Sample records for human rights discourse

  1. Human Rights Discourse in Domestic Settings: How Does it Emerge?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Neve Gordon; Nitza Berkovitch

    2007-01-01

    settings. Using Israel as a case study, and more specifically analyzing the Israeli press, we further develop some of the existing theoretical claims about how the global and local interact.We argue that in order to understand how the rights discourse is imported into the domestic arena and how it expands once it enters the local scene,it is crucial to employ

  2. AFRICAN-AMERICAN ABOLITIONISM AS A HUMAN RIGHTS DISCOURSE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy Shortell

    The resolution of the slavery issue in the United States may have had more to do with economic development and political power than a shift in public morality, but there can be no question that abolitionist discourse played a major role in the expansion of America's republican vision in the nineteenth century. The debate over slavery occurred about a century

  3. The object of "Rights" : third world women and the production of global human rights discourse

    E-print Network

    Hua, Julietta Y.

    2006-01-01

    and the United States respect and ensure women’s right toUnited States: A view from the trenches. In Religious fundamentalisms and the human rights of women,United States;” and finally, images of a Chinese culture and government restrictive of women’s rights

  4. Critique of ‘sexual orientation’ and ‘gender identity’ in human rights discourse: global queer politics beyond the Yogyakarta Principles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew Waites

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a critique of the concepts ‘sexual orientation’ and ‘gender identity’, which are being employed to contest global human rights discourses by prevailing international lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) and human rights activist networks – notably in the Declaration of Montreal (2006) and, especially, the Yogyakarta Principles (2007). Theoretical analysis, informed by social theory and queer theory,

  5. Bridging the Global and the LocalChina's Effort at Linking Human Rights Discourse and Neo-Confucianism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chih Chieh Chou

    2008-01-01

    This article aims to explore China's attempt to shift the tension between the global value and local difference over human rights debates. In other words, this article examines the relationship between West-promoted human rights and China-led neo-Confucian values within the context of globalisation rather than examining what Confucian values are. In what ways can a cultural discourse be viewed and

  6. The Paradox of Exclusion Within Equity: Interrogating Discourse at the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Delores V. Mullings

    2009-01-01

    Employment discrimination has been a challenge in Canada for many groups and for government agencies who propose to adhere to a human rights agenda. To address this concern, the federal government initiated various anti-discriminatory policies and programs to counteract employment discrimination for four designated groups: Aboriginal people, “visible minorities,” women, and people with disabilities. The Employment Equity Act and the

  7. Human Rights and Public Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowring, Bill

    2012-01-01

    This article attempts a contrast to the contribution by Hugh Starkey. Rather than his account of the inexorable rise of human rights discourse, and of the implementation of human rights standards, human rights are here presented as always and necessarily scandalous and highly contested. First, I explain why the UK has lagged so far behind its…

  8. Rights Discourses in Relation to Education of People with Intellectual Disability: Towards an Ethics of Care that Enables Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mckenzie, Judith Anne; Macleod, Catriona Ida

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we argue that human rights approaches for intellectually disabled people have failed to recognise the complexity of rights claims made by and on behalf of this group. Drawing on a research project into discourses of education for intellectually disabled people in the Eastern Cape, South Africa we discern three rights discourses;…

  9. Human Rights

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The idea of "human rights" is a relatively new development in history, but as this website from Britain's National Archives notes in its discussion of the long trajectory of struggles for equality and so forth, "We could do worse than characterizing this history as the struggle for human rights." This visually compelling online exhibit uses original documents from The National Archives to take a long view of these struggles and movements. Visitors can start their journey through the site by picking a time period, and then reading an introductory essay on the period. Each time period includes a timeline and links to digitized version of relevant documents, such as The Poor Act of 1601 and a poster for a Staffordshire coal miners' union public meeting from 1831. The site is rounded out by a thorough glossary and a document index.

  10. Teaching Human Rights: Evaluating Human Rights Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anja Mihr

    Human rights education (HRE) is currently discussed as one of the key means to establish sustainable and long-term stable societies. HRE contributes to the dissemination of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) from 1948 and to help creating a culture of Human Rights. There are dozens of international legal human rights frameworks such as conventions and treaties of the

  11. Challenging Corporate ‘Humanity’: Legal Disembodiment, Embodiment and Human Rights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anna Grear

    2007-01-01

    This article interrogates the corporate use of human rights discourse. It does so in light of concern surrounding corporate distortion of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) paradigm,1 and in light of the fact that corporations can claim shelter under human rights documents, particularly—as recently discussed by Emberland2—the European Convention of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (ECHR). The author

  12. The Queer(y)ing of Australian Public Culture Discourse: Activism, Rights Discourse, and Survival Strategies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Baden Offord

    2001-01-01

    This essay examines the contemporary context of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) activism in Australia situating the theoretical and practical concerns in the ambit of survival strategies and rights discourse. Drawing on media, interviews, and a specific piece of proposed legislation, the essay surveys and analyses the effects of LGBT strategies of survival that are demonstrated in public culture

  13. Clinical Relevance of Discourse Characteristics after Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Margaret Lehman

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Discourse characteristics of adults with right hemisphere brain damage are similar to those reported for healthy older adults, prompting the question of whether changes are due to neurological lesions or normal aging processes. The clinical relevance of potential differences across groups was examined through ratings by speech-language…

  14. Human Rights and Capabilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amartya Sen

    2005-01-01

    The two concepts — human rights and capabilities — go well with each other, so long as we do not try to subsume either concept entirely within the territory of the other. There are many human rights that can be seen as rights to particular capabilities. However, human rights to important process freedoms cannot be adequately analysed within the capability

  15. A Latin American Sociopolitical Conceptualization of Human Rights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ariadna Estévez

    2008-01-01

    Unlike their counterparts in Asia and Africa, many Latin American human rights scholars have passively accepted the supposed cultural relevance of the liberal discourse of human rights and have limited academic studies to the sphere of legal analysis. Nevertheless, the work of the social sciences in the region has enriched human rights thought and the practices of social movements have

  16. The Rhetorical Question of Human Rights--A Preface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doxtader, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Does rhetoric have a place in the discourse of human rights? Without certain reply, as the dilemmas of defining, claiming, and promoting human rights appear both to include and exclude the rhetorical gesture, this question invites inquiry into the preface of the contemporary human rights regime, the moment of the aftermath that provokes a struggle…

  17. Human Rights/Human Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canning, Cynthia

    1978-01-01

    The faculty of Holy Names High School developed an interdisciplinary human rights program with school-wide activities focusing on three selected themes: the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in conjunction with Human Rights Week; Food; and Women. This article outlines major program activities. (SJL)

  18. Rights-Based Education and Conflict: A Cross-National Study of Rights Discourse in Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Susan Garnett; Tiplic, Dijana

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the extent to which rights-based education is utilised in textbooks from conflict-affected countries. Drawing on a unique dataset of 528 secondary social science textbooks from 71 countries from 1966 to 2008, we analyse factors that predict a rights discourse in texts. We find that textbooks from conflict-affected nations…

  19. Human Rights in the Practice of Family Therapy: Domestic Violence, a Case in Point

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Teresa McDowell; Kathryn Libal; Andraé L. Brown

    2012-01-01

    In this article the authors introduce a human rights framework into the practice of family therapy. In particular, the authors explore the relevance of human rights to the practice of liberation-based work, arguing for situating individual experience within collective human rights discourse; drawing from human rights movements to promote resistance and resilience; and using a human rights framework to promote

  20. Human Rights in China

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Created in 1989, Human Rights in China is one of the major sources of information on human rights conditions in the People's Republic of China. The site offers press releases, reports, articles from its quarterly journal, China Rights Forum, organizational work reports, educational materials, action ideas and related links. In addition, the site covers a number of topics, including political prisoners and dissent, legal reform, freedom of association, women's rights, workers' rights, children's rights, and human rights education. The entire site is also available in Chinese.

  1. A Human Rights Glossary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Presents a human rights glossary that includes definitions of basic terms, treaties, charters, and groups/organizations that have been featured in previous articles in this edition of "Update on Law-Related Education"; the human rights terms have been compiled as part of the celebration of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). (CMK)

  2. THE 'HUMAN RIGHTS APPROACH'

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ernst-Ulrich Petersmann

    2004-01-01

    The today universal recognition of 'inalienable' human rights implies that the legitimacy and legality of all government measures, including rules and decisions of intergovernmental organizations, depend also on their respect for human rights as defined in national constitutions and international law. This contribution argues that the universal human rights obligations of every Member of the World Trade Organization (WTO) pursue

  3. Glasgow Human Rights Network

    E-print Network

    Guo, Zaoyang

    ways in which people and communities can be a part of wider campaigns for equality and human rights. We and knowledge on the Commonwealth, international human rights, sexual orientation, gender identity and intersex working to uphold the human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans people internationally. www

  4. Human Rights in Education

    E-print Network

    Ellis, Randy

    in the 1960s, is evident in the talk about rights of varied groups, such as women, aboriginal populations1 Human Rights in Education European View on Childhood and Education . .3 Children's Rights in Competitive Sport . . . . . . . . .4 Equality Rights of the Child . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Resources

  5. HEALTH AND HUMAN RIGHTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan M. Mann; Sofia Gruskin; MIA Troyen Brennan; Harvey V Fineberg

    1994-01-01

    H ealth and human rights have rarely been linked in an ex- plicit manner. With few exceptions, notably involving access to health care, discussions about health have rarely.included hu- man rights considerations. Similarly, except when obvious dam- age to health is the primary manifestation of a human rights abuse, such as with torture, health perspectives have been gen- erally absent

  6. The competing discourses of HIV\\/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa: Discourses of rights and empowerment vs discourses of control and exclusion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gill Seidel

    1993-01-01

    The competing discourses of HIV\\/AIDS circulating in sub-Saharan Africa are identified. These are medical, medico-moral, developmental (distinguishing between 'women in development' and gender and development perspectives), legal, ethical, and the rights discourse of groups living with HIV\\/AIDS and of African pressure groups. The analytical framework is that of discourse analysis as exemplified by Michel Foucault. The medical and medico-moral are

  7. The Quest for Universal Human Rights: A Brief Comparative Study of Universal Declarations of Human Rights by the UN and the Islamic Council of Europe

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nayeefa Chowdhury

    2008-01-01

    The universalist discourse of human rights cannot be defended without assuming a metaphysical position concerning the sanctity and inherent moral endowment of humankind. The canonical texts of Islam are accommodative of multiple interpretations. Traditionalist interpretations of the texts appear to stand in conflict with the universalist discourse of human rights principles, whereas the contextual readings of the Qur'an reveal a

  8. Local suffering and the global discourse of mental health and human rights: An ethnographic study of responses to mental illness in rural Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Read, Ursula M; Adiibokah, Edward; Nyame, Solomon

    2009-01-01

    Background The Global Movement for Mental Health has brought renewed attention to the neglect of people with mental illness within health policy worldwide. The maltreatment of the mentally ill in many low-income countries is widely reported within psychiatric hospitals, informal healing centres, and family homes. International agencies have called for the development of legislation and policy to address these abuses. However such initiatives exemplify a top-down approach to promoting human rights which historically has had limited impact at the level of those living with mental illness and their families. Methods This research forms part of a longitudinal anthropological study of people with severe mental illness in rural Ghana. Visits were made to over 40 households with a family member with mental illness, as well as churches, shrines, hospitals and clinics. Ethnographic methods included observation, conversation, semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions with people with mental illness, carers, healers, health workers and community members. Results Chaining and beating of the mentally ill was found to be commonplace in homes and treatment centres in the communities studied, as well as with-holding of food ('fasting'). However responses to mental illness were embedded within spiritual and moral perspectives and such treatment provoked little sanction at the local level. Families struggled to provide care for severely mentally ill relatives with very little support from formal health services. Psychiatric services were difficult to access, particularly in rural communities, and also seen to have limitations in their effectiveness. Traditional and faith healers remained highly popular despite the routine maltreatment of the mentally ill in their facilities. Conclusion Efforts to promote the human rights of those with mental illness must engage with the experiences of mental illness within communities affected in order to grasp how these may underpin the use of practices such as mechanical restraint. Interventions which operate at the local level with those living with mental illness within rural communities, as well as family members and healers, may have greater potential to effect change in the treatment of the mentally ill than legislation or investment in services alone. PMID:19825191

  9. Against SuperciliousnessRevisiting the Debate 60 Years after the Adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eva Kalny

    2009-01-01

    ? This text will analyze the commonly accepted philosophical foundation of human rights, the international system of protection of human rights and selected perspectives of activists. It argues that dominant European, North American and Australian discourses of human rights do not describe human rights as such but only constitute specific expressions of human rights, and attempts to outline the characteristics

  10. carleton.ca Human Rights

    E-print Network

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    carleton.ca Human Rights #12;Human rights contribute, through theory and practice, to people and approaches from the humanities and social sciences, the Human Rights program provides an overview of historical and contemporary human rights issues and their impact on human lives in different cultural

  11. Fighting for Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Bao

    2011-01-01

    Speak Truth To Power consists of 17 teacher-developed lessons based on the stories of rights advocates from all over the world. The lessons were created for sixth-through 12th-grade students, and have come to New York schools thanks to the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights and the New York State United Teachers union. Speak…

  12. Human & Constitutional Rights

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Arthur W. Diamond Law Library at Columbia Law School maintains this excellent resource for finding materials on human rights and constitutional rights. The metasite serves students, scholars, and practitioners as a portal to documents and Internet resources on international and domestic law related to human and constitutional rights. The information resources are divided into six sections: Country Reports, International Links, Regional Links, National Links, Documents, and Other Web Resources. Each section is clearly organized into neat lists or pop-up menus to ease navigation. Marylin Raisch -- the International, Comparative, and Foreign Law Librarian responsible for this metasite -- also provides a Hot Topics section, which posts information on current events related to human and constitutional rights.

  13. Human Rights: The Essential Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Carol; Hansen, Carol Rae; Wilde, Ralph; Bronkhorst, Daan; Moritz, Frederic A.; Rolle, Baptiste; Sherman, Rebecca; Southard, Jo Lynn; Wilkinson, Robert; Poole, Hilary, Ed.

    This reference work documents the history of human rights theory, explains each article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, explores the contemporary human rights movement, and examines the major human rights issues facing the world today. This book is the first to combine historical and contemporary perspectives on these critical…

  14. John F. Kennedy's Civil Rights Discourse: The Evolution from "Principled Bystander" to Public Advocate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldzwig, Steven R.; Dionisopoulos, George N.

    1989-01-01

    Argues that President John F. Kennedy's civil rights discourse evidences an important evolutionary pattern marking a transition from legal argument to moral argument. Highlights two speeches as exemplars of this change. Asserts that this analysis is useful in the study of contemporary presidential discourse during times of domestic crisis. (MM)

  15. Scientists and Human Rights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makdisi, Yousef

    2012-02-01

    The American Physical Society has a long history of involvement in defense of human rights. The Committee on International Freedom of Scientists was formed in the mid seventies as a subcommittee within the Panel On Public Affairs ``to deal with matters of an international nature that endangers the abilities of scientists to function as scientists'' and by 1980 it was established as an independent committee. In this presentation I will describe some aspects of the early history and the impetus that led to such an advocacy, the methods employed then and how they evolved to the present CIFS responsibility ``for monitoring concerns regarding human rights for scientists throughout the world''. I will also describe the current approach and some sample cases the committee has pursued recently, the interaction with other human rights organizations, and touch upon some venues through which the community can engage to help in this noble cause.

  16. Teachers and Human Rights Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osler, Audrey; Starkey, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    Why do teachers need to be familiar with human rights? In multicultural societies, whose values take precedence? How do schools resolve tensions between children's rights and teachers' rights? Campaigners, politicians and the media cite human rights to justify or challenge anything from peaceful protest to military action. The phrase "human

  17. United Nations: Human Rights

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    How does the United Nations work to protect human rights? This subject-specific website provides information on the various offices, officials, policy initiatives, and actions related to this important agenda. There are five main sections to the site: UN Bodies, Thematic Issues, International Courts and Tribunals, Other Resources, and Past Conferences. The UN Bodies section contains information about the UN Human Rights Council, its various charters, treaties, and more. Thematic Issues is another great feature, offering detailed information on the Secretary-General's Campaign to End Violence Against Women as well as the UNâ??s Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. News items from around the world can be found on the right-hand side of the page, effectively covering everything from Sri Lankan ethnic minority groups to ongoing conflicts in Pakistan.

  18. Freedom: Animal Rights, Human Rights, And Superhuman Rights

    E-print Network

    Fowler, Corbin; Manig, Thomas

    FREEDOM: ANIMAL RIGHTS/. HUMAN 'RIGHTS, AND SUPERHUMAN RIGHTS Corbin Fowler & Thomas Manig It is typical (even among many of the most zealous advocates of humane treatment of animals) for people to assume that the only moral issue regarding our... treatment of animals lies in our needlessly slaughtering them or causing them pain. Thus, people rightly complain about our causing the extinction of a certain species or of those who cruelly beat their pets. We, however, have come to think...

  19. Do international human rights treaties improve respect for human rights?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric Neumayer

    2004-01-01

    After the non-binding Universal Declaration of Human Rights, many global and regional human rights treaties have been concluded. Critics argue that these are unlikely to have made any actual difference in reality. Others contend that international regimes can improve respect for human rights in state parties, particularly in more democratic countries or countries with a strong civil society devoted to

  20. Do International Human Rights Treaties Improve Respect for Human Rights?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eric Neumayer

    2005-01-01

    After the nonbinding Universal Declaration of Human Rights, many global and regional human rights treaties have been concluded. Critics argue that these are unlikely to have made any actual difference in reality. Others contend that international regimes can improve respect for human rights in state parties, particularly in more democratic countries or countries with a strong civil society devoted to

  1. Two approaches to human rights

    E-print Network

    Holland, Sean Jamison

    2009-01-01

    Contemporary philosophy of human rights is dominated by two seemingly opposed approaches. This dissertation is concerned with the choice between them. The traditional approach to human rights is characterized by the belief ...

  2. Democracy and Human Rights

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Maintained by the US Department of State's Office of International Information Programs (OIIP), formerly the USIA, this site is among the four US Policy topics covered in depth on the OIIP site. The Democracy and Human Rights site contains fewer resources than the International Security site, and in fact, the first headline links to the latter. The site offers access to several journals off the front page -- Criminal Justice in the United States, Accountability in Government, and Towards a Community of Democracies -- but the bulk of the site's material is divided into two sections, Democracy and Human Rights. Each contains policy documents, in-depth looks at selected issues, links to other resources, and more.

  3. Human Rights Issues

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Chinese Embassy site contains statements on China's foreign policy in general, Sino-US relations, and relations with other countries. In addition, the Embassy also offers statements and papers on human rights issues. The State Visit of Chinese President Jiang Zemin last week represented a thaw in official Sino-US Relations, which have been somewhat chilly since Tiananmen in 1989. Despite reaching agreements on a broad range of security, economic, environmental and law-enforcement issues, the two Presidents were clearly far apart on the issue of human rights. While President Clinton made mention of the right to political and religious expression, President Jiang expressed the need for political and social stability in his country. On the whole, both leaders have achieved their goals. President Clinton has secured China's cooperation on several issues, most importantly arms control and trade, while the state dinner and formal ceremony recognized China's role as a key player in the world economy and Jiang's international position as its head of state.

  4. Neural mechanisms of discourse comprehension: a human lesion study.

    PubMed

    Barbey, Aron K; Colom, Roberto; Grafman, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    Discourse comprehension is a hallmark of human social behaviour and refers to the act of interpreting a written or spoken message by constructing mental representations that integrate incoming language with prior knowledge and experience. Here, we report a human lesion study (n = 145) that investigates the neural mechanisms underlying discourse comprehension (measured by the Discourse Comprehension Test) and systematically examine its relation to a broad range of psychological factors, including psychometric intelligence (measured by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale), emotional intelligence (measured by the Mayer, Salovey, Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test), and personality traits (measured by the Neuroticism-Extraversion-Openness Personality Inventory). Scores obtained from these factors were submitted to voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping to elucidate their neural substrates. Stepwise regression analyses revealed that working memory and extraversion reliably predict individual differences in discourse comprehension: higher working memory scores and lower extraversion levels predict better discourse comprehension performance. Lesion mapping results indicated that these convergent variables depend on a shared network of frontal and parietal regions, including white matter association tracts that bind these areas into a coordinated system. The observed findings motivate an integrative framework for understanding the neural foundations of discourse comprehension, suggesting that core elements of discourse processing emerge from a distributed network of brain regions that support specific competencies for executive and social function. PMID:24293267

  5. Neural mechanisms of discourse comprehension: a human lesion study

    PubMed Central

    Colom, Roberto; Grafman, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    Discourse comprehension is a hallmark of human social behaviour and refers to the act of interpreting a written or spoken message by constructing mental representations that integrate incoming language with prior knowledge and experience. Here, we report a human lesion study (n = 145) that investigates the neural mechanisms underlying discourse comprehension (measured by the Discourse Comprehension Test) and systematically examine its relation to a broad range of psychological factors, including psychometric intelligence (measured by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale), emotional intelligence (measured by the Mayer, Salovey, Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test), and personality traits (measured by the Neuroticism-Extraversion-Openness Personality Inventory). Scores obtained from these factors were submitted to voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping to elucidate their neural substrates. Stepwise regression analyses revealed that working memory and extraversion reliably predict individual differences in discourse comprehension: higher working memory scores and lower extraversion levels predict better discourse comprehension performance. Lesion mapping results indicated that these convergent variables depend on a shared network of frontal and parietal regions, including white matter association tracts that bind these areas into a coordinated system. The observed findings motivate an integrative framework for understanding the neural foundations of discourse comprehension, suggesting that core elements of discourse processing emerge from a distributed network of brain regions that support specific competencies for executive and social function. PMID:24293267

  6. A Hierarchy of Human Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockett, Charles

    To establish an objective conception of human rights, one must first identify basic needs intrinsic to all people and then determine whether these needs are or can be hierarchically ordered. Many scholars have conducted research on the concept of human needs, particularly in the area of human rights. Among these scholars are Abraham H. Maslow…

  7. Human rights: in the real world 

    E-print Network

    Brown, Abbe

    2006-01-01

    An analysis of the relevance of human rights to litigation and exploitation of intellectual property rights in the UK. The paper considers the impact of the Human Rights Act 1998, and other human rights instruments, materials and case law...

  8. Muslim Women’s Rights Discourse in the Pre independece Period

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sabiha Hussain

    2009-01-01

    The present paper deals with the discourse of the rights of Muslim women in the pre- independence period with particular reference to the Shariat Act 1937 and the Muslim Marriage Dissolution Act 1939. A few questions have been raised which would provide a comprehensive idea of the intentions behind these enactments. This paper attempts to explore the sociohistorical and political

  9. Human rights focus on trafficked women: An international law and feminist perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Annette Lansink

    2006-01-01

    Trafficking in women is regarded as both a cause and consequence of human rights violations. This article situates trafficking within different, intersecting analytical frameworks, including gender, migration, labour law, criminal law and human rights. It aims to contribute to the feminist project by highlighting the contested nature of the present discourse and, in particular, by paying attention to legal strategies

  10. Who's right? Human rights, sexual rights and social change in Barbados

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A. B. Murray

    2006-01-01

    Currently, in a number of public and semi?public forums in Barbados, the idea of ‘sexual rights’ is being discussed and debated. However, different meanings are attached to ‘rights’. This paper examines how these meanings demonstrate that different interpretations of sexuality, society, and morality are circulating through Barbados today. It also addresses whether or not sexual rights discourses are the best

  11. An African Perspective on Human Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiman, David

    1992-01-01

    Presents a series of classroom activities comparing differing views of human rights in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the African Charter on Human and People's Rights. Includes excerpts from the African Charter on Human and People's Rights and the full text of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. (CFR)

  12. Speaking Truth to Power: Women's Rights as Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crocco, Margaret Smith

    2007-01-01

    The author considers the treatment of women's rights as human rights in the social studies curriculum. She discusses the role of the United Nations in promoting women's rights since the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948. She also reviews the treatment of women's rights within social studies curriculum today through a…

  13. Gendered Constructions of Citizenship: Young Kenyans' Negotiations of Rights Discourses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnot, Madeleine; Chege, Fatuma N.; Wawire, Violet

    2012-01-01

    This paper contributes to the study of citizenship by interrogating how young people in Nairobi (Chege and Arnot 2012) perceive their rights of citizenship. It builds on previous analyses of the connections between gender, education and poverty's poor urban settlements by focusing on the political dimensions of the young people's lives. The…

  14. Hemispheric Contributions to Lexical Ambiguity Resolution in a Discourse Context: Evidence from Individuals with Unilateral Left and Right Hemisphere Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grindrod, C.M.; Baum, S.R.

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, a cross-modal semantic priming task was used to investigate the ability of left-hemisphere-damaged (LHD) nonfluent aphasic, right-hemisphere-damaged (RHD) and non-brain-damaged (NBD) control subjects to use a discourse context to resolve lexically ambiguous words. Subjects first heard four-sentence discourse passages ending…

  15. Scientific Freedom and Human Rights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Elisa

    2000-03-01

    As part of her ongoing work monitoring issues at the intersection of science and human rights, Ms. Munoz has highlighted violations of academic freedom in Serbia and Iran, the denial of visas and travel licenses to U.S. and Cuban scientists, interference with scientific freedom in Brazil, Mexico, Russia, and the Ukraine, the use of organs from executed prisoners in China, legislation jeopardizing women's health in Iran, and the closure of centers for the treatment of torture survivors in Turkey. Such violations contravene international human rights principles listed in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international human rights covenants. Ms. Munoz will describe current violations of scientific freedom and the relevant international principles on which these freedoms rest.

  16. Reservations to human rights treaties 

    E-print Network

    McCall-Smith, Kasey Lowe

    2012-06-26

    This thesis examines the default application of the 1969 Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties reservation rules to reservations to human rights treaties. The contemporary practice of formulating reservations allows ...

  17. Human rights and health law.

    PubMed

    Freckelton, Ian

    2006-08-01

    Important statutory and common law developments are changing the landscape of health law in Australia. Human rights considerations are formally included amongst the factors to be applied in the interpretation of statutory provisions and evaluating the lawfulness of actions on the part of government instrumentalities. The Human Rights Act 2004 (ACT) and the Charter of Human Rights and Responsibilities Act 2006 (Vic) create limited bills of rights at State/Territory level in two Australian jurisdictions. Although neither is entrenched, they have the potential to make it more difficult for government to promulgate laws that are inconsistent with human rights, as defined. They will have important repercussions for the evolution of health law in these jurisdictions. The decision of Royal Women's Hospital v Medical Practitioners Board (Vic) [2006] VSCA 85 by the Victorian Court of Appeal has also provided a legitimation for parties to incorporate human rights perspectives in submissions about the interpretation of statutory provisions where health rights are in conflict. PMID:16937776

  18. The Human Right to Water

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Several new resources are now available (in .pdf format) at the Pacific Institute for Studies in Development, Environment, and Security Website. This resource is a reprint of Peter Gleick's fifteen-page article, "The Human Right to Water." Originally published in 1999 in Water Policy, the paper argues that "a human right to adequate supplies of fresh water can be derived from principles of customary international law and international treaty regimes."

  19. Program Summary 2012 HUMAN RIGHTS MINOR

    E-print Network

    Su, Xiao

    struggles, meet and work with Bay Area human rights organizations, and gain experience in a graduate style,humanrightsadvocacy/reporting,forensicreporting on war crimes, genocide and crimes against humanity, community organizing, social movement networksProgram Summary 2012 HUMAN RIGHTS MINOR About the Minor in Human Rights: The Minor in Human Rights

  20. Teaching Strategy: Using the Human Rights Poster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Update on Law-Related Education, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Describes a lesson focusing on a human-rights poster that provides visual reinforcement of the second article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights that enforces freedom from discrimination. Presents students with examples of human-rights situations to assist them in understanding that all people are entitled to human rights. (CMK)

  1. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landorf, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    A study of human rights prepares students for their role as global citizens and their study of practices in the world's countries that relate to the rights of human beings. Today, when one talks of human rights it is usually with reference to the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). It is the task of teachers to give students the…

  2. Teaching and Learning about Human Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lister, Ian

    What a human rights course should consist of, i.e., the objectives, course content, teaching methods, and evaluation techniques, are discussed. Human rights education must foster attitudes of tolerance and respect, provide knowledge about human rights, and develop students' awareness of how to translate human rights into social and political…

  3. Human Rights Education Ways and Means

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sajan, K. S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the importance of human rights education as proclaimed by UN (1994) and also the strategies for developing human rights education by UN General assembly 2005. In proclaiming the United Nations Decade for Human Rights Education (1995-2004), in December 1994, the General Assembly defined human rights education as "a life-long…

  4. Foetus or child? Abortion discourse and attributions of humanness.

    PubMed

    Miko?ajczak, Ma?gorzata; Bilewicz, Micha?

    2014-11-24

    Due to moral, religious, and cultural sensibilities, the topic of abortion still gives rise to controversy. The ongoing public debate has become visibly polarized with the usage of the pro-life versus pro-choice rhetoric. The aim of the current research was to investigate whether the language used in abortion discourse can affect people's attitudes by changing their attributions of humanity to unborn. Across three experimental studies we showed that participants who read about a 'foetus', compared to a 'child' declared higher support for elective abortion (Study 1; N = 108), this effect can be explained by greater humanness, as reflected in human nature traits, attributed to the child (vs. the foetus; Study 2; N = 121). The effect is mediated uniquely by attribution of human nature, but not by human uniqueness traits (Study 3; N = 120). These findings serve as a starting point for discussion of the role of language in shaping attitudes on abortion and other morally ambiguous issues. PMID:25418861

  5. Linguistic Human Rights: Overcoming Linguistic Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skutnabb-Kangas, Tove, Ed.; Phillipson, Robert, Ed.

    A collection of essays on linguistic human rights includes: "Combining Immigrant and Autochthonous Language Rights: A Territorial Approach to Multilingualism" (Francois Grin); "On the Limits of Ethnolinguistic Democracy" (Joshua A. Fishman); "Linguistic Human Rights and Educational Policy in Russia" (Alexei A. Leontiev); "Linguistic Human Rights,…

  6. Institutionalizing Human Rights in Southeast Asia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John D. Ciorciari

    2012-01-01

    In 2009 and 2010, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) established two new human rights bodies: an inter-governmental human rights commission and a commission for the protection of the rights of women and children. This article examines the process leading to their creation, focusing on the normative and political debates that made creating an ASEAN human rights mechanism a

  7. Web Resources for Teaching about Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merryfield, Merry M.; Badang, Germain; Bragg, Christina; Kvasov, Aleksandr; Taylor, Nathan; Waliaula, Anne; Yamaguchi, Misato

    2012-01-01

    The study of human rights is inseparable from social studies. Beyond the basic political, economic, and social freedoms and rights spelled out in The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, hundreds of specialized topics have developed that demonstrate the complex nature of human rights in the twenty-first-century world--environmental exploitation…

  8. New Tactics in Human Rights

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    As this website explains in its Common Questions area, "Tactics consist of how to make a change", and given this statement, the site will be of great interest to those with a concern for international human rights. The New Tactics in Human Rights organization is primarily concerned with providing practitioners in the field with a package of practical tools, a worldwide symposium, and a number of other strategic planning resources. The project itself is coordinated by the Center for Victims of Torture and is overseen by a board of advisors that includes novelist Mario Vargas Llosa and the Right Honorable Kim Campbell, who is the former Prime Minister of Canada. The "Tools for Action" section is a real find as it contains a number of tactical notebooks taken from various case studies around the world, including work from Turkey, Hungary, Romania, and Albania. It is worth noting that many of the materials on the site are also available in Spanish and French.

  9. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Rights: A Human Rights Perspective. Human Rights Education Series, Topic Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, David M.

    This curriculum is intended to further thoughtful examination and responsible action among high school students about lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) issues. Unlike other curricula this discussion is not in the context of civil or political rights but in the broader context of human rights. These rights, as defined in the Universal…

  10. Human rights and abortion laws

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J Cook; B. M Dickens

    1999-01-01

    Human rights protections have developed to resist governmental intrusion in private life and choices. Abortion laws have evolved in legal practice to protect not fetuses as such but state interests, particularly in prenatal life. National and international tribunals are increasingly called upon to resolve conflicts between state enforcement of continuation of pregnancy against women's wishes and women's reproductive choices. Legal

  11. Development and Women's Human Rights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sunila Abeyesekera

    he Millennium Declaration affirms both gender equality and human rights as central commitments made by gov- ernments at the UN Millennium Assembly in 2000. The Millennium Development Goals constitute an attempt to set quanitifiable priorities in the development arena, but cannot be understood outside of the context of the broader Millennium Declaration. Equality, including the \\

  12. Human rights, health and development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Tarantola; Andrew Byrnes; Michael Johnson; Lynn Kemp; Anthony B Zwi; Sofia Gruskin

    Human rights, health and development represent interdependent sets of values, aspirations and disciplines. Drawing on these domains, this article offers a theoretical and practical framework for the analysis, application and assessment of health, justice and progress. It provides a simple conceptual framework illustrating the interdependence of these domains and highlights their key features and underlying principles. It then describes the

  13. Literacy, Human Rights, and Democracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivero, Jose H.

    1989-01-01

    Notes 1990 is UNESCO's International Literacy Year. Presents alternative ways of overcoming illiteracy in Latin America. Suggests major contributing factors concern the region's weak economy. Argues the state's role is decisive in transferring resources to marginal sectors. Views literacy as a basic human right and that it allows for democratic…

  14. Education Service Contracting in the Philippines: Human Rights as Trumps, Goals, or Policy Talk?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Donald R.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the goals and purposes of education within the international development discourse have shifted significantly away from education for productivity or human capital development and towards education for the fulfillment of the individual through human rights. The current global education climate provides governments with an…

  15. Taught degree MA in Human Rights

    E-print Network

    Sussex, University of

    in Human Rights brings together expertise from anthropology, law, international relations and politics. Human rights Taught degree MA in Human Rights 1 year full time/2 years part time This interdisciplinary, transnational social movements, and international agencies. You develop your ability to critically assess human

  16. [The right to food as a human right].

    PubMed

    Jusidman-Rapoport, Clara

    2014-01-01

    The right to adequate food is included as a human right in Article 25 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in which dignity and equality are recognized as inherent to all people. The objective of the present work is to summarize the main statements contained in the international instruments related to this right. The text tries to clarify -according to such instruments and the derived thoughts in the international human rights system- what is the right to adequate food, what are the guarantees that can make it possible, what are the States commitments, what actions should be taken by them in order to effectively realize it, and what are the mechanisms that allow this right to be enforceable and justiciable. It ends stating that -with the aim to guarantee the right to food- interinstitutional, intergovernmental, academic and social participation are required, emphasizing the importance of eradicating extreme poverty and hunger worldwide. PMID:25649458

  17. World Report 2010: Human Rights Watch

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Human Rights Watch is an organization whose goal is the following: "focusing international attention where human rights are violated, we give voice to the oppressed and hold oppressors accountable for their crimes." Every year over the past twenty years Human Rights Watch has published their World Report, which is an evaluation of more than 90 countries' human rights conditions. The staff of Human Rights Watch works closely with the human rights activists in each country, so as to get an accurate picture. The interactive map on the lower half of the homepage allows visitors to scroll over the map, which will highlight a country, and a dialogue box will open to reveal the country highlighted, and a link to read the chapter from the current World Report, reports from the prior year, and a multimedia feature on the selected country. As a note, only the blue colored countries have had human rights data collected on their human rights condition.

  18. Is there a human right to democracy?

    E-print Network

    Abdul-Matin, Karim (Ishmawil Karim)

    2006-01-01

    My dissertation asks whether there is a human right to democracy. This is a difficult question, not least because there is no consensus about either what democracy requires or how to interpret human rights. The introduction ...

  19. Paradoxical bedfellows: Nihilism and human rights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew Fagan

    2005-01-01

    This article identifies and considers the existence of a manifest, though often overlooked, paradox contained within the doctrine\\u000a of human rights. The principal justifications for human rights are based upon the identification of variously conceived human\\u000a characteristics, or attributes of human agency. Nevertheless, human rights have all too often been required to protect some\\u000a human beings from being seriously harmed

  20. Reflections on Regional Human Rights Law

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gabriel M. Wilner

    1995-01-01

    The principal purpose of the Colloquium, as can be seen from the great attention given to the papers presented by the second panel, was to discuss the uses of customary international human rights law in the defense of human rights before national courts. More generally, these discussions focused on the effectiveness of customary international human rights rules in influencing legislative

  1. Human Rights and Teaching for Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landorf, Hilary

    2010-01-01

    According to the author, teaching for social justice entails the acquisition of the following learning outcomes: (1) knowledge of the meaning, historical development, and application of human rights; (2) ability to analyze human rights from multiple perspectives; and (3) willingness to address human rights issues in local, global, intercultural,…

  2. Building a Human Rights Youth Justice System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyles, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The Australian Capital Territory's Human Rights Act 2004 and the establishment of an ACT Human Rights Commission have begun to create a human rights culture in the ACT. This paper highlights the influence of this culture on the design and build of the ACT's new youth justice centre. (Contains 2 figures.)

  3. HUMAN RIGHTS 2014-2015 concentration information

    E-print Network

    Levinson, David M.

    HUMAN RIGHTS 2014-2015 concentration information Applies to MPP concentrations and MPA focus/concentrations (updated 08/04/2014) The concentration in Human Rights is a pre-approved self-designed concentration intended to provide an interdisciplinary foundation in human rights studies and practical experience

  4. Examining Human Rights in a Global Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Greg; Inoue, Keiko; Orrick, Stefanie

    The United Nations' founding in 1945 and the 1948 adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights reflected the international community's growing commitment to the protection and recognition of what is now referred to as human rights. Despite increased international attention, human rights violations continue to occur at the local, regional,…

  5. Do Human Rights Offenders Oppose Human Rights Resolutions in the United Nations?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Axel Dreher; Bernhard Boockmann

    2007-01-01

    We investigate voting behavior on human rights in the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA). Our central question is whether countries with a low human rights record systematically oppose human rights resolutions. An instrumental account of voting would suggest that these countries aim to weaken UN human rights resolutions since they could be future targets of these policies. If reputation aspects

  6. Misconceptions about Human Rights and Women's Rights in Islam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syed, Khalida Tanvir

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to clarify three current misconceptions about the Islamic faith and issues of human rights and women's rights in the West. The first misconception is that Muslims are terrorists because they believe in Jihad. It is factually the case that Islamic teachings stress the value of peace and prosperity for all human beings. The second…

  7. Human Rights Watch World Report 2002

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Human Rights Watch has just released its twelfth annual review of human rights practices around the globe in the 2002 Human Rights Watch World Report. This report addresses developments in sixty-six countries, covering the period from November 2000 through November 2001. Most of the chapters examine significant human rights developments in a particular country, the response of global actors (such as the European Union, Japan, the United States, the United Nations, and various regional organizations), and the freedom of local human rights defenders to conduct their work. Other chapters address important thematic concerns.

  8. 75 FR 78147 - Human Rights Day, Bill of Rights Day, and Human Rights Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ...rights a reality for every person, regardless of race, gender, religion, nationality, sexual orientation, or circumstance...each human being lives with dignity, security, and equality. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President...

  9. Producing Neoliberal Citizens: Critical Reflections on Human Rights Education in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoja-Moolji, Shenila

    2014-01-01

    This paper challenges the celebratory uptake of human rights education (HRE) in postcolonial contexts by making visible the ideological and political entanglements of the discourse with neoliberal assumptions of citizenship. I draw evidence from, and critically reflect on, a specific HRE programme--a series of summer camps for girls entitled,…

  10. Possible Contributions of a Psychology of Liberation: Whither Health and Human Rights?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Brinton Lykes

    2000-01-01

    This article explores the possible contributions of a psychology of liberation for the practice of health psychology. It explores alternative psychological ‘practices’, for example participatory action research, with groups historically marginalized from access to power and resources. Selected lenses for crafting a liberatory psychology include: discourse of human rights and mental health; cultural and constructivist psychological theory; and reflexivity. Specific

  11. Human Rights in Social Science Textbooks: Cross-National Analyses, 1970-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, John W.; Bromley, Patricia; Ramirez, Francisco O.

    2010-01-01

    In reaction to the disasters of the first half the 20th century and World War II, a dramatic world movement arose emphasizing the human rights of persons in global society. The contrast--celebrated in international treaties, intergovernmental and nongovernmental organizations, and much cultural discourse--was with narrower world emphases on the…

  12. Incorporating Human Rights into the College Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledbetter, Pat

    This paper recounts development of a community college humanities course titled Human Rights/Human Wrongs: The History, Philosophy, Law, Art, and Literature of the Human Rights Movement. The author argues that a special focus, interdisciplinary course provides a broader base for exploring and understanding most of the pressing issues of our time.…

  13. Teaching about Human Rights and American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Karen D.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a flexible lesson plan integrating teaching about human rights into the existing curriculum about American Indians. Asserts that American Indians have the right to maintain their cultural ways and connects that subject to the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Includes three lists of resources and references. (MJP)

  14. Teaching Human Rights: Grades 7 through Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiman, David A.

    This curriculum resource on human rights is rooted in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights and seeks to help students understand the issues involved. Using the rights categories suggested by the Universal Declaration, this book offers new ways of teaching about familiar themes. The book contains activities to encourage students…

  15. The Trust in Indicators: Measuring Human Rights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    AnnJanette Rosga; Margaret L. Satterthwaite

    2008-01-01

    Debates over the best way to identify human rights violations, assess compliance with treaty obligations, and measure human rights progress over time have preoccupied scholars and practitioners for many years. These debates have been especially pressing in the field of economic, social, and cultural rights, where the need for new methodologies has been felt most urgently. Quantitative data has been

  16. Human Rights within Education: Assessing the Justifications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCowan, Tristan

    2012-01-01

    While respect for human rights has long been endorsed as a goal of education, only recently has significant attention been paid to the need to incorporate rights within educational processes. Current support for human rights within education, however, has a variety of motivations. This paper provides a theoretical exploration of these diverse…

  17. "Sphere" as a Gendered Space: Cognitive Linguistic Models of Conceptual Metaphor and Embodiment in Nineteenth-Century Women's Rights Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carol Lynn Kay

    2009-01-01

    This study contributes an approach to understanding the cognitive models underlying rhetorical arguments about the "first wave" of women's rights discourse in the United States, which began to emerge more publically with the Seneca Falls convention in 1848 and started to gain momentum in 1851 and beyond. The usage of the lexical item "sphere" (in…

  18. International Migration and Human Rights

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Global Migration Group (GMG) is an inter-agency group that is dedicated to encouraging the "adoption of more coherent, comprehensive and better coordinated approaches to the issue of international migration." Their number includes representatives from UNICEF, the World Bank and various regional commissions from the United Nations. In October 2008, they released this 144-page report in order to commemorate and reflect on the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The report is divided into seven sections, including those dealing with the legal framework of migration, globalization and migration trends, migration data, and a concluding chapter which discusses some of the most pressing issues facing different migrant groups around the world. The report also includes three very useful appendices which deal with the policy instruments used in regards to human migration and the adoption of key United Nations legal instruments involved with international migration.

  19. HUMAN RIGHTS POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Approved by

    E-print Network

    Carleton University

    and Harassment Policies 1. Anti-Racism and Ethnocultural Relations Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 2 Rights Conflict Resolution and Complaints Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Part VI Systemic Issues Systemic Human Rights Issues Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 #12

  20. Reporting the Rhetoric, Implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child as Represented in Ireland's Second Report to the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child: A Critical Discourse Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiersey, Rachel A.; Hayes, Noirin

    2010-01-01

    Ireland's second periodic report to the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC) presents the government's case that it is succeeding in protecting and promoting the rights of all children in Ireland. This article presents a critical discourse analysis of the government's Report to the CRC. Using a refined critical discourse

  1. Critical Thinking and Cedaw: Women's Rights as Human Rights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nancy Adams

    1997-01-01

    This thesis is designed as an exercise in critical thinking which attempts to trace the little-known and vaguely understood international effort to address women's rights as human rights. Specifically, it is intended to introduce and actively engage the reader in the application of critical thinking processes through an analysis of the history and status of the Convention on the Elimination

  2. International Human Rights Law: An Introduction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Connie de la Vega; David S. Weissbrodt

    2007-01-01

    For more than half a century, the world community has sought to codify a series of fundamental precepts intended to prevent such abuses of human rights as torture, discrimination, starvation, and forced eviction. The United Nations, other international organizations, regional institutions, and governments have developed various procedures for protecting against and providing remedies for human rights violations.\\u000aInternational Human Rights

  3. Democracy, Human Rights and Women's Health.

    PubMed

    Safaei, Jalil

    2012-01-01

    Significant improvements in human rights and democracy have been made since the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights by the United Nations in 1948. Yet, human rights, especially women's rights, are still being violated in many parts of the developing world. The adverse effects of such violations on women's and children's health are well known, but they are rarely measured. This study uses cross-national data from over 145 countries to estimate the impact of democracy and respect for human rights on various measures of women's health while controlling for confounding socio-economic factors such as income, education, fertility and healthcare. It finds that democracy and regards for human rights contribute positively to women's health outcomes, as do socio-economic variables. PMID:22654388

  4. Domain-Independent Discourse Ontology for Utterance Interpretation and Generation in Human-Computer Dialogue

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vladimir Popescu; Jean Caelen; Corneliu Burileanu

    This paper is concerned with the design, development and usage of a domain- and language-independent discourse ontol- ogy, useful for utterance interpretation and generation in service- oriented human-computer dialogue. Although the syntagm \\

  5. Human Rights in Theory and Practice: A Review of On Human Rights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald C. Slye

    1994-01-01

    One of the most important issues facing the international human rights movement is the claim that human rights values are universal and not culturally specific, and thus can be used to understand, evaluate, and influence global actors. This claim has obvious political and philosophical dimensions. That the concept of international human rights is being taken seriously by both governmental and

  6. Solidarity and fragmentation in the human rights community: An introduction to Human Rights Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Cushman

    1999-01-01

    Human Rights Review appears in the last year of a century that has witnessed the birth of the age of human rights. Many ventures being launched at century's end (to say nothing of one launched at the end of a millennium) are cloaked in a rhetoric of utopianism and optimism. It is tempting to announce the publication of Human Rights

  7. Public health nursing, ethics and human rights.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Luba L; Oden, Tami L

    2013-05-01

    Public health nursing has a code of ethics that guides practice. This includes the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics for Nurses, Principles of the Ethical Practice of Public Health, and the Scope and Standards of Public Health Nursing. Human rights and Rights-based care in public health nursing practice are relatively new. They reflect human rights principles as outlined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and applied to public health practice. As our health care system is restructured and there are new advances in technology and genetics, a focus on providing care that is ethical and respects human rights is needed. Public health nurses can be in the forefront of providing care that reflects an ethical base and a rights-based approach to practice with populations. PMID:23586767

  8. Human Rights, Diversity, and Citizenship Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, James A.

    2009-01-01

    The 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is a propitious time for educators to examine its implications for educating citizens in multicultural nation states. The author argues that students must experience democratic classrooms and schools that reflect their cultures and identities to internalize human rights values,…

  9. Midwives and human rights: dream or reality?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joyce E. Thompson

    2002-01-01

    Midwives as predominantly women caring for other women are subject to the same human rights violations and abuse that affect all the women of the world. They need to know and recognise these human rights violations before being able to take action that will reduce or eliminate such harmful practices. In this article, I address gender-based violations of the basic

  10. Diversity, Human Rights, and Curriculum in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Neyda H.

    Although a discussion of human rights is perhaps the most important topic of any social studies curriculum, such discussions are absent from even those curriculum topics where they would seem most appropriate. While the foundational principles of human rights are basic in all cultures throughout history, these basics are seldom taught. This paper…

  11. The European Convention on Human Rights. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castberg, Frede

    This book outlines the contents of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms and its Protocols 1 and 4. The major goal of the Convention, which constitutes an innovation in international law, is to guarantee the protection of "human rights" by allowing both member states and individuals to institute proceedings…

  12. Economic Sanctions Against Human Rights Violations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Buhm Suk Baek

    2008-01-01

    The idea of human rights protection, historically, has been considered as a domestic matter, to be realized by individual states within their domestic law and national institutions. The protection and promotion of human rights, however, have become one of the most important issues for the international community as a whole. Yet, with time, it has become increasingly difficult for the

  13. Human Rights Culture: Solidarity, Diversity and the Right to be Different

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kate Nash

    2005-01-01

    The concept of a human rights culture has been crucial to the incorporation of the European Convention of Human Rights into UK law. In this paper media and activist representations of human rights for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender human rights are considered as indicative of an emerging human rights culture, especially around the Civil Partnerships Act 2004. A typology

  14. The Universal Declaration on the Human Genome and Human Rights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Federico Mayor

    2003-01-01

    Since 1985, UNESCO studies ethical questions arising in genetics. In 1992, I established the International Bioethics Committee at UNESCO with the mission to draft the Universal Declaration on the Human Genome and Human Rights, which was adopted by UNESCO in 1997 and the United Nations in 1998. The Declaration relates the human genome with human dignity, deals with the rights

  15. Healing heart and mind: the pursuit of human rights in Engaged Buddhism as exemplified by Aung San Suu Kyi and the Dalai Lama

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura Kittel

    2011-01-01

    The struggle for human rights in Burma and Tibet evince religious influence: their respective leaders, Aung San Suu Kyi and the Dalai Lama, are dedicated to Buddhist principles and guide their movements accordingly. Yet, human rights discourse remains largely focused on politics. Religion is consigned to the realm of private concern, often creating and reinforcing a separation between ‘heart and

  16. Women's Human Rights Activists as Cross-Cultural Theorists

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brooke A. Ackerly

    2001-01-01

    In addition to offering a basis for the criticism of universal human rights theorizing and practice, women's experience contributes to universal human rights theory building. Women's human rights activists' insights provide the foundation for a theory of universal human rights that is cross-cultural and critical. In sharing their work and strategies, two online working groups of women's human rights activists

  17. Teaching Strategy: Human Rights Around the World and at Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manson, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    Presents a lesson on human rights for middle and secondary school students in which they identify human rights, cite examples of human-rights abuses and affirmations, and relate actions to the articles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). Explains that students identify human-rights issues globally and at home. (CMK)

  18. Human Rights Watch World Report 2000

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Human Rights Watch (Organization).

    Human Rights Watch issued their annual world report last week, summarizing the state of human rights in 66 countries around the globe. Written with the clarity and detail that marked previous annual issues, this year's report is distinguished by its note of guarded optimism. The report cites two main trends as evidence of a partial dismantling of national sovereignty as an impenetrable defense for human rights violators: international courts are increasingly attempting to bring sovereign leaders to justice and nations are more willing to act in concert against a single nation to oppose human rights violations. Separate sections of the report address special topics, such as academic freedom, child soldiers, the international campaign to ban landmines, and lesbian and gay rights.

  19. Stephen C. Angle - Human Rights and Harmony - Human Rights Quarterly 30:1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen C. Angle

    2008-01-01

    There are a number of reasons for thinking that human rights and harmony, two values much discussed with regard to contemporary China, make poor bedfellows. They emerge from different traditions and may apply in different ways: human rights setting a minimal standard and harmony articulating an elusive ideal. In addition, might not harmony demand the sacrifice of one person's rights

  20. Wales Observatory on Human Rights of Children and Young People

    E-print Network

    Harman, Neal.A.

    University, University of Antwerp, Belgium Human Trafficking and Child Trafficking - UNICEF Play - MarianneWales Observatory on Human Rights of Children and Young People Rights Here: Right Now! A conference about children's human rights 11th and 12th September 2014 Swansea University Rights Here: Right Now

  1. 2000 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2001-01-01

    In early 2001 the US State Department released the 25th edition of its Country Reports on Human Rights Practices. The report cites continued abuses in countries that have long been noted for human rights violations, including Iraq, North Korea, Cuba, and Afghanistan. It also notes a worsening in China's human rights record, perhaps signalling a tougher stance towards the world's most populous nation under the new US administration. Users may read the full text of the report, which is organized by region, at the State Department site.

  2. Inter-American Human Rights Database

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Inter-American Human Rights Database is an ongoing initiative of the Center for Human Rights and Humanitarian Law at the American University's Washington College of Law. The database is comprised of documents, in both English and Spanish, ratified by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, beginning with the commission's inception in 1960 and spanning to the present. The chronologically arranged documents include the commission's annual reports, sessional reports, and special situational reports. Currently, not all documents adopted by the commission are available. In the future, the site will include special country reports and thematic reports. All content at the site is searchable.

  3. When elephants fly: differential sensitivity of right and left inferior frontal gyri to discourse and world knowledge.

    PubMed

    Menenti, Laura; Petersson, Karl Magnus; Scheeringa, René; Hagoort, Peter

    2009-12-01

    Both local discourse and world knowledge are known to influence sentence processing. We investigated how these two sources of information conspire in language comprehension. Two types of critical sentences, correct and world knowledge anomalies, were preceded by either a neutral or a local context. The latter made the world knowledge anomalies more acceptable or plausible. We predicted that the effect of world knowledge anomalies would be weaker for the local context. World knowledge effects have previously been observed in the left inferior frontal region (Brodmann's area 45/47). In the current study, an effect of world knowledge was present in this region in the neutral context. We also observed an effect in the right inferior frontal gyrus, which was more sensitive to the discourse manipulation than the left inferior frontal gyrus. In addition, the left angular gyrus reacted strongly to the degree of discourse coherence between the context and critical sentence. Overall, both world knowledge and the discourse context affect the process of meaning unification, but do so by recruiting partly different sets of brain areas. PMID:19016600

  4. 76 FR 77363 - Human Rights Day and Human Rights Week, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ...commitment to upholding and advancing human dignity. The human race reflects a myriad of vibrant...prohibitions, and when same-sex couples refuse to be told whom...people rose up to demand their human rights. Around the world,...

  5. Economic Justice: Necessary Condition for Human Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloud, Fred

    1993-01-01

    Economic justice means taking the personhood of poor people into account; respecting their needs, personal ambitions, rights, and dignity; and affording equal opportunity and equal access to education, health care, housing, and jobs. Examples of injustice to minority groups are provided, citing the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. (SLD)

  6. Human Rights in the United Kingdom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Information Service, New York, NY. Reference Div.

    This pamphlet uses the Articles of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights as a framework within which to describe legal safeguards of individual rights in the United Kingdom. Under each article of the Declaration, a historical perspective of the tradition of civil liberties is provided, as are descriptions of recent trends and…

  7. Human Rights Act, 12 February 1987.

    PubMed

    1987-01-01

    This document reprints major provisions of the Yukon's (Canada) 1987 Human Rights Act. The Act furthers the public policy that every individual is free and equal in dignity and rights, seeks to discourage and eliminate discrimination, and promotes the underlying principles of Canadian and international human rights instruments. Part 1 contains a Bill of Rights that protects the right to freedom of: 1) religion and conscience, 2) expression, 3) assembly and association, and 4) to enjoyment and disposition of property. Part 2 prohibits discrimination based on ancestry (including color and race), national origin, ethnic or linguistic background or origin, age, sex (including pregnancy), and marital or family status. Discrimination is also prohibited when offering services, goods, or facilities to the public; in connection with employment; in connection with membership in trade unions or trade, occupational, or professional associations; and in negotiation or performance of public contracts. The Bill of Rights lists reasonable causes for discrimination as well as exemptions, including preferential treatment for organization or family members or employment in a private home. Special programs and affirmative action programs are specifically not considered discrimination under this Act. The Act sets forth rules for providing equal pay for work of equal value and creates a Yukon Human Rights Commission to promote human rights and assist adjudication of complaints. PMID:12346749

  8. Human Rights Watch: Limits of Tolerance

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Human Rights Watch has recently posted a new report. "Limits of Tolerance: Freedom of Expression and the Public Debate in Chile," examines the extreme restrictions on freedom of speech and freedom of information in the ostensibly democratic nation of Chile.

  9. Human Rights Watch: Chemical Warfare in Bosnia?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Human Rights Watch has recently posted a new report. "Chemical Warfare in Bosnia? The Strange Experiences of the Srebrenica Survivors," investigates whether or not Serb forces used chemical agents in an attack against people fleeing Srebrenica in Bosnia and Hercegovina.

  10. Revealing and concealing: Islamist discourse on human rights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Carle

    2005-01-01

    Historically as well as contemporarily, the relationship between religion and democratic pluralism in the Muslim world has\\u000a been problematic. In the Muslim world, both governments and popular movements are using religious documents (the Qur'an and\\u000a the hadith) to inspire political and social change. In the process, the fusion of religion and politics that characterizes\\u000a revivalist Islam has impeded the development

  11. Gendering Corporal Punishment: Beyond the Discourse of Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Sara

    2008-01-01

    In the last few years the Global Initiative to End All Corporal Punishment of Children has been gathering momentum, with a submission to "The United Nations Secretary General's study on violence against children" the most recent addition to the cause. Nevertheless, corporal punishment in schools is still condoned in many countries and its practice…

  12. Human rights organizations and online agenda setting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Niina Meriläinen; Marita Vos

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to better understand agenda setting by international human rights organizations in the online environment and at the same time contribute to agenda-setting theory. The role of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the area of human rights is clarified, and agenda setting and related concepts are discussed. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The study focuses on how

  13. Human Rights Watch: Reports on China

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Human Rights Watch (Organization).

    1998-01-01

    Human Rights Watch/Asia offers a number of reports and press releases on human rights abuses in China and Tibet. The State Visit of Chinese President Jiang Zemin last week represented a thaw in official Sino-US Relations, which have been somewhat chilly since Tiananmen in 1989. Despite reaching agreements on a broad range of security, economic, environmental and law-enforcement issues, the two Presidents were clearly far apart on the issue of human rights. While President Clinton made mention of the right to political and religious expression, President Jiang expressed the need for political and social stability in his country. On the whole, both leaders have achieved their goals. President Clinton has secured China's cooperation on several issues, most importantly arms control and trade, while the state dinner and formal ceremony recognized China's role as a key player in the world economy and Jiang's international position as its head of state.

  14. Human Rights Watch World Report 2001

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Human Rights Watch issued their annual world report yesterday, summarizing the state of human rights in 70 countries around the globe. Written with the clarity and detail that have marked previous annual issues, this year's report offers both good and bad news. On the positive side, it notes the popular overthrow of the Milosevic regime in Yugoslavia, the conclusion of a treaty barring the use of children as soldiers, and the UN Commission on Human Rights's first formal criticism of a permanent member of the UN Security Council (Russia, for its abuses in Chechnya). On the negative, the report cites the continued failure of the UN Commission to condemn China and the failure of the US to require the Colombian army to sever ties with paramilitaries as a condition for the recent huge military aid package to that country. The report begins with an essay on the global economy and then covers human rights developments by region. Separate sections of the report address special topics such as academic freedom, censorship, access to education, children's rights, and women's human rights. The report is available in both HTML and .rtf (zipped or uncompressed) formats.

  15. End-of-life care in the 21st century: advance directives in universal rights discourse.

    PubMed

    Besirevi?, Violeta

    2010-03-01

    This article explores universal normative bases that could help to shape a workable legal construct that would facilitate a global use of advance directives. Although I believe that advance directives are of universal character, my primary aim in approaching this issue is to remain realistic. I will make three claims. First, I will argue that the principles of autonomy, dignity and informed consent, embodied in the Oviedo Convention and the UNESCO Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, could arguably be regarded as universal bases for the global use of advance directives. Second, I will demonstrate that, despite the apparent consensus of ethical authorities in support of their global use, it is unlikely, for the time being, that such consensus could lead to unqualified legal recognition of advance directives, because of different understandings of the nature of the international rules, meanings of autonomy and dignity which are context-specific and culture-specific, and existing imperfections that make advance directives either unworkable or hardly applicable in practice. The third claim suggests that the fact that the concept of the advance directive is not universally shared does not mean that it should not become so, but never as the only option in managing incompetent patients. A way to proceed is to prioritize work on developing higher standards in managing incompetent patients and on progressing towards the realization of universal human rights in the sphere of bioethics, by advocating a universal, legally binding international convention that would outlaw human rights violations in end-of-life decision-making. PMID:20136818

  16. Gender Violence: A Development and Human Rights Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunch, Charlotte; Carrillo, Roxanna

    This document includes two articles describing the failure of the international human rights movement to consider or remedy the situation of women outside of the basic demand for political rights of people in general. The first article, "Women's Rights as Human Rights: Toward a Re-Vision of Human Rights" (Charlotte Bunch), emphasizes the…

  17. About the M.A. Human Rights The M.A. Human Rights addresses the growing im-

    E-print Network

    Fiebig, Peter

    About the M.A. Human Rights Aims The M.A. Human Rights addresses the growing im- portance of human and legal dimensions of human rights into account. Graduates of the program will be equipped with theoretical and practical skills to pursue professi- onal activities in human rights contexts. Students The M

  18. Economic and Social Justice: A Human Rights Perspective. Human Rights Education Series, Topic Book 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiman, David A.

    On December 10, 1998, the world celebrated the 50th anniversary of the United Nations' Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). The U.S. Constitution possesses many of the political and civil rights articulated in the UDHR. The UDHR, however, goes further than the U.S. Constitution, including many social and economic rights as well. This book…

  19. Influence of health rights discourses and community organizing on equitable access to health: the case of HIV, tuberculosis and cancer in Peru

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The right to health is recognized as a fundamental human right. Social participation is implied in the fulfillment of health rights since Alma Ata posited its relevance for successful health programs, although a wide range of interpretations has been observed for this term. While Peruvian law recognizes community and social participation in health, it was the GFATM requirement of mixed public-civil society participation in Country Coordination Mechanisms (CCM) for proposal submission what effectively led to formal community involvement in the national response to HIV and, to a lesser extent, tuberculosis. This has not been the case, however, for other chronic diseases in Peru. This study aims to describe and compare the role of health rights discourse and community involvement in the national response to HIV, tuberculosis and cancer. Methods Key health policy documents were identified and analyzed. In-depth interviews were conducted with stakeholders, representatives of civil society organizations (CSO), and leaders of organizations of people affected by HIV, cancer and tuberculosis. Results and discussion A health rights discourse, well established in the HIV field, is expanding to general health discussions and to the tuberculosis (TB) field in particular. Both HIV and TB programs have National Multisectoral Strategic Plans and recognize participation of affected communities’ organizations. Similar mechanisms are non-existent for cancer or other disease-focused programs, although other affected patients are starting some organization efforts. Interviewees agreed that reaching the achievements of HIV mobilization is difficult for other diseases, since the HIV response was modeled based on a global movement with strong networks and advocacy mechanisms, eventually succeeding in the establishment of financial sources like the GFATM. Nevertheless, organizations linked to cancer and other diseases are building a National Patient Network to defend health rights. Conclusions There are new efforts to promote and protect health rights in Peru, probably inspired by the achievements of organizations of people living with HIV (PLHA). The public health sector must consolidate the participation of affected communities’ organizations in decision-making processes and implementation of health programs. PLHA organizations have become a key political and social actor in Peruvian public health policy. PMID:23683817

  20. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights - Only a Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichert, Elisabeth

    2002-01-01

    Explains provisions contained within the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, tracing historical beginnings of human rights to 1945, detailing events after 1945 up to the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights by the United Nations, and explaining essential terminology used in describing human rights instruments that have been…

  1. Human Rights and Foreign Policy. Headline Series 241.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankel, Charles

    A discussion is presented of the meaning of human rights, implications of human rights for foreign policy, and obstacles to its realization on a global scale. Chapter I identifies human rights as a critical issue, commends President Carter's initiative in this area, and points out difficulties of implementing a human rights policy. Chapter II…

  2. Human Rights and Religion in the English Secondary RE Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowie, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between religion and human rights is an ambiguous and complex one, but there are academic, moral and political arguments for the inclusion of human rights in religious education (RE). The Universal Declaration of Human Rights advocates education in human rights and the English school curriculum aims to encourage a commitment to…

  3. Turkey: Human Rights And The European Union Accession Partnership

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In September, Human Rights Watch posted five new reports on their Website. Turkey: Human Rights And The European Union Accession Partnership is a 31-page report detailing Human Rights Watch's recommendations for the EU's Accession Partnership Document laying out the human rights criteria Turkey will have to meet to be granted EU membership.

  4. Human Rights as a Moral Issue: Lessons for moral educators from human rights work

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary M. Brabeck; Lauren Rogers

    2000-01-01

    Recent history has seen an increasing trend toward “crossing over” between contexts and cultures. As individuals and groups learn more about each other, opportunities arise to create stronger resources for respecting and protecting human rights. One such possible “crossing over” is between the field of moral education and the ideals and techniques of human rights work. While moral education and

  5. Human Rights Here and Now: Celebrating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Nancy, Ed.

    Although December 10, 1998, marked the 50th anniversary of the United Nations' Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), most people living in the United States remain unaware of this document, the foundation stone of all human rights. Intended for use by both community groups and teachers in elementary and secondary schools, this educational…

  6. Human Rights: Respecting Our Differences, Teachers' Manual [And] Human Rights: Respecting Our Differences, Students' Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCardle, Elizabeth, Ed.

    This unit on human rights designed for secondary students in Alberta, Canada includes both student and teacher manuals. Eleven chapters in the student manual examine what human rights are, the causes and effects of prejudice and discrimination, relevant laws, and social action. Each chapter includes readings followed by discussion questions and…

  7. Annual Report on Human Rights, 2000

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In July, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) issued its Human Rights report, the third such annual report issued under Tony Blair's government. The 176-page report provides a "detailed overview of the range of FCO work in the area of human rights, from the government's responses to major humanitarian crises in Kosovo, in East Timor, or in Sierra Leone, to grass-roots projects to promote civil society, safeguard children from conflict and exploitation, and eradicate torture around the world." The report also includes a brief section on the decision of the Home Secretary not to extradite former Chilean dictator Pinochet to Spain, with a URL included for access to the full text of his statement. According to the Secretary for FCO affairs, the document is not meant as an exhaustive report on Human Rights around the world, but rather as an in-depth examination of UK efforts in this area both at home and abroad.

  8. Making rights a reality The human rights approach to stopping violence against women \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LARA FERGUS

    This article examines some of the historic and contemporary debates surrounding women's human rights. Women's rights activists have effectively challenged and expanded traditional interpretations of human rights, which has affected the development of Amnesty International's own approach to the human rights of women. The development of this approach from its beginnings to the recently- launched Stop Violence Against Women campaign

  9. Measuring the Progressive Realization of Human Rights Obligations: An Index of Economic and Social Rights Fulfillment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sakiko Fukuda-Parr; Terra Lawson-Remer; Susan Randolph

    2008-01-01

    In response to an increasing demand for rigorous monitoring of state accountability in meeting their human rights obligations, a growing literature on human rights measurement has emerged. Yet there are no widely used indicators or indices of human rights obligations fulfillment. This paper proposes a methodology for an index of economic and social rights fulfillment that: uses available survey-based objective,

  10. Are evolving human rights harmless? An examination of English legislation, prostitution and its effect on human relatedness.

    PubMed

    Westin, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses key philosophical and social questions that shape the contemporary discourse on prostitution. The initial section outlines the contemporary challenges facing legislative practice on prostitution in England. This involves analysing moral and legal framework surrounding prostitution that has made the current legislative dilemma surrounding prostitution practice possible. The second part of the paper then outlines the history of the philosophy of human rights from Aquinas to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948). The paper concludes by analysing whether the current ontology employed by human rights theory is effective in creating a system of just relatedness between agents, made visible in concrete legislative guidance. I argue that legislation guided by a fragmented teleology and ontological anthropology enables asymmetrical patterns of relatedness that can cause genuine physical and psychological harm to individuals. PMID:25344012

  11. The Politics of Difference vs the Ethics of EssentializingLooking Back and Looking Forward in Humanities Discourse about Human Nature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marshall Gregory

    2002-01-01

    Now that the intensity of the Culture Wars has abated, a humanities discourse about human nature that has been practically impossible to conduct in nonpartisan terms for the last 25 years or so can be revisited and reconstructed. In an attempt to revive that discourse, the following argument critiques the extreme postmodern position of ‘constructed humanity’ and offers an argument

  12. GENDER, HEALTH AND HUMAN RIGHTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rebecca J. Cook

    M otherhood can take a woman to the heights of ec- stasy and the depths of despair; it can offer her protection and reverence. But it can also deny a woman consideration as anything more than a vehicle for human reproduction. Women's reproductive function fits within a social frame- work of gender that affects women's capacities and health. While traditional

  13. We "Must" Integrate Human Rights into the Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Ed

    1999-01-01

    Asserts that educators need to teach about human rights issues, such as social and economic rights, in the social studies curriculum because these issues are disregarded throughout the country. Defines human rights, discusses the importance of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), and provides two lessons. (CMK)

  14. Education Is a Human Right. EI Barometer on Human and Trade Union Rights in the Education Sector, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noonan, Michael A.

    This 2001 edition of Educational International's (EI) "Barometer on Trade Union and Human Rights in the Education Sector" focuses on four fundamental human rights: (1) the right to education; (2) academic freedom; (3) children's right to be protected from exploitation; and (4) workers' rights to form and join trade unions and to organize and…

  15. Human rights begin at birth: international law and the claim of fetal rights.

    PubMed

    Copelon, Rhonda; Zampas, Christina; Brusie, Elizabeth; Devore, Jacqueline

    2005-11-01

    In the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the foundation of human rights, the text and negotiating history of the "right to life" explicitly premises human rights on birth. Likewise, other international and regional human rights treaties, as drafted and/or subsequently interpreted, clearly reject claims that human rights should attach from conception or any time before birth. They also recognise that women's right to life and other human rights are at stake where restrictive abortion laws are in place. This paper reviews the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the Convention on the Rights of the Child, and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women, the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, the Inter-American Human Rights Agreements and African Charter on Human and People's Rights in this regard. No one has the right to subordinate another in the way that unwanted pregnancy subordinates a woman by requiring her to risk her own health and life to save her own child. Thus, the long-standing insistence of women upon voluntary motherhood is a demand for minimal control over one's destiny as a human being. From a human rights perspective, to depart from voluntary motherhood would impose upon women an extreme form of discrimination and forced labour. PMID:16291493

  16. Fact Sheet: China's Human Rights Record

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    United States. Dept. of State. Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs.

    1997-01-01

    US Department of State: China's Human Rights Record is a brief description of the administration's policy of "engagement" and its results in China. The State Visit of Chinese President Jiang Zemin last week represented a thaw in official Sino-US Relations, which have been somewhat chilly since Tiananmen in 1989. Despite reaching agreements on a broad range of security, economic, environmental and law-enforcement issues, the two Presidents were clearly far apart on the issue of human rights. While President Clinton made mention of the right to political and religious expression, President Jiang expressed the need for political and social stability in his country. On the whole, both leaders have achieved their goals. President Clinton has secured China's cooperation on several issues, most importantly arms control and trade, while the state dinner and formal ceremony recognized China's role as a key player in the world economy and Jiang's international position as its head of state.

  17. Human Rights and China. Lesson Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Stanley T.

    This curriculum unit presents lessons based on information and ideas gained from a 1994 Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminar Abroad Program in the People's Republic of China. This series of three lessons is created as an introduction to Model United Nations types of activities for high school students. Lesson 1, "What are Human Rights?" deals with…

  18. Academic Freedom 3: Education and Human Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, John, Ed.; And Others

    This collection of reports gives a picture of educational systems from a human rights perspective, monitoring academic freedom in the context of freedom of thought and freedom of opinion and expression. The World University Service's Lima Declaration on Academic Freedom and Autonomy of Institutions of Higher Education of 1988 is used as the…

  19. The Struggle for Human Rights in Myanmar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefer, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    The non-violent participation of Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi and Buddhist monks in resistance efforts to advocate for the welfare of Myanmar's people has played an important role in educating the world about human rights violations in the country. Faced with international condemnation, Myanmar's junta released Aung San Suu Kyi from…

  20. The Carr Center for Human Rights Policy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government was founded in 1999 with a substantial gift from Kennedy School alumnus Greg Carr. The mission of the Center is "to lead public policy debate, to train human rights leaders and to partner with human rights organizations to help them respond to current and future challenges." On their homepage, visitors can read about their latest news items, look over their publications and editorial pieces, and also learn about fellowship opportunities at the Center. Scholars and others will probably wish to start at the "Research & Publications" area. Here they can browse through articles and research reports that have been conducted by Center staff and affiliates. Some of the more compelling reports here include "Children in Conflict: Eradicating the Child Soldier Doctrine" and "Religion and Secular Constitution: Human Rights and the Challenge of Saria". Moving on, visitors also have the opportunity to sign up for email updates via the "News & Events" area.

  1. Human rights violations by the police

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Niels Uildriks; Piet van Reenen

    2001-01-01

    In some parts of the world, police forces are known for the brutality with which they operate. In Kosovo, for instance, the Serbian police functioned as a kind of paramilitary organization, responsible for numerous atrocities. In countries such as Brazil and Mexico, the police are known for all kinds of gross human rights violations: endemic brutality, torture, extrajudicial killings, and

  2. Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Tomuschat

    2010-01-01

    It is recognized today that human rights law is not generally displaced in times of armed conflict by international humanitarian law (IHL). Yet in large part this new insight remains to be particularized as to its actual consequences. In particular, IHL is still predominantly under the influence of the concept of military necessity.

  3. Tropes and Topoi of Anti-Intellectualism in the Discourse of the Christian Right

    E-print Network

    Carney, Zoe L.

    2011-08-08

    Christianity is not anti-intellectual; however, there is a distinct quality of anti-intellectualism in the rhetoric of the Christian Right. This thesis explores the ways in which rhetors in the Christian Right encourage anti-intellectual sentiment...

  4. Environmental and occupational health and human rights.

    PubMed

    Slatin, Craig

    2011-01-01

    Modern environmental- and occupational-related morbidities and mortality are determined by the power relations inherent in our existing capitalist systems of production and consumption. These systems thwart human public health rights because of the priority to maximize profit for the systems' owners rather than to establish ecologically sound and socially just development for all. The international public health community must return to its primary prevention roots and take action to eliminate the potential for population morbidities that result from hazardous substance exposures in work and community environments. The 1988 Adelaide Recommendations on Healthy Public Policy provide us with guidelines that incorporate a human rights approach and build on several decades of international public health declarations and charters. To succeed, public health must work with the labor movement. A human rights approach to environmental public health can help us make a transition to sustainable modes of production and consumption. The environmental justice movement's strategy for an economic greening that sets as a priority "pathways out of poverty" can help to advance environmental public health rights. PMID:21733799

  5. 78 FR 76029 - Human Rights Day and Human Rights Week, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ...unwavering support for the principles enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of...

  6. Working together for health and human rights.

    PubMed

    Sidel, V W

    2000-01-01

    The right to a standard of living adequate for health and well-being is being denied to vast numbers of people all over the world through increasing disparities in income and in wealth. In the name of economic development, a number of international and national policies have increased the grossly uneven distribution of income, with ever-growing numbers of people living in poverty as well as in increasing depths of poverty. Globalization, crippling levels of external debt, and the 'structural adjustment' policies of international agencies have expanded the numbers and the suffering of people living in poverty and have resulted in the neglect of government-funded social programs, of regulations protecting the environment, and of human development. Access to medical care, an essential element in the protection of health, is difficult for many, including the 44 million people in the United States who lack insurance coverage for the cost of medical care services. Working together for health and human rights also requires promotion of the right to peace. The right to life and health is threatened not only by the existence and active deployment of weapons of mass destruction, including nuclear, chemical and biological weapons and anti-personnel landmines, but also other weapons. The twentieth century has been the bloodiest in human history, with an estimated 250 wars, more than 110 million people killed, countless people wounded and at the least 50 million refugees. Health workers must work together with people in our communities for the promotion of health and human rights, which, in Sandwell and elsewhere, are inextricably intertwined. PMID:11130630

  7. Do human rights offenders oppose human rights resolutions in the United Nations?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernhard Boockmann; Axel Dreher

    2011-01-01

    We investigate whether countries with poor human rights records oppose human rights resolutions in the United Nations General\\u000a Assembly. An instrumental account of voting would suggest that these countries aim to weaken resolutions since they could\\u000a be future targets of these policies. We estimate determinants of voting using 13,000 individual voting decisions from 1980\\u000a to 2002. Our results from ordered

  8. Exploring synergies between human rights and public health ethics: A whole greater than the sum of its parts

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Stephanie; Forman, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Background The fields of human rights and public health ethics are each concerned with promoting health and elucidating norms for action. To date, however, little has been written about the contribution that these two justificatory frameworks can make together. This article explores how a combined approach may make a more comprehensive contribution to resolving normative health issues and to advancing a normative framework for global health action than either approach made alone. We explore this synergy by first providing overviews of public health ethics and of international human rights law relevant to health and, second, by articulating complementarities between human rights and public health ethics. Discussion We argue that public health ethics can contribute to human rights by: (a) reinforcing the normative claims of international human rights law, (b) strengthening advocacy for human rights, and (c) bridging the divide between public health practitioners and human rights advocates in certain contemporary health domains. We then discuss how human rights can contribute to public health ethics by contributing to discourses on the determinants of health through: (a) definitions of the right to health and the notion of the indivisibility of rights, (b) emphasis on the duties of states to progressively realize the health of citizens, and (c) recognition of the protection of human rights as itself a determinant of health. We also discuss the role that human rights can play for the emergent field of public health ethics by refocusing attention on the health and illness on marginalized individuals and populations. Summary Actors within the fields of public health, ethics and human rights can gain analytic tools by embracing the untapped potential for collaboration inherent in such a combined approach. PMID:18237409

  9. Local Impacts of Religious Discourses on Rights to Express Same-Sex Sexual Desires in Peri-Urban Rio de Janeiro1

    PubMed Central

    García, Jonathan; Laboy, Miguel Muñoz; de Almeida, Vagner; Parker, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on a study that examined how religious discourses of inclusion and exclusion—in Roman Catholic, evangelical Protestant, and Afro-Brazilian religious traditions—affected people’s rights to express same-sex sexual desires, behaviors, and identities in the socioeconomically marginalized urban periphery of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Using extended ethnographic observation of institutions and religious events over a period of 2 years, the authors identified how sexual rights were constructed within religious discourses and conducted ethnographic interviews with 45 religious leaders. In the low-income and violent urban periphery of Rio de Janeiro, religious leaders and institutions play key roles in molding community inclusion and exclusion. A comparison of the 3 major religious denominations shows a diversity of discourses about same-sex sexual desires and their impacts on community formation. PMID:20161503

  10. The Right to Development as a Human Right

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arjun Sengupta

    The consensus over the unity of civil and political rights and economic, social, and cultural rights was broken in the Fifties, with the spread of the Cold War. Two separate covenants, one covering civil and political rights and another covering economic, social, and cultural rights, were promulgated to give them the status of international treaties in the late Sixties, and

  11. Contextual Constraint Treatment for coarse coding deficit in adults with right hemisphere brain damage: generalisation to narrative discourse comprehension.

    PubMed

    Blake, Margaret Lehman; Tompkins, Connie A; Scharp, Victoria L; Meigh, Kimberly M; Wambaugh, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Coarse coding is the activation of broad semantic fields that can include multiple word meanings and a variety of features, including those peripheral to a word's core meaning. It is a partially domain-general process related to general discourse comprehension and contributes to both literal and non-literal language processing. Adults with damage to the right cerebral hemisphere (RHD) and a coarse coding deficit are particularly slow to activate features of words that are relatively distant or peripheral. This manuscript reports a pre-efficacy study of Contextual Constraint Treatment (CCT), a novel, implicit treatment designed to increase the efficiency of coarse coding with the goal of improving narrative comprehension and other language performance that relies on coarse coding. Participants were four adults with RHD. The study used a single-subject controlled experimental design across subjects and behaviours. The treatment involved pre-stimulation, using a hierarchy of strong and moderately biased contexts, to prime the intended distantly related features of critical stimulus words. Three of the four participants exhibited gains in auditory narrative discourse comprehension, the primary outcome measure. All participants exhibited generalisation to untreated items. No strong generalisation to processing non-literal language was evident. The results indicate that CCT yields both improved efficiency of the coarse coding process and generalisation to narrative comprehension. PMID:24983133

  12. A Global Perspective on Human Rights Education. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, John J.

    This ERIC Digest outlines what is meant by the phrase human rights and the origin of the concept. It also traces the delineation of the concept of human rights from the 17th century antecedent of "natural rights" to its eventual incarnation as inherent political or personal rights, such as freedom of speech, press, assembly, and religion. The…

  13. Human Rights Education: The Promise of the Third Millennium?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxi, Upendra

    The 20th century could be characterized as the "Age of Rights." Never before has there been such progress and interest in human rights standards. To ensure this progress, human rights education (HRE) needs to look at the world history of the struggles for rights and against tyranny and injustice. The notions of HRE originated in the text of the…

  14. Human Rights and Public Opinion: From Attitudes to Action

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shareen Hertel; Lyle Scruggs; C. Patrick Heidkamp

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates American public opinion supporting human rights and willingness to engage in economic behavior consistent with such support. We look at three types of rights in particular: freedom of expression, freedom from torture, and the right to a guaranteed minimum standard of living. The current literature on human rights largely ignores public opinion, and vice versa. Based on

  15. Evolution of Human Rights in the Age of Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hron, Benjamin

    1998-01-01

    Considers how biotechnology affects human-rights issues; in particular, the need for reexamining concerns about reproductive technology, the rights of indigenous peoples, and the rights of future generations. Maintains that the new areas for human-rights discussions, such as germ-line manipulation and genetic screening, are unprecedented concerns…

  16. The Right of the Child to Information: The Role of Public Libraries in Human Rights Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koren, Marian

    Information and education are crucial for child development. The child's right to information and education protect human values and the human dignity of the child. Formal and non-formal forms of education by parents, friends, schools, and libraries should be based on human rights. The United Nations (UN) Convention on the Rights of the Child…

  17. State Court International Human Rights Litigation: A Concerning Trend?

    E-print Network

    Loudon, Catherine

    25 State Court International Human Rights Litigation: A Concerning Trend? Austen L. Parrish .......................................................................................................................25 I. The Move to State Court Human Rights Litigation ................................................................................30 C. The Move to State Court Litigation

  18. Internship Opportunity with the International Federation for Human Rights

    E-print Network

    Kambhampati, Patanjali

    Internship Opportunity with the International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH) in New York is looking for full-time or part-time interns available a good working knowledge of current affairs, international human rights instruments

  19. Teme ale Discursului Extremei-Drepte in Publicistica Franceza Interbelica - Themes of the Extreme-Right Discourse in the French Interwar Journalistic Writings (Romanian version)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cristian SANDACHE

    2011-01-01

    The paper hightlights the common themes in the interwar journalistic writings discourse of the French Extreme-Right representatives, characters of great intellectual mobility, but dominated by ethnic-spiritual cliches and prejudices, assumed by them ina deliberate manner. A very complex and also controversial phenomenon, the ideological radicalism of right-wing is fought against with equal energy by the communist doctrine and by the

  20. Teme ale Discursului Extremei-Drepte in Publicistica Franceza Interbelica\\/ Themes of the Extreme-Right Discourse in the French Interwar Journalistic Writings (Romanian version)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cristian SANDACHE

    2011-01-01

    The paper hightlights the common themes in the interwar journalistic writings discourse of the French Extreme-Right representatives, characters of great intellectual mobility, but dominated by ethnic-spiritual cliches and prejudices, assumed by them ina deliberate manner. A very complex and also controversial phenomenon, the ideological radicalism of right-wing is fought against with equal energy by the communist doctrine and by the

  1. Human rigHts advocacy in action

    E-print Network

    Bristol, University of

    18 Brave new world 22 thought that counts 27 In pictures snapshots 5 taken 29 Regulars BristolHuman rigHts advocacy in action Lives weLL Lived: a new age of animaL weLfare aLzHeimer's: no smoke in pieces 2 & 17 alumni in the news 3 Bristol and beyond 10 Summer2012 Contents 29 2 new solutions to old

  2. Discourse, upstream public engagement and the governance of human life extension research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew Cotton

    2010-01-01

    Important scientific, ethical and sociological debates are emerging over the trans-humanist goal to achieve therapeutic treatments\\u000a to ‘cure’ the debilitation of age-related illness and extend the healthy life span of individuals through “interventive biogerontological\\u000a research”. The scientific and moral discourses surrounding this contentious scientific field are mapped out, followed by a\\u000a normative argument favouring ‘strong’ deliberative democratic control of human

  3. Perspective: Economic Human Rights: The Time Has Come!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittal, Anuradha

    1998-01-01

    Maintains that the high poverty levels in the United States implies that the goals of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) have not yet transformed the reality of U.S. citizens. Describes the national campaign called "Economic Human Rights: The Time Has Come!" that combats the violations of basic human rights like poverty. (CMK)

  4. Human rights, United Nations High Commissioner for (UNHCHR)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Boerefijn

    2007-01-01

    The post of United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (‘UNHCHR’ or ‘High Commissioner’) was established in 1993 by Resolution 48\\/141 of the United Nations General Assembly (‘UNGA’), following a recommendation by the ? Vienna World Conference on Human Rights (1993) (‘WCHR’; see also ? Human Rights; ? United Nations [UN]; ? United Nations, General Assembly). The UNHCHR has the

  5. Human Rights: Unfolding of the American Tradition. Report No. 8403.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Public Affairs (Dept. of State), Washington, DC.

    Excerpts from 100 speeches, essays, and legal documents dating from classical times to the present illustrate the record of human rights discussion over the centuries. The compilation was made in 1968 to mark the 20th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The readings indicate that human rights initially meant freedom from a…

  6. LGBTI Human Rights in the Commonwealth Conference Statement

    E-print Network

    Guo, Zaoyang

    as defined by the United Nations, and are to be claimed together with human rights related to other forms of discrimination such as in relation to racism and religion. Affirm the United Nations Human Rights Council on the Application of Human Rights Law in relation to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity. Affirm the resolutions

  7. Human Rights: 1948-1978--Changing Perceptions. A Wingspread Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sohn, Louis B.; Roosevelt, Curtis

    Conference participants examined the attitudes toward human rights which led to the drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, as compared to today's perceptions of the meaning of human rights. Using Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Four Freedoms" as a point of departure--freedom of speech and expression, freedom of every person to…

  8. INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW Lecturer: Dr Amy Strecker

    E-print Network

    Guenther, Frank

    INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS LAW CAS IR 306 Lecturer: Dr Amy Strecker Email: amy, structure and efficacy of international human rights law. In this module students will investigate the legal will assess the remedies that exist for violations of human rights law in the various systems and examine

  9. The World War II Era and Human Rights Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Stewart; Russell, William B., III

    2012-01-01

    International revulsion at the violation of human rights during World War II helped spark a global movement to define and protect individual human rights. Starting with the creation of war crimes tribunals after the war, this newfound awareness stimulated a concerted international effort to establish human rights for all, both in periods of war…

  10. Teaching Human Rights? "All Hell Will Break Loose!"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Claire; Brunner, Richard; Webster, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Human rights education is a prominent concern of a number of international organisations and has been dominant on the United Nations' agenda for the past 20 years. The UN Decade for Human Rights Education (1995-2004) has been followed by the World Programme for Human Rights Education (2005-ongoing) and the recently adopted UN Declaration on…

  11. McGill Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism

    E-print Network

    Barthelat, Francois

    -Governmental Organizations and Community-Based Organizations of Cameroon. #12;6CENTRE FOR HUMAN RIGHTS AND LEGALMcGill Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism Centre sur les droits de la personne et le pluralisme juridique de McGill 2013 ANNUAL REPORT #12;2CENTRE FOR HUMAN RIGHTS AND LEGAL PLURALISM | ANNUAL

  12. Background Paper - Human Rights in Kosovo - As Seen, As Told - Reports on Human Rights in Kosovo

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1999-01-01

    Released on 1999 December 6, two new human rights reports from the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) document extensive human rights violations in Kosovo. This page provides access to the reports, a background paper, and a press release. Totalling more than 900 pages, the reports reveal human rights abuses on both sides of the conflict. The first report "presents probably the most extensive and systematic survey to date of human rights in Kosovo in the first half of 1999," based on hundreds of in-country reports and statements from nearly 2,800 refugees. The report concludes that in this period, which also saw the NATO air campaign, the province's Albanian population suffered the overwhelming majority of abuses. The second report covers the period between June 14 and October 31, 1999, when over 800,000 displaced Albanians returned to Kosovo. Analyzing human rights conditions and events in each of the five regions of Kosovo, the report finds that the vast majority of violations were committed against Kosovo Serbs, Roma, Muslim Slavs and others who were marked for revenge by the returned Albanians. Both reports are offered by chapter in HTML or .pdf format.

  13. The human rights responsibilities of multinational tobacco companies

    PubMed Central

    Crow, M

    2005-01-01

    This article explores various strategies which could be used to hold the tobacco industry accountable for human rights violations precipitated by its conduct. First, a brief overview of the international human rights regime and the tobacco related jurisprudence issued by human rights treaty bodies is provided. The article then explains how tobacco control advocates could promote more systematic consideration of governments' tobacco related human rights violations by reconceptualising the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control in the language of rights. The feasibility of using the existing human rights framework to target the tobacco industry directly is analysed with the conclusion that this approach has serious limitations. Emerging human rights norms, which have greater potential to affect the industry's conduct, are presented. Finally, given the questionable authoritativeness of these norms, alternative ways that they could be employed to hold tobacco companies accountable for the rights related consequences of their activities are proposed. PMID:16046696

  14. Human/Nature Discourse in Environmental Science Education Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    It is argued that the view of nature and the relationship between human beings and nature that each of us holds impacts our decisions, actions, and notions of environmental responsibility and consciousness. In this study, I investigate the discursive patterns of selected environmental science classroom resources produced by three disparate…

  15. Joint Statement on the Rights of LGBT Persons at the Human Rights Office of the Spokesman

    E-print Network

    Auckland, University of

    Joint Statement on the Rights of LGBT Persons at the Human Rights Council Fact Sheet Office not seen in previous LGBT statements at the UN, including: welcoming attention to LGBT issues as a part of the Universal Periodic Review process, noting the increased attention to LGBT issues in regional human rights

  16. Sexual and Bodily Rights as Human Rights in the Middle East and North Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liz Ercevik Amado

    2004-01-01

    A regional workshop on sexual and bodily rights as human rights in the Middle East and North Africa was held in Malta in 2003, attended by 22 NGO representatives from Jordan, Egypt, Lebanon, Palestine, Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, Turkey, Pakistan and USA. The meeting aimed to develop strategies for overcoming human rights violations in the region with reference to law and

  17. Human and peoples' rights: social representations among Cameroonian students.

    PubMed

    Pirttilä-Backman, Anna-Maija; Kassea, Raul; Sakki, Inari

    2009-12-01

    Social representations of human and peoples' rights were studied among Cameroonian university students (N = 666) with a questionnaire based on the UN Declaration of Human Rights and the African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights and Duties. The respondents were asked how important and how well realized they regarded the 39 human and peoples' rights to be. A 13-factor model provided the best fit with Cameroonian students' perceptions of human and peoples' rights. Taken as a whole, our results are in line with previous quantitative studies on human rights, confirming structural similarity but also country-specific variation in the aggregation of specific rights. Moreover, our data showed that Cameroonian students value human and peoples' rights highly (M = 6.18), whereas their fulfillment is not regarded as highly (M = 5.09). Same law for all, equality and freedom, and right to work and living were highly appreciated but lowly realized rights. Higher than average in importance and realization were right to education and self-fulfillment, right to marriage and property, peoples' social and political basic rights and right to life and safety. Low in importance and realization were peoples' right to their country's natural resources and independence, right to meetings, and right to express opinion. Women appreciated the rights more than men and thought of their rights as better realized compared to men. We suggest that when women say that their rights are better fulfilled than men do, it is in comparison with the older generation, who are still very dependent on men. Nowadays, thanks to education and urbanization, young women have wider choices or opportunities for marriage and jobs. Men may feel frustrated in the context of political liberalization because the freedoms are more theoretical than fulfilled; the economic crises and cultural changes have hindered their economic domination and their prerogatives. PMID:22029663

  18. A tribute to Dorothy Height. Crusader for human rights.

    PubMed

    Halamandaris, Val J

    2002-12-01

    Dorothy Height, is a legendary figure in the American civil rights movement and in the broader worldwide human rights movement. As President of the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW), she worked tirelessly toward the enactment of civil rights and for equal rights in education, housing, and employment. PMID:12500647

  19. Do cultural diversity and human rights make a good match?

    PubMed

    Donders, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    The link between cultural diversity and human rights was clearly established by the Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity, adopted by the member states of UNESCO in 2001, which holds that "the defence of cultural diversity is … inseparable from respect for human dignity" and that it "implies a commitment to human rights and fundamental freedoms." The UNESCO Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions, adopted in 2005, states that "cultural diversity can be protected and promoted only if human rights and fundamental freedoms … are guaranteed" (Article 2[1]). The precise relationship between cultural diversity and human rights, however, is not clarified and thus leaves room for further exploration. This contribution analyses the issues surrounding the relationship between cultural diversity and human rights, in particular cultural rights. Firstly, it addresses general human rights issues such as universality and cultural relativism and the principles of equality and non-discrimination. Secondly, it explores the scope of cultural rights, as well as the cultural dimension of human rights. Thirdly, several cases are discussed in which human rights were invoked to protect cultural interests, confirming the value of cultural diversity. Finally, some concluding remarks are presented, indicating which areas require attention in order to further improve the promotion and protection of human rights in relation to cultural diversity. PMID:21132940

  20. The Discourse of Human Dignity and Techniques of Disempowerment: Giorgio Agamben, J. M. Coetzee, and Kazuo Ishiguro

    E-print Network

    Mohammad, Malek Hardan

    2012-02-14

    ‘s fiction subverts the human dignity discourse while Kazuo Ishiguro‘s work is enmeshed in it. Coetzee generates sympathy for humans who lack the sense of human dignity and act on mere instinct. He offers ?disgrace? as a spiritual-ethical state of sensuality...

  1. Women's human rights & the feminisation of poverty in South Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristina Bentley

    2004-01-01

    This article assesses the range of measures in place in South Africa to protect the human rights of women and establish their equality. The Constitution, the National Action Plan, ratified international law and domestic law all aim, or claim, to prioritise the ‘right’ treatment of women in South Africa. On paper then, there is a human rights ‘culture’ which is

  2. International Justice: the United Nations, Human Rights and Disability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah Parker

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the United Nations (UN) human rights system through the lens of disability. An analysis of two human rights instruments, the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and the Standard Rules on the Equalization of Opportunities for Persons with a Disability, is undertaken with reference to three key areas that influence the participation of persons with

  3. The relationship between right hemisphere damage and gesture in spontaneous discourse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naomi Cocks; Kathryn Hird; Kim Kirsner

    2007-01-01

    Background: The assessment and rehabilitation of acquired neurogenic communication disorders rarely involves a systematic analysis of gesture use. The right cerebral hemisphere has been identified as a possible locus of control for gesture. McNeill's (McNeill & Duncan, 2000) growth point theory posits a structure for the organisation of processes from both cerebral hemispheres which serves to support the integration of

  4. BETWEEN WOMEN’S RIGHTS AND MEN’S AUTHORITY: MASCULINITY AND SHIFTING DISCOURSES OF GENDER DIFFERENCE IN URBAN UGANDA

    PubMed Central

    Wyrod, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Across the African continent, women’s rights have become integral to international declarations, regional treaties, national legislation, and grassroots activism. Yet there is little research on how African men have understood these shifts, and how African masculinities are implicated in such changes. Drawing on a year of ethnographic research in the Ugandan capital Kampala, this article investigates how ordinary men and women in Uganda understand women’s rights, and how their attitudes are tied to local conceptions of masculinity. I argue that a new configuration of gender relations is evident in urban Uganda—one that accommodates some aspects of women’s rights while retaining previous notions of innate male authority. This article, therefore, illustrates the complex and often contradictory engagements with human rights that occur in local contexts, and how such engagements are shaped by gender relations, including conceptions of masculinity. PMID:19862350

  5. Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 1999

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2000-01-01

    The US State Department released its annual Country Reports on Human Rights Practices to the US Congress on February 25. Composed from evidence and data gathered by embassy staff, government officials, military sources, human-rights monitors, journalists, and others, the reports are designed to serve as a tool for shaping policy, conducting diplomacy, and determining international resource allocations. Reports are offered for nearly every country, grouped by region. Each report contains a brief overview of the country's political and economic systems and a detailed review of its record on respecting "internationally recognized individual, civil, political, and worker rights, as set forth in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights." Appendixes include a list of International Human Rights Conventions, the 54th UNHRC (UN Commission on Human Rights) Voting Record, and the text of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

  6. Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 1998

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1999-01-01

    The US State Department released its annual Country Reports on Human Rights Practices to the US Congress on February 26. Composed from evidence and data gathered by embassy staff, government officials, military sources, human-rights monitors, journalists, and others, the reports are designed to serve as a resource for shaping policy, conducting diplomacy, and determining international resource allocations. Reports are offered for nearly every country, grouped by region. Each report contains a brief overview of the country's political and economic systems and a detailed review of its record on respecting "internationally recognized individual, civil, political, and worker rights, as set forth in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights." Appendixes include a list of International Human Rights Conventions, the 54th UNHRC (UN Commission on Human Rights) Voting Record, and the text of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

  7. Men, HIV/AIDS, and Human Rights

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, Dean; Stemple, Lara; Sawires, Sharif; Coates, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Though still limited in scale, work with men to achieve gender equality is occurring on every continent and in many countries. A rapidly expanding evidence base demonstrates that rigorously implemented initiatives targeting men can change social practices that affect the health of both sexes, particularly in the context of HIV and AIDS. Too often however, messages only address the harm that regressive masculinity norms cause women, while neglecting the damage done to men by these norms. This article calls for a more inclusive approach which recognizes that men, far from being a monolithic group, have unequal access to health and rights depending on other intersecting forms of discrimination based on race, class, sexuality, disability, nationality, and the like. Messages that target men only as holders of privilege miss men who are disempowered or who themselves challenge rigid gender roles. The article makes recommendations which move beyond treating men simply as “the problem”, and instead lays a foundation for engaging men both as agents of change and holders of rights to the ultimate benefit of women and men. Human rights and other policy interventions must avoid regressive stereotyping, and successful local initiatives should be taken to scale nationally and internationally. PMID:19553779

  8. How the Use of Human Rights Treaties to Prohibit Genetic

    E-print Network

    Martin Gunderson

    2008-01-01

    Genetic engineering for purposes of human enhancement poses risks that justify regulation. I argue, however, that it is inappropriate to use human rights treaties to prohibit germ-line genetic engineering whether therapeutic or for purposes of enhancement. The scope and weight of human rights make them poor tools for regulating a rapidly developing technology such as genetic engineering. On the other hand, international treaties are appropriate regulatory tools as long as prohibitions are not put in terms of human rights.

  9. Sexual and reproductive rights and the human rights agenda: controversial and contested.

    PubMed

    Nowicka, Wanda

    2011-11-01

    In this paper I share some of my experience and observations, as an advocate for women's rights, of the last 20 years of struggles for sexual and reproductive health and rights, carried out in many key places where these issues have been debated and decided. I do not aspire to be comprehensive about the current status of human rights related to sexuality and reproduction. Given that my expertise is of a practical (rather than theoretical) nature, the complexity of the topic and contradictory events with regard to it, which take place almost everyday, I will highlight some selected achievements and setbacks in this area, particularly regarding abortion rights. I will provide examples of how human rights related to sexual and reproductive health have been addressed in UN policy-setting bodies, such as the Commission on the Status of Women and Commission on Population and Development, as well as in the UN human rights system such as Treaty Monitoring Bodies and Human Rights Council. Given my work with European institutions, I provide examples of important decisions by the Council of Europe and the European Court of Human Rights. Lastly, I discuss growing opposition to a progressive human rights agenda and the universality of human rights. Despite significant successes, sexual and reproductive rights will long remain controversial and contested. Hence, it is crucial to try to find new ways to engage and new partners to work with. PMID:22118146

  10. Pain relief is a human right.

    PubMed

    Daher, Michel

    2010-01-01

    For centuries, medical and surgical treatment has emphasized saving the life of the patient rather than ameliorating the patient's pain, particularly when there were few options for the latter. Today at the dawn of the 21st century, the best available evidence indicates a major gap between an increasingly understanding of the pathophysiology of pain and widespread inadequacy of its treatment. Epidemiologic evidence has proven that chronic pain is a widespread public health issue. Studies of cancer patients' pain control consistently reveal that up to half of patients receive inadequate analgesia and 30% do not receive appropriate drugs for their pain. Equally, for patients suffering HIV/AIDS, 60%-100% will experience pain at some stage in their illness. In the developed world, this gap has prompted a series of declarations and actions by national and international bodies advocating better pain control. One response to the worldwide undertreatment of pain has been to promote the concept that pain relief is a public health issue of such critical importance as to constitute an international imperative and fundamental human right. The importance of pain relief as the core of the medical ethic is clear. Pain clinicians promote the status of pain management beyond that of appropriate clinical practice or even an ethic of good medicine. They advocate a paradigm shift in the medical professions' perspective on pain management, from simply good practice to an imperative founded on patient rights. There is a need to promote policies which create conditions where human beings can bear even incurable illnesses and death in a dignified manner. This must help health professionals or lay groups to initiate a powerful agenda to reform local statutes. The essential components of such legislation are: 1. Reasonable pain management is a right. 2. Doctors have a duty to listen to and reasonably respond to a patient's report of pain. 3. Provision of necessary pain relief is immune from potential legal liability. 4. Doctors who are notable or willing to ensure adequate analgesia must refer to a colleague who has this expertise. 5. Pain management must be a compulsory component of continuing medical education. For too long, pain and its management have been prisoners of myth, irrationality, ignorance, and cultural bias. We are confident that the Pain Relief and Palliative Care Working Group under the auspices of the Lebanese Cancer Society is the main promoter of Palliative Care in Lebanon whose main goal is to relieve suffering and improve quality of life of the cancer patients, and advocate pain relief as a human right. PMID:20590358

  11. Human rights reasoning and medical law: a sceptical essay.

    PubMed

    Wall, Jesse

    2015-03-01

    I am sceptical as to the contribution that human rights can make to our evaluation of medical law. I will argue here that viewing medical law through a human rights framework provides no greater clarity, insight or focus. If anything, human rights reasoning clouds any bioethical or evaluative analysis. In Section 1 of this article, I outline the general structure of human rights reasoning. I will describe human rights reasoning as (a) reasoning from rights that each person has 'by virtue of their humanity', (b) reasoning from rights that provide 'hard to defeat' reasons for action and (c) reasoning from abstract norms to specified duties. I will then argue in Section 2 that, unless we (a) re-conceive of human rights as narrow categories of liberties, it becomes (b) necessary for our human rights reasoning to gauge the normative force of each claim or liberty. When we apply this approach to disputes in medical law, we (in the best case scenario) end up (c) 'looking straight through' the human right to the (disagreement about) values and features that each person has by virtue of their humanity. PMID:24547883

  12. Towards a human rights compatible nuclear liability regime: some human rights reflections from India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Subramanian Ramamurthy

    2010-01-01

    Despite comprehensive measures to ensure the highest amount of safety in nuclear activities, the eventuality of nuclear accident will certainly be a human rights disaster, resulting in devastating damage to individuals, property and environment. The economic and social cost of the catastrophe depends on a range of factors – from loss of life to personal injury, to loss of freedom

  13. Towards a human rights compatible nuclear liability regime: some human rights reflections from India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Subramanian Ramamurthy

    2011-01-01

    Despite comprehensive measures to ensure the highest amount of safety in nuclear activities, the eventuality of nuclear accident will certainly be a human rights disaster, resulting in devastating damage to individuals, property and environment. The economic and social cost of the catastrophe depends on a range of factors – from loss of life to personal injury, to loss of freedom

  14. Dangerous Places and Nimble Fingers: Discourses of Gender Discrimination and Rights in Global Corporations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Winifred R. Poster

    2001-01-01

    This paper considers how women's employment rights are being constructed in multinational corporations by examining three high-tech organizations—a U.S. company in Silicon Valley, its subsidiary in New Delhi, India, and a comparable local Indian company. It first describes the legal frameworks for addressing gender employment discrimination by state governments in India and the United States. Then it examines how these

  15. Advocating for the forgotten human rightArticle 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights – religious freedom

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David R. Hodge

    2006-01-01

    Human rights are a central social work concern. Little attention, however, has been paid to the right to religious freedom called by some the forgotten human right delineated in Article 18 of the Declaration. Given increasing religious persecution around the world, this represents a significant oversight. Accordingly, this article suggests strategies for promoting religious freedom and ameliorating religious oppression.

  16. The Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2001

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-01-01

    Recently released by the US State Department, the 2001 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices was designed to give voice to those who have been denied the freedoms and rights provided in the Universal Declaration on Human Rights. Covering internationally recognized individual, civil, political, and worker rights for nearly every country, the collection of reports is separated into six regions -- Africa, East Asia and the Pacific, Europe and Eurasia, Western Hemisphere, Near East and North Africa, and South Asia. The collection also offers appendices that include notes on the preparation of the reports, a selection of International Human Rights Conventions, a selection of Assistance Programs, the Human Rights Commission voting record, and the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

  17. POLICY TITLE EQUALITY, DIVERSITY AND HUMAN RIGHTS POLICY

    E-print Network

    Greenaway, Alan

    assessment. The policy is informed by the following: The UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights 1948POLICY TITLE EQUALITY, DIVERSITY AND HUMAN RIGHTS POLICY DOCUMENT AUTHOR AND DEPARTMENT POLICY Strategy University Regulations Student Engagement Policy Health and Safety Policy All Human Resource

  18. Conflicts and Human Rights Dorresteijn: Law, Economics, Governance

    E-print Network

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    . The wide and dynamic subject area of conflicts and human rights has become part of the research tradition Public Law), the Faculty of Arts and the Humanities (in particular the Project Group on International of conflicts and human rights in relation to each other from a broad perspective of international relations

  19. Women, Individual Rights and Cultural Relativity: Power and Difference in Human Rights Debates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carole Nagengast

    1998-01-01

    When talking about human rights, anthropologists often find it difficult to reconcile an apparent conflict between individual and collective rights, and cultural relativity and universalism. The argument in this paper mediates these dichotomies, especially with respect to women's rights. It concludes that the concept of cultural relativity, developed by anthropologists to induce respect for difference, is appropriated, simplified and deployed

  20. Ethiopia: Human Rights Watch Report, 2/5/98

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1998-01-01

    The African Studies Center site at the University of Pennsylvania has posted this 1997 report on the political and social condition of Ethiopia. It is an announcement released by Human Rights Watch (HRW)/Africa in December 1997, which criticizes "the failure of the Ethiopian government to live up to its professed commitment to human rights, and calling on the US in particular to put pressure for the government to live up to its human rights obligations."

  1. Reexamining workers' compensation: a human rights perspective.

    PubMed

    Boden, Leslie I

    2012-06-01

    Injured workers, particularly those with more severe injuries, have long experienced workers' compensation systems as stressful and demeaning, have found it difficult to obtain benefits, and, when able to obtain benefits, have found them inadequate. Moreover, the last two decades have seen a substantial erosion of the protections offered by workers' compensation. State after state has erected additional barriers to benefit receipt, making the workers' compensation experience even more difficult and degrading. These changes have been facilitated by a framing of the political debate focused on the free market paradigm, employer costs, and worker fraud and malingering. The articles in this special issue propose an alternate framework and analysis, a human rights approach, that values the dignity and economic security of injured workers and their families. PMID:22570018

  2. The Human Rights of Persons with Mental Disabilities: A Global Perspective on the Application of Human Rights Principles to Mental Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence O. Gostin; Lance Gable

    2004-01-01

    This Article examines the human rights of persons with mental disabilities and the application and development of these rights by the various international and regional systems that have been established to protect human rights. An international system of human rights with universal application has been developed under the auspices of the United Nations. Regional human rights systems have applied additional

  3. Coronial law and practice: a human rights perspective.

    PubMed

    Freckelton, Ian; McGregor, Simon

    2014-03-01

    Coronial law and practice inevitably impact upon the human rights of those affected by deaths. It is important that such rights be incorporated in how death investigations, up to and including coronial inquests, take place. This article explores the significant impact of the jurisprudence emanating from the European Court of Human Rights, as well as the application of such law by the courts of the United Kingdom and potentially in other countries. It argues that viewing the work of coroners through the lens of human rights is a constructive approach and that, although in the coronial legislation of Australia and New Zealand, many human rights, especially those of family members, and civil liberties are explicitly protected, there remain real advantages in reflecting upon compliance with human rights by death investigation procedures and decision-making. PMID:24804530

  4. Human Brain: Left-Right Asymmetries in Temporal Speech Region

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norman Geschwind; Walter Levitsky

    1968-01-01

    We have found marked anatomical asymmetries between the upper surfaces of the human right and left temporal lobes. The planum temporale (the area behind Heschl's gyrus) is larger on the left in 65 percent of brains; on the right it is larger in only 11 percent. The left planum is on the average one-third longer than the right planum. This

  5. Eradicating female circumcision: Human rights and cultural values

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linda A Williams

    1998-01-01

    Female circumcision excites strong emotions both from those against and those in favour of its continuation. It highlights the opposition between those who argue that there are rights which are universal to the whole of humanity and those who argue that rights are relativised to particular cultures. Women's rights are particularly contentious because, unlike imprisoning political opponents, or torture, which

  6. Implementing Children's Human Rights Education in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covell, Katherine; Howe, R. Brian; McNeil, Justin K.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluations of a children's rights education initiative in schools in Hampshire, England--consistent with previous research findings--demonstrate the effectiveness of a framework of rights for school policy, practice, and teaching, for promoting rights-respecting attitudes and behaviors among children, and for improving the school ethos. The value…

  7. Energy and Development: Is Energy a Basic Human Right?

    E-print Network

    Energy and Development: Is Energy a Basic Human Right? Skype/Video presentation for senior pupils national Laboratory/DTU Denmark #12;Is energy a basic human right? · What is energy? ­ the ability to make something happen · Different kinds of energy ­ or energy carriers - fuels · What do we use energy for

  8. Human Rights and History Education: An Australian Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burridge Nina; Buchanan, John; Chodkiewicz, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The place of education for and about human rights within the school curriculum remains contested and this paper reports on the first national cross-sectoral investigation of its place in Australian curricula and more specifically in national and state History curriculum documents. Opportunities for the inclusion of human rights based studies were…

  9. Human Rights: Lesson Plan for SDAIE (Sheltered) Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Husser, Michael D.

    This lesson plan on human rights uses the Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE) methodology used in California to teach academic content to intermediate, threshold level limited-English-proficient (LEP) students. It sets forth three educational goals for students to reach; asks students to examine definitions of human rights

  10. The Birth of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Outlines the history of the ideals and enactment of the United Nations' Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). Includes a discussion of the origins of the concept of human rights, the impact of World War II, the role of nongovernmental organizations, and the process of drafting and adopting the UDHR. (DSK)

  11. Universal Declaration of Human Rights: 40th Anniversary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Juanita, Ed.

    December 10, 1988, marks the 40th anniversary of the adoption by the United Nations of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The Declaration represents the first comprehensive, global statement on basic human rights, embracing many of the values long held by U.S. citizens; and it urges all peoples and all nations to promote respect for the…

  12. Human Rights and Values Education: Using the International Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Betty A.

    1994-01-01

    Asserts that, in teaching about human rights, the international standards should be the fundamental core of the content and values to be communicated. Recommends that teachers should use the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as the standard by which the actions of individuals and governments should be compared. (CFR)

  13. Teaching "Islam and Human Rights" in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muedini, Fait A.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses my approach to teaching a course on Islam and human rights. I begin by examining the attention Islam has received in the media and classroom. Then, I discuss how I structure lectures on Islam and human rights, the various readings associated with the lectures, as well as common themes discussed in class that include but are…

  14. Professionalizing a Global Social Movement: Universities and Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suarez, David; Bromley, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Research on the human rights movement emphasizes direct changes in nation-states, focusing on the efficacy of treaties and the role of advocacy in mitigating immediate violations. However, more than 140 universities in 59 countries established academic chairs, research centers, and programs for human rights from 1968-2000, a development that…

  15. Human Rights in the Reagan Era: Acceptance in Principle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aryeh Neier

    1989-01-01

    Over eight years, the Reagan administration's policy on human rights shifted dramatically. At the outset, some in the administration repudiated promoting human rights internationally as a foreign policy goal of the United States; others argued that the United States should condemn abuses by hostile totalitarian governments but not by friendly authoritarian governments. By the time the Reagan administration left office,

  16. Education as a Human Right in the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sharon E.

    2013-01-01

    According to the United Nations, education is a right to which all human beings are entitled. Since 2000, the UN has been promoting the Millennium Development Goal to achieve free universal primary education for all, regardless of gender, by 2015. If the UN is correct to suggest that education is both a human right in itself and an indispensable…

  17. Human Rights and Foreign Policy: A Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiman, David

    1999-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan for grades 9 through 12 that examines the making of foreign policy based on human-rights concerns. Helps students to understand the complexities of international relations and to clarify the beliefs and values about the appropriate role of human rights when making foreign policy. Provides two handouts. (CMK)

  18. [Human rights, an opportunity for public policies in health].

    PubMed

    Franco-Giraldo, Alvaro; Alvarez-Dardet, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Human rights outlined a better scenario for public policies in health. For it requires intersectoral and interdisciplinary approach. This article emphasizes the perspective of public health policies based on human rights, clarifies the relationship of public policies with the exercise of human rights, beyond the right to health. It recognizes the need to implement genuinely democratic and participatory mechanisms. It considers the universal declaration of human rights and other institutional expressions about the same as the international covenant on economic, social and cultural rights, discusses the ranking of the same and defend its entirety on the determinants of health through its cohesion and political factor. It defines a framework for public health and human rights that trend by strengthening social rights, as a new area of operation, based on public policies to address the determinants of health, upholding social justice, beyond the health field and the biological and behavioural risk factors to decisions arising from political power, exceeds medical solutions and access to health services. In conclusion, it promoting respect for human rights by greater understanding of them and strengthens the importance of indirect health policies (such as food, environment and health, violence gender) and the role of international policies in the global world. PMID:18579055

  19. Vulnerability, irregular migrants' health-related rights and the European Court of Human Rights.

    PubMed

    Da Lomba, Sylvie

    2014-09-01

    The protection of irregular migrants' health-related rights brings to the fore the tensions that exist between human rights, citizenship and the sovereign state, and exposes the protection gaps in the international human rights regime. With this in mind, I consider the merits of a vulnerability analysis in international human rights law (IHRL). I posit that, detached from specific groups and reconceptualised as universal, vulnerability can be reclaimed as a foundation and tool of IHRL. I further contend that the deployment of a vulnerability analysis can alleviate the exclusionary dimension of IHRL and extend protections to irregular migrants. On this basis, I investigate the development of a vulnerability analysis in the case law of the European Court of Human Rights. I argue that, in contrast with the Court's vulnerable population approach, a vulnerability analysis can improve protection standards for irregular migrants in the field of health. PMID:25199397

  20. Human Rights and Religious Education in the Contentious Context of Conflict-Troubled Societies: Perspectives from Human Rights Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zembylas, Michalinos

    2014-01-01

    This article explores some of the tensions that are created from the entanglement of religion and human rights and offers a possible response to these tensions in the context of religious education in conflict-troubled societies. It is suggested that a historicised and politicised approach in religious education in conjunction with human rights

  1. Human rights advances in women's reproductive health in Africa.

    PubMed

    Ngwena, Charles G; Brookman-Amissah, Eunice; Skuster, Patty

    2015-05-01

    The African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights recently adopted General Comment No 2 to interpret provisions of Article 14 of the Protocol to the African Charter on the Rights Women. The provisions relate to women's rights to fertility control, contraception, family planning, information and education, and abortion. The present article highlights the General Comment's potential to promote women's sexual and reproductive rights in multiple ways. The General Comment's human rights value goes beyond providing states with guidance for framing their domestic laws, practices, and policies to comply with treaty obligations. General Comment No 2 is invaluable in educating all stakeholders-including healthcare providers, lawyers, policymakers, and judicial officers at the domestic level-about pertinent jurisprudence. Civil society and human rights advocates can use the General Comment to render the state accountable for failure to implement its treaty obligations. PMID:25712778

  2. For the Record 1997: The UN Human Rights System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Produced by Human Rights Internet (HRI), this six volume report provides a country-by-country overview of human rights issues with links to relevant UN documents. The first volume includes an introduction, an appendix of UN bodies and mechanisms, a discussion of methodological and technical issues, and notes on major developments in the United Nations human rights system during 1997. The remaining volumes contain individual country reports, grouped by region. Each report contains links to treaties and reports to treaty bodies on a number of key topics. These include: Land and People; Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; Civil and Political Rights; Discrimination against Women; and Rights of the Child. Additional resources at the site include an internal search engine.

  3. [Human values and respect of human rights in oppressive conditions].

    PubMed

    Bomba, J

    1993-01-01

    Human rights, an issue of political debates in the last decades, listed in the United Nations Declaration of 1946 are rooted in the humanistic tradition of philosophy and religion. The UN declared their universal character and made state organizations responsible for their observation. Among all human rights that for freedom is usually perceived as crucial. Psychiatry developed in Europe primarily a caring function. The medical model developed in psychiatry through the 19th c. supplied the criteria for medical diagnosis of mental disturbance, and elaborated a system of treatment which included long term hospitalization. Medicalization of psychiatry (recently coming back) is a force which gives courage to those who suffer, to their families, and to professionals as well. This power however, can be easily abused, when a psychiatrist adopts a position of someone who knows better that which is good for his/her patient. Legal regulations of the circumstances of psychiatric treatment, especially treatment against the patient's will should prevent the abuse of the mentally disturbed person's right for freedom. The goal is usually achieved by clear description of clinical and other conditions under which a person can be committed, and by establishing the committed person's right to claim the decision to be unjust. Poland is a country without legal regulation in the area of mental health (there are only administrative acts). For more than sixty years several projects on mental health law have been worked on. The last one which came to the Sejm (parliament) in 1980 was withdrawn by the "Solidarity" Trade Union. At present, the membership of Poland in international organizations makes an introduction of mental health law an obligation. Having no legal regulation, Polish psychiatry has been a self-regulating system. It is worth to note that even in the hard Stalinist period (1947-1956) there was no abuse of psychiatry for political reasons. The main reason for Polish psychiatry staying free from political abuse is seen in the role of internalized norm of human dignity. But others should also be taken into account. It was a specificity of the political situation that the ruling powers did not insist that psychiatrists cooperate. On the other hand the integration of the Polish psychiatric community was helpful in observing the rule of non-collaboration. One of the most important factors is seen as the experience and memory of NAZI crimes in the field of psychiatry in Poland. Extermination of psychiatric patients had to leave the feeling of the importance of psychiatrist's own responsibility.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:8356170

  4. Unity in diversity and adversity: Venezuelan women's struggle for human rights.

    PubMed

    Rakowski, C A

    1998-01-01

    This article on the efforts of women in Venezuela to gain access to their human rights opens by noting that the most significant gains in this 80-year struggle have occurred in the past 20 years because activists 1) consistently framed women's issues as critical to attaining the goals of social justice and democracy, 2) built flexible coalitions among diverse groups of women, and 3) kept the issue before the public. The next section offers an historical perspective for these contemporary strategies by locating their origins in women's participation in political movements to end dictatorships and repression during the 1920s and tracing women's advancement from the gaining of the full right to vote in 1947 through the 1995 establishment of the National Council on Women. The article continues with a look at how the human rights agenda was reframed in the 1990s to include issues of violence against women and political participation and to increase public recognition of these issues. Consideration of new opportunities and continuing challenges focuses first on how spaces were created for new discourses by an erosion of confidence in public officials and a series of national protests and then on the related opportunity of a rapid rise in nontraditional presidential candidates. Next, the article details efforts to increase women's political participation as a human right and defense of democracy and to promote the idea that freedom from violence (poverty, sexual harassment, physical and emotional abuse, control over sexuality, rape and incest) is a human right. The article concludes by reemphasizing the importance of adopting a flexible style of networking and of recognizing that legislation merely provides the basis for action. PMID:12157789

  5. PhD Topic Arrangement in "D"iscourse Communities of Engineers and Social Sciences/Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasrati, Mostafa; Street, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This article is the result of a grounded theory investigation into the ways PhD topics are assigned by supervisors in engineering and selected by students in the social sciences/humanities in UK universities, broadly referred to as "topic arrangement", which can be regarded as one aspect of academic socialisation into academic Discourse

  6. British Idealism and the Human Rights Culture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Boucher

    2001-01-01

    Despite the fact that by the end of the nineteenth century philosophically Natural Rights had been severely undermined, and that the British Idealists found anathema most of the principles upon which they relied, such theories still had a currency among some political polemicists. The Idealists retained the vocabulary and transformed the meaning to refer to those rights which it is

  7. Policy and Practice Poverty, equity, human rights and health

    E-print Network

    Paula Braveman; Sofia Gruskin

    Abstract Those concerned with poverty and health have sometimes viewed equity and human rights as abstract concepts with little practical application, and links between health, equity and human rights have not been examined systematically. Examination of the concepts of poverty, equity, and human rights in relation to health and to each other demonstrates that they are closely linked conceptually and operationally and that each provides valuable, unique guidance for health institutions ’ work. Equity and human rights perspectives can contribute concretely to health institutions ’ efforts to tackle poverty and health, and focusing on poverty is essential to operationalizing those commitments. Both equity and human rights principles dictate the necessity to strive for equal opportunity for health for groups of people who have suffered marginalization or discrimination. Health institutions can deal with poverty and health within a framework encompassing equity and human rights concerns in five general ways: (1) institutionalizing the systematic and routine application of equity and human rights perspectives to all health sector actions; (2) strengthening and extending the public health functions, other than health care, that create the conditions necessary for health; (3) implementing equitable health care financing, which should help reduce poverty while increasing access for the poor; (4) ensuring that health services respond effectively to the major causes of preventable ill-health among the poor and disadvantaged; and (5) monitoring, advocating and taking action to

  8. Older persons' use of the European Court of Human Rights.

    PubMed

    Spanier, Benny; Doron, Israel; Milman-Sivan, Faina

    2013-12-01

    One of the most significant human rights tribunals in Europe is the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR). Up to day, no study has attempted to explore the cases brought before the ECtHR that discuss and rule on issues concerning the rights of older persons. To descriptively analyze the ECtHR cases that deal with older persons and elder rights issues. Quantitative and descriptive analysis of 226 randomly selected publicly-open ECtHR cases dealing with elder-rights between the years 2000-2010. On average, 11.9 % of the ECtHR case load included rulings that concern older persons' rights. In the majority of the cases (91 %, 205 judgments), the ECtHR found a violation of at least one human right concerning older persons. Despite the fact that rights of older persons do not appear as such in the European Convention on Human Rights, older persons do find their way to the ECtHR. PMID:24142028

  9. [Family planning and diverse declarations of human rights].

    PubMed

    Gakwaya, D

    1990-08-01

    Human beings have always desired to claim their rights, even in times when only a small proportion of the population was considered fully human and the rest were slaves, servants, uncivilized, colonized, underdeveloped, or, in the recent euphemism, "developing". The French Declaration of the Rights of Man of 1789 marked the 1st time in history that rights for all people were publicly affirmed. The rights in question were essentially constitutional and political, but the idea of claiming rights had been born. In 1948, the international community approved the Universal Declaration of Human Rights which encompassed all types of rights. Other international acts on civil and political rights and the rights of women and children have complemented and interpreted the 1948 document. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights affirmed that all human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights and that all persons have a right to satisfaction of economic, social, and cultural needs. The convention on elimination of all forms of discrimination against women referred in its preamble to the particular disadvantages of women living in poverty and affirmed the right of all women to education in health and family welfare, including family planning, as well as to medical and family planning services. Women were affirmed to have the same rights as men to decide freely and in an informed manner on the number and spacing of their children and to have access to the information, education, and means to exercise these rights. The United Nations has demonstrated its interest in Population Commission in 1946 and of the UN Fund for Population Activities in 1969, and through decennial worldwide population conferences in 1954, 1965, 1974, and 1984. UN demographic goals include reduced fertility on a worldwide basis, a reduced proportion of women not using reliable contraception, a substantial reduction of early marriage and adolescent pregnancy, reduction in infant and maternal mortality, a life expectancy of at least 62 years in all countries, and a better geographic distribution of population within national territories permitting rational use of resources. Governments which subscribed to the declaration and conventions on human rights should respect their promises. Population growth which outpaces increases in production will make it increasingly difficult to satisfy the rights and needs of all population sectors. A government confronted with this problem is obliged to explore every possible means of increasing production but must also seek to control population growth. Contraception is a legitimate means of achieving this end. PMID:12316572

  10. Grassroots Responsiveness to Human Rights Abuse: History of the Washtenaw Interfaith Coalition for Immigrant Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Laura; Martinez, Ramiro; Harner, Margaret; Harner, Melanie; Horner, Pilar; Delva, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss how a community agency based in Washtenaw County, the Washtenaw Interfaith Coalition for Immigration Rights (WICIR), emerged in response to increasing punitive immigration practices and human rights abuses toward the Latino community. The article discusses how WICIR is engaged in advocacy, community…

  11. Adolescent pregnancies and girls' sexual and reproductive rights in the amazon basin of Ecuador: an analysis of providers' and policy makers' discourses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Adolescent pregnancies are a common phenomenon that can have both positive and negative consequences. The rights framework allows us to explore adolescent pregnancies not just as isolated events, but in relation to girls' sexual and reproductive freedom and their entitlement to a system of health protection that includes both health services and the so called social determinants of health. The aim of this study was to explore policy makers' and service providers' discourses concerning adolescent pregnancies, and discuss the consequences that those discourses have for the exercise of girls' sexual and reproductive rights' in the province of Orellana, located in the amazon basin of Ecuador. Methods We held six focus-group discussions and eleven in-depth interviews with 41 Orellana's service providers and policy makers. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using discourse analysis, specifically looking for interpretative repertoires. Results Four interpretative repertoires emerged from the interviews. The first repertoire identified was "sex is not for fun" and reflected a moralistic construction of girls' sexual and reproductive health that emphasized abstinence, and sent contradictory messages regarding contraceptive use. The second repertoire -"gendered sexuality and parenthood"-constructed women as sexually uninterested and responsible mothers, while men were constructed as sexually driven and unreliable. The third repertoire was "professionalizing adolescent pregnancies" and lead to patronizing attitudes towards adolescents and disregard of the importance of non-medical expertise. The final repertoire -"idealization of traditional family"-constructed family as the proper space for the raising of adolescents while at the same time acknowledging that sexual abuse and violence within families was common. Conclusions Providers' and policy makers' repertoires determined the areas that the array of sexual and reproductive health services should include, leaving out the ones more prone to cause conflict and opposition, such as gender equality, abortion provision and welfare services for pregnant adolescents. Moralistic attitudes and sexism were present - even if divergences were also found-, limiting services' capability to promote girls' sexual and reproductive health and rights. PMID:20525405

  12. On the Historical and Ideal Nature of Human Rights: Reading "Human Rights and Human Diversity" by A. J. M. Milne

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhen, Han

    2002-01-01

    The foundation of human rights is social history, which is reflected as a kind of moral ideal. The ideal is produced on the historical base, it thus has real meaning, meanwhile the ideal is the ideal of the development of history; therefore, the history has a style of progress. In this paper, the author suggests the following points: (1)…

  13. hr-law: Human Rights Law Mailing List

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    hr-law is a mailing list for law students studying international human rights or humanitarian law, or who are just interested in the subject. The purpose of the list is to provide a forum where people can share information, experiences and ideas. Some of the appropriate topics for this list include: information on how to do research in the human rights area, and sharing of hints; exchanging help on papers or research projects; discussion of topics related to human rights law; and sharing information on employment, internship and volunteer opportunities.

  14. Bonhoeffer and universal health care as a human right.

    PubMed

    Clarke Chapman, G

    2013-12-01

    Bonhoeffer gave a theocentric basis for human rights, as God is the ground of ethics. In our earthly world, the "ultimate" must be prepared by what is "penultimate." That includes humanity's natural life and bodily wholeness, leading to human duties crafted by human reason. Nowadays, biblical texts should not be used as partisan weapons attacking government provision of health care, since all Scripture (even the Law) is seen as a Christ-centered focus on human redemption. Thus, Bonhoeffer implies a right to universal health care, but leaves entirely open which practical structures may best provide it. PMID:23737039

  15. Adult Literacy Education and Human Rights: A View from Afghanistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Susan M.; Kooij, Christina S.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we argue that adult literacy as part of international development is an issue of both human rights and women's rights. We explore this by presenting a case study of the effects of one innovative adult literacy program in Afghanistan that places men and women, as well as various ethnicities, together in the same classroom as…

  16. Voices of Afghan women: Human rights and economic development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Huma Ahmed-ghosh

    2006-01-01

    Contemporary Afghanistan provides a good case study for looking at the growing demand for women's rights within a tribal, Islamic and modernizing framework. As was explicated by three Afghan women interviewed at a conference in Italy in 2001, and additional women in Kabul in 2003, human rights for all people in Afghanistan, and specifically for women, can only be ensured

  17. Africa and Discovery: Human Rights, Environment, and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitchcock, Robert K.

    1993-01-01

    Contends that, in the past 30 years, a dramatic upsurge has taken place in activities designed to promote human rights for indigenous peoples around the world. Asserts that, in the case of Africa, attention generally has been concentrated on socioeconomic rights, such as health care, sufficient water, food, and shelter. (CFR)

  18. How Children Learn about Human Rights. Bulletin, 1951, No. 9

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Wilhelmina; Mackintosh, Helen K.

    1951-01-01

    This particular bulletin is concerned with the concept of human rights, and the interpretation of some of these rights in the classroom, in the school, at home, and in the community. Although the discussion is directed toward the classroom teacher primarily, principals, supervisors, administrators, and parents who want children to succeed in all…

  19. Narratives in Teaching and Research for Justice and Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osler, Audrey; Zhu, Juanjuan

    2011-01-01

    Throughout history individual and collective narratives have been used in struggles for justice. We draw on Sen's theory of justice to examine the potential of narratives in teaching and researching for social justice. Human rights are presented as powerful ethical claims that can be critically examined by learners to consider their rights and…

  20. Sex Education and Human Rights--A Lawyer's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumper, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The Human Rights Act 1998 is the most significant British statute to have been passed in the last decade. It has already been the catalyst for a series of high profile cases, ranging from the privacy rights of celebrities ("Douglas v Hello!" [2001] QB 967) to the Home Secretary's sentencing powers in murder cases ("R (Anderson) v Secretary of…

  1. Left–right holistic integration of human bodies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rachel A. Robbins; Max Coltheart

    2012-01-01

    Holistic integration of faces has been widely studied. More recently, investigations have explored whether similar processing is used for human bodies. Here we show that holistic processing, as measured by the composite task, does occur for bodies but is stronger for left and right halves than for top and bottom halves. We also found composite effects for left–right halves of

  2. Public health or human rights: what comes first?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Neil Hunt

    2004-01-01

    Respect for human rights is a defining feature of harm reduction, which is commonly characterised as a public health-based movement. The importance it attaches to ‘user-friendliness’ and the view that drug users have a right to the same respect and dignity that other users of health and social care services receive is largely undisputed among harm reductionists. Within harm reduction

  3. The human right to water: the importance of domestic and productive water rights.

    PubMed

    Hall, Ralph P; Van Koppen, Barbara; Van Houweling, Emily

    2014-12-01

    The United Nations (UN) Universal Declaration of Human Rights engenders important state commitments to respect, fulfill, and protect a broad range of socio-economic rights. In 2010, a milestone was reached when the UN General Assembly recognized the human right to safe and clean drinking water and sanitation. However, water plays an important role in realizing other human rights such as the right to food and livelihoods, and in realizing the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women. These broader water-related rights have been recognized but have not yet been operationalized. This paper unravels these broader water-related rights in a more holistic interpretation of existing international human rights law. By focusing on an emerging approach to water services provision--known as 'domestic-plus' services--the paper argues how this approach operationalizes a comprehensive range of socio-economic rights in rural and peri-urban areas. Domestic-plus services provide water for domestic and productive uses around homesteads, which challenges the widespread practice in the public sector of planning and designing water infrastructure for a single-use. Evidence is presented to show that people in rural communities are already using their water supplies planned for domestic uses to support a wide range of productive activities. Domestic-plus services recognize and plan for these multiple-uses, while respecting the priority for clean and safe drinking water. The paper concludes that domestic-plus services operationalize the obligation to progressively fulfill a comprehensive range of indivisible socio-economic rights in rural and peri-urban areas. PMID:24337891

  4. Office of Human Rights & Equity Services Planning for Accessibility

    E-print Network

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA), 2005 and the Ontario Human Rights Code, to ensure that all members accessibility costs (tick all that apply)i : · ASL (American Sign Language) Interpretation · Note-taker services

  5. Libraries and Human Rights: Iraq in the Crossfire

    E-print Network

    Cloonan, Michè le V.

    2008-07-14

    Michèle V. Cloonan, Dean and Professor at the Simmons College Graduate School of Library & Information Science, presents "Libraries and Human Rights: Iraq in the Crossfire," April 3, 2008 at the Spooner Commons, University of Kansas. Presentation...

  6. Using Human Rights Cases to Teach about Prejudice and Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Donald

    1983-01-01

    High school students analyze real-life case studies, taken from the files of the Ontario Human Rights Commission, to learn about the effects of prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination with regard to native people in Canada. (RM)

  7. International law, human rights and HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, David; London, Leslie

    2002-01-01

    This article explores the relevance of international human rights law in the response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic at national and international levels. Public health advocates can use arguments based on this body of law to promote responses to HIV/AIDS that reflect sound public health principles and documented best practice. Development assistance is increasingly linked to rights-based approaches, such as participatory processes, and strategic alliances between health professionals, organizations of people living with HIV/AIDS, and affected communities. Legal and human rights advocacy strategies are increasingly productive and necessary. PMID:12571725

  8. Teaching Human Rights: A Teaching Guide for Middle and High School Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiman, David A.

    This curriculum guide incorporates three dimensions of human rights education: teaching about human rights, teaching against human rights violations, and teaching for the creation of a world in which all human beings are treated with justice and dignity. The book is based upon the United Nations' Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR).…

  9. 3 CFR 9069 - Proclamation 9069 of December 9, 2013. Human Rights Day and Human Rights Week, 2013

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority...of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-eighth.BARACK...

  10. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights Celebrates 60th Anniversary

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-12-12

    Cuban activists say they were beaten on eve of 60th human rights anniversaryhttp://www.csmonitor.com/2008/1211/p25s02-woam.htmlBBC News: World Marks UN Human Rights Dayhttp://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/7771429.stmHuman rights violations in our own backyardhttp://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2008/12/09/ED5S14KPD6.DTLMary Robinson: Climate change is an issue of human rightshttp://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/commentators/mary-robinson-climate-change-is-an-issue-of-human-rights-1059360.htmlHuman Rights Day 2008 [Real Player, [pdf]http://www.un.org/events/humanrights/2008/index.shtmlUnited Nations Audio Library: Radio Classics [iTunes]http://www.unmultimedia.org/radio/library/classics/date.htmlThis Wednesday marked the 60th anniversary of the adoption of the United Nations' Universal Declaration of Human Rights. A number of groups around the world, including the United Nations and Amnesty International, used the observation of this event to bring attention to some of the continued human rights challenges and abuses around the world. Of course, sixty years ago, just getting the Declaration approved by the new U.N. General Assembly was quite a challenge, as individual countries had their own separate ideas about what constituted human rights. As Larry Cox, the director of Amnesty International USA, points out: "It was no longer a question of individual states doing whatever they want to for their citizens, because the way that governments treat their citizens affects the whole word and especially the peace and security of the whole world." Also this week, a number of commentators, such as Mary Robinson, the former United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights remarked that global climate change may be the next frontier in terms of thinking about human rights, especially in regards to the world's poor. The first link will lead visitors to a piece from the Voice of America News which talks about the legacy and future of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The second link leads to a piece from this Thursday's Christian Science Monitor which comments on a group of Cuban activists who said they were beaten while readying for a rally related to the anniversary of the Declaration. The third link will lead visitors to an excellent site created by the BBC to commemorate this event. The site includes a news article, an interactive slideshow, and a general Q&A section about the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Moving on, the fourth link leads to an editorial by Sumayyah Waheed on the state of California's prison youth system, which appeared in Wednesday's San Francisco Chronicle. The fifth link will whisk users away to an impassioned piece by Mary Robinson about the relationship between climate change and human rights. The sixth link leads to the official United Nations homepage on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Here, visitors can read the text of the Declaration in hundreds of different languages, watch short video presentations, and take a look through the "World Voices" project. Finally, the last link leads to a fascinating collection of audio documentaries produced by the United Nations over the past sixty years. While visitors do have to register to listen in, the range of voices is quite accomplished. The archive includes Edward Murrow talking about needy children in a post-WWII Europe, Helen Hayes narrating reports on the Korean War, and the unbeatable troika of Michael Redgrave, James Mason, and Orson Welles narrating the history of diplomacy.

  11. Introduction to Human Rights Theory and Practice GLBL S341 01 (30312) /PLSCS134

    E-print Network

    rights including: genocide, torture, human trafficking, women's rights, civil and political rightsIntroduction to Human Rights Theory and Practice GLBL S341 01 (30312) /PLSCS134 Summer 2013 June 1: After class or by appointment Course Description: Human rights become an important area of international

  12. Assessing human rights impacts in corporate development projects

    SciTech Connect

    Salcito, Kendyl, E-mail: kendyl.salcito@unibas.ch [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland) [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland); NomoGaia, 1900 Wazee Street, Suite 303, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); Utzinger, Jürg, E-mail: juerg.utzinger@unibas.ch [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland) [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland); Weiss, Mitchell G., E-mail: Mitchell-g.Weiss@unibas.ch [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland); Münch, Anna K., E-mail: annak.muench@gmail.com [Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Singer, Burton H., E-mail: bhsinger@epi.ufl.edu [Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Krieger, Gary R., E-mail: gkrieger@newfields.com [NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); Wielga, Mark, E-mail: wielga@nomogaia.org [NomoGaia, 1900 Wazee Street, Suite 303, Denver, CO 80202 (United States) [NomoGaia, 1900 Wazee Street, Suite 303, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Human rights impact assessment (HRIA) is a process for systematically identifying, predicting and responding to the potential impact on human rights of a business operation, capital project, government policy or trade agreement. Traditionally, it has been conducted as a desktop exercise to predict the effects of trade agreements and government policies on individuals and communities. In line with a growing call for multinational corporations to ensure they do not violate human rights in their activities, HRIA is increasingly incorporated into the standard suite of corporate development project impact assessments. In this context, the policy world's non-structured, desk-based approaches to HRIA are insufficient. Although a number of corporations have commissioned and conducted HRIA, no broadly accepted and validated assessment tool is currently available. The lack of standardisation has complicated efforts to evaluate the effectiveness of HRIA as a risk mitigation tool, and has caused confusion in the corporate world regarding company duties. Hence, clarification is needed. The objectives of this paper are (i) to describe an HRIA methodology, (ii) to provide a rationale for its components and design, and (iii) to illustrate implementation of HRIA using the methodology in two selected corporate development projects—a uranium mine in Malawi and a tree farm in Tanzania. We found that as a prognostic tool, HRIA could examine potential positive and negative human rights impacts and provide effective recommendations for mitigation. However, longer-term monitoring revealed that recommendations were unevenly implemented, dependent on market conditions and personnel movements. This instability in the approach to human rights suggests a need for on-going monitoring and surveillance. -- Highlights: • We developed a novel methodology for corporate human rights impact assessment. • We piloted the methodology on two corporate projects—a mine and a plantation. • Human rights impact assessment exposed impacts not foreseen in ESIA. • Corporations adopted the majority of findings, but not necessarily immediately. • Methodological advancements are expected for monitoring processes.

  13. Human dignity: scenarios with doing the right thing.

    PubMed

    Milton, Constance L

    2011-01-01

    Human dignity is a phenomenon of great importance to all health-related disciplines. For the professional nurse, human dignity is embedded in the ontological beliefs of a philosophical school of thought that guides the priority actions found in nurse practice. The common ethical phrase of doing the right thing is insinuated in the enduring truths of affirming human dignity in nurse practice. The author in this column examines possible meanings for doing the right thing in light of the ethical tenets of humanbecoming including reverence, awe, betrayal, and shame. PMID:21220568

  14. Pathologies of power: rethinking health and human rights.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, P

    1999-01-01

    The field of health and human rights has grown quickly, but its boundaries have yet to be traced. Fifty-one years after the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, consensus regarding the most promising directions for the future is lacking; however, outcome-oriented assessments lead us to question approaches that rely solely on recourse to formal legal and civil rights. Similarly unpromising are approaches that rely overmuch on appeals to governments: careful study reveals that state power has been responsible for most human rights violations and that most violations are embedded in "structural violence"--social and economic inequities that determine who will be at risk for assaults and who will be shielded. This article advances an agenda for research and action grounded in the struggle for social and economic rights, an agenda suited to public health and medicine, whose central contributions to future progress in human rights will be linked to the equitable distribution of the fruits of scientific advancement. Such an approach is in keeping with the Universal Declaration but runs counter to several of the reigning ideologies of public health, including those favoring efficacy over equity. PMID:10511828

  15. Education on human rights and healthcare: evidence from Serbia.

    PubMed

    Jovic Vranes, Aleksandra; Mikanovic, Vesna Bjegovic; Vukovic, Dejana; Djikanovic, Bosiljka; Babic, Momcilo

    2015-03-01

    Ensuring and enforcing human rights in patient care are important to promote health and to provide quality and appropriate healthcare services. Therefore, continued medical education (CME) is essential for healthcare professionals to utilize their sphere of influence to affect change in healthcare practice. A total of 123 participants attended three CME courses. Course topics covered: (i) the areas of human rights and healthcare, (ii) rights, obligations and responsibilities of healthcare professionals in relation to human rights and the rights of patients, (iii) healthcare of vulnerable groups and (iv) access to essential medical services. Evaluation of the CME courses involved two components: evaluation of participants' performance and the participants' evaluation of the teaching process. The participants were assessed at the beginning and end of each course. Each of the courses was evaluated by the participants through a questionnaire distributed at the end of each course. Descriptive statistics was used for data interpretation. Knowledge of the healthcare professionals improved at the end of all the three courses. The participants assessed several aspects of the courses, including the course topics, educational methods, the course methods, organization, duration and dynamics as well as the physical environment and the technical facilities of the course, and rated each very highly. Our results corroborate the importance and necessity of courses to heighten awareness of the state of current healthcare and human rights issues to increase the involvement of healthcare professionals both locally and globally. PMID:25344878

  16. How does the human rights perspective help to shape the food and nutrition policy research agenda?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence Haddad; Arne Oshaug

    1998-01-01

    Food as a human right was first laid down 50 years ago in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The last 10 years in particular, has witnessed an increased recognition of the importance of the human rights approach for designing policies and interventions that promote food and nutrition security, as evidenced by the highly visible role given to human rights

  17. Honing Human Rights in the L[subscript 2] Classroom: Pedagogical Possibilities Using Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praveen, C.

    2007-01-01

    Developing an understanding about human rights documents, and an awareness of human rights institutions and mechanisms of protection have become especially significant in the 21st century. Several classroom strategies have hitherto been employed to practice and experience human rights behaviour. Usually topics on human rights is introduced through…

  18. For Immediate Release IFI-published study: Human rights mechanisms gaining ground

    E-print Network

    Shihadeh, Alan

    recently in their active engagement with the Human Rights Council's Universal Periodic Review. This shows and declarations, including the entire human rights treaty system, the Human Rights council, and the OutcomeFor Immediate Release IFI-published study: Human rights mechanisms gaining ground in Arab States

  19. One Million Bones: Measuring the Effect of Human Rights Participation in the Social Work Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Jane; Cheatham, Leah P.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the integration of human rights content and a national arts-activism initiative--One Million Bones--into a bachelor's-level macro practice class as a human rights teaching strategy. Two previously validated scales, the Human Rights Exposure (HRX) in Social Work and the Human Rights Engagement (HRE) in Social Work…

  20. Human Rights Engagement and Exposure: New Scales to Challenge Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Jane; Abell, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Advancing human rights is a core competency of U.S. social work education; yet, human rights attitudes and behaviors have never been measured in the social work literature. Thus, this article describes the development and initial validation of two scales, Human Rights Engagement in Social Work (HRESW) and Human Rights Exposure in…

  1. The Formation of the ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights: A Protracted Journey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yung-Ming Yen

    2011-01-01

    The institutional gap of regional human rights mechanisms in Asia represents a notable inconsistency with the global trend of human rights protection. Recently, efforts to promote regional cooperation have finally begun to move forward. The first governmental human rights institution, the ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights (AICHR), began to operate in 2010. This article investigates this important development. Additionally,

  2. Girls' and Boys' Reasoning on Cultural and Religious Practices: A Human Rights Education Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Wet, Annamagriet; Roux, Cornelia; Simmonds, Shan; ter Avest, Ina

    2012-01-01

    Human rights play a vital role in citizens' political, religious and cultural life (Wang 2002, 171). Due to the prominence of human rights in the everyday life of citizens, including those of South Africa, human rights education has been included in many school curricula. Human rights education aims to develop responsible citizens who "inter alia"…

  3. Module No: 420150Human RightsModule Title: Pre-requisite

    E-print Network

    as local organizations which are concerned with Human Rights and its different specializations. A/6 becomeModule No: 420150Human RightsModule Title: Pre-requisite: Module Type: university elective: The topics of human rights discusses the development of the concept of human rights throughout various

  4. Information Sheet for BIS 403 Washington, D.C. Human Rights Seminar

    E-print Network

    Queitsch, Christine

    , D.C. Human Rights Seminar (BIS 403) is part of the human rights emphasis in the Interdisciplinary. The course has been a part of the curriculum since 1990 and focuses on the construction of human rights questions such as the following: What is the relation between international human rights and domestic U

  5. Sexual and bodily rights as human rights in the Middle East and North Africa.

    PubMed

    Ercevik Amado, Liz

    2004-05-01

    A regional workshop on sexual and bodily rights as human rights in the Middle East and North Africa was held in Malta in 2003, attended by 22 NGO representatives from Jordan, Egypt, Lebanon, Palestine, Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, Turkey, Pakistan and USA. The meeting aimed to develop strategies for overcoming human rights violations in the region with reference to law and social and political practices. Session topics included sexuality and gender identity; sexuality and sexual health; sexuality and comparative penal law; sexual rights in international documents; advocacy and lobbying. Sexual rights, sexual health and education, sexual violence and adolescent sexuality were explored in depth, including taboos and emerging trends. Specific areas of concern included marital rape, early marriages, temporary marriages, sexual orientation, premarital and extramarital sexuality, honour crimes, female genital mutilation, unmarried mothers, adolescent sexuality, unwanted pregnancies and safe abortion, sexuality in education and health services. An analysis of civil codes, penal codes and personal status codes indicated a clear imperative for legal reform. Participants heard about efforts to promote the right to sexual orientation which have already been initiated in Lebanon, Turkey and Tunisia. Networking within the region and with counterparts in other regions in comparable situations and conditions was deemed essential. PMID:15242219

  6. [Reflections for having bioethics involved in the human rights culture].

    PubMed

    Brussino, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Bioethics can be interpreted as a critical reflection on life and health, a new way to make decisions in these fields, a social reform movement, and an academic discipline. In any case, Bioethics implies an interdisciplinary and intercultural dialogue. At the same time, human rights, as universal moral guidelines, provide a plausible basis for this intercultural dialogue, for they enable the identification of a core of transcultural values that can work as "moral minima" in the dialogue among different cultures and the search for international consensuses. This article sets forth the triple connection (historical-genealogical, conceptual and practical) between bioethics and human rights, and reflects on some of the conditions that should be taken into account for bioethics to be involved in the human rights culture. PMID:23338646

  7. Child labor and environmental health: government obligations and human rights.

    PubMed

    Amon, Joseph J; Buchanan, Jane; Cohen, Jane; Kippenberg, Juliane

    2012-01-01

    The Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour was adopted by the International Labour Organization in 1999. 174 countries around the world have signed or ratified the convention, which requires countries to adopt laws and implement programs to prohibit and eliminate child labor that poses harms to health or safety. Nonetheless, child labor continues to be common in the agriculture and mining sectors, where safety and environmental hazards pose significant risks. Drawing upon recent human rights investigations of child labor in tobacco farming in Kazakhstan and gold mining in Mali, the role of international human rights mechanisms, advocacy with government and private sector officials, and media attention in reducing harmful environmental exposures of child workers is discussed. Human rights-based advocacy in both cases was important to raise attention and help ensure that children are protected from harm. PMID:23316246

  8. Human rights and mass disaster: lessons from the 2004 tsunami.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, H M; Fletcher, L E; Stover, E

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the results of an investigation into how the December, 2004 tsunami and its aftermath affected the human rights of the survivors. Teams of researchers interviewed survivors, government officials, representatives of international and local nongovernmental organisations, UN officials, the military, police, and other key informants in India, Sri Lanka, the Maldives, Indonesia, and Thailand. We also analysed newspaper articles, reports released by governments, UN agencies, NGOs, and private humanitarian aid groups, and we examined the laws and policies related to survivors' welfare in the affected countries. We found worsening of prior human rights violations, inequities in aid distribution, lack of accountability and impunity, poor coordination of aid, lack of community participation in reconstruction, including coastal redevelopment. Corruption and preexisting conflict negatively impact humanitarian interventions. We make recommendations to international agencies, states, and local health service providers. A human rights framework offers significant protection to survivors and should play a critical role in disaster response. PMID:18277529

  9. Child Labor and Environmental Health: Government Obligations and Human Rights

    PubMed Central

    Amon, Joseph J.; Buchanan, Jane; Cohen, Jane; Kippenberg, Juliane

    2012-01-01

    The Convention concerning the Prohibition and Immediate Action for the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labour was adopted by the International Labour Organization in 1999. 174 countries around the world have signed or ratified the convention, which requires countries to adopt laws and implement programs to prohibit and eliminate child labor that poses harms to health or safety. Nonetheless, child labor continues to be common in the agriculture and mining sectors, where safety and environmental hazards pose significant risks. Drawing upon recent human rights investigations of child labor in tobacco farming in Kazakhstan and gold mining in Mali, the role of international human rights mechanisms, advocacy with government and private sector officials, and media attention in reducing harmful environmental exposures of child workers is discussed. Human rights-based advocacy in both cases was important to raise attention and help ensure that children are protected from harm. PMID:23316246

  10. African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights.

    PubMed

    1987-01-01

    This Convention contains provisions relating to women's rights, pay equity, health, education, the family, the aged, freedom of movement, and asylum. Algeria ratified the Convention on 20 March 1987, Benin on 25 February 1986, Botswana on 22 July 1986, Burkina Faso on 21 September 1984, Cape Verde on 6 August 1987, Central African Republic on 27 July 1986, Chad on 11 November 1986, Comoros on 18 July 1986, Egypt on 3 April 1984, Equatorial Guinea on 18 August 1986, Gabon on 26 June 1986, Guinea-Bissau on 6 March 1986, Libya on 26 March 1987, Sao Tome and Principe on 28 July 1986, Sierra Leone on 27 January 1984, Somalia on 20 March 1986, Sudan on 11 March 1986, Tanzania on 9 March 1984, Uganda on 27 May 1986, Zaire 28 July 1987, Zambia on 2 February 1984, and Zimbabwe on 12 June 1986. PMID:12346796

  11. Bioethics as public discourse and second-order discipline.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, Loretta M

    2009-06-01

    Bioethics is best viewed as both a second-order discipline and also part of public discourse. Since their goals differ, some bioethical activities are more usefully viewed as advancing public discourse than academic disciplines. For example, the "Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights" sponsored by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization seeks to promote ethical guidance on bioethical issues. From the vantage of philosophical ethics, it fails to rank or specify its stated principles, justify controversial principles, clarify key terms, or say what is meant by calling potentially conflicting norms "foundational." From the vantage of improving the public discourse about bioethical problems and seeking ethical solutions in the public arena, however, this document may have an important role. The goals and relations between bioethics as a second-order discipline and public discourse are explored. PMID:19387001

  12. Procedural abortion rights: Ireland and the European Court of Human Rights.

    PubMed

    Erdman, Joanna N

    2014-11-01

    The Irish Protection of Life During Pregnancy Act seeks to clarify the legal ground for abortion in cases of risk to life, and to create procedures to regulate women's access to services under it. This article explores the new law as the outcome of an international human rights litigation strategy premised on state duties to implement abortion laws through clear standards and procedural safeguards. It focuses specifically on the Irish law reform and the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights, including A. B. and C. v. Ireland (2010). The article examines how procedural rights at the international level can engender domestic law reform that limits or expands women's access to lawful abortion services, serving conservative or progressive ends. PMID:25555760

  13. The Scope and Content of Article 15 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mirna Adjami; Julia Harrington

    2008-01-01

    Article 15 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) provides that “[e]veryone has the right to a nationality” and that “[n]o one shall be arbitrarily deprived of his nationality nor denied the right to change his nationality.” Enshrining citizenship and the right to be free from arbitrary deprivation of citizenship as human rights in and of themselves, article 15

  14. The Significance of UNESCO's Universal Declaration on the Human Genome and Human Rights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shawn H. E. Harmon

    2005-01-01

    Modern medical research, particularly genetic research, is changing the nature of medicine. Concerns surrounding these changes and their potential negative impact on human rights led UNESCO to spearhead collaboration by experts in the creation of an international instrument intended to provide guidance for the promotion of bioethics and the protection of human rights in the genetic context. The result was

  15. Violence against women: an issue of human rights.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    The most pervasive form of human rights abuse is violence against women. This violence includes domestic violence, sexual abuse, rape, forced prostitution, female genital mutilation, and murder. It cuts across socioeconomic lines and is so deeply embedded in tradition that millions of women consider violence their lot in life, yet international efforts to combat violence against women are currently in a fledgling state. Most women experience violence in their homes, and as many as 20% of women worldwide have been raped (most know their attacker). More than half of all sexual assaults target girls aged 15 years and younger, and armies continue to use rape as a weapon of war. The female infanticide and sex selective abortions that are caused by son preference have led to imbalances in sex ratios characterized by millions of females "missing" from populations in Asia, China, and north Africa. India is the site of an estimated 5000 dowry-related deaths each year, and an estimated 130 million women worldwide have undergone female genital mutilation with two million more at risk each year. In response to this problem, more than 160 countries have ratified the UN's Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Violence Against Women, and many countries have included provisions to protect women against violence in their constitutions and criminal codes. Only 44 countries specifically protect women against domestic violence, however, and only 17 countries consider marital rape a crime (12 countries in Latin America excuse a rapist from prosecution if he marries his victim). The US has worked to place women's rights on the human rights agenda by increasing monitoring of women's human rights abuses, supporting national efforts to revise legislation, supporting campaigns to help women reduce their dependency on men and understand their rights, and equating women's rights with human rights. PMID:12321050

  16. Internationalizing the Right to Know: Conceptualizations of Access to Information in Human Rights Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Cheryl Ann

    2009-01-01

    Currently there exists a global movement promoting institutional transparency and freedom of information legislation. Conceptualizing access to government-held information as a human right is one of the latest developments in this global trend promoting access to information. The purpose of this dissertation is to identify and analyze the various…

  17. The Human Right to Education as a Right to Literacy in Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motakef, Mona

    2007-01-01

    There are no official data, but it is estimated that four million adults in Germany have little or no reading, writing and numeracy skills, so that they are known as "functionally illiterate". This is a fact which was long ignored. In this contribution, literacy activities and research in Germany are analysed through a human rights-based approach.…

  18. The intersection between bioethics and human rights in the light of the universal declaration on bioethics and human rights.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Aline Albuquerque S

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to explore the increasing interconnection between bioethics and human rights that can be observed in recent international norms relating to biomedicine. To this end, the analysis has been focused on the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights (UDBHR) adopted by UNESCO in 2005. Investigating the meanings of the intersection perceived in the UDBHR has led to the understanding of how bioethics and human rights are in accordance, under the normative perspective. Hence, in normative terms, the intersection between bioethics and human rights is clearly undisputable. However, there is no way to affirm that it is consolidated, as UDBHR's adoption is recent and its consolidation, together with its precepts, depends on state and non-state agents. The efficacy of a norm and its content depends on social, cultural and economic conditions, that is, it depends on a series of factors that influence the normative system. In the case of the UDBHR, its effective application and assimilation of its principles are directly linked to the use that bioethical institutions make of them and to how the community of bioethicists will project them in their thoughts and theory production. If, on the one hand UDBHR symbolizes the intersection confirmation--which is of extreme importance for its consolidation--on the other hand its range and consequent stabilization are submitted to the actions from governments, social institutions and bioethicists. Hence, there is still a lot to do in terms of introducing the human rights precepts into bioethics. The aim of this paper is to contribute to this goal. Thus based on the meanings of the intersection between bioethics and human rights identified in the UDBHR, this article presents five ways to understand the connection between these two fields. PMID:22977955

  19. Bringing Human Rights Back Home: Learning from "Superman" and Addressing Political Issues at School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osler, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    Human rights are commonly conceived as more relevant to foreign policy than day-to-day living. Drawing on Eleanor Roosevelt's conception of human rights as beginning close to home, this article illustrates how human rights principles might inform everyday processes of schooling and learning to live together. It considers rights to, in and…

  20. Health and Human Rights--PH 393 Professor Juliet S. Sorensen

    E-print Network

    Contractor, Anis

    1 Health and Human Rights--PH 393 Professor Juliet S. Sorensen Rubloff 8th Floor, Bluhm Legal and international human rights. Readings and discussion will focus on whether there is a universal right to health as the Access to Health Project. Headed by Professor Sorensen of the Center for International Human Rights

  1. United Nations Human Rights Website: Treaty Bodies Database

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This database was created "to meet the growing interest in the committees established to monitor the implementation of the principal international human rights treaties (also referred as 'treaty monitoring bodies' or 'treaty bodies')" such as the Human Rights Committee, the Committee Against Torture, the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, and the Committee on the Rights of the Child. These committees are responsible for examining the "State reports" submitted by signatories to the various treaties to demonstrate their compliance. These reports and the concluding observations by the committees form the core of the database, which also contains a number of other related documents and data. Users may search the database by keyword and view results by relevance or date or browse by a variety of parameters, such as country, date, language, treaty, reporting status, or status of ratification. Documents may be in English, French, or Spanish.

  2. Meta Search Engine for Searching Multiple Human Rights Sites

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Recently unveiled by the Human Rights Library of the University of Minnesota (originally reviewed in the January 5, 1996 Scout Report), this new search engine will be welcomed by researchers and activists in human rights. Searchable by keyword and several optional operators (Boolean, proximity, truncation), the engine retrieves data from any or all of the 23 different rights-related sites that users select. Interestingly, returns are presented "as is" from the source pages (with page header, images, and unique formats) but combined into a single results page. A test search for "Northern Ireland" on four selected sites returned over 40 results. Direct links to the featured databases and, in some cases, their search tips pages are also provided.

  3. Women, Human Rights, and Counseling: Crossing International Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Rita Chi-Ying

    2005-01-01

    The fast-paced movement of globalization has affected all walks of life including professional counselors. As the world becomes more accessible, increased instances of social injustice on a global scale have become more apparent, with women and children being especially identified as victims of social injustice and human rights violations (World…

  4. TheEquityandHumanRightsOffice champions UVic's commitment to

    E-print Network

    Victoria, University of

    -721-8786 The Equity and Human Rights office supports inclusion, recognizes and embraces difference and values the recognition of difference in treating everyone fairly. Sometimes it means treating people differently in order, marital status, family status, physical or mental disability, sex (including gender identity), sexual

  5. Church, State, and Human Rights in Latin America

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benjamin Goldfrank; Nick Rowell

    2012-01-01

    Latin America's military dictatorships in the 1970s produced some of the worst human rights abuses in the Americas in the twentieth century. The Catholic Church was positioned to denounce the repression, yet the episcopacy's reaction varied by country. Why? In critiquing a prominent claim that competition from Protestant sects was the primary source of this variation, the article argues instead

  6. Mental health and human rights: never waste a serious crisis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Harry Minas

    2009-01-01

    A serious health and human rights crisis is unfolding in Indonesia. Media reports in the Jakarta press have highlighted the high death rates in shelters for people with mental illness that are run by the Jakarta Social Affairs Agency. This crisis represents an opportunity to bring about systematic and substantial changes in the Indonesian mental health system. In order to

  7. Learning History through the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landorf, Hilary; Pineda, Martha Fernanda

    2007-01-01

    Although adolescent students often do not have knowledge of specific laws, they usually have a keen sense of justice and fairness. In this article, the author discusses the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) as a powerful tool to channel students' sense of fairness into visible actions. Adopted in December 1948 by the General Assembly of…

  8. Bearing Witness: Citizen Journalism and Human Rights Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Stuart; Sonwalkar, Prasun; Carter, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    This article assesses the potential of online news reporting to create discursive spaces for emphatic engagement--of bearing witness--at a distance, especially where human rights violations are concerned. Taking as its focus the emergent forms and practices of citizen journalism, it examines the spontaneous actions of ordinary people compelled to…

  9. Sex Trafficking of Minors as a Human Rights Issue

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rick Halperin

    2011-01-01

    The following commentary serves as a response to the article, “Sex Trafficking of Minors in the U.S.: Implications for Policy, Prevention and Research,” drawing the important, though not often mentioned, connection between the sex trafficking of minors and human rights. The commentary argues that child trafficking has been inadequately addressed due to its relative invisibility, a lack of knowledge about

  10. Building Intercultural Citizenship through Education: A Human Rights Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stavenhagen, Rodolfo

    2008-01-01

    This article analyses the challenges posed by traditional ethnic and linguistic minorities in multicultural states and more specifically the problems faced by indigenous peoples and communities. Their educational and cultural needs and demands are increasingly being framed in the language of human rights, based on the expanding international legal…

  11. Human Rights and School Change: The Newham Story. New Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Linda; Goodey, Chris

    This report recounts the process of desegregation of the education service in the London (England) borough of Newham. It shows how inclusion in the borough began and was sustained by an understanding of inclusion as a human rights issue. It charts the steps which brought about the closure of most of the authority's separate special schools and…

  12. Solidarity and the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Darryl Gunson

    2009-01-01

    Recent work has stressed the importance of the concept of solidarity to bioethics and social philosophy generally. But can and should it feature in documents such as the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights as anything more than a vague notion with multiple possible interpretations? Although noting the tension between universality and particularity that such documents have to deal

  13. Exploring the Relevance of Holocaust Education for Human Rights Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckmann, Monique

    2010-01-01

    Can Holocaust education be considered a tool for human rights education? If so, to what extent? These questions elicit discussions among a wide range of educators, and interest among politicians, educational planners, and ministries in charge of memorials. At first glance the obvious answer seems to be yes; both educators and students have strong…

  14. Physicists for Human Rights in the Former Soviet Union

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyak, Yuri

    2005-03-01

    In his 1940 paper `Freedom and Science' Albert Einstein emphasized that ``intellectual independence is a primary necessity for the scientific inquirer'' and that ``political liberty is also extraordinarily important for his work.'' Raised in the tradition of intellectual independence and dedicated to the scientific truth, physicists were among the first to stand up for freedom in the USSR. It was no coincidence that the founders of the first independent Human Rights Committee (1970) were physicists: Andrei Sakharov, Valery Chalidze and Andrei Tverdokhlebov. In 1973 a physicist, Alexander Voronel, founded a Moscow Sunday (refusenik) Seminar -- the first openly independent scientific body in the history of the USSR. In 1976 physicists Andrei Sakharov, Yuri Orlov and a mathematician Natan Sharansky were the leading force in founding the famous Moscow Helsinki Human Rights Watch group. This talk briefly describes the special position of physicists (often viewed as Einstein's colleagues) in Soviet society, as well as their unique role in the struggle for human rights. It describes in some detail the Moscow Sunday Seminar, and extensions thereof such as International Conferences, the Computer School and the Computer Database of Refuseniks. The Soviet government considered such truly independent organizations as a challenge to Soviet authority and tried to destroy them. The Seminar's success and its very existence owed much to the support of Western scientific organizations, who persuaded their members to attend the Seminar and visit scientist-refuseniks. The human rights struggle led by physicists contributed substantially to the demise of the Soviet system.

  15. Toward a Hermeneutical Theory of International Human Rights Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Daraweesh, Fuad; Snauwaert, Dale T.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this essay is to articulate and defend the epistemological foundations of international human rights education from the perspective of a hermeneutical interpretive methodology. Fuad Al-Daraweesh and Dale Snauwaert argue here that this methodology potentially alleviates the challenges that face the cross-cultural implementation of…

  16. Canadian Human Rights Commission recommends prison needle exchange programs.

    PubMed

    Jürgens, Ralf

    2004-04-01

    In a report released on 28 January 2004, the Canadian Human Rights Commission recommended that the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) implement a pilot needle exchange program in three or more correctional facilities, at least one of them a women's facility, by June 2004. PMID:15216829

  17. Immanuel Kant's Account of Cognitive Experience and Human Rights Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bynum, Gregory Lewis

    2012-01-01

    In this essay Gregory Bynum seeks to show that Immanuel Kant's thought, which was conceived in an eighteenth-century context of new, and newly widespread, pressures for nationally institutionalized human rights-based regimes (the American and French revolutions being the most prominent examples), can help us think in new and appreciative ways…

  18. Human rights protection -a riposte to Chief Justice Patrick Keane

    E-print Network

    Human rights protection - a riposte to Chief Justice Patrick Keane CHARLES DARWIN UNIVERSITY Monday 27 August 2012 Mal Nairn Auditorium Red Precinct, Building 7 Casuarina campus, Charles Darwin to Country 6.10pm ­ 6.15pm Welcome address by Professor Barney Glover Vice-Chancellor, Charles Darwin

  19. The Human Rights Approach to Education in International Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hufner, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the work of three international governmental organisations (IGOs) dealing with human rights will be discussed, namely the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the Council of Europe (CoE). In the first section, the main characteristics of the…

  20. Children's Spiritual Development in Forced Displacement: A Human Rights Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojalehto, Bethany; Wang, Qi

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a synthesis of current research and theories of spiritual development in forced displacement from a human rights perspective. Spirituality, understood as a cognitive-cultural construct, has shown positive impact on children's development through both collective and individual processes and across ecological domains of the…

  1. Transforming Global Civics: The Need for Human Rights Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin-Goldberg, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    In today's globally interconnected community, it is imperative that students learn how human rights abuses are not a "thing of the past," but an ongoing exploitation that requires modern day crusaders to defend. Who might these crusaders be? None other than each student. However, if one wants to encourage these noble change agents, one needs to…

  2. National Feminisms,Transnational Arenas, Universal Human Rights Spring 2003

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    National Feminisms,Transnational Arenas, Universal Human Rights Spring 2003 Sociology 924/Political@polisci.wisc.edu) Feminism in the 21st century has unmistakably global dimensions but is also ever less obviously one, single-states shape what feminism is defined as being about? How do feminist definitions of what is good for women

  3. Social Studies: High School Guide for Teaching about Human Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Evelyn; And Others

    The implementation of the Detroit (Michigan) human rights curriculum at the high school level is done through a series of classroom activities and resources appropriate for high school students. Each of the lessons is structured around one of the 10 major goals identified in the curriculum and provides objectives, learner outcomes, activities, and…

  4. Social Studies: Middle School Guide for Teaching about Human Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todorov, Karen; And Others

    Implementation of the 10 major goals and various objectives of the Detroit (Michigan) curriculum for teaching middle school students about human rights is done through a number of activities and resources. Each of the lessons is structured around one of the major goals and provides objectives, learner outcomes, activities, and resources. An…

  5. Human Rights, Cosmopolitanism and Utopias: Implications for Citizenship Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkey, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    Citizenship education, defined as learning to live together, requires agreement on certain common principles. One central purpose of a state education system is the transmission of common normative standards such as the human rights and fundamental freedoms that underpin liberal democratic societies. The paper identifies the conceptual roots of…

  6. Fifty Years of the European Convention on Human Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France).

    This booklet is intended as the nongovernmental organization's (NGO's) contribution to the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). Its aim is to bear witness to the commitment of the NGOs having consultative status with the Council of Europe, and to all that they have done to make known, put into…

  7. Human Rights Education and the Post Secular Turn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowie, Bob

    2012-01-01

    This article questions whether human rights education (HRE) scholarship is responding adequately to the post secular turn in thinking about the place and nature of religion in society. Here the post secular turn is used to describe the discrediting of secularisation theory, the recognition of religion as an enduring and pervasive global cultural…

  8. Right-lateralized Brain Oscillations in Human Spatial Navigation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joshua Jacobs; Igor O. Korolev; Jeremy B. Caplan; Arne D. Ekstrom; Brian Litt; Gordon Baltuch; Itzhak Fried; Andreas Schulze-Bonhage; Joseph R. Madsen; Michael J. Kahana

    2010-01-01

    During spatial navigation, lesion and functional imaging studies suggest that the right hemisphere has a unique func- tional role. However, studies of direct human brain recordings have not reported interhemisphere differences in navigation- related oscillatory activity. We investigated this apparent dis- crepancy using intracranial electroencephalographic recordings from 24 neurosurgical patients playing a virtual taxi driver game. When patients were virtually

  9. Embracing democratic governance, human rights and the environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wangari Maathai

    2005-01-01

    Kenyan environmentalist and human rights campaigner Wangari Maathai, the 2004 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, is the first African woman to be awarded the peace prize since it was created in 1901. Agenda reprints her Nobel Lecture, delivered on 10 December 2004, in Oslo, Norway.

  10. Circumcision of male infants as a human rights violation.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, J Steven

    2013-07-01

    Every infant has a right to bodily integrity. Removing healthy tissue from an infant is only permissible if there is an immediate medical indication. In the case of infant male circumcision there is no evidence of an immediate need to perform the procedure. As a German court recently held, any benefit to circumcision can be obtained by delaying the procedure until the male is old enough to give his own fully informed consent. With the option of delaying circumcision providing all of the purported benefits, circumcising an infant is an unnecessary violation of his bodily integrity as well as an ethically invalid form of medical violence. Parental proxy 'consent' for newborn circumcision is invalid. Male circumcision also violates four core human rights documents-the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, and the Convention Against Torture. Social norm theory predicts that once the circumcision rate falls below a critical value, the social norms that currently distort our perception of the practice will dissolve and rates will quickly fall. PMID:23698885

  11. Human Rights Law for Persons with Disabilities in Asia and the Pacific: The Need for a Disability Rights Tribunal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlin, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Human rights are arguably the most significant political force shaping the life experience of people with disability. The "United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities" sets the standard at an international level, creating both positive and negative rights, and calls upon member states of the United Nations (UN)…

  12. 3 CFR 8765 - Proclamation 8765 of December 8, 2011. Human Rights Day and Human Rights Week, 2011

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...of individuals. On this anniversary, we recognize human rights as universal, and we stand with all those who reach for the dream of a free, just, and equal world. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America,...

  13. Education Is a Human Right 1998: El Barometer on Human and Trade Union Rights in the Education Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education International, Brussels (Belgium).

    In many countries, often at great personal cost, teachers and education support staff are at the forefront of the struggle for basic trade union and human rights. This book acknowledges their contributions. It also draws inspiration and hope from their efforts to show that a commitment to the interests of every child, to quality education, and to…

  14. The Role of Education in Freedom from Poverty as a Human Right

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhillon, Pradeep

    2011-01-01

    Education lies at the heart of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR): "Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms". However, when education is mentioned in the philosophical literature on human rights, or even within the…

  15. PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES Programme name International Politics and Human Rights

    E-print Network

    Weyde, Tillman

    of International Politics Programme code PSIPHR Type of study Full Time and Part Time Total UK credits 180 Total Nations in 1948 human rights has been a central feature of international politics. The protection of human, the importance of human rights has never been greater. The MA in International Politics and Human Rights provides

  16. Integrated human rights and poverty eradication strategy: the case of civil registration rights in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Musarandega, Reuben

    2009-01-01

    High poverty levels characterise sub-Saharan Africa, Zimbabwe included. Over 80 per cent of Zimbabwe's population lived below the total consumption poverty line and 70 per cent below the food poverty line in 2003. This plummeting of social indicators resulted from the freefall suffered by the country's economy from the 1990s, after unsuccessful attempts to implement structural adjustment programmes prescribed by international financial institutions. The ensuing socioeconomic decay, political crisis and international isolation of the country from the late 1990s reversed gains made in social indicators during the 1980s. Development theories attribute poverty to unchecked population growth, political, economic and environmental mismanagement, while developing countries' leaders attribute it to historical imbalances and global political and economic injustices. Despite this debate, poverty continues to evolve, expand and deepen and the need to eradicate it has become urgent. The complex question of what causes and what drives poverty is perpetually addressed and new ideas are emerging to answer the question. One recent view is that failure to centre development on people and to declare poverty a violation of human rights has allowed poverty to grow the world over. This study uses a hypothesised cause of poverty - civil registration - to exemplify the human right nature of poverty, and how a human rights' policy can be used as an instrument to eradicate poverty. The study demonstrates that civil registration is a right of instrumental relevance to poverty; and achieving civil registration grants people access to numerous other rights, some of which will lift them out of poverty, while the failure of civil registration deprives people of access to livelihoods, thereby entrenching them in poverty. PMID:20726138

  17. The choice of child delivery is a European human right.

    PubMed

    Eggermont, M

    2012-06-01

    In a judgment of 14 December 2010, in the case of Madam Ternovszky v. Hungary, the European Court of Human Rights has considered that a State should provide an adequate regulatory scheme concerning the right to choose in matters of child delivery (at home or in a hospital). In the context of homebirth, regarded as a matter of personal choice of the mother, this implies that the mother is entitled to a legal and institutional environment that enables her choice. This contribution stresses in which sense the regulatory schemes in the Member States Belgium, Germany, the Netherlands, France and the UK concerning the choice of child delivery are in accordance with Article 8 ECHR, the right to respect for the private life. Do the Member States provide the legal certainty to a mother that the midwife can legally assist a homebirth? Or are restrictions made in interests of public health? PMID:22916533

  18. Medicine, law and human rights - a symbiotic relationship.

    PubMed

    Tupanceski, Nikola; Kiprijanovska, Dragana

    2014-04-01

    Law and medicine are separate professions, and attorneys and physicians often see their professions in conflict. There are, however, more similarities than differences between the two professions. And there are areas of mutual concern and overlap that demand the application of both legal and medical knowledge for the good of the society. In the new categorical system of values, which is substantially influenced by the so-called modern or aggressive medicine, clever physicians, researchers, and technicians discover newer and better ways to do things. Often, what science and technology make possible soon becomes permissible and, eventually, normal and expected. Given the rapid advances in technology and medical technology in particular, it is clear that without the reasonable restraints imposed by philosophical but also, legal critique, medicine and its practitioners may unintentionally convert science and medical method into a muddled philosophy of human life'. Against this background, this paper will handle the questions posed by the extent and protection of human rights and freedoms in terms of application of new biomedical techniques and technologies of treatment toward the development of International human rights law. It also discusses the compatibility of domestic medical law with the normative system of international human rights. PMID:24946512

  19. Measuring the Progressive Realization of Economic and Social Human Rights in Brazil: A Disaggregated Economic and Social Rights Fulfillment Index

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick Nolan Guyer; Sakiko Fukuda-Parr; Susan Randolph; Louise Moreira Daniels

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes findings and conclusions from our application of the Economic and Social Rights Fulfillment Index developed by Fukuda-Parr, Lawson-Remer and Randolph (2009) to the states of Brazil. The key features of this methodology in assessing economic and human rights fulfillment is the focus on state obligations rather than only on human outcomes, and reference to both level of

  20. Bargaining in the Shadow of Social Institutions: Competing Discourses and Social Change in Workplace Mobilization of Civil Rights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catherine R. Albiston

    2005-01-01

    The Family and Medical Leave Act requires employers to provide job-pro- tected leave, but little is known about how these leave rights operate in prac- tice or how they interact with other normative systems to construct the meaning of leave. Drawing on interviews with workers who negotiated con- tested leaves, this study examines how social institutions influence workplace mobilization of

  1. Interrogating an Omission: The Absence of a Rights-Based Approach to Education in World Bank Policy Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menashy, Francine

    2013-01-01

    This study provides a discursive analysis of World Bank policy documents in order to reveal the stark omission of a rights-based approach to education, while highlighting instead the support of an economic-instrumentalist approach. Plausible explanations are provided to shed light on this exclusion, including the feasibility critique of education…

  2. No inherent left and right side in human 'mental number line': evidence from right brain damage.

    PubMed

    Aiello, Marilena; Jacquin-Courtois, Sophie; Merola, Sheila; Ottaviani, Teresa; Tomaiuolo, Francesco; Bueti, Domenica; Rossetti, Yves; Doricchi, Fabrizio

    2012-08-01

    Spatial reasoning has a relevant role in mathematics and helps daily computational activities. It is widely assumed that in cultures with left-to-right reading, numbers are organized along the mental equivalent of a ruler, the mental number line, with small magnitudes located to the left of larger ones. Patients with right brain damage can disregard smaller numbers while mentally setting the midpoint of number intervals. This has been interpreted as a sign of spatial neglect for numbers on the left side of the mental number line and taken as a strong argument for the intrinsic left-to-right organization of the mental number line. Here, we put forward the understanding of this cognitive disability by discovering that patients with right brain damage disregard smaller numbers both when these are mapped on the left side of the mental number line and on the right side of an imagined clock face. This shows that the right hemisphere supports the representation of small numerical magnitudes independently from their mapping on the left or the right side of a spatial-mental layout. In addition, the study of the anatomical correlates through voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping and the mapping of lesion peaks on the diffusion tensor imaging-based reconstruction of white matter pathways showed that the rightward bias in the imagined clock-face was correlated with lesions of high-level middle temporal visual areas that code stimuli in object-centred spatial coordinates, i.e. stimuli that, like a clock face, have an inherent left and right side. In contrast, bias towards higher numbers on the mental number line was linked to white matter damage in the frontal component of the parietal-frontal number network. These anatomical findings show that the human brain does not represent the mental number line as an object with an inherent left and right side. We conclude that the bias towards higher numbers in the mental bisection of number intervals does not depend on left side spatial, imagery or object-centred neglect and that it rather depends on disruption of an abstract non-spatial representation of small numerical magnitudes. PMID:22577222

  3. What is a human-rights based approach to health and does it matter?

    PubMed

    London, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    A human rights approach to health is critical to address growing global health inequalities. Three aspects of the nature of health as a right are relevant to shaping a human rights approach to health: (1) the indivisibility of civil and political rights, and socio-economic rights; (2) active agency by those vulnerable to human rights violations; and (3) the powerful normative role of human rights in establishing accountabiliy for protections and freedoms. Health professionals' practice, tpically governed by ethical codes, may benefit from human rights guidelines, particularly in situations of dual loyalty where clients' or communities' human rights are threatened Moreover, institutional accountability for protecting human rights is essential to avoid shifting responsibility solely onto the health professional Human rights approaches can include holding states and other parties accountable, developing policies and programs consistent with human rights, and facilitating redress for victims of violations of the right to health. However, underlying all models is the need to enable active social mobilization, without which legal approaches to rights lack sustainability and power. Evidence from South and Southern Africa has shown that different conceptions of what is meant by human rights impact substantially on state willingness and abiliy to meet constitutional obligations with regard to the right to health. New approaches to health polity development, which draw on the agency of vulnerable groups, link local struggles with their global context, and explicitly incorporate rights frameworks into public health planning are needed. Models that move away from individualizing conflict over rights between health professionals as disempowered duty bearers and patients as frustrated rights holders, toward more mutual approaches to shared rights objectives may be possible and are being actively pursued through the development of a learning network to realize the right to health in South Africa. PMID:20845830

  4. Right-hemispheric dominance for visual remapping in humans.

    PubMed

    Pisella, L; Alahyane, N; Blangero, A; Thery, F; Blanc, S; Pelisson, D

    2011-02-27

    We review evidence showing a right-hemispheric dominance for visuo-spatial processing and representation in humans. Accordingly, visual disorganization symptoms (intuitively related to remapping impairments) are observed in both neglect and constructional apraxia. More specifically, we review findings from the intervening saccade paradigm in humans--and present additional original data--which suggest a specific role of the asymmetrical network at the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) in the right hemisphere in visual remapping: following damage to the right dorsal posterior parietal cortex (PPC) as well as part of the corpus callosum connecting the PPC to the frontal lobes, patient OK in a double-step saccadic task exhibited an impairment when the second saccade had to be directed rightward. This singular and lateralized deficit cannot result solely from the patient's cortical lesion and, therefore, we propose that it is due to his callosal lesion that may specifically interrupt the interhemispheric transfer of information necessary to execute accurate rightward saccades towards a remapped target location. This suggests a specialized right-hemispheric network for visuo-spatial remapping that subsequently transfers target location information to downstream planning regions, which are symmetrically organized. PMID:21242144

  5. Protecting People and the Planet a proposal to address the human rights impacts

    E-print Network

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Protecting People and the Planet a proposal to address the human rights impacts of climate change Francisco School of Law #12;#12;Protecting People and the Planet a proposal to address the human rights

  6. Between Commitement and Pragmatism: Assessing International Influence on Human Rights Practices in Georgia

    E-print Network

    Omelicheva, Mariya Y.

    2010-01-01

    What explains the discrepancy between the avowed commitment of the Georgian government to human rights and praxis of human rights in the post-Rose Revolution republic? This article engages with this question and attributes ...

  7. The Human Rights Code, 1988, 8 July 1988.

    PubMed

    1988-01-01

    This Act prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex and marital status, among other things, with respect to accommodation practices, employment practices, and publications. In its employment practices provisions, it mandates equal pay for equal work and outlaws harassment and unwelcome sexual solicitation. Under the Act, the Newfoundland Human Rights Commission, already established, is given the power to investigate complaints, effect settlements, and refer matters to a board of inquiry for further action. PMID:12289244

  8. Girl child abuse: violation of her human rights.

    PubMed

    Kapur, P

    1995-01-01

    The human rights of female children in India and elsewhere, even when protected on paper, are violated in practice. An equitable and egalitarian world order must be established. A comprehensive campaign is needed that combats gender-based inequalities, discrimination, exploitation, oppression, abuse, violence, inhuman values, and violations of human rights, particularly against female children. People must radically change their attitudes and actions towards female children. Female children are not a commodity or sex-object but "an equally worthy human being to be loved, respected, and cared for." Strategies that accomplish these ends include the promotion of human and spiritual values of love, compassion, and nonviolence, and discouragement of values of consumerism and materialism and worthlessness of human beings. Effective education and mass media should counter corruption, dishonesty, selfishness, and inhuman actions. Family structures need to strengthened and enriched. The abuse of female children occurs due to the following interrelated factors: entrenched patriarchal value systems, the perpetuation of traditions and practices that identify girls as inferior to boys, the gender-biased and discriminatory attitude that identifies girl children as a burden or liability and as a sex-object or commodity, and prevalent illiteracy, poverty, and negative parenting life style patterns. Other factors include the low status of women, the reduction in human and spiritual values, and the rise of consumerism and corruption. Girls are subjected to female infanticide, feticide, lack of social and economic development, burdensome domestic work, early marriage and childbearing, neglect and denial of healthy living conditions, sexual abuse and exploitation, prostitution, rape, and a denial of their right to protection. PMID:12158013

  9. Applying human rights to improve access to reproductive health services.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Dorothy; Cook, Rebecca J

    2012-10-01

    Universal access to reproductive health is a target of Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 5B, and along with MDG 5A to reduce maternal mortality by three-quarters, progress is currently too slow for most countries to achieve these targets by 2015. Critical to success are increased and sustainable numbers of skilled healthcare workers and financing of essential medicines by governments, who have made political commitments in United Nations forums to renew their efforts to reduce maternal mortality. National essential medicine lists are not reflective of medicines available free or at cost in facilities or in the community. The WHO Essential Medicines List indicates medicines required for maternal and newborn health including the full range of contraceptives and emergency contraception, but there is no consistent monitoring of implementation of national lists through procurement and supply even for basic essential drugs. Health advocates are using human rights mechanisms to ensure governments honor their legal commitments to ensure access to services essential for reproductive health. Maternal mortality is recognized as a human rights violation by the United Nations and constitutional and human rights are being used, and could be used more effectively, to improve maternity services and to ensure access to drugs essential for reproductive health. PMID:22883913

  10. Social movements and human rights rhetoric in tobacco control

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, P; Banerjee, A

    2005-01-01

    After achieving breathtaking successes in securing state and local restrictions on smoking in public places and restricting youth access to tobacco products, the tobacco movement faces difficult decisions on its future strategic directions. The thesis of this article is that the tobacco control movement is at a point of needing to secure its recent successes and avoiding any public retrenchment. To do so requires rethinking the movement's strategic direction. We use the familiar trans-theoretical model of change to describe where the movement is currently and the threats it faces. The new tobacco control strategy should encompass a focus on voluntary non-smoking strategies, use human rights rhetoric to its advantage, and strengthen the public health voice to be more effective in political battles. In developing a new strategy, tobacco control advocates need to build a social movement based on a more forceful public health voice, along with the strategic use of human rights rhetoric, to focus on the power of voluntary non-smoking efforts. Using human rights rhetoric can help frame the movement in ways that have traditionally appealed to the American public. Perhaps more importantly, doing so can help infuse the tobacco control movement with a broader sense of purpose and mission. PMID:16046702

  11. Cornell Law School's Avon Global Center for Women and Justice and International Human Rights Clinic

    E-print Network

    Butler, Laurie J.

    International Human Rights Clinic WOMEN IN PRISON IN ARGENTINA: CAUSES, CONDITIONS, AND CONSEQUENCES May 2013's Avon Global Center for Women and Justice and International Human Rights Clinic Defensoría General de la Nación Argentina The University of Chicago Law School International Human Rights Clinic WOMEN IN PRISON

  12. The Women's Studies Program and the Human Rights Institute present a film screening and panel discussion

    E-print Network

    Holsinger, Kent

    The Women's Studies Program and the Human Rights Institute present a film screening and panel is sponsored by: the Women's Studies Program, the Human Rights Institute, the Institute for Puerto Rican Society Coalition on Human Rights and Constitutional Law, explores the reality that for some LGBTI

  13. The Women's Studies Program and the Human Rights Institute present a film screening and panel discussion

    E-print Network

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    The Women's Studies Program and the Human Rights Institute present a film screening and panel is sponsored by: the Women's Studies Program, the Human Rights Institute, the Institute for Puerto Rican with the Ugandan Civil Society Coalition on Human Rights and Constitutional Law, explores the reality that for some

  14. RELIGION, THE LAW AND THE HUMAN RIGHTS OF WOMEN IN THE MIDDLE EAST: A QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    TYRA BOUHAMDAN

    The human rights of women in The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) have been a subject of unresolved debate among sociologists, economists, and political scientists alike, as this region's gender related human rights performance remains uniquely weaker compared to other geographic regions in the world. Most notably, the human rights of women in the region have been lagging in

  15. Conflict-of-Laws Considerations in State Court Human Rights Actions

    E-print Network

    Loudon, Catherine

    Declaration on Human Rights, and a variety of other international declarations.11 Several international law45 Conflict-of-Laws Considerations in State Court Human Rights Actions Patrick J. Borchers in detention violates established norms of the international law of human rights, and hence the law of nations

  16. The Social Studies Should Include More Discussion of International Human Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torney, Judith V.

    1980-01-01

    Students need more exposure to the concept of human rights. They need to know The Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the subsequent covenants. Also, they need to know that substantial agreement exists in the international community about what constitutes human rights. (Author/KC)

  17. LRE Project Exchange: Building a Community through Partners in Human Rights Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Marna; Rudelius-Palmer, Kristi

    1998-01-01

    Describes Partners in Human Rights Education in which the Universal Declaration of Human Rights provides the framework for using interactive teaching methods to relate human-rights concepts to students' lives. Highlights Amnesty International's "Urgent Action Network" that encourages children to become lobbyists in a letter-writing campaign for…

  18. Human Rights and Curricular Policy in Latin America and the Caribbean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suarez, David F.

    2007-01-01

    Human rights have become increasingly salient for nations, organizations, and individuals since the end of World War II (Lauren 2003). Discussions of human rights now are common in formal education, including in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). A variety of indicators suggest that countries in Latin America have integrated human rights into…

  19. Supporting Dictatorship and Promoting Human Rights? UN Technical Assistance to Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura K. Landolt

    2012-01-01

    Does UN human rights technical assistance weaken or strengthen authoritarian dictatorship in Egypt? Drawing on interviews with UN, donor and domestic human rights non-governmental organization representatives conducted in Egypt in 2007 and 2010, this article focuses on the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)\\/Egypt's BENAA Human Rights Capacity Building Project. The UNDP partnered with the Egyptian government to train public officials

  20. For Immediate Release Human rights expert Fateh Azzam appointed as first director to lead the

    E-print Network

    Shihadeh, Alan

    for the development of an informed and engaged citizenry in the Arab world. Through its programs including education-Haq, the Palestinian human rights organization (1987-1995). Azzam led the process of establishing the Arab Human Rights is also a member of the Palestinian Independent Commission for Human Rights. Azzam will be giving

  1. "The Path of Social Justice": A Human Rights History of Social Justice Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Carl A.; Gibson, Melissa Leigh

    2013-01-01

    Although not often recognized, social justice education in the U.S. is historically and philosophically tied to the twentieth century's human rights initiatives. The efforts of human rights pioneers, such as those who authored the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, have indelibly shaped social justice efforts, including within education, in…

  2. Human Rights Education in Canada: Results from a CTF Teacher Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froese-Germain, Bernie; Riel, Rick; Theoret, Pauline

    2013-01-01

    The United Nations has placed a high priority on human rights education. Building on the foundation laid by the UN Decade for Human Rights Education (1995-2004), the UN General Assembly launched the World Programme for Human Rights Education in December 2004 "as a global initiative, structured in consecutive phases, to advance the implementation…

  3. Love, Justice, and Natural Law: On Martin Luther King, Jr. and Human Rights

    E-print Network

    Doyle, Robert

    1 Love, Justice, and Natural Law: On Martin Luther King, Jr. and Human Rights Vincent W. Lloyd that this is where King contributes to discussions of human rights, through his rhetoric of natural law which, in its human rights "theory") can be renewed. King's rhetoric of natural law is particularly potent, and has

  4. Mind the Gap: The Human Rights of Children with Intellectual Disabilities in Egypt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gobrial, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Children with intellectual disabilities (IDs) have the same human value as other children and are entitled to their basic human rights. And yet, in developing countries they face many barriers to accessing these rights. This study focuses on children with IDs in Egypt. Method: A new measure, the Human Rights of children with…

  5. Building the Unsettling Force: Social Workers and the Struggle for Human Rights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer R. Jewell; Khalilah V. Collins; Lindsay Gargotto; Amanda J. Dishon

    2009-01-01

    Community organizing for human rights provides a platform for social workers to be actively engaged in dismantling systems of oppression. Using a case study of Women In Transition, this article emphasizes strategies for organizing for economic human rights, including opportunities and challenges in using the human rights framework. Recommendations and implications for the social work profession are discussed.

  6. International Human Rights Cases Under State Law and in State Courts

    E-print Network

    Loudon, Catherine

    in Part I of this Article, no matter how the Court decides Kiobel, significant international human rights9 International Human Rights Cases Under State Law and in State Courts Paul Hoffman and Beth set of clearly defined, widely accepted international human rights norms.3 * Paul L. Hoffman

  7. ICTs in Support of Human Rights, Democracy and Good Governance By Audrey N. Selian

    E-print Network

    Schweik, Charles M.

    .selian@itu.int>, ITU. ICTs in Support of Human Rights, Democracy and Good Governance is part of the Strategy and Policy.....................................................................................14 b. Human Rights and the International ArenaICTs in Support of Human Rights, Democracy and Good Governance By Audrey N. Selian August 2002

  8. One Veil Between Two Eyes: How Muslim and Western Women in the United States Perceive Human Rights and Women’s Rights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sahar Sattarzadeh

    2007-01-01

    The dialogue of human rights being universal or not is not a recent one, nor has a common agreement been reached as to its meaning among cultural relativists, universalists, and others concerned about international human rights as a whole. If the basis of human rights is unclear to many, then how does this affect the implications of women’s rights for

  9. Tensions between Discourses of Development, Religion, and Human Capital in Early Childhood Education Policy Texts: The Case of Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Formen, Ali; Nuttall, Joce

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we consider how particular discourses have come to dominate early childhood education (ECE) policy in Indonesia. We briefly explain the governance of Indonesian ECE and then our approach to policy analysis using critical discourse analysis. Three prevalent discourses are identified and discussed: "developmentalism",…

  10. [Genetic individuality and the universal declaration on the human genome and human rights].

    PubMed

    Siqueiros, Jesús M; Saruwatari, Garbiñe; Oliva-Sánchez, Pablo Francisco

    2012-01-01

    In this article we explore the epistemic and ontological relationship between science and law through the concept of individual in the Universal Declaration of the Human Genome and Human Rights. We argue for a better understanding of this relationship in order to foresee ethical and social consequences derived from Law adopting concepts with a strong scientific meaning. PMID:23520917

  11. HUMAN RIGHTS ASSUMPTIONS OF RESTRICTIVE AND PERMISSIVE APPROACHES TO HUMAN REPRODUCTIVE CLONING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen P. Marks

    The current debate over cloning and germline gene therapy is usually considered in terms of bioethics. The Council of Europe and UNESCO have, however, adopted normative instruments on the human genome, and one that draws heavily on human rights is under consideration at the United Nations. This article suggests the need for more thorough analysis of the underlying assumptions of

  12. Is it only humans that count from left to right?

    PubMed Central

    Rugani, Rosa; Kelly, Debbie M.; Szelest, Izabela; Regolin, Lucia; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    We report that adult nutcrackers (Nucifraga columbiana) and newborn domestic chicks (Gallus gallus) show a leftward bias when required to locate an object in a series of identical ones on the basis of its ordinal position. Birds were trained to peck at either the fourth or sixth element in a series of 16 identical and aligned positions. These were placed in front of the bird, sagittally with respect to its starting position. When, at test, the series was rotated by 90° lying frontoparallel to the bird's starting position, both species showed a bias for identifying selectively the correct position from the left but not from the right end. The similarity with the well-known phenomenon of the left-to-right spatially oriented number line in humans is considered. PMID:20071393

  13. Is it only humans that count from left to right?

    PubMed

    Rugani, Rosa; Kelly, Debbie M; Szelest, Izabela; Regolin, Lucia; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2010-06-23

    We report that adult nutcrackers (Nucifraga columbiana) and newborn domestic chicks (Gallus gallus) show a leftward bias when required to locate an object in a series of identical ones on the basis of its ordinal position. Birds were trained to peck at either the fourth or sixth element in a series of 16 identical and aligned positions. These were placed in front of the bird, sagittally with respect to its starting position. When, at test, the series was rotated by 90 degrees lying frontoparallel to the bird's starting position, both species showed a bias for identifying selectively the correct position from the left but not from the right end. The similarity with the well-known phenomenon of the left-to-right spatially oriented number line in humans is considered. PMID:20071393

  14. The Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights.

    PubMed

    Freckelton, Ian

    2008-10-01

    The steps toward the adoption by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) of the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights took a number of years and generated considerable controversy. This editorial reviews the principal provisions in the Declaration and argues that the Declaration constitutes an important formalisation on the basis of international consensus of the fundamental attributes of bioethical work undertaken by medical practitioners and scientists. However, the Declaration is only a beginning; many challenges lie ahead to ensure its effective implementation. PMID:19009996

  15. Solidarity and the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights.

    PubMed

    Gunson, Darryl

    2009-06-01

    Recent work has stressed the importance of the concept of solidarity to bioethics and social philosophy generally. But can and should it feature in documents such as the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights as anything more than a vague notion with multiple possible interpretations? Although noting the tension between universality and particularity that such documents have to deal with, and also noting that solidarity has a political content, the paper explores the suggestion that solidarity should feature more centrally in international regulations. The paper concludes with the view that when solidarity is seen aright, the UDBHR is an implicitly solidaristic document. PMID:19387000

  16. Rwanda: the Search for Security and Human Rights Abuses

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This new report from Human Rights Watch details continued cases within Rwanda of "assassination, murder, arbitrary detention, torture and other abuses perpetrated chiefly by soldiers of the Rwandan Patriotic Army, and by members of a government-backed citizens' militia called the Local Defense Force." According to the report, the Local Defense Force, while supposedly acting under the auspices of local authorities, commits abuses without fear of reprisal since these authorities are often either allied with or afraid of the government-supported militia.

  17. Transnational mergers and acquisitions: The impact of FDI on human rights, 1981-2006

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dong-Hun Kim; Peter F Trumbore

    2010-01-01

    While globalization advocates have argued that market liberalization and economic integration will strengthen human rights by promoting economic development and facilitating the diffusion of rights-supportive norms and values, critics contend that the same processes threaten to undermine human rights through economic exploitation and the repressive actions of pro-growth governments. To contribute to this debate, the authors examine the relationship between

  18. Celebrating Human Rights: The 50th Anniversary of the U.N. Declaration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphey, Carol E.

    1998-01-01

    Responds to the 50th anniversary of the United Nations' Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) by arguing that elementary school is an appropriate place to begin teaching about human rights. Outlines the rights enumerated in the UDHR, provides related activities for primary and intermediate grades, and suggests related Web sites. (DSK)

  19. Palestine Refugees Today. Human Rights Day: Twenty-Fifth Anniversary. Newsletter Number 76.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Relief and Works Agency, New York, NY.

    A special issue of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) newsletter relates the ideals of human rights as carried out for the Palestine refugees. An overview of the publication and its contents is followed by a copy of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Three articles--The Right to Education, An Adequate Standard of Living,…

  20. Human Rights. Selected Documents, No. 5 (Revised). General Foreign Policy Series 310, Report No. 8961.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Public Affairs (Dept. of State), Washington, DC.

    The booklet contains the text of eight selected documents on human rights. The documents are Excerpts from the UN Charter; Universal Declaration of Human Rights; Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide; International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights; International Covenant on Civil and Political…

  1. Unfair Advantage: Workers' Freedom of Association in the United States under International Human Rights Standards

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In September, Human Rights Watch posted five new reports on their Website. This report, Unfair Advantage: Workers' Freedom of Association in the United States under International Human Rights Standards, reports on nationwide repeated violations, across all levels of employment, of federal laws and international standards protecting workers's rights to organize, to bargain collectively, and to strike.

  2. An Essay on Human Rights and the Market for Social Contracts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew M. Francis

    2010-01-01

    In this article, I discuss an economic theory of human rights. Interpreting the social contract as a market good, a vector of rights that cannot be unbundled, I construct a competitive model in which citizens demand and states supply social contracts. An international market for social contracts matches citizens with states and determines the optimal social contracts. Human rights are

  3. THE HUMAN RIGHT TO INFORMATION, THE ENVIRONMENT AND INFORMATION ABOUT THE ENVIRONMENT: FROM THE UNIVERSAL DECLARATION TO THE AARHUS CONVENTION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benjamin W. Cramer

    2009-01-01

    Citizen access to government-held information and the amelioration of environmental problems are considered statutory matters in the United States, but at the international level these are seen as fundamental human rights. In recent years two categories of human rights demanded by activists, the right to government information and the right to environmental protection, have converged into a new human right—the

  4. Discerning the meaning of human suffering through the discourse of Judeo-Christian scriptures and other faith teachings.

    PubMed

    Vitillo, Robert J

    2014-11-01

    When confronted with the meaning of human suffering, many experts from a variety of professional disciplines admit to being incapable of formulating, on the basis of scientific method, a coherent explanation or rationale. Within that perspective, this article proposes another approach to the dilemma-that of reflection rooted in faith. The author examines the discourse of the Judeo-Christian scriptures and the comprehensive and cohesive doctrine developed by Pope John Paul II to find and track an evolving theology on the meaning of human suffering-one that includes understanding of this phenomenon as a "punishment for sin or evil," a test for fidelity, an occasion for God to show mercy and love, and a redemptive act by which Jesus took on all human suffering through his own death on the Cross and gave a salvific meaning to suffering through his resurrection from the dead. Further scriptural reflection and later Christian doctrines acknowledged that the suffering of other believers has its own redemptive value and that human suffering presents an occasion for all believers to respond with compassion and care to the pain of others. PMID:25149388

  5. Human dignity and human rights as a common ground for a global bioethics.

    PubMed

    Andorno, Roberto

    2009-06-01

    The principle of respect for human dignity plays a crucial role in the emerging global norms relating to bioethics, in particular in the UNESCO Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights. This instrument, which is a legal, not merely an ethical document, can be regarded as an extension of international human rights law into the field of biomedicine. Although the Declaration does not explicitly define human dignity, it would be a mistake to see the emphasis put on this notion as a mere rhetorical strategy. Rather, the appeal to dignity reflects a real concern about the need to promote respect both for the intrinsic worth of human beings and for the integrity of the human species. But dignity alone cannot solve most of the dilemmas posed by biomedical practice. This is why international biolaw combines, on the one hand, the appeal to human dignity as an overarching principle with, on the other hand, the recourse to human rights, which provide an effective and practical way forward for dealing with bioethical issues at a global level. PMID:19386998

  6. The third era of human rights: global accountability.

    PubMed

    Suter, Keith

    2007-01-01

    This article argues that the trend in the current protection of human rights may be seen as a revival of an old idea: governments are accountable for their actions. The protection of human rights has gone through three eras. In the first era, the Catholic Church in the Middle Ages claimed to rule from a divine mandate. This principle of natural law was a unifying factor in western Europe because it created a standard system of morality. The second era, beginning in the seventeenth century with the doctrine of state sovereignty, rejected that natural law. Rulers wanted to run their own territories and not be subject to foreign influence. Laws were created by the 'national sovereign' (king, queen, president, parliament, congress and so on). This legal doctrine survived for about three centuries, but the excesses of leaders such as Hitler in the middle of last century forced a re-think. Although the term 'natural law' is not used, there has been a revival of its essential meaning: that governments have to be answerable to a higher authority for their behaviour. PMID:17822064

  7. International Human Rights Activism in the United States during the Cold War

    E-print Network

    Ramirez, Zachary Steven

    2013-01-01

    womens_work/bios/leary.htm; King, Learning to Become an International Human RightsRights Real at the Local Level,” The Tennessee Journalist, November 17, 2011, http://tnjn.com/2011/nov/17/sheila-dauer-making-womens-

  8. Food Rights, Food Frugality, and Climate Change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynn Vincentnathan

    2012-01-01

    Climate change-related food issues are key problems affecting the world today and into the future. This paper investigates how climate change is harming and is expected to harm food sources on land and in the sea, and how food production itself, especially industrialized agriculture and meat production, contributes to climate change. This article uses human rights discourse to frame the

  9. CULTURE, RIGHTS, IDENTITY: INTERFACES BETWEEN THE HUMANITIES AND THE LAW International Osnabrck Summer Institute on the Cultural Study of the Law

    E-print Network

    Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    Dinner Workshop 3 "Law, Rights and Cultural Fictions of Justice" Workshop 2 "From Human Rights to Civil of Cultural Property" Workshop 2 "From Human Rights to Civil Rights to Cultural Rights" 17:30- 19:00 Mayoral: The Proprieties of Cultural Property" Workshop 2 "From Human Rights to Civil Rights to Cultural Rights" Workshop 3

  10. Human Rights: The Struggle for Freedom, Dignity and Equality. Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford.

    Every human being deserves the right to live in freedom and dignity. Yet human rights violations dominate the headlines. In addition to becoming sensitive to human pain and suffering, young adults must also begin the lifelong process of creating, recognizing, and exercising options. This resource guide contains suggested questions and projects…

  11. The Struggle for Human Rights: A Question of Values. Perspectives in World Order.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraenkel, Jack R., Ed.; And Others

    Intended for junior or senior high school students, this pamphlet examines the status of the world community in upholding the promise of the United Nations'"Universal Declaration of Human Rights" of 1948. The five chapters include definitions for a human being, and discussions of human rights and whether laws and treaties are effective in…

  12. Responsiveness of Teacher Education Curriculum Towards Human Rights Education in India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PRANATI PANDA

    he global movement for the protection of human rights during the last five and half decades represent the culmination of the historical journey of human- kind that commenced with the institutionalization of social and political or- der. The post-second world war era witnessed the predominance of concerns to promote universal respect for the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all

  13. A Local Response to the Global Human Rights Standard: The "Ubuntu" Perspective on Human Dignity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murithi, Tim

    2007-01-01

    Some African leaders have made the argument that the promotion of an international human rights standard is a strategy that is used and abused by hypocritical Western governments to justify their intervention into the affairs of African countries. The tacit objective behind this articulation is the desire to avoid an external evaluation or…

  14. Conceiving modernity: discourses on reproduction in a community of Tibetan refugees.

    PubMed

    Ward, Shannon

    2013-06-01

    This article examines the trope of reproduction in narratives of Tibetan refugees living in Dharamsala, India. As they make sense of their personal histories, Tibetan refugees invoke a collective story that mirrors human rights literature on Tibet. Women come into contact with this literature through its incorporation into a political discourse expressed by the exile government and health institutions. The article traces facets of this discourse that deal centrally with reproduction. Political discourse on reproduction articulates pronatalism as a solution to the refugee community's concern with survival, and the discourse frames modernity as a site of violence through China's reproductive regulations. And yet, Tibetan refugees also employ the notion of modernity when discussing their own free reproductive decision-making, positioning modern reproductive interventions in opposition to Indian society. The article demonstrates that Tibetan refugees navigate competing figurations of modernity by expressing political resistance and affiliation through the idiom of reproduction. PMID:23804300

  15. Dependency discourse, disability rhetoric and expediency arguments: A geneology of the relationship between feminism and eugenic philosophy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heidi A. Temple

    2010-01-01

    This presentation is part of the Disability and Dependence track.\\u000a“Dependency Discourse, Disability Rhetoric and Expediency Arguments – A Genealogy of the Relationship between Feminism and Eugenic Philosophy”\\u000aAll known theories of human rights, whether based on humanity, social contract theory, utilitarianism, or citizenship, exclude individuals from the rights-bearing community if they do not possess the specific abilities required for

  16. Decolonizing Education: A Critical Discourse Analysis of Post-Secondary Humanities Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Kimberly C.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines nine post-secondary humanities textbooks published between 2001 and 2011 using an approach that includes both qualitative and quantitative methodology to analyze the written and visual content of humanities textbooks. This dissertation engages in current debates that address bias in humanities textbooks and contributes…

  17. Health and human rights of women imprisoned in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The healthcare needs and general experience of women in detention in sub-Saharan Africa are rarely studied and poorly understood. Methods A mixed-methods study was conducted including in-depth interviews with 38 adult female prisoners and 21 prison officers in four Zambian prisons to assess the health and human rights concerns of female detainees. Key informant interviews with 46 officials from government and non-governmental organizations and a legal and policy review were also conducted. Results Despite special protection under international and regional law, incarcerated women's health needs–including prenatal care, prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV, and nutritional support during pregnancy and breastfeeding–are not being adequately met in Zambian prisons. Women are underserved by general healthcare programs including those offering tuberculosis and HIV testing, and reported physical and sexual abuse conducted by police and prison officers that could amount to torture under international law. Conclusions There is an urgent need for women's healthcare services to be expanded, and for general prison health campaigns, including HIV and tuberculosis testing and treatment, to ensure the inclusion of female inmates. Abuses against women in Zambian police and prison custody, which violate their rights and compromise their health, must be halted immediately. PMID:21696625

  18. How to Influence States: Socialization and International Human Rights Law

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Goodman, Ryan

    Authored by Ryan Goodman and Derek Jinks, this working paper from the University of Chicagoâ??s Public Law and Legal Theory Working Paper series was published first in March 2004, and is due to appear later this year in the Duke Law Journal. In its 57-pages, the paper deals with the ways in which states might effectively change their human rights regime based on various processes of socialization where so-called "bad actors" might be persuaded to incorporate globally legitimated models of state behavior and, on the other side of the coin, how "good actors" might also be persuaded to act better. The paper begins by discussing three mechanisms of social influence, namely coercion, persuasion, and acculturation, then continues on to discuss the nature of conditional membership, the precision of obligations, and concludes with a section on implementation.

  19. Health as a Human Right: Who is Eligible?

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Aaron; Schiff, Teresa; Rieth, Katherine; Yamada, Seiji; Maskarinec, Gregory G

    2010-01-01

    In Hawai‘i, health care is a commodity, not a human right: those who can afford it receive care, those who cannot often don't. As health workers and health professional students, we witness the consequences that public policies and budget considerations have on people, on patients, on the health of those that we are dedicated to assisting. Beginning with a case study, we examine the historical antecedents leading to the increasing migration of Micronesians to Hawai‘i, examine the special relation that “Compact of Free Association” citizens have with the United States, and seek to reframe the political discussion regarding their health care status in this state as a debate in which medical considerations, not political or economic ones, should be the primary voice. PMID:20539993

  20. Fluoridation: a violation of medical ethics and human rights.

    PubMed

    Cross, Douglas W; Carton, Robert J

    2003-01-01

    Silicofluorides, widely used in water fluoridation, are unlicensed medicinal substances, administered to large populations without informed consent or supervision by a qualified medical practitioner. Fluoridation fails the test of reliability and specificity, and, lacking toxicity testing of silicofluorides, constitutes unlawful medical research. It is banned in most of Europe; European Union human rights legislation makes it illegal. Silicofluorides have never been submitted to the U.S. FDA for approval as medicines. The ethical validity of fluoridation policy does not stand up to scrutiny relative to the Nuremberg Code and other codes of medical ethics, including the Council of Europe's Biomedical Convention of 1999. The police power of the State has been used in the United States to override health concerns, with the support of the courts, which have given deference to health authorities. PMID:12749628

  1. Forced migration: health and human rights issues among refugee populations.

    PubMed

    Lori, Jody R; Boyle, Joyceen S

    2015-01-01

    Undocumented migration is a global phenomenon that is manifest in diverse contexts. In this article, we examine the situations that precipitate the movement of large numbers of people across several African countries, producing a unique type of undocumented migrant--the refugee. These refugee movements impact already fragile African health care systems and often involve human rights violations that are of particular concern, such as gender-based violence and child soldiers. We use examples from several countries in sub-Saharan Africa, including the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Mozambique. Drawing on key documents from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, current research, and our personal international experiences, we provide an overview of forced migration and discuss implications and opportunities for nurses to impact research, practice, and policy related to refugee health. PMID:25645484

  2. Understanding and Responding to Youth Substance Use: The Contribution of a Health and Human Rights Framework

    PubMed Central

    Gruskin, Sofia; Plafker, Karen; Smith-Estelle, Allison

    2001-01-01

    This article examines the utility of a health and human rights framework for conceptualizing and responding to the causes and consequences of substance use among young people. It provides operational definitions of “youth” and “substances,” a review of current international and national efforts to address substance use among youths, and an introduction to human rights and the intersection between health and human rights. A methodology for modeling vulnerability in relation to harmful substance use is introduced and contemporary international and national responses are discussed. When governments uphold their obligations to respect, protect, and fulfill human rights, vulnerability to harmful substance use and its consequences can be reduced. PMID:11726374

  3. Lifting Our Veil of Ignorance: Culture, Constitutionalism, and Women's Human Rights in Post-September 11 America

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catherine Powell

    2005-01-01

    While we live in an Age of Rights, culture continues to be a major challenge to the human rights project. During the drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) in the 1940s and during the Cold War era, the periodic disputes that erupted over civil and political rights in contrast to economic, social and cultural rights could be

  4. [Development, human rights and woman's condition: a new age].

    PubMed

    Isaacs, S L

    1989-06-01

    After World War II (WWII) concern grew about the economic and social development of Third World countries. Most countries in Africa, Asia and the Middle East were European colonies while Latin America, even though independent was completely dominated by the US. These countries are characterized by: 1) a poor majority ruled by a small rich minority; 2) large rural populations migrating to the cities resulting in bottlenecks and unemployment; 3) bad health status with deteriorating nutritional states; 4) large families; 5) low levels of education (2/3 of the women in the world are illiterate and 90% live in 17 countries); 5) high levels of corruption in public positions; 6) governments ruled by a military dictator; 7) women in the lowest positions with limited legal rights. After WWII the Marshall Plan was instituted in developing countries (LDCs) to provide economic aid to development a model that used per capita income to measure a country's progress. During the 70's and 80's this model was questioned and more emphasis was put on the need for social and institutional development before investing in economic development. The World Bank and USAID have been promoting the role of the public sector, a strategy that has lowered inflation but has also affected the poor in many countries. For example, infant mortality in Brazil is higher now than 10 years ago. A wise development policy should recognize the need of LDCs to develop their own models while emphasizing agricultural development rather than industrial. Development is never accomplished until every citizen participates in their community. Improving the status of women is not only a human right but a high priority in achieving development. Women in LDCs only have partial rights--they cannot own land, nor inherit, and are not given any credit. Development is not only increasing the per capita income, it includes improving health, education, nutrition, and the quality of life of all its citizens. International law recognizes the rights of women and these are stated in the Convention on Eliminating all Forms of Discrimination Against Women. PMID:12315837

  5. Reaffirming Rights: Human Rights Protections of Migrants, Asylum Seekers, and Refugees in Immigration Detention

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eleanor Acer; Jake Goodman

    2010-01-01

    The International Migrants Bill of Rights (IMBR) addresses migrants’ rights in a variety of contexts, and this paper looks closely at some of the most crucial rights that apply to migrants, refugees, and asylum seekers who are held in immigration detention.\\u000aMigrants, refugees and asylum seekers are entitled to a broad range of rights protections. These protections are spelled out

  6. International Human Rights: Islam's Friend or Foe? Algeria as an Example of the Compatibility of International Human Rights Regarding Women's Equality and Islamic Law

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joelle Entelis

    1996-01-01

    Part I of this Note briefly discusses the development of International Human Rights Law as embodied in international covenants today. Part I also discusses Islamic law, the traditional role of women under Islamic law and culture, Algeria's Constitution and Family Code, and other dynamics specific to Algeria that have hindered women's obtainment of equal rights in the modern era. Part

  7. Conditions for Freedom?: European Human Rights Law and the Islamic Headscarf Debate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jill Marshall

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates women's choices and personal freedom by reference to the European Court of Human Rights' jurisprudence on national laws banning the wearing of the Islamic headscarf by adult women. The article focuses on how ECHR law is used and misused to shape women's autonomy rights, with specific emphasis on how women's rights to develop and express their own

  8. Conceptualizing a Human Right to Prevention in Global HIV/AIDS Policy

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Benjamin Mason; Brugh, Kristen Nichole; Halima, Yasmin

    2012-01-01

    Given current constraints on universal treatment campaigns, recent advances in public health prevention initiatives have revitalized efforts to stem the tide of HIV transmission. Yet, despite a growing imperative for prevention—supported by the promise of behavioral, structural and biomedical approaches to lower the incidence of HIV—human rights frameworks remain limited in addressing collective prevention policy through global health governance. Assessing the evolution of rights-based approaches to global HIV/AIDS policy, this review finds that human rights have shifted from collective public health to individual treatment access. While the advent of the HIV/AIDS pandemic gave meaning to rights in framing global health policy, the application of rights in treatment access litigation came at the expense of public health prevention efforts. Where the human rights framework remains limited to individual rights enforced against a state duty bearer, such rights have faced constrained application in framing population-level policy to realize the public good of HIV prevention. Concluding that human rights frameworks must be developed to reflect the complementarity of individual treatment and collective prevention, this article conceptualizes collective rights to public health, structuring collective combination prevention to alleviate limitations on individual rights frameworks and frame rights-based global HIV/AIDS policy to assure research expansion, prevention access and health system integration. PMID:23226723

  9. The Potential of Human Rights Education for Conflict Prevention and Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the contribution of human rights education (HRE) to conflict prevention and to the promotion of security. It outlines the difficulties in evaluating the long-term impact of HRE, but then proposes five benefits of a rights-based approach to education--rights as secular, man-made, requiring transparency, enabling freedom from…

  10. Human Rights Education: A Framework for Social Study from the Interpersonal to the Global. Pull Out 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Janet; Manson, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Addresses human rights education (HRE) for young learners stressing the centrality of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Illustrates the use of HRE within history, geography, world cultures, and literature. Believes that HRE begins by creating a human rights community in the classroom. (CMK)

  11. Human rights from the grassroots up: Vermont's campaign for universal health care.

    PubMed

    McGill, Mariah

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, the Vermont Workers' Center launched the "Healthcare Is a Human Right Campaign," a grassroots campaign to secure the creation of a universal health care system in Vermont. Campaign organizers used a human rights framework to mobilize thousands of voters in support of universal health care. In response to this extraordinary grassroots effort, the state legislature passed health care legislation that incorporates human rights principles into Vermont law and provides a framework for universal health care. The United States has often lagged behind other nations in recognizing economic, social, and cultural (ESC) rights, including the right to health. Nonetheless, activists have begun to incorporate ESC rights into domestic advocacy campaigns, and state and local governments are beginning to respond where the federal government has not. Vermont serves as a powerful example of how a human rights framework can inform health care policy and inspire grassroots campaigns in the United States. This three-part article documents the Vermont Workers' Center campaign and discusses the impact that human rights activity at the grassroots level may have on attitudes towards ESC rights in the United States. The first part describes the Vermont health care crisis and explains why the center adopted international human rights principles for their campaign. The article then goes on to discuss the three-year campaign and analyze the health care reform bill that the Vermont legislature passed. Finally, the article discusses the campaign's local and national impact. PMID:22773094

  12. Damned if you do, damned if you don't? The Lundbeck case of pentobarbital, the guiding principles on business and human rights, and competing human rights responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Buhmann, Karin

    2012-01-01

    In 2011 it emerged that to induce the death penalty, United States authorities had begun giving injections of pentobarbital, a substance provided by Danish pharmaceutical company Lundbeck. Lundbeck's product pentobarbital is licensed for treatment of refractory forms of epilepsy and for usage as an anaesthetic, thus for a very different purpose. The Lundbeck case offers a difficult, but also interesting Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) dilemma between choices facing a pharmaceutical company to stop the distribution of a medical substance in order to avoid complicity in human rights violations, or to retain distribution of the substance in order not to impede access to the medicine for those patients who need it. The dilemma arose at a time when the United Nations (UN) Secretary General's Special Representative on Business and Human Rights, Professor John Ruggie, was finalizing a set of Guiding Principles to operationalize recommendations on business and human rights that he had presented to the UN Human Rights Council in 2008. The article discusses the dilemma in which Lundbeck was placed in from the perspective of the Guiding Principles on business and human rights and the 2008 Protect, Respect, Remedy UN Framework. The analysis seeks to assess what guidance may be gauged from the Guiding Principles in relation to the dilemma at hand and discusses the adequacy the Guiding Principles for dealing with acute human rights dilemmas of conflicting requirements in which a decision to avoid one type of violation risks causing violation of another human right. The article concludes by drawing up perspectives for further development of guidance on implementation of the UN Framework that could be considered by the newly established Working Group on Business and Human Rights and related UN bodies. PMID:22789041

  13. State Education as High-Yield Investment: Human Capital Theory in European Policy Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillies, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Human Capital Theory has been an increasingly important phenomenon in economic thought over the last 50 years. The central role it affords to education has become even more marked in recent years as the concept of the "knowledge economy" has become a global concern. In this paper, the prevalence of Human Capital Theory within European…

  14. GLOBAL HEALTH VIEWPOINT Health, human rights and Australia’s foreign policies

    E-print Network

    Elizabeth A Reid; Human Rights; Law Constitutes

    what it is to be human and of what constitutes a life worth living as a human being. Thus, human rights law maps out the terrain of the struggle for human wellbeing and dignity. It provides an approach to conceptualising social and economic demands The Medical and platforms Journal that of Australia differs from ISSN: approaches 0025-729X 16 based on national February interest, 2004 180 cost-effectiveness, 4 163-165 or commodification of a social ©The good. Medical Journal of Australia 2004 www.mja.com.au Human Viewpoint rights are considered to be guaranteed by human rights law, which protects individuals and groups against actions that interfere with their fundamental freedoms and human dignity. 1 These laws are contained in international human rights treaties, which are binding on states that ratify them. Governments of such states must not violate human rights and must ensure that others do not violate them. They must also work to ensure that everyone has full enjoyment of their human rights. Human rights are not a matter of state discretion — the domestic and foreign policies of a state need to reflect the human rights treaties it has ratified. The human right to health The right to health is not absolute. It has been variously defined as the “right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care ” 2 or, more recently, “the right of everyone to the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health”. 3 It is not a right to be healthy, nor does it require that governments put in place healthcare systems beyond their means. It is a right that is to be realised progressively. The right to health is an inclusive right, extending beyond healthcare to the determinants of health, such as access to drinking water, adequate sanitation, essential drugs and food; freedom from violence, torture, slavery, discrimination and harmful customary practices; and access to health-related This article is based on the Chairperson’s Background Note

  15. Shirin Ebadi, received the 2003 Nobel Peace Prize for promoting human rights, in particular, the rights of women, children, and political prisoners

    E-print Network

    Liebling, Michael

    Shirin Ebadi, received the 2003 Nobel Peace Prize for promoting human rights, in particular the Nobel Peace Prize and only the fifth Muslim to receive a Nobel Prize in any field. Dr. Ebadi was also the Society for Protecting the Rights of the Child, the Defenders of Human Rights Center, the Nobel Women

  16. Shirin Ebadi, received the 2003 Nobel Peace Prize for promoting human rights, in particular, the rights of women, children, and political prisoners in Iran. She

    E-print Network

    Akhmedov, Azer

    Shirin Ebadi, received the 2003 Nobel Peace Prize for promoting human rights, in particular the Nobel Peace Prize and only the fifth Muslim to receive a Nobel Prize in any field. Dr. Ebadi was also the Society for Protecting the Rights of the Child, the Defenders of Human Rights Center, the Nobel Women

  17. Democracy and Human Rights Education in South Korea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Soon-Won

    2002-01-01

    A review of the educational history of South Korea provides a frame for descriptions of authoritarianism in various school contexts. The lack of student rights, teacher rights, and parent rights is discussed, and the need for radical transformation of the educational structure and school culture is proposed. (Contains 31 references.) (SV)

  18. Let's Talk about Human Rights. Students' Books 1-3. Teacher's Guides, Books 1-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Ricki; Sarna, Shirley

    These documents are designed to introduce students to some of the fundamental concepts, principles, and values of human rights and to a basic knowledge of human rights legal instruments as they apply to daily lives. Student handbook 1 is a series of lessons and activities that stimulate reading and discussion around the following ideas: What is a…

  19. Infusing Human Rights into the Curriculum: The Case of the South African Revised National Curriculum Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrim, Nazir; Keet, Andre

    2005-01-01

    This article reflects on experiences of attempting to infuse human rights in the South African Revised National Curriculum Statement (RNCS). Using our experiences as members of Human Rights and Inclusivity Group (HRIWG), one of the curriculum development structures set up for the RNCS, and focusing particularly on the Learning Area of Mathematics,…

  20. 76 FR 24787 - Blocking Property of Certain Persons With Respect to Human Rights Abuses in Syria

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ...With Respect to Human Rights Abuses in Syria By the authority vested in me as President...2008, finding that the Government of Syria's human rights abuses, including those related to the repression of the people of Syria, manifested most recently by the use...

  1. "This Is a Public Record": Teaching Human Rights through the Performing Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spero, Andrea McEvoy

    2012-01-01

    Urban youth in the United States often experience daily human rights violations such as racism and violence. Therefore, Human Rights Education (HRE) can strengthen their understanding of these issues and unleash their power to act toward positive change. This qualitative study attempted to gain a deeper understanding of the use of performance arts…

  2. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights: 50 Years Old but Still Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Highlights the events of the past 50 years concerning the Universal Declaration of Human Rights that is the first document in human history to codify rights that apply to every person regardless of citizenship in a particular country. Explains why the United States does not comprehend the value of the declaration. (CMK)

  3. The Transformative Power of Democracy and Human Rights in Nonformal Education: The Case of Tostan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Diane; Melching, Molly

    2010-01-01

    This case study analyzes the introduction of democracy and human rights into the educational program of Tostan, a nongovernmental organization working in Africa. The authors show how Tostan's original educational approach created a meaningful context for integrating democracy and human rights into its curriculum, a process that took place from…

  4. The Globalization of Law: Implications for the Fulfillment of Human Rights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alison Brysk; Arturo Jimenez

    2012-01-01

    How does the globalization of law, the emergence of multiple and shifting venues of legal accountability, enhance or evade the fulfillment of international human rights? The utility of law for the fulfillment of human rights can be summarized as a combination of normative principles, universal repertoire of definitions and boundaries, links to state enforcement, predictable processes for conflict resolution, and

  5. The Geography and Political Context of Human Rights Education: Israel as a Case Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Neve Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Studies have shown that human rights education (HRE) can help promote democracy and social progress by empowering individuals and groups and pushing governments to fulfill their obligations towards residents. Assuming that such assessments are accurate, I argue that the successful application of human rights education requires much more than what is generally discussed in the scholarly literature: adjustments to curriculum,

  6. Teaching Recent History in Countries that Have Experienced Human Rights Violations: Case Studies from Chile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toledo, Maria Isabel; Magendzo, Abraham; Gazmuri, Renato

    2011-01-01

    Incorporating recent history into the educational curricula of countries that have experienced human rights violations combines the complexities of teaching history, teaching recent history, and human rights education. Recent history makes a historical analysis of social reality and a historiographical analysis of the immediate. It is located…

  7. Re-Thinking Relations in Human Rights Education: The Politics of Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adami, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Human Rights Education (HRE) has traditionally been articulated in terms of cultivating better citizens or world citizens. The main preoccupation in this strand of HRE has been that of bridging a gap between universal notions of a human rights subject and the actual locality and particular narratives in which students are enmeshed. This…

  8. Beyond Study Abroad: A Human Rights Delegation to Teach Policy Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gammonley, Denise; Rotabi, Karen Smith; Forte, Janett; Martin, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Advancement of human rights is a core competency in the social work curriculum. Presented is a model to teach policy practice from a human rights perspective based on a violence-against-women delegation visit to Guatemala. Postdelegation policy advocacy responses included White House and State Department briefings on the problems, including…

  9. Seeking Asylum: Adolescents Explore the Crossroads of Human Rights Education and Cosmopolitan Critical Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunkerly-Bean, Judith; Bean, Thomas; Alnajjar, Khaled

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore middle school (grade 6-8) students' understanding and interpretation of human rights issues with local and global implications as they engaged in the process of creating a film after reading print and multimedia texts and participating in human rights education activities. As the students explored…

  10. Toward Cosmopolitan Ethics in Teacher Education: An Ontological Dimension of Learning Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adami, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    There is a globalization trend in teacher education, emphasizing the role of teachers to make judgments based on human rights in their teaching profession. Rather than emphasizing the epistemological dimension of acquiring knowledge "about" human rights through teacher education, an ontological dimension is emphasized in this paper of…

  11. The Teaching of Patriotism and Human Rights: An Uneasy Entanglement and the Contribution of Critical Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zembylas, Michalinos

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the moral, political and pedagogical tensions that are created from the entanglement of patriotism and human rights, and sketches a response to these tensions in the context of critical education. The article begins with a brief review of different forms of patriotism, especially as those relate to human rights, and explains…

  12. Searching for the Missing Link: Trade, Censorship and Human Rights in the Digital Era

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shuchao Henry GAO

    2010-01-01

    For a long time, the relationship between trade law and human rights has been a subject of hot debate between scholars from both trade law and human rights circles. The latest Google episode in China provided yet another chance to revisit the debate. Compared to previous cases, this case is even more intriguing for the following reasons: First, unlike previous

  13. To the Orphaned, Dispossessed, and Illegitimate Children: Human Rights Beyond Republican and Liberal Traditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Siba N. Grovogui

    2011-01-01

    After the Helsinki Accords, the collapse of the Soviet Union and its empire, and the collapse of states in Africa and elsewhere, many in the West have come to envisage the enforcement of human rights as a practical matter. Human rights are thus incorporated in normative regimes under the rubrics of either the rule of law or the responsibility to

  14. Examining the Role of Narrative in Human Rights Advocacy, Documentation and Justice-Seeking

    E-print Network

    Salzman, Daniel

    of Narrative in Human Rights Advocacy, Documentation and Justice-Seeking" will feature Pamela Graham, Ramazan to 8:00 p.m. WHERE: Columbia University Law School, Jerome Greene Annex, Morningside Heights Campus-seeking initiatives in different societies. Pamela Graham (Moderator) is director of the Center for Human Rights

  15. Human Rights Education and Student Self-Conception in the Dominican Republic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bajaj, Monisha

    2004-01-01

    In 2001, a 3-month course in human rights based on critical inquiry was offered to 8th graders in a slum area of Santo Domingo. The students' attitudes, behaviors and knowledge of human rights principles were measured before and after the course. The curriculum focused on international principles and entrenched local problems such as…

  16. Human rights education and student self-conception in the Dominican Republic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Monisha Bajaj

    2004-01-01

    In 2001, a 3-month course in human rights based on critical inquiry was offered to 8th graders in a slum area of Santo Domingo. The students' attitudes, behaviors and knowledge of human rights principles were measured before and after the course. The curriculum focused on international principles and entrenched local problems such as discrimination against Haitian migrants, police brutality, violence

  17. HUMAN RIGHTS, CULTURAL TRADITION AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT: CULTURALLY APPROPRIATE INTERNATIONAL RESPONSES TO FEMALE GENITAL CUTTING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristen Thomasen

    This article investigates the question of how to address, in an appropriate and effective way, an internationally defined violation of human rights that is also a cultural tradition. The practice of female genital cutting (FGC), an accepted and valued tradition, which has existed for centuries in some parts of the world, is investigated, and Amartya Sen's framework of human rights

  18. Capital Punishment and the Right to Life: Some Reflections on the Human Right As Absolute

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter J. Riga

    1981-01-01

    The right to life of the person and its various applications in different political situations is one of the most debated subjects of our day. This question is important today for a number of reasons: the widespread demand for abortion, the drive for the right to die, and the challenge to capital punishment. The debate seems at times to be

  19. Book Review: The Rights International Companion to Criminal Law & Procedure: An International Human Rights & Humanitarian Law Supplement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce Zagaris

    1999-01-01

    This Book Review provides a compact supplement to teaching criminal law and procedure by providing materials on the sources and application of international human rights and humanitarian law to criminal law. Part One reviews the sources and principles of international law. Part Two contains treaties and statutes setting forth the principles of state liability and individual culpability. Part Three provides

  20. The Career Perceptions of Academic Staff and Human Resource Discourses in English Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strike, Tony; Taylor, John

    2009-01-01

    This paper sets out findings from research that considered the interplay between English national policy developments in human resources management in higher education and the personal stories of academic staff as career participants. Academic careers are pursued in an institutional and national policy context but it was not clear that the formal…

  1. Citizen's choice of preferred system of healthcare as a fundamental human right.

    PubMed

    Burford, Gemma

    2010-01-01

    Fundamental rights are preconditions for any human to act with sufficient freedom and to be allowed sufficient choice to realize their potential. The right to indigenous medicine must be recognized as a fundamental human right for indigenous peoples. In accordance with the principles of Evidence-Based Medicine, every citizen should be allowed to benefit from the placebo effect. It constitutes an essential aspect of treatment, which is rightfully theirs on the basis of payment for health care - regardless of whether the payment is made out of pocket, or from public finance. It then follows that, the right of citizens to access the medical system of their choice should be formally acknowledged. That choice should be regarded as a Fundamental Human Right, which should under no circumstance be denied them - not for reasons of scientific prejudice, nor commercial ambition. PMID:21829297

  2. Human Rights Education: The United Nations Endeavour and the Importance of Childhood and Intelligent Sympathy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katerina K. Frantzi

    School is the major vehicle for humanism, which is, in essence, respect on human nature. Human Rights Education is important for the existence of human society in the modern globalising era. Education can function as a unifying factor and produce informed and active citizens of an interdependent world. It can provide the tools for advocacy and resolution of conflict that

  3. Training Trainers in health and human rights: Implementing curriculum change in South African health sciences institutions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The complicity of the South African health sector in apartheid and the international relevance of human rights as a professional obligation prompted moves to include human rights competencies in the curricula of health professionals in South Africa. A Train-the-Trainers course in Health and Human Rights was established in 1998 to equip faculty members from health sciences institutions nationwide with the necessary skills, attitudes and knowledge to teach human rights to their students. This study followed up participants to determine the extent of curriculum implementation, support needed as well as barriers encountered in integrating human rights into health sciences teaching and learning. Methods A survey including both quantitative and qualitative components was distributed in 2007 to past course participants from 1998-2006 via telephone, fax and electronic communication. Results Out of 162 past participants, 46 (28%) completed the survey, the majority of whom were still employed in academic settings (67%). Twenty-two respondents (48%) implemented a total of 33 formal human rights courses into the curricula at their institutions. Respondents were nine times more likely (relative risk 9.26; 95% CI 5.14-16.66) to implement human rights education after completing the training. Seventy-two extracurricular activities were offered by 21 respondents, many of whom had successfully implemented formal curricula. Enabling factors for implementation included: prior teaching experience in human rights, general institutional support and the presence of allies - most commonly coworkers as well as deans. Frequently cited barriers to implementation included: budget restrictions, time constraints and perceived apathy of colleagues or students. Overall, respondents noted personal enrichment and optimism in teaching human rights. Conclusion This Train-the-Trainer course provides the historical context, educational tools, and collective motivation to incorporate human rights educational initiatives at health sciences institutions. Increased implementation of human rights instruction, both formally and extracurricularly, has demonstrated the training's significance not only within academic institutions but more broadly across the health sector. Coworkers are vital allies in teaching human rights to health sciences students, helping to alleviate institutional barriers. Training fellow staff members and those in key leadership roles is noted as vital to the sustainability of human rights education. PMID:21787421

  4. Human rights and reproductive choices in the case-law of Italian and European courts.

    PubMed

    Valongo, Alessia

    2014-04-01

    The major issues regarding human fertilisation and embryology are addressed in a comparative perspective and in the light of relevant rulings of the European Court for Human Rights: the relationship between artificial procreation and parental responsibilities, the legal nature of the unborn child, the human right to reproduce and to have a healthy child. The article focuses on the key data of the latest Italian regulation regarding assisted conception, especially compared with British law. Particular attention is paid to the contribution given by recent European decisions to the protection of new human rights. National and international judgements ensure the right to private life and to health that are not always guaranteed by law. Converging developments in case-law panorama make the right to have children, to responsible procreation, to information about medical treatments, much less disharmonic realities than the Member States legislation suggests. PMID:24851649

  5. The First Amendment Right to Speak About the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores whether laws that restrict the communication of genetic test results may, under certain circumstances, violate the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The focus is whether investigators have a right to return results from non-CLIA-certified laboratories in situations where a research participant requests the results and the investigator is willing to share them but is concerned that doing so may violate regulations under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (“CLIA”). This article takes no position on whether investigators can be compelled to return results when they do not wish to do so. It examines only whether investigators may, not whether they must, return results to a willing research participant. The article: (1) surveys state and federal laws that block communication of genetic test results to research participants; (2) examines the historical use of speech restrictions as a tool for protecting human research subjects; (3) traces how First Amendment doctrine has evolved since the 1970s when foundations of modern research bioethics were laid; (4) inquires whether recent bioethical and policy debate has accorded due weight to the First Amendment. The article applies two common methods of legal analysis, textual and constitutional analysis. It concludes that the CLIA regulations, when properly construed, do not treat the return of results as an event that triggers CLIA’s certification requirements. Moreover, there is a potential First Amendment problem in construing CLIA’s research exception in a way that bans the return of results from non-CLIA-certified laboratories. PMID:25473380

  6. Employing moderate resolution sensors in human rights and international humanitarian law monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, Andrew J.

    Organizations concerned with human rights are increasingly using remote sensing as a tool to improve their detection of human rights and international humanitarian law violations. However, as these organizations have transitioned to human rights monitoring campaigns conducted over large regions and extended periods of time, current methods of using fine- resolution sensors and manpower-intensive analyses have become cost- prohibitive. To support the continued growth of remote sensing in human rights and international humanitarian law monitoring campaigns, this study researches how moderate resolution land observatories can provide complementary data to operational human rights monitoring efforts. This study demonstrates the capacity of moderate resolutions to provide data to monitoring efforts by developing an approach that uses Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) as part of a system for the detection of village destruction in Darfur, Sudan. Village destruction is an indicator of a human rights or international humanitarian law violations in Darfur during the 2004 study period. This analysis approach capitalizes on Landsat's historical archive and systematic observations by constructing a historic spectral baseline for each village in the study area that supports automated detection of a potentially destroyed village with each new overpass of the sensor. Using Landsat's near-infrared band, the approach demonstrates high levels of accuracy when compared with a U.S. government database documenting destroyed villages. This approach is then applied to the Darfur conflict from 2002 to 2008, providing new data on when and where villages were destroyed in this widespread and long-lasting conflict. This application to the duration of a real-world conflict illustrates the abilities and shortcomings of moderate resolution sensors in human rights monitoring efforts. This study demonstrates that moderate resolution satellites have the capacity to contribute complementary data to operational human rights monitoring efforts. While this study validates this capacity for the burning of villages in arid environments, this approach can be generalized to detect other human rights violations if an observable signal that represents the violation is identified.

  7. Reproductive health information and abortion services: standards developed by the European Court of Human Rights.

    PubMed

    Westeson, Johanna

    2013-08-01

    In 3 recent judgments, the European Court of Human Rights addressed the issue of access to abortion and related reproductive health services. In 2 of the judgments, the Court declared that the state violated women's rights by obstructing access to legal health services, including abortion. In so doing, it referred to the state's failure to implement domestic norms on prenatal testing and conscientious objection, and recognized the relevance of international medical guidelines. This illustrates that domestic and international medical standards can serve as critical guidance to human rights courts. In the third case, the Court showed its unwillingness to declare access to abortion a human right per se, which is troubling from the perspective of women's right to health and dignity. The present article outlines the relevance of these cases for the reproductive health profession and argues that medical professional societies can influence human rights courts by developing and enforcing medical standards, not only for the benefit of abortion rights domestically but also for the advancement of women's human rights worldwide. PMID:23773435

  8. Human Rights Abuses and Suicidal Ideation among Male Injecting Drug Users in Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, Enisha; Samson, Luke; Sweat, Michael; Beyrer, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Background Human rights abuses, denial of care, police surveillance, and violence directed at IDUs have been found to impact HIV prevention efforts due to decreased attendance in harm reduction programs. The association of mental health status with rights abuses has not been examined extensively among drug users. In India, drug control laws are often in conflict with harm reduction policies, thus increasing the likelihood of rights abuses against IDUs. The purpose of this study was to describe human rights abuses occurring among IDUs in Delhi and examine their association with suicidal ideation. Methods 343 IDUs were recruited in two research sites in Delhi through respondent driven sampling and were interviewed with a cross sectional survey questionnaire that included items on human rights and socio demographics. Results IDUs in the study experienced many human rights abuses. Notably among these were denial of admission into hospital (38.5%), denial of needles and syringes (20%), police arrests for carrying needles and using drugs (85%), verbal abuse (95%) and physical abuse (88%). Several human rights abuses were associated with suicidal ideation. These include being denied needles and syringes (OR: 7.28, 95% CI: 3.03- 17.49); being arrested by police for carrying needles and using drugs (OR: 2.53, 95% CI: 1.06- 6.03), and being physically abused (OR: 1.66, 95% CI: 1.05- 2.23). The likelihood of suicidal ideation is also strongly related to the cumulative number of abuses. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that there is a high prevalence of human rights abuses among IDUs in Delhi. Given the alarming rate of suicidal ideation and its close relationship with human rights abuses it is essential that IDU interventions are executed within a rights-based framework. PMID:21439808

  9. Human rights and the challenges of science and technology: Commentary on Meier et al. "Translating the human right to water and sanitation into public policy reform" and Hall et al. "The human right to water: the importance of domestic and productive water rights".

    PubMed

    Marks, Stephen P

    2014-12-01

    The expansion of the corpus of international human rights to include the right to water and sanitation has implications both for the process of recognizing human rights and for future developments in the relationships between technology, engineering and human rights. Concerns with threats to human rights resulting from developments in science and technology were expressed in the early days of the United Nations (UN), along with the recognition of the ambitious human right of everyone "to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress and its applications." This comment explores the hypothesis that the emerging concepts most likely to follow recognition of the human right to water primarily involve issues of science and technology, such as access to medicines or clean and healthy environment. Many threats to human rights from advances in science, which were identified in the past as potential, have become real today, such as invasion of privacy from electronic recording, deprivation of health and livelihood as a result of climate change, or control over individual autonomy through advances in genetics and neuroscience. This comment concludes by urging greater engagement of scientists and engineers, in partnership with human rights specialists, in translating normative pronouncements into defining policy and planning interventions. PMID:24519531

  10. Women's Human Rights Resources: Bora Laskin Law Library at the University of Toronto

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    DIANA, a joint project provided by an international consortium of libraries and human rights organizations, is dedicated to the construction of a comprehensive database of documents essential to human rights research. Currently, segments of the database are hosted by four libraries. Each library provides a unique set of documents for the collaborative database. The Bora Laskin Law Library at the University of Toronto archives women's human rights resources. Unfortunately, users cannot query all four hosts at the same time; however, each host attempts to eliminate document duplication within the database as a whole in order to minimize overlap. Consequently, users must select a relevant host before searching or conduct parallel searches.

  11. Human Rights Education as a Tool of Grassroots Organizing and Social Transformation: A Case Study from Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilkkaracan, Pinar; Amado, Liz Ercevik

    2005-01-01

    Women for Women's Human Rights (WWHR) -- New Ways has been carrying out a "Human Rights Education Program for Women" throughout Turkey for over a decade, in cooperation with community centers. The training has a holistic, comprehensive nature, linking several areas of human rights through a critical gender perspective lens. One of the overarching…

  12. Human Rights Education, Moral Education and Modernisation: The General Relevance of Some Latin American Experiences: A Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misgeld, Dieter; Magendzo, Abraham

    1997-01-01

    Transcribes a conversation between Dieter Misgeld and Abraham Magendzo on human rights education. Misgeld envisions a moral climate based on the preservation of human rights while Magendzo articulates a vision of human rights education to produce democratic institutions and moral practice. Both call for a political analysis of moral education.…

  13. Human Rights Education in Japan: An Historical Account, Characteristics and Suggestions for a Better-Balanced Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takeda, Sachiko

    2012-01-01

    Although human rights are often expressed as universal tenets, the concept was conceived in a particular socio-political and historical context. Conceptualisations and practice of human rights vary across societies, and face numerous challenges. After providing an historical account of the conceptualisation of human rights in Japanese society,…

  14. Social Injustice, Human Rights-Based Education and Citizens' Direct Action to Promote Social Transformation in the Philippines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ty, Reynaldo

    2011-01-01

    This article opens with a proposed framework for human rights education (HRE), which synthesizes ideas drawn from Zinn's people's history, Sen's theory of justice and Freire's critical pedagogy. A review of the literature on HRE and human rights-based learning suggests three existent interrelated models of HRE. Drawing on human rights-based…

  15. Health and Human Rights Education in U.S. Schools of Medicine and Public Health: Current Status and Future Challenges

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Emily Cotter; Jonathan Chevrier; Wael Noor El-Nachef; Rohan Radhakrishna; Lisa Rahangdale; Sheri D. Weiser; Vincent Iacopino; Beverley J. Shea

    2009-01-01

    BackgroundDespite increasing recognition of the importance of human rights in the protection and promotion of health, formal human rights education has been lacking in schools of medicine and public health. Our objectives were: 1) to determine the nature and extent of health and human rights (HHR) education among schools of medicine (SOMs) and public health (SPHs); 2) to identify perceived

  16. The Nordic human rights paradox An interdisciplinary workshop University of Oslo, 29-30 August and 11-12 December, 2012

    E-print Network

    Johansen, Tom Henning

    _________________________________________________________________________ The Nordic human rights countries demonstrate a puzzling ambivalence towards human rights. On the one hand, citizens of these five policies, the Nordic countries pride themselves to be staunch defenders of human rights, seeking to promote

  17. Human rights violations against sex workers: burden and effect on HIV.

    PubMed

    Decker, Michele R; Crago, Anna-Louise; Chu, Sandra K H; Sherman, Susan G; Seshu, Meena S; Buthelezi, Kholi; Dhaliwal, Mandeep; Beyrer, Chris

    2015-01-10

    We reviewed evidence from more than 800 studies and reports on the burden and HIV implications of human rights violations against sex workers. Published research documents widespread abuses of human rights perpetrated by both state and non-state actors. Such violations directly and indirectly increase HIV susceptibility, and undermine effective HIV-prevention and intervention efforts. Violations include homicide; physical and sexual violence, from law enforcement, clients, and intimate partners; unlawful arrest and detention; discrimination in accessing health services; and forced HIV testing. Abuses occur across all policy regimes, although most profoundly where sex work is criminalised through punitive law. Protection of sex workers is essential to respect, protect, and meet their human rights, and to improve their health and wellbeing. Research findings affirm the value of rights-based HIV responses for sex workers, and underscore the obligation of states to uphold the rights of this marginalised population. PMID:25059943

  18. State obligations to implement African abortion laws: employing human rights in a changing legal landscape.

    PubMed

    Ngwena, Charles G

    2012-11-01

    Women in the African region are overburdened with unsafe abortion. Abortion regimes that fail to translate any given abortion rights into tangible access are partly to blame. Historically, African abortion laws have been highly restrictive. However, the post-independence era has witnessed a change toward liberalizing abortion law, even if incremental for many jurisdictions. Furthermore, Article 14 of the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa has significantly augmented the regional trend toward liberalization by recognizing abortion as a human right in given circumstances. However, states are failing to implement abortion laws. The jurisprudence that is emerging from the European Court of Human Rights and United Nations treaty bodies is a tool that can be used to render African governments accountable for failure to implement domestic abortion laws. PMID:22944215

  19. In the Service of Power: The Global Political Economy of Citizenship and Human Rights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tony Evans; Alison J. Ayers

    2006-01-01

    This article investigates how the idea of universal human rights has been co-opted by the prevailing (neo)liberal consensus in support of processes associated with capitalist globalization. So-called “civil and political” rights form the core of (neo)liberal values upon which free market, laissez-faire economics are based, but the idealism of the dichotomy of first and second generation rights is profoundly ideological.

  20. Human rights and the trauma model: genuine partners or uneasy allies?

    PubMed

    Steel, Zachary; Steel, Catherine R Bateman; Silove, Derrick

    2009-10-01

    Since World War II, a comprehensive body of international law has developed to protect and promote human rights. Three generations of rights can be delineated: civil and political; economic, social and cultural; and collective rights. The convergence of a medical rights-based campaign in the late 1970s with the emergence of the new trauma model resulted in mental health professionals playing a prominent role in documenting and protecting civil and political rights. Economic, social, and cultural rights also emerged as being pivotal, particularly in the Australian context as mental health professionals began to work with excluded populations such as asylum seekers. Consideration of third-generation rights raises important questions about the responsibilities facing mental health professionals applying the trauma model to non-Western settings. PMID:19743479

  1. Human Rights and Wrongs in Our Own Backyard: Incorporating International Human Rights Protections Under Domestic Civil Rights Law---A Case Study of Women in the United States Prisons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin A. Geer

    2000-01-01

    An urgent human rights crisis at home is under close scrutiny by diverse groups including the United Nations, non-governmental organizations, the U.S. Department of Justice, and public interest lawyers. Within the context of a prison population explosion that dwarfs that of the rest of the world, the undeveloped status of international human rights in U.S. domestic jurisprudence becomes more evident.

  2. HUMAN RIGHTS QUARTERLY Volumes 1 (1979) -25 (2003)

    E-print Network

    Papautsky, Ian

    in Isla Negra, 13 Hum. Rts. Q. 257. ______, Notes on the Poetics of the Acevedo Movement Against Torture and Abortion Under the Draft Convention on the Rights #12;2 of the Child, 12 Hum. Rts. Q. 156. ______, The UN

  3. [Gender discourses and bioethics].

    PubMed

    Aparisi Miralles, Angela

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present some of the contributions of the gender discourse to the bioethical debate, specifically in the field of nursing. At the same time, it will explain the contribution of the different feminist theories to the recognition and respect of human dignity. Basically, it will describe the three fundamental models in the gender discourse: the egalitarian model, the difference model, and the model of reciprocity or complementarity. The starting point is that even though the first two models have made significant contributions in the field of bioethics, they have nonetheless brought with them some deficiencies and reductionisms inherent in their thinking. The complementarity model, on the contrary, when properly understood, allows for the combination of the principles of equality and difference between man and woman, which places it at a much more enriching standpoint within the bioethical debate. PMID:25329418

  4. 2004 The MITRE Corporation. All rights reservedFor Internal MITRE Use Human Systems Integration

    E-print Network

    Cummings, Mary "Missy"

    © 2004 The MITRE Corporation. All rights reservedFor Internal MITRE Use Human Systems Integration Systems Engineering 2020 Vision Topic Areas for Workshop Focus Groups Human Role in Systems/Systems Engineering (adaptive capabilities of humans; cognitive systems engineering; support for decision making

  5. Abortion in Sri Lanka in the context of women's human rights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sunila Abeyesekera

    1997-01-01

    This paper analyses, from the perspective of women's human rights, an unsuccessful attempt to amend the abortion law in the Penal Code of Sri Lanka in 1995. The Parliamentary debate brought to the surface a number of contentious issues relating to women's right to control their sexuality and reproductive capacities, in which women were variously assumed to be promiscuous and

  6. Children in Vulnerable Situations: A multi-disciplinary, human rights-based approach

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    1 Children in Vulnerable Situations: A multi-disciplinary, human rights-based approach PHS 650 SPEAKERS Araceli Alonso, RN, PhD Faculty Associate, Women's Studies aalonso@wisc.edu Maureen Durkin, Ph Century of the Child." Indeed, the emphasis on children's rights ­ to protect in particular ­ marks

  7. School Attendance as a Civic Duty v. Home Education as a Human Right

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimer, Franz

    2010-01-01

    The article presents the legal situation of home education in Germany as a multi-level problem touching upon German constitutional law, State (Länder) constitutional law as well as administrative law, and the liberties of the European Convention of Human Rights. Whereas the parents' right to care for their children is explicitly granted by…

  8. Citizenship, Nationalism, Human Rights and Democracy: A Tangling of Terms in the Kuwaiti Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Nakib, Rania

    2011-01-01

    Background: Citizenship, nationalism, human rights and democracy are four terms and concepts that are inextricably linked. In Kuwait, the status of citizen is based on nationality, gender and age, with women, children, naturalised citizens, expatriates and "bidoon" (stateless people) denied many freedoms, rights and services. Citizenship is…

  9. The indirect negative inotropic effect of carbachol in ? 1-adrenoceptor antagonist-treated human right atria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thekla Wangemann; Christine Giessler; Pia Willmy-Matthes; Ralf-Edgar Silber; Otto-Erich Brodde

    2003-01-01

    To find out whether indirect negative inotropic effects of carbachol (i.e. decreases in force of contraction that had been stimulated by cyclic AMP-increasing agents) might differ dependent on the agonist employed to increase contractile force in isolated human right atrium, we studied effects of carbachol on atria prestimulated with noradrenaline, terbutaline, histamine and serotonin. All four agonists increased right atrial

  10. Human Rights, Identities and Conflict Management: A study of school culture as experienced through classroom relationships

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charlotte Carter; Audrey Osler

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of an action research project designed to examine the dynamics of classroom relationships and perceptions of how rights and identities operate in an all boys' comprehensive school in the English West Midlands. The principal aims of the research were to examine the feasibility of adopting a human rights framework as a basis for school life

  11. CHALLENGES OF HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES IN NIGERIAN DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE - WHICH WAY FORWARD?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adetoro Rasheed Adenrele; Omiyefa Muraina Olugbenga

    2014-01-01

    The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) was unanimously adopted and proclaimed by the United Nations through the General Assembly Resolution 217A(111) on the 10 th of December, 1948. Since its declaration, it has become fashionable for most countries of the world (Nigeria inclusive) to entrench the catalogue of rights in their national constitutions. Regrettably, in Nigeria and indeed in

  12. Russia: European Court of Human Rights rules HIV-positive foreign national suffered discrimination.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Rémi

    2011-10-01

    On 10 March 2011, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) held that refusing a residence permit to a foreign national solely on the basis of his HIV-positive status amounted to unlawful discrimination. This case is a significant boost to the rights of persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) in Europe and beyond. PMID:22165275

  13. Canadian Human Rights Act. Office Consolidation = Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne. Codification administrative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Supply and Services, Ottawa (Ontario).

    The Canadian Human Rights Act extends the laws in Canada that proscribe discrimination by establishing that each individual has the right to make the life for him- or herself that he or she is able and wishes to have, consistent with the duties and obligations of a member of society, without being hindered or prevented from doing so by…

  14. Functional specificity in the right human auditory cortex for perceiving pitch direction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ingrid S. Johnsrude; Virginia B. Penhune; Robert J. Zatorre

    2000-01-01

    Summary Previous lesion and functional imaging studies in humans suggest a greater involvement of right rather than left auditory cortical areas in certain aspects of pitch processing. In the present study, adaptive psychophysical procedures were used to determine auditory perceptual thresholds in 14 neurologically normal subjects, and in 31 patients who had undergone surgical resection from either the right or

  15. The Human Family, Human Rights, and Peace. A Sourcebook for the Study and Discussion of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, A Lay Version for the Common Man, Woman, and Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tankard, Alice Doumanian

    Human rights issues are brought to the attention of a larger lay public in this source book of questions, topics for discussion, and study of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The original declaration consists of a preamble, introduction, and 30 articles. These are all retained in this lay version which closely follows the…

  16. A Struggle for Human Rights: The Japanese Spinners' 106-Day Strike of 1954.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshida, Shoya

    1992-01-01

    Inhumane working conditions led to a strike of Japanese silk spinners and formation of a union. Company repression provoked public opinion, resulting in acceptance of worker demands for recognition of human rights in the workplace. (SK)

  17. Context, Politics and Moral Education: Comments on the Misgeld/Magendzo Conversation about Human Rights Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brabeck, Mary M.; Ting, Kathleen

    1997-01-01

    Introduces a conversation between Dieter Misgeld and Abraham Magendzo on the topic of human rights education. Provides a brief background on the two discussants, describes the tone of the conversations, and outlines points of agreement and disagreement. (DSK)

  18. 11.164 / 11.497 Human Rights in Theory and Practice, Spring 2005

    E-print Network

    Rajagopal, Balakrishnan

    This course provides a rigorous and critical introduction to the foundation, structure and operation of the international human rights movement. It includes leading theoretical and institutional issues and the functioning ...

  19. Rewards for Ratification: Payoffs for Participating in the International Human Rights Regime?

    E-print Network

    Simmons, Beth A.

    Among the explanations for state ratification of human rights treaties, few are more common and widely accepted than the conjecture that states are rewarded for ratification by other states. These rewards are expected to ...

  20. Council of the European Union: European Union Annual Report on Human Rights

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Council of the European Union.

    Adopted by the General Affairs Council in Luxembourg on October 11, 1999, this report covers the period June 1, 1998 to June 30, 1999 and "intends to explain how the [European] Union's headway towards integration is paralleled in the field of human rights." The Report is offered as part of a wider effort to promote transparency of the EU's human rights policies. To that end, it explains the major actors of the Union's human rights policies and their goals, methods, and activities. While concentrating on external relations, the Report does explore some human rights issues within the EU area, specifically racism. The report is offered in six sections in HTML or MS Word format.

  1. Being Human or Being a Citizen? Rethinking Human Rights and Citizenship Education in the Light of Agamben and Merleau-Ponty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Ruyu

    2012-01-01

    This paper argues against a trend of human rights education, where human rights are taught in the form of citizenship education. In my view, citizenship education and human rights education cannot be taken as replaceable for each other. Underpinning the idea of citizenship is a distinction between "politically qualified" and "politically…

  2. Human rights violations among sexual and gender minorities in Kathmandu, Nepal: a qualitative investigation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nepal has experienced sporadic reports of human rights violations among sexual and gender minorities. Our objective was to identify a range of human rights that are enshrined in international law and/or are commonly reported by sexual and gender minority participants in Kathmandu, to be nonprotected or violated. Methods In September 2009 three focus group discussions were conducted by trained interviewers among a convenience sample of sexual and gender minority participants in Kathmandu Nepal. The modified Delphi technique was utilized to elicit and rank participant-generated definitions of human rights and their subsequent violations. Data was analyzed independently and cross checked by another investigator. Results Participants (n?=?29) reported experiencing a range of human rights violations at home, work, educational, health care settings and in public places. Lack of adequate legal protection, physical and mental abuse and torture were commonly reported. Access to adequate legal protection and improvements in the family and healthcare environment were ranked as the most important priority areas. Conclusions Sexual and gender minorities in Nepal experienced a range of human rights violations. Future efforts should enroll a larger and more systematic sample of participants to determine frequency, timing, and/or intensity of exposure to rights violations, and estimate the population-based impact of these rights violations on specific health outcomes PMID:22591775

  3. Advancing sexual health through human rights: The role of the law

    PubMed Central

    Kismödi, Eszter; Cottingham, Jane; Gruskin, Sofia; Miller, Alice M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the International Conference on Population and Development, definitions of sexuality and sexual health have been greatly elaborated alongside widely accepted recognition that sexual health requires respect, protection and fulfilment of human rights. Considerable progress has also been made in enacting or changing laws that affect sexuality and sexual health, in line with human rights standards. These measures include legal guarantees against non-discrimination and violence, decriminalisation of consensual sexual conduct and guaranteeing availability, accessibility, acceptability and quality of sexual health information and services to all. Such legal actions have had positive effects on health and specifically on sexual health, particularly for marginalised populations. Yet in all regions of the world, laws still exist which jeopardise health, including sexual health, and violate human rights. In order to ensure accountability for the rights and health of their populations, states have an obligation to bring their laws into line with international, regional and national human rights standards. These rights-based legal guarantees, while insufficient alone, are essential for effective systems of accountability, achieving positive sexual health outcomes and the respect and protection of human rights. PMID:25539286

  4. The Growth of Individual Rights: Ideas and Politics. International Human Rights Syllabi No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Dennis

    Designed for teachers of undergraduate students with some familiarity with political theory, moral philosophy, and social history, this course outline focuses on individual rights and their realization in the United States and the world at large. The syllabus, arranged in 3 major parts, is subdivided into 16 sections that outline major course…

  5. Rise of the New Right: Human and Civil Rights in Jeopardy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, J. Charles

    1980-01-01

    The author warns that ultra-conservatism is growing in strength and sophistication as a political force. He cites literature from various right-wing groups attacking the public schools and suggests that educators must learn to cope with social stress and the political extremism it generates. (SJL)

  6. Court says French government's refusal to authorize adoption violates woman's human rights.

    PubMed

    Chu, Sandra Ka Hon

    2008-07-01

    On 22 January 2008, the European Court of Human Rights held that there had been a violation of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (European Convention) in the case of E.B. v. France, concerning a refusal by the French authorities to grant E.B.'s request to adopt a child, allegedly on account of her sexual orientation. PMID:18727204

  7. Associations between human rights environments and healthy longevity: the case of older persons in China.

    PubMed

    Brown, Bethany L; Qiu, Li; Gu, Danan

    2012-01-01

    Individual health can deteriorate through neglect or violation of human rights or can improve through favorable health policies and programs on human rights. Yet quantitative associations between human rights and health are insufficiently studied. Based on a nationwide dataset of the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS) with more than 18,800 adults aged 65 and older in mainland China interviewed in 2002 and 2005 and their follow-ups three years later, we examine how an individual's longevity and health are associated with some domains of human rights. We use three individual-level variables in early life stages (whether a respondent went to bed hungry, accessed adequate medical services, and years of schooling), three individual-level variables at present (whether a respondent has adequate housing; whether a respondent has adequate economic resources to support his/her daily subsistence, and whether a respondent gets adequate medical services when in need), and one community-level variable (air quality) as proxies to measure several fundamental domains of human rights in terms of access to adequate food/nutrition, housing/shelter, education, social security, health care, and clean-air environments. An indicator of healthy survival is introduced to measure survivors at sequent follow-ups with a good health condition. Our results demonstrate that better conditions of proxy measures of human rights at different life stages, especially at present, are associated with a higher likelihood of healthy survival after taking various confounding variables into consideration, suggesting the possibility of a significant linkage between good environments in human rights and healthy longevity. These findings may have important implications for promoting better environments in human rights, especially in the context of population aging. PMID:23568942

  8. An ‘action?poor’ human rights education: a critical review of the development of human rights education in the context of civic education in Hong Kong

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yan Wing Leung

    2008-01-01

    In Hong Kong, human rights education (HRE) is considered an aspect of civic education. For decades, HRE has been poorly attended. In 2009, a new compulsory subject, Liberal Studies, where HRE can be infused, will be introduced to senior secondary students (15–18 years old). This article reviews the development of HRE within civic education, followed by the analysis of Liberal

  9. Human Rights Casualties from the “War on Obesity”: Why Focusing on Body Weight Is Inconsistent with a Human Rights Approach to Health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lily OHara; Jane Gregg

    2012-01-01

    An increase in average body weight has been the subject of intense attention from public health authorities over the past decade. The weight-centered health paradigm and resulting concerns about the “obesity epidemic” are the foundation for public health policies and programs around the world. International human rights treaties describe the legal obligations of states and the moral obligations of other

  10. Human rights violations of people with mental and psychosocial disabilities: an unresolved global crisis.

    PubMed

    Drew, Natalie; Funk, Michelle; Tang, Stephen; Lamichhane, Jagannath; Chávez, Elena; Katontoka, Sylvester; Pathare, Soumitra; Lewis, Oliver; Gostin, Lawrence; Saraceno, Benedetto

    2011-11-01

    This report reviews the evidence for the types of human rights violations experienced by people with mental and psychosocial disabilities in low-income and middle-income countries as well as strategies to prevent these violations and promote human rights in line with the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). The article draws on the views, expertise, and experience of 51 people with mental and psychosocial disabilities from 18 low-income and middle-income countries as well as a review of English language literature including from UN publications, non-governmental organisation reports, press reports, and the academic literature. PMID:22008426

  11. Are Drug Companies Living Up to Their Human Rights Responsibilities? Moving Toward Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Gruskin, Sofia; Raad, Zyde

    2010-01-01

    Background to the debate The human rights responsibilities of drug companies have been considered for years by nongovernmental organizations, but were most sharply defined in a report by the UN Special Rapporteur on the right to health, submitted to the United Nations General Assembly in August 2008. The “Human Rights Guidelines for Pharmaceutical Companies in relation to Access to Medicines” include responsibilities for transparency, management, monitoring and accountability, pricing, and ethical marketing, and against lobbying for more protection in intellectual property laws, applying for patents for trivial modifications of existing medicines, inappropriate drug promotion, and excessive pricing. Two years after the release of the Guidelines, the PLoS Medicine Debate asks whether drug companies are living up to their human rights responsibilities. Sofia Gruskin and Zyde Raad from the Harvard School of Public Health say more assessment is needed of such responsibilities; Geralyn Ritter, Vice President of Global Public Policy and Corporate Responsibility at Merck & Co. argues that multiple stakeholders could do more to help States deliver the right to health; and Paul Hunt and Rajat Khosla introduce Mr. Hunt's work as the UN Special Rapporteur on the right to the highest attainable standard of health, regarding the human rights responsibilities of pharmaceutical companies and access to medicines. PMID:20927356

  12. Water as a Human Right: The Understanding of Water in the Arab Countries of the Middle East

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Simone Klawitter; Hadeel Qazzaz

    2005-01-01

    The international community has affirmed the human right to water in a number of international treaties, declarations and other documents. Most notably, the United Nations (UN) Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights adopted in November 2002 a General Comment on the Right to Water setting out international standards and obligations relating to the right to water. Based on the

  13. Freedom of Information as an Internationally Protected Human Right

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toby Mendel

    These quotations highlight the importance of freedom of information at a number of different levels: in itself, for the fulfilment of all other rights and as an underpinning of democracy. It is perhaps as an underpinning of democracy that freedom of information is most important. Information held by public authorities is not acquired for the benefit of officials or politicians

  14. HIV and AIDS stigma violates human rights in five African countries.

    PubMed

    Kohi, Thecla W; Makoae, Lucy; Chirwa, Maureen; Holzemer, William L; Phetlhu, Deliwe René; Uys, Leana; Naidoo, Joanne; Dlamini, Priscilla S; Greeff, Minrie

    2006-07-01

    The situation and human rights of people living with HIV and AIDS were explored through focus groups in five African countries (Lesotho, Malawi, South Africa, Swaziland and Tanzania). A descriptive qualitative research design was used. The 251 informants were people living with HIV and AIDS, and nurse managers and nurse clinicians from urban and rural settings. NVivo software was used to identify specific incidents related to human rights, which were compared with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The findings revealed that the human rights of people living with HIV and AIDS were violated in a variety of ways, including denial of access to adequate or no health care/services, and denial of home care, termination or refusal of employment, and denial of the right to earn an income, produce food or obtain loans. The informants living with HIV and AIDS were also abused verbally and physically. Country governments and health professionals need to address these issues to ensure the human rights of all people. PMID:16838571

  15. Public health, human rights, and the beneficence of states

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris Beyrer

    2003-01-01

    Conclusions  The HIV\\/AIDS pandemic, now well into its third decade and spreading in states as diverse as Belarus, Ukraine, Indonesia, and\\u000a Papua New Guinea, has shown us that we truly are sharing an interconnected world. As we struggle to deal with both ongoing\\u000a and emerging threats to public health, and to reach just balances of the rights of individuals and communities,

  16. Teaching about the Holocaust and Genocide: Introduction. The Human Rights Series, Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Clayton; And Others

    Designed to assist secondary school social studies, English, and humanities teachers as they teach about the Nazi Holocaust, the first of two volumes serves as an introduction to the concept of human rights. Divided into a rationale and two units, each unit includes a statement of purpose, a list of objectives, and a group of learning activities…

  17. Teaching about the Holocaust and Genocide. The Human Rights Series, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Clayton; And Others

    Designed to assist secondary school social studies, English, and humanities teachers as they teach about the Nazi Holocaust, the second of two volumes serves as a continuing introduction to the concept of human rights. Building on the first volume, which dealt with the roots of intolerance and persecution and precursors of the Holocaust, this…

  18. Mixed-Initiative Cyber Security: Putting humans in the right loop Jereme N. Haack1

    E-print Network

    Fulp, Errin W.

    Mixed-Initiative Cyber Security: Putting humans in the right loop Jereme N. Haack1 , Glenn A. Fink1), a new cyber- defense paradigm designed to unify complex-adaptive swarm intelligence, logical rational agents, and human insight. CID will enable cooperative defense of infrastructure through situational

  19. Discrimination against pregnant employees: An analysis of arbitration and human rights tribunal decisions in Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Andiappan; M. Reavley; S. Silver

    1990-01-01

    Recent arbitration and human rights boards of inquiry cases involving discrimination against pregnant employees are reviewed. A comparison is made between remedies available under each procedure. It is suggested that the human resource managers review their policies and procedures relevant to this issue to ensure that they do not have the effect or intent of discriminating against pregnant employees.

  20. Sakiko Fukuda-Parr - Millennium Development Goal 8: Indicators for International Human Rights Obligations? - Human Rights Quarterly 28:4

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sakiko Fukuda-Parr

    Millennium Development Goal 8 is arguably the most significant step since the Covenant on Economic Social Rights in taking the idea of global solidarity and international responsibilities for development from a statement of principle to international policy. It commits the international community to strengthen partnership for poverty reduction, and defines benchmark targets and indicators of progress. This article examines this