her transplant. She was electively maintained on hemodialysis during the pregnancy and delivered a live infant at 31 weeks gestation. Her renal function returned to prepregnancy levels post partum and she remained dialysis-independent. PMID:14690260

  1. Polyoma (BK) virus associated urothelial carcinoma originating within a renal allograft five years following resolution of polyoma virus nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Steven P; Myers-Gurevitch, Patricia M; Chu, Stacy; Robinson, Brian D; Dadhania, Darshana; Seshan, Surya V

    2016-03-01

    A direct role for BK polyomavirus infection in malignant tumors of renal allografts and urinary tract is emerging. Case reports suggest a link between BK virus (BKV) reactivation and development of malignancy in renal allograft recipients. Herein we describe the first case of BKV positive invasive urothelial carcinoma within the renal allograft, presenting with chronic diarrhea and weight loss 5 years following resolution of BK viremia/nephropathy (BKVN). Unique to our case was the remote history of BK viremia/BKVN, rising titer of anti-HLA antibody and presence of renal limited urothelial carcinoma with microinvasion of malignant cells staining positive for SV40 large T antigen (T-Ag). These findings suggest that persistence of subclinical BKV infection within the renal allograft may play a role in the malignant transformation of epithelial cells. Patients with history of BKVN may be at risk for kidney and urinary tract malignancy despite resolution of BK viremia/BKVN. PMID:26709521

  2. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin G deposits complicated by immunoglobulin A nephropathy in the renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Anri; Kawanishi, Kunio; Horita, Shigeru; Koike, Junki; Honda, Kazuho; Ochi, Ayami; Komoda, Mizuki; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Unagami, Kohei; Okumi, Masayoshi; Shimizu, Tomokazu; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari; Nagashima, Yoji; Nitta, Kosaku

    2016-07-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) A nephropathy (IgAN) is a known autoimmune disease due to abnormal glycosylation of IgA1, and occasionally, IgG co-deposition occurs. The prognosis of IgG co-deposition with IgAN is adverse, as shown in the previous studies. However, in the clinical setting, monoclonality of IgG co-deposition with IgAN has not been observed. We describe a case of proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) combined with IgAN in a renal allograft. A-21-year-old man developed end-stage renal failure with unknown aetiology and underwent living-donor kidney transplantation from his mother 2 years after being diagnosed. One year after kidney transplantation, proteinuria 2+ and haematuria 2+ were detected; allograft biopsy revealed mesangial IgA and C3 deposits, indicating a diagnosis of IgAN. After tonsillectomy and steroid pulse therapy, proteinuria and haematuria resolved. However, 4 years after transplantation, pedal oedema, proteinuria (6.89 g/day) and allograft dysfunction (serum creatinine (sCr) 203.3 µmol/L) appeared. A second allograft biopsy showed mesangial expansion and focal segmental proliferative endocapillary lesions with IgA1λ and monoclonal IgG1κ depositions. Electron microscopic analysis revealed a massive amount of deposits, located in the mesangial and subendothelial lesions. A diagnosis of PGNMID complicated with IgAN was made, and rituximab and plasmapheresis were added to steroid pulse therapy. With this treatment, proteinuria was alleviated to 0.5 g/day, and the allograft dysfunction recovered to sCr 132.6 µmol/L. This case suggests a necessity for investigation of PGNMID and IgA nephropathy in renal allografts to detect monoclonal Ig deposition disease. PMID:26971743

  3. Impaired elastin deposition in Fstl1-/- lung allograft under the renal capsule.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yan; Li, Lian; Dong, Yingying; Liu, Xue; Li, Xiao-He; Ning, Wen

    2013-01-01

    Lung alveolar development in late gestation is a process important to postnatal survival. Follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1) is a matricellular protein of the Bmp antagonist class, which is involved in the differentiation/maturation of alveolar epithelial cells during saccular stage of lung development. This study investigates the role of Fstl1 on elastin deposition in mesenchyme and subsequent secondary septation in the late gestation stage of terminal saccular formation. To this aim, we modified the renal capsule allograft model for lung organ culture by grafting diced E15.5 distal lung underneath the renal capsule of syngeneic host and cultured up to 7 days. The saccular development of the diced lung allografts, as indicated by the morphology, epithelial and vascular developments, occurred in a manner similar to that in utero. Fstl1 deficiency caused atelectatic phenotype companied by impaired epithelial differentiation in D3 Fstl1(-/-) lung allografts, which is similar to that of E18.5 Fstl1(-/-) lungs, supporting the role of Fstl1 during saccular stage. Inhibition of Bmp signaling by intraperitoneal injection of dorsomorphin in the host mice rescued the pulmonary atelectasis of D3 Fstl1(-/-) allografts. Furthermore, a marked reduction in elastin expression and deposition was observed in walls of air sacs of E18.5 Fstl1(-/-) lungs and at the tips of the developing alveolar septae of D7 Fstl1(-/-) allografts. Thus, in addition to its role on alveolar epithelium, Fstl1 is crucial for elastin expression and deposition in mesenchyme during lung alveologenesis. Our data demonstrates that the modified renal capsule allograft model for lung organ culture is a robust and efficient technique to increase our understanding of saccular stage of lung development. PMID:24282586

  4. Functional capacity and rehabilitation of recipients with a functioning renal allograft for ten years or more.

    PubMed

    Flechner, S M; Novick, A C; Braun, W E; Popowniak, K L; Steinmuller, D

    1983-06-01

    Forty-nine renal transplant recipients who had a single functioning allograft for ten or more years are reviewed. There were 17 cadaver recipients and 32 living-related recipients. Most patients have enjoyed excellent long-term renal function with stable mean daily dosages of azathioprine and prednisone. Fifty-three percent of patients never experienced a rejection episode, and 24% of patients experienced only one rejection episode. Five recipients (10%) developed malignancy following transplantation. Based on the Karnofsky activity scale, 80% of patients enjoyed unrestricted activity at ten years posttransplant. The two major factors contributing to declining activity were progression of systemic diseases such as atherosclerosis or diabetes, and declining allograft function. Following transplantation, all patients developed renewed interest in sexual activity, all men were potent, and all women experienced regular menses. Nine men achieved fatherhood and five women underwent successful pregnancy. Currently, 46 recipients are alive with a functioning allograft. These data confirm the ability of recipients with a long-term functioning renal allograft to return to the work force, participate in preillness levels of activity, and enjoy sexual activity and parenthood. PMID:6408771

  5. Treatment of Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis Recurrence in the Renal Allograft: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Minh-Ha; Chan, Cynthia; Pasch, Whitney; Carpenter, Philip; Ichii, Hirohito; Foster, Clarence

    2016-01-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) causes glomerular lesions that can progress to end-stage renal disease. It is suspected to be caused by a circulating factor that is amenable to plasmapheresis removal and exhibits a risk for recurrence in the renal allograft. We present two patients with FSGS recurrence in their allograft kidneys diagnosed by biopsy after significant proteinuria developed in the posttransplant setting. Treatment with therapeutic plasma exchange induced long-term remission in both patients. Spot urine protein:creatinine ratios were monitored and treatment was continued until a target of <0.5 was achieved. In patient number two, a second peak in proteinuria and azotemia was ultimately attributable to ureteral stenosis and these values normalized following repair. In conclusion, therapeutic plasma exchange is an effective treatment for FSGS recurring following renal transplant. PMID:27099858

  6. Proteinuria as a Noninvasive Marker for Renal Allograft Histology and Failure: An Observational Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Naesens, Maarten; Lerut, Evelyne; Emonds, Marie-Paule; Herelixka, Albert; Evenepoel, Pieter; Claes, Kathleen; Bammens, Bert; Sprangers, Ben; Meijers, Björn; Jochmans, Ina; Monbaliu, Diethard; Pirenne, Jacques; Kuypers, Dirk R J

    2016-01-01

    Proteinuria is routinely measured to assess renal allograft status, but the diagnostic and prognostic values of this measurement for renal transplant pathology and outcome remain unclear. We included 1518 renal allograft recipients in this prospective, observational cohort study. All renal allograft biopsy samples with concomitant data on 24-hour proteinuria were included in the analyses (n=2274). Patients were followed for ≥7 years post-transplantation. Compared with proteinuria <0.3 g/24 h, the hazard ratios for graft failure were 1.14 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.81 to 1.60; P=0.50), for proteinuria 0.3-1.0 g/24 h, 2.17 (95% CI, 1.49 to 3.18; P<0.001), for proteinuria 1.0-3.0 g/24 h, and 3.01 (95% CI, 1.75 to 5.18; P<0.001), for proteinuria >3.0 g/24 h, independent of GFR and allograft histology. The predictive performance of proteinuria for graft failure was lower at 3 months after transplant (area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve [AUC] 0.64, P<0.001) than at 1, 2, and 5 years after transplant (AUC 0.73, 0.71, and 0.77, respectively, all P<0.001). Independent determinants of proteinuria were repeat transplantation, mean arterial pressure, transplant glomerulopathy, microcirculation inflammation, and de novo/recurrent glomerular disease. The discriminatory power of proteinuria for these intragraft injury processes was better in biopsy samples obtained >3 months after transplant (AUC 0.73, P<0.001) than in those obtained earlier (AUC 0.56, P<0.01), with 85% specificity but lower sensitivity (47.8%) for proteinuria >1.0 g/24 h. These data support current clinical guidelines to routinely measure proteinuria after transplant, but illustrate the need for more sensitive biomarkers of allograft injury and prognosis. PMID:26152270

  7. SPECT- and PET-Based Approaches for Noninvasive Diagnosis of Acute Renal Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Pawelski, Helga; Schnöckel, Uta; Kentrup, Dominik; Grabner, Alexander; Schäfers, Michael; Reuter, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imaging techniques such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography are promising tools for noninvasive diagnosis of acute allograft rejection (AR). Given the importance of renal transplantation and the limitation of available donors, detailed analysis of factors that affect transplant survival is important. Episodes of acute allograft rejection are a negative prognostic factor for long-term graft survival. Invasive core needle biopsies are still the “goldstandard” in rejection diagnostics. Nevertheless, they are cumbersome to the patient and carry the risk of significant graft injury. Notably, they cannot be performed on patients taking anticoagulant drugs. Therefore, a noninvasive tool assessing the whole organ for specific and fast detection of acute allograft rejection is desirable. We herein review SPECT- and PET-based approaches for noninvasive molecular imaging-based diagnostics of acute transplant rejection. PMID:24804257

  8. Elderly recipients of hepatitis C positive renal allografts can quickly develop liver disease.

    PubMed

    Flohr, Tanya R; Bonatti, Hugo; Hranjec, Tjasa; Keith, Doug S; Lobo, Peter I; Kumer, Sean C; Schmitt, Timothy M; Sawyer, Robert G; Pruett, Timothy L; Roberts, John P; Brayman, Kenneth L

    2012-08-01

    Our institution explored using allografts from donors with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) for elderly renal transplantation (RT). Thirteen HCV- elderly recipients were transplanted with HCV+ allografts (eD+/R-) between January 2003 and April 2009. Ninety HCV- elderly recipients of HCV- allografts (eD-/R-), eight HCV+ recipients of HCV+ allografts (D+/R+) and thirteen HCV+ recipients of HCV- allografts (D-/R+) were also transplanted. Median follow-up was 1.5 (range 0.8-5) years. Seven eD+/R- developed a positive HCV viral load and six had elevated liver transaminases with evidence of hepatitis on biopsy. Overall, eD+/R- survival was 46% while the eD-/R- survival was 85% (P = 0.003). Seven eD+/R- died during follow-up. Causes included multi-organ failure and sepsis (n = 4), cancer (n = 1), failure-to-thrive (n = 1) and surgical complications (n = 1). One eD+/R- died from causes directly related to HCV infection. In conclusion, multiple eD+/R- quickly developed HCV-related liver disease and infections were a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality. PMID:22316669

  9. Elderly Recipients of Hepatitis C Positive Renal Allografts Can Quickly Develop Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Flohr, Tanya R.; Bonatti, Hugo; Hranjec, Tjasa; Keith, Doug S.; Lobo, Peter I.; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Sawyer, Robert G.; Pruett, Timothy L.; Roberts, John P.; Brayman, Kenneth L.

    2012-01-01

    Our institution explored using allografts from donors with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) for elderly renal transplantation (RT). Thirteen HCV− elderly recipients were transplanted with HCV+ allografts (eD+/R−) between January 2003 and April 2009. Ninety HCV− elderly recipients of HCV− allografts (eD−/R−), eight HCV+ recipients of HCV+ allografts (D+/R+) and thirteen HCV+ recipients of HCV− allografts (D−/R+) were also transplanted. Median follow-up was 1.5 (range 0.8–5) years. Seven eD+/R− developed a positive HCV viral load and six had elevated liver transaminases with evidence of hepatitis on biopsy. Overall, eD+/R− survival was 46% while the eD−/R− survival was 85% (P = 0.003). Seven eD+/R− died during follow-up. Causes included multi-organ failure and sepsis (n = 4), cancer (n = 1), failure-to-thrive (n = 1) and surgical complications (n = 1). One eD+/R− died from causes directly related to HCV infection. In conclusion, multiple eD+/R− quickly developed HCV-related liver disease and infections were a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality. PMID:22316669

  10. Concentration of In-111-oxine-labeled autologous leukocytes in noninfected and nonrejecting renal allografts: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, B.D.; Isitman, A.T.; Kaufman, H.M.; Rao, S.A.; Knobel, J.; Hellman, R.S.; Zielonka, J.S.; Pelc, L.

    1984-02-01

    Autologous leukocytes labeled with In-111 oxine (ILL) concentrated in the renal allografts of eight patients for whom transplant rejection, infection, or acute tubular necrosis (ATN) could be excluded. All patients had good-to-adequate renal function at the time of ILL scintigraphy, and none developed rejection or renal transplant failure during a 1-mo follow-up period. It is concluded that normally functioning renal allografts without evidence of rejection, infection, or ATN often will concentrate ILL. When a baseline study is not available for comparison, this phenomenon limits the value of ILL scintigraphy as a diagnostic test for transplant rejection or infection.

  11. Apoptosis and expression of cytotoxic T lymphocyte effector molecules in renal allografts.

    PubMed

    Olive, C; Cheung, C; Falk, M C

    1999-03-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) mediated apoptosis is thought to play a major role in the rejection of renal allografts following transplantation, however, the CTL effector mechanism that is primarily responsible for immunological rejection is unknown. The two major effector pathways of CTL killing which lead to apoptosis involve the Fas/Fas ligand (Fas L) lytic pathway, and the perforin/granzyme degranulation pathway. The expression of CTL effector molecules which influence these pathways include Fas, Fas L and TiA-1 (cytotoxic granule protein). This study has investigated apoptosis by in situ terminal deoxytransferase-catalysed DNA nick end labelling (TUNEL), and the expression of CTL effector molecules by immunohistochemistry, in renal allograft biopsies obtained from patients following kidney transplantation. Renal biopsies were classified into three histological groups; acute cellular rejection, chronic rejection, or no rejection. The extent of T-cell infiltration of renal tissues was assessed by immunohistochemical staining with an anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody. Numerous TUNEL positive cells were detected in all transplant biopsies examined; these consisted mainly of renal tubular cells and infiltrating cells, with some TUNEL positive cells also detected in the glomeruli. In the case of normal kidney tissue, renal cells also stained positive for TUNEL but there was no lymphocytic infiltration. There was significantly more T-cell infiltration observed in acute rejection biopsies compared to the no rejection biopsies. In the case of Fas L expression, there was little expression in all three biopsy groups, apart from one case of chronic rejection. Conversely, although there were no significant differences in TiA-1 expression between the three biopsy groups, TiA-1 expression was more prominent in acute rejection biopsies. Furthermore, Fas expression was significantly decreased in acute rejection biopsies when compared to those of chronic and no rejection in which Fas

  12. Deaths from Occlusive Arterial Disease in Renal Allograft Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Ibels, L. S.; Stewart, J. H.; Mahony, J. F.; Sheil, A. G. R.

    1974-01-01

    In a series of 325 recipients of cadaveric renal transplants sudden occlusive arterial disease was found to be responsible for 12% of deaths. Acute myocardial infarction (9%) occurred 25 times more than expected in the normal population and cerebral thrombosis (3%) 300 times more. The greatest loss was in the initial three-month period after transplantation. Patients with renal failure due to essential hypertension were especially at risk, accounting for six of the 12 deaths. PMID:4606408

  13. Graft vasculopathy in the skin of a human hand allograft: implications for diagnosis of rejection of vascularized composite allografts.

    PubMed

    Kanitakis, Jean; Karayannopoulou, Georgia; Lanzetta, Marco; Petruzzo, Palmina

    2014-11-01

    Whereas vascularized composite allografts often undergo acute rejections early in the postgraft period, rejection manifesting with severe vascular changes (graft vasculopathy) has only been observed on three occasions in humans. We report a hand-allografted patient who developed severe rejection following discontinuation of the immunosuppressive treatment. It manifested clinically with erythematous maculopapules on the skin and pathologically with graft vasculopathy that affected both large vessels and smaller cutaneous ones. The observation that graft vasculopathy can affect skin vessels shows that it is amenable to diagnosis with usual skin biopsy as recommended for the follow-up of these allografts. Graft vasculopathy developing in the setting of vascularized composite allografts likely represents chronic rejection due to under-immunosuppression and, if confirmed, should be included in a future update of the Banff classification of vascularized composite allograft rejection. PMID:25041139

  14. Non-immunologic predictors of chronic renal allograft failure: data from the United Network of Organ Sharing.

    PubMed

    Chertow, G M; Brenner, B M; Mackenzie, H S; Milford, E L

    1995-12-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical experience suggest that non-immunologic factors are important predictors of long-term renal allograft survival. It has been suggested that chronic allograft failure may in some cases by mediated by non-immunologic factors implicated in the pathobiology of other forms of progressive renal disease. Donor age, sex, and race may influence the "dose" of nephrons delivered in cadaveric renal transplantation. The United Network of Organ Sharing 1994 Public Use Data Tape was used to evaluate these and other risk factors in more than 31,000 recipients of cadaver allografts followed between 1987 and 1992. Female sex and African American race of the donor were important predictors of allograft failure. There was a markedly increased risk of allograft failure at both extremes of donor age. Recipients of large body size had accelerated graft loss. Stratified analyses suggested an interaction between donor and recipient race; nevertheless, all non-immunologic factors examined expressed independent associations with allograft survival. In sum, antigen-independent factors appear to be important determinants of allograft performance. Additional multivariable analyses are required to assess the relative importance of these factors compared with other known immunologic factors, such as HLA antigen mismatch. These findings may have important biomedical and health care policy implications. PMID:8587283

  15. Monocytic Tissue Transglutaminase in a Rat Model for Reversible Acute Rejection and Chronic Renal Allograft Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewicz, Anna; Atanasova, Srebrena; Padberg, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    Acute rejection is a major risk factor for chronic allograft injury (CAI). Blood leukocytes interacting with allograft endothelial cells during acute rejection were suggested to contribute to the still enigmatic pathogenesis of CAI. We hypothesize that tissue transglutaminase (Tgm2), a multifunctional protein and established marker of M2 macrophages, is involved in acute and chronic graft rejection. We focus on leukocytes accumulating in blood vessels of rat renal allografts (Fischer-344 to Lewis), an established model for reversible acute rejection and CAI. Monocytes in graft blood vessels overexpress Tgm2 when acute rejection peaks on day 9 after transplantation. Concomitantly, caspase-3 is activated, suggesting that Tgm2 expression is linked to apoptosis. After resolution of acute rejection on day 42, leukocytic Tgm2 levels are lower and activated caspase-3 does not differ among isografts and allografts. Cystamine was applied for 4 weeks after transplantation to inhibit extracellular transglutaminase activity, which did, however, not reduce CAI in the long run. In conclusion, this is the first report on Tgm2 expression by monocytes in vivo. Tgm2 may be involved in leukocytic apoptosis and thus in reversion of acute rejection. However, our data do not support a role of extracellular transglutaminase activity as a factor triggering CAI during self-limiting acute rejection. PMID:26063971

  16. Utility of Iron Staining in Identifying the Cause of Renal Allograft Dysfunction in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingchun; Doshi, Mona; Khan, Salman; Li, Wei; Zhang, Ping L

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell nephropathy (SCN) is associated with iron/heme deposition in proximal renal tubules and related acute tubular injury (ATI). Here we report the utility of iron staining in differentiating causes of renal allograft dysfunction in patients with a history of sickle cell disease. Case 1: the patient developed acute allograft dysfunction two years after renal transplant. Her renal biopsy showed ATI, supported by patchy loss of brush border and positive staining of kidney injury molecule-1 in proximal tubular epithelial cells, where diffuse increase in iron staining (2+) was present. This indicated that ATI likely resulted from iron/heme toxicity to proximal tubules. Electron microscope confirmed aggregated sickle RBCs in glomeruli, indicating a recurrent SCN. Case 2: four years after renal transplant, the patient developed acute allograft dysfunction and became positive for serum donor-specific antibody. His renal biopsy revealed thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) and diffuse positive C4d stain in peritubular capillaries. Iron staining was negative in the renal tubules, implying that TMA was likely associated with acute antibody-mediated rejection (AAMR, type 2) rather than recurrent SCN. These case reports imply that iron staining is an inexpensive but effective method in distinguishing SCN-associated renal injury in allograft kidney from other etiologies. PMID:26697257

  17. Impact of specimen adequacy on the assessment of renal allograft biopsy specimens

    PubMed Central

    Cimen, S.; Geldenhuys, L.; Guler, S.; Imamoglu, A.; Molinari, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Banff classification was introduced to achieve uniformity in the assessment of renal allograft biopsies. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of specimen adequacy on the Banff classification. All renal allograft biopsies obtained between July 2010 and June 2012 for suspicion of acute rejection were included. Pre-biopsy clinical data on suspected diagnosis and time from renal transplantation were provided to a nephropathologist who was blinded to the original pathological report. Second pathological readings were compared with the original to assess agreement stratified by specimen adequacy. Cohen's kappa test and Fisher's exact test were used for statistical analyses. Forty-nine specimens were reviewed. Among these specimens, 81.6% were classified as adequate, 6.12% as minimal, and 12.24% as unsatisfactory. The agreement analysis among the first and second readings revealed a kappa value of 0.97. Full agreement between readings was found in 75% of the adequate specimens, 66.7 and 50% for minimal and unsatisfactory specimens, respectively. There was no agreement between readings in 5% of the adequate specimens and 16.7% of the unsatisfactory specimens. For the entire sample full agreement was found in 71.4%, partial agreement in 20.4% and no agreement in 8.2% of the specimens. Statistical analysis using Fisher's exact test yielded a P value above 0.25 showing that - probably due to small sample size - the results were not statistically significant. Specimen adequacy may be a determinant of a diagnostic agreement in renal allograft specimen assessment. While additional studies including larger case numbers are required to further delineate the impact of specimen adequacy on the reliability of histopathological assessments, specimen quality must be considered during clinical decision making while dealing with biopsy reports based on minimal or unsatisfactory specimens. PMID:27119314

  18. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency as a rare cause of renal allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kaartinen, Kati; Hemmilä, Ulla; Salmela, Kaija; Räisänen-Sokolowski, Anne; Kouri, Timo; Mäkelä, Satu

    2014-04-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder manifesting as urolithiasis or crystalline nephropathy. It leads to the generation of large amounts of poorly soluble 2,8-dihydroxyadenine excreted in urine, yielding kidney injury and in some patients, kidney failure. Early recognition of the disease, institution of xanthine analog therapy to block the formation of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine, high fluid intake, and low purine diet prevent CKD. Because of symptom variability and lack of awareness, however, the diagnosis is sometimes extremely deferred. We describe a patient with adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency who was diagnosed during evaluation of a poorly functioning second kidney allograft. This report highlights the risk of renal allograft loss in patients with undiagnosed adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency and the need for improved early detection of this disease. PMID:24459232

  19. Reduction of delayed renal allograft function using sequential immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Müller, T; Ruffingshofer, D; Bidmon, B; Arbeiter, K; Balzar, E; Aufricht, C

    2001-08-01

    Previous data suggested that outcome in small children with cadaveric renal transplantation might be improved with sequential therapy. This protocol combines augmented immunosuppression [by including antibody induction (ATG)] with avoidance of nephrotoxic medication in the immediate postoperative phase (by delayed start of cyclosporin therapy). In this report, we describe effects of this approach in 12 consecutively transplanted small children of less than 5 years of age (mean 3.2 years) who received a cadaveric renal graft at our institution between 1991 and 1998. Up to 1996 triple therapy (prednisolone, azathioprine, cyclosporin) and since 1997 sequential therapy (prednisolone, azathioprine, ATG until serum creatinine <2 mg/dl, then cyclosporin) was used for immunosuppression. Five children had delayed graft function (45.4%), all of whom were treated with triple therapy including cyclosporin from the very beginning, whereas children treated by the sequential protocol gained immediate graft function (P<0.05). There was no statistical difference between the two protocols concerning frequency or severity of rejections (67% vs. 60%, all steroid responsive), difference in the incidence of either bacterial or viral infections, or between the incidence of hypertension. Although not reaching statistical significance, 1-year graft survival rates also increased from 60% for triple therapy to 80% for sequential therapy. In conclusion, our findings confirm previous studies showing that outcome in small children undergoing renal transplantation may be improved by specially tailored treatment protocols such as sequential therapy. PMID:11519888

  20. The effect of cyclosporin A on peripheral blood T cell subpopulations in renal allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Sweny, P; Tidman, N

    1982-01-01

    Treatment with cyclosporin A (CyA) produces a reversal of the normal ratio of OKT4+ (inducer type) to OKT84 (suppressor-cytotoxic type) cells so that renal allograft recipients on CyA alone develop a four-fold increase in the absolute number of circulating OKT8 positive cells. Conventional immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisolone reduces both populations of T cells without altering the ratio of OKT4+ to OKT8+ cells. This effect of CyA may help to explain its action as an immunosuppressive agent. PMID:6210475

  1. Functional and histological improvement after everolimus rescue of chronic allograft dysfunction in renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Kai Ming; Szeto, Cheuk Chun; Lai, Fernand Mac-Moune; Luk, Cathy Choi-Wan; Kwan, Bonnie Ching-Ha; Leung, Chi Bon; Li, Philip Kam-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Background We tested the strategy of mTOR inhibitors with calcineurin inhibitor minimization in renal transplant recipients with known chronic allograft dysfunction. Methods In this open-label, single-arm study, renal transplant patients were recruited after biopsy-confirmed chronic allograft dysfunction in the absence of acute rejection episode within 2 months, with proteinuria <0.8 g/day, and serum creatinine <220 μmol/L or estimated glomerular filtration rate >40 mL/min/1.73 m2. They were converted to everolimus (aiming for trough everolimus level 3–8 ng/mL) with cyclosporine minimization, to assess the effect on renal function, rate of glomerular filtration rate decline, and longitudinal transplant biopsy at 12 months. Results Seventeen Chinese patients (median transplant duration, 4.2 years) were recruited; no patients discontinued study medication. The mean slope of the glomerular filtration rate over time was −4.31±6.65 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year in the year before everolimus, as compared with 1.29±5.84 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year in the 12 months of everolimus therapy, a difference of 5.61 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40–10.8) favoring everolimus therapy (P=0.036). Serial renal biopsy histology showed significant decrease of tubular atrophy (15.7%±11.3% versus 7.1%±7.3%, P=0.005) and interstitial fibrosis (14.8%±11.5% versus 7.2%±8.2%, P=0.013). Intrarenal expression of TGF-β1 mRNA showed a nonsignificant decrease after everolimus treatment. Conclusion In renal transplant recipients with biopsy-confirmed chronic allograft dysfunction, we found a significant beneficial effect of everolimus rescue therapy and calcineurin inhibitor minimization strategy on the improvement of glomerular filtration rate decline rate. In secondary analysis, everolimus was shown to slow down the disease progression by reducing the tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis scoring. PMID:26056462

  2. Implementation and Results of a Percutaneous Renal Allograft Biopsy Protocol to Reduce Complication Rate.

    PubMed

    Li, Charles H; Traube, Laura E; Lu, David S; Raman, Steven S; Danovitch, Gabriel M; Gritsch, Hans A; McWilliams, Justin P

    2016-05-01

    Percutaneous renal transplant biopsy (PRTB) is the gold standard for evaluating allograft rejection after renal transplant. Hemorrhage is the predominant complication. We describe the implementation of a standardized protocol for PRTB at a single institution, with the aim of reducing bleeding complications. Utilizing the plan-do-study-act model for quality improvement, we created and deployed a protocol centered on controlling patient's hypertension, platelet function, and anticoagulation status. The 4-year study encompassed a total of 880 PRTBs, before and after implementation of the protocol. Total complication rate, which was 5.8% in the 2 years leading up to implementation of the protocol, was reduced to 2.9% after the protocol was introduced (P = .04). A standardized approach to PRTB can potentially lower complication rates; we present a framework for implementating a quality improvement protocol at other institutions. PMID:26970700

  3. Quantitative podocyte parameters predict human native kidney and allograft half-lives

    PubMed Central

    Cibrik, Diane; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Min; Kikuchi, Masao; Wickman, Larysa; Samaniego, Milagros; Bitzer, Markus; Wiggins, Jocelyn E.; Ojo, Akinlolu; Li, Yi; Wiggins, Roger C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Kidney function decreases with age. A potential mechanistic explanation for kidney and allograft half-life has evolved through the realization that linear reduction in glomerular podocyte density could drive progressive glomerulosclerosis to impact both native kidney and allograft half-lives. METHODS Predictions from podometrics (quantitation of podocyte parameters) were tested using independent pathologic, functional, and outcome data for native kidneys and allografts derived from published reports and large registries. RESULTS With age, native kidneys exponentially develop glomerulosclerosis, reduced renal function, and end-stage kidney disease, projecting a finite average kidney life span. The slope of allograft failure rate versus age parallels that of reduction in podocyte density versus age. Quantitative modeling projects allograft half-life at any donor age, and rate of podocyte detachment parallels the observed allograft loss rate. CONCLUSION Native kidneys are designed to have a limited average life span of about 100–140 years. Allografts undergo an accelerated aging-like process that accounts for their unexpectedly short half-life (about 15 years), the observation that older donor age is associated with shorter allograft half-life, and the fact that long-term allograft survival has not substantially improved. Podometrics provides potential readouts for these processes, thereby offering new approaches for monitoring and intervention. FUNDING National Institutes of Health. PMID:27280173

  4. Hepcidin as a Biomarker of Impaired Renal Function in Rat Models for Chronic Allograft Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Xue, Dong; Zhou, Cuixing; Shi, Yunbo; Lu, Hao; He, Xiaozhou

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND To explore the use of hepcidin as a marker of impaired renal function in a rat model for chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). MATERIAL AND METHODS Twenty-four models were developed and 20 models were included in this study, using Fisher (F344) rats (donors) and Lewis rats (recipients). Renal function tests were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Hepcidin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and erythropoietin levels in serum and urine were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To observe pathological changes in the kidneys, 10 rats each were sacrificed at 2 months and 4 months after surgery. RESULTS After transplantation, the serum hepcidin and IL-6 levels increased, while urine hepcidin levels decreased. Erythropoietin levels showed a similar trend; all P<0.05. Serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen significantly increased post-operatively, with SCr positively correlating with serum hepcidin. Serum hepcidin positively correlated with IL-6 and negatively correlated with EPO. Histopathological results were consistent with CAN, after transplantation. CONCLUSIONS Hepcidin may be considered as a potential marker of impaired renal function. PMID:26907911

  5. Hepcidin as a Biomarker of Impaired Renal Function in Rat Models for Chronic Allograft Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Dong; Zhou, Cuixing; Shi, Yunbo; Lu, Hao; He, Xiaozhou

    2016-01-01

    Background To explore the use of hepcidin as a marker of impaired renal function in a rat model for chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). Material/Methods Twenty-four models were developed and 20 models were included in this study, using Fisher (F344) rats (donors) and Lewis rats (recipients). Renal function tests were performed preoperatively and postoperatively. Hepcidin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and erythropoietin levels in serum and urine were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To observe pathological changes in the kidneys, 10 rats each were sacrificed at 2 months and 4 months after surgery. Results After transplantation, the serum hepcidin and IL-6 levels increased, while urine hepcidin levels decreased. Erythropoietin levels showed a similar trend; all P<0.05. Serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen significantly increased post-operatively, with SCr positively correlating with serum hepcidin. Serum hepcidin positively correlated with IL-6 and negatively correlated with EPO. Histopathological results were consistent with CAN, after transplantation. Conclusions Hepcidin may be considered as a potential marker of impaired renal function. PMID:26907911

  6. Interaction between omeprazole and tacrolimus in renal allograft recipients: a clinical-analytical study.

    PubMed

    Pascual, J; Marcén, R; Orea, O E; Navarro, M; Alarcón, M C; Ocaña, J; Villafruela, J J; Burgos, F J; Ortuño, J

    2005-11-01

    Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor with a number of pharmacokinetic drug interactions due to interference with cytochrome P450. Some studies show absence of relevant interaction between omeprazole and cyclosporine, but little is known about possible interactions between omeprazole and tacrolimus. In vitro studies suggest such interference, but no clinical data are available so far. We assessed interactions between omeprazole and tacrolimus among patients fulfilling two criteria: (1) renal allograft recipients receiving immunosuppression based on tacrolimus and acid-related disorder prophylaxis with omeprazole 20 mg/d since the day of the transplant procedure and (2) stopped omeprazole when it was considered unnecessary. Fifty-one transplant recipients received concomitant immunosuppression with MMF-prednisone (n = 47) or azathioprine-prednisone (n = 1), or rapamycin-prednisone (n = 2) or only prednisone (n = 1). omeprazole was stopped after 6.2 +/- 3 months of treatment. Tacrolimus doses and levels were recorded during 3 outpatient visits before omeprazole withdrawal (Pre3/Pre2/Pre1), at the withdrawal visit (Susp), and at 3 visits after withdrawal (Pos1/Pos2/Pos3). Weight gain was significant (72.5 +/- 13 kg Pre3; 73.4 +/- 13 kg Susp; 74 +/- 12.9 kg Pos3, P < .0001) and serum creatinine (SCr) decreased (1.70 +/- 0.49 mg/dL Pre3; 1.63 + 0.49 Susp; 1.58 +/- 0.48 Pos3, P < .0001). The progressive decrease in tacrolimus doses and levels was significant (ANOVA including the 7 visits <0.01 in all cases); whereas the level/dose ratio remained constant. Tacrolimus doses and levels continued a slow, progressive and significant decrease without any relevant change between visits during on versus off omeprazole. This clinical-analytical study supported the conclusion that an omeprazole-tacrolimus interaction is not clinically relevant. Despite possible competition or interaction at the molecular level, clinical management was not significantly affected in renal allograft

  7. Urine Metabolite Profiles Predictive of Human Kidney Allograft Status.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Karsten; Schwartz, Joseph E; Sharma, Vijay K; Chen, Qiuying; Lee, John R; Muthukumar, Thangamani; Dadhania, Darshana M; Ding, Ruchuang; Ikle, David N; Bridges, Nancy D; Williams, Nikki M; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Karoly, Edward D; Mohney, Robert P; Abecassis, Michael; Friedewald, John; Knechtle, Stuart J; Becker, Yolanda T; Samstein, Benjamin; Shaked, Abraham; Gross, Steven S; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2016-02-01

    Noninvasive diagnosis and prognostication of acute cellular rejection in the kidney allograft may help realize the full benefits of kidney transplantation. To investigate whether urine metabolites predict kidney allograft status, we determined levels of 749 metabolites in 1516 urine samples from 241 kidney graft recipients enrolled in the prospective multicenter Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation-04 study. A metabolite signature of the ratio of 3-sialyllactose to xanthosine in biopsy specimen-matched urine supernatants best discriminated acute cellular rejection biopsy specimens from specimens without rejection. For clinical application, we developed a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based assay that enabled absolute and rapid quantification of the 3-sialyllactose-to-xanthosine ratio in urine samples. A composite signature of ratios of 3-sialyllactose to xanthosine and quinolinate to X-16397 and our previously reported urinary cell mRNA signature of 18S ribosomal RNA, CD3ε mRNA, and interferon-inducible protein-10 mRNA outperformed the metabolite signatures and the mRNA signature. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve for the composite metabolite-mRNA signature was 0.93, and the signature was diagnostic of acute cellular rejection with a specificity of 84% and a sensitivity of 90%. The composite signature, developed using solely biopsy specimen-matched urine samples, predicted future acute cellular rejection when applied to pristine samples taken days to weeks before biopsy. We conclude that metabolite profiling of urine offers a noninvasive means of diagnosing and prognosticating acute cellular rejection in the human kidney allograft, and that the combined metabolite and mRNA signature is diagnostic and prognostic of acute cellular rejection with very high accuracy. PMID:26047788

  8. Detecting Renal Allograft Inflammation Using Quantitative Urine Metabolomics and CXCL10

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Julie; Sharma, Atul; Mandal, Rupasri; Wishart, David S.; Wiebe, Chris; Storsley, Leroy; Karpinski, Martin; Gibson, Ian W.; Nickerson, Peter W.; Rush, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to characterize urinary metabolomics for the noninvasive detection of cellular inflammation and to determine if adding urinary chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10) improves the overall diagnostic discrimination. Methods Urines (n = 137) were obtained before biopsy in 113 patients with no (n = 66), mild (borderline or subclinical; n = 58), or severe (clinical; n = 13) rejection from a prospective cohort of adult renal transplant patients (n = 113). Targeted, quantitative metabolomics was performed with direct flow injection tandem mass spectrometry using multiple reaction monitoring (ABI 4000 Q-Trap). Urine CXCL10 was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A projection on latent structures discriminant analysis was performed and validated using leave-one-out cross-validation, and an optimal 2-component model developed. Chemokine ligand 10 area under the curve (AUC) was determined and net reclassification index and integrated discrimination index analyses were performed. Results PLS2 demonstrated that urinary metabolites moderately discriminated the 3 groups (Cohen κ, 0.601; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.46-0.74; P < 0.001). Using binary classifiers, urinary metabolites and CXCL10 demonstrated an AUC of 0.81 (95% CI, 0.74-0.88) and 0.76 (95% CI, 0.68-0.84), respectively, and a combined AUC of 0.84 (95% CI, 0.78-0.91) for detecting alloimmune inflammation that was improved by net reclassification index and integrated discrimination index analyses. Urinary CXCL10 was the best univariate discriminator, followed by acylcarnitines and hexose. Conclusions Urinary metabolomics can noninvasively discriminate noninflamed renal allografts from those with subclinical and clinical inflammation, and the addition of urine CXCL10 had a modest but significant effect on overall diagnostic performance. These data suggest that urinary metabolomics and CXCL10 may be useful for noninvasive monitoring of alloimmune inflammation in renal

  9. In situ expression of cytokines in human heart allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Van Hoffen, E.; Van Wichen, D.; Stuij, I.; De Jonge, N.; Klöpping, C.; Lahpor, J.; Van Den Tweel, J.; Gmelig-Meyling, F.; De Weger, R.

    1996-01-01

    Although allograft rejection, the major complication of human organ transplantation, has been extensively studied, little is known about the exact cellular localization of the cytokine expression inside the graft during rejection. Therefore, we used in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to study local cytokine mRNA and protein expression in human heart allografts, in relation to the phenotypical characteristics of the cellular infiltrate. Clear expression of mRNA for interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-9, and IL-10 and weak expression for IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha was detected in biopsies exhibiting high rejection grades (grade 3A/B). Also at lower grades of rejection, mRNA for IL-6 and IL-9 was present. Some mRNA for IL-1 beta, TNF-beta, and interferon (IFN)-gamma was detected in only a few biopsies. Using immunohistochemistry, IL-2, IL-3, and IL-10 protein was detected in biopsies with high rejection grades, whereas few cells expressed IL-6, IL-8, and IFN-gamma. In biopsies with lower grades of rejection, a weaker expression of these cytokines was observed. IL-4 was hardly detected in any of the biopsies. The level of IL-12 expression was equal in all biopsies. Although mRNA expression of several cytokines was expressed at a low level compared with the protein level of those cytokines, there was a good correlation between localization of cytokine mRNA and protein. Expression of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma was mainly detected in lymphocytes. IL-3, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12 were not detected or not only detected in lymphocytes but also in other stromal elements (eg, macrophages). Macrophage production of IL-3 and IL-12 was confirmed by immunofluorescent double labeling with CD68. We conclude that cardiac allograft rejection is not simply regulated by T helper cell cytokine production, but other intragraft elements contribute considerably to this process. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8952534

  10. Sequential cytokine dynamics in chronic rejection of rat renal allografts: roles for cytokines RANTES and MCP-1.

    PubMed Central

    Nadeau, K C; Azuma, H; Tilney, N L

    1995-01-01

    Chronic rejection, the most important cause of long-term graft failure, is thought to result from both alloantigen-dependent and -independent factors. To examine these influences, cytokine dynamics were assessed by semiquantitative competitive reverse transcriptase-PCR and by immunohistology in an established rat model of chronic rejection lf renal allografts. Isograft controls develop morphologic and immunohistologic changes that are similar to renal allograft changes, although quantitatively less intense and at a delayed speed; these are thought to occur secondary to antigen-independent events. Sequential cytokine expression was determined throughout the process. During an early reversible allograft rejection episode, both T-cell associated [interleukin (IL) 2, IL-2 receptor, IL-4, and interferon gamma] and macrophage (IL-1 alpha, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and IL-6) products were up-regulated despite transient immunosuppression. RANTES (regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted) peaked at 2 weeks; intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) was maximally expressed at 6 weeks. Macrophage products such as monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) increased dramatically (to 10 times), presaging intense peak macrophage infiltration at 16 weeks. In contrast, in isografts, ICAM-1 peaked at 24 weeks. MCP-1 was maximally expressed at 52 weeks, commensurate with a progressive increase in infiltrating macrophages. Cytokine expression in the spleen of allograft and isograft recipients was insignificant. We conclude that chronic rejection of kidney allografts in rats is predominantly a local macrophage-dependent event with intense up-regulation of macrophage products such as MCP-1, IL-6, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. The cytokine expression in isografts emphasizes the contribution of antigen-independent events. The dynamics of RANTES expression between early and late phases of chronic rejection suggest a key role in mediating the events of the

  11. Tubular and endothelial chimerism in renal allografts using fluorescence and chromogenic in situ hybridization (FISH, CISH) technology.

    PubMed

    Varga, Zsuzsanna; Gaspert, Ariana; Behnke, Silvia; von Teichman, Adriana; Fritzsche, Florian; Fehr, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    The role of endothelial and tubular chimerism in renal allograft adaptation and rejection varies in different studies. We addressed the correlation between different clinico-pathological settings and sex-chromosomal endothelial and/or tubular chimerism in renal allografts. We examined the presence or absence of the X and Y chromosomes by fluorescence and chromogenic in situ hybridization (FISH, CISH) methodology on paraffin embedded kidney biopsies in 16 gender mismatched renal transplants (1 to 12 years post-transplantation). Twelve patients were male, four female. Four groups were selected: (i) Vascular calcineurin inhibitor toxicity without rejection; (ii) T-cell mediated vascular rejection; (iii) antibody mediated rejection; and (iv) C4d-positivity in AB0-incompatible transplants with or without rejection. Twelve non-transplant kidney biopsies (8 female, 4 male) were used as controls. Tubular chimerism was detected more frequently (69%) than endothelial chimerism (12%) in renal transplants. One of 12 control patients had tubular and endothelial chimeric cells (8%). The Y chromosome occurred in 8/12 male recipients (67%) in tubular epithelial cells and in 5/12 male recipients (42%) in endothelial cells. Double X chromosomes were detected in 3/4 female recipients in tubular epithelium. Tubular chimerism occurred more often with endothelial chimerism and capillaritis without correlation with other parameters, such as rejection. Combined Y chromosomal tubular and lymphatic endothelial chimerism correlated with T-cell mediated vascular rejection in two out of three patients (66%). Combined Y chromosomal tubular and peritubular capillary chimerism correlated with antibody mediated C4d+ rejection in one out of two patients (50%). Tubular and/or endothelial chimerism occur frequently in gender mismatched renal allografts and, when combined, this is associated with T-cell mediated rejection. PMID:22449229

  12. Successful treatment of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) following renal allografting is associated with sustained CD8(+) T-cell restoration.

    PubMed

    Porcu, Pierluigi; Eisenbeis, Charles F; Pelletier, Ronald P; Davies, Elizabeth A; Baiocchi, Robert A; Roychowdhury, Sameek; Vourganti, Srinivas; Nuovo, Gerard J; Marsh, William L; Ferketich, Amy K; Henry, Mitchell L; Ferguson, Ronald M; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2002-10-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a life-threatening Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B-cell malignancy occurring in 1% to 2% of renal transplantation patients. Host- and PTLD-related factors determining the likelihood of tumor response following reduction of immune suppression (IS) and antiviral therapy remain largely unknown. Standard therapy for PTLD is not well established. Eleven consecutive renal transplantation patients who developed EBV-positive PTLD 8 to 94 months after allografting were uniformly treated with acyclovir and IS reduction. All PTLDs were EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Ten patients (91%) obtained a durable complete response (CR), and 9 (82%) have remained in continuous CR with a median follow-up of 29 months. Five patients (45%) lost their allograft. Of these, 4 patients had PTLD affecting the transplanted kidney. Peripheral blood CD8(+) T cells increased significantly (P =.0078) from baseline in 8 responders available for analysis. One of 2 patients whose absolute CD8(+) T-cell count subsequently dropped to baseline after IS reduction relapsed. The expanded CD8(+) T cells from 2 responders specifically recognized an immunodominant peptide from the EBV lytic gene BZLF-1. Another lytic EBV gene, thymidine kinase, was expressed in all 8 PTLDs tested. IS reduction and antiviral therapy for PTLD after renal transplantation is a highly successful therapeutic combination, but the risk of graft rejection is significant, particularly in patients with PTLD involving the renal allograft. A sustained expansion of CD8(+) T cells and a cellular immune response to EBV lytic antigens may be important for PTLD clearance in renal transplantation patients. PMID:12239141

  13. A single center's approach to discriminating donor versus host origin of renal neoplasia in the allograft kidney.

    PubMed

    Robin, Adam J; Cohen, Eric P; Chongkrairatanakul, Tepsiri; Saad, Ehad; Mackinnon, A Craig

    2016-08-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in the allograft of kidney transplant recipient (KTR) patients is rare and may represent a de novo process arising from the transplanted organ or metastasis from a clinically undetectable host primary. Determination of host versus donor origin is important for staging and management. We report our experience utilizing Penta-C (PC) and Penta-D (PD) short-tandem repeat (STR) microsatellite analysis to discriminate between host and donor origin of RCC identified in renal allografts. We identified 5 KTR patients with RCC in the allograft kidney. The PC and PD microsatellite analysis was applied to tumor, host, and donor formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections and/or fresh blood leukocytes to identify the origin of the neoplastic cells. The PC and PD microsatellite alleles were robustly amplified in all samples. Each case showed one or more informative alleles indicating that the neoplastic cells originate from donor tissue. Allele frequency data indicate that by using both PC and PD markers, we will be able to discriminate between host and donor cell of origin in over 99% of cases. The PC and PD microsatellite analysis is a convenient, robust, and efficient strategy to determine donor versus host origin or RCC in transplant kidney specimens. PMID:27402221

  14. Circulating NK-cell subsets in renal allograft recipients with anti-HLA donor-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Crespo, M; Yelamos, J; Redondo, D; Muntasell, A; Perez-Saéz, M J; López-Montañés, M; García, C; Torio, A; Mir, M; Hernández, J J; López-Botet, M; Pascual, J

    2015-03-01

    Detection of posttransplant donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSA) constitutes a risk factor for kidney allograft loss. Together with complement activation, NK-cell antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) has been proposed to contribute to the microvascular damage associated to humoral rejection. In the present observational exploratory study, we have tried to find a relationship of circulating donor-specific and non donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSA and HLA non-DSA) with peripheral blood NK-cell subsets and clinical features in 393 renal allograft recipients. Multivariate analysis indicated that retransplantation and pretransplant sensitization were associated with detection of posttransplant DSA. Recipient female gender, DR mismatch and acute rejection were significantly associated with posttransplant DSA compared to HLA non-DSA. In contrast with patients without detectable anti-HLA antibodies, DSA and HLA non-DSA patients displayed lower proportions of NK-cells, associated with increased CD56(bright) and NKG2A(+) subsets, the latter being more marked in DSA cases. These differences appeared unrelated to retransplantation, previous acute rejection or immunosuppressive therapy. Although preliminary and observational in nature, our results suggest that the assessment of the NK-cell immunophenotype may contribute to define signatures of alloreactive humoral responses in renal allograft recipients. PMID:25656947

  15. Case report: parenchymal pseudoaneurysm of a renal allograft after core needle biopsy: a rare cause of allograft injury.

    PubMed

    Selim, M; Goldstein, M J

    2011-09-01

    There are multiple causes of worsening graft function after initial good function in cadaveric kidney transplant. In this report, we discuss a rare one: a traumatic pseudoaneurysm caused by a 14-gauge core needle biopsy in a 55-year-old woman. She had immediate graft function followed by rapid decline in the first postoperative week. Imaging studies showed an intraparenchymal 2-cm pulsatile mass with turbulent blood flow in the upper pole at the corticomedullary junction. Angiography the following morning confirmed the diagnosis of pseudoaneurysm. It was coiled successfully, with restoration of graft function. Although development of a pseudoaneurysm is a rare event, transplant centers must be cognizant of allograft injuries like this one. PMID:21911162

  16. Infrequency of cytomegalovirus genome in coronary arteriopathy of human heart allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Gulizia, J. M.; Kandolf, R.; Kendall, T. J.; Thieszen, S. L.; Wilson, J. E.; Radio, S. J.; Costanzo, M. R.; Winters, G. L.; Miller, L. L.; McManus, B. M.

    1995-01-01

    In heart transplantation, long-term engraftment success is severely limited by the rapid development of obliterative disease of the coronary arteries. Data from various groups have been suggestive of a pathogenetic role of herpesviruses, particularly human cytomegalovirus, in accelerated allograft coronary artery disease; however, results are not yet conclusive. This study examines the hypothesis that human cytomegalovirus infection of allograft tissues is related pathogenetically and directly to accelerated coronary artery disease. Using in situ DNA hybridization and polymerase chain reaction, we examined particular coronary artery segments from 41 human heart allografts (ranging from 4 days to greater than 4 years after transplantation; mean, 457 days) and 22 donor age- and gender-comparable, coronary site-matched trauma victims for presence of human cytomegalovirus DNA. Human cytomegalovirus genome was detected in 8 of 41 (19.5%) allografts and in 1 of 22 (4.5%) control hearts. This difference in positivity was not statistically significant (P = 0.10). In the human cytomegalovirus-positive hearts, viral genome was localized to perivascular myocardium or coronary artery media or adventitia. Human cytomegalovirus genome was not detected in arterial intima of any allograft or control heart, although human cytomegalovirus genome was readily identified within intima of small pulmonary arteries from lung tissue with human cytomegalovirus pneumonitis. By statistical analyses, the presence of human cytomegalovirus genome was not associated with the nature or digitized extent of transplant arteriopathy, evidence of rejection, allograft recipient or donor serological data suggestive of human cytomegalovirus infection, duration of allograft implantation, or causes of death or retransplantation. Thus, our data indicate a low frequency of detectable human cytomegalovirus genome in accelerated coronary artery disease and do not support a direct role for human cytomegalovirus

  17. Studies of the effects of FK506 on renal allografting in the beagle dog.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, T; Nagata, M; Nakajima, K; Suzuki, T; Sakamoto, K; Enomoto, K; Gunji, Y; Uematsu, T; Goto, T; Hori, S

    1987-12-01

    The immunosuppressive activities of a newly discovered macrolide extracted from Streptomyces tsukubaensis, FK506, were examined using 38 renal allografts in the beagle dog. The median survival time was 15.5 days in dogs without treatment, 61 days with a dose of 0.08 mg/kg/day and 176 days with a dose of 0.16 mg/kg/day of intramuscularly administered FK506. Prolongation of survival was statistically significant when compared with controls (P = 0.02, 0.0044, respectively). None of 6 recipient dogs receiving the agent at a dose of 0.16 mg/kg/day encountered rejection during the treatment course. Three of them survived over 200 days. Oral administration of FK506 at a dose of 0.32 mg/kg/day did not prolong the median survival time (20.5 days) compared with the placebo treated control (16.5 days), but oral treatment with 1.0 mg/kg/day resulted in all of the recipient dogs surviving over 130 days. Histological studies of 7 kidney graft biopsy specimens of the dogs surviving over 3 months revealed no cell infiltration or only some degree of reversible interstitial cell infiltration, but vascular and glomerular changes were not observed in any of the specimens. Irregularity of nuclear shape and cytoplasmic vacuolation of the pars recta of the proximal tubules were observed in one dog each. Liver biopsy specimens showed no consistent evidence of hepatocellular damage. Three dogs died of intussusception 2-3 weeks posttransplant. The dogs treated intramuscularly with 0.32 mg/kg/day suffered from anorexia. Two dogs receiving oral treatment at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg developed papilloma of the skin around day 60, but the tumors disappeared by day 120. We conclude that FK506 is a powerful immunosuppressant in the dog with tolerable side effects. PMID:2447688

  18. The appropriateness of swab cultures for the release of human allograft tissue.

    PubMed

    Ronholdt, Chad J; Bogdansky, Simon

    2005-08-01

    Surgeries utilizing human allograft tissues have increased dramatically in recent years. With this increase has come a greater reliance on the use of swab culturing to assess allograft tissues for microbial contamination prior to distribution. In contrast to the typical industrial microbiological uses for swabs, the tissue banking industry has relied on swab cultures as a sterility release method for allograft tissues. It has been reported in the literature that swabs have limitations, both in sensitivity and reproducibility, so their suitability as a final sterility release method was evaluated in this study. Two different swab-culturing systems were evaluated (COPAN, EZ Culturette) using human allograft tissues spiked with low levels of multiple bacterial and fungal microorganisms. The average microbial recoveries for all challenge microorganisms for each tissue type and each swab system were calculated. Percent recoveries for each challenge microorganism were also calculated and reported. The results indicated that both swab systems exhibited low and highly variable recoveries from the seeded allograft tissues. Further analysis indicated there was no statistical difference ( proportional, variant=0.05) between the two swab systems. It is the recommendation of the authors that swab culturing not be used to assess relatively low levels of microbial contamination on allografts. Instead, alternative validated microbial detection methods with improved sensitivity and reproducibility should be employed and validated for this critical task. PMID:15973533

  19. Extended-Spectrum-Beta-Lactamase Producing Bacteria Related Urinary Tract Infection in Renal Transplant Recipients and Effect on Allograft Function

    PubMed Central

    Ramadas, Poornima; Rajendran, Prejith P.; Krishnan, Prathik; Alex, Asha; Siskind, Eric; Kadiyala, Aditya; Jayaschandran, Vivek; Basu, Amit; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Molmenti, Ernesto P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a well-recognized early complication in renal transplant recipients (RTR) and can have significant bearing on their outcome. The recent rise in incidence of extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria causing UTI among RTR poses new and significant challenges in terms of management and outcome. Our aim is to analyze the effect of ESBL producing bacteria causing UTI in these patients and its impact on allograft function. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 147 RTR who were followed at a tertiary care hospital affiliated transplant center between January 2007 and May 2013 and noted five RTR who developed episodes of ESBL producing bacteria related UTI during follow up. Multiple patient characteristics including demographics, immunosuppression, recurrences, allograft function and outcome were analyzed. Results Five patients (3.4%) out of 147 had ESBL producing bacteria related UTI. We found all patients to be above 60 years of age, with three out of five being females, and all five patients had diabetes mellitus. We identified a total of 37 episodes of UTI among these five patients during this period. Two of these patients had elevated creatinine values during the episodes of UTI and three of them developed bacteremia. Of the five patients, four of them had a favorable outcome except for one patient who developed persistent allograft dysfunction. Conclusion RTR are at a higher risk for developing ESBL producing bacteria associated UTI. Early diagnosis along with appropriate and judicious use of antibiotics will ensure long term success in allograft and patient outcome. PMID:24637786

  20. Development of injury in a rat model of chronic renal allograft rejection: effect of dietary protein restriction.

    PubMed

    Bombas, A; Stein-Oakley, A N; Baxter, K; Thomson, N M; Jablonski, P

    1999-01-01

    Non-allogeneic factors such as increased nephron "workload" may contribute to chronic renal allograft rejection. Reducing dietary protein from 20% to 8% was tested in a model of chronic rejection: Dark Agouti kidney to Albino Surgery recipient, "tolerised" by previous donor blood transfusions. Survival, weight gain, serum creatinine concentration and creatinine clearance were similar for both groups at all times. Urinary protein was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the low-protein (LP) group 1 month after transplantation. After 3 and 6 months, both groups demonstrated mild chronic rejection. After 6 months, tubular atrophy was significantly (P < 0.05) less in the LP group and interstitial fibrosis was marginally reduced. Glomerular hypertrophy, glomerular sclerosis, tubular dilatation, leucocyte infiltration, adhesion molecule expression and TGF-beta1 mRNA expression were similarly increased in both groups. Thus, reducing dietary protein to 8% lowered urinary protein, but did not significantly affect the development of chronic rejection in renal allografts beyond affording a degree of protection from tubulointerstitial damage. PMID:10080402

  1. Osteoinductive effect of bone bank allografts on human osteoblasts in culture.

    PubMed

    de la Piedra, Concepción; Vicario, Carlos; de Acuña, Lucrecia Rodríguez; García-Moreno, Carmen; Traba, Maria Luisa; Arlandis, Santiago; Marco, Fernando; López-Durán, Luis

    2008-02-01

    Incorporation of a human bone allograft requires osteoclast activity and growth of recipient osteoblasts. The aim of this work was to study the effects produced by autoclavated and -80 degrees C frozen bone allografts on osteoblast proliferation and synthesis of interleukin 6 (IL6), activator of bone resorption, aminoterminal propeptide of procollagen I (PINP), marker of bone matrix formation, and osteoprotegerin (OPG), inhibitor of osteoclast activity and differentiation. Allografts were obtained from human femoral heads. Human osteoblasts were cultured in the presence (problem group) or in the absence (control group) of allografts during 15 days. Allografts produced a decrease in osteoblast proliferation in the first week of the experiment, and an increase in IL6 mRNA, both at 3 h and 2 days, and an increase in the IL6 released to the culture medium the second day of the experiment. We found a decrease in OPG released to the culture on the 2nd and fourth days. These results suggest an increase in bone resorption and a decrease in bone formation in the first week of the experiment. In the second week, allografts produced an increase in osteoblast proliferation and PINP release to the culture medium, indicating an increase in bone formation; an increase in OPG released to the culture medium, which would indicate a decrease in bone resorption; and a decrease in IL6, indicating a decrease in bone resorption stimulation. These results demonstrate that autoclavated and -80 degrees C frozen bone allografts produce in bone environment changes that regulate their own incorporation to the recipient bone. PMID:17853479

  2. Ultrasound strain zero-crossing elasticity measurement in assessment of renal allograft cortical hardness: a preliminary observation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; Rubin, Jonathan M

    2014-09-01

    To determine whether ultrasound strain zero-crossing elasticity measurement can be used to discriminate moderate cortical fibrosis or inflammation in renal allografts, we prospectively assessed cortical hardness with quasi-static ultrasound elastography in 38 renal transplant patients who underwent kidney biopsy from January 2013 to June 2013. With the Banff score criteria for renal cortical fibrosis as gold standard, 38 subjects were divided into two groups: group 1 (n = 18) with ≤25% cortical fibrosis and group 2 (n = 20) with >26% cortical fibrosis. We then divided this population again into group 3 (n = 20) with ≤ 25% inflammation and group 4 (n = 18) with >26% inflammation based on the Banff score for renal parenchyma inflammation. To estimate renal cortical hardness in both population divisions, we propose an ultrasound strain relative zero-crossing elasticity measurement (ZC) method. In this technique, the relative return to baseline, that is zero strain, of strain in the renal cortex is compared with that of strain in reference soft tissue (between the abdominal wall and pelvic muscles). Using the ZC point on the reference strain decompression slope as standard, we determined when cortical strain crossed zero during decompression. ZC was negative when cortical strain did not return or returned after the reference, whereas ZC was positive when cortical strain returned ahead of the reference. Fisher's exact test was used to examine the significance of differences in ZC between groups 1 and 2 and between groups 3 and 4. The accuracy of ZC in determining moderate cortical fibrosis and moderate inflammation was examined by receiver operating characteristic analysis. The intra-class correlation coefficient and analysis of variance were used to test inter-rater reliability and reproducibility. ZC had good inter-observer agreement (ICC = 0.912) and reproducibility (p = 0.979). ZCs were negative in 18 of 18 cases in group 1 and positive in 19 of 20 cases in

  3. Length of time on dialysis prior to renal transplantation is a critical factor affecting patient survival after allografting.

    PubMed

    West, J C; Bisordi, J E; Squiers, E C; Latsha, R; Miller, J; Kelley, S E

    1992-01-01

    Within the past year at our transplant center we have had the experience of performing renal allografts in two patients older than 65 years, each of whom had been on hemodialysis more than 10 years. Both resulted in patient mortality within 90 days of transplant (one due to myocardial infarction, the other due to visceral ischemia with infarction). This prompted us to review retrospectively our own data (n = 204) and the national (UNOS) data (n = 10,971) regarding transplant outcome, patient age, and length of time on dialysis prior to renal transplantation. This review revealed that patient mortality after transplant increased with the length of end-stage renal disease (dialysis, regardless of type) independent of age, the greatest mortality occurring within the first 6 months of transplant (and not thereafter); graft survival was similar for all age cohorts analyzed. Our review of the literature reveals a paucity of articles pertaining to post-transplant mortality and length of time on dialysis prior to transplant. Our results indicate the following possible conclusions. (1) The length of time of end-stage renal disease therapy prior to renal transplantation is a significant and independent risk factor for post-transplant mortality. (2) Higher priority should be given to this factor when formulating strategies for allocation of scarce resources. (3) Patients on dialysis for extended periods of time who are elderly may be at particularly high risk. (4) Patients being considered for renal transplant should be informed of their individual risk factors for mortality post-transplant based on length of ESRD therapy. (5) Renal transplantation should be considered as early as possible in patients with ESRD (or imminent ESRD). PMID:14621760

  4. The Identification of Novel Potential Injury Mechanisms and Candidate Biomarkers in Renal Allograft Rejection by Quantitative Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Sigdel, Tara K.; Salomonis, Nathan; Nicora, Carrie D.; Ryu, Soyoung; He, Jintang; Dinh, Van; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Hsieh, Szu-Chuan; Dai, Hong; Thien-Vu, Minh; Xiao, Wenzhong; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Camp, David G.; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2014-01-01

    Early transplant dysfunction and failure because of immunological and nonimmunological factors still presents a significant clinical problem for transplant recipients. A critical unmet need is the noninvasive detection and prediction of immune injury such that acute injury can be reversed by proactive immunosuppression titration. In this study, we used iTRAQ -based proteomic discovery and targeted ELISA validation to discover and validate candidate urine protein biomarkers from 262 renal allograft recipients with biopsy-confirmed allograft injury. Urine samples were randomly split into a training set of 108 patients and an independent validation set of 154 patients, which comprised the clinical biopsy-confirmed phenotypes of acute rejection (AR) (n = 74), stable graft (STA) (n = 74), chronic allograft injury (CAI) (n = 58), BK virus nephritis (BKVN) (n = 38), nephrotic syndrome (NS) (n = 8), and healthy, normal control (HC) (n = 10). A total of 389 proteins were measured that displayed differential abundances across urine specimens of the injury types (p < 0.05) with a significant finding that SUMO2 (small ubiquitin-related modifier 2) was identified as a “hub” protein for graft injury irrespective of causation. Sixty-nine urine proteins had differences in abundance (p < 0.01) in AR compared with stable graft, of which 12 proteins were up-regulated in AR with a mean fold increase of 2.8. Nine urine proteins were highly specific for AR because of their significant differences (p < 0.01; fold increase >1.5) from all other transplant categories (HLA class II protein HLA-DRB1, KRT14, HIST1H4B, FGG, ACTB, FGB, FGA, KRT7, DPP4). Increased levels of three of these proteins, fibrinogen beta (FGB; p = 0.04), fibrinogen gamma (FGG; p = 0.03), and HLA DRB1 (p = 0.003) were validated by ELISA in AR using an independent sample set. The fibrinogen proteins further segregated AR from BK virus nephritis (FGB p = 0.03, FGG p = 0.02), a finding that supports the utility of

  5. Mining the human urine proteome for monitoring renal transplant injury.

    PubMed

    Sigdel, Tara K; Gao, Yuqian; He, Jintang; Wang, Anyou; Nicora, Carrie D; Fillmore, Thomas L; Shi, Tujin; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Smith, Richard D; Qian, Wei-Jun; Salvatierra, Oscar; Camp, David G; Sarwal, Minnie M

    2016-06-01

    The human urinary proteome provides an assessment of kidney injury with specific biomarkers for different kidney injury phenotypes. In an effort to fully map and decipher changes in the urine proteome and peptidome after kidney transplantation, renal allograft biopsy matched urine samples were collected from 396 kidney transplant recipients. Centralized and blinded histology data from paired graft biopsies was used to classify urine samples into diagnostic categories of acute rejection, chronic allograft nephropathy, BK virus nephritis, and stable graft. A total of 245 urine samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry using isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) reagents. From a group of over 900 proteins identified in transplant injury, a set of 131 peptides were assessed by selected reaction monitoring for their significance in accurately segregating organ injury causation and pathology in an independent cohort of 151 urine samples. Ultimately, a minimal set of 35 proteins were identified for their ability to segregate the 3 major transplant injury clinical groups, comprising the final panel of 11 urinary peptides for acute rejection (93% area under the curve [AUC]), 12 urinary peptides for chronic allograft nephropathy (99% AUC), and 12 urinary peptides for BK virus nephritis (83% AUC). Thus, urinary proteome discovery and targeted validation can identify urine protein panels for rapid and noninvasive differentiation of different causes of kidney transplant injury, without the requirement of an invasive biopsy. PMID:27165815

  6. Glycerol treatment as recovery procedure for cryopreserved human skin allografts positive for bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Verbeken, Gilbert; Verween, Gunther; De Vos, Daniel; Pascual, Bruno; De Corte, Peter; Richters, Cornelia; De Coninck, Arlette; Roseeuw, Diane; Ectors, Nadine; Rose, Thomas; Jennes, Serge; Pirnay, Jean-Paul

    2012-03-01

    Human donor skin allografts are suitable and much used temporary biological (burn) wound dressings. They prepare the excised wound bed for final autografting and form an excellent substrate for revascularisation and for the formation of granulation tissue. Two preservation methods, glycerol preservation and cryopreservation, are commonly used by tissue banks for the long-term storage of skin grafts. The burn surgeons of the Queen Astrid Military Hospital preferentially use partly viable cryopreserved skin allografts. After mandatory 14-day bacterial and mycological culture, however, approximately 15% of the cryopreserved skin allografts cannot be released from quarantine because of positive culture. To maximize the use of our scarce and precious donor skin, we developed a glycerolisation-based recovery method for these culture positive cryopreserved allografts. The inactivation and preservation method, described in this paper, allowed for an efficient inactivation of the colonising bacteria and fungi, with the exception of spore-formers, and did not influence the structural and functional aspects of the skin allografts. PMID:21360142

  7. Infiltration of Macrophages Correlates with Severity of Allograft Rejection and Outcome in Human Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bourier, Felix; Kühne, Louisa; Banas, Miriam C.; Rümmele, Petra; Wurm, Simone; Banas, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Objective Despite substantial progress in recent years, graft survival beyond the first year still requires improvement. Since modern immunosuppression addresses mainly T-cell activation and proliferation, we studied macrophage infiltration into the allografts of 103 kidney transplant recipients during acute antibody and T-cell mediated rejection. Macrophage infiltration was correlated with both graft function and graft survival until month 36 after transplantation. Results Macrophage infiltration was significantly elevated in antibody-mediated and T-cell mediated rejection, but not in kidneys with established IFTA. Treatment of rejection with steroids was less successful in patients with more prominent macrophage infiltration into the allografts. Macrophage infiltration was accompanied by increased cell proliferation as well as antigen presentation. With regard to the compartmental distribution severity of T-cell-mediated rejection was correlated to the amount of CD68+ cells especially in the peritubular and perivascular compartment, whereas biopsies with ABMR showed mainly peritubular CD68 infiltration. Furthermore, severity of macrophage infiltration was a valid predictor of resulting creatinine values two weeks as well as two and three years after renal transplantation as illustrated by multivariate analysis. Additionally performed ROC curve analysis showed that magnitude of macrophage infiltration (below vs. above the median) was a valid predictor for the necessity to restart dialysis. Having additionally stratified biopsies in accordance to the magnitude of macrophage infiltration, differential CD68+ cell infiltration was reflected by striking differences in overall graft survival. Conclusion The differences in acute allograft rejection have not only been reflected by different magnitudes of macrophage infiltration, but also by compartment-specific infiltration pattern and subsequent impact on resulting allograft function as well as need for dialysis

  8. Noninvasive cardiac risk stratification of diabetic and nondiabetic uremic renal allograft candidates using dipyridamole-thallium-201 imaging and radionuclide ventriculography

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.A.; Rimmer, J.; Haisch, C. )

    1989-11-01

    The ability of noninvasive risk stratification using dipyridamole-thallium-201 (Tl-201) imaging and radionuclide ventriculography to predict perioperative and long-term cardiac events (myocardial infarction or cardiac death) was evaluated in 36 uremic diabetic and 29 nondiabetic candidates for renal allograft surgery. Of the 35 patients who underwent renal allograft surgery 8 +/- 7 months after the study, none had transient Tl-201 defects (although 13 had depressed left ventricular ejection fraction) and none developed perioperative cardiac events. During a mean follow-up of 23 +/- 11 months, 6 (9%) patients developed cardiac events. Logistic regression analysis was used to compare the predictive value of clinical data (including age, sex, diabetes, chest pain history, allograft recipient) and radionuclide data. Presence of transient Tl-201 defect and left ventricular ejection fraction were the only significant predictors of future cardiac events (p less than 0.01). No other patient variables, including diabetes or receiving a renal allograft, had either univariate or multivariate predictive value. All 3 patients with transient Tl-201 defects had cardiac events compared with only 3 of 62 (5%) patients without transient Tl-201 defect (p less than 0.0001). Mean left ventricular ejection fraction was lower in patients with cardiac events (44 +/- 13%) compared with patients without cardiac events (57 +/- 9%, p less than 0.005). Overall, 5 of 6 patients with cardiac events had either transient Tl-201 defects or depressed left ventricular ejection fraction. Dipyridamole-Tl-201 imaging and radionuclide ventriculography may be helpful in identifying uremic candidates for renal allograft surgery who are at low risk for perioperative and long-term cardiac events.

  9. Relationship between European Mitochondrial Haplogroups and Chronic Renal Allograft Rejection in Patients with Kidney Transplant

    PubMed Central

    JIMÉNEZ-SOUSA, María Angeles; TAMAYO, Eduardo; GUZMÁN-FULGENCIO, María; FERNÁNDEZ-RODRÍGUEZ, Amanda; HEREDIA-RODRIGUEZ, María; GARCÍA-ÁLVAREZ, Mónica; BERMEJO-MARTIN, Jesús F; PINEDA-TENOR, Daniel; RUIZ-GRANADO, Patricia; ALVAREZ-FUENTE, Elisa; GÓMEZ-SANCHEZ, Esther; GÓMEZ-HERRERAS, José I; RESINO, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA variants may contribute to differences in mitochondrial function, leading to an altered immune system. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between mtDNA haplogroups and the development of chronic allograft dysfunction in patients with kidney transplant. A retrospective observational study was carried out on 261 patients who received kidney transplant (114 had stable transplant and 147 patients developed chronic allograft dysfunction). DNA samples were genotyped for 14 mtDNA polymorphisms by using Sequenom's MassARRAY platform (San Diego, CA, USA). Only European white patients within the N macro-cluster were included. Patients with haplogroups V (odds ratio (OR)=0.32; p=0.037) and J (OR=0.36; p=0.038) showed lower odds for developing CRAD than patients with haplogroup H. After adjusting for the most significant variables, haplogroups V and J tended to statistical significance (p=0.091 and p=0.067 respectively). This is a preliminary study in which mtDNA haplogroups seem to be implicated in susceptibility or protection for developing chronic allograft dysfunction. PMID:25170295

  10. Urinary cell mRNA profiles predictive of human kidney allograft status.

    PubMed

    Lee, John R; Muthukumar, Thangamani; Dadhania, Darshana; Ding, Ruchuang; Sharma, Vijay K; Schwartz, Joseph E; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2014-03-01

    Kidney allograft status is currently characterized using the invasive percutaneous needle core biopsy procedure. The procedure has become safer over the years, but challenges and complications still exist including sampling error, interobserver variability, bleeding, arteriovenous fistula, graft loss, and even death. Because the most common type of acute rejection is distinguished by inflammatory cells exiting the intravascular compartment and gaining access to the renal tubular space, we reasoned that a kidney allograft may function as an in vivo flow cytometer and sort cells involved in rejection into urine. To test this idea, we developed quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for absolute quantification of mRNA and pre-amplification protocols to overcome the low RNA yield from urine. Here, we review our single center urinary cell mRNA profiling studies that led to the multicenter Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation (CTOT-04) study and the discovery and validation of a 3-gene signature of 18S rRNA-normalized measures of CD3ε mRNA and IP-10 mRNA and 18S rRNA that is diagnostic and predictive of acute cellular rejection in the kidney allograft. We also review our development of a 4-gene signature of mRNAs for vimentin, NKCC2, E-cadherin, and 18S rRNA diagnostic of interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy (IF/TA). PMID:24517436

  11. Development of cytotoxic antibodies following renal allograft transplantation is associated with reduced graft survival due to chronic vascular rejection.

    PubMed

    Davenport, A; Younie, M E; Parsons, J E; Klouda, P T

    1994-01-01

    We prospectively followed 64 patients who had had no cytotoxic antibodies prior to first cadaveric renal allograft transplantation for post-transplant antibodies. During a mean follow-up period of 62 months (range 45-92) cytotoxic antibodies developed in 36 patients (56%). Sixteen grafts were lost due to chronic vascular rejection in the group of patients who developed antibodies compared to two in those who remained antibody negative, P < 0.01. Renal function was worse in the antibody-positive group, median serum creatinine 215 mumol/l (131-256) (interquartile range) versus 111 mumol/l (98-127) in the antibody-negative group, P = 0.002, and creatinine clearance 39 ml/min (25-55) versus 90 ml/min (55-104), P < 0.001. There were no significant differences in immunosuppressive protocol, HLA-mismatching, blood transfusion history, the number of acute rejection episodes, mean arterial blood pressure, or proteinuria between the groups. The presence of cytotoxic antibodies predated the classical manifestations of chronic vascular rejection. This suggests that humoral mechanisms may play a role in the development of chronic vascular rejection. PMID:7816298

  12. Association of corticosteroids and factor V, prothrombin, and MTHFR gene mutations with avascular osteonecrosis in renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Celik, A; Tekis, D; Saglam, F; Tunali, S; Kabakci, N; Ozaksoy, D; Manisali, M; Ozcan, M A; Meral, M; Gülay, H; Camsari, T

    2006-03-01

    The mechanism of posttransplantation avascular osteonecrosis (AVN) is controversial. Besides an increased bone marrow pressure due to reduced blood supply, enhanced coagulation has been considered. We investigated the associations of factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, and MTHFR C677T mutations as well as cumulative corticosteroid doses with AVN in renal allograft recipients. The records of 39 volunteer patients and 11 patients in whom osteonecrosis was previously identified were reviewed for cumulative corticosteroid dosages during the first year. All patients were screened for factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, and MTHFR C677T mutations by direct sequencing of genomic DNA. The cumulative corticosteroid dosages at 3, 6, and 12 months in the osteonecrotic group (5033.5 +/- 1565.3, 7164.9 +/- 2063.1, 8835.1 +/- 2216.8 mg) were significantly higher than in the control group (3629 +/- 1504.1, 4784.5 +/- 1568.7, 6322.4 +/- 1686.6 mg; P = .013, P = .001, P = .001, respectively). No significant difference in factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, and MTHFR C677T mutations was observed between the osteonecrotic and control groups (P > .05). In conclusion, an association between the first year (3, 6, and 12 month) cumulative corticosteroid dosages and AVN was demonstrated in renal transplant recipients. However, no correlation was determined between factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, and MTHFR C677T mutations and osteonecrosis. PMID:16549163

  13. Dengue virus infection in renal allograft recipients: a case series during 2010 outbreak.

    PubMed

    Prasad, N; Bhadauria, D; Sharma, R K; Gupta, A; Kaul, A; Srivastava, A

    2012-04-01

    Dengue virus infection is an emerging global threat caused by Arbovirus, a virus from Flaviridiae family, which is transmitted by mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. Renal transplant recipients who live in the endemic zones of dengue infection or who travel to an endemic zone could be at risk of this infection. Despite multiple epidemics and a high case fatality rate in the Southeast Asian region, only a few cases of dengue infection in renal transplant recipients have been reported. Here, we report a case series of 8 dengue viral infection in renal transplant recipients. Of the 8 patients, 3 developed dengue hemorrhagic shock syndrome and died. PMID:22212524

  14. Cultured Human Renal Cortical Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the STS-90 shuttle flight in April 1998, cultured renal cortical cells revealed new information about genes. Timothy Hammond, an investigator in NASA's microgravity biotechnology program was interested in culturing kidney tissue to study the expression of proteins useful in the treatment of kidney diseases. Protein expression is linked to the level of differentiation of the kidney cells, and Hammond had difficulty maintaining differentiated cells in vitro. Intrigued by the improvement in cell differentiation that he observed in rat renal cells cultured in NASA's rotating wall vessel (a bioreactor that simulates some aspects of microgravity) and during an experiment performed on the Russian Space Station Mir, Hammond decided to sleuth out which genes were responsible for controlling differentiation of kidney cells. To do this, he compared the gene activity of human renal cells in a variety of gravitational environments, including the microgravity of the space shuttle and the high-gravity environment of a centrifuge. Hammond found that 1,632 genes out of 10,000 analyzed changed their activity level in microgravity, more than in any of the other environments. These results have important implications for kidney research as well as for understanding the basic mechanism for controlling cell differentiation.

  15. Seronegative invasive gastro-intestinal cytomegalovirus disease in renal allograft recipients a diagnostic dilemma! - Tissue PCR the saviour?

    PubMed

    Kaul, A; Bhadauria, D; Agarwal, V; Ruhela, V; Kumar, A; Mohendra, S; Barai, S; Prasad, N; Gupta, A; Sharma, R K

    2015-01-01

    Seronegative Invasive Gastro-intestinal cytomegalovirus disease in renal allograft recipients Background -CMV as oppurtunistic infection affecting the gastrointerstinal tract is the most common cause for tissue invasive CMV disease occuring in 10-30% of organ transplant recepients. Gastrointerstinal CMV disease can be diagnosed in presence of clinical suspecion along with histopathological findings (CMV inclusions) and presence of mucosal lesion(s) on endoscopic examination with collaborative evidences via molecular technique. Aims-Few cases of CMV infection affecting the gastrointerstinal tract show no evidences of dissemintion despite use of highly sensitive molecular techniques. We encountered 6 cases where in despite strong clinical suspecion of Gastrointerstinal CMV disease there were seronegative and endoscopic negative evidences for CMV, blind tissue biopsy yeilded positive results for CMV disease with excellent improvement with antiviral therapy. Conclusions-Blind biopsy specimen for tissue PCR could serve as saviour in an immunocompromised individiual who has a strong clinical symptomatology for GI-CMV disease in absence of viremia, normal endoscopy and histopathology, so that the early therapeutic interventions could help in excellent patient and graft survival. PMID:26068358

  16. Infection related renal impairment: a major cause of acute allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Nampoory, Mangalathillam R N; Johny, Kaivilayil V; Costandy, Jamal N; Nair, Madhavan P; Said, Tarek; Homoud, Hani; Al-Muzairai, Ibrahim; Samhan, Mohmoud; Al-Moussawi, Mustafa

    2003-06-01

    We prospectively analyzed the impact of post-transplant infections on the renal function in 532 stable renal transplant recipients (M=340; F=192) over a period of 5 years. Their age ranged from 3-75 years (40+14 years). During the follow-up period, 52 patients expired and 64 lost on followup. We defined renal impairment (RI) as a persistent rise in serum creatinine above 20% from baseline value. 495 episodes of RI occurred in 269 recipients. This included 180-36% episodes of acute rejection, 53-10.7% Cyclosporine toxicity, 236-47.7% infection related renal impairment [IRRI] and 26-5.3% others. The severity of renal failure is less in IRRI (100+90.2) than that of acute rejection (166+127.1), but was more than that in cyclosporine toxicity (50+42.2). Sites of infection in IRRI were urinary (33%), respiratory (26.3%), septicemia (15.7%) and others (25.4%). Episode of IRRI occurred more frequently in LURD (159-67.4%) compared to LRD-RTR (50-21.2%). Occurrence of IRRI is more significantly higher in patients on triple drug immunosuppression (IS) (34.3%) than those on two drug IS (13.2%) (P=or<0.01). Ecoli (23.1%), Pseudomonas (11.1%), Salmonella (8.8%), Klebsiella (8.8%) and Staphylococai (8.3%) were the major organisms producing IRRI. IRRI is frequent (27.8%) during the first six months. Present study denotes that IRRI is a major cause of acute failure in RTR. PMID:15859909

  17. Study of the association between the donors and recipients angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion gene polymorphism and the acute renal allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Azmandian, Jalal; Mohamadifar, Mohamadamir; Rahmanian-Koshkaki, Sara; Mehdipoor, Mohammad; Nematollahi, Mohamad-Hadi; Saburi, Amin; Mandegary, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is involved in various pathophysiological conditions including renal function. ACE levels are under genetic control. Objectives: This study was designed to investigate the association between the donors and recipients ACE-I/D gene polymorphism and risk of acute rejection outcome in renal allograft recipients. Patients and Methods: ACE-I/D polymorphism was determined in 200 donor-recipient pairs who had been referred to Afzalipour hospital in Kerman. ACE-I/D polymorphism was detected using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Acute rejection (AR) during at least six months post-transplantation was defined as a 20% increase in creatinine level from the postoperative baseline in the absence of other causes of graft dysfunction which responded to antirejection therapy. Results: The observed allele frequencies were II 9.8%, ID 35.6% and DD 44.4% in donors and II 9.8%, ID 35.1% and DD 52.7% in recipients. There were no significant association between ACE genotypes and AR episodes (ORID=0.96 [0.18-5.00] and ORDD: 1.24 [0.25-6.07] for the donors) and (ORID: 0.29 [0.06-1.45] and ORDD: 0.75 [0.19-2.90] for the recipients). Conclusions: It seems that donor and recipient ACE-I/D genotype might not be a risk factor for acute renal allograft rejection. However, due to conflicting results from this and other studies, multicenter collaborative studies with more participants and concomitant evaluation of ACE polymorphism with other polymorphisms in renin–angiotensin system (RAS) are suggested to determine whether ACE genotypes are significant predictors of renal allograft rejection. PMID:26311652

  18. Reversal of severe lactic acidosis with thiamine in a renal allograft recipient

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K. Nanda; Shah, Veena R.; Parikh, Beena K.; Sonde, Sumedha

    2015-01-01

    A 48-year-old female patient with end-stage renal failure developed unexplained severe lactic acidosis (LA) associated with hyperglycemia during robotic-assisted laparoscopic renal transplantation. Initial treatment with sodium bicarbonate and insulin infusion were ineffective in treating acidemia. Postoperatively, intravenous administration of thiamine resulted in rapid improvement of LA and blood sugar levels. Uremia and chronic hemodialysis might be the causes behind the quantitative/qualitative deficiency of thiamine unmasked during the surgical stress. Though a rare entity, acute thiamine deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained severe LA in patients with chronic kidney disease and hemodialysis who undergo major surgery or admitted to critical illness care units. PMID:26180438

  19. Recurrence of light chain deposit disease after renal allograft transplantation: potential role of rituximab?

    PubMed

    Kuypers, Dirk R J; Lerut, Evelyne; Claes, Kathleen; Evenepoel, Pieter; Vanrenterghem, Yves

    2007-04-01

    Light chain deposit disease (LCDD) is a monoclonal plasma cell disorder characterized by tissue deposition of nonamyloid immunoglobulin light chains, predominantly kappa chains, causing renal insufficiency. LCDD reoccurs almost invariably after renal grafting, leading to early graft loss, usually within a time span of months to years. We describe a female patient with LCDD who lost her first living donor graft after 1 year due to extensive recurrence of kappa chain deposition. Rituximab was administered on the seventh day after her second transplantation with a graft from a deceased donor, in order to prevent early recurrence of LCDD. The 2-year protocol biopsy - similarly to the completely normal 1-year protocol biopsy - revealed persistent absence of light chain deposition on light microscopy but immunohistochemical staining and electron microscopy showed very mild recurrence of light chain deposits. A second 4-week course of rituximab was repeated because of these electron microscopic findings. Subsequently, free kappa light chain concentration decreased from 693 to 74 mg/l and remained low 4 months after completion of therapy. Rituximab could be considered for delaying early LCDD recurrence in patients in whom treatment of the underlying bone marrow disorder failed or is contraindicated, but maintenance therapy is apparently necessary to consolidate this response. PMID:17326779

  20. FcR blocking activity in serum of actively enhanced rat renal allograft recipients due to IgG anti-class II MHC alloantibody.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, H E; Bolton, E M; Gracie, J A; Cocker, J E; Sandilands, G P; Bradley, J A

    1990-01-01

    In some rat strain combinations, pre-operative donor-specific blood transfusion produces long-term renal allograft survival, although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. This study has examined whether Fc receptor (FcR)-blocking activity could be detected in the serum of unmodified PVG strain recipients bearing a rejecting renal allograft and in recipients bearing an actively enhanced graft following pre-operative blood transfusion. Serum harvested on Day 5 from actively enhanced PVG recipients of DA rat renal allografts was shown to specifically inhibit erythrocyte-antibody (EA) rosette formation with donor strain, but not third-party, splenocytes, while the levels of EA rosette inhibition (EAI) in Day 5 serum from rejecting rats remained markedly lower. This FcR-blocking activity was present in enhanced serum fractions, prepared by discontinuous density gradient centrifugation, which corresponded to the 7 S peak. Purified IgG prepared from enhanced serum was also found to inhibit EA rosette formation with donor splenocytes, and absorption of the IgG preparations with donor strain erythrocytes failed to abrogate EA rosette inhibition. Further experiments, in which absorbed IgG from enhanced animals was tested for FcR blocking activity against splenocytes of defined major histocompatability complex (MHC) subregion specificities, established that FcR-blocking activity was mediated by IgG alloantibodies directed against donor MHC class II antigens. Whether the presence of such antibodies early after transplantation contributes to the beneficial effect of blood transfusion on graft survival remains to be determined. PMID:2312162

  1. Capillary Deposition of Complement C4d and C3d in Chinese Renal Allograft Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Rong; Zhang, Wei; Han, Fei; Liu, Guangjun; Xie, Wenqing

    2015-01-01

    Background. C3d is a product of both the classic and the alternative complement cascades; however, few studies have addressed the role of C3d in renal biopsies and its relationship with long-term graft survival rate is not very clear. Methods. 94 patients with biopsy-proven acute rejection episodes were included in the study. We investigated the associations between histological findings, clinical examinations, and outcome. Results. The overall prevalence for C4dPTC and C3dPTC was 42.6% and 29.8%. There was a significant association between C3dPTC and C4dPTC (P < 0.001). C3dPTC and C4dPTC were related with histological types (P = 0.024 and P < 0.001, resp.). The long-term survival rate for C4dPTC positive transplants was lower than that of C4dPTC negative transplants, but it was not statistic significant in our study (P = 0.150). The survival rate of C3dPTC positive group was much lower than the negative group (P = 0.014). Patients with double positives for C4dPTC and C3dPTC exhibited the lowest survival rate significantly different from those of the C3dPTC only and C4dPTC only groups (P = 0.01 and P = 0.0037). Conclusions. This longitudinal cohort study has demonstrated that C3d deposition in the PTC was closely related to renal dysfunction and pathological changes. PMID:25821339

  2. Depression of Complement Regulatory Factors in Rat and Human Renal Grafts Is Associated with the Progress of Acute T-Cell Mediated Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Kazuaki; Kakuta, Yoichi; Miyagawa, Shuji; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Kato, Taigo; Abe, Toyofumi; Imamura, Ryoichi; Okumi, Masayoshi; Maeda, Akira; Okuyama, Hiroomi; Mizuno, Masashi; Nonomura, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Background The association of complement with the progression of acute T cell mediated rejection (ATCMR) is not well understood. We investigated the production of complement components and the expression of complement regulatory proteins (Cregs) in acute T-cell mediated rejection using rat and human renal allografts. Methods We prepared rat allograft and syngeneic graft models of renal transplantation. The expression of Complement components and Cregs was assessed in the rat grafts using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunofluorescent staining. We also administered anti-Crry and anti-CD59 antibodies to the rat allograft model. Further, we assessed the relationship between the expression of membrane cofactor protein (MCP) by immunohistochemical staining in human renal grafts and their clinical course. Results qRT-PCR results showed that the expression of Cregs, CD59 and rodent-specific complement regulator complement receptor 1-related gene/protein-y (Crry), was diminished in the rat allograft model especially on day 5 after transplantation in comparison with the syngeneic model. In contrast, the expression of complement components and receptors: C3, C3a receptor, C5a receptor, Factor B, C9, C1q, was increased, but not the expression of C4 and C5, indicating a possible activation of the alternative pathway. When anti-Crry and anti-CD59 mAbs were administered to the allograft, the survival period for each group was shortened. In the human ATCMR cases, the group with higher MCP expression in the grafts showed improved serum creatinine levels after the ATCMR treatment as well as a better 5-year graft survival rate. Conclusions We conclude that the expression of Cregs in allografts is connected with ATCMR. Our results suggest that controlling complement activation in renal grafts can be a new strategy for the treatment of ATCMR. PMID:26928779

  3. Cross-correlative 3D micro-structural investigation of human bone processed into bone allografts.

    PubMed

    Singh, Atul Kumar; Gajiwala, Astrid Lobo; Rai, Ratan Kumar; Khan, Mohd Parvez; Singh, Chandan; Barbhuyan, Tarun; Vijayalakshmi, S; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Sinha, Neeraj; Kumar, Ashutosh; Bellare, Jayesh R

    2016-05-01

    Bone allografts (BA) are a cost-effective and sustainable alternative in orthopedic practice as they provide a permanent solution for preserving skeletal architecture and function. Such BA however, must be processed to be disease free and immunologically safe as well as biologically and clinically useful. Here, we have demonstrated a processing protocol for bone allografts and investigated the micro-structural properties of bone collected from osteoporotic and normal human donor samples. In order to characterize BA at different microscopic levels, a combination of techniques such as Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (ssNMR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), micro-computed tomography (μCT) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) were used for delineating the ultra-structural property of bone. ssNMR revealed the extent of water, collagen fine structure and crystalline order in the bone. These were greatly perturbed in the bone taken from osteoporotic bone donor. Among the processing methods analyzed, pasteurization at 60 °C and radiation treatment appeared to substantially alter the bone integrity. SEM study showed a reduction in Ca/P ratio and non-uniform distribution of elements in osteoporotic bones. μ-CT and MIMICS (Materialize Interactive Medical Image Control System) demonstrated that pasteurization and radiation treatment affects the BA morphology and cause a shift in the HU unit. However, the combination of all these processes restored all-important parameters that are critical for BA integrity and sustainability. Cross-correlation between the various probes we used quantitatively demonstrated differences in morphological and micro-structural properties between BA taken from normal and osteoporotic human donor. Such details could also be instrumental in designing an appropriate bone scaffold. For the best restoration of bone microstructure and to be used as a biomaterial allograft, a step-wise processing method is recommended that preserves all

  4. Influence of human leukocyte antigen matching on liver allograft survival and rejection: "the dualistic effect".

    PubMed

    Donaldson, P; Underhill, J; Doherty, D; Hayllar, K; Calne, R; Tan, K C; O'Grady, J; Wight, D; Portmann, B; Williams, R

    1993-06-01

    To date only one published large series of human leukocyte antigen matching and liver allograft survival exists, and considerable confusion has arisen about the advantage or disadvantage of human leukocyte antigen matching. In the present study we have reinvestigated the relationship between human leukocyte antigen mismatch and graft survival in 466 first liver allografts, seeking to clarify the relationship between human leukocyte antigen and both acute rejection and the vanishing bile duct syndrome. In view of current criticism regarding the accuracy of serological tissue typing for human leukocyte antigen-DR, we have used both classic serology and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis to ensure the accurate assignment of recipient DR types. In addition, we have used polymerase chain reaction amplification and allele-specific and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes to retest the hypothesis that human leukocyte antigen class II matching may increase susceptibility to the vanishing bile duct syndrome. One-year graft survival was significantly lower in patients with zero or two human leukocyte antigen-A mismatches (52% and 63%, respectively) than in those with one human leukocyte antigen--A mismatch (69%) (p = 0.016 and p = 0.018). A similar effect of B mismatching was observed, with a 1-yr graft survival of 73% for those with one compared with 60% for those with two human leukocyte antigen-B mismatches. In contrast no correlation was found between DR mismatch and graft survival. Human leukocyte antigen class I matching appears to influence graft survival largely through the occurrence of acute rejection and the development of the vanishing bile duct syndrome.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8514248

  5. Long-term efficacy of atorvastatin in allograft rejection following renal transplantation: A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Amirzargar, Mohammad A; Hosseini, Arsha Tafreshi; Gholiaf, Mahmood; Dadras, Farahnaz; Khoshjoo, Farhad

    2015-09-01

    Statins are a class of drug that can efficiently reduce the level of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) as well as increase the LDL receptors. Several non-lipid-lowering effects of this type of drug have been described. It is reported that they have an influence in preventing graft rejection, especially of the acute type. In this study, patients with end-stage renal disease and candidates for kidney transplantation were divided into two groups. Group A (intervention group) received atorvastatin for two weeks prior to their transplant surgery while group B (control group) received placebo. The lipid profile was tested (triglycerides, cholesterol, LDL) in all patients two weeks before the transplantation. After transplantation, drug use was stopped. We also checked the LDL serum levels in patients with raised lipid levels (LDL >100) every two weeks. After this period, the serum lipid levels were checked monthly up to six months. Hyperlipidemia, when present, was controlled by fibrates. Concerning the rejection episodes, there was no significant difference between the two groups. In group A (13 men and nine women), three (14.3%) cases of rejection were observed whereas four (21.3%) cases of rejection were seen in group B (11 men and 10 women) (P = 0.5). Within group A, five (22.7%) cases of delayed graft function were found while four (19%) similar cases were observed in group B (P = 0.7). There was no statistically significant difference concerning delayed graft function between the two groups. Despite all the mechanisms attributed to the probable anti-rejection properties of statins, we found no significant correlation with the administration of these drugs before transplantation and the protection against graft rejection episodes. PMID:26354567

  6. OKT3 escalating dose regimens provide effective therapy for renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Woodle, E S; Bruce, D S; Josephson, M; Cronin, D; Newell, K A; Millis, J M; Piper, J B; O'Laughlin, R; Thistlethwaite, J R

    1996-08-01

    Dose-response relationships for anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy remain undefined, particularly with respect to higher dose ranges. The clinical efficacy and safety of an OKT3 dosing regimen that incorporates higher doses (escalating dose regimens) was examined in a pilot trial. Patients undergoing acute rejection were treated with a 7-d course of OKT3 in which the daily OKT3 dose was escalated during treatment course (daily doses 5, 5, 5, 5, 10, 15, 25 mg). The total amount of OKT3 given was equal to a standard 14-d course (70 mg). A total of 10 primary cadaveric renal transplant recipients were treated, and data analyzed from a median follow up of 5 months (range 3-13 months). Pre-OKT3 immunosuppressive therapy consisted of ATGAM induction therapy (n = 8), and corticosteroid rejection therapy (n = 6, 18.6 +/- 11.4 mg/kg). Median time of first rejection was 32 d (12-48 d) and median time to OKT3 was 33 d (range 15-42 d). Pre-OKT3 histology (by Banff criteria) included: mild ACR (n = 6), moderate ACR (n = 2), AVR (n = 1), ACR and acute transplant glomerulopathy (n = 1). Rejection reversal rate with escalating dose OKT3 was 100%, and each patient experienced a rapid reversal of rejection (i.e. reversal within 14 d initiation of OKT3 therapy). Six recurrent rejection episodes were diagnosed in 5 patients with a median time to recurrent rejection of 30 d following cessation of OKT3 therapy. All recurrent rejection episodes were successfully treated (FK 506 n = 4, corticosteroids n = 1, and OKT3 n = 1). CMV disease was limited to a single episode of CMV viremia in one patient. PTLD was observed in one patient who had coexisting vascular rejection at the time of PTLD diagnosis. Short- and long-term graft function is excellent (pre-rejection baseline creatinine 1.8 +/- 0.4 mg/dl, current creatinine 1.75 +/- 0.4 mg/dl). Monitoring of OKT3 serum levels revealed that patients maintained therapeutic serum levels for an average of 4 d following the last OKT3 dose

  7. Complement Inhibition for Prevention and Treatment of Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Renal Allograft Recipients.

    PubMed

    Jordan, S C; Choi, J; Kahwaji, J; Vo, A

    2016-04-01

    Therapeutic interventions aimed at the human complement system are recognized as potentially important strategies for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases because there is often evidence of complement-mediated injury according to pathologic assessments. In addition, there are a large number of potential targets, both soluble and cell bound, that might offer potential for new drug development, but progress in this area has met with significant challenges. Currently, 2 drugs are approved aimed at inhibition of complement activation. The first option is eculizumab (anti-C5), which is approved for the treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Eculizumab has also been studied in human transplantation for the treatment and prevention of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). Initial data from uncontrolled studies suggested a significant benefit of eculizumab for the prevention of ABMR in highly HLA-sensitized patients, but a subsequent randomized, placebo-controlled trial failed to meet its primary endpoint. Anecdotal data, primarily from case studies, showed benefits in treating complement-mediated ABMR. A second approved complement-inhibiting therapy is C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), which is approved for use in patients with hereditary angioedema, a condition caused by mutations in the gene that codes for C1-INH. A recent placebo-controlled trial of C1-INH for prevention of ABMR in HLA-sensitized patients found that the drug was safe, with evidence for inhibition of systemic complement activation and complement-activating donor-specific antibodies. Other drugs are now under development. PMID:27234741

  8. Allograft dysfunction in a patient with an odd-looking kidney: case of renal lipomatosis and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Posadas, Maria Aurora; Chua, Elizabeth; Thomas, Beje; Savage, Stephen J.; Baliga, Prabhakar

    2012-01-01

    Renal lipomatosis was diagnosed in a kidney transplant recipient who presented with acute kidney injury (AKI) several years after transplantation. The patient had an odd-looking kidney transplant on ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) scan, showing a medullary mass with resultant compression of the surrounding renal parenchyma. A biopsy of the renal medulla confirmed fatty infiltration of the renal parenchyma. The patient underwent percutaneous nephrostomy and AKI resolved with relief of the obstruction. Renal lipomatosis is a rare condition that should be differentiated from other neoplasms of the kidney. When it occurs in a functioning transplant kidney, the treatment approach proves to be very challenging. PMID:25874099

  9. Resident Tissue-Specific Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Contribute to Fibrogenesis in Human Lung Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Natalie; Badri, Linda; Wettlaufer, Scott; Flint, Andrew; Sajjan, Uma; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar G.; Peters-Golden, Marc; Lama, Vibha N.

    2011-01-01

    Fibrotic obliteration of the small airways leading to progressive airflow obstruction, termed bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), is the major cause of poor outcomes after lung transplantation. We recently demonstrated that a donor-derived population of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be isolated from the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of human lung transplant recipients. Herein, we study the organ specificity of these cells and investigate the role of local mesenchymal progenitors in fibrogenesis after lung transplantation. We demonstrate that human lung allograft–derived MSCs uniquely express embryonic lung mesenchyme–associated transcription factors with a 35,000-fold higher expression of forkhead/winged helix transcription factor forkhead box (FOXF1) noted in lung compared with bone marrow MSCs. Fibrotic differentiation of MSCs isolated from normal lung allografts was noted in the presence of profibrotic mediators associated with BOS, including transforming growth factor-β and IL-13. MSCs isolated from patients with BOS demonstrated increased expression of α-SMA and collagen I when compared with non-BOS controls, consistent with a stable in vivo fibrotic phenotype. FOXF1 mRNA expression in the BAL cell pellet correlated with the number of MSCs in the BAL fluid, and myofibroblasts present in the fibrotic lesions expressed FOXF1 by in situ hybridization. These data suggest a key role for local tissue-specific, organ-resident, mesenchymal precursors in the fibrogenic processes in human adult lungs. PMID:21641374

  10. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of the Microstructure of Human Acellular Nerve Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shuang; Zhu, Qingtang; Liu, Xiaolin; Yang, Weihong; Jian, Yutao; Zhou, Xiang; He, Bo; Gu, Liqiang; Yan, Liwei; Lin, Tao; Xiang, Jianping; Qi, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The exact inner 3D microstructure of the human peripheral nerve has been a mystery for decades. Therefore, it has been difficult to solve several problems regarding peripheral nerve injury and repair. We used high-resolution X-ray computed microtomography (microCT) to scan a freeze-dried human acellular nerve allograft (hANA). The microCT images were then used to reconstruct a 3D digital model, which was used to print a 3D resin model of the nerve graft. The 3D digital model of the hANA allowed visualization of all planes. The magnified 3D resin model clearly showed the nerve bundles and basement membrane tubes of the hANA. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to analyse the microstructure of the hANA. Compared to the SEM images, the microCT image clearly demonstrated the microstructure of the hANA cross section at a resolution of up to 1.2 μm. The 3D digital model of the hANA facilitates a clear and easy understanding of peripheral nerve microstructure. Furthermore, the enlarged 3D resin model duplicates the unique inner structure of each individual hANA. This is a crucial step towards achieving 3D printing of a hANA or nerve that can be used as a nerve graft. PMID:27476584

  11. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of the Microstructure of Human Acellular Nerve Allograft.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shuang; Zhu, Qingtang; Liu, Xiaolin; Yang, Weihong; Jian, Yutao; Zhou, Xiang; He, Bo; Gu, Liqiang; Yan, Liwei; Lin, Tao; Xiang, Jianping; Qi, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The exact inner 3D microstructure of the human peripheral nerve has been a mystery for decades. Therefore, it has been difficult to solve several problems regarding peripheral nerve injury and repair. We used high-resolution X-ray computed microtomography (microCT) to scan a freeze-dried human acellular nerve allograft (hANA). The microCT images were then used to reconstruct a 3D digital model, which was used to print a 3D resin model of the nerve graft. The 3D digital model of the hANA allowed visualization of all planes. The magnified 3D resin model clearly showed the nerve bundles and basement membrane tubes of the hANA. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to analyse the microstructure of the hANA. Compared to the SEM images, the microCT image clearly demonstrated the microstructure of the hANA cross section at a resolution of up to 1.2 μm. The 3D digital model of the hANA facilitates a clear and easy understanding of peripheral nerve microstructure. Furthermore, the enlarged 3D resin model duplicates the unique inner structure of each individual hANA. This is a crucial step towards achieving 3D printing of a hANA or nerve that can be used as a nerve graft. PMID:27476584

  12. [Accessory renal arteries in human fetuses].

    PubMed

    Gościcka, D; Szpinda, M; Kochan, J

    1996-12-01

    Using conventional anatomical methods, renal arteries of 140 human fetuses were studied. It was found (21.1%) that the accessory renal arteries occurred in a three-fold manner: 1. as single arteries (19.2%), 2. as double arteries (2.1%) and 3. as triplex arteries (0.7%). More often they originated from the right part of the circumference of the abdominal aorta, mainly in the female fetuses. These arteries penetrated the following segments of the kidney: the inferior (12.9%), the superior (2.3%), the anterior inferior (2.8%), the posterior (2.1%) and the anterior superior (1.5%). They crossed the renal pelvis more often in front (12.2%) than from behind of it (5%). The frequency of the occurrence of the accessory arteries depends not from the age of the fetus. PMID:9082875

  13. Pathway-Specific Engineered Mouse Allograft Models Functionally Recapitulate Human Serous Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Szabova, Ludmila; Bupp, Sujata; Kamal, Muhaymin; Householder, Deborah B.; Hernandez, Lidia; Schlomer, Jerome J.; Baran, Maureen L.; Yi, Ming; Stephens, Robert M.; Annunziata, Christina M.; Martin, Philip L.; Van Dyke, Terry A.

    2014-01-01

    The high mortality rate from ovarian cancers can be attributed to late-stage diagnosis and lack of effective treatment. Despite enormous effort to develop better targeted therapies, platinum-based chemotherapy still remains the standard of care for ovarian cancer patients, and resistance occurs at a high rate. One of the rate limiting factors for translation of new drug discoveries into clinical treatments has been the lack of suitable preclinical cancer models with high predictive value. We previously generated genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models based on perturbation of Tp53 and Rb with or without Brca1 or Brca2 that develop serous epithelial ovarian cancer (SEOC) closely resembling the human disease on histologic and molecular levels. Here, we describe an adaptation of these GEM models to orthotopic allografts that uniformly develop tumors with short latency and are ideally suited for routine preclinical studies. Ovarian tumors deficient in Brca1 respond to treatment with cisplatin and olaparib, a PARP inhibitor, whereas Brca1-wild type tumors are non-responsive to treatment, recapitulating the relative sensitivities observed in patients. These mouse models provide the opportunity for evaluation of effective therapeutics, including prediction of differential responses in Brca1-wild type and Brca1–deficient tumors and development of relevant biomarkers. PMID:24748377

  14. Excellent long term patient and renal allograft survival after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation: Experience of one center

    PubMed Central

    Melexopoulou, Christina; Marinaki, Smaragdi; Liapis, George; Skalioti, Chrysanthi; Gavalaki, Maria; Zavos, George; Boletis, John N

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the long-term results of ABO-incompatible (ABOi) kidney transplantation in a single center in Greece. METHODS: Thirty consecutive ABOi kidney transplantations were performed from June 2005 to December 2013. All patients received rituximab one month prior to transplantation. Immunoadsorption therapy was performed for the removal of anti-A/B IgG antibodies until the titer was ≤ 1:16. Additional apheresis sessions were performed post-operatively. Intravenous immunoglobulin and oral immunosuppression consisting of tacrolimus (TAC) in combination with either everolimus or mycophenolate acid was administered. We compared the long term results of our ABOi group to those of a matched group of 30 ABO compatible (ABOc) living kidney recipients with similar baseline characteristics. The ABOc recipients received an immunosuppressive regimen consisting of TAC and mycophenolate acid. All patients in both groups received induction therapy with Basiliximab or Daclizumab, whereas corticosteroids were instituted on the day of surgery. During the follow-up period, indication biopsies were performed and interpreted by an experienced nephropathologist. The parameters we analyzed included the following: Donor/recipient age, gender, blood type, human leukocyte antigen mismatches, panel reactive antibodies, primary cause of renal failure, mean time on dialysis, immunosuppressive regimen, patient survival, graft outcome, incidence of rejections, surgical and infectious complications. RESULTS: The mean follow-up period was 6 years (range 1 to 9 years). A mean of 5.0 ± 3.0 (range 0-14) pre-transplant immunoadsorptions were required in order to reach the target titer. Patient survival in ABOi group in comparison to ABOc group at 1, 3, 5 and 8 years did not differ significantly (100% vs 100%, 96% vs 100%, 92% vs 100% and 92% vs 100%, P = ns). Additionally, graft survival was similar in the two groups at the same time points (100% vs 100%, 96% vs 96%, 92% vs 96% and 81

  15. Treatment of Autonomous Hyperparathyroidism in Post Renal Transplant Recipients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-23

    Chronic Allograft Nephropathy; Chronic Kidney Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Disordered Mineral Metabolism; End Stage Renal Disease; Hyperparathyroidism; Hypophosphatemia; Kidney Disease; Kidney Transplantation; Post Renal Transplantation

  16. Immuno-histological assessment of sub-clinical acute and borderline rejection in renal allograft recipients: Data from a transplant center in India.

    PubMed

    Badwal, Sonia; Kumar, Arun; Hooda, A K; Varma, P P

    2015-11-01

    This single-center study was carried out on living related and unrelated renal transplant recipients (RTRs) to evaluate the usefulness of surveillance biopsies in monitoring stable renal allografts using immuno-histological markers for immune-activation. This is a prospective, longitudinal study. Protocol biopsies of 60 RTRs with stable graft function were evaluated at three, six and 12 months post-transplant. Immuno-histological evaluation was carried out using immune-activation markers (perforins, granzyme and interleukin-2R), phenotypic markers (CD-3 and CD-20), viral markers and C4d. The demographic and clinical profile was recorded for each patient. All cases of acute sub-clinical rejection (SCR) were treated and borderline SCR cases were followed-up without treatment. SCR at three and six months post-transplant was evident in 16.7% and 3.7% of RTRs, respectively. Positive statistical association of SCR was seen with HLA-DR mismatches, whereas patients receiving induction therapy and tacrolimus-based immunosuppression exhibited a lower incidence of SCR. T cell phenotype with persistent expression of immune-activation markers exhibited positive statistical association with interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy at 12-month follow-up biopsy. The mean creatinine levels were significantly lower in the protocol biopsy group than the non-protocol biopsy group. No significant difference was found between the mean creatinine levels of the SCR group after treatment and the non-SCR cases within the protocol biopsy group. Early treatment of sub-clinical acute rejection leads to better functional outcomes. However, persistent immune-activation is associated with chronicity and may have implications on long-term graft survival. PMID:26586064

  17. Evidence for tissue-resident mesenchymal stem cells in human adult lung from studies of transplanted allografts.

    PubMed

    Lama, Vibha N; Smith, Lisa; Badri, Linda; Flint, Andrew; Andrei, Adin-Cristian; Murray, Susan; Wang, Zhuo; Liao, Hui; Toews, Galen B; Krebsbach, Paul H; Peters-Golden, Marc; Pinsky, David J; Martinez, Fernando J; Thannickal, Victor J

    2007-04-01

    The origin and turnover of connective tissue cells in adult human organs, including the lung, are not well understood. Here, studies of cells derived from human lung allografts demonstrate the presence of a multipotent mesenchymal cell population, which is locally resident in the human adult lung and has extended life span in vivo. Examination of plastic-adherent cell populations in bronchoalveolar lavage samples obtained from 76 human lung transplant recipients revealed clonal proliferation of fibroblast-like cells in 62% (106 of 172) of samples. Immunophenotyping of these isolated cells demonstrated expression of vimentin and prolyl-4-hydroxylase, indicating a mesenchymal phenotype. Multiparametric flow cytometric analyses revealed expression of cell-surface proteins, CD73, CD90, and CD105, commonly found on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Hematopoietic lineage markers CD14, CD34, and CD45 were absent. Multipotency of these cells was demonstrated by their capacity to differentiate into adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteocytes. Cytogenetic analysis of cells from 7 sex-mismatched lung transplant recipients harvested up to 11 years after transplant revealed that 97.2% +/- 2.1% expressed the sex genotype of the donor. The presence of MSCs of donor sex identity in lung allografts even years after transplantation provides what we believe to be the first evidence for connective tissue cell progenitors that reside locally within a postnatal, nonhematopoietic organ. PMID:17347686

  18. Vasopressin regulates renal calcium excretion in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hanouna, Guillaume; Haymann, Jean-Philippe; Baud, Laurent; Letavernier, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Antidiuretic hormone or arginine vasopressin (AVP) increases water reabsorption in the collecting ducts of the kidney. Three decades ago, experimental models have shown that AVP may increase calcium reabsorption in rat kidney. The objective of this study was to assess whether AVP modulates renal calcium excretion in humans. We analyzed calcium, potassium, and sodium fractional excretion in eight patients affected by insipidus diabetes (nephrogenic or central) under acute vasopressin receptor agonist action and in 10 patients undergoing oral water load test affected or not by inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). Synthetic V2 receptor agonist (dDAVP) reduced significantly calcium fractional excretion from 1.71% to 0.58% (P < 0.05) in patients with central diabetes insipidus. In patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (resistant to AVP), calcium fractional excretion did not change significantly after injection (0.48–0.68%, P = NS). In normal subjects undergoing oral water load test, calcium fractional excretion increased significantly from 1.02% to 2.54% (P < 0.05). Patients affected by SIADH had a high calcium fractional excretion at baseline that remained stable during test from 3.30% to 3.33% (P = NS), possibly resulting from a reduced calcium absorption in renal proximal tubule. In both groups, there was a significant correlation between urine output and calcium renal excretion. In humans, dDAVP decreases calcium fractional excretion in the short term. Conversely, water intake, which lowers AVP concentration, increases calcium fractional excretion. The correlation between urine output and calcium excretion suggests that AVP-related antidiuresis increases calcium reabsorption in collecting ducts. PMID:26620256

  19. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells suppress MHC class II expression on rat vascular endothelium and prolong survival time of cardiac allograft

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ying; Yun, Mark M; Han, Xia; Zhao, Ruidong; Zhou, Erxia; Yun, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (UC-MSCs) have low immunogenicity and immune regulation. To investigate immunomodulatory effects of human UC-MSCs on MHC class II expression and allograft, we transplanted heart of transgenic rats with MHC class II expression on vascular endothelium. Methods: UC-MSCs were obtained from human umbilical cords and confirmed with flow cytometry analysis. Transgenic rat line was established using the construct of human MHC class II transactivator gene (CIITA) under mouse ICAM-2 promoter control. The induced MHC class II expression on transgenic rat vascular endothelial cells (VECs) was assessed with immunohistological staining. And the survival time of cardiac allograft was compared between the recipients with and without UC-MSC transfusion. Results: Flow cytometry confirmed that the human UC-MSCs were positive for CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD271, and negative for CD34 and HLA-DR. Repeated infusion of human UC-MSCs reduced MHC class II expression on vascular endothelia of transplanted hearts, and increased survival time of allograft. The UC-MSCs increased regulatory cytokines IL10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and suppressed proinflammatory cytokines IL2 and IFN-γ in vivo. The UC-MSC culture supernatant had similar effects on cytokine expression, and decreased lymphocyte proliferation in vitro. Conclusions: Repeated transfusion of the human UC-MSCs reduced MHC class II expression on vascular endothelia and prolonged the survival time of rat cardiac allograft. PMID:25126177

  20. Function of transplanted human pancreatic allografts after preservation in cold storage for 6 to 26 hours.

    PubMed

    Abouna, G M; Sutherland, D E; Florack, G; Najarian, J S

    1987-05-01

    Preservation of cadaveric pancreas allografts has been a difficult problem in clinical pancreas transplantation; most institutions use Collins solution and limit preservation time to less than 6 hr. Longer preservation times have been used at the University of Minnesota. Between August 1983, and December 1985, 47 human cadaveric pancreas grafts were transplanted into Type I diabetic recipients after cold storage at 4 degrees C in a modified, hyperosmolar silica-gel filtered plasma (SGFP), a solution previously found to allow dog pancreas grafts to be successfully preserved for up to 48 hr. Ten grafts were preserved for 2-5 hr (group 1); 20 for 6-11 hr (group 2; 17 for 12-26 hr (group 3). Graft function and late outcome were compared between these groups and another group of 7 cadaveric grafts (group 4), which were transplanted immediately and without any preservation. Analysis of exocrine pancreatic function early after transplantation showed a maximum mean serum amylase (IU/L) of 557, 440, 429, and 307 in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Primary preservation failure rates of 0, 5%, 5.8%, and 0%, and endocrine graft function rates at 1 month of 80%, 80%, 76%, and 86% were obtained for groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively (P = NS). Only patients who were insulin-independent were counted as having functioning grafts. Detailed functional studies at 1 month showed that mean plasma glucose levels during 24-hr metabolic profiles were in the normal range in 71%, 68%, 72%, and 50%, while oral glucose tolerance test results were within the normal range in 38%, 81%, 76%, and 66% of groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively (P = NS). At 1 year, patient survival rates were 57%, 88%, 75%, and 100% (P = NS), and the graft functional survival rates were 0, 25%, 33%, and 29% (P = NS) in the respective groups. Five patients in group 2, and 6 in group 3 have currently functioning grafts at 4 to 37 months after transplantation. We conclude that cadaver pancreas grafts can be safely

  1. Prospective coronary angioscopy assessment of allograft coronary artery disease in human cardiac transplant recipients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Ashit; Ventura, Hector O.; Collins, Tyrone J.; Ramee, Stephen R.; White, Christopher J.

    1993-09-01

    Annual angiographic assessment to determine the presence or progression of allograft coronary artery disease (CAD) has been unable to modify the natural history of this disease. Coronary angioscopy is a sensitive method to detect the early presence of coronary artery disease and in a retrospective analysis severity of CAD by angioscopy correlated with the time since transplantation. The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate progression of coronary artery disease over a one year period in 40 cardiac transplant recipients. The progression of coronary artery disease as assessed by angioscopy is directly related to time after transplantation and therefore angioscopy may be the method of choice for detection and evaluation of therapeutic regimens to control allograft coronary artery disease.

  2. Prediction of Renal Allograft Acute Rejection Using a Novel Non-Invasive Model Based on Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Jin, Yunjie; Wu, Shengdi; Li, Long; Hu, Mushuang; Xu, Ming; Rong, Ruiming; Zhu, Tongyu; He, Wanyuan

    2016-09-01

    Point shear wave elastography based on acoustic radiation force impulse is a novel technology used to quantify tissue stiffness by measuring shear wave speed. A total of 115 kidney transplantation recipients were consecutively enrolled in this prospective study. The patients were subdivided into two groups using 1 mo post-transplantation as the cutoff time for determining the development of acute rejection (AR). Shear wave speed was significantly higher in the AR group than in the non-AR group. We created a model called SEV, comprising shear wave speed, estimated glomerular filtration rate and kidney volume change, that could successfully discriminate patients with or without AR. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of SEV was 0.89, which was higher than values for other variables; it was even better in patients within 1 mo post-transplantation (0.954), but was lower than the estimated glomerular filtration rate in patients after 1 mo post-transplantation. Therefore, the SEV model may predict AR after renal transplantation with a high degree of accuracy, and it may be more useful in the early post-operative stage after renal transplantation. PMID:27267289

  3. Amniotic membrane is a potential regenerative option for chronic non-healing wounds: a report of five cases receiving dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft.

    PubMed

    Mrugala, Andrew; Sui, Audrey; Plummer, Malgorzata; Altman, Igor; Papineau, Elaine; Frandsen, Devn; Hill, Danielle; Ennis, William J

    2016-08-01

    A case series of five patients with a total of six chronic non-healing wounds (>30 day duration) were non-randomly selected to evaluate the performance, safety and handling properties of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft, an amniotic membrane scaffolding product. The patients had lower extremity wounds that had previously failed standard of care within a university outpatient/inpatient wound healing programme. Five wounds treated with dehydrated amnion/chorion membrane allograft showed a mean 43% area reduction from baseline (51% median) at 3 weeks into treatment and completely healed with a 64-day median time to closure (SD ±27·6 days). One wound worsened at 3 weeks and was found to have a complete central vein obstruction that was treated with long-term mild compression but still eventually healed at 6 months. Removing this outlier, the four responding wounds had a 72% mean and 69% median change in area from baseline, at the 3 week point. All five patients received only one application of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft, and there were no adverse events. The product was easy to use, administer and handle. In summary, dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft appears to be a safe, effective and easy to use therapy for chronic non-healing wounds. This study describes the details of these clinical cases and provides an overview of the current evidence on the use of amniotic tissue in clinical practice. PMID:25974156

  4. RENAL SUBSTRATE EXCHANGE AND GLUCONEOGENESIS IN NORMAL POSTABSORPTIVE HUMANS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Release of glucose by the kidney in postabsorptive normal humans is generally regarded as being wholly due to gluconeogenesis. Although lactate is the most important systemic gluconeogenic precursor and there is appreciable net renal lactate uptake, renal lactate gluconeogenesis has not yet been inv...

  5. CD16⁺ monocytes with smooth muscle cell characteristics are reduced in human renal chronic transplant dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Boersema, M; van den Born, J C; van Ark, J; Harms, G; Seelen, M A; van Dijk, M C R F; van Goor, H; Navis, G J; Popa, E R; Hillebrands, J L

    2015-05-01

    In chronic transplant dysfunction (CTD), persistent (allo)immune-mediated inflammation eventually leads to tissue remodeling including neointima formation in intragraft arteries. We previously showed that recipient-derived neointimal α-SMA(+) smooth muscle-like cells are present in human renal allografts with CTD. Human PBMC contain myeloid cells capable of differentiating into α-SMA(+) cells in vitro; the phenotype of the ancestral subset is as yet unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether monocyte subsets contain cells with smooth muscle-like cell differentiation capacity and whether CTD in renal transplant recipients is associated with a shift in these monocyte subsets. To accomplish this goal, monocyte subsets from healthy controls were sorted based on CD14 and CD16 expression to investigate gene expression levels of mesenchymal markers α-SMA and SM22α. CD14(+)/CD16(++) monocytes displayed increased α-SMA and SM22α mRNA expression compared with CD14(++)/CD16(-) monocytes, suggesting increased differentiation potential toward smooth muscle-like cells. Flow cytometry revealed that in non-CTD transplant recipients the percentage of CD14(+)/CD16(++) monocytes was reduced, with an even further reduction in patients with CTD. To determine a potential correlation between CD14(+)/CD16(++) monocytes and α-SMA(+) cell outgrowth potential in vitro, PBMC of healthy controls and transplant recipients with and without CTD were cultured under fibrotic culture conditions, and indeed a significant correlation (p=0.0002, r=0.62) was observed. Finally, double staining for α-SMA and CD16 revealed presence of α-SMA(+)CD16(+) cells in kidney explants from CTD patients, albeit at very low numbers. Our data represent evidence that, compared to CD14(++)CD16(-) monocytes, CD14(+)CD16(++) monocytes have an increased expression of smooth muscle cell-associated genes. This monocyte subpopulation is reduced in renal transplant patients with CTD, possibly due to selective

  6. Radionuclide surveillance of the allografted pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    George, E.A.; Salimi, Z.; Carney, K.; Castaneda, M.; Garvin, P.J.

    1988-04-01

    To determine the value of scintigraphy to detect posttransplantation complications of the allografted pancreas, we retrospectively reviewed 209 scintigrams obtained with /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid (/sup 99m/Tc-SC) and /sup 99m/Tc-glucoheptonate (/sup 99m/Tc-GH). The scintigraphic studies were performed in 37 recipients of simultaneous renal and pancreatic allografts harvested from the same donor. /sup 99m/Tc-SC was used as an indicator of thrombotic vasculitis; pancreatic perfusion and blood-pool parameters were monitored with /sup 99m/Tc-GH. In 11 of the 37 recipients, scintigraphic abnormalities suggested posttransplantation infarction. Recurrent episodes of acute rejection of the pancreatic allograft, which always coincided with acute rejection of the renal allograft, were monitored in 24 recipients. Rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis was suggested in 12 of the 24 recipients and persisted in 10 recipients for several weeks after improvement of renal allograft rejection. Pancreatic atrophy was suggested scintigraphically in 16 of the 24 recipients with recurrent episodes of rejection. Spontaneous pancreatic-duct obstruction and obstructive pancreatitis were associated with a scintigraphic pattern similar to that of rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis. We concluded that the specific radionuclides used in this series are useful for the surveillance and assessment of posttransplantation pancreatic infarction, acute rejection, pancreatitis, and atrophy

  7. A Case of Intraparenchymal Pseudoaneurysms in Kidney Allograft.

    PubMed

    Lorentz, Liam Antony; Hlabangana, Linda Tebogo; Davies, Malcom

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Percutaneous needle biopsy is routinely performed for renal allograft management. Vascular complications of the procedure include pseudoaneurysm and arterio-venous fistulae formation. Delayed diagnosis of these complications is due to their mostly asymptomatic and indolent nature. CASE REPORT We present a case of extensive intraparenchymal pseudoaneurysm formation within the inferior pole of the allograft, diagnosed two years following the most recent biopsy procedure. CONCLUSIONS Renal pseudoaneurysms may only be diagnosed years after their formation as they are typically asymptomatic. PMID:27510594

  8. Operative technique for human composite flexor tendon allograft procurement and engraftment.

    PubMed

    DeGeorge, Brent R; Rodeheaver, George T; Drake, David B

    2014-01-01

    Devastating volar hand injuries with significant damage to the pulley structures and fibro-osseous sheath, flexor tendons, and volar plates pose a major problem to the reconstructive hand surgeon. Despite advances in tendon handling, operative technique, and postoperative hand rehabilitation, patients who have undergone flexor tendon reconstruction are often plagued by chronic pain, stiffness, and decreased range of motion with resultant decreased ability to work and poor quality of life. Postoperative adhesion formation and lack of suitable donor material for tendon autograft are 2 fundamental problems that continue to challenge the hand surgeon. In 1967, Erle E. Peacock, Jr, described a technique of flexor tendon reconstruction using cadaveric composite flexor tendon allograft, which consisted of both the flexor digitorum profundus and superficialis tendons in their respective fibro-osseous sheaths consisting of the digital pulley structures and the underlying periosteum and volar plates. This technique never gained widespread acceptance due to concerns regarding tissue antigenicity, infectious disease transmission, and the rising popularity of the method of Hunter for silastic rod-based flexor tendon reconstruction initially described during the same period. With modern-day advances in tissue processing with acellularization and extensive donor screening for transmissible diseases, this technique should be revisited to address the reconstructive needs of patients with extensive volar soft tissue and tendon injury. Herein, we describe the operative technique of composite flexor tendon procurement and reconstruction with key modifications from the initial technique described by Peacock for improved composite construct elevation, soft tissue inset, and bony attachment. PMID:24691346

  9. Three Dimensional Culture of Human Renal Cell Carcinoma Organoids

    PubMed Central

    Batchelder, Cynthia A.; Martinez, Michele L.; Duru, Nadire; Meyers, Frederick J.; Tarantal, Alice F.

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinomas arise from the nephron but are heterogeneous in disease biology, clinical behavior, prognosis, and response to systemic therapy. Development of patient-specific in vitro models that efficiently and faithfully reproduce the in vivo phenotype may provide a means to develop personalized therapies for this diverse carcinoma. Studies to maintain and model tumor phenotypes in vitro were conducted with emerging three-dimensional culture techniques and natural scaffolding materials. Human renal cell carcinomas were individually characterized by histology, immunohistochemistry, and quantitative PCR to establish the characteristics of each tumor. Isolated cells were cultured on renal extracellular matrix and compared to a novel polysaccharide scaffold to assess cell-scaffold interactions, development of organoids, and maintenance of gene expression signatures over time in culture. Renal cell carcinomas cultured on renal extracellular matrix repopulated tubules or vessel lumens in renal pyramids and medullary rays, but cells were not observed in glomeruli or outer cortical regions of the scaffold. In the polysaccharide scaffold, renal cell carcinomas formed aggregates that were loosely attached to the scaffold or free-floating within the matrix. Molecular analysis of cell-scaffold constructs including immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR demonstrated that individual tumor phenotypes could be sustained for up to 21 days in culture on both scaffolds, and in comparison to outcomes in two-dimensional monolayer cultures. The use of three-dimensional scaffolds to engineer a personalized in vitro renal cell carcinoma model provides opportunities to advance understanding of this disease. PMID:26317980

  10. Transport of circulating serum cholesterol by human renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Clayman, R.V.; Figenshau, R.S.; Prigge, W.F.; Forstrom, L.; Gebhard, R.L.

    1987-06-01

    Clear cell renal cancer contains a large quantity of cholesterol ester (300-mg./gm. protein). To determine whether abnormalities in cholesterol transport could account for this sterol accumulation, the uptake, release, and imaging capabilities of intravenously injected /sup 131/I-6-iodomethyl-29-norcholesterol, a cholesterol analogue, were studied preoperatively in five patients with clear cell renal cancer. At surgery, samples of the liver, tumor, adrenal, and non-tumor kidney were obtained for analysis. /sup 131/I-sterol uptake by the tumor, when normalized for cholesterol content, was less than for adrenal, liver or kidney. In contrast, release of preloaded /sup 131/I-sterol from the human tumors was consistently slower than for normal kidney. The reduced release of free cholesterol from renal cancer cells may, in part, be responsible for the accumulation of cholesterol in human renal cancer.

  11. Renal nursing and the Human Tissue Act 2004.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Abbe; Noble, Helen

    The Human Tissue Act of 2004 was introduced in the UK on 1 September 2006. It replaced all Acts that previously governed the procurement and utilization of tissues, cells and organs. It has promoted changes in requirements predominantly in transplantation settings. Past research has highlighted a shortage of organs for transplantation, particularly in renal donation. The new act hopes to remedy this so that future renal transplantations will occur more frequently, therefore improving choice and quality of life for patients with end stage renal disease. For UK renal nurses, the implementation of the Human Tissue Act 2004 presents challenges requiring adaptations of prior learning with new nursing roles. Recommendations can be made to help during the change process. Kurt Lewin's model of change provides a foundation for the understanding and recognition of change processes that occur in the implementation of individual and organizational change. PMID:17851366

  12. Renal

    MedlinePlus

    ... term "renal" refers to the kidney. For example, renal failure means kidney failure. Related topics: Kidney disease Kidney disease - diet Kidney failure Kidney function tests Renal scan Kidney transplant

  13. Recruitment of renal transplant patients into patrolling police roles using orthotic shields

    PubMed Central

    Levene, Sara; Levene, Charlotte Amy; Makanjuola, David; Rajakariar, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Renal allografts are transplanted to an anatomically unnatural site where they are exposed to trauma, and may fail if damaged. Individuals with renal allografts have been excluded from patrolling police roles as these often necessitate confrontation. We describe two patients with renal allografts who have been recruited by the Metropolitan Police Service, using bespoke orthotic shields to protect the grafts. PMID:24879727

  14. Renal denervation for human hypertension: is there a future?

    PubMed

    Izzo, Joseph L; Tobe, Sheldon W

    2016-05-01

    The sympathetic nervous system plays a permissive, if not primary causal role in the genesis and maintenance of human essential hypertension. Excessive sympathetic nervous system activity in man is most apparent in early forms of hypertension (prehypertension and white-coat type). Renal nerves are of particular interest because of their roles in modulating the activity of the renin-angiotensin system and renal sodium excretion. Renal denervation substantially ameliorates the development of hypertension in animal models such as renovascular, spontaneously hypertensive, and steroid-induced hypertension in rats and aortic coarctation in dogs. In man, catheter ablation of renal nerves has been undertaken in the late phases of hypertension; in a rigorously controlled trial in resistant hypertension (SYMPLICITY HTN-3), renal denervation did not reduce blood pressure over the long term. Is this because renal denervation is more appropriate to prevent than treat late-stage hypertension? Are there anatomical or technical barriers yet to be overcome in the procedure? These and other issues are addressed by two experts in this issue of the controversies series: Deepak L. Bhatt and Murray Epstein. PMID:27049792

  15. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human renal kallikrein gene

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, B.A.; Yun, Z.X.; Close, J.A.; Tregear, G.W.; Kitamura, N.; Nakanish, S.; Callen, D.F.; Baker, E.; Hyland, V.J.; Sutherland, G.R.; Richards, R.I.

    1988-05-03

    Glandular kallikreins are a family of proteases encoded by a variable number of genes in different mammalian species. In all species examined, however, one particular kallikrein is functionally conserved in its capacity to release the vasoactive peptide, Lys-bradykinin, from low molecular weight kininogen. This kallikrein is found in the kidney, pancreas, and salivary gland, showing a unique pattern of tissue-specific expression relative to other members of the family. The authors have isolated a genomic clone carrying the human renal kallikrein gene and compared the nucleotide sequence of its promoter region with those of the mouse renal kallikrein gene and another mouse kallikrein gene expressed in a distinct cell type. They find four sequence elements conserved between renal kallikrein genes from the two species. They have also shown that the human gene is localized to 19q13, a position analogous to that of the kallikrein gene family on mouse chromosome 7.

  16. A Case of Intraparenchymal Pseudoaneurysms in Kidney Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Lorentz, Liam Antony; Hlabangana, Linda Tebogo; Davies, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 31 Final Diagnosis: Intraparenchymal pseudo-aneurysms in kidney transplant Symptoms: Asymptomatic Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Percutaneous renal biopsy Specialty: Transplantology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accidents Background: Percutaneous needle biopsy is routinely performed for renal allograft management. Vascular complications of the procedure include pseudoaneurysm and arterio-venous fistulae formation. Delayed diagnosis of these complications is due to their mostly asymptomatic and indolent nature. Case Report: We present a case of extensive intraparenchymal pseudoaneurysm formation within the inferior pole of the allograft, diagnosed two years following the most recent biopsy procedure. Conclusions: Renal pseudoaneurysms may only be diagnosed years after their formation as they are typically asymptomatic. PMID:27510594

  17. Radiation sterilization of tissue allografts: A review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer; Singh, Antaryami

    2016-01-01

    Tissue substitutes are required in a number of clinical conditions for treatment of injured and diseased tissues. Tissues like bone, skin, amniotic membrane and soft tissues obtained from human donor can be used for repair or reconstruction of the injured part of the body. Allograft tissues from human donor provide an excellent alternative to autografts. However, major concern with the use of allografts is the risk of infectious disease transmission. Therefore, tissue allografts should be sterilized to make them safe for clinical use. Gamma radiation has several advantages and is the most suitable method for sterilization of biological tissues. This review summarizes the use of gamma irradiation technology as an effective method for sterilization of biological tissues and ensuring safety of tissue allografts. PMID:27158422

  18. Radiation sterilization of tissue allografts: A review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer; Singh, Antaryami

    2016-04-28

    Tissue substitutes are required in a number of clinical conditions for treatment of injured and diseased tissues. Tissues like bone, skin, amniotic membrane and soft tissues obtained from human donor can be used for repair or reconstruction of the injured part of the body. Allograft tissues from human donor provide an excellent alternative to autografts. However, major concern with the use of allografts is the risk of infectious disease transmission. Therefore, tissue allografts should be sterilized to make them safe for clinical use. Gamma radiation has several advantages and is the most suitable method for sterilization of biological tissues. This review summarizes the use of gamma irradiation technology as an effective method for sterilization of biological tissues and ensuring safety of tissue allografts. PMID:27158422

  19. Acute and Chronic Allograft Dysfunction in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Ryan J; Weng, Francis L; Kandula, Praveen

    2016-05-01

    Allograft dysfunction after a kidney transplant is often clinically asymptomatic and is usually detected as an increase in serum creatinine level with corresponding decrease in glomerular filtration rate. The diagnostic evaluation may include blood tests, urinalysis, transplant ultrasonography, radionuclide imaging, and allograft biopsy. Whether it occurs early or later after transplant, allograft dysfunction requires prompt evaluation to determine its cause and subsequent management. Acute rejection, medication toxicity from calcineurin inhibitors, and BK virus nephropathy can occur early or later. Other later causes include transplant glomerulopathy, recurrent glomerulonephritis, and renal artery stenosis. PMID:27095641

  20. The Use of Genomics and Pathway Analysis in Our Understanding and Prediction of Clinical Renal Transplant Injury.

    PubMed

    Menon, Madhav C; Keung, Karen L; Murphy, Barbara; OʼConnell, Philip J

    2016-07-01

    The development and application of high-throughput molecular profiling have transformed the study of human diseases. The problem of handling large, complex data sets has been facilitated by advances in complex computational analysis. In this review, the recent literature regarding the application of transcriptional genomic information to renal transplantation, with specific reference to acute rejection, acute kidney injury in allografts, chronic allograft injury, and tolerance is discussed, as is the current published data regarding other "omics" strategies-proteomics, metabolomics, and the microRNA transcriptome. These data have shed new light on our understanding of the pathogenesis of specific disease conditions after renal transplantation, but their utility as a biomarker of disease has been hampered by study design and sample size. This review aims to highlight the opportunities and obstacles that exist with genomics and other related technologies to better understand and predict renal allograft outcome. PMID:26447506

  1. Use of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography to Evaluate Chronic Allograft Nephropathy in Rats and Correlations between Time-Intensity Curve Parameters and Allograft Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Yu, Zexing; Xu, Yue; Zeng, Song; Zhang, Zijian; Xue, Wenrui; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hu, Xiaopeng

    2016-07-01

    This study quantitatively analyzed changes in the hemodynamic characteristics of renal allografts at different stages in a rat chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) model as well as the relationship between hemodynamic parameters and renal allograft fibrosis using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS). The experimental group used a CAN rat model (n = 30), and the control group used an orthotopic syngeneic renal transplant model (n = 30). After surgery, creatinine clearance rates were regularly monitored every 2 wk. The checking times were set at 4, 12 and 24 wk after surgery, which represent early, middle and late stage of CAN, respectively. At different stages of CAN, eight rats from each group were randomly selected for CEUS examination. Time-intensity curve (TIC) parameters, including rise time, peak intensity, mean transit time, area under the curve, wash-in slope, time-to-peak and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression; Vimentin expression; and chronic allograft damage index scores were evaluated by linear correlation analysis. Before the creatinine clearance rate showed significant abnormalities, the renal allografts in the experimental group had already presented pathologic changes associated with CAN. In the early stage after surgery, compared to the TIC curve of the control group, the experimental group showed increased rise time, mean transit time, area under the curve and time-to-peak, and decreased wash-in slope (p < 0.05). Chronic allograft damage index scores and the expression levels of α-SMA and Vimentin proteins in renal allografts were correlated with TIC parameters (p < 0.05). Compared to creatinine clearance rate, CEUS can detect CAN at earlier stages. The correlations between TIC-related parameters and the expression levels of α-SMA and Vimentin in renal allografts indicate that CEUS is a feasible way to assess the degree of renal allograft fibrosis quantitatively. PMID:27056611

  2. Comparison of frozen and freeze-dried particulate bone allografts.

    PubMed

    Malinin, Theodore; Temple, H Thomas

    2007-10-01

    Freeze-dried and frozen particulate bone allografts are used interchangeably on the assumption that the biologic behavior of these grafts is similar. Dissimilarities in biologic behavior and differences in the rate and extent of bone incorporation of freeze-dried and frozen particulate grafts were demonstrated in a comparative study using a non-human primate model. Freeze-dried particulate allografts induced new bone formation and healing of the osseous defects much faster than the frozen allografts. PMID:17658506

  3. DermACELL: Human Acellular Dermal Matrix Allograft A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Cole, Windy E

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes often causes ulcers on the feet of diabetic patients. A 56-year-old, insulin-dependent, diabetic woman presented to the wound care center with a Wagner grade 3 ulcer of the right heel. She reported a 3-week history of ulceration with moderate drainage and odor and had a history of ulceration and osteomyelitis in the contralateral limb. Rigorous wound care, including hospitalization; surgical incision and drainage; intravenous antibiotic drug therapy; vacuum-assisted therapy; and a new room temperature, sterile, human acellular dermal matrix graft were used to heal the wound, save her limb, and restore her activities of daily living. This case presentation involves alternative treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer with this new acellular dermal matrix, DermACELL. PMID:27031550

  4. Increase of Th17 Cell Phenotype in Kidney Transplant Recipients with Chronic Allograft Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Doh, Kyoung Chan; Cho, Mi-La; Yang, Chul Woo

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the association of Th17 cell phenotype with chronic allograft dysfunction in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs). We compared the expression of Th17 cell phenotype in KTRs with chronic allograft dysfunction group (CAD, n = 52) with four control groups (long-term stable KTRs (LTS, n = 67), early stable KTRs (ES, n = 28), end stage renal disease (ESRD, n = 45), and healthy control (HC, n = 26). We also performed in vitro study using human proximal renal tubular epithelial cell line (HPRTEpiC) to evaluate the effect of IL-17 on human renal tubular epithelial cells. The CAD group showed increased percentage of Th17 cells out of CD4+ T cells and also increased proportion of IL-17 producing cells out of effector memory T cells or out of CCR4+CCR6+/CD4+ T cells compared to the LTS group and other control groups. Also, the serum level of IL-17, IL-33, and RAGE, and the expression of IL-1beta, RAGE, and HMGB1 mRNA showed an increase in the CAD group compared to the LTS group. In vitro study revealed that IL-17 increased production of IL-6 and IL-8 and up-regulated profibrotic gene expression such as ACTA-2 and CTGF in HPRTEpiC in a dose-dependent manner, which suggests that IL-17 has a role in the development of renal tubular cell injury. The results of our study may suggest that increase of Th17 cell phenotype could be a marker for the chronic allograft injury; hence there is a need to develop diagnostic and therapeutic tools targeting the Th17 cells pathway. PMID:26717145

  5. A prospective, randomised comparative study of weekly versus biweekly application of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft in the management of diabetic foot ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Zelen, Charles M; Serena, Thomas E; Snyder, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if weekly application of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft reduce time to heal more effectively than biweekly application for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. This was an institutional review board-approved, registered, prospective, randomised, comparative, non-blinded, single-centre clinical trial. Patients with non-infected ulcers of ≥ 4 weeks duration were included for the study. They were randomised to receive weekly or biweekly application of allograft in addition to a non-adherent, moist dressing with compressive wrapping. All wounds were offloaded. The primary study outcome was mean time to healing. Overall, during the 12-week study period, 92·5% (37/40) ulcers completely healed. Mean time to complete healing was 4·1 ± 2·9 versus 2·4 ± 1·8 weeks (P = 0·039) in the biweekly versus weekly groups, respectively. Complete healing occurred in 50% versus 90% by 4 weeks in the biweekly and weekly groups, respectively (P = 0·014). Number of grafts applied to healed wounds was similar at 2·4 ± 1·5 and 2·3 ± 1·8 for biweekly versus weekly groups, respectively (P = 0·841). These results validate previous studies showing that the allograft is an effective treatment for diabetic ulcers and show that wounds treated with weekly application heal more rapidly than with biweekly application. More rapid healing may decrease clinical operational costs and prevent long-term medical complications. PMID:24618401

  6. A prospective, randomised comparative study of weekly versus biweekly application of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft in the management of diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Zelen, Charles M; Serena, Thomas E; Snyder, Robert J

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if weekly application of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft reduce time to heal more effectively than biweekly application for treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. This was an institutional review board-approved, registered, prospective, randomised, comparative, non-blinded, single-centre clinical trial. Patients with non-infected ulcers of ≥ 4 weeks duration were included for the study. They were randomised to receive weekly or biweekly application of allograft in addition to a non-adherent, moist dressing with compressive wrapping. All wounds were offloaded. The primary study outcome was mean time to healing. Overall, during the 12-week study period, 92·5% (37/40) ulcers completely healed. Mean time to complete healing was 4·1 ± 2·9 versus 2·4 ± 1·8 weeks (P = 0·039) in the biweekly versus weekly groups, respectively. Complete healing occurred in 50% versus 90% by 4 weeks in the biweekly and weekly groups, respectively (P = 0·014). Number of grafts applied to healed wounds was similar at 2·4 ± 1·5 and 2·3 ± 1·8 for biweekly versus weekly groups, respectively (P = 0·841). These results validate previous studies showing that the allograft is an effective treatment for diabetic ulcers and show that wounds treated with weekly application heal more rapidly than with biweekly application. More rapid healing may decrease clinical operational costs and prevent long-term medical complications. PMID:24618401

  7. Socket Preservation Therapy with Acellular Dermal Matrix and Mineralized Bone Allograft After Tooth Extraction in Humans: A Clinical and Histomorphometric Study.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Patricia Garani; Muglia, Valdir Antonio; Reino, Danilo Maeda; Maia, Luciana Prado; de Moraes Grisi, Marcio Fernando; de Souza, Sergio Luís; Taba, Mario; Palioto, Daniela Bazan; de Almeida, Adriana G; Novaes, Arthur Belém

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze through clinical and histomorphometric parameters the use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) with or without mineralized bone allograft (AB) on bone formation in human alveoli after a 6- to 8-month healing period. A total of 19 patients in need of extraction of the maxillary anterior teeth were selected and randomly assigned to the test group (ADM plus AB) or to the control group (ADM only). Clinical and histomorphometric measurements and histologic analysis were recorded 6 to 8 months after ridge preservation procedures. Clinical parameters and amount of mineralized and nonmineralized tissue were measured and analyzed. In the clinical measurements, the test group showed reduced bone loss in the buccopalatal dimension after 6 to 8 months (intragroup analysis P < .01). Histologic findings showed higher percentages of mineralized tissue and lower percentages of nonmineralized tissue in the test group when compared with the control group (P < .05). In this randomized controlled clinical and histomorphometric study in humans, acellular dermal matrix in association with mineralized bone allograft reduced alveolar bone loss in the anterior maxillae both in height and width after a follow-up period of 6 to 8 months. PMID:26901306

  8. Renal handling of free sialic acid in normal humans and patients with Salla disease or renal disease.

    PubMed

    Seppala, R; Renlund, M; Bernardini, I; Tietze, F; Gahl, W A

    1990-08-01

    The renal handling of free sialic acid, a negatively charged sugar, was investigated in normal humans and in patients with impaired sialic acid metabolism or impaired renal function. A sensitive assay for sialic acid, based upon the specific degradation of free sialic acid by N-acetylneuraminic acid aldolase, was developed to measure small amounts of sialic acid in human plasma. Using this assay on plasma from patients with disorders of sialic acid metabolism, we determined that the fractional excretion of sialic acid was maintained at approximately 98% over a wide range of filtered loads, i.e., from 40 to 2617 nmoles/minute. In other patients with different degrees of renal insufficiency, free sialic acid clearance varied directly with creatinine clearance, indicating filtration of this sugar by renal glomeruli. In patients with renal Fanconi syndrome, the urinary excretion of free sialic acid was independent of the severity of the generalized tubular defect, indicating that sialic acid was not reabsorbed by renal tubular cells. These findings indicate that sialic acid is filtered but not reabsorbed by the human kidney, in contrast with the handling of other sugars known to be reabsorbed by renal tubular cells. In addition, three of eight patients with Salla disease, a storage disorder due to impaired lysosomal transport of free sialic acid, were found to have reduced creatinine clearances, but all Salla disease patients had entirely normal renal tubular function. PMID:2381164

  9. Biochemical characterization of human renal tumors by in vitro nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, M. R.; Tugnoli, V.; Bottura, G.; Lucchi, P.; Battaglia, A.; Giorgianni, P.

    2001-05-01

    This study reports an in vitro magnetic resonance spectroscopy characterization of healthy renal parenchyma, renal cell carcinomas and oncocytomas. In vitro 1H NMR measurements allow in-depth biochemical characterization of human healthy and neoplastic renal tissues. Some metabolites with an osmotic activity are considered markers of physiological renal function. Moreover, the HPLC technique was applied to investigate the amino acidic profile of these tissues: some amino acids appear to have statistic significance.

  10. Skin donors and human skin allografts: evaluation of an 11-year practice and discard in a referral tissue bank.

    PubMed

    Gaucher, Sonia; Khaznadar, Zena; Gourevitch, Jean-Claude; Jarraya, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    The Saint Louis hospital tissue bank provides skin allografts to pediatric and adult burn units in the Paris area. The aim of this study was to analyze our activity during the last 11 years focusing on the reasons for skin discard. Skin is procured solely from the back of the body, which is divided into 10 zones that are harvested and processed separately. This retrospective study included all skin donors harvested between June 2002 and June 2013, representing a total of 336 donors and 2770 zones. The donors were multiorgan heart-beating donors in 91 % of cases (n = 307). The main reason for discarding harvested skin was microbial contamination, detected in 99 donors (29 %). Most contaminants were of low pathogenicity. Other reasons for discard included positive serologic tests for 2 donors [17 zones (0.61 %)], unsuitable physical skin characteristics for 3 zones (0.11 %), the donor's medical history for 53 zones (1.91 %), and technical issues with processing or distribution for 61 zones (2.2 %). In our experience, microbial contamination continues to be the main reason for discarding potential skin allografts. However, discards are limited by separate harvesting and processing of multiple zones in each donor. PMID:26275343

  11. Expression profiles of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and disposition in human renal tissues and renal cell models

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Hauwaert, Cynthia; Savary, Grégoire; Buob, David; Leroy, Xavier; Aubert, Sébastien; Flamand, Vincent; Hennino, Marie-Flore; Perrais, Michaël; and others

    2014-09-15

    Numerous xenobiotics have been shown to be harmful for the kidney. Thus, to improve our knowledge of the cellular processing of these nephrotoxic compounds, we evaluated, by real-time PCR, the mRNA expression level of 377 genes encoding xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), transporters, as well as nuclear receptors and transcription factors that coordinate their expression in eight normal human renal cortical tissues. Additionally, since several renal in vitro models are commonly used in pharmacological and toxicological studies, we investigated their metabolic capacities and compared them with those of renal tissues. The same set of genes was thus investigated in HEK293 and HK2 immortalized cell lines in commercial primary cultures of epithelial renal cells and in proximal tubular cell primary cultures. Altogether, our data offers a comprehensive description of kidney ability to process xenobiotics. Moreover, by hierarchical clustering, we observed large variations in gene expression profiles between renal cell lines and renal tissues. Primary cultures of proximal tubular epithelial cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue in terms of transcript profiling. Moreover, compared to other renal cell models, Tacrolimus dose dependent toxic effects were lower in proximal tubular cell primary cultures that display the highest metabolism and disposition capacity. Therefore, primary cultures appear to be the most relevant in vitro model for investigating the metabolism and bioactivation of nephrotoxic compounds and for toxicological and pharmacological studies. - Highlights: • Renal proximal tubular (PT) cells are highly sensitive to xenobiotics. • Expression of genes involved in xenobiotic disposition was measured. • PT cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue.

  12. Glomerular endothelial vesicles in a renal allograft: an unusual pattern of immunoglobulin deposition in a patient with biclonal gammopathy of unknown significance.

    PubMed

    Flatley, Ellen M; Segal, Gerald M; Batiuk, Thomas D; Bennett, William M; Houghton, Donald C; Troxell, Megan L

    2015-06-01

    Paraproteins have varied effects on the kidney on the basis of molecular structure, concentration, and renal function. Prototypical patterns include myeloma cast nephropathy, monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease, and amyloid, among others. We report a 69-year-old man with end-stage diabetic nephropathy and biclonal gammopathy of unknown significance. Serum monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG)-κ and urine monoclonal free λ light chains were identified during workup for nephrotic syndrome. A native renal biopsy demonstrated diabetic nephropathy, without indication of paraprotein-related pathology. After transplantation, a surveillance biopsy showed endothelialitis (type 2 rejection) and abundant eosinophilic droplets, nearly occluding glomerular capillary loops. Electron microscopy localized tightly packed electron-dense vesicles in glomerular endothelial cells. Immunofluorescence studies revealed IgG-κ-dominant endothelial staining, along with λ monotypic protein resorption droplets in tubules. Two additional biopsies within the following year showed this same paraprotein distribution, with some increase in mesangial sclerosis. Two years after transplant the patient remains asymptomatic with normal creatinine levels. Literature review yields rare cases of immunoglobulin crystalline deposits in multiple glomerular cell types, rarely including endothelial cells; however, this appears to be the first report of monoclonal immunoglobulin vesicles localized solely to endothelial cells. As these vesicles were not seen in the native kidney biopsy, we hypothesize an interaction of alloimmune-mediated endothelial injury and the physiochemical properties of the IgG-κ paraprotein. In addition, this case illustrates simultaneous different patterns of accumulation of monoclonal immunoglobulin and light chain components in this unique patient with biclonal gammopathy of unknown significance. PMID:25723111

  13. Everolimus-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition in immortalized human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells: key role of heparanase

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Everolimus (EVE) is a drug widely used in several renal transplant protocols. Although characterized by a relatively low nephrotoxicity, it may induce several adverse effects including severe fibro-interstitial pneumonitis. The exact molecular/biological mechanism associated to these pro-fibrotic effects is unknown, but epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) may have a central role. Additionally, heparanase, an enzyme recently associated with the progression of chronic allograft nephropathy, could contribute to activate this machinery in renal cells. Methods Several biomolecular strategies (RT-PCR, immunofluorescence, zymography and migration assay) have been used to assess the capability of EVE (10, 100, 200 and 500 nM) to induce an in vitro heparanase-mediated EMT in wild-type (WT) and Heparanase (HPSE)-silenced immortalized human renal epithelial proximal tubular cells (HK-2). Additionally, microarray technology was used to find additional biological elements involved in EVE-induced EMT. Results Biomolecular experiments demonstrated a significant up-regulation (more than 1.5 fold increase) of several genes encoding for well known EMT markers [(alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), Vimentin (VIM), Fibronectin (FN) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9)], enhancement of MMP9 protein level and increment of cells motility in WT HK2 cells treated with high concentrations of EVE (higher than 100 nM). Similarly, immunofluorescence analysis showed that 100 nM of EVE increased α-SMA, VIM and FN protein expression in WT HK2 cells. All these effects were absent in both HPSE- and AKT-silenced cell lines. AKT is a protein having a central role in EMT. Additionally, microarray analysis identified other 2 genes significantly up-regulated in 100 nM EVE-treated cells (p < 0.005 and FDR < 5%): transforming growth factor beta-2 (TGFβ2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Real-time PCR analysis validated microarray. Conclusions Our in vitro study

  14. Gene expression and cell turnover in human renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Woolf, A S; Winyard, P J

    2000-01-01

    Kidney malformations are common causes of chronic renal failure in children. Dysplastic kidneys represent a unique model of perturbed epithelial-mesenchymal interaction which leads to the formation of malformed branching tubules surrounded by undifferentiated and metaplastic mesenchymal cells. We have found that human dysplastic epithelia express PAX2 (a transcription factor), BCL2 (a survival factor) and galectin-3 (a cell adhesion/signaling molecule). These genes are implicated in oncogenesis and their persistent expression may drive proliferation of dysplastic cysts, hence explaining the massive growth of some multicystic dysplastic kidneys. We have also detected prominent apoptosis in undifferentiated tissues around dysplastic epithelia, and this may provide a potential mechanism for the well-documented regression of dysplastic kidneys. Hence, although these kidneys may not have any excretory function, it is incorrect to consider them as 'end stage organs' because they are highly active in terms of cell turnover and gene expression; furthermore, these processes can be correlated with patterns of tissue growth and involution. Further elucidation of 'molecular lesions' in renal malformations may lead to novel therapies to enhance the differentiation of progenitor cells. PMID:10668206

  15. Radiation sterilization of skin allograft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairiyama, E.; Horak, C.; Spinosa, M.; Pachado, J.; Schwint, O.

    2009-07-01

    In the treatment of burns or accidental loss of skin, cadaveric skin allografts provide an alternative to temporarily cover a wounded area. The skin bank facility is indispensable for burn care. The first human skin bank was established in Argentina in 1989; later, 3 more banks were established. A careful donor selection is carried out according to the national regulation in order to prevent transmissible diseases. As cadaveric human skin is naturally highly contaminated, a final sterilization is necessary to reach a sterility assurance level (SAL) of 10 -6. The sterilization dose for 106 batches of processed human skin was determined on the basis of the Code of Practice for the Radiation Sterilization of Tissue Allografts: Requirements for Validation and Routine Control (2004) and ISO 11137-2 (2006). They ranged from 17.6 to 33.4 kGy for bioburdens of >10-162.700 CFU/100 cm 2. The presence of Gram negative bacteria was checked for each produced batch. From the analysis of the experimental results, it was observed that the bioburden range was very wide and consequently the estimated sterilization doses too. If this is the case, the determination of a tissue-specific dose per production batch is necessary to achieve a specified requirement of SAL. Otherwise if the dose of 25 kGy is preselected, a standardized method for substantiation of this dose should be done to confirm the radiation sterilization process.

  16. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system....

  17. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system....

  18. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system....

  19. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system....

  20. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system....

  1. Immune Privilege of Corneal Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Niederkorn, Jerry Y.; Larkin, D. Frank P.

    2013-01-01

    Corneal transplantation has been performed successfully for over 100 years. Normally, HLA typing and systemic immunosuppressive drugs are not utilized, yet 90% of corneal allografts survive. In rodents, corneal allografts representing maximal histoincompatibility enjoy >50% survival even without immunosuppressive drugs. By contrast, other categories of transplants are invariably rejected in such donor/host combinations. The acceptance of corneal allografts compared to other categories of allografts is called immune privilege. The cornea expresses factors that contribute to immune privilege by preventing the induction and expression of immune responses to histocompatibility antigens on the corneal allograft. Among these are soluble and cell membrane molecules that block immune effector elements and also apoptosis of T lymphocytes. However, some conditions rob the corneal allograft of its immune privilege and promote rejection, which remains the leading cause of corneal allograft failure. Recent studies have examined new strategies for restoring immune privilege to such high-risk hosts. PMID:20482389

  2. Iontophoresis as a means of delivering antibiotics into allograft bone.

    PubMed

    Day, R E; Megson, S; Wood, D

    2005-11-01

    Allograft bone is widely used in orthopaedic surgery, but peri-operative infection of the graft remains a common and disastrous complication. The efficacy of systemic prophylactic antibiotics is unproven, and since the graft is avascular it is likely that levels of antibiotic in the graft are low. Using an electrical potential to accelerate diffusion of antibiotics into allograft bone, high levels were achieved in specimens of both sheep and human allograft. In human bone these ranged from 187.1 mg/kg in endosteal (sd 15.7) to 124.6 (sd 46.2) in periosteal bone for gentamicin and 31.9 (sd 8.9) in endosteal and 2.9 (sd 1.1) in periosteal bone for flucloxacillin. The antibiotics remained active against bacteria in vitro after iontophoresis and continued to elute from the allograft for up to two weeks. Structural allograft can be supplemented directly with antibiotics using iontophoresis. The technique is simple and inexpensive and offers a potential means of reducing the rate of peri-operative infection in allograft surgery. Iontophoresis into allograft bone may also be applicable to other therapeutic compounds. PMID:16260682

  3. Kidney allograft survival in dogs treated with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, R.J.; Sutherland, D.E.R.; Lum, C.T.; Lewis, W.I.; Kim, T.H.; Slavin, S.; Najarian, J.S.

    1981-02-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) is immunosuppressive and, in rodents, can induce a state where transplantation of allogenic bone marrow results in chimerism and permanent acceptance of organ allografts from the donor strain. Twelve splenectomized dogs were treated with TLI (150 rads per fraction, total dose 1950 to 3000 rads) before bilateral nephrectomy and renal allotransplantation. Eight dogs received bone marrow from the kidney donor. In 13 untreated control dogs renal allografts functioned for a mean +- (SE) of 4.7 +- 0.3 days. In the four TLI treated dogs who did not receive bone marrow the renal allografts functioned for 15 to 76 days (two dogs died with functioning grafts). In the eight TLI treated dogs who received donor bone marrow, two died immediately after transplantation, two rejected at 3 and 13 days, one died at 13 days with a functioning graft, and two have had the grafts function for longer than 500 days. Chimerism was not detected in the one dog tested. The response of peripheral blood lymphocytes to stimulation with phytohemaglutinin and in mixed lymphocyte culture was suppressed for at least one month after TLI. The results confirm the immunosuppressive effect of TLI. The absence of kidney rejection in two recipients of donor bone marrow show the potential of this approach to induce long-term immunologic unresponsiveness as to an organ allograft, but the outcome is unpredictable and further experiments are needed to define the optimal conditions for administration of TLI and bone marrow to the recipients.

  4. Effects of Renal Denervation on Renal Artery Function in Humans: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Doltra, Adelina; Hartmann, Arthur; Stawowy, Philipp; Goubergrits, Leonid; Kuehne, Titus; Wellnhofer, Ernst; Gebker, Rolf; Schneeweis, Christopher; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Esler, Murray; Fleck, Eckart; Kelle, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Aim To study the effects of RD on renal artery wall function non-invasively using magnetic resonance. Methods and Results 32 patients undergoing RD were included. A 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance of the renal arteries was performed before RD and after 6-month. We quantified the vessel sharpness of both renal arteries using a quantitative analysis tool (Soap-Bubble®). In 17 patients we assessed the maximal and minimal cross-sectional area of both arteries, peak velocity, mean flow, and renal artery distensibility. In a subset of patients wall shear stress was assessed with computational flow dynamics. Neither renal artery sharpness nor renal artery distensibility differed significantly. A significant increase in minimal and maximal areas (by 25.3%, p = 0.008, and 24.6%, p = 0.007, respectively), peak velocity (by 16.9%, p = 0.021), and mean flow (by 22.4%, p = 0.007) was observed after RD. Wall shear stress significantly decreased (by 25%, p = 0.029). These effects were observed in blood pressure responders and non-responders. Conclusions RD is not associated with adverse effects at renal artery level, and leads to an increase in cross-sectional areas, velocity and flow and a decrease in wall shear stress. PMID:27003912

  5. Enhanced lymphocyte longevity and absence of proliferation and lymphocyte apoptosis in Quilty effects of human heart allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, C.; Winters, G. L.; Wilson, J. E.; McManus, B. M.

    1997-01-01

    "Quilty effect" (QE) is a common and problematic observation in endomyocardial biopsy specimens from patients after cardiac transplantation. The origin, fate, and significance of QE cellular elements are unknown. Twenty-six paraffin-embedded endomyocardial biopsy specimens with QE (five QE As and twenty-one QE Bs) from twenty-two cardiac allografts were studied by immunohistochemistry for expression of Bcl-2, Fas antigen, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), perforin, T cells (UCHL-1), macrophages (CD68), and apoptosis by in situ terminal deoxyribonucleotide transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). Approximately 50% of the lymphocytes present, mainly in the deeper region of 20 of 21 QE Bs and all 5 QE As, expressed Bcl-2 in a pseudo-nodular pattern surrounding high endothelial venules. Fas expression was detected in lymphocytes in 20 of 21 QE Bs and 5 QE As in a similar pattern to Bcl-2. However, endothelial cells and macrophages were Bcl-2 negative, whereas both cell types were Fas positive. Perforin was negative in nearly all lymphocytes. TUNEL staining revealed that lymphocytes in QEs did not undergo apoptosis; however, TUNEL positivity was observed in approximately 70% of endothelial cells and macrophages and certain adjacent cardiac myocytes in 20 of 21 QE Bs and 5 QE As. One large QE B with a germinal center was noted. Germinal center cells expressed PCNA intensely but were negative for Bcl-2, Fas, and TUNEL. Cells surrounding the germinal center expressed abundant Bcl-2. The following conclusions were drawn. 1) Apoptosis does not occur in lymphocytes in QE where enhanced Bcl-2 (apoptosis inhibitor) and Fas antigen (apoptosis inducer) are expressed. 2) PCNA negativity indicates that QE lymphocytes may not proliferate, and perforin negativity indicates that they may not exhibit perforin-based cytotoxicity. We propose that there may be a relationship between the longevity of lymphocytes in QE and the absence of apoptosis. Images Figure 1

  6. Establishment and characterization of five new human renal tumor xenografts.

    PubMed Central

    Beniers, A. J.; Peelen, W. P.; Schaafsma, H. E.; Beck, J. L.; Ramaekers, F. C.; Debruyne, F. M.; Schalken, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Ten different human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) primary tumors were xenografted into BALB/c nu/nu mice. Five of the tumors (NU-10, NU-12, NU-20, NU-22, and NU-28) gave rise to serially transplantable tumors that were further characterized. Histology, DNA index, immunohistochemical characteristics, growth rate, and clonogenic potential were followed from primary tumor to the 5th to 15th transplant passage. Only one of the tumors (NU-20) showed remarkable instability for all tested parameters in the first five transplant passages. Histology of the other tumors was essentially the same to the histology of the primary tumors, although differences between human and host-derived vessels were apparent. DNA index values in general showed a trend toward an aneuploid character of the xenografts. Immunohistochemical analyses showed a loss of intensity of staining but a concomitant rise in the fraction of positively staining cells with antibodies against cytokeratins, vimentin, tumor-associated antigens, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I antigens. Human leukocyte antigen class II antigen expression showed a loss of intensity as well as a decrease in the fraction of positive cells. Tumor doubling time was lowest in transplant passage number 0, and stable growth was noticed in transplant passages 1 through 4. Clonogenic potential of four of the lines was higher for the xenografts than for the primary tumors. The authors conclude that, on xenografting, histologic characteristics of the primary tumor are essentially conserved. Progression in the first transplant passages, however, results in tumors with a more aggressive character. Images Figure 1 PMID:1739137

  7. A Bioartificial Renal Tubule Device Embedding Human Renal Stem/Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sciancalepore, Anna Giovanna; Sallustio, Fabio; Girardo, Salvatore; Gioia Passione, Laura; Camposeo, Andrea; Mele, Elisa; Di Lorenzo, Mirella; Costantino, Vincenzo; Schena, Francesco Paolo; Pisignano, Dario

    2014-01-01

    We present a bio-inspired renal microdevice that resembles the in vivo structure of a kidney proximal tubule. For the first time, a population of tubular adult renal stem/progenitor cells (ARPCs) was embedded into a microsystem to create a bioengineered renal tubule. These cells have both multipotent differentiation abilities and an extraordinary capacity for injured renal cell regeneration. Therefore, ARPCs may be considered a promising tool for promoting regenerative processes in the kidney to treat acute and chronic renal injury. Here ARPCs were grown to confluence and exposed to a laminar fluid shear stress into the chip, in order to induce a functional cell polarization. Exposing ARPCs to fluid shear stress in the chip led the aquaporin-2 transporter to localize at their apical region and the Na+K+ATPase pump at their basolateral portion, in contrast to statically cultured ARPCs. A recovery of urea and creatinine of (20±5)% and (13±5)%, respectively, was obtained by the device. The microengineered biochip here-proposed might be an innovative “lab-on-a-chip” platform to investigate in vitro ARPCs behaviour or to test drugs for therapeutic and toxicological responses. PMID:24498117

  8. Human Leukocyte Antigen Alleles and Cytomegalovirus Infection After Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Futohi, Farzaneh; Saber, Azadeh; Nemati, Eglim; Einollahi, Behzad; Rostami, Zohre

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies have been conducted on the relationship between a number of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and cytomegalovirus infection (CMV), in kidney transplant recipients, after transplantation. However, only a limited number of HLAs have been investigated, so far, and the results have been contradictory. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between 59 HLA alleles and the CMV infection, in transplant recipients, after kidney transplantation. Patients and Methods: This retrospective cohort study was conducted on 200 patients, receiving a kidney transplant, in Baqiyatallah Hospital, in Tehran, during 2013. Throughout a one-year follow-up of kidney transplant recipients, in case of detecting the CMV antigen in patients’ blood, at any time, they were placed in the group of patients with CMV infection, whereas, if no CMV-specific antigen was developed, over a year, patients were placed in the group of patients without CMV infection, after transplantation. This study investigated the relationship between CMV infection in kidney transplant recipients and 59 HLA alleles, including 14 HLA-A, 28 HLA-B, and 17 HLA-DRB1 cases. Results: Of all participants, 104 patients (52%) were diagnosed with CMV infection. There was no significant difference between the two groups, with and without CMV infection, in terms of patient’s characteristics. The CMV infection, in patients receiving a transplanted organ from deceased donor, was significantly more prevalent than in those receiving kidney transplant from living donor (63% vs. 39%, respectively, P = 0.001). Recipients with HLA-B44 were more infected with CMV compared with patients without this allele (80% vs. 50%, respectively, P = 0.024); on the contrary, kidney recipients with HLA-DRB1-1 were less infected with CMV than patients without this allele (31% vs. 55%, respectively, P = 0.020). There was no significant relationship between CMV infection and other HLA alleles. Results of

  9. Allograft Pancreatectomy: Indications and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Nagai, S; Powelson, J A; Taber, T E; Goble, M L; Mangus, R S; Fridell, J A

    2015-09-01

    This study evaluated the indications, surgical techniques, and outcomes of allograft pancreatectomy based on a single center experience. Between 2003 and 2013, 47 patients developed pancreas allograft failure, excluding mortality with a functioning pancreas allograft. Early graft loss (within 14 days) occurred in 16, and late graft loss in 31. All patients with early graft loss eventually required allograft pancreatectomy. Nineteen of 31 patients (61%) with late graft loss underwent allograft pancreatectomy. The main indication for early allograft pancreatectomy included vascular thrombosis with or without severe pancreatitis, whereas one recipient required urgent allograft pancreatectomy for gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to an arterioenteric fistula. In cases of late allograft pancreatectomy, graft failure with clinical symptoms such as abdominal discomfort, pain, and nausea were the main indications (13/19 [68%]), simultaneous retransplantation without clinical symptoms in 3 (16%), and vascular catastrophes including pseudoaneurysm and enteric arterial fistula in 3 (16%). Postoperative morbidity included one case each of pulmonary embolism leading to mortality, formation of pseudoaneurysm requiring placement of covered stent, and postoperative bleeding requiring relaparotomy eventually leading to femoro-femoral bypass surgery 2 years after allograftectomy. Allograft pancreatectomy can be performed safely, does not preclude subsequent retransplantation, and may be lifesaving in certain instances. PMID:25912792

  10. Ameliorative Effect of Recombinant Human Erythropoietin and Ischemic Preconditioning on Renal Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Elshiekh, Mohammed; Kadkhodaee, Mehri; Seifi, Behjat; Ranjbaran, Mina; Ahghari, Parisa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury is one of the most common causes of renal dysfunction. There is increasing evidence about the role of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these injuries and endogenous antioxidants seem to have an important role in decreasing the renal tissue injury. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) and ischemic preconditioning (IPC) on renal IR injury. Materials and Methods: Twenty four male Wistar rats were allocated into four experimental groups: sham-operated, IR, EPO + IR, and IPC + IR. Rats were underwent 50 minutes bilateral ischemia followed by 24 hours reperfusion. Erythropoietin (5000 IU/kg, i.p) was administered 30 minutes before onset of ischemia. Ischemic preconditioning was performed by three cycles of 3 minutes ischemia followed by 3 minutes reperfusion. Plasma concentrations of urea and creatinine were measured. Kidney samples were taken for reactive oxidative species (ROS) measurement including superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, glutathione (GSH) contents, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Results: Compared to the sham group, IR led to renal dysfunction as evidenced by significantly higher plasma urea and creatinine. Treatment with EPO or IPC decreased urea, creatinine, and renal MDA levels and increased SOD activity and GSH contents in the kidney. Conclusions: Pretreatment with EPO and application of IPC significantly ameliorated the renal injury induced by bilateral renal IR. However, both treatments attenuated renal dysfunction and oxidative stress in kidney tissues. There were no significant differences between pretreatment with EPO or application of IPC. PMID:26866008

  11. Pretransplant CD4 Count Influences Immune Reconstitution and Risk of Infectious Complications in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Kidney Allograft Recipients.

    PubMed

    Suarez, J F; Rosa, R; Lorio, M A; Morris, M I; Abbo, L M; Simkins, J; Guerra, G; Roth, D; Kupin, W L; Mattiazzi, A; Ciancio, G; Chen, L J; Burke, G W; Goldstein, M J; Ruiz, P; Camargo, J F

    2016-08-01

    In current practice, human immunodeficiency virus-infected (HIV(+) ) candidates with CD4 >200 cells/mm(3) are eligible for kidney transplantation; however, the optimal pretransplant CD4 count above this threshold remains to be defined. We evaluated clinical outcomes in patients with baseline CD4 >350 and <350 cells/mm(3) among 38 anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG)-treated HIV-negative to HIV(+) kidney transplants performed at our center between 2006 and 2013. Median follow-up was 2.6 years. Rates of acute rejection and patient and graft survival were not different between groups. Occurrence of severe CD4 lymphopenia (<200 cells/mm(3) ), however, was more common among patients with a baseline CD4 count 200-349 cells/mm(3) compared with those transplanted at higher counts (75% vs. 30% at 4 weeks [p = 0.04] and 71% vs. 5% at 52 weeks [p = 0.001], respectively, after transplant). After adjusting for age, baseline CD4 count of 200-349 cells/mm(3) was an independent predictor of severe CD4 lymphopenia at 4 weeks (relative risk [RR] 2.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-5.1) and 52 weeks (RR 14.3; 95% CI 2-100.4) after transplant. Patients with CD4 <200 cells/mm(3) at 4 weeks had higher probability of serious infections during first 6 months after transplant (19% vs. 50%; log-rank p = 0.05). These findings suggest that ATG must be used with caution in HIV(+) kidney allograft recipients with a pretransplant CD4 count <350 cells/mm(3) . PMID:26953224

  12. Reduced cilia frequencies in human renal cell carcinomas versus neighboring parenchymal tissue

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cilia are essential organelles in multiple organ systems, including the kidney where they serve as important regulators of renal homeostasis. Renal nephron cilia emanate from the apical membrane of epithelia, extending into the lumen where they function in flow-sensing and ligand-dependent signaling cascades. Ciliary dysfunction underlies renal cyst formation that is in part caused by deregulation of planar cell polarity and canonical Wnt signaling. Renal cancer pathologies occur sporadically or in heritable syndromes caused by germline mutations in tumor suppressor genes including VHL. Importantly, Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) patients frequently develop complex renal cysts that can be considered a premalignant stage. One of the well-characterized molecular functions of VHL is its requirement for the maintenance of cilia. In this study, tissue from 110 renal cancer patients who underwent nephrectomy was analyzed to determine if lower ciliary frequency is a common hallmark of renal tumorigenesis by comparing cilia frequencies in both tumor and adjacent parenchymal tissue biopsies from the same kidney. Methods We stained sections of human renal material using markers for cilia. Preliminary staining was performed using an immunofluorescent approach and a combination of acetylated-α-tubulin and pericentrin antibodies and DAPI. After validation of an alternative, higher throughput approach using acetylated-α-tubulin immunohistochemistry, we continued to manually quantify cilia in all tissues. Nuclei were separately counted in an automated fashion in order to determine ciliary frequencies. Similar staining and scoring for Ki67 positive cells was performed to exclude that proliferation obscures cilia formation potential. Results Samples from renal cell carcinoma patients deposited in our hospital tissue bank were previously used to compose a tissue microarray containing three cores of both tumor and parenchymal tissue per patient. Cilia frequencies in a total of

  13. Editorial Commentary: Reflections From a Mature Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgeon on the History and Current Benefits of Augmentation for the Revision of a Massive Rotator Cuff Tear Using Acellular Human Dermal Matrix Allograft.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Stephen J

    2016-09-01

    Acellular human dermal matrix allografts are now being used to augment and sometimes replace severely damaged rotator cuff tissue. I have been interested in this important aspect of orthopaedics for 15 years and am pleased to have the opportunity to share my personal reflections of some of the highlights in science and the literature that helped get to the point now where we can expect greater than 80% healing even in these difficult cases of revision after massive failed cuff repair. The field of tissue engineering will certainly be a critical part of our rotator cuff surgical future. PMID:27594327

  14. Metabolic and renal clearance rates of purified human chorionic gonadotropin.

    PubMed Central

    Wehmann, R E; Nisula, B C

    1981-01-01

    The metabolic clearance rate (MCR) and renal clearance rate (RCR) of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) were measured in healthy young men and women using techniques of continuous intravenous infusion and rapid intravenous injection of unlabeled, highly purified hCG. Seven subjects received 4 d of infusion at a rate of 0.2 microgram/min, followed by an additional 4 d of infusion at 0.8 microgram/min. Mean serum levels of hCG established at these rates of infusion were 61.1 +/- 3.3 and 237 +/- 16 ng/ml, respectively (mean +/- SEM). The MCR determined at the low infusion rate was not significantly different from that determined at the higher infusion rate (1.83 +/- 0.09 vs. 1.95 +/- 0.14 ml/min per m2). The mean MCR for all subjects was 1.88 +/- 0.08 ml/min per m2. The MCR was not significantly different between men amd women (2.04 +/- 0.13 vs. 1.76 +/- 0.07 ml/min per m2). The RCR also did not vary between low and high infusion rates (0.40 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.40 +/- 0.04 ml/min per m2). The mean RCR for all subjects was 0.40 +/- 0.02 ml/min per m2. There was no difference in RCR between men and women (0.42 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.39 +/- 0.03 ml/min per m2). Six subjects were given 1.0 mg of highly purified hCG by rapid intravenous injection. Initial serum levels of hCG were 300-400 ng/ml, and the subsequent disappearance curve was multiexponential over 8-10 d. The disappearance curve of hCG in each subject was fitted to a biexponential equation. The rapid component t1/2 was 5.97 +/- 0.63 h and the slow component t1/2 was 35.6 +/- 8.0 h. We conclude that the MCR of purified hCG in man is about 2 ml/min per m2 and the RCR is 0.4 ml/min per m2; these parameters are concentration independent and do not differ significantly between healthy young men and women. PMID:7251859

  15. Human anion exchanger1 mutations and distal renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai

    2003-09-01

    The human anion exchanger 1 (AE1 or SLC4A1) gene encodes anion exchanger 1 (or band 3) protein in erythrocytes and in alpha-intercalated cells of the kidney. Thus, AE1 mutations show pleiotrophic effects resulting in two distinct and seemingly unrelated defects, an erythrocyte abnormality and distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). Southeast Asian ovalocytosis (SAO), a well-known red blood cell (RBC) defect, which is widespread in Southeast Asian regions, is caused by AE1 mutation due to a deletion of 27 base pairs in codons 400-408 (delta400-408) leading to an in-frame 9 amino-acid loss in the protein. Co-existence of SAO and dRTA is usually not seen in the same individual. However, the two conditions can co-exist as the result of compound heterozygosities between delta400-408 and other mutations. The reported genotypes include delta400-408/G701D, delta400-408/R602H, delta400-408/deltaV850, and delta400-408/A858D. The presence of dRTA, with or without RBC abnormalities, may occur from homozygous or compound heterozygous conditions of recessive AE1 mutations (eg G701D/G701D, V488M/V488M, deltaV850/deltaV850, deltaV850/A858D, G701D/S773P) or heterozygous dominant AE1 mutations (eg R598H, R589C, R589S, S613F, R901X). Codon 589 of this gene seems to be a 'mutational hot-spot' since repeated mutations at this codon occurring in different ethnic groups and at least two de novo (R589H and R589C) mutations have been observed. Therefore, AE1 mutations can result in both recessive and dominant dRTA, possibly depending on the position of the amino acid change in the protein. As several mutant AE1 proteins still maintain a significant anion transport function but are defective in targeting to the cell surface, impaired intracellular trafficking of the mutant AE1 is an important molecular mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of dRTA associated with AE1 mutations. PMID:15115146

  16. Outcome of Kidney Allografts in Recipients With a Femoral Arteriovenous Fistula: Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Özdemir-van Brunschot, Denise M D; de Sévaux, Ruud G L; van Hamersvelt, Henk W; Warlé, Michiel C

    2016-09-01

    Two patients, who were on hemodialysis over a femoral arteriovenous fistula, were transplanted in our center. Despite adequate blood pressure, perfusion of the renal allograft remained poor after completion of the vascular anastomoses. Ligation of the femoral arteriovenous fistula (1.6 L/min) led to adequate perfusion. Initial graft function was good. Although it remains unclear whether ischemia of a renal allograft is caused by venous hypertension or vascular steal due to a femoral arteriovenous fistula, it might be necessary to ligate a femoral arteriovenous fistula to obtain adequate graft perfusion. PMID:27313989

  17. Endovascular repair of a transplant renal artery anastomotic pseudoaneurysm using the snorkel technique.

    PubMed

    Che, Haijie; Men, Changping; Yang, Mu; Zhang, Juwen; Chen, Ping; Yong, Jun

    2014-10-01

    Renal artery pseudoaneurysms after renal transplantation are extremely uncommon and are able to cause severe complications such as aneurysm rupture or renal allograft loss. Treatment often leads to transplant nephrectomy. We successfully treated a transplant renal artery pseudoaneurysm with covered stents, which resulted in well-preserved renal function. PMID:23993437

  18. Ambient ionization mass spectrometric analysis of human surgical specimens to distinguish renal cell carcinoma from healthy renal tissue.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Clint M; Jarmusch, Alan K; Pirro, Valentina; Kerian, Kevin S; Masterson, Timothy A; Cheng, Liang; Cooks, R Graham

    2016-08-01

    Touch spray-mass spectrometry (TS-MS) is an ambient ionization technique (ionization of unprocessed samples in the open air) that may find intraoperative applications in quickly identifying the disease state of cancerous tissues and in defining surgical margins. In this study, TS-MS was performed on fresh kidney tissue (∼1-5 cm(3)), within 1 h of resection, from 21 human subjects afflicted by renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The preliminary diagnostic value of TS-MS data taken from freshly resected tissue was evaluated. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the negative ion mode (m/z 700-1000) data provided the separation between RCC (16 samples) and healthy renal tissue (13 samples). Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) on the PCA-compressed data estimated sensitivity (true positive rate) and specificity (true negative rate) of 98 and 95 %, respectively, based on histopathological evaluation. The results indicate that TS-MS might provide rapid diagnostic information in spite of the complexity of unprocessed kidney tissue and the presence of interferences such as urine and blood. Desorption electrospray ionization-MS imaging (DESI-MSI) in the negative ionization mode was performed on the tissue specimens after TS-MS analysis as a reference method. The DESI imaging experiments provided phospholipid profiles (m/z 700-1000) that also separated RCC and healthy tissue in the PCA space, with PCA-LDA sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 89 %, respectively. The TS and DESI loading plots indicated that different ions contributed most to the separation of RCC from healthy renal tissue (m/z 794 [PC 34:1 + Cl](-) and 844 [PC 38:4 + Cl](-) for TS vs. m/z 788 [PS 36:1 - H](-) and 810 [PS 38:4 - H](-) for DESI), while m/z 885 ([PI 38:4 - H](-)) was important in both TS and DESI. The prospect, remaining hurdles, and future work required for translating TS-MS into a method of intraoperative tissue diagnosis are discussed. Graphical abstract Touch spray-mass spectrometry used for

  19. Post-renal Transplantation de novo Renal Cell Carcinoma in a Middle-aged Man

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, V. K.; Sutariya, H. C.

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is usually seen in the native kidney but may be seen in the renal allograft. We report a rare case of renal cell carcinoma in a 56-year-old renal allograft recipient who was transplanted for end-stage renal disease induced by analgesic nephropathy. This complication developed after 13 years of renal transplantation. Patient was investigated for hematuria and abdominal pain with a normal renal function. Computed tomography depicted a mass sized 9.0×7.3×6.8 cm that involved the upper pole of the transplant. There was no metastasis. The patient underwent radical allograft nephrectomy for the carcinoma that had extended up to the renal hilum. Histopathological examination revealed Furhman grade-1, clear cell variant, stage pT2 N0 M0. In the last visit, the patient was on maintenance hemodialysis via arterio-venous fistula and planned for cadaveric renal transplantation. Computed tomography could facilitate early diagnosis and proper management of patients with post-renal allograft renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26889374

  20. Post-renal Transplantation de novo Renal Cell Carcinoma in a Middle-aged Man.

    PubMed

    Pandya, V K; Sutariya, H C

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is usually seen in the native kidney but may be seen in the renal allograft. We report a rare case of renal cell carcinoma in a 56-year-old renal allograft recipient who was transplanted for end-stage renal disease induced by analgesic nephropathy. This complication developed after 13 years of renal transplantation. Patient was investigated for hematuria and abdominal pain with a normal renal function. Computed tomography depicted a mass sized 9.0×7.3×6.8 cm that involved the upper pole of the transplant. There was no metastasis. The patient underwent radical allograft nephrectomy for the carcinoma that had extended up to the renal hilum. Histopathological examination revealed Furhman grade-1, clear cell variant, stage pT2 N0 M0. In the last visit, the patient was on maintenance hemodialysis via arterio-venous fistula and planned for cadaveric renal transplantation. Computed tomography could facilitate early diagnosis and proper management of patients with post-renal allograft renal cell carcinoma. PMID:26889374

  1. SORCS1 contributes to the development of renal disease in rats and humans

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Jozef; O'Meara, Caitlin C.; Sarkis, Allison B.; Prisco, Sasha Z.; Xu, Haiyan; Fox, Caroline S.; Chen, Ming-Huei; Broeckel, Ulrich; Arnett, Donna K.; Moreno, Carol; Provoost, Abraham P.

    2013-01-01

    Many lines of evidence demonstrate that genetic variability contributes to chronic kidney disease susceptibility in humans as well as rodent models. Little progress has been made in discovering causal kidney disease genes in humans mainly due to genetic complexity. Here, we use a minimal congenic mapping strategy in the FHH (fawn hooded hypertensive) rat to identify Sorcs1 as a novel renal disease candidate gene. We investigated the hypothesis that genetic variation in Sorcs1 influences renal disease susceptibility in both rat and human. Sorcs1 is expressed in the kidney, and knocking out this gene in a rat strain with a sensitized genome background produced increased proteinuria. In vitro knockdown of Sorcs1 in proximal tubule cells impaired protein trafficking, suggesting a mechanism for the observed proteinuria in the FHH rat. Since Sorcs1 influences renal function in the rat, we went on to test this gene in humans. We identified associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms in SORCS1 and renal function in large cohorts of European and African ancestry. The experimental data from the rat combined with association results from different ethnic groups indicates a role for SORCS1 in maintaining proper renal function. PMID:23780848

  2. Natural Scaffolds for Renal Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells for Kidney Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Batchelder, Cynthia A.; Martinez, Michele L.; Tarantal, Alice F.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the enthusiasm for bioengineering of functional renal tissues for transplantation, many obstacles remain before the potential of this technology can be realized in a clinical setting. Viable tissue engineering strategies for the kidney require identification of the necessary cell populations, efficient scaffolds, and the 3D culture conditions to develop and support the unique architecture and physiological function of this vital organ. Our studies have previously demonstrated that decellularized sections of rhesus monkey kidneys of all age groups provide a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) with sufficient structural properties with spatial and organizational influences on human embryonic stem cell (hESC) migration and differentiation. To further explore the use of decellularized natural kidney scaffolds for renal tissue engineering, pluripotent hESC were seeded in whole- or on sections of kidney ECM and cell migration and phenotype compared with the established differentiation assays for hESC. Results of qPCR and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated upregulation of renal lineage markers when hESC were cultured in decellularized scaffolds without cytokine or growth factor stimulation, suggesting a role for the ECM in directing renal lineage differentiation. hESC were also differentiated with growth factors and compared when seeded on renal ECM or a new biologically inert polysaccharide scaffold for further maturation. Renal lineage markers were progressively upregulated over time on both scaffolds and hESC were shown to express signature genes of renal progenitor, proximal tubule, endothelial, and collecting duct populations. These findings suggest that natural scaffolds enhance expression of renal lineage markers particularly when compared to embryoid body culture. The results of these studies show the capabilities of a novel polysaccharide scaffold to aid in defining a protocol for renal progenitor differentiation from hESC, and advance the promise

  3. A Clinical Comparison of Cenobone (A Decalcified Freeze-dried Bone Allograft) with Autogenous Bone Graft in the Treatment of Two- and Three-wall Intrabony Periodontal Defects: A Human Study with Six-month Reentry

    PubMed Central

    Abolfazli, Nader; Saleh Saber, Fariba; Lafzi, Ardeshir; Eskandari, Amir; Mehrasbi, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Background and aims Complete and predictable regeneration of tissue lost as a result of infection or trauma is the ultimate goal of periodontal therapy. Various graft materials have been successfully used in the treatment of intrabony defects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of a decalcified freeze-dried bone allograft (Cerabone) with the autogenous bone graft as a gold standard in the treatment of human two- or three-wall intrabony periodontal defects. Materials and methods This split-mouth study was done on 10 pairs of matched two- or three-wall intrabony periodontal defects with 5 mm or more probing depth and 3 mm or more depth of intrabony component following phase I therapy. In the control sites autogenous bone graft and in the test sites decalcified freeze-dried bone allograft were used. Results At baseline, no significant differences were found in terms of oral hygiene and defect charac-teristics. At six months, analysis showed a significant improvement in soft and hard tissue parameters for both treatment groups as compared to preoperative measurements. There were no statistical differ-ences in clinically-measured parameters between treatment groups after 6 months except for crestal resorption that increased significantly in control group (P = 0.25). Defect resolution and bone fill in the test and control groups were 2.5 ± 0.46 mm versus 2.7 ± 0.73 mm and 2 ± 0.62 mm versus 2.20 ± 0.52 mm, respectively. Conclusion The results of this study demonstrated that both graft materials improved clinical parameters. The comparison of the two treatment groups did not show any significant differences in clinical parameters after six months. However, because of the limited amount of intra-oral donor bone, it is preferable to use decalcified freeze-dried bone allograft. PMID:23285322

  4. Validation of cold chain shipping environment for transport of allografts as part of a human tissue bank returns policy.

    PubMed

    Rooney, P; Eagle, M J; Kearney, J N

    2015-12-01

    Human tissue is shipped to surgeons in the UK in either a freeze-dried or frozen state. To ensure quality and safety of the tissue, frozen tissue must be shipped in insulated containers such that tissue is maintained at an appropriate temperature. UK Blood Transfusion Service regulations state "Transportation systems must be validated to show maintenance of the required storage temperature" and also state that frozen, non-cryopreserved tissue "must be transported… at -20 °C or lower" (Guidelines for the Blood Transfusion Services in the United Kingdom, 8th Edn. 2013). To maintain an expiry date for frozen tissue longer than 6 months, the tissue must be maintained at a temperature of -40 °C or below. The objective of this study was to evaluate and validate the capability of a commercially available insulated polystyrene carton (XPL10), packed with dry ice, to maintain tissue temperature below -40 °C. Tissue temperature of a single frozen femoral head or a single frozen Achilles tendon, was recorded over a 4-day period at 37 °C, inside a XPL10 carton with dry ice as refrigerant. The data demonstrate that at 37 °C, the XPL10 carton with 9.5 kg of dry ice maintained femoral head and tendon tissue temperature below -55 °C for at least 48 h; tissue temperature did not rise above -40 °C until at least 70 h. Data also indicated that at a storage temperature lower than 37 °C, tissue temperature was maintained for longer periods. PMID:25700692

  5. Sequestration of human cytomegalovirus by human renal and mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Twite, Nicolas; Andrei, Graciela; Kummert, Caroline; Donner, Catherine; Perez-Morga, David; De Vos, Rita; Snoeck, Robert; Marchant, Arnaud

    2014-07-15

    Urine and breast milk represent the main routes of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) transmission but the contribution of renal and mammary epithelial cells to viral excretion remains unclear. We observed that kidney and mammary epithelial cells were permissive to HCMV infection and expressed immediate early, early and late antigens within 72 h of infection. During the first 24 h after infection, high titers of infectious virus were measured associated to the cells and in culture supernatants, independently of de novo synthesis of virus progeny. This phenomenon was not observed in HCMV-infected fibroblasts and suggested the sequestration and the release of HCMV by epithelial cells. This hypothesis was supported by confocal and electron microscopy analyses. The sequestration and progressive release of HCMV by kidney and mammary epithelial cells may play an important role in the excretion of the virus in urine and breast milk and may thereby contribute to HCMV transmission. - Highlights: • Primary renal and mammary epithelial cells are permissive to HCMV infection. • HCMV is sequestered by epithelial cells and this phenomenon does not require viral replication. • HCMV sequestration by epithelial cells is reduced by antibodies and IFN-γ.

  6. A simple and accurate grading system for orthoiodohippurate renal scans in the assessment of post-transplant renal function

    SciTech Connect

    Zaki, S.K.; Bretan, P.N.; Go, R.T.; Rehm, P.K.; Streem, S.B.; Novick, A.C. )

    1990-06-01

    Orthoiodohippurate renal scanning has proved to be a reliable, noninvasive method for the evaluation and followup of renal allograft function. However, a standardized system for grading renal function with this test is not available. We propose a simple grading system to distinguish the different functional phases of hippurate scanning in renal transplant recipients. This grading system was studied in 138 patients who were evaluated 1 week after renal transplantation. There was a significant correlation between the isotope renographic functional grade and clinical correlates of allograft function such as the serum creatinine level (p = 0.0001), blood urea nitrogen level (p = 0.0001), urine output (p = 0.005) and need for hemodialysis (p = 0.007). We recommend this grading system as a simple and accurate method to interpret orthoiodohippurate renal scans in the evaluation and followup of renal allograft recipients.

  7. Integrin Alpha 8 Recessive Mutations Are Responsible for Bilateral Renal Agenesis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Humbert, Camille; Silbermann, Flora; Morar, Bharti; Parisot, Mélanie; Zarhrate, Mohammed; Masson, Cécile; Tores, Frédéric; Blanchet, Patricia; Perez, Marie-José; Petrov, Yuliya; Khau Van Kien, Philippe; Roume, Joelle; Leroy, Brigitte; Gribouval, Olivier; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Heidet, Laurence; Salomon, Rémi; Antignac, Corinne; Benmerah, Alexandre; Saunier, Sophie; Jeanpierre, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Renal hypodysplasia (RHD) is a heterogeneous condition encompassing a spectrum of kidney development defects including renal agenesis, hypoplasia, and (cystic) dysplasia. Heterozygous mutations of several genes have been identified as genetic causes of RHD with various severity. However, these genes and mutations are not associated with bilateral renal agenesis, except for RET mutations, which could be involved in a few cases. The pathophysiological mechanisms leading to total absence of kidney development thus remain largely elusive. By using a whole-exome sequencing approach in families with several fetuses with bilateral renal agenesis, we identified recessive mutations in the integrin α8-encoding gene ITGA8 in two families. Itga8 homozygous knockout in mice is known to result in absence of kidney development. We provide evidence of a damaging effect of the human ITGA8 mutations. These results demonstrate that mutations of ITGA8 are a genetic cause of bilateral renal agenesis and that, at least in some cases, bilateral renal agenesis is an autosomal-recessive disease. PMID:24439109

  8. The second short-term warm ischemia after vascular anastomosis did not affect early renal function recovery in renal transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Tao; Zhou, Jiangqiao; Liu, Xiuheng; Ge, Minghuan; Chen, Zhiyuan

    2012-09-01

    Ischemic postconditioning was defined as rapid intermittent interruptions of blood flow in the early phase of reperfusion, which has been found to be protective against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) in animal models but not in clinical trials.We describe a case that the allograft renal vein was twisted because of the surgeon's mistake, which caused the warm ischemia of allograft after reperfusion. The allograft restored blood flow without second reperfusion and cold preservation after 9 min of warm ischemia. The patient was followed up for 3 months and the allograft worked well without complications. PMID:22865119

  9. N -Methyl- N -nitrosourea-induced Renal Tumors in Rats: Immunohistochemical Comparison to Human Wilms Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Kinoshita, Yuichi; Emoto, Yuko; Kimura, Ayako; Uehara, Norihisa; Yuri, Takashi; Shikata, Nobuaki; Tsubura, Airo

    2013-01-01

    N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced renal tumors in rats and Wilms tumors in humans were compared. Renal mesenchymal tumors (RMTs) and nephroblastomas (blastemal and epithelial components) in female Lewis rats treated with a single intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg/kg MNU at birth and Wilms tumors (blastemal, epithelial and mesenchymal components) in humans were analyzed for the expression of pancytokeratin (CK), vimentin, p63, α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), desmin, S-100, CD57, CD117/c-kit, Wilms tumor 1 protein (WT1) and β-catenin. The mesenchymal components of rat RMTs and human Wilms tumors expressed vimentin, SMA and β-catenin. The blastemal components of rat nephroblastomas and human Wilms tumors expressed vimentin, CD117/c-kit and β-catenin. The epithelial components of rat nephroblastomas and human Wilms tumors expressed vimentin and β-catenin. WT1 was expressed in different cellular components of rat tumors as compared with human Wilms tumors; the expression was seen in mesenchymal tumors and blastemal components of nephroblastomas in rats and epithelial components in human Wilms tumors. CK, p63 and CD57 were not expressed in rat RMTs or nephroblastomas, while CK and WT1 were expressed in epithelial components and CD57 was expressed in blastemal and epithelial components of human Wilms tumors. Rat and human tumors were universally negative for the expression of desmin and S-100. The immunohistochemical characteristics of rat renal tumors and human Wilms tumors may provide valuable information on the differences in renal oncogenesis and biology between the two species. PMID:23914056

  10. Tubular Overexpression of Gremlin Induces Renal Damage Susceptibility in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Droguett, Alejandra; Krall, Paola; Burgos, M. Eugenia; Valderrama, Graciela; Carpio, Daniel; Ardiles, Leopoldo; Rodriguez-Diez, Raquel; Kerr, Bredford; Walz, Katherina; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Mezzano, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of patients are recognized worldwide to have chronic kidney disease. Glomerular and interstitial fibrosis are hallmarks of renal progression. However, fibrosis of the kidney remains an unresolved challenge, and its molecular mechanisms are still not fully understood. Gremlin is an embryogenic gene that has been shown to play a key role in nephrogenesis, and its expression is generally low in the normal adult kidney. However, gremlin expression is elevated in many human renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy, pauci-immune glomerulonephritis and chronic allograft nephropathy. Several studies have proposed that gremlin may be involved in renal damage by acting as a downstream mediator of TGF-β. To examine the in vivo role of gremlin in kidney pathophysiology, we generated seven viable transgenic mouse lines expressing human gremlin (GREM1) specifically in renal proximal tubular epithelial cells under the control of an androgen-regulated promoter. These lines demonstrated 1.2- to 200-fold increased GREM1 expression. GREM1 transgenic mice presented a normal phenotype and were without proteinuria and renal function involvement. In response to the acute renal damage cause by folic acid nephrotoxicity, tubule-specific GREM1 transgenic mice developed increased proteinuria after 7 and 14 days compared with wild-type treated mice. At 14 days tubular lesions, such as dilatation, epithelium flattening and hyaline casts, with interstitial cell infiltration and mild fibrosis were significantly more prominent in transgenic mice than wild-type mice. Tubular GREM1 overexpression was correlated with the renal upregulation of profibrotic factors, such as TGF-β and αSMA, and with increased numbers of monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes compared to wild-type mice. Taken together, our results suggest that GREM1-overexpressing mice have an increased susceptibility to renal damage, supporting the involvement of gremlin in renal damage progression. This

  11. Living Related Donor Renal Transplant in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infected Patient: Case Reports from Tertiary Care Hospital in Western India

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Sonal; Patel, Atul K; Patel, Ketan K; Shukla, Ketan D; Darji, Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Renal transplantation (TX) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasingly performed in developed countries in the era of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Management of HIV infected patients during and post-transplant is very complex and challenging due to drug interaction, infection risk and associated co-infections. We described our experience with living related donor renal TX in three HIV infected patients. PMID:25191053

  12. Living related donor renal transplant in human immunodeficiency virus infected patient: case reports from tertiary care hospital in Western India.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Sonal; Patel, Atul K; Patel, Ketan K; Shukla, Ketan D; Darji, Prakash

    2014-07-01

    Renal transplantation (TX) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) is increasingly performed in developed countries in the era of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Management of HIV infected patients during and post-transplant is very complex and challenging due to drug interaction, infection risk and associated co-infections. We described our experience with living related donor renal TX in three HIV infected patients. PMID:25191053

  13. Human schistosomiasis: Schistosoma mansoni antigen detection in renal glomeruli.

    PubMed

    Hoshino-Shimizu, S; De Brito, T; Kanamura, H Y; Canto, A L; Silva, A O; Campos, A R; Penna, D O; Da Silva, L C

    1976-01-01

    Twelve kidney, five biopsy and seven necropsy specimens, all from schistosomiasis mansoni patients were studied by light and immunoflurescent microscopy in an attempt to detect antigen in the glomerular walls. Deposits of IgM, IgG,I gA, IgE, complement C3 and fibrinogen were observered in most cases. Antigen was successfully detected in two cases(one biopsy and one necropsy specimen), both exhibiting proliferative glomerulonephritis. The only clinical manifestation was a slight proteinuria. IgG antibodies eluted from the sutopsy kidney homogenates showed specific binding mostly to Schistosoma mansoni gut, thus spggesting that the fixed antibodies (eluates) are, at least partially, consituted by antibodies similar to the anti-circulating antigen. These data reinfroce the hypothesis that renal injury in schistosomiasis is mediated through an immune complex disease. PMID:65811

  14. Serum and Urine Biomarkers for Human Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, A. L.; Palleschi, G.; Silvestri, L.; Moschese, D.; Ricci, S.; Petrozza, V.; Carbone, A.; Di Carlo, A.

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) diagnosis is mostly achieved incidentally by imaging provided for unrelated clinical reasons. The surgical management of localized tumors has reported excellent results. The therapy of advanced RCC has evolved considerably over recent years with the widespread use of the so-called “targeted therapies.” The identification of molecular markers in body fluids (e.g., sera and urine), which can be used for screening, diagnosis, follow-up, and monitoring of drug-based therapy in RCC patients, is one of the most ambitious challenges in oncologic research. Although there are some promising reports about potential biomarkers in sera, there is limited available data regarding urine markers for RCC. The following review reports some of the most promising biomarkers identified in the biological fluids of RCC patients. PMID:25922552

  15. Aortic valve allografts in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Borrie, John; Hill, G. L.

    1968-01-01

    Some of the mechnical and biological problems surrounding the use of fresh allograft inverted aortic valves as mitral valve substitutes are described. Certain aspects of the problem have been studied experimentally. In three sheep `fresh' aortic valve allografts were inserted, using cardiopulmonary bypass, into the main pulmonary artery, and were observed from 5 to 7 months after operation. The animals survived normally. Their normal pulmonary valves remained in situ. The technique is described. At subsequent necropsy, macroscopically the valves were found to be free from vegetation, and the cusps were pliable and apparently normal. Microscopically, the supporting allograft myocardium showed necrosis and early calcification. The valve cusp showed hyalinization of collagen, although beneath the endocardium this hyalinized collagen contained moderate numbers of fibroblasts with no evidence of proliferation. The endocardium and arterial intima of the allograft showed evidence of ingrowth from adjacent normal host endocardial tissues. The allograft itself was invested in a loose layer of fibro-fatty tissue, which, in view of the necrotic state of the graft myocardium, could well have been a reparative reaction rather than a homograft reaction. It is concluded that, although the cusps could function normally, the necrosis of the myocardium might in time lead to late failure of the graft. Further studies with the valve inserted at mitral level are indicated. Images PMID:5656757

  16. Osteochondral Allograft of the Talus

    PubMed Central

    Bisicchia, Salvatore; Rosso, Federica; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus are being recognized as an increasingly common injury. They are most commonly located postero-medially or antero-laterally, while centrally located lesions are uncommon. Large osteochondral lesions have significant biomechanical consequences and often require resurfacing with osteochondral autograft transfer, mosaicplasty, autologous chondrocyte implantation (or similar methods) or osteochondral allograft transplantation. Allograft procedures have become popular due to inherent advantages over other resurfacing techniques. Cartilage viability is one of the most important factors for successful clinical outcomes after transplantation of osteochondral allografts and is related to storage length and intra-operative factors. While there is abundant literature about osteochondral allograft transplantation in the knee, there are few papers about this procedure in the talus. Failure of non-operative management, initial debridement, curettage or microfractures are an indication for resurfacing. Patients should have a functional ankle motion, closed growth plates, absence of cartilage lesions on the tibial side. This paper reviews the published literature about osteochondral allograft transplantation of the talus focusing on indications, pre-operative planning, surgical approaches, postoperative management, results and complications of this procedure. PMID:25328456

  17. Precision-cut human kidney slices as a model to elucidate the process of renal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Stribos, Elisabeth G D; Luangmonkong, Theerut; Leliveld, Anna M; de Jong, Igle J; van Son, Willem J; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Seelen, Marc A; van Goor, Harry; Olinga, Peter; Mutsaers, Henricus A M

    2016-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a major health concern, and experimental models bridging the gap between animal studies and clinical research are currently lacking. Here, we evaluated precision-cut kidney slices (PCKSs) as a potential model for renal disease. PCKSs were prepared from human cortical tissue obtained from tumor nephrectomies and cultured up to 96 hours. Morphology, cell viability, and metabolic functionality (ie, uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase and transporter activity) were determined to assess the integrity of PCKSs. Furthermore, inflammatory and fibrosis-related gene expressions were characterized. Finally, to validate the model, renal fibrogenesis was induced using transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1). Preparation of PCKSs induced an inflammatory tissue response, whereas long-term incubation (96 hours) induced fibrogenesis as shown by an increased expression of collagen type 1A1 (COL1A1) and fibronectin 1 (FN1). Importantly, PCKSs remained functional for more than 48 hours as evidenced by active glucuronidation and phenolsulfonphthalein uptake. In addition, cellular diversity appeared to be maintained, yet we observed a clear loss of nephrin messenger RNA levels suggesting that our model might not be suitable to study the role of podocytes in renal pathology. Moreover, TGF-β1 exposure augmented fibrosis, as illustrated by an increased expression of multiple fibrosis markers including COL1A1, FN1, and α-smooth muscle actin. In conclusion, PCKSs maintain their renal phenotype during culture and appear to be a promising model to investigate renal diseases, for example, renal fibrosis. Moreover, the human origin of PCKSs makes this model very suitable for translational research. PMID:26687735

  18. Human Urine-Derived Renal Progenitors for Personalized Modeling of Genetic Kidney Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ronconi, Elisa; Angelotti, Maria Lucia; Peired, Anna; Mazzinghi, Benedetta; Becherucci, Francesca; Conti, Sara; Sansavini, Giulia; Sisti, Alessandro; Ravaglia, Fiammetta; Lombardi, Duccio; Provenzano, Aldesia; Manonelles, Anna; Cruzado, Josep M.; Giglio, Sabrina; Roperto, Rosa Maria; Materassi, Marco; Lasagni, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The critical role of genetic and epigenetic factors in the pathogenesis of kidney disorders is gradually becoming clear, and the need for disease models that recapitulate human kidney disorders in a personalized manner is paramount. In this study, we describe a method to select and amplify renal progenitor cultures from the urine of patients with kidney disorders. Urine-derived human renal progenitors exhibited phenotype and functional properties identical to those purified from kidney tissue, including the capacity to differentiate into tubular cells and podocytes, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy, Western blot analysis of podocyte-specific proteins, and scanning electron microscopy. Lineage tracing studies performed with conditional transgenic mice, in which podocytes are irreversibly tagged upon tamoxifen treatment (NPHS2.iCreER;mT/mG), that were subjected to doxorubicin nephropathy demonstrated that renal progenitors are the only urinary cell population that can be amplified in long-term culture. To validate the use of these cells for personalized modeling of kidney disorders, renal progenitors were obtained from (1) the urine of children with nephrotic syndrome and carrying potentially pathogenic mutations in genes encoding for podocyte proteins and (2) the urine of children without genetic alterations, as validated by next-generation sequencing. Renal progenitors obtained from patients carrying pathogenic mutations generated podocytes that exhibited an abnormal cytoskeleton structure and functional abnormalities compared with those obtained from patients with proteinuria but without genetic mutations. The results of this study demonstrate that urine-derived patient-specific renal progenitor cultures may be an innovative research tool for modeling of genetic kidney disorders. PMID:25568173

  19. Human Urine-Derived Renal Progenitors for Personalized Modeling of Genetic Kidney Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lazzeri, Elena; Ronconi, Elisa; Angelotti, Maria Lucia; Peired, Anna; Mazzinghi, Benedetta; Becherucci, Francesca; Conti, Sara; Sansavini, Giulia; Sisti, Alessandro; Ravaglia, Fiammetta; Lombardi, Duccio; Provenzano, Aldesia; Manonelles, Anna; Cruzado, Josep M; Giglio, Sabrina; Roperto, Rosa Maria; Materassi, Marco; Lasagni, Laura; Romagnani, Paola

    2015-08-01

    The critical role of genetic and epigenetic factors in the pathogenesis of kidney disorders is gradually becoming clear, and the need for disease models that recapitulate human kidney disorders in a personalized manner is paramount. In this study, we describe a method to select and amplify renal progenitor cultures from the urine of patients with kidney disorders. Urine-derived human renal progenitors exhibited phenotype and functional properties identical to those purified from kidney tissue, including the capacity to differentiate into tubular cells and podocytes, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy, Western blot analysis of podocyte-specific proteins, and scanning electron microscopy. Lineage tracing studies performed with conditional transgenic mice, in which podocytes are irreversibly tagged upon tamoxifen treatment (NPHS2.iCreER;mT/mG), that were subjected to doxorubicin nephropathy demonstrated that renal progenitors are the only urinary cell population that can be amplified in long-term culture. To validate the use of these cells for personalized modeling of kidney disorders, renal progenitors were obtained from (1) the urine of children with nephrotic syndrome and carrying potentially pathogenic mutations in genes encoding for podocyte proteins and (2) the urine of children without genetic alterations, as validated by next-generation sequencing. Renal progenitors obtained from patients carrying pathogenic mutations generated podocytes that exhibited an abnormal cytoskeleton structure and functional abnormalities compared with those obtained from patients with proteinuria but without genetic mutations. The results of this study demonstrate that urine-derived patient-specific renal progenitor cultures may be an innovative research tool for modeling of genetic kidney disorders. PMID:25568173

  20. Erythropoietin, but not the correction of anemia alone, protects from chronic kidney allograft injury.

    PubMed

    Cassis, Paola; Gallon, Lorenzo; Benigni, Ariela; Mister, Marilena; Pezzotta, Anna; Solini, Samantha; Gagliardini, Elena; Cugini, Daniela; Abbate, Mauro; Aiello, Sistiana; Rocchetta, Federica; Scudeletti, Pierangela; Perico, Norberto; Noris, Marina; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2012-05-01

    Anemia can contribute to chronic allograft injury by limiting oxygen delivery to tissues, particularly in the tubulointerstitium. To determine mechanisms by which erythropoietin (EPO) prevents chronic allograft injury we utilized a rat model of full MHC-mismatched kidney transplantation (Wistar Furth donor and Lewis recipients) with removal of the native kidneys. EPO treatment entirely corrected post-transplant anemia. Control rats developed progressive proteinuria and graft dysfunction, tubulointerstitial damage, inflammatory cell infiltration, and glomerulosclerosis, all prevented by EPO. Normalization of post-transplant hemoglobin levels by blood transfusions, however, had no impact on chronic allograft injury, indicating that EPO-mediated graft protection went beyond the correction of anemia. Compared to syngeneic grafts, control allografts had loss of peritubular capillaries, higher tubular apoptosis, tubular and glomerular oxidative injury, and reduced expression of podocyte nephrin; all prevented by EPO treatment. The effects of EPO were associated with preservation of intragraft expression of angiogenic factors, upregulation of the anti-apoptotic factor p-Akt in tubuli, and increased expression of Bcl-2. Inhibition of p-Akt by Wortmannin partially antagonized the effect of EPO on allograft injury and tubular apoptosis, and prevented EPO-induced Bcl-2 upregulation. Thus non-erythropoietic derivatives of EPO may be useful to prevent chronic renal allograft injury. PMID:22318420

  1. Human variability in hepatic and renal elimination: implications for risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Dorne, J L C M

    2007-01-01

    Hepatic metabolism and renal excretion constitute the main routes of xenobiotic elimination in humans. Improving human risk assessment for threshold contaminants requires the incorporation of quantitative data related to their elimination (toxicokinetics) and potential toxic effects (toxicodynamics). This type of data provides a scientific basis to replace the standard uncertainty factor (UF = 10) allowing for the consideration of human variability in toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics. This review focuses on recent research efforts aiming to incorporate human variability in hepatic and renal elimination (toxicokinetics) into the risk assessment process. A therapeutic drug database was developed to quantify pathway-related variability in human phase I and phase II hepatic metabolism as well as renal excretion in subgroups of the population (healthy adults, neonates and the elderly), using data on compounds cleared primarily through each route (> 60% dose). For each subgroup of the population and elimination route, pathway-related UFs were then derived to cover 95-99% of each subgroup. Overall, the default toxicokinetic UFs would not cover neonates, the elderly for most elimination routes and any subgroup of the population for compounds metabolized via polymorphic isozymes (such as CYP2C19 and CYP2D6). These pathway-related UFs allow the incorporation of in vivo metabolism and toxicokinetic data in the risk assessment process and provide a flexible intermediate option between the default UF and chemical-specific adjustment factors (CSAFs) derived from physiologically based pharmacokinetic models. Implications of human variability in hepatic metabolism and renal excretion for chemical risk assessment are discussed. PMID:17497760

  2. Localization of corin and atrial natriuretic peptide expression in human renal segments.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang; Wang, Hao; Dong, Ningzheng; Zhang, Ce; Xue, Boxin; Wu, Qingyu

    2016-09-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)-mediated natriuretic response is a well-established cardiac endocrine function. Corin is a transmembrane protease that activates ANP in the heart. Corin expression has been detected in non-cardiac tissues including the kidney. Here we examined corin, pro-ANP/ANP and natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) expression in human renal segments. By immunostaining and in situ hybridization, we found similar corin, pro-ANP/ANP and NPR-A protein and mRNA expression in human renal segments. The expression was most abundant in the proximal convoluted tubules and the medullary connecting ducts. In the proximal tubules, corin protein was present in the apical membrane region underneath the brush border where the ANP-degrading protease neprilysin was abundant. These results suggest that corin-mediated pro-ANP activation may occur in renal segments and that locally produced ANP may act in an autocrine manner to regulate sodium and water reabsorption in situ Our results also point to the proximal convoluted tubules as a major site for local ANP action. Such a renal corin/ANP autocrine mechanism may differ from the cardiac corin/ANP endocrine mechanism in regulating sodium homoeostasis under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27343265

  3. The regulatory T cell effector soluble fibrinogen-like protein 2 induces tubular epithelial cell apoptosis in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zitong; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Lingyan; Li, Long; Zhao, Tian; Hu, Linkun; Rong, Ruiming; Xu, Ming; Zhu, Tongyu

    2014-02-01

    Acute rejection (AR) hinders renal allograft survival. Tubular epithelial cell (TEC) apoptosis contributes to premature graft loss in AR, while the mechanism remains unclear. Soluble fibrinogen-like protein 2 (sFGL2), a novel effector of regulatory T cells (Treg), induces apoptosis to mediate tissue injury. We previously found that serum sFGL2 significantly increased in renal allograft rejection patients. In this study, the role of sFGL2 in AR was further investigated both in vivo and in vitro. The serum level of sFGL2 and the percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg in the peripheral blood were measured in renal allograft recipients with AR or stable renal function (n = 30 per group). The human TEC was stimulated with sFGL2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, or phosphate buffered saline and investigated for apoptosis in vitro. Apoptosis-associated genes expression in TEC was further assessed. Approval for this study was obtained from the Ethics Committee of Fudan University. Our results showed that the serum level of sFGL2, correlated with Treg in the peripheral blood, was significantly increased in the AR patients. In vitro, sFGL2 remarkably induced TEC apoptosis, with a significant up-regulation of proapoptotic genes, including CASP-3, CASP-8, CASP-9, CASP-10, TRADD, TNFSF10, FADD, FAS, FASLG, BAK1, BAD, BAX, and NF-KB1. However, no significant changes were observed in the expression of antiapoptotic genes, including CARD-18, NAIP, BCL2, IKBKB, and TBK1. Therefore, sFGL2, an effector of Treg, induces TEC apoptosis. Our study suggests that sFGL2 is a potential mediator in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection and provides novel insights into the role of Treg in AR. PMID:24414480

  4. Biomechanical properties of bone allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Pelker, R.R.; Friedlaender, G.E.; Markham, T.C.

    1983-04-01

    The biomechanical properties of allograft bone can be altered by the methods chosen for its preservation and storage. These effects are minimal with deep-freezing or low-level radiation. Freeze-drying, however, markedly diminishes the torsional and bending strength of bone allografts but does not deleteriously affect the compressive or tensile strength. Irradiation of bone with more than 3.0 megarad or irradiation combined with freeze-drying appears to cause a significant reduction in breaking strength. These factors should be considered when choosing freeze-dried or irradiated allogeneic bone that will be subjected to significant loads following implantation.

  5. Inferior vena cava reconstruction using fresh inferior vena cava allograft following caval resection for leiomyosarcoma: midterm results.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Marlon A; Cross, Chadrick A; Lin, Peter H; Keane, Thomas E; Lumsden, Alan B

    2007-07-01

    We present a 56-year-old woman affected by a large leiomyosarcoma originating from the suprarenal inferior vena cava (IVC). A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed near obstruction of the IVC and involvement of the right renal vein. The patient underwent successful en bloc resection of the tumor, right kidney, right adrenal gland, and IVC. Caval reconstruction was performed using a non-type specific allograft, followed by left renal vein re-implantation. The patient tolerated the procedure well without any complications. The use of an IVC allograft allowed for continued graft patency, without the need of immunosuppression or long-term anticoagulation. However, local recurrence did occur. PMID:17606132

  6. Allograft pancreas: pale acinar nodules.

    PubMed

    Troxell, Megan L; Drachenberg, Cinthia

    2016-08-01

    Microscopic pale-staining acinar nodules were characterized in native pancreas in the 1980s under a variety of names but have been infrequently reported since. We retrospectively studied the frequency and characteristics of pale acinar nodules in allograft pancreas biopsies, as compared to a sampling of native pancreas specimens at our center. Pale acinar nodules were present in 13% (9/69) of allograft biopsies from 22% (7/32) of transplant patients, and 23% (5/22) of native pancreas surgical specimens, although more nodules per pancreas area were present in allograft needle biopsies. Acinar nodules had size of 100 to 700 μm, were periodic acid-Schiff pale, were synaptophysin negative, stained more weakly with keratin CAM 5.2 compared to surrounding parenchyma, and had a low proliferative rate. Ultrastructural evaluation revealed paucity of zymogen granules with dilated cistern-like structures. In our experience, pale acinar nodules have similar features in allograft and native pancreas specimens, yet remain of uncertain etiology and significance. PMID:27063474

  7. Clinical Course and Outcomes of Late Kidney Allograft Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zakharov, Vadym; Ksenofontova, Anna; Onishchenko, Eugene; Golubova, Tatyana; Kichatyi, Sergey; Zakharova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study is provided to increase the efficiency of the treatment of kidney transplant recipients by predicting the development of the late allotransplant dysfunction. Methods. 330 patients who have lived for more than one year with functioning kidney allograft were evaluated. To predict the subsequent duration of the well-functioning of allotransplant the prognostic significance of 15 baseline clinical and sociodemographic characteristics on the results of the survey one year after transplantation was investigated. The result was considered to be positive in constructing the regression prognostication model if recipient lived more than 3 years from the time of transplantation. Results. It was established that more late start of renal allograft dysfunction after transplantation correlates with the more time it takes till complete loss of allograft function. Creatinine and hemoglobin blood concentration and the level of proteinuria one year after transplantation within created mathematical model allow predicting the loss of kidney transplant function three years after the transplantation. Patients with kidney transplant dysfunction are advised to renew the program hemodialysis upon reaching plasma creatinine concentration 0.5–0.7 mmol/L. Conclusion. Values of creatinine, hemoglobin, and proteinuria one year after transplantation can be used for subsequent prognostication of kidney transplant function. PMID:27478631

  8. Inhibitory effects of tetradecanoylphorbol acetate and diacylglycerol on erythropoietin production in human renal carcinoma cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Masamichi; Nagakura, Kazuhiko; Ueno, Munehisa; Fisher, J.W. )

    1987-11-01

    A human renal carcinoma from a patient with an erythrocytosis, serially transplanted into athymic nude mice, was grown in primary monolayer cell cultures. After reaching confluency the cultured cells formed multicellular hemicysts (domes) which became more abundant as the cultures approached saturation density. Erythropoietin (Ep) production by this renal carcinoma in culture was only slightly increased at the time of semiconfluency but showed a marked increase in Ep levels in the culture medium after the cultures reached confluency, in parallel with an increase in dome formation. The phorbol ester tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) showed a significant dose-related inhibitory effect on Ep production and dome formation in the renal carcinoma cell cultures, suggesting an important role of protein kinase C, the only known receptor for TPA, in inhibiting the expression of differentiated phenotypes in the renal carcinoma cells. These studies suggest a role of the inositol-lipid second messenger path and protein kinase C in the regulation of Ep production.

  9. Differentiated growth of human renal tubule cells on thin-film and nanostructured materials.

    PubMed

    Fissell, William H; Manley, Sargum; Westover, Angela; Humes, H David; Fleischman, Aaron J; Roy, Shuvo

    2006-01-01

    Over 300,000 Americans are dependent on hemodialysis as treatment for renal failure, and kidney transplantation is limited by scarcity of donor organs. This shortage has prompted research into tissue engineering of renal replacement therapy. Existing bioartificial kidneys are large and their use labor intensive, but they have shown improved survival compared to conventional therapy in preclinical studies and an US Food and Drug Administration-approved phase 2 clinical trial. This hybrid technology will require miniaturization of hemofilters, cell culture substrates, sensors, and integration of control electronics. Using the same harvesting and isolation techniques used in preparing bioartificial kidneys for clinical use, we characterized human renal tubule cell growth on a variety of silicon and related thin-film material substrates commonly used in the construction of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), as well as novel silicon nanopore membranes (SNMs). Human cortical tubular epithelial cells (HCTC) were seeded onto samples of single-crystal silicon, polycrystalline silicon, silicon dioxide, silicon nitride, SU-8 photoresist, SNMs, and polyester tissue culture inserts, and grown to confluence. The cells formed confluent monolayers with tight junctions and central cilia. Transepithelial resistances were similar between SNMs and polyester membranes. The differentiated growth of human tubular epithelial cells on MEMS materials strongly suggests that miniaturization of the existing bioartificial kidney will be feasible, paving the way for widespread application of this novel technology. PMID:16760708

  10. The renal scan in pregnant renal transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.A.; Ziessman, H.A.; Fahey, F.H.; Collea, J.V.; Alijani, M.R.; Helfrich, G.B.

    1985-05-01

    With the greater frequency of renal transplant surgery, more female pts are becoming pregnant and carrying to term. In the renal allograft blood vessels and ureter may be compressed resulting in impaired renal function and/or, hypertension. Toxemia of pregnancy is seen more frequently than normal. Radionuclide renal scan monitoring may be of significant value in this high risk obstetrical pt. After being maintained during the pregnancy, renal function may also deteriorate in the post partum period. 5 pregnant renal transplant pts who delivered live babies had renal studies with Tc-99m DTPA to assess allograft perfusion and function. No transplanted kidney was lost during or after pregnancy as a result of pregnancy. No congenital anomalies were associated with transplant management. 7 studies were performed on these 5 pts. The 7 scans all showed the uterus/placenta. The bladder was always distorted. The transplanted kidney was rotated to a more vertical position in 3 pts. The radiation dose to the fetus is calculated at 0.024 rad/mCi administered. This study demonstrates the anatomic and physiologic alterations expected in the transplanted kidney during pregnancy when evaluated by renal scan and that the radiation burden may be acceptable in management of these pts.

  11. Architecture of the human renal inner medulla and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guojun; Rosen, Seymour; Dantzler, William H; Pannabecker, Thomas L

    2015-10-01

    The architecture of the inner stripe of the outer medulla of the human kidney has long been known to exhibit distinctive configurations; however, inner medullary architecture remains poorly defined. Using immunohistochemistry with segment-specific antibodies for membrane fluid and solute transporters and other proteins, we identified a number of distinctive functional features of human inner medulla. In the outer inner medulla, aquaporin-1 (AQP1)-positive long-loop descending thin limbs (DTLs) lie alongside descending and ascending vasa recta (DVR, AVR) within vascular bundles. These vascular bundles are continuations of outer medullary vascular bundles. Bundles containing DTLs and vasa recta lie at the margins of coalescing collecting duct (CD) clusters, thereby forming two regions, the vascular bundle region and the CD cluster region. Although AQP1 and urea transporter UT-B are abundantly expressed in long-loop DTLs and DVR, respectively, their expression declines with depth below the outer medulla. Transcellular water and urea fluxes likely decline in these segments at progressively deeper levels. Smooth muscle myosin heavy chain protein is also expressed in DVR of the inner stripe and the upper inner medulla, but is sparsely expressed at deeper inner medullary levels. In rodent inner medulla, fenestrated capillaries abut CDs along their entire length, paralleling ascending thin limbs (ATLs), forming distinct compartments (interstitial nodal spaces; INSs); however, in humans this architecture rarely occurs. Thus INSs are relatively infrequent in the human inner medulla, unlike in the rodent where they are abundant. UT-B is expressed within the papillary epithelium of the lower inner medulla, indicating a transcellular pathway for urea across this epithelium. PMID:26290371

  12. Recent advances in renal interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although kidney transplantation has been an important means for the treatment of patients with end stage of renal disease, the long-term survival rate of the renal allograft remains a challenge. The cause of late renal allograft loss, once known as chronic allograft nephropathy, has been renamed “interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy” (IF/TA) to reflect the histologic pattern seen on biopsy. The mechanisms leading to IF/TA in the transplanted kidney include inflammation, activation of renal fibroblasts, and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. Identifying the mediators and factors that trigger IF/TA may be useful in early diagnosis and development of novel therapeutic strategies for improving long-term renal allograft survival and patient outcomes. In this review, we highlight the recent advances in our understanding of IF/TA from three aspects: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:25285155

  13. Vimentin metaplasia in renal cortical tubules of preneoplastic, neoplastic, aging, and regenerative lesions of rats and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, J. M.; Stevens, J. L.; Konishi, N.; Kurata, Y.; Uno, H.; Diwan, B. A.; Ohmori, T.

    1992-01-01

    Vimentin expression was studied immunohistochemically in renal cortical tubules of untreated male rats of various ages, rats exposed to toxins (barbital sodium, folic acid) and carcinogens (streptozotocin, N-bis(2-hydroxypropyl)nitrosamine, barbital sodium, and in humans of various ages with or without renal epithelial tumors. Fetal, neonatal, and young adult rats did not express vimentin in renal cortical tubules. Regenerative renal tubular lesions from rats with aging nephropathy and from rats with toxic nephropathy both expressed vimentin. Mitogenic lesions induced by folic acid at 24 hours, however, were not immunoreactive for vimentin. Carcinogen-induced preneoplastic renal cortical tubular lesions in rats were most often focally immunoreactive whereas strong vimentin expression was found in almost all induced renal tumors. In kidneys of three children (younger than 2 years of age), vimentin was not found in renal cortical tubular cells except in rare individual cells in one case. Vimentin was abundant in basophilic regenerative tubules in kidneys of aged individuals, however. Most (7/10) human renal carcinomas and latent preneoplastic or neoplastic renal tubular lesions found incidentally at autopsy (2/4) showed vimentin expression. The authors suggest that the switching to vimentin expression in phenotypically normal renal cortical tubular cells in rats and humans, which do not usually express the intermediate filament protein vimentin, should be considered vimentin metaplasia. Vimentin expression is dissociated from increased cell proliferation in hyperplastic and neoplastic lesions, however. Instead the degree of dedifferentiation of the tubule cells and changes in phenotype were associated with vimentin expression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 PMID:1415487

  14. The Human Variome Project: ensuring the quality of DNA variant databases in inherited renal disease.

    PubMed

    Savige, Judy; Dalgleish, Raymond; Cotton, Richard Gh; den Dunnen, Johan T; Macrae, Finlay; Povey, Sue

    2015-11-01

    A recent review identified 60 common inherited renal diseases caused by DNA variants in 132 different genes. These diseases can be diagnosed with DNA sequencing, but each gene probably also has a thousand normal variants. Many more normal variants have been characterised by individual laboratories than are reported in the literature or found in publicly accessible collections. At present, testing laboratories must assess each novel change they identify for pathogenicity, even when this has been done elsewhere previously, and the distinction between normal and disease-associated variants is particularly an issue with the recent surge in exomic sequencing and gene discovery projects. The Human Variome Project recommends the establishment of gene-specific DNA variant databases to facilitate the sharing of DNA variants and decisions about likely disease causation. Databases improve diagnostic accuracy and testing efficiency, and reduce costs. They also help with genotype-phenotype correlations and predictive algorithms. The Human Variome Project advocates databases that use standardised descriptions, are up-to-date, include clinical information and are freely available. Currently, the genes affected in the most common inherited renal diseases correspond to 350 different variant databases, many of which are incomplete or have insufficient clinical details for genotype-phenotype correlations. Assistance is needed from nephrologists to maximise the usefulness of these databases for the diagnosis and management of inherited renal disease. PMID:25384529

  15. Therapeutic lymphangiogenesis ameliorates established acute lung allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ye; Liu, Kaifeng; Monzon-Medina, Maria E; Padera, Robert F; Wang, Hao; George, Gautam; Toprak, Demet; Abdelnour, Elie; D'Agostino, Emmanuel; Goldberg, Hilary J; Perrella, Mark A; Forteza, Rosanna Malbran; Rosas, Ivan O; Visner, Gary; El-Chemaly, Souheil

    2015-11-01

    Lung transplantation is the only viable option for patients suffering from otherwise incurable end-stage pulmonary diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Despite aggressive immunosuppression, acute rejection of the lung allograft occurs in over half of transplant recipients, and the factors that promote lung acceptance are poorly understood. The contribution of lymphatic vessels to transplant pathophysiology remains controversial, and data that directly address the exact roles of lymphatic vessels in lung allograft function and survival are limited. Here, we have shown that there is a marked decline in the density of lymphatic vessels, accompanied by accumulation of low-MW hyaluronan (HA) in mouse orthotopic allografts undergoing rejection. We found that stimulation of lymphangiogenesis with VEGF-C156S, a mutant form of VEGF-C with selective VEGFR-3 binding, alleviates an established rejection response and improves clearance of HA from the lung allograft. Longitudinal analysis of transbronchial biopsies from human lung transplant recipients demonstrated an association between resolution of acute lung rejection and decreased HA in the graft tissue. Taken together, these results indicate that lymphatic vessel formation after lung transplantation mediates HA drainage and suggest that treatments to stimulate lymphangiogenesis have promise for improving graft outcomes. PMID:26485284

  16. Therapeutic lymphangiogenesis ameliorates established acute lung allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ye; Liu, Kaifeng; Monzon-Medina, Maria E.; Padera, Robert F.; Wang, Hao; George, Gautam; Toprak, Demet; Abdelnour, Elie; D’Agostino, Emmanuel; Goldberg, Hilary J.; Perrella, Mark A.; Forteza, Rosanna Malbran; Rosas, Ivan O.; Visner, Gary; El-Chemaly, Souheil

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation is the only viable option for patients suffering from otherwise incurable end-stage pulmonary diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Despite aggressive immunosuppression, acute rejection of the lung allograft occurs in over half of transplant recipients, and the factors that promote lung acceptance are poorly understood. The contribution of lymphatic vessels to transplant pathophysiology remains controversial, and data that directly address the exact roles of lymphatic vessels in lung allograft function and survival are limited. Here, we have shown that there is a marked decline in the density of lymphatic vessels, accompanied by accumulation of low-MW hyaluronan (HA) in mouse orthotopic allografts undergoing rejection. We found that stimulation of lymphangiogenesis with VEGF-C156S, a mutant form of VEGF-C with selective VEGFR-3 binding, alleviates an established rejection response and improves clearance of HA from the lung allograft. Longitudinal analysis of transbronchial biopsies from human lung transplant recipients demonstrated an association between resolution of acute lung rejection and decreased HA in the graft tissue. Taken together, these results indicate that lymphatic vessel formation after lung transplantation mediates HA drainage and suggest that treatments to stimulate lymphangiogenesis have promise for improving graft outcomes. PMID:26485284

  17. Two mutations in human BICC1 resulting in Wnt pathway hyperactivity associated with cystic renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Marine R-C; Clauin, Séverine; Pfister, Yvan; Di Maïo, Massimo; Ulinski, Tim; Constam, Daniel; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Bicaudal C homologue 1 (Bicc1) knockout in mice causes polycystic kidney disease and pancreas development defects, including a reduction in insulin-producing β-cells and ensuing diabetes. We therefore screened 137 patients with renal abnormalities or association of early-onset diabetes and renal disease for genetic alterations in BICC1. We identified two heterozygous mutations, one nonsense in the first K Homology (KH) domain and one missense in the sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain. In mice, Bicc1 blocks canonical Wnt signaling, mostly via its SAM domain. We show that the human BICC1, similar to its mouse counterpart, blocks canonical Wnt signaling. The nonsense mutation identified results in a complete loss of Wnt inhibitory activity. The point mutation in the SAM domain has a similar effect to a complete SAM domain deletion, resulting in a 22% loss of activity. PMID:21922595

  18. Antagonism of antiviral and allogeneic activity of a human public CTL clonotype by a single altered peptide ligand: implications for allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, Lauren K.; Green, Katherine J.; Beddoe, Travis; Clements, Craig S.; Miles, John J.; Bottomley, Stephen P.; Zernich, Danielle; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie; Burrows, Scott R.

    2010-06-30

    Alloreactive T lymphocytes are central mediators of graft-versus-host disease and allograft rejection. A public CTL clonotype with specificity for the alloantigens HLA-B*4402 and B*4405 is often expanded to large numbers in healthy HLA-B*0801{sup +} individuals, driven by cross-reactive stimulation with the common, persistent herpesvirus EBV. Since such alloreactive memory CTL expansions have the potential to influence transplantation outcome, altered peptide ligands (APLs) of the target HLA-B*0801-binding EBV peptide, FLRGRAYGL, were screened as specific antagonists for this immunodominant clonotype. One APL, FLRGRFYGL, exerted powerful antagonism of a prototypic T cell clone expressing this immunodominant TCR when costimulated with target cells presenting HLA-B*0801{sup FLRGRAYGL}. Significantly, this APL also reduced the lysis of allogeneic target cells expressing HLA-B*4402 by up to 99%. The affinities of the agonist and antagonist complexes for the public TCR, measured using solution and solid-phase assays, were 8 and 138 {micro}M, respectively. Surprisingly, the half-life of the agonist and antagonist complexes was similar, yet the association rate for the antagonist complex was significantly slower. These observations were further supported by structural studies that suggested a large conformational hurdle was required to ligate the immunodominant TCR to the HLA-B*0801 antagonist complex. By defining an antagonist APL against an immunodominant alloreactive TCR, these findings raise the prospect of exploiting such peptides to inhibit clinical alloreactivity, particularly against clonal T cell expansions that react with alloantigens.

  19. Inhibition of Chemokine-Glycosaminoglycan Interactions in Donor Tissue Reduces Mouse Allograft Vasculopathy and Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Erbin; Liu, Li-Ying; Wang, Hao; McIvor, Dana; Sun, Yun ming; Macaulay, Colin; King, Elaine; Munuswamy-Ramanujam, Ganesh; Bartee, Mee Yong; Williams, Jennifer; Davids, Jennifer; Charo, Israel; McFadden, Grant; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Lucas, Alexandra R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Binding of chemokines to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) is classically described as initiating inflammatory cell migration and creating tissue chemokine gradients that direct local leukocyte chemotaxis into damaged or transplanted tissues. While chemokine-receptor binding has been extensively studied during allograft transplantation, effects of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) interactions with chemokines on transplant longevity are less well known. Here we examine the impact of interrupting chemokine-GAG interactions and chemokine-receptor interactions, both locally and systemically, on vascular disease in allografts. Methodology/Principal Findings Analysis of GAG or CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) deficiency were coupled with the infusion of viral chemokine modulating proteins (CMPs) in mouse aortic allograft transplants (n = 239 mice). Inflammatory cell invasion and neointimal hyperplasia were significantly reduced in N-deacetylase-N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1f/fTekCre+) heparan sulfate (GAG)-deficient (Ndst1−/−, p<0.044) and CCR2-deficient (Ccr2−/−, p<0.04) donor transplants. Donor tissue GAG or CCR2 deficiency markedly reduced inflammation and vasculopathy, whereas recipient deficiencies did not. Treatment with three CMPs was also investigated; Poxviral M-T1 blocks CC chemokine receptor binding, M-T7 blocks C, CC, and CXC GAG binding, and herpesviral M3 binds receptor and GAG binding for all classes. M-T7 reduced intimal hyperplasia in wild type (WT) (Ccr2+/+, p≤0.003 and Ccr2−/−, p≤0.027) aortic allografts, but not in Ndst1−/− aortic allografts (p = 0.933). M-T1 and M3 inhibited WT (Ccr2+/+ and Ndst1+/+, p≤0.006) allograft vasculopathy, but did not block vasculopathy in Ccr2−/− (p = 0.61). M-T7 treatment alone, even without immunosuppressive drugs, also significantly prolonged survival of renal allograft transplants (p≤0.001). Conclusions/Significance Interruption of chemokine-GAG interactions, even in the absence of

  20. Multi-State Survival Analysis in Renal Transplantation Recipients

    PubMed Central

    MIRZAEE, Moghaddameh; MOHAMMAD, Kazem; MAHMOODI, Mahmood; ZERAATI, Hojjat; EBADZADEH, Mohammad-Reza; ETMINAN, Abbas; FAZELI, Faramarz; DEHGHANI FIROUZABADI, Mohammad Hasan; SATTARY, Hossein; HAGHPARAST, Mahdiyeh; RAHIMI FOROUSHANI, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Renal transplantation is a therapy for end-stage renal disease. During the study of recipients’ survival after renal transplantation, there are some events as intermediate events that not only affect the recipients’ survival but also events which are affected by various factors. The aim of this study was to handle these intermediate events in order to identify factors that affect recipients’ survival by using multi-state models. Methods This retrospective cohort study included 405 renal transplant patients from Afzalipour Hospital, Kerman, Iran, from 2004 to 2010. The survival time of these recipients was determined after transplantation and the effect of various factors on the death hazard with and without renal allograft failure and hazard of renal allograft failure was studied by using multi-state models. Results During 4.06 years (median) of follow-up; 28 (6.9%) recipients died and allograft failure occurred in 51 (12.6%) recipients. Based on the results of multi-state model, receiving a living kidney transplantation decreased the hazard of renal allograft failure (HR=0.38; 95% CI: 0.17- 0.87), pre-transplant hypertension (HR=2.94; 95% CI: 1.54- 5.63) and serum creatinine levels >1.6 upon discharge from the hospital (HR=7.38; 95% CI: 3.87- 7.08) increased the hazard of renal allograft failure. Receiving living kidney transplantation decreased the hazard of death directly (HR=0.18; 95% CI: 0.04- 0.93). Conclusion It was concluded that the effect of donor type, pre-transplant hypertension and having serum creatinine >1.6 upon discharge from the hospital was significant on hazard of renal allograft failure. The only variable that had a direct significant effect on hazard of death was donor type. PMID:25988091

  1. Hair Follicle Dermal Sheath Derived Cells Improve Islet Allograft Survival without Systemic Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaojie; Hao, Jianqiang; Leung, Gigi; Breitkopf, Trisia; Wang, Eddy; Kwong, Nicole; Akhoundsadegh, Noushin; Warnock, Garth L.; Shapiro, Jerry; McElwee, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs successfully prevent rejection of islet allografts in the treatment of type I diabetes. However, the drugs also suppress systemic immunity increasing the risk of opportunistic infection and cancer development in allograft recipients. In this study, we investigated a new treatment for autoimmune diabetes using naturally immune privileged, hair follicle derived, autologous cells to provide localized immune protection of islet allotransplants. Islets from Balb/c mouse donors were cotransplanted with syngeneic hair follicle dermal sheath cup cells (DSCC, group 1) or fibroblasts (FB, group 2) under the kidney capsule of immune-competent, streptozotocin induced, diabetic C57BL/6 recipients. Group 1 allografts survived significantly longer than group 2 (32.2 ± 12.2 versus 14.1 ± 3.3 days, P < 0.001) without administration of any systemic immunosuppressive agents. DSCC reduced T cell activation in the renal lymph node, prevented graft infiltrates, modulated inflammatory chemokine and cytokine profiles, and preserved better beta cell function in the islet allografts, but no systemic immunosuppression was observed. In summary, DSCC prolong islet allograft survival without systemic immunosuppression by local modulation of alloimmune responses, enhancing of beta cell survival, and promoting of graft revascularization. This novel finding demonstrates the capacity of easily accessible hair follicle cells to be used as local immunosuppression agents in islet transplantation. PMID:26000314

  2. Flcn-deficient renal cells are tumorigenic and sensitive to mTOR suppression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Schoen, Susan; Xiao, Guang-Qian; Li, Xueying; Teh, Bin Tean; Wu, Guan; Chen, Jindong

    2015-01-01

    Deficiency of tumor suppressor FLCN leads to the activation of the mTOR signaling pathway in human BHD-associated renal cell carcinomas (RCC). We have previously developed a renal distal tubule-collecting duct-Henle's loop-specific Flcn knockout (KO) mouse model (Flcnflox/flox/Ksp-Cre). This mouse model can only survive for three weeks after birth due to the development of polycystic kidney and uremia. Whether these cystic solid hyperplasia changes seen in those KO mice are tumorigenic or malignant is unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that genetic disruption of Flcn in mouse kidney distal tubule cells could lead to tumorigenic transformation of these cells to develop allograft tumors with an aggressive histologic phenotype. Consistent with previous reports, we showed that the mTOR pathway plays an important role in the growth of these Flcn-deficient allograft and human UOK 257-1 xenograft tumors. We further demonstrated that the mTOR inhibitor, sirolimus, suppresses the tumor's growth, suggesting that mTOR inhibitors might be effective in control of FLCN-deficient RCC, especially in BHD renal tumorigenesis. PMID:26418749

  3. Allicin inhibits human renal clear cell carcinoma progression via suppressing HIF pathway

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bin; Shu, Ying; Cui, Tianlei; Fu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α) protects hypoxic cells from apoptosis or necrosis under ischemic and anoxic conditions. Allicin is characterized by the anti-cancer characteristics. This study aims to explore whether allicin is involved in renal clear cell carcinoma progression through HIF-1α. A total of 40 RCC tissues and 39 normal renal tissues were collected H&E and immunohistochemistry were applied to study morphology changes. MTT assay and flow cytometry (FCM) were used to analyze cell viability and apoptosis. In vitro colony formation assay and wound healing assay were conducted to explore cell migration. The protein levels of Bcl-2, VEGF and HIF-1α were increased in RCC tissues. More importantly, treatment with allicin significantly decreased HIF-1α protein level, thereby reducing Bcl-2 and VEGF expression. In addition, allicin also obviously enhanced apoptotic cells. And colony formation capacity and cell migration rate were reduced in RCC-9863 cells treated with allicin. Further study revealed that overexpression of HIF-1α could partially repress allicin-induced downstream effects. To conclude, allicin inhibits human renal clear cell carcinoma progression partially by suppressing HIF pathway. PMID:26884975

  4. Allicin inhibits human renal clear cell carcinoma progression via suppressing HIF pathway.

    PubMed

    Song, Bin; Shu, Ying; Cui, Tianlei; Fu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α) protects hypoxic cells from apoptosis or necrosis under ischemic and anoxic conditions. Allicin is characterized by the anti-cancer characteristics. This study aims to explore whether allicin is involved in renal clear cell carcinoma progression through HIF-1α. A total of 40 RCC tissues and 39 normal renal tissues were collected H&E and immunohistochemistry were applied to study morphology changes. MTT assay and flow cytometry (FCM) were used to analyze cell viability and apoptosis. In vitro colony formation assay and wound healing assay were conducted to explore cell migration. The protein levels of Bcl-2, VEGF and HIF-1α were increased in RCC tissues. More importantly, treatment with allicin significantly decreased HIF-1α protein level, thereby reducing Bcl-2 and VEGF expression. In addition, allicin also obviously enhanced apoptotic cells. And colony formation capacity and cell migration rate were reduced in RCC-9863 cells treated with allicin. Further study revealed that overexpression of HIF-1α could partially repress allicin-induced downstream effects. To conclude, allicin inhibits human renal clear cell carcinoma progression partially by suppressing HIF pathway. PMID:26884975

  5. /sup 125/I-hippuran absorption from the human renal pelvis

    SciTech Connect

    Bratt, C.G.; Granerus, G.

    1986-09-01

    The absorption of /sup 125/I-hippuran from human renal pelvis was studied peroperatively in 18 patients with obstruction at the pelviureteric junction. Three types of experiment were included: absorption during induced diuresis, absorption at a constant intrapelvic pressure of 30 cm. H/sub 2/O, and excretion of the indicator by the contralateral kidney. Total and separate glomerular filtration rate were measured using /sup 51/Cr-EDTA clearance technique and isotope renography. Distal tubular function was evaluated as maximum concentration ability. During induced diuresis the intrapelvic pressure increased to an average maximum value of 31.6 cm. H/sub 2/O. The excretion of isotope from the contralateral kidney varied from one to 44% of the given dose. A significant correlation (r = 0.87) between the maximum intrapelvic pressure obtained and the amount of isotope excreted from the contralateral kidney was demonstrated. At a constant intrapelvic pressure of 30 cm. H/sub 2/O the excretion of isotope from the contralateral kidney varied from two to 26% of the dosage given. The low value probably depended on the impaired function of the obstructed kidney. Our results show the existence of a significant reflux from the renal pelvis of small molecules, which was affected by renal function, intrapelvic pressure and volume.

  6. Non-cardiac benefits of human recombinant erythropoietin in end stage renal failure and anaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, K P; Sharp, J; Watson, S; Coulthard, M G

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (r-HuEpo) is now available to correct the anaemia of end stage renal failure. The clinical consequences of increasing the haemoglobin concentration in children on dialysis are incompletely documented; a placebo controlled study is essential when assessing subjective changes, for example in appetite or other aspects of quality of life. A single blind, placebo controlled crossover study in 11 children with end stage renal failure was performed to assess the clinical benefits resulting from correction of anaemia. Ten of the 11 children completed 36 weeks of the study and seven completed both 24 week limbs. Subcutaneous administration of r-HuEpo twice a week resulted in an increase in haemoglobin concentration, from 73 to 112 g/l. This was associated with an objective improvement in exercise tolerance, and a subjective improvement in physical performance and health, and better school attendance. No consistent effect was seen on appetite, growth, psychosocial functioning, biochemical control, or peritoneal dialysis efficiency. A small but clinically unimportant increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure was seen in five children. One child on antihypertensive treatment required an increase in dosage during r-HuEpo while another child required a reduction in treatment. These findings, together with the important cardiac benefits previously described during r-HuEpo treatment, support the use of r-HuEpo in all children with end stage renal failure and anaemia. PMID:8257180

  7. KIAA0101 is associated with human renal cell carcinoma proliferation and migration induced by erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shengjun; Li, Xin; Tie, Lu; Pan, Yan; Li, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a frequently prescribed anti-anemic drug for patients with advanced renal carcinoma. However, recent evidence from clinical studies suggested that EPO accelerated tumor progression and jeopardized the 5-year survival. Herein, we show, starting from the in silico microarray bioinformatics analysis, that activation of Erythropoietin signaling pathway enhanced renal clear carcinoma (RCC) progression. EPO accelerated the proliferative and migratory ability in 786-O and Caki-2 cells. Moreover, comparative proteomics expression profiling suggested that exogenous EPO stimulated RCC progression via up-regulation of KIAA0101 expression. Loss of KIAA0101 impeded the undesirable propensity of EPO in RCC. Finally, low expression of KIAA0101 was associated with the excellent prognosis and prognosticated a higher 5-year survival in human patients with renal carcinoma. Overall, KIAA0101 appears to be a key promoter of RCC malignancy induced by EPO, which provide mechanistic insights into KIAA0101 functions, and pave the road to develop new therapeutics for treatment of cancer-related and chemotherapy-induced anemia in patients with RCC. PMID:26575329

  8. Human embryonic mesenchymal stem cells participate in differentiation of renal tubular cells in newborn mice

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Li; Liu, Hou-Qi; Wu, Min-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are used with increasing success in the treatment of renal tubular injury. However, whether mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) differentiate into renal tubular epithelial cells remains controversial. The aims of the present study were to observe the localization of human embryonic MSCs (hMSCs) in the kidneys of newborn mice, and to investigate hMSC differentiation into tubular epithelium. Primary culture hMSCs were derived from 4–7-week-old embryos and labeled with the cell membrane fluorescent dye PKH-26. The degree of apoptosis, cell growth, differentiation and localization of hMSCs with and without this label were then determined using immunohistochemical methods and flow cytometry. hMSCs and PKH26-labeled hMSCs were revealed to differentiate into chondrocytes and adipocytes, and were demonstrated to have similar proliferative capability. In the two cell types, the antigens CD34 and CD45, indicative of hematopoietic lineages, were not expressed; however, the expression of the mesenchymal markers CD29 and CD90 in MSCs, was significantly increased. During a 4-week culture period, laser confocal microscopy revealed that PKH26-labeled hMSCs in the kidneys of newborn mice gradually dispersed. Two weeks after the injection of the PKH26-labeled cells, the percentage of PKH26-labeled hMSCs localized to the renal tubules was 10±2.1%. In conclusion, PKH26 labeling has no effect on hMSC differentiation, proliferation and mesenchymal cell surface features, and hMSCs injected into the kidneys of newborn mice may transform to renal tubule epithelium. PMID:27446255

  9. Transcriptomic changes in human renal proximal tubular cells revealed under hypoxic conditions by RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenmin; Li, Yiping; Wang, Zhi; Liu, Lei; Liu, Jing; Ding, Fengan; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Cheng, Zhengyuan; Chen, Pingsheng; Dou, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Chronic hypoxia often occurs among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Renal proximal tubular cells may be the primary target of a hypoxic insult. However, the underlying transcriptional mechanisms remain undefined. In this study, we revealed the global changes in gene expression in HK‑2 human renal proximal tubular cells under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. We analyzed the transcriptome of HK‑2 cells exposed to hypoxia for 24 h using RNA sequencing. A total of 279 differentially expressed genes was examined, as these genes could potentially explain the differences in HK‑2 cells between hypoxic and normoxic conditions. Moreover, 17 genes were validated by qPCR, and the results were highly concordant with the RNA seqencing results. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analyses were performed to better understand the functions of these differentially expressed genes. The upregulated genes appeared to be significantly enriched in the pathyway of extracellular matrix (ECM)-receptor interaction, and in paticular, the pathway of renal cell carcinoma was upregulated under hypoxic conditions. The downregulated genes were enriched in the signaling pathway related to antigen processing and presentation; however, the pathway of glutathione metabolism was downregulated. Our analysis revealed numerous novel transcripts and alternative splicing events. Simultaneously, we also identified a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms, which will be a rich resource for future marker development. On the whole, our data indicate that transcriptome analysis provides valuable information for a more in depth understanding of the molecular mechanisms in CKD and renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27432315

  10. Quantitative Structure-Pharmacokinetic Relationships for the Prediction of Renal Clearance in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Rutwij A.

    2015-01-01

    Renal clearance (CLR), a major route of elimination for many drugs and drug metabolites, represents the net result of glomerular filtration, active secretion and reabsorption, and passive reabsorption. The aim of this study was to develop quantitative structure-pharmacokinetic relationships (QSPKR) to predict CLR of drugs or drug-like compounds in humans. Human CLR data for 382 compounds were obtained from the literature. Step-wise multiple linear regression was used to construct QSPKR models for training sets and their predictive performance was evaluated using internal validation (leave-one-out method). All qualified models were validated externally using test sets. QSPKR models were also constructed for compounds in accordance with their 1) net elimination pathways (net secretion, extensive net secretion, net reabsorption, and extensive net reabsorption), 2) net elimination clearances (net secretion clearance, CLSEC; or net reabsorption clearance, CLREAB), 3) ion status, and 4) substrate/inhibitor specificity for renal transporters. We were able to predict 1) CLREAB (Q2 = 0.77) of all compounds undergoing net reabsorption; 2) CLREAB (Q2 = 0.81) of all compounds undergoing extensive net reabsorption; and 3) CLR for substrates and/or inhibitors of OAT1/3 (Q2 = 0.81), OCT2 (Q2 = 0.85), MRP2/4 (Q2 = 0.78), P-gp (Q2 = 0.71), and MATE1/2K (Q2 = 0.81). Moreover, compounds undergoing net reabsorption/extensive net reabsorption predominantly belonged to Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System classes 1 and 2. In conclusion, constructed parsimonious QSPKR models can be used to predict CLR of compounds that 1) undergo net reabsorption/extensive net reabsorption and 2) are substrates and/or inhibitors of human renal transporters. PMID:25352657

  11. Human inorganic mercury exposure, renal effects and possible pathways in Wanshan mercury mining area, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Du, Buyun; Chan, Hing Man; Feng, Xinbin

    2015-07-01

    Rice can accumulate methylmercury (MeHg) and rice consumption is the main route of MeHg exposure for the local population in Guizhou, China. However, inorganic Hg (IHg) load in human body is not comprehensively studied in highly Hg polluted areas such as Hg mining areas. This study is designed to evaluate human IHg exposure, related renal effects and possible pathways in Wanshan Hg mining area, Guizhou, Southwest China. Residents lived within 3 km to the mine waste heaps showed high Urine Hg (UHg) concentrations and the geometrical means (Geomean) of UHg were 8.29, 5.13, and 10.3 μg/g Creatinine (Cr) at site A, D, and E, respectively. It demonstrated a gradient of UHg concentrations with the distance from the pollution sources. A significantly positive correlation between paired results for UHg concentrations and serum creatinine (SCr) was observed in this study, but not for UHg and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). There are significant increases of SCr in two quartiles with high UHg concentrations. The results indicated that human IHg exposure may cause impairment of renal function. By calculation of Probable Daily Intake from different routes, we found that dietary intake is the main pathway of IHg exposure for the local population, rather than inhalation of Hg vapor. PMID:25863593

  12. Angiotensin II Contributes to Diabetic Renal Dysfunction in Rodents and Humans via Notch1/Snail Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gagliardini, Elena; Perico, Norberto; Rizzo, Paola; Buelli, Simona; Longaretti, Lorena; Perico, Luca; Tomasoni, Susanna; Zoja, Carla; Macconi, Daniela; Morigi, Marina; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Benigni, Ariela

    2014-01-01

    In nondiabetic rat models of renal disease, angiotensin II (Ang II) perpetuates podocyte injury and promotes progression to end-stage kidney disease. Herein, we wanted to explore the role of Ang II in diabetic nephropathy by a translational approach spanning from in vitro to in vivo rat and human studies, and to dissect the intracellular pathways involved. In isolated perfused rat kidneys and in cultured human podocytes, Ang II down-regulated nephrin expression via Notch1 activation and nuclear translocation of Snail. Hairy enhancer of split-1 was a Notch1-downstream gene effector that activated Snail in cultured podocytes. In vitro changes of the Snail/nephrin axis were similar to those in renal biopsy specimens of Zucker diabetic fatty rats and patients with advanced diabetic nephropathy, and were normalized by pharmacological inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system. Collectively, the present studies provide evidence that Ang II plays a relevant role in perpetuating glomerular injury in experimental and human diabetic nephropathy via persistent activation of Notch1 and Snail signaling in podocytes, eventually resulting in down-regulation of nephrin expression, the integrity of which is crucial for the glomerular filtration barrier. PMID:23707238

  13. Monocarboxylate Transporter Inhibition with Osmotic Diuresis Increases γ-Hydroxybutyrate Renal Elimination in Humans: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Marilyn E.; Morse, Bridget L.; Baciewicz, Gloria J.; Tessena, Matthew M.; Acquisto, Nicole M.; Hutchinson, David J.; DiCenzo, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective The purpose of the current study was to demonstrate proof-of-concept that monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) inhibition with L-lactate combined with osmotic diuresis increases renal clearance of γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) in human subjects. GHB is a substrate for human and rodent MCTs, which are responsible for GHB renal reabsorption, and this therapy increases GHB renal clearance in rats. Methods Ten healthy volunteers were administered GHB orally as sodium oxybate 50 mg/kg (4.5 gm maximum dose) on two different study days. On study day 1, GHB was administered alone. On study day 2, treatment of L-lactate 0.125 mmol/kg and mannitol 200 mg/kg followed by L-lactate 0.75 mmol/kg/hr was administered intravenously 30 minutes after GHB ingestion. Blood and urine were collected for 6 hours, analyzed for GHB, and pharmacokinetic and statistical analyses performed. Results L-lactate/mannitol administration significantly increased GHB renal clearance compared to GHB alone, 439 vs. 615 mL/hr (P=0.001), and increased the percentage of GHB dose excreted in the urine, 2.2 vs. 3.3% (P=0.021). Total clearance was unchanged. Conclusions MCT inhibition with L-lactate combined with osmotic diuresis increases GHB renal elimination in humans. No effect on total clearance was observed in this study due to the negligible contribution of renal clearance to total clearance at this low GHB dose. Considering the nonlinear renal elimination of GHB, further research in overdose cases is warranted to assess the efficacy of this treatment strategy for increasing renal and total clearance at high GHB doses. PMID:24772380

  14. A Qualitative Assessment of Human Cadavers Embalmed by Thiel's Method Used in Laparoscopic Training for Renal Resection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rai, Bhavan Prasad; Tang, Benjie; Eisma, Roos; Soames, Roger W.; Wen, Haitao; Nabi, Ghulam

    2012-01-01

    Human cadaveric tissue is the fundamental substrate for basic anatomic and surgical skills training. A qualitative assessment of the use of human cadavers preserved by Thiel's method for a British Association of Urological Surgeons--approved, advanced laparoscopic renal resection skills training course is described in the present study. Four…

  15. Clinical Significance of HLA-DQ Antibodies in the Development of Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Allograft Failure in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Min, Ji Won; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In-Sung; Park, Ki-Hyun; Yang, Chul Woo; Chung, Byung Ha; Oh, Eun-Jee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract With the development of the single antigen beads assay, the role of donor specific alloantibody (DSA) against human leukocyte antigens in kidney transplantation (KT) has been highlighted. This study aimed to investigate the clinical significance of DQ-DSA detected at renal allograft biopsy. We evaluated 263 KT recipients who underwent allograft biopsy and DSA detection at the same time. Among them, 155 patients who were nonsensitized before transplantation were selected to investigate the role of de-novo DQ-DSA. Both the total and nonsensitized subgroup was categorized into 4 groups each according to DSA results as: DQ only, DQ + non-DQ, non-DQ, and no DSA. In the total patient group, post-KT DSA was positive in 79 (30.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was most prevalent (64.6%). In the nonsensitized subgroup, de-novo DSAs were detected in 45 (29.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was also most prevalent (73.3%). The DQ only group showed a significantly longer post-KT duration compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). The overall incidence of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) was 17.9%. B-DSA, DR-DSA, and DQ-DSA were associated with AMR (P < 0.05), but in the analysis for chronic AMR, only DQ-DSA showed significance in both the total and the nonsensitized subgroup (P < 0.05). On comparison of Banff scores among groups, those representing humoral immunity were significantly dominant in all DSA positive groups compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05), and higher scores of markers representing chronic tissue injury were more frequently detected in the groups with DQ-DSA. The worst postbiopsy survival was seen in the DQ + non-DQ group of the total patient group, and patients with de-novo DQ-DSA showed poorer graft survival in the nonsensitized subgroup compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, de-novo DQ-DSA was the only significant risk factor associated with late allograft failure (P < 0.05). Our study is the first to

  16. Clinical Significance of HLA-DQ Antibodies in the Development of Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Allograft Failure in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Min, Ji Won; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In-Sung; Park, Ki-Hyun; Yang, Chul Woo; Chung, Byung Ha; Oh, Eun-Jee

    2016-03-01

    With the development of the single antigen beads assay, the role of donor specific alloantibody (DSA) against human leukocyte antigens in kidney transplantation (KT) has been highlighted. This study aimed to investigate the clinical significance of DQ-DSA detected at renal allograft biopsy. We evaluated 263 KT recipients who underwent allograft biopsy and DSA detection at the same time. Among them, 155 patients who were nonsensitized before transplantation were selected to investigate the role of de-novo DQ-DSA. Both the total and nonsensitized subgroup was categorized into 4 groups each according to DSA results as: DQ only, DQ + non-DQ, non-DQ, and no DSA. In the total patient group, post-KT DSA was positive in 79 (30.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was most prevalent (64.6%). In the nonsensitized subgroup, de-novo DSAs were detected in 45 (29.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was also most prevalent (73.3%). The DQ only group showed a significantly longer post-KT duration compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). The overall incidence of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) was 17.9%. B-DSA, DR-DSA, and DQ-DSA were associated with AMR (P < 0.05), but in the analysis for chronic AMR, only DQ-DSA showed significance in both the total and the nonsensitized subgroup (P < 0.05). On comparison of Banff scores among groups, those representing humoral immunity were significantly dominant in all DSA positive groups compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05), and higher scores of markers representing chronic tissue injury were more frequently detected in the groups with DQ-DSA. The worst postbiopsy survival was seen in the DQ + non-DQ group of the total patient group, and patients with de-novo DQ-DSA showed poorer graft survival in the nonsensitized subgroup compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, de-novo DQ-DSA was the only significant risk factor associated with late allograft failure (P < 0.05). Our study is the first to demonstrate

  17. Allografts in Soft Tissue Reconstructive Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Giedraitis, Andrius; Arnoczky, Steven P.; Bedi, Asheesh

    2014-01-01

    Context Allografts offer several important advantages over autografts in musculoskeletal reconstructive procedures, such as anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Despite growing widespread use of allograft tissue, serious concerns regarding safety and functionality remain. We discuss the latest knowledge of the potential benefits and risks of allograft use and offer a critical review of allograft tissue regulation, management, and sterilization to enable the surgeon to better inform athletes considering reconstructive surgery options. Evidence Acquisition A review of sources published in the past 10 years is the primary basis of this research. Study Design: Observational analysis (cohort study). Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results Comparable outcome data for autografts and allografts do not support universal standards for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and physician recommendation and bias appear to significantly influence patient preference and satisfaction. Sterilization by gamma and electron-beam irradiation diminishes the biomechanical integrity of allograft tissue, but radioprotective agents such as collagen cross-linking and free radical scavengers appear to have potential in mitigating the deleterious effects of irradiation and preserving tissue strength and stability. Conclusion Allografts offer greater graft availability and reduced morbidity in orthopaedic reconstructive procedures, but greater expansion of their use by surgeons is challenged by the need to maintain tissue sterility and biomechanical functionality. Advances in the radioprotection of irradiated tissue may lessen concerns regarding allograft safety and structural stability. PMID:24790696

  18. Ex vivo reconstruction of the donor renal artery in renal transplantation: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    McLoughlin, Louise C; Davis, Niall F; Dowling, Catherine M; Power, Richard E; Mohan, Ponnusamy; Hickey, David P; Smyth, Gordon P; Eng, Molly M P; Little, Dilly M

    2014-05-01

    Transplantation of renal allografts with anatomic variability or injured vasculature poses a challenge to the transplanting surgeon but can be salvaged for transplantation with ex vivo bench reconstruction of the vasculature. We investigated whether renal allograft function is impaired in these reconstructed allografts; compared to the donor-matched, un-reconstructed allograft. Reconstructed allografts were transplanted into 60 patients at our institution between 1986 and 2012. A control group was selected from the matched pair of the recipient in deceased donor transplantation. We found no significant difference in the overall graft and patient survival rates (P = 1.0, P = 0.178). Serum creatinine levels were not significantly higher in the study group at 1, 3 and 12 months postoperatively. There were two cases of vascular thrombosis in the study group that were not related to the ex vivo reconstruction. A significantly greater proportion of reconstructed patients were investigated with a colour duplex ultrasound postoperatively (0.007). Although we have demonstrated a higher index of suspicion of transplant failure in patients with a reconstructed allograft, this practice has proven to be a safe and useful technique with equivocal outcome when compared to normal grafts; increasing the organ pool available for transplantation. PMID:24851246

  19. Fluid Secretion in Isolated Proximal Straight Renal Tubules EFFECT OF HUMAN UREMIC SERUM

    PubMed Central

    Grantham, Jared J.; Irwin, Richard L.; Qualizza, Patti B.; Tucker, Donald R.; Whittier, Frederick C.

    1973-01-01

    We have examined the effect of normal and uremic human sera on the transtubular flow of fluid in isolated perfused segments of rabbit proximal convoluted and straight renal tubules. Proximal convoluted and straight tubules absorbed fluid from the lumen when the external bath was normal rabbit serum. Normal human sera in the bath depressed net fluid absorption in both tubular segments, but more importantly, uremic human serum caused proximal straight tubules to secrete fluid into the lumen. Fluid secretion was also demonstrated indirectly by observing in nonperfused proximal straight, but not proximal convoluted tubules, that the normally collapsed lumens opened widely in uremic serum. Nonperfused proximal straight tubules developed expanded lumens even after a 25-fold dilution of human uremic serum with normal rabbit serum, whereas lumen expansion occurred only in undiluted normal human serum, on the average. Serum from acutely uremic rabbits possessed secretory activity but normal rabbit serum did not. The secretory effect of uremic sera in proximal straight tubules was inhibited by cooling and ouabain and probenecid. The secretory activity of uremic sera was removed by dialysis, but not by freezing or boiling. Para-aminohippurate and benzoate caused fluid secretion in proximal straight tubules but urea, creatinine, guanidinosuccinate, and urate did not. On the basis of these results, we suggest that the secretory factor in serum may be a substance or group of substances possibly related to the hippurate class of organic molecules that are accumulated to relatively high concentrations in renal failure. The secretory material in the serum of uremic patients may significantly influence the transport of salt and water in relatively intact residual nephrons. Images PMID:4738063

  20. Allograft Replacement for Absent Native Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Salma; Wanivenhaus, Florian; Fox, Alice J.; Warren, Russell F.; Doyle, Maureen; Rodeo, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Structural instability due to poor soft tissue quality often requires augmentation. Allografts are important biological substitutes that are used for the symptomatic patient in the reconstruction of deficient ligaments, tendons, menisci, and osteochondral defects. Interest in the clinical application of allografts has arisen from the demand to obtain stable anatomy with restoration of function and protection against additional injury, particularly for high-demand patients who participate in sports. Traditionally, allografts were employed to reinforce weakened tissue. However, they can also be employed to substitute deficient or functionally absent tissue, particularly in the sports medicine setting. Objective: This article presents a series of 6 cases that utilized allografts to restore functionally deficient anatomic architecture, rather than just simply augmenting the degenerated or damaged native tissue. Detailed discussions are presented of the use of allografts as a successful treatment strategy to replace functionally weakened tissue, often after failed primary repairs. PMID:24427387

  1. Renal targeted delivery of triptolide by conjugation to the fragment peptide of human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhi-xiang; Wu, Xiao-juan; Mo, Jingxin; Wang, Yan-li; Xu, Chao-qun; Lim, Lee Yong

    2015-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that peptide fragments (PFs) of the human serum albumin could be developed as potential renal targeting carriers, in particular, the peptide fragment, PF-A299-585 (A299-585 representing the amino acid sequence of the human serum albumin). In this paper, we conjugated triptolide (TP), the anti-inflammatory Chinese traditional medicine, to PF-A299-585 via a succinic acid spacer to give TPS-PF-A299-585 (TP loading 2.2% w/w). Compared with the free TP, TPS-PF-A299-585 exhibited comparable anti-inflammatory activity in the lipopolysaccharide stimulated MDCK cells, but was significantly less cytotoxic than the free drug. Accumulation of TPS-PF-A299-585 in the MDCK cells in vitro and in rodent kidneys in vivo was demonstrated using FITC-labeled TPS-PF-A299-585. Renal targeting was confirmed in vivo in a membranous nephropathic (MN) rodent model, where optical imaging and analyses of biochemical markers were combined to show that TPS-PF-A299-585 was capable of alleviating the characteristic symptoms of MN. The collective data affirm PF-A299-585 to be a useful carrier for targeting TP to the kidney. PMID:26117184

  2. Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin is cytotoxic for human renal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fernandez Miyakawa, Mariano E; Zabal, Osvaldo; Silberstein, Claudia

    2011-04-01

    Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin (ETX) is responsible for a fatal enterotoxemia in different animal species, producing extensive renal damage, neurological disturbance and edema of lungs, heart and kidneys. However, there is no information about the susceptibility of humans to ETX. Here, we report that primary cultures of human renal tubular epithelial cells (HRTEC) exposed to ETX showed a marked swelling with subsequent large blebs surrounding most cells. The incubation of HRTEC with ETX produced a reduction of cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The CD(50) after 1-hour and 24-hour incubation were 3 µg/mL and 0.5 µg/mL, respectively. The pulse with ETX for 3 min was enough to produce a significant cytotoxic effect on HRTEC after 1-hour incubation. ETX binds to HRTEC forming a large complex of about 160 kDa similar to what was found in the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line. The HRTEC could be a useful cell model to improve the understanding of the mechanisms involved on the cell damage mediated by ETX. PMID:20488848

  3. Osteochondral Allografts in the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Francesca; Buda, Roberto; Ruffilli, Alberto; Cavallo, Marco; Giannini, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this systematic review is to report about the clinical use of partial and total fresh osteochondral allograft in the ankle joint. The state of the art of allografts with regard to basic science, procurement and storage methods, immunogenicity, generally accepted indications and contraindications, and the rationale of the allografting procedure have been described. Methods: All studies published in PubMed from 2000 to January 2012 addressing fresh osteochondral allograft procedures in the ankle joint were identified, including those that fulfilled the following criteria: (a) level I-IV evidence addressing the areas of interest outlined above; (b) measures of functional, clinical, or imaging outcome; and (c) outcome related to ankle cartilage lesions or ankle arthritis treated by allografts. Results: The analysis showed a progressively increasing number of articles from 2000. The number of selected articles was 14; 9 of those focused on limited dimension allografts (plugs, partial) and 5 on bipolar fresh osteochondral allografts. The evaluation of evidence level showed 14 case series and no randomized studies. Conclusions: Fresh osteochondral allografts are now a versatile and suitable option for the treatment of different degrees of osteochondral disease in the ankle joint and may even be used as total joint replacement. Fresh osteochondral allografts used for total joint replacement are still experimental and might be considered as a salvage procedure in otherwise unsolvable situations. A proper selection of the patients is therefore a key point. Moreover, the patients should be adequately informed about the possible risks, benefits, and alternatives to the allograft procedure. PMID:26069666

  4. Interplay between Immune responses to HLA and Non-HLA self-antigens in allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Angaswamy, Nataraju; Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Sarma, Nayan J; Subramanian, Vijay; Klein, Christina; Wellen, Jason; Shenoy, Surendra; Chapman, William C; Mohanakumar, T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies strongly suggest an increasing role for immune responses against self-antigens (Ags) which are not encoded by the major histocompatibility complex in the immunopathogenesis of allograft rejection. Although, improved surgical techniques coupled with improved methods to detect and avoid sensitization against donor human leukocyte antigen (HLA) have improved the immediate and short term function of transplanted organs. However, acute and chronic rejection still remains a vexing problem for the long term function of the transplanted organ. Immediately following organ transplantation, several factors both immune and non immune mechanisms lead to the development of local inflammatory milieu which sets the stage for allograft rejection. Traditionally, development of antibodies (Abs) against mismatched donor HLA have been implicated in the development of Ab mediated rejection. However, recent studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that development of humoral and cellular immune responses against non-HLA self-Ags may contribute in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection. There are reports demonstrating that immune responses to self-Ags especially Abs to the self-Ags as well as cellular immune responses especially through IL17 has significant pro-fibrotic properties leading to chronic allograft failure. This review summarizes recent studies demonstrating the role for immune responses to self-Ags in allograft immunity leading to rejection as well as present recent evidence suggesting there is interplay between allo- and autoimmunity leading to allograft dysfunction. PMID:23876679

  5. Type I and II Diabetic Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Respond In Vitro to Dehydrated Human Amnion/Chorion Membrane Allograft Treatment by Increasing Proliferation, Migration, and Altering Cytokine Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Massee, Michelle; Chinn, Kathryn; Lim, Jeremy J.; Godwin, Lisa; Young, Conan S.; Koob, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Human amniotic membranes have been shown to be effective for healing diabetic foot ulcers clinically and to regulate stem cell activity in vitro and in vivo; however, diabetic stem cells may be impaired as a sequela of the disease. In this study, dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane (dHACM) allografts (EpiFix®; MiMedx Group) were evaluated for their ability to regulate diabetic stem cells in vitro. Approach: Human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) from normal, type I diabetic, and type II diabetic donors were treated with soluble extracts of dHACM and evaluated for proliferation after 3 days by DNA assay, chemotactic migration after 1 day by transwell assay, cytokine secretion after 3 days by multiplex ELISA, and gene expression after 5 days by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Results: Although diabetic ADSCs demonstrated decreased responses compared to normal ADSCs, dHACM treatment stimulated diabetic ADSCs to proliferate after 3 days and enhanced migration over 24 h, similar to normal ADSCs. dHACM-treated diabetic ADSCs modulated secretion of soluble signals, including regulators of inflammation, angiogenesis, and healing. All ADSCs evaluated also responded to dHACM treatment with altered expression of immunomodulatory genes, including interleukins (IL)-1α, IL-1β, and IL-1RA. Innovation: This is the first reported case demonstrating that diabetic ADSCs respond to novel amniotic membrane therapies, specifically treatment with dHACM. Conclusion: dHACM stimulated diabetic ADSCs to migrate, proliferate, and alter cytokine expression suggesting that, despite their diabetic origin, ADSCs may respond to dHACM to accelerate diabetic wound healing. PMID:26862462

  6. Emerging role of B cells in chronic allograft dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Colvin, Robert B.; Hirohashi, Tsutomu; Farris, Alton B.; Minnei, Francesca; Collins, A. Bernard; Smith, R. Neal

    2015-01-01

    B cells have many possible mechanisms by which they can affect allograft survival, including antigen presentation, cytokine production, immune regulation, and differentiation into alloantibody-producing plasma cells. This report reviews the last mechanism, which the authors regard as most critical for the long-term survival of allografts, namely, the promotion of chronic rejection by alloantibodies. Chronic humoral rejection characteristically arises late after transplantation and causes transplant glomerulopathy, multilamination of peritubular capillary basement membranes, and C4d deposition in PTCs and glomeruli. Circulating antidonor human leukocyte antigen class II antibodies are commonly detected and may precede the development of graft injury. Prognosis is poor, especially when recognized after graft dysfunction has developed. Improved detection and treatment are critically needed for this common cause of late graft loss. PMID:21116310

  7. RUNX3 Suppresses Migration, Invasion and Angiogenesis of Human Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wang; Mei, Pengjin; Liu, Hui; Li, Linlin; Pan, Zhenqiang; Wu, Yongping; Zheng, Junnian

    2013-01-01

    RUNX3 (runt-related transcription factor-3) is a known tumor suppressor gene which exhibits potent antitumor activity in several carcinomas. However, little is known about the role of RUNX3 in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC). To investigate the clinical relevance of RUNX3 in RCC patients, immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the clinical relevance of RUNX3 in 75 RCC tissues and paired non-cancerous tissues by using tissue microarray (TMA). We also investigated the role of RUNX3 in RCC cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis. The RUNX3 expression was decreased dramatically in human RCC tissue. The RUNX3 expression was significantly correlated with tumor size (P<0.001), depth of invasion (P<0.001), and of TNM stage (P<0.001). Restoration of RUNX3 significantly decreased renal carcinoma cell migration and invasion capacity compared with controls. In addition, we found that overexpression of RUNX3 reduced the proliferation and tube formation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). Gelatin zymography and Western blot showed that RUNX3 expression suppressed matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) protein level and enzyme activity. Western blot and ELISA showed that RUNX3 restoration inhibited the expression and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Taken together, our studies indicate that decreased expression of RUNX3 in human RCC tissue is significantly correlated with RCC progression. Restoration of RUNX3 expression significantly inhibits RCC cells migration, invasion and angiogenesis. These findings provide new insights into the significance of RUNX3 in migration, invasion and angiogenesis of RCC. PMID:23457532

  8. Asymptomatic hyperuricemia following renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bellomo, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating indicating a role for uric acid in the genesis and progression of kidney disease, and a few studies are beginning to show a possible beneficial effect of urate-lowering therapy. Whether this holds true for renal allograft recipients is not clear. In this short review evidence from epidemiological as well as intervention studies is summarized and discussed, with some practical considerations presented at the end. PMID:26167455

  9. Asymptomatic hyperuricemia following renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Gianni

    2015-07-01

    Evidence is accumulating indicating a role for uric acid in the genesis and progression of kidney disease, and a few studies are beginning to show a possible beneficial effect of urate-lowering therapy. Whether this holds true for renal allograft recipients is not clear. In this short review evidence from epidemiological as well as intervention studies is summarized and discussed, with some practical considerations presented at the end. PMID:26167455

  10. Conversion from calcineurin inhibitor to sirolimus in pediatric chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Falger, Jutta C; Mueller, Thomas; Arbeiter, Klaus; Boehm, Michael; Regele, Heinz; Balzar, Egon; Aufricht, Christoph

    2006-06-01

    Chronic allograft nephropathy is a major cause for allograft loss in renal transplantation. Sirolimus was recently introduced as a potent non-nephrotoxic alternative to calcineurin inhibitors. In the present study, effects of a conversion protocol were investigated in pediatric chronic allograft nephropathy with declining glomerular filtration rate (GFR), defined by a Schwartz formula clearance below 60 mL/1.73 m(2)/min, steadily increasing serum creatinine and allograft biopsy. In eight children with a median age of 12.8 yr, sirolimus was started at median 32 months after transplantation with a loading dose of 0.24 mg/kg bodyweight (BW), followed by 0.2 mg/kgBW/day, aimed at trough levels of 15-20 ng/mL. Calcineurin inhibitors were reduced to 50% at the start of sirolimus and discontinued at median 7 days when target levels of sirolimus were reached. Following conversion, changes of GFR significantly stabilized (-2.9 vs. +0.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2)/month, p = 0.025). Individual GFR increased in five out of eight patients (p = 0.026), and only one child exhibited unaltered progression of graft failure. In the responders, mean serum creatinine improved by 0.3 mg/dL (p = 0.043). Effects were not dependent on GFR at conversion, or on time post-transplantation. Blood pressure, hematological parameters and proteinuria remained stable during the observation period, and serum lipids increased transiently. About half of the children suffered from infectious complications. No child had to be taken off sirolimus; there was no graft loss during the observation period. In conclusion, conversion from calcineurin inhibitors to sirolimus is an effective protocol with tolerable side effects to stabilize renal graft function for at least one yr in the majority of children with biopsy-proven chronic allograft nephropathy. PMID:16712606