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Sample records for human retrovirology htlv

  1. 12th international conference on human retrovirology: HTLV and related retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lairmore, Michael D; Fujii, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    The 12th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and Related Retroviruses, was held at the Half Moon Hotel in Montego Bay, Jamaica, from June 22nd to June 25th 2005. The scientific conference, sponsored by the International Retrovirology Association, is held biennially at rotating international venues around the world. The meeting brings together basic scientists, epidemiologists and clinical researchers to discuss findings to prevent HTLV infection or develop new therapies against HTLV-mediated diseases. The Association fosters the education and training of young scientists to bring new approaches to the complex problems of HTLV research, such as translational research to bring findings from the laboratory into clinical trials that benefit HTLV-infected patients. The breadth and quality of research presentations and workshops at the 12th International Conference indicate that these goals are being accomplished. As HTLV research enters its third decade a new generation of scientists face many challenges. However, HTLV scientists and clinicians displayed exciting new approaches and discoveries during plenary talks and poster sessions. The conference encouraged research in HTLV infections and disease, fostered collaborations, and stimulated new partnerships between clinicians and scientists to encourage clinical trials and novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:16202161

  2. Conference highlights of the 15th international conference on human retrovirology: HTLV and related retroviruses, 4-8 june 2011, Leuven, Gembloux, Belgium

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The June 2011 15th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and Related Viruses marks approximately 30 years since the discovery of HTLV-1. As anticipated, a large number of abstracts were submitted and presented by scientists, new and old to the field of retrovirology, from all five continents. The aim of this review is to distribute the scientific highlights of the presentations as analysed and represented by experts in specific fields of epidemiology, clinical research, immunology, animal models, molecular and cellular biology, and virology. PMID:22035054

  3. Conference highlights of the 16th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and related retroviruses, 26-30 June 2013, Montreal, Canada.

    PubMed

    Barbeau, Benoit; Hiscott, John; Bazarbachi, Ali; Carvalho, Edgar; Jones, Kathryn; Martin, Fabiola; Matsuoka, Masao; Murphy, Edward L; Ratner, Lee; Switzer, William M; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    The 16th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and Related Retroviruses was held in Montreal, Québec from June 26th to June 30th, 2013 and was therefore hosted by a Canadian city for the first time. The major topic of the meeting was human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLVs) and was covered through distinct oral and poster presentation sessions: clinical research, animal models, immunology, molecular and cellular biology, human endogenous and emerging exogenous retroviruses and virology. In this review, highlights of the meeting are provided by different experts for each of these research areas. PMID:24558960

  4. Conference Highlights of the 16th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and Related Retroviruses, 26–30 June 2013, Montreal, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The 16th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and Related Retroviruses was held in Montreal, Québec from June 26th to June 30th, 2013 and was therefore hosted by a Canadian city for the first time. The major topic of the meeting was human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLVs) and was covered through distinct oral and poster presentation sessions: clinical research, animal models, immunology, molecular and cellular biology, human endogenous and emerging exogenous retroviruses and virology. In this review, highlights of the meeting are provided by different experts for each of these research areas. PMID:24558960

  5. Human histocultures (tissue explants) in retrovirology

    PubMed Central

    Arakelyan, Anush; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Vanpouille, Christophe; Margolis, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    Summary Viral pathogenesis is studied predominantly in cultures of primary isolated cells or cell lines. Many retroviruses efficiently replicate only in activated cells. Therefore, in order to become efficient viral producers cells should be artificially activated, a procedure which significantly changes cell physiology. However, for many viral diseases, like HIV-1 and other retroviruses’ diseases, critical pathogenic events occur in tissues and cell isolation from their native microenvironment prevents single cell cultures from faithfully reflecting important aspects of cell-cell and cell-pathogen interactions that occur in the context of complex tissue cytoarchitecture. Tissue explants (histocultures) that retain tissue cytoarchitecture and many aspects of cell-cell interactions more faithfully represent in vivo tissue features. Human histocultures constitute an adequate model for studying viral pathogenesis under controlled laboratory conditions. Protocols for various human histocultures as applied to study retroviral pathogenesis, in particular of HIV-1, have been refined by our laboratory and are described in the present publication. Human histocultures of human tonsils and lymph nodes, as well as of recto-sigmoid and cervico-vaginal tissues can be used to study viral transmission, pathogenesis and as a pre-clinical platform for antivirals evaluation. PMID:24158827

  6. Infection with human retroviruses other than HIV-1: HIV-2, HTLV-1, HTLV-2, HTLV-3 and HTLV-4.

    PubMed

    Nicolás, David; Ambrosioni, Juan; Paredes, Roger; Marcos, M Ángeles; Manzardo, Christian; Moreno, Asunción; Miró, José M

    2015-08-01

    HIV-1 is the most prevalent retrovirus, with over 30 million people infected worldwide. Nevertheless, infection caused by other human retroviruses like HIV-2, HTLV-1, HTLV-2, HTLV-3 and HTLV-4 is gaining importance. Initially confined to specific geographical areas, HIV-2, HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 are becoming a major concern in non-endemic countries due to international migration flows. Clinical manifestations of retroviruses range from asymptomatic carriers to life-threatening conditions, such as AIDS in HIV-2 infection or adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia or tropical spastic paraparesis in HTLV-1 infection. HIV-2 is naturally resistant to some antiretrovirals frequently used to treat HIV-1 infection, but it does have effective antiretroviral therapy options. Unfortunately, HTLV still has limited therapeutic options. In this article, we will review the epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic, pathogenic and therapeutic aspects of infections caused by these human retroviruses. PMID:26112187

  7. The Receptor Complex Associated with Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 3 (HTLV-3) Env-Mediated Binding and Entry Is Distinct from, but Overlaps with, the Receptor Complexes of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2▿

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kathryn S.; Huang, Ying K.; Chevalier, Sébastien A.; Afonso, Philippe V.; Petrow-Sadowski, Cari; Bertolette, Daniel C.; Gessain, Antoine; Ruscetti, Francis W.; Mahieux, Renaud

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the transmission or tropism of the newly discovered human retrovirus, human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 3 (HTLV-3). Here, we examine the entry requirements of HTLV-3 using independently expressed Env proteins. We observed that HTLV-3 surface glycoprotein (SU) binds efficiently to both activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. This contrasts with both HTLV-1 SU, which primarily binds to activated CD4+ T cells, and HTLV-2 SU, which primarily binds to activated CD8+ T cells. Binding studies with heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) and neuropilin-1 (NRP-1), two molecules important for HTLV-1 entry, revealed that these molecules also enhance HTLV-3 SU binding. However, unlike HTLV-1 SU, HTLV-3 SU can bind efficiently in the absence of both HSPGs and NRP-1. Studies of entry performed with HTLV-3 Env-pseudotyped viruses together with SU binding studies revealed that, for HTLV-1, glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1) functions at a postbinding step during HTLV-3 Env-mediated entry. Further studies revealed that HTLV-3 SU binds efficiently to naïve CD4+ T cells, which do not bind either HTLV-1 or HTLV-2 SU and do not express detectable levels of HSPGs, NRP-1, and GLUT-1. These results indicate that the complex of receptor molecules used by HTLV-3 to bind to primary T lymphocytes differs from that of both HTLV-1 and HTLV-2. PMID:19279090

  8. Human T Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1): Molecular Biology and Oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kannian, Priya; Green, Patrick L.

    2010-01-01

    Human T lymphotropic viruses (HTLVs) are complex deltaretroviruses that do not contain a proto-oncogene in their genome, yet are capable of transforming primary T lymphocytes both in vitro and in vivo. There are four known strains of HTLV including HTLV type 1 (HTLV-1), HTLV-2, HTLV-3 and HTLV-4. HTLV-1 is primarily associated with adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). HTLV-2 is rarely pathogenic and is sporadically associated with neurological disorders. There have been no diseases associated with HTLV-3 or HTLV-4 to date. Due to the difference in the disease manifestation between HTLV-1 and HTLV-2, a clear understanding of their individual pathobiologies and the role of various viral proteins in transformation should provide insights into better prognosis and prevention strategies. In this review, we aim to summarize the data accumulated so far in the transformation and pathogenesis of HTLV-1, focusing on the viral Tax and HBZ and citing appropriate comparisons to HTLV-2. PMID:21994719

  9. XBP-1, a novel human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) tax binding protein, activates HTLV-1 basal and tax-activated transcription.

    PubMed

    Ku, Sebastian C Y; Lee, Jialing; Lau, Joanne; Gurumurthy, Meera; Ng, Raymond; Lwa, Siew Hui; Lee, Joseph; Klase, Zachary; Kashanchi, Fatah; Chao, Sheng-Hao

    2008-05-01

    X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1), a basic leucine zipper transcription factor, plays a key role in the cellular unfolded protein response (UPR). There are two XBP-1 isoforms in cells, spliced XBP-1S and unspliced XBP-1U. XBP-1U has been shown to bind to the 21-bp Tax-responsive element of the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) long terminal repeat (LTR) in vitro and transactivate HTLV-1 transcription. Here we identify XBP-1S as a transcription activator of HTLV-1. Compared to XBP-1U, XBP-1S demonstrates stronger activating effects on both basal and Tax-activated HTLV-1 transcription in cells. Our results show that both XBP-1S and XBP-1U interact with Tax and bind to the HTLV-1 LTR in vivo. In addition, elevated mRNA levels of the gene for XBP-1 and several UPR genes were detected in the HTLV-1-infected C10/MJ and MT2 T-cell lines, suggesting that HTLV-1 infection may trigger the UPR in host cells. We also identify Tax as a positive regulator of the expression of the gene for XBP-1. Activation of the UPR by tunicamycin showed no effect on the HTLV-1 LTR, suggesting that HTLV-1 transcription is specifically regulated by XBP-1. Collectively, our study demonstrates a novel host-virus interaction between a cellular factor XBP-1 and transcriptional regulation of HTLV-1. PMID:18287238

  10. ORIGIN AND PREVALENCE OF HUMAN T-LYMPHOTROPIC VIRUS TYPE 1 (HTLV-1) AND TYPE 2 (HTLV-2) AMONG INDIGENOUS POPULATIONS IN THE AMERICAS

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Arthur; Casseb, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is found in indigenous peoples of the Pacific Islands and the Americas, whereas type 2 (HTLV-2) is widely distributed among the indigenous peoples of the Americas, where it appears to be more prevalent than HTLV-1, and in some tribes of Central Africa. HTLV-2 is considered ancestral in the Americas and is transmitted to the general population and injection drug users from the indigenous population. In the Americas, HTLV-1 has more than one origin, being brought by immigrants in the Paleolithic period through the Bering Strait, through slave trade during the colonial period, and through Japanese immigration from the early 20th century, whereas HTLV-2 was only brought by immigrants through the Bering Strait. The endemicity of HTLV-2 among the indigenous people of Brazil makes the Brazilian Amazon the largest endemic area in the world for its occurrence. A review of HTLV-1 in all Brazilian tribes supports the African origin of HTLV-1 in Brazil. The risk of hyperendemicity in these epidemiologically closed populations and transmission to other populations reinforces the importance of public health interventions for HTLV control, including the recognition of the infection among reportable diseases and events. PMID:25651320

  11. Origin and prevalence of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and type 2 (HTLV-2) among indigenous populations in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Arthur; Casseb, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is found in indigenous peoples of the Pacific Islands and the Americas, whereas type 2 (HTLV-2) is widely distributed among the indigenous peoples of the Americas, where it appears to be more prevalent than HTLV-1, and in some tribes of Central Africa. HTLV-2 is considered ancestral in the Americas and is transmitted to the general population and injection drug users from the indigenous population. In the Americas, HTLV-1 has more than one origin, being brought by immigrants in the Paleolithic period through the Bering Strait, through slave trade during the colonial period, and through Japanese immigration from the early 20th century, whereas HTLV-2 was only brought by immigrants through the Bering Strait. The endemicity of HTLV-2 among the indigenous people of Brazil makes the Brazilian Amazon the largest endemic area in the world for its occurrence. A review of HTLV-1 in all Brazilian tribes supports the African origin of HTLV-1 in Brazil. The risk of hyperendemicity in these epidemiologically closed populations and transmission to other populations reinforces the importance of public health interventions for HTLV control, including the recognition of the infection among reportable diseases and events. PMID:25651320

  12. Proinflammatory Cytokine Gene Induction by Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1) and HTLV-2 Tax in Primary Human Glial Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Prabal; Rochford, Rosemary; Antel, J.; Canute, G.; Wrzesinski, Stephen; Sieburg, Michelle; Feuer, Gerold

    2007-01-01

    Infection with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) can result in the development of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS). HTLV-2 is highly related to HTLV-1 at the genetic level and shares a high degree of sequence homology, but infection with HTLV-2 is relatively nonpathogenic compared to HTLV-1. Although the pathogenesis of HAM/TSP remains to be fully elucidated, previous evidence suggests that elevated levels of the proinflammatory cytokines in the CNS are associated with neuropathogenesis. We demonstrate that HTLV-1 infection in astrogliomas results in a robust induction of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-1α, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), TNF-β, and IL-6 expression. HTLV encodes for a viral transcriptional transactivator protein named Tax that also induces the transcription of cellular genes. To investigate and compare the effects of Tax1 and Tax2 expression on the dysregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, lentivirus vectors were used to transduce primary human astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas. The expression of Tax1 in primary human astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas resulted in significantly higher levels of proinflammatory cytokine gene expression compared to Tax2. Notably, Tax1 expression uniquely sensitized primary human astrocytomas to apoptosis. A Tax2/Tax1 chimera encoding the C-terminal 53 amino acids of the Tax1 fused to the Tax2 gene (Tax221) demonstrated a phenotype that resembled Tax1, with respect to proinflammatory cytokine gene expression and sensitization to apoptosis. The patterns of differential cytokine induction and sensitization to apoptosis displayed by Tax1 and Tax2 may reflect differences relating to the heightened neuropathogenicity associated with HTLV-1 infection and the development of HAM/TSP. PMID:17121800

  13. Human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1)-associated lichenoid dermatitis induced by CD8+ T cells in HTLV-1 carrier, HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tokura, Yoshiki; Ito, Taisuke; Kawakami, Chika; Sugita, Kazunari; Kasuya, Akira; Tatsuno, Kazuki; Sawada, Yu; Nakamura, Motonobu; Shimauchi, Takatoshi

    2015-10-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) induces adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and carrier. ATLL is a mature CD4+ CD25+ CCR4+ T-cell neoplasm, and approximately half of patients have direct skin involvement manifesting patch, plaque, tumor, multiple papules, erythroderma and purpura. However, there exist secondary eruptions without tumor cell infiltration in patients with ATLL or HAM/TSP and carriers of HTLV-1. To clarify the presence of reactive skin eruptions in HTLV-1-infected individuals, we reviewed our patients with HTLV-1-associated diseases. In 2002-2012, we saw 50 ATLL or HAM/TSP patients and HTLV-1 carriers presenting with skin lesions. We retrospectively selected cases that histologically showed lichenoid tissue reactions with predominant infiltration of CD8+ T cells, but not CD4+ tumor cells. The cases included erythroderma (HTLV-1 carrier), lichen planus (HTLV-1 carrier), alopecia areata (HAM/TSP), chronic actinic dermatitis (HTLV-1 carrier to acute ATLL conversion) and discoid lupus erythematosus (smoldering ATLL). They were graft-versus-host disease-like, major secondary lesions and seen in HTLV-1 carriers and patients with HAM/TSP and smoldering ATLL. We coin the term HTLV-1-associated lichenoid dermatitis (HALD) to encompass the conditions. HALD may occur in association with the elevated immunity toward HTLV-1-infected CD4+ T cells, thus sharing the pathogenetic role of cytotoxic T cells with HAM/TSP. PMID:26077665

  14. Demonstration of human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I)-specific T cell responses from seronegative and polymerase chain reaction-negative persons exposed to HTLV-I.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, M; Kermode, A G; Clerici, M; Shearer, G M; Berzofsky, J A; Uchiyama, T; Wiktor, S Z; Pate, E; Maloney, B; Manns, A

    1994-08-01

    Human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is a human retrovirus etiologically linked to adult T cell leukemia and the progressive chronic neurologic disease HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. Described is a method that measures the production of interleukin-2 from HTLV-I synthetic peptide-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) of HTLV-I-infected persons. The peptides correspond to immunogenic regions of the HTLV-I Env and Tax proteins. Significantly, this assay demonstrated T cell responses to these HTLV-I peptides from coded PBL samples in 7 of 19 HTLV-I-seronegative polymerase chain reaction-negative persons known to have been exposed to HTLV-I but in none of 16 matched controls without risk factors for exposure (P = .007). The implications of this finding are discussed. PMID:8035019

  15. Crystal structures of inhibitor complexes of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1) protease

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Tadashi; Li, Mi; Nguyen, Jeffrey-Tri; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-09-28

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus associated with several serious diseases, such as adult T-cell leukemia and tropical spastic paraparesis/myelopathy. For a number of years, the protease (PR) encoded by HTLV-1 has been a target for designing antiviral drugs, but that effort was hampered by limited available structural information. We report a high-resolution crystal structure of HTLV-1 PR complexed with a statine-containing inhibitor, a significant improvement over the previously available moderate-resolution structure. We also report crystal structures of the complexes of HTLV-1 PR with five different inhibitors that are more compact and more potent. A detailed study of structure-activity relationships was performed to interpret in detail the influence of the polar and hydrophobic interactions between the inhibitors and the protease.

  16. Crystal Structures of Inhibitir Complexes of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus (HTLV-1) Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Tadashi; Li, Mi; Nguyen, Jeffrey-Tri; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-09-17

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus associated with several serious diseases, such as adult T-cell leukemia and tropical spastic paraparesis/myelopathy. For a number of years, the protease (PR) encoded by HTLV-1 has been a target for designing antiviral drugs, but that effort was hampered by limited available structural information. We report a high-resolution crystal structure of HTLV-1 PR complexed with a statine-containing inhibitor, a significant improvement over the previously available moderate-resolution structure. We also report crystal structures of the complexes of HTLV-1 PR with five different inhibitors that are more compact and more potent. A detailed study of structure-activity relationships was performed to interpret in detail the influence of the polar and hydrophobic interactions between the inhibitors and the protease.

  17. Accumulation of human T lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-I-specific T cell clones in HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis patients.

    PubMed

    Höger, T A; Jacobson, S; Kawanishi, T; Kato, T; Nishioka, K; Yamamoto, K

    1997-08-15

    Human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraperesis (HAM/TSP) is a slowly progressive neurologic disorder following infection with HTLV-I. It is characterized by spasticity and hyper-reflexia of the lower extremities, urinary bladder disturbance, lower extremity muscle weakness, and sensory disturbances. HTLV-I, as an inducer of a strong humoral and cytotoxic response, is a well-known pathogenic factor for the progression of HAM/TSP. Peptides derived from proviral tax and env genes provide epitopes recognized by T cells. We herein report an accumulation of distinct clonotypes of alpha/beta TCR+ peripheral blood T lymphocytes from HAM/TSP patients in comparison with that observed in both asymptomatic carriers and healthy controls, using the reverse-transcriptase PCR/single-strand conformation polymorphism method. We also found that some of the accumulated T cell clones in the peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid are HTLV-I Tax(11-19) peptide specific. Such clones were found to expand strongly after being cultured with an HTLV-I Tax(11-19) peptide. Moreover, the cultured samples exhibited a strong MHC class I-restricted cytotoxic activity against HTLV-I Tax(11-19) peptide-expressing targets, and therefore most likely also include the disease-associated T cell clones observed in the patients. This is the first report of a direct assessment of Ag-specific T cell responses in fresh PBL and cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:9257872

  18. Defective human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) provirus in seronegative tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-I-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM) patients.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, E; Fernandez, J; Cartier, L; Villota, C; Rios, M

    2003-02-01

    Infection with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) have been associated with the development of the tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-I-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM). We studied the presence of HTLV-I provirus in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 72 Chilean patients with progressive spastic paraparesis by polymerase chain reaction: 32 seropositive and 40 seronegative cases. We amplified different genomic regions of HTLV-I using primers of 5' ltr, tax, env/tax, pX, pol and env genes. These genes were detected from all seropositive patients. The seronegative patients were negative with 5' ltr, pol, env, and pX primers. However, amplified product of tax and env/tax genes was detected from 16 and four seronegative patients, respectively. Three of them were positive with both genetic regions. The results of this study show that the complete HTLV-I provirus is found in 100% of seropositive cases. In seronegative cases, clinically very similar of seropositive cases, was found only tax gene in 42.5% (17/40) of patients. These results suggest the presence of a defective HTLV-I provirus in some seronegative patients with progressive spastic paraparesis, and suggest a pathogenic role of this truncate provirus for a group of TSP/HAM. PMID:12573502

  19. HUMAN T-LYMPHOTROPIC VIRUS 1 (HTLV-1) AND HUMAN T-LYMPHOTROPIC VIRUS 2 (HTLV-2): GEOGRAPHICAL RESEARCH TRENDS AND COLLABORATION NETWORKS (1989-2012)

    PubMed Central

    GONZÁLEZ-ALCAIDE, Gregorio; RAMOS, José Manuel; HUAMANÍ, Charles; de MENDOZA, Carmen; SORIANO, Vicent

    2016-01-01

    Publications are often used as a measure of research work success. Human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) type 1 and 2 are human retroviruses, which were discovered in the early 1980s, and it is estimated that 15-20 million people are infected worldwide. This article describes a bibliometric review and a coauthorship network analysis of literature on HTLV indexed in PubMed in a 24-year period. A total of 7,564 documents were retrieved, showing a decrease in the number of documents from 1996 to 2007. HTLV manuscripts were published in 1,074 journals. Japan and USA were the countries with the highest contribution in this field (61%) followed by France (8%). Production ranking changed when the number of publications was normalized by population (Dominican Republic and Japan), by gross domestic product (Guinea-Bissau and Gambia), and by gross national income per capita (Brazil and Japan). The present study has shed light on some of the defining features of scientific collaboration performed by HTLV research community, such as the existence of core researchers responsible for articulating the development of research in the area, facilitating wider collaborative relationships and the integration of new authors in the research groups. PMID:26910450

  20. HUMAN T-LYMPHOTROPIC VIRUS 1 (HTLV-1) AND HUMAN T-LYMPHOTROPIC VIRUS 2 (HTLV-2): GEOGRAPHICAL RESEARCH TRENDS AND COLLABORATION NETWORKS (1989-2012).

    PubMed

    González-Alcaide, Gregorio; Ramos, José Manuel; Huamaní, Charles; Mendoza, Carmen de; Soriano, Vicent

    2016-01-01

    Publications are often used as a measure of research work success. Human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) type 1 and 2 are human retroviruses, which were discovered in the early 1980s, and it is estimated that 15-20 million people are infected worldwide. This article describes a bibliometric review and a coauthorship network analysis of literature on HTLV indexed in PubMed in a 24-year period. A total of 7,564 documents were retrieved, showing a decrease in the number of documents from 1996 to 2007. HTLV manuscripts were published in 1,074 journals. Japan and USA were the countries with the highest contribution in this field (61%) followed by France (8%). Production ranking changed when the number of publications was normalized by population (Dominican Republic and Japan), by gross domestic product (Guinea-Bissau and Gambia), and by gross national income per capita (Brazil and Japan). The present study has shed light on some of the defining features of scientific collaboration performed by HTLV research community, such as the existence of core researchers responsible for articulating the development of research in the area, facilitating wider collaborative relationships and the integration of new authors in the research groups. PMID:26910450

  1. From Immunodeficiency to Humanization: The Contribution of Mouse Models to Explore HTLV-1 Leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pérès, Eléonore; Bagdassarian, Eugénie; This, Sébastien; Villaudy, Julien; Rigal, Dominique; Gazzolo, Louis; Duc Dodon, Madeleine

    2015-01-01

    The first discovered human retrovirus, Human T-Lymphotropic Virus type 1 (HTLV-1), is responsible for an aggressive form of T cell leukemia/lymphoma. Mouse models recapitulating the leukemogenesis process have been helpful for understanding the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of this retroviral-induced disease. This review will focus on the recent advances in the generation of immunodeficient and human hemato-lymphoid system mice with a particular emphasis on the development of mouse models for HTLV-1-mediated pathogenesis, their present limitations and the challenges yet to be addressed. PMID:26690200

  2. From Immunodeficiency to Humanization: The Contribution of Mouse Models to Explore HTLV-1 Leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pérès, Eléonore; Bagdassarian, Eugénie; This, Sébastien; Villaudy, Julien; Rigal, Dominique; Gazzolo, Louis; Duc Dodon, Madeleine

    2015-12-01

    The first discovered human retrovirus, Human T-Lymphotropic Virus type 1 (HTLV-1), is responsible for an aggressive form of T cell leukemia/lymphoma. Mouse models recapitulating the leukemogenesis process have been helpful for understanding the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of this retroviral-induced disease. This review will focus on the recent advances in the generation of immunodeficient and human hemato-lymphoid system mice with a particular emphasis on the development of mouse models for HTLV-1-mediated pathogenesis, their present limitations and the challenges yet to be addressed. PMID:26690200

  3. Genetic Characterization of Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 in Mozambique: Transcontinental Lineages Drive the HTLV-1 Endemic

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, Ana Carolina P.; Gudo, Eduardo Samo; Iñiguez, Alena Mayo; Otsuki, Koko; Bhatt, Nilesh; Abreu, Celina M.; Vubil, Adolfo; Bila, Dulce; Ferreira, Orlando C.; Tanuri, Amílcar; Jani, Ilesh V.

    2011-01-01

    Background Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). It has been estimated that 10–20 million people are infected worldwide, but no successful treatment is available. Recently, the epidemiology of this virus was addressed in blood donors from Maputo, showing rates from 0.9 to 1.2%. However, the origin and impact of HTLV endemic in this population is unknown. Objective To assess the HTLV-1 molecular epidemiology in Mozambique and to investigate their relationship with HTLV-1 lineages circulating worldwide. Methods Blood donors and HIV patients were screened for HTLV antibodies by using enzyme immunoassay, followed by Western Blot. PCR and sequencing of HTLV-1 LTR region were applied and genetic HTLV-1 subtypes were assigned by the neighbor-joining method. The mean genetic distance of Mozambican HTLV-1 lineages among the genetic clusters were determined. Human mitochondrial (mt) DNA analysis was performed and individuals classified in mtDNA haplogroups. Results LTR HTLV-1 analysis demonstrated that all isolates belong to the Transcontinental subgroup of the Cosmopolitan subtype. Mozambican HTLV-1 sequences had a high inter-strain genetic distance, reflecting in three major clusters. One cluster is associated with the South Africa sequences, one is related with Middle East and India strains and the third is a specific Mozambican cluster. Interestingly, 83.3% of HIV/HTLV-1 co-infection was observed in the Mozambican cluster. The human mtDNA haplotypes revealed that all belong to the African macrohaplogroup L with frequencies representatives of the country. Conclusions The Mozambican HTLV-1 genetic diversity detected in this study reveals that although the strains belong to the most prevalent and worldwide distributed Transcontinental subgroup of the Cosmopolitan subtype, there is a high HTLV diversity that could be correlated with at

  4. Leukotrienes Are Upregulated and Associated with Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1)-Associated Neuroinflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Trindade, Bruno Caetano; Sorgi, Carlos Artério; Nicolete, Larissa Deadame de Figueiredo; Malta, Tathiane Maistro; Pinto, Mariana Tomazini; Takayanagui, Osvaldo Massaiti; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Filho, Olindo Assis Martins; Kashima, Simone; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena

    2012-01-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) are lipid mediators involved in several inflammatory disorders. We investigated the LT pathway in human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection by evaluating LT levels in HTLV-1-infected patients classified according to the clinical status as asymptomatic carriers (HACs) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) patients. Bioactive LTB4 and CysLTs were both increased in the plasma and in the supernatant of peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures of HTLV-1-infected when compared to non-infected. Interestingly, CysLT concentrations were increased in HAM/TSP patients. Also, the concentration of plasma LTB4 and LTC4 positively correlated with the HTLV-1 proviral load in HTLV-1-infected individuals. The gene expression levels of LT receptors were differentially modulated in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells of HTLV-1-infected patients. Analysis of the overall plasma signature of immune mediators demonstrated that LT and chemokine amounts were elevated during HTLV-1 infection. Importantly, in addition to CysLTs, IP-10 was also identified as a biomarker for HAM/TSP activity. These data suggest that LTs are likely to be associated with HTLV-1 infection and HAM/TSP development, suggesting their putative use for clinical monitoring. PMID:23284797

  5. Factors secreted by human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I)-infected cells can enhance or inhibit replication of HIV-1 in HTLV-I-uninfected cells: implications for in vivo coinfection with HTLV-I and HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Moriuchi, H; Moriuchi, M; Fauci, A S

    1998-05-18

    It remains controversial whether human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) coinfection leads to more rapid progression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease in dually infected individuals. To investigate whether HTLV-I infection of certain cells can modulate HIV-1 infection of surrounding cells, primary CD4(+) T cells were treated with cell-free supernatants from HTLV-I-infected MT-2 cell cultures. The primary CD4+ T cells became resistant to macrophage (M)-tropic HIV-1 but highly susceptible to T cell (T)-tropic HIV-1. The CC chemokines RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, and MIP-1beta in the MT-2 cell supernatants were identified as the major suppressive factors for M-tropic HIV-1 as well as the enhancers of T-tropic HIV-1 infection, whereas soluble Tax protein increased susceptibility to both M- and T-tropic HIV-1. The effect of Tax or CC chemokines on T-tropic HIV-1 was mediated, at least in part, by increasing HIV Env-mediated fusogenicity. Our data suggest that the net effect of HTLV-I coinfection in HIV-infected individuals favors the transition from M- to T-tropic HIV phenotype, which is generally indicative of progressive HIV disease. PMID:9584147

  6. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-induced syncytium formation mediated by vascular cell adhesion molecule-1: evidence for involvement of cell adhesion molecules in HTLV-1 biology.

    PubMed Central

    Hildreth, J E; Subramanium, A; Hampton, R A

    1997-01-01

    While studying the potential role of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in infection of endothelial cells by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), we found that VCAM-1 can mediate human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-induced syncytium formation. Both expression-vector-encoded and endogenously expressed VCAM-1 supported fusion of uninfected cells with HTLV-1-infected cells. Fusion was obtained with cell lines carrying the HTLV-1 genome and expressing viral proteins but not with an HTLV-1-transformed cell line that does not express viral proteins. In clones of VCAM-1-transfected cells, the degree of syncytium formation observed directly reflected the level of VCAM-1 expression. Syncytium formation between HTLV-1-expressing cells and VCAM-1+ cells could be blocked with antiserum against HTLV-1 gp46 and with a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against VCAM-1. Fusion was not blocked by antiserum against HIV or a MAb against VLA-4, the physiological counter-receptor for VCAM-1. The results indicate that VCAM-1 can serve as an accessory molecule or potential coreceptor for HTLV-1-induced cell fusion and provide direct evidence of a role for cell adhesion molecules in the biology of HTLV-1. PMID:8995639

  7. Heat Shock Enhances the Expression of the Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type-I (HTLV-I) Trans-Activator (Tax) Antigen in Human HTLV-I Infected Primary and Cultured T Cells.

    PubMed

    Kunihiro, Marie; Fujii, Hideki; Miyagi, Takuya; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Reiko; Fukushima, Takuya; Ansari, Aftab A; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2016-01-01

    The environmental factors that lead to the reactivation of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) in latently infected T cells in vivo remain unknown. It has been previously shown that heat shock (HS) is a potent inducer of HTLV-I viral protein expression in long-term cultured cell lines. However, the precise HTLV-I protein(s) and mechanisms by which HS induces its effect remain ill-defined. We initiated these studies by first monitoring the levels of the trans-activator (Tax) protein induced by exposure of the HTLV-I infected cell line to HS. HS treatment at 43 °C for 30 min for 24 h led to marked increases in the level of Tax antigen expression in all HTLV-I-infected T cell lines tested including a number of HTLV-I-naturally infected T cell lines. HS also increased the expression of functional HTLV-I envelope gp46 antigen, as shown by increased syncytium formation activity. Interestingly, the enhancing effect of HS was partially inhibited by the addition of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)-inhibitor pifithlin-μ (PFT). In contrast, the HSP 70-inducer zerumbone (ZER) enhanced Tax expression in the absence of HS. These data suggest that HSP 70 is at least partially involved in HS-mediated stimulation of Tax expression. As expected, HS resulted in enhanced expression of the Tax-inducible host antigens, such as CD83 and OX40. Finally, we confirmed that HS enhanced the levels of Tax and gp46 antigen expression in primary human CD4⁺ T cells isolated from HTLV-I-infected humanized NOD/SCID/γc null (NOG) mice and HTLV-I carriers. In summary, the data presented herein indicate that HS is one of the environmental factors involved in the reactivation of HTLV-I in vivo via enhanced Tax expression, which may favor HTLV-I expansion in vivo. PMID:27409630

  8. Heat Shock Enhances the Expression of the Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type-I (HTLV-I) Trans-Activator (Tax) Antigen in Human HTLV-I Infected Primary and Cultured T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kunihiro, Marie; Fujii, Hideki; Miyagi, Takuya; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Reiko; Fukushima, Takuya; Ansari, Aftab A.; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2016-01-01

    The environmental factors that lead to the reactivation of human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-I) in latently infected T cells in vivo remain unknown. It has been previously shown that heat shock (HS) is a potent inducer of HTLV-I viral protein expression in long-term cultured cell lines. However, the precise HTLV-I protein(s) and mechanisms by which HS induces its effect remain ill-defined. We initiated these studies by first monitoring the levels of the trans-activator (Tax) protein induced by exposure of the HTLV-I infected cell line to HS. HS treatment at 43 °C for 30 min for 24 h led to marked increases in the level of Tax antigen expression in all HTLV-I-infected T cell lines tested including a number of HTLV-I-naturally infected T cell lines. HS also increased the expression of functional HTLV-I envelope gp46 antigen, as shown by increased syncytium formation activity. Interestingly, the enhancing effect of HS was partially inhibited by the addition of the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)-inhibitor pifithlin-μ (PFT). In contrast, the HSP 70-inducer zerumbone (ZER) enhanced Tax expression in the absence of HS. These data suggest that HSP 70 is at least partially involved in HS-mediated stimulation of Tax expression. As expected, HS resulted in enhanced expression of the Tax-inducible host antigens, such as CD83 and OX40. Finally, we confirmed that HS enhanced the levels of Tax and gp46 antigen expression in primary human CD4+ T cells isolated from HTLV-I-infected humanized NOD/SCID/γc null (NOG) mice and HTLV-I carriers. In summary, the data presented herein indicate that HS is one of the environmental factors involved in the reactivation of HTLV-I in vivo via enhanced Tax expression, which may favor HTLV-I expansion in vivo. PMID:27409630

  9. Molecular epidemiology of 58 new African human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) strains: identification of a new and distinct HTLV-1 molecular subtype in Central Africa and in Pygmies.

    PubMed Central

    Mahieux, R; Ibrahim, F; Mauclere, P; Herve, V; Michel, P; Tekaia, F; Chappey, C; Garin, B; Van Der Ryst, E; Guillemain, B; Ledru, E; Delaporte, E; de The, G; Gessain, A

    1997-01-01

    To gain new insights on the origin, evolution, and modes of dissemination of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1), we performed a molecular analysis of 58 new African HTLV-1 strains (18 from West Africa, 36 from Central Africa, and 4 from South Africa) originating from 13 countries. Of particular interest were eight strains from Pygmies of remote areas of Cameroon and the Central African Republic (CAR), considered to be the oldest inhabitants of these regions. Eight long-term activated T-cell lines producing HTLV-1 gag and env antigens were established from peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures of HTLV-1 seropositive individuals, including three from Pygmies. A fragment of the env gene encompassing most of the gp21 transmembrane region was sequenced for the 58 new strains, while the complete long terminal repeat (LTR) region was sequenced for 9 strains, including 4 from Pygmies. Comparative sequence analyses and phylogenetic studies performed on both the env and LTR regions by the neighbor-joining and DNA parsimony methods demonstrated that all 22 strains from West and South Africa belong to the widespread cosmopolitan subtype (also called HTLV-1 subtype A). Within or alongside the previously described Zairian cluster (HTLV-1 subtype B), we discovered a number of new HTLV-1 variants forming different subgroups corresponding mainly to the geographical origins of the infected persons, Cameroon, Gabon, and Zaire. Six of the eight Pygmy strains clustered together within this Central African subtype, suggesting a common origin. Furthermore, three new strains (two originating from Pygmies from Cameroon and the CAR, respectively, and one from a Gabonese individual) were particularly divergent and formed a distinct new phylogenetic cluster, characterized by specific mutations and occupying in most analyses a unique phylogenetic position between the large Central African genotype (HTLV-1 subtype B) and the Melanesian subtype (HTLV-1 subtype C). We have

  10. Analysis of the T-cell receptor repertoire of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes from patients with HTLV-1-associated disease: evidence for oligoclonal expansion.

    PubMed

    Utz, U; Banks, D; Jacobson, S; Biddison, W E

    1996-02-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is a chronic, progressive neurological disease characterized by marked degeneration of the spinal cord and the presence of antibodies against HTLV-1. Patients with HAM/TSP, but not asymptomatic carriers, show very high precursor frequencies of HTLV-1-specific CD8+ T cells in peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid, suggestive of a role of these T cells in the pathogenesis of the disease. In HLA-A2+ HAM/TSP patients, HTLV-1-specific T cells were demonstrated to be directed predominantly against one HTLV-1 epitope, namely, Tax11-19. In the present study, we analyzed HLA-A2-restricted HTLV-1 Tax11-19-specific cytotoxic T cells from three patients with HAM/TSP. An analysis of the T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire of these cells revealed an absence of restricted variable (V) region usage. Different combinations of TCR V alpha and V beta genes were utilized between, but also within, the individual patients for the recognition of Tax11-19. Sequence analysis of the TCR showed evidence for an oligoclonal expansion of few founder T cells in each patient. Apparent structural motifs were identified for the CDR3 regions of the TCR beta chains. One T-cell clone could be detected within the same patient over a period of 3 years. We suggest that these in vivo clonally expanded T cells might play a role in the pathogenesis of HAM/TSP and provide information on HTLV-1-specific TCR which may elucidate the nature of the T cells that infiltrate the central nervous system in HAM/TSP patients. PMID:8551623

  11. Telomere Length, Proviral Load and Neurologic Impairment in HTLV-1 and HTLV-2-Infected Subjects.

    PubMed

    Usadi, Benjamin; Bruhn, Roberta; Lin, Jue; Lee, Tzong-Hae; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Murphy, Edward L

    2016-01-01

    Short or damaged telomeres have been implicated in degenerative conditions. We hypothesized that analysis of telomere length (TL) in human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV) infection and HTLV-associated neuropathy might provide clues to the etiology of HTLV-associated disease and viral dynamics. A subset of 45 human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), 45 human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 2 (HTLV-2), and 45 seronegative subjects was selected from the larger HTLV Outcomes Study (HOST) cohort, matched on age, sex and race/ethnicity. Telomere-to-single-copy gene (T/S) ratio (a measure of TL) and HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 proviral loads were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) using quantitative PCR (qPCR). Vibration sensation measured by tuning fork during neurologic examinations performed as part of the HOST study allowed for an assessment of peripheral neuropathy. TL was compared between groups using t-tests, linear and logistic regression. Mean T/S ratio was 1.02 ± 0.16 in HTLV-1, 1.03 ± 0.17 in HTLV-2 and 0.99 ± 0.18 in HTLV seronegative subjects (p = 0.322). TL was not associated with HTLV-1 or -2 proviral load. Shorter TL was significantly associated with impaired vibration sense in the HTLV-2 positive group only. Overall, we found no evidence that telomere length was affected by chronic HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 infection. That TL was only associated with peripheral neuropathy in the HTLV-2-positive group is intriguing, but should be interpreted cautiously. Studies with larger sample size and telomere length measurement in lymphocyte subsets may clarify the relationship between TL and HTLV-infection. PMID:27529270

  12. Telomere Length, Proviral Load and Neurologic Impairment in HTLV-1 and HTLV-2-Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Usadi, Benjamin; Bruhn, Roberta; Lin, Jue; Lee, Tzong-Hae; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Murphy, Edward L.

    2016-01-01

    Short or damaged telomeres have been implicated in degenerative conditions. We hypothesized that analysis of telomere length (TL) in human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV) infection and HTLV-associated neuropathy might provide clues to the etiology of HTLV-associated disease and viral dynamics. A subset of 45 human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), 45 human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 2 (HTLV-2), and 45 seronegative subjects was selected from the larger HTLV Outcomes Study (HOST) cohort, matched on age, sex and race/ethnicity. Telomere-to-single-copy gene (T/S) ratio (a measure of TL) and HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 proviral loads were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) using quantitative PCR (qPCR). Vibration sensation measured by tuning fork during neurologic examinations performed as part of the HOST study allowed for an assessment of peripheral neuropathy. TL was compared between groups using t-tests, linear and logistic regression. Mean T/S ratio was 1.02 ± 0.16 in HTLV-1, 1.03 ± 0.17 in HTLV-2 and 0.99 ± 0.18 in HTLV seronegative subjects (p = 0.322). TL was not associated with HTLV-1 or -2 proviral load. Shorter TL was significantly associated with impaired vibration sense in the HTLV-2 positive group only. Overall, we found no evidence that telomere length was affected by chronic HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 infection. That TL was only associated with peripheral neuropathy in the HTLV-2-positive group is intriguing, but should be interpreted cautiously. Studies with larger sample size and telomere length measurement in lymphocyte subsets may clarify the relationship between TL and HTLV-infection. PMID:27529270

  13. HTLV-1-associated infective dermatitis and probable HTLV-1- associated myelopathy in an adolescent female*

    PubMed Central

    Steglich, Raquel Bisacotti; Tonoli, Renata Elise; Souza, Paulo Ricardo Martins; Pinto, Giselle Martins; Riesgo, Rudimar dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated infective dermatitis (ID) is a chronic, severe and recurrent eczema occurring during childhood in patients vertically infected with HTLV-1. HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesia (HAM/ TSP) is slow and progressive. We report the case of an adolescent female from a non-endemic area for HTLV-1 who presents ID and, most likely, associated HAM/TSP. PMID:26312674

  14. Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Subtype C Molecular Variants among Indigenous Australians: New Insights into the Molecular Epidemiology of HTLV-1 in Australo-Melanesia

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, Philippe V.; Gessain, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    Background HTLV-1 infection is endemic among people of Melanesian descent in Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu. Molecular studies reveal that these Melanesian strains belong to the highly divergent HTLV-1c subtype. In Australia, HTLV-1 is also endemic among the Indigenous people of central Australia; however, the molecular epidemiology of HTLV-1 infection in this population remains poorly documented. Findings Studying a series of 23 HTLV-1 strains from Indigenous residents of central Australia, we analyzed coding (gag, pol, env, tax) and non-coding (LTR) genomic proviral regions. Four complete HTLV-1 proviral sequences were also characterized. Phylogenetic analyses implemented with both Neighbor-Joining and Maximum Likelihood methods revealed that all proviral strains belong to the HTLV-1c subtype with a high genetic diversity, which varied with the geographic origin of the infected individuals. Two distinct Australians clades were found, the first including strains derived from most patients whose origins are in the North, and the second comprising a majority of those from the South of central Australia. Time divergence estimation suggests that the speciation of these two Australian clades probably occurred 9,120 years ago (38,000–4,500). Conclusions The HTLV-1c subtype is endemic to central Australia where the Indigenous population is infected with diverse subtype c variants. At least two Australian clades exist, which cluster according to the geographic origin of the human hosts. These molecular variants are probably of very ancient origin. Further studies could provide new insights into the evolution and modes of dissemination of these retrovirus variants and the associated ancient migration events through which early human settlement of Australia and Melanesia was achieved. PMID:24086779

  15. Genomic instability driven by the human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) oncoprotein, Tax.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Francene J; Marriott, Susan J

    2002-10-17

    The importance of maintaining genomic stability is evidenced by the fact that transformed cells often contain a variety of chromosomal abnormalities such as euploidy, translocations, and inversions. Gene amplification is a well-characterized hallmark of genomic instability thought to result from recombination events following the formation of double-strand, chromosomal breaks. Therefore, gene amplification frequency serves as an indicator of genomic stability. The PALA assay is designed to measure directly the frequency with which a specific gene, CAD, is amplified within a cell's genome. We have used the PALA assay to analyse the effects of the human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) oncoprotein, Tax, on genomic amplification. We demonstrate that Tax-expressing cells are five-times more likely to undergo gene amplification than control cells. Additionally, we show that Tax alters the ability of cells to undergo the typical PALA-mediated G(1) phase cell cycle arrest, thereby allowing cells to replicate DNA in the absence of appropriate nucleotide pools. This effect is likely the mechanism by which Tax induces gene amplification. These data suggest that HTLV-I Tax alters the genomic stability of cells, an effect that may play an important role in Tax-mediated, HTLV-I associated cellular transformation. PMID:12370813

  16. A Potential of an Anti-HTLV-I gp46 Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody (LAT-27) for Passive Immunization against Both Horizontal and Mother-to-Child Vertical Infection with Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type-I

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Hideki; Shimizu, Mamoru; Miyagi, Takuya; Kunihiro, Marie; Tanaka, Reiko; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2016-01-01

    Although the number of human T-cell leukemia virus type-I (HTLV-I)-infected individuals in the world has been estimated at over 10 million, no prophylaxis vaccines against HTLV-I infection are available. In this study, we took a new approach for establishing the basis of protective vaccines against HTLV-I. We show here the potential of a passively administered HTLV-I neutralizing monoclonal antibody of rat origin (LAT-27) that recognizes epitopes consisting of the HTLV-I gp46 amino acids 191–196. LAT-27 completely blocked HTLV-I infection in vitro at a minimum concentration of 5 μg/mL. Neonatal rats born to mother rats pre-infused with LAT-27 were shown to have acquired a large quantity of LAT-27, and these newborns showed complete resistance against intraperitoneal infection with HTLV-I. On the other hand, when humanized immunodeficient mice were pre-infused intravenously with humanized LAT-27 (hu-LAT-27), all the mice completely resisted HTLV-I infection. These results indicate that hu-LAT-27 may have a potential for passive immunization against both horizontal and mother-to-child vertical infection with HTLV-I. PMID:26848684

  17. Infection with human T-lymphotropic virus types-1 and -2 (HTLV-1 and -2): Implications for blood transfusion safety.

    PubMed

    Murphy, E L

    2016-02-01

    Many countries currently perform antibody screening for HTLV-1 infection in blood donors, and this intervention is likely cost-effective in preventing HTLV-1 related diseases in high prevalence countries. However, a number of high-income countries with low prevalence of HTLV-1 infection also perform universal HTLV-1 screening and debate has arisen regarding the cost-effectiveness of these strategies. Filter-based leukoreduction is likely to substantially reduce HTLV-1 transmission by removing infected lymphocytes, but actual laboratory data on its efficacy is currently lacking. Similarly, cost-effectiveness research on HTLV-1 prevention strategies is limited by poor data on prevalence, transmission efficacy and the cost of treating HTLV1 diseases. PMID:26778839

  18. Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type I (HTLV-1) Infection among Iranian Blood Donors: First Case-Control Study on the Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Hedayati-Moghaddam, Mohammad Reza; Tehranian, Farahnaz; Bayati, Maryam

    2015-11-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is an endemic condition in Northeast Iran and, as such, identification of risk factors associated with the infection in this region seems to be a necessity. All the possible risk factors for HTLV-1 seropositivity among first-time blood donors were evaluated in Mashhad, Iran, during the period of 2011-2012. Blood donation volunteers were interviewed for demographic data, medical history, and behavioral characteristics and the frequencies of risk factors were compared between HTLV-1 positive (case) and HTLV-1 negative (control) donors. The data was analyzed using Chi square and t-tests. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent risk factors for the infection. Assessments were carried out on 246 cases aged 17-60 and 776 controls aged 17-59, who were matched based on their ages, gender, and date and center of donation. Logistic analysis showed low income (OR = 1.53, p = 0.035), low educational level (OR = 1.64, p = 0.049), being born in the cities of either Mashhad (OR = 2.47, p = 0.001) or Neyshabour (OR = 4.30, p < 0001), and a history of blood transfusion (OR = 3.17, p = 0.007) or non-IV drug abuse (OR = 3.77, p < 0.0001) were significant predictors for infection with HTLV-1. Lack of variability or small sample size could be reasons of failure to detect some well-known risk factors for HTLV-1 infection, such as prolonged breastfeeding and sexual promiscuity. Pre-donation screening of possible risk factors for transfusion-transmissible infections should also be considered as an important issue, however, a revision of the screening criteria such as a history of transfusion for more than one year prior to donation is strongly recommended. PMID:26556363

  19. Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type I (HTLV-1) Infection among Iranian Blood Donors: First Case-Control Study on the Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Hedayati-Moghaddam, Mohammad Reza; Tehranian, Farahnaz; Bayati, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is an endemic condition in Northeast Iran and, as such, identification of risk factors associated with the infection in this region seems to be a necessity. All the possible risk factors for HTLV-1 seropositivity among first-time blood donors were evaluated in Mashhad, Iran, during the period of 2011–2012. Blood donation volunteers were interviewed for demographic data, medical history, and behavioral characteristics and the frequencies of risk factors were compared between HTLV-1 positive (case) and HTLV-1 negative (control) donors. The data was analyzed using Chi square and t-tests. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent risk factors for the infection. Assessments were carried out on 246 cases aged 17–60 and 776 controls aged 17–59, who were matched based on their ages, gender, and date and center of donation. Logistic analysis showed low income (OR = 1.53, p = 0.035), low educational level (OR = 1.64, p = 0.049), being born in the cities of either Mashhad (OR = 2.47, p = 0.001) or Neyshabour (OR = 4.30, p < 0001), and a history of blood transfusion (OR = 3.17, p = 0.007) or non-IV drug abuse (OR = 3.77, p < 0.0001) were significant predictors for infection with HTLV-1. Lack of variability or small sample size could be reasons of failure to detect some well-known risk factors for HTLV-1 infection, such as prolonged breastfeeding and sexual promiscuity. Pre-donation screening of possible risk factors for transfusion-transmissible infections should also be considered as an important issue, however, a revision of the screening criteria such as a history of transfusion for more than one year prior to donation is strongly recommended. PMID:26556363

  20. HTLV-1, Immune Response and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Quaresma, Juarez A S; Yoshikawa, Gilberto T; Koyama, Roberta V L; Dias, George A S; Fujihara, Satomi; Fuzii, Hellen T

    2015-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (PET/HAM) is involved in the development of autoimmune diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), and Sjögren’s Syndrome (SS). The development of HTLV-1-driven autoimmunity is hypothesized to rely on molecular mimicry, because virus-like particles can trigger an inflammatory response. However, HTLV-1 modifies the behavior of CD4+ T cells on infection and alters their cytokine production. A previous study showed that in patients infected with HTLV-1, the activity of regulatory CD4+ T cells and their consequent expression of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines are altered. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying changes in cytokine release leading to the loss of tolerance and development of autoimmunity. PMID:26712781

  1. Establishment of the milk-borne transmission as a key factor for the peculiar endemicity of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1): the ATL Prevention Program Nagasaki

    PubMed Central

    HINO, Shigeo

    2011-01-01

    In late 2010, the nation-wide screening of pregnant women for human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection was implemented in Japan to prevent milk-borne transmission of HTLV-1. In the late 1970s, recognition of the adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cluster in Kyushu, Japan, led to the discovery of the first human retrovirus, HTLV-1. In 1980, we started to investigate mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) for explaining the peculiar endemicity of HTLV-1. Retrospective and prospective epidemiological data revealed the MTCT rate at ∼20%. Cell-mediated transmission of HTLV-1 without prenatal infection suggested a possibility of milk-borne transmission. Common marmosets were successfully infected by oral inoculation of HTLV-1 harboring cells. A prefecture-wide intervention study to refrain from breast-feeding by carrier mothers, the ATL Prevention Program Nagasaki, was commenced in July 1987. It revealed a marked reduction of HTLV-1 MTCT by complete bottle-feeding from 20.3% to 2.5%, and a significantly higher risk of short-term breast-feeding (<6 months) than bottle-feeding (7.4% vs. 2.5%, P < 0.001). PMID:21558754

  2. Neurological Manifestations in Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1)–Infected Individuals Without HTLV-1–Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis: A Longitudinal Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanajura, Davi; Castro, Néviton; Oliveira, Paulo; Neto, Abraão; Muniz, André; Carvalho, Natália B.; Orge, Glória; Santos, Silvane; Glesby, Marshall J.; Carvalho, Edgar M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the agent of HTLV-1–associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), observed in up to 5% of infected individuals. Despite low prevalence, many HTLV-1–infected patients who do not fulfill criteria for HAM/TSP present with neurological complaints related to sensory, motor, urinary, or autonomic manifestations. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of neurologic manifestations and risk factors associated with these outcomes. Methods. The incidence of HAM/TSP and new signs and neurologic symptoms were computed in a group of patients enrolled in a cohort study. Results. Of 414 subjects, 76 had definite HAM/TSP, 87 had possible or probable HAM/TSP, and 251 subjects had no neurologic manifestation and were selected for analysis. Definite HAM/TSP developed in 5 (1.47%) patients. Follow-up of at least 3 years was achieved in 51% of patients. The incidence rate was computed in 1000 person-years (206 for hand numbness, 187 for feet numbness, 130 for nocturia, and 127 for urgency). Average incidence rate in neurological exam was 76 for leg hyperreflexia, 53 for leg weakness, and 37 for Babinski sign. In the applied Expanded Disability Status Scale, the incidence rate of worsening 1 point was 134 per 1000 person-years. Kaplan–Meier curves stratified by sex and proviral load showed that females and patients with proviral load >50 000 copies/106 peripheral blood mononuclear cells had a higher risk of progression. Conclusions. Development of neurological symptoms or signs occurred in up to 30% of asymptomatic subjects during 8 years of follow-up. PMID:25820277

  3. Cellular Factors Involved in HTLV-1 Entry and Pathogenicit

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Hiroo

    2012-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1 – associated myelopathy and tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). HTLV-1 has a preferential tropism for CD4 T cells in healthy carriers and ATL patients, while both CD4 and CD8 T cells serve as viral reservoirs in HAM/TSP patients. HTLV-1 has also been detected other cell types, including monocytes, endothelial cells, and dendritic cells. In contrast to the limited cell tropism of HTLV-1 in vivo, the HTLV receptor appears to be expressed in almost all human or animal cell lines. It remains to be examined whether this cell tropism is determined by host factors or by HTLV-1 heterogeneity. Unlike most retroviruses, cell-free virions of HTLV-1 are very poorly infectious. The lack of completely HTLV-1-resistant cells and the low infectivity of HTLV-1 have hampered research on the HTLV entry receptor. Entry of HTLV-1 into target cells is thought to involve interactions between the env (Env) glycoproteins, a surface glycoprotein (surface unit), and a transmembrane glycoprotein. Recent studies have shown that glucose transporter GLUT1, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), and neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) are the three proteins important for the entry of HTLV-1. Studies using adherent cell lines have shown that GLUT1 can function as a receptor for HTLV. HSPGs are required for efficient entry of HTLV-1 into primary CD4 T cells. NRP-1 is expressed in most established cell lines. Further studies have shown that these three molecules work together to promote HTLV-1 binding to cells and fusion of viral and cell membranes. The virus could first contact with HSPGs and then form complexes with NRP-1, followed by association with GLUT1. It remains to be determined whether these three molecules can explain HTLV-1 cell tropism. It also remains to be more definitively proven that these molecules are sufficient to permit HTLV-1 entry into completely HTLV-1-resistant cells. PMID

  4. Molecular Studies of HTLV-1 Replication: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jessica L.; Maldonado, José O.; Mueller, Joachim D.; Zhang, Wei; Mansky, Louis M.

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) was the first human retrovirus discovered. Studies on HTLV-1 have been instrumental for our understanding of the molecular pathology of virus-induced cancers. HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of an adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and can lead to a variety of neurological pathologies, including HTLV-1-associated-myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The ability to treat the aggressive ATL subtypes remains inadequate. HTLV-1 replicates by (1) an infectious cycle involving virus budding and infection of new permissive target cells and (2) mitotic division of cells harboring an integrated provirus. Virus replication initiates host antiviral immunity and the checkpoint control of cell proliferation, but HTLV-1 has evolved elegant strategies to counteract these host defense mechanisms to allow for virus persistence. The study of the molecular biology of HTLV-1 replication has provided crucial information for understanding HTLV-1 replication as well as aspects of viral replication that are shared between HTLV-1 and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Here in this review, we discuss the various stages of the virus replication cycle—both foundational knowledge as well as current updates of ongoing research that is important for understanding HTLV-1 molecular pathogenesis as well as in developing novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26828513

  5. Molecular Studies of HTLV-1 Replication: An Update.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jessica L; Maldonado, José O; Mueller, Joachim D; Zhang, Wei; Mansky, Louis M

    2016-02-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) was the first human retrovirus discovered. Studies on HTLV-1 have been instrumental for our understanding of the molecular pathology of virus-induced cancers. HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of an adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and can lead to a variety of neurological pathologies, including HTLV-1-associated-myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The ability to treat the aggressive ATL subtypes remains inadequate. HTLV-1 replicates by (1) an infectious cycle involving virus budding and infection of new permissive target cells and (2) mitotic division of cells harboring an integrated provirus. Virus replication initiates host antiviral immunity and the checkpoint control of cell proliferation, but HTLV-1 has evolved elegant strategies to counteract these host defense mechanisms to allow for virus persistence. The study of the molecular biology of HTLV-1 replication has provided crucial information for understanding HTLV-1 replication as well as aspects of viral replication that are shared between HTLV-1 and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Here in this review, we discuss the various stages of the virus replication cycle-both foundational knowledge as well as current updates of ongoing research that is important for understanding HTLV-1 molecular pathogenesis as well as in developing novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26828513

  6. Molecular characterization of murine and human OX40/OX40 ligand systems: identification of a human OX40 ligand as the HTLV-1-regulated protein gp34.

    PubMed Central

    Baum, P R; Gayle, R B; Ramsdell, F; Srinivasan, S; Sorensen, R A; Watson, M L; Seldin, M F; Baker, E; Sutherland, G R; Clifford, K N

    1994-01-01

    A ligand was cloned for murine OX40, a member of the TNF receptor family, using a T cell lymphoma cDNA library. The ligand (muOX40L) is a type II membrane protein with significant identity to human gp34 (gp34), a protein whose expression on HTLV-1-infected human leukemic T cells is regulated by the tax gene. The predicted structures of muOX40L and gp34 are similar to, but more compact than, those of other ligands of the TNF family. Mapping of the muOX40L gene revealed tight linkage to gld, the FasL gene, on chromosome 1. gp34 maps to a homologous region in the human genome, 1q25. cDNAs for human OX40 receptor were cloned by cross-hybridization with muOX40, and gp34 was found to bind the expressed human receptor. Lymphoid expression of muOX40L was detected on activated T cells, with higher levels found on CD4+ rather than CD8+ cells. The cell-bound recombinant ligands are biologically active, co-stimulating T cell proliferation and cytokine production. Strong induction of IL-4 secretion by muOX40L suggests that this ligand may play a role in regulating immune responses. In addition, the HTLV-1 regulation of gp34 suggests a possible connection between virally induced pathogenesis and the OX40 system. Images PMID:8076595

  7. Molecular approach to human leukemia: Isolation and characterization of the first human retrovirus HTLV-1 and its impact on tumorigenesis in Adult T-cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Mitsuaki

    2010-01-01

    Molecular biology of mouse and chicken retroviruses had identified oncogenes and provided a revolutionary concept in understanding of cancers. A human retrovirus was established during 1980–1982 in linkage with a unique human leukemia, concurrently in Japan and USA. This review covers our efforts on the discovery of new retrovirus, Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1), first introducing to a new class of retroviruses with a unique regulatory factors, Tax and Rex. Then it is followed by analyses of molecular interaction of the vial Tax with cellular machineries involved in the pathogenesis of Adult T-cell Leukemia (ATL). And then a probable mechanism of pathogenesis of ATL is proposed including recent findings on HBZ after our efforts. PMID:20154469

  8. Co-infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1): does immune activation lead to a faster progression to AIDS?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent data have shown that HTLV-1 is prevalent among HIV positive patients in Mozambique, although the impact of HTLV-1 infection on HIV disease progression remains controversial. Our aim was to determine the phenotypic profile of T lymphocytes subsets among Mozambican patients co-infected by HIV and HTLV-1. Methods We enrolled 29 patients co-infected by HTLV-1 and HIV (co-infected), 59 patients mono-infected by HIV (HIV) and 16 healthy controls (HC), respectively. For phenotypic analysis, cells were stained with the following fluorochrome-labeled anti-human monoclonal antibodies CD4-APC, CD8-PerCP, CD25-PE, CD62L-FITC, CD45RA-FITC. CD45RO-PE, CD38-PE; being analysed by four-colour flow cytometry. Results We initially found that CD4+ T cell counts were significantly higher in co-infected, as compared to HIV groups. Moreover, CD4+ T Lymphocytes from co-infected patients presented significantly higher levels of CD45RO and CD25, but lower levels of CD45RA and CD62L, strongly indicating that CD4+ T cells are more activated under HTLV-1 plus HIV co-infection. Conclusion Our data indicate that HTLV-1/HIV co-infected patients progress with higher CD4+ T cell counts and higher levels of activation markers. In this context, it is conceivable that in co-infected individuals, these higher levels of activation may account for a faster progression to AIDS. PMID:20028500

  9. An HTLV-I vaccine: why, how, for whom?

    PubMed

    de Thé, G; Bomford, R

    1993-05-01

    Endemic infection with the human T cell leukemia/lymphoma viruses I and II (HTLV-I/II) is now recognized to be worldwide, and is becoming epidemic among intravenous drug abusers (IVDAs) in the United States and Europe. The number of people around the world infected with HTLV-I can be estimated as between 10 and 20 million (Table 1). HTLV-I causes a rapidly progressing adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), and an incurable progressive neuromyelopathy named tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-I-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM), as well as a number of less well-studied syndromes. There is evidence that coinfection with HTLV-I or -II accelerates progression to AIDS. The cumulative lifetime risk of developing ATLL or TSP/HAM is around 5%, which, in terms of the induction of serious diseases, places HTLV-I in the same category of viruses for which efficient vaccines are made and used. Furthermore, there are factors favoring the feasibility of a vaccine against HTLV-I, in that the virus displays relatively low antigenic variability, natural immunity occurs in humans, and experimental vaccination with the envelope (Env) antigen is successful in animal models. A vaccine against HTLV-I would be of significant public health value in the fields of oncology, neurology, and AIDS, and it would serve as a pathfinder for a vaccine against HIV. PMID:8318266

  10. The Role of HBZ in HTLV-1-Induced Oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tiejun

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) causes adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and chronic inflammatory diseases. HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ) is transcribed as an antisense transcript of the HTLV-1 provirus. Among the HTLV-1-encoded viral genes, HBZ is the only gene that is constitutively expressed in all ATL cases. Recent studies have demonstrated that HBZ plays an essential role in oncogenesis by regulating viral transcription and modulating multiple host factors, as well as cellular signaling pathways, that contribute to the development and continued growth of cancer. In this article, I summarize the current knowledge of the oncogenic function of HBZ in cell proliferation, apoptosis, T-cell differentiation, immune escape, and HTLV-1 pathogenesis. PMID:26848677

  11. Activation of the PI3K-Akt pathway by human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) oncoprotein Tax increases Bcl3 expression, which is associated with enhanced growth of HTLV-1-infected T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Kousuke; Saito, Mineki; Taniura, Naoko; Okuwa, Takako; Ohara, Yoshiro

    2010-08-01

    Bcl3 is a member of the I{kappa}B family that regulates genes involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis. Recent reports indicated that Bcl3 is overexpressed in HTLV-1-infected T cells via Tax-mediated transactivation, and acts as a negative regulator of viral transcription. However, the role of Bcl3 in cellular signal transduction and the growth of HTLV-1-infected T cells have not been reported. In this study, we showed that the knockdown of Bcl3 by short hairpin RNA inhibited the growth of HTLV-1-infected T cells. Although phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor reduced Bcl3 expression, inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), an effector kinase of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, restored Bcl3 expression in Tax-negative but not in Tax-positive T cells. Our results indicate that the overexpression of Bcl3 in HTLV-1-infected T cells is regulated not only by transcriptional but also by post-transcriptional mechanisms, and is involved in overgrowth of HTLV-1-infected T cells.

  12. Extracellular matrix-remodeling metalloproteinases and infection of the central nervous system with retrovirus human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I).

    PubMed

    Giraudon, P; Buart, S; Bernard, A; Thomasset, N; Belin, M F

    1996-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (TIMPs) are involved in physiological processes and contribute to the phenotype of several pathological conditions associated with uncontrolled tissue degradation. In the central nervous system (CNS), MMPs are thought to play a role in cell migration and synaptic plasticity. We have investigated the expression, regulation and possible role of MMPs and TIMPs during infection of glial cells with human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I), the causative agent of a progressive chronic myelopathy, TSP/HAM. The major alteration consists in a high increase in MMP-9 secretion and TIMP-2 mRNA expression. Cytokines TNF alpha and IL1 alpha, induced in glial cells during HTLV-I infection, promote the upregulation of MMP-9. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid from TSP/HAM patients contain high MMP-9 level. The exact role of dysregulated MMPs/TIMPs in the pathogenesis of TSP/HAM is not known; however, functions of these proteases in physiological processes should provide valuable clues. MMPs can affect the blood-brain barrier and the intercellular connectivity by degrading the extracellular matrix of endothelial and neural cells. They can be involved in autoimmunity by generating preformed specific peptides from myelin components. Finally, they can direct and prolong TNF activity in the CNS by converting its inactive precursor into active molecules. PMID:8844825

  13. HTLV-I/II seroindeterminate Western blot reactivity in a cohort of patients with neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Soldan, S S; Graf, M D; Waziri, A; Flerlage, A N; Robinson, S M; Kawanishi, T; Leist, T P; Lehky, T J; Levin, M C; Jacobson, S

    1999-09-01

    The human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is associated with a chronic, progressive neurological disease known as HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. Screening for HTLV-I involves the detection of virus-specific serum antibodies by EIA and confirmation by Western blot. HTLV-I/II seroindeterminate Western blot patterns have been described worldwide. However, the significance of this blot pattern is unclear. We identified 8 patients with neurological disease and an HTLV-I/II seroindeterminate Western blot pattern, none of whom demonstrated increased spontaneous proliferation and HTLV-I-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity. However, HTLV-I tax sequence was amplified from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of 4 of them. These data suggest that patients with chronic progressive neurological disease and HTLV-I/II Western blot seroindeterminate reactivity may harbor either defective HTLV-I, novel retrovirus with partial homology to HTLV-I, or HTLV-I in low copy number. PMID:10438355

  14. Cyclosporine-induced immune suppression alters establishment of HTLV-1 infection in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Rashade A. H.; Ware, Evan; Premanandan, Christopher; Zimmerman, Bevin; Yu, Lianbo; Phipps, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection causes adult T-cell leukemia and several lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory diseases. Persistent HTLV-1 infection is determined by a balance between host immune responses and virus spread. Immunomodulatory therapy involving HTLV-1–infected patients occurs in a variety of clinical settings. Knowledge of how these treatments influence host-virus relationships is not understood. In this study, we examined the effects of cyclosporine A (CsA)–induced immune suppression during early infection of HTLV-1. Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were split into 4 groups. Three groups were treated with either 10 or 20 mg/kg CsA or saline before infection. The fourth group was treated with 20 mg/kg CsA 1 week after infection. Immune suppression, plasma CsA concentration, ex vivo lymphocyte HTLV-1 p19 production, anti–HTLV-1 serologic responses, and proviral load levels were measured during infection. Our data indicated that CsA treatment before HTLV-1 infection enhanced early viral expression compared with untreated HTLV-1–infected rabbits, and altered long-term viral expression parameters. However, CsA treatment 1 week after infection diminished HTLV-1 expression throughout the 10-week study course. Collectively, these data indicate immunologic control is a key determinant of early HTLV-1 spread and have important implications for therapeutic intervention during HTLV-1–associated diseases. PMID:19965683

  15. Tax Protein-induced Expression of Antiapoptotic Bfl-1 Protein Contributes to Survival of Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected T-cells*♦

    PubMed Central

    Macaire, Héloïse; Riquet, Aurélien; Moncollin, Vincent; Biémont-Trescol, Marie-Claude; Duc Dodon, Madeleine; Hermine, Olivier; Debaud, Anne-Laure; Mahieux, Renaud; Mesnard, Jean-Michel; Pierre, Marlène; Gazzolo, Louis; Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Valentin, Hélène

    2012-01-01

    Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). ATLL is a severe malignancy with no effective treatment. HTLV-1 regulatory proteins Tax and HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper factor (HBZ) play a major role in ATLL development, by interfering with cellular functions such as CD4+ T-cell survival. In this study, we observed that the expression of Bfl-1, an antiapoptotic protein of the Bcl-2 family, is restricted to HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines and to T-cells expressing both Tax and HBZ proteins. We showed that Tax-induced bfl-1 transcription through the canonical NF-κB pathway. Moreover, we demonstrated that Tax cooperated with c-Jun or JunD, but not JunB, transcription factors of the AP-1 family to stimulate bfl-1 gene activation. By contrast, HBZ inhibited c-Jun-induced bfl-1 gene activation, whereas it increased JunD-induced bfl-1 gene activation. We identified one NF-κB, targeted by RelA, c-Rel, RelB, p105/p50, and p100/p52, and two AP-1, targeted by both c-Jun and JunD, binding sites in the bfl-1 promoter of T-cells expressing both Tax and HBZ. Analyzing the potential role of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins in HTLV-1-infected T-cell survival, we demonstrated that these cells are differentially sensitive to silencing of Bfl-1, Bcl-xL, and Bcl-2. Indeed, both Bfl-1 and Bcl-xL knockdowns decreased the survival of HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines, although no cell death was observed after Bcl-2 knockdown. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Bfl-1 knockdown sensitizes HTLV-1-infected T-cells to ABT-737 or etoposide treatment. Our results directly implicate Bfl-1 and Bcl-xL in HTLV-1-infected T-cell survival and suggest that both Bfl-1 and Bcl-xL represent potential therapeutic targets for ATLL treatment. PMID:22553204

  16. Transcriptional and Epigenetic Regulatory Mechanisms Affecting HTLV-1 Provirus

    PubMed Central

    Miyazato, Paola; Matsuo, Misaki; Katsuya, Hiroo; Satou, Yorifumi

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus associated with human diseases, such as adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/Tropic spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). As a retrovirus, its life cycle includes a step where HTLV-1 is integrated into the host genomic DNA and forms proviral DNA. In the chronic phase of the infection, HTLV‑1 is known to proliferate as a provirus via the mitotic division of the infected host cells. There are generally tens of thousands of infected clones within an infected individual. They exist not only in peripheral blood, but also in various lymphoid organs. Viral proteins encoded in HTLV-1 genome play a role in the proliferation and survival of the infected cells. As is the case with other chronic viral infections, HTLV-1 gene expression induces the activation of the host immunity against the virus. Thus, the transcription from HTLV-1 provirus needs to be controlled in order to evade the host immune surveillance. There should be a dynamic and complex regulation in vivo, where an equilibrium between viral antigen expression and host immune surveillance is achieved. The mechanisms regulating viral gene expression from the provirus are a key to understanding the persistent/latent infection with HTLV-1 and its pathogenesis. In this article, we would like to review our current understanding on this topic. PMID:27322309

  17. Transcriptional and Epigenetic Regulatory Mechanisms Affecting HTLV-1 Provirus.

    PubMed

    Miyazato, Paola; Matsuo, Misaki; Katsuya, Hiroo; Satou, Yorifumi

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus associated with human diseases, such as adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/Tropic spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). As a retrovirus, its life cycle includes a step where HTLV-1 is integrated into the host genomic DNA and forms proviral DNA. In the chronic phase of the infection, HTLV‑1 is known to proliferate as a provirus via the mitotic division of the infected host cells. There are generally tens of thousands of infected clones within an infected individual. They exist not only in peripheral blood, but also in various lymphoid organs. Viral proteins encoded in HTLV-1 genome play a role in the proliferation and survival of the infected cells. As is the case with other chronic viral infections, HTLV-1 gene expression induces the activation of the host immunity against the virus. Thus, the transcription from HTLV-1 provirus needs to be controlled in order to evade the host immune surveillance. There should be a dynamic and complex regulation in vivo, where an equilibrium between viral antigen expression and host immune surveillance is achieved. The mechanisms regulating viral gene expression from the provirus are a key to understanding the persistent/latent infection with HTLV-1 and its pathogenesis. In this article, we would like to review our current understanding on this topic. PMID:27322309

  18. Serum total antioxidant capacity status of HTLV-1 infected patients.

    PubMed

    Shomali, S; Avval, F Zahedi; Boostani, R; Jarahi, L; Youssefi, M

    2015-06-01

    Many aspects of the pathogenesis of Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) still need further elucidations. Previous studies have indicated that oxidative stress occurs during infection with the other retrovirus, human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1). Similar results have been observed in some other chronic viral infections including hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV). In order to reveal possible oxidative stress in HTLV-1-infected patients, we evaluated serum total antioxidant capacity (TAC) as an indicator of oxidative stress in these patients. Forty-four HTLV-1-seropositive individuals were included in this study, consisting of 12 symptomatic and 32 asymptomatic (carrier) cases. Controls consisted of 36 apparently healthy, HTLV-1-, HIV- and hepatitis-seronegative individuals. All symptomatic patients had HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Serum TAC levels in patients and healthy individuals were measured using a quantitative TAC assay. The antioxidant capacity in HTLV-1-seropositive cases was significantly reduced compared to control group (P = 0.001). In addition, TAC was lower in patients with more than 5 years history of HAM/TSP compared to those with ≤5 years duration of the myelopathy (P = 0.03). Our results show a depletion of TAC during HTLV-1 infection, which intensifies along with the disease progress. This finding indicates a role of the oxidative stress in pathogenesis of HTLV-1. These results may prompt further research to evaluate any possible therapeutic effect of antioxidant dietary supplements for HTLV-1 infected individuals. PMID:26104339

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of HTLV-1 Cell-to-Cell Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Christine; Thoma-Kress, Andrea K.

    2016-01-01

    The tumorvirus human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), a member of the delta-retrovirus family, is transmitted via cell-containing body fluids such as blood products, semen, and breast milk. In vivo, HTLV-1 preferentially infects CD4+ T-cells, and to a lesser extent, CD8+ T-cells, dendritic cells, and monocytes. Efficient infection of CD4+ T-cells requires cell-cell contacts while cell-free virus transmission is inefficient. Two types of cell-cell contacts have been described to be critical for HTLV-1 transmission, tight junctions and cellular conduits. Further, two non-exclusive mechanisms of virus transmission at cell-cell contacts have been proposed: (1) polarized budding of HTLV-1 into synaptic clefts; and (2) cell surface transfer of viral biofilms at virological synapses. In contrast to CD4+ T-cells, dendritic cells can be infected cell-free and, to a greater extent, via viral biofilms in vitro. Cell-to-cell transmission of HTLV-1 requires a coordinated action of steps in the virus infectious cycle with events in the cell-cell adhesion process; therefore, virus propagation from cell-to-cell depends on specific interactions between cellular and viral proteins. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of HTLV-1 transmission with a focus on the HTLV-1-encoded proteins Tax and p8, their impact on host cell factors mediating cell-cell contacts, cytoskeletal remodeling, and thus, virus propagation. PMID:27005656

  20. Epidemiological Aspects and World Distribution of HTLV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gessain, Antoine; Cassar, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), identified as the first human oncogenic retrovirus 30 years ago, is not an ubiquitous virus. HTLV-1 is present throughout the world, with clusters of high endemicity located often nearby areas where the virus is nearly absent. The main HTLV-1 highly endemic regions are the Southwestern part of Japan, sub-Saharan Africa and South America, the Caribbean area, and foci in Middle East and Australo-Melanesia. The origin of this puzzling geographical or rather ethnic repartition is probably linked to a founder effect in some groups with the persistence of a high viral transmission rate. Despite different socio-economic and cultural environments, the HTLV-1 prevalence increases gradually with age, especially among women in all highly endemic areas. The three modes of HTLV-1 transmission are mother to child, sexual transmission, and transmission with contaminated blood products. Twenty years ago, de Thé and Bomford estimated the total number of HTLV-1 carriers to be 10–20 millions people. At that time, large regions had not been investigated, few population-based studies were available and the assays used for HTLV-1 serology were not enough specific. Despite the fact that there is still a lot of data lacking in large areas of the world and that most of the HTLV-1 studies concern only blood donors, pregnant women, or different selected patients or high-risk groups, we shall try based on the most recent data, to revisit the world distribution and the estimates of the number of HTLV-1 infected persons. Our best estimates range from 5–10 millions HTLV-1 infected individuals. However, these results were based on only approximately 1.5 billion of individuals originating from known HTLV-1 endemic areas with reliable available epidemiological data. Correct estimates in other highly populated regions, such as China, India, the Maghreb, and East Africa, is currently not possible, thus, the current number of HTLV-1 carriers is

  1. The need to accessorize: molecular roles of HTLV-1 p30 and HTLV-2 p28 accessory proteins in the viral life cycle.

    PubMed

    Anupam, Rajaneesh; Doueiri, Rami; Green, Patrick L

    2013-01-01

    Extensive studies of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV)-1 and HTLV-2 over the last three decades have provided detailed knowledge on viral transformation, host-viral interactions and pathogenesis. HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of adult T cell leukemia and multiple neurodegenerative and inflammatory diseases while HTLV-2 disease association remains elusive, with few infected individuals displaying neurodegenerative diseases similar to HTLV-1. The HTLV group of oncoretroviruses has a genome that encodes structural and enzymatic proteins Gag, Pro, and Env, regulatory proteins Tax and Rex, and several accessory proteins from the pX region. Of these proteins, HTLV-1 p30 and HTLV-2 p28 are encoded by the open reading frame II of the pX region. Like most other accessory proteins, p30 and p28 are dispensable for in vitro viral replication and transformation but are required for efficient viral replication and persistence in vivo. Both p30 and p28 regulate viral gene expression at the post-transcriptional level whereas p30 can also function at the transcriptional level. Recently, several reports have implicated p30 and p28 in multiple cellular processes, which provide novel insight into HTLV spread and survival and ultimately pathogenesis. In this review we summarize and compare what is known about p30 and p28, highlighting their roles in viral replication and viral pathogenesis. PMID:24062732

  2. Multifaceted functions and roles of HBZ in HTLV-1 pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guangyong; Yasunaga, Jun-Ichirou; Matsuoka, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus responsible for the development of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). Although HTLV-1 harbors an oncogene, tax, that transforms T cells in vitro and induces leukemia in transgenic mice, tax expression is frequently disrupted in ATL, making the oncogenesis of ATL a bit mysterious. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ) gene was discovered in 2002 and has been found to promote T-cell proliferation and cause lymphoma in transgenic mice. Thus HBZ has become a novel hotspot of HTLV-1 research. This review summarizes the current findings on HBZ with a special focus on its potential links to the oncogenesis of ATL. We propose viewing HBZ as a critical contributing factor in ATL development. PMID:26979059

  3. The Influence of Coinfection on Mood States in HTLV-1-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gascón, Maria Rita Polo; Capitão, Claudio Garcia; Nogueira-Martins, Maria Cezira Fantini; Casseb, Jorge; Penalva Oliveira, Augusto Cesar

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to discuss the influence of coinfection on mood states (depression and anxiety) in Human T Lymphotropic virus type 1 HTLV-1-infected patients. A cross-sectional study was performed with a sample obtained through a nonprobabilistic technique. A total of 130 patients in treatment at the HTLV Ambulatory of Instituto de Infectologia Emílio Ribas participated in the research, of whom 63 had HAM/TS and 67 were asymptomatic. A sociodemographic survey and the Beck Anxiety and Depression Inventories were used. The results indicated a prevalence of 7.2% for HTLV-1/HIV co-infection, 7.2% for HTLV-1/HCV, and 4.0% for HTLV-1/HIV/HCV. It is possible that the presence of a co-infection causes greater fear and concern about the future than asymptomatic HTLV-1 infection, increasing the observed degree of depression and anxiety. PMID:23738200

  4. Intracellular Localization and Cellular Factors Interaction of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 Tax Proteins: Similarities and Functional Differences

    PubMed Central

    Bertazzoni, Umberto; Turci, Marco; Avesani, Francesca; Di Gennaro, Gianfranco; Bidoia, Carlo; Romanelli, Maria Grazia

    2011-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic viruses type 1 (HTLV-1) and type 2 (HTLV-2) present very similar genomic structures but HTLV-1 is more pathogenic than HTLV-2. Is this difference due to their transactivating Tax proteins, Tax-1 and Tax-2, which are responsible for viral and cellular gene activation? Do Tax-1 and Tax-2 differ in their cellular localization and in their interaction pattern with cellular factors? In this review, we summarize Tax-1 and Tax-2 structural and phenotypic properties, their interaction with factors involved in signal transduction and their localization-related behavior within the cell. Special attention will be given to the distinctions between Tax-1 and Tax-2 that likely play an important role in their transactivation activity. PMID:21994745

  5. [Seroprevalence of HTLV-1/2 in blood donors from Misiones Province].

    PubMed

    Malan, Richard; Berini, Carolina A; Eirin, María E; Delfino, Cecilia M; Pedrozo, Williams; Krupp, Ramón; García Plichta, Atilio; Biglione, Mirna M

    2010-01-01

    Human T-cell Lymphotropic viruses type 1 (HTLV-1), the first human oncoretrovirus to be discovered, is the etiologic agent of Adult T-cell Leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1 Associated Mielopathy or Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP). It is endemic worldwide, including the North of Argentina where both associated diseases have also been detected. No etiologic role has been described for HTLV-2, although it has been associated with HAM/TSP-like neurologic syndromes. Both retroviruses are endemic in native populations of The Americas, Africa and at-risk populations. They are transmitted through sex contact, parenterally and from mother to child. The aim of this study was to estimate the seroprevalence of HTLV-1/2 in a blood donor population from Misiones province. A total of 6912 accepted blood donations in 2008 were analyzed. HTLV-1/2 screening was performed with ELISA and particle agglutination, and reactive samples were confirmed by Western Blot. From the total, 5 samples resulted seropositive with a final prevalence of 0.00072. Out of the 5 positive samples, one was an HTLV, three HTLV-1 and one HTLV-2. These blood donors were residents of Posadas, Eldorado and Oberá, with no risk antecedents. This study demonstrates the presence of HTLV-1/2 in a population of Misiones with a prevalence rate similar to those reported among blood donors from non-endemic areas. PMID:20228028

  6. High Prevalence of HTLV-1 Infection among Japanese Immigrants in Non-endemic Area of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bandeira, Larissa M.; Uehara, Silvia N. O.; Asato, Marcel A.; Aguena, Gabriela S.; Maedo, Cristiane M.; Benites, Nikolas H.; Puga, Marco A. M.; Rezende, Grazielli R.; Finotti, Carolina M.; Cesar, Gabriela A.; Tanaka, Tayana S. O.; Castro, Vivianne O. L.; Otsuki, Koko; Vicente, Ana C. P.; Fernandes, Carlos E.; Motta-Castro, Ana R. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has worldwide distribution and is considered endemic in many world regions, including southwestern Japan and Brazil. Japanese immigrants and their descendants have a high risk of acquiring this infection due to intense population exchange between Brazil and Japan. Objective This cross-sectional study aimed to estimate the prevalence of HTLV, analyze the main risk factors associated with this infection, identify the main circulating types and subtypes of HTLV in Japanese immigrants and descendants living in Campo Grande-MS (Middle-West Brazil), as well as analyze the phylogenetic relationship among isolates of HTLV. Study Design A total of 219 individuals were interviewed and submitted to blood collection. All collected blood samples were submitted for detection of anti-HTLV-1/2 using the immunoassay ELISA and confirmed by immunoblot method. The proviral DNA of the 14 samples HTLV- 1 positive were genotyped by nucleotide sequencing. Results The overall prevalence of HTLV-1 was 6.8% (IC 95%: 3,5-10,2). Descriptive analysis of behavioral risk factors showed statistical association between HTLV-1 and age greater than or equal to 45 years. The proviral DNA of HTLV-1 was detected in all HTLV-1 positive samples. Of these, 14 were sequenced and classified as Cosmopolitan subtype, and 50% (7/14) belonged to subgroup A (transcontinental) and 50% (7/14) to the subgroup B (Japanese). Conclusion The high prevalence of HTLV-1 found evidence of the importance of early diagnosis and counseling of individuals infected with HTLV-1 for the control and prevention of the spread of this infection among Japanese immigrants and their descendants in Central Brazil. PMID:25886507

  7. Prevalence and phylogenetic analysis of HTLV-1 in a segregated population in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rafatpanah, Houshang; Torkamani, Mahmood; Valizadeh, Narges; Vakili, Rosita; Meshkani, Baratali; Khademi, Hassan; Gerayli, Sina; Mozhgani, Sayed Hamid Reza; Rezaee, Seyed Abdolrahim

    2016-07-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is an important health issue that affects a variety of endemic areas. The Khorasan province, mainly its capital Mashhad in northeastern Iran, was reported to be as one of these endemic regions. Torbat-e Heydarieh, a large city Southwest border to Mashhad with a segregated population was investigated for the prevalence and associated risk factors of HTLV-1 infection in 400 randomly selected individuals. Blood samples were tested for the presence of HTLV-1 antibodies via the ELISA method and then were confirmed by an Immunoblot test. For the presence of HTLV-1 in lymphocytes of infected subjects, PCR was performed on LTR and TAX regions. DNA sequencing of LTR fragment was also carried out to determine the phylogenetic of HTLV-1, using the Maximum likelihood method. HTLV-1 sero-reactivity (sero-prevalence) among the study population was 2% (8/400), of which 1.25% had HTLV-1 provirus in lymphocytes (actual prevalence). HTLV-1 infection was significantly associated with the age, marital status, and history of blood transfusion (P < 0.05). However, there were no statistical differences between HTLV-1 infection, and gender, surgery, and hospitalization. In regression analysis, age showed the most significant correlation with the infection (P = 0.006, OR = 4.33). Based on our phylogenetic study, the HTLV-1 prevalent sequence type of Torbat-e Heydarieh belongs to the cosmopolitan subtype A. HTLV-1 prevalence in Torbat-e Heydarieh (1.25%) is low comparing to those of both Mashhad (2-3%) and Neishabour (3.5-5%) in the province of Khorasan. Thus, traveling mobility and population mixing such as marriage, bureaucratic affairs, occupation, and economic activities could be the usual routs of HTLV-1 new wave of spreading in this segregated city. J. Med. Virol. 88:1247-1253, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26680556

  8. Increased seroreactivity to HERV-K10 peptides in patients with HTLV myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previously, we had shown that persons infected with human T-cell lymphoma leukemia virus 1 or 2 (HTLV-1 or 2) had an increased prevalence of antibodies to a peptide in the Pol protein of the retrovirus HERV-K10, homologous to a peptide in HTLV gp21 envelope protein. The prevalence rate was higher in those with myelopathy vs. non-myelopathy. We have now extended our observations to a cohort restricted to North America in whom the diagnosis of HTLV myelopathy was rigorously confirmed to also test for reactivity to another HERV-K10 peptide homologous to the HTLV p24 Gag protein. Methods Sera from 100 volunteer blood donors (VBD), 53 patients with large granular lymphocytic leukemia (LGLL), 74 subjects with HTLV-1 or 2 infection (58 non-myelopathy and 16 myelopathy) and 83 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) were evaluated in ELISA assays using the above peptides. Results The HTLV myelopathy patients had a statistically significant increased prevalence of antibodies to both HERV-K10 peptides (87.5%) vs. the VBD (0%), LGLL patients (0%), MS patients (4.8%), and the HTLV positive non-myelopathy subjects (5.2%). Conclusion The data suggest that immuno-cross-reactivity to HERV-K10 peptides and/or transactivation of HERV-K10 expression by the HTLV Tax protein may be involved in the pathogenesis of HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis and spastic ataxia. PMID:24365054

  9. Integrating an HTLV-III Screening Program into a Community Based Family Health Service Agency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klausmeier, Walter W.; Henshaw, Beverly

    Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has become one of the most serious epidemic disease problems in recent years. In 1985 the Public Health Service recommended establishment of test sites where individuals might be tested for Human T Lymphotropic Virus III (HTLV-III) antibody. An HTLV-III antibody screening program was integrated into a…

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of HTLV-1 Cell-to-Cell Transmission.

    PubMed

    Gross, Christine; Thoma-Kress, Andrea K

    2016-01-01

    The tumorvirus human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), a member of the delta-retrovirus family, is transmitted via cell-containing body fluids such as blood products, semen, and breast milk. In vivo, HTLV-1 preferentially infects CD4⁺ T-cells, and to a lesser extent, CD8⁺ T-cells, dendritic cells, and monocytes. Efficient infection of CD4⁺ T-cells requires cell-cell contacts while cell-free virus transmission is inefficient. Two types of cell-cell contacts have been described to be critical for HTLV-1 transmission, tight junctions and cellular conduits. Further, two non-exclusive mechanisms of virus transmission at cell-cell contacts have been proposed: (1) polarized budding of HTLV-1 into synaptic clefts; and (2) cell surface transfer of viral biofilms at virological synapses. In contrast to CD4⁺ T-cells, dendritic cells can be infected cell-free and, to a greater extent, via viral biofilms in vitro. Cell-to-cell transmission of HTLV-1 requires a coordinated action of steps in the virus infectious cycle with events in the cell-cell adhesion process; therefore, virus propagation from cell-to-cell depends on specific interactions between cellular and viral proteins. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms of HTLV-1 transmission with a focus on the HTLV-1-encoded proteins Tax and p8, their impact on host cell factors mediating cell-cell contacts, cytoskeletal remodeling, and thus, virus propagation. PMID:27005656

  11. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and cluster of HTLV-I associated diseases in Brazilian settings.

    PubMed

    Pombo-de-Oliveira, M S; Carvalho, S M; Borducchi, D; Dobbin, J; Salvador, J; Correa, R B; Moellman, A; Loureiro, P; Chiattone, C; Rios, M

    2001-06-01

    We studied the transmission routes of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) within families of 82 Brazilian patients diagnosed with adult T-cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATL). Diagnosis of ATL in 43 male and 39 female patients was based on clinical and laboratory criteria of T-cell malignancy and detection of HTLV-I monoclonal integration. Samples were tested for HTLV antibodies and infection was confirmed as HTLV-I by Western Blot and/or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Overall 26/37 (70%) of mothers, 24/37 (65%) of wives, 8/22 (36%) of husbands, 34/112 (30%) of siblings and 10/82 (12%) offspring were HTLV-I infected. In 11 ATL patients, mothers were repeatedly HTLV-I seronegative, but HTLV-I pol or tax sequences were detected in 2 out of 6 cases tested by PCR. ATL patients with seronegative mothers related the following risk factors for HTLV-I infection: 6 were breast-fed by surrogate mothers with unknown HTLV-I status, 4 had a sexually promiscuous behaviour and 1 had multiple blood transfusions at a young age. Familial aggregation of ATL and other HTLV-I associated diseases such as HTLV-I myelopathy (HAM/TSP) and or uveitis, ATL in sibling pairs or in multiple generations was seen in 9 families. There were 6 families with ATL and TSP sibling pairs. In 3 families at least one parent had died with lymphoma or presenting neurological diseases and 2 offspring with ATL. Further to the extent of vertical and horizontal transmission of HTLV-I infection within ATL families, our results demonstrate that mothers who provide surrogate breast-milk appear to be an important source of HTLV-I transmission and ATL development in Brazil. PMID:11699201

  12. HTLV-I and Apoptosis: Role in Cellular Transformation and Recent Advances in Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, John M.; Nicot, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    A universal cellular defense mechanism against viral invasion is the elimination of infected cells through apoptotic cell death. To counteract host defenses many viruses have evolved complex apoptosis evasion strategies. The oncogenic human retrovirus HTLV-I is the etiological agent of adult-T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) and the neurodegenerative disease known as HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The poor prognosis in HTLV-I-induced ATLL is linked to the resistance of neoplastic T cells against conventional therapies and the immunocompromised state of patients. Nevertheless, several studies have shown that the apoptotic pathway is largely intact and can be reactivated in ATLL tumor cells to induce specific killing. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms employed by HTLV-I to counteract cellular death pathways remains an important challenge for future therapies and the treatment of HTLV-I-associated diseases. PMID:18421579

  13. A Peruvian family with a high burden of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Carolina; Verdonck, Kristien; Tipismana, Martín; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1) is frequent in Peru; an estimated 1-2% of the Peruvian population carry this retrovirus. HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is a chronic disabling disease that affects about 1% of the carriers of HTLV-1. It is not yet known why some HTLV-1-infected people develop HAM/TSP while others do not. In this case report, we present a family with an unusually high burden of HAM/TSP: 5 (the 2 parents and 3 of their children) of 7 HTLV-1 carriers developed the same disease. We describe the clinical presentation and discuss the clustering of disease against the current knowledge of the pathogenesis of HAM/TSP. Families such as this may hold the key to discovering which factors trigger the development of HAM/TSP. PMID:26392440

  14. Modulation of apoptosis during HTLV-1-mediated immortalization process in vitro.

    PubMed

    Matteucci, Claudia; Balestrieri, Emanuela; Macchi, Beatrice; Mastino, Antonio

    2004-11-01

    Suppression of apoptosis has been proposed as a mechanism involved in the transforming action of human T-cell leukemia/lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1). However, there is evidence that HTLV-1 and its protein Tax also induce apoptosis. To resolve this apparent paradox, apoptosis was monitored in primary cultures of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from healthy donors, following HTLV-1 infection in vitro. High levels of apoptosis in HTLV-1 infected cultures during the first weeks after infection were detected. Apoptosis was not related to the presence of uninfected cells, as revealed by a fluorescence in situ hybridization assay. Successively, a progressive decrease in apoptosis in infected cultures going towards immortalization, was observed. When IL-2 in the medium was replaced by IL-4, allowing the cells to be efficiently infected by HTLV-1 but not immortalized, apoptosis levels tended to increase, instead of decreasing, with the ongoing time. The caspase cascade was remarkably activated in PBLs recently infected in vitro by HTLV-1, but apoptosis was only partly reduced by caspase inhibitors. Even if spontaneous apoptosis was relatively low in long-term cultures of PBLs immortalized by HTLV-1 in vitro, Fas death-receptor expression and function were well conserved. These observations provide a new rationale for explaining the dual effect of HTLV-1 in controlling apoptosis. PMID:15368513

  15. Trends in the prevalence and distribution of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 infections in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although most HTLV infections in Spain have been found in native intravenous drug users carrying HTLV-2, the large immigration flows from Latin America and Sub-Saharan Africa in recent years may have changed the prevalence and distribution of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 infections, and hypothetically open the opportunity for introducing HTLV-3 or HTLV-4 in Spain. To assess the current seroprevalence of HTLV infection in Spain a national multicenter, cross-sectional, study was conducted in June 2009. Results A total of 6,460 consecutive outpatients attending 16 hospitals were examined. Overall, 12% were immigrants, and their main origin was Latin America (4.9%), Africa (3.6%) and other European countries (2.8%). Nine individuals were seroreactive for HTLV antibodies (overall prevalence, 0.14%). Evidence of HTLV-1 infection was confirmed by Western blot in 4 subjects (prevalence 0.06%) while HTLV-2 infection was found in 5 (prevalence 0.08%). Infection with HTLV types 1, 2, 3 and 4 was discarded by Western blot and specific PCR assays in another two specimens initially reactive in the enzyme immunoassay. All but one HTLV-1 cases were Latin-Americans while all persons with HTLV-2 infection were native Spaniards. Conclusions The overall prevalence of HTLV infections in Spain remains low, with no evidence of HTLV-3 or HTLV-4 infections so far. PMID:22444832

  16. HTLV-I associated arthritis: characteristics of an HTLV-I virus infected T cell line from synovial fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, K; Nakamura, T; Mine, M; Ida, H; Kawakami, A; Migita, K; Nagasato, K; Kurata, A; Fukuda, T; Nagataki, S

    1992-01-01

    A T cell line from mononuclear cells in the synovial fluid of a patient with polyarthritis was established. The T cell line reacted with serum samples positive for antibodies to human T cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) and with monoclonal antibody to HTLV-I p19. In Southern blotting with an env-pX-LTR HTLV-I probe and digestion of T cell line DNA with the restriction enzymes ClaI, DraI, and PstI generated fragments that were identical to those found in two HTLV-I infected T cell lines established from adult T cell leukaemia or HTLV-I associated myelopathy. The T cell line expressed CD2, CD3, CD4, CD45RA, CD29, HLA-DR, CD25, and CD26 antigens, but not CD8 and CD20 antigens. Large amounts of interleukin 6, interferon gamma, and tumour necrosis factor alpha were secreted in the culture supernatants of this cell line. This line helped immunoglobulin production by B cells, but not K562, Raji, and synovial cell lysis. Images PMID:1616338

  17. [Epidemiology, origin and genetic diversity of HTLV-1 retrovirus and STLV-1 simian affiliated retrovirus].

    PubMed

    Gessain, A; Mahieux, R

    2000-07-01

    Human T Cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I, the first human oncogenic retrovirus, is the aetiological factor of Adult T cell leukemia (ATL), a CD4+ malignant lymphoproliferative disease and of a chronic neuromyelopathy, the tropical spastic paraparesis or HTLV-1 associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM). HTLV-1, which infects from 15 to 25 million individuals world-wide, is highly endemic in certain areas such as south-western Japan, Central Africa, the Caribbean basin and some regions of South America, Melanesia and of the middle East (for example the Mashhad area of Iran). The three major modes of transmission for HTLV-1 infection are perinatal, sexual and by blood transfusion. Recent molecular studies on HTLV-1 have shown the existence of several molecular subtypes (genotypes). These are related to the geographical origin of the infected populations and not to the associated diseases. The virus has a very high genetic stability. Viral amplification via clonal expansion of infected cells, rather than by use of reverse transcription could explain this remarkable phenomenon which can be used as a molecular tool for gaining new insights into the origin, evolution and modes of dissemination of HTLV-1. Analyses of HTLV-1 and STLV-1 (the simian counterpart) viral strains from throughout the world suggest that four events are responsible for this pattern of dissemination: 1) the transmission in the wild of STLV-1 between simian species, 2) the transmission of STLV-1 to humans as exemplified by the high percentage of identity between STLV-1 strains from chimpanzees or from mandrills with some HTLV-1 strains present in inhabitants of Central Africa, 3) persistence of HTLV-1 over a long period of time (by sexual and perinatal transmissions) in remote populations, as seen in the Australo-Melanesian region and 4) a global distribution of HTLV-1 via large scale human migrations, e.g., the slave trade from Africa to the New World. PMID:11030050

  18. Evaluation of the Microbicidal Activity and Cytokines/Chemokines Profile Released by Neutrophils from HTLV-1-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Caroline A.; Cardoso, Thiago M.; Giudice, Angela; Porto, Aurélia F.; Santos, Silvane B.; Carvalho, Edgar M.; Bacellar, Olívia

    2011-01-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) induces activation and spontaneous proliferation of T cells with production of type-1 pro-inflammatory cytokines. It modifies the immune response to other antigens and increases susceptibility to infectious diseases. However, little is known about innate immunity in HTLV-1 infection. HTLV-1-infected individuals have higher spontaneous neutrophil activation than HTLV-1-seronegative individuals, as shown by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) assay. This study was conducted to evaluate neutrophil function in HTLV-1-infected individuals. Participants in the study included 18 HTLV-1-infected individuals and 14 HTLV-1-seronegative controls. We evaluated the ability of neutrophils (PMNs) to control a parasite infection, to produce peroxynitrite, cytokines and chemokines and to express activation markers in cultures when stimulated with LPS or infected with Leishmania. When compared with the control group, there was no difference in the percentage of PMNs infected with Leishmania or in the number of amastigotes/100 PMNs in HTLV-1-infected individuals. The microbicidal activity of the PMNs and the levels of CXCL8 and CCL4 released by these cells did not show a difference between HTLV-1-infected individuals and the control group. In both the HTLV-1 group and the control group, infection with Leishmania or stimulation of PMNs led to cellular activation. These observations suggest that neutrophils from HTLV-1-infected individuals have preserved their ability to become activated and to produce chemokines and peroxynitrite after stimulation and that the susceptibility to infection by intracellular Leishmania amazonensis in HTLV-1-infected individuals does not depend on impairment of neutrophil function. PMID:21595736

  19. HTLV-1 Evades Type I Interferon Antiviral Signaling by Inducing the Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 1 (SOCS1)

    PubMed Central

    Olière, Stéphanie; Hernandez, Eduardo; Lézin, Agnès; Arguello, Meztli; Douville, Renée; Nguyen, Thi Lien-Anh; Olindo, Stéphane; Panelatti, Gérard; Kazanji, Mirdad; Wilkinson, Peter; Sékaly, Rafick-Pierre; Césaire, Raymond; Hiscott, John

    2010-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of Adult T cell Leukemia (ATL) and the neurological disorder HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Although the majority of HTLV-1–infected individuals remain asymptomatic carriers (AC) during their lifetime, 2–5% will develop either ATL or HAM/TSP, but never both. To better understand the gene expression changes in HTLV-1-associated diseases, we examined the mRNA profiles of CD4+ T cells isolated from 7 ATL, 12 HAM/TSP, 11 AC and 8 non-infected controls. Using genomic approaches followed by bioinformatic analysis, we identified gene expression pattern characteristic of HTLV-1 infected individuals and particular disease states. Of particular interest, the suppressor of cytokine signaling 1—SOCS1—was upregulated in HAM/TSP and AC patients but not in ATL. Moreover, SOCS1 was positively correlated with the expression of HTLV-1 mRNA in HAM/TSP patient samples. In primary PBMCs transfected with a HTLV-1 proviral clone and in HTLV-1-transformed MT-2 cells, HTLV-1 replication correlated with induction of SOCS1 and inhibition of IFN-α/β and IFN-stimulated gene expression. Targeting SOCS1 with siRNA restored type I IFN production and reduced HTLV-1 replication in MT-2 cells. Conversely, exogenous expression of SOCS1 resulted in enhanced HTLV-1 mRNA synthesis. In addition to inhibiting signaling downstream of the IFN receptor, SOCS1 inhibited IFN-β production by targeting IRF3 for ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. These observations identify a novel SOCS1 driven mechanism of evasion of the type I IFN antiviral response against HTLV-1. PMID:21079688

  20. Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax Requires CADM1/TSLC1 for Inactivation of the NF-κB Inhibitor A20 and Constitutive NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Remy; van der Weyden, Louise; Rauch, Dan; Ratner, Lee; Nyborg, Jennifer K.; Ramos, Juan Carlos; Takai, Yoshimi; Shembade, Noula

    2015-01-01

    Persistent activation of NF-κB by the Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) oncoprotein, Tax, is vital for the development and pathogenesis of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). K63-linked polyubiquitinated Tax activates the IKK complex in the plasma membrane-associated lipid raft microdomain. Tax also interacts with TAX1BP1 to inactivate the NF-κB negative regulatory ubiquitin-editing A20 enzyme complex. However, the molecular mechanisms of Tax-mediated IKK activation and A20 protein complex inactivation are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that membrane associated CADM1 (Cell adhesion molecule1) recruits Ubc13 to Tax, causing K63-linked polyubiquitination of Tax, and IKK complex activation in the membrane lipid raft. The c-terminal cytoplasmic tail containing PDZ binding motif of CADM1 is critical for Tax to maintain persistent NF-κB activation. Finally, Tax failed to inactivate the NF-κB negative regulator ubiquitin-editing enzyme A20 complex, and activate the IKK complex in the lipid raft in absence of CADM1. Our results thus indicate that CADM1 functions as a critical scaffold molecule for Tax and Ubc13 to form a cellular complex with NEMO, TAX1BP1 and NRP, to activate the IKK complex in the plasma membrane-associated lipid rafts, to inactivate NF-κB negative regulators, and maintain persistent NF-κB activation in HTLV-1 infected cells. PMID:25774694

  1. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) tax requires CADM1/TSLC1 for inactivation of the NF-κB inhibitor A20 and constitutive NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Pujari, Rajeshree; Hunte, Richard; Thomas, Remy; van der Weyden, Louise; Rauch, Dan; Ratner, Lee; Nyborg, Jennifer K; Ramos, Juan Carlos; Takai, Yoshimi; Shembade, Noula

    2015-03-01

    Persistent activation of NF-κB by the Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) oncoprotein, Tax, is vital for the development and pathogenesis of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). K63-linked polyubiquitinated Tax activates the IKK complex in the plasma membrane-associated lipid raft microdomain. Tax also interacts with TAX1BP1 to inactivate the NF-κB negative regulatory ubiquitin-editing A20 enzyme complex. However, the molecular mechanisms of Tax-mediated IKK activation and A20 protein complex inactivation are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that membrane associated CADM1 (Cell adhesion molecule1) recruits Ubc13 to Tax, causing K63-linked polyubiquitination of Tax, and IKK complex activation in the membrane lipid raft. The c-terminal cytoplasmic tail containing PDZ binding motif of CADM1 is critical for Tax to maintain persistent NF-κB activation. Finally, Tax failed to inactivate the NF-κB negative regulator ubiquitin-editing enzyme A20 complex, and activate the IKK complex in the lipid raft in absence of CADM1. Our results thus indicate that CADM1 functions as a critical scaffold molecule for Tax and Ubc13 to form a cellular complex with NEMO, TAX1BP1 and NRP, to activate the IKK complex in the plasma membrane-associated lipid rafts, to inactivate NF-κB negative regulators, and maintain persistent NF-κB activation in HTLV-1 infected cells. PMID:25774694

  2. Cutaneous Manifestations in HTLV-I Positive Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanpanah, Mohammad Javad; Maleki, Masoud; Joneidi, Nasaibe; Khalighi, Amir Reza; Azarpazhooh, Mahmoud Reza; Khajedaluee, Mohammad; Tehranian, Farahnaz; Shahabi, Majid; Esmaeil Khayami, Mohammad; Livani, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Infection with the human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type-I (HTLV-I) is endemic in Mashhad, Iran. In our research we evaluated the relation between exposure to this infection and the occurrence of dermatologic manifestations. Materials and Methods: 100 blood donors, who were seropositive but asymptomatic for infection with HTLV-I, were selected as case group. They were identified by the Blood Transfusion Organization Mashhad via the ELISA test and documented by PCR. Another 100 blood donors, that were seronegative for HTLV-I via the ELISA test and who were matched to the case group for age, gender, and existence of systemic diseases, were considered as the controls. Dermatologic evaluations and skin biopsies were performed if deemed necessary, and the results were statistically analyzed. Results: 73% of the case and control groups were male, while 27% in each of these groups were female. The mean age in both groups was 40.96±11.94 years. The examination indicated that 58% of the case group and 37% of the control group had cutaneous manifestations (P<0.01). The most common diseases found in the case group were aphthous stomatitis, herpes labialis, and non-genital warts, while common diseases found in the control group were herpes labialis, aphthous stomatitis, and skin tag. The frequency of aphthous stomatitis, eczema, and non-genital warts in the case group were significantly more than the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion : Cutaneous diseases can be found more frequent in asymptomatic carriers of HTLV-I than those who are HTLV-I seronegative. The aphthous stomatitis, eczema, and non-genital warts are more prevalent in those infected by HTLV-I. PMID:24470876

  3. Roles of HTLV-1 basic Zip Factor (HBZ) in Viral Chronicity and Leukemic Transformation. Potential New Therapeutic Approaches to Prevent and Treat HTLV-1-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mesnard, Jean-Michel; Barbeau, Benoit; Césaire, Raymond; Péloponèse, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    More than thirty years have passed since human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) was described as the first retrovirus to be the causative agent of a human cancer, adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), but the precise mechanism behind HTLV-1 pathogenesis still remains elusive. For more than two decades, the transforming ability of HTLV-1 has been exclusively associated to the viral transactivator Tax. Thirteen year ago, we first reported that the minus strand of HTLV-1 encoded for a basic Zip factor factor (HBZ), and since then several teams have underscored the importance of this antisense viral protein for the maintenance of a chronic infection and the proliferation of infected cells. More recently, we as well as others have demonstrated that HBZ has the potential to transform cells both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we focus on the latest progress in our understanding of HBZ functions in chronicity and cellular transformation. We will discuss the involvement of this paradigm shift of HTLV-1 research on new therapeutic approaches to treat HTLV-1-related human diseases. PMID:26690203

  4. Signaling via the CD2 receptor enhances HTLV-1 replication in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Guyot, D J; Newbound, G C; Lairmore, M D

    1997-07-21

    Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is considered the etiologic agent of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma and several chronic progressive immune-mediated diseases. Approximately 1-4% of infected individuals develop disease, generally decades following infection. Increased proviral transcription, mediated by the viral 40-kDa trans-activating protein, Tax, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of HTLV-1-associated diseases. Since the HTLV-1 promoter contains sequences responsive to cyclic AMP and protein kinase C, we hypothesized that lymphocyte activation signals initiated through the TCR/CD3 complex or CD2 receptor promote viral replication in HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes. We demonstrate that mAbs directed against the CD2, but not the CD3 receptor increase viral p24 capsid protein 1.5- to 5.7-fold in CD2/CD3+ HTLV-1-infected cell culture supernatants. Northern blot analysis demonstrated a 2.5- to 4-fold increase in all species of viral mRNA following CD2 cross-linking of OSP2/4 cells, an immortalized HTLV-1 cell line. Consistent with transcriptional regulation, reporter gene activity increased approximately 11-fold in CD2-stimulated Jurkat T cells cotransfected with a Tax-expressing plasmid and a CAT reporter gene construct under control of the HTLV-1 promoter. These data suggest a possible physiologic mechanism, whereby CD2-mediated cell adhesion and lymphocyte activation may promote viral transcription in infected lymphocytes. PMID:9234953

  5. The Burden of Neglected HIV-2 and HTLV-1 Infections in Spain.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Ana; Caballero, Estrella; de Mendoza, Carmen; Aguilera, Antonio; Pirón, Maria; Soriano, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    HIV-2 and HTLV-1 infections are globally less frequent than those produced by HIV-1, the classical AIDS agent. In Spain and up to the end of 2014, a total of 310 cases of HIV-2, 274 of HTLV-1, and 776 of HTLV-2 infections had been reported. No cases of HTLV-3 or HTLV-4 infections have been identified so far in Spain. Most persons infected with HIV-2 or HTLV-1 acknowledge epidemiological risk factors for contagion, such as originating from or living in endemic regions and/or having had sexual partners from those areas. However, risk factors could not be recognized in up to 20-25% of carriers in Spain. Thus, it seems worth keeping a high level of clinical suspicion in order to identify earlier these neglected human retroviral infections, since diagnostic procedures and antiviral treatment are specific for each of these agents. In this article we summarize the major contributions reported at the meeting of the Spanish Group for HIV-2/HTLV held in Madrid in December 2014. PMID:26616845

  6. Modelling the role of Tax expression in HTLV-I persistence in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Michael Y; Lim, Aaron G

    2011-12-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is a persistent human retrovirus characterized by life-long infection and risk of developing HAM/TSP, a progressive neurological and inflammatory disease, and adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). Chronically infected individuals often harbor high proviral loads despite maintaining a persistently activated immune response. Based on a new hypothesis for the persistence of HTLV-I infection, a three-dimensional compartmental model is constructed that describes the dynamic interactions among latently infected target cells, target-cell activation, and immune responses to HTLV-I, with an emphasis on understanding the role of Tax expression in the persistence of HTLV-I. PMID:21509627

  7. Novel interactions between the HTLV antisense proteins HBZ and APH-2 and the NFAR protein family: Implications for the HTLV lifecycles.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jane; Hall, William W; Ratner, Lee; Sheehy, Noreen

    2016-07-01

    The human T-cell leukaemia virus type 1 and type 2 (HTLV-1/HTLV-2) antisense proteins HBZ and APH-2 play key roles in the HTLV lifecycles and persistence in the host. Nuclear Factors Associated with double-stranded RNA (NFAR) proteins NF90/110 function in the lifecycles of several viruses and participate in host innate immunity against infection and oncogenesis. Using GST pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate specific novel interactions between HBZ/APH-2 and NF90/110 and characterised the protein domains involved. Moreover we show that NF90/110 significantly enhance Tax mediated LTR activation, an effect that was abolished by HBZ but enhanced by APH-2. Additionally we found that HBZ and APH-2 modulate the promoter activity of survivin and are capable of antagonising NF110-mediated survivin activation. Thus interactions between HTLV antisense proteins and the NFAR protein family have an overall positive impact on HTLV infection. Hence NFARs may represent potential therapeutic targets in HTLV infected cells. PMID:27110706

  8. Novel interactions between the HTLV antisense proteins HBZ and APH-2 and the NFAR protein family: Implications for the HTLV lifecycles

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Jane; Hall, William W.; Ratner, Lee; Sheehy, Noreen

    2016-01-01

    The human T-cell leukaemia virus type 1 and type 2 (HTLV-1/HTLV-2) antisense proteins HBZ and APH-2 play key roles in the HTLV lifecycles and persistence in the host. Nuclear Factors Associated with double-stranded RNA (NFAR) proteins NF90/110 function in the lifecycles of several viruses and participate in host innate immunity against infection and oncogenesis. Using GST pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate specific novel interactions between HBZ/APH-2 and NF90/110 and characterised the protein domains involved. Moreover we show that NF90/110 significantly enhance Tax mediated LTR activation, an effect that was abolished by HBZ but enhanced by APH-2. Additionally we found that HBZ and APH-2 modulate the promoter activity of survivin and are capable of antagonising NF110-mediated survivin activation. Thus interactions between HTLV antisense proteins and the NFAR protein family have an overall positive impact on HTLV infection. Hence NFARs may represent potential therapeutic targets in HTLV infected cells. PMID:27110706

  9. HLA DRB1*DQB1* haplotype in HTLV-I-associated familial infective dermatitis may predict development of HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis

    SciTech Connect

    LaGrenade, L.; Miller, W.; Pate, E.; Rodgers-Johnson, P.

    1996-01-02

    A possible causal association between infective dermatitis and HTLV-I infection was reported in 1990 and confirmed in 1992. We now report familial infective dermatitis (ID) occurring in a 26-year-old mother and her 9-year-old son. The mother was first diagnosed with ID in 1969 at the age of 2 years in Dermatology Unit at the University Hospital of the West Indies (U.H.W.I.) in Jamacia. The elder of her 2 sons was diagnosed with ID at the age of 3 years, also at U.H.W.I. Both mother and son are HTLV-I-seropositive. A second, younger son, currently age 2 years, is also HTLV-I-seropositive, but without clinical evidence of ID. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC), class II, human leucocyte antigen (HLA) genotyping documented a shared class II haplotype, DRB1*DQB1* (1101-0301), in the mother and her 2 sons. This same haplotype has been described among Japanese patients with HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), and has been associated with a possible pathologically heightened immune response to HTLV-I infection. The presence of this haplotype in these familial ID cases with clinical signs of HAM/TSP may have contributed to their risk for development of HAM/TSP. The unaffected, HTLV-I-seropositive, younger son requires close clinical follow-up. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. HTLV-1-associated myelopathy in a solid organ transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Montesdeoca Andrade, Maria Jose; Correa Diaz, Edgar Patricio; Buestán, Maria Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is endemic in Japan, the Caribbean and in South American countries such as Ecuador. This virus is the cause of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy or tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), a myelopathy characterised by chronic progressive paraparesis, spasticity and urinary symptoms. We report the case of a 40-year-old man who received a kidney transplant from a living donor and developed HAM/TSP, 24 months after transplant. The diagnosis was confirmed by detection of HTLV-1 in blood and cerebrospinal fluid by the ELISA and Western Blot tests. For myelopathy, the patient was treated with pulse methylprednisolone, but had poor response to treatment. We recommend that all patients receiving transplants and their donors who come from endemic countries be given a mandatory screening for HTLV-1 through an ELISA test, in an effort to inform candidates for renal transplantation of the potential risk of infection and the development of this disease. PMID:27268291

  11. How does HTLV-1 cause adult T-cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATL)?

    PubMed Central

    Bangham, Charles RM; Ratner, Lee

    2016-01-01

    A typical person infected with the retrovirus human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) carries tens of thousands of clones of HTLV-1-infected T lymphocytes, each clone distinguished by a unique integration site of the provirus in the host genome. However, only 5% of infected people develop the malignant disease adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma, usually more than 50 years after becoming infected. We review the host and viral factors that cause this aggressive disease. PMID:26414684

  12. Tropical spastic paraparesis and HTLV-1 associated myelopathy: clinical, epidemiological, virological and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Gessain, A; Mahieux, R

    2012-03-01

    In 1980, Human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 (HTLV-1) was the first oncogenic human retrovirus to be discovered. HTLV-1 belongs to the Retroviridae family, the Orthoretrovirinae subfamily and to the deltaretrovirus genus. HTLV-1 preferentially infects CD4(+) lymphoid cells in vivo. Three molecules have been identified for binding and/or entry of HTLV-1: heparan sulfate proteoglycans, neuropilin-1, and glucose transporter 1. An efficient transfer of the virus from an infected cell to a target cell can occur through the formation of a viral synapse and/or by virofilm structure. As for all retroviruses, HTLV-1 genome possesses three major ORFs (gag, pol and env) encoding the structural and enzymatic proteins. HTLV-1 encodes also some regulatory and auxillary proteins including the tax protein with transforming activities and the HBZ protein which plays a role in the proliferation and maintenance of the leukemic cells. HTLV-1 is present throughout the world with clusters of high endemicity including mainly Southern Japan, the Caribbean region, areas in South America and in intertropical Africa. The worldwide HTLV-1 infected population is estimated to be around 10-20 million. HTLV-1 has three modes of transmission: (1): mother to child, mainly linked to prolonged breast-feeding; (2): sexual, mainly occurring from male to female and (3): contaminated blood products. HTLV-1 possesses a remarkable genetic stability. HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of mainly two severe diseases: a malignant T CD4(+) cell lymphoproliferation, of very poor prognosis, named Adult T cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATLL), and a chronic neuro-myelopathy named Tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1 Associated Myelopathy (TSP/HAM). The lifetime risk among HTLV-1 carriers is estimated to be around 0.25 to 3%. TSP/HAM mainly occurs in adults, with a mean age at onset of 40-50 years and it is more common in women than in men. Blood transfusion is a major risk factor for TSP/HAM development. Clinically

  13. Antiretroviral activity of 5-azacytidine during treatment of a HTLV-1 positive myelodysplastic syndrome with autoimmune manifestations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are often accompanied by autoimmune phenomena. The underlying mechanisms for these associations remain uncertain, although T cell activation seems to be important. Human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV-1) has been detected in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes, mostly in regions of the world which are endemic for the virus, and where association of HTLV-1 with rheumatological manifestation is not rare. We present here the case of a 58 year old man who presented with cytopenias, leukocytoclastic vasculitis of the skin and glomerulopathy, and was diagnosed as MDS (refractory anemia with excess blasts - RAEB 1). The patient also tested positive for HTLV-1 by PCR. After 8 monthly cycles of 5-azacytidine he achieved a complete hematologic remission. Following treatment, a second PCR for HTLV-1 was carried out and found to be negative. This is the first report in the literature of a HTLV-1-positive MDS with severe autoimmune manifestations, which was treated with the hypomethylating factor 5-azacitidine, achieving cytogenetic remission with concomitant resolution of the autoimmune manifestations, as well as HTLV-1-PCR negativity. HTLV-1-PCR negativity may be due to either immune mediated clearance of the virus, or a potential antiretroviral effect of 5-azacytidine. 5-azacytidine is known for its antiretroviral effects, although there is no proof of its activity against HTLV-1 infection in vivo. PMID:22214262

  14. Cell Surface Markers in HTLV-1 Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kress, Andrea K.; Grassmann, Ralph; Fleckenstein, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    The phenotype of HTLV-1-transformed CD4+ T lymphocytes largely depends on defined viral effector molecules such as the viral oncoprotein Tax. In this review, we exemplify the expression pattern of characteristic lineage markers, costimulatory receptors and ligands of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily, cytokine receptors, and adhesion molecules on HTLV-1-transformed cells. These molecules may provide survival signals for the transformed cells. Expression of characteristic surface markers might therefore contribute to persistence of HTLV-1-transformed lymphocytes and to the development of HTLV-1-associated disease. PMID:21994790

  15. Plasmatic proinflammatory chemokines levels are tricky markers to monitoring HTLV-1 carriers.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Daniel Gonçalves; Sales, Camila Campos; de Cássia Gonçalves, Poliane; da Silva-Malta, Maria Clara Fernandes; Romanelli, Luiz Cláudio; Ribas, João Gabriel; de Freitas Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Bárbara; Martins, Marina Lobato

    2016-08-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is present throughout the world and is associated with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and other inflammatory conditions. The pathogenesis of HAM/TSP involves a chronic inflammatory response in central nervous system (CNS), with the presence of HTLV-1 infected cells and HTLV-1-specific CD8+ lymphocytes. Chemokines may have a role in the infiltration of these cells into the CNS. In this context, the present study analyzed the level of plasmatic chemokines CCL2 (MCP-1), CCL5 (RANTES), IL8 (CXCL8), CXCL9 (MIG), and CXCL10 (IP-10) and HTLV-1 proviral load from peripheral blood in 162 asymptomatic carriers and 136 HAM/TSP patients to determine the differences that be associated with the clinical status of the HTLV-1 infection. The results showed that patients with HAM/TSP have significantly higher levels of IL8 and CXCL9, and that the level of IL8, CXCL9 and CXCL10 was significantly greater in HTLV-1 infected individuals with high (>1%) than those with low proviral load (<1%). However, the levels of the chemokines tested have not showed high sensitivity to discriminate HAM/TSP patients from asymptomatic carriers. In addition, chemokine profiles in asymptomatic carriers and HAM/TSP groups were similar, with no significant increased frequency of higher producers of chemokines in HAM/TSP individuals. Results indicate that the heterogeneity of the individuals in the groups regarding time of infection, duration of disease, proviral load level and other possible confound factors may impair the use of chemokines levels to monitor HTLV-1 carriers in clinical practice. J. Med. Virol. 88:1438-1447, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26800845

  16. Clinical and immunological features of patients with atopy and concomitant HTLV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Gaspar-Sobrinho, F P; Souza-Machado, A; Santos, S B; Orge, G; Lessa, H A; Cruz, A A; Carvalho, E M

    2010-12-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) induces an exacerbated type 1 immune response characterized by high spontaneous IFN-γ and TNF-α production. Allergic rhinitis and asthma are associated with the type 2 immune response, with elevated secretion of IL-4 and IL-5. The aim of this study was to characterize the immune response in atopic HTLV-1 carriers. The cytokine profile of atopic HTLV-1 carriers (N = 10; all females) was compared with that of non-atopic HTLV-1 carriers (N = 14; 9 females and 5 males). Mean patient age of atopic and non-atopic groups was 45 ± 8 and 38 ± 11 years, respectively. All atopic HTLV-1 carriers had rhinitis with or without asthma and a skin prick test positive for Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus antigen 1 (Derp-1). There was no difference in cytokine levels between the two groups in unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures. In cultures stimulated with Derp-1, IFN-γ levels tended to be higher (P = 0.06) and IL-5 levels were higher (P = 0.02) in atopic HTLV-1 patients than in non-atopic subjects. In contrast, IL-10 was lower (P = 0.004) in atopic than in non-atopic HTLV-1-infected subjects. This study shows that HTLV-1 infection with an exaggerated type 1 immune response does not prevent atopy. In this case, the exacerbated type 1 and type 2 immune responses were due to a lack of IL-10 production, a cytokine that plays an important role in down-modulating type 1 and type 2 immune responses and in preventing the development of chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:21140101

  17. PRMT5 Is Upregulated in HTLV-1-Mediated T-Cell Transformation and Selective Inhibition Alters Viral Gene Expression and Infected Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Panfil, Amanda R.; Al-Saleem, Jacob; Howard, Cory M.; Mates, Jessica M.; Kwiek, Jesse J.; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Green, Patrick L.

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a tumorigenic retrovirus responsible for development of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). This disease manifests after a long clinical latency period of up to 2–3 decades. Two viral gene products, Tax and HBZ, have transforming properties and play a role in the pathogenic process. Genetic and epigenetic cellular changes also occur in HTLV-1-infected cells, which contribute to transformation and disease development. However, the role of cellular factors in transformation is not completely understood. Herein, we examined the role of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) on HTLV-1-mediated cellular transformation and viral gene expression. We found PRMT5 expression was upregulated during HTLV-1-mediated T-cell transformation, as well as in established lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma cell lines and ATLL patient PBMCs. shRNA-mediated reduction in PRMT5 protein levels or its inhibition by a small molecule inhibitor (PRMT5i) in HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes resulted in increased viral gene expression and decreased cellular proliferation. PRMT5i also had selective toxicity in HTLV-1-transformed T-cells. Finally, we demonstrated that PRMT5 and the HTLV-1 p30 protein had an additive inhibitory effect on HTLV-1 gene expression. Our study provides evidence for PRMT5 as a host cell factor important in HTLV-1-mediated T-cell transformation, and a potential target for ATLL treatment. PMID:26729154

  18. Immune responses to HTLV-I(ACH) during acute infection of pig-tailed macaques.

    PubMed

    McGinn, Therese M; Wei, Qing; Stallworth, Jackie; Fultz, Patricia N

    2004-04-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-I) is causally linked to adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and a chronic progressive neurological disease, HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). A nonhuman primate model that reproduces disease symptoms seen in HTLV-I-infected humans might facilitate identification of initial immune responses to the virus and an understanding of pathogenic mechanisms in HTLV-I-related disease. Previously, we showed that infection of pig-tailed macaques with HTLV-I(ACH) is associated with multiple signs of disease characteristic of both HAM/TSP and ATL. We report here that within the first few weeks after HTLV-I(ACH) infection of pig-tailed macaques, serum concentrations of interferon (IFN)-alpha increased and interleukin-12 decreased transiently, levels of nitric oxide were elevated, and activation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes and CD16(+) natural killer cells in peripheral blood were observed. HTLV-I(ACH) infection elicited virus-specific antibodies in all four animals within 4 to 6 weeks; however, Tax-specific lymphoproliferative responses were not detected until 25-29 weeks after infection in all four macaques. IFN-gamma production by peripheral blood cells stimulated with a Tax or Gag peptide was detected to varying degrees in all four animals by ELISPOT assay. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from one animal that developed only a marginal antigen-specific cellular response were unresponsive to mitogen stimulation during the last few weeks preceding its death from a rapidly progressive disease syndrome associated with HTLV-I(ACH) infection of pig-tailed macaques. The results show that during the first few months after HTLV-I(ACH) infection, activation of both innate and adaptive immunity, limited virus-specific cellular responses, sustained immune system activation, and, in some cases, immunodeficiency were evident. Thus, this animal model might be valuable for understanding early stages of infection

  19. Animal models on HTLV-1 and related viruses: what did we learn?

    PubMed Central

    Hajj, Hiba El; Nasr, Rihab; Kfoury, Youmna; Dassouki, Zeina; Nasser, Roudaina; Kchour, Ghada; Hermine, Olivier; de Thé, Hugues; Bazarbachi, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Retroviruses are associated with a wide variety of diseases, including immunological, neurological disorders, and different forms of cancer. Among retroviruses, Oncovirinae regroup according to their genetic structure and sequence, several related viruses such as human T-cell lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2), simian T cell lymphotropic viruses types 1 and 2 (STLV-1 and STLV-2), and bovine leukemia virus (BLV). As in many diseases, animal models provide a useful tool for the studies of pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention. In the current review, an overview on different animal models used in the study of these viruses will be provided. A specific attention will be given to the HTLV-1 virus which is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) but also of a number of inflammatory diseases regrouping the HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), infective dermatitis and some lung inflammatory diseases. Among these models, rabbits, monkeys but also rats provide an excellent in vivo tool for early HTLV-1 viral infection and transmission as well as the induced host immune response against the virus. But ideally, mice remain the most efficient method of studying human afflictions. Genetically altered mice including both transgenic and knockout mice, offer important models to test the role of specific viral and host genes in the development of HTLV-1-associated leukemia. The development of different strains of immunodeficient mice strains (SCID, NOD, and NOG SCID mice) provide a useful and rapid tool of humanized and xenografted mice models, to test new drugs and targeted therapy against HTLV-1-associated leukemia, to identify leukemia stem cells candidates but also to study the innate immunity mediated by the virus. All together, these animal models have revolutionized the biology of retroviruses, their manipulation of host genes and more importantly the potential ways to either prevent their infection or to

  20. HTLV-III infection in Canada in 1985.

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, P W; Benning, B J; Robinson, D G; Gilmore, N; O'Shaughnessy, M V

    1986-01-01

    More than 25 000 serum specimens have been tested for antibody to human T-lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) at the Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Ottawa, since August 1984. In 1985 the prevalence rates of antibody positivity among selected risk groups were as follows: patients with Kaposi's sarcoma, 77%; patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or AIDS-related complex (ARC), 66%; patients with hemophilia, 65%; symptomatic homosexual men, 48%; cohabitants of patients with AIDS, ARC or antibody to HTLV-III, 24%; and intravenous drug abusers, 13%. No case of accidental parenteral exposure has resulted in seroconversion. Eight cases of AIDS, all in antibody-positive patients, have been associated with blood transfusions. A testing protocol based on risk-group information is proposed for diagnostic laboratories. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3461870

  1. Detection of HTLV-I in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes from Patients with Chronic HTLV-I-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis and Asymptomatic Carriers by PCR-in situ Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Walter, M.J.; Lehky, T.J.; Levin, M.C.; Fox, C.H.; Jacobson, S.

    1997-01-01

    Less than 5% of people infected with human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) develop HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), a chronic progressive neurologic disease. A number of factors have been implicated in the development of HAM/TSP including heterogeneity of viral sequences, host-genetic background, viral-specific cellular immune responses and viral load. This study examined the presence of HTLV-1 tax DNA in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from 2 chronic HAM/TSP patients and 2 asymptomatic HTLV-I carriers by using PCR-in situ hybridization (PCR-ISH) for the in situ presence of proviral HTLV-I tax DNA. By this technique, rare PBL from these HTLV-I-infected individuals contained HTLV-I DNA. PCR-ISH did not detect any difference in the number of infected cells between HAM/TSP patients and asymptomatic carriers. Copyright 1997 S. Karger AG, Basel PMID:11725134

  2. Detection of HTLV-1 by polymerase chain reaction in situ hybridization in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Setoyama, M; Kerdel, F A; Elgart, G; Kanzaki, T; Byrnes, J J

    1998-03-01

    A method for nonradioactive polymerase chain reaction in situ hybridization was developed and used to determine the distribution of human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) proviral DNA in paraffin-embedded surgical specimens of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). As controls, we used biopsy samples of five cases of mycosis fungoides, cells of an HTLV-I-infected cell line (MT2), as well as HTLV-1-negative cells (YAS). We successfully detected the amplicon of the HTLV-1 tax sequence in the nuclei of the cutaneous infiltrating lymphoid cells in 90% (9/10) of ATLL cases. Studies also revealed the existence of HTLV-1 provirus DNA in nuclei of sweat gland epithelial cells and vascular endothelial cells as well as lymphoid cells in ATLL patients. Mycosis fungoides and YAS cells were negative for the HTLV-I tax sequence, but MT2 cells were strongly positive. The results indicated that this technique was more sensitive in detecting intracellular amplicons than was the previous in situ hybridization method. Through its use, we were able to easily determine the distribution of HTLV-I-positive cells among the various cells and tissues of paraffin-embedded archival materials. PMID:9502410

  3. Seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV, and HTLV among Pregnant Women in Southwestern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Opaleye, Oluyinka Oladele; Igboama, Magdalene C; Ojo, Johnson Adeyemi; Odewale, Gbolabo

    2016-01-01

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are major public health challenge especially in developing countries. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of Hepatitis B virus (HBV), Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and Human T-cell lymphotropic Virus type I (HTLV-I) among pregnant women attending antenatal clinic, in Ladoke Akintola University Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, and South-Western Nigeria. One hundred and eighty two randomly selected pregnant women were screened for HBsAg, anti-HCV, anti-HIV and HTLV-1 IgM antibodies using commercially available ELISA kit. Of the 182 blood samples of pregnant women screened whose age ranged from 15-49 years, 13 (7.1%), 5 (2.7%), 9 (4.9%), and 44 (24.2%) were positive for HBsAg, anti-HCV, anti-HIV, and HTLV-1 IgM antibodies, respectively. The co-infection rate of 0.5% was obtained for HBV/HCV, HBV/HIV, HIV/HTLV-1, and HCV/HTLV-1 while 1.1% and 0% was recorded for HBV/HTLV-1 and HCV/HIV co-infections, respectively. Expected risk factors such as history of surgery, circumcision, tattooing and incision showed no significant association with any of the viral STIs (P > 0.05). This study shows that there is the need for a comprehensive screening of all pregnant women for HBsAg, anti-HCV, anti-HIV and HTLV-1 to prevent mother to child transmission of these viral infections and its attending consequences. PMID:25879258

  4. The HTLV-I envelope glycoproteins: structure and functions.

    PubMed

    Delamarre, L; Rosenberg, A R; Pique, C; Pham, D; Callebaut, I; Dokhélar, M C

    1996-01-01

    The human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) envelope has a structural organization shared by all retroviral envelopes, which contain two mature viral glycoproteins deriving from a common precursor: an external surface protein (SU), associated with a transmembrane protein (TM) responsible for anchoring the SU-TM complex at the cell surface or in the viral envelope. Our understanding of the tertiary structure of these proteins is extremely poor. The intracellular maturation follows the normal cellular secretory pathway, resulting in expression of the mature glycoproteins at the cell surface. The five potential N-glycosylation sites are glycosylated. Most mutations artificially introduced into the glycoproteins result in loss of function, mostly due to abnormal intracellular maturation. This probably indicates a very compact structure of these proteins, where the entire structure is involved in correct conformation. Studies using neutralizing antibodies or mutagenesis have defined functional domains in the SU protein, which is responsible for receptor binding. These domains occur throughout the SU glycoprotein. Sequence analysis of the HTLV-I TM predicts a structure, and probably functions, similar to other retrovirus TMs: involvement of this glycoprotein in the different oligomerization steps leading to a fusogenic SU-TM complex and in the fusion process itself. These features remain to be proven, and it is not yet understood why the free HTLV-I viral particle is not infectious. PMID:8797709

  5. Prevalence of antibodies interactive with HTLV-I antigens in selected Solomon Islands populations.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, M Y; Hrdy, D B; Carlson, J R; Friedlaender, J S

    1990-04-01

    Serum samples obtained in 1986 from healthy individuals in three distinct Solomon Islands populations were screened for antibodies to human lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). One of the populations tested lives on the remote Polynesian outlier atoll, Ontong Java. The other two groups, the Baegu and the Lau, are Melanesians living on Malaita, the most populous of the larger Solomon Islands. Eighty-eight of a total of 601 (14.6%) sera tested were repeatably reactive in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that uses as antigen a lysate of HTLV-I viral particles. The prevalence of antibodies interactive with HTLV-I viral particles. The prevalence of antibodies interactive with HTLV-I antigens varied among the three groups, ranging from 8.5% (16/188) in the Baegu, through 13% (7/54) in the Lau, to 18.1% (65/359) among the Ontong Java population. The specificity of the screening ELISA was confirmed by protein immunoblot. No serum samples were obtained from children under 9 years of age. Although 121 of the 601 sera came from children between the ages of 9 and 19, none of these were reactive in the HTLV-I ELISA. Starting in the third decade, the prevalence of HTLV-I seropositivity increased with age, from 8.8% (10/113) between the ages of 20 and 29 to a peak of 25.9% (15/58) and 25% (15/60) in the sixth and seventh decade, respectively. This age-specific prevalence pattern is strikingly similar to that which is seen in populations where HTLV-I infection is endemic. PMID:2333936

  6. Ku protein as a potential human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax target in clastogenic chromosomal instability of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Majone, Franca; Luisetto, Roberto; Zamboni, Daniela; Iwanaga, Yoichi; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2005-01-01

    The HTLV-1 Tax oncoprotein rapidly induces cytogenetic damage which can be measured by a significant increase in the number of micronuclei (MN) in cells. Tax is thought to have both aneuploidogenic and clastogenic effects. To examine the cellular target for Tax which might mechanistically explain the clastogenic phenomenon, we tested the ability of Tax to induce MN in rodents cells genetically defective for either the Ku80 protein or the catalytic subunit of DNA protein kinase (DNAPKcs). We found that cells genetically mutated in Ku80 were refractory to Tax's induction of MN while cells knocked-out for DNAPKcs showed increased number of Tax-induced MN. Using a cytogenetic method termed FISHI (Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization and Incorporation) which measures the number of DNA-breaks in cells that contained unprotected 3'-OH ends, we observed that Tax increased the prevalence of unprotected DNA breaks in Ku80-intact cells, but not in Ku80-mutated cells. Taken together, our findings suggest Ku80 as a cellular factor targeted by Tax in engendering clastogenic DNA damage. PMID:16014171

  7. Profile of the MP Diagnostics HTLV Blot 2.4 test: a supplemental assay for the confirmation and differentiation of antibodies to HTLV-1 and HTLV-2.

    PubMed

    Miller, Liane

    2016-01-01

    As the first US FDA-approved assay for supplemental HTLV testing, the MP Diagnostics HTLV Blot 2.4 is an effective and efficient method for confirming and differentiating HTLV type infection in repeatedly reactive samples. Novel and patented antigens added increased sensitivity in identifying specimens from infected individuals while differentiating those from uninfected individuals with false reactivity. PMID:26589659

  8. The Emerging Role of miRNAs in HTLV-1 Infection and ATLL Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Moles, Ramona; Nicot, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV)-1 is a human retrovirus and the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), a fatal malignancy of CD4/CD25+ T lymphocytes. In recent years, cellular as well as virus-encoded microRNA (miRNA) have been shown to deregulate signaling pathways to favor virus life cycle. HTLV-1 does not encode miRNA, but several studies have demonstrated that cellular miRNA expression is affected in infected cells. Distinct mechanisms such as transcriptional, epigenetic or interference with miRNA processing machinery have been involved. This article reviews the current knowledge of the role of cellular microRNAs in virus infection, replication, immune escape and pathogenesis of HTLV-1. PMID:26205403

  9. Persistent Strongyloidiasis Complicated by Recurrent Meningitis in an HTLV Seropositive Peruvian Migrant Resettled in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Montagnani, Francesca; Tordini, Giacinta; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Bisoffi, Zeno; Bartoloni, Alessandro; De Luca, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of persistent strongyloidiasis complicated by recurrent meningitis, in a human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) seropositive Peruvian migrant adult resettled in Italy. He was admitted with signs and symptoms of acute bacterial meningitis, reporting four other meningitis episodes in the past 6 years, with an etiological diagnosis of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecium in two cases. He had been previously treated with several antihelmintic regimens not including ivermectin, without eradication of strongyloidiasis, and he had never been tested for HTLV before. During the described episode, the patient was treated for meningitis with broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and 200 μg/kg/dose oral ivermectin once daily on day 1, 2, 15 and 16 with full recovery and no further episodes of meningitis. The presented case underlines several critical points concerning the management of poorly known neglected diseases such as strongyloidiasis and HTLV infection in low-endemic areas. Despite several admissions for meningitis and strongyloidiasis, the parasitic infection was not adequately treated and the patient was not previously tested for HTLV. The supply of ivermectin and the choice of treatment scheme was challenging since ivermectin is not approved in Italy and there are no standardized guidelines for the treatment of severe strongyloidiasis in HTLV seropositive subjects. PMID:25846292

  10. Persistent strongyloidiasis complicated by recurrent meningitis in an HTLV seropositive Peruvian migrant resettled in Italy.

    PubMed

    Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Montagnani, Francesca; Tordini, Giacinta; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Bisoffi, Zeno; Bartoloni, Alessandro; De Luca, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    We describe a case of persistent strongyloidiasis complicated by recurrent meningitis, in a human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) seropositive Peruvian migrant adult resettled in Italy. He was admitted with signs and symptoms of acute bacterial meningitis, reporting four other meningitis episodes in the past 6 years, with an etiological diagnosis of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecium in two cases. He had been previously treated with several antihelmintic regimens not including ivermectin, without eradication of strongyloidiasis, and he had never been tested for HTLV before. During the described episode, the patient was treated for meningitis with broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and 200 μg/kg/dose oral ivermectin once daily on day 1, 2, 15 and 16 with full recovery and no further episodes of meningitis. The presented case underlines several critical points concerning the management of poorly known neglected diseases such as strongyloidiasis and HTLV infection in low-endemic areas. Despite several admissions for meningitis and strongyloidiasis, the parasitic infection was not adequately treated and the patient was not previously tested for HTLV. The supply of ivermectin and the choice of treatment scheme was challenging since ivermectin is not approved in Italy and there are no standardized guidelines for the treatment of severe strongyloidiasis in HTLV seropositive subjects. PMID:25846292

  11. Mother-to-Child Transmission of HTLV-1 Epidemiological Aspects, Mechanisms and Determinants of Mother-to-Child Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Percher, Florent; Jeannin, Patricia; Martin-Latil, Sandra; Gessain, Antoine; Afonso, Philippe V.; Vidy-Roche, Aurore; Ceccaldi, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a human retrovirus that infects at least 5–10 million people worldwide, and is the etiological agent of a lymphoproliferative malignancy; Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATLL); and a chronic neuromyelopathy, HTLV-1 Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP), as well as other inflammatory diseases such as infective dermatitis and uveitis. Besides sexual intercourse and intravenous transmission, HTLV-1 can also be transmitted from infected mother to child during prolonged breastfeeding. Some characteristics that are linked to mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HTLV-1, such as the role of proviral load, antibody titer of the infected mother, and duration of breastfeeding, have been elucidated; however, most of the mechanisms underlying HTLV-1 transmission during breast feeding remain largely unknown, such as the sites of infection and cellular targets as well as the role of milk factors. The present review focuses on the latest findings and current opinions and perspectives on MTCT of HTLV-1. PMID:26848683

  12. Mother-to-Child Transmission of HTLV-1 Epidemiological Aspects, Mechanisms and Determinants of Mother-to-Child Transmission.

    PubMed

    Percher, Florent; Jeannin, Patricia; Martin-Latil, Sandra; Gessain, Antoine; Afonso, Philippe V; Vidy-Roche, Aurore; Ceccaldi, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2016-02-01

    Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a human retrovirus that infects at least 5-10 million people worldwide, and is the etiological agent of a lymphoproliferative malignancy; Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATLL); and a chronic neuromyelopathy, HTLV-1 Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP), as well as other inflammatory diseases such as infective dermatitis and uveitis. Besides sexual intercourse and intravenous transmission, HTLV-1 can also be transmitted from infected mother to child during prolonged breastfeeding. Some characteristics that are linked to mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HTLV-1, such as the role of proviral load, antibody titer of the infected mother, and duration of breastfeeding, have been elucidated; however, most of the mechanisms underlying HTLV-1 transmission during breast feeding remain largely unknown, such as the sites of infection and cellular targets as well as the role of milk factors. The present review focuses on the latest findings and current opinions and perspectives on MTCT of HTLV-1. PMID:26848683

  13. Orf-I and Orf-II-Encoded Proteins in HTLV-1 Infection and Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Dustin; Fenizia, Claudio; Gold, Heather; de Castro-Amarante, Maria Fernanda; Buchmann, Cody; Pise-Masison, Cynthia A.; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2011-01-01

    The 3′ end of the human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type-1 (HTLV-1) genome contains four overlapping open reading frames (ORF) that encode regulatory proteins. Here, we review current knowledge of HTLV-1 orf-I and orf-II protein products. Singly spliced mRNA from orf-I encodes p12, which can be proteolytically cleaved to generate p8, while differential splicing of mRNA from orf-II results in production of p13 and p30. These proteins have been demonstrated to modulate transcription, apoptosis, host cell activation and proliferation, virus infectivity and transmission, and host immune responses. Though these proteins are not essential for virus replication in vitro, p8, p12, p13, and p30 have an important role in the establishment and maintenance of HTLV-1 infection in vivo. PMID:21994758

  14. Seroepidemiological survey of HTLV-I infection in French Polynesia, Cook Islands and Fiji.

    PubMed

    Chungue, E; Boutin, J P; Le Marchand, L; Philippon, G; Le Guellec, A; Chanteau, S; Cartel, J L; Gras, C; Martin, P M; Roux, J F

    1993-05-01

    Different population groups of French Polynesia, Cook Islands and Fiji were screened for Human T-Lymphotropic Virus type I (HTLV-I) antibodies. Among 1487 individuals sampled in French Polynesia, twelve were considered Western Blot (WB) indeterminate and one was considered WB-positive for HTLV-I infection. This positive subject originated from France and was a blood donor. Out of 196 Polynesians of the Cook Islands, one was WB-indeterminate. Among populations sampled in Fiji, one of 222 Melanesians was found WB-indeterminate and one of 211 Indians was WB-indeterminate. PMID:8405324

  15. The Vancouver Lymphadenopathy-AIDS Study: 2. Seroepidemiology of HTLV-III antibody.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, E; Willoughby, B; Boyko, W J; Schechter, M T; Wiggs, B; Fay, S; O'Shaughnessy, M

    1985-06-15

    Testing for antibody to human T-lymphotropic retrovirus (HTLV-III) was carried out in 448 participants in the Vancouver Lymphadenopathy-AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) Study. The overall prevalence rate of seropositivity was 34%. Of 130 seronegative subjects followed for an average of 8.5 months, 14 became seropositive; thus, the approximate annual seroconversion rate was 15%. More than 100 male sexual partners in one's lifetime, frequent receptive anal intercourse, fisting, a history of gonorrhea or hepatitis, and frequent sexual contact in clubs were found to be independent risk factors for HTLV-III seropositivity. PMID:2988729

  16. Pseudotypes of human T-cell leukemia virus types 1 and 2: neutralization by patients' sera.

    PubMed Central

    Clapham, P; Nagy, K; Weiss, R A

    1984-01-01

    Pseudotypes of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) bearing envelope antigens of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) types 1 and 2 were prepared by propagating VSV in cells lines productively infected with HTLV. Plaque assays of VSV (HTLV) pseudotypes were employed to determine the presence of (i) HTLV receptors on cells and (ii) neutralizing antibodies in the serum of patients with adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATLL). Cell surface receptors for HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 were found on nonlymphoid cells of human and mammalian origin. Neutralizing antibodies specific to VSV(HTLV-1) were found in sera of ATLL patients in titers varying from 1:50 to 1:30,000 and did not correlate closely with antibody titers for internal viral antigens. Sera from ATLL patients in the United Kingdom (Caribbean immigrants), United States, and Japan completely neutralized VSV (HTLV-1), indicating that the HTLV isolates from these distinct geographic regions represent a single envelope serotype. Neutralization of VSV (HTLV-1) was more specific and more sensitive than assays of syncytium inhibition. No cross-neutralization was observed between bovine leukosis virus and HTLV, and only limited cross-reaction was found for envelope antigens of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2. These studies show that VSV (HTLV) pseudotypes can be readily used to screen for neutralizing antibodies in patients' sera and to distinguish HTLV envelope serotypes. PMID:6326149

  17. Genetic Markers of the Host in Persons Living with HTLV-1, HIV and HCV Infections

    PubMed Central

    Assone, Tatiane; Paiva, Arthur; Fonseca, Luiz Augusto M.; Casseb, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are prevalent worldwide, and share similar means of transmission. These infections may influence each other in evolution and outcome, including cancer or immunodeficiency. Many studies have reported the influence of genetic markers on the host immune response against different persistent viral infections, such as HTLV-1 infection, pointing to the importance of the individual genetic background on their outcomes. However, despite recent advances on the knowledge of the pathogenesis of HTLV-1 infection, gaps in the understanding of the role of the individual genetic background on the progress to disease clinically manifested still remain. In this scenario, much less is known regarding the influence of genetic factors in the context of dual or triple infections or their influence on the underlying mechanisms that lead to outcomes that differ from those observed in monoinfection. This review describes the main factors involved in the virus–host balance, especially for some particular human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypes, and other important genetic markers in the development of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and other persistent viruses, such as HIV and HCV. PMID:26848682

  18. Evidence for HTLV-III infection in prostitutes in Tamil Nadu (India).

    PubMed

    Simoes, E A; Babu, P G; John, T J; Nirmala, S; Solomon, S; Lakshminarayana, C S; Quinn, T C

    1987-04-01

    Blood samples were collected from 102 female prostitutes housed in a custodial care institution in Tamil Nadu, India, to determine the presence of antibodies to human T-lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III). Both social and sexual histories were taken from 101 of the 102 women. Commercial test kits were used to test sera for antibody to HTLV-III. Reactive sera were tested for a 2nd time by the enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA). Those repeatedly reactive sera were transported to the US, the National Institutes of Health, for western blot analysis. The sera from 11 of the study subjects were found to be repeatedly reactive in ELISA, and 10 were confirmed to have specific antibody to the virus by western blot analysis. Both infected and uninfected women were similar in age and of low socioeconomic status. The risk ratio for HTLV-III antibody was 8.2 in those women who had had sexual exposure to foreigners. None of the women were intravenous drug abusers, and all denied oral or rectal intercourse. On the basis of the stringent criteria used in the western blot analysis, it is believed that the 10 women have HTLV-III antibody. This emerges as the 1st report of evidence for HTLV-III infection in India. 10-40% of prostitutes in North America and Europe have HTLV-III antibody; the risk factors for infection appear to be intravenous drug use and penis-rectal intercourse. 54-88% of prostitutes in Central Africa have HTLV-III antibody, and the frequency of sexual contact with different partners is more important here as a risk-factor than the type of intercourse. As the prostitutes in this study in Indian did not use intravenous drugs and did not practice penis-rectal or penis-oral intercourse and had been prostitutes for shorter periods of time than the noninfected women and had fewer contacts, it is believed that HTLV-III infection has been introduced only recently into prostitutes in India. Sexual exposure to foreigners was a significant factor in the infected

  19. Immune Compromise in HIV-1/HTLV-1 Coinfection With Paradoxical Resolution of CD4 Lymphocytosis During Antiretroviral Therapy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Rockwood, N; Cook, L; Kagdi, H; Basnayake, S; Bangham, C R M; Pozniak, A L; Taylor, G P

    2015-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infections have complex effects on adaptive immunity, with specific tropism for, but contrasting effects on, CD4 T lymphocytes: depletion with HIV-1, proliferation with HTLV-1. Impaired T lymphocyte function occurs early in HIV-1 infection but opportunistic infections (OIs) rarely occur in the absence of CD4 lymphopenia. In the unusual case where a HIV-1 infected individual with a high CD4 count presents with recurrent OIs, a clinician is faced with the possibility of a second underlying comorbidity. We present a case of pseudo-adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) in HIV-1/HTLV-1 coinfection where the individual fulfilled Shimoyama criteria for chronic ATLL and had pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii, despite a high CD4 lymphocyte count. However, there was no evidence of clonal T-cell proliferation by T-cell receptor gene rearrangement studies nor of monoclonal HTLV-1 integration by high-throughput sequencing. Mutually beneficial interplay between HIV-1 and HTLV-1, maintaining high level HIV-1 and HTLV-1 viremia and proliferation of poorly functional CD4 cells despite chronicity of infection is a postulated mechanism. Despite good microbiological response to antimycobacterial therapy, the patient remained systemically unwell with refractory anemia. Subsequent initiation of combined antiretroviral therapy led to paradoxical resolution of CD4 T lymphocytosis as well as HIV-1 viral suppression and decreased HTLV-1 proviral load. This is proposed to be the result of attenuation of immune activation post-HIV virological control. This case illustrates the importance of screening for HTLV-1 in HIV-1 patients with appropriate clinical presentation and epidemiological risk factors and explores mechanisms for the complex interactions on HIV-1/HTLV-1 adaptive immunity. PMID:26683952

  20. The transcription elongation factor ELL2 is specifically upregulated in HTLV-1-infected T-cells and is dependent on the viral oncoprotein Tax

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Melanie C. Strobel, Sarah Fleckenstein, Bernhard Kress, Andrea K.

    2014-09-15

    The oncoprotein Tax of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a potent transactivator of viral and cellular transcription. Here, we identified ELL2 as the sole transcription elongation factor to be specifically upregulated in HTLV-1-/Tax-transformed T-cells. Tax contributes to regulation of ELL2, since transient transfection of Tax increases ELL2 mRNA, Tax transactivates the ELL2 promoter, and repression of Tax results in decrease of ELL2 in transformed T-lymphocytes. However, we also measured upregulation of ELL2 in HTLV-1-transformed cells exhibiting undetectable amounts of Tax, suggesting that ELL2 can still be maintained independent of continuous Tax expression. We further show that Tax and ELL2 synergistically activate the HTLV-1 promoter, indicating that ELL2 cooperates with Tax in viral transactivation. This is supported by our findings that Tax and ELL2 accumulate in nuclear fractions and that they co-precipitate upon co-expression in transiently-transfected cells. Thus, upregulation of ELL2 could contribute to HTLV-1 gene regulation. - Highlights: • ELL2, a transcription elongation factor, is upregulated in HTLV-1-positive T-cells. • Tax transactivates the ELL2 promoter. • Tax and ELL2 synergistically activate the HTLV-1 promoter. • Tax and ELL2 interact in vivo.

  1. HTLV-1 Infection and Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma-A Tale of Two Proteins: Tax and HBZ.

    PubMed

    Giam, Chou-Zen; Semmes, Oliver John

    2016-01-01

    HTLV-1 (Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1) is a complex human delta retrovirus that currently infects 10-20 million people worldwide. While HTLV-1 infection is generally asymptomatic, 3%-5% of infected individuals develop a highly malignant and intractable T-cell neoplasm known as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) decades after infection. How HTLV-1 infection progresses to ATL is not well understood. Two viral regulatory proteins, Tax and HTLV-1 basic zipper protein (HBZ), encoded by the sense and antisense viral transcripts, respectively, are thought to play indispensable roles in the oncogenic process of ATL. This review focuses on the roles of Tax and HBZ in viral replication, persistence, and oncogenesis. Special emphasis is directed towards recent literature on the mechanisms of action of these two proteins and the roles of Tax and HBZ in influencing the outcomes of HTLV-1 infection including senescence induction, viral latency and persistence, genome instability, cell proliferation, and ATL development. Attempts are made to integrate results from cell-based studies of HTLV-1 infection and studies of HTLV-1 proviral integration site preference, clonality, and clonal expansion based on high throughput DNA sequencing. Recent data showing that Tax hijacks key mediators of DNA double-strand break repair signaling-the ubiquitin E3 ligase, ring finger protein 8 (RNF8) and the ubiquitin E2 conjugating enzyme (UBC13)-to activate the canonical nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B-cells (NF-κB) and other signaling pathways will be discussed. A perspective on how the Tax-RNF8 signaling axis might impact genomic instability and how Tax may collaborate with HBZ to drive oncogenesis is provided. PMID:27322308

  2. HTLV-1 Infection and Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma—A Tale of Two Proteins: Tax and HBZ

    PubMed Central

    Giam, Chou-Zen; Semmes, Oliver John

    2016-01-01

    HTLV-1 (Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1) is a complex human delta retrovirus that currently infects 10–20 million people worldwide. While HTLV-1 infection is generally asymptomatic, 3%–5% of infected individuals develop a highly malignant and intractable T-cell neoplasm known as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) decades after infection. How HTLV-1 infection progresses to ATL is not well understood. Two viral regulatory proteins, Tax and HTLV-1 basic zipper protein (HBZ), encoded by the sense and antisense viral transcripts, respectively, are thought to play indispensable roles in the oncogenic process of ATL. This review focuses on the roles of Tax and HBZ in viral replication, persistence, and oncogenesis. Special emphasis is directed towards recent literature on the mechanisms of action of these two proteins and the roles of Tax and HBZ in influencing the outcomes of HTLV-1 infection including senescence induction, viral latency and persistence, genome instability, cell proliferation, and ATL development. Attempts are made to integrate results from cell-based studies of HTLV-1 infection and studies of HTLV-1 proviral integration site preference, clonality, and clonal expansion based on high throughput DNA sequencing. Recent data showing that Tax hijacks key mediators of DNA double-strand break repair signaling—the ubiquitin E3 ligase, ring finger protein 8 (RNF8) and the ubiquitin E2 conjugating enzyme (UBC13)—to activate the canonical nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B-cells (NF-κB) and other signaling pathways will be discussed. A perspective on how the Tax-RNF8 signaling axis might impact genomic instability and how Tax may collaborate with HBZ to drive oncogenesis is provided. PMID:27322308

  3. Role of resident CNS cell populations in HTLV-1-associated neuroinflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Lepoutre, Veronique; Jain, Pooja; Quann, Kevin; Wigdahl, Brian; Khan, Zafar K

    2009-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), the first human retrovirus discovered, is the etiologic agent for a number of disorders; the two most common pathologies include adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and a progressive demyelinating neuroinflammatory disease, HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The neurologic dysfunction associated with HAM/TSP is a result of viral intrusion into the central nervous system (CNS) and the generation of a hyperstimulated host response within the peripheral and central nervous system that includes expanded populations of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This robust, yet detrimental immune response likely contributes to the death of myelin producing oligodendrocytes and degeneration of neuronal axons. The mechanisms of neurological degeneration in HAM/TSP have yet to be fully delineated in vivo and may involve the immunogenic properties of the HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax. This comprehensive review characterizes the available knowledge to date concerning the effects of HTLV-1 on CNS resident cell populations with emphasis on both viral and host factors contributing to the genesis of HAM/TSP. PMID:19273122

  4. Biology and treatment of HTLV-1 associated T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Tsukasaki, Kunihiro; Tobinai, Kensei

    2013-03-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) is a distinct peripheral T-lymphocytic malignancy associated with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1) endemics in several regions of the world including the south-west Japan. The three major routes of HTLV-1 transmission are mother-to-child infections via breast milk, sexual intercourse, and blood transfusions. A HTLV-1 infection early in life, presumably from breast feeding, is crucial to the development of ATL. The estimated cumulative risk of developing ATL among HTLV-1-positive individuals is about 3% after transmission from the mother. The diversity in clinical features and prognosis of patients with this disease has led to its subtype-classification into acute, lymphoma, chronic, and smoldering types defined by organ involvement, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and calcium values. For the acute, lymphoma and unfavorable chronic subtypes (aggressive ATL), and the favorable chronic and smoldering subtypes (indolent ATL), intensive chemotherapy followed by allogeneic stem cell transplantation and watchful waiting until disease progression has been recommended, respectively, in Japan. A retrospective analysis suggested that the combination of interferon alpha and zidovudine was promising for the treatment of ATL, especially for leukemic subtypes. There are several new trials for ATL, including a defucosylated humanized anti-CC chemokine receptor 4 monoclonal antibody, histone deacetylase inhibitors, a purine nucleoside phosphorylase inhibitor, a proteasome inhibitor and lenalidomide. PMID:23768636

  5. HTLV-1 Tax deregulates autophagy by recruiting autophagic molecules into lipid raft microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Tong; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Liu, Xin; Loughran, Thomas P.; Sun, Shao-Cong; Wang, Hong-Gang; Cheng, Hua

    2014-01-01

    The retroviral oncoprotein Tax from Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), an etiological factor that causes adult T cell leukemia and lymphoma, plays a crucial role in initiating T lymphocyte transformation by inducing oncogenic signaling activation. We here report that Tax is a determining factor for dysregulation of autophagy in HTLV-1-transformed T cells and Tax-immortalized CD4 memory T cells. Tax facilitated autophagic process by activating IκB kinase complex, which subsequently recruited an autophagy molecular complex containing Beclin1 and Bif-1 to the lipid raft microdomains. Tax engaged a crosstalk between IκB kinase complex and autophagic molecule complex by directly interacting with both complexes, promoting assembly of LC3+ autophagosomes. Moreover, expression of lipid raft-targeted Bif-1 or Beclin1 was sufficient to induce formation of LC3+ autophagosomes, suggesting that Tax recruitment of autophagic molecules to lipid rafts is a dominant strategy to deregulate autophagy in the context of HTLV-1 transformation of T cells. Furthermore, depletion of autophagy molecules such as Beclin1 and PI3 kinase class III resulted in impaired growth of HTLV-1-transformed T cells, indicating a critical role of Tax-deregulated autophagy in promoting survival and transformation of virally infected T cells. PMID:24362528

  6. Ancient origin and molecular features of the novel human T-lymphotropic virus type 3 revealed by complete genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Switzer, William M; Qari, Shoukat H; Wolfe, Nathan D; Burke, Donald S; Folks, Thomas M; Heneine, Walid

    2006-08-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 3 (HTLV-3) is a new virus recently identified in two primate hunters in Central Africa. Limited sequence analysis shows that HTLV-3 is distinct from HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 but is genetically similar to simian T-lymphotropic virus type 3 (STLV-3). We report here the first complete HTLV-3 sequence obtained by PCR-based genome walking using uncultured peripheral blood lymphocytes from an HTLV-3-infected person. The HTLV-3(2026ND) genome is 8,917 bp long and is genetically equidistant from HTLV-1 and HTLV-2, sharing about 62% identity. Phylogenetic analysis of all gene regions confirms this relationship and shows that HTLV-3 falls within the diversity of STLV-3, suggesting a primate origin. However, HTLV-3(2026ND) is unique, sharing only 87% to 92% sequence identity with STLV-3. SimPlot and phylogenetic analysis did not reveal any evidence of genetic recombination with either HTLV-1, HTLV-2, or STLV-3. Molecular dating estimates that the ancestor of HTLV-3 is as old as HTLV-1 and HTLV-2, with an inferred divergence time of 36,087 to 54,067 years ago. HTLV-3 has a prototypic genomic structure, with all enzymatic, regulatory, and structural proteins preserved. Like STLV-3, HTLV-3 is missing a third 21-bp transcription element found in the long terminal repeats of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 but instead contains a unique activator protein-1 transcription factor upstream of the 21-bp repeat elements. A PDZ motif, like that in HTLV-1, which is important for cellular signal transduction and transformation, is present in the C terminus of the HTLV-3 Tax protein. A basic leucine zipper region located in the antisense strand of HTLV-1, believed to play a role in viral replication and oncogenesis, was also found in the complementary strand of HTLV-3. The ancient origin of HTLV-3, the broad distribution of STLV-3 in Africa, and the propensity of STLVs to cross species into humans all suggest that HTLV-3 may be prevalent and support the need for expanded

  7. Current prevalence of HTLV-1 in Japan as determined by screening of blood donors.

    PubMed

    Satake, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Kazunari; Tadokoro, Kenji

    2012-02-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1), a major source of adult T-cell leukemia and related diseases, is endemic to southwestern Japan. Mother-to-infant transmission via breast milk is an important route of infection, and establishing programs to prevent such transmission requires exact figures on the HTLV-1 prevalence rate and the number of carriers. Therefore, the seroprevalence of HTLV-1 among 1,196,321 Japanese first-time blood donors from 2006 to 2007 was investigated. A total of 3,787 of such donors were confirmed to be positive for anti-HTLV-1 antibody. By applying a fitness curve to the age ranges outside the blood donor age range, the present number of HTLV-1 carriers covering ages from 0 to 99 years was estimated to be at least 1.08 million in Japan; this value was 10% lower than that reported in 1988. The adjusted overall prevalence rates were estimated to be 0.66% and 1.02% in men and women, respectively. The peak in carrier numbers was found among individuals in their 70s, which is a shift from the previous peak observed in the 1988 database among individuals in their 50s. Carriers were distributed not only in the endemic southwestern region of Japan, but throughout the country, particularly in the greater Tokyo metropolitan area. By applying population projections, it was calculated that the carrier number will decrease by half in the next two decades; however, the carrier population will age over that interval, meaning that the age of patients with adult T-cell leukemia will also be higher. PMID:22170555

  8. Infective Dermatitis in an Adult Patient With HTLV-1

    PubMed Central

    Riveros, Rosalba; Medina, Raquel; Morel, Maida

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Infective dermatitis is a chronic exudative eczematous eruption presenting in human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)–infected people. It presents with relapsing erythematous, scaly, and crusted lesions affecting simultaneously the scalp, external ear, retroauricular area, eyelid, paranasal skin, neck axilla, and groin. Superimposed Staphylococcus and Streptococcus infection are common. It mainly affects children and exceptionally adults, and there are only a few published cases. The authors present the first reported case in Paraguay of an adult patient who had symptoms of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1–associated progressive tropical spastic paraparesis, and 6 years after the onset of the neurological symptoms, the patient developed infective dermatitis lesions on the skin, with frequent exacerbations since then. PMID:26588341

  9. Reactive oxygen species mediate N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide-induced cell death in malignant T cells and are inhibited by the HTLV-I oncoprotein Tax.

    PubMed

    Darwiche, N; Abou-Lteif, G; Bazarbachi, A

    2007-02-01

    N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide (HPR) is a synthetic retinoid that inhibits growth of many human tumor cells, including those resistant to natural retinoids. HPR is an effective chemopreventive agent for prostate, cervix, breast, bladder, skin and lung cancers, and has shown promise for the treatment of neuroblastomas. We have previously shown that HPR inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I)-associated adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-I-negative malignant T cells, whereas no effect is observed on normal lymphocytes. In this report, we identified HPR-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation as the key mediator of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of malignant T cells. HPR treatment of HTLV-I-negative malignant T cells was associated with a rapid and progressive ROS accumulation. Pre-treatment with the antioxidants vitamin C and dithiothreitol inhibited ROS generation, prevented HPR-induced ceramide accumulation, cell cycle arrest, cytochrome c release, caspase-activation and apoptosis. Therefore, anti-oxidants protected malignant T cells from HPR-induced growth inhibition. The expression of the HTLV-I oncoprotein Tax abrogated HPR-induced ROS accumulation in HTLV-I-infected cells, which explains their lower sensitivity to HPR. Defining the mechanism of free radical induction by HPR may support a potential therapeutic role for this synthetic retinoid in ATL and HTLV-I-negative T-cell lymphomas. PMID:17122865

  10. HTLV-1 Integration into Transcriptionally Active Genomic Regions Is Associated with Proviral Expression and with HAM/TSP

    PubMed Central

    Meekings, Kiran N.; Leipzig, Jeremy; Bushman, Frederic D.; Taylor, Graham P.; Bangham, Charles R. M.

    2008-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) causes leukaemia or chronic inflammatory disease in ∼5% of infected hosts. The level of proviral expression of HTLV-1 differs significantly among infected people, even at the same proviral load (proportion of infected mononuclear cells in the circulation). A high level of expression of the HTLV-1 provirus is associated with a high proviral load and a high risk of the inflammatory disease of the central nervous system known as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). But the factors that control the rate of HTLV-1 proviral expression remain unknown. Here we show that proviral integration sites of HTLV-1 in vivo are not randomly distributed within the human genome but are associated with transcriptionally active regions. Comparison of proviral integration sites between individuals with high and low levels of proviral expression, and between provirus-expressing and provirus non-expressing cells from within an individual, demonstrated that frequent integration into transcription units was associated with an increased rate of proviral expression. An increased frequency of integration sites in transcription units in individuals with high proviral expression was also associated with the inflammatory disease HAM/TSP. By comparing the distribution of integration sites in human lymphocytes infected in short-term cell culture with those from persistent infection in vivo, we infer the action of two selective forces that shape the distribution of integration sites in vivo: positive selection for cells containing proviral integration sites in transcriptionally active regions of the genome, and negative selection against cells with proviral integration sites within transcription units. PMID:18369476

  11. Overview on HTLV-1 p12, p8, p30, p13: accomplices in persistent infection and viral pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xue Tao; Nicot, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    The human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is etiologically linked to adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma and tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy. While the role of Tax and Rex in viral replication and pathogenesis has been extensively studied, recent evidence suggests that additional viral proteins are essential for the virus life cycle in vivo. In this review, we will summarize possible molecular mechanisms evoked in the literature to explain how p12, p8, p30, and p13 facilitate persistent viral infection of the host. We will explore several stratagems used by HTLV-1 accessory genes to escape immune surveillance, to establish latency, and to deregulate cell cycle and apoptosis to participate in virus-mediated cellular transformation. PMID:23248621

  12. MicroRNA miR-146a and further oncogenesis-related cellular microRNAs are dysregulated in HTLV-1-transformed T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pichler, Klemens; Schneider, Grit; Grassmann, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Background Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of a severe and fatal lymphoproliferative disease of mainly CD4+ T cell origin, adult T cell leukemia, which develops after prolonged viral persistence. Transformation of infected cells involves HTLV-1's oncoprotein Tax, which perturbs cell cycle regulation and modulates cellular gene expression. The latter function is also a hallmark of microRNAs, a rather new layer in the regulation of gene expression. Affecting e.g. proliferation, microRNAs constitute a potential target for viral interference on the way to persistence and transformation. Hence, we explored the interconnections between HTLV-1 and cellular microRNAs. Results We report that several microRNAs – miRs 21, 24, 146a, 155 and 223 – are deregulated in HTLV-1-transformed cells. They are all upregulated except for miR-223, which is downregulated. Each of those microRNAs has ties to cancer. Their expression pattern forms a uniform phenotype among HTLV-transformed cells when compared to HTLV-negative control cells. In particular, miR-146a expression was found to be directly stimulated by Tax via NF-κB-mediated transactivation of its promoter; a single NF-κB site proximal to the transcription start point was necessary and sufficient for this to happen. An in silico analysis of potential target genes revealed candidates that might be coregulated by two or more of the aforementioned overexpressed microRNAs. Conclusion These data demonstrate that cellular microRNAs are deregulated in HTLV-1-transformed T cells. In the case of miR-146a, this could be directly attributed to HTLV's oncoprotein Tax. Interference with cellular microRNAs may be crucial to maintaining persistence or may facilitate transformation of host cells. PMID:19014482

  13. A Critical Role for IL-17RB Signaling in HTLV-1 Tax-Induced NF-κB Activation and T-Cell Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Lavorgna, Alfonso; Matsuoka, Masao; Harhaj, Edward William

    2014-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is linked to the development of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and the neuroinflammatory disease HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The HTLV-1 Tax protein functions as a potent viral oncogene that constitutively activates the NF-κB transcription factor to transform T cells; however, the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Here, using next-generation RNA sequencing we identified the IL-25 receptor subunit IL-17RB as an aberrantly overexpressed gene in HTLV-1 immortalized T cells. Tax induced the expression of IL-17RB in an IκB kinase (IKK) and NF-κB-dependent manner. Remarkably, Tax activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway in T cells was critically dependent on IL-17RB expression. IL-17RB and IL-25 were required for HTLV-1-induced immortalization of primary T cells, and the constitutive NF-κB activation and survival of HTLV-1 transformed T cells. IL-9 was identified as an important downstream target gene of the IL-17RB pathway that drives the proliferation of HTLV-1 transformed cells. Furthermore, IL-17RB was overexpressed in leukemic cells from a subset of ATL patients and also regulated NF-κB activation in some, but not all, Tax-negative ATL cell lines. Together, our results support a model whereby Tax instigates an IL-17RB-NF-κB feed-forward autocrine loop that is obligatory for HTLV-1 leukemogenesis. PMID:25340344

  14. Molecular Detection and Clinical Implications of HTLV-1 Infections among Antiretroviral Therapy-Naïve HIV-1-Infected Individuals in Abuja, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Idris Abdullahi; Ahmad, Abdurrahman Elfulaty; Emeribe, Anthony Uchenna; Shehu, Muhammad Sagir; Medugu, Jessy Thomas; Babayo, Adamu

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Individuals with human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type-1 (HTLV-1)/HIV-1 coinfection have been demonstrated to undergo CD4+ lymphocytosis even in the face of immunodeficiency and increased vulnerability to opportunistic pathogens that can lead to poor prognosis. OBJECTIVE This study investigated the prevalence as well as the effects of HIV-1/HTLV-1 coinfection on CD4+ cell counts, routine hematology, and biochemical parameters of study participants. MATERIALS AND METHODS This prospective cross-sectional study involved 184 blood samples collected from HIV-1-seropositive individuals attending HIV-special clinic of the University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Gwagwalada, Nigeria. These samples were analyzed for anti-HTLV-1/2 IgM antibodies using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, CD4+ cell counts, and some routine hematological and biochemical parameters. All samples were also tested for HTLV-1 provirus DNA using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. RESULTS Of the 184 subjects studied, 9 (4.9%) were anti-HTLV-1/2 IgM seropositive; however, upon real-time PCR testing, 12 (6.5%) had detectable HTLV-1 provirus DNA. The CD4+ cell count was significantly high in HTLV-1-positive (742 ± 40.2) subjects compared to their HTLV-1-negative (380 ± 28.5) counterpart (P-value = 0.025). However, there was no significant association between HTLV-1 positivity with other hematology and biochemical parameters studied (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION All subjects (100%) who were HTLV-1/HIV-1-coinfected had normal CD4+ counts. This gives contrasting finding on the true extent of immunodeficiency of subjects. So it is suggested to be very careful in using only CD4+ counts to monitor disease progression and as indicators for antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings. In such conditions, there may be a need to test for HTLV-1 alongside HIV viral loads in order to begin appropriate ART regimens that contain both pathogens. PMID:26688662

  15. Niclosamide, an anti-helminthic molecule, downregulates the retroviral oncoprotein Tax and pro-survival Bcl-2 proteins in HTLV-1-transformed T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Di; Yuan, Yunsheng; Chen, Li; Liu, Xin; Belani, Chandra; Cheng, Hua

    2015-08-14

    Adult T cell leukemia and lymphoma (ATL) is a highly aggressive form of hematological malignancy and is caused by chronic infection of human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The viral genome encodes an oncogenic protein, Tax, which plays a key role in transactivating viral gene transcription and in deregulating cellular oncogenic signaling to promote survival, proliferation and transformation of virally infected T cells. Hence, Tax is a desirable therapeutic target, particularly at early stage of HTLV-1-mediated oncogenesis. We here show that niclosamide, an anti-helminthic molecule, induced apoptosis of HTLV-1-transformed T cells. Niclosamide facilitated degradation of the Tax protein in proteasome. Consistent with niclosamide-mediated Tax degradation, this compound inhibited activities of MAPK/ERK1/2 and IκB kinases. In addition, niclosamide downregulated Stat3 and pro-survival Bcl-2 family members such as Mcl-1 and repressed the viral gene transcription of HTLV-1 through induction of Tax degradation. Since Tax, Stat3 and Mcl-1 are crucial molecules for promoting survival and growth of HTLV-1-transformed T cells, our findings demonstrate a novel mechanism of niclosamide in inducing Tax degradation and downregulating various cellular pro-survival molecules, thereby promoting apoptosis of HTLV-1-associated leukemia cells. PMID:26116531

  16. Niclosamide, an anti-helminthic molecule, downregulates the retroviral oncoprotein Tax and pro-survival Bcl-2 proteins in HTLV-1-transformed T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Di; Yuan, Yunsheng; Chen, Li; Liu, Xin; Belani, Chandra; Cheng, Hua

    2015-08-14

    Adult T cell leukemia and lymphoma (ATL) is a highly aggressive form of hematological malignancy and is caused by chronic infection of human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The viral genome encodes an oncogenic protein, Tax, which plays a key role in transactivating viral gene transcription and in deregulating cellular oncogenic signaling to promote survival, proliferation and transformation of virally infected T cells. Hence, Tax is a desirable therapeutic target, particularly at early stage of HTLV-1-mediated oncogenesis. We here show that niclosamide, an anti-helminthic molecule, induced apoptosis of HTLV-1-transformed T cells. Niclosamide facilitated degradation of the Tax protein in proteasome. Consistent with niclosamide-mediated Tax degradation, this compound inhibited activities of MAPK/ERK1/2 and IκB kinases. In addition, niclosamide downregulated Stat3 and pro-survival Bcl-2 family members such as Mcl-1 and repressed the viral gene transcription of HTLV-1 through induction of Tax degradation. Since Tax, Stat3 and Mcl-1 are crucial molecules for promoting survival and growth of HTLV-1-transformed T cells, our findings demonstrate a novel mechanism of niclosamide in inducing Tax degradation and downregulating various cellular pro-survival molecules, thereby promoting apoptosis of HTLV-1-associated leukemia cells. - Highlights: • Niclosamide is a promising therapeutic candidate for adult T cell leukemia. • Niclosamide employs a novel mechanism through proteasomal degradation of Tax. • Niclosamide downregulates certain cellular pro-survival molecules.

  17. CADM1/TSLC1 Identifies HTLV-1-Infected Cells and Determines Their Susceptibility to CTL-Mediated Lysis.

    PubMed

    Manivannan, Kiruthika; Rowan, Aileen G; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Taylor, Graham P; Bangham, Charles R M

    2016-04-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1) primarily infects CD4+ T cells, causing inflammatory disorders or a T cell malignancy in 5% to 10% of carriers. The cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response is a key factor that controls the viral load and thus the risk of disease. The ability to detect the viral protein Tax in primary cells has made it possible to estimate the rate at which Tax-expressing infected cells are eliminated by CTLs in persistently infected people. However, most HTLV-1-infected cells are Tax-at a given time, and their immunophenotype is poorly defined. Here, we aimed to identify a cell-surface molecule expressed by both Tax+ and Tax-HTLV-1-infected cells and use it to analyse the CTL response in fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1/TSLC1) was the best single marker of HTLV-1 infection, identifying HTLV-1-infected cells with greater sensitivity and specificity than CD25, CCR4 or ICAM-1. CADM1+CD4+ T cells carried a median of 65% of proviral copies in peripheral blood. In a cohort of 23 individuals, we quantified the rate of CTL-mediated killing of Tax+ and Tax-CADM1+ cells. We show that CADM1 expression is associated with enhanced susceptibility of infected cells to CTL lysis: despite the immunodominance of Tax in the CTL response, Tax+CADM1- cells were inefficiently lysed by CTLs. Upregulation of the CADM1 ligand CRTAM on CD8+ T cells correlated with efficient lysis of infected cells. Tax-CADM1+ cells were lysed at a very low rate by autologous CTLs, however, were efficiently killed when loaded with exogenous peptide antigen. High expression of CADM1 on most HTLV-1-infected cells in the face of enhanced CTL counterselection implies that CADM1 confers a strong benefit on the virus. PMID:27105228

  18. Mechanisms of SHP-1 P2 promoter regulation in hematopoietic cells and its silencing in HTLV-1-transformed T cells.

    PubMed

    Nakase, Koichi; Cheng, Jihua; Zhu, Quan; Marasco, Wayne A

    2009-01-01

    The Src homology-2-containing protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SHP-1), is a negative regulator of cell signaling. It is also considered a tumor suppressor gene because of its ability to antagonize the action of tyrosine kinases. Although SHP-1 is expressed strongly in hematopoietic cells, decreased expression has been observed in various hematological malignancies, which suggests a central involvement of SHP-1 in leukemogenesis. We have shown previously that human T cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) Tax-induced promoter silencing (TIPS) is an early event causing down-regulation of SHP-1 expression, which is dependent on NF-kappaB. In this study, DNase I footprinting and EMSA also revealed binding of transcription factors, specificity protein 1 (Sp1) and octamer-binding transcription factor 1 (Oct-1) to the P2 promoter, and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that these factors contribute to the basal P2 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP) assays showed that Sp1, Oct-1, NF-kappaB, CREB-1, and RNA polymerase II interacted with the core SHP-1 P2 promoter in CD4+ T cells and Jurkat cells but not in HTLV-1-transformed MT-2 and HUT102 cells when HTLV-1 Tax is present. Furthermore, bisulfite sequencing of the SHP-1 P2 core region revealed heavy CpG methylation in HTLV-1-transformed cells compared with freshly isolated CD4+ T cells and HTLV-1-noninfected T cell lines. A significant inverse correlation between degree of CpG methylation and expression of SHP-1 mRNA or protein was observed. Taken together, our data support the notion that in HTLV-1-transformed CD4+ T cells, TIPS causes dissociation of transcription factors from the core SHP-1 P2 promoter, which in turn leads to subsequent DNA methylation, an important early step for leukemogenesis. PMID:18948549

  19. CADM1/TSLC1 Identifies HTLV-1-Infected Cells and Determines Their Susceptibility to CTL-Mediated Lysis

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yuetsu; Taylor, Graham P.; Bangham, Charles R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1) primarily infects CD4+ T cells, causing inflammatory disorders or a T cell malignancy in 5% to 10% of carriers. The cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response is a key factor that controls the viral load and thus the risk of disease. The ability to detect the viral protein Tax in primary cells has made it possible to estimate the rate at which Tax-expressing infected cells are eliminated by CTLs in persistently infected people. However, most HTLV-1-infected cells are Tax–at a given time, and their immunophenotype is poorly defined. Here, we aimed to identify a cell-surface molecule expressed by both Tax+ and Tax–HTLV-1-infected cells and use it to analyse the CTL response in fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1/TSLC1) was the best single marker of HTLV-1 infection, identifying HTLV-1-infected cells with greater sensitivity and specificity than CD25, CCR4 or ICAM-1. CADM1+CD4+ T cells carried a median of 65% of proviral copies in peripheral blood. In a cohort of 23 individuals, we quantified the rate of CTL-mediated killing of Tax+ and Tax−CADM1+ cells. We show that CADM1 expression is associated with enhanced susceptibility of infected cells to CTL lysis: despite the immunodominance of Tax in the CTL response, Tax+CADM1– cells were inefficiently lysed by CTLs. Upregulation of the CADM1 ligand CRTAM on CD8+ T cells correlated with efficient lysis of infected cells. Tax–CADM1+ cells were lysed at a very low rate by autologous CTLs, however, were efficiently killed when loaded with exogenous peptide antigen. High expression of CADM1 on most HTLV-1-infected cells in the face of enhanced CTL counterselection implies that CADM1 confers a strong benefit on the virus. PMID:27105228

  20. Human T-lymphotropic virus and transfusion safety: does one size fit all?

    PubMed

    Marano, Giuseppe; Vaglio, Stefania; Pupella, Simonetta; Facco, Giuseppina; Catalano, Liviana; Piccinini, Vanessa; Liumbruno, Giancarlo Maria; Grazzini, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia viruses (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) are associated with a variety of human diseases, including some severe ones. Transfusion transmission of HTLV through cellular blood components is undeniable. HTLV screening of blood donations became mandatory in different countries to improve the safety of blood supplies. In Japan and Europe, most HTLV-infected donors are HTLV-1 positive, whereas in the United States a higher prevalence of HTLV-2 is reported. Many industrialized countries have also introduced universal leukoreduction of blood components, and pathogen inactivation technologies might be another effective preventive strategy, especially if and when generalized to all blood cellular products. Considering all measures available to minimize HTLV blood transmission, the question is what would be the most suitable and cost-effective strategy to ensure a high level of blood safety regarding these viruses, considering that there is no solution that can be deemed optimal for all countries. PMID:26388300

  1. Analysis of the Prevalence of HTLV-1 Proviral DNA in Cervical Smears and Carcinomas from HIV Positive and Negative Kenyan Women.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaotong; Maranga, Innocent O; Oliver, Anthony W; Gichangi, Peter; Hampson, Lynne; Hampson, Ian N

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic retrovirus human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is endemic in some countries although its prevalence and relationship with other sexually transmitted infections in Sub-Saharan Africa is largely unknown. A novel endpoint PCR method was used to analyse the prevalence of HTLV-1 proviral DNA in genomic DNA extracted from liquid based cytology (LBC) cervical smears and invasive cervical carcinomas (ICCs) obtained from human immunodeficiency virus-positive (HIV+ve) and HIV-negative (HIV-ve) Kenyan women. Patient sociodemographic details were recorded by structured questionnaire and these data analysed with respect to HIV status, human papillomavirus (HPV) type (Papilocheck(®)) and cytology. This showed 22/113 (19.5%) of LBC's from HIV+ve patients were positive for HTLV-1 compared to 4/111 (3.6%) of those from HIV-ve women (p = 0.0002; odds ratio (OR) = 6.42 (2.07-26.56)). Only 1/37 (2.7%) of HIV+ve and none of the 44 HIV-ve ICC samples were positive for HTLV-1. There was also a significant correlation between HTLV-1 infection, numbers of sexual partners (p < 0.05) and smoking (p < 0.01). Using this unique method, these data suggest an unexpectedly high prevalence of HTLV-1 DNA in HIV+ve women in this geographical location. However, the low level of HTLV-1 detected in HIV+ve ICC samples was unexpected and the reasons for this are unclear. PMID:27608036

  2. Multiple Pathways Control the Reactivation of Telomerase in HTLV-I-Associated Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bellon, Marcia; Nicot, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    While telomerase (hTERT) activity is absent from normal somatic cells, reactivation of hTERT expression is a hallmark of cancer cells. Telomerase activity is required for avoiding replicative senescence and supports immortalization of cellular proliferation. Only a minority of cancer cells rely on a telomerase-independent process known as alternative lengthening of telomeres, ALT, to sustain cancer cell proliferation. Multiple genetic, epigenetic, and viral mechanisms have been found to de-regulate telomerase gene expression, thereby increasing the risk of cellular transformation. Here, we review the different strategies used by the Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1, HTLV-I, to activate hTERT expression and stimulate its enzymatic activity in virally infected CD4 T cells. The implications of hTERT reactivation in HTLV-I pathogenesis and disease treatment are discussed. PMID:26430700

  3. Preventive and Therapeutic Strategies for Bovine Leukemia Virus: Lessons for HTLV

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Sabrina M.; Florins, Arnaud; Gillet, Nicolas; de Brogniez, Alix; Sánchez-Alcaraz, María Teresa; Boxus, Mathieu; Boulanger, Fanny; Gutiérrez, Gerónimo; Trono, Karina; Alvarez, Irene; Vagnoni, Lucas; Willems, Luc

    2011-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is a retrovirus closely related to the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). BLV is a major animal health problem worldwide causing important economic losses. A series of attempts were developed to reduce prevalence, chiefly by eradication of infected cattle, segregation of BLV-free animals and vaccination. Although having been instrumental in regions such as the EU, these strategies were unsuccessful elsewhere mainly due to economic costs, management restrictions and lack of an efficient vaccine. This review, which summarizes the different attempts previously developed to decrease seroprevalence of BLV, may be informative for management of HTLV-1 infection. We also propose a new approach based on competitive infection with virus deletants aiming at reducing proviral loads. PMID:21994777

  4. Preventive and therapeutic strategies for bovine leukemia virus: lessons for HTLV.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Sabrina M; Florins, Arnaud; Gillet, Nicolas; de Brogniez, Alix; Sánchez-Alcaraz, María Teresa; Boxus, Mathieu; Boulanger, Fanny; Gutiérrez, Gerónimo; Trono, Karina; Alvarez, Irene; Vagnoni, Lucas; Willems, Luc

    2011-07-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is a retrovirus closely related to the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). BLV is a major animal health problem worldwide causing important economic losses. A series of attempts were developed to reduce prevalence, chiefly by eradication of infected cattle, segregation of BLV-free animals and vaccination. Although having been instrumental in regions such as the EU, these strategies were unsuccessful elsewhere mainly due to economic costs, management restrictions and lack of an efficient vaccine. This review, which summarizes the different attempts previously developed to decrease seroprevalence of BLV, may be informative for management of HTLV-1 infection. We also propose a new approach based on competitive infection with virus deletants aiming at reducing proviral loads. PMID:21994777

  5. Epidemic of AIDS related virus (HTLV-III/LAV) infection among intravenous drug abusers.

    PubMed

    Robertson, J R; Bucknall, A B; Welsby, P D; Roberts, J J; Inglis, J M; Peutherer, J F; Brettle, R P

    1986-02-22

    Stored blood samples from 164 intravenous drug abusers who attended a Scottish general practice were tested for HTLV-III/LAV (human T cell lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy associated virus) infection. Of those tested, 83 (51%) were seropositive, which is well above the prevalence reported elsewhere in Britain and Europe and approaches that observed in New York City. The timing of taking samples of negative sera and continued drug use suggest that as many as 85% of this population might now be infected. The infection became epidemic in late 1983 and early 1984, thereafter becoming endemic. The practice of sharing needles and syringes correlated with seropositivity, which, combined with the almost exclusive intravenous use of heroin and other behavioural patterns, may explain the high prevalence of HTLV-III/LAV infection in the area. Rapid and aggressive intervention is needed to control the spread of infection. PMID:3081158

  6. The HTLV-I tax protein transcriptionally modulates OX40 antigen expression.

    PubMed

    Pankow, R; Dürkop, H; Latza, U; Krause, H; Kunzendorf, U; Pohl, T; Bulfone-Paus, S

    2000-07-01

    OX40 is a member of the TNF receptor family, expressed on activated T cells. It is the only costimulatory T cell molecule known to be specifically up-regulated in human T cell leukemia virus type-I (HTLV-I)-producing cells. In a T cell line, OX40 surface expression was shown to be induced by HTLV-I Tax alone. To understand molecular mechanisms of OX40 gene regulation and modulation by HTLV-I Tax, we have cloned the human OX40 gene and analyzed its 5'-flanking region. By reporter gene analysis with progressive 5' deletions from nucleotides -1259 to -64, we have defined a 157-bp DNA fragment as a minimal promoter for constitutive expression. In addition, we show that in the OX40+ cell line, Co, Tax is able to further increase OX40 surface expression. Up-regulation of OX40 promoter activity by Tax requires two upstream NF-kappaB sites, which are not active in the constitutive OX40 expression. Their deletion abrogates Tax responsiveness in reporter gene analysis. The site-directed mutagenesis of each NF-kappaB site demonstrates that cooperative NF-kappaB binding is a prerequisite for Tax-directed activity as neither site alone is sufficient for a full Tax responsiveness of the OX40 promoter. Upon Tax expression, both sites bind p65 and c-Rel. These data provide new insight into the direct regulation of OX40 by Tax and add to our understanding of the possible role of the OX40/OX40 ligand system in the proliferation of HTLV-I+ T cells. PMID:10861060

  7. Effect of Pulsed Methylprednisolone on Pain, in Patients with HTLV-1-Associated Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Buell, Kevin G.; Puri, Aiysha; Demontis, Maria Antonietta; Short, Charlotte L.; Adonis, Adine; Haddow, Jana; Martin, Fabiola; Dhasmana, Divya

    2016-01-01

    HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is an immune mediated myelopathy caused by the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The efficacy of treatments used for patients with HAM/TSP is uncertain. The aim of this study is to document the efficacy of pulsed methylprednisolone in patients with HAM/TSP. Data from an open cohort of 26 patients with HAM/TSP was retrospectively analysed. 1g IV methylprednisolone was infused on three consecutive days. The outcomes were pain, gait, urinary frequency and nocturia, a range of inflammatory markers and HTLV-1 proviral load. Treatment was well tolerated in all but one patient. Significant improvements in pain were: observed immediately, unrelated to duration of disease and maintained for three months. Improvement in gait was only seen on Day 3 of treatment. Baseline cytokine concentrations did not correlate to baseline pain or gait impairment but a decrease in tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) concentration after pulsed methylprednisolone was associated with improvements in both. Until compared with placebo, treatment with pulsed methylprednisolone should be offered to patients with HAM/TSP for the treatment of pain present despite regular analgesia. PMID:27077747

  8. The HTLV-1-encoded protein HBZ directly inhibits the acetyl transferase activity of p300/CBP

    PubMed Central

    Wurm, Torsten; Wright, Diana G.; Polakowski, Nicholas; Mesnard, Jean-Michel; Lemasson, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    The homologous cellular coactivators p300 and CBP contain intrinsic lysine acetyl transferase (termed HAT) activity. This activity is responsible for acetylation of several sites on the histones as well as modification of transcription factors. In a previous study, we found that HBZ, encoded by the Human T-cell Leukemia Virus type 1 (HTLV-1), binds to multiple domains of p300/CBP, including the HAT domain. In this study, we found that HBZ inhibits the HAT activity of p300/CBP through the bZIP domain of the viral protein. This effect correlated with a reduction of H3K18 acetylation, a specific target of p300/CBP, in cells expressing HBZ. Interestingly, lower levels of H3K18 acetylation were detected in HTLV-1 infected cells compared to non-infected cells. The inhibitory effect of HBZ was not limited to histones, as HBZ also inhibited acetylation of the NF-κB subunit, p65, and the tumor suppressor, p53. Recent studies reported that mutations in the HAT domain of p300/CBP that cause a defect in acetylation are found in certain types of leukemia. These observations suggest that inhibition of the HAT activity by HBZ is important for the development of adult T-cell leukemia associated with HTLV-1 infection. PMID:22434882

  9. [Chronological analyses of neuropathological and molecular biological changes in affected spinal cord of HTLV-I-infected rat (HAM rat disease)].

    PubMed

    Ohya, O

    2000-03-01

    The author chronologically analyzed neuropathological aspects of the demyelination process in spinal cords of a rat model of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) from early asymptomatic to late disease stage for clarifying the pathogenetic roles of HTLV-I in central nervous system. There was no significant difference in histopathological and immunohistochemical findings between the rats within 7 months after the HTLV-I infection and age-matched controls. The first sign of demyelination was the appearance of apoptotic cell death beginning at 7 months after the infection and the apoptotic cell number gradually increased to 12 cells per a whole horizontal section of the spinal cord, in contrast to 5 cells in the control rats. The majority of the apoptotic cells were shown to be oligodendrocytes by immunohistochemical stain with an anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody. Increment of activated microglia/macrophages started at 9 months after the infection and they rapidly increased from 15 months to reach 600 cells per a whole horizontal section, in contrast to 300 cells in the control rats. Rapid increase of gemistocytic astrocytes was found from 20 months after the infection (the late disease stage). Molecular analysis of the spinal cords revealed that HTLV-I provirus DNA was evident as early as 4 months after the infection, and massages of HTLV-I pX and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha began to be expressed at 7 months, just before or at the same time as the appearance of the apoptotic cells. The collective evidence suggests that the apoptotic death of oligodendrocytes, which may be induced either directly by the local expression of HTLV-I or indirectly by upregulated cytotoxic humoral mediators, such as TNF-alpha, through the transactive function of p40 Tax, is the major cause of chronic progressive myelopathy in WKAH rats with HTLV-I infection. PMID:10791252

  10. The role of HTLV-1 clonality, proviral structure, and genomic integration site in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Lucy B.; Melamed, Anat; Niederer, Heather; Valganon, Mikel; Laydon, Daniel; Foroni, Letizia; Taylor, Graham P.; Matsuoka, Masao; Bangham, Charles R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) occurs in ∼5% of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)–infected individuals and is conventionally thought to be a monoclonal disease in which a single HTLV-1+ T-cell clone progressively outcompetes others and undergoes malignant transformation. Here, using a sensitive high-throughput method, we quantified clonality in 197 ATL cases, identified genomic characteristics of the proviral integration sites in malignant and nonmalignant clones, and investigated the proviral features (genomic structure and 5′ long terminal repeat methylation) that determine its capacity to express the HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax. Of the dominant, presumed malignant clones, 91% contained a single provirus. The genomic characteristics of the integration sites in the ATL clones resembled those of the frequent low-abundance clones (present in both ATL cases and carriers) and not those of the intermediate-abundance clones observed in 24% of ATL cases, suggesting that oligoclonal proliferation per se does not cause malignant transformation. Gene ontology analysis revealed an association in 6% of cases between ATL and integration near host genes in 3 functional categories, including genes previously implicated in hematologic malignancies. In all cases of HTLV-1 infection, regardless of ATL, there was evidence of preferential survival of the provirus in vivo in acrocentric chromosomes (13, 14, 15, 21, and 22). PMID:24735963

  11. Neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies to conformational epitopes of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 gp46.

    PubMed Central

    Hadlock, K G; Rowe, J; Perkins, S; Bradshaw, P; Song, G Y; Cheng, C; Yang, J; Gascon, R; Halmos, J; Rehman, S M; McGrath, M S; Foung, S K

    1997-01-01

    Ten human monoclonal antibodies derived from peripheral B cells of a patient with human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-associated myelopathy are described. One monoclonal antibody recognized a linear epitope within the carboxy-terminal 43 amino acids of HTLV gp21, and two monoclonal antibodies recognized linear epitopes within HTLV type 1 (HTLV-1) gp46. The remaining seven monoclonal antibodies recognized denaturation-sensitive epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46 that were expressed on the surfaces of infected cells. Two of these antibodies also bound to viable HTLV-2 infected cells and immunoprecipitated HTLV-2 gp46. Virus neutralization was determined by syncytium inhibition assays. Eight monoclonal antibodies, including all seven that recognized denaturation-sensitive epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46, possessed significant virus neutralization activity. By competitive inhibition analysis it was determined that these antibodies recognized at least four distinct conformational epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46. These findings indicate the importance of conformational epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46 in mediating a neutralizing antibody response to HTLV infection. PMID:9223472

  12. Short communication an interferon-γ ELISPOT assay with two cytotoxic T cell epitopes derived from HTLV-1 tax region 161-233 discriminates HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis patients from asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers in a Peruvian population.

    PubMed

    Best, Ivan; López, Giovanni; Talledo, Michael; MacNamara, Aidan; Verdonck, Kristien; González, Elsa; Tipismana, Martín; Asquith, Becca; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Vanham, Guido; Clark, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is a chronic and progressive disorder caused by the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). In HTLV-1 infection, a strong cytotoxic T cell (CTL) response is mounted against the immunodominant protein Tax. Previous studies carried out by our group reported that increased IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) responses against the region spanning amino acids 161 to 233 of the Tax protein were associated with HAM/TSP and increased HTLV-1 proviral load (PVL). An exploratory study was conducted on 16 subjects with HAM/TSP, 13 asymptomatic carriers (AC), and 10 HTLV-1-seronegative controls (SC) to map the HAM/TSP-associated CTL epitopes within Tax region 161-233. The PVL of the infected subjects was determined and the specific CTL response was evaluated with a 6-h incubation IFN-γ ELISPOT assay using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with 16 individual overlapping peptides covering the Tax region 161-233. Other proinflammatory and Th1/Th2 cytokines were also quantified in the supernatants by a flow cytometry multiplex assay. In addition, a set of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles that bind with high affinity to the CTL epitopes of interest was determined using computational tools. Univariate analyses identified an association between ELISPOT responses to two new CTL epitopes, Tax 173-185 and Tax 181-193, and the presence of HAM/TSP as well as an increased PVL. The HLA-A*6801 allele, which is predicted to bind to the Tax 181-193 peptide, was overpresented in the HAM/TSP patients tested. PMID:21453202

  13. Role of Accessory Proteins of HTLV-1 in Viral Replication, T Cell Activation, and Cellular Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Bindhu; Nair, Amithraj; Lairmore, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), causes adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), and initiates a variety of immune mediated disorders. The viral genome encodes common structural and enzymatic proteins characteristic of all retroviruses and utilizes alternative splicing and alternate codon usage to make several regulatory and accessory proteins encoded in the pX region (pX ORF I to IV). Recent studies indicate that the accessory proteins p12I, p27I, p13II, and p30II, encoded by pX ORF I and II, contribute to viral replication and the ability of the virus to maintain typical in vivo expression levels. Proviral clones that are mutated in either pX ORF I or II, while fully competent in cell culture, are severely limited in their replicative capacity in a rabbit model. These HTLV-1 accessory proteins are critical for establishment of viral infectivity, enhance T- lymphocyte activation and potentially alter gene transcription and mitochondrial function. HTLV-1 pX ORF I expression is critical to the viral infectivity in resting primary lymphocytes suggesting a role for the calcineurin-binding protein p12I in lymphocyte activation. The endoplasmic reticulum and cis-Golgi localizing p12I activates NFAT, a key T cell transcription factor, through calcium-mediated signaling pathways and may lower the threshold of lymphocyte activation via the JAK/STAT pathway. In contrast p30II localizes to the nucleus and represses viral promoter activity, but may regulate cellular gene expression through p300/CBP or related co-activators of transcription. The mitochondrial localizing p13II induces morphologic changes in the organelle and may influence energy metabolism infected cells. Future studies of the molecular details HTLV-1 “accessory” proteins interactions will provide important new directions for investigations of HTLV-1 and related viruses associated with lymphoproliferative diseases. Thus, the accessory proteins of HTLV-1, once thought to be dispensable for

  14. HTLV-1 bZIP Factor RNA and Protein Impart Distinct Functions on T-cell Proliferation and Survival.

    PubMed

    Mitobe, Yuichi; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Furuta, Rie; Matsuoka, Masao

    2015-10-01

    Infection of T cells with human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) induces clonal proliferation and is closely associated with the onset of adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) and inflammatory diseases. Although Tax expression is frequently suppressed in HTLV-1-infected cells, the accessory gene, HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ), is continuously expressed and has been implicated in HTLV-1 pathogenesis. Here, we report that transduction of mouse T cells with specific mutants of HBZ that distinguish between its RNA and protein activity results in differential effects on T-cell proliferation and survival. HBZ RNA increased cell number by attenuating apoptosis, whereas HBZ protein induced apoptosis. However, both HBZ RNA and protein promoted S-phase entry of T cells. We further identified that the first 50 bp of the HBZ coding sequence are required for RNA-mediated cell survival. Transcriptional profiling of T cells expressing wild-type HBZ, RNA, or protein revealed that HBZ RNA is associated with genes involved in cell cycle, proliferation, and survival, while HBZ protein is more closely related to immunological properties of T cells. Specifically, HBZ RNA enhances the promoter activity of survivin, an inhibitor of apoptosis, to upregulate its expression. Inhibition of survivin using YM155 resulted in impaired proliferation of several ATL cell lines as well as a T-cell line expressing HBZ RNA. The distinct functions of HBZ RNA and protein may have several implications for the development of strategies to control the proliferation and survival mechanisms associated with HTLV-1 infection and ATL. PMID:26383166

  15. Phosphatidylglycerol participates in syncytium formation induced by HTLV type 1-bearing cells.

    PubMed

    Sagara, Y; Inoue, Y; Kojima, E; Ishida, C; Shiraki, H; Maeda, Y

    2001-01-20

    We previously reported that 71-kDa heat shock cognate protein (HSC70) was expressed on the cell surface of human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-susceptible cells and that HSC70, beta-actin, and a lipid-like component on the target cell membrane participated in syncytium formation by HTLV-1. We have now identified this lipid-like component to be palmitoyl (16:0)-oleoyl (18:1)-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG), using preparative thin-layer chromatographic fractionation and tandem mass spectrometric analysis. In the syncytium formation assay, exogenously added PG inhibited cell-to-cell transmission of HTLV-1 in a dose-dependent manner. Other phospholipids showed less (PE) or no effect (PC, PS, PI, PA, lysoPC, lysoPE, and CL). Binding experiments showed that PG interacted with three synthetic peptides, gp46--111, gp46--197, and gp21--400, which correspond to regions Lys111--Asp138 and Asp197--Leu216 on the gp46 surface glycoprotein, and to region Cys400--Leu429 on the gp21 transmembrane glycoprotein, respectively, as well as with intact gp46 and gp21 proteins of HTLV-1. On the other hand, HSC70 and beta-actin interacted with gp46--197 and gp46, not with gp46--111. However, the eluate from an affinity column coupled with gp46--111 contained not only PG but also HSC70 and beta-actin, despite the lack of direct interaction between gp46--111 and these proteins. In the in vitro binding assay, HSC70 showed interaction with both PG and beta-actin, while there was no evidence of any interaction between PG and beta-actin. These results suggest that HSC70 molecules on target cell surface interact with both PG in lipid bilayers and intracellular beta-actin and that these three cellular components form a receptor complex that plays a critical role in syncytium formation induced by HTLV-1-bearing cells. PMID:11177392

  16. The Transcription Profile of Tax-3 Is More Similar to Tax-1 than Tax-2: Insights into HTLV-3 Potential Leukemogenic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Sébastien A.; Durand, Stéphanie; Dasgupta, Arindam; Radonovich, Michael; Cimarelli, Andrea; Brady, John N.

    2012-01-01

    Human T-cell Lymphotropic Viruses type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiological agent of Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma. Although associated with lymphocytosis, HTLV-2 infection is not associated with any malignant hematological disease. Similarly, no infection-related symptom has been detected in HTLV-3-infected individuals studied so far. Differences in individual Tax transcriptional activity might account for these distinct physiopathological outcomes. Tax-1 and Tax-3 possess a PDZ binding motif in their sequence. Interestingly, this motif, which is critical for Tax-1 transforming activity, is absent from Tax-2. We used the DNA microarray technology to analyze and compare the global gene expression profiles of different T- and non T-cell types expressing Tax-1, Tax-2 or Tax-3 viral transactivators. In a T-cell line, this analysis allowed us to identify 48 genes whose expression is commonly affected by all Tax proteins and are hence characteristic of the HTLV infection, independently of the virus type. Importantly, we also identified a subset of genes (n = 70) which are specifically up-regulated by Tax-1 and Tax-3, while Tax-1 and Tax-2 shared only 1 gene and Tax-2 and Tax-3 shared 8 genes. These results demonstrate that Tax-3 and Tax-1 are closely related in terms of cellular gene deregulation. Analysis of the molecular interactions existing between those Tax-1/Tax-3 deregulated genes then allowed us to highlight biological networks of genes characteristic of HTLV-1 and HTLV-3 infection. The majority of those up-regulated genes are functionally linked in biological processes characteristic of HTLV-1-infected T-cells expressing Tax such as regulation of transcription and apoptosis, activation of the NF-κB cascade, T-cell mediated immunity and induction of cell proliferation and differentiation. In conclusion, our results demonstrate for the first time that, in T- and non T-cells types, Tax-3 is a functional analogue of Tax-1 in terms of transcriptional activation and

  17. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 3: complete nucleotide sequence and characterization of the human tax3 protein.

    PubMed

    Calattini, Sara; Chevalier, Sébastien Alain; Duprez, Renan; Afonso, Philippe; Froment, Alain; Gessain, Antoine; Mahieux, Renaud

    2006-10-01

    We and others have recently uncovered the existence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 3 (HTLV-3), the third member of the HTLV family. We have now sequenced the full-length HTLV-3Pyl43 provirus. As expected, HTLV-3Pyl43 contains open reading frames corresponding to the gag, pol, env, tax, and rex genes. Interestingly, its long terminal repeat (LTR) includes only two Tax-responsive elements, as is the case for type 3 simian T-cell lymphotropic viruses (STLV-3). Phylogenetic analyses reveal that HTLV-3Pyl43 is closely related to central African STLV-3. Unexpectedly, the proximal pX region of HTLV-3Pyl43 lacks 366 bp compared to its STLV-3 counterpart. Because of this deletion, the previously described RorfII sequence is lacking. At the amino acid level, Tax3Pyl43 displays strong similarities with HTLV-1 Tax, including the sequence of a PDZ class I binding motif. In transient-transfection assays, Tax3Pyl43 activates the transcriptions from HTLV-3, HTLV-1, and HTLV-2 LTRs. Mutational analysis indicates that two functional domains (M22 and M47) important for transactivation through the CREB/ATF or NF-kappaB pathway are similar but not identical in Tax1 and Tax3Pyl43. We also show that Tax3Pyl43 transactivates the human interleukin-8 and Bcl-XL promoters through the induction of the NF-kappaB pathway. On the other hand, Tax3Pyl43 represses the transcriptional activity of the p53 tumor suppressor protein as well as the c-Myb promoter. Altogether, these results demonstrate that although HTLV-3 and HTLV-1 have only 60% identity, Tax3Pyl43 is functionally closely related to the transforming protein Tax1 and suggest that HTLV-3, like HTLV-1, might be pathogenic in vivo. PMID:16973592

  18. Evaluation of a combined lysate/recombinant antigen anti-HTLV-I/II ELISA in high and low endemic areas of HTLV-I/II infection.

    PubMed

    Vrielink, H; Sisay, Y; Reesink, H W; Woerdeman, M; Winkel, C; de Leeuw, S J; Lelie, P N; van der Poel, C L

    1995-06-01

    The Wellcozyme HTLV-I/II ELISA (Murex Diagnostics) was evaluated in 7800 samples of various serum panels. Repeat activity was found by Wellcozyme in (A) 1/2181 (0.05%) Dutch blood donors, (B) 44/3036 (1.4%) Curaçao (Caribbean area) blood donors, (C) 46/2533 (1.8%) individuals of different Ethiopian population subsets, (D) 30/30 (100%) confirmed anti-HTLV-I positive samples and (E) 20/20 (100%) HTLV-II PCR-positive samples. All 91 Wellcozyme-positive samples were tested for confirmation by Western blot (WB, Diagnostic Biotechnology). Among Wellcozyme HTLV-I/II ELISA-positive individuals, HTLV-I/II WB positivity was found in 0/1 Dutch blood donors, 40/44 (88.9%) Curaçao blood donors and 20/46 (43.5%) Ethiopian individuals. HTLV-I positivity was found in 40 (1.3%) WB-positive Curaçao blood donors and in 9 (0.35%) Ethiopian individuals. HTLV-II positivity was found in 11 (0.43%) WB-positive Ethiopian individuals. The Wellcozyme HTLV-I/II ELISA had a specificity of 99.95% in Dutch blood donors and a sensitivity of 100% on confirmed HTLV-I- and HTLV-II-positive samples. In Ethiopia 55% of the HTLV-I/II WB-positive individuals were exclusively HTLV-II positive, whereas in Curaçao no HTLV-II infections were found. PMID:7655577

  19. HTLV-I infection and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mann, D L; LeSane, F; Boumpas, D; Dean, M; Blattner, W A

    1988-01-01

    We have captured the immunoglobulin genes of CLL cells by fusing the peripheral blood lymphocytes from CLL cells with the B lymphoblastoid line. The hybridoma cell line established from the fusion of CLL cell from two patients who were HTLV-I seropositive produced antibody directed against HTLV-I proteins. The antibody activity of the immunoglobulin produced by the fused cells is different in the two patients in one case being directed against a gag protein and in the other against the viral large envelope protein. In an attempt to explore possible mechanisms whereby HTLV-I may contribute indirectly to the pathogenesis of B cell CLL, we have determined that B cell lines infected with HTLV-I produce growth factor(s) which stimulate and expand populations of normal B cells as well as CLL cells. These results suggest that HTLV-I infection may contribute in several ways to the development of a malignancy in cell where the virus is not present in the cellular genome. PMID:3065727

  20. Identification of TBK1 and IKKε, the non-canonical IκB kinases, as crucial pro-survival factors in HTLV-1-transformed T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huan; Chen, Li; Cai, Shao-Hui; Cheng, Hua

    2016-07-01

    Persistent activation of NF-κB is a prerequisite for development of adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) caused by human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). HTLV-1 genome encodes a viral transforming protein named Tax, which constitutively activates the canonical IκB kinases (IKK), the central regulator of NF-κB signaling. However, the role of the non-canonical IκB kinases, TBK1 and IKKε, in the pathogenesis of HTLV-1-associated leukemia has not been evaluated. We here show that TBK1/IKKε are crucial pro-survival molecules by maintaining persistent activity of Stat3. Consistent with this finding, silencing Stat3 by the specific shRNA or by the chemical inhibitor ruxolitinib results in drastic impediment of leukemia cell growth. We further find that in HTLV-1-transformed T cells expressing Tax, TBK1 co-localizes with the canonical IκB kinases and Tax in the lipid raft microdomains. The wild type Tax, but not the Tax mutant defective in activating the canonical IKK, promotes the lipid raft translocation of TBK1. This phenomenon correlates with Tax activation of both NF-κB and Stat3. Tax does not interact directly with TBK1/IKKε, and it rather engages a molecular crosstalk between the canonical IKKs and TBK1/IKKε. Our data, therefore, demonstrate a key role of TBK1/IKKε in the survival and proliferation of HTLV-1-transformed T cells and implicate a potential therapy targeting TBK1/IKKε and Stat3 in controlling HTLV-1-mediated oncogenesis. PMID:27123832

  1. Interferon-γ Promotes Inflammation and Development of T-Cell Lymphoma in HTLV-1 bZIP Factor Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mitagami, Yu; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Kinosada, Haruka; Ohshima, Koichi; Matsuoka, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an etiological agent of several inflammatory diseases and a T-cell malignancy, adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ) is the only viral gene that is constitutively expressed in HTLV-1-infected cells, and it has multiple functions on T-cell signaling pathways. HBZ has important roles in HTLV-1-mediated pathogenesis, since HBZ transgenic (HBZ-Tg) mice develop systemic inflammation and T-cell lymphomas, which are similar phenotypes to HTLV-1-associated diseases. We showed previously that in HBZ-Tg mice, HBZ causes unstable Foxp3 expression, leading to an increase in regulatory T cells (Tregs) and the consequent induction of IFN-γ-producing cells, which in turn leads to the development of inflammation in the mice. In this study, we show that the severity of inflammation is correlated with the development of lymphomas in HBZ-Tg mice, suggesting that HBZ-mediated inflammation is closely linked to oncogenesis in CD4+ T cells. In addition, we found that IFN-γ-producing cells enhance HBZ-mediated inflammation, since knocking out IFN-γ significantly reduced the incidence of dermatitis as well as lymphoma. Recent studies show the critical roles of the intestinal microbiota in the development of Tregs in vivo. We found that even germ-free HBZ-Tg mice still had an increased number of Tregs and IFN-γ-producing cells, and developed dermatitis, indicating that an intrinsic activity of HBZ evokes aberrant T-cell differentiation and consequently causes inflammation. These results show that immunomodulation by HBZ is implicated in both inflammation and oncogenesis, and suggest a causal connection between HTLV-1-associated inflammation and ATL. PMID:26296091

  2. Highly divergent molecular variants of human T-lymphotropic virus type I from isolated populations in Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands.

    PubMed Central

    Gessian, A; Yanagihara, R; Franchini, G; Garruto, R M; Jenkins, C L; Ajdukiewicz, A B; Gallo, R C; Gajdusek, D C

    1991-01-01

    To determine the molecular genetic relationship between Melanesian strains of human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) and cosmopolitan prototype HTLV-I, we amplified by PCR, then cloned, and sequenced a 522-base-pair region of the HTLV-I env gene in DNA extracted from uncultured (fresh) and cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from six seropositive Melanesian Papua New Guineans and Solomon Islanders, including a Solomon Islander with HTLV-I myeloneuropathy. Unlike isolates of HTLV-I from Japan, the West Indies, the Americas, and Africa, which share greater than or equal to 97% sequence homology, the Melanesian strains of HTLV-I were only 91.8%-92.5% identical with a prototype Japanese HTLV-IATK-1. The nucleotide sequence of proviral DNA from the Solomon Islander with HTLV-I myeloneuropathy also diverged markedly from that of HTLV-I isolated from Japanese patients with HTLV-I-associated myelopathy and from Jamaican patients with tropical spastic paraparesis, suggesting that these variant viruses are capable of causing disease. The HTLV-I variants from Papua New Guineans, in turn, differed by nearly 4% from the Melanesian variants from Solomon Islanders, indicating the existence of another HTLV-I quasi-species. By contrast, HTLV-I strains from two residents of Bellona Island, a Polynesian Outlier within the Solomon Islands, were closely related to cosmopolitan prototype HTLV-I (greater than or equal to 97% sequence identity), suggesting recent introduction, possibly during this century. These findings are consistent with a proto-Melanesian HTLV-I strain of archaic presence, which evolved independently of contemporary cosmopolitan strains, and pose new questions about the origin and global dissemination of HTLV-I. Images PMID:1881912

  3. Seropositivity to LAV/HTLV-III in 11 European countries.

    PubMed

    Ebbesen, P; Melbye, M; Jeffries, J; Antonen, J; Valle, S L; Suni, J; Ranki, A; Krohn, K; Chermann, J C; Koch, M A

    1986-12-01

    The ECP Working Group on AIDS has evaluated data on seropositivity to LAV/HTLV-III supplied by members in II Western European countries. The period covered is 1981-84. The rise in LAV/HTLV seropositivity parallels the incidence of cases of AIDS in the different countries. LAV/HTLV now spreads freely within Europe and spread has become less dependent upon promiscuity. The epidemic is about to enter Eastern Europe. Intravenous drug abusers appear to be the risk group experiencing the most rapid spread at present. Furthermore, seropositivity in males and females outside the traditional risk groups seems on the rise, and as in the US the percentage seronegative in individuals with PGL is quite high. AIDS is rapidly becoming a major cause of cancer in young adults. A coordinated European preventive effort is urgently needed. PMID:3474150

  4. Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 2a Strains Among HIV Type 1-Coinfected Patients from Brazil Have Originated Mostly from Brazilian Amerindians

    PubMed Central

    Magri, Mariana Cavalheiro; Brigido, Luis Fernando de Macedo; Morimoto, Helena Kaminami

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The human T cell lymphotropic virus type 2 (HTLV-2) is found mainly in Amerindians and in intravenous drug users (IDUs) from urban areas of the United States, Europe, and Latin America. Worldwide, HTLV-2a and HTLV-2b subtypes are the most prevalent. Phylogenetic analysis of HTLV-2 isolates from Brazil showed the HTLV-2a subtype, variant -2c, which spread from Indians to the general population and IDUs. The present study searched for the types of HTLV-2 that predominate among HIV-1-coinfected patients from southern and southeastern Brazil. Molecular characterization of the LTR, env, and tax regions of 38 isolates confirmed the HTLV-2c variant in 37 patients, and one HTLV-2b in a patient from Paraguay. Phylogenetic analysis of sequences showed different clades of HTLV-2 associated with risk factors and geographic region. These clades could represent different routes of virus transmission and/or little diverse evolutionary rates of virus. Taking into account the results obtained in the present study and the lack of the prototypic North American HTLV-2a strain and HTLV-2b subtypes commonly detected among HIV-coinfected individuals worldwide, we could speculate on the introduction of Brazilian HTLV-2 strains in such populations before the introduction of HIV. PMID:23484539

  5. Generation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to the putative CD4-binding domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, N C; Ho, D D; Sun, C R; Liou, R S; Gordon, W; Fung, M S; Li, X L; Ting, R C; Lee, T H; Chang, N T

    1989-01-01

    A panel of seven monoclonal antibodies against the relatively conserved CD4-binding domain on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 was generated by immunizing mice with purified gp120. These monoclonal antibodies reacted specifically with gp120 in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blots (immunoblots). By using synthetic peptides as antigens in the immunosorbent assay, the epitopes of these seven monoclonal antibodies were mapped to amino acid residues 423 to 437 of gp120. Further studies with radioimmunoprecipitation assays showed that they cross-reacted with both gp120 and gp160 of diverse HIV-1 isolates (HTLV-IIIB, HTLV-IIIRF, HTLV-IIIAL, and HTLV-IIIWMJ). They also bound specifically to H9 cells infected with HTLV-IIIB, HTLV-IIIRF, HTLV-IIIAL, HTLV-IIIZ84, and HTLV-IIIZ34 in indirect immunofluorescence studies. In addition, they blocked effectively the binding of HIV-1 to CD4+ C8166 cells. Despite the similarity of these properties, the monoclonal antibodies differed in neutralizing activity against HTLV-IIIB, HTLV-IIIRF, and HTLV-IIIAL, as demonstrated in both syncytium-forming assays and infectivity assays. Our findings suggest that these group-specific monoclonal antibodies to the putative CD4-binding domain on gp120 are potential candidates for development of therapeutic agents against acquired immunodeficiency disease syndrome. PMID:2474670

  6. HTLV-1 bZIP Factor Impairs Anti-viral Immunity by Inducing Co-inhibitory Molecule, T Cell Immunoglobulin and ITIM Domain (TIGIT).

    PubMed

    Yasuma, Keiko; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Takemoto, Keiko; Sugata, Kenji; Mitobe, Yuichi; Takenouchi, Norihiro; Nakagawa, Masanori; Suzuki, Yutaka; Matsuoka, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infects CD4+ T cells and induces proliferation of infected cells in vivo, which leads to the onset of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) in some infected individuals. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ) gene, which is encoded in the minus strand of HTLV-1, plays critical roles in pathogenesis. In this study, RNA-seq and ChIP-seq analyses using HBZ transduced T cells revealed that HBZ upregulates the expression and promoter acetylation levels of a co-inhibitory molecule, T cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain (TIGIT), in addition to those of regulatory T cells related genes, Foxp3 and Ccr4. TIGIT was expressed on CD4+ T cells from HBZ-transgenic (HBZ-Tg) mice, and on ATL cells and HTLV-1 infected CD4+ T cells of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) in vivo. Expression of Blimp1 and IL-10 was upregulated in TIGIT+CD4+ cells of HBZ-Tg mice compared with TIGIT-CD4+ T cells, suggesting the correlation between TIGIT expression and IL-10 production. When CD4+ T cells from HBZ-Tg mice were stimulated with TIGIT's ligand, CD155, their production of the inhibitory cytokine IL-10 was enhanced. Furthermore, dendritic cells from HBZ-Tg mice produced high levels of IL-10 after stimulation. These data suggest that HBZ alters immune system to suppressive state via TIGIT and IL-10. Importantly, TIGIT suppressed T-cell responses to another HTLV-1 virus protein, Tax, in vitro. Blocking of TIGIT and PD-1 slightly increased anti-Tax T-cell activity in some HAM/TSP patients. These results suggest that HBZ-induced TIGIT on HTLV-1 infected cells impairs T-cell responses to viral antigens. This study shows that HBZ-induced TIGIT plays a pivotal role in attenuating host immune responses and shaping a microenvironment favorable to HTLV-1. PMID:26735971

  7. HTLV-1 bZIP Factor Impairs Anti-viral Immunity by Inducing Co-inhibitory Molecule, T Cell Immunoglobulin and ITIM Domain (TIGIT)

    PubMed Central

    Yasuma, Keiko; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Takemoto, Keiko; Sugata, Kenji; Mitobe, Yuichi; Takenouchi, Norihiro; Nakagawa, Masanori; Suzuki, Yutaka; Matsuoka, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infects CD4+ T cells and induces proliferation of infected cells in vivo, which leads to the onset of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) in some infected individuals. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ) gene, which is encoded in the minus strand of HTLV-1, plays critical roles in pathogenesis. In this study, RNA-seq and ChIP-seq analyses using HBZ transduced T cells revealed that HBZ upregulates the expression and promoter acetylation levels of a co-inhibitory molecule, T cell immunoglobulin and ITIM domain (TIGIT), in addition to those of regulatory T cells related genes, Foxp3 and Ccr4. TIGIT was expressed on CD4+ T cells from HBZ-transgenic (HBZ-Tg) mice, and on ATL cells and HTLV-1 infected CD4+ T cells of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) in vivo. Expression of Blimp1 and IL-10 was upregulated in TIGIT+CD4+ cells of HBZ-Tg mice compared with TIGIT-CD4+ T cells, suggesting the correlation between TIGIT expression and IL-10 production. When CD4+ T cells from HBZ-Tg mice were stimulated with TIGIT’s ligand, CD155, their production of the inhibitory cytokine IL-10 was enhanced. Furthermore, dendritic cells from HBZ-Tg mice produced high levels of IL-10 after stimulation. These data suggest that HBZ alters immune system to suppressive state via TIGIT and IL-10. Importantly, TIGIT suppressed T-cell responses to another HTLV-1 virus protein, Tax, in vitro. Blocking of TIGIT and PD-1 slightly increased anti-Tax T-cell activity in some HAM/TSP patients. These results suggest that HBZ-induced TIGIT on HTLV-1 infected cells impairs T-cell responses to viral antigens. This study shows that HBZ-induced TIGIT plays a pivotal role in attenuating host immune responses and shaping a microenvironment favorable to HTLV-1. PMID:26735971

  8. Enhancement of anti-STLV-1/HTLV-1 immune responses through multimodal effects of anti-CCR4 antibody.

    PubMed

    Sugata, Kenji; Yasunaga, Jun-Ichirou; Miura, Michi; Akari, Hirofumi; Utsunomiya, Atae; Nosaka, Kisato; Watanabe, Yuko; Suzushima, Hitoshi; Koh, Ki-Ryang; Nakagawa, Masanori; Kohara, Michinori; Matsuoka, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) causes adult T-cell leukemia and inflammatory diseases. Because anti-HTLV-1 immune responses are critical for suppressing infected cells, enhancing cellular immunity is beneficial for the treatment of HTLV-1-associated diseases. Using simian T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (STLV-1) infected Japanese macaques, we analyzed the immune responses to viral antigens and the dynamics of virus-infected cells. The chemokine receptor CCR4 is expressed on STLV-1 infected cells, and administration of humanized monoclonal antibody to CCR4, mogamulizumab, dramatically decreased the number of STLV-1-infected cells in vivo. Concurrently, mogamulizumab treatment enhanced STLV-1 specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses by simultaneously targeting CCR4(+) effector regulatory T (Treg) cells and infected cells. Mogamulizumab promoted the phagocytosis of CCR4(+) infected cells by macrophages, which likely enhanced antigen presentation. Vaccination with recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV) expressing viral antigens suppressed the proviral load and the number of Tax-expressing cells. Enhanced T-cell responses were also observed in some ATL patients who were treated with mogamulizumab. This study shows that mogamulizumab works not only by killing CCR4(+) infected cells directly, but also by enhancing T cell responses by increasing the phagocytosis of infected cells by antigen-presenting cells and suppressing CCR4(+) effector Treg cells. PMID:27250643

  9. Enhancement of anti-STLV-1/HTLV-1 immune responses through multimodal effects of anti-CCR4 antibody

    PubMed Central

    Sugata, Kenji; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Miura, Michi; Akari, Hirofumi; Utsunomiya, Atae; Nosaka, Kisato; Watanabe, Yuko; Suzushima, Hitoshi; Koh, Ki-Ryang; Nakagawa, Masanori; Kohara, Michinori; Matsuoka, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) causes adult T-cell leukemia and inflammatory diseases. Because anti-HTLV-1 immune responses are critical for suppressing infected cells, enhancing cellular immunity is beneficial for the treatment of HTLV-1-associated diseases. Using simian T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (STLV-1) infected Japanese macaques, we analyzed the immune responses to viral antigens and the dynamics of virus-infected cells. The chemokine receptor CCR4 is expressed on STLV-1 infected cells, and administration of humanized monoclonal antibody to CCR4, mogamulizumab, dramatically decreased the number of STLV-1-infected cells in vivo. Concurrently, mogamulizumab treatment enhanced STLV-1 specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses by simultaneously targeting CCR4+ effector regulatory T (Treg) cells and infected cells. Mogamulizumab promoted the phagocytosis of CCR4+ infected cells by macrophages, which likely enhanced antigen presentation. Vaccination with recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV) expressing viral antigens suppressed the proviral load and the number of Tax-expressing cells. Enhanced T-cell responses were also observed in some ATL patients who were treated with mogamulizumab. This study shows that mogamulizumab works not only by killing CCR4+ infected cells directly, but also by enhancing T cell responses by increasing the phagocytosis of infected cells by antigen-presenting cells and suppressing CCR4+ effector Treg cells. PMID:27250643

  10. Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 infection among U.S. thalassemia patients.

    PubMed

    Switzer, William M; Shankar, Anupama; Trimble, Sean R; Thompson, Alexis A; Giardina, Patricia J; Cohen, Alan R; Coates, Thomas D; Vichinsky, Elliott; Neufeld, Ellis J; Boudreaux, Jeanne M; Heneine, Walid

    2013-07-01

    Thalassemia is an inherited genetic disorder requiring multiple transfusions to treat anemia caused by low hemoglobin levels. Thus, thalassemia patients are at risk for infection with blood-borne pathogens, including human T cell lymphotropic viruses (HTLV) that are transmitted by transfusion of cellular blood products. Here, we examined the prevalence of HTLV among 234 U.S. thalassemia patients using sera collected in 2008. Sera were tested for antibodies to HTLV-1/2 using enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and a confirmatory western blot (WB) that differentiates between HTLV-1 and HTLV-2. Demographic information and clinical information were collected at study enrollment, including HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) status. Three patients (1.3%) were WB positive; two were HTLV-1 and one could not be serotyped as HTLV-1/2. All three HTLV-positive persons were HIV-1 negative and one was HCV seropositive. The HTLV seroprevalence was higher than that of HIV-1 (0.85%) and lower than HCV (18.8%) in this population. All three patients (ages 26-46 years) were diagnosed with β-thalassemia shortly after birth and have since been receiving multiple transfusions annually. Two of the HTLV-positive patients confirmed receiving transfusions before HTLV blood screening was implemented in 1988. We identified a substantial HTLV-1 seroprevalence in U.S. thalassemia patients that is much greater than that seen in blood donors. Our findings highlight the importance of HTLV testing of patients with thalassemia and other diseases requiring multiple transfusions, especially in recipients of unscreened transfusions. In addition, appropriate counseling and follow-up of HTLV-infected patients are warranted. PMID:23409829

  11. TRANSMISIÓN VERTICAL DE HTLV-1 EN EL PERÚ

    PubMed Central

    Villaverde, Jorge Alarcón; Romaní, Franco Romaní; Torres, Silvia Montano; Zunt, Joseph R.

    2012-01-01

    La infección por el virus linfotrópico humano de células T tipo 1 (HTLV-1) ha sido descrita en muchas áreas del mundo, como en los países del Caribe, Japón, África, Oceanía y en Sudamérica. En la presente revisión definimos la endemicidad del HTLV-1 en el país, planteando cuatro criterios epidemiológicos. Luego discutimos el tema central de la revisión: la transmisión vertical del HTLV-1, que en nuestro país sería uno de los principales mecanismos de transmisión. Dentro del desarrollo de este aspecto en particular, presentamos una estimación de la tasa de transmisión vertical y los factores de riesgo asociados con la transmisión vertical sobre la base de una revisión exhaustiva de estudios nacionales y extranjeros. Con esta revisión pretendemos dar una primera aproximación al estudio de la trasmisión vertical de HTLV-1, un aspecto poco estudiado en nuestro medio. PMID:21537777

  12. The tax gene of human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 is essential for transformation of human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, T M; Pettiford, S M; Green, P L

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV)-mediated transformation and induction of malignancy is unknown; however, several studies have implicated the viral gene product, Tax. Conclusive evidence for the role of Tax in the HTLV malignant process has been impeded by the inability to mutate tax in the context of an infectious virus and dissociate viral replication from cellular transformation. To circumvent this problem we constructed a mutant of HTLV type 2 (HTLV-2) that replicates by a Tax-independent mechanism. For these studies, the Tax response element in the viral long terminal repeat was replaced with the cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter enhancer (C-enh). Transcription of the chimeric HTLV-2 (HTLVC-enh) was efficiently directed by this heterologous promoter. Also, the chimeric virus transformed primary human T lymphocytes with an efficiency similar to that of wild-type HTLV-2. A tax-knockout virus, termed HTLVC-enhDeltaTax, was constructed to directly assess the importance of Tax in cellular transformation. Transfection and infection studies indicated that HTLVC-enhDeltaTax was replication competent; however, HTLVC-enhDeltaTax failed to transform primary human T lymphocytes. We conclude that Tax is essential for HTLV-mediated transformation of human T lymphocytes. Furthermore, this chimeric HTLV, that replicates in the absence of Tax, should facilitate studies to determine the precise mechanism of T-lymphocyte transformation by HTLV. PMID:8764028

  13. HTLV-1 Rex is required for viral spread and persistence in vivo but is dispensable for cellular immortalization in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jianxin; Silverman, Lee; Lairmore, Michael D.; Green, Patrick L.

    2010-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is associated with leukemia/lymphoma and neurologic disorders. Although the viral transcriptional activator Tax is the critical viral oncoprotein, Rex, which regulates the expression of the viral structural and enzymatic genes, is essential for efficient viral replication. Herein, we investigate the contribution of Rex in HTLV-1 immortalization of primary T cells in vitro and viral survival in an infectious rabbit animal model. A Rex-deficient HTLV-1 (HTLVRex−) was constructed and characterized for viral gene expression, protein production, and immortalization capacity. Cells transiently transfected with the HTLVRex− proviral clone produced low detectable levels of p19 Gag. 729HTLVRex− stable transfectants produced functional Tax, but undetectable levels of Rex or p19 Gag. Coculture of irradiated 729HTLVRex− cells with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) resulted in sustained interleukin-2 (IL-2)–dependent growth of primary T lymphocytes. These cells carried the HTLVRex− genome and expressed tax/rex mRNA but produced no detectable Rex or p19 Gag. Rabbits inoculated with irradiated 729HTLVRex− cells or 729HTLVRex− cells transiently transfected with a Rex cDNA expression plasmid failed to become persistently infected or mount a detectable antibody response to the viral gene products. Together, our results provide the first direct evidence that Rex and its function to modulate viral gene expression and virion production is not required for in vitro immortalization by HTLV-1. However, Rex is critical for efficient infection of cells and persistence in vivo. PMID:12907436

  14. Seroprevalence of HTLV-1/2 among blood donors in the state of Maranhão, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Graça Maria de Castro; Nascimento, Maria do Desterro Soares Brandão; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Artur Souza; dos Santos, Alessandro Carvalho; Galvão, Carolina de Souza; da Silva, Marcos Antonio Custódio Neto

    2014-01-01

    Background Infection with human T-lymphotropic virus 1 or 2 (HTLV-1/2) is a major health problem. There is a public health policy defining measures for state hematology and hemotherapy centers in Brazil, in order to avoid virus transmission through blood donors. Objective This study aimed to evaluate the seroprevalence of HTLV -1/2 in blood donors in the State of Maranhão, Brazil, during routine blood unit screening. Methods Screening tests of blood donors using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect seropositivity for HTLV-1/2 performed at the Hematology and Hemotherapy Center of the State of Maranhão (HEMOMAR) between July of 2003 and December of 2009 were retrospectively evaluated. Results Of the 365,564 blood donors, 561 (0.15%) were HTLV-1/2-positive, of whom 72 (12.8%) performed the confirmatory test (Western blot). In donors who had a confirmatory test, 53 (73.6%) were positive. The ages of the infected individuals ranged from 18 to 65 years; 305 (54%) were aged over 40 years. Among the infected individuals, 309 (55%) were male, 399 (71%) were mixed-race, and 259 (46%) were single. Co-infections were frequently found, especially with hepatitis B (in 68.6% of the cases). Conclusion The results obtained will contribute to the planning and implementation of control measures by the epidemiological surveillance agency of Maranhão, and will also contribute to reducing morbidity. The high seropositivity in a small sample in donors who had confirmatory tests indicates the need for confirmatory tests for all donors who initially test as seropositive. PMID:24624036

  15. HTLV-1 Tax Stabilizes MCL-1 via TRAF6-Dependent K63-Linked Polyubiquitination to Promote Cell Survival and Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Bong; Harhaj, Edward William

    2014-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein hijacks the host ubiquitin machinery to activate IκB kinases (IKKs) and NF-κB and promote cell survival; however, the key ubiquitinated factors downstream of Tax involved in cell transformation are unknown. Using mass spectrometry, we undertook an unbiased proteome-wide quantitative survey of cellular proteins modified by ubiquitin in the presence of Tax or a Tax mutant impaired in IKK activation. Tax induced the ubiquitination of 22 cellular proteins, including the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family member MCL-1, in an IKK-dependent manner. Tax was found to promote the nondegradative lysine 63 (K63)-linked polyubiquitination of MCL-1 that was dependent on the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRAF6 and the IKK complex. Tax interacted with and activated TRAF6, and triggered its mitochondrial localization, where it conjugated four carboxyl-terminal lysine residues of MCL-1 with K63-linked polyubiquitin chains, which stabilized and protected MCL-1 from genotoxic stress-induced degradation. TRAF6 and MCL-1 played essential roles in the survival of HTLV-1 transformed cells and the immortalization of primary T cells by HTLV-1. Therefore, K63-linked polyubiquitination represents a novel regulatory mechanism controlling MCL-1 stability that has been usurped by a viral oncogene to precipitate cell survival and transformation. PMID:25340740

  16. Development and evaluation of a human T-cell leukemia virus type I serologic confirmatory assay incorporating a recombinant envelope polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Lillehoj, E P; Alexander, S S; Dubrule, C J; Wiktor, S; Adams, R; Tai, C C; Manns, A; Blattner, W A

    1990-12-01

    A recombinant protein derived from the gp21 region of the human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) env gene was synthesized in Escherichia coli and purified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The purified protein was free of contaminating bacterial proteins and retained reactivity with human HTLV-I- and HTLV-II-positive sera and a gp21 monoclonal antibody. An immunoblot procedure using the recombinant polypeptide in conjunction with native viral proteins was more sensitive than the conventional immunoblot and radioimmunoprecipitation confirmatory assays for detection of antibodies to HTLV-I and HTLV-II env-encoded gene products. The recombinant protein was equally reactive with sera from polymerase chain reaction-confirmed HTLV-I or HTLV-II infections. Furthermore, on the basis of the differential reactivities of gp21-positive sera with the HTLV-I p19 and p24 gag-encoded proteins, an algorithm was proposed to distinguish exposure to HTLV-I from exposure to HTLV-II. These results establish the utility of a modified immunoblot assay incorporating a recombinant envelope polypeptide as an alternative to existing HTLV-I-confirmatory assays. PMID:2279997

  17. Acetylation of the c-MYC oncoprotein is required for cooperation with the HTLV-1 p30{sup II} accessory protein and the induction of oncogenic cellular transformation by p30{sup II}/c-MYC

    SciTech Connect

    Romeo, Megan M.; Ko, Bookyung; Kim, Janice; Brady, Rebecca; Heatley, Hayley C.; He, Jeffrey; Harrod, Carolyn K.; Barnett, Braden; Ratner, Lee; Lairmore, Michael D.; Martinez, Ernest; Lüscher, Bernhard; Robson, Craig N.; Henriksson, Marie; Harrod, Robert

    2015-02-15

    The human T-cell leukemia retrovirus type-1 (HTLV-1) p30{sup II} protein is a multifunctional latency-maintenance factor that negatively regulates viral gene expression and deregulates host signaling pathways involved in aberrant T-cell growth and proliferation. We have previously demonstrated that p30{sup II} interacts with the c-MYC oncoprotein and enhances c-MYC-dependent transcriptional and oncogenic functions. However, the molecular and biochemical events that mediate the cooperation between p30{sup II} and c-MYC remain to be completely understood. Herein we demonstrate that p30{sup II} induces lysine-acetylation of the c-MYC oncoprotein. Acetylation-defective c-MYC Lys→Arg substitution mutants are impaired for oncogenic transformation with p30{sup II} in c-myc{sup −/−} HO15.19 fibroblasts. Using dual-chromatin-immunoprecipitations (dual-ChIPs), we further demonstrate that p30{sup II} is present in c-MYC-containing nucleoprotein complexes in HTLV-1-transformed HuT-102 T-lymphocytes. Moreover, p30{sup II} inhibits apoptosis in proliferating cells expressing c-MYC under conditions of genotoxic stress. These findings suggest that c-MYC-acetylation is required for the cooperation between p30{sup II}/c-MYC which could promote proviral replication and contribute to HTLV-1-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Acetylation of c-MYC is required for oncogenic transformation by HTLV-1 p30{sup II}/c-MYC. • Acetylation-defective c-MYC mutants are impaired for foci-formation by p30{sup II}/c-MYC. • The HTLV-1 p30{sup II} protein induces lysine-acetylation of c-MYC. • p30{sup II} is present in c-MYC nucleoprotein complexes in HTLV-1-transformed T-cells. • HTLV-1 p30{sup II} inhibits apoptosis in c-MYC-expressing proliferating cells.

  18. Combined Cytolytic Effects of a Vaccinia Virus Encoding a Single Chain Trimer of MHC-I with a Tax-Epitope and Tax-Specific CTLs on HTLV-I-Infected Cells in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Takafumi; Kidokoro, Minoru; Zhang, Xianfeng; Shida, Hisatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia (ATL) is a malignant lymphoproliferative disease caused by human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I). To develop an effective therapy against the disease, we have examined the oncolytic ability of an attenuated vaccinia virus (VV), LC16m8Δ (m8Δ), and an HTLV-I Tax-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) line, 4O1/C8, against an HTLV-I-infected rat T cell line, FPM1. Our results demonstrated that m8Δ was able to replicate in and lyse tumorigenic FPM1 cells but was incompetent to injure 4O1/C8 cells, suggesting the preferential cytolytic activity toward tumor cells. To further enhance the cytolysis of HTLV-I-infected cells, we modified m8Δ and obtained m8Δ/RT1AlSCTax180L, which can express a single chain trimer (SCT) of rat major histocompatibility complex class I with a Tax-epitope. Combined treatment with m8Δ/RT1AlSCTax180L and 4O1/C8 increased the cytolysis of FPM1V.EFGFP/8R cells, a CTL-resistant subclone of FPM1, compared with that using 4O1/C8 and m8Δ presenting an unrelated peptide, suggesting that the activation of 4O1/C8 by m8Δ/RT1AlSCTax180L further enhanced the killing of the tumorigenic HTLV-I-infected cells. Our results indicate that combined therapy of oncolytic VVs with SCTs and HTLV-I-specific CTLs may be effective for eradication of HTLV-I-infected cells, which evade from CTL lysis and potentially develop ATL. PMID:24791004

  19. HTLV-1 subgroups associated with the risk of HAM/TSP are related to viral and host gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, independent of the transactivation functions of the viral factors.

    PubMed

    Yasuma, Keiko; Matsuzaki, Toshio; Yamano, Yoshihisa; Takashima, Hiroshi; Matsuoka, Masao; Saito, Mineki

    2016-08-01

    Among human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected individuals, the risk of developing HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) across lifetime differs between ethnic groups. There is an association between HTLV-1 tax gene subgroups (subgroup-A or subgroup-B) and the risk of HAM/TSP in the Japanese population. In this study, we investigated the full-length proviral genome sequences of various HTLV-1-infected cell lines and patient samples. The functional differences in the viral transcriptional regulators Tax and HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ) between each subgroup and the relationships between subgroups and the clinical and laboratory characteristics of HAM/TSP patients were evaluated. The results of these analyses indicated the following: (1) distinct nucleotide substitutions corresponding to each subgroup were associated with nucleotide substitutions in viral structural, regulatory, and accessory genes; (2) the HBZ messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in HTLV-1-infected cells was significantly higher in HAM/TSP patients with subgroup-B than in those with subgroup-A; (3) a positive correlation was observed between the expression of HBZ mRNA and its target Foxp3 mRNA in HAM/TSP patients with subgroup-B, but not in patients with subgroup-A; (4) no clear differences were noted in clinical and laboratory characteristics between HAM/TSP patients with subgroup-A and subgroup-B; and (5) no functional differences were observed in Tax and HBZ between each subgroup based on reporter gene assays. Our results indicate that although different HTLV-1 subgroups are characterized by different patterns of viral and host gene expression in HAM/TSP patients via independent mechanisms of direct transcriptional regulation, these differences do not significantly affect the clinical and laboratory characteristics of HAM/TSP patients. PMID:26635027

  20. HTLV-I Tax-Mediated Inactivation of Cell Cycle Checkpoints and DNA Repair Pathways Contribute to Cellular Transformation: “A Random Mutagenesis Model”

    PubMed Central

    Nicot, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    To achieve cellular transformation, most oncogenic retroviruses use transduction by proto-oncogene capture or insertional mutagenesis, whereby provirus integration disrupts expression of tumor suppressors or proto-oncogenes. In contrast, the Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-I) has been classified in a separate class referred to as “transactivating retroviruses”. Current views suggest that the viral encoded Tax protein transactivates expression of cellular genes leading to deregulated growth and transformation. However, if Tax-mediated transactivation was indeed sufficient for cellular transformation, a fairly high frequency of infected cells would eventually become transformed. In contrast, the frequency of transformation by HTLV-I is very low, likely less than 5%. This review will discuss the current understanding and recent discoveries highlighting critical functions of Tax in cellular transformation. HTLV-I Tax carries out essential functions in order to override cell cycle checkpoints and deregulate cellular division. In addition, Tax expression is associated with increased DNA damage and genome instability. Since Tax can inhibit multiple DNA repair pathways and stimulate unfaithful DNA repair or bypass checkpoints, these processes allow accumulation of genetic mutations in the host genome. Given this, a “Random Mutagenesis” transformation model seems more suitable to characterize the oncogenic activities of HTLV-I. PMID:26835512

  1. HTLV-1 Rex Tunes the Cellular Environment Favorable for Viral Replication.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Kazumi; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2016-03-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) Rex is a viral RNA binding protein. The most important and well-known function of Rex is stabilizing and exporting viral mRNAs from the nucleus, particularly for unspliced/partially-spliced mRNAs encoding the structural proteins essential for viral replication. Without Rex, these unspliced viral mRNAs would otherwise be completely spliced. Therefore, Rex is vital for the translation of structural proteins and the stabilization of viral genomic RNA and, thus, for viral replication. Rex schedules the period of extensive viral replication and suppression to enter latency. Although the importance of Rex in the viral life-cycle is well understood, the underlying molecular mechanism of how Rex achieves its function has not been clarified. For example, how does Rex protect unspliced/partially-spliced viral mRNAs from the host cellular splicing machinery? How does Rex protect viral mRNAs, antigenic to eukaryotic cells, from cellular mRNA surveillance mechanisms? Here we will discuss these mechanisms, which explain the function of Rex as an organizer of HTLV-1 expression based on previously and recently discovered aspects of Rex. We also focus on the potential influence of Rex on the homeostasis of the infected cell and how it can exert its function. PMID:26927155

  2. HTLV-1 Rex Tunes the Cellular Environment Favorable for Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Kazumi; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) Rex is a viral RNA binding protein. The most important and well-known function of Rex is stabilizing and exporting viral mRNAs from the nucleus, particularly for unspliced/partially-spliced mRNAs encoding the structural proteins essential for viral replication. Without Rex, these unspliced viral mRNAs would otherwise be completely spliced. Therefore, Rex is vital for the translation of structural proteins and the stabilization of viral genomic RNA and, thus, for viral replication. Rex schedules the period of extensive viral replication and suppression to enter latency. Although the importance of Rex in the viral life-cycle is well understood, the underlying molecular mechanism of how Rex achieves its function has not been clarified. For example, how does Rex protect unspliced/partially-spliced viral mRNAs from the host cellular splicing machinery? How does Rex protect viral mRNAs, antigenic to eukaryotic cells, from cellular mRNA surveillance mechanisms? Here we will discuss these mechanisms, which explain the function of Rex as an organizer of HTLV-1 expression based on previously and recently discovered aspects of Rex. We also focus on the potential influence of Rex on the homeostasis of the infected cell and how it can exert its function. PMID:26927155

  3. Molecular Aspects of HTLV-1 Entry: Functional Domains of the HTLV-1 Surface Subunit (SU) and Their Relationships to the Entry Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kathryn S.; Lambert, Sophie; Bouttier, Manuella; Bénit, Laurence; Ruscetti, Frank W.; Hermine, Olivier; Pique, Claudine

    2011-01-01

    The initial step in retroviral infection involves specific interactions between viral envelope proteins (Env) and specific receptors on the surface of target cells. For many years, little was known about the entry receptors for HTLV-1. During this time, however, functional domains of the HTLV-1 Env were identified by analyzing the effects of neutralizing antibodies and specific mutations in Env on HTLV-1 infectivity. More recent studies have revealed that HTLV-1 infectivity involves interactions with three different molecules: heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), the VEGF-165 receptor Neuropilin 1 (NRP-1) and glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT1). Here, we revisit previously published data on the functional domains of Env in regard to the recent knowledge acquired about this multi-receptor complex. We also discuss the similarities and differences between HTLV-1 and other deltaretroviruses in regards to receptor usage. PMID:21994754

  4. The Prevalence of Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Infection among Blood Donors in Southeast China, 2004-2013

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jinzhen; Ge, Shengxiang; Zhang, Yali; Lin, Yongcai; Ni, Hongying; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Changrong

    2015-01-01

    Background The human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) which is associated with the diseases of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, HTLV-1 associated myelopathy / tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and HTLV-associated uveitis, can cause transfusion-transmitted infections. Although HTLV screening of blood donors was already routinely performed in developed countries, little is know about the HTLV prevalence among blood donors in developing countries which do not perform HTLV screening, such as China. Objectives &Aims To systematically characterize the prevalence of HTLV infection among bloods in southeast China. Methods A 10-year survey for HTLV prevalence in blood donors was performed in Xiamen, southeast China, during 2004-2013. The HTLV-1/2 of blood donations were screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, following with confirmation by western blot assay and 9nucleic acid testing. The HTLV-1 prevalences in donors from different cities were calculated. Viral sequences derived from identified HTLV-positive cases were sequenced and analyzed. Results Among 253,855 blood donors, 43 were confirmed to be seropositive for HTLV-1 (16.9 per 100,000 95% CI: 12.3-22.8) and none HTLV-2 infection was found. The HTLV-1 prevalence varied significantly in donors from different cities. Donors from cities in Fujian province (24.3 per 100,000, 95%CI: 17.4-33.1) had a significantly higher (p=0.001) HTLV-1 seroprevalence than those who were born in non-Fujian cities (3.4 per 100,000, 95%CI: 0.7-9.8). Among nine cities in Fujian province, the highest prevalence was found in blood donors from Ningde (171.3 per 100,000, 95%CI: 91.3-292.8) which is a coastal city in the northeast of Fujian. Molecular characterization of viral sequences from 27 HTLV-1 carriers revealed 25 were Transcontinental subtype of genotype A and 2 were Japanese subtype of genotype A. Interestingly, 12 of 25 Transcontinental subtype sequences harbored a characteristic L55P mutation in viral gp46 protein

  5. NF-κB hyper-activation by HTLV-1 tax induces cellular senescence, but can be alleviated by the viral anti-sense protein HBZ.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Huijun; Yang, Liangpeng; Kuo, Yu-Liang; Ho, Yik-Khuan; Shih, Hsiu-Ming; Giam, Chou-Zen

    2011-04-01

    Activation of I-κB kinases (IKKs) and NF-κB by the human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) trans-activator/oncoprotein, Tax, is thought to promote cell proliferation and transformation. Paradoxically, expression of Tax in most cells leads to drastic up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21(CIP1/WAF1) and p27(KIP1), which cause p53-/pRb-independent cellular senescence. Here we demonstrate that p21(CIP1/WAF1)-/p27(KIP1)-mediated senescence constitutes a checkpoint against IKK/NF-κB hyper-activation. Senescence induced by Tax in HeLa cells is attenuated by mutations in Tax that reduce IKK/NF-κB activation and prevented by blocking NF-κB using a degradation-resistant mutant of I-κBα despite constitutive IKK activation. Small hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown indicates that RelA induces this senescence program by acting upstream of the anaphase promoting complex and RelB to stabilize p27(KIP1) protein and p21(CIP1/WAF1) mRNA respectively. Finally, we show that down-regulation of NF-κB by the HTLV-1 anti-sense protein, HBZ, delay or prevent the onset of Tax-induced senescence. We propose that the balance between Tax and HBZ expression determines the outcome of HTLV-1 infection. Robust HTLV-1 replication and elevated Tax expression drive IKK/NF-κB hyper-activation and trigger senescence. HBZ, however, modulates Tax-mediated viral replication and NF-κB activation, thus allowing HTLV-1-infected cells to proliferate, persist, and evolve. Finally, inactivation of the senescence checkpoint can facilitate persistent NF-κB activation and leukemogenesis. PMID:21552325

  6. Potential role of natural killer cells in controlling tumorigenesis by human T-cell leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Feuer, G; Stewart, S A; Baird, S M; Lee, F; Feuer, R; Chen, I S

    1995-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), a malignancy of T lymphocytes that is characterized by a long latency period after virus exposure. Intraperitoneal inoculation of severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with HTLV-transformed cell lines and ATL tumor cells was employed to investigate the tumorigenic potential of HTLV type I (HTLV-I)-infected cells. In contrast to inoculation of ATL (RV-ATL) cells into SCID mice, which resulted in the formation of lymphomas, inoculation of HTLV-I- and HTLV-II-transformed cell lines (SLB-I and JLB-II cells, respectively) did not result in tumor formation. Immunosuppression of SCID mice, either by whole-body irradiation or by treatment with an antiserum, anti-asialo GM1 (alpha-AGM1), which transiently abrogates natural killer cell activity in vivo, was necessary to establish the growth of tumors derived from HTLV-transformed cell lines. PCR and flow cytometric studies reveal that HTLV-I-transformed cells are eliminated from the peritoneal cavities of inoculated mice by 3 days postinoculation; in contrast, RV-ATL cells persist and are detected until the mice succumb to lymphoma development. The differing behaviors of HTLV-infected cell lines and ATL tumor cells in SCID mice suggest that ATL cells have a higher tumorigenic potential in vivo than do HTLV-infected cell lines because of their ability to evade natural killer cell-mediated cytolysis. PMID:7815516

  7. Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 and 2 Seroprevalence among first-time blood donors in Chile, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    San Martín, Héctor; Balanda, Monserrat; Vergara, Nicolás; Valenzuela, María Antonieta; Cartier, Luis; Ayala, Salvador; Ramírez, Eugenio

    2016-06-01

    Infection with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1/2 (HTLV-1/2) is a major health problem. HTLV-1/2 infection is endemic in Chile but representative donor prevalence data are lacking. Data on all blood donors in a large network of Chilean blood centers were examined during 2011-2013. Screening of HTLV-1/2 antibodies were measured by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) at all blood banks. Blood samples with anticoagulants from initially reactive blood donors were analyzed by serological confirmation tests (immunofluorescence or recombinant immunoblot) at the HTLV National Reference Laboratory of the Public Health Institute of Chile. Additionally, detection of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 provirus in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was performed in all blood donors as confirmatory test. Prevalence rates were calculated. Among 694,016 donors, 706 were seropositive for HTLV-1 (prevalence, 1.02 cases per 1,000; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94-1.09), and 97 were seropositive for HTLV-2 (prevalence, 0.14 cases per 1,000; 95%CI, 0.11-0.17). Prevalence of HTLV-1 differed considerably by region, from 0.51 to 1.69 per 1,000. Prevalence of HTLV-2 was similar across the country (0.12-0.16). HTLV-1 prevalence was associated with female sex, older age, and residence in the north of Chile. HTVL-2 prevalence was associated with older age. The HTLV-1 prevalence among Chilean blood donors was relatively high and could be reduced by improving donor recruitment and selection in high prevalence areas. Blood center data may contribute to surveillance for HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 infections. PMID:26538335

  8. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 produces a spliced antisense transcript encoding a protein that lacks a classic bZIP domain but still inhibits Tax2-mediated transcription

    PubMed Central

    Halin, Marilène; Douceron, Estelle; Clerc, Isabelle; Journo, Chloé; Ko, Nga Ling; Landry, Sébastien; Murphy, Edward L.; Gessain, Antoine; Lemasson, Isabelle; Mesnard, Jean-Michel

    2009-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and type 2 (HTLV-2) retroviruses infect T lymphocytes. The minus strand of the HTLV-1 genome encodes HBZ, a protein that could play a role in the development of leukemia in infected patients. Herein, we demonstrate that the complementary strand of the HTLV-2 genome also encodes a protein that we named APH-2 for “antisense protein of HTLV-2.” APH-2 mRNA is spliced, polyadenylated, and initiates in the 3′-long terminal repeat at different positions. This transcript was detected in all HTLV-2–infected cell lines and short-term culture of lymphocytes obtained from HTLV-2 African patients tested and in 4 of 15 HTLV-2–infected blood donors. The APH-2 protein is 183 amino acids long, is localized in the cell nucleus, and is detected in vivo. Despite the lack of a consensus basic leucine zipper domain, APH-2 interacts with cyclic adenosine monophosphate-response element binding protein (CREB) and represses Tax2-mediated transcription in Tax2-expressing cells and in cells transfected with an HTLV-2 molecular clone. Altogether, our results demonstrate the existence of an antisense strand–encoded protein in HTLV-2, which could represent an important player in the development of disorders, such as lymphocytosis, which is frequently observed in HTLV-2 patients. PMID:19602711

  9. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 produces a spliced antisense transcript encoding a protein that lacks a classic bZIP domain but still inhibits Tax2-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Halin, Marilène; Douceron, Estelle; Clerc, Isabelle; Journo, Chloé; Ko, Nga Ling; Landry, Sébastien; Murphy, Edward L; Gessain, Antoine; Lemasson, Isabelle; Mesnard, Jean-Michel; Barbeau, Benoît; Mahieux, Renaud

    2009-09-17

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and type 2 (HTLV-2) retroviruses infect T lymphocytes. The minus strand of the HTLV-1 genome encodes HBZ, a protein that could play a role in the development of leukemia in infected patients. Herein, we demonstrate that the complementary strand of the HTLV-2 genome also encodes a protein that we named APH-2 for "antisense protein of HTLV-2." APH-2 mRNA is spliced, polyadenylated, and initiates in the 3'-long terminal repeat at different positions. This transcript was detected in all HTLV-2-infected cell lines and short-term culture of lymphocytes obtained from HTLV-2 African patients tested and in 4 of 15 HTLV-2-infected blood donors. The APH-2 protein is 183 amino acids long, is localized in the cell nucleus, and is detected in vivo. Despite the lack of a consensus basic leucine zipper domain, APH-2 interacts with cyclic adenosine monophosphate-response element binding protein (CREB) and represses Tax2-mediated transcription in Tax2-expressing cells and in cells transfected with an HTLV-2 molecular clone. Altogether, our results demonstrate the existence of an antisense strand-encoded protein in HTLV-2, which could represent an important player in the development of disorders, such as lymphocytosis, which is frequently observed in HTLV-2 patients. PMID:19602711

  10. Immune functions in homosexual men with antibodies to HTLV-III in Finland.

    PubMed Central

    Krohn, K; Ranki, A; Antonen, J; Valle, S L; Suni, J; Vaheri, A; Saxinger, C; Gallo, R C

    1985-01-01

    The occurrence of HTLV-III antibodies in a voluntary group of 175 homosexual men in a low risk AIDS area was studied, and the findings were correlated to clinical, virological, immunological and lifestyle parameters. Fifteen of 175 men had HTLV-III antibodies; two of these had AIDS, five had LAS and two had enlarged lymph nodes. In the HTLV-III antibody negative group, no signs of AIDS or pre-AIDS were seen during a 10 month follow-up. In HTLV-III antibody positive individuals, low TH/TS ratio was mainly due to decreased number of TH cells. Most HTLV-III antibody positive cases had low responses to a specific antigen, PPD, while responses to the mitogens PHA and PWM were only slightly affected. In HTLV-III antibody negative cases, 13% had a low TH/TS ratio, mostly due to elevation of TS cells. In this group, mitogen and antigen responses were normal or only slightly affected. The results reinforce the causal relationship between HTLV-III and AIDS and suggest that the cells primarily affected by the virus infection are TH cells, responsible for antigen specific responses. Longitudinal studies are required to find out, what is the relationship of immune response to the development of clinical AIDS in HTLV-III infected individuals. PMID:2988832

  11. Immunological profile of HTLV-1-infected patients associated with infectious or autoimmune dermatological disorders.

    PubMed

    Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana Grazziela Alves; Passos, Livia; Duarte, Mariana Costa; Araújo, Marcelo Grossi; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Trindade, Bruno Caetano; Dos Santos Dias, Raquel; Martins, Marina Lobato; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Barbara de Freitas; Guedes, Antônio Carlos; Gonçalves, Denise Utsch; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the frequency, the activation and the cytokine and chemokine profile of HTLV-1 carriers with or without dermatological lesions were thoroughly described and compared. The results indicated that HTLV-1-infected patients with dermatological lesions have distinct frequency and activation status when compared to asymptomatic carriers. Alterations in the CD4(+)HLA-DR(+), CD8(+) T cell, macrophage-like and NKT subsets as well as in the serum chemokines CCL5, CXCL8, CXCL9 and CXCL10 were observed in the HTLV-1-infected group with skin lesions. Additionally, HTLV-1 carriers with dermatological skin lesions showed more frequently high proviral load as compared to asymptomatic carriers. The elevated proviral load in HTLV-1 patients with infectious skin lesions correlated significantly with TNF-α/IL-10 ratio, while the same significant correlation was found for the IL-12/IL-10 ratio and the high proviral load in HTLV-1-infected patients with autoimmune skin lesions. All in all, these results suggest a distinct and unique immunological profile in the peripheral blood of HTLV-1-infected patients with skin disorders, and the different nature of skin lesion observed in these patients may be an outcome of a distinct unbalance of the systemic inflammatory response upon HTLV-1 infection. PMID:23936564

  12. Immunological Profile of HTLV-1-Infected Patients Associated with Infectious or Autoimmune Dermatological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Mariana Costa; Araújo, Marcelo Grossi; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Trindade, Bruno Caetano; dos Santos Dias, Raquel; Martins, Marina Lobato; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Barbara de Freitas; Guedes, Antônio Carlos; Gonçalves, Denise Utsch; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the frequency, the activation and the cytokine and chemokine profile of HTLV-1 carriers with or without dermatological lesions were thoroughly described and compared. The results indicated that HTLV-1-infected patients with dermatological lesions have distinct frequency and activation status when compared to asymptomatic carriers. Alterations in the CD4+HLA-DR+, CD8+ T cell, macrophage-like and NKT subsets as well as in the serum chemokines CCL5, CXCL8, CXCL9 and CXCL10 were observed in the HTLV-1-infected group with skin lesions. Additionally, HTLV-1 carriers with dermatological skin lesions showed more frequently high proviral load as compared to asymptomatic carriers. The elevated proviral load in HTLV-1 patients with infectious skin lesions correlated significantly with TNF-α/IL-10 ratio, while the same significant correlation was found for the IL-12/IL-10 ratio and the high proviral load in HTLV-1-infected patients with autoimmune skin lesions. All in all, these results suggest a distinct and unique immunological profile in the peripheral blood of HTLV-1-infected patients with skin disorders, and the different nature of skin lesion observed in these patients may be an outcome of a distinct unbalance of the systemic inflammatory response upon HTLV-1 infection. PMID:23936564

  13. HTLV-1 and -2 infections among 10 indigenous groups in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Alva, Isaac E; Orellana, E Roberto; Blas, Magaly M; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Cotrina, Armando; Chiappe, Marina; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Carcamo, Cesar P; García, Patricia J; Zunt, Joseph R; Buffardi, Anne L; Montano, Silvia M

    2012-11-01

    Infections with HTLV-1 and -2 were detected in 12 (1.9%) and 6 (0.9%) indigenous individuals living in 27 Amazonian villages in Peru. All infections occurred in Shipibo-Konibo people. HTLV was more common among participants living in villages distant from larger port cities and women with non-monogamous sexual partners. PMID:22964719

  14. Low degree of human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I genetic drift in vivo as a means of monitoring viral transmission and movement of ancient human populations.

    PubMed Central

    Gessain, A; Gallo, R C; Franchini, G

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the genetic variation of human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) isolates in the same individuals over time, as well as of HTLV-I isolates from various parts of the world. The viral DNA fragment studied encodes the carboxy terminus of gp46 and almost all of gp21, both of which are envelope glycoproteins. Samples were obtained from native inhabitants of five African countries, two South American countries, China, the French West Indies, and Haiti and included 14 patients with tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-I-associated myelopathy, 10 patients with adult T-cell leukemia, 1 patient with T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and 3 healthy HTLV-I-seropositive individuals. DNA analyses of HTLV-I sequences demonstrated that (i) little or no genetic variation occurred in vivo in the same individual or in different hosts from the same region carrying the same virus, regardless of their clinical statuses; (ii) changes in nucleotide sequences in some regions of the HTLV-I genome were diagnostic of the geographical origin of the viruses; (iii) HTLV-I sequences from West African countries (Mauritania and Guinea Bissau) and some from the Ivory Coast and Central African Republic were virtually identical to those from the French West Indies, Haiti, French Guyana, and Peru, strongly suggesting that at least some HTLV-I strains were introduced into the New World through infected individuals during the slave trade events; and (iv) the Zairian HTLV-I isolates represent a separate HTLV-I cluster, in which intrastrain variability was also observed, and are more divergent from the other HTLV-I isolates. Because of the low genetic variability of HTLV-I in vivo, the study of the proviral DNA sequence in selected populations of infected individuals will increase our knowledge of the origin and evolution of HTLV-I and might be useful in anthropological studies. PMID:1548762

  15. Low degree of human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I genetic drift in vivo as a means of monitoring viral transmission and movement of ancient human populations.

    PubMed

    Gessain, A; Gallo, R C; Franchini, G

    1992-04-01

    We have studied the genetic variation of human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) isolates in the same individuals over time, as well as of HTLV-I isolates from various parts of the world. The viral DNA fragment studied encodes the carboxy terminus of gp46 and almost all of gp21, both of which are envelope glycoproteins. Samples were obtained from native inhabitants of five African countries, two South American countries, China, the French West Indies, and Haiti and included 14 patients with tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-I-associated myelopathy, 10 patients with adult T-cell leukemia, 1 patient with T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and 3 healthy HTLV-I-seropositive individuals. DNA analyses of HTLV-I sequences demonstrated that (i) little or no genetic variation occurred in vivo in the same individual or in different hosts from the same region carrying the same virus, regardless of their clinical statuses; (ii) changes in nucleotide sequences in some regions of the HTLV-I genome were diagnostic of the geographical origin of the viruses; (iii) HTLV-I sequences from West African countries (Mauritania and Guinea Bissau) and some from the Ivory Coast and Central African Republic were virtually identical to those from the French West Indies, Haiti, French Guyana, and Peru, strongly suggesting that at least some HTLV-I strains were introduced into the New World through infected individuals during the slave trade events; and (iv) the Zairian HTLV-I isolates represent a separate HTLV-I cluster, in which intrastrain variability was also observed, and are more divergent from the other HTLV-I isolates. Because of the low genetic variability of HTLV-I in vivo, the study of the proviral DNA sequence in selected populations of infected individuals will increase our knowledge of the origin and evolution of HTLV-I and might be useful in anthropological studies. PMID:1548762

  16. Northern African Strains of Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Arose from a Recombination Event

    PubMed Central

    Desrames, Alexandra; Cassar, Olivier; Gout, Olivier; Hermine, Olivier; Taylor, Graham P.; Afonso, Philippe V.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although recombination is a major source of genetic variability in retroviruses, no recombinant strain had been observed for human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), the first isolated human-pathogenic retrovirus. Different genotypes exist for HTLV-1: Genotypes b and d to g are restricted to central Africa, while genotype c is only endemic in Australo-Melanesia. In contrast, the cosmopolitan genotype a is widely distributed. We applied a combination of phylogenetics and recombination analysis approaches to a set of new HTLV-1 sequences, which we collected from 19 countries throughout Africa, the continent where the virus has the largest endemic presence. This led us to demonstrate the presence of recombinants in HTLV-1. Indeed, the HTLV-1 strains currently present in North Africa have originated from a recombinant event between strains from Senegal and West Africa. This recombination is estimated to have occurred around 4,000 years ago. This recombination seems to have been generated during reverse transcription. In conclusion, we demonstrate that, albeit rare, recombination can occur in HTLV-1 and may play a role in the evolution of this retrovirus. IMPORTANCE A number of HTLV-1 subtypes have been described in different populations, but none of the genetic differences between these subtypes have been ascribed to recombination events. Here we report an HTLV-1 recombinant virus among infected individuals in North Africa. This demonstrates that, contrary to what was thought, recombination can occur and could play a role in the evolution of HTLV-1. PMID:24942582

  17. Short Communication: Current Prevalence and Risk Factors Associated with Human T Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 and Human T Lymphotropic Virus Type 2 Infections Among HIV/AIDS Patients in São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Sacchi, Cláudio Tavares; Gonçalves, Maria Gisele; Campos, Karoline Rodrigues; Magri, Mariana Cavalheiro; Alencar, Wong Kuen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract During the 1990s, high prevalences of HIV/human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and HIV/human T lymphotropic virus type 2 (HTLV-2) coinfections were detected in São Paulo, Brazil in association with intravenous drug use (IDU). The current prevalences and risk factors for HIV/HTLV-1/-2 were evaluated in 1,608 patients attending the AIDS/STD Reference and Training Center in São Paulo. Blood samples were analyzed for HTLV-1/2-specific antibodies using enzyme immunoassays (EIA Murex HTLV-I+II, Diasorin, and Gold ELISA HTLV-I+II, REM) and immunoblotting (HTLV Blot 2.4, MP Biomedicals and INNO-LIA HTLV-I/II, Innogenetics) and for the pol proviral DNA segments of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 by “in-house” real-time PCR. These analyses revealed that 50 (3.11%) of the samples were HTLV positive, including 25 (1.55%) that were HTLV-1 positive, 21 (1.31%) that were HTLV-2 positive, and 4 (0.25%) that were HTLV positive (untypeable). The median age of the HIV/HTLV-coinfected individuals was 50 years versus 44 years in the overall population (p=0.000). The risk factors associated with HIV/HTLV-1/-2 coinfections were female gender (OR 3.26, 1.78–5.95), black/pardo color (OR 2.21, 1.21–4.03), infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) (OR 4.27, 2.32–7.87) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) (OR 24.40, 12.51–48.11), and intravenous drug use (IDU) (OR 30.01, 15.21–59.29). The current low prevalence of HTLV-1/2 in HIV-infected patients in São Paulo could be explained in part by programs providing IDUs with sterile needles and syringes and changes in the drug usage patterns of individuals from injecting cocaine to smoking crack cocaine. PMID:25464979

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 neutralization epitope with conserved architecture elicits early type-specific antibodies in experimentally infected chimpanzees.

    PubMed Central

    Goudsmit, J; Debouck, C; Meloen, R H; Smit, L; Bakker, M; Asher, D M; Wolff, A V; Gibbs, C J; Gajdusek, D C

    1988-01-01

    Chimpanzees are susceptible to infection by divergent strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), none of which cause clinical or immunological abnormalities. Chimpanzees were inoculated with one of four strains of HIV-1: human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) type IIIB, lymphadenopathy virus (LAV) type 1, HTLV type IIIRF, or an isolate from the brain of a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Within 6 months after inoculation with the closely related strains HTLV-IIIB or LAV-1, six chimpanzees developed serum antibodies to the C-terminal half (amino acids 288-467) of the HTLV-IIIB external envelope glycoprotein gp120. Sera from five of those chimpanzees had HTLV-IIIB cell-fusion-inhibiting antibody titers greater than or equal to 20 at that time, indicating that they neutralized the infecting strain of HIV-1 in vitro. No antibodies to the carboxyl terminus of HTLV-IIIB gp120 were observed in sera of chimpanzees inoculated with HTLV-IIIRF or with the brain-tissue strain, and those sera did not neutralize HTLV-IIIB. A rabbit immunized with the C-terminal portion of gp120 acquired neutralizing antibodies that bound to four domains of the HTLV-IIIB external envelope as analyzed by reactivity to 536 overlapping nonapeptides of gp120. One of these domains in the variable region V3, with the amino acid sequence IRIQRGPGRAFVTIG (amino acids 307-321), bound to all chimpanzee sera that neutralized HTLV-IIIB but not to the serum of the HTLV-IIIRF-inoculated chimpanzee that did not neutralize HTLV-IIIB. The HTLV-IIIRF sequence at the same location, ITKGPGRVIYA, was recognized by the serum of the HTLV-IIIRF-inoculated chimpanzee but not by any sera of the HTLV-IIIB-inoculated or LAV-1-inoculated chimpanzees. The HTLV-IIIB residues RIQR and AFV and the HTLV-IIIRF residues lysine and VIYA, flanking a highly conserved beta-turn (GPGR), appear to be critical for antibody binding and subsequent type-specific virus neutralization. This neutralization epitope

  19. Two specific drugs, BMS-345541 and purvalanol A induce apoptosis of HTLV-1 infected cells through inhibition of the NF-kappaB and cell cycle pathways.

    PubMed

    Agbottah, Emmanuel; Yeh, Wen-I; Berro, Reem; Klase, Zachary; Pedati, Caitlin; Kehn-Hall, Kyleen; Wu, Weilin; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2008-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) induces adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL/L), a fatal lymphoproliferative disorder, and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), a chronic progressive disease of the central nervous system after a long period of latent infection. Although the mechanism of transformation and leukemogenesis is not fully elucidated, there is evidence to suggest that the viral oncoprotein Tax plays a crucial role in these processes through the regulation of several pathways including NF-kappaB and the cell cycle pathways. The observation that NF-kappaB, which is strongly induced by Tax, is indispensable for the maintenance of the malignant phenotype of HTLV-1 by regulating the expression of various genes involved in cell cycle regulation and inhibition of apoptosis provides a possible molecular target for these infected cells. To develop potential new therapeutic strategies for HTLV-1 infected cells, in this present study, we initially screened a battery of NF-kappaB and CDK inhibitors (total of 35 compounds) to examine their effects on the growth and survival of infected T-cell lines. Two drugs namely BMS-345541 and Purvalanol A exhibited higher levels of growth inhibition and apoptosis in infected cell as compared to uninfected cells. BMS-345541 inhibited IKKbeta kinase activity from HTLV-1 infected cells with an IC50 (the 50% of inhibitory concentration) value of 50 nM compared to 500 nM from control cells as measured by in vitro kinase assays. The effects of Purvalanol A were associated with suppression of CDK2/cyclin E complex activity as previously shown by us. Combination of both BMS-345541 and Purvalanol A showed a reduced level of HTLV-1 p19 Gag production in cell culture. The apparent apoptosis in these infected cells were associated with increased caspase-3 activity and PARP cleavage. The potent and selective apoptotic effects of these drugs suggest that both BMS-345541 and Purvalanol A, which target

  20. Two specific drugs, BMS-345541 and purvalanol A induce apoptosis of HTLV-1 infected cells through inhibition of the NF-kappaB and cell cycle pathways

    PubMed Central

    Agbottah, Emmanuel; Yeh, Wen-I; Berro, Reem; Klase, Zachary; Pedati, Caitlin; Kehn-Hall, Kyleen; Wu, Weilin; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2008-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) induces adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL/L), a fatal lymphoproliferative disorder, and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), a chronic progressive disease of the central nervous system after a long period of latent infection. Although the mechanism of transformation and leukemogenesis is not fully elucidated, there is evidence to suggest that the viral oncoprotein Tax plays a crucial role in these processes through the regulation of several pathways including NF-κB and the cell cycle pathways. The observation that NF-κB, which is strongly induced by Tax, is indispensable for the maintenance of the malignant phenotype of HTLV-1 by regulating the expression of various genes involved in cell cycle regulation and inhibition of apoptosis provides a possible molecular target for these infected cells. To develop potential new therapeutic strategies for HTLV-1 infected cells, in this present study, we initially screened a battery of NF-κB and CDK inhibitors (total of 35 compounds) to examine their effects on the growth and survival of infected T-cell lines. Two drugs namely BMS-345541 and Purvalanol A exhibited higher levels of growth inhibition and apoptosis in infected cell as compared to uninfected cells. BMS-345541 inhibited IKKβ kinase activity from HTLV-1 infected cells with an IC50 (the 50% of inhibitory concentration) value of 50 nM compared to 500 nM from control cells as measured by in vitro kinase assays. The effects of Purvalanol A were associated with suppression of CDK2/cyclin E complex activity as previously shown by us. Combination of both BMS-345541 and Purvalanol A showed a reduced level of HTLV-1 p19 Gag production in cell culture. The apparent apoptosis in these infected cells were associated with increased caspase-3 activity and PARP cleavage. The potent and selective apoptotic effects of these drugs suggest that both BMS-345541 and Purvalanol A, which target both NF

  1. IL28B gene polymorphisms and Th1/Th2 cytokine levels might be associated with HTLV-associated arthropathy.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Keyla Santos Guedes; Santana, Bárbara Brasil; de Souza Ferreira, Tuane Carolina; Sousa, Rita Catarina Medeiros; Caldas, Cezar Augusto Muniz; Azevedo, Vânia Nakauth; Feitosa, Rosimar Neris Martins; Machado, Luiz Fernando Almeida; de Oliveira Guimarães Ishak, Marluísa; Ishak, Ricardo; Vallinoto, Antonio Carlos Rosário

    2016-01-01

    The present study is the first investigation of the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs - rs8099917, rs12979860 and rs8103142) of the IL28B gene and the development of human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-associated arthropathy (HAA). Individuals with HAA exhibited low interleukin (IL) 6 (p<0.05) and high IL-10 (p<0.05) levels compared with asymptomatic patients. TNF-α/CD4(+) T cell count, TNF-α/CD8(+) T cell count and IFN-γ/proviral load positively correlated in asymptomatic patients. The allelic and genotypic frequencies did not differ between patients with HAA and asymptomatic patients. Seven haplotypes were detected in the investigated population, with haplotype CCT (p<0.05) being the most frequent among the HTLV-infected individuals, while haplotype TTG (p<0.05) was detected in the group with HAA only. Compared with asymptomatic patients, individuals with HAA and genotype TT (rs8099917) exhibited larger numbers of CD8(+) T cells (p<0.05) and higher proviral load levels (p<0.05). Those patients with HAA and genotypes CC (rs12979860) and TT (rs8103142) exhibited high TNF-β (p<0.05) and IFN-γ (p<0.05) levels. Those patients with HAA and genotype CT/TT (rs12979860) exhibited high IL-10 levels (p<0.05). These results suggest that haplotypes CCT and TTG might be associated with susceptibility to HTLV infection and progression to HAA, respectively. Genotype TT (rs8099917) might be a risk factor for elevation of the proviral load and CD8(+) T cell count. In addition, genotypes CC (rs12979860) and TT (rs8103142) seem to be associated with increased TNF-β and IFN-γ levels. PMID:26546777

  2. Identification of TL-Om1, an Adult T-Cell Leukemia (ATL) Cell Line, as Reference Material for Quantitative PCR for Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1

    PubMed Central

    Okuma, Kazu; Yamagishi, Makoto; Yamochi, Tadanori; Firouzi, Sanaz; Momose, Haruka; Mizukami, Takuo; Takizawa, Kazuya; Araki, Kumiko; Sugamura, Kazuo; Yamaguchi, Kazunari; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative PCR (qPCR) for human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1) is useful for measuring the amount of integrated HTLV-1 proviral DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Many laboratories in Japan have developed different HTLV-1 qPCR methods. However, when six independent laboratories analyzed the proviral load of the same samples, there was a 5-fold difference in their results. To standardize HTLV-1 qPCR, preparation of a well-defined reference material is needed. We analyzed the integrated HTLV-1 genome and the internal control (IC) genes of TL-Om1, a cell line derived from adult T-cell leukemia, to confirm its suitability as a reference material for HTLV-1 qPCR. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) showed that HTLV-1 provirus was monoclonally integrated in chromosome 1 at the site of 1p13 in the TL-Om1 genome. HTLV-1 proviral genome was not transferred from TL-Om1 to an uninfected T-cell line, suggesting that the HTLV-1 proviral copy number in TL-Om1 cells is stable. To determine the copy number of HTLV-1 provirus and IC genes in TL-Om1 cells, we used FISH, digital PCR, and qPCR. HTLV-1 copy numbers obtained by these three methods were similar, suggesting that their results were accurate. Also, the ratio of the copy number of HTLV-1 provirus to one of the IC genes, RNase P, was consistent for all three methods. These findings indicate that TL-Om1 cells are an appropriate reference material for HTLV-1 qPCR. PMID:25502533

  3. Predominance of human lymphotropic T cell virus type 2 subtype B in urban populations of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Berini, Carolina A; Eirin, Maria E; Delfino, Cecilia M; Weissenbacher, Mercedes; Biglione, Mirna M

    2012-09-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus subtype b (HTLV-2b) infection has been described among aborigines from Northern Argentina, while HTLV-2a has been described in an injecting drug user (IDU) from a Central region, similar to the situation in Spain, the United States, and Brazil. In this study, 22 of the 26 strains analyzed from blood donors and HIV-1(+) individuals were HTLV-2b (84.6%) clustering with Amerindian references, while 4 HIV-1(+) (15.4%) were HTLV-2a. HTLV-2a sequences were closely related to Brazilian references in contrast to the previous Argentinean IDU strain that clustered with Africans and Amerindians from North America. In summary, these findings show that HTLV-2b is the major strain circulating in an urban population of Argentina. HTLV-2a/b could have been introduced from endemic South American countries such as Brazil and because of contact with other populations such as IDUs from Europe despite its introduction due to the increasing internal migration of aborigines to large urban centers. Considering this results and recent data about the dissemination of HTLV-1 in residents of Buenos Aires city, new studies among non-at-risk groups for HTLV-1/2 infection should be performed. PMID:22115426

  4. Long Terminal Repeat Circular DNA as Markers of Active Viral Replication of Human T Lymphotropic Virus-1 in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fox, James M; Hilburn, Silva; Demontis, Maria-Antonietta; Brighty, David W; Rios Grassi, Maria Fernanda; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Taylor, Graham P; Martin, Fabiola

    2016-01-01

    Clonal expansion of human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infected cells in vivo is well documented. Unlike human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), HTLV-1 plasma RNA is sparse. The contribution of the “mitotic” spread of HTLV-1 compared with infectious spread of the virus to HTLV-1 viral burden in established infection is uncertain. Since extrachromosomal long terminal repeat (LTR) DNA circles are indicators of viral replication in HIV-1 carriers with undetectable plasma HIV RNA, we hypothesised that HTLV-1 LTR circles could indicate reverse transcriptase (RT) usage and infectious activity. 1LTR and 2LTR DNA circles were measured in HTLV-1 cell lines and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of asymptomatic carriers (ACs) and patients with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) or adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL). 1LTR DNA circles were detected in 14/20 patients at a mean of 1.38/100 PBMC but did not differentiate disease status nor correlate with HTLV-1 DNA copies. 2LTR DNA circles were detected in 30/31 patients and at higher concentrations in patients with HTLV-1-associated diseases, independent of HTLV-1 DNA load. In an incident case the 2LTR DNA circle concentration increased 2.1 fold at the onset of HAM/TSP compared to baseline. Detectable and fluctuating levels of HTLV-1 DNA circles in patients indicate viral RT usage and virus replication. Our results indicate HTLV-1 viral replication capacity is maintained in chronic infection and may be associated with disease onset. PMID:26985903

  5. Long Terminal Repeat Circular DNA as Markers of Active Viral Replication of Human T Lymphotropic Virus-1 in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Fox, James M; Hilburn, Silva; Demontis, Maria-Antonietta; Brighty, David W; Rios Grassi, Maria Fernanda; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Taylor, Graham P; Martin, Fabiola

    2016-03-01

    Clonal expansion of human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infected cells in vivo is well documented. Unlike human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), HTLV-1 plasma RNA is sparse. The contribution of the "mitotic" spread of HTLV-1 compared with infectious spread of the virus to HTLV-1 viral burden in established infection is uncertain. Since extrachromosomal long terminal repeat (LTR) DNA circles are indicators of viral replication in HIV-1 carriers with undetectable plasma HIV RNA, we hypothesised that HTLV-1 LTR circles could indicate reverse transcriptase (RT) usage and infectious activity. 1LTR and 2LTR DNA circles were measured in HTLV-1 cell lines and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of asymptomatic carriers (ACs) and patients with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) or adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL). 1LTR DNA circles were detected in 14/20 patients at a mean of 1.38/100 PBMC but did not differentiate disease status nor correlate with HTLV-1 DNA copies. 2LTR DNA circles were detected in 30/31 patients and at higher concentrations in patients with HTLV-1-associated diseases, independent of HTLV-1 DNA load. In an incident case the 2LTR DNA circle concentration increased 2.1 fold at the onset of HAM/TSP compared to baseline. Detectable and fluctuating levels of HTLV-1 DNA circles in patients indicate viral RT usage and virus replication. Our results indicate HTLV-1 viral replication capacity is maintained in chronic infection and may be associated with disease onset. PMID:26985903

  6. Association of Sicca Syndrome with Proviral Load and Proinflammatory Cytokines in HTLV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Clara Mônica; Santos, Silvane; Dourado, Adriana; Carvalho, Natália B.; Bittencourt, Valéria; Lessa, Marcus Miranda; Siqueira, Isadora; Carvalho, Edgar M.

    2016-01-01

    The Sjögren syndrome has been diagnosed in patients with HTLV-1 associated myelopathy and dry mouth and dry eyes are documented in HTLV-1 carriers. However the diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome in these subjects has been contested. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated the role of immunological factors and proviral load, in sicca syndrome associated with HTLV-1 in patients without myelopathy. Subjects were recruited in the HTLV-1 Clinic, from 2009 to 2011. The proviral load and cytokine levels (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-5, and IL-10) were obtained from a database containing the values presented by the subjects at admission in the clinic. Of the 272 participants, 59 (21.7%) had sicca syndrome and in all of them anti-Sjögren syndrome related antigen A (SSA) and antigen B (SSB) were negatives. The production of TNF-α and IFN-γ was higher in the group with sicca syndrome (P < 0.05) than in HTLV-1 infected subjects without sicca syndrome. Our data indicates that patients with sicca syndrome associated with HTLV-1 do not have Sjögren syndrome. However the increased production of TNF-α and IFN-γ in this group of patients may contribute to the pathogenesis of sicca syndrome associated with HTLV-1. PMID:26904697

  7. Prevalence of HTLV-1 Antibody among Major Thalassemic Patients in Gorgan (South East of Caspian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, A.; Mansurian, A. R.; Ahmadi, A. R.; Ghaemi, E.; Kalavi, K. H.; Marjani, A.; Sanei Moghaddam, E.

    In this study, the prevalence of HTLV-1 infection among the thalassemic patients was investigated. 181 thalassemic patients whom referred to Talghani hospital during, Oct. 2004-Sep. 2005 were participated in this study. HTLV antibody was determined using ELISA technique. In this procedure (Diapron laboratory kit) HTLV, positive samples tested by HTLV-1 western blot (kit, 2.4) to confirm, ELISA positive samples and also to detect the HTLV types. From 181 thalassemic patients, 93 (51.4%) were males. The age rate of these ranged 1-25 years, (mean of 14.11±6.5). Of these subjects 169 patients (93.4%) were received packet cell at least one unite per month. 28(14.9%) of subjects were HTLV positive, while only 4.4% of them were confirmed by western blot and also for contamination with type-1 virus infection. Contamination with this virus increased, as the patients were getting older. The findings derived from this study indicated that among the thalassemic patients in Gorgan there were cases with HTLV-1, infection that was correlated with the other part of the country. It is therefore concluded; that further comprehensive studies are required to identify infected blood donations by blood donors in Gorgan.

  8. Prevalence of antibody to LAV/HTLV-III among homosexual men in Seattle.

    PubMed Central

    Collier, A C; Barnes, R C; Handsfield, H H

    1986-01-01

    The prevalence of antibody to LAV/HTLV-III among homosexual men attending a community clinic and a sexually transmitted disease clinic in Seattle, Washington in early 1985 was 42 per cent and 32 per cent, respectively. Seropositivity was apparently not related to age or number of sexual partners. The high prevalence of LAV/HTLV-III seropositivity in an area where overt AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is still relatively uncommon suggests that public health measures to prevent acquisition and transmission of LAV/HTLV-III should be a high priority even in areas with low incidences of AIDS. PMID:3008580

  9. HTLV-1 bZIP factor protein targets the Rb/E2F-1 pathway to promote proliferation and apoptosis of primary CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Kawatsuki, A; Yasunaga, J-I; Mitobe, Y; Green, P L; Matsuoka, M

    2016-08-25

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus that induces a fatal T-cell malignancy, adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). Among several regulatory/accessory genes in HTLV-1, HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ) is the only viral gene constitutively expressed in infected cells. Our previous study showed that HBZ functions in two different molecular forms, HBZ protein and HBZ RNA. In this study, we show that HBZ protein targets retinoblastoma protein (Rb), which is a critical tumor suppressor in many types of cancers. HBZ protein interacts with the Rb/E2F-1 complex and activates the transcription of E2F-target genes associated with cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Mouse primary CD4(+) T cells transduced with HBZ show accelerated G1/S transition and apoptosis, and importantly, T cells from HBZ transgenic (HBZ-Tg) mice also demonstrate enhanced cell proliferation and apoptosis. To evaluate the functions of HBZ protein alone in vivo, we generated a new transgenic mouse strain that expresses HBZ mRNA altered by silent mutations but encoding intact protein. In these mice, the numbers of effector/memory and Foxp3(+) T cells were increased, and genes associated with proliferation and apoptosis were upregulated. This study shows that HBZ protein promotes cell proliferation and apoptosis in primary CD4(+) T cells through activation of the Rb/E2F pathway, and that HBZ protein also confers onto CD4(+) T-cell immunophenotype similar to those of ATL cells, suggesting that HBZ protein has important roles in dysregulation of CD4(+) T cells infected with HTLV-1. PMID:26804169

  10. The HTLV-1 Tax oncoprotein represses Ku80 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ducu, Razvan I; Dayaram, Tajhal; Marriott, Susan J

    2011-07-20

    The HTLV-I oncoprotein Tax interferes with DNA double strand break repair. Since non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway used to repair DNA double strand breaks we examined the effect of Tax on this pathway, with particular interest in the expression and function of Ku80, a critical component of the NHEJ pathway. Tax expression decreased Ku80 mRNA and protein levels, and repressed transcription from the Ku80 promoter. Conversely, Ku80 mRNA increased following siRNA knockdown of Tax in HTLV-I infected cells. Tax expression was associated with an elevated number of micronuclei and nucleoplasmic bridges, hallmarks of improper DNA double strand break repair. Our studies identified Tax as a transcriptional repressor of Ku80 that correlates with decreased DNA repair function. The reduction of Ku80 transcription by Tax may deplete the cell of an essential DNA break binding protein, resulting in reduced repair of DNA double strand breaks and accumulation genomic mutations. PMID:21571351

  11. High production of RANTES and MIP-1alpha in the tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM).

    PubMed

    Montanheiro, Patricia; Vergara, Maria Paulina Posada; Smid, Jerusa; da Silva Duarte, Alberto José; de Oliveira, Augusto César Penalva; Casseb, Jorge

    2007-08-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is associated with progressive neurological disorders and tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM). The pathogenesis of TSP/HAM is considered as immune mediated, involving cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses to a number of viral proteins and notably the regulation protein Tax. T CD8+ cells produce beta-chemokines, which are important in the anti-viral response. In the present study, we have analyzed the CC chemokines (RANTES, MIP-1beta and MIP-1alpha) production in retrovirus-infected subjects. A total of 191 subjects were studied: 52 healthy controls, 72 asymptomatic HTLV-1-infected carriers and 67 TSP/HAM patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were maintained in the presence or absence of PHA, and supernatant fluids were assayed using EIA. MIP-1beta concentration was not significantly different across groups, but RANTES and MIP-1alpha concentrations showed significant differences when the three groups were compared. In TSP/HAM patients, the increase in the production of chemokines may lead to a recruitment of pro-inflammatory factors, contributing to the membrane's myelin damage. PMID:17588676

  12. A case of peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified in a HCV and HTLV-II-positive patient, diagnosed by abdominal fluid cytology

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Trisha M.; Qian, You-Wen; Elghetany, M. Tarek; Schnadig, Vicki; Nawgiri, Ranjina

    2016-01-01

    Background Peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (PTCL, NOS) is a rare neoplasm that typically presents as generalized lymphadenopathy. PTCL, NOS presenting as malignant ascites is rare. Methods A 61-year-old African-American man with past medical history of HCV, cryoglobulinemia, and cryptococcal pneumonia was admitted for dyspnea on exertion over a period of 1 month and new onset of abdominal distension. Results Ascites, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly and extensive lymphadenopathy were found by imaging. Paracentesis obtained 1.3 liter of abdominal fluid, the cytologic evaluation showed a monomorphic population of intermediate-sized lymphoid cells with irregular to convoluted nuclear contours. Fluid sent for flow cytometry showed an abnormal T-lymphocyte population expressing CD4, weak surface CD3 and absence of CD7. PCR studies of ascitic fluid detected a clonal T-lymphocyte population with T-cell receptor gamma gene rearrangement. Serologic testing for human T lymphotropic virus (HTLV) was positive for HTLV-II. Subsequent bone marrow biopsy revealed lymphomatous involvement. CD30 and ALK-1 immunostaining were negative. This case was classified as PTCL, NOS. Conclusions PTCL, NOS can have unusual clinical presentation such as ascites and pleural effusion, and may also occur as a complication of immunodeficiency state. Further studies are needed to determine if HCV or HTLV-II viral infection is associated with PTCL. PMID:27034820

  13. Durable hematologic complete response and suppression of HTLV-1 viral load following alemtuzumab in zidovudine/IFN-α–refractory adult T-cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mone, Andrew; Puhalla, Shannon; Whitman, Susan; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Cruz, Julio; Vukosavljevic, Tamara; Banks, Amy; Eisenbeis, Charles F.; Byrd, John C.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Porcu, Pierluigi

    2005-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is a highly chemoresistant and usually fatal T-cell malignancy due to the human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1). After chemotherapy failure, antiretrovirals and interferon-α (IFN-α) produce brief responses followed by progression and death. More effective agents and new approaches to detect and treat minimal residual disease are needed. ATL cells express CD52, the target of the antibody alemtuzumab, which is active in a preclinical model of ATL and is cytotoxic for p53-deficient cells. A patient with refractory chronic ATL in transformation achieved longer than a 1-year complete hematologic response following 12 weeks of outpatient subcutaneous alemtuzumab. Persistent suppression of HTLV-1 viral load, even at recovery of T cells, after alemtuzumab and efficient in vitro complement-mediated cytotoxicity of primary ATL cells with mutated TP53 were observed. The unprecedented response and the profound suppression of HTLV-1 viral load observed in this patient suggest that further clinical investigation of alemtuzumab in ATL is warranted. PMID:16076875

  14. Durable hematologic complete response and suppression of HTLV-1 viral load following alemtuzumab in zidovudine/IFN-{alpha}-refractory adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mone, Andrew; Puhalla, Shannon; Whitman, Susan; Baiocchi, Robert A; Cruz, Julio; Vukosavljevic, Tamara; Banks, Amy; Eisenbeis, Charles F; Byrd, John C; Caligiuri, Michael A; Porcu, Pierluigi

    2005-11-15

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is a highly chemoresistant and usually fatal T-cell malignancy due to the human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1). After chemotherapy failure, antiretrovirals and interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) produce brief responses followed by progression and death. More effective agents and new approaches to detect and treat minimal residual disease are needed. ATL cells express CD52, the target of the antibody alemtuzumab, which is active in a preclinical model of ATL and is cytotoxic for p53-deficient cells. A patient with refractory chronic ATL in transformation achieved longer than a 1-year complete hematologic response following 12 weeks of outpatient subcutaneous alemtuzumab. Persistent suppression of HTLV-1 viral load, even at recovery of T cells, after alemtuzumab and efficient in vitro complement-mediated cytotoxicity of primary ATL cells with mutated TP53 were observed. The unprecedented response and the profound suppression of HTLV-1 viral load observed in this patient suggest that further clinical investigation of alemtuzumab in ATL is warranted. PMID:16076875

  15. Barefoot Plantar Pressure Indicates Progressive Neurological Damage in Patients with Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Beatriz Helena B.; Souza, Givago S.; Barroso, Tatiana G. C. P.; Silveira, Luiz Carlos L.; Sousa, Rita Catarina M.; Callegari, Bianca; Xavier, Marília B.

    2016-01-01

    Background The human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus associated with neurological alterations; individuals with HTLV-1 infection may develop HTLV-1 associated myelopathy / tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Frequent neurological complaints include foot numbness and leg weakness. In this study, we compared the distribution of the body weight on different areas of the foot in HTLV-1 patients with HAM/TSP, asymptomatic HTLV-1 patients, and healthy individuals. Methodology We studied 36 HTLV-1 infected patients, who were divided in two groups of 18 patients each based on whether or not they had been diagnosed with HAM/TSP, and 17 control subjects. The evaluation included an interview on the patient’s clinical history and examinations of the patient’s reflexes, foot skin tactile sensitivity, and risk of falling. The pressure distribution on different areas of the foot was measured with baropodometry, using a pressure platform, while the patients had their eyes open or closed. Main Findings The prevalence of neurological disturbances—altered reflexes and skin tactile sensitivity and increased risk of falling—was higher in HTLV-1 HAM/TSP patients than in HTLV-1 asymptomatic patients. The medium and maximum pressure values were higher in the forefoot than in the midfoot and hindfoot in both HTLV-1 groups. In addition, the pressure on the hindfoot was lower in HAM/TSP patients compared to control subjects. Conclusions The neurological disturbances associated with HTLV-1 infection gradually worsened from HTLV-1 asymptomatic patients to HAM/TSP patients. Baropodometry is a valuable tool to establish the extent of neurological damage in patients suffering from HTLV-1 infection. PMID:26998608

  16. Prevalence of antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus and to human T cell leukemia virus type I in transfused sickle cell disease patients.

    PubMed

    Castro, O; Saxinger, C; Barnes, S; Alexander, S; Flagg, R; Frederick, W

    1990-09-01

    The prevalence of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody and the human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) antibody was examined in 116 adults with sickle cell disease. Eighty-eight of them had received a mean of 18.6 transfusions of red blood cells between 1978 and 1985, and none was positive for the HIV antibody. Of 116 patients, 9 (7.8%) tested positive for HTLV-I antibodies. HTLV-I-positive patients were similar to those without HTLV-I antibody with respect to age, number of transfusions, and proportion of patients with greater than 40 transfusions. However, 3 of the 9 HTLV-I-positive patients came from West Africa or from the Caribbean, whereas this proportion was much lower (7/107) in the HTLV-I-negative group (x2, 7.564; P less than .01). Our analysis suggests that the risk of HIV infection in transfused sickle cell disease patients is low. Although HTLV-I antibodies in these patients may not be related to blood transfusions, it seems prudent to screen blood donors for HTLV-I infection. PMID:2387998

  17. Molecular Epidemiology of Endemic Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 in a Rural Community in Guinea-Bissau

    PubMed Central

    van Tienen, Carla; de Silva, Thushan I.; Alcantara, Luiz Carlos Junior; Onyango, Clayton O.; Jarju, Sheikh; Gonçalves, Nato; Vincent, Tim; Aaby, Peter; Whittle, Hilton; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten; Cotten, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Background Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1) infection causes lethal adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and severely debilitating HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) in up to 5% of infected adults. HTLV-1 is endemic in parts of Africa and the highest prevalence in West Africa (5%) has been reported in Caio, a rural area in the North-West of Guinea-Bissau. It is not known which HTLV-1 variants are present in this community. Sequence data can provide insights in the molecular epidemiology and help to understand the origin and spread of HTLV-1. Objective To gain insight into the molecular diversity of HTLV-1 in West Africa. Methods HTLV-1 infected individuals were identified in community surveys between 1990–2007. The complete Long Terminal Repeat (LTR) and p24 coding region of HTLV-1 was sequenced from infected subjects. Socio-demographic data were obtained from community census and from interviews performed by fieldworkers. Phylogenetic analyses were performed to characterize the relationship between the Caio HTLV-1 and HTLV-1 from other parts of the world. Results LTR and p24 sequences were obtained from 72 individuals (36 LTR, 24 p24 only and 12 both). Consistent with the low evolutionary change of HTLV-1, many of the sequences from unrelated individuals showed 100% nucleotide identity. Most (45 of 46) of the LTR sequences clustered with the Cosmopolitan HTLV-1 subtype 1a, subgroup D (1aD). LTR and p24 sequences from two subjects were divergent and formed a significant cluster with HTLV-1 subtype 1g, and with the most divergent African Simian T-cell Lymphotropic Virus, Tan90. Conclusions The Cosmopolitan HTLV-1 1aD predominates in this rural West African community. However, HTLV-1 subtype 1g is also present. This subtype has not been described before in West Africa and may be more widespread than previously thought. These data are in line with the hypothesis that multiple monkey-to-man zoonotic events are contributing to HTLV-1

  18. [Sarcoidosis and leukemia/T-cell lymphoma associated with HTLV-1 virus infection in adults (apropos of a case)].

    PubMed

    Panelatti, G; Plumelle, Y; Arfi, S; Pascaline, N; Caplanne, D; Jean-Baptiste, G

    1992-01-01

    The HTLV-1 virus causes a disturbance of the immune system, the evaluation of which is often difficult. We report a case of sarcoidosis in a 49 year old woman of Martinique as evidenced by bilateral hilar adenopathy, hypercalcaemia, uveitis and granulomatous lesions on histological examination. Serological was positive for HTLV-1 antibodies. Three years later she developed an adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. The relationships between the HTLV-1 retroviral infection and different pathologies observed are discussed. PMID:1287773

  19. HTLV-1 and HIV-1 co-infection: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Isache, Carmen; Sands, Michael; Guzman, Nilmarie; Figueroa, Danisha

    2016-01-01

    HTLV type 1 and 2 are both involved in actively spreading epidemics, affecting over 15 million people worldwide. HTLV-1 has been described as the more clinically significant one, being associated with diseases such as adult T-cell leukemia and tropical spastic paraparesis. We report here a case of tropical spastic paraparesis in an HIV-positive patient who did not report any history of travel or residence in an HTLV endemic area. A 57 year old African-American male was admitted to the hospital due to bilateral upper and lower extremity weakness associated with stiffness. He had recently been diagnosed with HIV. His physical examination showed mild to moderate decreased motor strength, in both upper extremities and marked loss in both lower extremities. This was associated with hyperreflexia and clonus. Sensory function was intact. He looked cachectic and had several psoriatic plaques on both lower and upper extremities. Laboratory work-up showed a CD4 count decreased to 94 cells/mm3 and a HIV viral load of 273,000 copies/mL. Based on serum positivity for HTLV type 1 and the patient's clinical presentation suggestive of upper and lower motor neuron dysfunction, the diagnosis of tropical spastic paraparesis was made. HTLV and HIV share the same routes of transmission and the same tropism for T-lymphocytes. Co-infection occurs probably more frequently than we are aware, since testing for HTLV is not routinely performed in outpatient HIV clinics. PMID:27144124

  20. Gastrointestinal parasitic infection in healthy Jamaican carriers of HTLV-I.

    PubMed

    Robinson, R D; Murphy, E L; Wilks, R J; Neva, F A; Terry, S I; Hanchard, B; Figueroa, J P; Blattner, W A

    1991-12-01

    A subsample (1.6%; n = 13,260) of a healthy Jamaican population of food-handlers, studied by Murphy et al. (1991), who were serologically positive (n = 99) or negative (n = 113) for HTLV-I was investigated for intestinal parasitic infection using coprological methods. Helminth infection included Ascaris lumbricoides (2.8%), Trichuris trichiura (7.1%) and hookworms (6.1%). Entamoeba coli was found in 21.8% of samples, while E. hartmanni, Giardia lamblia, Endolimax nana, Iodamoeba bütschlii and Chilomastix mesnili each occurred in less than 10% of responders. T. trichiura displayed a higher prevalence (10.6 vs 3%) (chi 2 = 4.623; P = 0.03) in the HTLV-I negative group. G. lamblia was detected more frequently among HTLV-I carriers compared to controls (9.1 and 3.5%, respectively), but the association was not statistically significant (chi 2 = 2.825; P = 0.09). Infection with intestinal parasites is likely to occur independent of HTLV-I status: however, possible HTLV-I-induced immunosuppression may lead to higher intensity infections of certain organisms thus facilitating easier detection using parasitological methods. The immunomodulatory potential of HTLV-I infection in the aetiology of non-malignant diseases requires further investigation. PMID:1758014

  1. Endemic versus epidemic viral spreads display distinct patterns of HTLV-2b replication

    SciTech Connect

    Gabet, Anne-Sophie; Moules, Vincent; Sibon, David; Nass, Catharie C.; Mortreux, Franck; Mauclere, Philippe; Gessain, Antoine; Murphy, Edward L.; Wattel, Eric . E-mail: wattel@lyon.fnclcc.fr

    2006-02-05

    As the replication pattern of leukemogenic PTLVs possesses a strong pathogenic impact, we investigated HTLV-2 replication in vivo in asymptomatic carriers belonging into 2 distinct populations infected by the same HTLV-2b subtype. They include epidemically infected American blood donors, in whom HTLV-2b has been present for only 30 years, and endemically infected Bakola Pygmies from Cameroon, characterized by a long viral endemicity (at least few generations). In blood donors, both the circulating proviral loads and the degree of infected cell proliferation were largely lower than those characterizing asymptomatic carriers infected with leukemogenic PTLVs (HTLV-1, STLV-1). This might contribute to explain the lack of known link between HTLV-2b infection and the development of malignancies in this population. In contrast, endemically infected individuals displayed high proviral loads resulting from the extensive proliferation of infected cells. The route and/or the duration of infection, viral genetic drift, host immune response, genetic background, co-infections or a combination thereof might have contributed to these differences between endemically and epidemically infected subjects. As the clonality pattern observed in endemically infected individuals is very reminiscent of that of leukemogenic PTLVs at the pre-leukemic stage, our results highlight the possible oncogenic effect of HTLV-2b infection in such population.

  2. Modes of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Transmission, Replication and Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Carpentier, Alexandre; Barez, Pierre-Yves; Hamaidia, Malik; Gazon, Hélène; de Brogniez, Alix; Perike, Srikanth; Gillet, Nicolas; Willems, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus that causes cancer (Adult T cell Leukemia, ATL) and a spectrum of inflammatory diseases (mainly HTLV-associated myelopathy—tropical spastic paraparesis, HAM/TSP). Since virions are particularly unstable, HTLV-1 transmission primarily occurs by transfer of a cell carrying an integrated provirus. After transcription, the viral genomic RNA undergoes reverse transcription and integration into the chromosomal DNA of a cell from the newly infected host. The virus then replicates by either one of two modes: (i) an infectious cycle by virus budding and infection of new targets and (ii) mitotic division of cells harboring an integrated provirus. HTLV-1 replication initiates a series of mechanisms in the host including antiviral immunity and checkpoint control of cell proliferation. HTLV-1 has elaborated strategies to counteract these defense mechanisms allowing continuous persistence in humans. PMID:26198240

  3. Genetic heterogeneity in human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type II.

    PubMed Central

    Dube, D K; Sherman, M P; Saksena, N K; Bryz-Gornia, V; Mendelson, J; Love, J; Arnold, C B; Spicer, T; Dube, S; Glaser, J B

    1993-01-01

    DNA from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 17 different individuals infected with human T-cell lymphoma/leukemia virus type II (HTLV-II) was successfully amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the primer pair SK110/SK111. This primer pair is conserved among the pol genes of all primate T-cell lymphoma viruses (PTLV) and flanks a 140-bp fragment of DNA which, when used in comparative analyses, reflects the relative degree of diversity among PTLV genomes. Cloning, sequencing, and phylogenetic comparisons of these amplified 140-bp pol fragments indicated that there are at least two distinct genetic substrains of HTLV-II in the Western Hemisphere. These data were confirmed for selected isolates by performing PCR, cloning, and sequencing with to 10 additional primer pair-probe sets specific for different regions throughout the PTLV genome. HTLV-II isolates from Seminole, Guaymi, and Tobas Indians belong in the new substrain of HTLV-II, while the prototype MoT isolate defines the original substrain. There was greater diversity among HTLV-II New World strains than among HTLV-I New World strains. In fact, the heterogeneity among HTLV-II strains from the Western Hemisphere was similar to that observed in HTLV-I and simian T-cell lymphoma/leukemia virus type I isolates from around the world, including Japan, Africa, and Papua New Guinea. Given these geographic and anthropological considerations and assuming similar mutation rates and selective forces among the PTLV, these data suggest either that HTLV-II has existed for a long time in the indigenous Amerindian population or that HTLV-II isolates introduced into the New World were more heterogeneous than the HTLV-I strains introduced into the New World. PMID:8437209

  4. Ubiquitination and sumoylation of the HTLV-2 Tax-2B protein regulate its NF-κB activity: a comparative study with the HTLV-1 Tax-1 protein

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Retroviruses HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 have homologous genomic structures but differ significantly in pathogenicity. HTLV-1 is associated with Adult T cell Leukemia (ATL), whereas infection by HTLV-2 has no association with neoplasia. Transformation of T lymphocytes by HTLV-1 is linked to the capacity of its oncoprotein Tax-1 to alter cell survival and cell cycle control mechanisms. Among these functions, Tax-1-mediated activation of cellular gene expression via the NF-κB pathway depends on Tax-1 post-translational modifications by ubiquitination and sumoylation. The Tax-2 protein of HTLV-2B (Tax-2B) is also modified by ubiquitination and sumoylation and activates the NF-κB pathway to a level similar to that of Tax-1. The present study aims to understand whether ubiquitination and sumoylation modifications are involved in Tax-2B-mediated activation of the NF-κB pathway. Results The comparison of Tax-1 and Tax-2B lysine to arginine substitution mutants revealed conserved patterns and levels of ubiquitination with notable difference in the lysine usage for sumoylation. Neither Tax-1 nor Tax-2B ubiquitination and sumoylation deficient mutants could activate the NF-κB pathway and fusion of ubiquitin or SUMO-1 to the C-terminus of the ubiquitination and sumoylation deficient Tax-2B mutant strikingly restored transcriptional activity. In addition, ubiquitinated forms of Tax-2B colocalized with RelA and IKKγ in prominent cytoplasmic structures associated with the Golgi apparatus, whereas colocalization of Tax-2B with the RelA subunit of NF-κB and the transcriptional coactivator p300 in punctate nuclear structures was dependent on Tax-2B sumoylation, as previously observed for Tax-1. Conclusions Both Tax-1 and Tax-2 activate the NF-κB pathway via similar mechanisms involving ubiquitination and sumoylation. Therefore, the different transforming potential of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 is unlikely to be related to different modes of activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway

  5. HTLV-2B Tax oncoprotein is modified by ubiquitination and sumoylation and displays intracellular localization similar to its homologue HTLV-1 Tax

    SciTech Connect

    Turci, Marco; Lodewick, Julie; Righi, Paola; Polania, Angela; Romanelli, Maria Grazia; Bex, Francoise; Bertazzoni, Umberto

    2009-03-30

    HTLV-1 is more pathogenic than HTLV-2B. The difference is generally attributed to the properties of their individual transactivating Tax proteins. By using internal Flag-6His tagged Tax-1 and Tax-2B, which display transcriptional activities comparable to the untagged proteins and can be recognized by a single anti-Flag antibody, we demonstrate that Tax-2B is modified by ubiquitination and sumoylation. In addition, Tax2B is distributed in punctuate nuclear structures that include the RelA subunit of NF-{kappa}B, as has been previously demonstrated for Tax-1.

  6. Transmission of Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Tax to Rabbits by tax-Only-Positive Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zucker-Franklin, Dorothea; Pancake, Bette A.; Lalezari, Parviz; Khorshidi, Manoochehr

    2000-01-01

    The human T-cell lymphrotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is causally related to adult T-cell leukemia and lymphoma and the neurodegenerative diseases tropical spastic paraparesis and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy. In the United States the prevalence of infection has been estimated to range from 0.016 to 0.1% on the basis of serologic tests for antibodies to the viral structural proteins. Blood from donors positive for antibodies to HTLV-1 or HTLV-2 is not used for transfusion. However, patients with the cutaneous T-cell lymphoma mycosis fungoides (MF) are HTLV-1 and -2 seronegative yet harbor proviral sequences identical to those that encode the HTLV-1 transactivating and transforming gene product p40tax in their peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and they usually have antibodies to p40tax. Moreover, a study of 250 randomly selected blood donors revealed that approximately 8% of these seronegative individuals also had HTLV-1 tax sequences and antibodies to p40tax, while they lacked sequences and antibodies related to gag, pol, or env. Thus, it seemed important to determine whether the “tax-only” state can be transmitted by transfusion. To this end, PBMCs from HTLV-1 and -2 seronegative tax-only-positive MF patients or from healthy tax-only-positive blood donors were injected into adult rabbits, an established animal model for HTLV-1 infection. The PBMCs of all injected rabbits became tax sequence positive. These observations suggest that HTLV-1 tax can be transmitted by tax-only-positive mononuclear cells. PMID:10702504

  7. A gorilla reservoir for human T-lymphotropic virus type 4

    PubMed Central

    LeBreton, Matthew; Switzer, William M; Djoko, Cyrille F; Gillis, Amethyst; Jia, Hongwei; Sturgeon, Michele M; Shankar, Anupama; Zheng, Haoqiang; Nkeunen, Gerard; Tamoufe, Ubald; Nana, Ahmadou; Le Doux Diffo, Joseph; Tafon, Babila; Kiyang, John; Schneider, Bradley S; Burke, Donald S; Wolfe, Nathan D

    2014-01-01

    Of the seven known species of human retroviruses only one, human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 4 (HTLV-4), lacks a known animal reservoir. We report the largest screening for simian T-cell lymphotropic virus (STLV-4) to date in a wide range of captive and wild non-human primate (NHP) species from Cameroon. Among the 681 wild and 426 captive NHPs examined, we detected STLV-4 infection only among gorillas by using HTLV-4-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The large number of samples analyzed, the diversity of NHP species examined, the geographic distribution of infected animals relative to the known HTLV-4 case, as well as detailed phylogenetic analyses on partial and full genomes, indicate that STLV-4 is endemic to gorillas, and that rather than being an ancient virus among humans, HTLV-4 emerged from a gorilla reservoir, likely through the hunting and butchering of wild gorillas. Our findings shed further light on the importance of gorillas as keystone reservoirs for the evolution and emergence of human infectious diseases and provide a clear course for preventing HTLV-4 emergence through management of human contact with wild gorillas, the development of improved assays for HTLV-4/STLV-4 detection and the ongoing monitoring of STLV-4 among gorillas and for HTLV-4 zoonosis among individuals exposed to gorilla populations. PMID:26038495

  8. Health education and knowledge assessment of HTLV-III diseases among intravenous drug users.

    PubMed

    Ginzburg, H M; French, J; Jackson, J; Hartsock, P I; MacDonald, M G; Weiss, S H

    1986-01-01

    The human T-cell lymphotropic virus, type III (HTLV-III) is the causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Since AIDS is not curable, public health efforts must be focused on decreasing AIDS transmission. 72% of all AIDS cases are male homosexuals; 17% are intravenous (IV) drug users; and 3% are hemophiliacs, blood recipients, and infants of these groups. The gay community is sufficiently organized to provide the necessary infrastructure for AIDS education and treatment; the drug users are not, and at least 1/3 of IV drug users share needles and syringes. In 1984 a cooperative study was undertaken in New Jersey by the New Jersey State Department of Health, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) to determine the seroprevalence of HTLV-III among IV drug users and to assess their knowledge about AIDS. Over 95% knew the severer symptoms of AIDS; 76% knew that most AIDS patients die within 2 years of diagnosis; but 9% thought AIDS could be treated. A year later in 1985 a similar knowledge assessment survey was done among 577 clients entering drug treatment programs in New Jersey. 90% of these respondents knew that homosexuals and IV drug users were the primary risk groups, but 11% thought alcoholics were also at risk, and 43% did not know that the infants of drug users were at risk. 84% knew that sex and shared needles were the major modes of transmission, but 1/3 thought that an infected person would immediately show visible signs of illness, and many did not know how rapidly AIDS killed. Also, many did not know how to adequately clean syringes. They thought boiling would damage the syringes, and only 1/3 knew that a dilute solution of household bleach kills the virus. New Jersey decided to use indigenous health workers, recruited from rehabilitated drug users, to educate the drug community. The core message was: get treatment; don't share needles; and if you must share needles, clean them. The same

  9. HTLV-1 in rural Guinea-Bissau: prevalence, incidence and a continued association with HIV between 1990 and 2007

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background HTLV-1 is endemic in Guinea-Bissau, and the highest prevalence in the adult population (5.2%) was observed in a rural area, Caió, in 1990. HIV-1 and HIV-2 are both prevalent in this area as well. Cross-sectional associations have been reported for HTLV-1 with HIV infection, but the trends in prevalence of HTLV-1 and HIV associations are largely unknown, especially in Sub Saharan Africa. In the current study, data from three cross-sectional community surveys performed in 1990, 1997 and 2007, were used to assess changes in HTLV-1 prevalence, incidence and its associations with HIV-1 and HIV-2 and potential risk factors. Results HTLV-1 prevalence was 5.2% in 1990, 5.9% in 1997 and 4.6% in 2007. Prevalence was higher among women than men in all 3 surveys and increased with age. The Odds Ratio (OR) of being infected with HTLV-1 was significantly higher for HIV positive subjects in all surveys after adjustment for potential confounding factors. The risk of HTLV-1 infection was higher in subjects with an HTLV-1 positive mother versus an uninfected mother (OR 4.6, CI 2.6-8.0). The HTLV-1 incidence was stable between 1990-1997 (Incidence Rate (IR) 1.8/1,000 pyo) and 1997-2007 (IR 1.6/1,000 pyo) (Incidence Rate Ratio (IRR) 0.9, CI 0.4-1.7). The incidence of HTLV-1 among HIV-positive individuals was higher compared to HIV negative individuals (IRR 2.5, CI 1.0-6.2), while the HIV incidence did not differ by HTLV-1 status (IRR 1.2, CI 0.5-2.7). Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the largest community based study that has reported on HTLV-1 prevalence and associations with HIV. HTLV-1 is endemic in this rural community in West Africa with a stable incidence and a high prevalence. The prevalence increases with age and is higher in women than men. HTLV-1 infection is associated with HIV infection, and longitudinal data indicate HIV infection may be a risk factor for acquiring HTLV-1, but not vice versa. Mother to child transmission is likely to contribute to the

  10. Human T-lymphotropic virus type II infection in Vietnamese thalassemic patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, M T; Nguyen, B T; Binh, T V; Be, T V; Chiang, T Y; Tseng, L H; Yang, Y C; Lin, K H; Chen, Y C

    1997-01-01

    Anti-human T-lymphotropic virus type I/II (HTLV-I/II) antibodies were screened by particle agglutination test in a total of 66 patients with thalassemia major who received multiple transfusion from paid donors at the Blood Transfusion Hematology Center of Ho Chi Minh City in South Vietnam. HTLV-II infection was confirmed in 6 patients (9.1%) by Western blot analysis and/or polymerase chain reaction. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that long terminal repeat sequences of HTLV-II proviruses from 5 thalassemic patients in Vietnam belonged to the same phylogenetic subgroup of HTLV-IIb as those from intravenous drug abusers in North America and Europe. These data shed light on the route of introducing HTLV-II into Vietnam. PMID:9267453

  11. NLRP3 polymorphism is associated with protection against human T-lymphotropic virus 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Anselmo Jiro; Pontillo, Alessandra; Guimarães, Rafael Lima; Loureiro, Paula; Crovella, Sergio; Brandão, Lucas André Cavalcanti

    2014-11-01

    Inter-individual heterogeneity in the response to human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1) infection has been partially attributed to host genetic background. The antiviral activity of the inflammasome cytoplasmic complex recognises viral molecular patterns and regulates immune responses via the activation of interleukin (IL)-1 family (IL-1, IL-18 and IL-33) members. The association between polymorphisms in the inflammasome receptors NLRP1 and NLRP3 and HTLV-1 infection was evaluated in a northeastern Brazilian population (84 HTLV-1 carriers and 155 healthy controls). NLRP3 rs10754558 G/G was associated with protection against HTLV-1 infection (p = 0.012; odds ratio = 0.37). rs10754558 affects NLRP3 mRNA stability; therefore, our results suggest that higher NLRP3 expression may augment first-line defences, leading to the effective protection against HTLV-1 infection. PMID:25411003

  12. Mechanisms of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 transmission and disease.

    PubMed

    Lairmore, Michael D; Haines, Robyn; Anupam, Rajaneesh

    2012-08-01

    Human T-lymphotrophic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infects approximately 15-20 million people worldwide, with endemic areas in Japan, the Caribbean, and Africa. The virus is spread through contact with bodily fluids containing infected cells most often from mother to child through breast milk or via blood transfusion. After prolonged latency periods, approximately 3-5% of HTLV-1 infected individuals will develop either adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, or other lymphocyte-mediated disorders such as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. The genome of this complex retrovirus contains typical gag, pol, and env genes, but also unique nonstructural proteins encoded from the pX region. These nonstructural genes encode the Tax and Rex regulatory proteins, as well as novel proteins essential for viral spread in vivo such as p30, p12, p13 and the antisense-encoded HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper factor (HBZ). While progress has been made in knowledge of viral determinants of cell transformation and host immune responses, host and viral determinants of HTLV-1 transmission and spread during the early phases of infection are unclear. Improvements in the molecular tools to test these viral determinants in cellular and animal models have provided new insights into the early events of HTLV-1 infection. This review will focus on studies that test HTLV-1 determinants in context to full-length infectious clones of the virus providing insights into the mechanisms of transmission and spread of HTLV-1. PMID:22819021

  13. Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Types 1 and 2 Seropositivity among Blood Donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank, South Western Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Uchenna Tweteise, Patience; Natukunda, Bernard; Bazira, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Background. The human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 (HTLV 1/2) are retroviruses associated with different pathologies. HTLV-1 causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP); HTLV-2 is not clearly associated with a known clinical disease. Both viruses may be transmitted by whole blood transfusion, from mother to child predominantly through breastfeeding, and by sexual contact. Presently, none of the regional blood banks in Uganda perform routine pretransfusion screening for HTLV. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of anti-human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1/2 (HTLV-1/2) antibodies among blood donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank in South Western Uganda. A cross-sectional study was conducted between June 2014 and September 2014. Methodology. Consecutive blood samples of 368 blood donors were screened for anti-HTLV-1/2 antibodies using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Samples reactive on a first HTLV-1/2 ELISA were further retested in duplicate using the same ELISA. Of the three hundred and sixty-eight blood donors (229 (62.2%) males and 139 (37.8%) females), only two male donors aged 20 and 21 years were HTLV-1/2 seropositive, representing a prevalence of 0.54%. Conclusion. HTLV-1/2 prevalence is low among blood donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank. Studies among other categories of people at risk for HTLV 1/2 infection should be carried out. PMID:27034840

  14. IL28B Gene Polymorphism SNP rs8099917 Genotype GG Is Associated with HTLV-1-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP) in HTLV-1 Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Luiz, Olinda do Carmo; Malta, Fernanda; Pinho, João Renato Rebello; Gonçalves, Fernanda de Toledo; Duarte, Alberto Jose da Silva; de Oliveira, Augusto Cesar Penalva

    2014-01-01

    Background The polymorphisms of IL28B have been described as important in the pathogenesis of infections caused by some viruses. The aim of this research was to evaluate whether IL28B gene polymorphisms (SNP rs8099917 and SNP rs12979860) are associated with HAM/TSP. Methods The study included 229 subjects, classified according to their neurological status in two groups: Group I (136 asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers) and Group II (93 HAM/TSP patients). The proviral loads were quantified, and the rs8099917 and rs12979860 SNPs in the region of IL28B-gene were analyzed by StepOnePlus Real-time PCR System. Results A multivariate model analysis, including gender, age, and HTLV-1 DNA proviral load, showed that IL28B polymorphisms were independently associated with HAM/TSP outcome in rs12979860 genotype CT (OR = 2.03; IC95% = 0.96–4.27) and in rs8099917 genotype GG (OR = 7.61; IC95% = 1.82–31.72). Conclusion Subjects with SNP rs8099917 genotype GG and rs12979618 genotype CT may present a distinct immune response against HTLV-1 infection. So, it seems reasonable to suggest that a search for IL28B polymorphisms should be performed for all HTLV-1-infected subjects in order to monitor their risk for disease development; however, since this is the first description of such finding in the literature, we should first replicate this study with more HTLV-1-infected persons to strengthen the evidence already provided by our results. PMID:25233462

  15. Type-specific neutralization of the human immunodeficiency virus with antibodies to env-encoded synthetic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Palker, T J; Clark, M E; Langlois, A J; Matthews, T J; Weinhold, K J; Randall, R R; Bolognesi, D P; Haynes, B F

    1988-01-01

    A synthetic peptide (SP-10-IIIB) with an amino acid sequence [Cys-Thr-Arg-Pro-Asn-Asn-Asn-Thr-Arg-Lys-Ser-Ile-Arg-Ile-Gln-Arg-Gly-Pro -Pro-Gly-(Tyr); amino acids 303-321] from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) isolate human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) HTLV-IIIB envelope glycoprotein gp120 was coupled to tetanus toxoid and used to raise goat antibodies to HIV gp120. Goat anti-SP-10-IIIB serum bound to the surface of HTLV-IIIB-infected CEM T cells but not to the surface of HTLV-IIIRF-infected or uninfected CEM T cells. Anti-SP-10-IIIB antibodies also selectively bound to gp120 from lysates of HTLV-IIIB cells in immunoblot assays. Twenty-one percent of sera (28 of 175) from patients seropositive for HIV contained antibodies that reacted with SP-10-IIIB in RIA. Human anti-SP-10-IIIB antibodies affinity purified from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient serum bound to HTLV-IIIB-infected cells and immunoprecipitated gp120. Goat antibodies to SP-10-IIIB neutralized HTLV-IIIB (80% neutralization titer of 1/600), inhibited HTLV-IIIB-induced syncytium formation, but did not neutralize HIV isolates HTLV-IIIRF or HTLV-IIIMN or inhibit syncytium formation with these isolates. Also, goat antiserum to an homologous synthetic peptide [SP-10-IIIRF(A), (Cys)-Arg-Lys-Ser-Ile-Thr-Lys-Gly-Pro-Gly-Arg-Val-Ile-Tyr] from gp120 of HIV isolate HTLV-IIIRF inhibited syncytium formation by HTLV-IIIRF, but did not inhibit syncytium formation by HTLV-IIIB or by HTLV-IIIMN. Thus, the amino acid sequences of SP-10-IIIB and SP-10-IIIRF(A) define homologous regions of gp120 that are important in type-specific virus neutralization. The identification of these type-specific neutralizing epitopes should facilitate the design of a polyvalent, synthetic vaccine for AIDS. Images PMID:2450351

  16. In vivo immunogenicity of Tax 11-19 epitope in HLA-A2/DTR transgenic mice: implication for dendritic cell-based anti-HTLV-1 vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, Divya; Masih, Shet; Schell, Todd; Jacobson, Steven; Comber, Joseph D.; Philip, Ramila; Wigdahl, Brian; Jain, Pooja; Khan, Zafar K.

    2014-01-01

    Viral oncoprotein Tax plays key roles in transformation of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1)-infected T cells leading to adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), and is the key antigen recognized during HTLV-associated myelopathy (HAM). In HLA-A2+ asymptomatic carriers as well as ATL and HAM patients, Tax(11-19) epitope exhibits immunodominance. Here, we evaluate CD8 T-cell immune response against this epitope in the presence and absence of dendritic cells (DCs) given the recent encouraging observations made with Phase 1 DC-based vaccine trial for ATL. To facilitate these studies, we first generated an HLA-A2/DTR hybrid mouse strain carrying the HLA-A2.1 and CD11c-DTR genes. We then studied CD8 T-cell immune response against Tax(11-19) epitope delivered in the absence or presence of Freund’s adjuvant and/or DCs. Overall results demonstrate that naturally presented Tax epitope could initiate an antigen-specific CD8 T cell response in vivo but failed to do so upon DC depletion. Presence of adjuvant potentiated Tax(11-19)-specific response. Elevated serum IL-6 levels coincided with depletion of DCs whereas decreased TGF-β was associated with adjuvant use. Thus, Tax(11-19) epitope is a potential candidate for the DC-based anti-HTLV-1 vaccine and the newly hybrid mouse strain could be used for investigating DC involvement in human class-I-restricted immune responses. PMID:24739247

  17. David D. Derse, 1949-2009

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    David D. Derse, Ph.D., Head of the Retrovirus Gene Expression Section in the HIV Drug Resistance Program at the National Cancer Institute-Frederick (NCI-Frederick), passed away on October 9, 2009, a scant six weeks after being diagnosed with liver cancer. It was with great sadness that family, friends, and colleagues gathered together for his memorial service on Saturday, October 17, 2009, at the Middletown United Methodist Church in Maryland. As a NCI scientist since 1986, Dave studied the molecular mechanisms of infection and replication of a number of different types of retroviruses. Dave became an internationally known expert on human T cell lymphotrophic viruses type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) and served on the editorial boards of Virology and Retrovirology. His most recent studies focused on the mechanisms of HTLV-1 virion morphogenesis, transmission, and replication. PMID:19951436

  18. Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 uveitis after Graves' disease.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, K; Mochizuki, M; Watanabe, T; Yoshimura, K; Shirao, M; Araki, S; Miyata, N; Mori, S; Kiyokawa, T; Takatsuki, K

    1994-01-01

    A distinct clinical entity of uveitis associated with human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-I) has been reported previously. During the period between January 1989 and April 1992, 93 patients were observed with HTLV-I uveitis and a significant correlation was found between Graves' disease and HTLV-I uveitis. Sixteen of the 93 patients with HTLV-I uveitis (17.2%) had a previous history of Graves' disease. Fifteen patients were female (15/60, 25.0%) and one was male (1/33, 3.0%). Interestingly, uveitis occurred after the onset of Graves' disease in all cases. On the other hand, none of 222 patients with idiopathic uveitis who were seronegative to HTLV-I had a history of Graves' disease. Although the mechanisms by which HTLV-I causes the correlation between uveitis and Graves' disease are unknown, the present data suggest that immune mediated or autoimmune mechanisms are involved in HTLV-I uveitis. Images PMID:8148330

  19. LKB1 tumor suppressor and salt-inducible kinases negatively regulate human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 transcription

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) causes adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). Treatment options are limited and prophylactic agents are not available. We have previously demonstrated an essential role for CREB-regulating transcriptional coactivators (CRTCs) in HTLV-1 transcription. Results In this study we report on the negative regulatory role of LKB1 tumor suppressor and salt-inducible kinases (SIKs) in the activation of HTLV-1 long terminal repeats (LTR) by the oncoprotein Tax. Activation of LKB1 and SIKs effectively blunted Tax activity in a phosphorylation-dependent manner, whereas compromising these kinases, but not AMP-dependent protein kinases, augmented Tax function. Activated LKB1 and SIKs associated with Tax and suppressed Tax-induced LTR activation by counteracting CRTCs and CREB. Enforced expression of LKB1 or SIK1 in cells transfected with HTLV-1 molecular clone pX1MT repressed proviral transcription. On the contrary, depletion of LKB1 in pX1MT-transfected cells and in HTLV-1-transformed T cells boosted the expression of Tax. Treatment of HTLV-1 transformed cells with metformin led to LKB1/SIK1 activation, reduction in Tax expression, and inhibition of cell proliferation. Conclusions Our findings revealed a new function of LKB1 and SIKs as negative regulators of HTLV-1 transcription. Pharmaceutical activation of LKB1 and SIKs might be considered as a new strategy in anti-HTLV-1 and anti-ATL therapy. PMID:23577667

  20. [Preliminary study of HTLV-I seroprevalence in Chilean Indian populations].

    PubMed

    Cartier, L; Tajima, K; Araya, F; Castillo, J L; Zaninovic, V; Hayami, M; Imai, J; Born, P; Cárdenas, M; Moreno, J

    1993-03-01

    Aiming to seek the origin and define the prevalence of HTLV-1 infections, 464 blood samples from aboriginal populations proceeding from isolated regions of the north and south of Chile were studied. Antibodies against HTLV were measured with agglutination tests and confirmed with immuno-fluorescence and Western Blotting. Seven out of 107 (6.5%) blood samples from Atacama indians, 2 out of 202 (1%) from Mapuche indians and 3 out of 155 (1.9%) from Huilliche aborigines were positive. These results highlight an important presence of the virus in indigenous populations, specially in the extremes of the country. These findings could suggest an indigenous (mongoloid) origin of HTLV-1 in Chile, specially in Chiloe, where apparently there has been no contact with african or japanese populations, that could be the origin of the contamination. PMID:8248634

  1. Efficient induction of human T-cell leukemia virus-1-specific CTL by chimeric particle without adjuvant as a prophylactic for adult T-cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kozako, Tomohiro; Fukada, Katsuhiko; Hirata, Shinya; White, Yohann; Harao, Michiko; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Kino, Youichiro; Soeda, Shinji; Shimeno, Hiroshi; Lemonnier, François; Sonoda, Shunro; Arima, Naomichi

    2009-12-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) is an aggressive peripheral T-cell neoplasm that develops after long-term infection with the human T-cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1). HTLV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in suppressing proliferation of HTLV-1-infected or transformed T-cells in vitro. Efficient induction of antigen-specific CTLs is important for immunologic suppression of oncogenesis, but has evaded strategies utilizing poorly immunogenic free synthetic peptides. In the present study, we examined the efficient induction of HTLV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell response by an HTLV-1/hepatitis B virus core (HBc) chimeric particle incorporating the HLA-A*0201-restricted HTLV-1 Tax-epitope. The immunization of HLA-A*0201-transgenic mice with the chimeric particle induced antigen-specific gamma-interferon reaction, whereas immunization with epitope peptide only induced no reaction as assessed by enzyme-linked immunospot assay. Immunization with the chimeric particle also induced HTLV-1-specific CD8+ T-cells in spleen and inguinal lymph nodes. Furthermore, upon exposure of dendritic cells from HLA-A*0201-transgenic mice to the chimeric particle, the expression of CD86, HLA-A02, TLR4 and MHC class II was increased. Additionally, our results show that HTLV-1-specific CD8+ T-cells can be induced by peptide with HTLV-1/HBc particle from ATL patient, but not by peptide only and these HTLV-1-specific CD8+ T-cells were able to lyse cells presenting the peptide. These results suggest that HTLV-1/HBc chimeric particle is capable of inducing strong cellular immune responses without adjuvants via effective maturation of dendritic cells and is potentially useful as an effective carrier for therapeutic vaccines in tumors, or in infectious diseases by substituting the epitope peptide. PMID:19889459

  2. Prevalence of antibody to human T cell lymphotropic virus types 1/2 among aboriginal groups inhabiting northern Argentina and the Amazon region of Peru.

    PubMed

    Medeot, S; Nates, S; Recalde, A; Gallego, S; Maturano, E; Giordano, M; Serra, H; Reategui, J; Cabezas, C

    1999-04-01

    We carried out a seroepidemiologic survey to define the prevalence of human T cell lymphotropic virus types 1/2 (HTLV-1/2) infections among aboriginal populations from isolated regions of northern Argentina and the Amazon region of Peru. Antibodies against HTLV were measured with agglutination tests and confirmed with by an immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and Western blotting. Five (6.94%) of 72 samples from the Tobas Indians in Argentina were positive by the IFA; two samples were typed as HTLV-1 (2.78%), two as HTLV-2 (2.78%), and one (1.39%) could not be typed because it had similar antibody titers against both viruses. No positive samples were found among 84 Andinos Puneños and 47 Matacos Wichis Indians. Seroprevalences of 2.50% (1 of 40) and 1.43% (1 of 70) for HTLV-1 were observed among Wayku and San Francisco communities in the Amazon region of Peru, and seroprevalences of 4.54% (1 of 22) and 2.38% (1 of 42) for HTLV-2 were observed among Boca Colorada and Galilea communities. No serologic evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was found among the Indians tested. These results indicated the presence of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 in the indigenous populations of Argentina and Peru. Moreover, the lack of HIV infection indicates that the virus has probably not yet been introduced into these populations. PMID:10348238

  3. Psychiatric Disorders in HTLV-1-Infected Individuals with Bladder Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Orge, Glória O.; Dellavechia, Thais R.; Carneiro-Neto, José Abraão; Araújo-de-Freitas, Lucas; Daltro, Carla H. C.; Santos, Carlos T.; Quarantini, Lucas C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have reported high rates of depression and anxiety in HTLV-1 infected individuals with the neurological disease and in the asymptomatic phase. No study has investigated the rates in individuals that already show bladder symptoms without severe neurological changes; that is, during the oligosymptomatic phase. The present study investigated patients in this intermediate form on the spectrum of the infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Participants answered a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview Brazilian Version 5.0.0 (MINI PLUS) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Data analysis was performed in STATA statistical software (version 12.0). Depressive disorder was the most frequent comorbidity. Current depressive disorder was higher in the group of overactive bladder subjects (11.9%), and lifelong depression was more frequent in the HAM/TSP group (35%). The three groups had similar frequencies of anxiety disorders. Increased frequency and severity of anxiety and depression symptoms were observed in the overactive bladder group. Conclusion/Significance The results suggest that individuals with overactive bladders need a more thorough assessment from the mental health perspective. These patients remain an understudied group regarding psychiatric comorbidities. PMID:26018525

  4. [A case of HTLV-1 associated myelopathy with pulmonary involvement].

    PubMed

    Araki, J; Kaku, M; Mashimoto, H; Fukuda, Y; Asai, S

    1989-11-01

    A 70-year-old woman was admitted complaining of gait disturbance and difficulty in urination. Neurological examination showed myelopathy and both serum and CSF anti ATLA antibodies were positive. A diagnosis of HTLV-associated myelopathy (HAM) was made and steroid therapy was initiated. Chest X-ray film on admission showed no abnormality, but three months later, diffuse fine nodular and reticular shadows appeared in both lung fields. The patients had no respiratory symptom. The results of pulmonary function tests were normal, aside from a mild obstructive defect as indicated by reduced V25. Arterial blood gas was also normal. Bronchoalveolar lavage studies showed increased total cell counts and an increased proportion of T-cells. The histological findings of the transbronchial lung biopsy specimen were bronchiolitis and alveolitis. Subsequently, within the next eight months the abnormal shadows on chest X-ray cleared gradually on maintenance dosage of prednisolone, 10 mg/day. Possible relationships between HAM and the pulmonary lesions were discussed. PMID:2625816

  5. Low prevalence of HCV, HIV, and HTLV-I/II infection markers in northwestern Greece: results of a 3-year prospective donor study (1995-1997).

    PubMed

    Zervou, E K.; Boumba, D S.; Liaskos, Ch; Georgiadou, S; Tsianos, E V.; Dalekos, G N.

    2003-02-01

    Background: The risk of infection with transfusion-transmitted viruses has been reduced remarkably. A zero-risk blood supply, however, remains a popular goal. A 3-year prospective donor study was conducted in the Epirus region of Greece to determine the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV), hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Herein, we report the prevalence of HIV, HTLV, and HCV infection markers in this area. Methodology: Between January 1, 1995 and December 31, 1997, 6696 donors were investigated for the presence of anti-HIV, anti-HTLV, and anti-HCV antibodies using standard enzyme immunoassays (EIA). Every sample with anti-HCV reactivity by third-generation EIA was further investigated using a third-generation recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA 3.0) and HCV-RNA by a combination of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA EIA. Results: None of the donors tested positive for anti-HIV or anti-HTLV antibodies. In contrast, anti-HCV was detected in 41 donors (0.61%). Using a RIBA 3.0 test, eight donors tested positive and eight had indeterminate results, while 25 tested negative. Seven of the eight donors with both EIA and RIBA 3.0 reactivity had increased levels of aminotransferases and detectable serum HCV-RNA. The remaining 34 donors had repeatedly normal aminotransferases and three times negative HCV-RNA. Liver biopsy was performed in anti-HCV/HCV-RNA-positive donors (7/41). The lesions were compatible with chronic hepatitis C in all of them. Conclusion: A zero prevalence of HIV and HTLV infection markers was found. Although the number of annual donations in this study was relatively low, the negative data for HIV and HTLV clearly indicate that rates of these infections are low in our region and that infected donors will be seen infrequently. HCV infection in blood donors remains very low in our region and is similar to the data reported in other industrialized countries. In fact, the prevalence of

  6. HTLV-1 bZIP factor HBZ promotes cell proliferation and genetic instability by activating OncomiRs.

    PubMed

    Vernin, Céline; Thenoz, Morgan; Pinatel, Christiane; Gessain, Antoine; Gout, Olivier; Delfau-Larue, Marie-Hélène; Nazaret, Nicolas; Legras-Lachuer, Catherine; Wattel, Eric; Mortreux, Franck

    2014-11-01

    Viruses disrupt the host cell microRNA (miRNA) network to facilitate their replication. Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1) replication relies on the clonal expansion of its host CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, yet this virus causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) that typically has a CD4(+) phenotype. The viral oncoprotein Tax, which is rarely expressed in ATLL cells, has long been recognized for its involvement in tumor initiation by promoting cell proliferation, genetic instability, and miRNA dysregulation. Meanwhile, HBZ is expressed in both untransformed infected cells and ATLL cells and is involved in sustaining cell proliferation and silencing virus expression. Here, we show that an HBZ-miRNA axis promotes cell proliferation and genetic instability, as indicated by comet assays that showed increased numbers of DNA-strand breaks. Expression profiling of miRNA revealed that infected CD4(+) cells, but not CD8(+) T cells, overexpressed oncogenic miRNAs, including miR17 and miR21. HBZ activated these miRNAs via a posttranscriptional mechanism. These effects were alleviated by knocking down miR21 or miR17 and by ectopic expression of OBFC2A, a DNA-damage factor that is downregulated by miR17 and miR21 in HTLV-1-infected CD4(+) T cells. These findings extend the oncogenic potential of HBZ and suggest that viral expression might be involved in the remarkable genetic instability of ATLL cells. PMID:25205102

  7. HTLV-1 tax-induced NF-kappaB activation is synergistically enhanced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate: mechanism and implications for Tax oncogenicity.

    PubMed

    Azran-Shaish, Inbal; Tabakin-Fix, Yulia; Huleihel, Mahmoud; Bakhanashvili, Mary; Aboud, Mordechai

    2008-07-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) factors regulate a wide range of physiological and oncogenic processes. Normally, these factors are transiently activated by specific external signals which induce their dissociation from inhibitors of kappaB (IkappaB) and subsequent translocation to the nucleus where p65 links to the cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CBP)-p300 and P/CAF coactivators that are essential for its transcriptional activity. The pathogenic potential of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein is partly ascribed to its capacity to constitutively activate NF-kappaB factors because constitutive activity of these factors play an important role in the pathophysiology of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and tropical spastic paraparesis-HTLV-1 associated myelopathy (TSP-HAM). In assessing the possibility of modulating Tax pathogenic potential by external factors, we focused here on 12-O -tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) which is a potent protein kinase C (PKC) activator. There are conflicting reports regarding the effect of TPA and PKC on NF-kappaB. Therefore, we reassessed this issue and also investigated their influence on Tax-mediated activation of these factors. We found that TPA promoted NF-kappaB nuclear translocation and the DNA binding of p65 dimers through PKC activation. However, both TPA and ectopically expressed PKC had only a marginal effect on the transcriptional competence of these dimers, indicating that the DNA binding of such dimers is insufficient by itself for gene activation. Notably, however, both TPA and the ectopic PKC displayed strong synergistic enhancement of the Tax-induced activation of the NF-kappaB transcriptional function. In contrast, TPA and the ectopic PKC only slightly elevated the low activation of the NF-kappaB transcriptional capacity by cytoplasmic Tax mutants, indicating that the nuclear translocation of Tax was essential for this synergism. Subsequent experiments suggested

  8. Identification of clonally rearranged T-cell receptor beta chain genes in HTLV-I carriers as a potential instrument for early detection of neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Sales, M M; Bezerra, C N A; Hiraki, Y; Melo, N B; Rebouças, N A

    2005-05-01

    We analyzed the genetic recombination pattern of the T-cell receptor beta-chain gene (TCR-beta) in order to identify clonal expansion of T-lymphocytes in 17 human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I)-positive healthy carriers, 7 of them with abnormal features in the peripheral blood lymphocytes. Monoclonal or oligoclonal expansion of T-cells was detected in 5 of 7 HTLV-I-positive patients with abnormal lymphocytes and unconfirmed diagnosis by using PCR amplification of segments of TCR-beta gene, in a set of reactions that target 102 different variable (V) segments, covering all members of the 24 V families available in the gene bank, including the more recently identified segments of the Vbeta-5 and Vbeta-8 family and the two diversity beta segments. Southern blots, the gold standard method to detect T-lymphocyte clonality, were negative for all of these 7 patients, what highlights the low sensitivity of this method that requires a large amount of very high quality DNA. To evaluate the performance of PCR in the detection of clonality we also analyzed 18 leukemia patients, all of whom tested positive. Clonal expansion was not detected in any of the negative controls or healthy carriers without abnormal lymphocytes. In conclusion, PCR amplification of segments of rearranged TCR-beta is reliable and highly suitable for the detection of small populations of clonal T-cells in asymptomatic HTLV-I carriers who present abnormal peripheral blood lymphocytes providing an additional instrument for following up these patients with potentially higher risk of leukemia. PMID:15917950

  9. Pentosan polysulfate treatment ameliorates motor function with increased serum soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in HTLV-1-associated neurologic disease.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Satoh, Katsuya; Fukuda, Taku; Kinoshita, Ikuo; Nishiura, Yoshihiro; Nagasato, Kunihiko; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Kataoka, Yasufumi; Nakamura, Tadahiro; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Kumagai, Kenji; Niwa, Masami; Noguchi, Mitsuru; Nakamura, Hideki; Nishida, Noriyuki; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2014-06-01

    The main therapeutic strategy against human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) characterized by lower extremity motor dysfunction is immunomodulatory treatment, with drugs such as corticosteroid hormone and interferon-α, at present. However, there are many issues in long-term treatment with these drugs, such as insufficient effects and various side effects. We now urgently need to develop other therapeutic strategies. The heparinoid, pentosan polysulfate sodium (PPS), has been safely used in Europe for the past 50 years as a thrombosis prophylaxis and for the treatment of phlebitis. We conducted a clinical trial to test the effect of subcutaneous administration of PPS in 12 patients with HAM/TSP in an open-labeled design. There was a marked improvement in lower extremity motor function, based on reduced spasticity, such as a reduced time required for walking 10 m and descending a flight of stairs. There were no significant changes in HTLV-I proviral copy numbers in peripheral blood contrary to the inhibitory effect of PPS in vitro for intercellular spread of HTLV-I. However, serum soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (sVCAM)-1 was significantly increased without significant changes of serum level of chemokines (CXCL10 and CCL2). There was a positive correlation between increased sVCAM-1and reduced time required for walking 10 m. PPS might induce neurological improvement by inhibition of chronic inflammation in the spinal cord, through blocking the adhesion cascade by increasing serum sVCAM-1, in addition to rheological improvement of the microcirculation. PPS has the potential to be a new therapeutic tool for HAM/TSP. PMID:24671717

  10. Engraftment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 carriers in NOD/SCID/gammac(null) (NOG) mice.

    PubMed

    Takajo, Ichiro; Umeki, Kazumi; Morishita, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Ikuo; Kubuki, Yoko; Hatakeyama, Kinta; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Okayama, Akihiko

    2007-11-15

    The transmission of human T-lymphotropic virus Type 1 (HTLV-1) occurs mainly via breast-feeding, sexual intercourse and blood transfusions. After transmission, the HTLV-1 infection is predominantly maintained by cell-to-cell infection and clonal expansion; however, the details have not yet been clarified. To investigate how HTLV-1 infected cells act in an environment without an effective immune reaction, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers were inoculated into nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID)/gammac(null) (NOG) mice, which have immunological dysfunctions of T- and B-lymphocytes and NK cells. Human mononuclear cells including both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were found to have infiltrated into various organs, including the liver, kidney, spleen and lung, when the mice were sacrificed 1 month after inoculation. The copy numbers of HTLV-1 provirus detected in the tissue-infiltrating human cells were much higher than those in the original PBMCs from the carriers. The expression of HTLV-1 mRNA was demonstrated in the tissue-infiltrating cells by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Inverse-long polymerase chain reaction showed that the pattern of HTLV-1 proviral integration was different from that of the original carrier and that it varied among NOG mice inoculated with PBMCs from the same carrier. These results suggest the selective proliferation of particular clones of HTLV-1 infected cells in NOG mice. Alternatively, transmission and new integration of HTLV-1 from infected cells to noninfected cells might have occurred in an environment without an effective immune reaction. The NOG mouse is considered a good animal model for the patho-physiological study of HTLV-1 infection with immunodeficiency. PMID:17657714

  11. Absence of cytotoxic antibody to human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells in humans and its induction in animals after infection or immunization with purified envelope glycoprotein gp120

    SciTech Connect

    Nara, P.L.; Robey, W.G.; Gonda, M.A.; Carter, S.G.; Fischinger, P.J.

    1987-06-01

    The presence of antibody-dependent complement-mediated cytotoxicity (ACC) was assessed in humans and chimpanzees, which are capable of infection with human immunodeficiency virus isolate HTLV-IIIb, and examined in the goat after immunization with the major viral glycoprotein (gp120) of HTLV-IIIb. In infected humans no antibody mediating ACC was observed regardless of the status of disease. Even healthy individuals with high-titer, broadly reactive, neutralizing antibodies has no ACC. In contrast, chimpanzees infected with HTLV-IIIb, from whom virus could be isolated, not only had neutralizing antibody but also antibodies broadly reactive in ACC, even against distantly related human immunodeficiency virus isolates, as well as against their own reisolated virus. In the goat, the gp120 of HTLV-IIIb induced a highly type-specific response as measured by both ACC and flow cytofluorometry of live infected H9 cells. Normal human cells were not subject to ACC by animal anti-HTLV-III gp120-specific sera. Induction of ACC and neutralizing antibody were closely correlated in the animal experimental models but not in humans. The presence of ACC in gp120-inoculated goats and HTLV-III-infected chimpanzees represent a qualitative difference that may be important in the quest for the elicitation of a protective immunity in humans.

  12. Control of the Inflammatory Response Mechanisms Mediated by Natural and Induced Regulatory T-Cells in HCV-, HTLV-1-, and EBV-Associated Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Moralès, Olivier; Delhem, Nadira

    2014-01-01

    Virus infections are involved in chronic inflammation and, in some cases, cancer development. Although a viral infection activates the immune system's response that eradicates the pathogen mainly through inflammatory mechanisms, it is now recognized that this inflammatory condition is also favorable to the development of tumors. Indeed, it is well described that viruses, such as hepatitis C virus (HCV), Epstein Barr virus (EBV), human papillomavirus (HPV) or human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1), are important risk factors for tumor malignancies. The inflammatory response is a fundamental immune mechanism which involves several molecular and cellular components consisting of cytokines and chemokines that are released by various proinflammatory cells. In parallel to this process, some endogenous recruited components release anti-inflammatory mediators to restore homeostasis. The development of tools and strategies using viruses to hijack the immune response is mostly linked to the presence of regulatory T-cells (Treg) that can inhibit inflammation and antiviral responses of other effector cells. In this review, we will focus on current understanding of the role of natural and induced Treg in the control and the resolution of inflammatory response in HCV-, HTLV-1-, and EBV-associated cancers. PMID:25525301

  13. Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma in a pregnant woman diagnosed as a human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 carrier.

    PubMed

    Fuchi, Naoki; Miura, Kiyonori; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2016-03-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL), which is difficult to cure. In Japan, a nationwide HTLV-1 screening test in pregnant women has been recommended since 2011. A 30-year-old woman was diagnosed as being an HTLV-1 carrier in her previous pregnancy. During the current pregnancy, she had persistent fever and cough. Although she had treatment with antibiotics, peripheral white blood cell count remained high, with an abnormal lymphocyte count. Given that she was an HTLV-1 carrier, she was diagnosed with unfavorable chronic ATL (aggressive ATL) at 12 weeks gestation. After pregnancy termination, her ATL status became favorable chronic ATL (indolent ATL). Therefore, watchful waiting was performed until disease progression. This is the first case report of chronic ATL in early pregnancy, in a woman already diagnosed as an HTLV-1 carrier on screening test. PMID:26663442

  14. Characterization of a variant of human T-lymphotropic virus type I isolated from a healthy member of a remote, recently contacted group in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed Central

    Yanagihara, R; Nerurkar, V R; Garruto, R M; Miller, M A; Leon-Monzon, M E; Jenkins, C L; Sanders, R C; Liberski, P P; Alpers, M P; Gajdusek, D C

    1991-01-01

    We report the characterization of a variant of human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) isolated from an interleukin 2-dependent, CD8+ T-cell line derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a healthy member of a remote, recently contacted hunter-horticulturalist group (Hagahai) in Madang province of Papua New Guinea. Antigenic characterization of this variant, designated PNG-1, by immunofluorescence, indicated no expression of gag-encoded proteins p19 and p24 (even after incubation with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine), using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against HTLV-I gag gene products. Virus-specific proteins of 15, 19, 46, 53, and 61/68 kDa were demonstrated by Western blot analysis, using sera from patients with serologically and/or virologically confirmed HTLV-I myeloneuropathy, sera from HTLV-I-infected rabbits, and antibodies prepared against the C terminus of the major envelope glycoprotein gp46. Restriction endonuclease maps of PNG-1 proviral DNA differed from that of a prototype strain of HTLV-I (MT-2), but, as verified by polymerase chain reaction, PNG-1 was definitely HTLV-I, not HTLV-II. Nucleotide sequencing and further molecular genetic studies of this variant may provide insights into the origin and evolution of HTLV-I. Images PMID:1996344

  15. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With HTLV-Associated T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-07

    Acute Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Chronic Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; HTLV-1 Infection; Lymphomatous Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Smoldering Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  16. Frequency of adult T-cell leukaemia/lymphoma and HTLV-I in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C. K.; Alexander, S. S.; Bodner, A.; Levine, A.; Saxinger, C.; Gallo, R. C.; Blattner, W. A.

    1993-01-01

    Sera from a small sample of adult blood donors, healthy school children and patients with lymphoma, leukaemia, non-haematologic cancer, congenital and inflammatory disorders from Ibadan, Nigeria were screened for HTLV-I antibody by an enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay and confirmed by investigational Western blot. Seventy-nine of 236 positively screened samples could not be tested for confirmation. Seropositive reactivity was observed in nine of 123 blood donors, and 3 of 46 healthy school children but banding patterns on Western blot were often sparse. Among non-Burkitt's non Hodgkin's lymphoma patients six of 30 were HTLV-I positive including four of four with clinical features of adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL). Other clinical conditions had a frequency of positivity indistinguishable from healthy donors. Western blot patterns ranged from strong with multiple bands, which were uncommon, to those with only p24 and p21 envelope positive which were frequent. Given the relative paucity of clinical ATL and the unusual Western blot patterns the true rate of HTLV-I infection may be lower than estimated. It is possible that a cross-reactive HTLV-I-like virus accounts for this pattern. PMID:8471436

  17. Acetylation of the c-MYC oncoprotein is required for cooperation with the HTLV-1 p30II accessory protein and the induction of oncogenic cellular transformation by p30II/c-MYC

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Megan M.; Ko, Bookyung; Kim, Janice; Brady, Rebecca; Heatley, Hayley C.; He, Jeffrey; Harrod, Carolyn K.; Barnett, Braden; Ratner, Lee; Lairmore, Michael D.; Martinez, Ernest; Lüscher, Bernhard; Robson, Craig N.; Henriksson, Marie; Harrod, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia retrovirus type-1 (HTLV-1) p30II protein is a multifunctional latency-maintenance factor that negatively regulates viral gene expression and deregulates host signaling pathways involved in aberrant T-cell growth and proliferation. We have previously demonstrated that p30II interacts with the c-MYC oncoprotein and enhances c-MYC-dependent transcriptional and oncogenic functions. However, the molecular and biochemical events that mediate the cooperation between p30II and c-MYC remain to be completely understood. Herein we demonstrate that p30II induces lysine-acetylation of the c-MYC oncoprotein. Acetylation-defective c-MYC Lys→Arg substitution mutants are impaired for oncogenic transformation with p30II in c-myc−/− HO15.19 fibroblasts. Using dual-chromatin-immunoprecipitations (dual-ChIPs), we further demonstrate that p30II is present in c-MYC-containing nucleoprotein complexes in HTLV-1-transformed HuT-102 T-lymphocytes. Moreover, p30II inhibits apoptosis in proliferating cells expressing c-MYC under conditions of genotoxic stress. These findings suggest that c-MYC-acetylation is required for the cooperation between p30II/c-MYC which could promote proviral replication and contribute to HTLV-1-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:25569455

  18. Infection of monocyte/macrophages by human T lymphotropic virus type III.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, D D; Rota, T R; Hirsch, M S

    1986-01-01

    Normal blood-derived monocyte/macrophages were found to be susceptible to infection in vitro by human T lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III), the etiologic agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. In addition, HTLV-III was recovered from monocyte/macrophages of patients infected with this virus. The above findings raise the possibility that HTLV-III-infected monocyte/macrophages may serve as a vehicle for the dissemination of virus to target organs and as a reservoir for viral persistence, as has been shown for other lentiviruses including visna virus and caprine arthritis encephalitis virus. PMID:2422213

  19. De novo human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 infection of human lymphocytes in NOD-SCID, common gamma-chain knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Miyazato, Paola; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Taniguchi, Yuko; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Matsuoka, Masao

    2006-11-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia, a disease that is triggered after a long latency period. HTLV-1 is known to spread through cell-to-cell contact. In an attempt to study the events in early stages of HTLV-1 infection, we inoculated uninfected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the HTLV-1-producing cell line MT-2 into NOD-SCID, common gamma-chain knockout mice (human PBMC-NOG mice). HTLV-1 infection was confirmed with the detection of proviral DNA in recovered samples. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were found to harbor the provirus, although the latter population harbored provirus to a lesser extent. Proviral loads increased with time, and inverse PCR analysis revealed the oligoclonal proliferation of infected cells. Although tax gene transcription was suppressed in human PBMC-NOG mice, it increased after in vitro culture. This is similar to the phenotype of HTLV-1-infected cells isolated from HTLV-1 carriers. Furthermore, the reverse transcriptase inhibitors azidothymidine and tenofovir blocked primary infection in human PBMC-NOG mice. However, when tenofovir was administered 1 week after infection, the proviral loads did not differ from those of untreated mice, indicating that after initial infection, clonal proliferation of infected cells was predominant over de novo infection of previously uninfected cells. In this study, we demonstrated that the human PBMC-NOG mouse model should be a useful tool in studying the early stages of primary HTLV-1 infection. PMID:16943297

  20. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I infects eccrine sweat gland epithelia.

    PubMed

    Setoyama, M; Mizoguchi, S; Eizuru, Y

    1999-03-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is known to be associated with several non-neoplastic inflammatory disorders such as HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis, arthropathy, uveitis and lymphadenitis, in addition to neoplastic adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). A strong relation between HTLV-I infection and Sjögren's syndrome (SS) has been reported, and impaired sweating in SS is well known. We have often encountered dry skin in patients with ATLL. On the basis of these observations, we aimed to determine whether HTLV-I infection is present in isolated sweat glands. Eccrine gland epithelia were isolated from full thickness skin biopsies from 8 HTLV-I-seropositive and 7 seronegative individuals using dispase in Eagle's minimum essential medium supplemented with 13% fetal calf serum. We detected HTLV-IpX sequences in samples of eccrine sweat gland epithelia from 4 samples of the 8 seropositive individuals using nested polymerase chain reaction, but all 7 samples from the seronegative donors had no signal corresponding to the sequence. Our results were confirmed by dot blot hybridization. Our results suggest that eccrine epithelium is one of the target organs of HTLV-I infection. PMID:10048961

  1. Molecular determinants of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 transmission and spread.

    PubMed

    Lairmore, Michael D; Anupam, Rajaneesh; Bowden, Nadine; Haines, Robyn; Haynes, Rashade A H; Ratner, Lee; Green, Patrick L

    2011-07-01

    Human T-lymphotrophic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infects approximately 15 to 20 million people worldwide, with endemic areas in Japan, the Caribbean, and Africa. The virus is spread through contact with bodily fluids containing infected cells, most often from mother to child through breast milk or via blood transfusion. After prolonged latency periods, approximately 3 to 5% of HTLV-1 infected individuals will develop either adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL), or other lymphocyte-mediated disorders such as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The genome of this complex retrovirus contains typical gag, pol, and env genes, but also unique nonstructural proteins encoded from the pX region. These nonstructural genes encode the Tax and Rex regulatory proteins, as well as novel proteins essential for viral spread in vivo such as, p30, p12, p13 and the antisense encoded HBZ. While progress has been made in the understanding of viral determinants of cell transformation and host immune responses, host and viral determinants of HTLV-1 transmission and spread during the early phases of infection are unclear. Improvements in the molecular tools to test these viral determinants in cellular and animal models have provided new insights into the early events of HTLV-1 infection. This review will focus on studies that test HTLV-1 determinants in context to full length infectious clones of the virus providing insights into the mechanisms of transmission and spread of HTLV-1. PMID:21994774

  2. Immunization against HTLV-I with chitosan and tri-methylchitosan nanoparticles loaded with recombinant env23 and env13 antigens of envelope protein gp46.

    PubMed

    Amirnasr, Maryam; Fallah Tafti, Tannan; Sankian, Mojtaba; Rezaei, Abdorrahim; Tafaghodi, Mohsen

    2016-08-01

    To prevent the spread of HTLV-I (Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1), a safe and effective vaccine is required. To increase immune responses against the peptide antigens can be potentiated with polymer-based nanoparticles, like chitosan (CHT) and trimethylchitosan (TMC), as delivery system/adjuvant. CHT and TMC nanoparticles loaded with recombinant proteins (env23 & env13) of gp46 were prepared by direct coating of antigens with positively charged polymers. The size of CHT and TMC nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with each antigen was about 400 nm. The physical stability of NPs was followed for 4 weeks. Both formulations showed to be stable for about 15 days. The immunogenicity of NPs loaded with antigens was studied after nasal and subcutaneous immunization in mice. Three immunizations (7.5 μg antigen) were performed with 2 weeks intervals. Two weeks after the last booster dose, sera IgG subtypes were measured. After subcutaneous administration, for both nanoparticulate antigens, serum IgG1 and IgGtotal levels were higher than antigen solution (P < 0.001). After nasal administration, for env23, IgG2a levels and IgG2a/IgG1 ratio was significantly higher than groups with subcutaneous administration (P < 0.001). Both nanoparticles showed good immunoadjuvant potential. Env23 antigen was a better candidate for vaccination against HTLV-I, as it induced higher cellular immune responses, compared with env13. PMID:27235335

  3. Broad host range of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 demonstrated with an improved pseudotyping system.

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, R E; Littman, D R

    1996-01-01

    Studies of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) have been hampered by the difficulty of achieving high cell-free and cell-associated infectious titers. Current retroviral pseudotyping systems using the HTLV-1 envelope generate titers of less than 200 infectious particles per ml. We describe here an improved system for pseudotyping using a defective human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 genome in combination with HTLV-1 env in 293T producer cells. Introduction of additional copies of rev and treatment of cells with sodium butyrate resulted in a cell-associated titer of 10(5)/ml and cell-free titers of greater than 10(4)/ml . By using this system, we found that the host range of HTLV-1 is even greater than previously suspected. Earlier studies which assigned a chromosomal location for the HTLV-1 receptor may therefore reflect cell-to-cell variation in receptor number rather than the absolute presence or absence of a receptor. The generation of higher-titer HIV(HTLV-1) may facilitate identification of the cellular receptor and investigations of the pathophysiology of HTLV-1 infection. PMID:8794391

  4. Molecular Epidemiology and Clinical Features of Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Infection in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Alcantara, Luiz Carlos; Benito, Rafael; Caballero, Estrella; Aguilera, Antonio; Ramos, José Manuel; de Mendoza, Carmen; Rodríguez, Carmen; García, Juan; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel; Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raúl; Roc, Lourdes; Parra, Patricia; Eiros, José; del Romero, Jorge; Soriano, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection in Spain is rare and mainly affects immigrants from endemic regions and native Spaniards with a prior history of sexual intercourse with persons from endemic countries. Herein, we report the main clinical and virological features of cases reported in Spain. All individuals with HTLV-1 infection recorded at the national registry since 1989 were examined. Phylogenetic analysis was performed based on the long terminal repeat (LTR) region. A total of 229 HTLV-1 cases had been reported up to December 2012. The mean age was 41 years old and 61% were female. Their country of origin was Latin America in 59%, Africa in 15%, and Spain in 20%. Transmission had occurred following sexual contact in 41%, parenteral exposure in 12%, and vertically in 9%. HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) was diagnosed in 27 cases and adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) in 17 subjects. HTLV-1 subtype could be obtained for 45 patients; all but one belonged to the Cosmopolitan subtype a. One Nigerian pregnant woman harbored HTLV-1 subtype b. Within the Cosmopolitan subtype a, two individuals (from Bolivia and Peru, respectively) belonged to the Japanese subgroup B, another two (from Senegal and Mauritania) to the North African subgroup D, and 39 to the Transcontinental subgroup A. Of note, one divergent HTLV-1 strain from an Ethiopian branched off from all five known Cosmopolitan subtype 1a subgroups. Divergent HTLV-1 strains have been introduced and currently circulate in Spain. The relatively large proportion of symptomatic cases (19%) suggests that HTLV-1 infection is underdiagnosed in Spain. PMID:24924996

  5. Analysis of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Particles by Using Cryo-Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Sheng; Maldonado, José O.; Grigsby, Iwen F.

    2014-01-01

    The particle structure of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is poorly characterized. Here, we have used cryo-electron tomography to analyze HTLV-1 particle morphology. Particles produced from MT-2 cells were polymorphic, roughly spherical, and varied in size. Capsid cores, when present, were typically poorly defined polyhedral structures with at least one curved region contacting the inner face of the viral membrane. Most of the particles observed lacked a defined capsid core, which likely impacts HTLV-1 particle infectivity. PMID:25473052

  6. Human T-lymphotropic virus type I-associated myelopathy and tax gene expression in CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Moritoyo, T; Reinhart, T A; Moritoyo, H; Sato, E; Izumo, S; Osame, M; Haase, A T

    1996-07-01

    Infection by human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is associated with adult T-cell leukemia and a slowly progressive disease of the central nervous system (CNS), HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis, characterized pathologically by inflammation and white matter degeneration in the spinal cord. One of the explanations for the tissue destruction is that HTLV-I infects cells in the CNS, or HTLV-I-infected CD4+ T lymphocytes enter the CNS, and this drives local expansion of virus-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which along with cytokines cause the pathological changes. Because both in the circulation and in the cerebrospinal fluid, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes are primarily reactive to the product of the HTLV-I tax gene, we sought evidence of expression of this gene within cells in the inflammatory lesions. After using double-label in situ hybridization techniques, we now report definitive localization of HTLV-I tax gene expression in CD4+ T lymphocytes in areas of inflammation and white matter destruction. These findings lend support to a hypothetical scheme of neuropathogenesis in which HTLV-I tax gene expression provokes and sustains an immunopathological process that progressively destroys myelin and axons in the spinal cord. PMID:8687197

  7. In vitro CD4+ lymphocyte transformation and infection in a rabbit model with a molecular clone of human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, N D; Newbound, G C; Ratner, L; Lairmore, M D

    1996-01-01

    We transfected human and rabbit peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with the ACH molecular clone of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) to study its in vitro and in vivo properties. PBMC transfected with ACH were shown to transfer infection to naive PBMC. ACH transformed rabbit PBMC, as indicated by interleukin-2-independent proliferation of a transfectant culture. This transformant culture was shown by flow cytometric analysis to be a CD4+ CD25+ T-lymphocyte population containing, as determined by Southern blot analysis, at least three integrated HTLV-1 proviral copies. HTLV-1 infection was produced in rabbits inoculated with ACH-transfected, irradiated PBMC. Inoculated rabbits seroconverted to positivity for antibodies against HTLV-1 and had steady or rising HTLV-1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibody titers. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis revealed sustained seroconversion of rabbits to positivity for antibodies against all major viral antigenic determinants. Infection of rabbits was further demonstrated by antigen capture assay of p24 in PBMC and lymph node cultures and PCR amplification of proviral sequences from PBMC. These data suggest that ACH, like wild-type HTLV-1, infects and transforms primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and is infectious in vivo. This clone will facilitate investigations into the role of viral genes on biological properties of HTLV-1 in vitro and in vivo. PMID:8794375

  8. Global stability for delay-dependent HTLV-I model with CTL immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Liu, Jun

    2016-06-01

    We present a delay-dependent HTLV-I model with CTL immune response. The basic reproduction number is obtained for the existence of positive steady state. By constructing suitable Lyapunov functions, when the basic reproduction number is less than one, the infection-free steady state is globally asymptotically stable; when the basic reproduction number is greater than one, the infected steady state is globally asymptotically stable.

  9. Small-Molecule Inhibitor Which Reactivates p53 in Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1-Transformed Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyung-Jin; Dasgupta, Arindam; Huang, Keven; Jeong, Soo-Jin; Pise-Masison, Cynthia; Gurova, Katerina V.; Brady, John N.

    2008-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of the aggressive and fatal disease adult T-cell leukemia. Previous studies have demonstrated that the HTLV-1-encoded Tax protein inhibits the function of tumor suppressor p53 through a Tax-induced NF-κB pathway. Given these attributes, we were interested in the activity of small-molecule inhibitor 9-aminoacridine (9AA), an anticancer drug that targets two important stress response pathways, NF-κB and p53. In the present study, we have examined the effects of 9AA on HTLV-1-transformed cells. Treatment of HTLV-1-transformed cells with 9AA resulted in a dramatic decrease in cell viability. Consistent with these results, we observed an increase in the percentage of cells in sub-G1 and an increase in the number of cells positive by terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling assay following treatment of HTLV-1-transformed cells with 9AA. In each assay, HTLV-1-transformed cells C8166, Hut102, and MT2 were more sensitive to treatment with 9AA than control CEM and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Analyzing p53 function, we demonstrate that treatment of HTLV-1-transformed cells with 9AA resulted in an increase in p53 protein and activation of p53 transcription activity. Of significance, 9AA-induced cell death could be blocked by introduction of a p53 small interfering RNA, linking p53 activity and cell death. These results suggest that Tax-repressed p53 function in HTLV-1-transformed cells is “druggable” and can be restored by treatment with 9AA. The fact that 9AA induces p53 and inhibits NF-κB suggests a promising strategy for the treatment of HTLV-1-transformed cells. PMID:18550670

  10. Immunoblastic transformation of a Sezary syndrome in a black Caribbean patient without evidence of HTLV-I.

    PubMed

    Matutes, E; Schulz, T; Dyer, M; Ellis, J; Hedges, M; Catovsky, D

    1995-08-01

    We describe an unusual case of Sezary syndrome which transformed into a large T-cell non Hodgkin's lymphoma (immunoblastic) in a black man of Caribbean descent with negative HTLV-I serology and no evidence of HTLV-I infection by DNA analysis using sensitive techniques. The disease presented as a small-cell Sezary syndrome and transformed in an inguinal lymph node one year from diagnosis. Immunological markers in the small and large cells showed a mature T-cell phenotype CD4+, CD8- with expression of T-cell activation markers and a high proliferative rate. Ultrastructural analysis confirmed small Sezary cells with serpentine nucleus in the peripheral blood and immunoblasts in the lymph node. Cytogenetics demonstrated complex clonal chromosome abnormalities with involvement of 7q35, the locus for the beta chain of the T-cell receptor (TCR). Southern-blot analysis showed the same rearrangement of the TCR beta, gamma, delta chain genes in lymph node and peripheral blood cells. Antibodies to HTLV-I were not detected in the serum by ELISA and particle agglutination (PA) nor HTLV-I specific sequences were demonstrated by nested polymerase chain reaction with primers to the envelope proteins, LTR and tax/rex of HTLV-I in both tissues, blood and lymph node. The disease had an aggressive course and was refractory to therapy; the patient died of progressive disease 28 months from presentation. Two unusual features characterised this patient's illness: immunoblastic transformation of a Sezary syndrome in a patient of Afro-Caribbean origin without evidence of HTLV-I DNA sequences and negative HTLV-I serology and the atypical lymph node histology resembling ATLL. PMID:8528063

  11. Quantitative Comparison of HTLV-1 and HIV-1 Cell-to-Cell Infection with New Replication Dependent Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Mazurov, Dmitriy; Ilinskaya, Anna; Heidecker, Gisela; Lloyd, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    We have developed an efficient method to quantify cell-to-cell infection with single-cycle, replication dependent reporter vectors. This system was used to examine the mechanisms of infection with HTLV-1 and HIV-1 vectors in lymphocyte cell lines. Effector cells transfected with reporter vector, packaging vector, and Env expression plasmid produced virus-like particles that transduced reporter gene activity into cocultured target cells with zero background. Reporter gene expression was detected exclusively in target cells and required an Env-expression plasmid and a viral packaging vector, which provided essential structural and enzymatic proteins for virus replication. Cell-cell fusion did not contribute to infection, as reporter protein was rarely detected in syncytia. Coculture of transfected Jurkat T cells and target Raji/CD4 B cells enhanced HIV-1 infection two fold and HTLV-1 infection ten thousand fold in comparison with cell-free infection of Raji/CD4 cells. Agents that interfere with actin and tubulin polymerization strongly inhibited HTLV-1 and modestly decreased HIV-1 cell-to-cell infection, an indication that cytoskeletal remodeling was more important for HTLV-1 transmission. Time course studies showed that HTLV-1 transmission occurred very rapidly after cell mixing, whereas slower kinetics of HIV-1 coculture infection implies a different mechanism of infectious transmission. HTLV-1 Tax was demonstrated to play an important role in altering cell-cell interactions that enhance virus infection and replication. Interestingly, superantigen-induced synapses between Jurkat cells and Raji/CD4 cells did not enhance infection for either HTLV-1 or HIV-1. In general, the dependence on cell-to-cell infection was determined by the virus, the effector and target cell types, and by the nature of the cell-cell interaction. PMID:20195464

  12. [Aseptic purulent meningitis in two patients co-infected by HTLV-1 and Strongyloides stercoralis].

    PubMed

    Foucan, L; Genevier, I; Lamaury, I; Strobel, M

    1997-01-01

    Occurrence of anguilluliasis always progresses to hyperinfestation or disseminated anguilluliasis with severe clinical manifestations in carriers of HTLV-1. This prognosis is further illustrated by two new cases of non-septic purulent meningitis observed in two male patients from Guadalope. Ages were 61 and 64 years. In both cases examination of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) demonstrated pleiocytosis with more than 3000 cells (mostly polynuclear neutrophils) per mm3, protein content greater than 3 g/l, and low sugar level. No soluble germs or antigens were found in the CSF. In both patients Strongyloides stercoralis larvae were detected in stools but not in CSF. Meningitis responded to antibiotic treatment but follow-up tests showed the persistence of larvae in stools despite treatment using thiabendazole. While similar cases of meningitis have been reported in carriers of HTLV-1, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Co-infection with Strongyloides stercoralis appears to be a predisposing factor. This association may warrant preventive anti-parasitic treatment in patients infected by HTLV-1. PMID:9513154

  13. Infectious complications of human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I infection.

    PubMed

    Marsh, B J

    1996-07-01

    Infection with human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) has been etiologically associated with two diseases: adult T cell leukemia and HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. Increasing evidence suggests that HTLV-I infection may be associated with immunosuppression and, as a consequence, affect the risk and expression of several other infectious diseases, of which the best studied are strongyloidiasis, tuberculosis, and leprosy. In strongyloidiasis, coinfection with HTLV-I appears to result in a higher rate of chronic carriage, an increased parasite load, and a risk of more severe infection. In tuberculosis, a decrease in delayed-type hypersensitivity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been established, but whether this decrease is clinically significant has yet to be determined. In leprosy, an increased risk of disease is suggested, but the published studies are all too poorly controlled to draw definite conclusions. PMID:8816143

  14. Hepatitis C virus/human T lymphotropic virus 1/2 co-infection: Regional burden and virological outcomes in people who inject drugs

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Erika; Roger, Elena

    2016-01-01

    This review analyses current data concerning co-infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human T lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-1/2 in people who inject drugs (PWID), with a particular focus on disease burden and global implications for virological outcome. In addition, the available treatment options for HTLV-1/2 are summarized and the ongoing and likely future research challenges are discussed. The data in this review was obtained from 34 articles on HCV/HTLV-1/2 co-infection in PWID retrieved from the PubMed literature database and published between 1997 and 2015. Despite unavailable estimates of the burden of HCV/HTLV-1/2 co-infection in general, the epidemiologic constellation of HTLV-1/2 shows high incidence in PWID with history of migration, incarceration, and other blood-borne infectious diseases such as HCV or human immunodeficiency virus. The most recent research data strongly suggest that HTLV-1 co-infection can influence HCV viral load, HCV sustained virological response to α-interferon treatment, and HCV-related liver disease progression. In short, outcome of HCV infection is worse in the context of HTLV-1 co-infection, yet more studies are needed to gain accurate estimations of the burden of HCV/HTLV-1/2 co-infections. Moreover, in the current era of new direct-acting antiviral treatments for HCV and proven HTLV-1/2 treatment options, prospective clinical and treatment studies should be carried out, with particular focus on the PWID patient population, with the aim of improving virological outcomes. PMID:27175351

  15. Hepatitis C virus/human T lymphotropic virus 1/2 co-infection: Regional burden and virological outcomes in people who inject drugs.

    PubMed

    Castro, Erika; Roger, Elena

    2016-05-12

    This review analyses current data concerning co-infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human T lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-1/2 in people who inject drugs (PWID), with a particular focus on disease burden and global implications for virological outcome. In addition, the available treatment options for HTLV-1/2 are summarized and the ongoing and likely future research challenges are discussed. The data in this review was obtained from 34 articles on HCV/HTLV-1/2 co-infection in PWID retrieved from the PubMed literature database and published between 1997 and 2015. Despite unavailable estimates of the burden of HCV/HTLV-1/2 co-infection in general, the epidemiologic constellation of HTLV-1/2 shows high incidence in PWID with history of migration, incarceration, and other blood-borne infectious diseases such as HCV or human immunodeficiency virus. The most recent research data strongly suggest that HTLV-1 co-infection can influence HCV viral load, HCV sustained virological response to α-interferon treatment, and HCV-related liver disease progression. In short, outcome of HCV infection is worse in the context of HTLV-1 co-infection, yet more studies are needed to gain accurate estimations of the burden of HCV/HTLV-1/2 co-infections. Moreover, in the current era of new direct-acting antiviral treatments for HCV and proven HTLV-1/2 treatment options, prospective clinical and treatment studies should be carried out, with particular focus on the PWID patient population, with the aim of improving virological outcomes. PMID:27175351

  16. The Sumo-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 regulates the localization and function of the HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax

    PubMed Central

    Fryrear, Kimberly A.; Guo, Xin

    2012-01-01

    The Really Interesting New Gene (RING) Finger Protein 4 (RNF4) represents a class of ubiquitin ligases that target Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO)–modified proteins for ubiquitin modification. To date, the regulatory function of RNF4 appears to be ubiquitin-mediated degradation of sumoylated cellular proteins. In the present study, we show that the Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1) oncoprotein Tax is a substrate for RNF4 both in vivo and in vitro. We mapped the RNF4-binding site to a region adjacent to the Tax ubiquitin/SUMO modification sites K280/K284. Interestingly, RNF4 modification of Tax protein results in relocalization of the oncoprotein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Overexpression of RNF4, but not the RNF4 RING mutant, resulted in cytoplasmic enrichment of Tax. The RNF4-induced nucleus-to-cytoplasm relocalization was associated with increased NF-κB–mediated and decreased cAMP Response Element-Binding (CREB)–mediated Tax activity. Finally, depletion of RNF4 by RNAi prevented the DNA damage–induced nuclear/cytoplasmic translocation of Tax. These results provide important new insight into STUbL-mediated pathways that regulate the subcellular localization and functional dynamics of viral oncogenes. PMID:22106342

  17. The Sumo-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 regulates the localization and function of the HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax.

    PubMed

    Fryrear, Kimberly A; Guo, Xin; Kerscher, Oliver; Semmes, O John

    2012-02-01

    The Really Interesting New Gene (RING) Finger Protein 4 (RNF4) represents a class of ubiquitin ligases that target Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO)-modified proteins for ubiquitin modification. To date, the regulatory function of RNF4 appears to be ubiquitin-mediated degradation of sumoylated cellular proteins. In the present study, we show that the Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1) oncoprotein Tax is a substrate for RNF4 both in vivo and in vitro. We mapped the RNF4-binding site to a region adjacent to the Tax ubiquitin/SUMO modification sites K280/K284. Interestingly, RNF4 modification of Tax protein results in relocalization of the oncoprotein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Overexpression of RNF4, but not the RNF4 RING mutant, resulted in cytoplasmic enrichment of Tax. The RNF4-induced nucleus-to-cytoplasm relocalization was associated with increased NF-κB-mediated and decreased cAMP Response Element-Binding (CREB)-mediated Tax activity. Finally, depletion of RNF4 by RNAi prevented the DNA damage-induced nuclear/cytoplasmic translocation of Tax. These results provide important new insight into STUbL-mediated pathways that regulate the subcellular localization and functional dynamics of viral oncogenes. PMID:22106342

  18. A Case of Pneumonia Caused by Pneumocystis Jirovecii and Cryptococcus Neoformans in a Patient with HTLV-1 Associated Adult T- Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma: Occam's Razor Blunted.

    PubMed

    Desai, Anish; Fe, Alexander; Desai, Amishi; Ilowite, Jonathan; Cunha, Burke A; Mathew, Joseph P

    2016-02-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is usually preceded by infection with human T-cell lymphotropic virus I (HTLV-I). Patients with ATLL frequently get opportunistic infections of the lungs, intestines, and central nervous system. Pneumocystis pneumonia is commonly known as an AIDS defining illness. Grocott's methenamine silver stain of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples obtained via bronchoscopy remain the gold standard for diagnosis. Pulmonary cryptococcosis is seen in patients with T-cell deficiencies and a diagnosis is made by culture of sputum, BAL, or occasionally of pleural fluid. We present the second case of coinfection with these two organisms in a patient with ATLL who was successfully treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, corticosteroids, and fluconazole. We illustrate the need for high clinical vigilance for seeking out an additional diagnosis, especially in immunocompromised patients if they are not improving despite receiving appropriate treatment. PMID:27024978

  19. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 infection leads to arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meihong; Yang, Liangpeng; Zhang, Ling; Liu, Baoying; Merling, Randall; Xia, Zheng; Giam, Chou-Zen

    2008-09-01

    Infection by the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is thought to cause dysregulated T-cell proliferation, which in turn leads to adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. Early cellular changes after HTLV-1 infection have been difficult to study due to the poorly infectious nature of HTLV-1 and the need for cell-to-cell contact for HTLV-1 transmission. Using a series of reporter systems, we show that HeLa cells cease proliferation within one or two division cycles after infection by HTLV-1 or transduction of the HTLV-1 tax gene. HTLV-1-infected HeLa cells, like their tax-transduced counterparts, expressed high levels of p21(CIP1/WAF1) and p27(KIP1), developed mitotic abnormalities, and became arrested in G(1) in senescence. In contrast, cells of a human osteosarcoma lineage (HOS) continued to divide after HTLV-1 infection or Tax expression, albeit at a reduced growth rate and with mitotic aberrations. Unique to HOS cells is the dramatic reduction of p21(CIP1/WAF1) and p27(KIP1) expression, which is in part associated with the constitutive activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)-protein kinase B (Akt) pathway. The loss of p21(CIP1/WAF1) and p27(KIP1) in HOS cells apparently allows HTLV-1- and Tax-induced G(1) arrest to be bypassed. Finally, HTLV-1 infection and Tax expression also cause human SupT1 T cells to arrest in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle. These results suggest that productive HTLV-1 infection ordinarily leads to Tax-mediated G(1) arrest. However, T cells containing somatic mutations that inactivate p21(CIP1/WAF1) and p27(KIP1) may continue to proliferate after HTLV-1 infection and Tax expression. These infected cells can expand clonally, accumulate additional chromosomal abnormalities, and progress to cancer. PMID:18596104

  20. HTLV-1 in pregnant women from the Southern Bahia, Brazil: a neglected condition despite the high prevalence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As the most frequent pathway of vertical transmission of HTLV-1 is breast-feeding, and considering the higher prevalence in women, it is very important to perform screening examinations for anti-HTLV-1 antibodies as part of routine prenatal care. So far, no studies of HTLV-1 seroprevalence in pregnant women in the Southern region of Bahia, Brazil, have been described. Methods Pregnant women were selected at the two regional reference centers for health care from Southern Bahia. A total of 2766 pregnant women attending the antenatal unit between November 2008 and May 2010 have been analyzed. An extra blood sample was drawn during their routine antenatal testing. A standardized questionnaire was applied and all positive plasma samples were tested by ELISA and were confirmed by Western Blot and PCR. Besides that, positive women were contacted and visited. The family members that were present during the visit were asked to be serologically screened to the virus. A prospective study was also carried out and newborns were followed up to two years for evaluation of vertical transmission. Results HTLV prevalence was 1.05% (CI 95%: 0.70-1.50). There was no association of HTLV-1 infection with age, education, income and ethnic differences. The association with marital status was borderline (OR = 7.99; 95% CI 1.07-59.3; p = 0.042). In addition, 43 family members of the HTLV-1 seropositive women have been analyzed and specific reactivity was observed in 32.56%, including two children from previous pregnancy. Conclusion: It is very important to emphasize that the lack of HTLV-1 screening in pregnant women can promote HTLV transmission especially in endemic areas. HTLV screening in this vulnerable population and the promotion of bottle-feeding for children of seropositive mothers could be important cost-effective methods to limit the vertical transmission. Besides that, our data reinforce the need to establish strategies of active surveillance in household and

  1. No evidence of HTLV-I proviral integration in lymphoproliferative disorders associated with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, G. S.; Schaffer, J. M.; Boni, R.; Dummer, R.; Burg, G.; Takeshita, M.; Kikuchi, M.

    1997-01-01

    Several recent studies have reported detection of HTLV-I genetic sequences in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) including mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome. The purpose of this study was to determine whether HTLV-I was detectable in lesional tissues of patients suffering from diseases known to be associated with CTCL. Thirty-five cases were obtained from diverse geographical locations including Ohio, California, Switzerland, and Japan. Six of them had concurrent CTCL. Cases were analyzed using a combination of genomic polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/ Southern blot, dot blot, and Southern blot analyses. All assays were specific for HTLV-I provirus. Sensitivity ranged from approximately 10(-6) for PCR-based studies to 10(-2) for unamplified genomic blotting. Lesional DNA from patients with lymphomatoid papulosis (fourteen cases), Hodgkin's disease (twelve cases), and CD30+ large-cell lymphoma (nine cases) was tested for the HTLV-I proviral pX region using a genomic PCR assay followed by confirmatory Southern blot analysis with a nested oligonucleotide pX probe. All cases were uniformly negative. All of the Hodgkin's disease cases, eight of the large-cell lymphoma cases, and six of the lymphomatoid papulosis cases were then subjected to dot blot analysis of genomic DNA using a full-length HTLV-I proviral DNA probe that spans all regions of the HTLV-I genome. Again, all cases were negative. Finally, eleven of the Hodgkin's disease cases were also subjected to Southern blot analysis of EcoRI-digested genomic DNA using the same full-length HTLV-I probe. Once again, all cases were negative. These findings indicated that, despite utilization of a variety of sensitive and specific molecular biological methods, HTLV-I genetic sequences were not detectable in patients with CTCL-associated lymphoproliferative disorders. These results strongly suggest that the HTLV-I retrovirus is not involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2

  2. HTLV-1 Tax Stimulates Ubiquitin E3 Ligase, Ring Finger Protein 8, to Assemble Lysine 63-Linked Polyubiquitin Chains for TAK1 and IKK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yik-Khuan; Zhi, Huijun; Bowlin, Tara; Dorjbal, Batsukh; Philip, Subha; Zahoor, Muhammad Atif; Shih, Hsiu-Ming; Semmes, Oliver John; Schaefer, Brian; Glover, J. N. Mark; Giam, Chou-Zen

    2015-01-01

    Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) trans-activator/oncoprotein, Tax, impacts a multitude of cellular processes, including I-κB kinase (IKK)/NF-κB signaling, DNA damage repair, and mitosis. These activities of Tax have been implicated in the development of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) in HTLV-1-infected individuals, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. IKK and its upstream kinase, TGFβ-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), contain ubiquitin-binding subunits, NEMO and TAB2/3 respectively, which interact with K63-linked polyubiquitin (K63-pUb) chains. Recruitment to K63-pUb allows cross auto-phosphorylation and activation of TAK1 to occur, followed by TAK1-catalyzed IKK phosphorylation and activation. Using cytosolic extracts of HeLa and Jurkat T cells supplemented with purified proteins we have identified ubiquitin E3 ligase, ring finger protein 8 (RNF8), and E2 conjugating enzymes, Ubc13:Uev1A and Ubc13:Uev2, to be the cellular factors utilized by Tax for TAK1 and IKK activation. In vitro, the combination of Tax and RNF8 greatly stimulated TAK1, IKK, IκBα and JNK phosphorylation. In vivo, RNF8 over-expression augmented while RNF8 ablation drastically reduced canonical NF-κB activation by Tax. Activation of the non-canonical NF-κB pathway by Tax, however, is unaffected by the loss of RNF8. Using purified components, we further demonstrated biochemically that Tax greatly stimulated RNF8 and Ubc13:Uev1A/Uev2 to assemble long K63-pUb chains. Finally, co-transfection of Tax with increasing amounts of RNF8 greatly induced K63-pUb assembly in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, Tax targets RNF8 and Ubc13:Uev1A/Uev2 to promote the assembly of K63-pUb chains, which signal the activation of TAK1 and multiple downstream kinases including IKK and JNK. Because of the roles RNF8 and K63-pUb chains play in DNA damage repair and cytokinesis, this mechanism may also explain the genomic instability of HTLV-1-transformed T cells and ATL cells. PMID:26285145

  3. STAT1: A Novel Target of miR-150 and miR-223 Is Involved in the Proliferation of HTLV-I–Transformed and ATL Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Moles, Ramona; Bellon, Marcia; Nicot, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported on the deregulation of cellular microRNAs involved in hematopoiesis and inflammation in human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-I)–transformed cells. In this study, we demonstrate that miR-150 and miR-223 specifically target the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) 3′ untranslated region, reducing STAT1 expression and dampening STAT1-dependent signaling in human T cells. The effects of miR-150 and miR-223 on endogenous STAT1 were confirmed using inducible cell lines. Our studies also showed that miR-150 expression is upregulated by interleukin-2 signaling in adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) cells. HTLV-I–transformed and ATL-derived cells have reduced levels of miR150 and miR223 expression, which coincide with increased STAT1 expression and STAT1-dependent signaling. Knockdown of STAT1 by short hairpin RNA demonstrated that the constitutive activation of STAT1 is required for the continuous proliferation of HTLV-I–transformed cells. Our studies further demonstrate that increased expression of STAT1 in ATL cells is associated with higher levels of major histocompatibility complex class I expression. Previous studies have demonstrated that the pressure exerted by natural killer (NK) cells in vivo can edit leukemic tumor cells by forcing an increased expression of major histocompatibility complex class I to escape immune clearance. STAT1-expressing tumor cells produce more aggressive tumors because they cannot be eliminated by NK cells. Our results suggest that therapeutic approaches using combined targeting of STAT1 and MHC class I may be an effective approach to activate NK cell–mediated clearance of ATL tumor cells. PMID:26025667

  4. The origin and diversity of human retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Martine; D’Arc, Mirela; Delaporte, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIV), T-cell lymphotrophic viruses (STLV), and foamy viruses (SFV) from non-human primates (NHP) have crossed the species barrier to humans at several occasions, leading to the HIV and HTLV epidemic and to sporadic cases of human infections with simian foamy viruses, respectively. Efficient infection and spread in humans differs between SFV, STLV and SIV, but seems also to differ among the different viruses from the same simian lineage, as illustrated by the different spread of HIV-1 M, N O, P or for the different HIV-2 groups. Among the four HIV-1 groups, only HIV-1 group M has spread worldwide and the actual diversity within HIV-1 M (subtypes, Circulating Recombinants) is the result of subsequent evolution and spread in the human population. HIV-2 did only spread to some extent in West Africa, and similarly as for HIV-1, the nine HIV-2 groups have also a different epidemic spread. Four types of HTLV, type 1 to 4, have been described in humans and for 3 of them simian counterparts (STLV-1, STLV-2, STLV-3) have been identified in multiple NHP species. The majority of human infections are with HTLV-1 which is present throughout the world as clusters of high endemicity. Humans are susceptible to a wide variety of SFVs and seem to acquire these viruses more readily than SIVs or STLVs but no signs of disease in humans nor human-to-human transmission of SFV has been documented yet. The current HIV-1 M epidemic illustrates the impact of a single cross-species transmission. The recent discovery of HIV-1 P, HIV-2 I, new HTLV-1 and HTLV-3 variants as well as SFV infections in humans in Central Africa, show that our knowledge of genetic diversity and cross-species transmissions of simian retroviruses are still incomplete. PMID:24584106

  5. Human T cell leukemia virus type I and neurologic disease: events in bone marrow, peripheral blood, and central nervous system during normal immune surveillance and neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Grant, Christian; Barmak, Kate; Alefantis, Timothy; Yao, Jing; Jacobson, Steven; Wigdahl, Brian

    2002-02-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic/leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) has been identified as the causative agent of both adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Although the exact sequence of events that occur during the early stages of infection are not known in detail, the initial route of infection may predetermine, along with host, environmental, and viral factors, the subset of target cells and/or the primary immune response encountered by HTLV-I, and whether an HTLV-I-infected individual will remain asymptomatic, develop ATL, or progress to the neuroinflammatory disease, HAM/TSP. Although a large number of studies have indicated that CD4(+) T cells represent an important target for HTLV-I infection in the peripheral blood (PB), additional evidence has accumulated over the past several years demonstrating that HTLV-I can infect several additional cellular compartments in vivo, including CD8(+) T lymphocytes, PB monocytes, dendritic cells, B lymphocytes, and resident central nervous system (CNS) astrocytes. More importantly, extensive latent viral infection of the bone marrow, including cells likely to be hematopoietic progenitor cells, has been observed in individuals with HAM/TSP as well as some asymptomatic carriers, but to a much lesser extent in individuals with ATL. Furthermore, HTLV-I(+) CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells can maintain the intact proviral genome and initiate viral gene expression during the differentiation process. Introduction of HTLV-I-infected bone marrow progenitor cells into the PB, followed by genomic activation and low level viral gene expression may lead to an increase in proviral DNA load in the PB, resulting in a progressive state of immune dysregulation including the generation of a detrimental cytotoxic Tax-specific CD8(+) T cell population, anti-HTLV-I antibodies, and neurotoxic cytokines involved in disruption of myelin-producing cells and neuronal degradation

  6. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III infection of the central nervous system: a preliminary in situ analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stoler, M.H.; Eskin, T.A.; Benn, S.; Angerer, R.C.; Angerer, L.M.

    1986-11-07

    Patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are subject to a spectrum of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Recent evidence implicates the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) in the pathogenesis of some of these illnesses, although the cells infected by the virus have yet to be identified. Using in situ hybridization, the authors examined brain tissue from two patients with AIDS encephalopathy for the presence of HTLV-III RNA. In both cases, viral RNA was detected and concentrated in, though not limited to, the white matter. The CNS cells most frequently infected included macrophages, pleomorphic microglia, and multinucleated giant cells. Less frequently, cells morphologically consistent with astrocytes, oligodendroglia, and rarely neurons were also infected. The findings strengthen the association of HTLV-III with the pathogenesis of AIDS encephalopathy. In situ hybridization can be applied to routinely prepared biopsy tissue in the diagnosis of HTLV-III infection of the CNS.

  7. Retroviral sequences related to human T-lymphotropic virus type II in patients with chronic fatigue immune dysfunction syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    DeFreitas, E.; Hilliard, B.; Cheney, P.R.; Bell, D.S.; Kiggundu, E.; Sankey, D.; Wroblewska, Z.; Palladino, M.; Woodward, J.P.; Koprowski, H. )

    1991-04-01

    Chronic fatigue immune dysfunction syndrome (CFIDS) is a recently recognized illness characterized by debilitating fatigue as well as immunological and neurological abnormalities. Once thought to be caused by Epstein-Barr virus, it is now thought to have a different but unknown etiology. The authors evaluted 30 adult and pediatric CFIDS patients from six eastern states for the presence of human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) types I and II by Western immunoblotting, polymerase chain reaction, and in situ hybridization of blood samples. The majority of patients were positive for HTLV antibodies by Western blotting and for HTLV-II gag sequences by polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization. Twenty nonexposure healthy controls were negative in all assays. These data support an association between an HTLV-II-like virus and CFIDS.

  8. INTERFERON BETA-1A TREATMENT IN HTLV-1-ASSOCIATED MYELOPATHY/TROPICAL SPASTIC PARAPARESIS: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Graça Maria de Castro; da Silva, Marcos Antonio Custódio Neto; Souza, Victor Lima; Lopes, Natália Barbosa da Silva; da Silva, Diego Luz Felipe; Nascimento, Maria do Desterro Soares Brandão

    2014-01-01

    Here a young patient (< 21 years of age) with a history of infective dermatitis is described. The patient was diagnosed with myelopathy associated with HTLV-1/tropical spastic paraparesis and treated with interferon beta-1a. The disease was clinically established as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), and laboratory tests confirmed the presence of antibodies to HTLV-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Mumps, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, schistosomiasis, herpes virus 1 and 2, rubella, measles, varicella-zoster toxoplasmosis, hepatitis, HIV, and syphilis were excluded by serology. The patient was diagnosed with neurogenic bladder and presented with nocturia, urinary urgency, paresthesia of the lower left limb, a marked reduction of muscle strength in the lower limbs, and a slight reduction in upper limb strength. During the fourth week of treatment with interferon beta-1a, urinary urgency and paresthesia disappeared and clinical motor skills improved. PMID:25229227

  9. Interferon beta-1a treatment in HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Viana, Graça Maria de Castro; Silva, Marcos Antonio Custódio Neto da; Souza, Victor Lima; Lopes, Natália Barbosa da Silva; Silva, Diego Luz Felipe da; Nascimento, Maria do Desterro Soares Brandão

    2014-01-01

    Here a young patient (< 21 years of age) with a history of infective dermatitis is described. The patient was diagnosed with myelopathy associated with HTLV-1/tropical spastic paraparesis and treated with interferon beta-1a. The disease was clinically established as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), and laboratory tests confirmed the presence of antibodies to HTLV-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Mumps, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, schistosomiasis, herpes virus 1 and 2, rubella, measles, varicella-zoster toxoplasmosis, hepatitis, HIV, and syphilis were excluded by serology. The patient was diagnosed with neurogenic bladder and presented with nocturia, urinary urgency, paresthesia of the lower left limb, a marked reduction of muscle strength in the lower limbs, and a slight reduction in upper limb strength. During the fourth week of treatment with interferon beta-1a, urinary urgency and paresthesia disappeared and clinical motor skills improved. PMID:25229227

  10. AP-1-directed human T cell leukemia virus type 1 viral gene expression during monocytic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Grant, Christian; Jain, Pooja; Nonnemacher, Michael; Flaig, Katherine E; Irish, Bryan; Ahuja, Jaya; Alexaki, Aikaterini; Alefantis, Timothy; Wigdahl, Brian

    2006-09-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has previously been shown to infect antigen-presenting cells and their precursors in vivo. However, the role these important cell populations play in the pathogenesis of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis or adult T cell leukemia remains unresolved. To better understand how HTLV-1 infection of these important cell populations may potentially impact disease progression, the regulation of HTLV-1 viral gene expression in established monocytic cell lines was examined. U-937 promonocytic cells transiently transfected with a HTLV-1 long-terminal repeat (LTR) luciferase construct were treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) to induce cellular differentiation. PMA-induced cellular differentiation resulted in activation of basal and Tax-mediated transactivation of the HTLV-1 LTR. In addition, electrophoretic mobility shift analyses demonstrated that PMA-induced cellular differentiation induced DNA-binding activity of cellular transcription factors to Tax-responsive element 1 (TRE-1) repeat II. Supershift analyses revealed that factors belonging to the activator protein 1 (AP-1) family of basic region/leucine zipper proteins (Fra-1, Fra-2, JunB, and JunD) were induced to bind to TRE-1 repeat II during cellular differentiation. Inhibition of AP-1 DNA-binding activity by overexpression of a dominant-negative c-Fos mutant (A-Fos) in transient expression analyses resulted in severely decreased levels of HTLV-1 LTR activation in PMA-induced U-937 cells. These results have suggested that following infection of peripheral blood monocytes, HTLV-1 viral gene expression may become up-regulated by AP-1 during differentiation into macrophages or dendritic cells. PMID:16829632

  11. Activation of enhancer sequences in type II human T-cell leukemia virus and bovine leukemia virus long terminal repeats by virus-associated trans-acting regulatory factors.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, C A; Sodroski, J G; Kettman, R; Haseltine, W A

    1986-01-01

    The ability of the sequences present in the long terminal repeats (LTRs) of human T-cell leukemia viruses type I and II (HTLV-I and HTLV-II) and of bovine leukemia virus to function as enhancer elements was investigated. Recombinant plasmids that contained the HTLV-I, HTLV-II, and bovine leukemia virus LTRs at a distance from a simian virus 40 promoter element located 5' to the bacterial gene encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.28) were constructed. We report that all three LTR sequences contain enhancer elements capable of increasing the level of gene expression directed from a distal heterologous promoter. The enhancer present in the HTLV-I LTR was active in uninfected cells of lymphoid and nonlymphoid origin. In contrast, the enhancer activity of the HTLV-II and bovine leukemia virus LTR sequences was evident only in virus-infected cells. This activity is likely due to virus-associated trans-acting transcriptional factors previously shown to be present in HTLV- and bovine leukemia virus-infected cells. The implication of these observations for virus replication and transforming activity are discussed. Images PMID:3005624

  12. Clinical Associations of Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Infection in an Indigenous Australian Population

    PubMed Central

    Einsiedel, Lloyd; Spelman, Tim; Goeman, Emma; Cassar, Olivier; Arundell, Mick; Gessain, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In resource-poor areas, infectious diseases may be important causes of morbidity among individuals infected with the Human T-Lymphotropic Virus type 1 (HTLV-1). We report the clinical associations of HTLV-1 infection among socially disadvantaged Indigenous adults in central Australia. Methodology and Principal Findings HTLV-1 serological results for Indigenous adults admitted 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2010 were obtained from the Alice Springs Hospital pathology database. Infections, comorbid conditions and HTLV-1 related diseases were identified using ICD-10 AM discharge morbidity codes. Relevant pathology and imaging results were reviewed. Disease associations, admission rates and risk factors for death were compared according to HTLV-1 serostatus. HTLV-1 western blots were positive for 531 (33.3%) of 1595 Indigenous adults tested. Clinical associations of HTLV-1 infection included bronchiectasis (adjusted Risk Ratio, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.14–1.60), blood stream infections (BSI) with enteric organisms (aRR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.05–1.77) and admission with strongyloidiasis (aRR 1.38; 95% CI, 1.16–1.64). After adjusting for covariates, HTLV-1 infection remained associated with increased numbers of BSI episodes (adjusted negative binomial regression, coefficient, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.02–0.41) and increased admission numbers with strongyloidiasis (coefficient, 0.563; 95% CI, 0.17–0.95) and respiratory conditions including asthma (coefficient, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.27–1.7), lower respiratory tract infections (coefficient, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.04–0.34) and bronchiectasis (coefficient, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.02–1.18). Two patients were admitted with adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma, four with probable HTLV-1 associated myelopathy and another with infective dermatitis. Independent predictors of mortality included BSI with enteric organisms (aRR 1.78; 95% CI, 1.15–2.74) and bronchiectasis (aRR 2.07; 95% CI, 1.45–2.98). Conclusion HTLV-1 infection contributes to

  13. Common γ-chain blocking peptide reduces in vitro immune activation markers in HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis.

    PubMed

    Massoud, Raya; Enose-Akahata, Yoshimi; Tagaya, Yutaka; Azimi, Nazli; Basheer, Asjad; Jacobson, Steven

    2015-09-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is a progressive inflammatory myelopathy occurring in a subset of HTLV-1-infected individuals. Despite advances in understanding its immunopathogenesis, an effective treatment remains to be found. IL-2 and IL-15, members of the gamma chain (γc) family of cytokines, are prominently deregulated in HAM/TSP and underlie many of the characteristic immune abnormalities, such as spontaneous lymphocyte proliferation (SP), increased STAT5 phosphorylation in the lymphocytes, and increased frequency and cytotoxicity of virus-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T lymphocytes (CTLs). In this study, we describe a novel immunomodulatory strategy consisting of selective blockade of certain γc family cytokines, including IL-2 and IL-15, with a γc antagonistic peptide. In vitro, a PEGylated form of the peptide, named BNZ132-1-40, reduced multiple immune activation markers such as SP, STAT5 phosphorylation, spontaneous degranulation of CD8(+) T cells, and the frequency of transactivator protein (Tax)-specific CD8(+) CTLs, thought to be major players in the immunopathogenesis of the disease. This strategy is thus a promising therapeutic approach to HAM/TSP with the potential of being more effective than single monoclonal antibodies targeting either IL-2 or IL-15 receptors and safer than inhibitors of downstream signaling molecules such as JAK1 inhibitors. Finally, selective cytokine blockade with antagonistic peptides might be applicable to multiple other conditions in which cytokines are pathogenic. PMID:26283355

  14. Use of human antigen presenting cell gene array profiling to examine the effect of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax on primary human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Jaya; Kampani, Karan; Datta, Suman; Wigdahl, Brian; Flaig, Katherine E; Jain, Pooja

    2006-02-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is etiologically linked to adult T-cell leukemia and a progressive demyelinating disorder termed HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). One of the most striking features of the immune response in HAM/TSP centers on the expansion of HTLV-1-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) compartment in the peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid. More than 90% of the HTLV-1-specific CTLs are directed against the viral Tax (11-19) peptide implying that Tax is available for immune recognition by antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs). DCs obtained from HAM/TSP patients have been shown to be infected with HTLV-1 and exhibit rapid maturation. Therefore, we hypothesized that presentation of Tax peptides by activated DCs to naIve CD8(+) T cells may play an important role in the induction of a Tax-specific CTL response and neurologic dysfunction. In this study, a pathway-specific antigen presenting cell gene array was used to study transcriptional changes induced by exposure of monocyte-derived DCs to extracellular HTLV-1 Tax protein. Approximately 100 genes were differentially expressed including genes encoding toll-like receptors, cell surface receptors, proteins involved in antigen uptake and presentation and adhesion molecules. The differential regulation of chemokines and cytokines characteristic of functional DC activation was also observed by the gene array analyses. Furthermore, the expression pattern of signal transduction genes was also significantly altered. These results have suggested that Tax-mediated DC gene regulation might play a critical role in cellular activation and the mechanisms resulting in HTLV-1-induced disease. PMID:16595374

  15. Distinct Morphology of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, José O.; Cao, Sheng; Zhang, Wei; Mansky, Louis M.

    2016-01-01

    The Gag polyprotein is the main retroviral structural protein and is essential for the assembly and release of virus particles. In this study, we have analyzed the morphology and Gag stoichiometry of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-like particles and authentic, mature HTLV-1 particles by using cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). HTLV-1-like particles mimicked the morphology of immature authentic HTLV-1 virions. Importantly, we have observed for the first time that the morphology of these virus-like particles (VLPs) has the unique local feature of a flat Gag lattice that does not follow the curvature of the viral membrane, resulting in an enlarged distance between the Gag lattice and the viral membrane. Other morphological features that have been previously observed with other retroviruses include: (1) a Gag lattice with multiple discontinuities; (2) membrane regions associated with the Gag lattice that exhibited a string of bead-like densities at the inner leaflet; and (3) an arrangement of the Gag lattice resembling a railroad track. Measurement of the average size and mass of VLPs and authentic HTLV-1 particles suggested a consistent range of size and Gag copy numbers in these two groups of particles. The unique local flat Gag lattice morphological feature observed suggests that HTLV-1 Gag could be arranged in a lattice structure that is distinct from that of other retroviruses characterized to date. PMID:27187442

  16. Sexual transmission of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Arthur; Casseb, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is endemic in many parts of the world and is primarily transmitted through sexual intercourse or from mother to child. Sexual transmission occurs more efficiently from men to women than women to men and might be enhanced by sexually transmitted diseases that cause ulcers and result in mucosal ruptures, such as syphilis, herpes simplex type 2 (HSV-2), and chancroid. Other sexually transmitted diseases might result in the recruitment of inflammatory cells and could increase the risk of HTLV-1 acquisition and transmission. Additionally, factors that are associated with higher transmission risks include the presence of antibodies against the viral oncoprotein Tax (anti-Tax), a higher proviral load in peripheral blood lymphocytes, and increased cervicovaginal or seminal secretions. Seminal fluid has been reported to increase HTLV replication and transmission, whereas male circumcision and neutralizing antibodies might have a protective effect. Recently, free virions were discovered in plasma, which reveals a possible new mode of HTLV replication. It is unclear how this discovery might affect the routes of HTLV transmission, particularly sexual transmission, because HTLV transmission rates are significantly higher from men to women than women to men. PMID:25075475

  17. Distinct Morphology of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1-Like Particles.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, José O; Cao, Sheng; Zhang, Wei; Mansky, Louis M

    2016-01-01

    The Gag polyprotein is the main retroviral structural protein and is essential for the assembly and release of virus particles. In this study, we have analyzed the morphology and Gag stoichiometry of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-like particles and authentic, mature HTLV-1 particles by using cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). HTLV-1-like particles mimicked the morphology of immature authentic HTLV-1 virions. Importantly, we have observed for the first time that the morphology of these virus-like particles (VLPs) has the unique local feature of a flat Gag lattice that does not follow the curvature of the viral membrane, resulting in an enlarged distance between the Gag lattice and the viral membrane. Other morphological features that have been previously observed with other retroviruses include: (1) a Gag lattice with multiple discontinuities; (2) membrane regions associated with the Gag lattice that exhibited a string of bead-like densities at the inner leaflet; and (3) an arrangement of the Gag lattice resembling a railroad track. Measurement of the average size and mass of VLPs and authentic HTLV-1 particles suggested a consistent range of size and Gag copy numbers in these two groups of particles. The unique local flat Gag lattice morphological feature observed suggests that HTLV-1 Gag could be arranged in a lattice structure that is distinct from that of other retroviruses characterized to date. PMID:27187442

  18. [Adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia associated with HTLV-I virus in Martinique: apropos of 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Gessain, A; Plumelle, Y; Sanhadji, K; Barin, F; Gazzolo, L; Constant-Desportes, M; Pascaline, N; Diebold, J; De-Thé, G

    1986-01-01

    Two HTLV-I associated adult T cell leukemia cases were observed in patient from Martinique (French West Indies). These case are similar to the clinical entity, described by Takatsuki in 1977 in Japan and by Catovsky in Caribbean patients, characterized by a lymphadenopathy, skin lesions and visceral involvement, hypercalcemia, an aggressive course, and poor prognosis. The malignant cells with T4 phenotype and often suppressive function, were pleomorphic, mature, with prominent nuclear irregularities. Systematic research of HTLV-I virus or antibodies in patients with this clinical picture, to measure the influence of this virus in T cell lymphoproliferative diseases in France and in French West Indies is required. PMID:3016639

  19. Animals Models of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type I Leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Niewiesk, Stefan

    2016-03-31

    Infection with human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) causes adult T cell leukemia (ATL) in a minority of infected individuals after long periods of viral persistence. The various stages of HTLV-I infection and leukemia development are studied by using several different animal models: (1) the rabbit (and mouse) model of persistent HTLV-I infection, (2) transgenic mice to model tumorigenesis by HTLV-I specific protein expression, (3) ATL cell transfers into immune-deficient mice, and (4) infection of humanized mice with HTLV-I. After infection, virus replicates without clinical disease in rabbits and to a lesser extent in mice. Transgenic expression of both the transactivator protein (Tax) and the HTLV-I bZIP factor (HBZ) protein have provided insight into factors important in leukemia/lymphoma development. To investigate factors relating to tumor spread and tissue invasion, a number of immune-deficient mice based on the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) or non-obese diabetic/SCID background have been used. Inoculation of adult T cell leukemia cell (lines) leads to lymphoma with osteolytic bone lesions and to a lesser degree to leukemia development. These mice have been used extensively for the testing of anticancer drugs and virotherapy. A recent development is the use of so-called humanized mice, which, upon transfer of CD34(+)human umbilical cord stem cells, generate human lymphocytes. Infection with HTLV-I leads to leukemia/lymphoma development, thus providing an opportunity to investigate disease development with the aid of molecularly cloned viruses. However, further improvements of this mouse model, particularly in respect to the development of adaptive immune responses, are necessary. PMID:27034390

  20. Nucleotide sequence of the 3' region of an infectious human T-cell leukemia virus type II genome.

    PubMed Central

    Shimotohno, K; Wachsman, W; Takahashi, Y; Golde, D W; Miwa, M; Sugimura, T; Chen, I S

    1984-01-01

    The nucleic acid sequence of the 3' region of human T-cell leukemia virus type II (HTLV-II) proviral DNA was determined using a HTLV-II proviral clone that could be recovered as infectious, transforming virus. The sequence data indicate a region of unknown function of approximately equal to 1.6 kilobase pairs in the 3' region, analogous to the X region previously identified in human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I). Three overlapping open reading frames are present in the X region of HTLV-II. One of these open reading frames, Xc, is most likely to encode a protein product, because it has greater predicted amino acid sequence homology (78%) with the X-IV region of HTLV-I and a greater percentage of its base differences with X-IV at the third nucleotide position of codons than do the other open reading frames. Sequences of the X-region that include the open reading frames are conserved in two deletion mutants of HTLV-II, which are associated with a subline of Mo cells with a decreased dependence on fetal bovine serum. Images PMID:6093110

  1. Alternate receptor usage of neuropilin-1 and glucose transporter protein 1 by the human T cell leukemia virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Qingwen; Alkhatib, Bashar; Cornetta, Kenneth; Alkhatib, Ghalib

    2010-01-20

    Recent studies have demonstrated that neuropilin 1 (NP-1) is involved in HTLV-1 entry; however, the role NP-1 plays in this process is not understood. We demonstrated that ectopic expression of human NP-1 but not NP-2 cDNA increased susceptibility to HTLV-1. SiRNA-mediated inhibition of NP-1 expression correlated with significant reduction of HTLV-1 Env-mediated fusion. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF{sub 165}) caused downmodulation of surface NP-1 and inhibited HTLV-1 infection of U87 cells. In contrast, VEGF{sub 165} partially inhibited infection of primary astrocytes and had no significant effect on infection of HeLa cells. VEGF{sub 165} and antibodies to the glucose transporter protein 1 (anti-GLUT-1) were both needed to block infection of primary astrocytes, however, only anti-GLUT-1 antibodies were sufficient to block infection of HeLa cells. HTLV-1 Env forms complexes with both NP-1 and GLUT-1 in primary human astrocytes. The alternate usage of these two cellular receptors may have important implications regarding HTLV-1 neuro-tropism.

  2. Characterization of an infectious molecular clone of human T-cell leukemia virus type I.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, T M; Robinson, M A; Bowers, F S; Kindt, T J

    1995-01-01

    An infectious molecular clone of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) was derived from an HTLV-I-transformed rabbit T-cell line, RH/K30, obtained by coculture of rabbit peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with the human HTLV-I-transformed cell line MT-2. The RH/K30 cell line contained two integrated proviruses, an intact HTLV-I genome and an apparently defective provirus with an in-frame stop codon in the env gene. A genomic DNA fragment containing the intact HTLV-I provirus was cloned into bacteriophage lambda (K30 phi) and subcloned into a plasmid vector (K30p). HTLV-I p24gag protein was detected in culture supernatants of human and rabbit T-cell and fibroblast lines transfected with these clones, at levels comparable to those of the parental cell line RH/K30. Persistent expression of virus was observed in one of these lines, RL-5/K30p, for more than 24 months. Biologic characterization of this cell line revealed the presence of integrated HTLV-I provirus, spliced and unspliced mRNA transcripts, and typical extracellular type C retrovirus particles. As expected, these virus particles contained HTLV-I RNA and reverse transcriptase activity. The transfected cells also expressed surface major histocompatibility complex class II, whereas no expression of this molecule was detected in the parental RL-5 cell line. Virus was passaged by cocultivation of irradiated RL-5/K30p cells with either rabbit PBMC or human cord blood mononuclear cells, demonstrating in vitro infectivity. The virus produced in these cells was also infectious in vivo, since rabbits injected with RL-5/K30p cells became productively infected, as evidenced by seroconversion, amplification of HTLV-I-specific sequences by PCR from PBMC DNA, and virus isolation from PBMC. Availability of infectious molecular clones will facilitate functional studies of HTLV-I genes and gene products. PMID:7884847

  3. Small Noncoding RNAs in Cells Transformed by Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1: a Role for a tRNA Fragment as a Primer for Reverse Transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Ruggero, Katia; Guffanti, Alessandro; Corradin, Alberto; Sharma, Varun Kumar; De Bellis, Gianluca; Corti, Giorgio; Grassi, Angela; Zanovello, Paola; Bronte, Vincenzo; D'Agostino, Donna M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The present study employed mass sequencing of small RNA libraries to identify the repertoire of small noncoding RNAs expressed in normal CD4+ T cells compared to cells transformed with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). The results revealed distinct patterns of microRNA expression in HTLV-1-infected CD4+ T-cell lines with respect to their normal counterparts. In addition, a search for virus-encoded microRNAs yielded 2 sequences that originated from the plus strand of the HTLV-1 genome. Several sequences derived from tRNAs were expressed at substantial levels in both uninfected and infected cells. One of the most abundant tRNA fragments (tRF-3019) was derived from the 3′ end of tRNA-proline. tRF-3019 exhibited perfect sequence complementarity to the primer binding site of HTLV-1. The results of an in vitro reverse transcriptase assay verified that tRF-3019 was capable of priming HTLV-1 reverse transcriptase. Both tRNA-proline and tRF-3019 were detected in virus particles isolated from HTLV-1-infected cells. These findings suggest that tRF-3019 may play an important role in priming HTLV-1 reverse transcription and could thus represent a novel target to control HTLV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE Small noncoding RNAs, a growing family of regulatory RNAs that includes microRNAs and tRNA fragments, have recently emerged as key players in many biological processes, including viral infection and cancer. In the present study, we employed mass sequencing to identify the repertoire of small noncoding RNAs in normal T cells compared to T cells transformed with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), a retrovirus that causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. The results revealed a distinct pattern of microRNA expression in HTLV-1-infected cells and a tRNA fragment (tRF-3019) that was packaged into virions and capable of priming HTLV-1 reverse transcription, a key event in the retroviral life cycle

  4. Persistent infection of chimpanzees with human immunodeficiency virus: serological responses and properties of reisolated viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Nara, P L; Robey, W G; Arthur, L O; Asher, D M; Wolff, A V; Gibbs, C J; Gajdusek, D C; Fischinger, P J

    1987-01-01

    Persistent infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) in the chimpanzee may be valuable for immunopathologic and potential vaccine evaluation. Two HIV strains, the tissue culture-derived human T-cell lymphotropic virus type IIIB (HTLV-IIIB) and in vivo serially passaged lymphadenopathy-associated virus type 1 (LAV-1), were injected intravenously into chimpanzees. Two animals received HTLV-IIIB as either virus-infected H9 cells or cell-free virus. A third animal received chimpanzee-passaged LAV-1. Evaluation of their sera for virus-specific serologic changes, including neutralizations, was done during a 2-year period. During this period all animals had persistently high titers of antibodies to viral core and envelope antigens. All three animals developed a progressively increasing type-specific neutralizing LAV-1 versus HTLV-IIIB antibody titer during the 2-year observation period which broadened in specificity to include HTLV-HIRF, HTLV-IIIMN, and HTLV-IIICC after 6 to 12 months. The antibody titers against both viruses were still increasing by 2 years after experimental virus inoculation. Sera from all animals were capable of neutralizing both homologously and heterologously reisolated virus from chimpanzees. A slightly more rapid type-specific neutralizing response was noted for the animal receiving HTLV-IIIB-infected cells compared with that for cell-free HTLV-IIIB. Sera from all persistently infected chimpanzees were capable of mediating group-specific antibody-mediated complement-dependent cytolysis of HIV-infected cells derived from all isolates tested. Viruses reisolated from all three animals at 20 months after inoculation revealed very similar peptide maps of their respective envelope gp120s, as determined by two-dimensional chymotrypsin oligopeptide analysis. One peptide, however, from the original HTLV-IIIB-inoculated virus was deleted in viruses from all three animals, and in addition, we noted the appearance of a new or modified peptide which

  5. Persistent infection of chimpanzees with human immunodeficiency virus: serological responses and properties of reisolated viruses.

    PubMed

    Nara, P L; Robey, W G; Arthur, L O; Asher, D M; Wolff, A V; Gibbs, C J; Gajdusek, D C; Fischinger, P J

    1987-10-01

    Persistent infection by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) in the chimpanzee may be valuable for immunopathologic and potential vaccine evaluation. Two HIV strains, the tissue culture-derived human T-cell lymphotropic virus type IIIB (HTLV-IIIB) and in vivo serially passaged lymphadenopathy-associated virus type 1 (LAV-1), were injected intravenously into chimpanzees. Two animals received HTLV-IIIB as either virus-infected H9 cells or cell-free virus. A third animal received chimpanzee-passaged LAV-1. Evaluation of their sera for virus-specific serologic changes, including neutralizations, was done during a 2-year period. During this period all animals had persistently high titers of antibodies to viral core and envelope antigens. All three animals developed a progressively increasing type-specific neutralizing LAV-1 versus HTLV-IIIB antibody titer during the 2-year observation period which broadened in specificity to include HTLV-HIRF, HTLV-IIIMN, and HTLV-IIICC after 6 to 12 months. The antibody titers against both viruses were still increasing by 2 years after experimental virus inoculation. Sera from all animals were capable of neutralizing both homologously and heterologously reisolated virus from chimpanzees. A slightly more rapid type-specific neutralizing response was noted for the animal receiving HTLV-IIIB-infected cells compared with that for cell-free HTLV-IIIB. Sera from all persistently infected chimpanzees were capable of mediating group-specific antibody-mediated complement-dependent cytolysis of HIV-infected cells derived from all isolates tested. Viruses reisolated from all three animals at 20 months after inoculation revealed very similar peptide maps of their respective envelope gp120s, as determined by two-dimensional chymotrypsin oligopeptide analysis. One peptide, however, from the original HTLV-IIIB-inoculated virus was deleted in viruses from all three animals, and in addition, we noted the appearance of a new or modified peptide which

  6. Examining Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Infection and Replication by Cell-Free Infection with Recombinant Virus Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Derse, David; Hill, Shawn A.; Lloyd, Patricia A.; Chung, Hye-kyung; Morse, Barry A.

    2001-01-01

    A sensitive and quantitative cell-free infection assay, utilizing recombinant human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-based vectors, was developed in order to analyze early events in the virus replication cycle. Previous difficulties with the low infectivity and restricted expression of the virus have prevented a clear understanding of these events. Virus stocks were generated by transfecting cells with three plasmids: (i) a packaging plasmid encoding HTLV-1 structural and regulatory proteins, (ii) an HTLV-1 transfer vector containing either firefly luciferase or enhanced yellow fluorescent protein genes, and (iii) an envelope expression plasmid. Single-round infections were initiated by exposing target cells to filtered supernatants and quantified by assaying for luciferase activity in cell extracts or by enumerating transduced cells by flow cytometry. Transduction was dependent on reverse transcription and integration of the recombinant virus genome, as shown by the effects of the reverse transcriptase inhibitor 3′-azido-3′-deoxythymidine (AZT) and by mutation of the integrase gene in the packaging vector, respectively. The 50% inhibitory concentration of AZT was determined to be 30 nM in this HTLV-1 replication system. The stability of HTLV-1 particles, pseudotyped with either vesicular stomatitis virus G protein or HTLV-1 envelope, was typical of retroviruses, exhibiting a half-life of approximately 3.5 h at 37°C. The specific infectivity of recombinant HTLV-1 virions was at least 3 orders of magnitude lower than that of analogous HIV-1 particles, though both were pseudotyped with the same envelope. Thus, the low infectivity of HTLV-1 is determined in large part by properties of the core particle and by the efficiency of postentry processes. PMID:11507191

  7. A case report of HTLV-I associated myelopathy presenting with cerebellar ataxia and nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Taki, Masakatsu; Nin, Fumiaki; Hasegawa, Tatsuhisa; Sakaguchi, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Hisa, Yasuo; Azuma, Yumiko; Nakagawa, Masanori

    2011-06-01

    HTLV-I associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is characterized by spastic paraparesis in the lower extremities, and urinary disturbance. HAM/TSP has also been less frequently associated with cerebellar syndromes and nystagmus. We report a case of HAM/TSP presenting with cerebellar ataxia and nystagmus. The patient was a 73-year-old woman who was born in southern Japan. At age 41, she developed pain and spasticity in the bilateral lower limbs and gradually progressive gait disturbance. At age 57, she was diagnosed with HAM/TSP based on spastic paraparesis in the lower limbs, urinary disturbance and positive anti HTLV-I antibody in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. In June 2008, she was referred to our university and hospitalized for rehabilitation. Twenty days later, she experienced rotatory vertigo sensation. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed pontocerebellar atrophy. The patient presented with cerebellar signs in the upper limbs, gaze-evoked nystagmus in the sitting position and right-beating horizontal nystagmus in the supine and head-hanging positions. Electronystagmography (ENG) showed horizontal saccadic overshoot dysmetria and horizontal saccadic pursuit. Nystagmus is rare among the literature on HAM/TSP. ENG is helpful to evaluate and confirm the cerebellar syndromes of HAM/TSP. PMID:21035292

  8. A historical reflection on the discovery of human retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Vahlne, Anders

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of HIV-1 as the cause of AIDS was one of the major scientific achievements during the last century. Here the events leading to this discovery are reviewed with particular attention to priority and actual contributions by those involved. Since I would argue that discovering HIV was dependent on the previous discovery of the first human retrovirus HTLV-I, the history of this discovery is also re-examined. The first human retroviruses (HTLV-I) was first reported by Robert C. Gallo and coworkers in 1980 and reconfirmed by Yorio Hinuma and coworkers in 1981. These discoveries were in turn dependent on the previous discovery by Gallo and coworkers in 1976 of interleukin 2 or T-cell growth factor as it was called then. HTLV-II was described by Gallo's group in 1982. A human retrovirus distinct from HTLV-I and HTLV-II in that it was shown to have the morphology of a lentivirus was in my mind described for the first time by Luc Montagnier in an oral presentation at Cold Spring Harbor in September of 1983. This virus was isolated from a patient with lymphadenopathy using the protocol previously described for HTLV by Gallo. The first peer reviewed paper by Montagnier's group of such a retrovirus, isolated from two siblings of whom one with AIDS, appeared in Lancet in April of 1984. However, the proof that a new human retrovirus (HIV-1) was the cause of AIDS was first established in four publications by Gallo's group in the May 4th issue of Science in 1984. PMID:19409074

  9. Muscular weakness represents the main limiting factor of walk, functional independence and quality of life of myelopathy patients associated to HTLV-1.

    PubMed

    Caiafa, Renata Costa; Orsini, Marco; Felicio, Lilian R; Puccioni-Sohler, Marzia

    2016-04-01

    HTLV-1-associated myelopathy is a progressive disabling disease associated with gait abnormalities. Objective To identify and quantify the main muscles affected by weakness and spasticity, their impact on gait, functional capacity and on quality of life of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy patients. Method We evaluated lower limbs muscular strength according to the Medical Research Council scale, spasticity according to the modified Ashworth scale, daily activities according to the Barthel Index and quality of life according to the Short-Form Health Survey-36 of 26 HTLV-1-associated myelopathy patients. Results The muscles most affected by weakness included the dorsal flexors and knee flexors. Spasticity predominated in the hip adductor muscles and in plantar flexors. Assistance for locomotion, minimal dependence in daily activities, limitations in functional capacity and physical aspects were the most common findings. Conclusion The impairment of gait, functional dependence and quality of life were predominantly a consequence of intense muscle weakness in HTLV-1-associated myelopathy patients. PMID:27096999

  10. Nuclear export and expression of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 tax/rex mRNA are RxRE/Rex dependent.

    PubMed

    Bai, X T; Sinha-Datta, U; Ko, N L; Bellon, M; Nicot, C

    2012-04-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a complex retrovirus associated with the lymphoproliferative disease adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and the neurodegenerative disorder tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM). Replication of HTLV-1 is under the control of two major trans-acting proteins, Tax and Rex. Previous studies suggested that Tax activates transcription from the viral long terminal repeat (LTR) through recruitment of cellular CREB and transcriptional coactivators. Other studies reported that Rex acts posttranscriptionally and allows the cytoplasmic export of unspliced or incompletely spliced viral mRNAs carrying gag/pol and env only. As opposed to HIV's Rev-responsive element (RRE), the Rex-responsive element (RxRE) is present in all viral mRNAs in HTLV-1. However, based on indirect observations, it is believed that nuclear export and expression of the doubly spliced tax/rex RNA are Rex independent. In this study, we demonstrate that Rex does stimulate Tax expression, through nuclear-cytoplasmic export of the tax/rex RNA, even though a Rex-independent basal export mechanism exists. This effect was dependent upon the RxRE element and the RNA-binding activity of Rex. In addition, Rex-mediated export of tax/rex RNA was CRM1 dependent and inhibited by leptomycin B treatment. RNA immunoprecipitation (RNA-IP) experiments confirmed Rex binding to the tax/rex RNA in both transfected cells with HTLV-1 molecular clones and HTLV-1-infected T cells. Since both Rex and p30 interact with the tax/rex RNA and with one another, this may offer a temporal and dynamic regulation of HTLV-1 replication. Our results shed light on HTLV-1 replication and reveal a more complex regulatory network than previously anticipated. PMID:22318152

  11. Quantification of HTLV-1 Clonality and TCR Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Laydon, Daniel J.; Melamed, Anat; Sim, Aaron; Gillet, Nicolas A.; Sim, Kathleen; Darko, Sam; Kroll, J. Simon; Douek, Daniel C.; Price, David A.; Bangham, Charles R. M.; Asquith, Becca

    2014-01-01

    Estimation of immunological and microbiological diversity is vital to our understanding of infection and the immune response. For instance, what is the diversity of the T cell repertoire? These questions are partially addressed by high-throughput sequencing techniques that enable identification of immunological and microbiological “species” in a sample. Estimators of the number of unseen species are needed to estimate population diversity from sample diversity. Here we test five widely used non-parametric estimators, and develop and validate a novel method, DivE, to estimate species richness and distribution. We used three independent datasets: (i) viral populations from subjects infected with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1; (ii) T cell antigen receptor clonotype repertoires; and (iii) microbial data from infant faecal samples. When applied to datasets with rarefaction curves that did not plateau, existing estimators systematically increased with sample size. In contrast, DivE consistently and accurately estimated diversity for all datasets. We identify conditions that limit the application of DivE. We also show that DivE can be used to accurately estimate the underlying population frequency distribution. We have developed a novel method that is significantly more accurate than commonly used biodiversity estimators in microbiological and immunological populations. PMID:24945836

  12. Quantification of HTLV-1 clonality and TCR diversity.

    PubMed

    Laydon, Daniel J; Melamed, Anat; Sim, Aaron; Gillet, Nicolas A; Sim, Kathleen; Darko, Sam; Kroll, J Simon; Douek, Daniel C; Price, David A; Bangham, Charles R M; Asquith, Becca

    2014-06-01

    Estimation of immunological and microbiological diversity is vital to our understanding of infection and the immune response. For instance, what is the diversity of the T cell repertoire? These questions are partially addressed by high-throughput sequencing techniques that enable identification of immunological and microbiological "species" in a sample. Estimators of the number of unseen species are needed to estimate population diversity from sample diversity. Here we test five widely used non-parametric estimators, and develop and validate a novel method, DivE, to estimate species richness and distribution. We used three independent datasets: (i) viral populations from subjects infected with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1; (ii) T cell antigen receptor clonotype repertoires; and (iii) microbial data from infant faecal samples. When applied to datasets with rarefaction curves that did not plateau, existing estimators systematically increased with sample size. In contrast, DivE consistently and accurately estimated diversity for all datasets. We identify conditions that limit the application of DivE. We also show that DivE can be used to accurately estimate the underlying population frequency distribution. We have developed a novel method that is significantly more accurate than commonly used biodiversity estimators in microbiological and immunological populations. PMID:24945836

  13. Postrenal Transplant Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type I–Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Julian Andres; Taimur, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We report a case of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I)–associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), in a 59 year-old, living-donor, renal transplant recipient from Jamaica. The patient's renal transplant had been performed 11 years ago, and her organ donor was also from Jamaica. Pretransplant HTLV-I serologic status for both the donor and recipient was unknown. The prevalence of HTLV-I seropositivity in the United States and Europe is low, and HAM/TSP is a rare occurrence. The positive predictive value of HTLV-I screening in these regions is therefore, low. This has generated debate among transplant societies regarding universal screening for HTLV-I before solid organ transplantation. Very limited evidence is available for the prevention and treatment of this devastating condition. Our case highlights the importance of selected pretransplant screening for HTLV-I infection among organ donors and candidates from endemic areas. We feel such testing may aid in the early recognition of HAM/TSP and more timely initiation of treatment.

  14. Relationship among Strongyloides stercoralis Infection, Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Infection, and Cancer: A 24-Year Cohort Inpatient Study in Okinawa, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Teruhisa; Hirata, Tetsuo; Parrott, Gretchen; Higashiarakawa, Miwa; Kinjo, Takeshi; Kinjo, Tetsu; Hokama, Akira; Fujita, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis infection and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection in the population. In addition, this study investigated the relationship between S. stercoralis infection or HTLV-1 infection and a patient's risk of developing related cancers. This is a retrospective cohort study of 5,209 patients. The prevalence of S. stercoralis infection was 5.2% among all patients. The prevalence among men (6.3%) was significantly higher than among women (3.6%, P < 0.001). The prevalence of HTLV-1 infection among this population was 13.6% and the prevalence among women (15.5%) was significantly higher than that of men (12.3%, P < 0.001). HTLV-1 seroprevalence was higher in patients with liver cancer (P = 0.003, odds ratio [OR]: 1.91, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24, 2.95) and in those with lymphoma other than adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) (P = 0.005, adjusted OR: 2.76, 95% CI: 1.36, 5.62) if compared with patients without any neoplasm. The prevalence of both S. stercoralis and HTLV-1 in the Okinawan population has been steadily decreasing over the past 24 years. HTLV-1 infection significantly increases the odds of developing liver cancer and lymphomas other than ATLL. PMID:26621566

  15. Relationship Among Strongyloides stercoralis Infection, Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Infection, and Cancer: A 24-Year Cohort Inpatient Study in Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Teruhisa; Hirata, Tetsuo; Parrott, Gretchen; Higashiarakawa, Miwa; Kinjo, Takeshi; Kinjo, Tetsu; Hokama, Akira; Fujita, Jiro

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis infection and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection in the population. In addition, this study investigated the relationship between S. stercoralis infection or HTLV-1 infection and a patient's risk of developing related cancers. This is a retrospective cohort study of 5,209 patients. The prevalence of S. stercoralis infection was 5.2% among all patients. The prevalence among men (6.3%) was significantly higher than among women (3.6%, P < 0.001). The prevalence of HTLV-1 infection among this population was 13.6% and the prevalence among women (15.5%) was significantly higher than that of men (12.3%, P < 0.001). HTLV-1 seroprevalence was higher in patients with liver cancer (P = 0.003, odds ratio [OR]: 1.91, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24, 2.95) and in those with lymphoma other than adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) (P = 0.005, adjusted OR: 2.76, 95% CI: 1.36, 5.62) if compared with patients without any neoplasm. The prevalence of both S. stercoralis and HTLV-1 in the Okinawan population has been steadily decreasing over the past 24 years. HTLV-1 infection significantly increases the odds of developing liver cancer and lymphomas other than ATLL. PMID:26621566

  16. In situ hybridization detection of HTLV-I RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of TSP/HAM patients and their spouses.

    PubMed

    Beilke, M A; In, D R; Gravell, M; Hamilton, R S; Mora, C A; Leon-Monzon, M; Rodgers-Johnson, P E; Gajdusek, D C; Gibbs, C J; Zaninovic, V

    1991-01-01

    This is the first report of the direct detection of HTLV-I RNA in uncultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC's) of patients with tropical spastic paraparesis and HTLV-I-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM) and their spouses, using the technique of in situ hybridization. Twenty-one Colombian patients were tested, all of whom had antibodies to HTLV-I; the presence of HTLV-I proviral DNA in their PBMNC's was confirmed by the polymerase chain reaction technique. Of the 21 patients 15 had a clinical diagnosis of tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP/HAM), 5 were asymptomatic relatives, and 1 patient had leukemia. In situ hybridization was positive in samples from 5 patients; 2 of these were TSP/HAM patients and the other 3 were healthy wives of TSP/HAM patients. This study demonstrates for the first time that viral RNA is expressed in uncultured PBMNC's of some patients with TSP/HAM in whom proviral DNA is also present; furthermore, the detection of HTLV-I RNA in the blood of female partners of TSP/HAM patients clearly illustrates the high likelihood of HTLV-I transmission through sexual contact. PMID:1849984

  17. The 5′ Untranslated Region of the Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 mRNA Enables Cap-Independent Translation Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, Eduardo; Landry, Dori M.; Cáceres, C. Joaquín; Pino, Karla; Rossi, Federico; Navarrete, Camilo; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo; Thompson, Sunnie R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a complex human retrovirus that causes adult T cell leukemia and of HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. The mRNA of some complex retroviruses, including the human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV), can initiate translation using a canonical cap-dependent mechanism or through an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). In this study, we present strong evidence showing that like HIV-1 and SIV, the 5′-untranslated region (5′UTR) of the HTLV-1 full-length mRNA harbors an IRES. Cap-independent translational activity was evaluated and demonstrated using dual luciferase bicistronic mRNAs in rabbit reticulocyte lysate, in mammalian cell culture, and in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Characterization of the HTLV-1 IRES shows that its activity is dependent on the ribosomal protein S25 (RPS25) and that its function is highly sensitive to the drug edeine. Together, these findings suggest that the 5′UTR of the HTLV-1 full-length mRNA enables internal recruitment of the eukaryotic translation initiation complex. However, the recognition of the initiation codon requires ribosome scanning. These results suggest that, after internal recruitment by the HTLV-1 IRES, a scanning step takes place for the 40S ribosomal subunit to be positioned at the translation initiation codon. IMPORTANCE The mechanism by which retroviral mRNAs recruit the 40S ribosomal subunit internally is not understood. This study provides new insights into the mechanism of translation initiation used by the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The results show that the HTLV-1 mRNA can initiate translation via a noncanonical mechanism mediated by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). This study also provides evidence showing the involvement of cellular proteins in HTLV-1 IRES-mediated translation initiation. Together, the data presented in this report significantly contribute to the understanding of HTLV-1 gene

  18. Cyclosporine for the Treatment of HTLV-1-Induced HAM/TSP

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Montalvá, Adrián; Salvador, Fernando; Caballero, Estrella; Molina, Israel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) remains a challenging disease. Treatment options are scarce, and their safety and efficacy are currently a matter of concern. We present a case report describing our experience using cyclosporine in a patient with early HAM/TSP who started with a gait disturbance at Vall d’Hebron University Hospital (Barcelona) from August 2012 to October 2013. After 62 weeks of treatment, clinical improvement was observed and proviral load diminished. No safety concerns were observed. Cyclosporine seems to be effective in new-onset HAM/TSP or in chronic HAM/TSP that develops a relapse. However, the duration and safety profile of this steroid-sparing therapy remain unknown and should be further investigated. PMID:25569667

  19. Memory lineage relationships in HTLV-1-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T cells

    PubMed Central

    Johnson-Nauroth, Julie M.; Graber, Jerome; Yao, Karen; Jacobson, Steve; Calabresi, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic memory T cells play a critical role in combating viral infections; however, in some diseases they may contribute to tissue damage. In HAM/TSP, HTLV-1 Tax 11–19+ cells proliferate spontaneously in vitro and can be tracked using the Tax 11–19 MHC Class I tetramer. Immediately ex vivo, these cells were a mix of CD45RA−/CCR7− TEM and CD45RA+/CCR7− TDiff memory CTL. The subsequent proliferating Tax 11–19 tetramer+ population expressed low levels of IL-7Rα, failed to respond to IL-7 and IL-15, and did not develop a TCM phenotype. Thus, chronic exposure to viral antigen may result in a sustained pool of TEM cells that home to the CNS and mediate the spinal cord pathology seen in this disease. PMID:16740321

  20. HTLV-1-associated adult T cell leukemia is highly susceptible to Navitoclax due to enhanced Bax expression.

    PubMed

    Witzens-Harig, Mathias; Giaisi, Marco; Köhler, Rebecca; Krammer, Peter H; Li-Weber, Min

    2016-01-15

    Over-expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bcl-w is frequently associated with cancer resistance to chemotherapy. Navitoclax (ABT-263), an orally bio-available small-molecule mimetic of the Bcl-2 homology domain 3, specifically inhibits Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bcl-w. Despite promising results obtained from the clinical trials, the use of Navitoclax in patients is dose-limited due to induction of death of platelets via inhibition of Bcl-xL and subsequent thrombocytopenia. This side effect limits the use of Navitoclax in low doses and to very sensitive tumors. In this study, we show that HTLV-1-associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) cells, which over-express Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bcl-w, show a 10- to 20-fold higher sensitivity (EC50 = ∼ 25-50 nM) to Navitoclax compared to non-HTLV-1-associated leukemic cells (EC50 = ∼ 1 μM). Investigation of the molecular mechanisms revealed that the HTLV-1 oncogenic protein Tax up-regulates expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax which enhances the therapeutic efficacy of Navitoclax. In addition, we show that agents that inhibit the transcription elongation or translation initiation such as Wogonin and Roc-A can further decrease the effective dose of Navitoclax. Our study suggests that HTLV-1 ATL may be a good candidate disease for low dose Navitoclax therapy and probably with less risk of thrombocytopenia. PMID:26260669

  1. The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Rex regulatory protein exhibits an impaired functionality in human lymphoblastoid Jurkat T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hamaia, S; Cassé, H; Gazzolo, L; Duc Dodon, M

    1997-01-01

    The Rex protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) intervenes in the posttranscriptional regulation of proviral gene expression. Its binding to the Rex response element (XRE) present in the 3' long terminal repeat ensures the coordinate cytoplasmic accumulation of spliced and unspliced forms of viral messengers. Consequently, synthesis of viral structural and enzymatic proteins is strictly dependent on the Rex posttranscriptional activity. Here we report that synthesis of HTLV-1 envelope glycoproteins by Jurkat T cells could be detected only when they were regulated in a Rex-independent manner. Indeed, Jurkat T cells transfected with a Rex-dependent env expression vector (encompassing both the env and pX open reading frames) do not produce significant levels of envelope glycoproteins despite the production of significant amounts of Rex protein. The analysis of levels and distribution patterns of the unspliced env and of the singly spliced tax/rex transcripts suggests that the failure in envelope glycoprotein synthesis may be ascribed to a deficiency of Rex in mediating the nucleocytoplasmic transport of unspliced env RNAs in these cells. Furthermore, despite the synthesis of regulatory proteins, HTLV-1 structural proteins were not detected in Jurkat T cells transfected with an HTLV-1 infectious provirus. Conversely, and as expected, structural proteins were produced by Jurkat cells transfected by a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infectious provirus. This phenotype appeared to be linked to a specific dysfunction of Rex, since the functionally equivalent Rev protein of HIV-1 was shown to be fully efficient in promoting the synthesis of HTLV-1 envelope glycoproteins in Jurkat cells. Therefore, it seems likely that the block to Rex function in these lymphoblastoid T cells is determined by inefficient Rex-XRE interactions. These observations suggest that the acquisition of this Rex-deficient phenotype by in vivo-infected HTLV-1 T cells may

  2. Integration Site and Clonal Expansion in Human Chronic Retroviral Infection and Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Niederer, Heather A.; Bangham, Charles R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Retroviral vectors have been successfully used therapeutically to restore expression of genes in a range of single-gene diseases, including several primary immunodeficiency disorders. Although clinical trials have shown remarkable results, there have also been a number of severe adverse events involving malignant outgrowth of a transformed clonal population. This clonal expansion is influenced by the integration site profile of the viral integrase, the transgene expressed, and the effect of the viral promoters on the neighbouring host genome. Infection with the pathogenic human retrovirus HTLV-1 also causes clonal expansion of cells containing an integrated HTLV-1 provirus. Although the majority of HTLV-1-infected people remain asymptomatic, up to 5% develop an aggressive T cell malignancy. In this review we discuss recent findings on the role of the genomic integration site in determining the clonality and the potential for malignant transformation of cells carrying integrated HTLV-1 or gene therapy vectors, and how these results have contributed to the understanding of HTLV-1 pathogenesis and to improvements in gene therapy vector safety. PMID:25365582

  3. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 Tax mediates enhanced transcription in CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Newbound, G C; Andrews, J M; O'Rourke, J P; Brady, J N; Lairmore, M D

    1996-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and is associated with a variety of immunoregulatory disorders. HTLV-1 has been shown to bind to and infect a variety of hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. However, both in vivo and in vitro, the provirus is mostly detected in and preferentially transforms CD4+ T cells. The molecular mechanism that determines the CD4+ T-cell tropism of HTLV-1 has not been determined. Using cocultures of purified CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with an HTLV-1 producing cell line, we measured viral transcription by using Northern (RNA) blot analysis, protein production by using a p24 antigen capture assay and flow cytometric analysis for viral envelope, and proviral integration by using DNA slot blot analysis. We further measured HTLV-1 long terminal repeat-directed transcription in purified CD4+ and CD8+ T cells by using transient transfection assays and in vitro transcription. We demonstrate a higher rate of viral transcription in primary CD4+ T cells than in CD8+ T cells. HTLV-1 protein production was 5- to 25-fold greater in CD4+ cocultures and mRNA levels were 5-fold greater in these cultures than in the CD8+ cocultures. Transient transfection and in vitro transcription indicated a modest increase in basal transcription in CD4+ T cells, whereas there was a 20-fold increase in reporter gene activity in CD4+ T cells cotransfected with tax. These data suggest that unique or activated transcription factors, particularly Tax-responsive factors in CD4+ T cells, recognize regulatory sequences within the HTLV-1 long terminal repeat, and this mediates the observed enhanced viral transcription and ultimately the cell tropism and leukemogenic potential of the virus. PMID:8642630

  4. Molecular insights of protein contour recognition with ligand pharmacophoric sites through combinatorial library design and MD simulation in validating HTLV-1 PR inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Chandrabose; Omer, Ankur; Singh, Poonam; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Retroviruses HIV-1 and HTLV-1 are chiefly considered to be the most dangerous pathogens in Homo sapiens. These two viruses have structurally unique protease (PR) enzymes, which are having common function of its replication mechanism. Though HIV PR drugs failed to inhibit HTLV-1 infections, they emphatically emphasise the need for designing new lead compounds against HTLV-1 PR. Therefore, we tried to understand the binding level interactions through the charge environment present in both ligand and protein active sites. The domino effect illustrates that libraries of purvalanol-A are attuned to fill allosteric binding site of HTLV-1 PR through molecular recognition and shows proper binding of ligand pharmacophoric features in receptor contours. Our screening evaluates seven compounds from purvalanol-A libraries, and these compounds' pharmacophore searches for an appropriate place in the binding site and it places well according to respective receptor contour surfaces. Thus our result provides a platform for the progress of more effective compounds, which are better in free energy calculation, molecular docking, ADME and molecular dynamics studies. Finally, this research provided novel chemical scaffolds for HTLV-1 drug discovery. PMID:25335799

  5. Inactivation of human T-cell lymphotropic virus, type III by heat, chemicals, and irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Quinnan, G.V. Jr.; Wells, M.A.; Wittek, A.E.; Phelan, M.A.; Mayner, R.E.; Feinstone, S.; Purcell, R.H.; Epstein, J.S.

    1986-09-01

    Infectivity of human T-cell lymphotropic virus, Type III (HTLV-III) was inactivated by heat more rapidly if in liquid medium than if lyophilized and more rapidly at 60 than 56/sup 0/C. When HTLV-III was added to factor VIII suspension, then lyophilized and heated at 60/sup 0/C for 2 hours or longer there was elimination of 1 X 10(6) in vitro infectious units (IVIU) of virus. Much of the viral inactivation appeared to result from lyophilization. The application of water-saturated chloroform to the lyophilized material containing virus also resulted in elimination of infectivity. HTLV-III was efficiently inactivated by formalin, beta-propiolactone, ethyl ether, detergent, and ultraviolet light plus psoralen. The results are reassuring regarding the potential safety of various biological products.

  6. Tightly bound zinc in human immunodeficiency virus type 1, human T-cell leukemia virus type I, and other retroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Bess, J W; Powell, P J; Issaq, H J; Schumack, L J; Grimes, M K; Henderson, L E; Arthur, L O

    1992-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) were purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation in the presence of 1 mM EDTA. Pelleted gradient fractions were analyzed for total protein, total Gag capsid protein, and total zinc. Zinc was found to copurify and concentrate with the virus particles. Through successive cycles of resuspending in buffer containing EDTA and repelleting, the zinc content remained constant at about 1.7 mol of zinc per mol of Gag protein. Proteins from purified virus (HIV-1 and HTLV-I) were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, blotted to polyvinylidene fluoride paper, and probed with 65ZnCl2. Viral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins (HIV-1 p7NC and HTLV-I p15NC) bound 65Zn2+. Other retroviruses, including simian immunodeficiency virus, equine infectious anemia virus, bovine leukemia virus, Moloney murine leukemia virus, mouse mammary tumor virus, and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus, were found to contain amounts of zinc per milligram of total protein similar to those found in HIV-1 and HTLV-I. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that retroviral NC proteins function as zinc finger proteins in mature viruses. Images PMID:1731111

  7. The HTLV-I Tax oncoprotein: hyper-tasking at the molecular level.

    PubMed

    Wycuff, Diane R; Marriott, Susan J

    2005-01-01

    HTLV-I is a complex retrovirus that encodes a transcriptional activator, Tax, which regulates expression of the viral promoter. Tax has been shown to be both necessary and sufficient to effect immortalization and transformation of cells in culture and tumorigenesis in animal models. Tax exerts its influence through protein-protein interactions with a variety of molecular targets, including transcription factors and cofactors, histone modifying enzymes and post-translational modifying enzymes. Through these interactions, Tax disrupts cellular regulatory cascades and checkpoints designed to control a variety of systems. The result is untimely activation or repression of gene expression, inappropriate protein modifications, incorrect cell cycling, loss of adequate DNA repair capacity, and potential release of the cell from tumor suppression. Whereas for the virus these functions of Tax provide a means for successful completion of its life cycle, for the cell, they result at best in anarchy, and at worst in death of both the cell and the organism of which that cell is a part. PMID:15569604

  8. Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 antisense-encoded gene, Hbz, promotes T-lymphocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Joshua; Zimmerman, Bevin; Li, Min; Lairmore, Michael D; Green, Patrick L

    2008-11-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) basic leucine zipper factor (HBZ) is dispensable for HTLV-1-mediated cellular transformation in cell culture, but is required for efficient viral infectivity and persistence in rabbits. In most adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cells, Tax oncoprotein expression is typically low or undetectable, whereas Hbz gene expression is maintained, suggesting that Hbz expression may support infected cell survival and, ultimately, leukemogenesis. Emerging data indicate that HBZ protein can interact with cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and Jun family members, altering transcription factor binding and transactivation of both viral and cellular promoters. Herein, lentiviral vectors that express Hbz-specific short hairpin (sh)-RNA effectively decreased both Hbz mRNA and HBZ protein expression in transduced HTLV-1-transformed SLB-1 T cells. Hbz knockdown correlated with a significant decrease in T-cell proliferation in culture. Both SLB-1 and SLB-1-Hbz knockdown cells engrafted into inoculated NOD/SCID(gammachain-/-) mice to form solid tumors that also infiltrated multiple tissues. However, tumor formation and organ infiltration were significantly decreased in animals challenged with SLB-1-Hbz knockdown cells. Our data indicate that Hbz expression enhances the proliferative capacity of HTLV-1-infected T cells, playing a critical role in cell survival and ultimately HTLV-1 tumorigenesis in the infected host. PMID:18689544

  9. Resistance of human T cell leukemia virus type 1 to APOBEC3G restriction is mediated by elements in nucleocapsid

    PubMed Central

    Derse, David; Hill, Shawn A.; Princler, Gerald; Lloyd, Patricia; Heidecker, Gisela

    2007-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has evolved a remarkable strategy to thwart the antiviral effects of the cellular cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G (hA3G). HTLV-1 infects T lymphocytes in vivo, where, like HIV-1, it is likely to encounter hA3G. HIV-1 counteracts the innate antiviral activity of hA3G by producing an accessory protein, Vif, which hastens the degradation of hA3G. In contrast, HTLV-1 does not encode a Vif homologue; instead, HTLV-1 has evolved a cis-acting mechanism to prevent hA3G restriction. We demonstrate here that a peptide motif in the C terminus of the HTLV-1 nucleocapsid (NC) domain inhibits hA3G packaging into nascent virions. Mutation of amino acids within this region resulted in increased levels of hA3G incorporation into virions and increased susceptibility to hA3G restriction. Elements within the C-terminal extension of the NC domain are highly conserved among the primate T cell leukemia viruses, but this extension is absent in all other retroviral NC proteins. PMID:17299050

  10. Physiotherapy for human T-lymphotropic virus 1-associated myelopathy: review of the literature and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Katia N; Macêdo, Maíra C; Andrade, Rosana P; Mendes, Selena D; Martins, José V; Baptista, Abrahão F

    2015-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1) infection may be associated with damage to the spinal cord – HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis – and other neurological symptoms that compromise everyday life activities. There is no cure for this disease, but recent evidence suggests that physiotherapy may help individuals with the infection, although, as far as we are aware, no systematic review has approached this topic. Therefore, the objective of this review is to address the core problems associated with HTLV-1 infection that can be detected and treated by physiotherapy, present the results of clinical trials, and discuss perspectives on the development of knowledge in this area. Major problems for individuals with HTLV-1 are pain, sensory-motor dysfunction, and urinary symptoms. All of these have high impact on quality of life, and recent clinical trials involving exercises, electrotherapeutic modalities, and massage have shown promising effects. Although not influencing the basic pathologic disturbances, a physiotherapeutic approach seems to be useful to detect specific problems related to body structures, activity, and participation related to movement in HTLV-1 infection, as well as to treat these conditions. PMID:25759588

  11. A novel human T-leukemia virus type 1 cell-to-cell transmission assay permits definition of SU glycoprotein amino acids important for infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Delamarre, L; Rosenberg, A R; Pique, C; Pham, D; Dokhélar, M C

    1997-01-01

    Human T-leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) envelope glycoproteins play a major role in viral transmission, which in the case of this virus occurs almost exclusively via cell-to-cell contact. Until very recently, the lack of an HTLV-1 infectivity assay precluded the determination of the HTLV-1 protein domains required for infectivity. Here, we describe an assay which allows the quantitative evaluation of HTLV-1 cell-to-cell transmission in a single round of infection. Using this assay, we demonstrate that in this system, cell-to-cell transmission is at least 100 times more efficient than transmission with free viral particles. We have examined 46 surface (SU) glycoprotein mutants in order to define the amino acids of the HTLV-1 SU glycoprotein required for full infectivity. We demonstrate that these amino acids are distributed along the entire length of the SU glycoprotein, including the N-terminus and C-terminus regions, which have not been previously defined as being important for HTLV-1 glycoprotein function. For most of the mutated glycoproteins, the capacity to mediate cell-to-cell transmission is correlated with the ability to induce formation of syncytia. This result indicates that the fusion capacity is the main factor responsible for infectivity mediated by the HTLV-1 SU envelope glycoprotein, as is the case for other retroviral glycoproteins. However, other factors must also intervene, since two of the mutated glycoproteins were correctly fusogenic but could not mediate cell-to-cell transmission. Existence of this phenotype shows that capacity for fusion is not sufficient to confer infectivity, even in cell-to-cell transmission, and could suggest that postfusion events involve the SU. PMID:8985345

  12. Induction of antibody responses that neutralize human T-cell leukemia virus type I infection in vitro and in vivo by peptide immunization.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Y; Tanaka, R; Terada, E; Koyanagi, Y; Miyano-Kurosaki, N; Yamamoto, N; Baba, E; Nakamura, M; Shida, H

    1994-01-01

    In order to define neutralization regions on the envelope antigen of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I), we have generated a number of new anti-envelope gp46 monoclonal antibodies from rats and mice. Epitopes recognized by new monoclonal antibodies which could neutralize HTLV-I in syncytium and transformation inhibition assays were localized to sequences in gp46 from amino acids 186 to 193, 190 to 195, 191 to 195, 191 to 196, and 194 to 199. Ovalbumin-conjugated synthetic gp46 peptides containing these neutralization epitopes, pep190-199 (a synthetic gp46 peptide containing amino acids 190 to 199) and pep180-204, but not pep185-194 or pep194-203, could give rise to HTLV-I-neutralizing antibody responses in rabbits. These immune or nonimmune rabbits were then challenged with HTLV-I by intravenous inoculation with 5 x 10(7) live HTLV-I-producing ILT-8M2 cells. By a PCR assay, it was revealed that HTLV-I provirus was detected in peripheral blood lymphocytes from nonimmune and pep288-312-immunized rabbits, whereas the provirus was not detected in peripheral blood lymphocytes from pep190-199- and pep180-204-immunized rabbits over an extended period. These results suggest that the induction of anti-gp46 neutralizing antibody responses by immunization with synthetic peptides has the potential to protect animals against HTLV-I infection in vivo. Images PMID:8083972

  13. Molecular cloning of human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type I-like proviral genome from the peripheral lymphocyte DNA of a patient with chronic neurologic disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, E.P.; Mettus, R.V.; DeFreitas, E.; Wroblewska, Z.; Cisco, M.; Koprowski, H. )

    1988-05-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-I), the etiologic agent of human T-cell leukemia, has recently been shown to be associated with neurologic disorders such as tropical spastic paraparesis, HTLV-associated myelopathy, and possibly with multiple sclerosis. In this communication, the authors have examined one specific case of neurologic disorder that can be classified as multiple sclerosis or tropical spastic paraparesis. The patient suffering from chronic neurologic disorder was found to contain antibodies to HTLV-I envelope and gag proteins in his serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Lymphocytes from peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid of the patient were shown to express viral RNA sequences by in situ hybridization. Southern blot analysis of the patient lymphocyte DNA revealed the presence of HTLV-I-related sequences. Blot-hybridization analysis of the RNA from fresh peripheral lymphocytes stimulated with interleukin 2 revealed the presence of abundant amounts of genomic viral RNA with little or no subgenomic RNA. They have clones the proviral genome from the DNA of the peripheral lymphocytes and determined its restriction map. This analysis shows that this proviral genome is very similar if not identical to that of the prototype HTLV-I genome.

  14. Oncogenic Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Tax Suppression of Primary Innate Immune Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Jinhee; Ramos, Juan Carlos; Toomey, Ngoc; Balachandran, Siddharth; Lavorgna, Alfonso; Harhaj, Edward

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus considered to be the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). The viral transactivator Tax is regarded as the oncoprotein responsible for contributing toward the transformation process. Here, we demonstrate that Tax potently inhibits the activity of DEx(D/H) box helicases RIG-I and MDA5 as well as Toll-dependent TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF), which function as cellular sensors or mediators of viral RNA and facilitate innate immune responses, including the production of type I IFN. Tax manifested this function by binding to the RIP homotypic interaction motif (RHIM) domains of TRIF and RIP1 to disrupt interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) activity, a critical type I IFN transcription factor. These data provide further mechanistic insight into HTLV-1-mediated subversion of cellular host defense responses, which may help explain HTLV-1-related pathogenesis and oncogenesis. IMPORTANCE It is predicted that up to 15% of all human cancers may involve virus infection. For example, human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has been reported to infect up to 25 million people worldwide and is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). We show here that HTLV-1 may be able to successfully infect the T cells and remain latent due to the virally encoded product Tax inhibiting a key host defense pathway. Understanding the mechanisms by which Tax subverts the immune system may lead to the development of a therapeutic treatment for HTLV-1-mediated disease. PMID:25694597

  15. Infection with human T-lymphotropic virus types I and II results in alterations of cellular receptors, including the up-modulation of T-cell counterreceptors CD40, CD54, and CD80 (B7-1).

    PubMed Central

    Dezzutti, C S; Rudolph, D L; Lal, R B

    1995-01-01

    To examine the phenotypic alterations associated with human T-lymphotropic virus types I and II (HTLV-I and -II) infection, long-term cell lines (n = 12 HTLV-I cell lines; n = 11 HTLV-II cell lines; n = 6 virus-negative cell lines) were analyzed for the cell surface expression of various lineage markers (i.e., myeloid, progenitor, and leukocyte), integrin receptors, and receptor-counterreceptor (R-CR) pairs responsible for cellular activation. As expected, all cell lines expressed the markers characterizing the leukocyte lineage (CD43, CD44, and CD53). Of the progenitor-myeloid markers examined (CD9, CD13, CD33, CD34, and CD63), only the percent expression of CD9 was significantly increased on HTLV-I and -II-infected cell lines as compared with that on virus-negative cell lines. Analysis of the beta 1 integrin subfamily (CD29, CD49b, CD49d, CD49e, and CD49f) showed no significant change, except that CD49e was significantly decreased on the HTLV-infected cell lines. For the beta 2 integrin subfamily, the cell surface density was increased for CD18 and CD11a, while the CD11c molecule was expressed exclusively on the HTLV-I- and HTLV-II-infected cell lines. Analysis of several R-CR pairs (CD2-CD58, CD45RO-CD22, CD5-CD72, CD11a-CD54, gp39-CD40, and CD28-CD80) demonstrated that comparable levels of expression of the Rs (CD2, CD45RO, CD5, and CD28) and of some of the CRs (CD58, CD22, and CD72) were in all cell lines; however, CD54, CD40, and CD80 were expressed constitutively on the HTLV-I- and HTLV-II-infected cell lines. Functionally, the expression of these R-CR pairs did not appear to affect the autologous proliferation since monoclonal antibodies to these R-CR pairs were not able to inhibit proliferation of the infected cell lines. Taken together, our results indicate that HTLV-I and -II can modulate the expression of several T-cell activation molecules and CRs normally expressed on alternate cell types. PMID:7545080

  16. Intracellular Distribution of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Gag Proteins Is Independent of Interaction with Intracellular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Isabelle; Blot, Vincent; Bouchaert, Isabelle; Salamero, Jean; Goud, Bruno; Rosenberg, Arielle R.; Dokhélar, Marie-Christine

    2002-01-01

    Retrovirus Gag proteins are synthesized on free ribosomes, and are sufficient to govern the assembly and release of virus particles. Like type C retroviruses, human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) assembles and buds at the plasma membrane. After immunofluorescence staining, HTLV-1 Gag proteins appear as punctuated intracellular clusters, which suggests that they are associated either with intracellular membranes or with the plasma membrane. However, colocalization experiments using a panel of markers demonstrated that Gag proteins were not associated with the membranes involved in the secretory or endocytosis pathway. Small amounts of Gag proteins were detected at the plasma membrane and colocalized with the envelope glycoproteins. Moreover, Gag proteins were excluded from streptolysin-O permeabilized cells and in this respect behaved like cytoplasmic proteins. This suggests that the trafficking of HTLV-1 Gag proteins through the cytoplasm of the host cell is independent of any cell membrane system. PMID:11752179

  17. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III infection in a cohort of homosexual men in New York City

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, C.E.; Taylor, P.E.; Zang, E.A.; Morrison, J.M.; Harley, E.J.; de Cordoba, S.R.; Bacino, C.; Ting, R.C.; Bodner, A.J.; Sarngadharan, M.G.; Gallo, R.C.

    1986-04-25

    Using blood samples collected since 1978, the authors investigated the epidemiology of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III), the etiologic agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, in a group of 378 homosexually active men who have resided in New York City since the acquire immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic began. The anti-HTLV-III prevalence was 6.6% in sera from 1978 or 1979, and the subsequent annual incidence of seroconversion among susceptible men ranged between 5.5% and 10.6%. The highest incidences were in recent years, even though these men reported a decrease in their sexual activity during this time. These data demonstrate the continuing risk of HTLV-III infections in the homosexual population studied and emphasize the need for more effective prevention of transmission. The year during which antibody was first present was the only factor identified that was associated with altered cell-mediated immunity in antibody-positive men.

  18. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus in volunteer blood donors.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P E; Stevens, C E; Pindyck, J; Schrode, J; Steaffens, J W; Lee, H

    1990-01-01

    Serum samples collected in 1985 and 1986 from 18,257 donors to the Greater New York Blood Program were screened by enzyme-linked immunoassay for antibody to human T-cell lymphotropic virus (anti-HTLV). Fifteen samples (0.08%) were confirmed positive: 7 by radioimmunoprecipitation assay (RIPA) alone, 6 by Western blot alone, and 2 by combined results from both tests. One donor, whose original test result was uninterpretable because multiple nonspecific bands were present on RIPA, clearly tested positive on subsequent specimens. Follow-up testing of individuals with this type of result may be needed to resolve their HTLV status. Anti-HTLV prevalence increased with age and was significantly more common in black or Hispanic donors and in those born in the Caribbean than in other donors. All anti-HTLV-positive donors were negative for antibody to HIV-1, and only one donor (7% of those positive) would have been excluded by any of the routine donor screening tests used at that time. PMID:2173176

  19. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 tax dysregulates beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Mariko; Kikuchi, Akira; Akiyama, Tetsu; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Mori, Naoki

    2006-11-01

    Dysregulation of beta-catenin signaling has been implicated in the malignant transformation of cells. However, the role of beta-catenin in the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-induced transformation of T cells is unknown. Here we found that beta-catenin protein was overexpressed in the nucleus and that beta-catenin-dependent transcription was significantly enhanced in Tax-positive HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines compared to that in Tax-negative HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines. Transfection with beta-catenin-specific small interfering RNA inhibited the growth of the Tax-positive HTLV-1-infected T-cell line HUT-102. Transient transfection of Tax appeared to enhance beta-catenin-dependent transcription by stabilizing the beta-catenin protein via activation of the cyclic AMP (cAMP) response element-binding protein. HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines overexpressing beta-catenin also showed increased Akt activity via Tax activation of the cAMP response element-binding protein, resulting in the phosphorylation and inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta, which phosphorylates beta-catenin for ubiquitination. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 reduced beta-catenin expression in Tax-positive T-cell lines, and inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta by lithium chloride restored beta-catenin expression in Tax-negative T-cell lines. Finally, we showed that dominant-negative Akt inhibited Tax-induced beta-catenin-dependent transcription. These results indicate that Tax activates beta-catenin through the Akt signaling pathway. Our findings suggest that activation of beta-catenin by Tax may be important in the transformation of T cells by HTLV-1 infection. PMID:16920823

  20. Mechanisms of leukemogenesis induced by bovine leukemia virus: prospects for novel anti-retroviral therapies in human

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Nicolas; Florins, Arnaud; Boxus, Mathieu; Burteau, Catherine; Nigro, Annamaria; Vandermeers, Fabian; Balon, Hervé; Bouzar, Amel-Baya; Defoiche, Julien; Burny, Arsène; Reichert, Michal; Kettmann, Richard; Willems, Luc

    2007-01-01

    In 1871, the observation of yellowish nodules in the enlarged spleen of a cow was considered to be the first reported case of bovine leukemia. The etiological agent of this lymphoproliferative disease, bovine leukemia virus (BLV), belongs to the deltaretrovirus genus which also includes the related human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). This review summarizes current knowledge of this viral system, which is important as a model for leukemogenesis. Recently, the BLV model has also cast light onto novel prospects for therapies of HTLV induced diseases, for which no satisfactory treatment exists so far. PMID:17362524

  1. SMYD3 interacts with HTLV-1 Tax and regulates subcellular localization of Tax.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Keiyu; Ishida, Takaomi; Nakano, Kazumi; Yamagishi, Makoto; Yamochi, Tadanori; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Furukawa, Yoichi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2011-01-01

    HTLV-1 Tax deregulates signal transduction pathways, transcription of genes, and cell cycle regulation of host cells, which is mainly mediated by its protein-protein interactions with host cellular factors. We previously reported an interaction of Tax with a histone methyltransferase (HMTase), SUV39H1. As the interaction was mediated by the SUV39H1 SET domain that is shared among HMTases, we examined the possibility of Tax interaction with another HMTase, SMYD3, which methylates histone H3 lysine 4 and activates transcription of genes, and studied the functional effects. Expression of endogenous SMYD3 in T cell lines and primary T cells was confirmed by immunoblotting analysis. Co-immuno-precipitaion assays and in vitro pull-down assay indicated interaction between Tax and SMYD3. The interaction was largely dependent on the C-terminal 180 amino acids of SMYD3, whereas the interacting domain of Tax was not clearly defined, although the N-terminal 108 amino acids were dispensable for the interaction. In the cotransfected cells, colocalization of Tax and SMYD3 was indicated in the cytoplasm or nuclei. Studies using mutants of Tax and SMYD3 suggested that SMYD3 dominates the subcellular localization of Tax. Reporter gene assays showed that nuclear factor-κB activation promoted by cytoplasmic Tax was enhanced by the presence of SMYD3, and attenuated by shRNA-mediated knockdown of SMYD3, suggesting an increased level of Tax localization in the cytoplasm by SMYD3. Our study revealed for the first time Tax-SMYD3 direct interaction, as well as apparent tethering of Tax by SMYD3, influencing the subcellular localization of Tax. Results suggested that SMYD3-mediated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Tax provides one base for the pleiotropic effects of Tax, which are mediated by the interaction of cellular proteins localized in the cytoplasm or nucleus. PMID:21054678

  2. Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax inhibits innate antiviral signaling via NF-kappaB-dependent induction of SOCS1.

    PubMed

    Charoenthongtrakul, Soratree; Zhou, Qinjie; Shembade, Noula; Harhaj, Nicole S; Harhaj, Edward W

    2011-07-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) inhibits host antiviral signaling pathways although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here we found that the HTLV-1 Tax oncoprotein induced the expression of SOCS1, an inhibitor of interferon signaling. Tax required NF-κB, but not CREB, to induce the expression of SOCS1 in T cells. Furthermore, Tax interacted with SOCS1 in both transfected cells and in HTLV-1-transformed cell lines. Although SOCS1 is normally a short-lived protein, in the presence of Tax, the stability of SOCS1 was greatly increased. Accordingly, Tax enhanced the replication of a heterologous virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), in a SOCS1-dependent manner. Surprisingly, Tax required SOCS1 to inhibit RIG-I-dependent antiviral signaling, but not the interferon-induced JAK/STAT pathway. Inhibition of SOCS1 by RNA-mediated interference in the HTLV-1-transformed cell line MT-2 resulted in increased IFN-β expression accompanied by reduced HTLV-1 replication and p19(Gag) levels. Taken together, our results reveal that Tax inhibits antiviral signaling, in part, by hijacking an interferon regulatory protein. PMID:21593151

  3. Human T-Lymphotropic Virus-1 Associated with Adult T-Cell Lymphoma/ Leukemia and Generalized Expansion of Palatal and Jaw Bones: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dalirsani, Zohreh; Javadzade Bolouri, Abbas; Delavarian, Zahra; Bidad, Salma; Sanatkhani, Majid; Amirchaghmaghi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1) can cause adult T-cell leukemia/ lymphoma (ATL/L), which is a rare and aggressive type of blood cancer. Herein, we report a case of ATL/L in a middle-aged man with unusual jaw presentations. The patient presented with mandibular, maxillary and palatal bony hard expansion, accompanied by generalized tooth mobility six months prior to admission to the Department of Oral Medicine. The panoramic radiograph showed generalized rarefaction of jaw bones. After laboratory examinations and bone marrow aspiration, ATL/L was diagnosed in association with HTLV-1. The patient underwent chemotherapy. Although the majority of infections associated with HTLV-1 are asymptomatic, some patients may develop blood diseases such as ATL/L and neurological disorders, mainly HTLV-1 associated myelopathy and tropical spastic paraparesis. ATL/L is a rare hematological malignancy in oral cavity that should be included in the differential diagnosis of cases with jaw swelling or generalized demineralization. Serum levels of anti-HTLV-1 antibodies should be examined in suspicious patients, particularly in endemic regions. PMID:26331152

  4. Serological evaluation of Escherichia coli-expressed human T-cell leukemia virus type I env, gag p24, and tax proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Coates, S R; Harris, A J; Parkes, D L; Smith, C M; Liu, H L; Akita, R W; Ferrer, M M; Sampson, E K; Brandis, J W; Sliwkowski, M X

    1990-01-01

    Three proteins (env, gag, and tax) encoded by the human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) genome were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The env protein contained a substantial part of the gp46 domain and a majority of the p21e domain. The gag protein contained all of p24 and portions of p19 and p15. In addition to these two structural proteins, a full-length tax (p40X) construct was obtained. All three recombinant proteins were purified to near homogeneity. When used in an immunoblot assay, the three recombinant proteins detected antibodies in more HTLV-I antibody-positive patient sera than did the corresponding native proteins. Antibodies to at least two of these three different gene products were detected in 98.4% of adult T-cell leukemia patients, 100% of HTLV-I-associated myelopathy patients, 97.4% of asymptomatic carriers, and 94% of uncharacterized HTLV-I-positive patients. Antibody to recombinant tax was found in 4.9% of adult T-cell leukemia patients, whereas antibody to recombinant env could not be detected. These recombinant proteins from three different gene products may be useful in detecting or confirming the presence of antibodies to HTLV-I. Images PMID:2199486

  5. HTLV-1 positive and negative T cells cloned from infected individuals display telomerase and telomere genes deregulation that predominate in activated but untransformed CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Zane, Linda; Sibon, David; Capraro, Valérie; Galia, Perrine; Karam, Maroun; Delfau-Larue, Marie-Hélène; Gilson, Eric; Gessain, Antoine; Gout, Olivier; Hermine, Olivier; Mortreux, Franck; Wattel, Eric

    2012-08-15

    Untransformed HTLV-1 positive CD4(+) cells from infected individuals are selected for expressing tax and displaying morphological features consistent with telomere dysfunctions. We show that in resting HTLV-1 positive CD4(+) cells cloned from patients, hTERT expression parallels tax expression and cell cycling. Upon activation, these cells dramatically augment tax expression, whereas their increase in telomerase activity is about 20 times lower than that of their uninfected counterpart. Activated HTLV-1 positive CD4(+) but not uninfected CD4(+) or CD8(+) clones also repress the transcription of TRF1, TPP1, TANK1, POT1, DNA-PKc and Ku80. Both infected and uninfected lymphocytes from infected individuals shared common telomere gene deregulations toward a pattern consistent with premature senescence. ATLL cells displayed the highest telomerase activity (TA) whereas recovered a telomere gene transcriptome close to that of normal CD4(+) cells. In conclusion HTLV-1-dependent telomere modulations seem involved in clonal expansion, immunosuppression, tumor initiation and progression. PMID:21717459

  6. HTLV-1-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis Is Not Associated with SNP rs12979860 of the IL-28B Gene.

    PubMed

    Vallinoto, Antonio C R; Santana, Bárbara Brasil; Sá, Keyla S G; Ferreira, Tuane C S; Sousa, Rita Catarina M; Azevedo, Vânia N; Feitosa, Rosimar N M; Machado, Luiz Fernando A; Ishak, Marluísa O G; Ishak, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the association between the rs12979860 polymorphism in the IL-28B gene and HTLV-1 infection as well as the development of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). HTLV-1-infected patients (26 HAM/TSP symptomatic and 53 asymptomatic) and 300 seronegative healthy controls were investigated. Plasma levels of the cytokines TNF-α, TNF-β, IL-8, IL-10, IL-6, and IFN-γ from infected patients were measured using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The HTLV proviral load was measured using a real-time PCR assay, and T-cell subset counts were determined by flow cytometry. Real-time PCR was used to genotype the rs12979860 SNP. The allelic and genotypic distributions displayed no significant differences among the investigated groups. No significant association between the serum cytokine levels and the presence of the rs12979860 SNP in symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects was observed. A positive correlation (p = 0.0015) between TNF-β and IFN-γ was observed in the asymptomatic group, but a positive correlation was only observed (p = 0.0180) between TNF-α and IL-6 in the HAM/TSP group. The proviral load was significantly higher in HAM/TSP patients than in asymptomatic subjects. The present results do not support a previous report indicating an association between the SNP rs12979860 and HAM/TSP outcome. PMID:26609200

  7. Impairment of the humoral and CD4(+) T cell responses in HTLV-1-infected individuals immunized with tetanus toxoid.

    PubMed

    Souza, Anselmo; Santos, Silvane; Carvalho, Lucas P; Grassi, Maria Fernanda R; Carvalho, Edgar M

    2016-08-01

    T cells from HTLV-1-infected individuals have a decreased ability to proliferate after stimulation with recall antigens. This abnormality may be due to the production of regulatory cytokine or a dysfunctional antigen presentation. The aims of this study were to evaluate the antibody production and cytokine expression by lymphocytes before and after immunization with tetanus toxoid (TT) and to evaluate the immune response of monocytes after stimulation with TT and frequency of dendritic cells (DC) subsets. HTLV-1 carriers (HC) and uninfected controls (UC) with negative serology for TT were immunized with TT, and the antibody titers were determined by ELISA as well as the cell activation markers expression by monocytes. The frequencies of DC subsets were determined by flow cytometry. Following immunization, the IgG anti-TT titers and the frequency of CD4(+) T cells expressing IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-10 in response to TT were lower in the HC than in the UC. Additionally, monocytes from HC did not exhibit increased HLA-DR expression after stimulation with TT, and presented low numbers of DC subsets, therefore, it's necessary to perform functional studies with antigen-presenting cells. Collectively, our finding suggests that HC present an impairment of the humoral and CD4(+) T cell immune responses after vaccination. PMID:27282836

  8. HTLV-III/LAV Viral Antigens in Lymph Nodes of Homosexual Men With Persistent Generalized Lymphadenopathy and AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Tenner-Racz, Klara; Racz, P.; Bofill, Margarita; Schulz-Meyer, Anke; Dietrich, M.; Kern, P.; Weber, J.; Pinching, A. J.; Veronese-Dimarzo, Fulvia; Popovic, M.; Klatzmann, D.; Gluckman, J. C.; Janossy, G.

    1986-01-01

    The presence of core antigens of retrovirus HTLV-III/LAV, referred to as “AIDS-related virus” (AV), has been sought in lymph node samples of patients with persistent generalized lymphadenopathy (PGL, 28 patients), prodromal AIDS (1 patient) and AIDS with Kaposi sarcoma (3 patients). In 30 patients the deposition of viral antigens, detected by monoclonal antibodies to HTLV-III and LAV, could be observed within the germinal centers (GCs) primarily within the extracellular network of immune complexes, and the two patients who were negative were atypical. No AV could be found in normal tonsil or in samples with follicular hyperplasia of unknown etiology (20 cases). These findings, taken together with the ultrastructural identification of typical retrovirus particles in all 9 PGL and 2 AIDS cases studied, indicates that the network of follicular dendritic (FD) cells is an important reservoir of AV virus antigen at this site. The persistence of this retrovirus inside the GCs helps explain how the follicular hyperplasia affecting FD cells and B blasts in PGL may in progressive cases be accompanied by destruction of FD cells and gradual development of T4+ lymphopenia. T4+ T cells may circulate through the GCs and become infected with AV there. In addition, the identification of retrovirus antigen in situ may be of diagnostic value. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:3008562

  9. Peptidylproline cis-trans-Isomerase Pin1 Interacts with Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Tax and Modulates Its Activation of NF-κB▿

    PubMed Central

    Peloponese, Jean-Marie; Yasunaga, Junichiro; Kinjo, Takao; Watashi, Koichi; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2009-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus etiologically causal of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). The virus encodes a Tax oncoprotein that functions in transcriptional regulation, cell cycle control, and transformation. ATL is a highly virulent cancer that is resistant to chemotherapeutic treatments. To understand this disease better, it is important to comprehend how HTLV-1 promotes cellular growth and survival. Tax activation of NF-κB is important for the proliferation and transformation of virus-infected cells. We show here that prolyl isomerase Pin1 is over expressed in HTLV-1 cell lines; Pin1 binds Tax and regulates Tax-induced NF-κB activation. PMID:19158244

  10. Human T cell lymphotropic virus type I genomic expression and impact on intracellular signaling pathways during neurodegenerative disease and leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yao, J; Wigdahl, B

    2000-01-01

    HTLV-I has been identified as the etiologic agent of neoplasia within the human peripheral blood T lymphocyte population, and a progressive neurologic disorder based primarily within the central nervous system. We have examined the role of HTLV-I in these two distinctly different clinical syndromes by examining the life cycle of the virus, with emphasis on the regulation of viral gene expression within relevant target cell populations. In particular, we have examined the impact of specific viral gene products, particularly Tax, on cellular metabolic function. Tax is a highly promiscuous and pleiotropic viral oncoprotein, and is the most important factor contributing to the initial stages of viral-mediated transformation of T cells after HTLV-I infection. Tax, which weakly binds to Tax response element 1 (TRE-1) in the viral long terminal repeat (LTR), can dramatically trans-activate viral gene expression by interacting with cellular transcription factors, such as activated transcription factors and cyclic AMP response element binding proteins (ATF/CREB), CREB binding protein (CBP/p300), and factors involved with the basic transcription apparatus. At the same time, Tax alters cellular gene expression by directly or indirectly interacting with a variety of cellular transcription factors, cell cycle control elements, and cellular signal transduction molecules ultimately resulting in dysregulated cell proliferation. The mechanisms associated with HTLV-I infection, leading to tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP) are not as clearly resolved. Possible explanations of viral-induced neurologic disease range from central nervous system (CNS) damage caused by direct viral invasion of the CNS to bystander CNS damage caused by the immune response to HTLV-I infection. It is interesting to note that it is very rare for an HTLV-I infected individual to develop both adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and TSP in his/her life time, suggesting that the mechanisms governing development of these

  11. Effect of p40tax trans-activator of human T cell lymphotropic virus type I on expression of autoantigens.

    PubMed

    Banki, K; Ablonczy, E; Nakamura, M; Perl, A

    1994-03-01

    The possibility of a retroviral etiology has long been raised in a number of autoimmune disorders. More recently, Sjögren's syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis were noted in transgenic mice carrying the tax gene of human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I). To evaluate the involvement of HTLV-I Tax in autoimmunity, its effect on expression of autoantigens was investigated. A metallothionein promoter-driven p40tax expression plasmid, pMAXRHneo-1, was stably transfected into Molt4 and Jurkat cells and the p40tax protein was induced with CdCl2. trans-Activation or trans-repression of autoantigens by HTLV-I Tax was studied by Western blot analysis utilizing autoantigen-specific murine monoclonal and rabbit polyvalent antibodies as well as sera from 161 autoimmune patients. Induction of p40tax of HTLV-I had no significant effect on levels of expression of common autoantigens U1 snRNP, Sm, Ro, La, HSP-70, topoisomerase I/Scl70, PCNA, and HRES-1. Expression of two potentially novel autoantigens, 44 and 46 kDa, was induced by p40tax as detected by sera of progressive systemic sclerosis patients, BAK and VAR. By contrast, expression of 24- and 34-kDa proteins was suppressed in response to induction of p40tax as detected by sera of systemic lupus erythematosus patients PUS and HOR. Because none of these patients were infected by HTLV-I, a protein functionally similar to p40tax may be involved in eliciting autoantigen expression and a subsequent autoantibody response in a minority of patients with PSS and SLE. Sera of autoimmune patients may also be utilized to detect novel proteins trans-activated or trans-repressed by p40tax of HTLV-I. PMID:8018391

  12. Evidence for a post-Columbian introduction of human T-cell lymphotropic virus [type I] [corrected] in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Van Dooren, S; Gotuzzo, E; Salemi, M; Watts, D; Audenaert, E; Duwe, S; Ellerbrok, H; Grassmann, R; Hagelberg, E; Desmyter, J; Vandamme, A M

    1998-11-01

    To investigate the origin and dissemination of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I in Latin America, we performed phylogenetic analysis on the LTR and env sequences of 13 HTLV-I isolates from Peruvians of four different ethnic groups: blacks and some mulattos of African origin; Quechuas of Inca origin; Nikkei of Japanese descendance; and Mestizos, a mixed population of white and Indian origin. All Peruvian samples could be situated within the cosmopolitan subtype HTLV-Ia, yet one sample showed an indeterminate Western blot pattern, lacking reactivity towards the HTLV-I type specific MTA1 peptide. Within the LTR, we could confirm the previously reported subdivision into four subgroups--one big transcontinental clade A, a Japanese clade B, a West African/Caribbean clade C and a North African clade D--and we identified a new separate subgroup E of black Peruvian strains. The clustering of the Peruvian samples seemed to depend on the ethnic origin of the host. The largest heterogeneity was observed in the black Peruvian samples. The mitochondrial DNA type of one of these black Peruvian strains of subgroup E was identical to that of West African source populations of the slave trade. Both findings support the idea of multiple post-Columbian introductions of African HTLV-Ia strains into the black Latin American population. Additionally, a tight cluster of Nikkei and Japanese samples implied a separate and rather recent transmission of a Japanese lineage of HTLV-I into Peru. A well-supported cluster of Latin American strains (including Peruvian Quechuas and Colombian Amerindians) could be situated within the transcontinental group. Molecular clock analysis of the Latin American and Japanese clade resulted in an equal evolutionary rate for those strains. Along with the anthropologically documented peopling of the Americas, the analysis was more in favour of a recent (400 to 100 years ago) introduction of HTLV-Ia into the American continent rather than a Palaeolithic

  13. Prospective study of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to influenza and antibodies to human T lymphotropic virus-III in homosexual men. Selective loss of an influenza-specific, human leukocyte antigen-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte response in human T lymphotropic virus-III positive individuals with symptoms of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, G M; Salahuddin, S Z; Markham, P D; Joseph, L J; Payne, S M; Kriebel, P; Bernstein, D C; Biddison, W E; Sarngadharan, M G; Gallo, R C

    1985-01-01

    Peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) from 18 homosexual men who did not have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and from 9 heterosexual men were repetitively tested for their ability to generate HLA self-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to influenza virus (flu-self) over a 2-yr period. The sera of the same donors were tested for antibodies to human T lymphotropic virus-III (HTLV-III). Six of the homosexual and none of the heterosexual donors consistently generated weak cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to flu-self. Seven of the homosexual and none of the heterosexual donors were seropositive for antibodies to HTLV-III. No obvious correlation was detected between weak flu-self cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses and antibodies to HTLV-III. However, one homosexual donor generated no detectable cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity to flu-self, although he was a strong responder to HLA-alloantigens. This donor had an OKT4:OKT8 ratio of 0.4 and was seropositive for HTLV-III antigens; HTLV-III virus was identified in his PBL; and he developed AIDS during the course of this study. A second donor with lymphadenopathy and who was seropositive for HTLV-III antigens exhibited marginal cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity to flu-self which he subsequently lost. PBL from two patients, one with Kaposi's sarcoma and one with generalized lymphadenopathy, were also tested for cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to flu-self and to alloantigens. Both donors failed to generate cytotoxic T lymphocyte to flu-self, but generated strong cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to alloantigens. The selective loss of an HLA-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte response without loss of HLA alloantigenic cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity may be an important functional immunologic characteristic in the development of AIDS. PMID:2997287

  14. Serological responses in chimpanzees inoculated with human immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein (gp120) subunit vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, L.O.; Pyle, S.W.; Nara, P.L.; Bess, J.W. Jr.; Gonda, M.A.; Kelliher, J.C.; Gilden, R.V.; Robey, W.G.; Bolognesi, D.P.; Gallo, R.C.

    1987-12-01

    The major envelope glycoprotein of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been purified and was utilized as a prototype vaccine in chimpanzees. The 120,000-dalton glycoprotein (gp120) was purified from membranes of human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-IIIB-infected cells and the final preparation contained low levels to no detectable HTLV-IIIB core antigen (p24) and low levels of endotoxin. Chimpanzees inoculated with gp120 responded by developing antibodies that precipitated radiolabeled gp120 and neutralized in vitro infection of HTLV-IIIB. Antibodies to HTLV-IIIB p24 were not detected in the gp120-immunized chimpanzees. Peripheral blood leukocytes from the vaccinated animals were examined for T4/sup +/ and T8/sup +/ cells, and no decrease in the T4/T8 ratio was found, indicating that immunization with a ligand (gp120) that binds to T4 has not detectable adverse effect on the population of T4/sup +/ cells. The only current animal model that can be reproducibly infected with HIV is the chimpanzee. Immunization of chimpanzees with HIV proteins will provide an experimental system for testing the effectiveness of prototype vaccines for preventing HIV infection in vivo.

  15. Regulation of expression driven by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and human T-cell leukemia virus type I long terminal repeats in pluripotential human embryonic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Maio, J.; Brown, F.L. )

    1988-04-01

    Human pluripotential embryonic teratocarcinoma cells differentially expressed gene activity controlled by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) long terminal repeats (LTRs) when differentiation was induced by the morphogen all-trans retinoic acid. The alterations occurred after commitment and before the appearance of the multiple cell types characteristic of these pluripotential cells. After commitment, gene activity controlled by the HIV-1 LTR markedly increased, whereas that controlled by the HTLV-I LTR decreased. Steady-state mRNA levels and nuclear run-on transcription indicated that the increased HIV-1-directed activity during differentiation occurred posttranscriptionally, whereas the decreased HTLV-I activity was at the transcriptional level. Phorbol esters did not cause commitment but strongly enhanced expression by both viral LTRs at the transcriptional level. Differentiating cells gradually lost the ability to respond to phorbol ester stimulation. Experiments with a deletion mutant of the HIV-1 LTR suggested that this was due to imposition of negative regulation during differentiation that was not reversed by phorbol ester induction. Cycloheximide, with or without phorbol ester, slightly stimulated HIV-1-directed activity at the transcriptional level and massively increased the amounts of steady-state mRNA by posttranscriptional superinduction. It appeared, however, that new nuclear protein synthesis was required for maximal transcriptional stimulation by phorbol esters. Thus, changing cellular regulatory mechanisms influenced human retrovirus expression during human embryonic cell differentiation.

  16. Median Nerve Somatosensory Evoked Potential in HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Boostani, Reza; Poorzahed, Ali; Ahmadi, Zahra; Mellat, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is a progressive Myelopathy that mainly involves the corticospinal tract. Despite pronounced involvement of the lower limbs, patients also have abnormalities in their upper limbs. So, we studied somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEPs) of the median nerve in HAM/TSP patients to determine the extent of the involvement of the pathway of the central nervous system, especially the cervical spinal cord. Methods In this cross sectional study, 48 patients with HAM/TSP who were referred to Qaem Hospital in Mashhad from October 2010 to October 2011 were evaluated for various indices, including SSEPs of the median nerve for N9, N11, N13, and N20 waveforms and also N11–13 and N13–20 Inter Peak Latency (IPL), severity of disease (based on Osama criteria), disease duration (less or more than 2 years), age, and gender. SPSS software was used for data analysis. The t-test was used for quantitative data, and the chi-squared test was used for the qualitative variables. Results Thirty-four patients (70.2%) were females. The mean age was 45.6 ± 14.2 years. About SSEPs indices of the median nerve, N9 and N11 were normal in all patients, but N13 (50%), N20 (16.7%), IPL11–13 (58.3%), and IPL13–20 (22.9%) were abnormal. No significant relationships were found between age, gender, disease duration, and SSEPs indices (p > 0.05), but IPL11–13 and IPL13–20 had significant relationships with disease disability (p = 0.017 and p = 0.01, respectively). Conclusion Despite the lack of obvious complaints of upper limbs, SSEPs indices of the median nerve from the cervical spinal cord to the cortex were abnormal, which indicated extension of the lesion from the thoracic spinal cord up to the cervical spinal cord and thalamocortical pathways. Also, abnormalities in the cervical spinal cord had a direct correlation with the severity of disability in patients with HAM/TSP. PMID:27382445

  17. Electrophysiological Analysis Shows Dizziness as the First Symptom in Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis

    PubMed Central

    Labanca, Ludimila; Starling, Ana Lúcia Borges; de Sousa-Pereira, Silvio Roberto; Romanelli, Luiz Cláudio Ferreira; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Bárbara de Freitas; Carvalho, Lucas Novaes; Fernandes, Daniele Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dizziness is a symptom in human T cell lymphotropic virus type-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and may occur due to vestibulospinal tract dysfunction. This tract can be assessed by an electrophysiological test called vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP). The aim was to correlate the result of VEMP generated by acoustic stimuli and dizziness in individuals with human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-asymptomatic infection and HAM/TSP. VEMP was recorded from the sternocleidomastoid muscle of 60 HTLV-1-negative adults (60±8 years) and 60 individuals infected with HTLV-1, 30 being asymptomatic (59±8 years) and 30 with HAM/TSP (59±8 years). In all groups, 90% of the participants were women. VEMP was generated by acoustic stimuli (short tone bursts), with an intensity of 118 dBHL and band-pass filter from 10 Hz to 1,500 Hz, and presented 200 stimuli at a frequency of 1,000 Hz with a record time of 60 ms. Of 60 HTLV-1-negative individuals, 14 (23%) reported dizziness; VEMP was normal in all. In the HTLV-1-asymptomatic group, 11(37%) complained of dizziness (p=0.31); VEMP was altered in four (40%) subjects with dizziness and in one (5%) without dizziness (p=0.00). In the group with HAM/TSP, dizziness was reported by 17 (57%) subjects (p=0.002); VEMP was altered in 11 (64%) with dizziness and in 5 (38%) without dizziness (p=0.15). Dizziness without an apparent etiology in HTLV-1-asymptomatic carriers deserves attention in terms of a possible subclinical spinal cord involvement that can be clarified through spinal electrophysiological tests. Damage of the vestibulospinal tract seems to occur in the early stages of HAM/TSP. PMID:25760424

  18. Digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) for the precise quantification of human T-lymphotropic virus 1 proviral loads in peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid of HAM/TSP patients and identification of viral mutations.

    PubMed

    Brunetto, Giovanna S; Massoud, Raya; Leibovitch, Emily C; Caruso, Breanna; Johnson, Kory; Ohayon, Joan; Fenton, Kaylan; Cortese, Irene; Jacobson, Steven

    2014-08-01

    An elevated human T cell lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV)-1 proviral load (PVL) is the main risk factor for developing HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) in HTLV-1 infected subjects, and a high cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) PVL ratio may be diagnostic of the condition. However, the standard method for quantification of HTLV-1 PVL-real-time PCR-has multiple limitations, including increased inter-assay variability in compartments with low cell numbers, such as CSF. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated a novel technique for HTVL-1 PVL quantification, digital droplet PCR (ddPCR). In ddPCR, PCR samples are partitioned into thousands of nanoliter-sized droplets, amplified on a thermocycler, and queried for fluorescent signal. Due to the high number of independent events (droplets), Poisson algorithms are used to determine absolute copy numbers independently of a standard curve, which enables highly precise quantitation. This assay has low intra-assay variability allowing for reliable PVL measurement in PBMC and CSF compartments of both asymptomatic carriers (AC) and HAM/TSP patients. It is also useful for HTLV-1-related clinical applications, such as longitudinal monitoring of PVL and identification of viral mutations within the region targeted by the primers and probe. PMID:24781526

  19. Higher Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Subtype C Proviral Loads Are Associated With Bronchiectasis in Indigenous Australians: Results of a Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Einsiedel, Lloyd; Cassar, Olivier; Goeman, Emma; Spelman, Tim; Au, Virginia; Hatami, Saba; Joseph, Sheela; Gessain, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Background.  We previously suggested that infection with the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) subtype C is associated with bronchiectasis among Indigenous Australians. Bronchiectasis might therefore result from an HTLV-1-mediated inflammatory process that is typically associated with a high HTLV-1 proviral load (PVL). Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 PVL have not been reported for Indigenous Australians. Methods.  Thirty-six Indigenous adults admitted with bronchiectasis from June 1, 2008, to December 31, 2009 were prospectively recruited and matched by age, sex, and ethno-geographic origin to 36 controls. Case notes and chest high-resolution computed tomographs were reviewed, and pulmonary injury scores were calculated. A PVL assay for the HTLV-1c subtype that infects Indigenous Australians was developed and applied to this study. Clinical, radiological, and virological parameters were compared between groups and according to HTLV-1 serostatus. Results.  Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 infection was the main predictor of bronchiectasis in a multivariable model (adjusted risk ratio [aRR], 1.84; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19–2.84; P = .006). Moreover, the median HTLV-1c PVL (interquartile range) for cases was >100-fold that of controls (cases, 0.319 [0.007, 0.749]; controls, 0.003 [0.000, 0.051] per 100 peripheral blood lymphocytes; P = .007), and HTLV-1c PVL were closely correlated with radiologically determined pulmonary injury scores (Spearman's rho = 0.7457; P = .0000). Other predictors of bronchiectasis were positive Strongyloides serology (aRR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.13–2.53) and childhood skin infections (aRR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.07–2.44). Bronchiectasis was the major predictor of death (aRR, 2.71; 95% CI, 1.36–5.39; P = .004). Conclusions.  These data strongly support an etiological association between HTLV-1 infection and bronchiectasis in a socially disadvantaged population at risk of recurrent lower respiratory tract infections

  20. Familial Transmission of Human T-cell Lymphotrophic Virus: Silent Dissemination of an Emerging but Neglected Infection

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Carlos Araujo; Furtado, Karen Cristini Yumi Ogawa; Ferreira, Louise de Souza Canto; Almeida, Danilo de Souza; Linhares, Alexandre da Costa; Ishak, Ricardo; Vallinoto, Antonio Carlos Rosário; de Lemos, José Alexandre Rodrigues; Martins, Luisa Caricio; Ishikawa, Edna Aoba Yassui; de Sousa, Rita Catarina Medeiros; de Sousa, Maísa Silva

    2013-01-01

    Background HTLV-1 is a retrovirus that causes lymphoproliferative disorders and inflammatory and degenerative diseases of the central nervous system in humans. The prevalence of this infection is high in parts of Brazil and there is a general lack of public health care programs. As a consequence, official data on the transmission routes of this virus are scarce. Objective To demonstrate familial aggregation of HTLV infections in the metropolitan region of Belém, Pará, Brazil. Method A cross-sectional study involving 85 HTLV carriers treated at an outpatient clinic and other family members. The subjects were tested by ELISA and molecular methods between February 2007 and December 2010. Results The prevalence of HTLV was 43.5% (37/85) for families and 25.6% (58/227) for the family members tested (95% CI: 1.33 to 3.79, P = 0.0033). Sexual and vertical transmission was likely in 38.3% (23/60) and 20.4% (29/142) of pairs, respectively (95% CI: 1.25 to 4.69, P = 0.0130). Positivity was 51.3% (20/39) and 14.3% (3/21) in wives and husbands, respectively (95% CI: 0.04 to 0.63, P = 0.0057). By age group, seropositivity was 8.0% (7/88) in subjects <30 years of age and 36.7% (51/139) in those of over 30 years (95% CI: 0.06 to 0.34, P<0.0001). Positivity was 24.1% (7/29) in the children of patients infected with HTLV-2, as against only 5.8% (4/69) of those infected with HTLV-1 (95% CI: 0.05 to 0.72, P = 0.0143). Conclusion The results of this study indicate the existence of familial aggregations of HTLV characterized by a higher prevalence of infection among wives and subjects older than 30 years. Horizontal transmission between spouses was more frequent than vertical transmission. The higher rate of infection in children of HTLV-2 carriers suggests an increase in the prevalence of this virus type in the metropolitan region of Belém. PMID:23785534

  1. Functional changes in astrocytes by human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Akaoka, H; Szymocha, R; Beurton-Marduel, P; Bernard, A; Belin, M F; Giraudon, P

    2001-10-30

    The human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of a chronic progressive myelopathy (TSP/HAM) in which lesions of the central nervous system (CNS) are associated with infiltration of HTLV-1-infected T-cells. In a model that mimics the interaction between glial and T-cells, we show that transient contact with T-lymphocytes chronically infected with HTLV-1 induce profound metabolic alterations in astrocytes. Within the first week post-contact, an overall activation of astrocyte metabolism was observed as assessed by enhanced uptake of glutamate and glucose, and lactate release. In contrast, longer examination showed a reduced astrocytic accumulation of glutamate. The time course of the change in glutamate uptake was in fact biphasic. Previous observations indicated that HTLV-1 protein Tax-1 was involved in this delayed decrease, via the induction of TNF-alpha. The expression of the glial glutamate transporters, GLAST and GLT-1 decreased in parallel. These decreases in glutamate uptake and transporters' expression were associated with an imbalance in the expression of the catabolic enzymes of glutamate, GS and GDH, presumably due to Tax-1. Given the fact that impairment of glutamate management in astrocytes is able to compromise the functional integrity of neurons and oligodendrocytes, our results altogether give new insights into the physiopathology of TSP/HAM. PMID:11520580

  2. Mutational analysis of human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 Tax.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, T M; Minella, A C; Fang, Z Y; Pettiford, S M; Green, P L

    1997-01-01

    A mutational analysis of human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 (HTLV-2) Tax (Tax-2) was performed to identify regions within Tax-2 important for activation of promoters through the CREB/ATF or NF-kappaB/Rel signaling pathway. Tax-2 mutations within the putative zinc-binding region as well as mutations at the carboxy terminus disrupted CREB/ATF transactivation. A single mutation within the central proline-rich region of Tax-2 disrupted the transactivation of the NF-kappaB/Rel pathway. Surprisingly, this mutation, which is thought to be in a separate activation domain, was suppressed by mutations within or around the putative zinc-binding region, suggesting an interaction between these two regions. These analyses indicate that the functional regions or domains important for transactivation through the CREB/ATF or NF-kappaB/Rel signaling pathway are similar, but not identical, in Tax-1 and Tax-2. Identification of these distinct Tax-2 mutants should facilitate comparative biological studies of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 and ultimately lead to the determination of the functional importance of Tax trans-acting capacities in T-lymphocyte transformation by HTLV. PMID:9343258

  3. Phenotypic and Genotypic Comparisons of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptases from Infected T-Cell Lines and Patient Samples▿

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Michael S.; Bodine, Ellen T.; Hill, Shawn; Princler, Gerald; Lloyd, Patricia; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Matsuoka, Masao; Derse, David

    2007-01-01

    It is well established that cell-free infection with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is less efficient than that with other retroviruses, though the specific infectivities of only a limited number of HTLV-1 isolates have been quantified. Earlier work indicated that a postentry step in the infectious cycle accounted for the poor cell-free infectivity of HTLV-1. To determine whether variations in the pol gene sequence correlated with virus infectivity, we sequenced and phenotypically tested pol genes from a variety of HTLV-1 isolates derived from primary sources, transformed cell lines, and molecular clones. The pol genes and deduced amino acid sequences from 23 proviruses were sequenced and compared with 14 previously published sequences, revealing a limited number of amino acid variations among isolates. The variations appeared to be randomly dispersed among primary isolates and proviruses from cell lines and molecular clones. In addition, there was no correlation between reverse transcriptase sequence and the disease phenotype of the original source of the virus isolate. HTLV-1 pol gene fragments encoding reverse transcriptase were amplified from a variety of isolates and were subcloned into HTLV-1 vectors for both single-cycle infection and spreading-infection assays. Vectors carrying pol genes that matched the consensus sequence had the highest titers, and those with the largest number of variations from the consensus had the lowest titers. The molecular clone from CS-1 cells had four amino acid differences from the consensus sequence and yielded infectious titers that were approximately eight times lower than those of vectors encoding a consensus reverse transcriptase. PMID:17287279

  4. T helper cell activation and human retroviral pathogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, K F; Heeney, J L

    1996-01-01

    T helper (Th) cells are of central importance in regulating many critical immune effector mechanisms. The profile of cytokines produced by Th cells correlates with the type of effector cells induced during the immune response to foreign antigen. Th1 cells induce the cell-mediated immune response, while Th2 cells drive antibody production. Th cells are the preferential targets of human retroviruses. Infections with human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) result in the expansion of Th cells by the action of HTLV (adult T-cell leukemia) or the progressive loss of T cells by the action of HIV (AIDS). Both retrovirus infections impart a high-level activation state in the host immune cells as well as systemically. However, diverging responses to this activation state have contrasting effects on the Th-cell population. In HIV infection, Th-cell loss has been attributed to several mechanisms, including a selective elimination of cells by apoptosis. The induction of apoptosis in HIV infection is complex, with many different pathways able to induce cell death. In contrast, infection of Th cells with HTLV-1 affords the cell a protective advantage against apoptosis. This advantage may allow the cell to escape immune surveillance, providing the opportunity for the development of Th-cell cancer. In this review, we will discuss the impact of Th-cell activation and general immune activation on human retrovirus expression with a focus upon Th-cell function and the progression to disease. PMID:8987361

  5. Mouse Models of Human T Lymphotropic Virus Type-1–Associated Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, B.; Niewiesk, S.; Lairmore, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1), the first human retrovirus discovered, is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and a number of lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory conditions including HTLV-1–associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. Development of animal models to study the pathogenesis of HTLV-1–associated diseases has been problematic. Mechanisms of early infection and cell-to-cell transmission can be studied in rabbits and nonhuman primates, but lesion development and reagents are limited in these species. The mouse provides a cost-effective, highly reproducible model in which to study factors related to lymphoma development and the preclinical efficacy of potential therapies against ATL. The ability to manipulate transgenic mice has provided important insight into viral genes responsible for lymphocyte transformation. Expansion of various strains of immunodeficient mice has accelerated the testing of drugs and targeted therapy against ATL. This review compares various mouse models to illustrate recent advances in the understanding of HTLV-1–associated ATL development and how improvements in these models are critical to the future development of targeted therapies against this aggressive T-cell lymphoma. PMID:20442421

  6. HIV-1, HBV, HCV, HTLV, HPV-16/18, and Treponema pallidum Infections in a Sample of Brazilian Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Caroline C.; Georg, Ingebourg; Lampe, Elisabeth; Lewis, Lia; Morgado, Mariza G.; Nicol, Alcina F.; Pinho, Adriana A.; Salles, Regina C. S.; Teixeira, Sylvia L. M.; Vicente, Ana Carolina P.; Viscidi, Raphael P.; Gomes, Selma A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Men who have sex with men (MSM) are more vulnerable to blood-borne infections and/or sexually-transmitted infections (STI). This study was conducted to estimate the prevalences of mono and co-infections of HIV-1 and other blood-borne/STIs in a sample of MSM in Campinas, Brazil. Methods Responding Driven Sampling (RDS) was used for recruitment of MSM. Serum samples collected from 558 MSM were analyzed for the presence of serological markers for HIV-1, HBV, HCV, HTLV, HPV-16/18, and T. pallidum infections. Results The highest prevalences of infection in serum samples were found for HPV-16 and 18 (31.9% and 20.3%, respectively). Approximately 8% of the study population showed infection with HIV-1, and within that group, 27.5% had recently become infected with HIV-1. HBV infection and syphilis were detected in 11.4% and 10% of the study population, respectively, and the rates of HTLV and HCV infection were 1.5% and 1%, respectively. With the exception of HTLV, all other studied infections were usually found as co-infections rather then mono-infections. The rates of co-infection for HCV, HPV-18, and HIV-1 were the highest among the studied infections (100%, 83%, and 85%, respectively). Interestingly, HTLV infection was usually found as a mono-infection in the study group, whereas HCV was found only as a co-infection. Conclusions The present findings highlight the need to educate the MSM population concerning their risk for STIs infections and methods of prevention. Campaigns to encourage vaccination against HBV and HPV could decrease the rates of these infections in MSM. PMID:25083768

  7. Transcriptional activation of JC virus by human T-lymphotropic virus type I Tax protein in human neuronal cell lines.

    PubMed

    Okada, Y; Sawa, H; Tanaka, S; Takada, A; Suzuki, S; Hasegawa, H; Umemura, T; Fujisawa, J; Tanaka, Y; Hall, W W; Nagashima, K

    2000-06-01

    Polyomavirus JC (JCV) causes the human demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). The recent demonstration of cases of PML in association with human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) infection prompted us to examine whether the HTLV-I-encoded regulatory protein Tax activates JCV transcription. By employing a dual luciferase assay, we initially found that the expression of Tax activated the transcriptional potential of both early and late promoters of JCV in human neuronal but not in non-neuronal cells. We subsequently analyzed the mechanism of Tax-induced activation of the JCV promoter in neuronal cells with the following results: 1) the JCV promoter that lacks the NF-kappaB-binding motif could not be activated by Tax; 2) the overexpression of IkappaBalpha abolished Tax-induced transcriptional activation of the JCV promoter; 3) a Tax mutant (M22) lacking the potential for activation via the NF-kappaB pathway did not activate the JCV promoter. Furthermore, Tax enhances the gene expression of JCV T antigen and VP1. We examined mechanisms of the cell-specific activation of the JCV promoter by Tax. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated the presence of Tax-bound protein(s) that were specifically present in non-neuronal cells. This study is the first demonstration of the activation of JCV promoter by HTLV-I Tax in an NF-kappaB-dependent manner. PMID:10828075

  8. Lethal cutaneous disease in transgenic mice conditionally expressing type I human T cell leukemia virus Tax.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hakju; Ogle, Louise; Benitez, Bobby; Bohuslav, Jan; Montano, Mauricio; Felsher, Dean W; Greene, Warner C

    2005-10-21

    Type I human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV-I) is etiologically linked with adult T cell leukemia, an aggressive and usually fatal expansion of activated CD4+ T lymphocytes that frequently traffic to skin. T cell transformation induced by HTLV-I involves the action of the 40-kDa viral Tax transactivator protein. Tax both stimulates the HTLV-I long terminal repeat and deregulates the expression of select cellular genes by altering the activity of specific host transcription factors, including cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)/activating transcription factor, NF-kappaB/Rel, and serum response factor. To study initiating events involved in HTLV-I Tax-induced T cell transformation, we generated "Tet-off" transgenic mice conditionally expressing in a lymphocyte-restricted manner (EmuSR alpha promoter-enhancer) either wild-type Tax or mutant forms of Tax that selectively compromise the NF-kappaB (M22) or CREB/activating transcription factor (M47) activation pathways. Wild-type Tax and M47 Tax-expressing mice, but not M22-Tax expressing mice, developed progressive alopecia, hyperkeratosis, and skin lesions containing profuse activated CD4 T cell infiltrates with evidence of deregulated inflammatory cytokine production. In addition, these animals displayed systemic lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly. These findings suggest that Tax-mediated activation of NF-kappaB plays a key role in the development of this aggressive skin disease that shares several features in common with the skin disease occurring during the preleukemic stage in HTLV-I-infected patients. Of note, this skin disease completely resolved when Tax transgene expression was suppressed by administration of doxycycline, emphasizing the key role played by this viral oncoprotein in the observed pathology. PMID:16105841

  9. Preferential selection of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 provirus lacking the 5' long terminal repeat during oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Maki; Yasunaga, Jun-Ichirou; Taniguchi, Yuko; Tamiya, Sadahiro; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Matsuoka, Masao

    2007-06-01

    In adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cells, a defective human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) provirus lacking the 5' long terminal repeat (LTR), designated type 2 defective provirus, is frequently observed. To investigate the mechanism underlying the generation of the defective provirus, we sequenced HTLV-1 provirus integration sites from cases of ATL. In HTLV-1 proviruses retaining both LTRs, 6-bp repeat sequences were adjacent to the 5' and 3' LTRs. In 8 of 12 cases with type 2 defective provirus, 6-bp repeats were identified at both ends. In five of these cases, a short repeat was bound to CA dinucleotides of the pol and env genes at the 5' end, suggesting that these type 2 defective proviruses were formed before integration. In four cases lacking the 6-bp repeat, short (6- to 26-bp) deletions in the host genome were identified, indicating that these defective proviruses were generated after integration. Quantification indicated frequencies of type 2 defective provirus of less than 3.9% for two carriers, which are much lower than those seen for ATL cases (27.8%). In type 2 defective proviruses, the second exons of the tax, rex, and p30 genes were frequently deleted, leaving Tax unable to activate NF-kappaB and CREB pathways. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor gene, located on the minus strand, is expressed in ATL cells with this defective provirus, and its coding sequences are intact, suggesting its significance in oncogenesis. PMID:17344291

  10. Mechanisms of pathogenesis induced by bovine leukemia virus as a model for human T-cell leukemia virus

    PubMed Central

    Aida, Yoko; Murakami, Hironobu; Takahashi, Masahiko; Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke

    2013-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) make up a unique retrovirus family. Both viruses induce chronic lymphoproliferative diseases with BLV affecting the B-cell lineage and HTLV-1 affecting the T-cell lineage. The pathologies of BLV- and HTLV-induced infections are notably similar, with an absence of chronic viraemia and a long latency period. These viruses encode at least two regulatory proteins, namely, Tax and Rex, in the pX region located between the env gene and the 3′ long terminal repeat. The Tax protein is a key contributor to the oncogenic potential of the virus, and is also the key protein involved in viral replication. However, BLV infection is not sufficient for leukemogenesis, and additional events such as gene mutations must take place. In this review, we first summarize the similarities between the two viruses in terms of genomic organization, virology, and pathology. We then describe the current knowledge of the BLV model, which may also be relevant for the understanding of leukemogenesis caused by HTLV-1. In addition, we address our improved understanding of Tax functions through the newly identified BLV Tax mutants, which have a substitution between amino acids 240 and 265. PMID:24265629

  11. Molecular and cellular correlates of the CIITA-mediated inhibition of HTLV-2 Tax-2 transactivator function resulting in loss of viral replication

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background MHC class II transactivator CIITA inhibits the function of HTLV-2 Tax-2 viral transactivator and, consequently, the replication of the virus in infected cells. Moreover overexpression of the nuclear factor NF-YB, that cooperates with CIITA for the expression of MHC class II genes, results also in inhibition of Tax-2 transactivation. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the cellular and molecular basis of the CIITA-mediated inhibition on Tax-2, and the relative role of NF-YB in this phenomenon. Methods By co-immunoprecipitation of lysates from 293T cells cotransfected with CIITA or fragments of it, and Tax-2 it was assessed whether the two factors interact in vivo. A similar approach was used to assess Tax-2-NF-YB interaction. In parallel, deletion fragments of CIITA were tested for the inhibition of Tax-2-dependent HTLV-2 LTR-luciferase transactivation. Subcellular localization of CIITA and Tax-2 was investigated by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Results CIITA and Tax-2 interact in vivo through at least two independent regions, at the 1-252 N-term and at the 410-1130 C-term, respectively. Interestingly only the 1-252 N-term region mediates Tax-2 functional inhibition. CIITA and Tax-2 are localized both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus, when separately expressed. Instead, when coexpressed, most of Tax-2 colocalize with CIITA in cytoplasm and around the nuclear membrane. The Tax-2 minor remaining nuclear portion also co-localizes with CIITA. Interestingly, when CIITA nucleus-cytoplasm shuttling is blocked by leptomycin B treatment, most of the Tax-2 molecules are also blocked and co-localize with CIITA in the nucleus, suggesting that CIITA-Tax-2 binding does not preclude Tax-2 entry into the nucleus. Finally, the nuclear factor NF-YB, also strongly binds to Tax-2. Notably, although endogenous NF-YB does not inhibit Tax-2-dependent HTLV-2 LTR transactivation, it still binds to Tax-2, and in presence of CIITA, this binding seems to

  12. The pathogenesis of tropical spastic paraparesis/human T-cell leukemia type I-associated myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Casseb, J; Penalva-de-Oliveira, A C

    2000-12-01

    Tropical spastic paraparesis/human T-cell leukemia type I-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM) is caused by a human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) after a long incubation period. TSP/HAM is characterized by a chronic progressive paraparesis with sphincter disturbances, no/mild sensory loss, the absence of spinal cord compression and seropositivity for HTLV-I antibodies. The pathogenesis of this entity is not completely known and involves a multivariable phenomenon of immune system activation against the presence of HTLV-I antigens, leading to an inflammatory process and demyelination, mainly in the thoracic spinal cord. The current hypothesis about the pathogenesis of TSP/HAM is: 1) presence of HTLV-I antigens in the lumbar spinal cord, noted by an increased DNA HTLV-I load; 2) CTL either with their lytic functions or release/production of soluble factors, such as CC-chemokines, cytokines, and adhesion molecules; 3) the presence of Tax gene expression that activates T-cell proliferation or induces an inflammatory process in the spinal cord; 4) the presence of B cells with neutralizing antibody production, or complement activation by an immune complex phenomenon, and 5) lower IL-2 and IFN-gamma production and increased IL-10, indicating drive to a cytokine type 2 pattern in the TSP/HAM subjects and the existence of a genetic background such as some HLA haplotypes. All of these factors should be implicated in TSP/HAM and further studies are necessary to investigate their role in the development of TSP/HAM. PMID:11105090

  13. ANALYSIS OF HUMAN T-CELL LYMPHOTROPIC VIRUS IN CD25-POSITIVE-ANAPLASTIC LARGE CELL LYMPHOMAS IN CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Chioato, Lucimara; Weiss, Lawrence M.; Harrington, William J.; Bacchi, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    T-cell lymphomas are rare in children. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is the most common pediatric mature T-cell lymphoma, accounting for about 10-20% of all pediatric non-Hodgkin lymphoma. ALCL is now recognized as two distinct diseases, i.e., ALCL-ALK-positive (ALCL- ALK+) and ALCL-ALK-negative (ALCL- ALK-); ALK-positive ALCL presents at a younger age and has a better prognosis. The human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus that mainly infects helper T lymphocytes and is linked to the development of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). The other type of lymphoma related to this virus family is hairy cell leukemia (HCL). Both of these neoplasms frequently express CD25 (alpha chain-IL-2 receptor). Recently, it was demonstrated that CD25 is significantly expressed in childhood ALCL (75%). In Brazil, HTLV-1 infection is considered endemic, and vertical transmission is responsible for spread to children, and it is important to point out that 90% or more of the HTLV-1 carriers remain asymptomatic. Some cases of HTLV-1-related lymphomas in adults are described as having characteristics of ALCL, but are considered to be CD30-positive subtypes of ATLL based on the virologic findings. No similar cases have been described in children, therefore we analyzed 33 cases of pediatric ALCL, both CD25-positive and CD25-negative, looking for the presence of proviral HTLV-1 DNA, by PCR. All cases corresponded to the common histological type of ALCL and were CD30-positive in virtually all neoplastic cells. ALK expression was observed in all but two cases (93.9%), while CD25 was positive in 27 cases (82%), including one of the ALCL-ALK-. There was a strong positive correlation between ALK and CD25 expression. None of the cases showed proviral HTLV-1-DNA presence. Our study concludes that ALCL in children has no relationship with HTLV-1 and the high frequency of CD25 expression must be explained by a different mechanism than that described in ATLL. PMID:19864230

  14. Serologic confirmation of simian T-lymphotropic virus type I infection by using immunoassays developed for human T-lymphotropic virus antibody detection.

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, D L; Yee, J; Mone, J; Foung, S K; Lipka, J J; Reyes, G R; Hadlock, K; Chan, L; Villinger, F; Lairmore, M D

    1992-01-01

    Serum specimens from diverse species of Old World monkeys, categorized as seropositive (n = 97) or seronegative (n = 23) for human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) infection, were tested by using recombinant env-spiked Western immunoblot assays and synthetic peptide assays for simultaneous detection and discrimination of simian T-lymphotropic virus (STLV) infection. Of the 97 seropositive specimens, 93 reacted with the recombinant transmembrane (r21env) protein and 90 reacted with a recombinant, MTA-1, derived from the central region of the external glycoprotein of HTLV-I (rgp46env), thus yielding test sensitivities of 96 and 93%, respectively. While 1 of the 23 negative monkey specimens reacted with r21env, none reacted with rgp46env, for overall specificities of 96 and 100%, respectively. Analysis of synthetic peptide-based immunoassays demonstrated that while 85 of 97 (88%) seropositive specimens reacted with HTLV-I-specific epitope (p19gag), none of the specimens reacted with HTLV-II-specific epitope (gp52env). These results show that recombinant envelope-spiked Western blots provide a simple means for serologic confirmation of STLV-I infection and that type-specific synthetic peptides can be used to confirm the virus type in seropositive monkey specimens. Images PMID:1349306

  15. HIRF: a novel nuclear factor that binds to the human T-cell leukemia virus type I internal regulatory element (HIRE).

    PubMed

    Ariumi, Y; Copeland, T D; Nosaka, T; Hatanaka, M

    1997-04-01

    The transcription of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) provirus starts from a promoter located in the 5' long terminal repeat (LTR). We have identified a second promoter at the 3' end of the pol gene. This internal promoter expresses the Tax transactivator protein, but does not require Tax for its activity. Furthermore, we have found the novel enhancer motif AGTTCTGCCC, which are located near the initiation site. We have named the sequence HIRE (HTLV-I internal regulatory element). The HIRE binding protein is a ubiquitous protein. We purified this protein from the HTLV-I producing cell line MT-2 cells by DNA affinity chromatography. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed four major bands (70, 85, 115 and more than 200 kDa) and some minor bands on the gel. We renatured each major protein and showed the 70 and 115 kDa proteins bind to DNA, although the 115 kDa protein seemed to bind nonspecifically. We have designated these components as HIRF (HTLV-I internal regulatory factor). PMID:9209287

  16. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 oncoprotein tax represses ZNF268 expression through the cAMP-responsive element-binding protein/activating transcription factor pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Guo, Ming-Xiong; Hu, Hai-Ming; Zhao, Zhou-Zhou; Qiu, Hong-Ling; Shao, Huan-Jie; Zhu, Chen-Gang; Xue, Lu; Shi, Yun-Bo; Li, Wen-Xin

    2008-06-13

    Expression of the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) oncoprotein Tax is correlated with cellular transformation, contributing to the development of adult T-cell leukemia. In this study, we investigated the role of Tax in the regulation of the ZNF268 gene, which plays a role in the differentiation of blood cells and the pathogenesis of leukemia. We demonstrated that ZNF268 mRNA was repressed in HTLV-1-infected cells. We also showed that stable and transient expression of HTLV-1 Tax led to repression of ZNF268. In addition, by using reporter constructs that bear the human ZNF268 promoter and its mutants, we showed that Tax repressed ZNF268 promoter in a process dependent on a functional cAMP-responsive element. By using Tax, cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)-1, CREB-2, and their mutants, we further showed that Tax repressed ZNF268 through the CREB/activating transcription factor pathway. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated the formation of the complex of Tax.CREB-1 directly at the cAMP-responsive element both in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest a role for ZNF268 in aberrant T-cell proliferation observed in HTLV-1-associated diseases. PMID:18375384

  17. Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Integration Target Sites in the Human Genome: Comparison with Those of Other Retroviruses▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Derse, David; Crise, Bruce; Li, Yuan; Princler, Gerald; Lum, Nicole; Stewart, Claudia; McGrath, Connor F.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Munroe, David J.; Wu, Xiaolin

    2007-01-01

    Retroviral integration into the host genome is not entirely random, and integration site preferences vary among different retroviruses. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prefers to integrate within active genes, whereas murine leukemia virus (MLV) prefers to integrate near transcription start sites and CpG islands. On the other hand, integration of avian sarcoma-leukosis virus (ASLV) shows little preference either for genes, transcription start sites, or CpG islands. While host cellular factors play important roles in target site selection, the viral integrase is probably the major viral determinant. It is reasonable to hypothesize that retroviruses with similar integrases have similar preferences for target site selection. Although integration profiles are well defined for members of the lentivirus, spumaretrovirus, alpharetrovirus, and gammaretrovirus genera, no members of the deltaretroviruses, for example, human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), have been evaluated. We have mapped 541 HTLV-1 integration sites in human HeLa cells and show that HTLV-1, like ASLV, does not specifically target transcription units and transcription start sites. Comparing the integration sites of HTLV-1 with those of ASLV, HIV, simian immunodeficiency virus, MLV, and foamy virus, we show that global and local integration site preferences correlate with the sequence/structure of virus-encoded integrases, supporting the idea that integrase is the major determinant of retroviral integration site selection. Our results suggest that the global integration profiles of other retroviruses could be predicted from phylogenetic comparisons of the integrase proteins. Our results show that retroviruses that engender different insertional mutagenesis risks can have similar integration profiles. PMID:17409138

  18. Studies of retroviral infection in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Matthew D.; Zack, Jerome A.

    2015-01-01

    Many important aspects of human retroviral infections cannot be fully evaluated using only in vitro systems or unmodified animal models. An alternative approach involves the use of humanized mice, which consist of immunodeficient mice that have been transplanted with human cells and/or tissues. Certain humanized mouse models can support robust infection with human retroviruses including different strains of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV). These models have provided wide-ranging insights into retroviral biology, including detailed information on primary infection, in vivo replication and pathogenesis, latent/persistent reservoir formation, and novel therapeutic interventions. Here we describe the humanized mouse models that are most commonly utilized to study retroviral infections, and outline some of the important discoveries that these models have produced during several decades of intensive research. PMID:25680625

  19. Low prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), HIV-2, and human T cell lymphotropic virus-1 infection in Somalia.

    PubMed

    Scott, D A; Corwin, A L; Constantine, N T; Omar, M A; Guled, A; Yusef, M; Roberts, C R; Watts, D M

    1991-12-01

    A seroepidemiologic survey was conducted to determine the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), HIV-2, human T cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I), and Treponema pallidum infection among southern Somalis. Sera were collected from 1,269 study subjects in the urban area of the capital city, Mogadishu, and in the rural towns of Merka, Qoryoley, and Kismayo. The subjects included 57 prostitutes, 79 sexually transmitted disease (STD) patients, and 1,133 others, including outpatient and hospitalized patients with leprosy, tuberculosis, other infectious diseases, individuals from rehabilitation camps and secondary schools, and Ethiopian immigrants. Results indicated that none of the sera were positive for HIV-1 and HIV-2 by Western blot, but one was positive for HTLV-I. The prostitutes had a significantly higher prevalence of treponemal antibody (50.8%; P less than 0.0001) than either the STD patients (12.6%) or the other subjects (5.2%). Epidemiologic data indicated that 94% of the males and females were circumcised and only 2.6% of the males used condoms. Overall, the results of this study suggested a very low prevalence of HIV-1, HIV-2, and HTLV-I infections, especially among prostitutes and STD patients, who were considered at greatest risk of contracting these retroviral infections. PMID:1763791

  20. Dual Simian Foamy Virus/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infections in Persons from Côte d’Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Switzer, William M.; Tang, Shaohua; Zheng, HaoQiang; Shankar, Anupama; Sprinkle, Patrick S.; Sullivan, Vickie; Granade, Timothy C.; Heneine, Walid

    2016-01-01

    Zoonotic transmission of simian retroviruses in West-Central Africa occurring in primate hunters has resulted in pandemic spread of human immunodeficiency viruses (HIVs) and human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLVs). While simian foamy virus (SFV) and simian T- lymphotropic virus (STLV)-like infection were reported in healthy persons exposed to nonhuman primates (NHPs) in West-Central Africa, less is known about the distribution of these viruses in Western Africa and in hospitalized populations. We serologically screened for SFV and STLV infection using 1,529 specimens collected between 1985 and 1997 from Côte d’Ivoire patients with high HIV prevalence. PCR amplification and analysis of SFV, STLV, and HIV/SIV sequences from PBMCs was used to investigate possible simian origin of infection. We confirmed SFV antibodies in three persons (0.2%), two of whom were HIV-1-infected. SFV polymerase (pol) and LTR sequences were detected in PBMC DNA available for one HIV-infected person. Phylogenetic comparisons with new SFV sequences from African guenons showed infection likely originated from a Chlorocebus sabaeus monkey endemic to Côte d’Ivoire. 4.6% of persons were HTLV seropositive and PCR testing of PBMCs from 15 HTLV seroreactive persons identified nine with HTLV-1 and one with HTLV-2 LTR sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that two persons had STLV-1-like infections, seven were HTLV-1, and one was an HTLV-2 infection. 310/858 (53%), 8/858 (0.93%), and 18/858 (2.1%) were HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-positive but undifferentiated by serology, respectively. No SIV sequences were found in persons with HIV-2 antibodies (n = 1) or with undifferentiated HIV results (n = 7). We document SFV, STLV-1-like, and dual SFV/HIV infection in Côte d’Ivoire expanding the geographic range for zoonotic simian retrovirus transmission to West Africa. These findings highlight the need to define the public health consequences of these infections. Studying dual HIV-1/SFV infections in

  1. Dual Simian Foamy Virus/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infections in Persons from Côte d'Ivoire.

    PubMed

    Switzer, William M; Tang, Shaohua; Zheng, HaoQiang; Shankar, Anupama; Sprinkle, Patrick S; Sullivan, Vickie; Granade, Timothy C; Heneine, Walid

    2016-01-01

    Zoonotic transmission of simian retroviruses in West-Central Africa occurring in primate hunters has resulted in pandemic spread of human immunodeficiency viruses (HIVs) and human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLVs). While simian foamy virus (SFV) and simian T- lymphotropic virus (STLV)-like infection were reported in healthy persons exposed to nonhuman primates (NHPs) in West-Central Africa, less is known about the distribution of these viruses in Western Africa and in hospitalized populations. We serologically screened for SFV and STLV infection using 1,529 specimens collected between 1985 and 1997 from Côte d'Ivoire patients with high HIV prevalence. PCR amplification and analysis of SFV, STLV, and HIV/SIV sequences from PBMCs was used to investigate possible simian origin of infection. We confirmed SFV antibodies in three persons (0.2%), two of whom were HIV-1-infected. SFV polymerase (pol) and LTR sequences were detected in PBMC DNA available for one HIV-infected person. Phylogenetic comparisons with new SFV sequences from African guenons showed infection likely originated from a Chlorocebus sabaeus monkey endemic to Côte d'Ivoire. 4.6% of persons were HTLV seropositive and PCR testing of PBMCs from 15 HTLV seroreactive persons identified nine with HTLV-1 and one with HTLV-2 LTR sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that two persons had STLV-1-like infections, seven were HTLV-1, and one was an HTLV-2 infection. 310/858 (53%), 8/858 (0.93%), and 18/858 (2.1%) were HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-positive but undifferentiated by serology, respectively. No SIV sequences were found in persons with HIV-2 antibodies (n = 1) or with undifferentiated HIV results (n = 7). We document SFV, STLV-1-like, and dual SFV/HIV infection in Côte d'Ivoire expanding the geographic range for zoonotic simian retrovirus transmission to West Africa. These findings highlight the need to define the public health consequences of these infections. Studying dual HIV-1/SFV infections in

  2. Phosphorylation of p53: a Novel Pathway for p53 Inactivation in Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1-Transformed Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pise-Masison, Cynthia A.; Radonovich, Michael; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu; Appella, Ettore; Brady, John N.

    1998-01-01

    Inhibition of p53 function, through either mutation or interaction with viral or cellular transforming proteins, correlates strongly with the oncogenic potential. Only a small percentage of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-transformed cells carry p53 mutations, and mutated p53 genes have been found in only one-fourth of adult T-cell leukemia cases. In previous studies, we demonstrated that wild-type p53 is stabilized and transcriptionally inactive in HTLV-1-transformed cells. Further, the viral transcriptional activator Tax plays a role in both the stabilization and inactivation of p53 through a mechanism involving the first 52 amino acids of p53. Here we show for the first time that phosphorylation of p53 inactivates p53 by blocking its interaction with basal transcription factors. Using two-dimensional peptide mapping, we demonstrate that peptides corresponding to amino acids 1 to 19 and 387 to 393 are hyperphosphorylated in HTLV-1-transformed cells. Moreover, using antibodies specific for phosphorylated Ser15 and Ser392, we demonstrate increased phosphorylation of these amino acids. Since HTLV-1 p53 binds DNA in a sequence-specific manner but fails to interact with TFIID, we tested whether phosphorylation of the N terminus of p53 affected p53-TFIID interaction. Using biotinylated peptides, we show that phosphorylation of Ser15 alone inhibits p53-TFIID interaction. In contrast, phosphorylation at Ser15 and -37 restores TFIID binding and blocks MDM2 binding. Our studies provide evidence that HTLV-1 utilizes the posttranslational modification of p53 in vivo to inactivate function of the tumor suppressor protein. PMID:9658074

  3. The combination of IκB kinase β inhibitor and everolimus modulates expression of interleukin-10 in human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1-infected T cells.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Chie; Ikezoe, Takayuki; Yang, Jing; Udaka, Keiko; Yokoyama, Akihito

    2013-03-01

    Adult T-cell leukaemia-lymphoma (ATLL) is an aggressive malignancy of CD4(+)  CD25(+) T lymphocytes, characterized by a severely compromised immunosystem, in which the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has been recognized as the aetiological agent. This study found that an IκB kinase β (IKKβ) inhibitor Bay11-7082 inactivated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and transcription factor nuclear factor-κB in HTLV-1-infected T cells; this was significantly enhanced in the presence of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. In addition, Bay11-7082 decreased production of the immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10), which was further down-regulated when Bay11-7082 was combined with evelolimus in HTLV-1-infected T and ATLL cells isolated from patients. Interleukin-10 is known to inhibit maturation and the antigen-presenting function of dendritic cells (DCs). The culture media of HTLV-1-infected MT-1 cells, which contained a large amout of IL-10, hampered tumour necrosis factor-α-induced maturation of DCs isolated from healthy volunteers. Culture supernatant of MT-1 cells treated with a combination of Bay11-7082 and everolimus augmented maturation of DCs in association with a decrease in production of IL-10 and enhanced the allostimulatory function of DCs. Similarly, when DCs isolated from patients with ATLL were treated with the combination of Bay11-7082 and everolimus, they were fully matured and their capability to stimulate proliferation of lymphocytes was augmented. Taken together, the combination of Bay11-7082 and everolimus might exhibit immunostimulatory properties in HTLV-1-infected T and ATLL cells isolated from patients, and this combination may be potentially therapeutic to regain the compromised immunosystem in ATLL patients. PMID:23278479

  4. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I-associated adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma: new directions in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Tsukasaki, Kunihiro; Tobinai, Kensei

    2014-10-15

    Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) is a distinct malignancy of regulatory T cell (Treg)/TH2 cells caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1), with a high frequency of expression of CD3/CD4/CD25/CCR4 and FoxP3 in about half of the cells. However, in primary ATL cells, although expression of the virus, including the Tax oncoprotein, appears just after an in vitro culture, integration sites of the provirus into the host genome are random, and chromosomal/genetic abnormalities are complex. ATL is thus a single disease entity that is caused by HTLV-1 and possesses diverse molecular features. The clinical features and prognosis of ATL vary, and this has led to subtypes classified into four categories: acute, lymphomatous, chronic, and smoldering types, based on lactate dehydrogenase and calcium values and organ involvement. Approximately 15 to 20 million individuals are infected with HTLV-1 worldwide, 1.1 million of whom reside in Japan, and the annual incidence of ATL has been estimated to be approximately 1,000. HTLV-1 infection early in life, mainly from breast feeding, is crucial for the development of ATL. The age-specific occurrence of ATL and complex genome abnormalities that accumulate with disease progression suggest a multistep carcinogenesis model following HTLV-1 infection. Various treatment options are available for ATL and consist of watchful waiting for indolent ATL, intensive chemotherapy followed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for aggressive ATL, and a combination of IFNα and zidovudine for ATL with leukemic manifestation. Several promising new agents, including an anti-CCR4 antibody, are currently undergoing clinical trials associated with translational research. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Paradigm Shifts in Lymphoma." PMID:25320371

  5. Direct analysis of viral-specific CD8+ T cells with soluble HLA-A2/Tax11-19 tetramer complexes in patients with human T cell lymphotropic virus-associated myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Bieganowska, K; Höllsberg, P; Buckle, G J; Lim, D G; Greten, T F; Schneck, J; Altman, J D; Jacobson, S; Ledis, S L; Hanchard, B; Chin, J; Morgan, O; Roth, P A; Hafler, D A

    1999-02-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus-I (HTLV-I)-associated myelopathy is a slowly progressive neurologic disease characterized by inflammatory infiltrates in the central nervous system accompanied by clonal expansion of HTLV-I-reactive CD8+ T-cells. In patients carrying the HLA-A2 allele, the immune response is primarily directed to the Tax11-19 peptide. The frequency, activation state, and TCR usage of HLA-A2/Tax11-19 binding T cells in patients with HTLV-I-associated myelopathy was determined using MHC class I tetramers loaded with the Tax11-19 peptide. Circulating Tax11-19-reactive T cells were found at very high frequencies, approaching 1:10 circulating CD8+ T cells. T cells binding HLA-A2/Tax11-19 consisted of heterogeneous populations expressing different chemokine receptors and the IL-2R beta-chain but not the IL-2R alpha-chain. Additionally, Tax11-19-reactive CD8+ T cells used one predominant TCR Vbeta-chain for the recognition of the HLA-A2/Tax11-19 complex. These data provide direct evidence for high frequencies of circulating Tax11-19-reactive CD8+ T cells in patients with HTLV-I-associated myelopathy. PMID:9973440

  6. HTLV-1 Tax Functions as a Ubiquitin E3 Ligase for Direct IKK Activation via Synthesis of Mixed-Linkage Polyubiquitin Chains

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong; Long, Wenying; Peng, Chao; Hu, Lin; Zhang, Qiong; Wu, Ailing; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Duan, Xiaotao; Wong, Catherine C. L.; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Xia, Zongping

    2016-01-01

    The HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax plays a key role in CD4+ T cell transformation by promoting cell proliferation and survival, mainly through permanent activation of the NK-κB pathway and induction of many NF-κB target genes. Elucidating the underlying molecular mechanism is therefore critical in understanding HTLV-1-mediated transformation. Current studies have suggested multiple but controversial mechanisms regarding Tax-induced IKK activation mainly due to blending of primary Tax-induced IKK activation events and secondary IKK activation events induced by cytokines secreted by the primary Tax-induced IKK-NF-κB activation events. We reconstituted Tax-stimulated IKK activation in a cell-free system to dissect the essential cellular components for primary IKK activation by Tax and studied the underlying biochemical mechanism. We found that Tax is a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase, which, together with UbcH2, UhcH5c, or UbcH7, catalyzes the assembly of free mixed-linkage polyubiquitin chains. These free mixed-linkage polyubiquitin chains are then responsible for direct IKK activation by binding to the NEMO subunit of IKK. Our studies revealed the biochemical function of Tax in the process of IKK activation, which utilizes the minimal cellular ubiquitination components for NF-κB activation. PMID:27082114

  7. HTLV-1 Tax Functions as a Ubiquitin E3 Ligase for Direct IKK Activation via Synthesis of Mixed-Linkage Polyubiquitin Chains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Long, Wenying; Peng, Chao; Hu, Lin; Zhang, Qiong; Wu, Ailing; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Duan, Xiaotao; Wong, Catherine C L; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Xia, Zongping

    2016-04-01

    The HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax plays a key role in CD4+ T cell transformation by promoting cell proliferation and survival, mainly through permanent activation of the NK-κB pathway and induction of many NF-κB target genes. Elucidating the underlying molecular mechanism is therefore critical in understanding HTLV-1-mediated transformation. Current studies have suggested multiple but controversial mechanisms regarding Tax-induced IKK activation mainly due to blending of primary Tax-induced IKK activation events and secondary IKK activation events induced by cytokines secreted by the primary Tax-induced IKK-NF-κB activation events. We reconstituted Tax-stimulated IKK activation in a cell-free system to dissect the essential cellular components for primary IKK activation by Tax and studied the underlying biochemical mechanism. We found that Tax is a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase, which, together with UbcH2, UhcH5c, or UbcH7, catalyzes the assembly of free mixed-linkage polyubiquitin chains. These free mixed-linkage polyubiquitin chains are then responsible for direct IKK activation by binding to the NEMO subunit of IKK. Our studies revealed the biochemical function of Tax in the process of IKK activation, which utilizes the minimal cellular ubiquitination components for NF-κB activation. PMID:27082114

  8. Efficient Expression and Rapid Purification of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Protease

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Y. Shirley; Owen, Sherry M.; Lal, Renu B.; Ikeda, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an oncovirus that is clinically associated with adult T-cell leukemia. We report here the construction of a pET19-based expression clone containing HTLV-1 protease fused to a decahistidine-containing leader peptide. The recombinant protein is efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli, and the fusion protein can be easily purified by affinity chromatography. Active mature protease in yields in excess of 3 mg/liter of culture can then be obtained by a novel two-step refolding and autoprocessing procedure. The purified enzyme exhibited Km and Kcat values of 0.3 mM and 0.143 sec−1 at pH 5.3 and was inhibited by pepstatin A. PMID:9525666

  9. Interaction of HTLV-1 Tax with minichromosome maintenance proteins accelerates the replication timing program.

    PubMed

    Boxus, Mathieu; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Legros, Sébastien; Kettmann, Richard; Willems, Luc

    2012-01-01

    The Tax oncoprotein encoded by the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 plays a pivotal role in viral persistence and pathogenesis. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-infected cells proliferate faster than normal lymphocytes, expand through mitotic division, and accumulate genomic lesions. Here, we show that Tax associates with the minichromosome maintenance MCM2-7 helicase complex and localizes to origins of replication. Tax modulates the spatiotemporal program of origin activation and fires supplementary origins at the onset of S phase. Thereby, Tax increases the DNA replication rate, accelerates S phase progression, but also generates a replicative stress characterized by the presence of genomic lesions. Mechanistically, Tax favors p300 recruitment and histone hyperacetylation at late replication domains, advancing their replication timing in early S phase. PMID:22058115

  10. Sexually Transmitted Diseases: from HPV to HTLV--clinical profile and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Fabíola Suris da; Bonamigo, Renan Rangel

    2015-01-01

    The Brazilian Ministry of Health recommends the performance of serological tests in patients with clinical signs of Sexually Transmitted Diseases. However, data are lacking to affirm the necessity of testing these patients for human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 or type 2. This is a cross-sectional study with 120 patients seen at the Sexually Transmitted Diseases unit of the Sanitary Dermatology Outpatient Clinic of Rio Grande do Sul. The serum from none of the patients was positive for human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 or type 2. Viral warts were the most frequent diagnosis. Drug use was confirmed as a risk factor and high educational levels were found to be a protective factor against Sexually Transmitted Diseases. PMID:26734881

  11. Application of targeted enrichment to next-generation sequencing of retroviruses integrated into the host human genome

    PubMed Central

    Miyazato, Paola; Katsuya, Hiroo; Fukuda, Asami; Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Matsuo, Misaki; Tokunaga, Michiyo; Hino, Shinjiro; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Satou, Yorifumi

    2016-01-01

    The recent development and advancement of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have enabled the characterization of the human genome at extremely high resolution. In the retrovirology field, NGS technologies have been applied to integration-site analysis and deep sequencing of viral genomes in combination with PCR amplification using virus-specific primers. However, virus-specific primers are not available for some epigenetic analyses, like chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) assays. Viral sequences are poorly detected without specific PCR amplification because proviral DNA is very scarce compared to human genomic DNA. Here, we have developed and evaluated the use of biotinylated DNA probes for the capture of viral genetic fragments from a library prepared for NGS. Our results demonstrated that viral sequence detection was hundreds or thousands of times more sensitive after enrichment, enabling us to reduce the economic burden that arises when attempting to analyze the epigenetic landscape of proviruses by NGS. In addition, the method is versatile enough to analyze proviruses that have mismatches compared to the DNA probes. Taken together, we propose that this approach is a powerful tool to clarify the mechanisms of transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of retroviral proviruses that have, until now, remained elusive. PMID:27321866

  12. Application of targeted enrichment to next-generation sequencing of retroviruses integrated into the host human genome.

    PubMed

    Miyazato, Paola; Katsuya, Hiroo; Fukuda, Asami; Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Matsuo, Misaki; Tokunaga, Michiyo; Hino, Shinjiro; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Satou, Yorifumi

    2016-01-01

    The recent development and advancement of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have enabled the characterization of the human genome at extremely high resolution. In the retrovirology field, NGS technologies have been applied to integration-site analysis and deep sequencing of viral genomes in combination with PCR amplification using virus-specific primers. However, virus-specific primers are not available for some epigenetic analyses, like chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) assays. Viral sequences are poorly detected without specific PCR amplification because proviral DNA is very scarce compared to human genomic DNA. Here, we have developed and evaluated the use of biotinylated DNA probes for the capture of viral genetic fragments from a library prepared for NGS. Our results demonstrated that viral sequence detection was hundreds or thousands of times more sensitive after enrichment, enabling us to reduce the economic burden that arises when attempting to analyze the epigenetic landscape of proviruses by NGS. In addition, the method is versatile enough to analyze proviruses that have mismatches compared to the DNA probes. Taken together, we propose that this approach is a powerful tool to clarify the mechanisms of transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of retroviral proviruses that have, until now, remained elusive. PMID:27321866

  13. [Isolation of LAV/HTLV III from tears of patients with the ARC syndrome].

    PubMed

    Baudouin, C; Laffont, C; Cottalorda, J; De Galleani, B; Gastaud, P; Lefebvre, J C

    1987-01-01

    Isolation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) was attempted from the tears of seven patients with ARC. For two of these patients the fluid from cell cultures showed significant reverse transcriptase activity. One strain was maintained on C.E.M. (T lymphocytes cell line). Indirect fixed cell immuno fluorescence and Western Blot tests have shown this strain to be a HIV. This result confirms other already published data. Although there is no evidence of transmission through tears, the presence of the virus should not be forgotten. PMID:2440938

  14. Interaction of the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 tax transactivator with transcription factor IIA.

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, K E; Piras, G; Radonovich, M F; Choi, K S; Duvall, J F; DeJong, J; Roeder, R; Brady, J N

    1996-01-01

    The Tax protein of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a 40-kDa transcriptional activator which is critical for HTLV-1 gene regulation and virus-induced cellular transformation. Tax is localized to the DNA through its interaction with the site-specific activators cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein, NF-kappaB, and serum response factor. It has been suggested that the recruitment of Tax to the DNA positions Tax for interaction with the basal transcriptional machinery. On the basis of several independent assays, we now report a physical and functional interaction between Tax and the transcription factor, TFIIA. First, Tax was found to interact with the 35-kDa (alpha) subunit of TFIIA in the yeast two-hybrid interaction system. Importantly, two previously characterized mutants with point mutations in Tax, M32 (Y196A, K197S) and M41 (H287A, P288S), which were shown to be defective in Tax-activated transcription were unable to interact with TFIIA in this assay. Second, a glutathione-S-transferase (GST) affinity-binding assay showed that the interaction of holo-TFIIA with GST-Tax was 20-fold higher than that observed with either the GST-Tax M32 activation mutant or the GST control. Third, a coimmunoprecipitation assay showed that in HTLV-1-infected human T lymphocytes, Tax and TFIIA were associated. Finally, TFIIA facilitates Tax transactivation in vitro and in vivo. In vitro transcription studies showed reduced levels of Tax-activated transcription in cell extracts depleted of TFIIA. In addition, transfection of human T lymphocytes with TFIIA expression vectors enhanced Tax-activated transcription of an HTLV-1 long terminal repeat-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter construct. Our study suggests that the interaction of Tax with the transcription factor TFIIA may play a role in Tax-mediated transcriptional activation. PMID:8756622

  15. GLUT-1-independent infection of the glioblastoma/astroglioma U87 cells by the human T cell leukemia virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Qingwen; Agrawal, Lokesh; VanHorn-Ali, Zainab; Alkhatib, Ghalib . E-mail: galkhati@iupui.edu

    2006-09-15

    The human glucose transporter protein 1 (GLUT-1) functions as a receptor for human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV). GLUT-1 is a twelve-transmembrane cell surface receptor with six extracellular (ECL) and seven intracellular domains. To analyze HTLV-1 cytotropism, we utilized polyclonal antibodies to a synthetic peptide corresponding to the large extracellular domain of GLUT-1. The antibodies caused significant blocking of envelope (Env)-mediated fusion and pseudotyped virus infection of HeLa cells but had no significant effect on infection of U87 cells. This differential effect correlated with the detection of high-level surface expression of GLUT-1 on HeLa cells and very weak staining of U87 cells. To investigate this in terms of viral cytotropism, we cloned GLUT-1 cDNA from U87 cells and isolated two different versions of cDNA clones: the wild-type sequence (encoding 492 residues) and a mutant cDNA with a 5-base pair deletion (GLUT-1{delta}5) between nucleotides 1329 and 1333. The deletion, also detected in genomic DNA, resulted in a frame-shift and premature termination producing a truncated protein of 463 residues. Transfection of the wild-type GLUT-1 but not GLUT-1{delta}5 cDNA into CHO cells resulted in efficient surface expression of the human GLUT-1. Co-expression of GLUT-1 with GLUT-1{delta}5 produces a trans-inhibition by GLUT-1{delta}5 of GLUT-1-mediated HTLV-1 envelope (Env)-mediated fusion. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated physical interaction of the wild-type and mutant proteins. Northern blot and RT-PCR analyses demonstrated lower GLUT-1 RNA expression in U87 cells. We propose two mechanisms to account for the impaired cell surface expression of GLUT-1 on U87 cells: low GLUT-1 RNA expression and the formation of GLUT-1/GLUT-1{delta}5 heterodimers that are retained intracellularly. Significant RNAi-mediated reduction of endogenous GLUT-1 expression impaired HTLV-1 Env-mediated fusion with HeLa cells but not with U87 cells. We propose a

  16. HUMAN VIRAL ONCOGENESIS: A CANCER HALLMARKS ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Mesri, Enrique A.; Feitelson, Mark; Munger, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Approximately twelve percent of all human cancers are caused by oncoviruses. Human viral oncogenesis is complex and only a small percentage of the infected individuals develop cancer and often many years to decades after initial infection. This reflects the multistep nature of viral oncogenesis, host genetic variability and the fact that viruses contribute to only a portion of the oncogenic events. In this review, the Hallmarks of Cancer framework of Hanahan & Weinberg (2000 and 2011) is used to dissect the viral, host and environmental co-factors that contribute to the biology of multistep oncogenesis mediated by established human oncoviruses. The viruses discussed include Epstein Barr Virus (EBV), high-risk Human Papillomaviruses (HPV16/18), Hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV, HCV respectively), Human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1) and Kaposi’s sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV). PMID:24629334

  17. Infection of CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes by the human T cell leukemia virus type 1 is mediated by the glucose transporter GLUT-1: Evidence using antibodies specific to the receptor's large extracellular domain

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Qingwen; Agrawal, Lokesh; VanHorn-Ali, Zainab; Alkhatib, Ghalib . E-mail: galkhati@iupui.edu

    2006-05-25

    To analyze HTLV-1 cytotropism, we developed a highly sensitive vaccinia virus-based assay measuring activation of a reporter gene upon fusion of two distinct cell populations. We used this system in a functional cDNA screening to isolate and confirm that the glucose transporter protein 1 (GLUT-1) is a receptor for HTLV-1. GLUT-1 is a ubiquitously expressed plasma membrane glycoprotein with 12 transmembrane domains and 6 extracellular loops (ECL). We demonstrate for the first time that peptide antibodies (GLUT-IgY) raised in chicken to the large extracellular loop (ECL1) detect GLUT-1 at the cell surface and inhibit envelope (Env)-mediated fusion and infection. Efficient GLUT-IgY staining was detected with peripheral blood CD4{sup +} lymphocytes purified by positive selection. Further, GLUT-IgY caused efficient inhibition of Env-mediated fusion and infection of CD4{sup +} T and significantly lower inhibition of CD8{sup +} T lymphocytes. The specificity of GLUT-IgY antibodies to GLUT-1 was demonstrated by ECL1 peptide competition studies. Grafting ECL1 of GLUT-1 onto the receptor-negative GLUT-3 conferred significant receptor activity. In contrast, grafting ECL1 of GLUT-3 onto GLUT-1 resulted in a significant loss of the receptor activity. The ECL1-mediated receptor activity was efficiently blocked with four different human monoclonal antibody (HMab) to HTLV-1 Env. The ECL1-derived peptide blocked HTLV-1 Env-mediated fusion with several nonhuman mammalian cell lines. The results demonstrate the utilization of cell surface GLUT-1 in HTLV-1 infection of CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes and implicate a critical role for the ECL1 region in viral tropism.

  18. Tax Posttranslational Modifications and Interaction with Calreticulin in MT-2 Cells and Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type-I-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Fernando; Quintremil, Sebastian; Alberti, Carolina; Barriga, Andres; Cartier, Luis; Puente, Javier; Ramírez, Eugenio; Ferreira, Arturo; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The human retrovirus human T cell lymphotropic virus type-I (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Axonal degeneration in HAM/TSP patients occurs without neuron infection, with the secreted viral Tax protein proposed to be involved. We previously found that Tax secreted into the culture medium of MT-2 cells (HTLV-1-infected cell line) produced neurite retraction in neuroblastoma cells differentiated to neuronal type. To assess the relevance of Tax posttranslational modifications on this effect, we addressed the question of whether Tax secreted by MT-2 cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HTLV-1-infected subjects is modified. The interaction of Tax with calreticulin (CRT) that modulates intracellular Tax localization and secretion has been described. We studied Tax localization and modifications in MT-2 cells and its interaction with CRT. Intracellular Tax in MT-2 cells was assessed by flow cytometry, corresponding mainly to a 71-kDa protein followed by western blot. This protein reported as a chimera with gp21 viral protein—confirmed by mass spectrometry—showed no ubiquitination or SUMOylation. The Tax–CRT interaction was determined by confocal microscopy and coimmunoprecipitation. Extracellular Tax from HAM/TSP PBMCs is ubiquitinated according to western blot, and its interaction with CRT was shown by coimmunoprecipitation. A positive correlation between Tax and CRT secretion was observed in HAM/TSP PBMCs and asymptomatic carriers. For both proteins inhibitors and activators of secretion showed secretion through the endoplasmic reticulum–Golgi complex. Tax, present in PBMC culture medium, produced neurite retraction in differentiated neuroblastoma cells. These results suggest that Tax, whether ubiquitinated or not, is active for neurite retraction. PMID:24321043

  19. Outcome of patients with HTLV-1-associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma after SCT: a retrospective study by the EBMT LWP.

    PubMed

    Bazarbachi, A; Cwynarski, K; Boumendil, A; Finel, H; Fields, P; Raj, K; Nagler, A; Mohty, M; Sureda, A; Dreger, P; Hermine, O

    2014-10-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) carries a dismal prognosis. Experience with allo-SCT for ATL appears encouraging but is limited to Japanese series. This retrospective analysis of the EBMT registry revealed 21 HTLV-I seropositive ATL including 7 acute and 12 lymphoma subtypes. Four patients received auto-SCT and rapidly died from ATL. Out of 17 allo-SCT (4 myeloablative, 13 reduced intensity), 6 are still alive (4 were in CR1 at SCT). Eleven patients died within 2 years, eight from relapse/progression and three from transplant toxicity. Six of seven informative patients who lived >12 months had chronic GVHD. Overall these results indicate that allo-SCT but not auto-SCT may salvage a subset of ATL patients, supporting the existence of graft vs ATL effect also in non-Japanese patients. PMID:25029232

  20. APOBEC3G generates nonsense mutations in human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 proviral genomes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jun; Ma, Guangyong; Nosaka, Kisato; Tanabe, Junko; Satou, Yorifumi; Koito, Atsushi; Wain-Hobson, Simon; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre; Matsuoka, Masao

    2010-07-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) induces cell proliferation after infection, leading to efficient transmission by cell-to-cell contact. After a long latent period, a fraction of carriers develop adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). Genetic changes in the tax gene in ATL cells were reported in about 10% of ATL cases. To determine genetic changes that may occur throughout the provirus, we determined the entire sequence of the HTLV-1 provirus in 60 ATL cases. Abortive genetic changes, including deletions, insertions, and nonsense mutations, were frequent in all viral genes except the HBZ gene, which is transcribed from the minus strand of the virus. G-to-A base substitutions were the most frequent mutations in ATL cells. The sequence context of G-to-A mutations was in accordance with the preferred target sequence of human APOBEC3G (hA3G). The target sequences of hA3G were less frequent in the plus strand of the HBZ coding region than in other coding regions of the HTLV-1 provirus. Nonsense mutations in viral genes including tax were also observed in proviruses from asymptomatic carriers, indicating that these mutations were generated during reverse transcription and prior to oncogenesis. The fact that hA3G targets the minus strand during reverse transcription explains why the HBZ gene is not susceptible to such nonsense mutations. HTLV-1-infected cells likely take advantage of hA3G to escape from the host immune system by losing expression of viral proteins. PMID:20463074

  1. Prevalence of antibody to human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I/II in people of Caribbean origin in Toronto.

    PubMed Central

    Chiavetta, J; Nusbacher, J; Tam, F; Wall, A; Steaffens, J; Lee, H

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of antibody to human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I/II (anti-HTLV-I/II) in people from an HTLV-I/II-endemic area (the Caribbean) living in a nonendemic region (Canada). DESIGN: Cross-sectional household survey. SETTING: Households in Toronto in 1989. PARTICIPANTS: A modified quota sampling method was used to recruit subjects of Caribbean origin as well as other Canadians. Of 2900 people invited to participate in the study 1323, 743 of Caribbean origin, were interviewed about their background and possible exposure to HTLV-I/II. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Blood samples were analysed for anti-HTLV-I/II by means of an enzyme-linked immunoassay, the result being confirmed by the Western blot technique and radioimmunoprecipitation assay. The samples were also analysed for antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (anti-HIV) and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and for surrogate markers of non-A, non-B hepatitis. RESULTS: A total of 853 blood samples (64.5%) were analysed, 483 (56.6%) from subjects of Caribbean origin. The proportion of subjects who agreed to give a blood sample was similar for the Caribbean and non-Caribbean strata. Eleven subjects, all of Caribbean origin (2.3% of the Caribbean stratum), were confirmed to be positive for anti-HTLV-I/II. There were no significant differences between the antibody-positive and antibody-negative subjects with respect to sex, age, racial origin or residence in the Caribbean for at least 22 years. All anti-HTLV-I/II-positive subjects were negative for anti-HIV and HBsAg, and four (36.4%) were positive for antibody to HBsAg and to hepatitis B core antigen. CONCLUSIONS: Except for origin, an association between antibody positivity and other factors could not be demonstrated. The findings suggest that blood donor screening might include place of origin in addition to the usual lifestyle or behavioural factors. However, the need to ensure safety of transfusion must be balanced against the

  2. Current human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 mother-to-child transmission prevention status in Kagoshima.

    PubMed

    Nerome, Yasuhito; Kojyo, Kanami; Ninomiya, Yumiko; Ishikawa, Tamayo; Ogiso, Ayano; Takei, Syuji; Kawano, Yoshifumi; Douchi, Tsutomu; Takezaki, Toshiro; Owaki, Tetsuhiro

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the current human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-I) mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) prevention system in Kagoshima Prefecture. We investigated the rate of carrier pregnant women from obstetrics facilities in Kagoshima by mail in 2012 and compared our results with previous study results. We interviewed carrier pregnant women about their choices for infant nutrition, and we interviewed midwives about the follow-up system. In 2012, 8719 screening tests were performed, covering 58.1% of all pregnant women in Kagoshima; the rate of carrier pregnant women was 1.3%. Of 59 carriers, 39 chose short-term breast-feeding. The HTLV-I carrier rate among pregnant women in Kagoshima has declined. The current HTLV-I MTCT prevention system in Kagoshima is effective, but not sufficient. To bring the nutrition methods to completion, various types of support are needed. Further studies will elucidate many unsolved problems concerning MTCT. PMID:25252059

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus contains an epitope immunoreactive with thymosin. cap alpha. /sub 1/ and the 30-amino acid synthetic p17 group-specific antigen peptide HGP-30

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, P.H.; Naylor, C.W.; Badamchian, M.; Wada, S.; Goldstein, A.L.; Wang, S.S.; Sun, D.K.; Thornton, A.H.; Sarin, P.S.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have reported that an antiserum prepared against thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/ (which shares a region of homology with the p17 protein of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated human immunodeficiency virus) effectively neutralized the AIDs virus and prevented its replication in H9 cells. Using HPLC and immunoblot analysis, they have identified from a clone B, type III human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV-IIIB) extracts a protein with a molecular weight of 17,000 that is immunoreactive with thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/. In contrast, no immunoreactivity was found in retroviral extracts from a number of nonhuman species including feline, bovine, simian, gibbon, and murine retroviruses. Heterologous antiserum prepared against a 30-amino acid synthetic peptide analogue (HGP-30) does not cross-react with thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/ but does react specifically with the p17 protein of the AIDS virus in a manner identical to that seen with an HTLV-IIIB p17-specific monoclonal antibody. The demonstration that this synthetic analogue is immunogenic and that antibodies to HGP-30 cross-react not only with synthetic peptide but also with the HTLV-IIIB p17 viral protein provides an additional, and potentially more specific, candidate for development of a synthetic peptide vaccine for AIDS. In addition, the p17 synthetic peptide (HGP-3) may prove to be useful in a diagnostic assay for the detection of AIDS virus infection in seronegative individuals.

  4. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1-infected T lymphocytes impair catabolism and uptake of glutamate by astrocytes via Tax-1 and tumor necrosis factor alpha.

    PubMed

    Szymocha, R; Akaoka, H; Dutuit, M; Malcus, C; Didier-Bazes, M; Belin, M F; Giraudon, P

    2000-07-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of a chronic progressive myelopathy called tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM). In this disease, lesions of the central nervous system (CNS) are associated with perivascular infiltration by lymphocytes. We and others have hypothesized that these T lymphocytes infiltrating the CNS may play a prominent role in TSP/HAM. Here, we show that transient contact of human or rat astrocytes with T lymphocytes chronically infected by HTLV-1 impairs some of the major functions of brain astrocytes. Uptake of extracellular glutamate by astrocytes was significantly decreased after transient contact with infected T cells, while the expression of the glial transporters GLAST and GLT-1 was decreased. In two-compartment cultures avoiding direct cell-to-cell contact, similar results were obtained, suggesting possible involvement of soluble factors, such as cytokines and the viral protein Tax-1. Recombinant Tax-1 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) decreased glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Tax-1 probably acts by inducing TNF-alpha, as the effect of Tax-1 was abolished by anti-TNF-alpha antibody. The expression of glutamate-catabolizing enzymes in astrocytes was increased for glutamine synthetase and decreased for glutamate dehydrogenase, the magnitudes of these effects being correlated with the level of Tax-1 transcripts. In conclusion, Tax-1 and cytokines produced by HTLV-1-infected T cells impair the ability of astrocytes to manage the steady-state level of glutamate, which in turn may affect neuronal and oligodendrocytic functions and survival. PMID:10864655

  5. Assessing Walking Ability in People with HTLV-1-Associated Myelopathy Using the 10 Meter Timed Walk and the 6 Minute Walk Test

    PubMed Central

    Adonis, Adine; Taylor, Graham P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Five to ten million persons, are infected by HTLV-1 of which 3% will develop HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (HAM) a chronic, disabling inflammation of the spinal cord. Walking, a fundamental, complex, multi-functional task is demanding of multiple body systems. Restricted walking ability compromises activity and participation levels in people with HAM (pwHAM). Therapy aims to improve mobility but validated measures are required to assess change. Study Design Prospective observational study. Objectives To explore walking capacity in pwHAM, walking endurance using the 6 minute walk (6MW), and gait speed, using the timed 10m walk (10mTW). Setting Out-patient setting in an inner London Teaching hospital. Methods Prospective documentation of 10mTW and 6MW distance; walking aid usage and pain scores measured twice, a median of 18 months apart. Results Data analysis was completed for twenty-six pwHAM, (8♂; 18♀; median age: 57.8 years; median disease duration: 8 years). Median time at baseline to: complete 10m was 17.5 seconds, versus 21.4 seconds at follow up; 23% completed the 6MW compared to 42% at follow up and a median distance of 55m was covered compared to 71m at follow up. Using the 10mTW velocity to predict the 6MW distance, overestimated the distance walked in 6 minutes (p<0.01). Functional decline over time was captured using the functional ambulation categories. Conclusions The 10mTW velocity underestimated the degree of disability. Gait speed usefully predicts functional domains, shows direction of functional change and comparison with published healthy age matched controls show that these patients have significantly slower gait speeds. The measured differences over 18 months were sufficient to reliably detect change and therefore these assessments can be useful to detect improvement or deterioration within broader disability grades. Walking capacity in pwHAM should be measured using the 10mTW for gait speed and the 6MW for endurance. PMID

  6. Failure in activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax in non-hematopoietic cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Mizukoshi, Terumi; Komori, Hideyuki; Mizuguchi, Mariko; Abdelaziz, Hussein; Hara, Toshifumi; Higuchi, Masaya; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Ohara, Yoshiro; Funato, Noriko; Fujii, Masahiro; Nakamura, Masataka

    2013-09-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax (Tax1) plays crucial roles in leukemogenesis in part through activation of NF-κB. In this study, we demonstrated that Tax1 activated an NF-κB binding (gpκB) site of the gp34/OX40 ligand gene in a cell type-dependent manner. Our examination showed that the gpκΒ site and authentic NF-κB (IgκB) site were activated by Tax1 in hematopoietic cell lines. Non-hematopoietic cell lines including hepatoma and fibroblast cell lines were not permissive to Tax1-mediated activation of the gpκB site, while the IgκB site was activated in those cells in association with binding of RelB. However RelA binding was not observed in the gpκB and IgκB sites. Our results suggest that HTLV-1 Tax1 fails to activate the canonical pathway of NF-κB in non-hematopoietic cell lines. Cell type-dependent activation of NF-κB by Tax1 could be associated with pathogenesis by HTLV-1 infection. - Highlights: • HTLV-1 Tax1 does not activate RelA of NF-κB in non-hematopoietic cell lines. • Tax1 activates the NF-κB non-canonical pathway in non-hematopoietic cell lines. • Tax1 does not induce RelA nuclear translocation in those cell lines, unlike TNFα. • The OX40L promoter κB site is activated by ectopic, but not endogenous, RelA.

  7. Low Proviral Load is Associated with Indeterminate Western Blot Patterns in Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Infected Individuals: Could Punctual Mutations be Related?

    PubMed Central

    Cánepa, Camila; Salido, Jimena; Ruggieri, Matías; Fraile, Sindy; Pataccini, Gabriela; Berini, Carolina; Biglione, Mirna

    2015-01-01

    Background: indeterminate Western blot (WB) patterns are a major concern for diagnosis of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection, even in non-endemic areas. Objectives: (a) to define the prevalence of indeterminate WB among different populations from Argentina; (b) to evaluate if low proviral load (PVL) is associated with indeterminate WB profiles; and (c) to describe mutations in LTR and tax sequence of these cases. Results: Among 2031 samples, 294 were reactive by screening. Of them, 48 (16.3%) were WB indeterminate and of those 15 (31.3%) were PCR+. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) was performed to 52 HTLV-1+ samples, classified as Group 1 (G1): 25 WB+ samples from individuals with pathologies; Group 2 (G2): 18 WB+ samples from asymptomatic carriers (AC); and Group 3 (G3): 9 seroindeterminate samples from AC. Median PVL was 4.78, 2.38, and 0.15 HTLV-1 copies/100 PBMCs, respectively; a significant difference (p=0.003) was observed. Age and sex were associated with PVL in G1 and G2, respectively. Mutations in the distal and central regions of Tax Responsive Elements (TRE) 1 and 2 of G3 were observed, though not associated with PVL.The 8403A>G mutation of the distal region, previously related to high PVL, was absent in G3 but present in 50% of WB+ samples (p = 0.03). Conclusions: indeterminate WB results confirmed later as HTLV-1 positive may be associated with low PVL levels. Mutations in LTR and tax are described;  their functional relevance remains to be determined. PMID:26516904

  8. Tax and Semaphorin 4D Released from Lymphocytes Infected with Human Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 and Their Effect on Neurite Growth.

    PubMed

    Quintremil, Sebastián; Alberti, Carolina; Rivera, Matías; Medina, Fernando; Puente, Javier; Cartier, Luis; Ramírez, Eugenio; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Valenzuela, M Antonieta

    2016-01-01

    Human lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus causing HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), a neurodegenerative central nervous system (CNS) axonopathy. This virus mainly infects CD4(+) T lymphocytes without evidence of neuronal infection. Viral Tax, secreted from infected lymphocytes infiltrated in the CNS, is proposed to alter intracellular pathways related to axonal cytoskeleton dynamics, producing neurological damage. Previous reports showed a higher proteolytic release of soluble Semaphorin 4D (sSEMA-4D) from CD4(+) T cells infected with HTLV-1. Soluble SEMA-4D binds to its receptor Plexin-B1, activating axonal growth collapse pathways in the CNS. In the current study, an increase was found in both SEMA-4D in CD4(+) T cells and sSEMA-4D released to the culture medium of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HAM/TSP patients compared to asymptomatic carriers and healthy donors. After a 16-h culture, infected PBMCs showed significantly higher levels of CRMP-2 phosphorylated at Ser(522). The effect was blocked either with anti-Tax or anti-SEMA-4D antibodies. The interaction of Tax and sSEMA-4D was found in secreted medium of PBMCs in patients, which might be associated with a leading role of Tax with the SEMA-4D-Plexin-B1 signaling pathway. In infected PBMCs, the migratory response after transwell assay showed that sSEMA-4D responding cells were CD4(+)Tax(+) T cells with a high CRMP-2 pSer(522) content. In the present study, the participation of Tax-sSEMA-4D in the reduction in neurite growth in PC12 cells produced by MT2 (HTLV-1-infected cell line) culture medium was observed. These results lead to the participation of plexins in the reported effects of infected lymphocytes on neuronal cells. PMID:26389656

  9. Tax abolishes histone H1 repression of p300 acetyltransferase activity at the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Konesky, Kasey L; Nyborg, Jennifer K; Laybourn, Paul J

    2006-11-01

    Upon infection of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), the provirus is integrated into the host cell genome and subsequently packaged into chromatin that contains histone H1. Consequently, transcriptional activation of the virus requires overcoming the environment of chromatin and H1. To efficiently activate transcription, HTLV-1 requires the virally encoded protein Tax and cellular transcription factor CREB. Together Tax and CREB interact with three cis-acting promoter elements called viral cyclic-AMP response elements (vCREs). Binding of Tax and CREB to the vCREs promotes association of p300/CBP into the complex and leads to transcriptional activation. Therefore, to fully understand the mechanism of Tax transactivation, it is necessary to examine transcriptional activation from chromatin assembled with H1. Using a DNA template harboring the complete HTLV-1 promoter sequence and a highly defined recombinant assembly system, we demonstrate proper incorporation of histone H1 into chromatin. Addition of H1 to the chromatin template reduces HTLV-1 transcriptional activation through a novel mechanism. Specifically, H1 does not inhibit CREB or Tax binding to the vCREs or p300 recruitment to the promoter. Rather, H1 directly targets p300 acetyltransferase activity. Interestingly, in determining the mechanism of H1 repression, we have discovered a previously undefined function of Tax, overcoming the repressive effects of H1-chromatin. Tax specifically abrogates the H1 repression of p300 enzymatic activity in a manner independent of p300 recruitment and without displacement of H1 from the promoter. PMID:16943293

  10. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 p30 interacts with REGgamma and modulates ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) to promote cell survival.

    PubMed

    Anupam, Rajaneesh; Datta, Antara; Kesic, Matthew; Green-Church, Kari; Shkriabai, Nikolozi; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Lairmore, Michael D

    2011-03-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a causative agent of adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma and a variety of inflammatory disorders. HTLV-1 encodes a nuclear localizing protein, p30, that selectively alters viral and cellular gene expression, activates G(2)-M cell cycle checkpoints, and is essential for viral spread. Here, we used immunoprecipitation and affinity pulldown of ectopically expressed p30 coupled with mass spectrometry to identify cellular binding partners of p30. Our data indicate that p30 specifically binds to cellular ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and REGγ (a nuclear 20 S proteasome activator). Under conditions of genotoxic stress, p30 expression was associated with reduced levels of ATM and increased cell survival. Knockdown or overexpression of REGγ paralleled p30 expression, suggesting an unexpected enhancement of p30 expression in the presence of REGγ. Finally, size exclusion chromatography revealed the presence of p30 in a high molecular mass complex along with ATM and REGγ. On the basis of our findings, we propose that HTLV-1 p30 interacts with ATM and REGγ to increase viral spread by facilitating cell survival. PMID:21216954

  11. Therapeutic benefits of an oral vitamin B1 derivative for human T lymphotropic virus type I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP).

    PubMed

    Kira, Jun-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    Prosultiamine, a vitamin B1 derivative, has long been used for beriberi neuropathy and Wernicke's encephalopathy. Based on the finding that prosultiamine induces apoptosis in human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I)-infected T cells, Nakamura et al. conducted a clinical trial of prosultiamine in patients with HTLV-I-associated myelopathy (HAM)/tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP). In this open-label, single arm study enrolling 24 HAM/TSP patients recently published in BMC Medicine, oral prosultiamine (300 mg/day for 12 weeks) was found to be effective by neurological, urological and virological evaluations. Notably, it increased detrusor pressure, bladder capacity and maximum flow rate, and improved detrusor overactivity and detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia. A significant decrease in HTLV-I copy numbers in peripheral blood following the treatment provided a rationale for using the drug. The trial has some limitations, such as the small numbers of participants, the open-label design, the lack of a placebo arm, and the short trial period. Nevertheless, the observation that such a safe, cheap drug may have excellent therapeutic effects on HAM/TSP, a chronic devastating illness occurring mainly in developing countries, provides support for future large-scale randomized controlled trials.Please see related research: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/182. PMID:23945332

  12. Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1-encoded protein HBZ represses p53 function by inhibiting the acetyltransferase activity of p300/CBP and HBO1

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Kimson; Ankney, John A.; Nguyen, Stephanie T.; Rushing, Amanda W.; Polakowski, Nicholas; Miotto, Benoit; Lemasson, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an often fatal malignancy caused by infection with the complex retrovirus, human T-cell Leukemia Virus, type 1 (HTLV-1). In ATL patient samples, the tumor suppressor, p53, is infrequently mutated; however, it has been shown to be inactivated by the viral protein, Tax. Here, we show that another HTLV-1 protein, HBZ, represses p53 activity. In HCT116 p53+/+ cells treated with the DNA-damaging agent, etoposide, HBZ reduced p53-mediated activation of p21/CDKN1A and GADD45A expression, which was associated with a delay in G2 phase-arrest. These effects were attributed to direct inhibition of the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity of p300/CBP by HBZ, causing a reduction in p53 acetylation, which has be linked to decreased p53 activity. In addition, HBZ bound to, and inhibited the HAT activity of HBO1. Although HBO1 did not acetylate p53, it acted as a coactivator for p53 at the p21/CDKN1A promoter. Therefore, through interactions with two separate HAT proteins, HBZ impairs the ability of p53 to activate transcription. This mechanism may explain how p53 activity is restricted in ATL cells that do not express Tax due to modifications of the HTLV-1 provirus, which accounts for a majority of patient samples. PMID:26625199

  13. Triple synergism of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1-encoded tax, GATA-binding protein, and AP-1 is required for constitutive expression of the interleukin-5 gene in adult T-cell leukemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, T; Mitani, K; Ueno, H; Kanda, Y; Yazaki, Y; Hirai, H

    1997-01-01

    Accumulated evidence demonstrates that adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is frequently associated with eosinophilia, and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected cells frequently express interleukin-5 (IL-5). However, the molecular mechanism of constitutive IL-5 expression in HTLV-1-infected cells remains unclear. To clarify the mechanism of aberrant IL-5 expression in HTLV-1-infected cells, we investigated the response of the human IL-5 promoter to the HTLV-1-encoded protein Tax. Cotransfection experiments using Jurkat cells revealed that Tax is incapable of activating the IL-5 promoter by itself but that it synergistically transactivates the promoter with GATA-binding protein (GATA-4) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) stimulation. By introducing a series of mutations within the IL-5 promoter, we found that conserved lymphokine element 0 (CLE0) is responsible for mediating the signal induced by Tax-TPA. A deletion construct of the promoter indicated that the -75 GATA element and CLE0 are sufficient to mediate synergistic activation of the IL-5 promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using Jurkat cell nuclear extracts demonstrated that TPA induces a transcription factor to bind CLE0, and an experiment using JPX-9 cell nuclear extracts showed that Tax enhances this binding activity. An antibody supershift experiment revealed that this band consists of c-Jun and JunD. However, among the Jun family members, only c-Jun is able to cooperate with Tax and GATA-4 to activate the IL-5 promoter. We have determined the minimum factors required for IL-5 gene activation by reconstituting the IL-5 promoter activity in F9 cells. This is the first report to demonstrate the functional involvement of Tax protein in IL-5 gene regulation and to suggest the functional triple synergism among Tax, GATA-4, and AP-1, which disrupts regulated control of the gene and leads to constitutive expression of the IL-5 gene. PMID:9234684

  14. Adenosine deaminase isoenzyme levels in patients with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infections.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, I; Sagawa, K; Shichijo, S; Yokoyama, M M; Ou, D W; Wiederhold, M D

    1995-01-01

    In serum, the enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) is known to be divided into two isoenzymes, ADA1 and ADA2, which have different molecular weights and kinetic properties. The present study investigated ADA isoenzyme levels in the sera of patients infected with retroviruses associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy (HAM), and AIDS, ADA isoenzyme activities were found to be significantly (P < 0.001) higher in the sera of patients with ATL, HAM, and AIDS than in the sera of healthy controls. In the case of the ADA subtypes in the sera of patients with ATL, ADA1 activity was significantly (P < 0.001) elevated in patients with the acute and lymphoma types of ATL compared with that in patients with the chronic and smoldering types of ATL. ADA2 activity was significantly elevated in the sera of patients with the acute, lymphoma, and chronic types of ATL (P < 0.001) compared with that in patients with smoldering ATL and HTLV-1 carriers. In the case of patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, ADA1 and ADA2 activities in the sera of patients with AIDS and HIV-1 antibody-positive individuals were significantly (P < 0.001) higher than those in the sera of HIV-1 antibody-negative individuals. A significant elevation in ADA2 activity was also seen in the sera of AIDS patients (P < 0.01) compared with that in the sera of HIV-1 antibody-positive individuals. These results suggest that the magnitude of elevation of ADA isoenzyme levels in serum correlates well with the clinical conditions of the patients with these diseases. Measurement of the activities of ADA isoenzymes may therefore provide an additional parameter for distinguishing the subtypes of ATL and may prove to be useful as prognostic and therapeutic monitors in diseases associated with HTLV-1 and HIV-1 infections. PMID:8548545

  15. Inhibition of proliferation by agricultural plant extracts in seven human adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL)-related cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kai, Hisahiro; Akamatsu, Ena; Torii, Eri; Kodama, Hiroko; Yukizaki, Chizuko; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Morishita, Kazuhiro; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Matsuno, Koji

    2011-07-01

    Adult T-cell leukaemia (ATL) is caused by human T-cell leukaemia virus type I (HTLV-I) infection and is resistant to conventional chemotherapy. We evaluated the inhibitory effects of agricultural plants on the proliferation of seven ATL-related human leukaemia cells, using three ATL cell lines (ED, Su9T01 and S1T), two human T-cell lines transformed by HTLV-I infection (HUT-102 and MT-2) and two HTLV-I-negative human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cell lines (Jurkat and MOLT-4). A total of 52 samples of 80% ethanol extracts obtained from 30 types of agricultural plants were examined. On the basis of IC(50) values, we selected samples with greater activity than genistein, which was used as a positive control. The highest inhibitory effect was observed with extracts from leaves of Vaccinium virgatum Aiton (blueberry) on four cell lines (ED, Su9T01, HUT-102 and Jurkat); seeds of Momordica charantia L. (bitter gourd) exhibited the second highest activity. The bitter gourd seeds suppressed the proliferation of three cell lines (Su9T01, HUT-102 and Jurkat). The extracts from edible parts of Ipomea batatas LAM. (sweet potato), edible parts of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott (taro), skin of taro and seeds of Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc. (mume) showed markedly greater inhibitory effects on Su9T01 than genistein. These findings suggest that ATL-preventative bioactive compounds may exist in these agricultural plants, which are considered to be functional foods. PMID:21293936

  16. Conformation-specific antibodies targeting the trimer-of-hairpins motif of the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein recognize the viral envelope but fail to neutralize viral entry.

    PubMed

    Mirsaliotis, Antonis; Nurkiyanova, Kulpash; Lamb, Daniel; Woof, Jenny M; Brighty, David W

    2007-06-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) entry into cells is dependent upon the viral envelope glycoprotein-catalyzed fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. Following receptor activation of the envelope, the transmembrane glycoprotein (TM) is thought to undergo a series of fusogenic conformational transitions through a rod-like prehairpin intermediate to a compact trimer-of-hairpins structure. Importantly, synthetic peptides that interfere with the conformational changes of TM are potent inhibitors of membrane fusion and HTLV-1 entry, suggesting that TM is a valid target for antiviral therapy. To assess the utility of TM as a vaccine target and to explore further the function of TM in HTLV-1 pathogenesis, we have begun to examine the immunological properties of TM. Here we demonstrate that a recombinant trimer-of-hairpins form of the TM ectodomain is strongly immunogenic. Monoclonal antibodies raised against the TM immunogen specifically bind to trimeric forms of TM, including structures thought to be important for membrane fusion. Importantly, these antibodies recognize the envelope on virally infected cells but, surprisingly, fail to neutralize envelope-mediated membrane fusion or infection by pseudotyped viral particles. Our data imply that, even in the absence of overt membrane fusion, there are multiple forms of TM on virally infected cells and that some of these display fusion-associated structures. Finally, we demonstrate that many of the antibodies possess the ability to recruit complement to TM, suggesting that envelope-derived immunogens capable of eliciting a combination of neutralizing and complement-fixing antibodies would be of value as subunit vaccines for intervention in HTLV infections. PMID:17376912

  17. Inactivation of IkappaBbeta by the tax protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1: a potential mechanism for constitutive induction of NF-kappaB.

    PubMed Central

    McKinsey, T A; Brockman, J A; Scherer, D C; Al-Murrani, S W; Green, P L; Ballard, D W

    1996-01-01

    In resting T lymphocytes, the transcription factor NF-kappaB is sequestered in the cytoplasm via interactions with members of the I kappa B family of inhibitors, including IkappaBalpha and IkappaBbeta. During normal T-cell activation, IkappaBalpha is rapidly phosphorylated, ubiquitinated, and degraded by the 26S proteasome, thus permitting the release of functional NF-kappaB. In contrast to its transient pattern of nuclear induction during an immune response, NF-kappaB is constitutively activated in cells expressing the Tax transforming protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1). Recent studies indicate that HTLV-1 Tax targets IkappaBalpha to the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. However, it remains unclear how this viral protein induces a persistent rather than transient NF-kappaB response. In this report, we provide evidence that in addition to acting on IkappaBalpha, Tax stimulates the turnover Of IkappaBbeta via a related targeting mechanism. Like IkappaBalpha, Tax-mediated breakdown of IkappaBbeta in transfected T lymphocytes is blocked either by cell-permeable proteasome inhibitors or by mutation Of IkappaBbeta at two serine residues present within its N-terminal region. Despite the dual specificity of HTLV-1 Tax for IkappaBalpha and IkappaBbeta at the protein level, Tax selectively stimulates NF-kappaB-directed transcription of the IkappaBalpha gene. Consequently, IkappaBbeta protein expression is chronically downregulated in HTLV-1-infected T lymphocytes. These findings with IkappaBbeta provide a potential mechanism for the constitutive activation of NF-kappaB in Tax-expressing cells. PMID:8628274

  18. "Signal-on" photoelectrochemical biosensor for sensitive detection of human T-Cell lymphotropic virus type II DNA: dual signal amplification strategy integrating enzymatic amplification with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated extension.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qingming; Han, Li; Fan, Gaochao; Zhang, Jian-Rong; Jiang, Liping; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2015-01-01

    A novel "signal-on" photoelectrochemical (PEC) biosensor for sensitive detection of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type II (HTLV-II) DNA was developed on the basis of enzymatic amplification coupled with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated extension strategy. The intensity of the photocurrent signal was proportional to the concentration of the HTLV-II DNA-target DNA (tDNA) by dual signal amplification. In this protocol, GR-CdS:Mn/ZnS nanocomposites were used as photoelectric conversion material, while pDNA was used as the tDNA recognizing unit. Moreover, the TdT-mediated extension and the enzymatic signal amplification technique were used to enhance the sensitivity of detection. Using this novel dual signal amplification strategy, the prototype of PEC DNA sensor can detect as low as ∼0.033 fM of HTLV-II DNA with a linear range of 0.1-5000 fM, with excellent differentiation ability even for single-base mismatches. This PEC DNA assay opens a promising platform to detect various DNA targets at ultralow levels for early diagnoses of different diseases. PMID:25871300

  19. Transactivation of human osteopontin promoter by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-encoded Tax protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Yamada, Osamu; Matsushita, Yoshihisa; Chagan-Yasutan, Haorile; Hattori, Toshio

    2010-06-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a cytokine that contributes substantially to the growth and metastasis in a wide spectrum of malignancies. We report here that OPN gene is transactivated by Tax protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). Northern blot showed enhanced OPN gene expression in cells stably expressing Tax. Co-expression of Tax increased the reporter gene expression directed by OPN promoter. Tax-induced OPN activation was abrogated by treatment with LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor) or co-transfection with AKT siRNA, suggesting PI3K/AKT pathway is involved in Tax-mediated transactivation. Reporter assay with deletion mutants showed that the 5'-partial sequence between -765 and -660 of the OPN promoter is the region responsive to Tax, and further, disrupting the AP-1 site within this region abolished the OPN induction by Tax, indicating that Tax activation of OPN promoter is likely mediated by AP-1 site. This study suggests that OPN is one of the downstream mediators of aberrantly activated PI3K/AKT signaling by Tax, which may partially contribute to HTLV-1-associated leukemogenesis. PMID:19767100

  20. Soluble interleukin 2 receptors are released from activated human lymphoid cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, L.A.; Kurman, C.C.; Fritz, M.E.; Biddison, W.E.; Boutin, B.; Yarchoan, R.; Nelson, D.L.

    1985-11-01

    With the use of an enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay to measure soluble human interleukin 2 receptors (IL 2R), certain human T cell leukemia virus I (HTLV I)-positive T cell lines were found to spontaneously release large quantities of IL 2R into culture supernatants. This was not found with HTLV I-negative and IL 2 independent T cell lines, and only one of seven B cell-derived lines examined produced small amounts of IL 2R. In addition to this constitutive production of soluble IL 2R by certain cell lines, normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) could be induced to release soluble IL 2R by plant lectins, the murine monoclonal antibody OKT3, tetanus toxoid, and allogeneic cells. Such activated cells also expressed cellular IL 2R measurable in detergent solubilized cell extracts. The generation of cellular and supernatant IL 2R was: dependent on cellular activation, rapid, radioresistant (3000 rad), and inhibited by cycloheximide treatment. NaDodSO4-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of soluble IL 2R demonstrated molecules of apparent Mr = 35,000 to 40,000, and 45,000 to 50,000, respectively, somewhat smaller than the mature surface receptor on these cells. The release of soluble IL 2R appears to be a characteristic marker of T lymphocyte activation and might serve an immunoregulatory function during both normal and abnormal cell growth and differentiation.

  1. Epidemiology, Treatment, and Prevention of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1-Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Denise Utsch; Proietti, Fernando Augusto; Ribas, João Gabriel Ramos; Araújo, Marcelo Grossi; Pinheiro, Sônia Regina; Guedes, Antônio Carlos; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Bárbara F.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), the first human retrovirus to be discovered, is present in diverse regions of the world, where its infection is usually neglected in health care settings and by public health authorities. Since it is usually asymptomatic in the beginning of the infection and disease typically manifests later in life, silent transmission occurs, which is associated with sexual relations, breastfeeding, and blood transfusions. There are no prospects of vaccines, and screening of blood banks and in prenatal care settings is not universal. Therefore, its transmission is active in many areas such as parts of Africa, South and Central America, the Caribbean region, Asia, and Melanesia. It causes serious diseases in humans, including adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and an incapacitating neurological disease (HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis [HAM/TSP]) besides other afflictions such as uveitis, rheumatic syndromes, and predisposition to helminthic and bacterial infections, among others. These diseases are not curable as yet, and current treatments as well as new perspectives are discussed in the present review. PMID:20610824

  2. Intersubunit disulfide isomerization controls membrane fusion of human T-cell leukemia virus Env.

    PubMed

    Li, Kejun; Zhang, Shujing; Kronqvist, Malin; Wallin, Michael; Ekström, Maria; Derse, David; Garoff, Henrik

    2008-07-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1) Env carries a typical disulfide isomerization motif, C(225)XXC, in the C-terminal domain SU. Here we have tested whether this motif is used for isomerization of the intersubunit disulfide of Env and whether this rearrangement is required for membrane fusion. We introduced the C225A and C228A mutations into Env and found that the former but not the latter mutant matured into covalently linked SU-TM complexes in transfected cells. Next, we constructed a secreted Env ectodomain and showed that it underwent incubation-dependent intersubunit disulfide isomerization on target cells. However, the rearrangement was blocked by the C225A mutation, suggesting that C(225) carried the isomerization-active thiol. Still, it was possible to reduce the intersubunit disulfide of the native C225A ectodomain mutant with dithiothreitol (DTT). The importance of the CXXC-mediated disulfide isomerization for infection was studied using murine leukemia virus vectors pseudotyped with wild-type or C225A HTLV-1 Env. We found that the mutant Env blocked infection, but this could be rescued with DTT. The fusion activity was tested in a fusion-from-within assay using a coculture of rat XC target and transfected BHK-21 effector cells. We found that the mutation blocked polykaryon formation, but this could be reversed with DTT. Similar DTT-reversible inhibition of infection and fusion was observed when a membrane-impermeable alkylator was present during the infection/fusion incubation. We conclude that the fusion activity of HTLV-1 Env is controlled by an SU CXXC-mediated isomerization of the intersubunit disulfide. Thus, this extends the applicability of the isomerization model from gammaretroviruses to deltaretroviruses. PMID:18480461

  3. Induction of Cell Death in Growing Human T-Cells and Cell Survival in Resting Cells in Response to the Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Tax.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, Mariko; Sasaki, Yuka; Hara, Toshifumi; Higuchi, Masaya; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Funato, Noriko; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Fujii, Masahiro; Nakamura, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Tax1 encoded by the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has been believed to dysregulate the expression of cellular genes involved in cell survival and mortality, leading to the development of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). The function of Tax1 in ATL development however is still controversial, primarily because Tax1 induces cell cycle progression and apoptosis. To systemically understand cell growth phase-dependent induction of cell survival or cell death by Tax1, we established a single experimental system using an interleukin 2 (IL-2)-dependent human T-cell line Kit 225 that can be forced into resting phase by IL-2 deprivation. Introduction of Tax1 and HTLV-2 Tax (Tax2B) decreased mitochondrial activity alongside apoptosis in growing cells but not in resting cells. Cell cycle profile analysis indicated that Tax1 and Tax2B were likely to perturb the S phase in growing cells. Studies with Tax1 mutants and siRNA for NF-κB/RelA revealed that Tax1-mediated cell growth inhibition and apoptosis in growing Kit 225 cells depend on RelA. Interestingly, inactivation of the non-canonical NF-κB and p38 MAPK pathways relieved Tax1-mediated apoptosis, suggesting that the Tax1-NF-κB-p38 MAPK axis may be associated with apoptosis in growing cells. Inflammatory mediators such as CCL3 and CCL4, which are involved in oncogene-induced senescence (OIS), were induced by Tax1 and Tax2B in growing cells. In contrast, RelA silencing in resting cells reduced mitochondrial activity, indicating that NF-κB/RelA is also critical for Tax1-mediated cell survival. These findings suggest that Tax1-mediated cell survival and death depend on the cell growth phase. Both effects of Tax1 may be implicated in the long latency of HTLV-1 infection. PMID:26829041

  4. Induction of Cell Death in Growing Human T-Cells and Cell Survival in Resting Cells in Response to the Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Tax

    PubMed Central

    Mizuguchi, Mariko; Sasaki, Yuka; Hara, Toshifumi; Higuchi, Masaya; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Funato, Noriko; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Fujii, Masahiro; Nakamura, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Tax1 encoded by the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has been believed to dysregulate the expression of cellular genes involved in cell survival and mortality, leading to the development of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). The function of Tax1 in ATL development however is still controversial, primarily because Tax1 induces cell cycle progression and apoptosis. To systemically understand cell growth phase-dependent induction of cell survival or cell death by Tax1, we established a single experimental system using an interleukin 2 (IL-2)-dependent human T-cell line Kit 225 that can be forced into resting phase by IL-2 deprivation. Introduction of Tax1 and HTLV-2 Tax (Tax2B) decreased mitochondrial activity alongside apoptosis in growing cells but not in resting cells. Cell cycle profile analysis indicated that Tax1 and Tax2B were likely to perturb the S phase in growing cells. Studies with Tax1 mutants and siRNA for NF-κB/RelA revealed that Tax1-mediated cell growth inhibition and apoptosis in growing Kit 225 cells depend on RelA. Interestingly, inactivation of the non-canonical NF-κB and p38 MAPK pathways relieved Tax1-mediated apoptosis, suggesting that the Tax1-NF-κB-p38 MAPK axis may be associated with apoptosis in growing cells. Inflammatory mediators such as CCL3 and CCL4, which are involved in oncogene-induced senescence (OIS), were induced by Tax1 and Tax2B in growing cells. In contrast, RelA silencing in resting cells reduced mitochondrial activity, indicating that NF-κB/RelA is also critical for Tax1-mediated cell survival. These findings suggest that Tax1-mediated cell survival and death depend on the cell growth phase. Both effects of Tax1 may be implicated in the long latency of HTLV-1 infection. PMID:26829041

  5. Impact factor, H index, peer comparisons, and Retrovirology: is it time to individualize citation metrics?

    PubMed Central

    Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2007-01-01

    There is a natural tendency to judge a gift by the attractiveness of its wrapping. In some respect, this reflects current mores of measuring the gravitas of a scientific paper based on the journal cover in which the work appears. Most journals have an impact factor (IF) which some proudly display on their face page. Although historically journal IF has been a convenient quantitative shorthand, has its (mis)use contributed to inaccurate perceptions of the quality of scientific articles? Is now the time that equally convenient but more individually accurate metrics be adopted? PMID:17577403

  6. Physical and functional interaction between the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 Tax1 protein and the CCAAT binding protein NF-Y.

    PubMed Central

    Pise-Masison, C A; Dittmer, J; Clemens, K E; Brady, J N

    1997-01-01

    Tax1, a potent activator of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) transcription, has been shown to modulate expression of many cellular genes. Tax1 does not bind DNA directly but regulates transcription through protein-protein interactions with sequence-specific transcription factors. Using the yeast two-hybrid system to screen for proteins which interact with Tax1, we isolated the B subunit of the CCAAT binding protein NF-Y from a HeLa cDNA library. The interaction of Tax1 with NF-YB was specific in that NF-YB did not interact with a variety of other transcription factors, including human immunodeficiency virus Tat, human papillomavirus E6, and Bicoid, or with the M7 (amino acids 29CP-AS) Tax1 mutant. However, NF-YB did interact with the C-terminal Tax1 mutants M22 (130TL-AS) and M47 (319LL-RS). We also show that in vitro-translated NF-YB specifically bound to a glutathione S-transferase-Tax1 fusion protein. Further, Tax1 coimmunoprecipitated with NF-Y from nuclear extracts of HTLV-1-transformed cells, providing evidence for in vivo interaction of Tax1 and NF-YB. We further demonstrate that Tax1 specifically activated the NF-Y-responsive DQbeta promoter, as well as a minimal promoter which contains only the Y-box element. In addition, mutation of the Y-box element alone abrogated Tax1-mediated activation. Taken together, these data indicate that Tax1 interacts with NF-Y through the B subunit and that this interaction results in activation of the major histocompatibility complex class II promoter. Through activation of this and other NF-Y driven promoters, the Tax1-NF-Y interaction may play a critical role in causing cellular transformation and HTLV-1 pathogenesis. PMID:9032250

  7. On the general theory of the origins of retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The order retroviridae comprises viruses based on ribonucleic acids (RNA). Some, such as HIV and HTLV, are human pathogens. Newly emerged human retroviruses have zoonotic origins. As far as has been established, both repeated infections (themselves possibly responsible for the evolution of viral mutations (Vm) and host adaptability (Ha)); along with interplay between inhibitors and promoters of cell tropism, are needed to effect retroviral cross-species transmissions. However, the exact modus operadi of intertwine between these factors at molecular level remains to be established. Knowledge of such intertwine could lead to a better understanding of retrovirology and possibly other infectious processes. This study was conducted to derive the mathematical equation of a general theory of the origins of retroviruses. Methods and results On the basis of an arbitrarily non-Euclidian geometrical "thought experiment" involving the cross-species transmission of simian foamy virus (sfv) from a non-primate species Xy to Homo sapiens (Hs), initially excluding all social factors, the following was derived. At the port of exit from Xy (where the species barrier, SB, is defined by the Index of Origin, IO), sfv shedding is (1) enhanced by two transmitting tensors (Tt), (i) virus-specific immunity (VSI) and (ii) evolutionary defenses such as APOBEC, RNA interference pathways, and (when present) expedited therapeutics (denoted e2D); and (2) opposed by the five accepting scalars (At): (a) genomic integration hot spots, gIHS, (b) nuclear envelope transit (NMt) vectors, (c) virus-specific cellular biochemistry, VSCB, (d) virus-specific cellular receptor repertoire, VSCR, and (e) pH-mediated cell membrane transit, (↓pH CMat). Assuming As and Tt to be independent variables, IO = Tt/As. The same forces acting in an opposing manner determine SB at the port of sfv entry (defined here by the Index of Entry, IE = As/Tt). Overall, If sfv encounters no unforeseen effects on transit

  8. Brain volume measurements in patients with human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1-associated tropical spastic paraparesis.

    PubMed

    Griffith, C; Bagnato, F; Gupta, S; Calabrese, A; Oh, U; Chiu, A; Ohayon, J M; McAuliffe, M J; Tasciyan, T A; Jacobson, S

    2006-10-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-1 is associated with a chronic progressive neurologic disease known as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) that affects 0.2% to 3% of HTLV-1-infected people. The authors aimed at exploring, in vivo, whether brain volume reduction occurs in patients with HAM/TSP through the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). T1 pre/postcontrast spin echo-weighted images (WIs) and T2WIs of the brain were obtained in 19 HAM/TSP patients and 14 age-and sex-matched healthy volunteers. Both patients and healthy individuals were imaged at a 1.5-Tesla magnet by employing a conventional head coil. Focal T1 and T2 abnormalities were calculated and two measurements of brain parenchyma fraction (BPF) were obtained by using SIENAx (Structural Image Evaluation,using Normalisation, of Atrophy; University of Oxford, Oxford, UK) and MIPAV (Medical Image Processing, Analysis, and Visualization; National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA) from T1WIs. No significant differences in BPF were found between patients and healthy subjects when using either SIENAx or MIPAV. Analysis of individual patients detected that BPF was lower by 1 standard deviation (SD) relative to patients' average BPF in one patient. The authors conclude that reductions in BPF do not occur frequently in patients with HAM/TSP. However, the authors believe that one individual case of significant brain atrophy raises the question as to whether atrophy selectively targets the spinal cord of HAM/TSP patients or may involve the brain as well. A larger patient population analyzing regional brain volume changes could be helpful in determining whether brain atrophy is a marker of disease in patients with HAM/TSP. PMID:17065127

  9. Screening of promising chemotherapeutic candidates from plants against human adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (III).

    PubMed

    Nakano, Daisuke; Ishitsuka, Kenji; Kamikawa, Mio; Matsuda, Michika; Tsuchihashi, Ryota; Okawa, Masafumi; Okabe, Hikaru; Tamura, Kazuo; Kinjo, Junei

    2013-10-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is a malignancy of mature peripheral T lymphocytes caused by human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). In our previous paper, 214 extracts from 162 plants were screened to elucidate the anti-proliferative principles against HTLV-I-infected T-cell lines. In this study, 245 extracts from 182 plants belonging to 61 families were further tested against two HTLV-I-infected T-cell lines (MT-1 and MT-2). Potent anti-proliferative effects were exhibited against MT-1 and MT-2 cells by 52 and 60 of the 245 extracts tested, respectively. Of these, two extracts showed strong inhibitory activity (EC₅₀ values 0.1-1 μg/mL; +++) against both cells, 7 extracts showed moderate inhibitory activity (EC5₅₀ values 1-10 μg/mL; ++), and 43 extracts showed weak inhibitory activity (EC₅₀ values 10-100 μg/mL; +), whereas the remaining extracts did not show any activity (EC₅₀ values >100 μg/mL; -) against MT-1 cells. On the other hand, 10 extracts showed moderate inhibitory activit and, 48 extracts showed weak inhibitory activity, whereas the remaining extracts did not show any activity against MT-2 cells. Extracts from the aerial parts of Annona reticulata and A. squamosa showed the most potent inhibitory activity and three aporphine alkaloids were isolated from their extracts as the active principles by activity-guided fractionation. PMID:23397239

  10. Influence of human T-cell leukemia virus type I tax and rex on interleukin-2 gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, K L; Curtiss, V E; Larson, E L; Haseltine, W A

    1993-01-01

    The X region of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) encodes two proteins that regulate viral gene expression. The tax protein is the product of the transactivator gene and has been shown to up-regulate the expression of some cellular genes controlling T-cell replication, including that of the interleukin-2 (IL-2) T-cell growth hormone and the alpha chain of its receptor (IL-2R). Several studies have shown that tax transactivation of the IL-2R alpha-chain promoter is mediated by binding sites for the transcriptional activator NF-kappa B, and this mechanism has also been implicated in the tax activation of IL-2 promoter activity. The rex gene product of HTLV-I regulates viral protein production by influencing mRNA expression and has been implicated in the stabilization of IL-2R alpha-chain mRNA. In the present studies, the ability of the tax and rex proteins to transactivate IL-2 gene expression has been reinvestigated. The ability of the tax protein to transactivate IL-2 promoter activity appears, at least in part, to be mediated by the recognition sequence for a DNA-binding complex known as CD28RC. Consistent with this hypothesis is the observation that tax-mediated activation of IL-2 gene expression is resistant to the immunosuppressive affects of cyclosporin A, a property postulated for the CD28RC binding complex. Unexpectedly, this tax-mediated up-regulation of IL-2 expression is synergized by the presence of the rex protein. These findings demonstrate that transactivation of IL-2 gene expression by tax is augmented by mechanisms distinct from NF-kappa B and raise the possibility that rex, as well as tax, contributes to the oncogenic capability of HTLV-I by altering the expression of the IL-2 gene in T cells infected with this retrovirus. Images PMID:8382312

  11. Human T lymphotropic virus type-1 p30II alters cellular gene expression to selectively enhance signaling pathways that activate T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Bindhu; Nair, Amrithraj M; Hiraragi, Hajime; Shen, Lei; Feuer, Gerold; Boris-Lawrie, Kathleen; Lairmore, Michael D

    2004-01-01

    Background Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a deltaretrovirus that causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and is implicated in a variety of lymphocyte-mediated disorders. HTLV-1 contains both regulatory and accessory genes in four pX open reading frames. pX ORF-II encodes two proteins, p13II and p30II, which are incompletely defined in the virus life cycle or HTLV-1 pathogenesis. Proviral clones of the virus with pX ORF-II mutations diminish the ability of the virus to maintain viral loads in vivo. Exogenous expression of p30II differentially modulates CREB and Tax-responsive element-mediated transcription through its interaction with CREB-binding protein/p300 and represses tax/rex RNA nuclear export. Results Herein, we further characterized the role of p30II in regulation of cellular gene expression, using stable p30II expression system employing lentiviral vectors to test cellular gene expression with Affymetrix U133A arrays, representing ~33,000 human genes. Reporter assays in Jurkat T cells and RT-PCR in Jurkat and primary CD4+ T-lymphocytes were used to confirm selected gene expression patterns. Our data reveals alterations of interrelated pathways of cell proliferation, T-cell signaling, apoptosis and cell cycle in p30II expressing Jurkat T cells. In all categories, p30II appeared to be an overall repressor of cellular gene expression, while selectively increasing the expression of certain key regulatory genes. Conclusions We are the first to demonstrate that p30II, while repressing the expression of many genes, selectively activates key gene pathways involved in T-cell signaling/activation. Collectively, our data suggests that this complex retrovirus, associated with lymphoproliferative diseases, relies upon accessory gene products to modify cellular environment to promote clonal expansion of the virus genome and thus maintain proviral loads in vivo. PMID:15560845

  12. Cytoplasmic Forms of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Tax Induce NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Nicot, Christophe; Tie, Feng; Giam, Chou-Zen

    1998-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax targets I-κBα and I-κBβ for phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and proteasome-mediated degradation, causing the nuclear translocation of NF-κB/Rel proteins and transcription induction of many cellular genes. The mechanism by which a nuclear protein such as Tax stimulates I-κB phosphorylation and degradation remains unclear. Here, we describe two cytoplasmic mutants of Tax, designated TaxΔN81 and TaxΔN109, from which the domains important for cyclic AMP response element binding factor (CREB) and serum response factor (SRF) binding and nuclear transport have been removed. These mutants were unable to trans activate from the HTLV-1 21-bp repeats or the serum response element in the c-fos promoter. In contrast, they activated NF-κB reporters, suggesting that activation of NF-κB by Tax occurs in the cytoplasm. Incorporation of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of the simian virus 40 large T antigen into TaxΔN81 and TaxΔN109 redirected both proteins predominantly to the nucleus yet did not restore trans activation via CREB or SRF. The NLS fusion had little effect on TaxΔN81 but reduced NF-κB trans activation by TaxΔN109, possibly because of its proximity to the NF-κB-activating domain of Tax. In contrast to wild-type Tax, the cytoplasmic TaxΔN mutants are not cytotoxic. Stable expression of TaxΔN109 in HeLa cells resulted in a significant reduction in the intracellular level of I-κBα, with the constitutive presence of NF-κB in the nucleus and concomitant activation of the NF-κB enhancer. These results are suggestive of a potential application of the TaxΔN109-like mutants in targeting I-κB degradation and NF-κB activation. Interestingly, a Tax species with a molecular mass similar to that of TaxΔN109 was identified in many HTLV-1-transformed T cells, suggesting that TaxΔN109-like species might play a role in HTLV-1-induced leukemogenesis. PMID:9658126

  13. Differential transactivation of the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 gene promoter by Tax1 and Tax2 of human T-cell leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Y; Hayashi, M; Takagi, S; Yoshie, O

    1996-01-01

    Previously, we showed that surface expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) was strongly upregulated in T cells carrying proviral human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and that the viral transactivator protein Tax1 was capable of inducing the ICAM-1 gene. To determine the responsive elements in the human ICAM-1 gene promoter, a reporter construct in which the 5'-flanking 4.4-kb region of the ICAM-1 gene was linked to the promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene was cotransfected with expression vectors for Tax1 and Tax2, both of which were separately confirmed to be potent transactivators of the HTLV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR). Tax1 strongly activated the ICAM-1 promoter in all the cell lines tested: three T-cell lines (Jurkat, MOLT-4, and CEM), one monocytoid cell line (U937), and HeLa. Unexpectedly, Tax2 activated the ICAM-1 promoter only in HeLa. By deletion and mutation analyses of the 1.3-kb 5'-flanking region, we found that Tax1 transactivated the ICAM-1 promoter mainly via a cyclic AMP-responsive element (CRE)-like site at -630 to -624 in the Jurkat T-cell line and via an NF-kappaB site at -185 to -177 and an SP-1 site at -59 to -54 in HeLa. On the other hand, Tax2 was totally inactive on the ICAM-1 promoter in Jurkat but transactivated the promoter via the NF-kappaB site at -185 to -177 in HeLa. Gel mobility shift assays demonstrated proteins specifically binding to the CRE-like site at -630 to -624 in Tax1-expressing T-cell lines. Stable expression of Tax1 but not Tax2 in Jurkat subclones enhanced the surface expression of ICAM-1. The differential ability of Tax1 and Tax2 in transactivation of the ICAM-1 gene may be related to the differential pathogenicity of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2. PMID:8970974

  14. Clastogenic effect of the human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax oncoprotein correlates with unstabilized DNA breaks.

    PubMed

    Majone, F; Jeang, K T

    2000-10-20

    Expression of the human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) Tax oncoprotein rapidly engenders DNA damage as reflected in a significant increase of micronuclei (MN) in cells. To understand better this phenomenon, we have investigated the DNA content of MN induced by Tax. Using an approach that we termed FISHI, fluorescent in situ hybridization and incorporation, we attempted to characterize MN with centric or acentric DNA fragments for the presence or absence of free 3'-OH ends. Free 3'-OH ends were defined as those ends accessible to in situ addition of digoxigenin-dUTP using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. MN were also assessed for centromeric sequences using standard fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Combining these results, we determined that Tax oncoprotein increased the frequency of MN containing centric DNA with free 3'-OH and decreased the frequency of MN containing DNA fragments that had incorporation-inaccessible 3'-ends. Recently, it has been suggested that intracellular DNA breaks without detectable 3'-OH ends are stabilized by the protective addition of telomeric caps, while breaks with freely detectable 3'-OH are uncapped and are labile to degradation, incomplete replication, and loss during cell division. Accordingly, based on increased detection of free 3'-OH-containing DNA fragments, we concluded that HTLV-I Tax interferes with protective cellular mechanism(s) used normally for stabilizing DNA breaks. PMID:10969065

  15. Tax secretion from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and Tax detection in plasma of patients with human T-lymphotropic virus-type 1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis and asymptomatic carriers.

    PubMed

    Medina, Fernando; Quintremil, Sebastián; Alberti, Carolina; Godoy, Fabián; Pando, María E; Bustamante, Andrés; Barriga, Andrés; Cartier, Luis; Puente, Javier; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Valenzuela, María A; Ramírez, Eugenio

    2016-03-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus-type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of the neurologic disease HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Tax viral protein plays a critical role in viral pathogenesis. Previous studies suggested that extracellular Tax might involve cytokine-like extracellular effects. We evaluated Tax secretion in 18 h-ex vivo peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) cultures from 15 HAM/TSP patients and 15 asymptomatic carriers. Futhermore, Tax plasma level was evaluated from other 12 HAM/TSP patients and 10 asymptomatic carriers. Proviral load and mRNA encoding Tax were quantified by PCR and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. Intracellular Tax in CD4(+)CD25(+) cells occurred in 100% and 86.7% of HAM/TSP patients and asymptomatic carriers, respectively. Percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+) Tax+, proviral load and mRNA encoding Tax were significantly higher in HAM/TSP patients. Western blot analyses showed higher secretion levels of ubiquitinated Tax in HAM/TSP patients than in asymptomatic carriers. In HTLV-1-infected subjects, Western blot of plasma Tax showed higher levels in HAM/TSP patients than in asymptomatic carriers, whereas no Tax was found in non-infected subjects. Immunoprecipitated plasma Tax resolved on SDS-PAGE gave two major bands of 57 and 48 kDa allowing identification of Tax and Ubiquitin peptides by mass spectrometry. Relative percentage of either CD4(+)CD25(+) Tax+ cells, or Tax protein released from PBMCs, or plasma Tax, correlates neither with tax mRNA nor with proviral load. This fact could be explained by a complex regulation of Tax expression. Tax secreted from PBMCs or present in plasma could potentially become a biomarker to distinguish between HAM/TSP patients and asymptomatic carriers. PMID:26241614

  16. Propensity for HBZ-SP1 isoform of HTLV-I to inhibit c-Jun activity correlates with sequestration of c-Jun into nuclear bodies rather than inhibition of its DNA-binding activity

    SciTech Connect

    Clerc, Isabelle; Hivin, Patrick; Rubbo, Pierre-Alain; Lemasson, Isabelle; Barbeau, Benoit; Mesnard, Jean-Michel

    2009-09-01

    HTLV-I bZIP factor (HBZ) contains a C-terminal zipper domain involved in its interaction with c-Jun. This interaction leads to a reduction of c-Jun DNA-binding activity and prevents the protein from activating transcription of AP-1-dependent promoters. However, it remained unclear whether the negative effect of HBZ-SP1 was due to its weak DNA-binding activity or to its capacity to target cellular factors to transcriptionally-inactive nuclear bodies. To answer this question, we produced a mutant in which specific residues present in the modulatory and DNA-binding domain of HBZ-SP1 were substituted for the corresponding c-Fos amino acids to improve the DNA-binding activity of the c-Jun/HBZ-SP1 heterodimer. The stability of the mutant, its interaction with c-Jun, DNA-binding activity of the resulting heterodimer, and its effect on the c-Jun activity were tested. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the repression of c-Jun activity in vivo is mainly due to the HBZ-SP1-mediated sequestration of c-Jun to the HBZ-NBs.

  17. Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study-II (REDS-II)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-14

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome; Blood Donors; Blood Transfusion; HIV Infections; HIV-1; HIV-2; HTLV-I; HTLV-II; Retroviridae Infections; Hepatitis, Viral, Human; Hepatitis B; Hepacivirus; West Nile Virus

  18. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax modulates interferon-alpha signal transduction through competitive usage of the coactivator CBP/p300.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Yamada, Osamu; Kawagishi, Kenji; Araki, Hiromasa; Yamaoka, Shoji; Hattori, Toshio; Shimotohno, Kunitada

    2008-09-30

    We describe here Tax protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) as an interferon (IFN)-alpha antagonist counteracting the transactivation function of IFN-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3). Co-expression of Tax, but not the Tax mutant unable to bind to CBP, significantly inhibited the reporter gene expression directed by IFN-stimulated regulatory elements, despite that the formation of DNA-binding ISGF3 complex was unaffected. Gene activation induced by STAT2 transcription domain was also inhibited by expression of Tax. Furthermore, Tax-mediated transcriptional inhibition was reversed by overexpression of p300. These observations indicate that Tax interferes with IFN-alpha-induced JAK-STAT pathway by competition with STAT2 for CBP/p300 binding. Consistently, GST pull-down assay showed that Tax dose-dependently inhibited binding of STAT2 to p300. This study suggests that Tax may prevent IFN-alpha from exerting its antiviral, antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects, thereby contributing to persistent viral infection and HTLV-1-associated oncogenesis. PMID:18678383

  19. In vivo genetic mutations define predominant functions of the human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus p12I protein

    PubMed Central

    Fukumoto, Risaku; Andresen, Vibeke; Bialuk, Izabela; Cecchinato, Valentina; Walser, Jean-Claude; Valeri, Valerio W.; Nauroth, Julie M.; Gessain, Antoine; Nicot, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 (HTLV-1) ORF-I encodes a 99–amino acid hydrophobic membrane protein, p12I, that affects receptors in different cellular compartments. We report here that proteolytic cleavage dictates different cellular localization and functions of p12I. The removal of a noncanonical endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention/retrieval signal within the amino terminus of p12I is necessary for trafficking to the Golgi apparatus and generation of a completely cleaved 8-kDa protein. The 8-kDa protein in turn traffics to the cell surface, is recruited to the immunologic synapse following T-cell receptor (TCR) ligation, and down-regulates TCR proximal signaling. The uncleaved 12-kDa form of p12I resides in the ER and interacts with the β and γc chains of the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R), the heavy chain of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, as well as calreticulin and calnexin. Genetic analysis of ORF-I from ex vivo samples of HTLV-1–infected patients reveals predominant amino acid substitutions within ORF-I that affect proteolytic cleavage, suggesting that ER-associated functions of p12I may contribute to the survival and proliferation of the infected T cells in the host. PMID:18791162

  20. Evaluation of an antimicrobial soap formula for virucidal efficacy in vitro against human immunodeficiency virus in a blood-virus mixture.

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, G C; Gubbe, S L; Neveaux, J L; Bowden, B J

    1989-01-01

    The virucidal efficacy of a health care personnel hand wash product containing 0.5% parachlorometaxylenol in a sodium C14-16 olefin sulfonate formula was evaluated in in vitro tests with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the presence of 50% whole human blood. The HTLV-IIIRF strain of HIV-1 was suspended in 50% medium-50% whole human blood and exposed to various dilutions of the hand wash product for 30 or 60 s. Following detoxification, residual infectivity was determined by a lytic cytopathogenic assay in MT2 cell cultures. No infectious HIV could be detected after a 30-s exposure to the hand wash product at dilutions of 1:5 and 1:10 and after a 60-s exposure at dilutions of 1:5, 1:10, 1:20, and 1:30. More than 99.9% of the virus was inactivated at these dilutions and exposure times. PMID:2619271

  1. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    PubMed

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis. PMID:26038756

  2. In vivo kinetics of human natural killer cells: the effects of ageing and acute and chronic viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Wallace, Diana L; de Lara, Catherine M; Ghattas, Hala; Asquith, Becca; Worth, Andrew; Griffin, George E; Taylor, Graham P; Tough, David F; Beverley, Peter C L; Macallan, Derek C

    2007-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells form a circulating population in a state of dynamic homeostasis. We investigated NK cell homeostasis by labelling dividing cells in vivo using deuterium-enriched glucose in young and elderly healthy subjects and patients with viral infection. Following a 24-hr intravenous infusion of 6,6-D2-glucose, CD3– CD16+ NK cells sorted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) were analysed for DNA deuterium content by gas chromatography mass spectrometry to yield minimum estimates for proliferation rate (p). In healthy young adults (n = 5), deuterium enrichment was maximal ∼10 days after labelling, consistent with postmitotic maturation preceding circulation. The mean (± standard deviation) proliferation rate was 4·3 ± 2·4%/day (equivalent to a doubling time of 16 days) and the total production rate was 15 ± 7·6 × 106 cells/l/day. Labelled cells disappeared from the circulation at a similar rate [6·9 ± 4·0%/day; half-life (T½) <10 days]. Healthy elderly subjects (n = 8) had lower proliferation and production rates (P = 2·5 ± 1·0%/day and 7·3 ± 3·7 × 106 cells/l/day, respectively; P = 0·04). Similar rates were seen in patients chronically infected with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) (P = 3·2 ± 1·9%/day). In acute infectious mononucleosis (n = 5), NK cell numbers were increased but kinetics were unaffected (P = 2·8 ± 1·0%/day) a mean of 12 days after symptom onset. Human NK cells have a turnover time in blood of about 2 weeks. Proliferation rates appear to fall with ageing, remain unperturbed by chronic HTLV-I infection and normalize rapidly following acute Epstein–Barr virus infection. PMID:17346281

  3. The Impact of Routine HTLV-III Antibody Testing on Public Health. National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference Statement, Vol. 6, No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    A policy statement by a group of experts on screening blood donations for contamination by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), is presented in this document. This document provides policy recommendations formed by a consensus conference sponsored by the National Institutes of Health…

  4. The rapamycin sensitivity of human T-cell leukaemia virus type I-induced T-cell proliferation is mediated independently of the polypyrimidine motifs in the 5' long terminal repeat.

    PubMed

    Rose, N; Lever, A

    2001-02-01

    The immunosuppressant rapamycin can regulate the translation of a subset of messenger RNAs, a phenotype which has been linked to the presence of a polypyrimidine motif [C(N)(4-14)] downstream of the mRNA cap structure. T-cell clones naturally infected with transcriptionally active human T-cell leukaemia virus, type I (HTLV-I) undergo autologous proliferation; this phenotype is inhibited by rapamycin but not FK506, which reverses the rapamycin effect. Within the R region of the HTLV-I 5' long terminal repeat (LTR) there are seven polypyrimidine motifs. We sought to determine if these were involved in the sensitivity of proliferation to the presence of rapamycin. Here we illustrate the generation of an in vitro model of this rapamycin-sensitivity and the analysis of LTR mutants which were created to determine the importance of the polypyrimidine motifs. Reporter gene assays suggest the effect is independent of the polypyrimidine motifs in the virus leader sequence. PMID:11161283

  5. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax releases cell cycle arrest induced by p16INK4a.

    PubMed Central

    Low, K G; Dorner, L F; Fernando, D B; Grossman, J; Jeang, K T; Comb, M J

    1997-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax oncoprotein causes cellular transformation by deregulating important cellular processes such as DNA repair, transcription, signal transduction, proliferation, and growth. Although it is clear that normal cell cycle control is deregulated during HTLV-1-induced cellular transformation, the effects of Tax on cell cycle control are not well understood. Flow cytometric analyses of human T cells indicate that cell cycle arrest in late G1, at or before the G1/S restriction point, by p16INK4a is relieved by Tax. Furthermore, Tax-dependent stimulation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation and transcriptional activation is inhibited by p16INK4a. This result suggests that p16INK4a is able to block Tax-dependent stimulation of DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression into S phase. In vitro binding assays with recombinant glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins and [35S]methionine-labeled proteins indicate that Tax binds specifically with p16INK4a but not with either p21cip1 or p27kip1. Furthermore, sequential immunoprecipitation assays with specific