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Sample records for human tissue kallikrein

  1. Hydrolysis of somatostatin by human tissue kallikrein after the amino acid pair phe-Phe.

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta, D C; Juliano, M A; Juliano, L

    1997-01-01

    Somatostatin-(1-14) was hydrolysed by human tissue kallikrein at the Phe7-Trp8 bond, after a Phe-Phe pair of amino acids, with similar kinetic parameters to those described for human high- and low-molecular-mass kininogens. Substance P and human insulin, which also contain a Phe-Phe pair in their sequences, were both resistant. More details of this hydrolytic specificity of human tissue kallikrein were obtained by synthesizing and assaying internally quenched fluorescent peptides containing the sequence of somatostatin-(1-14), as well as the reactive-centre loop of human kallikrein-binding protein (kallistatin). We also observed that human tissue kallikrein hydrolysed growth hormone-releasing hormone at the Arg11-Lys12 bond, although this peptide contains in its structure a pair of leucines (Leu22-Leu23), in contrast with the Phe-Phe pair in somatostatin. We have also demonstrated the susceptibility to human tissue kallikrein of some chromogenic peptide s with the general structure of X-Phe-Phe-p-nitroanilide and D-Pro-Phe-Phe-4-methylcoumaryl-7-amide. PMID:9355730

  2. Crystal structure of recombinant human tissue kallikrein at 2.0 A resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, B. A.; Liu, B.; Barnes, M.; Springman, E. B.

    1998-01-01

    Human tissue kallikrein, a trypsin-like serine protease involved in blood pressure regulation and inflammation processes, was expressed in a deglycosylated form at high levels in Pichia pastoris, purified, and crystallized. The crystal structure at 2.0 A resolution is described and compared with that of porcine kallikrein and of other trypsin-like proteases. The active and S1 sites (nomenclature of Schechter I, Berger A, 1967, Biochem Biophys Res Commun 27:157-162) are similar to those of porcine kallikrein. Compared to trypsin, the S1 site is enlarged owing to the insertion of an additional residue, cis-Pro 219. The replacement Tyr 228 --> Ala further enlarges the S1 pocket. However, the replacement of Gly 226 in trypsin with Ser in human tissue kallikrein restricts accessibility of substrates and inhibitors to Asp 189 at the base of the S1 pocket; there is a hydrogen bond between O delta1Asp189 and O gammaSer226. These changes in the architecture of the S1 site perturb the binding of inhibitors or substrates from the modes determined or inferred for trypsin. The crystal structure gives insight into the structural differences responsible for changes in specificity in human tissue kallikrein compared with other trypsin-like proteases, and into the structural basis for the unusual specificity of human tissue kallikrein in cleaving both an Arg-Ser and a Met-Lys peptide bond in its natural protein substrate, kininogen. A Zn+2-dependent, small-molecule competitive inhibitor of kallikrein (Ki = 3.3 microM) has been identified and the bound structure modeled to guide drug design. PMID:9568894

  3. Prognostic significance of human tissue kallikrein-related peptidases 6 and 10 in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kolin, David L; Sy, Keiyan; Rotondo, Fabio; Bassily, Mena N; Kovacs, Kalman; Brezden-Masley, Christine; Streutker, Catherine J; Yousef, George M

    2014-09-01

    The prognosis of patients following surgery for gastric cancer is often poor and is estimated using traditional clinicopathological parameters, which can be inaccurate predictors of future survival. Kallikreins are a group of serine proteases, which are differentially expressed in many human tumors and are being investigated as potential cancer biomarkers. This study assessed the prognostic utility of human tissue kallikrein-like peptidases 6 and 10 (KLK6 and KLK10) and correlated their expression with histopathological and clinical parameters in gastric cancer. We constructed a gastric tumor tissue microarray from 113 gastrectomy specimens and quantified KLK6 and KLK10 expression using immunohistochemistry. To overcome the problem of inter-observer variability and subjectivity in immunohistochemistry interpretation, a whole-slide scanned image of the tissue microarray was analyzed using an automated algorithm to quantify staining intensity. KLK6 expression was positively correlated with nodal involvement (p=0.002) and was predictive of advanced-stage disease (p<0.05). Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed that tumors expressing high levels of KLK6 were significantly associated with significantly lower overall survival (p=0.04). KLK10 overexpression was also a predictor of advanced-stage disease (p<0.01), but was not significantly correlated with lymph node involvement or survival period. Our results show the potential ability of KLK6 as a prognostic marker for gastric cancer. PMID:25153389

  4. Indirect Back-Titration ELISA: A New Format for Estimation of Human Tissue Kallikreins.

    PubMed

    Nasim, Faiz-Ul-Hassan; Ejaz, Samina; Ashraf, Muhammad; Ahmad, Gulzar

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is either based on sandwich, competitive, or inhibition type of format. However, these formats need 2 or 3 monoclonal antibodies (moAB) to estimate 1 antigen. To get a cost-effective, high throughput, ELISA for estimation of human tissue kallikreins we have now developed an indirect, back-titration style, Time Resolved ImmunoFluorometric (TRIF) ELISA that uses only 1 antigen-specific moAB and a general polyclonal antibody. Polystyrene microtiter plate wells coated with a capture antibody, a mouse moAB prepared against a specific human tissue kallikrein are allowed to interact either with the corresponding pure antigen, as the calibrator, or with the corresponding antigen present in a biological fluid or tissue extract. The detection antibody, anti-mouse IgG conjugated with alkaline phosphatase, is added to find the antigen-free immobilized capture moAB. Conjugated enzyme is allowed to hydrolyze diflunisal phosphate to produce a highly fluorescent complex. The fluorescence measured in TRIF mode corresponds to the antigen-free immobilized capture moAB and is used to quantify antigen-bound capture moAB. The detection antibody binds with the antigen-free capture moAB and strength of the signal correlates inversely with the amount of antigen bound to the capture moAB. With a minimum detection level of 20 ng/L the assay has no cross-reactivity with several test molecules. The method is sensitive, specific, applicable to a variety of biological samples, and cost-effective as it uses only 1 moAB and a polyclonal antibody. Using this assay, a single epitope can be estimated without purification. PMID:26180936

  5. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human renal kallikrein gene

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, B.A.; Yun, Z.X.; Close, J.A.; Tregear, G.W.; Kitamura, N.; Nakanish, S.; Callen, D.F.; Baker, E.; Hyland, V.J.; Sutherland, G.R.; Richards, R.I.

    1988-05-03

    Glandular kallikreins are a family of proteases encoded by a variable number of genes in different mammalian species. In all species examined, however, one particular kallikrein is functionally conserved in its capacity to release the vasoactive peptide, Lys-bradykinin, from low molecular weight kininogen. This kallikrein is found in the kidney, pancreas, and salivary gland, showing a unique pattern of tissue-specific expression relative to other members of the family. The authors have isolated a genomic clone carrying the human renal kallikrein gene and compared the nucleotide sequence of its promoter region with those of the mouse renal kallikrein gene and another mouse kallikrein gene expressed in a distinct cell type. They find four sequence elements conserved between renal kallikrein genes from the two species. They have also shown that the human gene is localized to 19q13, a position analogous to that of the kallikrein gene family on mouse chromosome 7.

  6. A potential role for tissue kallikrein-related peptidases in human cervico-vaginal physiology.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Julie L V; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2008-06-01

    Human tissue kallikrein-related peptidases (KLK) are a family of 15 genes located on chromosome 19q13.4 that encode secreted serine proteases with trypsin- and/or chymotrypsin-like activity. Relatively large levels of many KLKs are present in human cervico-vaginal fluid (CVF) and in the supernatant of cultured human vaginal epithelial cells. Many KLKs are also hormonally regulated in vaginal epithelial cells, particularly by glucocorticoids and estrogens. The physiological role of KLK in the vagina is currently unknown; however, analysis of the CVF proteome has revealed clues for potential KLK functions in this environment. Here, we detail potential roles for KLKs in cervico-vaginal physiology. First, we suggest that KLKs play a role in the vagina similar to their role in skin physiology: (1) in the desquamation of vaginal epithelial cells, similar to their activity in the desquamation of skin corneocytes; and (2) in their ability to activate antimicrobial proteins in CVF as they do in sweat. Consequently, we hypothesize that dysregulated KLK expression in the vagina could lead to the development of pathological conditions such as desquamative inflammatory vaginitis. Second, we propose that KLKs may play a role in premature rupture of membranes and pre-term birth through their cleavage of fetal membrane extracellular matrix proteins. PMID:18627298

  7. Human Tissue Kallikrein Activity in Angiographically Documented Chronic Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Estêvão Lanna; Magalhães, Carolina Antunes; Belli, Karlyse Claudino; Mandil, Ari; Garcia, José Carlos Faria; Araújo, Rosanã Aparecida; Figueiredo, Amintas Fabiano de Souza; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2015-01-01

    Background Human tissue kallikrein (hK1) is a key enzyme in the kallikrein–kinin system (KKS). hK1-specific amidase activity is reduced in urine samples from hypertensive and heart failure (HF) patients. The pathophysiologic role of hK1 in coronary artery disease (CAD) remains unclear. Objective To evaluate hK1-specific amidase activity in the urine of CAD patients Methods Sixty-five individuals (18–75 years) who underwent cardiac catheterism (CATH) were included. Random midstream urine samples were collected immediately before CATH. Patients were classified in two groups according to the presence of coronary lesions: CAD (43 patients) and non-CAD (22 patients). hK1 amidase activity was estimated using the chromogenic substrate D-Val-Leu-Arg-Nan. Creatinine was determined using Jaffé’s method. Urinary hK1-specific amidase activity was expressed as µM/(min · mg creatinine) to correct for differences in urine flow rates. Results Urinary hK1-specific amidase activity levels were similar between CAD [0.146 µM/(min ·mg creatinine)] and non-CAD [0.189 µM/(min . mg creatinine)] patients (p = 0.803) and remained similar to values previously reported for hypertensive patients [0.210 µM/(min . mg creatinine)] and HF patients [0.104 µM/(min . mg creatinine)]. CAD severity and hypertension were not observed to significantly affect urinary hK1-specific amidase activity. Conclusion CAD patients had low levels of urinary hK1-specific amidase activity, suggesting that renal KKS activity may be reduced in patients with this disease. PMID:26351984

  8. Crystal structures of human tissue kallikrein 4: activity modulation by a specific zinc binding site.

    PubMed

    Debela, Mekdes; Magdolen, Viktor; Grimminger, Valerie; Sommerhoff, Christian; Messerschmidt, Albrecht; Huber, Robert; Friedrich, Rainer; Bode, Wolfram; Goettig, Peter

    2006-10-01

    Human tissue kallikrein 4 (hK4) belongs to a 15-member family of closely related serine proteinases. hK4 is predominantly expressed in prostate, activates hK3/PSA, and is up-regulated in prostate and ovarian cancer. We have identified active monomers of recombinant hK4 besides inactive oligomers in solution. hK4 crystallised in the presence of zinc, nickel, and cobalt ions in three crystal forms containing cyclic tetramers and octamers. These structures display a novel metal site between His25 and Glu77 that links the 70-80 loop with the N-terminal segment. Micromolar zinc as present in prostatic fluid inhibits the enzymatic activity of hK4 against fluorogenic substrates. In our measurements, wild-type hK4 exhibited a zinc inhibition constant (IC50) of 16 microM including a permanent residual activity, in contrast to the zinc-independent mutants H25A and E77A. Since the Ile16 N terminus of wild-type hK4 becomes more accessible for acetylating agents in the presence of zinc, we propose that zinc affects the hK4 active site via the salt-bridge formed between the N terminus and Asp194 required for a functional active site. hK4 possesses an unusual 99-loop that creates a groove-like acidic S2 subsite. These findings explain the observed specificity of hK4 for the P1 to P4 substrate residues. Moreover, hK4 shows a negatively charged surface patch, which may represent an exosite for prime-side substrate recognition. PMID:16950394

  9. Evolutionary History of Tissue Kallikreins

    PubMed Central

    Pavlopoulou, Athanasia; Pampalakis, Georgios; Michalopoulos, Ioannis; Sotiropoulou, Georgia

    2010-01-01

    The gene family of human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) encodes proteins with diverse and pleiotropic functions in normal physiology as well as in disease states. Currently, the most widely known KLK is KLK3 or prostate-specific antigen (PSA) that has applications in clinical diagnosis and monitoring of prostate cancer. The KLK gene family encompasses the largest contiguous cluster of serine proteases in humans which is not interrupted by non-KLK genes. This exceptional and unique characteristic of KLKs makes them ideal for evolutionary studies aiming to infer the direction and timing of gene duplication events. Previous studies on the evolution of KLKs were restricted to mammals and the emergence of KLKs was suggested about 150 million years ago (mya). In order to elucidate the evolutionary history of KLKs, we performed comprehensive phylogenetic analyses of KLK homologous proteins in multiple genomes including those that have been completed recently. Interestingly, we were able to identify novel reptilian, avian and amphibian KLK members which allowed us to trace the emergence of KLKs 330 mya. We suggest that a series of duplication and mutation events gave rise to the KLK gene family. The prominent feature of the KLK family is that it consists of tandemly and uninterruptedly arrayed genes in all species under investigation. The chromosomal co-localization in a single cluster distinguishes KLKs from trypsin and other trypsin-like proteases which are spread in different genetic loci. All the defining features of the KLKs were further found to be conserved in the novel KLK protein sequences. The study of this unique family will further assist in selecting new model organisms for functional studies of proteolytic pathways involving KLKs. PMID:21072173

  10. Isomannide-based peptidomimetics as inhibitors for human tissue kallikreins 5 and 7.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Jocelia P C; Freitas, Renato F; Melo, Leandro Silva de; Barros, Thalita G; Santos, Jorge A N; Juliano, Maria A; Pinheiro, Sérgio; Blaber, Michael; Juliano, Luiz; Muri, Estela M F; Puzer, Luciano

    2014-02-13

    Human kallikrein 5 (KLK5) and 7 (KLK7) are potential targets for the treatment of skin inflammation and cancer. Previously, we identified isomannide derivatives as potent and competitive KLK7 inhibitors. The introduction of N-protected amino acids into the isomannide-based scaffold was studied. Some KLK5 inhibitors with submicromolar affinity (K i values of 0.3-0.7 μM) were identified, and they were 6- to 13-fold more potent than our previous hits. Enzyme kinetics studies and the determination of the mechanism of inhibition confirmed that the new isomannide-based derivatives are competitive inhibitors of both KLK5 and KLK7. Molecular docking and MD simulations of selected inhibitors into the KLK5 binding site provide insight into the molecular mechanism by which these compounds interact with the enzyme. The promising results obtained in this study open new prospects on the design and synthesis of highly specific KLK5 and KLK7 inhibitors. PMID:24900785

  11. Inhibitors of Kallikrein in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, David J.

    1972-01-01

    Human plasma was fractionated by ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE-cellulose chromatography, and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration to determine which method would give the greatest number of clearly separable kallikrein inhibitory peaks. With G-200 gel filtration three peaks could be separated which were demonstrated to contain α2-macroglobulin, C1̄ inactivator, and α1-antitrypsin. No other kallikrein inhibitors could be identified. The fractions containing C1̄ inactivator and α2-macroglobulin appeared to be more effective against kallikrein than that containing α1-antitrypsin. A patient with hereditary angioneurotic edema was shown to have an abnormal C1̄ inactivator protein capable of interfering with kallikrein's biologic, but not its esterolytic activity. Heat-treated human plasma, a commonly used source of kininogen for experiments with kallikrein, was shown to have kallikrein inhibitory activity. PMID:4113391

  12. Tissue kallikrein in cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and renal diseases and skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Chao, Julie; Shen, Bo; Gao, Lin; Xia, Chun-Fang; Bledsoe, Grant; Chao, Lee

    2010-04-01

    Tissue kallikrein (KLK1) processes low-molecular weight kininogen to produce vasoactive kinins, which exert biological functions via kinin receptor signaling. Using various delivery approaches, we have demonstrated that tissue kallikrein through kinin B2 receptor signaling exhibits a wide spectrum of beneficial effects by reducing cardiac and renal injuries, restenosis and ischemic stroke, and by promoting angiogenesis and skin wound healing, independent of blood pressure reduction. Protection by tissue kallikrein in oxidative organ damage is attributed to the inhibition of apoptosis, inflammation, hypertrophy and fibrosis. Tissue kallikrein also enhances neovascularization in ischemic heart and limb. Moreover, tissue kallikrein/kinin infusion not only prevents but also reverses kidney injury, inflammation and fibrosis in salt-induced hypertensive rats. Furthermore, there is a wide time window for kallikrein administration in protection against ischemic brain infarction, as delayed kallikrein infusion for 24 h after cerebral ischemia in rats is effective in reducing neurological deficits, infarct size, apoptosis and inflammation. Importantly, in the clinical setting, human tissue kallikrein has been proven to be effective in the treatment of patients with acute brain infarction when injected within 48 h after stroke onset. Finally, kallikrein promotes skin wound healing and keratinocyte migration by direct activation of protease-activated receptor 1. PMID:20180644

  13. Evolution of the plasma and tissue kallikreins, and their alternative splicing isoforms.

    PubMed

    Koumandou, Vassiliki Lila; Scorilas, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Kallikreins are secreted serine proteases with important roles in human physiology. Human plasma kallikrein, encoded by the KLKB1 gene on locus 4q34-35, functions in the blood coagulation pathway, and in regulating blood pressure. The human tissue kallikrein and kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) have diverse expression patterns and physiological roles, including cancer-related processes such as cell growth regulation, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), the product of the KLK3 gene, is the most widely used biomarker in clinical practice today. A total of 15 KLKs are encoded by the largest contiguous cluster of protease genes in the human genome (19q13.3-13.4), which makes them ideal for evolutionary analysis of gene duplication events. Previous studies on the evolution of KLKs have traced mammalian homologs as well as a probable early origin of the family in aves, amphibia and reptilia. The aim of this study was to address the evolutionary and functional relationships between tissue KLKs and plasma kallikrein, and to examine the evolution of alternative splicing isoforms. Sequences of plasma and tissue kallikreins and their alternative transcripts were collected from the NCBI and Ensembl databases, and comprehensive phylogenetic analysis was performed by Bayesian as well as maximum likelihood methods. Plasma and tissue kallikreins exhibit high sequence similarity in the trypsin domain (>50%). Phylogenetic analysis indicates an early divergence of KLKB1, which groups closely with plasminogen, chymotrypsin, and complement factor D (CFD), in a monophyletic group distinct from trypsin and the tissue KLKs. Reconstruction of the earliest events leading to the diversification of the tissue KLKs is not well resolved, indicating rapid expansion in mammals. Alternative transcripts of each KLK gene show species-specific divergence, while examination of sequence conservation indicates that many annotated human KLK isoforms are missing

  14. Tissue kallikrein activation of the epithelial Na channel

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ankit B.; Chao, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial Na Channels (ENaC) are responsible for the apical entry of Na+ in a number of different epithelia including the renal connecting tubule and cortical collecting duct. Proteolytic cleavage of γ-ENaC by serine proteases, including trypsin, furin, elastase, and prostasin, has been shown to increase channel activity. Here, we investigate the ability of another serine protease, tissue kallikrein, to regulate ENaC. We show that excretion of tissue kallikrein, which is secreted into the lumen of the connecting tubule, is stimulated following 5 days of a high-K+ or low-Na+ diet in rats. Urinary proteins reconstituted in a low-Na buffer activated amiloride-sensitive currents (INa) in ENaC-expressing oocytes, suggesting an endogenous urinary protease can activate ENaC. We next tested whether tissue kallikrein can directly cleave and activate ENaC. When rat ENaC-expressing oocytes were exposed to purified tissue kallikrein from rat urine (RTK), ENaC currents increased threefold in both the presence and absence of a soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI). RTK and trypsin both decreased the apparent molecular mass of cleaved cell-surface γ-ENaC, while immunodepleted RTK produced no shift in apparent molecular mass, demonstrating the specificity of the tissue kallikrein. A decreased effect of RTK on Xenopus ENaC, which has variations in the putative prostasin cleavage sites in γ-ENaC, suggests these sites are important in RTK activation of ENaC. Mutating the prostasin site in mouse γ-ENaC (γRKRK186QQQQ) abolished ENaC activation and cleavage by RTK while wild-type mouse ENaC was activated and cleaved similar to that of the rat. We conclude that tissue kallikrein can be a physiologically relevant regulator of ENaC activity. PMID:22622459

  15. Estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) regulates oxygen-dependent expression of voltage-gated potassium (K+) channels and tissue kallikrein during human trophoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yanmin; Kumar, Premlata; Mendelson, Carole R

    2013-06-01

    Estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) serves a critical O2-dependent regulatory role in the differentiation of human cytotrophoblasts to syncytiotrophoblast. In this study, we investigated expression of genes encoding tissue kallikrein (KLK1) and voltage-gated K(+) channels (KV7) during differentiation of human trophoblasts in culture and the roles of ERRγ and O2 tension in their regulation. Expression of KLK1 and the KV7 channel subunits, KCNQ1, KCNE1, KCNE3, and KCNE5, increased during differentiation of cultured human trophoblast cells in a 20% O2 environment. Notably, together with ERRγ, expression of KLK1, KCNQ1, KCNE1, KCNE3, and KCNE5 was markedly reduced when cells were cultured in a hypoxic environment (2% O2). Moreover, upon transduction of trophoblast cells with short hairpin RNAs for endogenous ERRγ, KLK1, KCNQ1, KCNE1, and KCNE3 expression was significantly decreased. Promoter and site-directed mutagenesis studies in transfected cells identified putative ERRγ response elements within the KLK1 and KCNE1 5'-flanking regions required for ERRγ-stimulated transcriptional activity. Binding of endogenous ERRγ to these ERRγ response elements increased during trophoblast differentiation in culture and was inhibited by hypoxia. The KV7 blocker linopirdine reduced human chorionic gonadotropin secretion and aggregation of cultured human trophoblasts, suggesting a possible role of KV7 channels in cell fusion and differentiation. Illumina gene expression arrays of cultured human trophoblast cells revealed several genes upregulated during syncytiotrophoblast differentiation and downregulated upon ERRγ knockdown involved in cell differentiation, adhesion, and synthesis of steroid and peptide hormones required for placental development and function. Collectively, these findings suggest that ERRγ mediates O2-dependent expression of genes involved in human trophoblast differentiation, function, and vascular homeostasis. PMID:23584901

  16. Estrogen-Related Receptor γ (ERRγ) Regulates Oxygen-Dependent Expression of Voltage-gated Potassium (K+) Channels and Tissue Kallikrein during Human Trophoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yanmin; Kumar, Premlata

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) serves a critical O2-dependent regulatory role in the differentiation of human cytotrophoblasts to syncytiotrophoblast. In this study, we investigated expression of genes encoding tissue kallikrein (KLK1) and voltage-gated K+ channels (KV7) during differentiation of human trophoblasts in culture and the roles of ERRγ and O2 tension in their regulation. Expression of KLK1 and the KV7 channel subunits, KCNQ1, KCNE1, KCNE3, and KCNE5, increased during differentiation of cultured human trophoblast cells in a 20% O2 environment. Notably, together with ERRγ, expression of KLK1, KCNQ1, KCNE1, KCNE3, and KCNE5 was markedly reduced when cells were cultured in a hypoxic environment (2% O2). Moreover, upon transduction of trophoblast cells with short hairpin RNAs for endogenous ERRγ, KLK1, KCNQ1, KCNE1, and KCNE3 expression was significantly decreased. Promoter and site-directed mutagenesis studies in transfected cells identified putative ERRγ response elements within the KLK1 and KCNE1 5′-flanking regions required for ERRγ-stimulated transcriptional activity. Binding of endogenous ERRγ to these ERRγ response elements increased during trophoblast differentiation in culture and was inhibited by hypoxia. The KV7 blocker linopirdine reduced human chorionic gonadotropin secretion and aggregation of cultured human trophoblasts, suggesting a possible role of KV7 channels in cell fusion and differentiation. Illumina gene expression arrays of cultured human trophoblast cells revealed several genes upregulated during syncytiotrophoblast differentiation and downregulated upon ERRγ knockdown involved in cell differentiation, adhesion, and synthesis of steroid and peptide hormones required for placental development and function. Collectively, these findings suggest that ERRγ mediates O2-dependent expression of genes involved in human trophoblast differentiation, function, and vascular homeostasis. PMID:23584901

  17. Human kallikrein 5 as a novel prognostic biomarker for triple-negative breast cancer: tissue expression analysis and relationship with disease course.

    PubMed

    Yang, F; Li, J Y; Yin, Q N; Yang, K; Dong, S N; Bai, L J; Liu, P; Tong, X W

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to analyze the expression and distribution of human kallikrein 5 (hK5) in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) tissues, to establish a standard operating procedure (SOP) for its immunohistochemical assay, and to evaluate the possibility of hK5 being a prognostic biomarker for TNBC. Recombinant hK5 protein and specific antibody were prepared, and the expression and distribution of hK5 in TNBC tissues were detected using immunohistochemistry. An SOP for immunohistochemical staining of hK5 in TNBC tissues was established to allow automatic staining under optimized conditions. The resulting images were digitized for evaluation and statistical analysis via a human scoring system. Our results showed that expression of hK5 protein could predict the progression of TNBC. Pearson's chi-square test results showed that high hK5 expression in tumor stromal cells was significantly correlated with distal metastasis (P = 0.039). A high staining score for lymphocyte infiltration in tumor stroma was significantly correlated with low histological grade of tumor (P = 0.025). Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses verified that the staining score for hK5 in tumor stromal cells may be a biomarker for poor prognosis in TNBC patients (univariate HR = 2.289, 95%CI = 1.362-3.848, P = 0.002; multivariate HR = 2.105, 95%CI = 1.189-3.727, P = 0.011). In conclusion, the expression level of hK5 in tumor stromal cells is a promising biomarker for poor prognosis in TNBC. Patients with high histological grade are more prone to distal metastasis and aggressive tumor progression. PMID:26345898

  18. Quantitative expression analysis and study of the novel human kallikrein-related peptidase 14 gene (KLK14) in malignant and benign breast tissues.

    PubMed

    Papachristopoulou, Georgia; Avgeris, Margaritis; Charlaftis, Antonios; Scorilas, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidase 14 gene (KLK14) is regulated by androgens and progestins. This gene is expressed in the central nervous system and endocrine tissues such as the breast, prostate and ovary. The differential KLK14 mRNA expression levels are related to several human neoplasias, among them breast cancer. The aim of this study was to analyse the KLK14 expression in breast tissues and to investigate its differential diagnostic and prognostic value in the mammary carcinomas. For this purpose, we isolated total RNA from 70 malignant and 33 benign specimens. After testing RNA quality, we synthesised cDNA by reverse transcription and applied a highly sensitive quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) method for KLK14 mRNA quantification using the SYBR Green® chemistry. HPRT1 was used as a reference gene and the BT20 breast cancer cell line as a calibrator. Relative quantification analysis was performed using the comparative CT method 2-ΔΔCT. KLK14 expression was detected in both types of breast tumours. However, a statistically significant increase of the KLK14 mRNA level was observed in the malignant, compared to the benign tumour samples (p<0.001), highlighting its value in discriminating these breast lesions. Elevated KLK14 expression profiles were associated with higher tumour grade (p=0.043) and size (p=0.007) in cancerous samples. Furthermore, KLK14 mRNA expression showed negative correlation in a statistically significant manner with estrogen receptor status (p=0.024). In accordance with logistic regression models (p=0.012) and receiver-operating-characteristics analysis (p<0.001), KLK14 gene expression could be evaluated as a putative independent diagnostic biomarker in breast tumour biopsies. PMID:21057706

  19. Human plasma kallikrein releases neutrophil elastase during blood coagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Wachtfogel, Y T; Kucich, U; James, H L; Scott, C F; Schapira, M; Zimmerman, M; Cohen, A B; Colman, R W

    1983-01-01

    Elastase is released from human neutrophils during the early events of blood coagulation. Human plasma kallikrein has been shown to stimulate neutrophil chemotaxis, aggregation, and oxygen consumption. Therefore, the ability of kallikrein to release neutrophil elastase was investigated. Neutrophils were isolated by dextran sedimentation, and elastase release was measured by both an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and an enzymatic assay using t-butoxy-carbonyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-amino methyl coumarin as the substrate. Kallikrein, 0.1-1.0 U/ml, (0.045-0.45 microM), was incubated with neutrophils that were preincubated with cytochalasin B (5 micrograms/ml). The release of elastase was found to be proportional to the kallikrein concentration. Kallikrein released a maximum of 34% of the total elastase content, as measured by solubilizing the neutrophils in the nonionic detergent Triton X-100. A series of experiments was carried out to determine if kallikrein was a major enzyme involved in neutrophil elastase release during blood coagulation. When 10 million neutrophils were incubated in 1 ml of normal plasma in the presence of 30 mM CaCl2 for 90 min, 2.75 micrograms of elastase was released. In contrast, neutrophils incubated in prekallikrein-deficient or Factor XII-deficient plasma released less than half of the elastase, as compared with normal plasma. The addition of purified prekallikrein to prekallikrein-deficient plasma restored neutrophil elastase release to normal levels. Moreover, release of elastase was enhanced in plasma deficient in C1-inhibitor, the major plasma inhibitor of kallikrein. This release was not dependent upon further steps in the coagulation pathway, or on C5a, since levels of elastase, released in Factor XI- or C5-deficient plasma, were similar to that in normal plasma, and an antibody to C5 failed to inhibit elastase release. These data suggest that kallikrein may be a major enzyme responsible for the release of elastase during blood

  20. Nitric oxide mediates cardiac protection of tissue kallikrein by reducing inflammation and ventricular remodeling after myocardial ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang; Chao, Lee; Chao, Julie

    2008-01-01

    We assessed the role of nitric oxide (NO) and the kinin B2 receptor in mediating tissue kallikrein’s actions in intramyocardial inflammation and cardiac remodeling after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Adenovirus carrying the human tissue kallikrein gene was delivered locally into rat hearts 4 days prior to 30-minute ischemia followed by 24- hour or 7-day reperfusion with or without administration of icatibant, a kinin B2 receptor antagonist, or N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. Kallikrein gene delivery improved cardiac contractility and diastolic function, reduced infarct size at 1 day after I/R without affecting mean arterial pressure. Kallikrein treatment reduced macrophage/monocyte and neutrophil accumulation in the infarcted myocardium in association with reduced intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels. Kallikrein increased cardiac endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation and NO levels and decreased superoxide formation, TGF-β1 levels and Smad2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, kallikrein reduced I/R-induced JNK, p38MAPK, IκB-α phosphorylation and nuclear NF-κB activation. In addition, kallikrein improved cardiac performance, reduced infarct size and prevented ventricular wall thinning at 7 days after I/R. The effects of kallikrein on cardiac function, inflammation and signaling mediators were all blocked by icatibant and L-NAME. These results indicate that tissue kallikrein through kinin B2 receptor and NO formation improves cardiac function, prevents inflammation and limits left ventricular remodeling after myocardial I/R by suppression of oxidative stress, TGF-β1/Smad2 and JNK/p38MAPK signaling pathways and NF-κB activation. PMID:18068196

  1. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of human kallikrein 7, a serine protease of the multigene kallikrein family

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández, Israel S.; Ständker, Ludger; Forssmann, Wolf-Georg; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo; Romero, Antonio

    2007-08-01

    The cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of recombinant human kallikrein 7, directly synthesized in the active form in E. coli, is described. Diffraction data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution from native crystals. Human kallikreins are a group of serine proteases of high sequence homology whose genes are grouped as a single cluster at chromosome 19. Although the physiological roles of kallikreins are generally still unknown, members of the kallikrein family have been clearly implicated in pathological situations such as cancer and psoriasis. Human kallikrein 7 (hK7) has been shown to be involved in pathological keratinization, psoriasis and ovarian cancer. In order to gain insight into the molecular structure of this protein, hK7 was crystallized after recombinant production in its folded and active form using a periplasmic secretion vector in Escherichia coli. The crystals belonged to the rhombohedral space group H32 and diffracted to 2.8 Å. The phase problem was solved by molecular replacement using the mouse kallikrein-related protein neuropsin. Completion of the model and structure refinement are under way.

  2. Human plasma kallikrein-kinin system: Physiological and biochemical parameters

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, J.W.; Shariat-Madar, z

    2016-01-01

    The plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) plays a critical role in human physiology. The KKS encompasses coagulation factor XII (FXII), the complex of prekallikrein (PK) and high molecular weight kininogen (HK). The conversion of plasma to kallikrein by the activated FXII and in response to numerous different stimuli leads to the generation of bradykinin (BK) and activated HK (HKa, an antiangiogenic peptide). BK is a proinflammatory peptide, a pain mediator and potent vasodilator, leading to robust accumulation of fluid in the interstitium. Systemic production of BK, HKa with the interplay between BK bound-BK receptors and the soluble form of HKa are key to angiogenesis and hemodynamics. KKS has been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammation, hypertension, endotoxemia, and coagulopathy. In all these cases increased BK levels is the hallmark. In some cases, the persistent production of BK due to the deficiency of the blood protein C1-inhibitor, which controls FXII, is detrimental to the survival of the patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE). In others, the inability of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) to degrade BK leads to elevated BK levels and edema in patients on ACE inhibitors. Thus, the mechanisms that interfere with BK liberation or degradation would lead to blood pressure dysfunction. In contrast, anti-kallikrein treatment could have adverse effects in hemodynamic changes induced by vasoconstrictor agents. Genetic models of kallikrein deficiency are needed to evaluate the quantitative role of kallikrein and to validate whether strategies designed to activate or inhibit kallikrein may be important for regulating whole-body BK sensitivity. PMID:19689262

  3. Tissue Kallikrein Prevents Restenosis After Stenting of Severe Atherosclerotic Stenosis of the Middle Cerebral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ruifeng; Zhang, Renliang; Yang, Fang; Lin, Min; Li, Min; Liu, Ling; Yin, Qin; Lin, Hang; Xiong, Yunyun; Liu, Wenhua; Fan, Xiaobing; Dai, Qiliang; Zhou, Lizhi; Lan, Wenya; Cao, Qinqin; Chen, Xin; Xu, Gelin; Liu, Xinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In-stent restenosis (ISR) following intracranial artery stenting affects long-term clinical outcome. This randomized controlled trial sought to identify the long-term efficacy of exogenous tissue kallikrein (TK) for preventing ISR after intracranial stenting of symptomatic middle cerebral artery (MCA) atherosclerotic stenosis. Sixty-one patients successfully treated with intracranial stenting for symptomatic MCA M1 segment stenosis (>70%) were enrolled and randomized into 2 groups: control group and TK group. Patients in the TK group received human urinary kallidinogenase for 7 days, followed by maintenance therapy of pancreatic kallikrein for 6 months. The primary end point was angiographically verified ISR at 6 months, and secondary end points included vascular events and death within 12 months. Endogenous TK plasma concentrations of patients were measured before stenting and at the 6-month follow-up time-point. Patients in the TK group had lower occurrence rates of ISR and vascular events than patients in the control group. There was no difference in endogenous TK levels in plasma at 6 months postoperatively between the TK and control groups. Further subgroup analysis revealed that patients without ISR had higher endogenous TK levels at baseline and lower concentrations at 6 months postoperatively compared with patients who underwent ISR. Exogenous TK is effective for the prevention of ISR after intracranial stenting. PMID:26871851

  4. Purification and characterisation of blarinasin, a new tissue kallikrein-like protease from the short-tailed shrew Blarina brevicauda: comparative studies with blarina toxin.

    PubMed

    Kita, Masaki; Okumura, Yuushi; Ohdachi, Satoshi D; Oba, Yuichi; Yoshikuni, Michiyasu; Nakamura, Yasuo; Kido, Hiroshi; Uemura, Daisuke

    2005-02-01

    A new tissue kallikrein-like protease, blarinasin, has been purified from the salivary glands of the short-tailed shrew Blarina brevicauda. Blarinasin is a 32-kDa N-glycosylated protease with isoelectric values ranging between 5.3 and 5.7, and an optimum pH of 8.5 for enzyme activity. The cloned blarinasin cDNA coded for a pre-pro-sequence and a mature peptide of 252 amino acids with a catalytic triad typical for serine proteases and 43.7-54.0% identity to other mammalian tissue kallikreins. Blarinasin preferentially hydrolysed Pro-Phe-Arg-4-methylcoumaryl-7-amide (MCA) and N-tert-butyloxycarbonyl-Val-Leu-Lys-MCA, and preferentially converted human high-molecular-weight kininogen (HK) to bradykinin. The activity of blarinasin was prominently inhibited by aprotinin (K(i) =3.4 nM). A similar kallikrein-like protease, the lethal venom blarina toxin, has previously been purified from the salivary glands of the shrew Blarina and shows 67.9% identity to blarinasin. However, blarinasin was not toxic in mice. Blarinasin is a very abundant kallikrein-like protease and represents 70-75% of kallikrein-like enzymes in the salivary gland of B. brevicauda. PMID:15843162

  5. Tissue expression of glandular kallikrein and its response to 17 beta-estradiol in the acclimatized carp.

    PubMed

    Haussmann, Denise; Vidal, Rene; Figueroa, Jaime

    2006-06-01

    Cyprinus carpio skeletal muscle kallikrein was isolated to apparent homogeneity, and a polyclonal antiserum against the purified protein was generated. Glandular kallikrein expression and tissue distribution were assessed using both Western blots and immunohistochemistry. A 39-kDa protein was detected in skeletal muscle, the gill, kidney, and pituitary gland, where an additional 72-kDa immunoreactive band was observed. Immunohistochemistry revealed immunoreactive kallikrein in the intermuscle tissue, epithelial gill cells, apical portion of distal and proximal tubular cells in the kidney, mucus and epithelial cells of the skin, intestinal tube, and prolactin-producing cells of the pituitary gland. In addition, the effect of 17beta-estradiol on kallikrein expression was analyzed in three different tissues of winter- and summer-acclimatized male carps. A 2.5-fold (p<0.05) increase in kallikrein immunoreactivity due to estrogen treatment was observed in winter-acclimatized carp muscle, but not in summer-acclimatized fish. In contrast, the gill responded differently, since a 2-fold (p<0.05) increase was found only in summer-acclimatized carps. Kallikrein immunoreactivity in the kidney increased both in summer- (2.5 fold) and in winter-acclimatized carps (1.5 fold). The signals obtained demonstrate the existence of tissue-specific variable responses to estrogen treatment in vivo, between winter and summer-acclimatized carp. PMID:16849838

  6. Kallikrein Promotes Inflammation in Human Dental Pulp Cells Via Protease-Activated Receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Tomomi; Kamio, Naoto; Okabe, Tatsu; Muromachi, Koichiro; Matsushima, Kiyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Plasma kallikrein (KLKB1), a serine protease, cleaves high-molecular weight kininogen to produce bradykinin, a potent vasodilator and pro-inflammatory peptide. In addition, KLKB1 activates plasminogen and other leukocyte and blood coagulation factors and processes pro-enkephalin, prorenin, and C3. KLKB1 has also been shown to cleave protease-activated receptors in vascular smooth muscle cells to regulate the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor. In this study, we investigated KLKB1-dependent inflammation and activation of protease-activated receptor-1 in human dental pulp cells. These cells responded to KLKB1 stimulation by increasing intracellular Ca(2+) , upregulating cyclooxygenase-2, and secreting prostaglandin E2 . Remarkably, SCH79797, an antagonist of protease-activated receptor-1, blocked these effects. Thus, these data indicate that KLKB1 induces inflammatory reactions in human dental tissues via protease-activated receptor 1. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1522-1528, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26566265

  7. Tissue Kallikrein Prevents Restenosis After Stenting of Severe Atherosclerotic Stenosis of the Middle Cerebral Artery: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ruifeng; Zhang, Renliang; Yang, Fang; Lin, Min; Li, Min; Liu, Ling; Yin, Qin; Lin, Hang; Xiong, Yunyun; Liu, Wenhua; Fan, Xiaobing; Dai, Qiliang; Zhou, Lizhi; Lan, Wenya; Cao, Qinqin; Chen, Xin; Xu, Gelin; Liu, Xinfeng

    2016-02-01

    In-stent restenosis (ISR) following intracranial artery stenting affects long-term clinical outcome. This randomized controlled trial sought to identify the long-term efficacy of exogenous tissue kallikrein (TK) for preventing ISR after intracranial stenting of symptomatic middle cerebral artery (MCA) atherosclerotic stenosis.Sixty-one patients successfully treated with intracranial stenting for symptomatic MCA M1 segment stenosis (>70%) were enrolled and randomized into 2 groups: control group and TK group. Patients in the TK group received human urinary kallidinogenase for 7 days, followed by maintenance therapy of pancreatic kallikrein for 6 months. The primary end point was angiographically verified ISR at 6 months, and secondary end points included vascular events and death within 12 months. Endogenous TK plasma concentrations of patients were measured before stenting and at the 6-month follow-up time-point.Patients in the TK group had lower occurrence rates of ISR and vascular events than patients in the control group. There was no difference in endogenous TK levels in plasma at 6 months postoperatively between the TK and control groups. Further subgroup analysis revealed that patients without ISR had higher endogenous TK levels at baseline and lower concentrations at 6 months postoperatively compared with patients who underwent ISR.Exogenous TK is effective for the prevention of ISR after intracranial stenting. PMID:26871851

  8. Human kallikrein 14: a new potential biomarker for ovarian and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Borgoño, Carla A; Grass, Linda; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Yousef, George M; Petraki, Constantina D; Howarth, David H C; Fracchioli, Stefano; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2003-12-15

    Human kallikrein gene 14 (KLK14) is a recently discovered member of the tissue kallikrein family of secreted serine proteases, which includes hK3/prostate-specific antigen, the best cancer biomarker to date. Given that KLK14 is hormonally regulated, differentially expressed in endocrine-related cancers, and a prognostic marker for breast and ovarian cancer at the mRNA level, we hypothesize that its encoded protein, hK14, like hK3/prostate-specific antigen, may constitute a new biomarker for endocrine-related malignancies. The objective of this study was to generate immunological reagents for hK14, to develop an ELISA and immunohistochemical techniques to study its expression in normal and cancerous tissues and biological fluids. Recombinant hK14 was produced in Pichia pastoris, purified by affinity chromatography, and injected into mice and rabbits for polyclonal antibody generation. Using the mouse and rabbit antisera, a sandwich-type immunofluorometric ELISA and immunohistochemical methodologies were developed for hK14. The ELISA was sensitive (detection limit of 0.1 micro g/liter), specific for hK14, linear from 0 to 20 micro g/liter with between-run and within-run coefficients of variation of <10%. hK14 was quantified in human tissue extracts and biological fluids. Highest levels were observed in the breast, skin, prostate, seminal plasma, and amniotic fluid, with almost undetectable levels in normal serum. hK14 concentration was higher in 40% of ovarian cancer tissues compared with normal ovarian tissues. Serum hK14 levels were elevated in a proportion of patients with ovarian (65%) and breast (40%) cancers. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated strong cytoplasmic staining of hK14 by the epithelial cells of normal and malignant skin, ovary, breast, and testis. In conclusion, we report the first ELISA and immunohistochemical assays for hK14 and describe its distribution in tissues and biological fluids. Our preliminary data indicate that hK14 is a potential

  9. Cleavage Activation of Human-adapted Influenza Virus Subtypes by Kallikrein-related Peptidases 5 and 12*

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Brian S.; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2013-01-01

    A critical step in the influenza virus replication cycle is the cleavage activation of the HA precursor. Cleavage activation of influenza HA enables fusion with the host endosome, allowing for release of the viral genome into the host cell. To date, studies have determined that HA activation is driven by trypsin-like host cell proteases, as well as yet to be identified bacterial proteases. Although the number of host proteases that can activate HA is growing, there is still uncertainty regarding which secreted proteases are able to support multicycle replication of influenza. In this study, we have determined that the kallikrein-related peptidases 5 and 12 are secreted from the human respiratory tract and have the ability to cleave and activate HA from the H1, H2, and H3 subtypes. Each peptidase appears to have a preference for particular influenza subtypes, with kallikrein 5 cleaving the H1 and H3 subtypes most efficiently and kallikrein 12 cleaving the H1 and H2 subtypes most efficiently. Cleavage analysis using HA cleavage site peptide mimics revealed that the amino acids neighboring the arginine cleavage site affect cleavage efficiency. Additionally, the thrombolytic zymogens plasminogen, urokinase, and plasma kallikrein have all been shown to cleave and activate influenza but are found circulating mainly as inactive precursors. Kallikrein 5 and kallikrein 12 were examined for their ability to activate the thrombolytic zymogens, and both resulted in activation of each zymogen, with kallikrein 12 being a more potent activator. Activation of the thrombolytic zymogens may therefore allow for both direct and indirect activation of the HA of human-adapted influenza viruses by kallikrein 5 and kallikrein 12. PMID:23612974

  10. Expression of kallikrein 4 (Klk4) in dental and non-dental tissues

    PubMed Central

    Simmer, James P.; Richardson, Amelia S.; Smith, Charles E.; Hu, Yuanyuan; Hu, Jan C-C.

    2011-01-01

    Kallikrein 4 (Klk4) is critical for proper dental enamel formation. Klk4 null mice and persons with two defective KLK4 alleles have obvious enamel defects, with no other apparent phenotype. Klk4 mRNA or protein is reported to be in tissues besides teeth, including prostate, ovary, kidney, liver, and salivary gland. In this study we used the Klk4 knockout/NLS-lacZ knockin mouse to assay Klk4 expression using ß-galactosidase histochemistry. Incubations for 5 h were used to detect Klk4 expression with minimal endogenous background, while overnight incubations susceptible to false positives were used to look for trace Klk4 expression. Developing maxillary molars at postnatal days 5, 6, 7, 8, and 14, developing mandibular incisors at postnatal day 14, and selected non-dental tissues from adult wild-type and Klk4lacZ/lacZ mice were examined by X-gal histochemistry. After 5 h incubation, Xgal staining was observed specifically in the nuclei of maturation stage ameloblasts in molars and incisors from Klk4lacZ/lacZ mice and was detected weakly in nuclei of salivary gland ducts and patches of prostate epithelia. We conclude that Klk4 is predominantly a tooth-specific protease with low expression in submandibular salivary gland and prostate, and with no detectable expression in liver, kidney, testis, ovary, oviduct, epididymis, and vas deferens. PMID:22243250

  11. Kallikrein genes are associated with lupus and glomerular basement membrane-specific antibody-induced nephritis in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kui; Li, Quan-Zhen; Delgado-Vega, Angelica M; Abelson, Anna-Karin; Sánchez, Elena; Kelly, Jennifer A; Li, Li; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jinchun; Yan, Mei; Ye, Qiu; Liu, Shenxi; Xie, Chun; Zhou, Xin J; Chung, Sharon A; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Witte, Torsten; de Ramón, Enrique; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Barizzone, Nadia; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Merrill, Joan T; Gregersen, Peter K; Gilkeson, Gary G; Kimberly, Robert P; Vyse, Timothy J; Kim, Il; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Martin, Javier; Harley, John B; Criswell, Lindsey A; Wakeland, Edward K; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Mohan, Chandra

    2009-04-01

    Immune-mediated nephritis contributes to disease in systemic lupus erythematosus, Goodpasture syndrome (caused by antibodies specific for glomerular basement membrane [anti-GBM antibodies]), and spontaneous lupus nephritis. Inbred mouse strains differ in susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody-induced and spontaneous lupus nephritis. This study sought to clarify the genetic and molecular factors that maybe responsible for enhanced immune-mediated renal disease in these models. When the kidneys of 3 mouse strains sensitive to anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis were compared with those of 2 control strains using microarray analysis, one-fifth of the underexpressed genes belonged to the kallikrein gene family,which encodes serine esterases. Mouse strains that upregulated renal and urinary kallikreins exhibited less evidence of disease. Antagonizing the kallikrein pathway augmented disease, while agonists dampened the severity of anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis. In addition, nephritis-sensitive mouse strains had kallikrein haplotypes that were distinct from those of control strains, including several regulatory polymorphisms,some of which were associated with functional consequences. Indeed, increased susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis and spontaneous lupus nephritis was achieved by breeding mice with a genetic interval harboring the kallikrein genes onto a disease-resistant background. Finally, both human SLE and spontaneous lupus nephritis were found to be associated with kallikrein genes, particularly KLK1 and the KLK3 promoter, when DNA SNPs from independent cohorts of SLE patients and controls were compared. Collectively, these studies suggest that kallikreins are protective disease-associated genes in anti-GBM antibody-induced nephritis and lupus. PMID:19307730

  12. Kallikrein genes are associated with lupus and glomerular basement membrane–specific antibody–induced nephritis in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kui; Li, Quan-Zhen; Delgado-Vega, Angelica M.; Abelson, Anna-Karin; Sánchez, Elena; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Li, Li; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jinchun; Yan, Mei; Ye, Qiu; Liu, Shenxi; Xie, Chun; Zhou, Xin J.; Chung, Sharon A.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Witte, Torsten; de Ramón, Enrique; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Barizzone, Nadia; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Merrill, Joan T.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Gilkeson, Gary G.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Kim, Il; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Martin, Javier; Harley, John B.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Wakeland, Edward K.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Mohan, Chandra

    2009-01-01

    Immune-mediated nephritis contributes to disease in systemic lupus erythematosus, Goodpasture syndrome (caused by antibodies specific for glomerular basement membrane [anti-GBM antibodies]), and spontaneous lupus nephritis. Inbred mouse strains differ in susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody–induced and spontaneous lupus nephritis. This study sought to clarify the genetic and molecular factors that may be responsible for enhanced immune-mediated renal disease in these models. When the kidneys of 3 mouse strains sensitive to anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis were compared with those of 2 control strains using microarray analysis, one-fifth of the underexpressed genes belonged to the kallikrein gene family, which encodes serine esterases. Mouse strains that upregulated renal and urinary kallikreins exhibited less evidence of disease. Antagonizing the kallikrein pathway augmented disease, while agonists dampened the severity of anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis. In addition, nephritis-sensitive mouse strains had kallikrein haplotypes that were distinct from those of control strains, including several regulatory polymorphisms, some of which were associated with functional consequences. Indeed, increased susceptibility to anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis and spontaneous lupus nephritis was achieved by breeding mice with a genetic interval harboring the kallikrein genes onto a disease-resistant background. Finally, both human SLE and spontaneous lupus nephritis were found to be associated with kallikrein genes, particularly KLK1 and the KLK3 promoter, when DNA SNPs from independent cohorts of SLE patients and controls were compared. Collectively, these studies suggest that kallikreins are protective disease-associated genes in anti-GBM antibody–induced nephritis and lupus. PMID:19307730

  13. Kallikrein gene downregulation in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yousef, G M; Yacoub, G M; Polymeris, M-E; Popalis, C; Soosaipillai, A; Diamandis, E P

    2004-01-12

    Recent evidence suggests that many members of the human kallikrein gene family are differentially regulated in breast cancer and other endocrine-related malignancies. In this study, we utilised the serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) and expressed sequence tag (EST) databases of the Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) to perform in silico analyses of the expression pattern of the 15 human kallikrein genes in normal and cancerous breast tissues and cell lines using different analytical tools such as Virtual Northern blotting, Digital Differential Display and X-profiler. Our results indicate that at least four kallikrein genes (KLK5, 6, 8, 10) are downregulated in breast cancer. Probing eight normal and 24 breast cancer SAGE libraries with gene-specific tags for each of the above kallikreins indicated moderate-to-high expression densities in normal breast (27-319 tags per million; tpm, in two to five out of eight libraries), compared to no or low expression (0 - 34 tpm in zero to two libraries out of 24) in breast cancer. These data were verified by screening the EST databases, where all mRNA clones isolated for these genes, except for one in each, were from normal breast libraries, with no clones detected from breast cancer tissues or cell lines (with the exception of KLK8). X-profiler comparison of two pools of normal and breast cancer libraries further verified the presence of significant downregulation of expression levels of 4 of the kallikreins genes (KLK5, 6, 10, 12). We experimentally verified the downregulation of these four kallikreins (KLK5, 6, 8, 10 and 12) by RT - PCR analysis. PMID:14710225

  14. Kallikrein-8 Proteolytically Processes Human Papillomaviruses in the Extracellular Space To Facilitate Entry into Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira, Carla; Samperio Ventayol, Pilar; Vogeley, Christian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The entry of human papillomaviruses into host cells is a complex process. It involves conformational changes at the cell surface, receptor switching, internalization by a novel endocytic mechanism, uncoating in endosomes, trafficking of a subviral complex to the Golgi complex, and nuclear entry during mitosis. Here, we addressed how the stabilizing contacts in the capsid of human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) may be reversed to allow uncoating of the viral genome. Using biochemical and cell-biological analyses, we determined that the major capsid protein L1 underwent proteolytic cleavage during entry. In addition to a dispensable cathepsin-mediated proteolysis that occurred likely after removal of capsomers from the subviral complex in endosomes, at least two further proteolytic cleavages of L1 were observed, one of which was independent of the low-pH environment of endosomes. This cleavage occurred extracellularly. Further analysis showed that the responsible protease was the secreted trypsin-like serine protease kallikrein-8 (KLK8) involved in epidermal homeostasis and wound healing. Required for infection, the cleavage was facilitated by prior interaction of viral particles with heparan sulfate proteoglycans. KLK8-mediated cleavage was crucial for further conformational changes exposing an important epitope of the minor capsid protein L2. Occurring independently of cyclophilins and of furin that mediate L2 exposure, KLK8-mediated cleavage of L1 likely facilitated access to L2, located in the capsid lumen, and potentially uncoating. Since HPV6 and HPV18 also required KLK8 for entry, we propose that the KLK8-dependent entry step is conserved. IMPORTANCE Our analysis of the proteolytic processing of incoming HPV16, an etiological agent of cervical cancer, demonstrated that the capsid is cleaved extracellularly by a serine protease active during wound healing and that this cleavage was crucial for infection. The cleavage of L1 is one of at least four structural

  15. A genetically engineered human Kunitz protease inhibitor with increased kallikrein inhibition in an ovine model of cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Ohri, S K; Parratt, R; White, T; Becket, J; Brannan, J J; Hunt, B J; Taylor, K M

    2001-05-01

    A recombinant human serine protease inhibitor known as Kunitz protease inhibitor (KPI) wild type has functional similarities to the bovine Kunitz inhibitor, aprotinin, and had shown a potential to reduce bleeding in an ovine model of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The aim of this study was to assess KPI-185, a modification of KPI-wild type that differs from KPI-wild type in two amino acid residues and which enhances anti-kallikrein activity in a further double-blind, randomized study in an ovine model of CPB, and to compare with our previous study of KPI-wild type and aprotinin in the same ovine model. Post-operative drain losses and subjective assessment of wound 'dryness' showed no significant differences between KPI-185 and KPI-wild type, despite the significant enhancement of kallikrein inhibition using KPI-185 seen in serial kallikrein inhibition assays. These preliminary findings support the hypothesis that kallikrein inhibition is not the major mechanism by which Kunitz inhibitors such as aprotinin reduce perioperative bleeding. PMID:11419655

  16. Kallikrein-related Peptidase 5 Functions in Proteolytic Processing of Profilaggrin in Cultured Human Keratinocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Sakabe, Jun-ichi; Yamamoto, Mami; Hirakawa, Satoshi; Motoyama, Akira; Ohta, Isao; Tatsuno, Kazuki; Ito, Taisuke; Kabashima, Kenji; Hibino, Toshihiko; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2013-01-01

    Filaggrin protein is synthesized in the stratum granulosum of the skin and contributes to the formation of the human skin barrier. Profilaggrin is cleaved by proteolytic enzymes and converted to functional filaggrin, but its processing mechanism remains not fully elucidated. Kallikrein-related peptidase 5 (KLK5) is a major serine protease found in the skin, which is secreted from lamellar granules following its expression in the stratum granulosum and activated in the extracellular space of the stratum corneum. Here, we searched for profilaggrin-processing protease(s) by partial purification of epidermal extracts and found KLK5 as a possible candidate. We used high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry to show that KLK5 cleaves profilaggrin. Furthermore, based on a proximity ligation assay, immunohistochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy analysis, we reveal that KLK5 and profilaggrin co-localize in the stratum granulosum in human epidermis. KLK5 knockdown in normal cultured human epidermal keratinocytes resulted in higher levels of profilaggrin, indicating that KLK5 potentially functions in profilaggrin cleavage. PMID:23629652

  17. SPINK5 knockdown in organotypic human skin culture as a model system for Netherton syndrome: effect of genetic inhibition of serine proteases kallikrein 5 and kallikrein 7.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shirley; Olt, Sabine; Schoefmann, Nicole; Stuetz, Anton; Winiski, Anthony; Wolff-Winiski, Barbara

    2014-07-01

    Netherton syndrome (NS; OMIM 256500) is a genetic skin disease resulting from defects in the serine protease inhibitor Kazal-type 5 (SPINK5) gene, which encodes the protease inhibitor lympho-epithelial Kazal type inhibitor (LEKTI). We established a SPINK5 knockdown skin model by transfecting SPINK5 small interfering RNA (siRNA) into normal human epidermal keratinocytes, which were used together with fibroblast-populated collagen gels to generate organotypic skin cultures. This model recapitulates some of the NS skin morphology: thicker, parakeratotic stratum corneum frequently detached from the underlying epidermis and loss of corneodesmosomes. As enhanced serine protease activity has been implicated in the disease pathogenesis, we investigated the impact of the kallikreins KLK5 [stratum corneum trypsin-like enzyme (SCTE)] and KLK7 [stratum corneum chymotrypsin-like enzyme (SCCE)] on the SPINK5 knockdown phenotype by generating double knockdowns in the organotypic model. Knockdown of KLK5 or KLK7 partially ameliorated the epidermal architecture: increased epidermal thickness and expression of desmocollin 1 (DSC1), desmoglein 1 (DSG1) and (pro)filaggrin. Thus, inhibition of serine proteases KLK5 and KLK7 could be therapeutically beneficial in NS. PMID:24848304

  18. Tissue kallikrein is required for the cardioprotective effect of cyclosporin A in myocardial ischemia in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Youcef, G; Belaidi, E; Waeckel, L; Fazal, L; Clemessy, M; Vincent, M P; Zadigue, G; Richer, C; Alhenc-Gelas, F; Ovize, M; Pizard, A

    2015-03-01

    Clinical and experimental studies suggest that pharmacological postconditioning with Cyclosporin A (CsA) reduces infarct size in cardiac ischemia and reperfusion. CsA interacts with Cyclophilin D (CypD) preventing opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Tissue kallikrein (TK) and its products kinins are involved in cardioprotection in ischemia. CypD knockout mice are resistant to the cardioprotective effects of both CsA and kinins suggesting common mechanisms of action. Using TK gene knockout mice, we investigated whether the kallikrein-kinin system is involved in the cardioprotective effect of CsA. Homozygote and heterozygote TK deficient mice (TK(-/-), TK(+/-)) and wild type littermates (TK(+/+)) were subjected to cardiac ischemia-reperfusion with and without CsA postconditioning. CsA reduced infarct size in TK(+/+) mice but had no effect in TK(+/-) and TK(-/-) mice. Cardiac mitochondria isolated from TK(-/-) mice had indistinguishable basal oxidative phosphorylation and calcium retention capacity compared to TK(+/+) mice but were resistant to CsA inhibition of mPTP opening. TK activity was documented in mouse heart and rat cardiomyoblasts mitochondria. By proximity ligation assay TK was found in close proximity to the mitochondrial membrane proteins VDAC and Tom22, and CypD. Thus, partial or total deficiency in TK induces resistance to the infarct size reducing effect of CsA in cardiac ischemia in mice, suggesting that TK level is a critical factor for cardioprotection by CsA. TK is required for the mitochondrial action of CsA and may interact with CypD. Genetic variability in TK activity has been documented in man and may influence the cardioprotective effect of CsA. PMID:25623731

  19. Quantification of Human Kallikrein-Related Peptidases in Biological Fluids by Multiplatform Targeted Mass Spectrometry Assays.

    PubMed

    Karakosta, Theano D; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Batruch, Ihor; Drabovich, Andrei P

    2016-09-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a group of 15 secreted serine proteases encoded by the largest contiguous cluster of protease genes in the human genome. KLKs are involved in coordination of numerous physiological functions including regulation of blood pressure, neuronal plasticity, skin desquamation, and semen liquefaction, and thus represent promising diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Until now, quantification of KLKs in biological and clinical samples was accomplished by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Here, we developed multiplex targeted mass spectrometry assays for the simultaneous quantification of all 15 KLKs. Proteotypic peptides for each KLK were carefully selected based on experimental data and multiplexed in single assays. Performance of assays was evaluated using three different mass spectrometry platforms including triple quadrupole, quadrupole-ion trap, and quadrupole-orbitrap instruments. Heavy isotope-labeled synthetic peptides with a quantifying tag were used for absolute quantification of KLKs in sweat, cervico-vaginal fluid, seminal plasma, and blood serum, with limits of detection ranging from 5 to 500 ng/ml. Analytical performance of assays was evaluated by measuring endogenous KLKs in relevant biological fluids, and results were compared with selected ELISAs. The multiplex targeted proteomic assays were demonstrated to be accurate, reproducible, sensitive, and specific alternatives to antibody-based assays. Finally, KLK4, a highly prostate-specific protein and a speculated biomarker of prostate cancer, was unambiguously detected and quantified by immunoenrichment-SRM assay in seminal plasma and blood serum samples from individuals with confirmed prostate cancer and negative biopsy. Mass spectrometry revealed exclusively the presence of a secreted isoform and thus unequivocally resolved earlier disputes about KLK4 identity in seminal plasma. Measurements of KLK4 in either 41 seminal plasma or 58 blood serum samples

  20. Tissue kallikrein induces SH-SY5Y cell proliferation via epidermal growth factor receptor and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zhengyu; Yang, Qi; Cui, Mei; Liu, Yanping; Wang, Tao; Zhao, Hong; Dong, Qiang

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • TK promotes EGFR phosphorylation in SH-SY5Y cells. • TK activates ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation in SH-SY5Y cells. • TK mediates SH-SY5Y cell proliferation via EGFR and ERK1/2 pathway. - Abstract: Tissue kallikrein (TK) is well known to take most of its biological functions through bradykinin receptors. In the present study, we found a novel signaling pathway mediated by TK through epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in human SH-SY5Y cells. We discovered that TK facilitated the activation of EGFR, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and p38 cascade. Interestingly, not p38 but ERK1/2 phosphorylation was severely compromised in cells depleted of EGFR. Nevertheless, impairment of signaling of ERK1/2 seemed not to be restricted to EGFR phosphorylation. We also observed that TK stimulation could induce SH-SY5Y cell proliferation, which was reduced by EGFR down-regulation or ERK1/2 inhibitor. Overall, our findings provided convincing evidence that TK could mediate cell proliferation via EGFR and ERK1/2 pathway in vitro.

  1. The kallikrein-kinin system in diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Menakshi; Pouliot, Mylène; Couture, Réjean; Vaucher, Elvire

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a major microvascular complication associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, which can lead to visual impairment and blindness. Current treatment strategies for DR are mostly limited to laser therapies, steroids, and anti-VEGF agents, which are often associated with unwanted side effects leading to further complications. Recent evidence suggests that kinins play a primary role in the development of DR through enhanced vascular permeability, leukocytes infiltration, and other inflammatory mechanisms. These deleterious effects are mediated by kinin B1 and B2 receptors, which are expressed in diabetic human and rodent retina. Importantly, kinin B1 receptor is virtually absent in sane tissue, yet it is induced and upregulated in diabetic retina. These peptides belong to the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS), which contains two separate and independent pathways of regulated serine proteases, namely plasma kallikrein (PK) and tissue kallikrein (TK) that are involved in the biosynthesis of bradykinin (BK) and kallidin (Lys-BK), respectively. Hence, ocular inhibition of kallikreins or antagonism of kinin receptors offers new therapeutic avenues in the treatment and management of DR. Herein, we present an overview of the principal features and known inflammatory mechanisms associated with DR along with the current therapeutic approaches and put special emphasis on the KKS as a new and promising therapeutic target due to its link with key pathways directly associated with the development of DR. PMID:25130041

  2. Inhibition of human kallikreins 5 and 7 by the serine protease inhibitor lympho-epithelial Kazal-type inhibitor (LEKTI).

    PubMed

    Schechter, Norman M; Choi, Eun-Jung; Wang, Zhe-Mei; Hanakawa, Yasushi; Stanley, John R; Kang, Ya'an; Clayman, Gary L; Jayakumar, Arumugam

    2005-11-01

    LEKTI is a 120-kDa protein that plays an important role in skin development, as mutations affecting LEKTI synthesis underlie Netherton syndrome, an inherited skin disorder producing severe scaling. Its primary sequence indicates that the protein consists of 15 domains, all resembling a Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor. LEKTI and two serine proteases belonging to the human tissue kallikrein (hK) family (hK5 and hK7) are expressed in the granular layer of skin. In this study, we characterize the interaction of two recombinant LEKTI fragments containing three or four intact Kazal domains (domains 6-8 and 9-12) with recombinant rhK5, a trypsin-like protease, and recombinant rhK7, a chymotrypsin-like protease. Both fragments inhibited rhK5 similarly in binding and kinetic studies performed at pH 8.0, as well as pH 5.0, the pH of the stratum corneum where both LEKTI and proteases may function. Inhibition equilibrium constants (Ki) measured either directly in concentration-dependent studies or calculated from measured association (kass) and dissociation (kdis) rate constants were 1.2-5.5 nM at pH 8.0 and 10-20 nM at pH 5.0. At pH 8.0, kass and kdis values were 4.7 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and 5.5 x 10(-4) s(-1), and at pH 5.0 they were 4.0 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and 4.3 x 10(-4) s(-1), respectively. The low Ki and kdis values (t1/2 of 20-25 min) indicate tight and specific association. Only fragment 6-9' was a good inhibitor of rhK7, demonstrating a Ki of 11 nM at pH 8.0 in a reaction that was rapidly reversible. These results show that LEKTI, at least in fragment form, is a potent inhibitor of rhK5 and that this protease may be a target of LEKTI in human skin. PMID:16307483

  3. Virtual Screening and X-ray Crystallography for Human Kallikrein 6 Inhibitors with an Amidinothiophene P1 Group

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A series of compounds with an amidinothiophene P1 group and a pyrrolidinone-sulphonamide scaffold linker was identified as potent inhibitors of human kallikrein 6 by structure-based virtual screening based on the union accessible binding space of serine proteases. As the first series of potent nonmechanism-based hK6 inhibitors, they may be used as tool compounds for target validation. An X-ray structure of a representative compound complexed with hK6, resolved at a resolution of 1.88 Å, revealed that the amidinothiophene moiety bound in the S1 pocket and the pyrrolidinone-sulphonamide linker projected the aromatic tail into the S′ pocket. PMID:24900446

  4. Improved prostate cancer detection with a human kallikrein 11 and percentage free PSA-based artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Carsten; Meyer, Hellmuth-Alexander; Cammann, Henning; Nakamura, Terukazu; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Jung, Klaus

    2006-06-01

    Human kallikrein 11 (hK11) was evaluated in a percentage free PSA-based artificial neural network (ANN) to reduce unnecessary prostate biopsies. Serum samples from 357 patients with (n=132) and without (n=225) prostate cancer (PCa) were analyzed and ANN models were constructed and compared to all parameters. The discriminatory power of hK11 was lower than that of PSA, but receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analyses demonstrated significantly larger areas under the curves for the ANN compared to all other parameters. ANNs with hK11 may lead to a further reduction in unnecessary prostate biopsies, especially when analyzing patients with less than 15% free PSA. PMID:16800743

  5. A novel signaling pathway of tissue kallikrein in promoting keratinocyte migration: Activation of proteinase-activated receptor 1 and epidermal growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Lin; Chao, Lee; Chao, Julie

    2010-02-01

    Biological functions of tissue kallikrein (TK, KLK1) are mainly mediated by kinin generation and subsequent kinin B2 receptor activation. In this study, we investigated the potential role of TK and its signaling pathways in cultured human keratinocyte migration and in a rat skin wound healing model. Herein, we show that TK promoted cell migration and proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Inactive TK or kinin had no significant effect on cell migration. Interestingly, cell migration induced by active TK was not blocked by icatibant or L-NAME, indicating an event independent of kinin B2 receptor and nitric oxide formation. TK's stimulatory effect on cell migration was inhibited by small interfering RNA for proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR{sub 1}), and by PAR{sub 1} inhibitor. TK-induced migration was associated with increased phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which was blocked by inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC), Src, EGFR and ERK. TK-induced cell migration and EGFR phosphorylation were blocked by metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor, heparin, and antibodies against EGFR external domain, heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) and amphiregulin (AR). Local application of TK promoted skin wound healing in rats, whereas icatibant and EGFR inhibitor blocked TK's effect. Skin wound healing was further delayed by aprotinin and neutralizing TK antibody. This study demonstrates a novel role of TK in skin wound healing and uncovers new signaling pathways mediated by TK in promoting keratinocyte migration through activation of the PAR{sub 1}-PKC-Src-MMP pathway and HB-EGF/AR shedding-dependent EGFR transactivation.

  6. Glandular kallikreins in the teleost Cyprinus carpio: tissue distribution, possible involvement in prolactin processing, and effect of 17 beta-estradiol in vivo.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, J; Fernández, K; Haussmann, D; Richards, G; Barra, V; Kausel, G

    2002-09-01

    We examined glandular kallikrein (GK), a putative prolactin processing protease, in the teleost Cyprinus carpio. When employing an anti-Centropristis striata GK antibody proteins of 39 kDa in muscle, 52 kDa in gill, 52 kDa in kidney, and two proteins of 46 and 72 kDa in pituitary gland were detected. Immunoreactive kallikreins were recognized in intermuscle cell tissue, epithelial gill cells, apical region of tubular cells, and prolactin producing lactotrophs in pituitary gland, suggesting a osmoregulatory role for this enzyme. We found three prolactin (PRL) variants using anti-tilapia PRL antibodies, in pituitary gland 23 and 16 kDa, and in plasma 23 and 22 kDa forms. Clearly co-localization of GK and PRL in lactotrophs could be demonstrated. In winter-acclimatized male carp, where the pituitary PRL level is low, 17beta-estradiol treatment increased PRL but not GK immunoreactivity. In contrast to GK and PRL co-regulation by estrogen in mammalian pituitary gland, no similar effect on immunoreactive PRL and GK was observed in the ichtyc pituitary. No changes in GK immunostaining occurred in gill or muscle tissue in response to estrogen treatment. These results, taken with the observation of significantly increased GK immunoreactivity in the apical region of kidney tubular cells in estrogen treated male carp, indicate that the regulation of GK expression in pituitary and kidney could be different in fish with respect to mammals. PMID:12392686

  7. A Single Glycan at the 99-Loop of Human Kallikrein-related Peptidase 2 Regulates Activation and Enzymatic Activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shihui; Skala, Wolfgang; Magdolen, Viktor; Briza, Peter; Biniossek, Martin L; Schilling, Oliver; Kellermann, Josef; Brandstetter, Hans; Goettig, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidase 2 (KLK2) is a key serine protease in semen liquefaction and prostate cancer together with KLK3/prostate-specific antigen. In order to decipher the function of its potential N-glycosylation site, we produced pro-KLK2 in Leishmania tarentolae cells and compared it with its non-glycosylated counterpart from Escherichia coli expression. Mass spectrometry revealed that Asn-95 carries a core glycan, consisting of two GlcNAc and three hexoses. Autocatalytic activation was retarded in glyco-pro-KLK2, whereas the activated glyco-form exhibited an increased proteolytic resistance. The specificity patterns obtained by the PICS (proteomic identification of protease cleavage sites) method are similar for both KLK2 variants, with a major preference for P1-Arg. However, glycosylation changes the enzymatic activity of KLK2 in a drastically substrate-dependent manner. Although glyco-KLK2 has a considerably lower catalytic efficiency than glycan-free KLK2 toward peptidic substrates with P2-Phe, the situation was reverted toward protein substrates, such as glyco-pro-KLK2 itself. These findings can be rationalized by the glycan-carrying 99-loop that prefers to cover the active site like a lid. By contrast, the non-glycosylated 99-loop seems to favor a wide open conformation, which mostly increases the apparent affinity for the substrates (i.e. by a reduction of Km). Also, the cleavage pattern and kinetics in autolytic inactivation of both KLK2 variants can be explained by a shift of the target sites due to the presence of the glycan. These striking effects of glycosylation pave the way to a deeper understanding of kallikrein-related peptidase biology and pathology. PMID:26582203

  8. In-silico analysis of kallikrein gene expression in pancreatic and colon cancers.

    PubMed

    Yousef, George M; Borgoño, Carla A; Popalis, Cynthia; Yacoub, George M; Polymeris, Mary-Ellen; Soosaipillai, Antoninus; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2004-01-01

    Human kallikreins are a cluster of 15 serine protease genes located in the chromosomal band 19q13.4, a non-randomly rearranged region in many solid tumors, including pancreatic cancer. We utilized the SAGE and EST databases of the Cancer Genome Anatomy Project to perform in-silico analysis of kallikrein gene expression in normal and cancerous pancreatic and colon tissues and cell lines using virtual Northern blotting (VNB), digital differential display (DDD) and X-profiler. At least two kallikreins, KLK6 and KLK10, are significantly up-regulated in pancreatic cancer. We probed 2 normal and 6 pancreatic cancer SAGE libraries with gene-specific tags for each of these kallikreins. KLK6 was found to be expressed in 5/6 cancer libraries and showed the most marked (5-fold) increase in average expression levels in cancer vs. normal. These data were verified by screening the EST databases, where all mRNA clones isolated were from cancerous libraries, with no clones detected in normal pancreatic tissues or cell lines. X-profiler comparison of two pools of normal and cancerous pancreatic libraries further verified the significant increase of KLK6 expression levels in pancreatic cancer. DDD data showed a 13-fold increase in KLK10 expression in pancreatic cancer. Three kallikrein genes, KLK6, 8 and 10 are overexpressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon, while one kallikrein, KLK1, is down-regulated. While no expression of KLK6 was detected in normal colon, KLK6-specific tags were detectable in 2 cancer libraries. Similar results were obtained by EST screening; no KLK6 clones were detected in any of the 28 normal libraries examined, while 10 KLK6 EST clones were found in colon adenocarcinoma. KLK10 was not detectable in normal colon. Gene-specific tags were, however, detectable with high density in colon cancer and 7 EST clones were found to be expressed in colon Adenocarcinoma. PMID:15015574

  9. Separation of Plasma Thromboplastin Antecedent from Kallikrein by the Plasma α2-Macroglobulin, Kallikrein Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Harpel, Peter C.

    1971-01-01

    Plasma thromboplastin antecedent (PTA, factor XI) is an important intermediate in the intrinsic coagulation system, and plasma kallikrein has been implicated as a mediator of the inflammatory process. Whereas their biologic activities are functionally distinct, their identity as separate entities in plasma has not been fully established, and the nature of their plasma inhibitors has not been completely characterized. A partially purified preparation containing the clotting, tosyl arginine methyl ester (TAMe) esterase and kinin-producing activities of these substances has been prepared by DEAE-cellulose chromatography of a Celite eluate obtained from acid-treated human plasma. These activities were not separable by acrylamide gel electrophoresis nor by isoelectric focusing, their pI being approximately 8.7. Human plasma α2-macroglobulin has been shown to inhibit the proteolytic activity of kallikrein and to inhibit partially its TAMe esterase activity. An α2-macroglobulin, PTA, kallikrein incubation mixture was separated by gel filtration chromatography. The α2-macroglobulin formed a high molecular weight complex with kallikrein and appeared in early chromatographic fractions. The PTA-clotting activity was not inhibited by the α2-macroglobulin; 64% of the initial PTA activity was isolated in later fractions free of kallikrein-induced kinin-like activity. In contrast, clotting, TAMe esterase, and kinin-forming activities were inhibited after gel filtration chromatography of an incubation mixture of these activities and partially purified C1̄ inactivator (C1 esterase inhibitor). Electrofocusing of an incubation mixture of an activated PTA, kallikrein preparation, and α2-macroglobulin resulted in the isolation of a PTA fraction free of kallikrein proteolytic activity, and with 4% of the original TAMe esterase activity. In this manner, activated PTA and plasma kallikrein have been shown to be distinct substances, and methods have been introduced for the further

  10. Ferritin binds to light chain of human H-kininogen and inhibits kallikrein-mediated bradykinin release.

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Narayanan; Torti, Suzy V; Torti, Frank M

    2002-01-01

    Ferritin is an iron-storage protein that exists in both intracellular and extracellular compartments. We have previously identified H-kininogen (high-molecular-weight kininogen) as a ferritin-binding protein [Torti and Torti (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 13630-13635]. H-Kininogen is a precursor of the potent pro-inflammatory peptide bradykinin, which is released from H-kininogen following cleavage of H-kininogen by the serine protease kallikrein. In this report, we demonstrate that binding of ferritin to H-kininogen occurs via the modified light chain of H-kininogen, and that ferritin binds preferentially to activated H-kininogen. We further demonstrate that binding of ferritin to H-kininogen retards the proteolytic cleavage of H-kininogen by kallikrein and its subsequent release of bradykinin from H-kininogen. Ferritin does not interfere with the ability of kallikrein to digest a synthetic substrate, suggesting that ferritin specifically impedes the ability of kallikrein to digest H-kininogen, perhaps by steric hindrance. Based on these results, we propose a model of sequential H-kininogen cleavage and ferritin binding. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the binding of ferritin to H-kininogen may serve to modulate bradykinin release. PMID:12071855

  11. Tissue Kallikrein Alleviates Cerebral Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Activating the B2R-ERK1/2-CREB-Bcl-2 Signaling Pathway in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Kunxiong; Hu, Bin; Sang, Hongfei; Xie, Yi; Xu, Lili; Cao, Qinqin; Chen, Xin; Zhao, Lingling; Liu, Xinfeng; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Renliang

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) substantially increases the risk of ischemic stroke and reduces the tolerance to ischemic insults. Tissue kallikrein (TK) has been demonstrated to protect neurons from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in orthoglycemic model by activating the bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R). Considering the differential effects of B2R or bradykinin B1 receptor (B1R) on cardioprotection and neuroprotection in I/R with or without diabetes, this study was designed to investigate the role of TK during cerebral I/R injury in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Intravenous injection of TK inhibited apoptosis in neurons, alleviated edema and inflammatory reactions after focal cerebral I/R, significantly reduced the infarct volume, and improved functional recovery. These beneficial effects were accompanied by activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), cAMP response element-binding (CREB), and Bcl-2 signal proteins. Inhibition of the B2R or ERK1/2 pathway abated the effects of TK, whereas an antagonist of B1R enhanced the effects. These findings reveal that the neuroprotective effect of TK against cerebral I/R injury in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats mainly involves the enhancement of B2R and ERK1/2-CREB-Bcl-2 signaling pathway activity.

  12. Toward the first class of suicide inhibitors of kallikreins involved in skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiao; Soualmia, Feryel; Furio, Laetitia; Renard, Jean-François; Kempen, Isabelle; Qin, Lixian; Pagano, Maurice; Pirotte, Bernard; El Amri, Chahrazade; Hovnanian, Alain; Reboud-Ravaux, Michèle

    2015-01-22

    The inhibition of kallikreins 5 and 7, and possibly kallikrein 14 and matriptase, (that initiates the kallikrein proteolytic cascade) constitutes an innovative way to treat some skin diseases such as Netherton syndrome. We present here the inhibitory properties of coumarin-3-carboxylate derivatives against these enzymes. Our small collection of these versatile organic compounds was enriched by newly synthesized derivatives in order to obtain molecules selective against one, two, three enzymes or acting on the four ones. We evidenced a series of compounds with IC50 values in the nanomolar range. A suicide mechanism was observed against kallikrein 7 whereas the inactivation was either definitive (suicide type) or transient for kallikreins 5 and 14, and matriptase. Most of these potent inhibitors were devoid of cytotoxicity toward healthy human keratinocytes. In situ zymography investigations on skin sections from human kallikrein 5 transgenic mouse revealed significant reduction of the global proteolytic activity by several compounds. PMID:25489658

  13. Identification of lympho-epithelial Kazal-type inhibitor 2 in human skin as a kallikrein-related peptidase 5-specific protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Hoffert, Ulf; Wu, Zhihong; Schröder, Jens-Michael

    2009-01-01

    Kallikreins-related peptidases (KLKs) are serine proteases and have been implicated in the desquamation process of the skin. Their activity is tightly controlled by epidermal protease inhibitors like the lympho-epithelial Kazal-type inhibitor (LEKTI). Defects of the LEKTI-encoding gene serine protease inhibitor Kazal type (Spink)5 lead to the absence of LEKTI and result in the genodermatose Netherton syndrome, which mimics the common skin disease atopic dermatitis. Since many KLKs are expressed in human skin with KLK5 being considered as one of the most important KLKs in skin desquamation, we proposed that more inhibitors are present in human skin. Herein, we purified from human stratum corneum by HPLC techniques a new KLK5-inhibiting peptide encoded by a member of the Spink family, designated as Spink9 located on chromosome 5p33.1. This peptide is highly homologous to LEKTI and was termed LEKTI-2. Recombinant LEKTI-2 inhibited KLK5 but not KLK7, 14 or other serine proteases tested including trypsin, plasmin and thrombin. Spink9 mRNA expression was detected in human skin samples and in cultured keratinocytes. LEKTI-2 immune-expression was focally localized at the stratum granulosum and stratum corneum at palmar and plantar sites in close localization to KLK5. At sites of plantar hyperkeratosis, LEKTI-2 expression was increased. We suggest that LEKTI-2 contributes to the regulation of the desquamation process in human skin by specifically inhibiting KLK5. PMID:19190773

  14. Vaspin inhibits kallikrein 7 by serpin mechanism.

    PubMed

    Heiker, John T; Klöting, Nora; Kovacs, Peter; Kuettner, E Bartholomeus; Sträter, Norbert; Schultz, Stephan; Kern, Matthias; Stumvoll, Michael; Blüher, Matthias; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2013-07-01

    The molecular target of the adipokine vaspin (visceral adipose tissue-derived serpin; serpinA12) and its mode of action are unknown. Here, we provide the vaspin crystal structure and identify human kallikrein 7 (hK7) as a first protease target of vaspin inhibited by classical serpin mechanism with high specificity in vitro. We detect vaspin-hK7 complexes in human plasma and find co-expression of both proteins in murine pancreatic β-cells. We further demonstrate that hK7 cleaves human insulin in the A- and B-chain. Vaspin treatment of isolated pancreatic islets leads to increased insulin concentration in the media upon glucose stimulation without influencing insulin secretion. By application of vaspin and generated inactive mutants, we find the significantly improved glucose tolerance in C57BL/6NTac and db/db mice treated with recombinant vaspin fully dependent on the vaspin serpin activity and not related to vaspin-mediated changes in insulin sensitivity as determined by euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp studies. Improved glucose metabolism could be mediated by increased insulin plasma concentrations 150 min after a glucose challenge in db/db mice, supporting the hypothesis that vaspin may inhibit insulin degradation by hK7 in the circulation. In conclusion, we demonstrate the inhibitory serpin nature and the first protease target of the adipose tissue-derived serpin vaspin, and our findings suggest hK7 inhibition by vaspin as an underlying physiological mechanism for its compensatory actions on obesity-induced insulin resistance. PMID:23370777

  15. Kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) and the hallmarks of cancer.

    PubMed

    Filippou, Panagiota S; Karagiannis, George S; Musrap, Natasha; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2016-08-01

    The kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) represent the largest family of serine proteases within the human genome and are expressed in various tissues. Although they regulate several important physiological functions, KLKs have also been implicated in numerous pathophysiological processes, including cancer. Growing evidence describing the deregulation of KLK expression and secretion, as well as activation in various malignancies, has uncovered their potential as mediators of cancer progression, biomarkers of disease and as candidate therapeutic targets. The diversity of signalling pathways and proteolytic cascades involving KLKs and their downstream targets appears to affect cancer biology through multiple mechanisms, including those related to the hallmarks of cancer. The aim of this review is to provide an update on the importance of KLK-driven molecular pathways in relation to cancer cell traits associated with the hallmarks of cancer and to highlight their potential in personalized therapeutics. PMID:26886390

  16. Synthesis, biological evaluation, and docking studies of PAR2-AP-derived pseudopeptides as inhibitors of kallikrein 5 and 6.

    PubMed

    Severino, Beatrice; Fiorino, Ferdinando; Corvino, Angela; Caliendo, Giuseppe; Santagada, Vincenzo; Assis, Diego Magno; Oliveira, Juliana R; Juliano, Luiz; Manganelli, Serena; Benfenati, Emilio; Frecentese, Francesco; Perissutti, Elisa; Juliano, Maria Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    A series of protease activated receptor 2 activating peptide (PAR2-AP) derivatives (1-15) were designed and synthesized. The obtained compounds were tested on a panel of human kallikreins (hKLK1, hKLK2, hKLK5, hKLK6, and hKLK7) and were found completely inactive toward hKLK1, hKLK2, and hKLK7. Aiming to investigate the mode of interaction between the most interesting compounds and the selected hKLKs, docking studies were performed. The described compounds distinguish the different human tissue kallikreins with compounds 1 and 5 as the best hKLK5 and hKLK6 inhibitors, respectively. PMID:25153237

  17. Biochemical characterization of a novel high-affinity and specific plasma kallikrein inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Kolte, D; Bryant, JW; Holsworth, D; Wang, J; Akbari, P; Gibson, GW; Shariat-Madar, Z

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Kallikrein acts on high molecular weight kininogen (HK) to generate HKa (cleaved HK) and bradykinin (BK). BK exerts its effects by binding to B2 receptors. The activation of B2 receptors leads to the formation of tissue plasminogen activator, nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin (PGI2). An elevated kallikrein-dependent pathway has been linked to cardiovascular disease risk. The aim of this study was to investigate whether our novel plasma kallikrein inhibitor abolishes kallikrein-mediated generation of BK from HK and subsequent BK-induced NO and PGI2 formation, thereby influencing endothelial pathophysiology during chronic inflammatory diseases. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Kinetic analysis was initially used to determine the potency of PF-04886847. Biochemical ligand binding assays, immunological methods and calcium flux studies were used to determine the selectivity of the kallikrein inhibitor. In addition, the effect of PF-04886847 on BK-induced relaxation of the rat aortic ring was determined in a model of lipopolysaccharide-induced tissue inflammation. KEY RESULTS Evidence was obtained in vitro and in situ, indicating that PF-04886847 is a potent and specific inhibitor of plasma kallikrein. PF-04886847 efficiently blocked calcium influx as well as NO and PGI2 formation mediated through the BK-stimulated B2 receptor signalling pathway. PF-04886847 blocked kallikrein-induced endothelial-dependent relaxation of isolated rat aortic rings pre-contracted with phenylephrine. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS PF-04886847 was shown to be the most potent small molecule inhibitor of plasma kallikrein yet described; it inhibited kallikrein in isolated aortic rings and cultured endothelial cells. Overall, our results indicate that PF-04886847 would be useful for the treatment of kallikrein-mediated inflammatory disorders. PMID:21175583

  18. Kallikrein-related peptidase-8 (KLK8) is an active serine protease in human epidermis and sweat and is involved in a skin barrier proteolytic cascade.

    PubMed

    Eissa, Azza; Amodeo, Vanessa; Smith, Christopher R; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2011-01-01

    Kallikrein-related peptidase-8 (KLK8) is a relatively uncharacterized epidermal protease. Although proposed to regulate skin-barrier desquamation and recovery, the catalytic activity of KLK8 was never demonstrated in human epidermis, and its regulators and targets remain unknown. Herein, we elucidated for the first time KLK8 activity in human non-palmoplantar stratum corneum and sweat ex vivo. The majority of stratum corneum and sweat KLK8 was catalytically active, displaying optimal activity at pH 8.5 and considerable activity at pH 5. We also showed that KLK8 is a keratinocyte-specific protease, not secreted by human melanocytes or dermal fibroblasts. KLK8 secretion increased significantly upon calcium induction of terminal keratinocyte differentiation, suggesting an active role for this protease in upper epidermis. Potential activators, regulators, and targets of KLK8 activity were identified by in vitro kinetic assays using pro-KLK8 and mature KLK8 recombinant proteins produced in Pichia pastoris. Mature KLK8 activity was enhanced by calcium and magnesium ions and attenuated by zinc ions and by autocleavage after Arg(164). Upon screening KLK8 cleavage of a library of FRET-quenched peptides, trypsin-like specificity was observed with the highest preference for (R/K)(S/T)(A/V) at P1-P1'-P2'. We also demonstrated that KLK5 and lysyl endopeptidase activate latent pro-KLK8, whereas active KLK8 targets pro-KLK11, pro-KLK1, and LL-37 antimicrobial peptide activation in vitro. Together, our data identify KLK8 as a new active serine protease in human stratum corneum and sweat, and we propose regulators and targets that augment its involvement in a skin barrier proteolytic cascade. The implications of KLK8 elevation and hyperactivity in desquamatory and inflammatory skin disease conditions remain to be studied. PMID:20940292

  19. A Highly Sensitive Porous Silicon (P-Si)-Based Human Kallikrein 2 (hK2) Immunoassay Platform toward Accurate Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Wook; Hosokawa, Kazuo; Kim, Soyoun; Jeong, Ok Chan; Lilja, Hans; Laurell, Thomas; Maeda, Mizuo

    2015-01-01

    Levels of total human kallikrein 2 (hK2), a protein involved the pathology of prostate cancer (PCa), could be used as a biomarker to aid in the diagnosis of this disease. In this study, we report on a porous silicon antibody immunoassay platform for the detection of serum levels of total hK2. The surface of porous silicon has a 3-dimensional macro- and nanoporous structure, which offers a large binding capacity for capturing probe molecules. The tailored pore size of the porous silicon also allows efficient immobilization of antibodies by surface adsorption, and does not require chemical immobilization. Monoclonal hK2 capture antibody (6B7) was dispensed onto P-Si chip using a piezoelectric dispenser. In total 13 × 13 arrays (169 spots) were spotted on the chip with its single spot volume of 300 pL. For an optimization of capture antibody condition, we firstly performed an immunoassay of the P-Si microarray under a titration series of hK2 in pure buffer (PBS) at three different antibody densities (75, 100 and 145 µg/mL). The best performance of the microarray platform was seen at 100 µg/mL of the capture antibody concentration (LOD was 100 fg/mL). The platform then was subsequently evaluated for a titration series of serum-spiked hK2 samples. The developed platform utilizes only 15 µL of serum per test and the total assay time is about 3 h, including immobilization of the capture antibody. The detection limit of the hK2 assay was 100 fg/mL in PBS buffer and 1 pg/mL in serum with a dynamic range of 106 (10−4 to 102 ng/mL). PMID:26007739

  20. Human Tissue Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Neurodyne Corporation Human Tissue Stimulator (HTS) is a totally implantable system used for treatment of chronic pain and involuntary motion disorders by electrical stimulation. It was developed by Pacesetter Systems, Inc. in cooperation with the Applied Physics Laboratory. HTS incorporates a nickel cadmium battery, telemetry and command systems technologies of the same type as those used in NASA's Small Astronomy Satellite-3 in microminiature proportions so that the implantable element is the size of a deck of cards. The stimulator includes a rechargeable battery, an antenna and electronics to receive and process commands and to report on its own condition via telemetry, a wireless process wherein instrument data is converted to electrical signals and sent to a receiver where signals are presented as usable information. The HTS is targeted to nerve centers or to particular areas of the brain to provide relief from intractable pain or arrest involuntary motion. The nickel cadmium battery can be recharged through the skin. The first two HTS units were implanted last year and have been successful. Extensive testing is required before HTS can be made available for general use.

  1. 4-Kallikrein Test and Kallikrein Markers in Prostate Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Michelle L; Parsons, J Kellogg

    2016-02-01

    A preponderance of clinical evidence supports a significant public health benefit for prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based screening and early detection of prostate cancer in appropriately counseled and selected men. Population-based screening with PSA decreases prostate cancer mortality; however, because of relatively poor specificity, PSA-based screening may also increase the detection of clinically insignificant cancers that would otherwise never require treatment. Use of newer biomarkers that increase the specificity for prostate cancer detection may aid in risk stratification and the appropriate identification of men for prostate biopsy. The authors review the 4-kallikrein panel and 4K probability score. PMID:26614027

  2. Trade in human tissue products.

    PubMed

    Tonti-Filippini, Nicholas; Zeps, Nikolajs

    2011-03-01

    Trade in human tissue in Australia is prohibited by state law, and in ethical guidelines by the National Health and Medical Research Council: National statement on ethical conduct in human research; Organ and tissue donation by living donors: guidelines for ethical practice for health professionals. However, trade in human tissue products is a common practice especially for: reconstructive orthopaedic or plastic surgery; novel human tissue products such as a replacement trachea created by using human mesenchymal stem cells; biomedical research using cell lines, DNA and protein provided through biobanks. Cost pressures on these have forced consideration of commercial models to sustain their operations. Both the existing and novel activities require a robust framework to enable commercial uses of human tissue products while maintaining community acceptability of such practices, but to date no such framework exists. In this article, we propose a model ethical framework for ethical governance which identifies specific ethical issues such as: privacy; unique value of a person's tissue; commodification of the body; equity and benefit to the community; perverse incentives; and "attenuation" as a potentially useful concept to help deal with the broad range of subjective views relevant to whether it is acceptable to commercialise certain human tissue products. PMID:21382003

  3. The Kallikrein-Kinin System as a Regulator of Cardiovascular and Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Rhaleb, Nour-Eddine; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Carretero, Oscar A.

    2015-01-01

    Autocrine, paracrine, endocrine, and neuroendocrine hormonal systems help regulate cardiovascular and renal function. Any change in the balance among these systems may result in hypertension and target organ damage, whether the cause is genetic, environmental or a combination of the two. Endocrine and neuroendocrine vasopressor hormones such as the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), aldosterone, and catecholamines are important for regulation of blood pressure and pathogenesis of hypertension and target organ damage. While the role of vasodepressor autacoids such as kinins is not as well defined, there is increasing evidence that they are not only critical to blood pressure and renal function but may also oppose remodeling of the cardiovascular system. Here we will primarily be concerned with kinins, which are oligopeptides containing the aminoacid sequence of bradykinin. They are generated from precursors known as kininogens by enzymes such as tissue (glandular) and plasma kallikrein. Some of the effects of kinins are mediated via autacoids such as eicosanoids, nitric oxide (NO), endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF), and/or tissue plasminogen activator (†PA). Kinins help protect against cardiac ischemia and play an important part in preconditioning as well as the cardiovascular and renal protective effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin type 1 receptor blockers (ARB). But the role of kinins in the pathogenesis of hypertension remains controversial. A study of Utah families revealed that a dominant kallikrein gene expressed as high urinary kallikrein excretion was associated with a decreased risk of essential hypertension. Moreover, researchers have identified a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) that distinguishes the kallikrein gene family found in one strain of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) from a homologous gene in normotensive Brown Norway rats, and in recombinant inbred substrains derived from these SHR

  4. Inhibition of kallikrein-related peptidases by the serine protease inhibitor of Kazal-type 6.

    PubMed

    Kantyka, Tomasz; Fischer, Jan; Wu, Zhihong; Declercq, Wim; Reiss, Karina; Schröder, Jens-Michael; Meyer-Hoffert, Ulf

    2011-06-01

    Kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a group of serine proteases, expressed in several tissues. Their activity is regulated by inhibitors including members of the serine protease of Kazal-type (SPINK) family. Recently, we discovered that SPINK6 is expressed in human skin and inhibits KLK5, KLK7, KLK14 but not KLK8. In this study we tested whether SPINK6 inhibits other members of the KLK family and caspase-14. Using chromogenic substrates, SPINK6 exhibited inhibitory activity against KLK12 and KLK13 with K(i) around 1nM, KLK4 with K(i)=27.3nM, KLK6 with K(i)=140nM, caspase-14 with a K(i) approximating 1μM and no activity against KLK1, KLK3 and KLK11. Taken together, SPINK6 is a potent inhibitor of distinct KLKs members. PMID:21439340

  5. On the mechanism of rat uterus desensitization to kallikrein.

    PubMed

    Heneine, I F; Feitosa, M H; Beraldo, W T; Oliveira, G M; Pesquero, J L

    1992-01-01

    An inactive form of kallikrein prepared by iodination with cold iodine, did not show any enzymatic or oxytocic action. However, a competitive pattern between this inactive and active kallikrein was observed in rat uterus preparation: When the inactive form was applied several times in the muscle, a single dose of active kallikrein was unable to cause contraction, but a double dose elicited a response. The rhythmic movement caused by a singular dose of active kallikrein, had its time curtailed by adding the inactive kallikrein to the bath. The inactive kallikrein did not interfere with bradykinin activity. PMID:1462820

  6. [Brown fat tissue in humans].

    PubMed

    Medvedev, L N; Elsukova, E I

    2002-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is universally present in mammals. Thermal production in such tissue is physiologically important for maintaining temperature homeostasis and regulation of body mass in small-size homoiotherms. At present it is clearly established that unlike other large mammals, brown adipose in man and primates is retained throughout the whole postnatal othogenesis. Therefore, BAT appears as a possible effector of pharmacogenetic protection from human excessive adiposis. Systematic reserach of various functioning aspects of this unique organ of mammals were started abroad as early as 1960-es, and are actively developing at present. Domestic research of energy circulation physiology and of thermoregulation developed mostly outside the brown adipose tissue. Therefore, the principal objective of this publication is to draw attention of experimental and clinical researches to an intriguing aspect of the issue of energy circulation in humans--the issue of brown adipose functioning. PMID:12004574

  7. Renal kallikrein in chronic hypoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, C F; Chen, L W; Chien, C T; Wu, M S; Tsai, T J

    1996-09-01

    1. We have studied the role of kallikrein (KK) in the maintenance of renal function in chronic hypoxic rats (high altitude; HA), compared with control rats kept at sea level (SL). Hypoxia was induced by placing female Wistar rats (198-290 g) in an altitude chamber (5500 m) 15 h/day for 4 weeks. Experiments were also conducted to study the interaction of KK with renal nerve activity and endothelin (ET), two parameters previously shown to be altered in this model. 2. It was found that renal cortex tissue KK activity (TKA) was not significantly different in 10 SL and 10 HA rats. However, the urinary KK activity (UKA) was reduced nearly to half (from 35.2 +/- 4.6 to 18.5 +/- 1.7 pkat/min) in HA rats after 4 weeks of chronic hypoxia. 3. Acute renal denervated diuresis was accompanied by a significant increase in UKA (from 9 +/- 2 to 14 +/- 2 pkat/min in HA and denervated HA rats, respectively; P < 0.05) in HA rats. Intrarenal arterial pretreatment of aprotinin reduced the denervated diuresis. 4. Endothelin (600 ng/kg per h) reduced urine flow, sodium and potassium excretion in the ipsilateral kidney in another 10 SL and 10 HA rats. The extent of the drop of these parameters was significantly less in HA rats. Urinary KK activity was correlated significantly with the measured renal functional parameters (r ranging from 0.472 to 0.612) in SL rats, but was insignificant in HA rats (r ranging from 0.032 to 0.192). 5. We have demonstrated that chronic exposure to hypoxia decreases urinary KK excretion and that KK is involved in acute renal denervated diuresis generated in these animals. The present study suggests that KK plays a partial role in the maintenance of renal function in chronic hypoxic rats. PMID:8911720

  8. Radiation Effect on Human Tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.; Cruz, Angela; Bors, Karen; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Predicting the occurrence of human cancer following exposure of an epidemiologic population to any agent causing genetic damage is a difficult task. To an approximation, this is because the uncertainty of uniform exposure to the damaging agent, and the uncertainty of uniform processing of that damage within a complex set of biological variables, degrade the confidence of predicting the delayed expression of cancer as a relatively rare event within clinically normal individuals. This situation begs the need for alternate controlled experimental models that are predictive for the development of human cancer following exposures to agents causing genetic damage. Such models historically have not been of substantial proven value. It is more recently encouraging, however, that developments in molecular and cell biology have led to an expanded knowledge of human carcinogenesis, and of molecular markers associated with that process. It is therefore appropriate to consider new laboratory models developed to accomodate that expanded knowledge in order to assess the cancer risks associated with exposures to genotoxic agents. When ionizing radiation of space is the genotoxic agent, then a series of additional considerations for human cancer risk assessment must also be applied. These include the dose of radiation absorbed by tissue at different locations in the body, the quality of the absorbed radiation, the rate at which absorbed dose accumulates in tissue, the way in which absorbed dose is measured and calculated, and the alterations in incident radiation caused by shielding materials. It is clear that human cancer risk assessment for damage caused by ionizing radiation is a multidisciplinary responsibility, and that within this responsibility no single discipline can hold disproportionate sway if a risk assessment model of radiation-induced human cancer is to be developed that has proven value. Biomolecular and cellular markers from the work reported here are considered

  9. Natural and synthetic inhibitors of kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs).

    PubMed

    Goettig, Peter; Magdolen, Viktor; Brandstetter, Hans

    2010-11-01

    Including the true tissue kallikrein KLK1, kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) represent a family of fifteen mammalian serine proteases. While the physiological roles of several KLKs have been at least partially elucidated, their activation and regulation remain largely unclear. This obscurity may be related to the fact that a given KLK fulfills many different tasks in diverse fetal and adult tissues, and consequently, the timescale of some of their physiological actions varies significantly. To date, a variety of endogenous inhibitors that target distinct KLKs have been identified. Among them are the attenuating Zn(2+) ions, active site-directed proteinaceous inhibitors, such as serpins and the Kazal-type inhibitors, or the huge, unspecific compartment forming α(2)-macroglobulin. Failure of these inhibitory systems can lead to certain pathophysiological conditions. One of the most prominent examples is the Netherton syndrome, which is caused by dysfunctional domains of the Kazal-type inhibitor LEKTI-1 which fail to appropriately regulate KLKs in the skin. Small synthetic inhibitory compounds and natural polypeptidic exogenous inhibitors have been widely employed to characterize the activity and substrate specificity of KLKs and to further investigate their structures and biophysical properties. Overall, this knowledge leads not only to a better understanding of the physiological tasks of KLKs, but is also a strong fundament for the synthesis of small compound drugs and engineered biomolecules for pharmaceutical approaches. In several types of cancer, KLKs have been found to be overexpressed, which makes them clinically relevant biomarkers for prognosis and monitoring. Thus, down regulation of excessive KLK activity in cancer and in skin diseases by small inhibitor compounds may represent attractive therapeutical approaches. PMID:20615447

  10. Effects of the Demethylating Agent, 5-Azacytidine, on Expression of the Kallikrein-Kinin Genes in Carcinoma Cells of the Lung and Pleura

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Joshua; Sia, Yee Yen; Misso, Neil L.; Aggarwal, Shashi; Ng, Angeline; Bhoola, Kanti D.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue kallikrein (KLK1) and plasma kallikrein (KLKB1) may regulate the growth and proliferation of tumours of the lung and pleura, through the generation of kinin peptides that signal through the kinin B1 (BDKRB1) and B2 (BDKRB2) receptors. The development and progression of cancer results from genetic mutations, as well as epigenetic changes that include methylation of DNA at CpG islands. The aim of this study was to assess whether expression of the kallikrein-kinin genes in lung cancer and mesothelioma cells is regulated by DNA methylation. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR and immunocytochemistry showed differences in the basal expression of the kallikrein-kinin genes and proteins in lung carcinoma and mesothelioma cells, compared with non-malignant lung epithelial and mesothelial cells, respectively. Following treatment with the demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine (5-AZA), KLKB1 mRNA expression was consistently increased in both lung carcinoma and mesothelioma cells, whereas KLK1, BDKRB1 and BDKRB2 mRNA expression was decreased or unchanged. Increased expression of KLKB1 after 5-AZA treatment suggests it may function as a tumour suppressor gene in cancers of the lung and pleura. Studies on DNA methylation of the kallikrein-kinin genes will enhance understanding of their role in carcinogenesis and provide insights into the importance of kallikreins as tumour biomarkers. PMID:21904690

  11. Matriptase initiates activation of epidermal pro-kallikrein and disease onset in a mouse model of Netherton syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sales, Katiuchia Uzzun; Masedunskas, Andrius; Bey, Alexandra L; Rasmussen, Amber L; Weigert, Roberto; List, Karin; Szabo, Roman; Overbeek, Paul A; Bugge, Thomas H

    2010-08-01

    Deficiency in the serine protease inhibitor LEKTI is the etiological origin of Netherton syndrome, which causes detachment of the stratum corneum and chronic inflammation. Here we show that the membrane protease matriptase initiates Netherton syndrome in a LEKTI-deficient mouse model by premature activation of a pro-kallikrein cascade. Auto-activation of pro-inflammatory pro-kallikrein-related peptidases that are associated with stratum corneum detachment was either low or undetectable, but they were efficiently activated by matriptase. Ablation of matriptase from LEKTI-deficient mice dampened inflammation, eliminated aberrant protease activity, prevented detachment of the stratum corneum, and improved the barrier function of the epidermis. These results uncover a pathogenic matriptase-pro-kallikrein pathway that could operate in several human skin and inflammatory diseases. PMID:20657595

  12. Plasma Kallikrein Inhibitors in Cardiovascular Disease: An Innovative Therapeutic Approach.

    PubMed

    Kolte, Dhaval; Shariat-Madar, Zia

    2016-01-01

    Plasma prekallikrein is the liver-derived precursor of the trypsin-like serine protease plasma kallikrein, and circulates in plasma bound to high molecular weight kininogen. Plasma prekallikrein is activated to plasma kallikrein by activated factor XII or prolylcarboxypeptidase. Plasma kallikrein regulates the activity of multiple proteolytic cascades in the cardiovascular system such as the intrinsic pathway of coagulation, the kallikrein-kinin system, the fibrinolytic system, the renin-angiotensin system, and the complement pathways. As such, plasma kallikrein plays a central role in the pathogenesis of thrombosis, inflammation, and blood pressure regulation. Under physiological conditions, plasma kallikrein serves as a cardioprotective enzyme. However, its increased plasma concentration or hyperactivity perpetuates cardiovascular disease (CVD). In this article, we review the biochemistry and cell biology of plasma kallikrein and summarize data from preclinical and clinical studies that have established important functions of this serine protease in CVD states. Finally, we propose plasma kallikrein inhibitors as a novel class of drugs with potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of CVDs. PMID:25853524

  13. α-Klotho Expression in Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kenneth; Groen, Arnoud; Molostvov, Guerman; Lu, Tzongshi; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Snead, David; James, Sean; Wilkinson, Ian B.; Ting, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Context: α-Klotho has emerged as a powerful regulator of the aging process. To date, the expression profile of α-Klotho in human tissues is unknown, and its existence in some human tissue types is subject to much controversy. Objective: This is the first study to characterize systemwide tissue expression of transmembrane α-Klotho in humans. We have employed next-generation targeted proteomic analysis using parallel reaction monitoring in parallel with conventional antibody-based methods to determine the expression and spatial distribution of human α-Klotho expression in health. Results: The distribution of α-Klotho in human tissues from various organ systems, including arterial, epithelial, endocrine, reproductive, and neuronal tissues, was first identified by immunohistochemistry. Kidney tissues showed strong α-Klotho expression, whereas liver did not reveal a detectable signal. These results were next confirmed by Western blotting of both whole tissues and primary cells. To validate our antibody-based results, α-Klotho-expressing tissues were subjected to parallel reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (data deposited at ProteomeXchange, PXD002775) identifying peptides specific for the full-length, transmembrane α-Klotho isoform. Conclusions: The data presented confirm α-Klotho expression in the kidney tubule and in the artery and provide evidence of α-Klotho expression across organ systems and cell types that has not previously been described in humans. PMID:26280509

  14. TiO2 nanoparticles tested in a novel screening whole human blood model of toxicity trigger adverse activation of the kallikrein system at low concentrations.

    PubMed

    Ekstrand-Hammarström, Barbro; Hong, Jaan; Davoodpour, Padideh; Sandholm, Kerstin; Ekdahl, Kristina N; Bucht, Anders; Nilsson, Bo

    2015-05-01

    There is a compelling need to understand and assess the toxicity of industrially produced nanoparticles (NPs). In order to appreciate the long-term effects of NPs, sensitive human-based screening tests that comprehensively map the NP properties are needed to detect possible toxic mechanisms. Animal models can only be used in a limited number of test applications and are subject to ethical concerns, and the interpretation of experiments in animals is also distorted by the species differences. Here, we present a novel easy-to-perform highly sensitive whole-blood model using fresh non-anticoagulated human blood, which most justly reflects complex biological cross talks in a human system. As a demonstrator of the tests versatility, we evaluated the toxicity of TiO2 NPs that are widely used in various applications and otherwise considered to have relatively low toxic properties. We show that TiO2 NPs at very low concentrations (50 ng/mL) induce strong activation of the contact system, which in this model elicits thromboinflammation. These data are in line with the finding of components of the contact system in the protein corona of the TiO2 NPs after exposure to blood. The contact system activation may lead to both thrombotic reactions and generation of bradykinin, thereby representing fuel for chronic inflammation in vivo and potentially long-term risk of autoimmunity, arteriosclerosis and cancer. These results support the notion that this novel whole-blood model represents an important contribution to testing of NP toxicity. PMID:25770998

  15. Use of human tissue explants to study human infectious agents

    PubMed Central

    Grivel, Jean-Charles; Margolis, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    The study of human cell–cell and cell–pathogen interactions that occur in the context of complex tissue cytoarchitecture is critical for deciphering the mechanisms of many normal and pathogenic processes. This protocol describes methods for culturing and infecting explants of human tissues to study the pathogenesis of human infectious agents and their local interactions. The protocol relies on the use of fresh human tissues dissected into small blocks or biopsies that are cultured at the liquid–air interface on collagen rafts. These tissue blocks retain their cytoarchitecture and support productive infection of various pathogens without exogenous stimulation. Experimental details for setting up cultures of human tonsils, lymph nodes and cervicovaginal and rectosigmoid tissues, including protocols for their infection with HIV-1 and other pathogens, are described here. Using this protocol, culture and infections can be set up in 3–6 h and be maintained for 2–3 weeks, depending on the tissue used. PMID:19197269

  16. Grating-based tomography of human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bert; Schulz, Georg; Mehlin, Andrea; Herzen, Julia; Lang, Sabrina; Holme, Margaret; Zanette, Irene; Hieber, Simone; Deyhle, Hans; Beckmann, Felix; Pfeiffer, Franz; Weitkamp, Timm

    2012-07-01

    The development of therapies to improve our health requires a detailed knowledge on the anatomy of soft tissues from the human body down to the cellular level. Grating-based phase contrast micro computed tomography using synchrotron radiation provides a sensitivity, which allows visualizing micrometer size anatomical features in soft tissue without applying any contrast agent. We show phase contrast tomography data of human brain, tumor vessels and constricted arteries from the beamline ID 19 (ESRF) and urethral tissue from the beamline W2 (HASYLAB/DESY) with micrometer resolution. Here, we demonstrate that anatomical features can be identified within brain tissue as well known from histology. Using human urethral tissue, the application of two photon energies is compared. Tumor vessels thicker than 20 μm can be perfectly segmented. The morphology of coronary arteries can be better extracted in formalin than after paraffin embedding.

  17. NCI’s Cooperative Human Tissue Network

    Cancer.gov

    Quality biospecimens are a foundational resource for cancer research. One of NCI’s longest running biospecimen programs is the Cooperative Human Tissue Network, a resource mainly for basic discovery and early translational research.

  18. Variation in alternative splicing across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Gene; Holste, Dirk; Kreiman, Gabriel; Burge, Christopher B

    2004-01-01

    Background Alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS) is widely used by higher eukaryotes to generate different protein isoforms in specific cell or tissue types. To compare AS events across human tissues, we analyzed the splicing patterns of genomically aligned expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from libraries of cDNAs from different tissues. Results Controlling for differences in EST coverage among tissues, we found that the brain and testis had the highest levels of exon skipping. The most pronounced differences between tissues were seen for the frequencies of alternative 3' splice site and alternative 5' splice site usage, which were about 50 to 100% higher in the liver than in any other human tissue studied. Quantifying differences in splice junction usage, the brain, pancreas, liver and the peripheral nervous system had the most distinctive patterns of AS. Analysis of available microarray expression data showed that the liver had the most divergent pattern of expression of serine-arginine protein and heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein genes compared to the other human tissues studied, possibly contributing to the unusually high frequency of alternative splice site usage seen in liver. Sequence motifs enriched in alternative exons in genes expressed in the brain, testis and liver suggest specific splicing factors that may be important in AS regulation in these tissues. Conclusions This study distinguishes the human brain, testis and liver as having unusually high levels of AS, highlights differences in the types of AS occurring commonly in different tissues, and identifies candidate cis-regulatory elements and trans-acting factors likely to have important roles in tissue-specific AS in human cells. PMID:15461793

  19. Melanin content of hamster tissues, human tissues, and various melanomas

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, K.P.; Fairchild, R.G.; Slatkin, D.N.; Greenberg, D.; Packer, S.; Atkins, H.L.; Hannon, S.J.

    1981-02-01

    Melanin content (percentage by weight) was determined in both pigmented and nonpigmented tissues of Syrian golden hamsters bearing Greene melanoma. Melanin content was also measured in various other melanoma models (B-16 in C57 mice, Harding-Passey in BALB/c mice, and KHDD in C3H mice) and in nine human melanomas, as well as in selected normal tissues. The purpose was to evaluate the possible efficacy of chlorpromazine, which is known to bind to melanin, as a vehicle for boron transport in neutron capture therapy. Successful therapy would depend upon selective uptake and absolute concentration of borated compounds in tumors; these parameters will in turn depend upon melanin concentration in melanomas and nonpigmented ''background'' tissues. Hamster whole eyes, hamster melanomas, and other well-pigmented animal melanomas were found to contain 0.3 to 0.8% melanin by weight, whereas human melanomas varied from 0.1 to 0.9% (average, 0.35%). Other tissues, with the exception of skin, were lower in content by a factor of greater than or equal to30. Melanin pigment was extracted from tissues, and the melanin content was determined spectrophotometrically. Measurements were found to be sensitive to the presence of other proteins. Previous procedures for isolating and quantifying melanin often neglected the importance of removing proteins and other interfering nonmelanic substances.

  20. Involvement of Kallikrein-Related Peptidases in Normal and Pathologic Processes

    PubMed Central

    Stefanini, Ana Carolina B.; da Cunha, Bianca Rodrigues; Henrique, Tiago; Tajara, Eloiza H.

    2015-01-01

    Human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are a subgroup of serine proteases that participate in proteolytic pathways and control protein levels in normal physiology as well as in several pathological conditions. Their complex network of stimulatory and inhibitory interactions may induce inflammatory and immune responses and contribute to the neoplastic phenotype through the regulation of several cellular processes, such as proliferation, survival, migration, and invasion. This family of proteases, which includes one of the most useful cancer biomarkers, kallikrein-related peptidase 3 or PSA, also has a protective effect against cancer promoting apoptosis or counteracting angiogenesis and cell proliferation. Therefore, they represent attractive therapeutic targets and may have important applications in clinical oncology. Despite being intensively studied, many gaps in our knowledge on several molecular aspects of KLK functions still exist. This review aims to summarize recent data on their involvement in different processes related to health and disease, in particular those directly or indirectly linked to the neoplastic process. PMID:26783378

  1. Pre-stimulation of the kallikrein system in cisplatin-induced acute renal injury: An approach to renoprotection

    SciTech Connect

    Aburto, Andrés; Barría, Agustín; Cárdenas, Areli; Carpio, Daniel; Figueroa, Carlos D.; Burgos, Maria E.; Ardiles, Leopoldo

    2014-10-15

    Antineoplastic treatment with cisplatin is frequently complicated by nephrotoxicity. Although oxidative stress may be involved, the pathogenic mechanisms responsible for renal damage have not been completely clarified. In order to investigate the role of the renal kinin system in this condition, a group of rats was submitted to high potassium diet to stimulate the synthesis and excretion of tissue kallikrein 1 (rKLK1) previous to an intraperitoneal injection of 7 mg/kg cisplatin. A significant reduction in lipoperoxidation, evidenced by urinary excretion of malondialdehyde and renal immunostaining of hidroxy-nonenal, was accompanied by a decline in apoptosis. Coincident with these findings we observed a reduction in the expression of renal KIM-1 suggesting that renoprotection may be occurring. Stimulation or indemnity of the renal kinin system deserves to be evaluated as a complementary pharmacological measure to diminish cisplatin nephrotoxicity. - Highlights: • Mechanisms of cisplatin-induced-renal damage have not been completely clarified. • Cisplatin induces oxidative stress and apoptosis. • The renal kallikrein-kinin system is protective in experimental acute renal damage. • Kallikrein stimulation reduces oxidative stress and apoptosis induced by cisplatin. • Protection of the kallikrein-kinin system may reduce cisplatin toxicity.

  2. Human histocultures (tissue explants) in retrovirology

    PubMed Central

    Arakelyan, Anush; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Vanpouille, Christophe; Margolis, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    Summary Viral pathogenesis is studied predominantly in cultures of primary isolated cells or cell lines. Many retroviruses efficiently replicate only in activated cells. Therefore, in order to become efficient viral producers cells should be artificially activated, a procedure which significantly changes cell physiology. However, for many viral diseases, like HIV-1 and other retroviruses’ diseases, critical pathogenic events occur in tissues and cell isolation from their native microenvironment prevents single cell cultures from faithfully reflecting important aspects of cell-cell and cell-pathogen interactions that occur in the context of complex tissue cytoarchitecture. Tissue explants (histocultures) that retain tissue cytoarchitecture and many aspects of cell-cell interactions more faithfully represent in vivo tissue features. Human histocultures constitute an adequate model for studying viral pathogenesis under controlled laboratory conditions. Protocols for various human histocultures as applied to study retroviral pathogenesis, in particular of HIV-1, have been refined by our laboratory and are described in the present publication. Human histocultures of human tonsils and lymph nodes, as well as of recto-sigmoid and cervico-vaginal tissues can be used to study viral transmission, pathogenesis and as a pre-clinical platform for antivirals evaluation. PMID:24158827

  3. Prekallikein and kallikrein inhibitor in liver cirrhosis and hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Faciullacci, M; Galli, P; Monetti, M G; Pela, I; Del Bianco, P L

    1976-01-01

    Plasma prekallikrein (kallikreinogen) and kallikrein inhibitor, assayed with the kaolin activable esterase method, have been evaluated in 20 patients with hepatic cirrhosis, in 12 cases with jaundice from acute viral hepatitis, and in 9 normal. A significant reduction of the plasma prekallikrein in cirrhosis has been found. A lowering of plasma prekallikrein has also been observed in viral hepatitis; in this condition, however, the modifications were less important than those obtained in cirrhosis. In three cases of hepatitis, the behaviour of the plasma prekallikrein and kallikrein inhibitor have been controlled during the period of the disease and compared with the behaviour of some conventional parameters, such as serum transaminases and bilirubin. An important increase of the prekallikrein level has been observed during the improvement of hepatitis. These data confirm the implication of the prekallikrein-kallikrein system in severe liver diseases, and indirectly points out the role of the liver in maintaining the physiological balance of the kallikrein system. PMID:1084679

  4. Myeloperoxidase Interacts with Endothelial Cell-Surface Cytokeratin 1 and Modulates Bradykinin Production by the Plasma Kallikrein-Kinin System

    PubMed Central

    Astern, Joshua M.; Pendergraft, William F.; Falk, Ronald J.; Jennette, J. Charles; Schmaier, Alvin H.; Mahdi, Fakhri; Preston, Gloria A.

    2007-01-01

    During an inflammatory state, functional myeloperoxidase (MPO) is released into the vessel as a result of intravascular neutrophil degradation. One mechanism of resulting cellular injury involves endothelial internalization of MPO, which causes oxidative damage and impairs endothelial signaling. We report the discovery of a protein that facilitates MPO internalization, cytokeratin 1 (CK1), identified using affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry. CK1 interacts with MPO in vitro, even in the presence of 100% human plasma, thus substantiating biological relevance. Immunofluorescent microscopy confirmed that MPO added to endothelial cells can co-localize with endogenously expressed CK1. CK1 acts as a scaffolding protein for the assembly of the vasoregulatory plasma kallikrein-kinin system; thus we explored whether MPO and high molecular weight kininogen (HK) reside on CK1 together or whether they compete for binding. The data support cooperative binding of MPO and HK on cells such that MPO masked the plasma kallikrein cleavage site on HK, and MPO-generated oxidants caused inactivation of both HK and kallikrein. Collectively, interactions between MPO and the components of the plasma kallikrein-kinin system resulted in decreased bradykinin production. This study identifies CK1 as a facilitator of MPO-mediated vascular responses and thus provides a new paradigm by which MPO affects vasoregulatory systems. PMID:17591979

  5. Three Dimension Filamentous Human Cardiac Tissue Model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhen; Koo, Sangmo; Finnegan, Micaela A.; Loskill, Peter; Huebsch, Nathaniel; Marks, Natalie C.; Conklin, Bruce R.; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2013-01-01

    A human in vitro cardiac tissue model would be a significant advancement for understanding, studying, and developing new strategies for treating cardiac arrhythmias and related cardiovascular diseases. We developed an in vitro model of three-dimensional (3D) human cardiac tissue by populating synthetic filamentous matrices with cardiomyocytes derived from healthy wild-type volunteer (WT) and patient-specific long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3) induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-CMs) to mimic the condensed and aligned human ventricular myocardium. Using such a highly controllable cardiac model, we studied the contractility malfunctions associated with the electrophysiological consequences of LQT3 and their response to a panel of drugs. By varying the stiffness of filamentous matrices, LQT3 iPS-CMs exhibited different level of contractility abnormality and susceptibility to drug-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:24268663

  6. Frequency domain optical tomography in human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuqi; Wang, Yao; Pei, Yaling; Zhu, Wenwu; Hu, Jenhun; Barbour, Randall L.

    1995-10-01

    In this paper, a reconstruction algorithm for frequency-domain optical tomography in human tissue is presented. A fast and efficient multigrid finite difference (MGFD) method is adopted as a forward solver to obtain the simulated detector responses and the required imaging operator. The solutions obtained form MGFD method for 3D problems with weakly discontinuous cocoefficients are compared with analyzed solutions to determine the accuracy of the numerical method. Simultaneous reconstruction of both absorption and scattering coefficients for tissue-like media is accomplished by solving a perturbation equation using the Born approximation. This solution is obtained by a conjugate gradient descent method with Tikhonov regularization. Two examples are given to show the quality of the reconstruction results. Both involve the examination of anatomically accurate optical models of tissue derived from segmented 3D magnetic resonance images to which have been assigned optical coefficients to the designated tissue types. One is a map of a female breast containing two small 'added pathologies', such as tumors. The other is a map of the brain containing a 'local bleeding' area, representing a hemorrhage. The reconstruction results show that the algorithm is computationally practical and can yield qualitatively correct geometry of the objects embedded in the simulated human tissue. Acceptable results are obtaiend even when 10% noise is present in the data.

  7. 1,2,4-Triazole derivatives as transient inactivators of kallikreins involved in skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiao; Furio, Laetitia; Reboud-Ravaux, Michèle; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Hovnanian, Alain; El Amri, Chahrazade

    2013-08-15

    We describe here 1,2,4-triazoles derivatives identified as transient inactivators acting at the nanomolar level on human kallikreins (hK5, hK7 and hK14) and matriptase. Both the nature of the targeted enzymes and structural variations of the inhibitors influence the life-times of acyl-enzymes. These nonpeptidic, transient and low-molecular-weight inhibitors were found to be noncytotoxic against healthy human keratinocytes. These molecules may be useful to counteract dysregulated proteolytic cascades observed in dermatological disorders such as Netherton syndrome. PMID:23849879

  8. Engineering tissue from human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Metallo, CM; Azarin, SM; Ji, L; De Pablo, JJ; Palecek, SP

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Recent advances in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) biology now offer an alternative cell source for tissue engineers, as these cells are capable of proliferating indefinitely and differentiating to many clinically relevant cell types. Novel culture methods capable of exerting spatial and temporal control over the stem cell microenvironment allow for more efficient expansion of hESCs, and significant advances have been made toward improving our understanding of the biophysical and biochemical cues that direct stem cell fate choices. Effective production of lineage specific progenitors or terminally differentiated cells enables researchers to incorporate hESC derivatives into engineered tissue constructs. Here, we describe current efforts using hESCs as a cell source for tissue engineering applications, highlighting potential advantages of hESCs over current practices as well as challenges which must be overcome. PMID:18194458

  9. Alpha-dispersion in human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimnes, Sverre; Martinsen, Ørjan G.

    2010-04-01

    Beta dispersion is found in living tissue in the kilohertz - megahertz range and is caused by the cellular structure of biological materials with low frequency properties caused by cell membranes. Alpha dispersion is found in the hertz range and the causes are not so well known. Alpha dispersions are the first to disappear when tissue dies. Tissue data have often been based upon excised specimen from animals and are therefore not necessarily representative for human tissue alpha dispersions. Here we present data obtained with non-invasive skin surface electrodes for different segments of the living human body. We found alpha dispersions in all cases; the ankle-wrist results had the smallest. Large alpha dispersions were found where the distance between the electrodes and muscle masses was small, e.g. on the calf. Further studies on electrode technique and reciprocity, electrode positioning, statistical variations, gender, age and bodily constitutions are necessary in order to reveal more about the alpha dispersion, its appearance and disappearance.

  10. Identification by in silico and in vitro screenings of small organic molecules acting as reversible inhibitors of kallikreins.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiao; Bertonati, Claudia; Qin, Lixian; Furio, Laetitia; El Amri, Chahrazade; Hovnanian, Alain; Reboud-Ravaux, Michèle; Villoutreix, Bruno O

    2013-01-01

    Netherton syndrome is caused by loss-of-function mutations in SPINK5 encoding the Kazal-type inhibitor LEKTI-1 leading to dysregulation of proteolytic cascades involving several kallikreins. We used both structure-based and ligand-based virtual screening computations to identify commercially available non-covalent inhibitors of human kallikrein 5 (hK5), a serine protease (trypsin-like) that plays a central role in the initiation of the molecular cascades leading to the Netherton syndrome phenotype. The efficacy and mechanism of inhibition of the identified new families of organic compounds were analyzed not only for hK5 but also on other proteases implicated in the cascades (hK7, hK14 and matriptase). These inhibitors are nontoxic on healthy human keratinocytes and are structurally different from traditional serine protease inhibitors validating their potential utility as initial hits to control proteolytic disorders observed in dermatological pathologies such as Netherton syndrome. PMID:24211642

  11. Sorption studies of human keratinized tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, G. K.; Martinsen, Ø. G.; Grimnes, Sverre

    2010-04-01

    Water content is known to be the most important single parameter for keratinized tissue to remain its vital functions. In that sense, a general knowledge of the water binding properties is of great interest, and a reliable measurement setup must be found. Also, revealing the sorption properties of human keratinized tissues is vital towards a calibration of susceptance based skin hydration measurements that already is an important diagnostic tool in clinical dermatology, and we will see that any hysteresis will complicate such a calibration further. In this study we investigated the sorption properties of keratinized tissues such as human epidermal stratum corneum (SC), hair and nail. The study was performed under controlled environmental conditions with a dynamic vapor sorption (DVS) instrument, and the water uptake of the keratinized test samples was measured as the relative humidity in the ambient air was altered step-wisely. In this study, vital and characteristic water sorption properties such as the isotherm, relative water uptake, and hysteresis were investigated and will be discussed.

  12. Kallikrein-related peptidase 8 is expressed in myocardium and induces cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Buqing; Yu, Qing; Zhao, Wei; Tang, Zhiping; Cong, Binghai; Du, Jiankui; Lu, Jianqiang; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Ni, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The tissue kallikrein-related peptidase family (KLK) is a group of trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like serine proteases that share a similar homology to parent tissue kallikrein (KLK1). KLK1 is identified in heart and has anti-hypertrophic effects. However, whether other KLK family members play a role in regulating cardiac function remains unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated for the first time that KLK8 was expressed in myocardium. KLK8 expression was upregulated in left ventricle of cardiac hypertrophy models. Both intra-cardiac adenovirus-mediated and transgenic-mediated KLK8 overexpression led to cardiac hypertrophy in vivo. In primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, KLK8 knockdown inhibited phenylephrine (PE)-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, whereas KLK8 overexpression promoted cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via a serine protease activity-dependent but kinin receptor-independent pathway. KLK8 overexpression increased epidermal growth factor (EGF) production, which was blocked by the inhibitors of serine protease. EGF receptor (EGFR) antagonist and EGFR knockdown reversed the hypertrophy induced by KLK8 overexpression. KLK8-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was also significantly decreased by blocking the protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) or PAR2 pathway. Our data suggest that KLK8 may promote cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through EGF signaling- and PARs-dependent but a kinin receptor-independent pathway. It is implied that different KLK family members can subtly regulate cardiac function and remodeling. PMID:26823023

  13. Finite Element Modeling of Human Placental Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mao; Manoogian, Sarah; Duma, Stefan M.; Stitzel, Joel D.

    2009-01-01

    Motor vehicle crashes account for a large portion of placental abruption and fetal losses. To better understand the material properties of the human placenta, a Finite Element (FE) model of human placenta tissue was created and verified using data from uniaxial tension tests. Sixty-four tensile tests at three different strain rates of 7% strain/s, 70% strain/s, and 700% strain/s from six whole human placentas were used for model development. Nominal stresses were calculated by dividing forces at the grips by the original cross-sectional area. Nominal strains were calculated by dividing cross-head displacement by the original gauge length. A detailed methodology for interpreting experimental data for application to material model development is presented. A model of the tension coupon was created in LS-DYNA and stretched in the same manner as the uniaxial tension tests. The behavior of the material was optimized to the uniaxial tension test using a multi-island genetic algorithm. The results demonstrate good correlation between experiments and the model, with an average difference of 2% between the optimized FE and experimental first principal stress at the termination state. The material parameters found in this study can be utilized in FE models of placental tissues for behavior under dynamic loading. PMID:20184849

  14. Effect of Kallikrein 4 Loss on Enamel Mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Charles E.; Richardson, Amelia S.; Hu, Yuanyuan; Bartlett, John D.; Hu, Jan C-C.; Simmer, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Enamel formation depends on a triad of tissue-specific matrix proteins (amelogenin, ameloblastin, and enamelin) to help initiate and stabilize progressively elongating, thin mineral ribbons of hydroxyapatite formed during an appositional growth phase. Subsequently, these proteins are eradicated to facilitate lateral expansion of the hydroxyapatite crystallites. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in enamel mineralization occurring in mice unable to produce kallikrein 4 (Klk4), a proteinase associated with terminal extracellular degradation of matrix proteins during the maturation stage. Mice lacking functional matrix metalloproteinase 20 (Mmp20), a proteinase associated with early cleavage of matrix proteins during the secretory stage, were also analyzed as a frame of reference. The results indicated that mice lacking Klk4 produce enamel that is normal in thickness and overall organization in terms of layers and rod/inter-rod structure, but there is a developmental defect in enamel rods where they first form near the dentinoenamel junction. Mineralization is normal up to early maturation after which the enamel both retains and gains additional proteins and is unable to mature beyond 85% mineral by weight. The outmost enamel is hard, but inner regions are soft and contain much more protein than normal. The rate of mineral acquisition overall is lower by 25%. Mice lacking functional Mmp20 produce enamel that is thin and structurally abnormal. Relatively high amounts of protein remain throughout maturation, but the enamel is able to change from 67 to 75% mineral by weight during maturation. These findings reaffirm the importance of secreted proteinases to enamel mineral acquisition. PMID:21454549

  15. Hippocampus and epilepsy: Findings from human tissues.

    PubMed

    Huberfeld, G; Blauwblomme, T; Miles, R

    2015-03-01

    Surgical removal of the epileptogenic zone provides an effective therapy for several focal epileptic syndromes. This surgery offers the opportunity to study pathological activity in living human tissue for pharmacoresistant partial epilepsy syndromes including temporal lobe epilepsies with hippocampal sclerosis, cortical dysplasias, epilepsies associated with tumors and developmental malformations. Slices of tissue from patients with these syndromes retain functional neuronal networks and may generate epileptic activities. The properties of cells in this tissue may not be greatly changed, but excitatory synaptic transmission is often enhanced and GABAergic inhibition is preserved. Typically epileptic activity is not generated spontaneously by the neocortex, whether dysplastic or not, but can be induced by convulsants. The initiation of ictal discharges in the neocortex depends on both GABAergic signaling and increased extracellular potassium. In contrast, a spontaneous interictal-like activity is generated by tissues from patients with temporal lobe epilepsies associated with hippocampal sclerosis. This activity is initiated, not in the hippocampus but in the subiculum, an output region, which projects to the entorhinal cortex. Interictal events seem to be triggered by GABAergic cells, which paradoxically excite about 20% of subicular pyramidal cells while simultaneously inhibiting the majority. Interictal discharges thus depend on both GABAergic and glutamatergic signaling. The depolarizing effects of GABA depend on a pathological elevation in levels of chloride in some subicular cells, similar to those of developmentally immature cells. Such defect is caused by a perturbed expression of the cotransporters regulating intracellular chloride concentration, the importer NKCC1 and the extruder KCC2. Blockade of NKCC1 actions by the diuretic bumetanide restores intracellular chloride and thus hyperpolarizing GABAergic actions and consequently suppressing interictal

  16. Hippocampus and epilepsy: findings from human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Huberfeld, Gilles; Blauwblomme, Thomas; Miles, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Surgical removal of the epileptogenic zone provides an effective therapy for several epileptic syndromes. This surgery offers the opportunity to study pathological activity in living human tissue for pharmacoresistant partial epilepsy syndromes including (1) temporal lobe epilepsies with hippocampal sclerosis, (2) cortical dysplasias, (3) epilepsies associated with tumors and (4) developmental malformations. Slices of tissue from patient with these syndromes retain functional neuronal networks and may generate epileptic activities. The properties of cells in this tissue may not be greatly changed, but excitatory synaptic transmission is often enhanced and GABAergic inhibition is preserved. Typically epileptic activity is not generated spontaneously by the neocortex, whether dysplastic or not, but can be induced by convulsants. The initiation of ictal discharges in neocortex depends on both GABAergic signaling and increased extracellular potassium. In contrast, a spontaneous interictal-like activity is generated by tissues from patients with temporal lobe epilepsies associated with hippocampal sclerosis. This activity is initiated, not in the hippocampus but in the subiculum an output region which projects to the entorhinal cortex. Interictal events seem to be triggered by GABAergic cells which paradoxically excite about 20% of subicular pyramidal cells while simultaneously inhibiting the majority. Interictal discharges thus depend on both GABAergic and glutamatergic signaling. The depolarizing effects of GABA depend on a pathological elevation in levels of chloride in some subicular cells, similar to those of developmentally immature cells. Such defect is caused by a perturbed expression of the cotransporters regulating intracellular chloride concentration, the importer NKCC1 and the extruder KCC2. Blockade of NKCC1 actions by the diuretic bumetanide, restores intracellular chloride and thus hyperpolarizing GABAergic actions so suppressing interictal activity. PMID

  17. Effects of restriction of sodium or administration of fludrocortisone on parotid salivary kallikrein in man.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, D; Proud, D; Lawton, W J; Yates, K N; Highet, P; Pisano, J J; Keiser, H R

    1982-07-01

    Urinary kallikrein is increased by restriction of dietary sodium and by administration of fludrocortisone, a sodium-retaining steroid. In order to determine whether salivary kallikrein responds similarly, we studied 16 normal volunteers after 1-week periods of daily intake of 9, 109, and 259 mEQ of sodium; 10 subjects were studied after addition of 0.6 mg/day fludrocortisone for a week to a regimen of 109 mEq/day sodium. During sodium restriction, parotid saliva had a significantly higher mean concentration of kallikrein ad potassium and a significantly lower concentration of sodium than during periods of intake of 109 or 259 mEq/day sodium. Sodium restriction also caused significantly higher urinary excretion of kallikrein and aldosterone. Salivary amylase remained unchanged during the three sodium periods. Administration of fludrocortisone significantly increased the mean concentration of parotid kallikrein and excretion of urinary kallikrein in comparison with control levels, however the concentrations of parotid sodium and potassium did not change significantly. Four patients studied before and after removal of aldosterone-producing adenomas each showed decreased concentrations of parotid kallikrein and potassium and increased concentrations of parotid sodium after surgery. It is concluded that both salivary and urinary kallikrein increased in response to restriction of sodium and that these increases were mediated by levels of sodium-retaining steroid. Increased output of kallikrein in response to increased levels of sodium-retaining steroid may be a generalized response of organs that contain glandular kallikrein and can conserve sodium. PMID:6919568

  18. Proteomics. Tissue-based map of the human proteome.

    PubMed

    Uhlén, Mathias; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Lindskog, Cecilia; Oksvold, Per; Mardinoglu, Adil; Sivertsson, Åsa; Kampf, Caroline; Sjöstedt, Evelina; Asplund, Anna; Olsson, IngMarie; Edlund, Karolina; Lundberg, Emma; Navani, Sanjay; Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili; Odeberg, Jacob; Djureinovic, Dijana; Takanen, Jenny Ottosson; Hober, Sophia; Alm, Tove; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Berling, Holger; Tegel, Hanna; Mulder, Jan; Rockberg, Johan; Nilsson, Peter; Schwenk, Jochen M; Hamsten, Marica; von Feilitzen, Kalle; Forsberg, Mattias; Persson, Lukas; Johansson, Fredric; Zwahlen, Martin; von Heijne, Gunnar; Nielsen, Jens; Pontén, Fredrik

    2015-01-23

    Resolving the molecular details of proteome variation in the different tissues and organs of the human body will greatly increase our knowledge of human biology and disease. Here, we present a map of the human tissue proteome based on an integrated omics approach that involves quantitative transcriptomics at the tissue and organ level, combined with tissue microarray-based immunohistochemistry, to achieve spatial localization of proteins down to the single-cell level. Our tissue-based analysis detected more than 90% of the putative protein-coding genes. We used this approach to explore the human secretome, the membrane proteome, the druggable proteome, the cancer proteome, and the metabolic functions in 32 different tissues and organs. All the data are integrated in an interactive Web-based database that allows exploration of individual proteins, as well as navigation of global expression patterns, in all major tissues and organs in the human body. PMID:25613900

  19. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE...

  20. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE...

  1. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE...

  2. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE...

  3. 21 CFR 1270.42 - Human tissue offered for import.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Human tissue offered for import. 1270.42 Section 1270.42 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION HUMAN TISSUE...

  4. Imaging the Human Body: Micro- and Nanostructure of Human Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Müller, Bert

    Computed tomography based on X-rays is known to provide the best spatial resolution of all clinical three-dimensional imaging facilities and currently reaches a fraction of a millimeter. Better spatial and density resolution is obtained by means of micro computed tomography well established in the field of materials science. It is also very supportive imaging human tissues down to the level of individual cells (Lareida et al. J. Microsc. 234:95, 2009). The article demonstrates the power of micro computed tomography for imaging parts of the human body such as teeth, inner ear, cerebellum, tumors, and urethral tissue with conventional X-ray sources and synchrotron radiation facilities in absorption and phase contrast modes. The second part of the chapter relies on scanning X-ray scattering of tooth slices (Müller et al. Eur. J. Clin. Nanomed. 3:30, 2010) to uncover the presence of nanostructures including their anisotropy and orientation. This imaging technique gives unrivalled insights for medical experts, which will have a major influence on fields such as dental and incontinence treatments.

  5. Gene Electrotransfer in 3D Reconstructed Human Dermal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Madi, Moinecha; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Gibot, Laure

    2016-01-01

    Gene electrotransfer into the skin is of particular interest for the development of medical applications including DNA vaccination, cancer treatment, wound healing or treatment of local skin disorders. However, such clinical applications are currently limited due to poor understanding of the mechanisms governing DNA electrotransfer within human tissue. Nowadays, most studies are carried out in rodent models but rodent skin varies from human skin in terms of cell composition and architecture. We used a tissue-engineering approach to study gene electrotransfer mechanisms in a human tissue context. Primary human dermal fibroblasts were cultured according to the self-assembly method to produce 3D reconstructed human dermal tissue. In this study, we showed that cells of the reconstructed cutaneous tissue were efficiently electropermeabilized by applying millisecond electric pulses, without affecting their viability. A reporter gene was successfully electrotransferred into this human tissue and gene expression was detected for up to 48h. Interestingly, the transfected cells were solely located on the upper surface of the tissue, where they were in close contact with plasmid DNA solution. Furthermore, we report evidences that electrotransfection success depends on plasmid mobility within tissue- rich in collagens, but not on cell proliferation status. In conclusion, in addition to proposing a reliable alternative to animal experiments, tissue engineering produces valid biological tool for the in vitro study of gene electrotransfer mechanisms in human tissue. PMID:27029947

  6. Studies on the Interaction between Collagen and a Plasma Kallikrein-Like Activity EVIDENCE FOR A SURFACE-ACTIVE ENZYME SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Harpel, Peter C.

    1972-01-01

    This study has demonstrated that collagen particles, after exposure to platelet-poor human plasma and subsequent washing, generate a kinin-like agent when incubated with prekinin substrate. The binding of kinin-generating activity to collagen in the plasma collagen incubation mixture occurs rapidly, whereas the loss of this activity in the incubation mixture occurs relatively slowly. The Hageman factor appeared to be necessary for the surface-bound kinin-generating activity, as this activity was absent in collagen exposed to Hageman factor-deficient plasma. These studies have partially characterized the plasma-derived enzymatic activity bound to collagen. Incubation of collagen with plasma caused a concentration-dependent reduction in the kinin-producing activity which was generated by the addition of ellagic acid, a known activator of plasma kallikrein. The kinin-inducing activity bound to collagen is inhibited by soybean trypsin inhibitor, Trasylol, serum C1̄ inactivator and the plasma α2-macroglobulin, but not by lima bean trypsin inhibitor. An eluate prepared from plasma-treated collagen, when compared with purified plasma kallikrein, shared a similar inhibitor profile. Selective chemical blockage of the free carboxyl groups on the collagen molecule, or heat denaturation, inactivated the ability of the collagen to generate kinin-like activity after incubation with plasma. Removal of the collagen telopeptides or blockage of the free amino groups failed to affect the collagen-plasma interaction. The binding of partially purified plasma kallikrein to collagen was found to have similar structural and chemical requirements. These data indicate that there is a structural and chemical specificity for the activation and binding of plasma kallikrein-like activity by collagen. These studies suggest that a plasma kallikrein may function as a surface-bound enzyme system. PMID:4338122

  7. Transplantation of a tissue-engineered human vascularized cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Lesman, Ayelet; Habib, Manhal; Caspi, Oren; Gepstein, Amira; Arbel, Gil; Levenberg, Shulamit; Gepstein, Lior

    2010-01-01

    Myocardial regeneration strategies have been hampered by the lack of sources for human cardiomyocytes (CMs) and by the significant donor cell loss following transplantation. We assessed the ability of a three-dimensional tissue-engineered human vascularized cardiac muscle to engraft in the in vivo rat heart and to promote functional vascularization. Human embryonic stem cell-derived CMs alone or with human endothelial cells (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) and embryonic fibroblasts (triculture constructs) were seeded onto biodegradable porous scaffolds. The resulting tissue constructs were transplanted to the in vivo rat heart and formed cardiac tissue grafts. Immunostaining studies for human-specific CD31 and alpha-smooth muscle actin demonstrated the formation of both donor (human) and host (rat)-derived vasculature within the engrafted triculture tissue constructs. Intraventricular injection of fluorescent microspheres or lectin resulted in their incorporation by human-derived vessels, confirming their functional integration with host coronary vasculature. Finally, the number of blood vessels was significantly greater in the triculture tissue constructs (60.3 +/- 8/mm(3), p < 0.05) when compared with scaffolds containing only CMs (39.0 +/- 14.4/mm(3)). In conclusion, a tissue-engineered human vascularized cardiac muscle can be established ex vivo and transplanted in vivo to form stable grafts. By utilizing a multicellular preparation we were able to increase biograft vascularization and to show that the preexisting human vessels can become functional and contribute to tissue perfusion. PMID:19642856

  8. Fluorescence Lifetimes of Normal and Carcinomatous Human Nasopharyngeal Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M.; Li, H.; Li, B.; Chen, R.; Zheng, G.; Song, C.

    2016-03-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence spectra of normal and carcinomatous in vitro human nasopharyngeal tissues are compared. By fitting the time-resolved emission with exponential decays, mean lifetimes were obtained. There were marked differences between the lifetimes of the carcinomatous and the normal tissues. Thus, early diagnosis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma is possible. In general, comprehensive information from human tissue autofluorescence can be acquired via both time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence spectra.

  9. The human transcriptome across tissues and individuals

    PubMed Central

    Melé, Marta; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Reverter, Ferran; DeLuca, David S.; Monlong, Jean; Sammeth, Michael; Young, Taylor R.; Goldmann, Jakob M; Pervouchine, Dmitri D.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Johnson, Rory; Segrè, Ayellet V.; Djebali, Sarah; Niarchou, Anastasia; Wright, Fred A.; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Calvo, Miquel; Getz, Gad; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Ardlie, Kristin G.; Guigó, Roderic

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation and posttranscriptional processing underlie many cellular and organismal phenotypes. We used RNA sequence data generated by Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project to investigate the patterns of transcriptome variation across individuals and tissues. Tissues exhibit characteristic transcriptional signatures that show stability in postmortem samples. These signatures are dominated by a relatively small number of genes—which is most clearly seen in blood—though few are exclusive to a particular tissue and vary more across tissues than individuals. Genes exhibiting high interindividual expression variation include disease candidates associated with sex, ethnicity, and age. Primary transcription is the major driver of cellular specificity, with splicing playing mostly a complementary role; except for the brain, which exhibits a more divergent splicing program. Variation in splicing, despite its stochasticity, may play in contrast a comparatively greater role in defining individual phenotypes. PMID:25954002

  10. Predicting DNA methylation level across human tissues.

    PubMed

    Ma, Baoshan; Wilker, Elissa H; Willis-Owen, Saffron A G; Byun, Hyang-Min; Wong, Kenny C C; Motta, Valeria; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Schwartz, Joel; Cookson, William O C M; Khabbaz, Kamal; Mittleman, Murray A; Moffatt, Miriam F; Liang, Liming

    2014-04-01

    Differences in methylation across tissues are critical to cell differentiation and are key to understanding the role of epigenetics in complex diseases. In this investigation, we found that locus-specific methylation differences between tissues are highly consistent across individuals. We developed a novel statistical model to predict locus-specific methylation in target tissue based on methylation in surrogate tissue. The method was evaluated in publicly available data and in two studies using the latest IlluminaBeadChips: a childhood asthma study with methylation measured in both peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and lymphoblastoid cell lines; and a study of postoperative atrial fibrillation with methylation in PBL, atrium and artery. We found that our method can greatly improve accuracy of cross-tissue prediction at CpG sites that are variable in the target tissue [R(2) increases from 0.38 (original R(2) between tissues) to 0.89 for PBL-to-artery prediction; from 0.39 to 0.95 for PBL-to-atrium; and from 0.81 to 0.98 for lymphoblastoid cell line-to-PBL based on cross-validation, and confirmed using cross-study prediction]. An extended model with multiple CpGs further improved performance. Our results suggest that large-scale epidemiology studies using easy-to-access surrogate tissues (e.g. blood) could be recalibrated to improve understanding of epigenetics in hard-to-access tissues (e.g. atrium) and might enable non-invasive disease screening using epigenetic profiles. PMID:24445802

  11. Predicting DNA methylation level across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Baoshan; Wilker, Elissa H.; Willis-Owen, Saffron A. G.; Byun, Hyang-Min; Wong, Kenny C. C.; Motta, Valeria; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Schwartz, Joel; Cookson, William O. C. M.; Khabbaz, Kamal; Mittleman, Murray A.; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Liang, Liming

    2014-01-01

    Differences in methylation across tissues are critical to cell differentiation and are key to understanding the role of epigenetics in complex diseases. In this investigation, we found that locus-specific methylation differences between tissues are highly consistent across individuals. We developed a novel statistical model to predict locus-specific methylation in target tissue based on methylation in surrogate tissue. The method was evaluated in publicly available data and in two studies using the latest IlluminaBeadChips: a childhood asthma study with methylation measured in both peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and lymphoblastoid cell lines; and a study of postoperative atrial fibrillation with methylation in PBL, atrium and artery. We found that our method can greatly improve accuracy of cross-tissue prediction at CpG sites that are variable in the target tissue [R2 increases from 0.38 (original R2 between tissues) to 0.89 for PBL-to-artery prediction; from 0.39 to 0.95 for PBL-to-atrium; and from 0.81 to 0.98 for lymphoblastoid cell line-to-PBL based on cross-validation, and confirmed using cross-study prediction]. An extended model with multiple CpGs further improved performance. Our results suggest that large-scale epidemiology studies using easy-to-access surrogate tissues (e.g. blood) could be recalibrated to improve understanding of epigenetics in hard-to-access tissues (e.g. atrium) and might enable non-invasive disease screening using epigenetic profiles. PMID:24445802

  12. LRRC31 is induced by IL-13 and regulates kallikrein expression and barrier function in the esophageal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    D’Mello, RJ; Caldwell, JM; Azouz, NP; Wen, T; Sherrill, JD; Hogan, SP; Rothenberg, ME

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergic inflammatory disease of the esophagus featuring increased esophageal interleukin 13 (IL-13) levels and impaired barrier function. Herein, we investigated leucine-rich repeat–containing protein 31 (LRRC31) in human EoE esophageal tissue and IL-13–treated esophageal epithelial cells. LRRC31 had basal mRNA expression in colonic and airway mucosal epithelium. Esophageal LRRC31 mRNA and protein increased in active EoE and strongly correlated with esophageal eosinophilia and IL13 and CCL26 mRNA expression. IL-13 treatment increased LRRC31 mRNA and protein in air-liquid interface–differentiated esophageal epithelial cells (EPC2s). At baseline, differentiated LRRC31-overexpressing EPC2s had increased barrier function (1.9-fold increase in transepithelial electrical resistance [P < 0.05] and 2.8-fold decrease in paracellular flux [P < 0.05]). RNA sequencing analysis of differentiated LRRC31-overexpressing EPC2s identified 38 dysregulated genes (P < 0.05), including 5 kallikrein (KLK) serine proteases. Notably, differentiated LRRC31-overexpressing EPC2s had decreased KLK expression and activity, whereas IL-13–treated, differentiated LRRC31 gene-silenced EPC2s had increased KLK expression and suprabasal epithelial detachment. We identified similarly dysregulated KLK expression in the esophagus of patients with active EoE and in IL-13–treated esophageal epithelial cells. We propose that LRRC31 is induced by IL-13 and modulates epithelial barrier function, potentially through KLK regulation. PMID:26462420

  13. Urinary kallikrein in the rat: stimulation with angiotensin infusion but depression with increasing sodium concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, I H; Lee, G; Brownlee, A A

    1994-01-01

    1. The kallikrein response to angiotensin II infusion in the conscious rat was studied to compare it with the response in the dog. 2. Active kallikrein was measured by the aprotinin-suppressible esterase technique in 20 min periods. Angiotensin (5 x 10(-9) to 5 x 10(-2) micrograms min-1) was infused in 10 mM saline in period 10 (group A), or in 90 mM saline in periods 10-12 (group B). 3. In group A, no dose of angiotensin was antinatriuretic. Natriuresis and urinary sodium concentration were dose dependent. 4. Kallikrein excretion was dose dependent with angiotensin (P < 0.0001) and inversely correlated with urinary sodium concentration (P = 0.011). In natriuretic and non-natriuretic rats, kallikrein excretion after angiotensin was inversely correlated with urinary sodium concentration in the preceding period. 5. In group B, natriuresis and urinary sodium concentration were dose dependent. Kallikrein excretion in periods 10-13 was inversely correlated with urinary sodium concentration in the preceding period (P = 0.0001) and inversely correlated with urinary osmolality in periods 9-13. 6. Infusion of angiotensin II at 5 x 10(-6) micrograms min-1 led to antinatriuresis. 7. Formulae were derived which enabled the opposing effects of angiotensin and urinary sodium concentration on kallikrein excretion to be separated. In group A both these effects were statistically significant only in the natriuretic rats (natriuresis > 20 mumols per period). In group B the formulae showed a dose-dependent rise in kallikrein excretion, which was counteracted by the decrease in kallikrein excretion associated with the increasing urinary sodium concentration. 8. With infusions of 0.9% saline, kallikrein excretion in periods 10-13 was inversely correlated with urinary sodium concentration in the preceding period (P = 0.001). 9. The overall effect in the rat differs from that in the dog, where kallikrein increases with angiotensin natriuresis and dilution of the urine occurs. PMID

  14. Depth-resolved fluorescence of human ectocervical tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yicong; Xi, Peng; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Yim, So Fan; Yu, Mei-Yung; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2005-04-01

    The depth-resolved autofluorescence of normal and dysplastic human ectocervical tissue within 120um depth were investigated utilizing a portable confocal fluorescence spectroscopy with the excitations at 355nm and 457nm. From the topmost keratinizing layer of all ectocervical tissue samples, strong keratin fluorescence with the spectral characteristics similar to collagen was observed, which created serious interference in seeking the correlation between tissue fluorescence and tissue pathology. While from the underlying non-keratinizing epithelial layer, the measured NADH fluorescence induced by 355nm excitation and FAD fluorescence induced by 457nm excitation were strongly correlated to the tissue pathology. The ratios between NADH over FAD fluorescence increased statistically in the CIN epithelial relative to the normal and HPV epithelia, which indicated increased metabolic activity in precancerous tissue. This study demonstrates that the depth-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy can reveal fine structural information on epithelial tissue and potentially provide more accurate diagnostic information for determining tissue pathology.

  15. Analysis of human breast tissues with Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Jianhong; Yu, Fan; Sun, Shizhong

    2006-01-01

    Raman microspectroscopy was used to study normal, benign and malignant human breast tissues. The Raman spectrum of normal breast tissue recorded with 514.5 nm line of Ar + laser excitation contains features attributed to carotenoids and lipids. The CH II bending mode near 1447 cm -1 in normal tissue shifts up to 1454 cm -1 in diseased tissues (benign and malignant). The band near 1660 cm -1 in normal tissue is narrow and sharp; whereas the band is broaden in the diseased tissues. In the region of C-H stretching mode, the 2902-/2860-cm -1 intensity ratio shows differences among normal, benign and malignant breast tissues. The ratio is the smallest in carcinoma tissue. The observed spectra differences may be used to probe breast lesion. The results show that Raman spectroscopic technique may have clinical applications.

  16. Kallistatin ameliorates influenza virus pathogenesis by inhibition of kallikrein-related peptidase 1-mediated cleavage of viral hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Leu, Chia-Hsing; Yang, Mei-Lin; Chung, Nai-Hui; Huang, Yen-Jang; Su, Yu-Chu; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Chia-Cheng; Shieh, Gia-Shing; Chang, Meng-Ya; Wang, Shainn-Wei; Chang, Yao; Chao, Julie; Chao, Lee; Wu, Chao-Liang; Shiau, Ai-Li

    2015-09-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of the hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus by host trypsin-like proteases is required for viral infectivity. Some serine proteases are capable of cleaving influenza virus HA, whereas some serine protease inhibitors (serpins) inhibit the HA cleavage in various cell types. Kallikrein-related peptidase 1 (KLK1, also known as tissue kallikrein) is a widely distributed serine protease. Kallistatin, a serpin synthesized mainly in the liver and rapidly secreted into the circulation, forms complexes with KLK1 and inhibits its activity. Here, we investigated the roles of KLK1 and kallistatin in influenza virus infection. We show that the levels of KLK1 increased, whereas those of kallistatin decreased, in the lungs of mice during influenza virus infection. KLK1 cleaved H1, H2, and H3 HA molecules and consequently enhanced viral production. In contrast, kallistatin inhibited KLK1-mediated HA cleavage and reduced viral production. Cells transduced with the kallistatin gene secreted kallistatin extracellularly, which rendered them more resistant to influenza virus infection. Furthermore, lentivirus-mediated kallistatin gene delivery protected mice against lethal influenza virus challenge by reducing the viral load, inflammation, and injury in the lung. Taking the data together, we determined that KLK1 and kallistatin contribute to the pathogenesis of influenza virus by affecting the cleavage of the HA peptide and inflammatory responses. This study provides a proof of principle for the potential therapeutic application of kallistatin or other KLK1 inhibitors for influenza. Since proteolytic activation also enhances the infectivity of some other viruses, kallistatin and other kallikrein inhibitors may be explored as antiviral agents against these viruses. PMID:26149981

  17. Identification of progesterone receptor in human subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, S N; Welter, B H; Mantzke, K A; Price, T M

    1998-02-01

    Sex steroids are postulated to play a role in adipose tissue regulation and distribution, because the amount and location of adipose tissue changes during puberty and menopause. Because of the nature of adipose tissue, receptors for the female sex steroids have been difficult to demonstrate. To date, estrogen receptor messenger RNA and protein have been identified in human subcutaneous adipose tissue, but the presence of progesterone receptor (PR) has not been reported. In this study, we demonstrate PR message by Northern blot analysis in RNA isolated from the abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue of premenopausal women. These preliminary studies revealed that PR messenger RNA levels are higher in the stromal-vascular fraction as opposed to the adipocyte fraction. Western blot analysis demonstrates both PR protein isoforms (human PR-A and human PR-B) in human subcutaneous adipose tissue. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, total PR could be quantitated. These studies substantiate that sex steroid receptors are present in human adipose tissue, thereby providing a direct route for regulation of adipose tissue by female sex steroids. PMID:9467566

  18. Distribution of miRNA expression across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Nicole; Leidinger, Petra; Becker, Kurt; Backes, Christina; Fehlmann, Tobias; Pallasch, Christian; Rheinheimer, Steffi; Meder, Benjamin; Stähler, Cord; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We present a human miRNA tissue atlas by determining the abundance of 1997 miRNAs in 61 tissue biopsies of different organs from two individuals collected post-mortem. One thousand three hundred sixty-four miRNAs were discovered in at least one tissue, 143 were present in each tissue. To define the distribution of miRNAs, we utilized a tissue specificity index (TSI). The majority of miRNAs (82.9%) fell in a middle TSI range i.e. were neither specific for single tissues (TSI > 0.85) nor housekeeping miRNAs (TSI < 0.5). Nonetheless, we observed many different miRNAs and miRNA families that were predominantly expressed in certain tissues. Clustering of miRNA abundances revealed that tissues like several areas of the brain clustered together. Considering -3p and -5p mature forms we observed miR-150 with different tissue specificity. Analysis of additional lung and prostate biopsies indicated that inter-organism variability was significantly lower than inter-organ variability. Tissue-specific differences between the miRNA patterns appeared not to be significantly altered by storage as shown for heart and lung tissue. MiRNAs TSI values of human tissues were significantly (P = 10−8) correlated with those of rats; miRNAs that were highly abundant in certain human tissues were likewise abundant in according rat tissues. We implemented a web-based repository enabling scientists to access and browse the data (https://ccb-web.cs.uni-saarland.de/tissueatlas). PMID:26921406

  19. Distribution of miRNA expression across human tissues.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Nicole; Leidinger, Petra; Becker, Kurt; Backes, Christina; Fehlmann, Tobias; Pallasch, Christian; Rheinheimer, Steffi; Meder, Benjamin; Stähler, Cord; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    We present a human miRNA tissue atlas by determining the abundance of 1997 miRNAs in 61 tissue biopsies of different organs from two individuals collected post-mortem. One thousand three hundred sixty-four miRNAs were discovered in at least one tissue, 143 were present in each tissue. To define the distribution of miRNAs, we utilized a tissue specificity index (TSI). The majority of miRNAs (82.9%) fell in a middle TSI range i.e. were neither specific for single tissues (TSI > 0.85) nor housekeeping miRNAs (TSI < 0.5). Nonetheless, we observed many different miRNAs and miRNA families that were predominantly expressed in certain tissues. Clustering of miRNA abundances revealed that tissues like several areas of the brain clustered together. Considering -3p and -5p mature forms we observed miR-150 with different tissue specificity. Analysis of additional lung and prostate biopsies indicated that inter-organism variability was significantly lower than inter-organ variability. Tissue-specific differences between the miRNA patterns appeared not to be significantly altered by storage as shown for heart and lung tissue. MiRNAs TSI values of human tissues were significantly (P = 10(-8)) correlated with those of rats; miRNAs that were highly abundant in certain human tissues were likewise abundant in according rat tissues. We implemented a web-based repository enabling scientists to access and browse the data (https://ccb-web.cs.uni-saarland.de/tissueatlas). PMID:26921406

  20. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Lung Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H.; Deatly, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesenchymal tissue-like assemblies (3D hLEM TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infection with the virus. Therefore, we assert TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host s immune system.

  1. Three-Dimensionally Engineered Normal Human Broncho-epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies: Target Tissues for Human Respiratory Viral Infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Lin, Y-H

    2006-01-01

    In vitro three-dimensional (3D) human broncho-epithelial (HBE) tissue-like assemblies (3D HBE TLAs) from this point forward referred to as TLAs were engineered in Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) technology to mimic the characteristics of in vivo tissues thus providing a tool to study human respiratory viruses and host cell interactions. The TLAs were bioengineered onto collagen-coated cyclodextran microcarriers using primary human mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (HBTC) as the foundation matrix and an adult human bronchial epithelial immortalized cell line (BEAS-2B) as the overlying component. The resulting TLAs share significant characteristics with in vivo human respiratory epithelium including polarization, tight junctions, desmosomes, and microvilli. The presence of tissue-like differentiation markers including villin, keratins, and specific lung epithelium markers, as well as the production of tissue mucin, further confirm these TLAs differentiated into tissues functionally similar to in vivo tissues. Increasing virus titers for human respiratory syncytial virus (wtRSVA2) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (wtPIV3 JS) and the detection of membrane bound glycoproteins over time confirm productive infections with both viruses. Therefore, TLAs mimic aspects of the human respiratory epithelium and provide a unique capability to study the interactions of respiratory viruses and their primary target tissue independent of the host's immune system.

  2. National Human Adipose Tissue Survey (Nhats)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background:

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s National Human Monitoring Program (NHMP), established by the U.S. Public Health Service in 1967, used an exposure-based approach to assess human exposure to toxic substances. Its primary component was the Natio...

  3. Bovine Leukemia Virus DNA in Human Breast Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hua Min; Jensen, Hanne M.; Choi, K. Yeon; Sun, Dejun; Nuovo, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV), a deltaretrovirus, causes B-cell leukemia/lymphoma in cattle and is prevalent in herds globally. A previous finding of antibodies against BLV in humans led us to examine the possibility of human infection with BLV. We focused on breast tissue because, in cattle, BLV DNA and protein have been found to be more abundant in mammary epithelium than in lymphocytes. In human breast tissue specimens, we identified BLV DNA by using nested liquid-phase PCR and DNA sequencing. Variations from the bovine reference sequence were infrequent and limited to base substitutions. In situ PCR and immunohistochemical testing localized BLV to the secretory epithelium of the breast. Our finding of BLV in human tissues indicates a risk for the acquisition and proliferation of this virus in humans. Further research is needed to determine whether BLV may play a direct role in human disease. PMID:24750974

  4. Altered autophagy in human adipose tissues in obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Context: Autophagy is a housekeeping mechanism, involved in metabolic regulation and stress response, shown recently to regulate lipid droplets biogenesis/breakdown and adipose tissue phenotype. Objective: We hypothesized that in human obesity autophagy may be altered in adipose tissue in a fat d...

  5. Tissue-based imaging model of human trabecular meshwork.

    PubMed

    Chu, Edward R; Gonzalez, Jose M; Tan, James C H

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a tissue-based model of the human trabecular meshwork (TM) using viable postmortem corneoscleral donor tissue. Two-photon microscopy is used to optically section and image deep in the tissue to analyze cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) within the original three-dimensional (3D) environment of the TM. Multimodal techniques, including autofluorescence (AF), second harmonic generation (SHG), intravital dye fluorescence, and epifluorescence, are combined to provide unique views of the tissue at the cellular and subcellular level. SHG and AF imaging are non-invasive tissue imaging techniques with potential for clinical application, which can be modeled in the system. We describe the following in the tissue-based model: analysis of live cellularity to determine tissue viability; characteristics of live cells based on intravital labeling; features and composition of the TM's structural ECM; localization of specific ECM proteins to regions such as basement membrane; in situ induction and expression of tissue markers characteristic of cultured TM cells relevant to glaucoma; analysis of TM actin and pharmacological effects; in situ visualization of TM, inner wall endothelium, and Schlemm's canal; and application of 3D reconstruction, modeling, and quantitative analysis to the TM. The human model represents a cost-effective use of valuable and scarce yet available human tissue that allows unique cell biology, pharmacology, and translational studies of the TM. PMID:24517246

  6. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues.

    PubMed

    Kletsov, Andrey; Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-10-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated. PMID:26609415

  7. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated. PMID:26609415

  8. Total DDT and dieldrin content of human adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, N.; Harsas, W.; Marolt, R.S.; Morton, M.; Pollack, J.K.

    1988-12-01

    As far as the authors could ascertain only 4 well-documented analytical studies have been carried out in Australia determining the total DDT and dieldrin content of human adipose tissue. The latest of these studies was published over 16 years ago. Therefore it is timely and important to re-examine the total DDT and dieldrin concentration within the adipose tissue of the Australian population. The present investigation has analyzed 290 samples of human adipose tissue obtained from Westmead Hospital situated in an outer suburb of Sydney, New South Wales for their content of total DDT and dieldrin.

  9. Efficient In Vitro Electropermeabilization of Reconstructed Human Dermal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Madi, Moinecha; Rols, Marie-Pierre; Gibot, Laure

    2015-10-01

    DNA electrotransfer is a successful technic for gene delivery. However, its use in clinical applications is limited since little is known about the mechanisms governing DNA electrotransfer in the complex environment occurring in a tissue. The objectives of this work were to investigate the role of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in that process. Tumor ECM composition was shown to modulate in vivo gene electrotransfer efficiency. In order to assess the effects of ECM composition and organization, as well as intercellular junctions and communication, in normal tissue response to electric pulses, we developed an innovative three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed human connective tissue model. 3D human dermal tissue was reconstructed in vitro by a tissue engineering approach and was representative of in vivo cell organization since cell-cell contacts were present as well as complex ECM. This human cell model presented multiple layers of primary dermal fibroblasts embedded in a native, collagen-rich ECM. This dermal tissue could become a useful tool to study skin DNA electrotransfer mechanisms. As proof of the concept, we show here that the cells within this standardized 3D tissue can be efficiently electropermeabilized by milliseconds electric pulses. We believe that a better comprehension of gene electrotransfer in such a model tissue would help improve electrogene therapy approaches such as the systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins and DNA vaccination. PMID:25788148

  10. Kallikrein-kinin system in the plasma of snakes.

    PubMed

    Picarelli, Z P; Prezoto, B C; Hiraichi, E; Abdalla, F M

    1992-01-01

    Using pharmacological preparations suitable for assay of mammalian kinins, it was shown that Bothrops jararaca (Bj) venom and other kininogenases were unable to release kinins from snake plasma. The kallikrein-kinin system presents species-specificity in birds. In order to detect such a specificity in snakes, the effects of Bj venom on snake blood pressure and the effect of incubates of snake plasma with trypsin, on snake blood pressure and snake uterus, were studied. The possibility of activating snake plasma kallikrein with ellagic acid, glass beads or kaolin was also investigated. Whereas plasma of the snakes Waglerophis merremii (Wm) and Crotalus durissus (Cd), were shown to contain factor XII, prekallikrein, kininogen, kininases and to present a low but definite activation rate of the kinin system, the plasmas of Bj, Bothrops mojeni (Bm) and Oxyrophus trigeminus (Ot), yielded only kininogen and kininases. Activation of the system was not even detected by the sensitive substrate Ac-Phe-Arg-Nan (acetyl-phenylalanyl-arginyl-4nitro-anilide), indicating that the plasma of these species does not possess either factor XII and/or prekallikrein. Snake plasma may constitute an interesting model for the study of blood clotting, fibrinolytic and complement systems. PMID:1609651

  11. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  12. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  13. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  14. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  15. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  16. 78 FR 44134 - Submission for OMB Review; 30-day Comment Request: Financial Sustainability of Human Tissue...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ...: Financial Sustainability of Human Tissue Biobanking (NCI) SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1... Collection: Financial Sustainability of Human Tissue Biobanking, 0925-NEW, National Cancer Institute...

  17. Predicting tissue-specific enhancers in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    Determining how transcriptional regulatory signals are encoded in vertebrate genomes is essential for understanding the origins of multicellular complexity; yet the genetic code of vertebrate gene regulation remains poorly understood. In an attempt to elucidate this code, we synergistically combined genome-wide gene-expression profiling, vertebrate genome comparisons, and transcription factor binding-site analysis to define sequence signatures characteristic of candidate tissue-specific enhancers in the human genome. We applied this strategy to microarray-based gene expression profiles from 79 human tissues and identified 7187 candidate enhancers that defined their flanking gene expression, the majority of which were located outside of known promoters. We cross-validated this method for its ability to de novo predict tissue-specific gene expression and confirmed its reliability in 57 of the 79 available human tissues, with an average precision in enhancer recognition ranging from 32% to 63% and a sensitivity of 47%. We used the sequence signatures identified by this approach to successfully assign tissue-specific predictions to ∼328,000 human–mouse conserved noncoding elements in the human genome. By overlapping these genome-wide predictions with a data set of enhancers validated in vivo, in transgenic mice, we were able to confirm our results with a 28% sensitivity and 50% precision. These results indicate the power of combining complementary genomic data sets as an initial computational foray into a global view of tissue-specific gene regulation in vertebrates. PMID:17210927

  18. Predicting Tissue-Specific Enhancers in the Human Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2006-07-01

    Determining how transcriptional regulatory signals areencoded in vertebrate genomes is essential for understanding the originsof multi-cellular complexity; yet the genetic code of vertebrate generegulation remains poorly understood. In an attempt to elucidate thiscode, we synergistically combined genome-wide gene expression profiling,vertebrate genome comparisons, and transcription factor binding siteanalysis to define sequence signatures characteristic of candidatetissue-specific enhancers in the human genome. We applied this strategyto microarray-based gene expression profiles from 79 human tissues andidentified 7,187 candidate enhancers that defined their flanking geneexpression, the majority of which were located outside of knownpromoters. We cross-validated this method for its ability to de novopredict tissue-specific gene expression and confirmed its reliability in57 of the 79 available human tissues, with an average precision inenhancer recognition ranging from 32 percent to 63 percent, and asensitivity of 47 percent. We used the sequence signatures identified bythis approach to assign tissue-specific predictions to ~;328,000human-mouse conserved noncoding elements in the human genome. Byoverlapping these genome-wide predictions with a large in vivo dataset ofenhancers validated in transgenic mice, we confirmed our results with a28 percent sensitivity and 50 percent precision. These results indicatethe power of combining complementary genomic datasets as an initialcomputational foray into the global view of tissue-specific generegulation in vertebrates.

  19. Expression of tmp21 in normal adult human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jian; Yang, Yuan; Li, Jianbo; Hou, Jing; Xia, Kun; Song, Weihong; Liu, Shengchun

    2014-01-01

    TMP21, known as p23 protein, is one important member of the p24 protein families. The degradation of TMP21 is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, as with the other presenilin-associated γ-secretase complex members. NFAT plays a very important role in regulation of human TMP21 gene expression. Compared with the function of TMP21, the studies about the distribution of this protein in human tissues are limited. We collected 19 normal adult human tissues from a healthy adult man died in a traffic accident and did examination of all the tissues collected for ICH, western blot and RT-PCR. It was shown that the expression of TMP21 is at high levels in heart, liver, lung, kidney and adrenal gland; moderate levels in brain, pancreas, prostate gland, testicle, small intestine, colon, stomach, gall bladder, thyroid gland and trachea; low levels in skeletal muscle, skin and lymphonodus. TMP21 is widely existed in normal adult human tissues. The current study provided for the first time a comprehensive expression of TMP21 in normal adult human tissues. It will benefit on helping in the design and interpretation of future studies focused on expounding the function of TMP21. PMID:25356171

  20. Engineered human broncho-epithelial tissue-like assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional human broncho-epithelial tissue-like assemblies (TLAs) are produced in a rotating wall vessel (RWV) with microcarriers by coculturing mesenchymal bronchial-tracheal cells (BTC) and bronchial epithelium cells (BEC). These TLAs display structural characteristics and express markers of in vivo respiratory epithelia. TLAs are useful for screening compounds active in lung tissues such as antiviral compounds, cystic fibrosis treatments, allergens, and cytotoxic compounds.

  1. Infrared absorption spectra of human malignant tumor tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skornyakov, I. V.; Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Butra, V. A.

    2008-05-01

    We used infrared spectroscopy methods to study the molecular structure of tissues from human organs removed during surgery. The IR spectra of the surgical material from breast, thyroid, and lung are compared with data from histological examination. We show that in malignant neoplasms, a change occurs in the hydrogen bonds of protein macromolecules found in the tissue of the studied organs. We identify the spectral signs of malignant pathology.

  2. Xenotransplantation of human fetal adipose tissue: a model of in vivo adipose tissue expansion and adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Briana; Francois-Vaughan, Heather; Onikoyi, Omobola; Kostadinov, Stefan; De Paepe, Monique E.; Gruppuso, Philip A.; Sanders, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity during childhood and beyond may have its origins during fetal or early postnatal life. At present, there are no suitable in vivo experimental models to study factors that modulate or perturb human fetal white adipose tissue (WAT) expansion, remodeling, development, adipogenesis, angiogenesis, or epigenetics. We have developed such a model. It involves the xenotransplantation of midgestation human WAT into the renal subcapsular space of immunocompromised SCID-beige mice. After an initial latency period of approximately 2 weeks, the tissue begins expanding. The xenografts are healthy and show robust expansion and angiogenesis for at least 2 months following transplantation. Data and cell size and gene expression are consistent with active angiogenesis. The xenografts maintain the expression of genes associated with differentiated adipocyte function. In contrast to the fetal tissue, adult human WAT does not engraft. The long-term viability and phenotypic maintenance of fetal adipose tissue following xenotransplantation may be a function of its autonomous high rates of adipogenesis and angiogenesis. Through the manipulation of the host mice, this model system offers the opportunity to study the mechanisms by which nutrients and other environmental factors affect human adipose tissue development and biology. PMID:25193996

  3. Xenotransplantation of human fetal adipose tissue: a model of in vivo adipose tissue expansion and adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Briana; Francois-Vaughan, Heather; Onikoyi, Omobola; Kostadinov, Stefan; De Paepe, Monique E; Gruppuso, Philip A; Sanders, Jennifer A

    2014-12-01

    Obesity during childhood and beyond may have its origins during fetal or early postnatal life. At present, there are no suitable in vivo experimental models to study factors that modulate or perturb human fetal white adipose tissue (WAT) expansion, remodeling, development, adipogenesis, angiogenesis, or epigenetics. We have developed such a model. It involves the xenotransplantation of midgestation human WAT into the renal subcapsular space of immunocompromised SCID-beige mice. After an initial latency period of approximately 2 weeks, the tissue begins expanding. The xenografts are healthy and show robust expansion and angiogenesis for at least 2 months following transplantation. Data and cell size and gene expression are consistent with active angiogenesis. The xenografts maintain the expression of genes associated with differentiated adipocyte function. In contrast to the fetal tissue, adult human WAT does not engraft. The long-term viability and phenotypic maintenance of fetal adipose tissue following xenotransplantation may be a function of its autonomous high rates of adipogenesis and angiogenesis. Through the manipulation of the host mice, this model system offers the opportunity to study the mechanisms by which nutrients and other environmental factors affect human adipose tissue development and biology. PMID:25193996

  4. Laser ablation of human atherosclerotic plaque without adjacent tissue injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grundfest, W. S.; Litvack, F.; Forrester, J. S.; Goldenberg, T.; Swan, H. J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Seventy samples of human cadaver atherosclerotic aorta were irradiated in vitro using a 308 nm xenon chloride excimer laser. Energy per pulse, pulse duration and frequency were varied. For comparison, 60 segments were also irradiated with an argon ion and an Nd:YAG laser operated in the continuous mode. Tissue was fixed in formalin, sectioned and examined microscopically. The Nd:YAG and argon ion-irradiated tissue exhibited a central crater with irregular edges and concentric zones of thermal and blast injury. In contrast, the excimer laser-irradiated tissue had narrow deep incisions with minimal or no thermal injury. These preliminary experiments indicate that the excimer laser vaporizes tissue in a manner different from that of the continuous wave Nd:YAG or argon ion laser. The sharp incision margins and minimal damage to adjacent normal tissue suggest that the excimer laser is more desirable for general surgical and intravascular uses than are the conventionally used medical lasers.

  5. Integrative analysis of haplotype-resolved epigenomes across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Anthony; Selvaraj, Siddarth; Lee, Ah Young; Yen, Chia-An; Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Qiu, Yunjiang; Xie, Wei; Yue, Feng; Hariharan, Manoj; Ray, Pradipta; Kuan, Samantha; Edsall, Lee; Yang, Hongbo; Chi, Neil C.; Zhang, Michael Q.; Ecker, Joseph R.; Ren, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Allelic differences between the two homologous chromosomes can affect the propensity of inheritance in humans; however, the extent of such differences in the human genome has yet to be fully explored. Here, for the first time, we delineate allelic chromatin modifications and transcriptomes amongst a broad set of human tissues, enabled by a chromosome-spanning haplotype reconstruction strategy1. The resulting masses of haplotype-resolved epigenomic maps reveal extensive allelic biases in both chromatin state and transcription, which show considerable variation across tissues and between individuals, and allow us to investigate cis-regulatory relationships between genes and their control sequences. Analyses of histone modification maps also uncover intriguing characteristics of cis-regulatory elements and tissue-restricted activities of repetitive elements. The rich datasets described here will enhance our understanding of the mechanisms of how cis-regulatory elements control gene expression programs. PMID:25693566

  6. Integrative analysis of haplotype-resolved epigenomes across human tissues.

    PubMed

    Leung, Danny; Jung, Inkyung; Rajagopal, Nisha; Schmitt, Anthony; Selvaraj, Siddarth; Lee, Ah Young; Yen, Chia-An; Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Qiu, Yunjiang; Xie, Wei; Yue, Feng; Hariharan, Manoj; Ray, Pradipta; Kuan, Samantha; Edsall, Lee; Yang, Hongbo; Chi, Neil C; Zhang, Michael Q; Ecker, Joseph R; Ren, Bing

    2015-02-19

    Allelic differences between the two homologous chromosomes can affect the propensity of inheritance in humans; however, the extent of such differences in the human genome has yet to be fully explored. Here we delineate allelic chromatin modifications and transcriptomes among a broad set of human tissues, enabled by a chromosome-spanning haplotype reconstruction strategy. The resulting large collection of haplotype-resolved epigenomic maps reveals extensive allelic biases in both chromatin state and transcription, which show considerable variation across tissues and between individuals, and allow us to investigate cis-regulatory relationships between genes and their control sequences. Analyses of histone modification maps also uncover intriguing characteristics of cis-regulatory elements and tissue-restricted activities of repetitive elements. The rich data sets described here will enhance our understanding of the mechanisms by which cis-regulatory elements control gene expression programs. PMID:25693566

  7. Solubility of Freon 22 in human blood and lung tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Varene, N.; Choukroun, M.L.; Marthan, R.; Varene, P.

    1989-05-01

    The solubility of Freon 22 in human blood and lung tissue was determined using the chromatographic method of Wagner et al. In normal human blood, the mean Bunsen coefficient of solubility (alpha B) was 0.804 cm3 STPD.cm-3.ATA-1 at 37 degrees C. It increased with hematocrit (Hct) according to the equation alpha B = 0.274 Hct + 0.691. Tissue homogenates were prepared from macroscopically normal lung pieces obtained at thoracotomy from eight patients undergoing resection for lung carcinoma. The Bunsen solubility coefficients were 0.537 +/- 0.068 and 0.635 +/- 0.091 in washed and unwashed lung, respectively. These values can be used in the determination of both cardiac output and pulmonary tissue volume in humans by use of the rebreathing technique.

  8. Engineering Kunitz Domain 1 (KD1) of Human Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor-2 to Selectively Inhibit Fibrinolysis

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Madhu S.; Ogueli, Godwin I.; Kumar, Yogesh; Vadivel, Kanagasabai; Lawson, Gregory; Shanker, Sreejesh; Schmidt, Amy E.; Bajaj, S. Paul

    2011-01-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2) inhibits factor XIa, plasma kallikrein, and factor VIIa/tissue factor; accordingly, it has been proposed for use as an anticoagulant. Full-length TFPI-2 or its isolated first Kunitz domain (KD1) also inhibits plasmin; therefore, it has been proposed for use as an antifibrinolytic agent. However, the anticoagulant properties of TFPI-2 or KD1 would diminish its antifibrinolytic function. In this study, structure-based investigations and analysis of the serine protease profiles revealed that coagulation enzymes prefer a hydrophobic residue at the P2′ position in their substrates/inhibitors, whereas plasmin prefers a positively charged arginine residue at the corresponding position in its substrates/inhibitors. Based upon this observation, we changed the P2′ residue Leu-17 in KD1 to Arg (KD1-L17R) and compared its inhibitory properties with wild-type KD1 (KD1-WT). Both WT and KD1-L17R were expressed in Escherichia coli, folded, and purified to homogeneity. N-terminal sequences and mass spectra confirmed proper expression of KD1-WT and KD1-L17R. Compared with KD1-WT, the KD1-L17R did not inhibit factor XIa, plasma kallikrein, or factor VIIa/tissue factor. Furthermore, KD1-L17R inhibited plasmin with ∼6-fold increased affinity and effectively prevented plasma clot fibrinolysis induced by tissue plasminogen activator. Similarly, in a mouse liver laceration bleeding model, KD1-L17R was ∼8-fold more effective than KD1-WT in preventing blood loss. Importantly, in this bleeding model, KD1-L17R was equally or more effective than aprotinin or tranexamic acid, which have been used as antifibrinolytic agents to prevent blood loss during major surgery/trauma. Furthermore, as compared with aprotinin, renal toxicity was not observed with KD1-L17R. PMID:21115497

  9. The Role of Plasma Kallikrein-Kinin Pathway in the Development of Diabetic Retinopathy: Pathophysiology and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Abdulaal, Marwan; Haddad, Nour Maya N; Sun, Jennifer K; Silva, Paolo S

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinal disease is characterized by a series of retinal microvascular changes and increases in retinal vascular permeability that lead to development of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and diabetic macular edema (DME), respectively. Current treatment strategies for DR and DME are mostly limited to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors and laser photocoagulation. These treatment modalities are not universally effective in all patients, and potential side effects persist in a significant portion of patients. The plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) is one of the pathways that has been identified in the vitreous in proliferative DR and DME. Preclinical studies have shown that the activation of intraocular KKS induces retinal vascular permeability, vasodilation, and retinal thickening. Proteomic analysis from vitreous of eyes with DME has shown that KKS and VEGF pathways are potentially independent biologic pathways. Furthermore, proteins associated with DME in the vitreous were significantly more correlated with the KKS pathway compared to VEGF pathway. Preclinical experiments on diabetic animals showed that inhibition of KKS components was found to be an effective approach to decrease retinal vascular permeability. An initial phase I human trial of a novel plasma kallikrein inhibitor for the treatment of DME is currently ongoing to test the safety of this approach and serves as an initial step in the translation of basic science discovery into an innovative clinical intervention. PMID:26959125

  10. Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Human Nonmalignant and Malignant Cells and Tissues.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassman, Wenling Sha

    This thesis explores steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy from human malignant and non -malignant cells and tissues. The focus of these studies are the analysis of the excitation spectra, emission spectra, and decay time based on the contribution from several key intrinsic fluorophors: NAD(P)H, flavins, tryptophan, elastin and collagen that exist in different amounts in the human tissues and cells. The comparison between the spectra from malignant and non-malignant cells and tissues gives information on the changes that occur from non-malignancy to malignancy in the cells and tissues. The spectra of tissues and cells are also compared to help in understanding what fluorophors are responsible for fluorescence spectral differences between the malignant and non-malignant tissues and cells. The results in this thesis show that the spectral differences between the normal and cancerous tissues and cells exist in various wavelength ranges. The experimental data from GYN tissues have shown with over 95% of the sensitivity and specificity to separate malignant from non-malignant tissues using 300nm excitation. The 340nm band, which is mostly in response to intrinsic fluorophor (amino acid tryptophan), from malignant tissues were relatively higher then that from the non-malignant tissues. This might have been caused by the higher concentration of free tryptophan in the malignant tumor when compared to that of the normal tissue. This has been found in medical clinical study. The experimental data in this thesis also show that the fluorescence intensities around 450nm-460nm, which are mostly due to the intrinsic fluorophor coenzyme NADH, from both malignant cells in vitro and tissues in vitro are relatively higher than from non-malignant cells in vitro and tissues in vitro. These findings are reinforced by the faster decay time of the NADH fluorescence from normal cells in vitro than from neoplasm cells in vitro. Thus, the NADH in the mitochondria might be

  11. Transepithelial Transport of PAMAM Dendrimers Across Isolated Human Intestinal Tissue.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Dallin; Enda, Michael; Bond, Tanner; Moghaddam, Seyyed Pouya Hadipour; Conarton, Josh; Scaife, Courtney; Volckmann, Eric; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2015-11-01

    Poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers have shown transepithelial transport across intestinal epithelial barrier in rats and across Caco-2 cell monolayers. Caco-2 models innately lack mucous barriers, and rat isolated intestinal tissue has been shown to overestimate human permeability. This study is the first report of transport of PAMAM dendrimers across isolated human intestinal epithelium. It was observed that FITC labeled G4-NH2 and G3.5-COOH PAMAM dendrimers at 1 mM concentration do not have a statistically higher permeability compared to free FITC controls in isolated human jejunum and colonic tissues. Mannitol permeability was increased at 10 mM concentrations of G3.5-COOH and G4-NH2 dendrimers. Significant histological changes in human colonic and jejunal tissues were observed at G3.5-COOH and G4-NH2 concentrations of 10 mM implying that dose limiting toxicity may occur at similar concentrations in vivo. The permeability through human isolated intestinal tissue in this study was compared to previous rat and Caco-2 permeability data. This study implicates that PAMAM dendrimer oral drug delivery may be feasible, but it may be limited to highly potent drugs. PMID:26414679

  12. 21 CFR 1270.43 - Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue..., recall, and destruction of human tissue. (a) Upon a finding that human tissue may be in violation of the... dispose of the tissue in any manner except to recall and/or destroy the tissue consistent with...

  13. 21 CFR 1270.43 - Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue..., recall, and destruction of human tissue. (a) Upon a finding that human tissue may be in violation of the... dispose of the tissue in any manner except to recall and/or destroy the tissue consistent with...

  14. 21 CFR 1270.43 - Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue..., recall, and destruction of human tissue. (a) Upon a finding that human tissue may be in violation of the... dispose of the tissue in any manner except to recall and/or destroy the tissue consistent with...

  15. Cortisol in human tissues at different stages of life.

    PubMed

    Costa, A; Benedetto, C; Fabris, C; Giraudi, G F; Testori, O; Bertino, E; Marozio, L; Varvello, G; Arisio, R; Ariano, M; Emanuel, A

    1996-01-01

    Aim of the work was to measure the cortisol level in human tissues at different stages of life, by means of radioimmunoassay and by chromatography. Viable samples of 13 different tissues were obtained during surgical intervention from 30 to 70 years old patients of either sex. Mean tissue cortisol concentration was 78 +/- 35 ng/g, ranging from 20 +/- 10 ng/g in the thyroid to 124 +/- 76 ng/g in the kidney. Similar values were measured in the corresponding tissues from not decayed corpses, so that paired values could be mediated. However the pancreas, and corrupted autopsy tissues, gave nil or exceedingly high cortisol concentration values; in some cases, opposite extreme values were measured in different organs of the same body. Cortisol concentration was also measured in 11 sound different tissues of spontaneously aborted or stillbirth fetuses, between 16 and 36 weeks of gestation. Mean value was 63 +/- 27 ng/g, ranging from 30 +/- 25 ng/g in the liver to 104 +/- 52 ng/g in the lungs. Also in fetuses nil or exceedingly high cortisol values occurred in altered tissues. One hundred and fourteen samples of limbs and carcasses of 7 to 12 gestational weeks embryos, obtained from voluntary abortions, were also examined: 20% gave nil result, in the remaining mean cortisol concentration was 32 ng/g. In 33 samples of embryos' mixed viscera, RIA and chromatography gave unreliable exceedingly high values. The nil and the exceedingly high values measured in the altered autoptic tissue specimens were inconsistent with the cortisol blood level measured in the patients, as were those measured in embryonic tissues with the acknowledged blood and adrenals cortisol levels at that stage of life. Thus cortisol may be measured by RIA and by chromatography in sound tissues, while the values obtained in the pancreas, in corrupted tissues, and in embryonal viscera do not represent the hormonal milieu, but are likely artifacts due to impeachment of the diagnostic system. PMID:8884541

  16. Formation of tissue factor activity following incubation of recombinant human tissue factor apoprotein with plasma lipoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, T.; Kisiel, W. )

    1990-11-01

    Incubation of recombinant human tissue factor apoprotein (Apo-TF) with human plasma decreased the recalcified clotting time of this plasma in a time-and dose-dependent manner suggesting relipidation of the Apo-TF by plasma lipoproteins. Incubation of Apo-TF with purified preparations of human very low density, low density and high density lipoproteins resulted in tissue factor activity in a clotting assay. The order of effectiveness was VLDL greater than LDL much greater than HDL. Tissue factor activity generated by incubation of a fixed amount of Apo-TF with plasma lipoproteins was lipoprotein concentration-dependent and saturable. The association of Apo-TF with lipoprotein particles was supported by gel filtration studies in which {sup 125}I-Apo-TF coeluted with the plasma lipoprotein in the void volume of a Superose 6 column in the presence and absence of calcium ions. In addition, void-volume Apo-TF-lipoprotein fractions exhibited tissue factor activity. These results suggest that the factor VIII-bypassing activity of bovine Apo-TF observed in a canine hemophilic model may be due, in part, to its association with plasma lipoproteins and expression of functional tissue factor activity.

  17. Thermogenic potential and physiological relevance of human epicardial adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Chechi, K; Richard, D

    2015-01-01

    Epicardial adipose tissue is a unique fat depot around the heart that shares a close anatomic proximity and vascular supply with the myocardium and coronary arteries. Its accumulation around the heart, measured using various imaging modalities, has been associated with the onset and progression of coronary artery disease in humans. Epicardial adipose tissue is also the only fat depot around the heart that is known to express uncoupling protein 1 at both mRNA and protein levels in the detectable range. Recent advances have further indicated that human epicardial fat exhibits beige fat-like features. Here we provide an overview of the physiological and pathophysiological relevance of human epicardial fat, and further discuss whether its thermogenic properties can serve as a target for the therapeutic management of coronary heart disease in humans. PMID:27152172

  18. Translational neuropharmacology: the use of human isolated gastrointestinal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sanger, GJ; Broad, J; Kung, V; Knowles, CH

    2013-01-01

    Translational sciences increasingly emphasize the measurement of functions in native human tissues. However, such studies must confront variations in patient age, gender, genetic background and disease. Here, these are discussed with reference to neuromuscular and neurosecretory functions of the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Tissues are obtained after informed consent, in collaboration with surgeons (surgical techniques help minimize variables) and pathologists. Given the difficulties of directly recording from human myenteric neurones (embedded between muscle layers), enteric motor nerve functions are studied by measuring muscle contractions/relaxations evoked by electrical stimulation of intrinsic nerves; responses are regionally dependent, often involving cholinergic and nitrergic phenotypes. Enteric sensory functions can be studied by evoking the peristaltic reflex, involving enteric sensory and motor nerves, but this has rarely been achieved. As submucosal neurones are more accessible (after removing the mucosa), direct neuronal recordings are possible. Neurosecretory functions are studied by measuring changes in short-circuit current across the mucosa. For all experiments, basic questions must be addressed. Because tissues are from patients, what are the controls and the influence of disease? How long does it take before function fully recovers? What is the impact of age- and gender-related differences? What is the optimal sample size? Addressing these and other questions minimizes variability and raises the scientific credibility of human tissue research. Such studies also reduce animal use. Further, the many differences between animal and human GI functions also means that human tissue research must question the ethical validity of using strains of animals with unproved translational significance. Linked Article BJP published a themed issue on Translational Neuropharmacology in 2011. To view the articles in this themed issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10

  19. Translational neuropharmacology: the use of human isolated gastrointestinal tissues.

    PubMed

    Sanger, G J; Broad, J; Kung, V; Knowles, C H

    2013-01-01

    Translational sciences increasingly emphasize the measurement of functions in native human tissues. However, such studies must confront variations in patient age, gender, genetic background and disease. Here, these are discussed with reference to neuromuscular and neurosecretory functions of the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Tissues are obtained after informed consent, in collaboration with surgeons (surgical techniques help minimize variables) and pathologists. Given the difficulties of directly recording from human myenteric neurones (embedded between muscle layers), enteric motor nerve functions are studied by measuring muscle contractions/relaxations evoked by electrical stimulation of intrinsic nerves; responses are regionally dependent, often involving cholinergic and nitrergic phenotypes. Enteric sensory functions can be studied by evoking the peristaltic reflex, involving enteric sensory and motor nerves, but this has rarely been achieved. As submucosal neurones are more accessible (after removing the mucosa), direct neuronal recordings are possible. Neurosecretory functions are studied by measuring changes in short-circuit current across the mucosa. For all experiments, basic questions must be addressed. Because tissues are from patients, what are the controls and the influence of disease? How long does it take before function fully recovers? What is the impact of age- and gender-related differences? What is the optimal sample size? Addressing these and other questions minimizes variability and raises the scientific credibility of human tissue research. Such studies also reduce animal use. Further, the many differences between animal and human GI functions also means that human tissue research must question the ethical validity of using strains of animals with unproved translational significance. PMID:22946540

  20. Analysis of the phosphofructokinase subunits and isoenzymes in human tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Dunaway, G A; Kasten, T P; Sebo, T; Trapp, R

    1988-01-01

    The 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK) subunits and isoenzymes were studied in human muscle, heart, brain, liver, platelets, fibroblasts, erythrocytes, placenta and umbilical cord. In each tissue, the subunit types in the native isoenzymes were characterized by immunological titration with subunit-specific antibodies and by column chromatography on QAE (quaternary aminoethyl)-Sephadex. Further, the subunits of the partially purified native isoenzymes were resolved by SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, identified by immunoblotting, and quantified by scanning gel densitometry of silver-stained gels and immunoblots. Depending on the type of tissue, one to three subunits were detected. The Mr values of the L, M and C subunits regardless of tissue were 76,700 +/- 1400, 82,500 +/- 1640 and 86,500 +/- 1620. Of the tissues studied, only the muscle PFK isoenzymes exhibited one subunit, which was the M-type subunit. Of the other tissues studied, the PFK isoenzymes contained various amounts of all three subunits. Considering the properties of the native PFK isoenzymes, it is clear that, in human tissues, they are not simply various combinations of two or three homotetrameric isoenzymes, but complex mixtures of homotetramers and heterotetramers. The kinetic/regulatory properties of the various isoenzyme pools were found to be dependent on subunit composition. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2970843

  1. Microimaging FT-IR of oral cavity tumours. Part III: Cells, inoculated tissues and human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, C.; Ferraris, P.; Giorgini, E.; Pieramici, T.; Possati, L.; Rocchetti, R.; Rubini, C.; Sabbatini, S.; Tosi, G.; Mariggiò, M. A.; Lo Muzio, L.

    2007-05-01

    The biochemistry of healthy and tumour cell cultures, inoculated tissues and oral cavity tissues have been studied by FT-IR Microscopy with the aim to relate spectral patterns with microbiological and histopathological findings. 'Supervised' and 'unsupervised' procedures of data handling afforded a satisfactory degree of accordance between spectroscopic and the other two techniques. In particular, changes in frequency and intensity of proteins, connective and nucleic acids vibrational modes as well as the visualization of biochemical single wave number or band ratio images, allowed an evaluation of the pathological changes. The spectroscopic patterns of inoculated tissues resulted quite similar to human tissues; differences of both types of sections with cellular lines could be explained by the influence of the environment.

  2. Collagen in Human Tissues: Structure, Function, and Biomedical Implications from a Tissue Engineering Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, Preethi; Prabhakaran, Molamma P.; Sireesha, Merum; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    The extracellular matrix is a complex biological structure encoded with various proteins, among which the collagen family is the most significant and abundant of all, contributing 30-35% of the whole-body protein. "Collagen" is a generic term for proteins that forms a triple-helical structure with three polypeptide chains, and around 29 types of collagen have been identified up to now. Although most of the members of the collagen family form such supramolecular structures, extensive diversity exists between each type of collagen. The diversity is not only based on the molecular assembly and supramolecular structures of collagen types but is also observed within its tissue distribution, function, and pathology. Collagens possess complex hierarchical structures and are present in various forms such as collagen fibrils (1.5-3.5 nm wide), collagen fibers (50-70 nm wide), and collagen bundles (150-250 nm wide), with distinct properties characteristic of each tissue providing elasticity to skin, softness of the cartilage, stiffness of the bone and tendon, transparency of the cornea, opaqueness of the sclera, etc. There exists an exclusive relation between the structural features of collagen in human tissues (such as the collagen composition, collagen fibril length and diameter, collagen distribution, and collagen fiber orientation) and its tissue-specific mechanical properties. In bone, a transverse collagen fiber orientation prevails in regions of higher compressive stress whereas longitudinally oriented collagen fibers correlate to higher tensile stress. The immense versatility of collagen compels a thorough understanding of the collagen types and this review discusses the major types of collagen found in different human tissues, highlighting their tissue-specific uniqueness based on their structure and mechanical function. The changes in collagen during a specific tissue damage or injury are discussed further, focusing on the many tissue engineering applications for

  3. Tissue distribution of human acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase messenger RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Jbilo, O.; Barteles, C.F.; Chatonnet, A.; Toutant, J.P.; Lockridge, O.

    1994-12-31

    Tissue distribution of human acetyicholinesterase and butyryicholinesterase messenger RNA. 1 Cholinesterase inhibitors occur naturally in the calabar bean (eserine), green potatoes (solanine), insect-resistant crab apples, the coca plant (cocaine) and snake venom (fasciculin). There are also synthetic cholinesterase inhibitors, for example man-made insecticides. These inhibitors inactivate acetyicholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase as well as other targets. From a study of the tissue distribution of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase mRNA by Northern blot analysis, we have found the highest levels of butyrylcholinesterase mRNA in the liver and lungs, tissues known as the principal detoxication sites of the human body. These results indicate that butyrylcholinesterase may be a first line of defense against poisons that are eaten or inhaled.

  4. Renal nursing and the Human Tissue Act 2004.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Abbe; Noble, Helen

    The Human Tissue Act of 2004 was introduced in the UK on 1 September 2006. It replaced all Acts that previously governed the procurement and utilization of tissues, cells and organs. It has promoted changes in requirements predominantly in transplantation settings. Past research has highlighted a shortage of organs for transplantation, particularly in renal donation. The new act hopes to remedy this so that future renal transplantations will occur more frequently, therefore improving choice and quality of life for patients with end stage renal disease. For UK renal nurses, the implementation of the Human Tissue Act 2004 presents challenges requiring adaptations of prior learning with new nursing roles. Recommendations can be made to help during the change process. Kurt Lewin's model of change provides a foundation for the understanding and recognition of change processes that occur in the implementation of individual and organizational change. PMID:17851366

  5. Arrhenius parameters for primary thermal injury in human tonsillar tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Kathleen; Radabaugh, Rebecca; Coad, James E.

    2011-03-01

    Clinical implementation of a thermal therapy requires the ability to predict tissue injury following exposures to specific thermal histories. As part of an effort to develop a nonexcisional alternative to tonsillectomy, the degree of primary hyperthermic tissue injury in human tonsil was characterized. Fifteen fresh pediatric hypertrophic tonsillectomy specimens were sectioned and treated in a NIST-calibrated saline bath at temperatures of 40 to 70°C with hold times of one to seven minutes. The treated tissues were subsequently nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) stained to assess for thermal respiratory enzyme inactivation as a marker of cellular injury/death. The NBT stains were quantitatively image analyzed and used to calculate Arrhenius parameters for primary thermal injury in human tonsils.

  6. Plant-derived human collagen scaffolds for skin tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Willard, James J; Drexler, Jason W; Das, Amitava; Roy, Sashwati; Shilo, Shani; Shoseyov, Oded; Powell, Heather M

    2013-07-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds are commonly formed using proteins extracted from animal tissues, such as bovine hide. Risks associated with the use of these materials include hypersensitivity and pathogenic contamination. Human-derived proteins lower the risk of hypersensitivity, but possess the risk of disease transmission. Methods engineering recombinant human proteins using plant material provide an alternate source of these materials without the risk of disease transmission or concerns regarding variability. To investigate the utility of plant-derived human collagen (PDHC) in the development of engineered skin (ES), PDHC and bovine hide collagen were formed into tissue engineering scaffolds using electrospinning or freeze-drying. Both raw materials were easily formed into two common scaffold types, electrospun nonwoven scaffolds and lyophilized sponges, with similar architectures. The processing time, however, was significantly lower with PDHC. PDHC scaffolds supported primary human cell attachment and proliferation at an equivalent or higher level than the bovine material. Interleukin-1 beta production was significantly lower when activated THP-1 macrophages where exposed to PDHC electrospun scaffolds compared to bovine collagen. Both materials promoted proper maturation and differentiation of ES. These data suggest that PDHC may provide a novel source of raw material for tissue engineering with low risk of allergic response or disease transmission. PMID:23298216

  7. The implications of the Human Tissue Act 2004 for dentistry.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Laura; Woof, Marcus

    2006-12-23

    Partly as a consequence of the inquiries into the events at the Bristol Royal Infirmary and the Royal Liverpool Children's Hospital (Alder Hey), the Government recently enacted the Human Tissue Act 2004. The main provisions of the Act came into force on 1 September 2006 and have potential implications for dentists. PMID:17183410

  8. Plant-Derived Human Collagen Scaffolds for Skin Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Willard, James J.; Drexler, Jason W.; Das, Amitava; Roy, Sashwati; Shilo, Shani; Shoseyov, Oded

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds are commonly formed using proteins extracted from animal tissues, such as bovine hide. Risks associated with the use of these materials include hypersensitivity and pathogenic contamination. Human-derived proteins lower the risk of hypersensitivity, but possess the risk of disease transmission. Methods engineering recombinant human proteins using plant material provide an alternate source of these materials without the risk of disease transmission or concerns regarding variability. To investigate the utility of plant-derived human collagen (PDHC) in the development of engineered skin (ES), PDHC and bovine hide collagen were formed into tissue engineering scaffolds using electrospinning or freeze-drying. Both raw materials were easily formed into two common scaffold types, electrospun nonwoven scaffolds and lyophilized sponges, with similar architectures. The processing time, however, was significantly lower with PDHC. PDHC scaffolds supported primary human cell attachment and proliferation at an equivalent or higher level than the bovine material. Interleukin-1 beta production was significantly lower when activated THP-1 macrophages where exposed to PDHC electrospun scaffolds compared to bovine collagen. Both materials promoted proper maturation and differentiation of ES. These data suggest that PDHC may provide a novel source of raw material for tissue engineering with low risk of allergic response or disease transmission. PMID:23298216

  9. More insights into a human adipose tissue GPAT activity assay

    PubMed Central

    Morgan-Bathke, Maria; Chen, Liang; Oberschneider, Elisabeth; Harteneck, Debra; Jensen, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adipose tissue fatty acid storage varies according to sex, adipose tissue depot and degree of fat gain. However, the mechanism(s) for these variations is not completely understood. We recently published findings based on the glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) enzyme activity assay we optimized for use with human adipose tissue. These findings include a decrease in total GPAT and GPAT1 as a function of adipocyte size in both omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue and a strong, positive correlations between ACS, GPAT, and DGAT activities for both sexes and depots and between these storage factors and palmitate storage rates into TAG. The aim of this commentary is to expand upon the data from our recent publication. We describe here additional details on the optimization of the GPAT enzyme activity assay, a correlation between DGAT and percentage palmitate in the diacylglycerol fraction, and sex differences in fatty acid storage factors and storage rates into TAG at high palmitate concentrations. PMID:27144101

  10. Optical spectroscopy for quantitative sensing in human pancreatic tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robert H.; Chandra, Malavika; Lloyd, William; Chen, Leng-Chun; Scheiman, James; Simeone, Diane; McKenna, Barbara; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2011-07-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma has a five-year survival rate of only 6%, largely because current diagnostic methods cannot reliably detect the disease in its early stages. Reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopies have the potential to provide quantitative, minimally-invasive means of distinguishing pancreatic adenocarcinoma from normal pancreatic tissue and chronic pancreatitis. The first collection of wavelength-resolved reflectance and fluorescence spectra and time-resolved fluorescence decay curves from human pancreatic tissues was acquired with clinically-compatible instrumentation. Mathematical models of reflectance and fluorescence extracted parameters related to tissue morphology and biochemistry that were statistically significant for distinguishing between pancreatic tissue types. These results suggest that optical spectroscopy has the potential to detect pancreatic disease in a clinical setting.

  11. Method for characterizing viscoelasticity of human gluteal tissue.

    PubMed

    Then, C; Vogl, T J; Silber, G

    2012-04-30

    Characterizing compressive transient large deformation properties of biological tissue is becoming increasingly important in impact biomechanics and rehabilitation engineering, which includes devices interfacing with the human body and virtual surgical guidance simulation. Individual mechanical in vivo behaviour, specifically of human gluteal adipose and passive skeletal muscle tissue compressed with finite strain, has, however, been sparsely characterised. Employing a combined experimental and numerical approach, a method is presented to investigate the time-dependent properties of in vivo gluteal adipose and passive skeletal muscle tissue. Specifically, displacement-controlled ramp-and-hold indentation relaxation tests were performed and documented with magnetic resonance imaging. A time domain quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) formulation with Prony series valid for finite strains was used in conjunction with a hyperelastic model formulation for soft tissue constitutive model parameter identification and calibration of the relaxation test data. A finite element model of the indentation region was employed. Strong non-linear elastic but linear viscoelastic tissue material behaviour at finite strains was apparent for both adipose and passive skeletal muscle mechanical properties with orthogonal skin and transversal muscle fibre loading. Using a force-equilibrium assumption, the employed material model was well suited to fit the experimental data and derive viscoelastic model parameters by inverse finite element parameter estimation. An individual characterisation of in vivo gluteal adipose and muscle tissue could thus be established. Initial shear moduli were calculated from the long-term parameters for human gluteal skin/fat: G(∞,S/F)=1850 Pa and for cross-fibre gluteal muscle tissue: G(∞,M)=881 Pa. Instantaneous shear moduli were found at the employed ramp speed: G(0,S/F)=1920 Pa and G(0,M)=1032 Pa. PMID:22360834

  12. Human cancers overexpress genes that are specific to a variety of normal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lotem, Joseph; Netanely, Dvir; Domany, Eytan; Sachs, Leo

    2005-01-01

    We have analyzed gene expression data from three different kinds of samples: normal human tissues, human cancer cell lines, and leukemic cells from lymphoid and myeloid leukemia pediatric patients. We have searched for genes that are overexpressed in human cancer and also show specific patterns of tissue-dependent expression in normal tissues. Using the expression data of the normal tissues, we identified 4,346 genes with a high variability of expression and clustered these genes according to their relative expression level. Of 91 stable clusters obtained, 24 clusters included genes preferentially expressed either only in hematopoietic tissues or in hematopoietic and one to two other tissues; 28 clusters included genes preferentially expressed in various nonhematopoietic tissues such as neuronal, testis, liver, kidney, muscle, lung, pancreas, and placenta. Analysis of the expression levels of these two groups of genes in the human cancer cell lines and leukemias identified genes that were highly expressed in cancer cells but not in their normal counterparts and, thus, were overexpressed in the cancers. The different cancer cell lines and leukemias varied in the number and identity of these overexpressed genes. The results indicate that many genes that are overexpressed in human cancer cells are specific to a variety of normal tissues, including normal tissues other than those from which the cancer originated. It is suggested that this general property of cancer cells plays a major role in determining the behavior of the cancers, including their metastatic potential. PMID:16339305

  13. Assessment of permeation of lipoproteins in human carotid tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosn, Mohamad G.; Syed, Saba H.; Leba, Michael; Morrisett, Joel D.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2010-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is among the leading causes of death in the United States. Specifically, atherosclerosis is an increasingly devastating contributor to the tally and has been found to be a byproduct of arterial permeability irregularities in regards to lipoprotein penetration. To further explore arterial physiology and molecular transport, the imaging technique of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) was employed. With OCT, the permeation of glucose (MW = 180 Da), low density lipoprotein (LDL; MW = 2.1 × 106 Da), and high density lipoprotein (HDL; MW = 2.5 × 105 Da) in human carotid tissue was studied to determine the effect of different molecular characteristics on permeation in atherosclerotic tissues. The permeability rates calculated from the diffusion of the molecular agents into the abnormal carotid tissue samples is compared to those of normal, healthy tissue. The results show that in the abnormal tissue, the permeation of agents correlate to the size constraints. The larger molecules of LDL diffuse the slowest, while the smallest molecules of glucose diffuse the fastest. However, in normal tissue, LDL permeates at a faster rate than the other two agents, implying the existence of a transport mechanism that facilitates the passage of LDL molecules. These results highlight the capability of OCT as a sensitive and specific imaging technique as well as provide significant information to the understanding of atherosclerosis and its effect on tissue properties.

  14. Gene expression in human ovarian tissue after xenografting.

    PubMed

    Van Langendonckt, A; Romeu, L; Ambroise, J; Amorim, C; Bearzatto, B; Gala, J L; Donnez, J; Dolmans, M M

    2014-06-01

    Cryobanking and transplantation of ovarian tissue is a promising approach to restore fertility in cancer patients. However, ischemic stress following avascular ovarian cortex grafting is known to induce stromal tissue fibrosis and alterations in follicular development. The aim of the study was to analyze the impact of freeze-thawing and grafting procedures on gene expression in human ovarian tissue. Frozen-thawed ovarian tissue from 14 patients was xenografted for 7 days to nude mice and one ungrafted fragment was used as a control. Immediately after recovery, grafts were processed for RNA extraction and histological analysis. Their expression profile was screened by whole-genome oligonucleotide array (n = 4) and validated by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain analysis (n = 10). After data filtering, the Limma package was used to build a linear regression model for each gene and to compute its fold change between tissues on Days 0 and 7. After adjusting the P-value by the Sidak method, 84 of the transcripts were significantly altered after 7 days of grafting, including matrix metalloproteinase-9 and -14 and angiogenic factors such as placental growth factor and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4). Major biological processes were related to tissue remodeling, including secretory processes, cellular adhesion and response to chemical and hormonal stimuli. Angiopoietin signaling, the interleukin-8 pathway and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activation were shown to be differentially regulated. On Day 7, overexpression was confirmed by PCR for interleukin-8, transforming growth factor-beta 1, matrix metalloproteinase-14 and CXCR4, compared with ungrafted controls. In conclusion, new as well as known genes involved in tissue restructuring and angiogenesis were identified and found to play a key role during the first days after human ovarian tissue transplantation. This will facilitate the development of strategies to optimize grafting techniques. PMID

  15. Ecallantide: a plasma kallikrein inhibitor for the treatment of acute attacks of hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Stolz, L E; Horn, P T

    2010-08-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a debilitating, potentially fatal disease characterized by variable and unpredictable acute attacks of swelling affecting the subcutaneous tissue and mucosa. It is an autosomal dominant disorder resulting from a genetic deficiency of functional C1-esterase inhibitor. Available treatments include long-term prophylaxis, short-term prophylaxis and treatment of acute attacks. Ecallantide is a novel, specific and potent inhibitor of plasma kallikrein that was recently approved in the United States for the treatment of acute attacks of HAE in patients aged 16 years and older. In two phase III clinical trials, the subcutaneous administration of 30 mg ecallantide resulted in significantly greater symptom improvement than placebo for acute attacks of HAE. Ecallantide was generally well tolerated throughout the clinical development program. The main safety concern following ecallantide treatment is hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis. A Risk Evaluation and Management Strategy (REMS) has been implemented to minimize this risk and a long-term observational safety study is currently under way to collect more information about hypersensitivity and immunogenicity. Ecallantide represents a novel treatment option for patients with HAE. PMID:20830315

  16. Modeling network correlations in cortical tissue from juvenile human epileptics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Jonathan Paul

    Models of neural tissue can make predictions about a real neural network, but these predictions rely on the data to determine parameters. Hence, the model is only as good as the data. I collected in vitro data removed from juvenile humans with refractory epilepsy, and found human-specific spatial and temporal dynamics that are not found in rats. I will first describe the general characteristics of the human data in comparison with rat data, and my attempts to model these differences with three popular models of neural networks: branching, pair-wise maximum entropy, and a forest fire model. I will describe three key discoveries from this exploration: first, spatial dynamics are more easily satisfied than temporal in both the rat and human tissue, second temporal correlations are not captured by the branching or the maximum entropy model, and thirdly, strong temporal correlations can be accounted for with the addition of a parameter in the forest fire model. Finally I will suggest new questions that this research has revealed about human tissue, and models of neural networks.

  17. Reprogramming of the human intestinal epigenome by surgical tissue transposition

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Fides D.; Triche, Timothy J.; Tsai, Yvonne C.; Su, Sheng-Fang; Martin, Sue Ellen; Daneshmand, Siamak; Skinner, Eila C.; Liang, Gangning; Chihara, Yoshitomo; Jones, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular cues play critical roles in the establishment of the epigenome during development and may also contribute to epigenetic perturbations found in disease states. The direct role of the local tissue environment on the post-development human epigenome, however, remains unclear due to limitations in studies of human subjects. Here, we use an isogenic human ileal neobladder surgical model and compare global DNA methylation levels of intestinal epithelial cells pre- and post-neobladder construction using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. Our study is the first to quantify the effect of environmental cues on the human epigenome and show that the local tissue environment directly modulates DNA methylation patterns in normal differentiated cells in vivo. In the neobladder, the intestinal epithelial cells lose their tissue-specific epigenetic landscape in a time-dependent manner following the tissue’s exposure to a bladder environment. We find that de novo methylation of many intestine-specific enhancers occurs at the rate of 0.41% per month (P < 0.01, Pearson = 0.71), while demethylation of primarily non-intestine-specific transcribed regions occurs at the rate of −0.37% per month (P < 0.01, Pearson = −0.57). The dynamic resetting of the DNA methylome in the neobladder not only implicates local environmental cues in the shaping and maintenance of the epigenome but also illustrates an unexpected cross-talk between the epigenome and the cellular environment. PMID:24515120

  18. Profiling RNA editing in human tissues: towards the inosinome Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Picardi, Ernesto; Manzari, Caterina; Mastropasqua, Francesca; Aiello, Italia; D’Erchia, Anna Maria; Pesole, Graziano

    2015-01-01

    Adenine to Inosine RNA editing is a widespread co- and post-transcriptional mechanism mediated by ADAR enzymes acting on double stranded RNA. It has a plethora of biological effects, appears to be particularly pervasive in humans with respect to other mammals, and is implicated in a number of diverse human pathologies. Here we present the first human inosinome atlas comprising 3,041,422 A-to-I events identified in six tissues from three healthy individuals. Matched directional total-RNA-Seq and whole genome sequence datasets were generated and analysed within a dedicated computational framework, also capable of detecting hyper-edited reads. Inosinome profiles are tissue specific and edited gene sets consistently show enrichment of genes involved in neurological disorders and cancer. Overall frequency of editing also varies, but is strongly correlated with ADAR expression levels. The inosinome database is available at: http://srv00.ibbe.cnr.it/editing/. PMID:26449202

  19. Enabling research with human embryonic and fetal tissue resources

    PubMed Central

    Gerrelli, Dianne; Lisgo, Steven; Copp, Andrew J.; Lindsay, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Congenital anomalies are a significant burden on human health. Understanding the developmental origins of such anomalies is key to developing potential therapies. The Human Developmental Biology Resource (HDBR), based in London and Newcastle UK, was established to provide embryonic and fetal material for a variety of human studies ranging from single gene expression analysis to large scale genomic/transcriptomic studies. Increasingly HDBR material is enabling the derivation of stem cell lines and contributing towards developments in tissue engineering. Use of the HDBR and other fetal tissue resources discussed here will contribute to the long term aims of understanding the causation and pathogenesis of congenital anomalies, and developing new methods for their treatment and prevention. PMID:26395135

  20. Microwave dielectric measurements and tissue characteristics of the human brain: potential in localizing intracranial tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axer, Hubertus; Gräßel, David; Steinhauer, Matthias; Stöhr, Peter; John, Andreas; Coenen, Volker A.; Jansen, Rolf H.; Keyserlingk, Diedrich Graf v.

    2002-05-01

    This study describes the measurements of dielectric properties in the microwave range to differentiate various human central nervous structures. Using a vector network analyser transmission and reflection coefficients were measured from 500 MHz to 18 GHz in four human formalin fixed human brains. The positions of the electrodes were marked, and the tissue was histologically stained to visualize the myelo- and the cytoarchitecture as well as the nerve fibre orientation at the electrodes. The profiles of the transmission coefficients showed a characteristic minimum peak. In order to describe this peak, a mathematical function was fitted. Parameters derived from digital image processing were used to characterize the myelo- and cytoarchitecure of the tissue at the electrodes. A multiple regression model, with the frequency at the transmission peak minimum as a dependent variable and two tissue characteristics at the two electrodes as independent variables, showed a multiple regression coefficient of 0.765. A neural network model was able to estimate the frequency at the transmission peak minimum from the tissue characteristics at the electrode. The measurements of dielectric properties are well suited to differentiate distinct intracerebral structures. The method could be used for online monitoring of the needle's position during a stereotactic intervention in neurosurgery.

  1. Tissue factor expression during human and mouse development.

    PubMed Central

    Luther, T.; Flössel, C.; Mackman, N.; Bierhaus, A.; Kasper, M.; Albrecht, S.; Sage, E. H.; Iruela-Arispe, L.; Grossmann, H.; Ströhlein, A.; Zhang, Y.; Nawroth, P. P.; Carmeliet, P.; Loskutoff, D. J.; Müller, M.

    1996-01-01

    In the adult organism the cellular distribution of tissue factor (TF) expression corresponds to biological boundary layers forming a hemostatic barrier ready to activate blood coagulation after tissue injury. Whether TF expression might also play a role in development is unknown. To determine the significance of TF in ontogenesis, we examined the pattern of TF expression in mouse development and compared it with the distribution of TF in human post-implantation embryos and fetuses of corresponding gestational age. At early embryonic periods of murine (6.5 and 7.5 pc) and human (stage 5) development, there was strong expression of TF in both ectodermal and entodermal cells. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that TF mRNA and protein were expressed widely in epithelial areas with high levels of morphogenic activity during organogenesis. Staining for TF was seen during ontogenetic development in tissues such as epidermis, myocardium, bronchial epithelium, and hepatocytes, which express TF in the adult organism. Surprisingly, during renal development and in adults, expression of TF differed between humans and mice. In humans, maturing stage glomeruli were stained for TF whereas in mice, TF was absent from glomeruli but was present in the epithelia of tubular segments. In neuroepithelial cells, there was a substantial expression of TF. Moreover, there was robust TF expression in tissues such as skeletal muscle and pancreas, which do not express it in the adult. In contrast, expression of the physiological ligand for TF, factor VII, was not detectable during early stages of human embryogenesis using immunohistochemistry. The temporal and spatial pattern of TF expression during murine and human development supports the contention that TF serves as an important morphogenic factor during embryogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8686734

  2. Near-infrared laser speckle imaging of human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, Robert Speer

    Current methods of breast cancer diagnostics (self-exam, clinical exam, x-ray mammography) fail to diagnose a significant number of cases while still in readily operable stages. This is especially true in younger women, where fibrotic tissue reduces the efficacy of x-ray mammography. Near infrared (NIR) laser photons pass diffusively through human tissue, creating a speckle pattern in a detector after transmission. The high and low intensity variations of the speckle have the appearance of random noise, but are not. The speckle pattern will have an intensity distribution that is informative about the scattering and absorption properties of the tissue that is imaged. Adaptations to the Los Alamos National Laboratory MCNP code are described that allow simulation of NIR laser transport through human tissue. A HeNe laser was used to create laser intensity patterns via transmission through homogeneous and non-homogeneous tissue phantoms. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to compare the cumulative distribution functions of the laser intensity patterns, and identify the presence of a non-homogeneity. Laser speckle techniques offer the ability to image tumors with few (<3) millimeter resolution without ionizing radiation dose.

  3. The human tri-peptide GHK and tissue remodeling.

    PubMed

    Pickart, Loren

    2008-01-01

    Tissue remodeling follows the initial phase of wound healing and stops inflammatory and scar-forming processes, then restores the normal tissue morphology. The human peptide Gly-(L-His)-(L-Lys) or GHK, has a copper 2+ (Cu(2+)) affinity similar to the copper transport site on albumin and forms GHK-Cu, a complex with Cu(2+). These two molecules activate a plethora of remodeling related processes: (1) chemoattraction of repair cells such as macrophages, mast cells, capillary cells; (2) anti-inflammatory actions (suppression of free radicals, thromboxane formation, release of oxidizing iron, transforming growth factor beta-1, tumor necrosis factor alpha and protein glycation while increasing superoxide dismutase, vessel vasodilation, blocking ultraviolet damage to skin keratinocytes and improving fibroblast recovery after X-ray treatments); (3) increases protein synthesis of collagen, elastin, metalloproteinases, anti-proteases, vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 2, nerve growth factor, neutrotropins 3 and 4, and erythropoietin; (4) increases the proliferation of fibroblasts and keratinocytes; nerve outgrowth, angiogenesis, and hair follicle size. GHK-Cu stimulates wound healing in numerous models and in humans. Controlled studies on aged skin demonstrated that it tightens skin, improves elasticity and firmness, reduces fine lines, wrinkles, photodamage and hyperpigmentation. GHK-Cu also improves hair transplant success, protects hepatic tissue from tetrachloromethane poisoning, blocks stomach ulcer development, and heals intestinal ulcers and bone tissue. These results are beginning to define the complex biochemical processes that regulate tissue remodeling. PMID:18644225

  4. Modeling of human artery tissue with probabilistic approach.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Linfei; Chui, Chee-Kong; Fu, Yabo; Teo, Chee-Leong; Li, Yao

    2015-04-01

    Accurate modeling of biological soft tissue properties is vital for realistic medical simulation. Mechanical response of biological soft tissue always exhibits a strong variability due to the complex microstructure and different loading conditions. The inhomogeneity in human artery tissue is modeled with a computational probabilistic approach by assuming that the instantaneous stress at a specific strain varies according to normal distribution. Material parameters of the artery tissue which are modeled with a combined logarithmic and polynomial energy equation are represented by a statistical function with normal distribution. Mean and standard deviation of the material parameters are determined using genetic algorithm (GA) and inverse mean-value first-order second-moment (IMVFOSM) method, respectively. This nondeterministic approach was verified using computer simulation based on the Monte-Carlo (MC) method. Cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the MC simulation corresponds well with that of the experimental stress-strain data and the probabilistic approach is further validated using data from other studies. By taking into account the inhomogeneous mechanical properties of human biological tissue, the proposed method is suitable for realistic virtual simulation as well as an accurate computational approach for medical device validation. PMID:25748681

  5. FT-Raman spectroscopy study of human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitar Carter, Renata A.; Martin, Airton A.; Netto, Mario M.; Soares, Fernando A.

    2004-07-01

    Optical spectroscopy has been extensively studied as a potential in vivo diagnostic tool to provide information about the chemical and morphologic structure of tissue. Raman Spectroscpy is an inelastic scattering process that can provide a wealth of spectral features that can be related to the specific molecular structure of the sample. This article reports results of an in vitro study of the FT-Raman human breast tissue spectra. An Nd:YAG laser at 1064nm was used as the excitation source in the FT-Raman Spectrometer. The neoplastic human breast samples, both Fibroadenoma and ICD, were obtained during therapeutical routine medical procedures required by the primary disease, and the non-diseased human tissue was obtained in plastic surgery. No sample preparation was needed for the FT-Raman spectra collection. The FT-Raman spectra were recorded from normal, benign (Fibroadenomas) and malignant (IDC-Intraductal Carcinoma) samples, adding up 51 different areas. The main spectral differences of a typical FT-Raman spectra of a Normal (Non-diseased), Fibroadenoma, and Infiltrating Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) breast tissue at the interval of 600 to 1800cm-1, which may differentiate diagnostically the sample, were found in the bands of 1230 to 1295cm-1, 1440 to 1460 cm-1 and 1650 to 1680 cm-1, assigned to the vibrational bands of the carbohydrate-amide III, proteins and lipids, and carbohydrate-amide I, respectively.

  6. Thyroxine monodeiodination in normal human kidney tissue in vitro.

    PubMed

    Boye, N

    1986-08-01

    The present study deals with thyroxine monodeiodination in normal human kidney. To allow for comparison with previous reports, the present methods are similar to those used by others in rat tissue studies. The microsomal cell fraction of normal human kidney tissue was obtained by differential ultracentrifugation. The microsomes were incubated under various conditions and the deiodination products assayed with radioimmunoassay. A type I 5'-monodeiodinase was demonstrated, pH optimum around 6.5. Competitive inhibition was observed of T3 generation from T4 by rT3 with a Km of 3.0 microM and a Ki of 4 microM. Vmax was 26.1 pmol/min/mg protein. Likewise rT3 was generated from added T4, but it was rapidly degraded, while T3 was relatively stable as is the case in rat tissue preparations. Propylthiouracil inhibited 5'-deiodination in a dose dependent fashion with complete abolishment of deiodination at propylthiouracil concentration of 10(-4) M. Ipodate inhibited the reaction with complete inhibition at 10(-2) M. The data demonstrate that a human kidney particulate cell-fraction contained considerable amounts of T4 deiodinases, very similar to the type I deiodinase of various rat tissue, although the handling of rT3 and the inhibitory action of this iodothyronine on T4 to T3 conversion seem to be slightly different in the two species. PMID:3751464

  7. Epithelial cell cultures from normal and cancerous human tissues.

    PubMed

    Owens, R B; Smith, H S; Nelson-Rees, W A; Springer, E L

    1976-04-01

    Thirty epithelial cell strains were isolated from human carcinomas and normal epithelial tissues by collagenase digestion and selective removal of fibroblasts with trypsin-Versene. Most strains were obtained from metastatic carcinomas or epithelia of the urinary and intestinal tracts. The success rate for growth of both neoplastic and normal tissues (excluding skin) was 38%. Six of these strains showed gross morphologic and chromosome changes typical of malignant cells. Nine resembled normal epithelium. The other 15 exhibited some degree of morphologic change from normal. PMID:176412

  8. Monitoring changes in tissue optical properties following interstitial photothermal therapy of ex vivo human prostate tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weersink, Robert A.; He, Jie; Veilleux, Israel; Trachtenberg, John; Wilson, Brian C.

    2013-03-01

    We are developing a method of monitoring treatment progression of interstitial photothermal therapy of focal prostate cancer using transrectal diffuse optical tomography (TRDOT) combined with transrectal 3D ultrasound (3D-TRUS). Measurements of prostate tissue optical properties were made on ex vivo human prostate samples prior to and post coagulation. Interstitial photothermal treatments were delivered to the ex vivo samples and monitored using an interstitial probe near the treatment fiber. After treatment, bulk optical properties were measured on native and coagulated zones of tissue. Changes in optical properties across the boundary between native and coagulated tissues were spatially mapped using a small diffuse reflectance probe. The optical property estimates and spatial information obtained using each method was compared.

  9. An Introduction to The Royan Human Ovarian Tissue Bank

    PubMed Central

    Abtahi, Naeimeh Sadat; Ebrahimi, Bita; Fathi, Rouhollah; Khodaverdi, Sepideh; Mehdizadeh Kashi, Abolfazl; Valojerdi, Mojtaba Rezazadeh

    2016-01-01

    From December 2000 until 2010, the researchers at Royan Institute conducted a wide range of investigations on ovarian tissue cryopreservation with the intent to provide fertility pres- ervation to cancer patients that were considered to be candidates for these services. In 2010, Royan Institute established the Royan Human Ovarian Tissue Bank as a subgroup of the Embryology Department. Since its inception, approximately 180 patients between the ages of 747 years have undergone consultations. Ovarian samples were cryopreserved from 47 patients (age: 7-35 years) diagnosed with cervical adenocarcinoma (n=9); breast carcinoma (n=7), Ewing’s sarcoma (n=7), opposite side ovarian tumor (n=7), endometrial adenocarci- noma (n=4), malignant colon tumors (n=3), as well as Hodgkin’s lymphoma, major thalas- semia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n=1-2 patients for each disease). Additionally, two patients requested ovarian tissue transplantation after completion of their treatments.

  10. Fallout sup 3 H in human tissue at Akita, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Hisamatsu, S.; Takizawa, Y.; Itoh, M.; Ueno, K.; Katsumata, T.; Sakanoue, M. )

    1989-10-01

    The {sup 3}H concentration in Japanese human tissue samples is reported in this paper. Four brain, 10 liver, and nine lung samples from 11 cases were collected from Akita Prefecture in northern Japan from January to July 1986. The median of free-water {sup 3}H concentration was similar in these tissues and agreed well with the concentrations in the diet, including tap water. The median specific activity ratio of tissue-bound {sup 3}H to free-water {sup 3}H was 1.1 and was slightly lower than that in the diet. The specific activity ratio was also lower than that reported in the United States and significantly lower than in Italy.

  11. A continuous fiber distribution material model for human cervical tissue.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kristin M; Hendon, Christine P; Gan, Yu; Yao, Wang; Yoshida, Kyoko; Fernandez, Michael; Vink, Joy; Wapner, Ronald J

    2015-06-25

    The uterine cervix during pregnancy is the vital mechanical barrier which resists compressive and tensile loads generated from a growing fetus. Premature cervical remodeling and softening is hypothesized to result in the shortening of the cervix, which is known to increase a woman׳s risk of preterm birth. To understand the role of cervical material properties in preventing preterm birth, we derive a cervical material model based on previous mechanical, biochemical and histological experiments conducted on nonpregnant and pregnant human hysterectomy cervical tissue samples. In this study we present a three-dimensional fiber composite model that captures the equilibrium material behavior of the tissue in tension and compression. Cervical tissue is modeled as a fibrous composite material, where a single family of preferentially aligned and continuously distributed collagen fibers are embedded in a compressible neo-Hookean ground substance. The total stress in the collagen solid network is calculated by integrating the fiber stresses. The shape of the fiber distribution is described by an ellipsoid where semi-principal axis lengths are fit to optical coherence tomography measurements. The composite material model is fit to averaged mechanical testing data from uni-axial compression and tension experiments, and averaged material parameters are reported for nonpregnant and term pregnant human cervical tissue. The model is then evaluated by investigating the stress and strain state of a uniform thick-walled cylinder under a compressive stress with collagen fibers preferentially aligned in the circumferential direction. This material modeling framework for the equilibrium behavior of human cervical tissue serves as a basis to determine the role of preferentially-aligned cervical collagen fibers in preventing cervical deformation during pregnancy. PMID:25817474

  12. Transgenic kallikrein 5 mice reproduce major cutaneous and systemic hallmarks of Netherton syndrome.

    PubMed

    Furio, Laetitia; de Veer, Simon; Jaillet, Madeleine; Briot, Anais; Robin, Aurelie; Deraison, Celine; Hovnanian, Alain

    2014-03-10

    Netherton syndrome (NS) is a severe genetic skin disease in which absence of a key protease inhibitor causes congenital exfoliative erythroderma, eczematous-like lesions, and atopic manifestations. Several proteases are overactive in NS, including kallikrein-related peptidase (KLK) 5, KLK7, and elastase-2 (ELA2), which are suggested to be part of a proteolytic cascade initiated by KLK5. To address the role of KLK5 in NS, we have generated a new transgenic murine model expressing human KLK5 in the granular layer of the epidermis (Tg-KLK5). Transgene expression resulted in increased proteolytic activity attributable to KLK5 and its downstream targets KLK7, KLK14, and ELA2. Tg-KLK5 mice developed an exfoliative erythroderma with scaling, growth delay, and hair abnormalities. The skin barrier was defective and the stratum corneum was detached through desmosomal cleavage. Importantly, Tg-KLK5 mice displayed cutaneous and systemic hallmarks of severe inflammation and allergy with pruritus. The skin showed enhanced expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, infiltration of immune cells, and markers of Th2/Th17/Th22 T cell responses. Moreover, serum IgE and Tslp levels were elevated. Our study identifies KLK5 as an important contributor to the NS proteolytic cascade and provides a new and viable model for the evaluation of future targeted therapies for NS or related diseases such as atopic dermatitis. PMID:24534191

  13. Levels of chlordane, oxychlordane, and nonachlor in human adipose tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Yukio; Tomokuni, Katsumaro )

    1991-08-01

    Chlordane was used as a termiticide for more than twenty years in Japan. Chlordane is stable in the environment such as sediment and its bioaccumulation in some species of bacteria, freshwater invertebrates, and marine fish is large. Many researches were done to elucidate the levels of chlordane and/or its metabolite oxychlordane in human adipose tissues. A comprehensive review concerning chlordane was recently provided by USEPA. On the other hand, Japan authorities banned the use of chlordane in September 1986. In the last paper, the authors reported that both water and sediment of the rivers around Saga city were slightly contaminated with chlordane. In the present study, they investigated the levels of chlordane, oxychlordane and nonachlor in human adipose tissues.

  14. Expression of the endocannabinoid receptors in human fascial tissue.

    PubMed

    Fede, C; Albertin, G; Petrelli, L; Sfriso, M M; Biz, C; De Caro, R; Stecco, C

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors have been localized in the central and peripheral nervous system as well as on cells of the immune system, but recent studies on animal tissue gave evidence for the presence of cannabinoid receptors in different types of tissues. Their presence was supposed also in myofascial tissue, suggesting that the endocannabinoid system may help resolve myofascial trigger points and relieve symptoms of fibromyalgia. However, until now the expression of CB1 (cannabinoid receptor 1) and CB2 (cannabinoid receptor 2) in fasciae has not yet been established. Small samples of fascia were collected from volunteers patients during orthopedic surgery. For each sample were done a cell isolation, immunohistochemical investigation (CB1 and CB2 antibodies) and real time RT-PCR to detect the expression of CB1 and CB2. Both cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human fascia and in human fascial fibroblasts culture cells, although to a lesser extent than the control gene. We can assume that the expression of mRNA and protein of CB1 and CB2 receptors in fascial tissue are concentrated into the fibroblasts. This is the first demonstration that the fibroblasts of the muscular fasciae express CB1 and CB2. The presence of these receptors could help to provide a description of cannabinoid receptors distribution and to better explain the role of fasciae as pain generator and the efficacy of some fascial treatments. Indeed the endocannabinoid receptors of fascial fibroblasts can contribute to modulate the fascial fibrosis and inflammation. PMID:27349320

  15. Expression of the Endocannabinoid Receptors in Human Fascial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fede, C.; Albertin, G.; Petrelli, L.; Sfriso, M.M.; Biz, C.; Caro, R. De; Stecco, C.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors have been localized in the central and peripheral nervous system as well as on cells of the immune system, but recent studies on animal tissue gave evidence for the presence of cannabinoid receptors in different types of tissues. Their presence was supposed also in myofascial tissue, suggesting that the endocannabinoid system may help resolve myofascial trigger points and relieve symptoms of fibromyalgia. However, until now the expression of CB1 (cannabinoid receptor 1) and CB2 (cannabinoid receptor 2) in fasciae has not yet been established. Small samples of fascia were collected from volunteers patients during orthopedic surgery. For each sample were done a cell isolation, immunohistochemical investigation (CB1 and CB2 antibodies) and real time RT-PCR to detect the expression of CB1 and CB2. Both cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human fascia and in human fascial fibroblasts culture cells, although to a lesser extent than the control gene. We can assume that the expression of mRNA and protein of CB1 and CB2 receptors in fascial tissue are concentrated into the fibroblasts. This is the first demonstration that the fibroblasts of the muscular fasciae express CB1 and CB2. The presence of these receptors could help to provide a description of cannabinoid receptors distribution and to better explain the role of fasciae as pain generator and the efficacy of some fascial treatments. Indeed the endocannabinoid receptors of fascial fibroblasts can contribute to modulate the fascial fibrosis and inflammation. PMID:27349320

  16. Effect of Various Concentrations of Caffeine, Pentoxifylline, and Kallikrein on Hyperactivation of Frozen Bovine Semen

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Ibrahim A. H.; Danfour, Mohamed A.; Galewan, Fatma A. M.; Dkhil, Mohamed A.

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine, pentoxifylline, and kallikrein are substances that affect the efficiency of sperms in the fertilization process; however, they have not been adequately studied. The present study aimed to examine the influence of caffeine, kallikrein, and pentoxifylline on sperm motility in bovine as well as investigate their optimum concentrations for increasing the movement of sperms in bovine. Frozen bovine sperms were thawed in universal IVF medium supplemented with 1, 5, and 10 mM caffeine or pentoxifylline or 1, 4, and 8 U/mL kallikrein and were then incubated for 30 min. Treated semen parameters were analyzed using a computer assisted semen analyzer (CASA). Data analysis showed that the mean values concerning progression and motility of sperm increased in caffeine and pentoxifylline treatments when compared with the kallikrein group. The obtained results revealed that kallikrein is not necessary for the improvement of bovine sperm motility. Additionally, our results revealed that 5 mM from caffeine was the best concentration added to the medium, followed by 1 or 5 mM from pentoxifylline. Therefore, it is concluded from the present study that caffeine has hyperactivation efficacy at 5 mM concentration compared to other treatments. PMID:25950005

  17. Effects of temperature on fluorescence in human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, D. B.; Walsh, Alex; Welch, A. J.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2010-02-01

    The fluorescence properties of human tissue are known to be temperature dependent. The most apparent effect of this dependence is the inverse relationship between fluorescence and temperature. In this study, we used fluorescence and diffuse-reflectance spectroscopy to investigate the effects of temperature on fluorescence, thermal coagulation, and tissue optical properties. Human tissue from the breast and abdomen were examined in vitro, and human skin was examined in vivo using a fluorescence and diffuse-reflectance system to observe the effects of temperature on fluorescence and optical properties. Fluorescence measurements were carried out using a pulsed nitrogen laser at 337 nm for excitation and a thermal camera for temperature measurements. Thermal variation of the specimens was provided by a phosphate buffered saline solution for the in vitro experiments and an ice pack and heat lamp for the in vivo experiments. In vitro temperatures varied from 0°C to 70°C and in vivo temperatures varied from 15°C to 40°C. Optical property measurements and Monte Carlo simulations were carried out on the in vitro samples for different levels of thermal exposure. Results of both the in vivo and in vitro experiments indicate that optical properties of human tissue change at high temperatures, primarily due to increased scattering. In addition, certain internal processes may have contributed to a decrease in fluorescence with increasing temperature. Some of these effects were found to be reversible before a certain temperature threshold, while some effects of coagulation on fluorescence and optical properties were not reversible.

  18. Cervical tissue engineering using silk scaffolds and human cervical cells.

    PubMed

    House, Michael; Sanchez, Cristina C; Rice, William L; Socrate, Simona; Kaplan, David L

    2010-06-01

    Spontaneous preterm birth is a frequent complication of pregnancy and a common cause of morbidity in childhood. Obstetricians suspect abnormalities of the cervix are implicated in a significant number of preterm births. The cervix is composed of fibrous connective tissue and undergoes significant remodeling in preparation for birth. We hypothesized that a tissue engineering strategy could be used to develop three-dimensional cervical-like tissue constructs that would be suitable for investigating cervical remodeling. Cervical cells were isolated from two premenopausal women undergoing hysterectomy for a benign gynecological condition, and the cells were seeded on porous silk scaffolds in the presence or absence of dynamic culture and with 10% or 20% serum. Morphological, biochemical, and mechanical properties were measured during the 8-week culture period. Cervical cells proliferated in three-dimensions and synthesized an extracellular matrix with biochemical constituents and morphology similar to native tissue. Compared to static culture, dynamic culture was associated with significantly increased collagen deposition (p < 0.05), sulfated glycosaminoglycan synthesis (p < 0.05), and mechanical stiffness (p < 0.05). Serum concentration did not affect measured variables. Relevant human tissue-engineered cervical-like constructs constitute a novel model system for a range of fundamental and applied studies related to cervical remodeling. PMID:20121593

  19. The formation of immunoglobulins by human tissues in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Van Furth, R.; Schuit, Henrica R. E.; Hijmans, W.

    1966-01-01

    The formation of immunoglobulins by human tissues was studied by three techniques: (1) Autoradiography of the immunoelectrophoretic pattern of culture fluids of tissue fragments or cell suspensions in a medium with radio-active amino acids; (2) immunofluorescent staining of the tissue sections or cell suspensions, before incubation, with antisera specific for one immunoglobulin; and (3) histological and cytological study of the samples. The paper gives a detailed description of the techniques applied and evaluates the specificity of the immunological methods used. Various control experiments were performed: Incubation of dead tissues or normal serum in the radioactive culture medium excluded the adsorption of [14C]amino acids on to immunoglobulins. Cultures of tissue fragments in the presence of puromycin showed an inhibition of the synthesis of [14C]immunoglobulins. Autoradiography of a `fingerprint' of radioactive IgG demonstrated radioactive amino acids present in different peptides of the synthesized molecule. From these control experiments it can be concluded that the labelling of the immunoglobulins is based on the incorporation of [14C]amino acids during incubation in vitro. The specificity of the immunofluorescent staining was evaluated by immunodiffusion of the antisera and conjugates, by blocking procedures and by specific staining of bone-marrow samples from patients with various immunoglobulin abnormalities. ImagesFIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4161984

  20. Cervical Tissue Engineering Using Silk Scaffolds and Human Cervical Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Cristina C.; Rice, William L.; Socrate, Simona; Kaplan, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous preterm birth is a frequent complication of pregnancy and a common cause of morbidity in childhood. Obstetricians suspect abnormalities of the cervix are implicated in a significant number of preterm births. The cervix is composed of fibrous connective tissue and undergoes significant remodeling in preparation for birth. We hypothesized that a tissue engineering strategy could be used to develop three-dimensional cervical-like tissue constructs that would be suitable for investigating cervical remodeling. Cervical cells were isolated from two premenopausal women undergoing hysterectomy for a benign gynecological condition, and the cells were seeded on porous silk scaffolds in the presence or absence of dynamic culture and with 10% or 20% serum. Morphological, biochemical, and mechanical properties were measured during the 8-week culture period. Cervical cells proliferated in three-dimensions and synthesized an extracellular matrix with biochemical constituents and morphology similar to native tissue. Compared to static culture, dynamic culture was associated with significantly increased collagen deposition (p < 0.05), sulfated glycosaminoglycan synthesis (p < 0.05), and mechanical stiffness (p < 0.05). Serum concentration did not affect measured variables. Relevant human tissue-engineered cervical-like constructs constitute a novel model system for a range of fundamental and applied studies related to cervical remodeling. PMID:20121593

  1. DNA methylation age of human tissues and cell types

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is not yet known whether DNA methylation levels can be used to accurately predict age across a broad spectrum of human tissues and cell types, nor whether the resulting age prediction is a biologically meaningful measure. Results I developed a multi-tissue predictor of age that allows one to estimate the DNA methylation age of most tissues and cell types. The predictor, which is freely available, was developed using 8,000 samples from 82 Illumina DNA methylation array datasets, encompassing 51 healthy tissues and cell types. I found that DNA methylation age has the following properties: first, it is close to zero for embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells; second, it correlates with cell passage number; third, it gives rise to a highly heritable measure of age acceleration; and, fourth, it is applicable to chimpanzee tissues. Analysis of 6,000 cancer samples from 32 datasets showed that all of the considered 20 cancer types exhibit significant age acceleration, with an average of 36 years. Low age-acceleration of cancer tissue is associated with a high number of somatic mutations and TP53 mutations, while mutations in steroid receptors greatly accelerate DNA methylation age in breast cancer. Finally, I characterize the 353 CpG sites that together form an aging clock in terms of chromatin states and tissue variance. Conclusions I propose that DNA methylation age measures the cumulative effect of an epigenetic maintenance system. This novel epigenetic clock can be used to address a host of questions in developmental biology, cancer and aging research. PMID:24138928

  2. Streamlined bioreactor-based production of human cartilage tissues.

    PubMed

    Tonnarelli, B; Santoro, R; Adelaide Asnaghi, M; Wendt, D

    2016-01-01

    Engineered tissue grafts have been manufactured using methods based predominantly on traditional labour-intensive manual benchtop techniques. These methods impart significant regulatory and economic challenges, hindering the successful translation of engineered tissue products to the clinic. Alternatively, bioreactor-based production systems have the potential to overcome such limitations. In this work, we present an innovative manufacturing approach to engineer cartilage tissue within a single bioreactor system, starting from freshly isolated human primary chondrocytes, through the generation of cartilaginous tissue grafts. The limited number of primary chondrocytes that can be isolated from a small clinically-sized cartilage biopsy could be seeded and extensively expanded directly within a 3D scaffold in our perfusion bioreactor (5.4 ± 0.9 doublings in 2 weeks), bypassing conventional 2D expansion in flasks. Chondrocytes expanded in 3D scaffolds better maintained a chondrogenic phenotype than chondrocytes expanded on plastic flasks (collagen type II mRNA, 18-fold; Sox-9, 11-fold). After this "3D expansion" phase, bioreactor culture conditions were changed to subsequently support chondrogenic differentiation for two weeks. Engineered tissues based on 3D-expanded chondrocytes were more cartilaginous than tissues generated from chondrocytes previously expanded in flasks. We then demonstrated that this streamlined bioreactor-based process could be adapted to effectively generate up-scaled cartilage grafts in a size with clinical relevance (50 mm diameter). Streamlined and robust tissue engineering processes, as the one described here, may be key for the future manufacturing of grafts for clinical applications, as they facilitate the establishment of compact and closed bioreactor-based production systems, with minimal automation requirements, lower operating costs, and increased compliance to regulatory guidelines. PMID:27232665

  3. Insulin is ubiquitous in extrapancreatic tissues of rats and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, J L; Havrankova, J; Lesniak, M A; Brownstein, M; Roth, J

    1980-01-01

    Insulin has been detected, at levels higher than those in plasma, in a broad range of extrapancreatic tissues in both rats and humans. Rat liver insulin was shown to be indistinguishable from genuine insulin by radioimmunoassay, Sephadex chromatography, bioassay, and antibody neutralization. Liver insulin (like brain insulin) was unchanged in ob/ob mice, in rats treated with streptozotocin, or in fasted rats, despite marked alterations in pancreatic secretion of insulin and in liver content of insulin receptors. Insulin was found in cultured human IM-9 lymphocytes and cultured fibroblasts at concentrations greater than 100 times the levels in the media. IM-9 lymphocyte insulin also was shown to be indistinguishable from genuine insulin, by the same criteria used for liver insulin. The insulin concentration in cultured human cells was unaffected by depletion of insulin from the culture medium or by addition of beef insulin to the medium. The data suggest that a part, if not all, of the extrapancreatic tissue insulin is independent of plasma insulin and may be synthesized by the tissues themselves. PMID:6987656

  4. Elastic, Permeability and Swelling Properties of Human Intervertebral Disc Tissues: A Benchmark for Tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Daniel H.; Jacobs, Nathan T.; DeLucca, John F.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The aim of functional tissue engineering is to repair and replace tissues that have a biomechanical function, i.e., connective orthopaedic tissues. To do this, it is necessary to have accurate benchmarks for the elastic, permeability, and swelling (i.e., biphasic-swelling) properties of native tissues. However, in the case of the intervertebral disc, the biphasic-swelling properties of individual tissues reported in the literature exhibit great variation and even span several orders of magnitude. This variation is probably caused by differences in the testing protocols and the constitutive models used to analyze the data. Therefore, the objective of this study was to measure the human lumbar disc annulus fibrosus (AF), nucleus pulposus (NP), and cartilaginous endplates (CEP) biphasic-swelling properties using a consistent experimental protocol and analyses. The testing protocol was composed of a swelling period followed by multiple confined compression ramps. To analyze the confined compression data, the tissues were modeled using a biphasic-swelling model, which augments the standard biphasic model through the addition of a deformation-dependent osmotic pressure term. This model allows considering the swelling deformations and the contribution of osmotic pressure in the analysis of the experimental data. The swelling stretch was not different between the disc regions (AF: 1.28±0.16; NP: 1.73±0.74; CEP: 1.29±0.26), with a total average of 1.42. The aggregate modulus (Ha) of the matrix was higher in the CEP (390 kPa) compared to the NP (100 kPA) or AF (30 kPa). The permeability was very different across tissues regions, with the AF permeability (80 E−4 mm4/Ns) higher than the NP and CEP (6-7 E−16 m4/Ns). Additionally, a normalized time-constant (3000 sec) for the stress relaxation was similar for all the disc tissues. The properties measured in this study are important as benchmarks for tissue engineering and for modeling the disc's mechanical

  5. 3D Extracellular Matrix from Sectioned Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Catherine B; Cukierman, Edna; Artym, Vira V

    2014-01-01

    corneal endothelial cell lines produce an ECM mimicking an in vivo subendothelium, and the EHS tumor cell line produces a matrix that can be extracted to produce Matrigel, which simulates basement membrane molecular complexity including laminin, collagen IV and nidogen (Beacham, et al., 2007; Friedl and Brocker, 2000). To simulate a physiological environment even more closely, 3D matrices derived from mouse tissue slices from which cells were extracted have reportedly provided successful ECM replicas for studying in vivo cellular behavior (Cukierman, et al., 2001). Because of the important roles of the extracellular microenvironment on normal and tumor cells, we have developed protocols to produce cell-free (decellularized) 3D matrices from cryostat sections of normal and tumor human tissues. These extracted matrices can be used as a 3D tissue culture environment to analyze effects of various 3D matrices on normal and tumor cell responses and behavior. Using human pancreas and breast tissue samples, we have successfully prepared cell-free 3D ECM models, used them as cell culture substrates for a human breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, and then performed immunofluorescence staining to characterize intracellular structures. A frequently observed difference between normal and tumor tissue-derived ECM environments involves the amount of deposited fibrillar collagen (Provenzano, 2008). Tumor tissues from both breast and pancreas often contain substantially more collagen than normal adjacent tissue, and this protocol preserves this difference in cell-free 3D matrices from these tissues (Vidi, et al., 2013). This 3D culture system we describe using cell-free 3D matrix provides an approach to studying cellular behavior and migratory mechanisms associated with cancer. The basic protocol describes methods for successfully extracting cells and cellular debris from human tissue cryostat sections to obtain a clean, cell-free 3D ECM for plating cell lines (Figure 1). Cellular

  6. Multipotent progenitor cells isolated from adult human pancreatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Todorov, I; Nair, I; Ferreri, K; Rawson, J; Kuroda, A; Pascual, M; Omori, K; Valiente, L; Orr, C; Al-Abdullah, I; Riggs, A; Kandeel, F; Mullen, Y

    2005-10-01

    The supply of islet cells is a limiting factor for the widespread application of islet transplantation of type-1 diabetes. Islets constitute 1% to 2% of pancreatic tissue, leaving approximately 98% as discard after islet isolation and purification. In this report we present our data on the isolation of multipotent progenitor cells from discarded adult human pancreatic tissue. The collected cells from discarded nonislet fractions, after enzymatic digestion and gradient purification of islets, were dissociated for suspension culture in a serum-free medium. The cell clusters grown to a size of 100 to 150 mum contained cells staining for stage-specific embryonic antigens, but not insulin or C-peptide. To direct cell differentiation toward islets, clusters were recultured in a pancreatic differentiation medium. Insulin and C-peptide-positive cells by immunocytochemistry appeared within a week, reaching over 10% of the cell population. Glucagon and somatostatin-positive cells were also detected. The cell clusters were found to secrete insulin in response to glucose stimulation. Cells from the same clusters also had the capacity for differentiation into neural cells, as documented by staining for neural and glial cell markers when cultured as monolayers in media containing neurotrophic factors. These data suggest that multipotent pancreatic progenitor cells exist within the human pancreatic tissue that is typically discarded during islet isolation procedures. These adult progenitor cells can be successfully differentiated into insulin-producing cells, and thus they have the potential for treatment of type-1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:16298614

  7. Comparison of the transcriptional landscapes between human and mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Nery, Joseph R; Urich, Mark A; Breschi, Alessandra; Davis, Carrie A; Dobin, Alexander; Zaleski, Christopher; Beer, Michael A; Chapman, William C; Gingeras, Thomas R; Ecker, Joseph R; Snyder, Michael P

    2014-12-01

    Although the similarities between humans and mice are typically highlighted, morphologically and genetically, there are many differences. To better understand these two species on a molecular level, we performed a comparison of the expression profiles of 15 tissues by deep RNA sequencing and examined the similarities and differences in the transcriptome for both protein-coding and -noncoding transcripts. Although commonalities are evident in the expression of tissue-specific genes between the two species, the expression for many sets of genes was found to be more similar in different tissues within the same species than between species. These findings were further corroborated by associated epigenetic histone mark analyses. We also find that many noncoding transcripts are expressed at a low level and are not detectable at appreciable levels across individuals. Moreover, the majority lack obvious sequence homologs between species, even when we restrict our attention to those which are most highly reproducible across biological replicates. Overall, our results indicate that there is considerable RNA expression diversity between humans and mice, well beyond what was described previously, likely reflecting the fundamental physiological differences between these two organisms. PMID:25413365

  8. Comparison of the transcriptional landscapes between human and mouse tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Nery, Joseph R.; Urich, Mark A.; Breschi, Alessandra; Davis, Carrie A.; Dobin, Alexander; Zaleski, Christopher; Beer, Michael A.; Chapman, William C.; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Ecker, Joseph R.; Snyder, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Although the similarities between humans and mice are typically highlighted, morphologically and genetically, there are many differences. To better understand these two species on a molecular level, we performed a comparison of the expression profiles of 15 tissues by deep RNA sequencing and examined the similarities and differences in the transcriptome for both protein-coding and -noncoding transcripts. Although commonalities are evident in the expression of tissue-specific genes between the two species, the expression for many sets of genes was found to be more similar in different tissues within the same species than between species. These findings were further corroborated by associated epigenetic histone mark analyses. We also find that many noncoding transcripts are expressed at a low level and are not detectable at appreciable levels across individuals. Moreover, the majority lack obvious sequence homologs between species, even when we restrict our attention to those which are most highly reproducible across biological replicates. Overall, our results indicate that there is considerable RNA expression diversity between humans and mice, well beyond what was described previously, likely reflecting the fundamental physiological differences between these two organisms. PMID:25413365

  9. Characterization of Leukocyte Formin FMNL1 Expression in Human Tissues.

    PubMed

    Gardberg, Maria; Heuser, Vanina D; Iljin, Kristiina; Kampf, Caroline; Uhlen, Mathias; Carpén, Olli

    2014-04-01

    Formins are cytoskeleton regulating proteins characterized by a common FH2 structural domain. As key players in the assembly of actin filaments, formins direct dynamic cytoskeletal processes that influence cell shape, movement and adhesion. The large number of formin genes, fifteen in the human, suggests distinct tasks and expression patterns for individual family members, in addition to overlapping functions. Several formins have been associated with invasive cell properties in experimental models, linking them to cancer biology. One example is FMNL1, which is considered to be a leukocyte formin and is known to be overexpressed in lymphomas. Studies on FMNL1 and many other formins have been hampered by a lack of research tools, especially antibodies suitable for staining paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed tissues. Here we characterize, using bioinformatics tools and a validated antibody, the expression pattern of FMNL1 in human tissues and study its subcellular distribution. Our results indicate that FMNL1 expression is not restricted to hematopoietic tissues and that neoexpression of FMNL1 can be seen in epithelial cancer. PMID:24700756

  10. Characterization of Leukocyte Formin FMNL1 Expression in Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Heuser, Vanina D.; Iljin, Kristiina; Kampf, Caroline; Uhlen, Mathias; Carpén, Olli

    2014-01-01

    Formins are cytoskeleton regulating proteins characterized by a common FH2 structural domain. As key players in the assembly of actin filaments, formins direct dynamic cytoskeletal processes that influence cell shape, movement and adhesion. The large number of formin genes, fifteen in the human, suggests distinct tasks and expression patterns for individual family members, in addition to overlapping functions. Several formins have been associated with invasive cell properties in experimental models, linking them to cancer biology. One example is FMNL1, which is considered to be a leukocyte formin and is known to be overexpressed in lymphomas. Studies on FMNL1 and many other formins have been hampered by a lack of research tools, especially antibodies suitable for staining paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed tissues. Here we characterize, using bioinformatics tools and a validated antibody, the expression pattern of FMNL1 in human tissues and study its subcellular distribution. Our results indicate that FMNL1 expression is not restricted to hematopoietic tissues and that neoexpression of FMNL1 can be seen in epithelial cancer. PMID:24700756

  11. Dynamic biaxial tissue properties of the human cadaver aorta.

    PubMed

    Shah, Chirag S; Hardy, Warren N; Mason, Matthew J; Yang, King H; Van Ee, Chris A; Morgan, Richard; Digges, Kennerly

    2006-11-01

    This study focuses on the biaxial mechanical properties of planar aorta tissue at strain rates likely to be experienced during automotive crashes. It also examines the structural response of the whole aorta to longitudinal tension. Twenty-six tissue-level tests were conducted using twelve thoracic aortas harvested from human cadavers. Cruciate samples were excised from the ascending, peri-isthmic, and descending regions. The samples were subjected to equibiaxial stretch at two nominal speed levels using a new biaxial tissue-testing device. Inertia-compensated loads were measured to facilitate calculation of true stress. High-speed videography and regional correlation analysis were used to track ink dots marked on the center of each sample to obtain strain. In a series of component-level tests, the response of the intact thoracic aorta to longitudinal stretch was obtained using seven aorta specimens. The aorta fails within the peri-isthmic region. The aorta fails in the transverse direction, and the intima fails before the media or adventitia. The aorta tissue exhibits nonlinear behavior. The aorta as complete structure can transect completely from 92 N axial load and 0.221 axial strain. Complete transection can be accompanied by intimal tears. These results have application to finite element modeling and the better understanding of traumatic rupture of the aorta. PMID:17311166

  12. 78 FR 26639 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request: Financial Sustainability of Human Tissue Biobanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... Sustainability of Human Tissue Biobanking (NCI) Summary: In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2...: Financial Sustainability of Human Tissue Biobanking, 0925-NEW, National Cancer Institute (NCI),...

  13. Computational model of soft tissues in the human upper airway.

    PubMed

    Pelteret, J-P V; Reddy, B D

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional finite element model of the tongue and surrounding soft tissues with potential application to the study of sleep apnoea and of linguistics and speech therapy. The anatomical data was obtained from the Visible Human Project, and the underlying histological data was also extracted and incorporated into the model. Hyperelastic constitutive models were used to describe the material behaviour, and material incompressibility was accounted for. An active Hill three-element muscle model was used to represent the muscular tissue of the tongue. The neural stimulus for each muscle group was determined through the use of a genetic algorithm-based neural control model. The fundamental behaviour of the tongue under gravitational and breathing-induced loading is investigated. It is demonstrated that, when a time-dependent loading is applied to the tongue, the neural model is able to control the position of the tongue and produce a physiologically realistic response for the genioglossus. PMID:25830209

  14. Dynamic DNA methylation across diverse human cell lines and tissues

    PubMed Central

    Varley, Katherine E.; Gertz, Jason; Bowling, Kevin M.; Parker, Stephanie L.; Reddy, Timothy E.; Pauli-Behn, Florencia; Cross, Marie K.; Williams, Brian A.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Crawford, Gregory E.; Absher, Devin M.; Wold, Barbara J.; Myers, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    As studies of DNA methylation increase in scope, it has become evident that methylation has a complex relationship with gene expression, plays an important role in defining cell types, and is disrupted in many diseases. We describe large-scale single-base resolution DNA methylation profiling on a diverse collection of 82 human cell lines and tissues using reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS). Analysis integrating RNA-seq and ChIP-seq data illuminates the functional role of this dynamic mark. Loci that are hypermethylated across cancer types are enriched for sites bound by NANOG in embryonic stem cells, which supports and expands the model of a stem/progenitor cell signature in cancer. CpGs that are hypomethylated across cancer types are concentrated in megabase-scale domains that occur near the telomeres and centromeres of chromosomes, are depleted of genes, and are enriched for cancer-specific EZH2 binding and H3K27me3 (repressive chromatin). In noncancer samples, there are cell-type specific methylation signatures preserved in primary cell lines and tissues as well as methylation differences induced by cell culture. The relationship between methylation and expression is context-dependent, and we find that CpG-rich enhancers bound by EP300 in the bodies of expressed genes are unmethylated despite the dense gene-body methylation surrounding them. Non-CpG cytosine methylation occurs in human somatic tissue, is particularly prevalent in brain tissue, and is reproducible across many individuals. This study provides an atlas of DNA methylation across diverse and well-characterized samples and enables new discoveries about DNA methylation and its role in gene regulation and disease. PMID:23325432

  15. Human Engineered Heart Tissue: Analysis of Contractile Force.

    PubMed

    Mannhardt, Ingra; Breckwoldt, Kaja; Letuffe-Brenière, David; Schaaf, Sebastian; Schulz, Herbert; Neuber, Christiane; Benzin, Anika; Werner, Tessa; Eder, Alexandra; Schulze, Thomas; Klampe, Birgit; Christ, Torsten; Hirt, Marc N; Huebner, Norbert; Moretti, Alessandra; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Hansen, Arne

    2016-07-12

    Analyzing contractile force, the most important and best understood function of cardiomyocytes in vivo is not established in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM). This study describes the generation of 3D, strip-format, force-generating engineered heart tissues (EHT) from hiPSC-CM and their physiological and pharmacological properties. CM were differentiated from hiPSC by a growth factor-based three-stage protocol. EHTs were generated and analyzed histologically and functionally. HiPSC-CM in EHTs showed well-developed sarcomeric organization and alignment, and frequent mitochondria. Systematic contractility analysis (26 concentration-response curves) reveals that EHTs replicated canonical response to physiological and pharmacological regulators of inotropy, membrane- and calcium-clock mediators of pacemaking, modulators of ion-channel currents, and proarrhythmic compounds with unprecedented precision. The analysis demonstrates a high degree of similarity between hiPSC-CM in EHT format and native human heart tissue, indicating that human EHTs are useful for preclinical drug testing and disease modeling. PMID:27211213

  16. Expression of interleukin-17RC protein in normal human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dongxia; You, Zongbing

    2008-01-01

    Background Interleukin-17 (IL-17) cytokines and receptors play an important role in many autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. IL-17 receptors IL-17RA and IL-17RC have been found to form a heterodimer for mediating the signals of IL-17A and IL-17F cytokines. While the function and signaling pathway of IL-17RA has been revealed, IL-17RC has not been well characterized. The function and signaling pathway of IL-17RC remain largely unknown. The purpose of the present study was to systematically examine IL-17RC protein expression in 53 human tissues. Results IL-17RC expression in 51 normal human tissues and two benign tumors (i.e., lymphangioma and parathyroid adenoma) on the tissue microarrays was determined by immunohistochemical staining, using two polyclonal antibodies against IL-17RC. IL-17RC protein was expressed in many cell types including the myocardial cells, vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells, glandular cells (of the adrenal, parathyroid, pituitary, thyroid, pancreas, parotid salivary, and subepidermal glands), epithelial cells (of the esophagus, stomach, intestine, anus, renal tubule, breast, cervix, Fallopian tube, epididymis, seminal vesicle, prostate, gallbladder, bronchus, lung, and skin), oocytes in the ovary, Sertoli cells in the testis, motor neurons in the spinal cord, autonomic ganglia and nerves in the intestine, skeletal muscle cells, adipocytes, articular chondrocytes, and synovial cells. High levels of IL-17RC protein expression were observed in most vascular and lymphatic endothelium and squamous epithelium. The epithelium of the breast, cervix, Fallopian tube, kidney, bladder and bronchus also expressed high levels of IL-17RC, so did the glandular cells in the adrenal cortex, parotid salivary and subepidermal glands. In contrast, IL-17RC protein was not detectable in the smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, antral mucosa of the stomach, mucosa of the colon, endometrium of the uterus, neurons of the brain, hepatocytes, or lymphocytes

  17. Direct measurement of the permeability of human cervical tissue.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Michael; Vink, Joy; Yoshida, Kyoko; Wapner, Ronald; Myers, Kristin M

    2013-02-01

    The mechanical integrity of the uterine cervix is critical for a pregnancy to successfully reach full term. It must be strong to retain the fetus throughout gestation and then undergo a remodeling and softening process before labor for delivery of the fetus. It is believed that cervical insufficiency (CI), a condition in pregnancy resulting in preterm birth (PTB), is related to a cervix with compromised mechanical strength which cannot resist deformation caused by external forces generated by the growing fetus. Such PTBs are responsible for infant developmental problems and in severe cases infant mortality. To understand the etiologies of CI, our overall research goal is to investigate the mechanical behavior of the cervix. Permeability is a mechanical property of hydrated collagenous tissues that dictates the time-dependent response of the tissue to mechanical loading. The goal of this study was to design a novel soft tissue permeability testing device and to present direct hydraulic permeability measurements of excised nonpregnant (NP) and pregnant (PG) human cervical tissue from women with different obstetric histories. Results of hydraulic permeability testing indicate repeatability for specimens from single patients, with an order of magnitude separating the NP and PG group means (2.1 ± 1.4×10(-14) and 3.2 ± 4.8×10(-13)m(4)/N[middle dot]s, respectively), and large variability within the NP and PG sample groups. Differences were found between samples with similar obstetric histories, supporting the view that medical history may not be a good predictor of permeability (and therefore mechanical behavior) and highlighting the need for patient-specific measurements of cervical mechanical properties. The permeability measurements from this study will be used in future work to model the constitutive material behavior of cervical tissue and to develop in vivo diagnostic tools to stage the progression of labor. PMID:23445069

  18. 21 CFR 1270.43 - Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue. 1270.43 Section 1270.43 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... HUMAN TISSUE INTENDED FOR TRANSPLANTATION Inspection of Tissue Establishments § 1270.43...

  19. 21 CFR 1270.43 - Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Retention, recall, and destruction of human tissue. 1270.43 Section 1270.43 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... HUMAN TISSUE INTENDED FOR TRANSPLANTATION Inspection of Tissue Establishments § 1270.43...

  20. Identification of Tissue-Specific Protein-Coding and Noncoding Transcripts across 14 Human Tissues Using RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jinhang; Chen, Geng; Zhu, Sibo; Li, Suqing; Wen, Zhuo; Bin Li; Zheng, Yuanting; Shi, Leming

    2016-01-01

    Many diseases and adverse drug reactions exhibit tissue specificity. To better understand the tissue-specific expression characteristics of transcripts in different human tissues, we deeply sequenced RNA samples from 14 different human tissues. After filtering many lowly expressed transcripts, 24,729 protein-coding transcripts and 1,653 noncoding transcripts were identified. By analyzing highly expressed tissue-specific protein-coding transcripts (TSCTs) and noncoding transcripts (TSNTs), we found that testis expressed the highest numbers of TSCTs and TSNTs. Brain, monocytes, ovary, and heart expressed more TSCTs than the rest tissues, whereas brain, placenta, heart, and monocytes expressed more TSNTs than other tissues. Co-expression network constructed based on the TSCTs and TSNTs showed that each hub TSNT was co-expressed with several TSCTs, allowing functional annotation of TSNTs. Important biological processes and KEGG pathways highly related to the specific functions or diseases of each tissue were enriched with the corresponding TSCTs. These TSCTs and TSNTs may participate in the tissue-specific physiological or pathological processes. Our study provided a unique data set and systematic analysis of expression characteristics and functions of both TSCTs and TSNTs based on 14 distinct human tissues, and could facilitate future investigation of the mechanisms behind tissue-specific diseases and adverse drug reactions. PMID:27329541

  1. Identification of Tissue-Specific Protein-Coding and Noncoding Transcripts across 14 Human Tissues Using RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinhang; Chen, Geng; Zhu, Sibo; Li, Suqing; Wen, Zhuo; Bin Li; Zheng, Yuanting; Shi, Leming

    2016-01-01

    Many diseases and adverse drug reactions exhibit tissue specificity. To better understand the tissue-specific expression characteristics of transcripts in different human tissues, we deeply sequenced RNA samples from 14 different human tissues. After filtering many lowly expressed transcripts, 24,729 protein-coding transcripts and 1,653 noncoding transcripts were identified. By analyzing highly expressed tissue-specific protein-coding transcripts (TSCTs) and noncoding transcripts (TSNTs), we found that testis expressed the highest numbers of TSCTs and TSNTs. Brain, monocytes, ovary, and heart expressed more TSCTs than the rest tissues, whereas brain, placenta, heart, and monocytes expressed more TSNTs than other tissues. Co-expression network constructed based on the TSCTs and TSNTs showed that each hub TSNT was co-expressed with several TSCTs, allowing functional annotation of TSNTs. Important biological processes and KEGG pathways highly related to the specific functions or diseases of each tissue were enriched with the corresponding TSCTs. These TSCTs and TSNTs may participate in the tissue-specific physiological or pathological processes. Our study provided a unique data set and systematic analysis of expression characteristics and functions of both TSCTs and TSNTs based on 14 distinct human tissues, and could facilitate future investigation of the mechanisms behind tissue-specific diseases and adverse drug reactions. PMID:27329541

  2. Marketing of human organs and tissues is justified and necessary.

    PubMed

    Kevorkian, J

    1989-01-01

    The bioethical guidelines now banning commerce in human body parts to be used for transplantation manifest unrealistic and arbitrary inflexibility which perpetuates and worsens the deficit in organ supply. Instead of relying on traditionally revered but now outmoded and even irrelevant bioethical maxims, formulators of the guidelines should have concentrated on a more meaningful situational adaptation to contemporary real-life circumstances. Many unexpectedly relevant and important nuances of concepts such as property, ownership, and altruism must now be taken into account. Hypothetical examples explore the morality of a universal ban by fiat and the associated problems of organ supply and demand, of cost and affordability, and of fair equity. It is difficult to justify purely altruistic organ donation today, when the health care professions and industries are frantically pursuing commercial profits. It is concluded that the ban should be scrapped in favor of a well-organized, open, and legally regulated commercial market for human organs and tissues. PMID:2495395

  3. Fracture of Human Femur Tissue Monitored by Acoustic Emission Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Aggelis, Dimitrios. G.; Strantza, Maria; Louis, Olivia; Boulpaep, Frans; Polyzos, Demosthenes; van Hemelrijck, Danny

    2015-01-01

    The study describes the acoustic emission (AE) activity during human femur tissue fracture. The specimens were fractured in a bending-torsion loading pattern with concurrent monitoring by two AE sensors. The number of recorded signals correlates well with the applied load providing the onset of micro-fracture at approximately one sixth of the maximum load. Furthermore, waveform frequency content and rise time are related to the different modes of fracture (bending of femur neck or torsion of diaphysis). The importance of the study lies mainly in two disciplines. One is that, although femurs are typically subjects of surgical repair in humans, detailed monitoring of the fracture with AE will enrich the understanding of the process in ways that cannot be achieved using only the mechanical data. Additionally, from the point of view of monitoring techniques, applying sensors used for engineering materials and interpreting the obtained data pose additional difficulties due to the uniqueness of the bone structure. PMID:25763648

  4. Brominated dioxins and dibenzofurans in human adipose tissue. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, P.H.; Stanley, J.S.; Bauer, K.; Ayling, R.E.; Thornburg, K.R.

    1990-04-11

    The report describes the analytical efforts for the determination of polybrominated dioxins (PBDDs) and furans (PBDFs) in human adipose tissues. Data on the precision and accuracy of the method for three tetra- through hexabrominated dioxins and three tetra- through hexabrominated furans (specific 2,3,7,8-substituted isomers) were generated from the analysis of 5 unspiked and 10 spiked (5 replicates at 2 spike levels) adipose tissue samples that were included with the analysis of the FY 1987 samples. In addition, data are presented on the results of the analysis of 48 composite samples for the six specific PBDD and PBDF compounds. The targeted 2,3,7,8-substituted PBDDs and PBDFs were not detected in any of the samples except those prepared as spiked QC materials. The detection limits calculated for the tetrabromo congeners in the samples ranged from 0.46 to 8.9 pg/g (lipid basis). The detection limits for the higher brominated congeners were typically greater than that observed for the tetrabrominated compounds. There is some evidence for the presence of other brominated compounds in the adipose tissue samples. Specifically, responses were noted that correspond to the qualitative criteria for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (hexa through octabromo).

  5. Mechanical stimulation improves tissue-engineered human skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Courtney A.; Smiley, Beth L.; Mills, John; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    2002-01-01

    Human bioartificial muscles (HBAMs) are tissue engineered by suspending muscle cells in collagen/MATRIGEL, casting in a silicone mold containing end attachment sites, and allowing the cells to differentiate for 8 to 16 days. The resulting HBAMs are representative of skeletal muscle in that they contain parallel arrays of postmitotic myofibers; however, they differ in many other morphological characteristics. To engineer improved HBAMs, i.e., more in vivo-like, we developed Mechanical Cell Stimulator (MCS) hardware to apply in vivo-like forces directly to the engineered tissue. A sensitive force transducer attached to the HBAM measured real-time, internally generated, as well as externally applied, forces. The muscle cells generated increasing internal forces during formation which were inhibitable with a cytoskeleton depolymerizer. Repetitive stretch/relaxation for 8 days increased the HBAM elasticity two- to threefold, mean myofiber diameter 12%, and myofiber area percent 40%. This system allows engineering of improved skeletal muscle analogs as well as a nondestructive method to determine passive force and viscoelastic properties of the resulting tissue.

  6. The significance of using pooled human serum in human articular cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Azmi, B; Aminuddin, B S; Sharaf, I; Samsudin, O C; Munirah, S; Chua, K H; Ruszymah, B H I

    2004-05-01

    Animal serum is commonly used in chondrocytes culture expansion to promote cell proliferation and shorten the time lag before new tissue reconstruction is possible. However, animal serum is not suitable for regeneration of clinical tissue because it has potential risk of viral and prion related disease transmission particularly mad cow disease and foreign protein contamination that can stimulate immune reaction leading to graft rejection. In this context, human serum as homologous supplement has a greater potential as growth promoting agents for human chondrocytes culture. PMID:15468795

  7. Inhibition of Plasma Kallikrein by a Highly Specific Active Site Blocking Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Kenniston, Jon A.; Faucette, Ryan R.; Martik, Diana; Comeau, Stephen R.; Lindberg, Allison P.; Kopacz, Kris J.; Conley, Gregory P.; Chen, Jie; Viswanathan, Malini; Kastrapeli, Niksa; Cosic, Janja; Mason, Shauna; DiLeo, Mike; Abendroth, Jan; Kuzmic, Petr; Ladner, Robert C.; Edwards, Thomas E.; TenHoor, Christopher; Adelman, Burt A.; Nixon, Andrew E.; Sexton, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma kallikrein (pKal) proteolytically cleaves high molecular weight kininogen to generate the potent vasodilator and the pro-inflammatory peptide, bradykinin. pKal activity is tightly regulated in healthy individuals by the serpin C1-inhibitor, but individuals with hereditary angioedema (HAE) are deficient in C1-inhibitor and consequently exhibit excessive bradykinin generation that in turn causes debilitating and potentially fatal swelling attacks. To develop a potential therapeutic agent for HAE and other pKal-mediated disorders, we used phage display to discover a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (DX-2930) against pKal. In vitro experiments demonstrated that DX-2930 potently inhibits active pKal (Ki = 0.120 ± 0.005 nm) but does not target either the zymogen (prekallikrein) or any other serine protease tested. These findings are supported by a 2.1-Å resolution crystal structure of pKal complexed to a DX-2930 Fab construct, which establishes that the pKal active site is fully occluded by the antibody. DX-2930 injected subcutaneously into cynomolgus monkeys exhibited a long half-life (t½ ∼12.5 days) and blocked high molecular weight kininogen proteolysis in activated plasma in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, subcutaneous DX-2930 reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats. A potent and long acting inhibitor of pKal activity could be an effective treatment option for pKal-mediated diseases, such as HAE. PMID:24970892

  8. Disulphide bond assignment in human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP).

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, R A; Marston, F A; Angal, S; Koklitis, P; Panico, M; Morris, H R; Carne, A F; Smith, B J; Harris, T J; Freedman, R B

    1990-01-01

    Disulphide bonds in human recombinant tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) were assigned by resolving proteolytic digests of TIMP on reverse-phase h.p.l.c. and sequencing those peaks judged to contain disulphide bonds by virtue of a change in retention time on reduction. This procedure allowed the direct assignment of Cys-145-Cys-166 and the isolation of two other peptides containing two disulphide bonds each. Further peptide cleavage in conjunction with fast-atom-bombardment m.s. analysis permitted the assignments Cys-1-Cys-70, Cys-3-Cys-99, Cys-13-Cys-124 and Cys-127-Cys-174 from these peptides. The sixth bond Cys-132-Cys-137 was assigned by inference, as the native protein has no detectable free thiol groups. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2163605

  9. Second harmonic generation imaging of dermal collagen component in human keloid tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H. B.; Chen, S.; Zhu, X. Q.; Yang, H. Q.; Chen, J. X.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we report second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging of human keloid tissue. High resolution SHG images of collagen component were obtained in the superficial, medial and deep dermis of human keloid tissue, respectively. Our results show that this method has a capability to observe the structure of collagen component in human keloid tissue, which will help to better understand the formation process of human keloid scar at the molecular level.

  10. Endogenous ways to stimulate brown adipose tissue in humans.

    PubMed

    Broeders, Evie; Bouvy, Nicole D; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2015-03-01

    Obesity is the result of disequilibrium between energy intake and energy expenditure (EE). Successful long-term weight loss is difficult to achieve with current strategies for the correction of this caloric imbalance. Non-shivering thermogenesis (NST) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a possible therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of obesity and associated metabolic diseases. In recent years, more knowledge about the function and stimulation of bat has been obtained. The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is currently seen as the main effector for brown fat function. Also, interplay between the thyroid axis and SNS plays an important role in BAT thermogenesis. Almost daily new pathways for the induction of BAT thermogenesis and 'browning' of white adipose tissue (WAT) are identified. Especially the activation of BAT via endogenous pathways has received strong scientific attention. Here we will discuss the relevance of several pathways in activating BAT and their implications for the treatment of obesity. In this review we will focus on the discussion of the most promising endocrine and paracrine pathways to stimulate BAT, by factors and pathways that naturally occur in the human body. PMID:24521443

  11. Characterization of proopiomelanocortin transcripts in human nonpituitary tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Lacaze-Masmonteil, T.; De Keyzer, Y.; Luton, J.P.; Kahn, A.; Bertagna, X.

    1987-10-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC), the precursor to adrenocorticotropic hormone and other related peptides, was originally identified in the corticotropic cell. Recent evidence shows that POMC products are also normally present in a variety of nonpituitary tissues. To investigate this phenomenon in humans the authors looked for the presence and characteristics of POMC transcripts in various adult tissues. Blot hybridization analysis of normal adrenal, thymus, and testis RNAs revealed a small RNA species approximately 400 nucleotides shorter than the 1200-nucleotide pituitary species. Primer extension and S1 nuclease mapping studies showed that this small RNA lacked exon 1 and exon 2 of the gene, and it corresponded to a set of at least six molecules starting 41 to 162 nucleotides downstream from the 5' end of exon 3. These RNAs appear to result from heterogeneous transcription initiation sites presumably under the control of GC box promoter sequences located in the 3' end of intron 2. They cannot encode a complete POMC molecule, and the only truncated POMC molecules that could be translated would lack a signal peptide necessary for membrane translocation and precursor processing. The use of highly sensitive S1 nuclease mapping techniques with uniformly labeled single-stranded DNA probes allowed the detection of a small but definite amount of the normal, 1200-nucleotide, mRNA species. It is suggested that it is this POMC mRNA that is responsible for the local production of all the POMC peptides.

  12. Organochlorine pesticides and PCBs in human adipose tissues in Poland

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwicki, J.K.; Goralczyk, K. )

    1994-03-01

    Most of the persistent organochlorine (OC) pesticides, excluding lindane, were banned in Poland in 1975/76. The first restrictions concerning the use and marketing of lindane (gamma-HCH) became effective in 1980 and were gradually extended until it's agricultural use was ultimately banned in 1989. Unfortunately, there are no detailed data on the use and release of PCBs to the environment in Poland. The former studies showed that in the late seventies the concentrations of OC pesticides and their metabolites in men reached considerable high levels. Despite of the restrictions or bans of these pesticides in most of the countries of the temperate climate, they still circulate in various food chains and eventually concentrate in man. Many authors claim an uneven distribution of the OC compounds in the population and report different levels in men and women and also some relations between OC compounds levels in fat tissues and age. Environmental contamination also plays an important role in the magnitude of OC compounds levels in man. The aim of this paper is to present the actual concentrations of HCB, p,p[prime]-DDT, p,p[prime]-DDE, isomers of HCH (alpha, beta, gamma), and PCBs in human adipose tissues particularly regarding age and sex as possible factors influencing the levels of these compounds and to contribute to the general discussion on the distribution patterns of the organochlorine compounds in the population. 12 refs., 3 tabs.

  13. Engineering bone tissue substitutes from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    de Peppo, Giuseppe Maria; Marcos-Campos, Iván; Kahler, David John; Alsalman, Dana; Shang, Linshan; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Marolt, Darja

    2013-01-01

    Congenital defects, trauma, and disease can compromise the integrity and functionality of the skeletal system to the extent requiring implantation of bone grafts. Engineering of viable bone substitutes that can be personalized to meet specific clinical needs represents a promising therapeutic alternative. The aim of our study was to evaluate the utility of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for bone tissue engineering. We first induced three hiPSC lines with different tissue and reprogramming backgrounds into the mesenchymal lineages and used a combination of differentiation assays, surface antigen profiling, and global gene expression analysis to identify the lines exhibiting strong osteogenic differentiation potential. We then engineered functional bone substitutes by culturing hiPSC-derived mesenchymal progenitors on osteoconductive scaffolds in perfusion bioreactors and confirmed their phenotype stability in a subcutaneous implantation model for 12 wk. Molecular analysis confirmed that the maturation of bone substitutes in perfusion bioreactors results in global repression of cell proliferation and an increased expression of lineage-specific genes. These results pave the way for growing patient-specific bone substitutes for reconstructive treatments of the skeletal system and for constructing qualified experimental models of development and disease. PMID:23653480

  14. Hexabrachion proteins in embryonic chicken tissues and human tumors.

    PubMed

    Erickson, H P; Taylor, H C

    1987-09-01

    Cell cultures of chicken embryo and human fibroblasts produce a large extracellular matrix molecule with a six-armed structure that we called a hexabrachion (Erickson, H. P., and J. L. Iglesias, 1984, Nature (Lond.), 311:267-269. In the present work we have determined that the myotendinous (M1) antigen described by M. Chiquet and D. M. Fambrough in chicken tissues (1984, J. Cell Biol., 98:1926-1936), and the glioma mesenchymal extracellular matrix protein described by Bourdon et al. in human tumors (Bourdon, M. A., C. J. Wikstrand, H. Furthmayr, T. J. Matthews, and D. D. Bigner, 1983, Cancer Res. 43:2796-2805) have the structure of hexabrachions. We also demonstrate that the M1 antigen is present in embryonic brain, where it was previously reported absent, and have purified hexabrachions from brain homogenates. The recently described cytotactin (Grumet, M., S. Hoffman, K. L. Crossin, and G. M. Edelman, 1985, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 82:8075-8079) now appears to be identical to the chicken hexabrachion protein. In a search for functional roles, we looked for a possible cell attachment activity. A strong, fibronectin-like attachment activity was present in (NH4)2SO4 precipitates of cell supernatant and sedimented with hexabrachions in glycerol gradients. Hexabrachions purified by antibody adsorption, however, had lost this activity, suggesting that it was due to a separate factor associated with hexabrachions in the gradient fractions. The combined information in the several, previously unrelated studies suggests that hexabrachions may play a role in organizing localized regions of extracellular matrix. The protein is prominently expressed at specific times and locations during embryonic development, is retained in certain adult tissues, and is reexpressed in a variety of tumors. PMID:3654758

  15. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins

    PubMed Central

    Fukusumi, Hayato; Shofuda, Tomoko; Bamba, Yohei; Yamamoto, Atsuyo; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Handa, Yukako; Okita, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Kanemura, Yonehiro

    2016-01-01

    Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB) formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi). Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes. PMID:27212953

  16. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins.

    PubMed

    Fukusumi, Hayato; Shofuda, Tomoko; Bamba, Yohei; Yamamoto, Atsuyo; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Handa, Yukako; Okita, Keisuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Kanemura, Yonehiro

    2016-01-01

    Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB) formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi). Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes. PMID:27212953

  17. [The effect of dopaminergic stimulation and inhibition on the urinary excretion of aldosterone and kallikrein in spontaneously hypertensive rats].

    PubMed

    Minuz, P; Gangi, F; Degan, M; Lechi, C; Delva, P; Lechi, A

    1983-10-30

    The effect on the electrolyte balance of a dopaminergic agonist (bromocriptine) and an antagonist (metoclopramide) and their effect on renal aldosterone and kallikrein excretion were investigated. Ten normotensive Wistar rats and ten spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-Wistar Kioto) were treated with BCR (4 mg/Kg weight b.i.d.) for 4 days; after a week of pharmacological wash-out they received MCP (0,5 mg/Kg weight b.i.d.) for 4 days. Before and after treatment and at the 2nd and 4th day of each treatment diuresis, urinary excretion of aldosterone, kallikrein, sodium, potassium and proteins were measured. During the 24-hour urine collections the rats were kept in separate metabolic cages with free access to food and water. Kallikrein urinary excretion was lower in SHR than in normotensive rats under basal conditions (p 0.05); urinary sodium, potassium, proteins and sodium/potassium rate were also reduced in SHR. After treatment with bromocriptine a further reduction in urinary kallikrein excretion was observed in SHR. After MCP all the parameters were unchanged both in normotensive rats and in SHR, but SHR showed a significant correlation between aldosterone and kallikrein excretion (p less than 0,001); in this condition it seems that in SHR the control exerted by aldosterone on kallikrein excretion is greater than the one exerted by dopamine. It may indicate a defect of the natriuretic and vasodilator dopaminergic system in spontaneously hypertensive rats. PMID:6559080

  18. Impact of Statins on Gene Expression in Human Lung Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jérôme; van Eeden, Stephan F.; Obeidat, Ma’en; Sin, Don D.; Tebbutt, Scott J.; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje S.; Laviolette, Michel; Paré, Peter D.; Bossé, Yohan

    2015-01-01

    Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that alter the synthesis of cholesterol. Some studies have shown a significant association of statins with improved respiratory health outcomes of patients with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Here we hypothesize that statins impact gene expression in human lungs and may reveal the pleiotropic effects of statins that are taking place directly in lung tissues. Human lung tissues were obtained from patients who underwent lung resection or transplantation. Gene expression was measured on a custom Affymetrix array in a discovery cohort (n = 408) and two replication sets (n = 341 and 282). Gene expression was evaluated by linear regression between statin users and non-users, adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, and other covariables. The results of each cohort were combined in a meta-analysis and biological pathways were studied using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. The discovery set included 141 statin users. The lung mRNA expression levels of eighteen and three genes were up-regulated and down-regulated in statin users (FDR < 0.05), respectively. Twelve of the up-regulated genes were replicated in the first replication set, but none in the second (p-value < 0.05). Combining the discovery and replication sets into a meta-analysis improved the significance of the 12 up-regulated genes, which includes genes encoding enzymes and membrane proteins involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Canonical biological pathways altered by statins in the lung include cholesterol, steroid, and terpenoid backbone biosynthesis. No genes encoding inflammatory, proteases, pro-fibrotic or growth factors were altered by statins, suggesting that the direct effect of statin in the lung do not go beyond its antilipidemic action. Although more studies are needed with specific lung cell types and different classes and doses of statins, the improved health outcomes and survival observed in statin

  19. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers: human tissue levels and toxicology.

    PubMed

    Gill, Udai; Chu, Ih; Ryan, John J; Feeley, Mark

    2004-01-01

    with behavioral alterations in neonatal mice. When considering the outlier value for PBDE-99 at 229 ng/g, this would result in an estimated PBDE-99 body burden of 46 microg/kg, or a MOS of only 9. However, no toxicokinetics data are available for humans, and the actual margin of safety may be much smaller if based on levels in critical target organs or tissues. PMID:15369322

  20. The landscape of genomic imprinting across diverse adult human tissues.

    PubMed

    Baran, Yael; Subramaniam, Meena; Biton, Anne; Tukiainen, Taru; Tsang, Emily K; Rivas, Manuel A; Pirinen, Matti; Gutierrez-Arcelus, Maria; Smith, Kevin S; Kukurba, Kim R; Zhang, Rui; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G; Urbanek, Cydney; Li, Jin Billy; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R; Burchard, Esteban G; Seibold, Max A; MacArthur, Daniel G; Montgomery, Stephen B; Zaitlen, Noah A; Lappalainen, Tuuli

    2015-07-01

    Genomic imprinting is an important regulatory mechanism that silences one of the parental copies of a gene. To systematically characterize this phenomenon, we analyze tissue specificity of imprinting from allelic expression data in 1582 primary tissue samples from 178 individuals from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project. We characterize imprinting in 42 genes, including both novel and previously identified genes. Tissue specificity of imprinting is widespread, and gender-specific effects are revealed in a small number of genes in muscle with stronger imprinting in males. IGF2 shows maternal expression in the brain instead of the canonical paternal expression elsewhere. Imprinting appears to have only a subtle impact on tissue-specific expression levels, with genes lacking a systematic expression difference between tissues with imprinted and biallelic expression. In summary, our systematic characterization of imprinting in adult tissues highlights variation in imprinting between genes, individuals, and tissues. PMID:25953952

  1. The landscape of genomic imprinting across diverse adult human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Yael; Subramaniam, Meena; Biton, Anne; Tukiainen, Taru; Tsang, Emily K.; Rivas, Manuel A.; Pirinen, Matti; Gutierrez-Arcelus, Maria; Smith, Kevin S.; Kukurba, Kim R.; Zhang, Rui; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G.; Urbanek, Cydney; Li, Jin Billy; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Burchard, Esteban G.; Seibold, Max A.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Zaitlen, Noah A.; Lappalainen, Tuuli

    2015-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an important regulatory mechanism that silences one of the parental copies of a gene. To systematically characterize this phenomenon, we analyze tissue specificity of imprinting from allelic expression data in 1582 primary tissue samples from 178 individuals from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project. We characterize imprinting in 42 genes, including both novel and previously identified genes. Tissue specificity of imprinting is widespread, and gender-specific effects are revealed in a small number of genes in muscle with stronger imprinting in males. IGF2 shows maternal expression in the brain instead of the canonical paternal expression elsewhere. Imprinting appears to have only a subtle impact on tissue-specific expression levels, with genes lacking a systematic expression difference between tissues with imprinted and biallelic expression. In summary, our systematic characterization of imprinting in adult tissues highlights variation in imprinting between genes, individuals, and tissues. PMID:25953952

  2. Viability of human composite tissue model for experimental study of burns.

    PubMed

    Qu, Miao; Kruse, Stephan; Pitsch, Heinz; Pallua, Norbert; Nourbakhsh, Mahtab

    2016-08-01

    Experimental studies of burns are primarily performed with animal models that have important anatomical and physiological differences relative to human systems. The aim of this study was to develop a human experimental burn model using composite tissue obtained from bariatric surgery. We established a new protocol to maintain viable sections of human cutaneous and subcutaneous (sub/cutaneous) tissue in vitro. Under the conditions selected, multiparametric flow cytometry and histological analysis confirmed the viability and integrity of the human sub/cutaneous tissue for at least 5 days. Furthermore, we utilized a precision McKenna burner to inflict burns on the human tissue model under well-defined thermal conditions in vitro. Our data showed a localized, temporally restricted polarization of the resident macrophages in the subcutaneous human tissue in response to specific thermal forces. Therefore, our model provides a useful alternative to animal studies for further detailed investigations of human responses to injuries and treatments. PMID:27585227

  3. Commodification of human tissue: implications for feminist and development ethics.

    PubMed

    Dickenson, Donna

    2002-05-01

    One effect of late capitalism--the commodification of practically everything--is to knock down the Chinese walls between the natural and productive realms, to use a Marxist framework. Women's labour in egg extraction and 'surrogate' motherhood might then be seen as what it is, labour which produces something of value. But this does not necessarily mean that women will benefit from the commodification of practically everything, in either North or South. In the newly developing biotechnologies involving stem cells, the reverse is more likely, particular given the the shortage in the North of the egg donors who will be increasingly necessary to therapeutic cloning. Although most of the ethical debate has focused on the status of the embryo, this is to define ethics with no reference to global or gender justice. There has been little or no debate about possible exploitation of women, particularly of ovum donors from the South. Countries of the South without national ethics committees or guidelines may be particularly vulnerable: although there is increasing awareness of the susceptibility of poorer countries to abuses in research ethics, very little has been written about how they might be affected by the enormously profitable new technologies exploiting human tissue. Even in the UK, although the new Medical Research Council guidelines make a good deal of the 'gift relationship', what they are actually about is commodification. If donors believe they are demonstrating altruism, but biotechnology firms and researchers use the discourse of commodity and profit, we have not 'incomplete commodification' but complete commodification with a plausibly human face. PMID:12872770

  4. Characterizing and Diminishing Autofluorescence in Formalin-fixed Paraffin-embedded Human Respiratory Tissue.

    PubMed

    Davis, A Sally; Richter, Anke; Becker, Steven; Moyer, Jenna E; Sandouk, Aline; Skinner, Jeff; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2014-04-10

    Tissue autofluorescence frequently hampers visualization of immunofluorescent markers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded respiratory tissues. We assessed nine treatments reported to have efficacy in reducing autofluorescence in other tissue types. The three most efficacious were Eriochrome black T, Sudan black B and sodium borohydride, as measured using white light laser confocal Λ(2) (multi-lambda) analysis. We also assessed the impact of steam antigen retrieval and serum application on human tracheal tissue autofluorescence. Functionally fitting this Λ(2) data to 2-dimensional Gaussian surfaces revealed that steam antigen retrieval and serum application contribute minimally to autofluorescence and that the three treatments are disparately efficacious. Together, these studies provide a set of guidelines for diminishing autofluorescence in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human respiratory tissue. Additionally, these characterization techniques are transferable to similar questions in other tissue types, as demonstrated on frozen human liver tissue and paraffin-embedded mouse lung tissue fixed in different fixatives. PMID:24722432

  5. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Substantial Tissue Specificity in Human Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Ying; Gu, Weidong; Ni, Buqing; Sun, Haoliang; Yu, Tong; Gu, Wanjun; Chen, Liang; Shao, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionary roles in transcriptome identification and quantification of different types of tissues and cells in many organisms. Although numerous RNA-seq data derived from many types of human tissues and cell lines, little is known on the transcriptome repertoire of human aortic valve. In this study, we sequenced the total RNA prepared from two calcified human aortic valves and reported the whole transcriptome of human aortic valve. Integrating RNA-seq data of 13 human tissues from Human Body Map 2 Project, we constructed a transcriptome repertoire of human tissues, including 19,505 protein-coding genes and 4,948 long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). Among them, 263 lincRNAs were identified as novel noncoding transcripts in our data. By comparing transcriptome data among different human tissues, we observed substantial tissue specificity of RNA transcripts, both protein-coding genes and lincRNAs, in human aortic valve. Further analysis revealed that aortic valve-specific lincRNAs were more likely to be recently derived from repetitive elements in the primate lineage, but were less likely to be conserved at the nucleotide level. Expression profiling analysis showed significant lower expression levels of aortic valve-specific protein-coding genes and lincRNA genes, when compared with genes that were universally expressed in various tissues. Isoform-level expression analysis also showed that a majority of mRNA genes had a major isoform expressed in the human aortic valve. To our knowledge, this is the first comparative transcriptome analysis between human aortic valve and other human tissues. Our results are helpful to understand the transcriptome diversity of human tissues and the underlying mechanisms that drive tissue specificity of protein-coding genes and lincRNAs in human aortic valve. PMID:27493474

  6. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Substantial Tissue Specificity in Human Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Ying; Gu, Weidong; Ni, Buqing; Sun, Haoliang; Yu, Tong; Gu, Wanjun; Chen, Liang; Shao, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionary roles in transcriptome identification and quantification of different types of tissues and cells in many organisms. Although numerous RNA-seq data derived from many types of human tissues and cell lines, little is known on the transcriptome repertoire of human aortic valve. In this study, we sequenced the total RNA prepared from two calcified human aortic valves and reported the whole transcriptome of human aortic valve. Integrating RNA-seq data of 13 human tissues from Human Body Map 2 Project, we constructed a transcriptome repertoire of human tissues, including 19,505 protein-coding genes and 4,948 long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). Among them, 263 lincRNAs were identified as novel noncoding transcripts in our data. By comparing transcriptome data among different human tissues, we observed substantial tissue specificity of RNA transcripts, both protein-coding genes and lincRNAs, in human aortic valve. Further analysis revealed that aortic valve-specific lincRNAs were more likely to be recently derived from repetitive elements in the primate lineage, but were less likely to be conserved at the nucleotide level. Expression profiling analysis showed significant lower expression levels of aortic valve-specific protein-coding genes and lincRNA genes, when compared with genes that were universally expressed in various tissues. Isoform-level expression analysis also showed that a majority of mRNA genes had a major isoform expressed in the human aortic valve. To our knowledge, this is the first comparative transcriptome analysis between human aortic valve and other human tissues. Our results are helpful to understand the transcriptome diversity of human tissues and the underlying mechanisms that drive tissue specificity of protein-coding genes and lincRNAs in human aortic valve. PMID:27493474

  7. Wave Dispersion and Attenuation on Human Femur Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Strantza, Maria; Louis, Olivia; Polyzos, Demosthenes; Boulpaep, Frans; van Hemelrijck, Danny; Aggelis, Dimitrios G.

    2014-01-01

    Cortical bone is a highly heterogeneous material at the microscale and has one of the most complex structures among materials. Application of elastic wave techniques to this material is thus very challenging. In such media the initial excitation energy goes into the formation of elastic waves of different modes. Due to “dispersion”, these modes tend to separate according to the velocities of the frequency components. This work demonstrates elastic wave measurements on human femur specimens. The aim of the study is to measure parameters like wave velocity, dispersion and attenuation by using broadband acoustic emission sensors. First, four sensors were placed at small intervals on the surface of the bone to record the response after pencil lead break excitations. Next, the results were compared to measurements on a bulk steel block which does not exhibit heterogeneity at the same wave lengths. It can be concluded that the microstructure of the tissue imposes a dispersive behavior for frequencies below 1 MHz and care should be taken for interpretation of the signals. Of particular interest are waveform parameters like the duration, rise time and average frequency, since in the next stage of research the bone specimens will be fractured with concurrent monitoring of acoustic emission. PMID:25196011

  8. Nattokinase-promoted tissue plasminogen activator release from human cells.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Chieko; Maruyama, Masugi; Kawahara, Tomoko; Sumi, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    When heated to a temperature of 70 degrees C or higher, the strong fibrinolytic activity of nattokinase in a solution was deactivated. Similar results were observed in the case of using Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA and H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-pNA, which are synthetic substrates of nattokinase. In the current study, tests were conducted on the indirect fibrinolytic effects of the substances containing nattokinase that had been deactivated through heating at 121 degrees C for 15 min. Bacillus subtilis natto culture solutions made from three types of bacteria strain were heat-treated and deactivated, and it was found that these culture solutions had the ability to generate tissue plasminogen activators (tPA) from vascular endothelial cells and HeLa cells at certain concentration levels. For example, it was found that the addition of heat-treated culture solution of the Naruse strain (undiluted solution) raises the tPA activity of HeLa cells to about 20 times that of the control. Under the same conditions, tPA activity was raised to a level about 5 times higher for human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), and to a level about 24 times higher for nattokinase sold on the market. No change in cell count was observed for HeLa cells and HUVEC in the culture solution at these concentrations, and the level of activity was found to vary with concentration. PMID:19996631

  9. Evaluation of immunohistochemical staining for glucagon in human pancreatic tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gurlo, Tatyana; Butle, Peter C.; Butler, Alexandra E.

    2016-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and immunofluorescence (IF) staining techniques are important diagnostic tools of anatomic pathology in the clinical setting and widely used analytical tools in research laboratories. In diabetes research, they are routinely used for the assessment of beta- and alpha-cell mass, for assessment of endocrine cell distribution within the pancreas, for evaluation of islet composition and islet morphology. Here, we present the evaluation of IHC techniques for the detection of alpha-cells in human pancreatic tissue. We compared the Horse Radish Peroxidase (HRP)-based method utilizing DAB Peroxidase Substrate to the Alkaline Phosphatase (AP)-based method utilizing Vector Red substrate. We conclude that HRP–DAB staining is a robust and reliable method for detection of alpha-cells using either rabbit polyclonal or mouse monoclonal anti-glucagon antibodies. However, AP-Vector Red staining should be used with caution, because it is affected by the dehydration with ethanol and toluene preceding the mounting of slides with Permount mounting medium. When AP-Vector Red is a preferable method for alpha-cell labeling, slides should be mounted using aqueous mounting medium or, alternatively, they could be air-dried before permanent mounting PMID:27182095

  10. Strategies for improving the physiological relevance of human engineered tissues

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Kaplan, David L

    2015-01-01

    This review examines important robust methods for sustained, steady state, in vitro culture. To achieve ‘physiologically relevant’ tissues in vitro additional complexity must be introduced to provide suitable transport, cell signaling, and matrix support for cells in 3D environments to achieve stable readouts of tissue function. Most tissue engineering systems draw conclusions on tissue functions such as responses to toxins, nutrition or drugs based on short term outcomes with in vitro cultures (2–14 days). However, short term cultures limit insight with physiological relevance, as the cells and tissues have not reached a steady state. PMID:25937289