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Sample records for human tracheal smooth

  1. beta. -Adrenoceptors in human tracheal smooth muscle: characteristics of binding and relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    van Koppen, C.J.; Hermanussen, M.W.; Verrijp, K.N.; Rodrigues de Miranda, J.F.; Beld, A.J.; Lammers, J.W.J.; van Ginneken, C.A.M.

    1987-06-29

    Specific binding of (/sup 125/I)-(-)-cyanopindolol to human tracheal smooth muscle membranes was saturable, stereo-selective and of high affinity (K/sub d/ = 5.3 +/- 0.9 pmol/l and R/sub T/ = 78 +/- 7 fmol/g tissue). The ..beta../sub 1/-selective antagonists atenolol and LK 203-030 inhibited specific (/sup 125/I)-(-)-cyanopindolol binding according to a one binding site model with low affinity in nearly all subjects, pointing to a homogeneous BETA/sub 2/-adrenoceptor population. In one subject using LK 203-030 a small ..beta../sub 1/-adrenoceptor subpopulation could be demonstrated. The beta-mimetics isoprenaline, fenoterol, salbutamol and terbutaline recognized high and low affinity agonist binding sites. Isoprenaline's pK/sub H/- and pK/sub L/-values for the high and low affinity sites were 8.0 +/- 0.2 and 5.9 +/- 0.3 respectively. In functional experiments isoprenaline relaxed tracheal smooth muscle strips having intrinsic tone with a pD/sub 2/-value of 6.63 +/- 0.19. 32 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Lipopolysaccharide induces VCAM-1 expression and neutrophil adhesion to human tracheal smooth muscle cells: Involvement of Src/EGFR/PI3-K/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.-N.; Luo, S.-F.; Wu, C.-B.; Lin, C.-C.; Yang, C.-M.

    2008-04-15

    In our previous study, LPS has been shown to induce vascular cell adhesion molecule-1(VCAM-1) expression through MAPKs and NF-{kappa}B in human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs). In addition to these pathways, the non-receptor tyrosine kinases (Src), EGF receptor (EGFR), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) have been shown to be implicated in the expression of several inflammatory target proteins. Here, we reported that LPS-induced up-regulation of VCAM-1 enhanced the adhesion of neutrophils onto HTSMC monolayer, which was inhibited by LY294002 and wortmannin. LPS stimulated phosphorylation of protein tyrosine kinases including Src, PYK2, and EGFR, which were further confirmed using specific anti-phospho-Src, PYK2, or EGFR Ab, respectively, revealed by Western blotting. LPS-stimulated Src, PYK2, EGFR, and Akt phosphorylation and VCAM-1 expression were attenuated by the inhibitors of Src (PP1), EGFR (AG1478), PI3-K (LY294002 and wortmannin), and Akt (SH-5), respectively, or transfection with siRNAs of Src or Akt and shRNA of p110. LPS-induced VCAM-1 expression was also blocked by pretreatment with curcumin (a p300 inhibitor) or transfection with p300 siRNA. LPS-stimulated Akt activation translocated into nucleus and associated with p300 and VCAM-1 promoter region was further confirmed by immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. This association of Akt and p300 to VCAM-1 promoter was inhibited by pretreatment with PP1, AG1478, wortmannin, and SH-5. LPS-induced p300 activation enhanced VCAM-1 promoter activity and VCAM-1 mRNA expression. These results suggested that in HTSMCs, Akt phosphorylation mediated through transactivation of Src/PYK2/EGFR promoted the transcriptional p300 activity and eventually led to VCAM-1 expression induced by LPS.

  3. Endothelin-1 induces VCAM-1 expression-mediated inflammation via receptor tyrosine kinases and Elk/p300 in human tracheal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Chung; Lin, Wei-Ning; Hou, Wei-Chen; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2015-08-01

    The elevated level of endothelin-1 (ET-1) has been detected in the bronchoalveolar lavage of patients with severe asthma, acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and sepsis. ET-1 may affect vessel tone together with lung physiology and pathology. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) is one kind of adhesion molecules participating in the process of polymorphonuclear leukocyte transmigration and regulating the occurrence and amplification of tissue inflammation. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying ET-1-mediated expression of VCAM-1 on human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs) were largely unknown. Here we reported that ET-1 stimulated expression of VCAM-1 gene on HTSMCs, which was blocked by pretreatment with the inhibitors of ET receptors, Src, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), AKT, MEK1/2, and p300, suggesting the participation of these signaling components in ET-1-regulated HTSMC responses. Furthermore, transfection with small-interfering RNA (siRNA) of Src, AKT, p42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), or p300 downregulated the respective proteins and significantly attenuated ET-1-induced VCAM-1 expression. ET-1 also stimulated phosphorylation of Src, EGFR, PDGFR, AKT, p42/p44 MAPK, and Elk-1 and acetylation of histone H4 on HTSMCs. Immunoprecipitation assay showed the association between Elk-1 and p300 in the nucleus. Adhesion assay revealed that the adhesion of THP-1 to HTSMCs challenged with ET-1 was increased, which was attenuated by the inhibitors of ET receptors, Src, MMPs, EGFR, PDGFR, PI3K, AKT, p42/p44 MAPK, and p300. Taken together, these data suggested that ET-1 promotes occurrence and amplification of pathology-related airway inflammation via enhancing VCAM-1 expression in an ET receptor/Src/MMP/EGFR, PDGFR/PI3K/AKT/p42/p44 MAPK/Elk-1/p300 pathway in HTSMCs. PMID:26071554

  4. Abnormal tracheal smooth muscle function in the CF mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Helen L; Southern, Kevin W; Connell, Marilyn G; Wray, Susan; Burdyga, Theodor

    2013-01-01

    Increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) contractility is thought to underlie symptoms of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). In the cystic fibrosis (CF) airway, ASM anomalies have been reported, but have not been fully characterized and the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We examined ASM in an adult CF mouse tracheal ring preparation, and determined whether changes in contractility were associated with altered ASM morphology. We looked for inherent changes in the cellular pathways involved in contractility, and characterized trachea morphology in the adult trachea and in an embryonic lung culture model during development. Results showed that that there was a reduction in tracheal caliber in CF mice as indicated by a reduction in the number of cartilage rings; proximal cross-sectional areas of cftr−/− tracheas and luminal areas were significantly smaller, but there was no difference in the area or distribution of smooth muscle. Morphological differences observed in adult trachea were not evident in the embryonic lung at 11.5 days gestation or after 72 h in culture. Functional data showed a significant reduction in the amplitude and duration of contraction in response to carbachol (CCh) in Ca-free conditions. The reduction in contraction was agonist specific, and occurred throughout the length of the trachea. These data show that there is a loss in the contractile capacity of the CF mouse trachea due to downregulation of the pathway specific to acetylcholine (ACh) activation. This reduction in contraction is not associated with changes in the area or distribution of ASM. PMID:24400140

  5. Hydrogen peroxide induced responses of cat tracheal smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, V; Oike, M; Tanaka, H; Inoue, R; Ito, Y

    1997-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen peroxide H2O2 (10−6 and 10−3 M) on membrane potential, membrane currents, intracellular calcium concentration, resting muscle tone and contractions elicited by electrical field stimulation (EFS) and carbachol were examined in cat tracheal strips and isolated smooth muscle cells. H2O2 (10−4 and 10−5 M) enhanced the amplitude of contractions and excitatory junction potentials (e.j.p.) evoked by EFS without changing muscle tone and resting membrane potential of the tracheal smooth muscle, and enhanced the contraction induced by carbachol (10−8 M). At an increased concentration (10−3 M), H2O2 elevated resting muscle tone and marginally hyperpolarized the membrane in the majority of the cells. In 51 out of 56 cells examined, H2O2 (10−6–10−3 M) elicited an outward current at a holding potential of −40 mV and enhanced the frequency of the spontaneous transient outward current (STOC). In 20 cells the outward current was preceded by a small inward current. In the other cells, H2O2 elicited only an inward current or did not affect the background current. In Ca2+ free solution the action of H2O2 on the resting muscle tone, STOCs, background current and on the current induced by ramp depolarization was significantly reduced. H2O2 (10−4 M) increased the intracellular ionized calcium concentration both in the absence and presence of external Ca2+. However, the effect developed faster and was of a higher amplitude in the presence of external Ca2+. These results suggest that H2O2 increases intracellular Ca2+, with a subsequent augmentation of stimulation-evoked contractions, and enhances Ca2+ and voltage-sensitive potassium conductance. PMID:9222542

  6. Muscarinic M2 receptors in bovine tracheal smooth muscle: discrepancies between binding and function.

    PubMed

    Roffel, A F; Elzinga, C R; Van Amsterdam, R G; De Zeeuw, R A; Zaagsma, J

    1988-08-01

    Previous work showing that AF-DX 116, a cardioselective muscarinic antagonist in functional experiments, does not discriminate between muscarinic receptors in bovine cardiac and tracheal membranes has been extended. In addition to AF-DX 116 we used the muscarinic antagonists, atropine, pirenzepine, 4-DAMP methobromide, gallamine, hexahydrosiladifenidol and methoctramine, in radioligand binding experiments on bovine cardiac left ventricular and tracheal smooth muscle membranes. The functional antagonism of the methacholine-induced contraction of bovine tracheal smooth muscle strips was also evaluated. An excellent correlation was found for all compounds between the binding affinities for muscarinic receptors in cardiac and tracheal smooth muscle membranes; moreover, the affinities found in cardiac membranes correspond with the pA2 values reported for atrial preparations of rat and guinea pig. However, significant and occasionally marked discrepancies were found between binding and functional affinities of these muscarinic antagonists on bovine tracheal smooth muscle. PMID:3215279

  7. In vivo recording of electrical activity of canine tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Kondo, T; Tamura, K; Onoe, K; Takahira, H; Ohta, Y; Yamabayashi, H

    1992-01-01

    Electrical activity of the tracheal smooth muscle was studied using extracellular bipolar electrodes in 37 decerebrate, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated dogs. A spontaneous oscillatory potential that consisted of a slow sinusoidal wave of 0.57 +/- 0.13 (SD) Hz mean frequency but lacked a fast spike component was recorded from 15 dogs. Lung collapse accomplished by bilateral pneumothoraxes evoked or augmented the slow potentials that were associated with an increase in tracheal muscle contraction in 26 dogs. This suggests that the inputs from the airway mechanoreceptors reflexly activate the tracheal smooth muscle cells. Bilateral vagal transection abolished both the spontaneous and the reflexly evoked slow waves and provided relaxation of the tracheal smooth muscle. Electrical stimulation of the distal nerve with a train pulse (0.5 ms, 1-30 Hz) evoked slow-wave oscillatory potentials accompanied by a contraction of the tracheal smooth muscle in all the experimental animals. Our observations in this in vivo study confirm that the electrical activity of tracheal smooth muscle consists of slow oscillatory potentials and that tracheal contraction is at least partly coupled to the slow-wave activity of the smooth muscle. PMID:1537706

  8. Effects of sumatriptan nasal spray (Imigran) on isolated rat's tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li-Hsiang; Wu, Pei-Chuan; Liu, Shao-Cheng; Chiu, Feng-Shiang; Chu, Yueng-Hsiang; Chang, Ying-Nan; Wang, Hsing-Won

    2015-10-01

    Sumatriptan (Imigran) is a potent and highly selective 5-HT1 receptor agonist often used in treating acute migraine. Intranasal sumatriptan is well absorbed and is generally effective in relieving headache. However, the effects of Imigran given intratracheally have rarely been well explored. We aimed to verify the effect of Imigran, which acts on the tracheal smooth muscle directly in vitro. We examined the effectiveness of Imigran on isolated rat tracheal smooth muscle by testing: (1) effect on tracheal smooth muscle resting tension; (2) effect on contraction caused by 10(-6) M methacholine as a parasympathetic mimetic; (3) effect of the drugs on electrically induced tracheal smooth muscle contractions. The results indicated that the addition of methacholine to the incubation medium caused the trachea to contract in a dose-dependent manner. The addition of Imigran at doses of 10(-5) M or above elicited a significant relaxation response to 10(-6) M methacholine-induced contraction. Imigran could inhibit electrical field stimulation-induced spike contraction. It also had a minimal effect on the basal tension of trachea as the concentration increased. The study indicated high concentrations of Imigran could cause bronchodilation to reduce asthma attacks not only by blocking parasympathetic tone, but also by directly antagonizing the effect of cholinergic receptors. PMID:25394582

  9. Anti-cholinergic effect of singulair on isolated rat's tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li-Hsiang; Kao, Chuan-Hsiang; Wang, Chih-Hung; Chu, Yueng-Hsiang; Wang, Jia-Yi; Wang, Hsing-Won

    2012-08-01

    Singulair (Montelukast) is a potent and selective leukotriene D(4) receptor antagonist, often used in treating inflammatory conditions of the respiratory system such as allergic rhinitis and asthma. However, the effects of singulair given intratracheally have rarely been well explored. To verify the effect of singulair, which acts on the tracheal smooth muscle directly in vitro. We used our preparation to test the effects of singulair on isolated rat's tracheal smooth muscle. The following assessments of singulair were performed: (1) effect on the tracheal smooth muscle resting tension, (2) effect on contraction caused by 10(-6) M methacholine as a parasympathetic mimetic, and (3) effect of the drugs on electrically induced tracheal smooth muscle contractions. The results indicated that the addition of methacholine to the incubation medium caused the trachea to contract in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of singulair at doses of 10(-5) M or above elicited a significant relaxation response to 10(-6) M methacholine-induced contraction. Singulair could not inhibit electrical field stimulation-induced spike contraction. It also had a minimal effect on the basal tension of trachea as the concentration increased. This study showed that the high concentrations of singulair also had an anti-cholinergic effect for relieving symptoms of asthma. PMID:22203119

  10. Activation of ROS/NF-{kappa}B and Ca{sup 2+}/CaM kinase II are necessary for VCAM-1 induction in IL-1{beta}-treated human tracheal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, S.-F.; Chang, C.-C.; Lee, I-T.; Lee, C.-W.; Lin, W.-N.; Lin, C.-C.; Yang, C.-M.

    2009-05-15

    Histone acetylation regulated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) plays a critical role in the expression of inflammatory genes, such as vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Oxidative processes have been shown to induce VCAM-1 expression. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying IL-1{beta}-induced VCAM-1 expression in human tracheal smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs). Our results showed that IL-1{beta} enhanced HTSMCs-monocyte adhesion through up-regulation of VCAM-1, which was inhibited by pretreatment with selective inhibitors of PKC{alpha} (Goe6976), c-Src (PP1), NADPH oxidase [diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and apocynin (APO)], intracellular calcium chelator (BAPTA/AM), PI-PLC (U73122), CaM (calmidazolium chloride), CaM kinase II (KN62), p300 (garcinol), NF-{kappa}B (Bay11-7082), HDAC (trichostatin A), and ROS scavenger [N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC)] or transfection with siRNAs of MyD88, PKC{alpha}, Src, p47{sup phox}, p300, and HDAC4. Moreover, IL-1{beta} stimulated NF-{kappa}B and CaMKII phosphorylation through MyD88-dependent PI-PLC/PKC{alpha}/c-Src/ROS and PI-PLC/Ca{sup 2+}/CaM pathways, respectively. Activation of NF-{kappa}B and CaMKII may eventually lead to the acetylation of histone residues and phosphorylation of histone deacetylases. These findings suggested that IL-1{beta} induced VCAM-1 expression via these multiple signaling pathways in HTSMCs. Blockade of these pathways may reduce monocyte adhesion via VCAM-1 suppression and attenuation of the inflammatory responses in airway diseases.

  11. Exposure of immature rats to hyperoxia increases tracheal smooth muscle stress generation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hershenson, M B; Wylam, M E; Punjabi, N; Umans, J G; Schumacker, P T; Mitchell, R W; Solway, J

    1994-02-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that chronic exposure to hyperoxia causes in vivo airway muscarinic receptor hyperresponsiveness in the developing rat [Am. J. Physiol. 262 (Lung Cell. Mol. Physiol. 6): L263-L269, 1992]. To test whether airway cholinergic hyperresponsiveness might result from intrinsic alterations in smooth muscle contractility, we measured the effect of in vivo hyperoxia on the contractile force elicited by acetylcholine (ACh) of isometrically mounted tracheal rings in vitro. Tracheal rings were obtained from 3-wk-old rats exposed to air or to > 95% O2 for 8 days. Muscarinic responses were determined by measuring the force elicited by exposure to increasing concentrations of ACh. Responses were normalized to the morphometrically determined tracheal smooth muscle cross-sectional area in a plane perpendicular to the axis of force generation. In vivo O2 exposure significantly increased maximal ACh-induced stress generation (response to 10(-3) M ACh: air, 15.92 +/- 1.37 g/mm2; O2, 21.78 +/- 1.52 g/mm2; P = 0.010). The ACh-induced stress generation of cylinders from hyperoxic rats was substantially reduced by both epithelial removal and treatment with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. We conclude that in vivo hyperoxic exposure increases tracheal smooth muscle contractile function in vitro and that epithelium-derived prostaglandin(s) contributes to the observed increase in maximal contractile responsiveness. PMID:8175585

  12. Allosteric interactions of three muscarine antagonists at bovine tracheal smooth muscle and cardiac M2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Roffel, A F; Elzinga, C R; Meurs, H; Zaagsma, J

    1989-03-01

    The kinetics of [3H]dexetimide dissociation from muscarine receptors in bovine cardiac left ventricular and tracheal smooth muscle membranes were studied in the absence and presence of three muscarine antagonists. It was found that [3H]dexetimide dissociation from cardiac muscarine receptors was monophasic and very fast (half life less than 1 min) and was slowed by the cardioselective muscarine antagonists, gallamine, methoctramine and AF-DX 116, concentration dependently. [3H]Dexetimide dissociation from tracheal muscarine receptors was biphasic, with a fast phase (half-life less than 1 min) followed after 4-5 min by a slow phase (half-life = 38.5 min). The fast component, but not the slow component, was slowed by the muscarine antagonists with concentration dependencies very similar to those found in the heart. We conclude from these data that the major population of tracheal smooth muscle muscarine receptors resembles the cardiac M2 type not only with respect to equilibrium binding affinities but also with respect to the secondary, allosteric binding site on the muscarine receptor. The results also imply that the cardiac receptor subtype is much more sensitive to allosteric modulation than the glandular/smooth muscle receptor subtype. PMID:2714370

  13. Reactivity of tracheal smooth muscles in albino rats with experimental diabetes mellitus treated with a new complex compound of oxovanadium (IV) and isonicotinic acid hydrazide.

    PubMed

    Khafiz'yanova, R Kh; Minnebaev, M M; Gallyamov, R M; Latypov, R S; Gosmanov, A R; Aleeva, G N

    2003-06-01

    We studied functional properties of tracheal smooth muscle cells in rats with diabetes mellitus. Reactivity of tracheal smooth muscles increased in rats with experimental alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus. A new complex compound of oxovanadium (IV) and isonicotinic acid hydrazide affected reactivity of tracheal smooth muscles in albino rats with experimental type I diabetes mellitus. This new organic vanadium-containing compound reduced contractility of tracheal smooth muscles in rats and potentiated relaxation of smooth muscle cells in the trachea in response to exogenous nitric oxide. PMID:12937677

  14. Inhibition of tracheal smooth muscle contraction and myosin phosphorylation by ryanodine

    SciTech Connect

    Gerthoffer, W.T.; Murphey, K.A.; Khoyi, M.A.

    1988-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that muscarinic activation of airway smooth muscle in low Ca++ solutions increases myosin phosphorylation without increasing tension. Blocking Ca++ influx reduced phosphorylation, but not to basal levels. It was proposed that release of intracellular Ca++ contributed to dissociation of phosphorylation and contraction. To test this hypothesis the effects of ryanodine were studied under similar conditions. Ryanodine (10(-7) to 10(-5) M) antagonized caffeine-induced contraction of canine tracheal smooth muscle. Ryanodine also reduced carbachol-induced contractions and carbachol-induced myosin phosphorylation. The effect of ryanodine on potassium and serotonin-induced contractions was also investigated to test for a nonspecific inhibitory effect. In contrast to the effect on carbachol responses, ryanodine (10(-5) M) potentiated the contractile response to low concentrations of serotonin and potassium, but had no effect on the maximum response to either stimulant. Carbachol (10(-6) M) and ryanodine (10(-5) M) both significantly decreased /sup 45/Ca++ content of tracheal muscle. The effect of ryanodine and carbachol together on /sup 45/Ca++ content was not greater than either drug alone suggesting that ryanodine reduces the caffeine and carbachol responses by depleting releaseable Ca++ stores. Ryanodine significantly reduced Ca++-induced contraction and myosin phosphorylation in carbachol-stimulated muscle, suggesting that some of the Ca++ responsible for elevated phosphorylation is released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  15. Possible Mechanisms for Functional Antagonistic Effect of Ferula assafoetida on Muscarinic Receptors in Tracheal Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kiyanmehr, Majid; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Khazdair, Mohammad Reza; Hashemzehi, Milad

    2016-01-01

    Background The contribution of histamine (H1) receptors inhibitory and/or β-adrenoceptors stimulatory mechanisms in the relaxant property of Ferula assa-foetida. (F. asafoetida) was examined in the present study. Methods We evaluated the effect of three concentrations of F. asafoetida extract (2.5, 5, and 10 mg/mL), a muscarinic receptors antagonist, and saline on methacholine concentration-response curve in tracheal smooth muscles incubated with β-adrenergic and histamine (H1) (group 1), and only β-adrenergic (group 2) receptors antagonists. Results EC50 values in the presence of atropine, extract (5 and 10 mg/mL) and maximum responses to methacholine due to the 10 mg/mL extract in both groups and 5 mg/mL extract in group 1 were higher than saline (P < 0.0001, P = 0.0477, and P = 0.0008 in group 1 and P < 0.0001, P = 0.0438, and P = 0.0107 in group 2 for atropine, 5 and 10 mg/mL extract, respectively). Values of concentration ratio minus one (CR-1), in the presence of extracts were lower than atropine in both groups (P = 0.0339 for high extract concentration in group 1 and P < 0.0001 for other extract concentrations in both groups). Conclusion Histamine (H1) receptor blockade affects muscarinic receptors inhibitory property of F. asafoetida in tracheal smooth muscle PMID:27540324

  16. Leukotriene D4 receptor-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoinositide and mobilization of calcium in sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mong, S.; Miller, J.; Wu, H.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1988-02-01

    A sheep tracheal smooth muscle primary culture cell system was developed to characterize leukotriene D4 (LTD4) receptor-mediated biochemical and pharmacological effects. (/sup 3/H)LTD4 binding to the enriched plasma membrane receptor was specific, stereoselective and saturable. LTE4 and high affinity receptor antagonists bound to the receptors with a rank-order potency that was expected from previous smooth muscle contraction studies. In the (/sup 3/H)myoinositol labeled cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis. The biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-trisphosphate was rapid and the induction of biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-monophosphate by LTs was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited specifically by a receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. In the fura-2 loaded smooth muscle cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced transient intracellular Ca++ mobilization. The fura-2/Ca++ transient was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited by receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. These results suggest that the cultured sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells have plasma membrane receptors for LTD4. These receptors were coupled to a phospholipase C that, when activated by agonists, induced hydrolysis of inositol containing phospholipids. The hydrolysis products, e.g. diacylglycerol and inositol-trisphosphate, may serve as intracellular messengers that trigger or contribute to the contractile effect in sheep tracheal smooth muscle.

  17. Human turbinate mesenchymal stromal cell sheets with bellows graft for rapid tracheal epithelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Hun; Park, Ju Young; Nam, Inn-Chul; Hwang, Se-Hwan; Kim, Choung-Soo; Jung, Jin Woo; Jang, Jinah; Lee, Hyungseok; Choi, Yeongjin; Park, Sun Hwa; Kim, Sung Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-10-01

    Rapid functional epithelial regeneration on the luminal surface is essential when using artificial tracheal grafts to repair tracheal defects. In this study, we imposed human turbinate mesenchymal stromal cell (hTMSC) sheets for tracheal epithelial regeneration, and then assessed their potential as a new clinical cell source. In vitro, hTMSCs sheets showed high capacity to differentiate into tracheal epithelium. We fabricated a poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) tracheal graft by indirect three-dimensional (3D) printing technique and created a composite construct by transplanting the hTMSC sheets to its luminal surface of the tracheal graft, then applied this tissue-engineered tracheal graft to non-circumferential tracheal reconstruction in a rabbit model. 4 weeks after implantation, the luminal surface of tissue-engineered tracheal graft was covered by a mature and highly-ciliated epithelium, whereas tracheal grafts without hTMSC sheets were covered by only a thin, immature epithelium. Therefore, hTMSC sheets on the luminal surface of a tissue-engineered tracheal graft can accelerate the tracheal epithelial regeneration, and the tissue-engineered tracheal graft with hTMSC sheets provides a useful clinical alternative for tracheal epithelial regeneration. PMID:26163763

  18. Functional identification of a sarcolemmal chloride channel from bovine tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Salvail, D; Alioua, A; Rousseau, E

    1996-11-01

    The biophysical and pharmacological characteristics of unitary Cl- currents from bovine tracheal smooth muscle cells were studied after reconstitution of microsomal vesicles into planar lipid bilayers. Two types of currents were recorded simultaneously in KCl buffer: the well-defined Ca(2+)-dependent K+ conductance [GK(Ca)] and a much smaller Cl- current, indicating that the Cl- channels under scrutiny originate from the same membrane as the GK(Ca)-type channels, the plasma membrane of airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. The GK(Ca) activities were eliminated by the use of CsCl buffer. The average unitary Cl- conductance measured in 50 mM trans-250 mM cis CsCl was 77 +/- 6 pS (n = 21), and the reversal potential measured in various CsCl gradients followed the Cl- equilibrium potential as determined from the Nernst equation. In contrast with the previous reports describing the Ca2+ sensitivity of macroscopic ASM Cl- currents, this channel was found to be insensitive to cytoplasmic and extracellular Ca2+ levels. Phosphorylation cocktails, including protein kinases A, G, or C, did not alter the activity of the channel nor did changes in pH. Among a series of Cl- channel inhibitors, 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2, 2'-disulfonic acid [50% effective concentration (EC50) = 30 microM] and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (EC50 = 130 microM) were the most potent blockers of the current examined. The exact role of this surface Cl- conductance remains unclear, and its involvement in cellular activity needs further investigation. PMID:8944656

  19. Protein kinase C, arachidonate metabolism, and tracheal smooth muscle - effects of temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; Baraban, J.; Menkes, H.

    1986-03-01

    Cooling causes airway obstruction in asthma. Contractions of airway smooth muscle may be produced through the phosphatidylinositol cycle and the activation of protein kinase C. Protein kinase C can be activated directly with phorbol esters. The authors studied the effects of temperature on responses to phorbol 12,13-diacetate (PDA) in guinea pig tracheal rings bathed in Krebs-Henseleit solution. At 37/sup 0/C, 1 ..mu..M PDA relaxed the tissue (tension fell 0.60 +/- S.E. 0.04 g). At 27/sub 0/C, 1 ..mu..M PDA contracted the tissue (tension rose 0.050 +/- 0.05 g). In comparison, near maximum contractions produced by 4 ..mu..M carbachol were 2.00 +/- 0.09 g at 37/sub 0/C and 1.90 +/- 0.09 g at 27/sup 0/C. Butler-Gralla et al. showed that phorbol esters may stimulate the release of arachidonic acid from cultured cells. In order to determine whether arachidonate metabolites play a role in responses observed in guinea pig trachea, the authors used indomethacin (a cyclooxygenase inhibitor), FPL 55712 (a leukotriene receptor antagonist) and Na arachidonate. At 37/sup 0/C, 3 ..mu..M indomethacin pretreatment abolished relaxationby 1 uM PDA. At 27/sup 0/C, 10 uM FPL 55712 pretreatment abolished contractions by 1 ..mu..M PDA. Like PDA, 1 ..mu..M Na arachidonate produced relaxation at 37/sup 0/C and contraction at 27/sup 0/C. The authors conclude that the effects of PDA at different temperatures parallel the effects of Na arachidonate. These results suggest that the effects of PDA in the guinea pig trachea are related to the release of endogenous arachidonic acid and that the cyclooxygenase pathway predominates at high temperature and the lipoxygenase pathway predominates at low temperature.

  20. Protective effects of anisodamine on cigarette smoke extract-induced airway smooth muscle cell proliferation and tracheal contractility

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Guang-Ni; Yang, Kai; Xu, Zu-Peng; Zhu, Liang; Hou, Li-Na; Qi, Hong; Chen, Hong-Zhuan Cui, Yong-Yao

    2012-07-01

    Anisodamine, an antagonist of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), has been used therapeutically to improve smooth muscle function, including microvascular, intestinal and airway spasms. Our previous studies have revealed that airway hyper-reactivity could be prevented by anisodamine. However, whether anisodamine prevents smoking-induced airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell proliferation remained unclear. In this study, a primary culture of rat ASM cells was used to evaluate an ASM phenotype through the ability of the cells to proliferate and express contractile proteins in response to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and intervention of anisodamine. Our results showed that CSE resulted in an increase in cyclin D1 expression concomitant with the G0/G1-to-S phase transition, and high expression of M2 and M3. Functional studies showed that tracheal hyper-contractility accompanied contractile marker α-SMA high-expression. These changes, which occur only after CSE stimulation, were prevented and reversed by anisodamine, and CSE-induced cyclin D1 expression was significantly inhibited by anisodamine and the specific inhibitor U0126, BAY11-7082 and LY294002. Thus, we concluded that the protective and reversal effects and mechanism of anisodamine on CSE-induced events might involve, at least partially, the ERK, Akt and NF-κB signaling pathways associated with cyclin D1 via mAChRs. Our study validated that anisodamine intervention on ASM cells may contribute to anti-remodeling properties other than bronchodilation. -- Highlights: ► CSE induces tracheal cell proliferation, hyper-contractility and α-SMA expression. ► Anisodamine reverses CSE-induced tracheal hyper-contractility and cell proliferation. ► ERK, PI3K, and NF-κB pathways and cyclin D1 contribute to the reversal effect.

  1. Biological characteristics of tracheal smooth muscle cells regulated by NK-1R in asthmatic rat with airway remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Bing; Liu, Yali; Yue, Xiaozhe; Li, Yinping; Shang, Yunxiao

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the biological characteristic changes of infant rat tracheal smooth muscle cells in asthma airway remodeling and the impact of NK-1R on the mechanism. Ovalbumin (OVA) was used to excited juvenile SD rats by 8 w. Immunofluorescence, MTT assay, transwell chambers, real time quantitative PCR, Western blot and other methods were used to observe the proliferation, migration, synthesis and secretion changes of infant airway remodeling in rat tracheal smooth muscle cell and the Neurokinin 1 receptor (NK-1R) expression. 1. NK-1R mRNA, protein expression of airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) of each asthma group were higher than that of the control group, especially the asthma 8 w group had highest expression (P<0.01). 2. The average A value of 8 w asthma group measured by MTT method were significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05), WIN62577 10-8 mol/L group had the strongest inhibition of ASMC proliferation (P<0.01). 3. The number of cell migration in the asthma group significantly increased than that in the control group. The number of migrating cells in the NK-1R antagonist group significantly reduced compared with the asthma 8 w group (P<0.05). 4. The average gray value of type III collagen in each asthma group were higher than that of the control group, and the asthma 8 w group had the highest (P<0.01). After NK-1R blocking, the average gray value of type III collagen was significantly lower (P<0.05). ASMC proliferation, migration, synthesis and secretion function increased in the airway remodeling group, and NK-1R played an important role. PMID:26628953

  2. Investigations into human tracheal cartilage osseocalcineus metaplasia II. Histopathological examination of tracheal cartilages.

    PubMed

    Sośnik, Henryk; Sośnik, Katarzyna

    2009-01-01

    Different opinions in the literature about changes in tracheal cartilages were the basis for investigations concerning the types of morphological changes occurring in ageing tracheal cartilages. 5 micron thick specimens stained with haematoxylin-eosin and in selected cases using von Kossa method of 371 cartilages taken from 95 male (mean age 56.6 +/-13.4 years) and 279 cartilages from 70 female patients (mean age 64.9 +/-16 years) (p < 0.001) were the investigated material. The analysis demonstrated statistically significant cartilage type differences between men and women (p < 0.001). Chondrolysis and asbestoids were observed in 11.9% of male and 2.9% of female patients. Calcium deposits were seen in 13.2% of male and 9.7% of female patients, while cartilage ossification in 20.5% and 3.6%, respectively. The coexistence of calcium deposits and osseous metaplasia was observed in 8.6% of male and 3.9% of female patients. PMID:20072952

  3. An Apical-Membrane Chloride Channel in Human Tracheal Epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.

    1986-06-01

    The mechanism of chloride transport by airway epithelia has been of substantial interest because airway and sweat gland-duct epithelia are chloride-impermeable in cystic fibrosis. The decreased chloride permeability prevents normal secretion by the airway epithelium, thereby interfering with mucociliary clearance and contributing to the morbidity and mortality of the disease. Because chloride secretion depends on and is regulated by chloride conductance in the apical cell membrane, the patch-clamp technique was used to directly examine single-channel currents in primary cultures of human tracheal epithelium. The cells contained an anion-selective channel that was not strongly voltage-gated or regulated by calcium in cell-free patches. The channel was also blocked by analogs of carboxylic acid that decrease apical chloride conductance in intact epithelia. When attached to the cell, the channel was activated by isoproterenol, although the channel was also observed to open spontaneously. However, in some cases, the channel was only observed after the patch was excised from the cell. These results suggest that this channel is responsible for the apical chloride conductance in airway epithelia.

  4. Mechanism underlying H2O2-induced inhibition of acetylcholine-induced contraction in rabbit tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Saito, Michihiro; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Itoh, Takeo

    2007-02-28

    The mechanism underlying the inhibition by H2O2 of acetylcholine-induced contraction was investigated in epithelium-denuded strips of rabbit trachea. Acetylcholine (10 microM) generated a phasic, followed by a tonic increase in both the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and force. Although the acetylcholine-induced tonic contraction was around 9 times the high K+ (80 mM)-induced one, the two stimulants induced similar [Ca2+]i increases (around 0.2 microM), indicating that acetylcholine generates tonic contraction via increases in both [Ca2+]i and myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity. H2O2 (30 microM) (a) enhanced the acetylcholine-induced tonic (not phasic) increase in [Ca2+]i but attenuated both phases of the acetylcholine-induced contraction and (b) enhanced the high K+-induced increase in [Ca2+]i but did not modify the high K+-induced contraction. In beta-escin-skinned strips, application of acetylcholine in the presence of GTP enhanced the contraction induced by 0.3 microM Ca2+ so that its amplitude became similar to that induced by 1 microM Ca2+. H2O2 (30 microM) attenuated the contraction induced by 0.3 microM Ca2+ (alone or in the presence of acetylcholine) but not those induced by higher concentrations of Ca2+ alone (0.5 microM and 1 microM). These results indicate that H2O2 acts directly on contractile proteins in rabbit tracheal smooth muscle to inhibit the contraction induced by low concentrations of Ca2+ (<0.5 microM). An action of H2O2 that increases [Ca2+]i (and thereby masks this reactive-oxygen-induced inhibition of myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity) is apparent in the presence of high K+ but not of acetylcholine. Thus, in rabbit tracheal smooth muscle H2O2 downregulates myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity more potently during acetylcholine-induced contraction than during high-K+-induced contraction, leading to an effective inhibition of the former contraction. PMID:17188263

  5. Investigations into human tracheal cartilage osseocalcineus metaplasia. I. Radiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Sośnik, H; Sośnik, K

    2008-05-01

    Osseocalcineus metaplasia (OCM) of the tracheal cartilages is well known, but no exact data are available relating it to age and sex. To resolve this problem we analysed tracheal teleradiograms of 99 female (age: 0.4-92; x = 59.98 +/- +/- 22.75 years) and 110 male patients (age: 0-83; x = 53.53 +/- 19.95 years). As the first step we estimated the percentage of trachea that had complete lesions, those that had trace lesions and those that were unchanged in relation to the patient's age and sex. Secondly we determined the extent and growth of developing lesions during the process of ageing. Data were collected for all the cartilages, with two cartilages with trace lesions considered to be of similar value to one cartilage with complete remodelling. This enabled us to determine the correlation coefficient for changed cartilages and patient age and also the dynamism of OCM in the trachea examined. The chi2 and Student's t tests were used in determining the mean differences between subgroups. The lesions referred to above occurred in 66.35% of men and in 33.33% of women and correlated with age (r = 0.93, p < 0.001 in men, and r = 0.27, p < 0.01 in women). Total remodelling of the OCM occurred in the oldest age group, when both sexes were taken into consideration, while cartilages with trace changes were detected in the younger group of patients. The lowest mean patient age was observed in the group without tracheal changes. Osseocalcineus metaplasia of the tracheal cartilages was conditioned by patient age and sex. In male patients it occurred twice as often as in females. Until the age of 50 it occurred as much as nine times as often, while after this age it occurred only twice as often as in female patients. PMID:18521814

  6. Mechanisms of relaxant activity of the nitric oxide-independent soluble guanylyl cyclase stimulator BAY 41-2272 in rat tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Toque, Haroldo A; Mónica, Fabíola Z T; Morganti, Rafael P; De Nucci, Gilberto; Antunes, Edson

    2010-10-25

    The soluble guanylyl cyclase is expressed in airway smooth muscle, and agents that stimulate this enzyme activity cause airway smooth muscle relaxation and bronchodilation. The compound 5-Cyclopropyl-2-[1-(2-fluoro-benzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-3-yl]-pyrimidin-4-ylamine (BAY 41-2272) is a potent nitric oxide (NO)-independent soluble guanylyl cyclase stimulator, but little is known about its effects in airway smooth muscle. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying the relaxations of rat tracheal smooth muscle induced by BAY 41-2272. Tracheal rings were mounted in 10-ml organ baths for isometric force recording. BAY 41-2272 concentration-dependently relaxed carbachol-precontracted tracheal rings (pEC(50)=6.68+/-0.14). Prior incubation with the NO synthesis inhibitor l-NAME (100 microM) or the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ (10 microM) caused significant rightward shifts in the concentration-response curves to BAY 41-2272. Sodium nitroprusside caused concentration-dependent relaxations, which were greatly potentiated by BAY 41-2272 and completely inhibited by ODQ. In addition, BAY 41-2272 shifted to the right the tracheal contractile responses to either carbachol (0.01-1 microM) or electrical field stimulation (EFS, 1-32 Hz). BAY 41-2272 (1 microM) also caused a marked rightward shift and decreased the maximal contractile responses to extracellular CaCl2, and such effect was not modified by pretreatment with ODQ. In addition, BAY 41-2272 (up to 1 microM) significantly increased the cGMP levels, and that was abolished by ODQ. Our results indicate that BAY 41-2272 causes cGMP-dependent rat tracheal smooth muscle relaxations in a synergistic fashion with exogenous NO. BAY 41-2272 has also an additional mechanism independently of soluble guanylyl cyclase activation possibly involving Ca(2+) entry blockade. PMID:20670622

  7. Increased TGF-β: a drawback of tracheal occlusion in human and experimental congenital diaphragmatic hernia?

    PubMed

    Vuckovic, Aline; Herber-Jonat, Susanne; Flemmer, Andreas W; Ruehl, Ina M; Votino, Carmela; Segers, Valérie; Benachi, Alexandra; Martinovic, Jelena; Nowakowska, Dorota; Dzieniecka, Monika; Jani, Jacques C

    2016-02-15

    Survivors of severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) present significant respiratory morbidity despite lung growth induced by fetal tracheal occlusion (TO). We hypothesized that the underlying mechanisms would involve changes in lung extracellular matrix and dysregulated transforming growth factor (TGF)-β pathway, a key player in lung development and repair. Pulmonary expression of TGF-β signaling components, downstream effectors, and extracellular matrix targets were evaluated in CDH neonates who died between birth and the first few weeks of life after prenatal conservative management or TO, and in rabbit pups that were prenatally randomized for surgical CDH and TO vs. sham operation. Before tissue harvesting, lung tissue mechanics in rabbits was measured using the constant-phase model during the first 30 min of life. Human CDH and control fetal lungs were also collected from midterm onwards. Human and experimental CDH did not affect TGF-β/Smad2/3 expression and activity. In human and rabbit CDH lungs, TO upregulated TGF-β transcripts. Analysis of downstream pathways indicated increased Rho-associated kinases to the detriment of Smad2/3 activation. After TO, subtle accumulation of collagen and α-smooth muscle actin within alveolar walls was detected in rabbit pups and human CDH lungs with short-term mechanical ventilation. Despite TO-induced lung growth, mediocre lung tissue mechanics in the rabbit model was associated with increased transcription of extracellular matrix components. These results suggest that prenatal TO increases TGF-β/Rho kinase pathway, myofibroblast differentiation, and matrix deposition in neonatal rabbit and human CDH lungs. Whether this might influence postnatal development of sustainably ventilated lungs remains to be determined. PMID:26637634

  8. Comparative Study of Protective Effects of Salbutamol and Beclomethasone against Insulin Induced Airway Hyper-reactivity on Isolated Tracheal Smooth Muscle of Guinea Pig

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mahjabeen; Tayyaba Khan, Bushra; Bakhtiar, Salman; Anwar, Mohammad Asim

    2015-01-01

    Inhalational insulin was withdrawn from the market due to its potential to produce airway hyper-reactivity and bronchoconstriction. So the present study was designed to explore the acute effects of insulin on airway reactivity of guinea pigs and protective effects of salbutamol and beclomethasone against insulin induced airway hyper-responsiveness on isolated tracheal smooth muscle of guinea pig. Effects of varying concentrations of insulin (10-7 to 10-3 M), insulin pretreated with fixed concentration of salbutamol (10-7 M) and beclomethasone (10-6 M) were studied on isolated tracheal tissue of guinea pig by constructing cumulative concentration response curves. Changes in tracheal smooth muscle contractions were recorded on four channel oscillograph. The mean ± SEM of maximum amplitudes of contraction with increasing concentrations of insulin, insulin pretreated with fixed concentration of salbutamol and beclomethasone were 35 ± 1.13 mm, 14.55 ± 0.62 mm and 22 ± 1.154 mm respectively. Although salbutamol and beclomethasone both had a profound inhibitory effect on insulin induced airway hyper-reactivity, yet salbutamol is more efficacious than beclomethasone. So we suggest that pretreatment of inhaled insulin with salbutamol may be preferred over beclomethasone in amelioration of its potential respiratory adverse effects such as bronchoconstriction. PMID:25901165

  9. Stimulation by endothelin-1 of mitogen-activated protein kinases and DNA synthesis in bovine tracheal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Malarkey, K.; Chilvers, E. R.; Lawson, M. F.; Plevin, R.

    1995-01-01

    1. In cultures of bovine tracheal smooth muscle cells, platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF), bradykinin (BK) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) stimulated the tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of both pp42 and pp44 kDa forms of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. 2. Both ET-1 and PDGF stimulated a sustained activation of MAP kinase whilst the response to BK was transient. 3. Activation of MAP kinase occurred in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50 values: ET-1, 2.3 +/- 1.3 nM; BK, 8.7 +/- 4.1 nM, PDGF, 9.7 +/- 3.2 ng ml-1). 4. Pretreatment with the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor Ro-318220, significantly reduced ET-1 activation of MAP kinase at 2 and 5 min but enhanced MAP kinase activation at 60 min. 5. Following chronic phorbol ester pretreatment, BK-stimulated activation of MAP kinase was abolished whilst the responses to PDGF and ET-1 were only partly reduced (80 and 45% inhibition respectively). 6. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin reduced ET-1 stimulated activation of MAP kinase particularly at later times (60 min), but left the responses to both PDGF and BK unaffected. 7. ET-1 also stimulated a 3 fold increase in [3H]-thymidine incorporation which was abolished by pertussis toxin pretreatment. In contrast, PDGF stimulated a 131 fold increase in [3H]-thymidine incorporation which was not affected by pertussis toxin. 8. These results suggest that a pertussis toxin-sensitive activation of MAP kinase may play an important role in ET-1-stimulated DNA synthesis but that activation of MAP kinase alone is not sufficient to induce the magnitude of DNA synthesis observed in response to PDGF. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8564258

  10. Investigations into human tracheal cartilage osseocalcineus metaplasia III. ventro-dorsal measurement of the thickness of human tracheal cartilages.

    PubMed

    Sośnik, Henryk; Sośnik, Katarzyna

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to verify the hypothesis that osseocalcineus metaplasia present in the tracheal cartilage is conditioned by its thickness. The study group comprised 78 male tracheas (age ranging between 19 and 84 years, mean = 56.5 years ±12.6 years), and 69 female tracheas (age ranging between 18 and 90 years, mean = 65.3 ±14 years). Tracheal transverse segments (every 4 cm) were collected for histopathological examinations from organs fixed in 10% formalin solution. Typical paraffin specimens, 5 μm thick, were measured in the horizontal position using the ocular micrometer (10 : 100 Zeiss) and Semiplan 3.2/0.10 objective. Differences between mean patient group and subgroup values were statistically verified. P = 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Osseocalcineus metaplasia occurred 2.5-fold more often in male patients, in spite of the higher mean age of female patients (p < 0.001). The average male cartilage thickness was 50.32 ±7.94 × 10⁻² cm, while that of female patients was 38.44 ±4.44 × 10⁻² cm (p < 0.001). The average height of male patients (168.63 ±27.14 cm) was significantly higher in comparison to female patients (157.2 ±5.78 cm) (p < 0.001). The thickness of tracheal cartilages in men was significantly greater in metaplastic tracheas than in tracheas without metaplasia, as well as in changed cartilages as compared to unchanged ones in the same trachea. Considering both genders, the thickness of tracheal cartilages positively correlated with patient age (men: +0.44; p < 0.001; women: +0.293; p < 0.014), whereas height did not correlate with cartilage thickness. PMID:20924990

  11. Phosphotidylinositol turnover in vascular, uterine, fundal, and tracheal smooth muscle: effect of serotonin (5HT)

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.L.; Wittenauer, L.A.

    1986-03-01

    In brain, platelets, and aorta, 5HT has been reported to increase phosphotidylinositol turnover, an effect linked to 5HT/sub 2/ receptors. The authors examined the effect of 5HT on /sup 3/H-inositol-1-phosphate (/sup 3/H-I-P) in tissues possessing 5HT/sub 2/ receptors that mediate contraction to 5HT (rat jugular vein, aorta, uterus and guinea pig trachea) and in a tissue in which contraction to 5HT is not mediated by 5HT/sub 2/ receptors (rat stomach fundus). Tissues were incubated (37/sup 0/C, 95% O/sub 2/, 5% CO/sub 2/) with /sup 3/H-inositol (90 min), washed, LiCl/sub 2/ (10 mM) and 5HT added for 90 min, extracted, and /sup 3/H-I-P eluted from a Dowex-1 column. Basal /sup 3/H-I-P was 10-fold higher in the uterus than in the other tissues. 5HT (10/sup -6/-10/sup -4/M) increased /sup 3/H-I-P in the jugular vein, aorta, and uterus but not in the trachea or fundus. Maximum increase was greatest in the jugular vein (8-fold) with an ED/sub 50/ of 0.4 ..mu..M 5HT. The selective 5HT/sub 2/ receptor blocker, LY53857 (10/sup -8/M) antagonized the increase in /sup 3/H-I-P by 5HT in the jugular vein, aorta and uterus. Pargyline (10/sup -5/M) added to the trachea and fundus did not unmask an effect of 5HT (10/sup -4/M). These data suggest that (1) the jugular vein produced the most sensitive response to 5HT-induced increases in /sup 3/H-I-P, (2) increases in /sup 3/H-I-P by 5HT in smooth muscle may be linked to 5HT/sub 2/ receptors and (3) activation of 5HT/sub 2/ receptors as occurred in the trachea will not always increase /sup 3/H-I-P.

  12. Tracheal replacement.

    PubMed

    Delaere, Pierre; Van Raemdonck, Dirk

    2016-03-01

    Non-malignant and malignant obstruction of the tracheal airway causes significant morbidity and mortality. With increased use of artificial airways, benign and iatrogenic complications are increasing. A tracheal stenosis that is less than 5 cm in length can be resected with end-to-end anastomosis. Longer tracheal lesions can be treated in a palliative way by placement of a stent to secure airway lumen patency. The management of tracheal defects is an evolving field. Tracheal transplantation and tracheal regeneration may bring major treatment advances to cases with long-segment tracheal involvement. This review examines the current possibilities and future prospects in the area of tracheal transplantation and regeneration. PMID:26981270

  13. Tracheal replacement

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Non-malignant and malignant obstruction of the tracheal airway causes significant morbidity and mortality. With increased use of artificial airways, benign and iatrogenic complications are increasing. A tracheal stenosis that is less than 5 cm in length can be resected with end-to-end anastomosis. Longer tracheal lesions can be treated in a palliative way by placement of a stent to secure airway lumen patency. The management of tracheal defects is an evolving field. Tracheal transplantation and tracheal regeneration may bring major treatment advances to cases with long-segment tracheal involvement. This review examines the current possibilities and future prospects in the area of tracheal transplantation and regeneration. PMID:26981270

  14. Solving the confusion of gnaphaliin structure: gnaphaliin A and gnaphaliin B identified as active principles of Gnaphalium liebmannii with tracheal smooth muscle relaxant properties.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ramos, Fernando; Navarrete, Andrés

    2009-06-01

    Inflorescences of Gnaphalium liebmannii, commonly known as "Gordolobo", is the most important remedy in Mexican traditional medicine to treat respiratory diseases, including asthma. By a bioguided fractionation of the n-hexane extract of this plant, following the relaxant effect on guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle, the flavones 5,7-dihydroxy-3,8-dimethoxyflavone (1) and 3,5-dihydroxy-7,8-dimethoxyflavone (2) were identified as the active relaxant compounds. Compounds 1 and 2 showed more potent relaxant properties than aminophylline in this model. Both 1 and 2 have been described as gnaphaliin in the past; here EIMS data, NMR experiments for both compounds, and X-ray diffraction analysis for 1 provided structural information to suggest that 1 and 2 should be named gnaphaliins A and B, respectively. PMID:19505084

  15. Investigations into human tracheal cartilage osseocalcineus metaplasia IV. Morphokinesis of tracheal cartilage retrograde lesions during the process of aging.

    PubMed

    Sośnik, Henryk; Sośnik, Katarzyna

    2010-01-01

    We determined the frequency of occurrence and dynamism of the mentioned retrograde lesions. The investigated material comprised 371 cartilages collected from 95 male tracheas (mean age: 56 ± 13 years), and 279 cartilages collected from 70 female tracheas (mean age: 65.3 ± 14 years) during the process of aging. The dynamism proved non-homogenous with a visible gender difference. The empirical regression curves often crossed each other. Some of the presented curves in female patients were observed beginning two decades after that of male patients, and at lower levels. Thus, it seems hard to conclude that some processes considering tracheal cartilage morphokinesis always precede others. PMID:21290346

  16. Mechanisms of relaxant action of a crude hexane extract of Gnaphalium liebmannii in guinea pig tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mendoza, María Elena; Torres, Gabriela; Arrieta, Jesús; Aguilar, Abigail; Castillo-Henkel, Carlos; Navarrete, Andrés

    2007-04-20

    We investigated the mechanisms of action of Gnaphalium liebmannii which is used as a folk medicine in México for treating various respiratory diseases such as gripe, fever, asthma, cough, cold, bronchitis, expectorating, and bronchial affections. The tension changes of guinea pig tracheal segments were isometrically recorder on a polygraph. Hexane extract of Gnaphalium liebmannii was the most active relaxant extract (IC(30)=54.23+/-19.79 microg/mL with 99.5+/-3.2 % of relaxation), followed by dichloromethane extract (IC(30)=120.22+/-5.27 microg/mL) and methanol extract (IC(30)=190.25+/-30.02 microg/mL). Hexane extract produced a parallel rightward shift of the concentration-response curve of carbachol in a competitive manner (pA(2)=-2.4), but did not modify the concentration-response curves for histamine. The relaxant effect of hexane extract of Gnaphalium liebmannii was unaffected by the presence of propranolol (3x10(-6)M) or glibenclamide (10 microM). However hexane extract produced a leftward shifts of the concentration-response curve of forskolin (10(-8) to 10(-3)M), nitroprusside (10(-10) to 10(-6)M), isoproterenol (3x10(-10) to 3x10(-5)M) and aminophylline (10(-11) to 10(-2)M). The above results suggest that Gnaphalium liebmannii induce relaxation of the tracheal muscle, probably via phosphodiesterase inhibition. The bronchodilator effect of Gnaphalium liebmannii might explain in part their traditional use as anti-asthmatic remedy. PMID:17141995

  17. Carbachol induces a rapid and sustained hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositide in bovine tracheal smooth muscle measurements of the mass of polyphosphoinositides, 1,2-diacylglycerol, and phosphatidic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Takuwa, Y.; Takuwa, N.; Rasmussen, H.

    1986-11-05

    The effects of carbachol on polyphosphoinositides and 1,2-diacylglycerol metabolism were investigated in bovine tracheal smooth muscle by measuring both lipid mass and the turnover of (/sup 3/H)inositol-labeled phosphoinositides. Carbachol induces a rapid reduction in the mass of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate and a rapid increase in the mass of 1,2-diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. These changes in lipid mass are sustained for at least 60 min. The level of phosphatidylinositol shows a delayed and progressive decrease during a 60-min period of carbachol stimulation. The addition of atropine reverses these responses completely. Carbachol stimulates a rapid loss in (/sup 3/H)inositol radioactivity from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate associated with production of (/sup 3/H)inositol trisphosphate. The carbachol-induced change in the mass of phosphoinositides and phosphatidic acid is not affected by removal of extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ and does not appear to be secondary to an increase in intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/. These results indicate that carbachol causes phospholipase C-mediated polyphosphoinositide breakdown, resulting in the production of inositol trisphosphate and a sustained increase in the actual content of 1,2-diacylglycerol. These results strongly suggest that carbachol-induced contraction is mediated by the hydrolysis of polyphosphoinositides with the resulting generation of two messengers: inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and 1,2-diacylglycerol.

  18. Targeted delivery of antiprotease to the epithelial surface of human tracheal xenografts.

    PubMed

    Ferkol, Thomas; Cohn, Leah A; Phillips, Thomas E; Smith, Arnold; Davis, Pamela B

    2003-05-15

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) lung is uniquely susceptible to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and infection with this organism incites an intense, compartmentalized inflammatory response that leads to chronic airway obstruction and bronchiectasis. Neutrophils migrate into the airway, and released neutrophil elastase contributes to the progression of the lung disease characteristic of CF. We have developed a strategy that permits the delivery of antiproteases to the inaccessible CF airways by targeting the respiratory epithelium via the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (hpIgR). A fusion protein consisting of a single-chain Fv directed against secretory component, the extracellular portion of the pIgR, linked to human alpha1-antitrypsin is effectively ferried across human tracheal xenografts and delivers the antiprotease to the apical surface to a much greater extent than occurs by passive diffusion of human alpha1-antitrypsin alone. Targeted antiprotease delivery paralleled hpIgR expression in the respiratory epithelium in vivo and was not increased by escalating dose, so airway penetration was receptor-dependent, not dose-dependent. Thus, this approach provides us with the ability to deliver therapeutics, like antiproteases, specifically to the lumenal surface of the respiratory epithelium, within the airway surface fluid, where it will be in highest concentration at this site. PMID:12615618

  19. Tracheal collapse.

    PubMed

    Hedlund, C S

    1991-06-01

    Tracheal collapse, one form of tracheal obstruction, is classically described as occurring in middle-aged or older toy breed dogs with a history of chronic "goose-honk" cough. Many dogs with tracheal collapse fit this description, but others are young and may wheeze, hack, or have no cough at all. Patients with a history and physical examination compatible with tracheal collapse are definitively diagnosed based on the findings of the following respiratory tract examinations: inspiratory/expiratory radiographs, fluoroscopy, culture and susceptibility, and a thorough endoscopic evaluation. Prosthetic ring tracheoplasty relieves many of the signs of tracheal obstruction but does not cure the disease. Early diagnosis and treatment are expected to give the dog a better quality life. Following prosthetic ring tracheoplasty, most dogs are more active, breathe easier, cough less, and require less medical treatment for respiratory disease. PMID:1802250

  20. Tracheal rupture

    MedlinePlus

    ... MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Bronchial Disorders Tracheal Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  1. Ambroxol inhibits rhinovirus infection in primary cultures of human tracheal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yamaya, Mutsuo; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Nadine, Lusamba Kalonji; Ota, Chiharu; Kubo, Hiroshi; Nagatomi, Ryoichi

    2014-04-01

    The mucolytic drug ambroxol hydrochloride reduces the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the frequency of exacerbation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the inhibitory effects of ambroxol on rhinovirus infection, the major cause of COPD exacerbations, have not been studied. We examined the effects of ambroxol on type 14 rhinovirus (RV14) infection, a major RV group, in primary cultures of human tracheal epithelial cells. RV14 infection increased virus titers and cytokine content in the supernatants and RV14 RNA in the cells. Ambroxol (100 nM) reduced RV14 titers and cytokine concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 in the supernatants and RV14 RNA in the cells after RV14 infection, in addition to reducing susceptibility to RV14 infection. Ambroxol also reduced the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), the receptor for RV14, and the number of acidic endosomes from which RV14 RNA enters the cytoplasm. In addition, ambroxol reduced the activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in the nucleus. These results suggest that ambroxol inhibits RV14 infection partly by reducing ICAM-1 and acidic endosomes via the inhibition of NF-κB activation. Ambroxol may modulate airway inflammation by reducing the production of cytokines in rhinovirus infection. PMID:23856970

  2. Regulation of actin dynamics by WNT-5A: implications for human airway smooth muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Koopmans, Tim; Kumawat, Kuldeep; Halayko, Andrew J; Gosens, Reinoud

    2016-01-01

    A defining feature of asthma is airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), which underlies the exaggerated bronchoconstriction response of asthmatics. The role of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) in AHR has garnered increasing interest over the years, but how asthmatic ASM differs from healthy ASM is still an active topic of debate. WNT-5A is increasingly expressed in asthmatic ASM and has been linked with Th2-high asthma. Due to its link with calcium and cytoskeletal remodelling, we propose that WNT-5A may modulate ASM contractility. We demonstrated that WNT-5A can increase maximum isometric tension in bovine tracheal smooth muscle strips. In addition, we show that WNT-5A is preferentially expressed in contractile human airway myocytes compared to proliferative cells, suggesting an active role in maintaining contractility. Furthermore, WNT-5A treatment drives actin polymerisation, but has no effect on intracellular calcium flux. Next, we demonstrated that WNT-5A directly regulates TGF-β1-induced expression of α-SMA via ROCK-mediated actin polymerization. These findings suggest that WNT-5A modulates fundamental mechanisms that affect ASM contraction and thus may be of relevance for AHR in asthma. PMID:27468699

  3. Ozone exposure of human tracheal epithelial cells inactivates cyclooxygenase and increases 15-HETE production.

    PubMed

    Alpert, S E; Walenga, R W

    1995-12-01

    We assessed the immediate and prolonged effects of ozone on arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism by primary cultured human tracheal epithelial (TE) cells. TE monolayers were exposed at a gas-fluid interface to air or 0.1, 0.25, or 0.5 ppm ozone (15 min air, then 45 min air/ozone), and serially collected effluents were analyzed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and/or high-performance liquid chromatography. Release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and AA, but not 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) or its metabolites, was detected from cultures prelabeled with [14C]AA. PGE2 production, measured by immunoassay, was nearly constant during air exposure. In contrast, PGE2 increased two- to threefold during the first 15-min exposure to all concentrations of ozone, but then progressively declined to 78 +/- 17, 57 +/- 12 (P < or = 0.05), and 45 +/- 15% (P < or = 0.05) of air controls after exposure to 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 ppm ozone. Ozone did not induce a new spectrum of AA metabolites; only PGE2, lesser amounts of PGF2 alpha, and 15-HETE were present in media and cell extracts of air- or ozone-exposed cultures provided with 30 microM exogenous AA. However, cyclooxygenase (CO) activity (PGE2 produced from 30 microM AA) decreased to 82 +/- 9, 53 +/- 8 (P < or = 0.05), and 28 +/- 6% (P < or = 0.05) vs. controls after 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 ppm ozone, whereas 15-HETE production was unimpaired. When cells exposed to 0.5 ppm ozone were maintained for up to 6 h in 5% CO2-air, spontaneous PGE2 production remained decreased and recovery of CO activity was extremely slow. TLC analysis of lipid extracts from [14C]AA-labeled cells revealed a nearly twofold increase in free intracellular 15-HETE, and hydrolysis of phospholipids demonstrated increased esterified 15-HETE. Exposure of human TE cells to ozone leads to a transient increase followed by prolonged decrease in PGE2 production and increased intracellular retention of 15-HETE. Loss of the bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory properties

  4. Inhibitory action of relaxin on human cervical smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Norström, A; Bryman, I; Wiqvist, N; Sahni, S; Lindblom, B

    1984-09-01

    The influence of purified porcine relaxin on contractility of human cervical smooth muscle was investigated in vitro. Strips of cervical tissue were obtained by needle biopsy from pregnant and nonpregnant women and were mounted in a superfused organ chamber for isometric measurement of contractile activity. Relaxin (0.005-25 micrograms/ml) inhibited the spontaneous contractions in cervical strips from 18% of nonpregnant, 68% of early pregnant, and in 100% of term pregnant women. These results indicate that relaxin has an inhibitory action on cervical smooth muscle and that this effect is more constantly detected as pregnancy proceeds. PMID:6746858

  5. Analysis of tracheal noise of forced human expiration according to clinical experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenbaum, V. I.; Pochekutova, I. A.

    2004-09-01

    The analysis of tracheal noise of forced expiration is one of the promising methods for the diagnosis of bronchial patency disorders, which are a sign of such widespread diseases as bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive bronchitis. The aim of this study is the verification and refinement of the acoustic model of forced expiration (Korenbaum et al., 1998) on the basis of a statistical analysis of clinical experimental data. A sample of 127 volunteers (from 18 to 74 years old) is used as an experimental statistical model: 34 persons suffering from bronchial asthma, 21 persons suffering from chronic obstructive bronchitis, 29 healthy persons, and 43 persons liable to developing the aforementioned diseases. The following parameters are analyzed: the total duration of noise of forced expiration at the trachea, the duration of wheeze of forced expiration with frequencies from 400 to 600 Hz, and the presence of narrowband high-frequency (over 600 700 Hz) spectral components at the end of forced expiration and during the whole expiration process. Reliable differences in the parameters of tracheal noise are revealed in the groups under study. The high prognostic value (a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 86%) of the parameters of tracheal noise of forced expiration, which were suggested a priori as the diagnostic parameters on the basis of the acoustic model (Korenbaum et al., 1998), indirectly confirms the adequacy of this model. The biomechanical-pathophysiological interpretation of the occurrence of acoustic deviations in the experimental sample groups provides an opportunity to relate the parameters of tracheal noise of forced expiration to the degree of mechanical nonuniformity of the lungs.

  6. Engineered cartilaginous tubes for tracheal tissue replacement via self-assembly and fusion of human mesenchymal stem cell constructs

    PubMed Central

    Dikina, Anna D.; Strobel, Hannah A.; Lai, Bradley P.; Rolle, Marsha W.; Alsberg, Eben

    2015-01-01

    There is a critical need to engineer a neotrachea because currently there are no long-term treatments for tracheal stenoses affecting large portions of the airway. In this work, a modular tracheal tissue replacement strategy was developed. High-cell density, scaffold-free human mesenchymal stem cell-derived cartilaginous rings and tubes were successfully generated through employment of custom designed culture wells and a ring-to-tube assembly system. Furthermore, incorporation of transforming growth factor-β1-delivering gelatin microspheres into the engineered tissues enhanced chondrogenesis with regard to tissue size and matrix production and distribution in the ring- and tube-shaped constructs, as well as luminal rigidity of the tubes. Importantly, all engineered tissues had similar or improved biomechanical properties compared to rat tracheas, which suggests they could be transplanted in a small animal model for airway defects. The modular, bottom up approach used to grow stem cell-based cartilaginous tubes in this report is a promising platform to engineer complex organs (e.g., trachea), with control over tissue size and geometry, and has the potential to be used to generate autologous tissue implants for human clinical applications. PMID:25818451

  7. Tracheal Diverticula.

    PubMed

    Gayer, Gabriela

    2016-06-01

    Extraluminal paratracheal air bubbles are occasionally seen on computed tomography (CT) studies that include the thoracic inlet (ie, CT of the neck, of the cervical spine, and of the chest). In most cases, these paratracheal air bubbles are tracheal diverticula (TD), sometimes also referred to as tracheal pouch, tracheocele, and tracheogenic cyst. TD are most commonly seen at the right posterolateral aspect of the upper trachea at the level T1-T3. Because of their typical location and appearance, they are easily recognized and should not be confused with pneumomediastinum or other causes of air bubbles in the same region. This article describes the prevalence, possible pathophysiology, and associated complications of TD and illustrates the spectrum of their appearance on CT. PMID:27261344

  8. Tracheal reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Srikrishna, S V; Shekar, P S; Shetty, N

    1998-12-01

    Surgical reconstruction of the trachea is a relatively complex procedure. We had 20 cases of tracheal stenosis. We have a modest experience of 16 tracheal reconstructions for acquired tracheal stenosis. Two patients underwent laser treatment while another two died before any intervention. The majority of these cases were a result of prolonged ventilation (14 cases), following organophosphorous poisoning (11 cases), Guillain-Barré syndrome, bullet injury, fat embolism and surprisingly only one tumor, a case of mucoepidermoid carcinoma, who had a very unusual presentation. There were 12 males and 4 females in this series, age ranging from 12-35 years. The duration of ventilation ranged from 1-21 days and the interval from decannulation to development of stridor was between 5-34 days. Six of them were approached by the cervical route, 5 by thoracotomy and cervical approach, 2 via median sternotomy and 3 by thoracotomy alone. Five of them required an additional laryngeal drop and 1 required pericardiotomy and release of pulmonary veins to gain additional length. The excised segments of trachea measured 3 to 5 cms in length. All were end to end anastomosis with interrupted Vicryl sutures. We have had no experience with stents or prosthetic tubes. Three patients developed anastomotic leaks which were controlled conservatively. Almost all of them required postoperative tracheo-bronchial suctioning with fibreoptic bronchoscope. We had one death in this series due to sepsis. PMID:9914459

  9. Human vascular smooth muscle cells express a urate transporter.

    PubMed

    Price, Karen L; Sautin, Yuri Y; Long, David A; Zhang, Li; Miyazaki, Hiroki; Mu, Wei; Endou, Hitoshi; Johnson, Richard J

    2006-07-01

    An elevated serum uric acid is associated with the development of hypertension and renal disease. Renal regulation of urate excretion is largely controlled by URAT1 (SLC22A12), a member of the organic anion transporter superfamily. This study reports the specific expression of URAT1 on human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells, as assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis. Expression of URAT1 was localized to the cell membrane. Evidence that the URAT1 transporter was functional was provided by the finding that uptake of 14C-urate was significantly inhibited in the presence of probenecid, an organic anion transporter inhibitor. It is proposed that URAT1 may provide a mechanism by which uric acid enters the human vascular smooth muscle cell, a finding that may be relevant to the role of uric acid in cardiovascular disease. PMID:16775029

  10. Effect of hydrogen peroxide on guinea-pig tracheal smooth muscle in vitro: role of cyclo-oxygenase and airway epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Rhoden, K. J.; Barnes, P. J.

    1989-01-01

    1. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) (0.1 microM-3 mM) induced variable contractions of guinea-pig isolated trachea which were attenuated by catalase (100 u ml-1) and mannitol (15 mM) suggesting that contractions were induced by H2O2 and/or the hydroxyl anion. 2. Epithelial removal potentiated contractile responses of tracheal preparations to H2O2 with a leftward shift of the concentration-response curve and an increase in the maximal response. 3. Indomethacin (3 microM) inhibited contractions to H2O2 of intact preparations and preparations without epithelium suggesting that contractions may be mediated by cyclo-oxygenase products. Intact preparations (but not preparations without epithelium) contracted in response to high concentrations (greater than 0.1 mM) of H2O2 in the presence of indomethacin suggesting that other excitatory factor(s) released by the epithelium may induce contraction. 4. Preincubation of intact tracheal preparations with H2O2 (1 mM) for 1 h had no effect on responses to histamine or isoprenaline. 5. These results suggest that hydrogen peroxide generated during the inflammatory process may play a role in bronchoconstriction. PMID:2508982

  11. Transdifferentiation of human endothelial progenitors into smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, HaYeun; Atchison, Leigh; Chen, Zaozao; Chakraborty, Syandan; Jung, Youngmee; Truskey, George A; Christoforou, Nicolas; Leong, Kam W

    2016-04-01

    Access to smooth muscle cells (SMC) would create opportunities for tissue engineering, drug testing, and disease modeling. Herein we report the direct conversion of human endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) to induced smooth muscle cells (iSMC) by induced expression of MYOCD. The EPC undergo a cytoskeletal rearrangement resembling that of mesenchymal cells within 3 days post initiation of MYOCD expression. By day 7, the reprogrammed cells show upregulation of smooth muscle markers ACTA2, MYH11, and TAGLN by qRT-PCR and ACTA2 and MYH11 expression by immunofluorescence. By two weeks, they resemble umbilical artery SMC in microarray gene expression analysis. The iSMC, in contrast to EPC control, show calcium transients in response to phenylephrine stimulation and a contractility an order of magnitude higher than that of EPC as determined by traction force microscopy. Tissue-engineered blood vessels constructed using iSMC show functionality with respect to flow- and drug-mediated vasodilation and vasoconstriction. PMID:26874281

  12. Calcium oscillations in human mesenteric vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Dorado, Jorge; Garcia-Alonso, Mauricio; van Breemen, Cornelis; Tejerina, Teresa; Fameli, Nicola

    2014-02-28

    Phenylephrine (PE)-induced oscillatory fluctuations in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) of vascular smooth muscle have been observed in many blood vessels isolated from a wide variety of mammals. Paradoxically, until recently similar observations in humans have proven elusive. In this study, we report for the first time observations of adrenergically-stimulated [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in human mesenteric artery smooth muscle. In arterial segments preloaded with Fluo-4 AM and mounted on a myograph on the stage of a confocal microscope, we observed PE-induced oscillations in [Ca(2+)]i, which initiated and maintained vasoconstriction. These oscillations present some variability, possibly due to compromised health of the tissue. This view is corroborated by our ultrastructural analysis of the cells, in which we found only (5 ± 2)% plasma membrane-sarcoplasmic reticulum apposition, markedly less than measured in healthy tissue from laboratory animals. We also partially characterized the oscillations by using the inhibitory drugs 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) and nifedipine. After PE contraction, all drugs provoked relaxation of the vessel segments, sometimes only partial, and reduced or inhibited oscillations, except CPA, which rarely caused relaxation. These preliminary results point to a potential involvement of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) in the maintenance of the Ca(2+) oscillations observed in human blood vessels. PMID:24508261

  13. Endothelin ETA receptor expression in human cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, J. C.; Pickard, J. D.; Davenport, A. P.

    1995-01-01

    1. Endothelin (ET) has been implicated in cerebrovasospasm for example, following subarachnoid haemorrhage, and blocking the interaction of ET with its receptors on cerebral vessels, may be of therapeutic benefit. The aim of our study was to characterize endothelin receptor sub-types on medial smooth muscle cells of human cerebral vessels. Cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells were explanted from human cerebral resistance vessels and characterized as human brain smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs). 2. Over a 48 h incubation period, HBSMC cultures secreted comparable levels of immunoreactive (IR) big endothelin-1 (big ET-1) and IR endothelin (ET): 12.7 +/- 10.3 and 8.3 +/- 5.6 pmol/10(6) cells, respectively (mean +/- s.e. mean from three different individuals), into the culture medium. 3. Total RNA was extracted from cultures of human brain smooth muscle cells. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RI-PCR) assays and subsequent product separation by agarose gel electrophoresis revealed single bands corresponding to the expected product sizes encoding cDNA for ETA (299 base pairs) and ETB (428 base pairs) (n = 3 different cultures). 4. Autoradiography demonstrated the presence of specific binding sites for [125I]-ET-1 which labels all ET receptors, and [125I]-PD151242, an ETA subtype-selective antagonist which exclusively labels ETA receptors, but no specific-binding was detected using ETB subtype-selective [125I]-BQ3020 (n = 3 different cultures, in duplicate). 5. In saturation binding assays, [123I]-ET-1 bound with high affinity: KD = 0.8 +/- 0.1 nM and Bmax = 690 +/- 108 fmol mg-1. A one-site fit was preferred and Hill slopes were close to unity over the concentration range (10(-12) to 10(-8) M). [125I]-PD151242 also bound with similar affinity: KD = 0.4 +/- 0.1 nM and Bmax = 388 +/- 68 fmol mg-1 (mean +/- s.e. mean, n = 3 different cultures). Again, a one-site fit was preferred and Hill slopes were close to unity over the concentration range. Unlabelled PD

  14. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis....

  15. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis....

  16. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis....

  17. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis....

  18. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis....

  19. Evaluations of thyme extract effects in human normal bronchial and tracheal epithelial cell lines and in human lung cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Oliviero, Marinelli; Romilde, Iannarelli; Beatrice, Morelli Maria; Matteo, Valisi; Giovanna, Nicotra; Consuelo, Amantini; Claudio, Cardinali; Giorgio, Santoni; Filippo, Maggi; Massimo, Nabissi

    2016-08-25

    Thyme (Thymus vulgaris) is used traditionally to prepare herbal remedies possessing expectorant, mucolytic, antitussive and antispasmodic properties. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a standardized hydroalcoholic extract of thyme on primary human airway (bronchial/tracheal) epithelial cell lines in a model of lung inflammation induced by LPS. In addition, the effects of thyme extract on human lung cancer cell line (H460) were analysed. Thyme extract showed significant anti-inflammatory properties by reducing the NF-κB p65 and NF-κB p52 transcription factors protein levels followed by the decrease of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 beta and IL-8), and Muc5ac secretion in human normal bronchial and tracheal epithelial cells. Moreover, the extract showed cytotoxic effects on H460 cancer cells, modulated the release of IL-1 beta, IL-8 and down-regulated NF-κB p65 and NF-κB p52 proteins. Taken together, these results substantiated the traditional uses of thyme in the treatment of respiratory diseases. Thyme extract might be an effective treatment of chronic diseases based on inflammatory processes when hypersecretion of mucus overwhelms the ciliary clearance and obstructs airways, causing morbidity and mortality. Moreover thyme extract, evaluated in H460 lung cancer cell line, demonstrated to induce cell cytotoxicity in addition to reduce inflammatory cell signals. PMID:27369807

  20. Endodermal Wnt signaling is required for tracheal cartilage formation

    PubMed Central

    Snowball, John; Ambalavanan, Manoj; Whitsett, Jeffrey; Sinner, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Tracheobronchomalacia is a common congenital defect in which the walls of the trachea and bronchi lack of adequate cartilage required for support of the airways. Deletion of Wls, a cargo receptor mediating Wnt ligand secretion, in the embryonic endoderm using ShhCre mice inhibited formation of tracheal-bronchial cartilaginous rings. The normal dorsal-ventral patterning of tracheal mesenchyme was lost. Smooth muscle cells, identified by Acta2 staining, were aberrantly located in ventral mesenchyme of the trachea, normally the region of Sox9 expression in cartilage progenitors. Wnt/β-catenin activity, indicated by Axin2 LacZ reporter, was decreased in tracheal mesenchyme of Wlsf/f;ShhCre/+ embryos. Proliferation of chondroblasts was decreased and reciprocally, proliferation of smooth muscle cells was increased in Wlsf/f;ShhCre/+ tracheal tissue. Expression of Tbx4, Tbx5, Msx1 and Msx2, known to mediate cartilage and muscle patterning, were decreased in tracheal mesenchyme of Wlsf/f;ShhCre/+ embryos. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that Wnt7b and Wnt5a, expressed by the epithelium of developing trachea, and active Wnt/β-catenin signaling are required for tracheal chondrogenesis before formation of mesenchymal condensations. In conclusion, Wnt ligands produced by the tracheal epithelium pattern the tracheal mesenchyme via modulation of gene expression and cell proliferation required for proper tracheal cartilage and smooth muscle differentiation. PMID:26093309

  1. Neurophysiology and Neuroanatomy of Smooth Pursuit in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lencer, Rebekka; Trillenberg, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Smooth pursuit eye movements enable us to focus our eyes on moving objects by utilizing well-established mechanisms of visual motion processing, sensorimotor transformation and cognition. Novel smooth pursuit tasks and quantitative measurement techniques can help unravel the different smooth pursuit components and complex neural systems involved…

  2. Unregulated smooth-muscle myosin in human intestinal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Alhopuro, Pia; Phichith, Denis; Tuupanen, Sari; Sammalkorpi, Heli; Nybondas, Miranda; Saharinen, Juha; Robinson, James P; Yang, Zhaohui; Chen, Li-Qiong; Orntoft, Torben; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Järvinen, Heikki; Eng, Charis; Moeslein, Gabriela; Shibata, Darryl; Houlston, Richard S; Lucassen, Anneke; Tomlinson, Ian P M; Launonen, Virpi; Ristimäki, Ari; Arango, Diego; Karhu, Auli; Sweeney, H Lee; Aaltonen, Lauri A

    2008-04-01

    A recent study described a recessive ATPase activating germ-line mutation in smooth-muscle myosin (smmhc/myh11) underlying the zebrafish meltdown (mlt) phenotype. The mlt zebrafish develops intestinal abnormalities reminiscent of human Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) and juvenile polyposis (JP). To examine the role of MYH11 in human intestinal neoplasia, we searched for MYH11 mutations in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), PJS and JP. We found somatic protein-elongating frameshift mutations in 55% of CRCs displaying microsatellite instability and in the germ-line of one individual with PJS. Additionally, two somatic missense mutations were found in one microsatellite stable CRC. These two missense mutations, R501L and K1044N, and the frameshift mutations were functionally evaluated. All mutations resulted in unregulated molecules displaying constitutive motor activity, similar to the mutant myosin underlying mlt. Thus, MYH11 mutations appear to contribute also to human intestinal neoplasia. Unregulated MYH11 may affect the cellular energy balance or disturb cell lineage decisions in tumor progenitor cells. These data challenge our view on MYH11 as a passive differentiation marker functioning in muscle contraction and add to our understanding of intestinal neoplasia. PMID:18391202

  3. Reaction of human smooth muscle antibody with thyroid cells

    PubMed Central

    Biberfeld, Gunnel; Fagraeus, Astrid; Lenkei, Rodica

    1974-01-01

    Sera from cases of active chronic hepatitis or acute hepatitis containing smooth muscle antibodies reacted by immunofluorescence with the membrane region of sectioned thyroid cells from thyrotoxic glands. With non-toxic glands the reaction was negative or weak. The prerequisite for a positive reaction was that the complement of the sera had been heat-inactivated. Absorption with smooth muscle antigen abolished the reaction of smooth muscle antibody positive sera with thyroid cells. Some smooth muscle antibody negative sera from cases with disorders other than liver disease were found to give a similar immunofluorescence staining of the membrane region of sectioned thyroid cells, but these antibodies were not absorbed with smooth muscle antigen. Culture of thyroid cells was found to increase the number of cells reacting with smooth muscle antibody. In contrast, the thyroid cell antigen reacting with smooth muscle antibody negative sera was lost during culture. PMID:4619977

  4. Tracheal Smooth Muscle Cells Stimulated by Stem Cell Factor-c-Kit Coordinate the Production of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 and Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Mediated by Chemokine (C-C Motif) Ligand 3.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luis Cezar Farias de; Danilucci, Taís Marolato; Chaves-Neto, Antonio Hernandes; Campanelli, Ana Paula; Silva, Tereza Cristina Cardoso da; Oliveira, Sandra Helena Penha

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanism involved in the stem cell factor (SCF)-induced production of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3 (CCL3) in tracheal smooth muscle cells (tSMCs) and the signaling pathway involved in the process. tSMC primary cultures were stimulated with SCF and evaluated at 24 h. Cells treated with specific antibodies did not show any immunolabeling for cytokeratin or fibroblast activation protein, but were positive for α-smooth muscle actin, indicating the purity of the primary cell line. Western blot analysis showed constitutive phosphorylation of c-Kit, as well as increased total protein and phosphorylated c-Kit levels in tSMCs after SCF stimulation. Flow cytometry analysis also showed an increase in cell-surface c-Kit expression in the presence of SCF. SCF induced TGF-β mRNA expression in tSMCs, as well as the production of TGF-β1, CCL3, and FGF-2. Pretreatment with anti-CCL3 antibody blocked TGF-β1 expression and partially inhibited FGF-2 production. On the other hand, anti-c-Kit antibody blocked TGF-β1 expression and FGF-2 production. Thus, TGF-β1 and FGF-2 production were mediated by CCL3 production through c-Kit. Pretreatment with mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1, p38, and Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitors showed that the effects mediated by SCF were involved with the modulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Development of inhibitors targeting CCL3 through MAPK activation could thus be an attractive strategy to inhibit tSMC activation during asthma. PMID:27123814

  5. Tracheal Reconstruction for Comlex Acute Tracheal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Fatimi, Saulat H.; Qasim Raza, M.; Ghani, Alina; Shah, Nilay; Ashfaq, Awais

    2013-01-01

    Tracheal stenosis refers to a reduction in the size of the tracheal lumen and can be due to a myriad of reasons, but the most common remains trauma. In iatrogenic situations, internal trauma is the most likely culprit, resulting from prolonged intubation. Our case reviews a patient who developed severe tracheal stenosis (90% reduction in lumen size) within a month of a threeday- long intubation, and presented to the emergency room with dyspnea, orthopnea, and stridor. Tracheal reconstruction with resection of the stenosed segment and end-to-end anastomosis was done. The patient returned a month later with re-stenosis, and underwent tracheal dilatation. Subsequently, he was discharged with a tracheostomy with no problems thereafter. PMID:25628886

  6. Human colonic smooth muscle: electrical and contractile activity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Gill, R C; Cote, K R; Bowes, K L; Kingma, Y J

    1986-01-01

    Extracellular electrical and contractile activities were recorded in vitro from strips of human colonic smooth muscle obtained at the time of surgery. Serosal electrical activity of longitudinally oriented strips from the taenia and intertaenial region was characterised by continuous oscillation at a frequency of 28 +/- 1/min. Contractions were marked electrically by a series of oscillations upon which spikes were superimposed. The electrical activity recorded from the submucosal surface of circularly oriented strips exhibited oscillations at 24 +/- 4/min, a frequency significantly lower (p less than 0.001) than that recorded from the serosal surface of similar preparations. The contractile force and frequency was dependent upon the part of the colon from which the strip originated; the most powerful contractions were recorded from strips of sigmoid colon. The contractile frequency of circularly oriented strips from the right colon was 6.3 +/- 0.6/min, significantly higher (p less than 0.001) than that of strips from the left colon (3.4 +/- 0.3/min). Stretching these strips caused an increase in contractile frequency to that of the electrical oscillation. PMID:3699550

  7. Cultures of human tracheal gland cells of mucous or serous phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Finkbeiner, Walter E.; Zlock, Lorna T.; Mehdi, Irum

    2009-01-01

    There are two main epithelial cell types in the secretory tubules of mammalian glands: serous and mucous. The former is believed to secrete predominantly water and antimicrobials, the latter mucins. Primary cultures of human airway gland epithelium have been available for almost 20 yr, but they are poorly differentiated and lack clear features of either serous or mucous cells. In this study, by varying growth supports and media, we have produced cultures from human airway glands that in terms of their ultrastructure and secretory products resemble either mucous or serous cells. Of four types of porous-bottomed insert tested, polycarbonate filters (Transwells) most strongly promoted the mucous phenotype. Coupled with the addition of epidermal growth factor (EGF), this growth support produced “mucous” cells that contained the large electron-lucent granules characteristic of native mucous cells, but lacked the small electron-dense granules characteristic of serous cells. Furthermore, they showed high levels of mucin secretion and low levels of release of lactoferrin and lysozyme (markers of native serous cells). By contrast, growth on polyethylene terephthalate filters (Cyclopore) in medium lacking EGF produced “serous” cells in which small electron-dense granules replaced the electron-lucent ones, and the cells had high levels of lactoferrin and lysozyme but low levels of mucins. Measurements of transepithelial resistance and short-circuit current showed that both “serous” and “mucous” cell cultures possessed tight junctions, had become polarized, and were actively secreting Cl. PMID:19998060

  8. Association of Oversized Tracheal Tubes and Cuff Overinsufflation With Postintubation Tracheal Ruptures

    PubMed Central

    Sudhoff, Tobias H.; Seidl, Rainer O.; Estel, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Postintubation tracheal ruptures (PTR) are rare but cause severe complications. Our objective was to investigate the tracheal pattern of injury resulting from cuff inflation of the tracheal tube, to study the two main factors responsible for PTR (cuff overinsufflation and inapplicable tube sizes), and to explain the context, why small women are particularly susceptible to PTR. Methods Experimental study performed on 28 fresh human laryngotracheal specimens (16 males, 12 females) within 24 hours post autopsy. Artificial ventilation was simulated by using an underwater construction and a standard tracheal tube. Tube sizes were selected according to our previously published nomogram. Tracheal lesions were detected visually and tracheal diameters measured. The influence of body size, sex difference and appropriate tube size were investigated according to patient height. Results In all 28 cases, the typical tracheal lesion pattern was a longitudinal median rupture of the posterior trachea. Appropriate tube sizes according to body size caused PTR with significantly higher cuff pressure when compared with oversized tubes. An increased risk of PTR was found in shorter patients, when oversized tubes were used. Sex difference did not have any significant influence. Conclusion This experimental model provides information about tracheal patterns in PTR for the first time. The model confirms by experiment the observations of case series in PTR patients, and therefore emphasizes the importance of correct tube size selection according to patient height. This minimizes the risk of PTR, especially in shorter patients, who have an increased risk of PTR when oversized tubes are used. PMID:26622963

  9. A pre-operative planning for endoprosthetic human tracheal implantation: a decision support system based on robust design of experiments.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, O; Villalobos, J L López; Ginel, A; Cortes, E Barrot; Doblaré, M

    2014-05-01

    Swallowing depends on physiological variables that have a decisive influence on the swallowing capacity and on the tracheal stress distribution. Prosthetic implantation modifies these values and the overall performance of the trachea. The objective of this work was to develop a decision support system based on experimental, numerical and statistical approaches, with clinical verification, to help the thoracic surgeon in deciding the position and appropriate dimensions of a Dumon prosthesis for a specific patient in an optimal time and with sufficient robustness. A code for mesh adaptation to any tracheal geometry was implemented and used to develop a robust experimental design, based on the Taguchi's method and the analysis of variance. This design was able to establish the main swallowing influencing factors. The equations to fit the stress and the vertical displacement distributions were obtained. The resulting fitted values were compared to those calculated directly by the finite element method (FEM). Finally, a checking and clinical validation of the statistical study were made, by studying two cases of real patients. The vertical displacements and principal stress distribution obtained for the specific tracheal model were in agreement with those calculated by FE simulations with a maximum absolute error of 1.2 mm and 0.17 MPa, respectively. It was concluded that the resulting decision support tool provides a fast, accurate and simple tool for the thoracic surgeon to predict the stress state of the trachea and the reduction in the ability to swallow after implantation. Thus, it will help them in taking decisions during pre-operative planning of tracheal interventions. PMID:23046526

  10. Involvement of MAPKs, NF-{kappa}B and p300 co-activator in IL-1{beta}-induced cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2} expression in canine tracheal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, S.-F.; Lin, C.-C.; Chen, H.-C.; Lin, W.-N.; Lee, I-T.; Lee, C.-W.; Hsiao, L.-D.; Yang, C.-M.

    2008-11-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2} (cPLA{sub 2}) plays a pivotal role in mediating agonist-induced arachidonic acid release for prostaglandin (PG) synthesis during stimulation with interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}). However, the mechanisms underlying IL-1{beta}-induced cPLA{sub 2} expression and PGE{sub 2} synthesis by canine tracheal smooth muscle cells (CTSMCs) have not been defined. IL-1{beta} induced cPLA{sub 2} protein and mRNA expression, PGE{sub 2} production, and phosphorylation of p42/p44 MAPK, p38 MAPK (ATF{sub 2}), and JNK (c-Jun) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, determined by Western blotting, RT-PCR, and ELISA, which was attenuated by the inhibitors of MEK1/2 (U0126), p38 MAPK (SB202190), and JNK (SP600125), or transfection with dominant negative mutants of MEK1/2, p38, and JNK, respectively. Furthermore, IL-1{beta}-induced cPLA{sub 2} expression and PGE{sub 2} synthesis was inhibited by a selective NF-{kappa}B inhibitor (helenalin) or transfection with dominant negative mutants of NF-{kappa}B inducing kinase (NIK), I{kappa}B kinase (IKK)-{alpha}, and IKK-{beta}. Consistently, IL-1{beta} stimulated both I{kappa}B-{alpha} degradation and NF-{kappa}B translocation into nucleus in these cells. NF-{kappa}B translocation was blocked by helenalin, but not by U0126, SB202190, and SP600125. MAPKs together with NF-{kappa}B-activated p300 recruited to cPLA{sub 2} promoter thus facilitating the binding of NF-{kappa}B to cPLA{sub 2} promoter region and expression of cPLA{sub 2} mRNA. IL-1{beta}-induced cPLA{sub 2} expression and PGE{sub 2} production was inhibited by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, indicating the involvement of transcriptional and translational events in these responses. These results suggest that in CTSMCs, IL-1{beta}-induced cPLA{sub 2} expression and PGE{sub 2} synthesis was independently mediated through activation of MAPKs and NF-{kappa}B pathways and was connected to p300 recruitment and activation.

  11. SREBP inhibits VEGF expression in human smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Motoyama, Koka; Fukumoto, Shinya . E-mail: sfukumoto@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp; Koyama, Hidenori; Emoto, Masanori; Shimano, Hitoshi; Maemura, Koji; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2006-03-31

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are transcription factors that regulate expression of genes encoding enzymes for lipid biosynthesis. SREBPs are activated by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins). Statins have been also reported to suppress vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Therefore, we hypothesized that SREBPs are involved in statin-mediated regulation of VEGF production in VSMCs. SREBP1 was robustly expressed, and was activated by atorvastatin in VSMCs, as demonstrated by increased levels of the mature nuclear form of SREBP1, and increased promoter activities of a reporter containing sterol regulatory elements by atorvastatin. Moreover, overexpression of SREBP1a dose-dependently suppressed VEGF promoter activity. Site-specific mutation or deletion of the proximal Sp1 sites reduced the inhibitory effects of SREBP1a on VEGF promoter activity. These data demonstrated that SREBP1, activated by atorvastatin, suppressed VEGF expression through the indirect interaction with the proximal tandem Sp1 sites in VSMCs.

  12. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section 868.5750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  13. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section 868.5750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section 868.5750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section 868.5750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5750 - Inflatable tracheal tube cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Inflatable tracheal tube cuff. 868.5750 Section 868.5750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cuff. (a) Identification. An inflatable tracheal tube cuff is a device used to provide an airtight...

  17. Smooth muscle and purinergic contraction of the human, rabbit, rat, and mouse testicular capsule.

    PubMed

    Banks, Frederick C L; Knight, Gillian E; Calvert, Robert C; Turmaine, Mark; Thompson, Cecil S; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Morgan, Robert J; Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2006-03-01

    The smooth-muscle cells of the testicular capsule (tunica albuginea) of man, rat, and mouse were examined by electron microscopy. They were characteristically flattened, elongated, branching cells and diffusely incorporated into the collagenous matrix and did not form a compact muscle layer. Contractile and synthetic smooth-muscle cell phenotypes were identified. Nerve varicosities in close apposition to smooth muscle were seen in human tissue. Contractions induced by adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), alpha, beta-methylene ATP, noradrenaline (NA), acetylcholine (ACh), and electrical field stimulation (EFS) of autonomic nerves were investigated. Nerve-mediated responses of the rabbit and human tunica albuginea were recorded. The EFS-induced human responses were completely abolished by prazosin. In the rabbit, EFS-induced contractile responses were reduced by pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid by 36% and by prazosin by 77%. Both antagonists together almost completely abolished all EFS-induced contractions. The human tunica albuginea was contracted by NA, ATP, and alpha, beta-methylene ATP, but not by ACh. The rabbit and rat tunica albuginea were contracted by NA, ATP, alpha, beta-methylene ATP, and ACh. The mouse tunica albuginea was contracted by ACh, ATP, and alpha, beta-methylene ATP, but relaxed to NA. Immunohistochemical studies showed that P2X1 (also known as P2RX1) and P2X2 (also known as P2RX2) receptors were expressed on the smooth muscle of the rodent testicular capsule, expression being less pronounced in man. The testicular capsule of the rat, mouse, rabbit, and man all contain contractile smooth muscle. ATP, released as a cotransmitter from sympathetic nerves, can stimulate the contraction of rabbit smooth muscle. Human, rat, and mouse testicular smooth muscle demonstrated purinergic responsiveness, probably mediated through the P2X1 and/or P2X2 receptors. PMID:16280417

  18. Ranolazine inhibits voltage-gated mechanosensitive sodium channels in human colon circular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Neshatian, Leila; Strege, Peter R; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kraichely, Robert E; Mazzone, Amelia; Bernard, Cheryl E; Cima, Robert R; Larson, David W; Dozois, Eric J; Kline, Crystal F; Mohler, Peter J; Beyder, Arthur; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-09-15

    Human jejunum smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) express the SCN5A-encoded voltage-gated, mechanosensitive sodium channel NaV1.5. NaV1.5 contributes to small bowel excitability, and NaV1.5 inhibitor ranolazine produces constipation by an unknown mechanism. We aimed to determine the presence and molecular identity of Na(+) current in the human colon smooth muscle and to examine the effects of ranolazine on Na(+) current, mechanosensitivity, and smooth muscle contractility. Inward currents were recorded by whole cell voltage clamp from freshly dissociated human colon SMCs at rest and with shear stress. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were examined by RT-PCR and Western blots, respectively. Ascending human colon strip contractility was examined in a muscle bath preparation. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were identified in human colon circular muscle. Freshly dissociated human colon SMCs had Na(+) currents (-1.36 ± 0.36 pA/pF), shear stress increased Na(+) peaks by 17.8 ± 1.8% and accelerated the time to peak activation by 0.7 ± 0.3 ms. Ranolazine (50 μM) blocked peak Na(+) current by 43.2 ± 9.3% and inhibited shear sensitivity by 25.2 ± 3.2%. In human ascending colon strips, ranolazine decreased resting tension (31%), reduced the frequency of spontaneous events (68%), and decreased the response to smooth muscle electrical field stimulation (61%). In conclusion, SCN5A-encoded NaV1.5 is found in human colonic circular smooth muscle. Ranolazine blocks both peak amplitude and mechanosensitivity of Na(+) current in human colon SMCs and decreases contractility of human colon muscle strips. Our data provide a likely mechanistic explanation for constipation induced by ranolazine. PMID:26185330

  19. Adult human arterial smooth muscle cells in primary culture. Modulation from contractile to synthetic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Thyberg, J; Nilsson, J; Palmberg, L; Sjölund, M

    1985-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells were isolated enzymatically from adult human arteries, grown in primary culture in medium containing 10% whole blood serum, and studied by transmission electron microscopy and [3H]thymidine autoradiography. In the intact arterial wall and directly after isolation, each smooth muscle cell had a nucleus with a wide peripheral zone of condensed chromatin and a cytoplasm dominated by myofilament bundles with associated dense bodies. After 1-2 days of culture, the cells had attached to the substrate and started to spread out. At the same time, a characteristic fine-structural modification took place. It included nuclear enlargement, dispersion of the chromatin and formation of large nucleoli. Moreover, myofilament bundles disappeared and an extensive rough endoplasmic reticulum and a large Golgi complex were organized in the cytoplasm. This morphological transformation of the cells was completed in 3-4 days. It was accompanied by initiation of DNA replication and mitosis. The observations demonstrate that adult human arterial smooth muscle cells, when cultivated in vitro, pass through a phenotypic modulation of the same type as arterial smooth muscle cells from experimental animals. This modulation gives the cells morphological and functional properties resembling those of the modified smooth muscle cells found in fibroproliferative lesions of atherosclerosis. Further studies of the regulation of smooth muscle phenotype and growth may provide important clues for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:3967287

  20. Has cervical smooth muscle any physiological role in the human?

    PubMed

    Bryman, I; Norström, A; Lindblom, B

    1985-01-01

    Strips of human cervical tissue were obtained by needle biopsy and contractile activity was registered isometrically in a tissue chamber perfused by Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer. The most frequently encountered pattern of contractile activity was high frequency-short duration. Prostaglandin (PG)E2, PGI2 and 6-keto-PGF1 alpha had an inhibitory effect on the muscular activity. Cervical muscle from pregnant women was more sensitive to PGE2 than specimens from non-pregnant women. PGF2 alpha had no apparent effect on cervical contractility in non-pregnant and early pregnant patients. In late pregnancy, however, PGF2 alpha inhibited muscle contractions. The present results point to a physiological role of the cervical muscles for the control of cervical competence during pregnancy. The inhibitory effect of PGs on the muscle activity may promote cervical dilatation and retraction. PMID:3893038

  1. Obstructive inflammatory tracheal pseudomembrane.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Lessmann, Astrid; Torrego-Fernández, Alfons

    2013-09-01

    Pathologies acquired after the establishment of an artificial airway include stenosis, granulomas and the formation of pseudomembranes, to name a few. The most common form of presentation in adults is circumferential stenosis, which often requires therapeutic endoscopic measures to achieve resolution. This Case Report describes the case of an obstructive inflammatory tracheal pseudomembrane in the shape of a tracheal septum secondary to repeated intubations that was resolved with conservative treatment. The clinical presentation of this entity generally includes the appearance of respiratory infection and/or atelectasis after the withdrawal of the orotracheal tube as a consequence of the accumulation of secretions between the tracheal wall and the pseudomembrane. Inflammatory pseudomembranes can resolve spontaneously with the help of glucocorticoids, although on occasion they require an invasive endotracheal procedure depending on the evolution. PMID:23419993

  2. Human smooth muscle VLA-1 integrin: purification, substrate specificity, localization in aorta, and expression during development.

    PubMed

    Belkin, V M; Belkin, A M; Koteliansky, V E

    1990-11-01

    A membrane glycoprotein complex was isolated and purified from human smooth muscle by detergent solubilization and affinity chromatography on collagen-Sepharose. The complex was identified as VLA-1 integrin and consisted of two subunits of 195 and 130 kD in SDS-PAGE. Liposomes containing the VLA-1 integrin adhered to surfaces coated with type I, II, III, and IV collagens, Clq subcomponent of the first component of the complement, and laminin. The liposomes specifically adhered to these proteins in a Ca2+, Mg2(+)-dependent manner, but did not bind to gelatin, fibronectin, and thrombospondin substrates. The expression of VLA-1 integrin in different human tissues and cell types, and during aorta smooth muscle development was studied by SDS-PAGE, and subsequent quantitative immunoblotting was performed with antibodies recognizing alpha 1 and beta 1 subunits of the VLA-1 integrin. A high level of VLA-1 integrin expression was an exceptional feature of smooth muscles. Fibroblasts, endothelial cells, keratinocytes, striated muscles, and platelets contained trace amounts of VLA-1 integrin. In the 10-wk-old human fetal aorta, VLA-1 integrin was found only in smooth muscle cells whereas mesenchymal cells, surrounding aortic smooth muscle cells, were VLA-1 integrin negative. By the 24th wk of gestation, the amount of VLA-1 integrin was significantly reduced in the aortic media (4.3-fold for alpha 1 subunit and 2.5-fold for beta 1 subunit) compared with that in the 10-wk-old aortic smooth muscle cells. After birth, the expression of VLA-1 integrin increased and in the 1.5-yr-old child aorta the VLA-1 integrin level was almost the same as in adult aortic media. Smooth muscle cells from intimal thickening of adult aorta express five times less alpha 1 subunit of VLA integrin that smooth muscle cells from adult aortic media. In primary culture of aortic smooth muscle cells, the content of the VLA-1 integrin was dramatically reduced and subcultured cells did not contain VLA-1

  3. Endothelin B receptors on human endothelial and smooth-muscle cells show equivalent binding pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Flynn, M A; Haleen, S J; Welch, K M; Cheng, X M; Reynolds, E E

    1998-07-01

    We have described the pharmacologic profiles of endothelin B receptors in human endothelial cells and vascular and nonvascular smooth-muscle cells. First, by amplifying endothelin B receptor numbers through the use of phosphoramidon and intact cell-binding techniques, we demonstrated the presence of these receptors in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (100% endothelin B receptors), human aortic smooth-muscle cells (22% endothelin B, 78% endothelin A receptors), and human bronchial smooth-muscle cells (55% endothelin B, 45% endothelin A receptors) by using [125I]-endothelin-1 radioligand binding. The typical binding profiles of the endothelin B receptors were established through competition binding curve analysis with endothelin-1, endothelin-3, sarafotoxin 6c, and the endothelin A receptor-selective antagonist BQ-123. In the presence of BQ-123, a diverse group of antagonists, including PD 142893, BQ-788, SB 209670, and Ro 47-0203, were used to probe for binding differences indicative of multiple endothelin B-receptor subtypes. The results indicate a rank order of potency for the antagonists of BQ-788 > SB 209670 > PD 142893 > Ro 47-0203 for each cell line, and that between any of these human cell lines, measurements of [125I]-endothelin-1-binding antagonism for each of the four test compounds differed by less than twofold. Although this study cannot discount the possibility of more than one endothelin B-receptor subtype in humans, it does indicate that these tissues express receptors that show equivalent binding pharmacology. PMID:9676729

  4. Steroid receptors in canine and human female genital tract tumours with smooth muscle differentiation.

    PubMed

    Millán, Y; Gordon, A; de los Monteros, A Espinosa; Reymundo, C; de las Mulas, J Martín

    2007-01-01

    The expression of oestrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) and progesterone receptor (PR) was examined in 32 canine genital tract tumours diagnosed as smooth muscle tumours (benign or malignant, pure or mixed). The immunohistochemical expression of calponin was used to assess the smooth muscle differentiation of the tumours. Nineteen human uterine leiomyomas were also examined. Calponin expression was detected in 89.3% of canine and 100% of human genital tract tumours diagnosed as leiomyomas, as well as in the majority of other tumours examined (canine or human, genital or extragenital, benign or malignant) with the exception of canine negative control tumours (cutaneous fibroma and hepatoid gland adenoma). ERalpha was found in 56.3% of canine and 52.6% of human leiomyomas, while PR was found in 84.4% of canine and 94.7% of human tumours. These results indicate that calponin is a good marker for differentiating neoplasia of the canine genital system of uncertain origin, as in human patients. They also show that canine tumours with smooth muscle differentiation of the genital tract of the bitch express steroid hormone receptors, a finding that opens up the possibility of hormone therapy. PMID:17362977

  5. Developmental changes in expression of contractile and cytoskeletal proteins in human aortic smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Glukhova, M A; Frid, M G; Koteliansky, V E

    1990-08-01

    To describe phenotypic changes of human aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs), proportion of smooth muscle and nonmuscle variants of actin, myosin heavy chains (MHCs), vinculin, and caldesmon, during prenatal and several months of postnatal development was determined. In aortic SMCs from 9-10-week-old fetus, both nonmuscle and smooth muscle-specific variants of all four proteins were present, however, the nonmuscle forms were more abundant. During development, a shift towards the expression of muscle-specific variants was observed, although the time course of changes in protein variant content was not similar for all the proteins studied. By the 24th week of gestation, fractional content of alpha-smooth muscle actin and smooth muscle MHCs was rather close to that in the mature SMCs, and comprised approximately 80 and 90%, respectively, of the levels characteristic of SMCs from adult aortic media. On the contrary, fractional ratio of meta-vinculin and 150-kDa caldesmon was still rather low in the aorta from the 24-week-old fetus, did not increase in a 2-month-old child aorta, and did not reach the level characteristic of mature SMCs even in the 6-month-old child aorta. Thus changes in alpha-smooth muscle actin and smooth muscle MHC fractional content occur mainly during the prenatal period of development, before the 24th week of gestation; while meta-vinculin and the 150-kDa caldesmon proportion increases mainly in the postnatal period, during several months after birth. In the "Discussion," phenotypes of SMCs from developing aorta were compared to those from different layers of the adult aortic wall. PMID:2376586

  6. BMP-2 gene expression and effects on human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Willette, R N; Gu, J L; Lysko, P G; Anderson, K M; Minehart, H; Yue, T

    1999-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and their serine/threonine kinase receptors have been identified in atherosclerotic arteries and vascular smooth muscle cells, respectively. Thus, BMPs (the largest subfamily of the TGF-beta superfamily) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. However, the origins of BMP biosynthesis and the functional roles of BMP in blood vessels are unclear. The present study explored BMP-2 gene expression in various human blood vessels and vascular cell types. Functional in vitro studies were also performed to determine the effects of recombinant human BMP-2 on migration (transwell assay) and proliferation ([3H]-thymidine incorporation) of human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (HASMC). RT-PCR experiments revealed BMP-2 gene expression in normal and atherosclerotic human arteries as well as cultured human aortic and coronary vascular smooth muscle cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human macrophages. In cellular migration studies, incubation with BMP-2 produced efficacious (smooth muscle cell response to vascular injury. PMID:10213907

  7. Generation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Patsch, Christoph; Challet-Meylan, Ludivine; Thoma, Eva C.; Urich, Eduard; Heckel, Tobias; O’Sullivan, John F; Grainger, Stephanie J; Kapp, Friedrich G.; Sun, Lin; Christensen, Klaus; Xia, Yulei; Florido, Mary H. C.; He, Wei; Pan, Wei; Prummer, Michael; Warren, Curtis R.; Jakob-Roetne, Roland; Certa, Ulrich; Jagasia, Ravi; Freskgård, Per-Ola; Adatto, Isaac; Kling, Dorothee; Huang, Paul; Zon, Leonard I; Chaikof, Elliot L.; Gerszten, Robert E.; Graf, Martin; Iacone, Roberto; Cowan, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of human pluripotent stem cells for in vitro disease modeling and clinical applications requires protocols that convert these cells into relevant adult cell types. Here, we report the rapid and efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. We found that GSK3 inhibition and BMP4 treatment rapidly committed pluripotent cells to a mesodermal fate and subsequent exposure to VEGF or PDGF-BB resulted in the differentiation of either endothelial or vascular smooth muscle cells, respectively. Both protocols produced mature cells with efficiencies over 80% within six days. Upon purification to 99% via surface markers, endothelial cells maintained their identity, as assessed by marker gene expression, and showed relevant in vitro and in vivo functionality. Global transcriptional and metabolomic analyses confirmed that the cells closely resembled their in vivo counterparts. Our results suggest that these cells could be used to faithfully model human disease. PMID:26214132

  8. Generation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Patsch, Christoph; Challet-Meylan, Ludivine; Thoma, Eva C; Urich, Eduard; Heckel, Tobias; O'Sullivan, John F; Grainger, Stephanie J; Kapp, Friedrich G; Sun, Lin; Christensen, Klaus; Xia, Yulei; Florido, Mary H C; He, Wei; Pan, Wei; Prummer, Michael; Warren, Curtis R; Jakob-Roetne, Roland; Certa, Ulrich; Jagasia, Ravi; Freskgård, Per-Ola; Adatto, Isaac; Kling, Dorothee; Huang, Paul; Zon, Leonard I; Chaikof, Elliot L; Gerszten, Robert E; Graf, Martin; Iacone, Roberto; Cowan, Chad A

    2015-08-01

    The use of human pluripotent stem cells for in vitro disease modelling and clinical applications requires protocols that convert these cells into relevant adult cell types. Here, we report the rapid and efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. We found that GSK3 inhibition and BMP4 treatment rapidly committed pluripotent cells to a mesodermal fate and subsequent exposure to VEGF-A or PDGF-BB resulted in the differentiation of either endothelial or vascular smooth muscle cells, respectively. Both protocols produced mature cells with efficiencies exceeding 80% within six days. On purification to 99% via surface markers, endothelial cells maintained their identity, as assessed by marker gene expression, and showed relevant in vitro and in vivo functionality. Global transcriptional and metabolomic analyses confirmed that the cells closely resembled their in vivo counterparts. Our results suggest that these cells could be used to faithfully model human disease. PMID:26214132

  9. Three-Dimensional Human Bronchial-Tracheal Epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies (TLAs) as Hosts For Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)-CoV Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suderman, M. T.; McCarthy, M.; Mossell, E.; Watts, D. M.; Peters, C. J.; Shope, R.; Goodwin, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) tissue-like assembly (TLA) of human bronchial-tracheal mesenchymal (HBTC) cells with an overlay of human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells was constructed using a NASA Bioreactor to survey the infectivity of SARS-CoV. This TLA was inoculated with a low passage number Urbani strain of SARS-CoV. At selected intervals over a 10-day period, media and cell aliquots of the 3-D TLA were harvested for viral titer assay and for light and electron microscopy examination. All viral titer assays were negative in both BEAS-2B two-dimensional monolayer and TLA. Light microscopy immunohistochemistry demonstrated antigen-antibody reactivity with anti-SARS-CoV polyclonal antibody to spike and nuclear proteins on cell membranes and cytoplasm. Coronavirus Group 2 cross-reactivity was demonstrated by positive reaction to anti-FIPV 1 and anti-FIPV 1 and 2 antibodies. TLA examination by transmission electron microscopy indicated increasing cytoplasmic vacuolation with numerous electron-dense bodies measuring 45 to 270 nm from days 4 through 10. There was no evidence of membrane blebbing, membrane duplication, or fragmentation of organelles in the TLAs. However, progressive disruption of endoplasmic reticulum was observed throughout the cells. Antibody response to SARS-CoV specific spike and nucleocapsid glycoproteins, cross-reactivity with FIPV antibodies, and the cytoplasmic pathology suggests this HBTE TLA model is permissive to SARS-CoV infection.

  10. Rapid effects of phytoestrogens on human colonic smooth muscle are mediated by oestrogen receptor beta.

    PubMed

    Hogan, A M; Collins, D; Sheehan, K; Zierau, O; Baird, A W; Winter, D C

    2010-05-14

    Epidemiological studies have correlated consumption of dietary phytoestrogens with beneficial effects on colon, breast and prostate cancers. Genomic and non-genomic mechanisms are responsible for anti-carcinogenic effects but, until now, the effect on human colon was assumed to be passive and remote. No direct effect on human colonic smooth muscle has previously been described. Institutional research board approval was granted. Histologically normal colon was obtained from the proximal resection margin of colorectal carcinoma specimens. Circular smooth muscle strips were microdissected and suspended under 1g of tension in organ baths containing oxygenated Krebs solution at 37 degrees C. After an equilibration period, tissues were exposed to diarylpropionitrile (DPN) (ER beta agonist) and 1,3,5-tris(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4-propyl-1H-pyrazole (PPT) (ER alpha agonist) or to the synthetic phytoestrogen compounds genistein (n=8), daidzein (n=8), fisetin (n=8) and quercetin (n=8) in the presence or absence of fulvestrant (oestrogen receptor antagonist). Mechanism of action was investigated by inhibition of downstream pathways. The cholinergic agonist carbachol was used to induce contractile activity. Tension was recorded isometrically. Phytoestrogens inhibit carbachol-induced colonic contractility. In keeping with a non-genomic, rapid onset direct action, the effect was within minutes, reversible and similar to previously described actions of 17 beta oestradiol. No effect was seen in the presence of fulvestrant indicating receptor modulation. While the DPN exerted inhibitory effects, PPT did not. The effect appears to be reliant on a p38/mitogen activated protein kinase mediated induction of nitric oxide production in colonic smooth muscle. The present data set provides the first description of a direct effect of genistein, daidzein, fisetin and quercetin on human colonic smooth muscle. The presence of ER in colonic smooth muscle has been functionally proven and the beta

  11. OUABAIN- AND MARINOBUFAGENIN-INDUCED PROLIFERATION OF HUMAN UMBILICAL VEIN SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS AND A RAT VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELL LINE, A7R5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied the growth-promoting effects of 2 sodium pump-selective cardiotonic steroids, ouabain and marinobufagenin, on cultured cells from vascular smooth muscle (VSMCs) from human umbilical vein and a rat VSMC line, A7r5. Both ouabain and marinobufagenin activated proliferation of these cells in...

  12. A new enzymic method for the isolation and culture of human bladder body smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, F -H; Higashira, H; Ukai, Y; Hanai, T; Kiwamoto, H; Park, Y C; Kurita, T

    2002-01-01

    Cultured cells of the human urinary bladder smooth muscle are useful for investigating bladder function, but methods for culturing them are not well developed. We have now established a novel enzymic technique. The smooth muscle layer was separated out and incubated with 0.2% trypsin for 30 min at 37 degrees C. The samples were then minced and incubated with 0.1% collagenase for 30 min and centrifuged at 900 g. The pellets were resuspended in RPMI-1640 medium containing 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) and centrifuged at 250 g. The smooth muscle cells from the supernatant were cultured in RPMI-1640 containing 10% FCS. The cells grew to confluence after 7-10 days, forming the "hills and valleys" growth pattern characteristic of smooth muscle cells. Immunostaining with anti-alpha-actin, anti-myosin, and anti-caldesmon antibodies demonstrated that 99% of the cells were smooth muscle cells. To investigate the pharmacological properties of the cultured cells, we determined the inhibitory effect of muscarinic receptor antagonists on the binding of [3H]N-methylscopolamine to membranes from cultured cells. The pKi values obtained for six antagonists agreed with the corresponding values for transfected cells expressing the human muscarinic M2 subtype. Furthermore, carbachol produced an increase in the concentration of cytoplasmic free Ca2+ an action that was blocked by 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide, an M3 selective antagonist. This result suggests that these cells express functional M3 muscarinic receptors, in addition to M2 receptors. The subcultured cells therefore appear to be unaffected by our new isolation method. PMID:11835427

  13. Tracheal Resection for Symptomatic Tracheal Stenosis During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Mariam; Muniappan, Ashok; Modest, Vicki; Mathisen, Douglas J; Madapu, Manokanth; Bryant, Allison; Kaimal, Anjali

    2016-04-01

    A 31-year-old multipara was diagnosed with tracheal stenosis that developed after intubation after an intentional benzodiazepine overdose in the first trimester of pregnancy. Tracheal dilations only temporarily improved her dyspnea at rest. A definitive repair by tracheal resection and reconstruction was performed at 28 weeks' gestation. Her symptoms resolved, and she delivered vaginally at 36 weeks' gestation after spontaneous labor. PMID:27000585

  14. Cytotoxicity of some oxysterols on human vascular smooth muscle cells was mediated by apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Y; Shirai, K; Ito, Y; Watanabe, J; Urano, Y; Murano, T; Tomioka, H

    1997-01-01

    A decrease in smooth muscle cells is observed in advanced atherosclerotic lesion. To understand this mechanism, we selected oxysterols as candidates for toxic lipid, and examined their cytotoxicity on human cultured vascular smooth muscle cells, together with the manner of cell death. In the presence of 7-ketocholesterol or 7 beta-hydroxycholesterol (50 mumol/L), the percentage of detached cells increased significantly with dose dependency, and an increase in detached cell number and DNA nick detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling study (TUNEL) preceded an increase in lactate dehydrogenase released into the medium. DNA extracted from smooth muscle cells incubated with 7-ketocholesterol or 7 beta-hydroxycholesterol showed a laddering pattern on agarose electrophoresis. In the presence of 7-ketocholesterol or 7 beta-hydroxycholesterol, fragmented DNA quantified by the quantitative sandwich enzyme immunoassay was significantly increased. From these results, it is proposed that 7-ketocholesterol and 7 beta-hydroxycholesterol are toxic to smooth muscle cells, and that this cytotoxicity is mediated by apoptosis. PMID:9638517

  15. Advances in Tracheal Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Salna, Michael; Waddell, Thomas K.; Hofer, Stefan O.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: A recent revival of global interest for reconstruction of long-segment tracheal defects, which represents one of the most interesting and complex problems in head and neck and thoracic reconstructive surgery, has been witnessed. The trachea functions as a conduit for air, and its subunits including the epithelial layer, hyaline cartilage, and segmental blood supply make it particularly challenging to reconstruct. A myriad of attempts at replacing the trachea have been described. These along with the anatomy, indications, and approaches including microsurgical tracheal reconstruction will be reviewed. Novel techniques such as tissue-engineering approaches will also be discussed. Multiple attempts at replacing the trachea with synthetic scaffolds have been met with failure. The main lesson learned from such failures is that the trachea must not be treated as a “simple tube.” Understanding the anatomy, developmental biology, physiology, and diseases affecting the trachea are required for solving this problem. PMID:25426361

  16. Endoscopic laser reshaping of rabbit tracheal cartilage: preliminary investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Walter; Lam, Anthony; Protsenko, Dmitry; Wong, Brian J.

    2005-04-01

    Background: Tracheal cartilage deformities due to trauma, prolonged endotracheal intubation or infection are difficult to correct. Current treatment options such as dilation, laser ablation, stent placement, and segmental resection are only temporary or carry significant risks. The objectives of this project were to design and test a laser activated endotracheal stent system that can actively modify the geometry of tracheal cartilage, leading to permanent retention of a new and desirable tracheal geometry. Methods: Ex vivo rabbit tracheal cartilage (simulating human neonate trachea) were irradiated with an Er: Glass laser, (λ= 1.54um, 0.5W-2.5W, 1 sec to 5 sec). Shape change and gross thermal injury were assessed visually to determine the best laser power parameters for reshaping. A rigid endoscopic telescope and hollow bronchoscope were used to record endoscopic images. The stent was constructed from nitinol wire, shaped into a zigzag configuration. An ex vivo testing apparatus was also constructed. Results: The best laser power parameter to produce shape change was 1 W for 6-7 seconds. At this setting, there was significant shape change with only minimal thermal injury to the tracheal mucosa, as assessed by visual inspection. The bronchoscopy system functioned adequately during testing in the ex vivo testing apparatus. Conclusion: We have successfully designed instrumentation and created the capability to endoscopically reshape tracheal cartilage in an ex vivo rabbit model. The results obtained in ex vivo tracheal cartilage indicated that reshaping using Er: Glass laser can be accomplished.

  17. Actin expression in smooth muscle cells of rat aortic intimal thickening, human atheromatous plaque, and cultured rat aortic media.

    PubMed Central

    Gabbiani, G; Kocher, O; Bloom, W S; Vandekerckhove, J; Weber, K

    1984-01-01

    Actin of smooth muscle cells of rat and human aortic media shows a predominance of the alpha-isoform. In experimental rat aortic intimal thickening, in human atheromatous plaque, and in cultured aortic smooth muscle cells, there is a typical switch in actin expression with a predominance of the beta-form and a noticeable amount of gamma-form. This pattern of actin expression represents a new reliable protein-chemical marker of experimental and human atheromatous smooth muscle cells. Images PMID:6690475

  18. Long-Term Expression of Human Adenosine Deaminase in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells of Rats: A Model for Gene Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Carmel M.; Clowes, Monika M.; Osborne, William R. A.; Clowes, Alexander W.; Dusty Miller, A.

    1992-02-01

    Gene transfer into vascular smooth muscle cells in animals was examined by using recombinant retroviral vectors containing an Escherichia coli β-galactosidase gene or a human adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) gene. Direct gene transfer by infusion of virus into rat carotid arteries was not observed. However, gene transfer by infection of smooth muscle cells in culture and seeding of the transduced cells onto arteries that had been denuded of endothelial cells was successful. Potentially therapeutic levels of human adenosine deaminase activity were detected over 6 months of observation, indicating the utility of vascular smooth muscle cells for gene therapy in humans.

  19. Nitric Oxide-mediated Relaxation by High K in Human Gastric Longitudinal Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Chul; Choi, Woong; Yun, Hyo-Young; Sung, Rohyun; Yoo, Ra Young; Park, Seon-Mee; Yun, Sei Jin; Kim, Mi-Jung; Song, Young-Jin; Xu, Wen-Xie; Lee, Sang Jin

    2011-12-01

    This study was designed to elucidate high-K(+)induced response of circular and longitudinal smooth muscle from human gastric corpus using isometric contraction. Contraction from circular and longitudinal muscle stripes of gastric corpus greater curvature and lesser curvature were compared. Circular smooth muscle from corpus greater curvature showed high K(+) (50 mM)-induced tonic contraction. On the contrary, however, longitudinal smooth muscle strips showed high K(+) (50 mM)-induced sustained relaxation. To find out the reason for the discrepancy we tested several relaxation mechanisms. Protein kinase blockers like KT5720, PKA inhibitor, and KT5823, PKG inhibitor, did not affect high K(+)-induced relaxation. K(+) channel blockers like tetraethylammonium (TEA), apamin (APA), glibenclamide (Glib) and barium (Ba(2+)) also had no effect. However, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) and 1H-(1,2,4) oxadiazolo (4,3-A) quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) and 4-AP (4-aminopyridine), voltage-dependent K(+) channel (K(V)) blocker, inhibited high K(+)-induced relaxation, hence reversing to tonic contraction. High K(+)-induced relaxation was observed in gastric corpus of human stomach, but only in the longitudinal muscles from greater curvature not lesser curvature. L-NNA, ODQ and K(V) channel blocker sensitive high K(+)-induced relaxation in longitudinal muscle of higher portion of corpus was also observed. These results suggest that longitudinal smooth muscle from greater curvature of gastric corpus produced high K(+)-induced relaxation which was activated by NO/sGC pathway and by K(V) channel dependent mechanism. PMID:22359479

  20. Highly Sulfated K5 Escherichia coli Polysaccharide Derivatives Inhibit Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infectivity in Cell Lines and Human Tracheal-Bronchial Histocultures

    PubMed Central

    Cagno, Valeria; Donalisio, Manuela; Civra, Andrea; Volante, Marco; Veccelli, Elena; Oreste, Pasqua; Rusnati, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) exploits cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) as attachment receptors. The interaction between RSV and HSPGs thus presents an attractive target for the development of novel inhibitors of RSV infection. In this study, selective chemical modification of the Escherichia coli K5 capsular polysaccharide was used to generate a collection of sulfated K5 derivatives with a backbone structure that mimics the heparin/heparan sulfate biosynthetic precursor. The screening of a series of N-sulfated (K5-NS), O-sulfated (K5-OS), and N,O-sulfated (K5-N,OS) derivatives with different degrees of sulfation revealed the highly sulfated K5 derivatives K5-N,OS(H) and K5-OS(H) to be inhibitors of RSV. Their 50% inhibitory concentrations were between 1.07 nM and 3.81 nM in two different cell lines, and no evidence of cytotoxicity was observed. Inhibition of RSV infection was maintained in binding and attachment assays but not in preattachment assays. Moreover, antiviral activity was also evident when the K5 derivatives were added postinfection, both in cell-to-cell spread and viral yield reduction assays. Finally, both K5-N,OS(H) and K5-OS(H) prevented RSV infection in human-derived tracheal/bronchial epithelial cells cultured to form a pseudostratified, highly differentiated model of the epithelial tissue of the human respiratory tract. Together, these features put K5-N,OS(H) and K5-OS(H) forward as attractive candidates for further development as RSV inhibitors. PMID:24914125

  1. Smooth Muscle Precursor Cells Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Wen, Yan; Li, Yan Hui; Wei, Yi; Green, Morgaine; Wani, Prachi; Zhang, Pengbo; Pera, Renee Reijo; Chen, Bertha

    2016-03-15

    There is great interest in using stem cells (SC) to regenerate a deficient urethral sphincter in patients with urinary incontinence. The smooth muscle component of the sphincter is a significant contributor to sphincter function. However, current translational efforts for sphincter muscle restoration focus only on skeletal muscle regeneration because they rely on adult mesenchymal SC as cell source. These adult SC do not yield sufficient smooth muscle cells (SMCs) for transplantation. We may be able to overcome this limitation by using pluripotent stem cell (PSC) to derive SMCs. Hence, we sought to investigate whether smooth muscle precursor cells (pSMCs) derived from human PSCs can restore urethral function in an animal model generated by surgical urethrolysis and ovariectomy. Rats were divided into four groups: control (no intervention), sham saline (surgery + saline injection), bladder SMC (surgery + human bladder SMC injection), and treatment (surgery + pSMC injection, which includes human embryonic stem cell (hESC) H9-derived pSMC, episomal reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)-derived pSMC, or viral reprogrammed iPSC-derived pSMC). pSMCs (2 × 10(6) cells/rat) were injected periurethrally 3 weeks postsurgery. Leak point pressure (LPP) and baseline external urethral sphincter electromyography were measured 5 weeks postinjection. Both iPSC-derived pSMC treatment groups showed significantly higher LPP compared to the sham saline group, consistent with restoration of urethral sphincter function. While the difference between the H9-derived pSMC treatment and sham saline group was not significant, it did show a trend toward restoration of the LPP to the level of intact controls. Our data indicate that pSMCs derived from human PSCs (hESC and iPSC) can restore sphincter function. PMID:26785911

  2. Smooth Muscle Precursor Cells Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Li, Yan Hui; Wei, Yi; Green, Morgaine; Wani, Prachi; Zhang, Pengbo; Pera, Renee Reijo; Chen, Bertha

    2016-01-01

    There is great interest in using stem cells (SC) to regenerate a deficient urethral sphincter in patients with urinary incontinence. The smooth muscle component of the sphincter is a significant contributor to sphincter function. However, current translational efforts for sphincter muscle restoration focus only on skeletal muscle regeneration because they rely on adult mesenchymal SC as cell source. These adult SC do not yield sufficient smooth muscle cells (SMCs) for transplantation. We may be able to overcome this limitation by using pluripotent stem cell (PSC) to derive SMCs. Hence, we sought to investigate whether smooth muscle precursor cells (pSMCs) derived from human PSCs can restore urethral function in an animal model generated by surgical urethrolysis and ovariectomy. Rats were divided into four groups: control (no intervention), sham saline (surgery + saline injection), bladder SMC (surgery + human bladder SMC injection), and treatment (surgery + pSMC injection, which includes human embryonic stem cell (hESC) H9-derived pSMC, episomal reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)-derived pSMC, or viral reprogrammed iPSC-derived pSMC). pSMCs (2 × 106 cells/rat) were injected periurethrally 3 weeks postsurgery. Leak point pressure (LPP) and baseline external urethral sphincter electromyography were measured 5 weeks postinjection. Both iPSC-derived pSMC treatment groups showed significantly higher LPP compared to the sham saline group, consistent with restoration of urethral sphincter function. While the difference between the H9-derived pSMC treatment and sham saline group was not significant, it did show a trend toward restoration of the LPP to the level of intact controls. Our data indicate that pSMCs derived from human PSCs (hESC and iPSC) can restore sphincter function. PMID:26785911

  3. Expression of TRPC homologs in endothelial cells and smooth muscle layers of human arteries.

    PubMed

    Yip, Ham; Chan, Wing-Yee; Leung, Pan-Cheung; Kwan, Hiu-Yee; Liu, Cuiling; Huang, Yu; Michel, Villaz; Yew, David Tai-Wai; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2004-12-01

    TRPC channels are a group of Ca(2+)-permeable nonselective cation channels that mediate store-operated and/or agonist-stimulated Ca(2+) influx in a variety of cell types. In this study, we extensively examined the expression patterns of TRPC homologs in human vascular tissues. RT-PCR amplified cDNA fragments of TRPC1 (505 bp), TRPC3 (372 bp), TRPC4 (499 bp), TRPC5 (325 bp), TRPC6 (509 bp), and TRPC7 (187 bp) from RNA isolated from cultured human coronary artery endothelial cells. In situ hybridization yielded strong labeling of TRPC1,3-6 in the endothelial and smooth muscle cells of human coronary and cerebral arteries. TRPC7 labeling was exclusively found in endothelial cells but not in smooth muscle cells. Results from immunohistochemical staining were consistent with those from in situ hybridization. Similar expression patterns of TRPC homologs were also observed in arterioles and vaso vasora. In conclusion, our study indicates that TRPC homologs are widely expressed in human vessels of all calibers, including medium-sized coronary arteries and cerebral arteries, smaller-sized resistance arteries, and vaso vasora. These results suggest a ubiquitous role of TRPC homologs in regulating blood supply to different regions and in controlling arterial blood pressure. PMID:15538613

  4. Robust derivation of epicardium and its differentiated smooth muscle cell progeny from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Dharini; Gambardella, Laure; Bernard, William G; Serrano, Felipe; Mascetti, Victoria L; Pedersen, Roger A; Talasila, Amarnath; Sinha, Sanjay

    2015-04-15

    The epicardium has emerged as a multipotent cardiovascular progenitor source with therapeutic potential for coronary smooth muscle cell, cardiac fibroblast (CF) and cardiomyocyte regeneration, owing to its fundamental role in heart development and its potential ability to initiate myocardial repair in injured adult tissues. Here, we describe a chemically defined method for generating epicardium and epicardium-derived smooth muscle cells (EPI-SMCs) and CFs from human pluripotent stem cells (HPSCs) through an intermediate lateral plate mesoderm (LM) stage. HPSCs were initially differentiated to LM in the presence of FGF2 and high levels of BMP4. The LM was robustly differentiated to an epicardial lineage by activation of WNT, BMP and retinoic acid signalling pathways. HPSC-derived epicardium displayed enhanced expression of epithelial- and epicardium-specific markers, exhibited morphological features comparable with human foetal epicardial explants and engrafted in the subepicardial space in vivo. The in vitro-derived epicardial cells underwent an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition when treated with PDGF-BB and TGFβ1, resulting in vascular SMCs that displayed contractile ability in response to vasoconstrictors. Furthermore, the EPI-SMCs displayed low density lipoprotein uptake and effective lowering of lipoprotein levels upon treatment with statins, similar to primary human coronary artery SMCs. Cumulatively, these findings suggest that HPSC-derived epicardium and EPI-SMCs could serve as important tools for studying human cardiogenesis, and as a platform for vascular disease modelling and drug screening. PMID:25813541

  5. Heparin fragments inhibit human vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Selden, S.C.; Johnson, W.V.; Maciag, T.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have examined the effect of heparin on human abdominal aortic smooth muscle cell growth. Cell proliferation was inhibited by more than 90% at a concentration of 20 ..mu..g/ml in a 12 day growth assay using heparin from Sigma, Upjohn or Calbiochem. Additionally, 200 ..mu..g/ml Upjohn heparin inhibits /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation by 50% in short term assays using serum or purified platelet-derived growth factor (25-100ng/ml) to initiate the cell cycle. Homogeneous size classes of heparin fragments were prepared by nitrous acid cleavage and BioGel P-10 filtration chromatography. Deca-, octa-, hexa-, tetra-, and di-saccharides inhibited proliferation by 90% at concentrations of 280, 320, 260, 180 and 100 ..mu..g/ml, respectively, in a 12 day growth assay. These data confirm the work of Castellot et.al. and extend the range of inhibitory fragments down to the tetra- and di-saccharide size. These data suggest, therefore, that di-saccharide subunit of heparin is sufficient to inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. The authors are now examining the role of the anhydromannose moiety on the reducing end of the nitrous acid generated fragments as a possible mediator of heparin-induced inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

  6. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (P<0.01). A 50% increase in FGF-2 content versus control (P<0.01) was found in the pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment). Furthermore, a significant decrease in FGF-2 was detected in the cell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  7. Effects of cobalt chloride on phenotypes of normal human saphenous vein smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Wang, Huai-Ming

    2014-01-01

    To explore the cellular adaptations and responses to hypoxia in normal human saphenous vein smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and presume what roles phenotypic modulation of normal human saphenous vein SMCs would play in varicose vein of lower extremity, we used cobalt chloride (CoCl2), a hypoxia mimetic, to treat normal human saphenous vein SMCs in vitro. The proliferating ability of cells exposed to serial dilutions of CoCl2 (0, 200, 300, 400 and 500 μM) at 24 h, 48 h and 72 h respectively was detected by MTT assay. Wound healing assay was used to observe the migrating ability of cells under CoCl2 (200 μM) treatment for 8 days continuously. Hoechst 33258 stain was used to determine whether hypoxia induced by CoCl2 could cause apoptosis of normal human saphenous vein SMCs. We found that CoCl2 enhanced the proliferation and inhibited the migration of normal human saphenous vein SMCs. The apparent morphous of normal human saphenous vein SMCs under chronic CoCl2 treatment was significantly changed compared to no CoCl2 treated control, but this process did not relate to cell apoptosis. To conclude, our results support the concept that the phenotypes of normal human saphenous vein SMCs could be influenced by hypoxia stimulus. Cellular structural and functional changes under chronic hypoxia in normal human saphenous vein SMCs might play important roles in the development of varicose veins of lower extremity. PMID:25663990

  8. Effects of cobalt chloride on phenotypes of normal human saphenous vein smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Huai-Ming

    2014-01-01

    To explore the cellular adaptations and responses to hypoxia in normal human saphenous vein smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and presume what roles phenotypic modulation of normal human saphenous vein SMCs would play in varicose vein of lower extremity, we used cobalt chloride (CoCl2), a hypoxia mimetic, to treat normal human saphenous vein SMCs in vitro. The proliferating ability of cells exposed to serial dilutions of CoCl2 (0, 200, 300, 400 and 500 μM) at 24 h, 48 h and 72 h respectively was detected by MTT assay. Wound healing assay was used to observe the migrating ability of cells under CoCl2 (200 μM) treatment for 8 days continuously. Hoechst 33258 stain was used to determine whether hypoxia induced by CoCl2 could cause apoptosis of normal human saphenous vein SMCs. We found that CoCl2 enhanced the proliferation and inhibited the migration of normal human saphenous vein SMCs. The apparent morphous of normal human saphenous vein SMCs under chronic CoCl2 treatment was significantly changed compared to no CoCl2 treated control, but this process did not relate to cell apoptosis. To conclude, our results support the concept that the phenotypes of normal human saphenous vein SMCs could be influenced by hypoxia stimulus. Cellular structural and functional changes under chronic hypoxia in normal human saphenous vein SMCs might play important roles in the development of varicose veins of lower extremity. PMID:25663990

  9. Enhanced capacitative calcium entry and TRPC channel gene expression in human LES smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Laurier, Lisanne G; Sims, Stephen M; Preiksaitis, Harold G

    2003-06-01

    Transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) genes encode Ca(2+)-permeable channels mediating capacitative Ca(2+) entry (CCE), which maintains intracellular Ca(2+) stores. We compared TRPC gene expression and CCE in human esophageal body (EB) and lower esophageal sphincter (LES), because these smooth muscles have distinct contractile functions that are likely associated with different Ca(2+) regulatory mechanisms. Circular layer smooth muscle cells were grown in primary culture. Transcriptional expression of TRPC genes was compared by semiquantitative RT-PCR. CCE was measured by fura 2 Ca(2+) fluorescence after blockade of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase with thapsigargin. mRNA for TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5, and TRPC6 was identified in EB and LES. TRPC3 and TRPC4 were more abundant in LES than EB. Basal concentration of free intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) was similar in cells from LES (138 +/- 8 nmol/l) and EB (110 +/- 6 nmol/l) and increased with ACh (10 micromol/l; 650 +/- 28 and 590 +/- 21 nmol/l, respectively). With zero Ca(2+) in bath, thapsigargin (2 micromol/l) increased [Ca(2+)](i) more in LES (550 +/- 22 nmol/l) than EB (250 +/- 15 nmol/l, P < 0.001). Subsequent external application of 1 mmol/l Ca(2+) increased [Ca(2+)](i) more in LES (585 +/- 35 nmol/l) than EB (295 +/- 21 nmol/l, P < 0.001), indicating enhanced CCE in LES. This demonstrates CCE and TRPC transcriptional expression in human esophageal smooth muscle. In LES cells, enhanced CCE and expression of TRPC3 and TRPC4 may contribute to the physiological characteristics that distinguish LES from EB. PMID:12736151

  10. Inhibition of smooth muscle force generation by focal adhesion kinase inhibitors in the hyperplastic human prostate.

    PubMed

    Kunit, Thomas; Gratzke, Christian; Schreiber, Andrea; Strittmatter, Frank; Waidelich, Raphaela; Rutz, Beata; Loidl, Wolfgang; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Stief, Christian G; Hennenberg, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Smooth muscle contraction may be critical for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in patients with benign prostate hyperplasia and requires stable anchorage of the cytoskeleton to the cell membrane. These connections are regulated by focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Here, we addressed the involvement of FAK in the regulation of smooth muscle contraction in hyperplastic human prostate tissues. Prostate tissues were obtained from radical prostatectomy. Expression of FAK and focal adhesion proteins was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical stainings. Effects of the FAK inhibitors PF-573228 and Y-11 on contraction of prostate strips were examined in the organ bath. Expression of FAK and focal adhesion proteins (integrin-5α, paxilin, and c-Src) was detected by Western blot analysis in prostate samples. By double immunofluorescence staining with calponin and pan-cytokeratin, expression of FAK was observed in stromal and epithelial cells. Immunoreactivity for FAK colocalized with integrin-5α, paxilin, talin, and c-Src. Stimulation of prostate tissues with the α1-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine increased the phosphorylation state of FAK at Tyr³⁹⁷ and Tyr⁹²⁵ with different kinetics, which was blocked by the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist tamsulosin. Norepinephrine and phenylephrine induced concentration-dependent contractions of prostate strips. Both FAK inhibitors PF-573228 and Y-11 significantly inhibited norepinephrine- and phenylephrine-induced contractions. Finally, PF-573228 and Y-11 inhibited contractions induced by electric field stimulation, which was significant at the highest frequency. In conclusion, α1-adrenergic smooth muscle contraction or its regulation involves FAK in the human prostate. Consequently, FAK may be involved in the pathophysiology of LUTS and in current or future LUTS therapies. PMID:25056351

  11. The role of K+ conductances in regulating membrane excitability in human gastric corpus smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Yeon; Ko, Eun-ju; Ahn, Ki Duck; Kim, Sung

    2015-01-01

    Changes in resting membrane potential (RMP) regulate membrane excitability. K+ conductance(s) are one of the main factors in regulating RMP. The functional role of K+ conductances has not been studied the in human gastric corpus smooth muscles (HGCS). To examine the role of K+ channels in regulation of RMP in HGCS we employed microelectrode recordings, patch-clamp, and molecular approaches. Tetraethylammonium and charybdotoxin did not affect the RMP, suggesting that BK channels are not involved in regulating RMP. Apamin, a selective small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel (SK) blocker, did not show a significant effect on the membrane excitability. 4-Aminopyridine, a Kv channel blocker, caused depolarization and increased the duration of slow wave potentials. 4-Aminopyridine also inhibited a delayed rectifying K+ current in isolated smooth muscle cells. End-product RT-PCR gel detected Kv1.2 and Kv1.5 in human gastric corpus muscles. Glibenclamide, an ATP-sensitive K+ channel (KATP) blocker, did not induce depolarization, but nicorandil, a KATP opener, hyperpolarized HGCS, suggesting that KATP are expressed but not basally activated. Kir6.2 transcript, a pore-forming subunit of KATP was expressed in HGCS. A low concentration of Ba2+, a Kir blocker, induced strong depolarization. Interestingly, Ba2+-sensitive currents were minimally expressed in isolated smooth muscle cells under whole-cell patch configuration. KCNJ2 (Kir2.1) transcript was expressed in HGCS. Unique K+ conductances regulate the RMP in HGCS. Delayed and inwardly rectifying K+ channels are the main candidates in regulating membrane excitability in HGCS. With the development of cell dispersion techniques of interstitial cells, the cell-specific functional significance will require further analysis. PMID:25591864

  12. Proteomic network analysis of human uterine smooth muscle in pregnancy, labor, and preterm labor

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Craig; Quilici, David R.; Schlauch, Karen A.; Buxton, Iain L. O.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in human uterine quiescence during gestation and the induction of labor at term or preterm are not completely known. Preterm delivery is associated with major morbidity and mortality and current efforts to prevent delivery until term are largely ineffective. Identification and semi-quantification of proteomic changes in uterine smooth muscle during pregnancy will allow for targeted research into how quiescence is maintained and what changes are associated with induction of labor. Examining preterm labor in this context will provide potential therapeutic targets for the management of preterm labor. We have recently performed two dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry on myometrial proteins isolated from pregnant patients in labor, pregnant patients not in labor, and pregnant patients in labor preterm. Using a conservative false discovery rate of 1% we have identified 2132 protein groups using this method and semi-quantitative spectral counting shows 201 proteins that have disparate levels of expression in preterm laboring samples. To our knowledge this is the first large scale proteomic study examining human uterine smooth muscle and this initial work has provided a target list for future experiments that can address how changing protein levels are involved in the induction of labor at term and preterm. PMID:26413312

  13. Evidence for 5-HT7 receptors mediating relaxation of human colonic circular smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Nicolaas H; Briejer, Michel R; Van Bergen, Patrick J E; Akkermans, Louis M A; Schuurkes, Jan A J

    1999-01-01

    5-HT4 receptors mediate relaxation of human colon circular muscle. However, after 5-HT4 receptor blockade (SB 204070 10 nM), 5-HT still induced a relaxation (pEC50 6.3). 5-HT4 receptors were sufficiently blocked, as the curves to 5-HT obtained in the presence of 10 and 100 nM SB 204070 were indistinguishable. This 5-HT-induced relaxation was tetrodotoxin-insensitive, indicative of a smooth muscle relaxant 5-HT receptor. This, and the rank order of potency (5-CT=5-MeOT=5-HT) suggested involvement of 5-HT1 or 5-HT7 receptors. Mesulergine, a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist at nanomolar concentrations, and a 5-HT1 receptor antagonist at micromolar concentrations, competitively antagonized the 5-HT-induced relaxation (pKB 8.3) and antagonized the relaxation to 5-CT. Methysergide antagonized the 5-HT-induced relaxation (pA2 7.6). It is concluded that the profile of the smooth muscle inhibitory 5-HT receptor resembles that of the 5-HT7 receptor. These data provide the first evidence for functional human 5-HT7 receptors. PMID:10556917

  14. Tissue-Engineered Vascular Rings from Human iPSC-Derived Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Dash, Biraja C; Levi, Karen; Schwan, Jonas; Luo, Jiesi; Bartulos, Oscar; Wu, Hongwei; Qiu, Caihong; Yi, Ting; Ren, Yongming; Campbell, Stuart; Rolle, Marsha W; Qyang, Yibing

    2016-07-12

    There is an urgent need for an efficient approach to obtain a large-scale and renewable source of functional human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to establish robust, patient-specific tissue model systems for studying the pathogenesis of vascular disease, and for developing novel therapeutic interventions. Here, we have derived a large quantity of highly enriched functional VSMCs from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC-VSMCs). Furthermore, we have engineered 3D tissue rings from hiPSC-VSMCs using a facile one-step cellular self-assembly approach. The tissue rings are mechanically robust and can be used for vascular tissue engineering and disease modeling of supravalvular aortic stenosis syndrome. Our method may serve as a model system, extendable to study other vascular proliferative diseases for drug screening. Thus, this report describes an exciting platform technology with broad utility for manufacturing cell-based tissues and materials for various biomedical applications. PMID:27411102

  15. IL-9-mediated induction of eotaxin1/CCL11 in human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gounni, Abdelilah Soussi; Hamid, Qutayba; Rahman, Sahidur M; Hoeck, Jutta; Yang, Jie; Shan, Lianyu

    2004-08-15

    Recent work has shown the potential importance of IL-9 in allergic diseases. The development of transgenic mice overexpressing IL-9 has suggested a key role for this cytokine in the development of the asthmatic phenotype including airway eosinophilia. In this study, we evaluated the expression of the IL-9R and the effects of IL-9 on human ASM cells by examining the release of Th2-associated chemokines (eotaxin1/CCL11 and thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC)/CCL17). IL-9R alpha-chain mRNA and surface expression were detected in cultured human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. In addition, primary cultured ASM cells, as well as bronchial smooth muscle cells within biopsies of asthmatics and not control subjects, revealed IL-9R protein expression. IL-9 stimulation of human ASM cells resulted in release of eotaxin1/CCL11, but had no effect on the release of TARC/CCL17, in time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, in vitro chemotaxis assay demonstrated that conditioned medium from IL-9-stimulated ASM cells attracted human eosinophils. Neutralizing Abs to IL-9, but not to IL-4 or IL-13, reduced significantly IL-9-induced production of eotaxin1/CCL11 from ASM cells. Interestingly, real-time RT-PCR showed that IL-9 up-regulated eotaxin1/CCL11 mRNA expression, but had no effect on TARC/CCL17. Treatment with Act D abrogates IL-9-induced eotaxin1/CCL11 mRNA and protein release by ASM cells. Finally, transfection study using eotaxin1/CCL11 promoter luciferase construct confirmed that IL-9 induced eotaxin1/CCL11 at the transcriptional level. Taken together, these data provide new evidence demonstrating that IL-9-dependent activation of ASM cells contributes to eosinophilic inflammation observed in asthma. PMID:15294996

  16. Regulatory mechanism of human vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic transformation induced by NELIN.

    PubMed

    Pei, Changan; Qin, Shiyong; Wang, Minghai; Zhang, Shuguang

    2015-11-01

    Vascular disorders, including hypertension, atherosclerosis and restenosis, arise from dysregulation of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) differentiation, which can be controlled by regulatory factors. The present study investigated the regulatory mechanism of the phenotypic transformation of human VSMCs by NELIN in order to evaluate its potential as a preventive and therapeutic of vascular disorders. An in vitro model of NELIN‑overexpressing VSMCs was prepared by transfection with a lentiviral (LV) vector (NELIN‑VSMCs) and NELIN was slienced using an a lentiviral vector with small interfering (si)RNA in another group (LV‑NELIN‑siRNA‑VSMCs). The effects of NELIN overexpression or knockdown on the phenotypic transformation of human VSMCs were observed, and its regulatory mechanism was studied. Compared with the control group, cells in the NELIN‑VSMCs group presented a contractile phenotype with a significant increase of NELIN mRNA, NELIN protein, smooth muscle (SM)α‑actin and total Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA) protein expression. The intra‑nuclear translocation of SMα‑actin‑serum response factor (SMα‑actin‑SRF) occurred in these cells simultaneously. Following exposure to Rho kinsase inhibitor Y‑27632, SRF and SMα‑actin expression decreased. However, cells in the LV‑NELIN‑siRNA‑VSMCs group presented a synthetic phenotype, and the expression of NELIN mRNA, NELIN protein, SMα‑actin protein and total RhoA protein was decreased. The occurrence of SRF extra‑nuclear translocation was observed. In conclusion, the present study suggested that NELIN was able to activate regulatory factors of SMα‑actin, RhoA and SRF successively in human VSMCs cultured in vitro. Furthermore, NELIN‑induced phenotypic transformation of human VSMCs was regulated via the RhoA/SRF signaling pathway. The results of the present study provide a foundation for the use of NELIN in preventive and therapeutic treatment of vascular remodeling

  17. Molecular constituents of maxi KCa channels in human coronary smooth muscle: predominant alpha + beta subunit complexes.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Meera, P; Song, M; Knaus, H G; Toro, L

    1997-08-01

    1. Human large-conductance voltage- and calcium-sensitive K+ (maxi KCa) channels are composed of at least two subunits: the pore-forming subunit, alpha, and a modulatory subunit, beta. Expression of the beta subunit induces dramatic changes in alpha subunit function. It increases the apparent Ca2+ sensitivity and it allows dehydrosoyasaponin I (DHS-I) to upregulate the channel. 2. The functional coupling of maxi KCa channel alpha and beta subunits in freshly dissociated human coronary smooth muscle cells was assessed. To distinguish maxi KCa currents modulated by the beta subunit, we examined (a) their apparent Ca2+ sensitivity, as judged from the voltage necessary to half-activate the channel (V1/2), and (b) their activation by DHS-I. 3. In patches with unitary currents, the majority of channels were half-activated near -85 mV at 18 microM Ca2+, a value similar to that obtained when the human KCa channel alpha (HSLO) and beta (HKV,Ca beta) subunits are co-expressed. A small number of channels half-activated around 0 mV, suggesting the activity of the alpha subunit alone. 4. The properties of macroscopic currents were consistent with the view that most pore-forming alpha subunits were coupled to beta subunits, since the majority of currents had values for V1/2 near to -90 mV, and currents were potentiated by DHS-I. 5. We conclude that in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells, most maxi KCa channels are composed of alpha and beta subunits. The higher Ca2+ sensitivity of maxi KCa channels, resulting from their coupling to beta subunits, suggests an important role of this channel in regulating coronary tone. Their massive activation by micromolar Ca2+ concentrations may lead to a large hyperpolarization causing profound changes in coronary blood flow and cardiac function. PMID:9279807

  18. Molecular constituents of maxi KCa channels in human coronary smooth muscle: predominant alpha + beta subunit complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Y; Meera, P; Song, M; Knaus, H G; Toro, L

    1997-01-01

    1. Human large-conductance voltage- and calcium-sensitive K+ (maxi KCa) channels are composed of at least two subunits: the pore-forming subunit, alpha, and a modulatory subunit, beta. Expression of the beta subunit induces dramatic changes in alpha subunit function. It increases the apparent Ca2+ sensitivity and it allows dehydrosoyasaponin I (DHS-I) to upregulate the channel. 2. The functional coupling of maxi KCa channel alpha and beta subunits in freshly dissociated human coronary smooth muscle cells was assessed. To distinguish maxi KCa currents modulated by the beta subunit, we examined (a) their apparent Ca2+ sensitivity, as judged from the voltage necessary to half-activate the channel (V1/2), and (b) their activation by DHS-I. 3. In patches with unitary currents, the majority of channels were half-activated near -85 mV at 18 microM Ca2+, a value similar to that obtained when the human KCa channel alpha (HSLO) and beta (HKV,Ca beta) subunits are co-expressed. A small number of channels half-activated around 0 mV, suggesting the activity of the alpha subunit alone. 4. The properties of macroscopic currents were consistent with the view that most pore-forming alpha subunits were coupled to beta subunits, since the majority of currents had values for V1/2 near to -90 mV, and currents were potentiated by DHS-I. 5. We conclude that in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells, most maxi KCa channels are composed of alpha and beta subunits. The higher Ca2+ sensitivity of maxi KCa channels, resulting from their coupling to beta subunits, suggests an important role of this channel in regulating coronary tone. Their massive activation by micromolar Ca2+ concentrations may lead to a large hyperpolarization causing profound changes in coronary blood flow and cardiac function. Images Figure 1 PMID:9279807

  19. [Metaplasia of aortic tissue into tracheal tissue. Surgical perspectives].

    PubMed

    Martinod, E; Zakine, G; Fornes, P; Zegdi, R; d'Audiffret, A; Aupecle, B; Goussef, N; Azorin, J; Chachques, J C; Fabiani, J N; Carpentier, A

    2000-05-01

    Tracheal reconstruction after extensive resection remains an unsolved surgical problem. Numerous attempts have been made using tracheal grafts or prosthetic conduits with disappointing results. In this study, we propose a new alternative using an aortic autograft as tracheal substitute. In a first series of experiments, a half circumference of two rings was replaced with an autologous carotid artery patch. In a second series, a complete segment of trachea was replaced with an autologous aortic graft supported by an endoluminal tracheal stent. No dehiscence or stenosis was observed. Microscopic examinations at 3 and 6 months showed the replacement of the aortic tissue by tracheal tissue comprising neoformation of cartilage and mucociliary or non-keratinizing metaplastic polystratified squamous epithelium. Although these results need to be confirmed by a larger series of experiments, they showed that a vascular tissue placed in a different environment with a different function can be submitted to a metaplastic transformation which tends to restore a normal structure adapted to its new function. These remarkable findings offer new perspectives in tracheal reconstruction in human. PMID:10879293

  20. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping Wang, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (K{sub ATP}) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that K{sub ATP} channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K{sup +} channels triggers K{sup +} efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca{sup 2+}entry through closing voltage-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels. Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K{sup +} efflux decreases Ca{sup 2+} influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a K{sub ATP} channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective K{sub ATP} channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt

  1. Bioengineering functional human sphincteric and non-sphincteric gastrointestinal smooth muscle constructs.

    PubMed

    Rego, Stephen L; Zakhem, Elie; Orlando, Giuseppe; Bitar, Khalil N

    2016-04-15

    Digestion and motility of luminal content through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are achieved by cooperation between distinct cell types. Much of the 3 dimensional (3D) in vitro modeling used to study the GI physiology and disease focus solely on epithelial cells and not smooth muscle cells (SMCs). SMCs of the gut function either to propel and mix luminal contents (phasic; non-sphincteric) or to act as barriers to prevent the movement of luminal materials (tonic; sphincteric). Motility disorders including pyloric stenosis and chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIPO) affect sphincteric and non-sphincteric SMCs, respectively. Bioengineering offers a useful tool to develop functional GI tissue mimics that possess similar characteristics to native tissue. The objective of this study was to bioengineer 3D human pyloric sphincter and small intestinal (SI) constructs in vitro that recapitulate the contractile phenotypes of sphincteric and non-sphincteric human GI SMCs. Bioengineered 3D human pylorus and circular SI SMC constructs were developed and displayed a contractile phenotype. Constructs composed of human pylorus SMCs displayed tonic SMC characteristics, including generation of basal tone, at higher levels than SI SMC constructs which is similar to what is seen in native tissue. Both constructs contracted in response to potassium chloride (KCl) and acetylcholine (ACh) and relaxed in response to vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). These studies provide the first bioengineered human pylorus constructs that maintain a sphincteric phenotype. These bioengineered constructs provide appropriate models to study motility disorders of the gut or replacement tissues for various GI organs. PMID:26314281

  2. Canine tracheal collapse.

    PubMed

    Tappin, S W

    2016-01-01

    Tracheal collapse occurs most commonly in middle-aged, small breed dogs. Clinical signs are usually proportional to the degree of collapse, ranging from mild airway irritation and paroxysmal coughing to respiratory distress and dyspnoea. Diagnosis is made by documenting dynamic airway collapse with radiographs, bronchoscopy or fluoroscopy. Most dogs respond well to medical management and treatment of any concurrent comorbidities. Surgical intervention may need to be considered in dogs that do not respond or have respiratory compromise. A variety of surgical techniques have been reported although extraluminal ring prostheses or intraluminal stenting are the most commonly used. Both techniques have numerous potential complications and require specialised training and experience but are associated with good short- and long-term outcomes. PMID:26780854

  3. Bioengineered Human Pyloric Sphincters Using Autologous Smooth Muscle and Neural Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Rego, Stephen Lee; Zakhem, Elie; Orlando, Giuseppe; Bitar, Khalil N

    2016-01-01

    Gastroparesis leads to inadequate emptying of the stomach resulting in severe negative health impacts. Appropriate long-term treatments for these diseases may require pyloric sphincter tissue replacements that possess functional smooth muscle cell (SMC) and neural components. This study aims to bioengineer, for the first time, innervated human pylorus constructs utilizing autologous human pyloric sphincter SMCs and human neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Autologous SMCs and NPCs were cocultured in dual-layered hydrogels and formed concentrically aligned pylorus constructs. Innervated autologous human pylorus constructs were characterized through biochemical and physiologic assays to assess the phenotype and functionality of SMCs and neurons. SMCs within bioengineered human pylorus constructs displayed a tonic contractile phenotype and maintained circumferential alignment. Neural differentiation within bioengineered constructs was verified by positive expression of βIII-tubulin, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Autologous bioengineered innervated human pylorus constructs generated a robust spontaneous basal tone and contracted in response to potassium chloride (KCl). Contraction in response to exogenous neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh), relaxation in response to vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and electrical field stimulation (EFS) were also observed. Neural network integrity was demonstrated by inhibition of EFS-induced relaxation in the presence of a neurotoxin or nNOS inhibitors. Partial inhibition of ACh-induced contraction and VIP-induced relaxation following neurotoxin treatment was observed. These studies provide a proof of concept for bioengineering functional innervated autologous human pyloric sphincter constructs that generate a robust basal tone and contain circumferentially aligned SMCs, which display a tonic contractile phenotype and functional differentiated neurons. These autologous constructs have

  4. Essential role for calcium waves in migration of human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Tanguma, Ricardo; O'Neil, Caroline; Chrones, Tom; Pickering, J Geoffrey; Sims, Stephen M

    2011-08-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) migration is characterized by extension of the lamellipodia at the leading edge, lamellipodial attachment to substrate, and release of the rear (uropod) of the cell, all of which enable forward movement. However, little is known regarding the role of intracellular cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in coordinating these distinct activities of migrating SMCs. The objective of our study was to determine whether regional changes of Ca(2+) orchestrate the migratory cycle in human vascular SMCs. We carried out Ca(2+) imaging using digital fluorescence microscopy of fura-2 loaded human smooth muscle cells. We found that motile SMCs exhibited Ca(2+) waves that characteristically swept from the rear of polarized cells toward the leading edge. Ca(2+) waves were less evident in nonpolarized, stationary cells, although acute stimulation of these SMCs with the agonists platelet-derived growth factor-BB or histamine could elicit transient rise of [Ca(2+)](i). To investigate a role for Ca(2+) waves in the migratory cycle, we loaded cells with the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA, which abolished Ca(2+) waves and significantly reduced retraction, supporting a causal role for Ca(2+) in initiation of retraction. However, lamellipod motility was still evident in BAPTA-loaded cells. The incidence of Ca(2+) oscillations was reduced when Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores was disrupted with the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin or by treatment with the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor blocker 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl borate or xestospongin C, implicating Ca(2+) stores in generation of waves. We conclude that Ca(2+) waves are essential for migration of human vascular SMCs and can encode cell polarity. PMID:21572011

  5. Prostanoid-induced contraction of human bronchial smooth muscle is mediated by TP-receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, R. A.; Sheldrick, R. L.

    1989-01-01

    1. A range of naturally-occurring prostaglandins sulprostone, 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2 (DME2) and the thromboxane A2 (TXA2)-mimetic, 11 alpha,9 alpha-epoxymethano prostaglandin H2 (U-46619) have been tested for contractile agonist activity on human isolated bronchial smooth muscle. 2. Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), PGF2 alpha, 9 alpha,11 beta-PGF2 (11 beta-PGF2) and U-46619 all caused concentration-related contractions. U46619 was at least 300 fold more potent than the other prostanoids with a mean EC50 of 12 nM. Sulprostone caused contraction only at the highest concentration tested (30 microM). PGE2 and PGI2 caused relaxations at low concentrations, and only caused contractile responses at high concentrations (greater than or equal to 10 microM). In contrast, DME2 caused small contractions at low concentrations but relaxation at the highest concentration tested (30 microM). 3. The rank order of contractile agonist potency was: U-46619 much greater than 11 beta-PGF2 congruent to PGF2 alpha greater than PGD2 greater than PGE2 greater than PGI2 congruent to sulprostone congruent to DME2. 4. The TP-receptor blocking drug, AH23848 (1 microM) antagonized the contractile effects of U-46619, PGD2, PGF2 alpha and 11 beta-PGF2, but had no effect against contractions to carbachol. In a single experiment, a pA2 of 8.3 (slope = 1.2) was obtained for AH23848 against U-46619. 5. In most preparations, administration of AH23848 (1 microM) to human bronchus resulted in small, transient contractile responses. 6. The results obtained with both the agonists and the antagonist, AH23848 are therefore consistent with prostanoid-induced contractions of human bronchial smooth muscle being mediated by TP-receptors. PMID:2720298

  6. Receptor-based differences in human aortic smooth muscle cell membrane stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, H.; Kamm, R. D.; So, P. T.; Lee, R. T.

    2001-01-01

    Cells respond to mechanical stimuli with diverse molecular responses. The nature of the sensory mechanism involved in mechanotransduction is not known, but integrins may play an important role. The integrins are linked to both the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix, suggesting that probing cells via integrins should yield different mechanical properties than probing cells via non-cytoskeleton-associated receptors. To test the hypothesis that the mechanical properties of a cell are dependent on the receptor on which the stress is applied, human aortic smooth muscle cells were plated, and magnetic beads, targeted either to the integrins via fibronectin or to the transferrin receptor by use of an IgG antibody, were attached to the cell surface. The resistance of the cell to deformation ("stiffness") was estimated by oscillating the magnetic beads at 1 Hz by use of single-pole magnetic tweezers at 2 different magnitudes. The ratio of bead displacements at different magnitudes was used to explore the mechanical properties of the cells. Cells stressed via the integrins required approximately 10-fold more force to obtain the same bead displacements as the cells stressed via the transferrin receptors. Cells stressed via integrins showed stiffening behavior as the force was increased, whereas this stiffening was significantly less for cells stressed via the transferrin receptor (P<0.001). Mechanical characteristics of vascular smooth muscle cells depend on the receptor by which the stress is applied, with integrin-based linkages demonstrating cell-stiffening behavior.

  7. Heparin induces the expression of specific matrix proteins by human intestinal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, D.L.; Perr, H.; Graham, M.F.; Diegelmann, R.F.

    1986-03-01

    Human intestinal smooth muscle (HISM) cells have recently been identified as the major cell type responsible for stricture formation in Crohn's disease. Heparin, a sulfated glycosaminoglycan, has been shown to be a key modulator of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) growth both in vivo and in vitro and to affect the phenotypic expression of proteins made by VSMC. Heparin has also been shown to effect the growth of HISM cells and in this report the authors demonstrate that heparin also has very specific effects on proteins released by HISM cells in vitro. Examination of the proteins in the culture medium of heparin-treated HISM cells observed at 3 time points following sparse plating and proliferation revealed an increase in /sup 35/S-methionine-labeled 200, 37, and 35 kd proteins. A transient effect on a 48 kd protein was observed in substrate-attached material left on the culture dish after the cells were removed with EGTA. No effects on intracellular labeled proteins could be demonstrated. The protein phenotype of HISM cells exposed to heparin appears very similar to that observed in VSMC. The release of specific proteins following exposure to heparin does not appear to be species specific. This response to heparin may reflect a significant influence of this glycosaminoglycan on the phenotypic expression of these cells.

  8. Differentiation of Human Induced-Pluripotent Stem Cells into Smooth-Muscle Cells: Two Novel Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Libang; Geng, Zhaohui; Nickel, Thomas; Johnson, Caitlin; Gao, Lin; Dutton, James; Hou, Cody; Zhang, Jianyi

    2016-01-01

    Conventional protocols for differentiating human induced-pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) into smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) can be inefficient and generally fail to yield cells with a specific SMC phenotype (i.e., contractile or synthetic SMCs). Here, we present two novel hiPSC-SMC differentiation protocols that yield SMCs with predominantly contractile or synthetic phenotypes. Flow cytometry analyses of smooth-muscle actin (SMA) expression indicated that ~45% of the cells obtained with each protocol assumed an SMC phenotype, and that the populations could be purified to ~95% via metabolic selection. Assessments of cellular mRNA and/or protein levels indicated that SMA, myosin heavy chain II, collagen 1, calponin, transgelin, connexin 43, and vimentin expression in the SMCs obtained via the Contractile SMC protocol and in SMCs differentiated via a traditional protocol were similar, while SMCs produced via the Sythetic SMC protocol expressed less calponin, more collagen 1, and more connexin 43. Differences were also observed in functional assessments of the two SMC populations: the two-dimensional surface area of Contractile SMCs declined more extensively (to 12% versus 44% of original size) in response to carbachol treatment, while quantification of cell migration and proliferation were greater in Synthetic SMCs. Collectively, these data demonstrate that our novel differentiation protocols can efficiently generate SMCs from hiPSCs. PMID:26771193

  9. Smooth enlargement of human standing sway by instability due to weak reaction floor and noise

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Tetsuro; Aoi, Shinya; Tomita, Nozomi; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Human quiet standing is accompanied by body sway. The amplitude of this body sway is known to be larger than would be predicted from simple noise effects, and sway characteristics are changed by neurological disorders. This large sway is thought to arise from nonlinear control with prolonged periods of no control (intermittent control), and a nonlinear control system of this kind has been predicted to exhibit bifurcation. The presence of stability-dependent transition enables dynamic reaction that depends on the stability of the environment, and can explain the change in sway characteristics that accompanies some neurological disorders. This research analyses the characteristics of a system model that induces transition, and discusses whether human standing reflects such a mechanism. In mathematical analysis of system models, (intermittent control-like) nonlinear control with integral control is shown to exhibit Hopf bifurcation. Moreover, from the analytical solution of the system model with noise, noise is shown to work to smooth the enlargement of sway around the bifurcation point. This solution is compared with measured human standing sway on floors with different stabilities. By quantitatively comparing the control parameters between human observation and model prediction, enlargement of sway is shown to appear as predicted by the model analysis. PMID:26909186

  10. The rhythmic expression of clock genes attenuated in human plaque-derived vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute myocardial infarction and stroke are more likely to occur in the early morning. Circadian pacemakers are considered to be involved in the process. Many peripheral tissues and cells also contain clock systems. In this study, we examined whether the primary cultured human plaque-derived vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) process circadian rhythmicity; furthermore, we investigated the expression difference of clock genes between normal human carotid VSMCs and human plaque-derived VSMCs. Methods Fifty-six human carotid plaques provided the atherosclerotic tissue, and 21 samples yielded viable cultured primary VSMCs. The normal carotid VSMCs were cultured from donors’ normal carotids. The mRNA levels of the target genes were measured by Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR). Results After serum shock, both types of cells showed clear circadian expressions of Bmal1, Cry1, Cry2, Per1, Per2, Per3 and Rev-erbα mRNA; meanwhile the Clock mRNA show a rhythmic expression in plaque-derived SMCs but not in normal carotid VSMCs. The expression levels of these main clock genes were significantly attenuated in human plaque-derived VSMCs compared with normal human carotid VSMCs. The rhythm of Bmal1 mRNA in plaque-derived VSMCs was changed. Conclusion The present results demonstrate that the human plaque-derived VSMCs possess different circadian rhythmicity from that of normal carotid VSMCs. The rhythm changes of clock genes in plaque-derived VSMCs may be involved in the process of atherosclerosis and finally promote the rupture of plaque. PMID:24418196

  11. Smooth Muscle-Like Cells Generated from Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Display Marker Gene Expression and Electrophysiological Competence Comparable to Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Juliane; Lutz, Katrin A.; Neumayer, Katharina M. H.; Klein, Gerd; Seeger, Tanja; Uynuk-Ool, Tatiana; Wörgötter, Katharina; Schmid, Sandra; Kraushaar, Udo; Guenther, Elke; Rolauffs, Bernd; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Hart, Melanie L.

    2015-01-01

    The use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) differentiated toward a smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype may provide an alternative for investigators interested in regenerating urinary tract organs such as the bladder where autologous smooth muscle cells cannot be used or are unavailable. In this study we measured the effects of good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant expansion followed by myogenic differentiation of human MSCs on the expression of a range of contractile (from early to late) myogenic markers in relation to the electrophysiological parameters to assess the functional role of the differentiated MSCs and found that differentiation of MSCs associated with electrophysiological competence comparable to bladder SMCs. Within 1–2 weeks of myogenic differentiation, differentiating MSCs significantly expressed alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA; ACTA2), transgelin (TAGLN), calponin (CNN1), and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC; MYH11) according to qRT-PCR and/or immunofluorescence and Western blot. Voltage-gated Na+ current levels also increased within the same time period following myogenic differentiation. In contrast to undifferentiated MSCs, differentiated MSCs and bladder SMCs exhibited elevated cytosolic Ca2+ transients in response to K+-induced depolarization and contracted in response to K+ indicating functional maturation of differentiated MSCs. Depolarization was suppressed by Cd2+, an inhibitor of voltage-gated Ca2+-channels. The expression of Na+-channels was pharmacologically identified as the Nav1.4 subtype, while the K+ and Ca2+ ion channels were identified by gene expression of KCNMA1, CACNA1C and CACNA1H which encode for the large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel BKCa channels, Cav1.2 L-type Ca2+ channels and Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels, respectively. This protocol may be used to differentiate adult MSCs into smooth muscle-like cells with an intermediate-to-late SMC contractile phenotype exhibiting voltage-gated ion channel

  12. Smooth Muscle-Like Cells Generated from Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Display Marker Gene Expression and Electrophysiological Competence Comparable to Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Brun, Juliane; Lutz, Katrin A; Neumayer, Katharina M H; Klein, Gerd; Seeger, Tanja; Uynuk-Ool, Tatiana; Wörgötter, Katharina; Schmid, Sandra; Kraushaar, Udo; Guenther, Elke; Rolauffs, Bernd; Aicher, Wilhelm K; Hart, Melanie L

    2015-01-01

    The use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) differentiated toward a smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype may provide an alternative for investigators interested in regenerating urinary tract organs such as the bladder where autologous smooth muscle cells cannot be used or are unavailable. In this study we measured the effects of good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant expansion followed by myogenic differentiation of human MSCs on the expression of a range of contractile (from early to late) myogenic markers in relation to the electrophysiological parameters to assess the functional role of the differentiated MSCs and found that differentiation of MSCs associated with electrophysiological competence comparable to bladder SMCs. Within 1-2 weeks of myogenic differentiation, differentiating MSCs significantly expressed alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA; ACTA2), transgelin (TAGLN), calponin (CNN1), and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC; MYH11) according to qRT-PCR and/or immunofluorescence and Western blot. Voltage-gated Na+ current levels also increased within the same time period following myogenic differentiation. In contrast to undifferentiated MSCs, differentiated MSCs and bladder SMCs exhibited elevated cytosolic Ca2+ transients in response to K+-induced depolarization and contracted in response to K+ indicating functional maturation of differentiated MSCs. Depolarization was suppressed by Cd2+, an inhibitor of voltage-gated Ca2+-channels. The expression of Na+-channels was pharmacologically identified as the Nav1.4 subtype, while the K+ and Ca2+ ion channels were identified by gene expression of KCNMA1, CACNA1C and CACNA1H which encode for the large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel BKCa channels, Cav1.2 L-type Ca2+ channels and Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels, respectively. This protocol may be used to differentiate adult MSCs into smooth muscle-like cells with an intermediate-to-late SMC contractile phenotype exhibiting voltage-gated ion channel

  13. Biomechanical effects of environmental and engineered particles on human airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Berntsen, P.; Park, C. Y.; Rothen-Rutishauser, B.; Tsuda, A.; Sager, T. M.; Molina, R. M.; Donaghey, T. C.; Alencar, A. M.; Kasahara, D. I.; Ericsson, T.; Millet, E. J.; Swenson, J.; Tschumperlin, D. J.; Butler, J. P.; Brain, J. D.; Fredberg, J. J.; Gehr, P.; Zhou, E. H.

    2010-01-01

    The past decade has seen significant increases in combustion-generated ambient particles, which contain a nanosized fraction (less than 100 nm), and even greater increases have occurred in engineered nanoparticles (NPs) propelled by the booming nanotechnology industry. Although inhalation of these particulates has become a public health concern, human health effects and mechanisms of action for NPs are not well understood. Focusing on the human airway smooth muscle cell, here we show that the cellular mechanical function is altered by particulate exposure in a manner that is dependent upon particle material, size and dose. We used Alamar Blue assay to measure cell viability and optical magnetic twisting cytometry to measure cell stiffness and agonist-induced contractility. The eight particle species fell into four categories, based on their respective effect on cell viability and on mechanical function. Cell viability was impaired and cell contractility was decreased by (i) zinc oxide (40–100 nm and less than 44 μm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 50 nm); cell contractility was decreased by (ii) fluorescent polystyrene spheres (40 nm), increased by (iii) welding fumes and unchanged by (iv) diesel exhaust particles, titanium dioxide (25 nm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 5 μm), although in none of these cases was cell viability impaired. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide up to 500 μM did not alter viability or cell mechanics, suggesting that the particle effects are unlikely to be mediated by particle-generated reactive oxygen species. Our results highlight the susceptibility of cellular mechanical function to particulate exposures and suggest that direct exposure of the airway smooth muscle cells to particulates may initiate or aggravate respiratory diseases. PMID:20356875

  14. Cigarette smoke enhances proliferation and extracellular matrix deposition by human fetal airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Elizabeth R.; VanOosten, Sarah K.; Holman, Michelle A.; Hohbein, Danielle D.; Thompson, Michael A.; Vassallo, Robert; Pandya, Hitesh C.; Prakash, Y. S.

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoke is a common environmental insult associated with increased risk of developing airway diseases such as wheezing and asthma in neonates and children. In adults, asthma involves airway remodeling characterized by increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell proliferation and increased extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, as well as airway hyperreactivity. The effects of cigarette smoke on remodeling and contractility in the developing airway are not well-elucidated. In this study, we used canalicular-stage (18–20 wk gestational age) human fetal airway smooth muscle (fASM) cells as an in vitro model of the immature airway. fASM cells were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE; 0.5–1.5% for 24–72 h), and cell proliferation, ECM deposition, and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) responses to agonist (histamine 10 μM) were used to evaluate effects on remodeling and hyperreactivity. CSE significantly increased cell proliferation and deposition of ECM molecules collagen I, collagen III, and fibronectin. In contrast, [Ca2+]i responses were not significantly affected by CSE. Analysis of key signaling pathways demonstrated significant increase in extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) and p38 activation with CSE. Inhibition of ERK or p38 signaling prevented CSE-mediated changes in proliferation, whereas only ERK inhibition attenuated the CSE-mediated increase in ECM deposition. Overall, these results demonstrate that cigarette smoke may enhance remodeling in developing human ASM through hyperplasia and ECM production, thus contributing to development of neonatal and pediatric airway disease. PMID:25344066

  15. Biomechanical effects of environmental and engineered particles on human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Berntsen, P; Park, C Y; Rothen-Rutishauser, B; Tsuda, A; Sager, T M; Molina, R M; Donaghey, T C; Alencar, A M; Kasahara, D I; Ericsson, T; Millet, E J; Swenson, J; Tschumperlin, D J; Butler, J P; Brain, J D; Fredberg, J J; Gehr, P; Zhou, E H

    2010-06-01

    The past decade has seen significant increases in combustion-generated ambient particles, which contain a nanosized fraction (less than 100 nm), and even greater increases have occurred in engineered nanoparticles (NPs) propelled by the booming nanotechnology industry. Although inhalation of these particulates has become a public health concern, human health effects and mechanisms of action for NPs are not well understood. Focusing on the human airway smooth muscle cell, here we show that the cellular mechanical function is altered by particulate exposure in a manner that is dependent upon particle material, size and dose. We used Alamar Blue assay to measure cell viability and optical magnetic twisting cytometry to measure cell stiffness and agonist-induced contractility. The eight particle species fell into four categories, based on their respective effect on cell viability and on mechanical function. Cell viability was impaired and cell contractility was decreased by (i) zinc oxide (40-100 nm and less than 44 microm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 50 nm); cell contractility was decreased by (ii) fluorescent polystyrene spheres (40 nm), increased by (iii) welding fumes and unchanged by (iv) diesel exhaust particles, titanium dioxide (25 nm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 5 microm), although in none of these cases was cell viability impaired. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide up to 500 microM did not alter viability or cell mechanics, suggesting that the particle effects are unlikely to be mediated by particle-generated reactive oxygen species. Our results highlight the susceptibility of cellular mechanical function to particulate exposures and suggest that direct exposure of the airway smooth muscle cells to particulates may initiate or aggravate respiratory diseases. PMID:20356875

  16. Cryopreservation of the tracheal grafts

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Transplantation of the trachea may become the preferred method for the reconstruction of extensive tracheal defects, however, several unresolved problems must be addressed, such as immunosuppression, preservation and donor shortage. In this manuscript, the cryopreservation of tracheal grafts is reviewed, which potentially is associated with a lessened immunological response. Cryopreservation may be used clinically for long-term preservation and may solve the donor shortage. It is very important to confirm the immunomodulatory effect of cryopreservation on tracheal allografts in order to expand the potential clinical application of tracheal transplantation in the future. The cartilage as well as the epithelium and lamina propria serve as targets for rejection. However, the effect of cryopreservation on chondrocytes could be associated with reduced allogenicity of the trachea. The long-term cryopreservation of cartilage must be investigated in basic research models of chondrocyte viability. Growth of cryopreserved tracheal allografts is less well understood. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism of synergistic effects of both cryopreservation and adequate immunosuppression for tracheal xenografts. PMID:20046673

  17. Correlation of Organic Cation/Carnitine Transporter 1 and Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 1 Transport Activities With Protein Expression Levels in Primary Cultured Human Tracheal, Bronchial, and Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Atsushi; Suzuki, Shinobu; Matsumaru, Takehisa; Yamamura, Norio; Uchida, Yasuo; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2016-02-01

    Understanding how transporters contribute to the distribution of inhaled drugs in the lung is important for the discovery and development of such drugs. Protein expression levels may be useful to predict and understand drug distribution. As previously reported, organic cation/carnitine transporter 1 (OCTN1) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) have higher levels of protein expression among transporters in primary cultured human lung cells. Nevertheless, it is unclear to what extent transport activity correlates with transporter protein expression. The purpose is to evaluate whether differences in OCTN1 and MRP1 protein expression govern the respective transport activity in primary cultured human lung cells. The model substrates of 4-[4-(dimethylamino) styryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP(+)) and carboxy-dichlorofluorescein (CDF) for OCTN1 and MRP1, respectively, were used in the lung cells from five donors. Significant correlation was found between the kinetic parameter Vmax for ASP(+) and OCTN1 protein expression in plasma membrane of tracheal, bronchial, and alveolar cells (r(2) = 0.965, 0.834, and 0.877, respectively), and between the efflux of CDF and MRP1 protein expression in plasma membrane of tracheal, bronchial, and alveolar cells (r(2) = 0.800, 0.904, and 0.790, respectively). These findings suggest that OCTN1 and MRP1 protein concentrations are determinants for drug distribution in the lung. PMID:26429295

  18. Derivation of Functional Smooth Muscle Cells from Multipotent Human Hair Follicle Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin Yu; Peng, Hao Fan; Gopinath, Siddhita; Tian, Jun

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the potential of human hair follicle cells for multilineage differentiation and as a source of functional smooth muscle cells (SMCs). We report that human hair follicle stem cells (HFCs) isolated from individual follicles expressed surface markers that are characteristic of mesenchymal stem cells such as CD44, CD49b, CD73, CD90, and CD105 but lacked hematopoietic markers CD45 and CD34. In addition, HFCs differentiated toward adipocytes, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, or SMCs in the appropriate induction medium. Treatment with basic fibroblast growth factor increased proliferation and prevented myogenic differentiation, suggesting that basic fibroblast growth factor can be used to expand the population of undifferentiated HFCs to the large numbers needed for therapeutic applications. SMCs were isolated from HFCs using tissue-specific promoters and flow cytometry sorting. Cylindrical vascular constructs engineered with HF-SMCs showed remarkable contractility in response to receptor and nonreceptor agonists such KCl, endothelin-1, and the thromboxane mimetic, U46619, as well as superior mechanical properties compared to their counterparts with human vascular SMCs. Our results suggest that HF is a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells with great potential for myogenic differentiation providing functional SMCs for tissue regeneration and cell therapies. PMID:20236033

  19. Identification of Functional Voltage-gated Na+ Channels in Cultured Human Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sison, Tiffany; Yuan, Jason X.-J.

    2005-01-01

    Electrical excitability, which plays an important role in excitation-contraction coupling in the pulmonary vasculature, is regulated by transmembrane ion flux in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC). This study aimed to characterize the electrophysiological properties and molecular identities of voltage-gated Na+ channels in cultured human PASMC. We recorded tetrodotoxin-sensitive and rapidly inactivating Na+ currents with properties similar to those described in cardiac myocytes. Using RT-PCR, we detected transcripts of seven Na+ channel α genes (SCN2A, 3A, 4A, 7A, 8A, 9A, and 11A), and two β subunit genes (SCN1B and 2B). Our results demonstrate that human PASMC express TTX-sensitive voltage-gated Na+ channels. Their physiological functions remain unresolved, although our data suggest that Na+ channel activity does not directly influence membrane potential, intracellular Ca2+ release, or proliferation in normal human PASMC. Whether their expression and/or activity are heightened in the pathological state is discussed. PMID:16052353

  20. Expression and function of KV2-containing channels in human urinary bladder smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hristov, Kiril L.; Chen, Muyan; Afeli, Serge A. Y.; Cheng, Qiuping; Rovner, Eric S.

    2012-01-01

    The functional role of the voltage-gated K+ (KV) channels in human detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) is largely unexplored. Here, we provide molecular, electrophysiological, and functional evidence for the expression of KV2.1, KV2.2, and the electrically silent KV9.3 subunits in human DSM. Stromatoxin-1 (ScTx1), a selective inhibitor of KV2.1, KV2.2, and KV4.2 homotetrameric channels and of KV2.1/9.3 heterotetrameric channels, was used to examine the role of these channels in human DSM function. Human DSM tissues were obtained during open bladder surgeries from patients without a history of overactive bladder. Freshly isolated human DSM cells were studied using RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, live-cell Ca2+ imaging, and the perforated whole cell patch-clamp technique. Isometric DSM tension recordings of human DSM isolated strips were conducted using tissue baths. RT-PCR experiments showed mRNA expression of KV2.1, KV2.2, and KV9.3 (but not KV4.2) channel subunits in human isolated DSM cells. KV2.1 and KV2.2 protein expression was confirmed by Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Perforated whole cell patch-clamp experiments revealed that ScTx1 (100 nM) inhibited the amplitude of the voltage step-induced KV current in freshly isolated human DSM cells. ScTx1 (100 nM) significantly increased the intracellular Ca2+ level in DSM cells. In human DSM isolated strips, ScTx1 (100 nM) increased the spontaneous phasic contraction amplitude and muscle force, and enhanced the amplitude of the electrical field stimulation-induced contractions within the range of 3.5–30 Hz stimulation frequencies. These findings reveal that ScTx1-sensitive KV2-containing channels are key regulators of human DSM excitability and contractility and may represent new targets for pharmacological or genetic intervention for bladder dysfunction. PMID:22422395

  1. Myocardial ischaemia during tracheal intubation and extubation.

    PubMed

    Edwards, N D; Alford, A M; Dobson, P M; Peacock, J E; Reilly, C S

    1994-10-01

    The incidence of myocardial ischaemia during tracheal intubation and extubation was compared using ambulatory ECG monitoring in 60 patients undergoing a variety of different surgical operations. Seven patients had myocardial ischaemia after tracheal intubation and seven patients during tracheal extubation. The patients who developed myocardial ischaemia during tracheal extubation had significantly greater rate-pressure products immediately before tracheal extubation (P < 0.05) and 1 min after tracheal extubation (P < 0.01) compared with those patients who did not develop myocardial ischaemia during extubation. PMID:7999498

  2. Smoking and Female Sex: Independent Predictors of Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Stiffening

    PubMed Central

    Dinardo, Carla Luana; Santos, Hadassa Campos; Vaquero, André Ramos; Martelini, André Ricardo; Dallan, Luis Alberto Oliveira; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Krieger, José Eduardo; Pereira, Alexandre Costa

    2015-01-01

    Aims Recent evidence shows the rigidity of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) contributes to vascular mechanics. Arterial rigidity is an independent cardiovascular risk factor whose associated modifications in VSMC viscoelasticity have never been investigated. This study’s objective was to evaluate if the arterial rigidity risk factors aging, African ancestry, female sex, smoking and diabetes mellitus are associated with VMSC stiffening in an experimental model using a human derived vascular smooth muscle primary cell line repository. Methods Eighty patients subjected to coronary artery bypass surgery were enrolled. VSMCs were extracted from internal thoracic artery fragments and mechanically evaluated using Optical Magnetic Twisting Cytometry assay. The obtained mechanical variables were correlated with the clinical variables: age, gender, African ancestry, smoking and diabetes mellitus. Results The mechanical variables Gr, G’r and G”r had a normal distribution, demonstrating an inter-individual variability of VSMC viscoelasticity, which has never been reported before. Female sex and smoking were independently associated with VSMC stiffening: Gr (apparent cell stiffness) p = 0.022 and p = 0.018, R2 0.164; G’r (elastic modulus) p = 0.019 and p = 0.009, R2 0.184 and G”r (dissipative modulus) p = 0.011 and p = 0.66, R2 0.141. Conclusion Female sex and smoking are independent predictors of VSMC stiffening. This pro-rigidity effect represents an important element for understanding the vascular rigidity observed in post-menopausal females and smokers, as well as a potential therapeutic target to be explored in the future. There is a significant inter-individual variation of VSMC viscoelasticity, which is slightly modulated by clinical variables and probably relies on molecular factors. PMID:26661469

  3. Chemokine production by human vascular smooth muscle cells: modulation by IL-13

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Nicola J; Watson, Malcolm L; Williams, Robert J; Roach, Alan G; Yoshimura, Teizo; Westwick, John

    1997-01-01

    The production of chemokines by vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) is implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, although the factors regulating chemokine production by these cells are incompletely characterized. We describe the differential stimulation of interleukin-(IL)-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) synthesis following treatment of human vascular SMC with IL-1α or tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα). Under basal conditions, cultured SMC release very low amounts of IL-8, MCP-1 and RANTES as assessed by specific ELISA. Concentration-response studies with IL-1α or TNFα revealed that each stimulus induced a similar amount of MCP-1. In contrast approximately three fold more IL-8 was induced by IL-1α than by TNFα whereas significant RANTES production was induced only by TNFα. These findings point to a divergence in the regulation of synthesis of the different chemokines in response to IL-1α or TNFα stimulation. The T-cell derived cytokines IL-10 and IL-13 were also found to have differential effects on chemokine production by SMC. IL-13, but not IL-10, significantly enhanced IL-8 and MCP-1 release in response to IL-1α or TNFα. This increase in chemokine release appeared to be accounted for by increased mRNA expression. These findings provide support for the concept that smooth muscle cells can have an active role in a local immune response via the production of chemokines which can be selectively modulated by T-cell derived cytokines. PMID:9375973

  4. Fetal human airway smooth muscle cell production of leukocyte chemoattractants is differentially regulated by fluticasone

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Helen; Britt, Rodney D.; Pabelick, Christine M.; Prakash, Y.S.; Amrani, Yassine; Pandya, Hitesh C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adult human airway smooth muscle (ASM) produce cytokines involved in recruitment and survival of leukocytes within airway walls. Cytokine generation by adult ASM is glucocorticoid-sensitive. Whether developing lung ASM produces cytokines in a glucocorticoid-sensitive fashion is unknown. Methods Cultured fetal human ASM cells stimulated with TNF-α (0–20 ng/ml) were incubated with TNF-α receptor-blocking antibodies, fluticasone (1 and 100 nm), or vehicle. Supernatants and cells were assayed for the production of CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 mRNA and protein and glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation. Results CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 mRNA and protein production by fetal ASM cell was significantly and dose-dependently following TNF-α treatment. Cytokine mRNA and protein production were effectively blocked by TNF-α R1 and R2 receptor neutralizing antibodies but variably inhibited by fluticasone. TNF-α-induced TNF-R1 and R2 receptor mRNA expression was only partially attenuated by fluticasone. Glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation at serine (Ser) 211 but not at Ser 226 was enhanced by fluticasone. Conclusion Production of CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 by fetal ASM appears to involve pathways that are both qualitatively and mechanistically distinct to those described for adult ASM. The findings imply developing ASM has potential to recruit leukocyte into airways and, therefore, of relevance to childhood airway diseases. PMID:26331770

  5. Nitric oxide production by cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells: stimulation by fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Tilton, R. G.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    1998-01-01

    This study demonstrated that exposure of cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) to fluid flow resulted in nitric oxide (NO) production, monitored by nitrite and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production. A rapid burst in nitrite production rate was followed by a more gradual increase throughout the period of flow exposure. Neither the initial burst nor the prolonged nitrite production was dependent on the level of shear stress in the range of 1.1-25 dyn/cm2. Repeated exposure to shear stress after a 30-min static period restimulated nitrite production similar to the initial burst. Ca(2+)-calmodulin antagonists blocked the initial burst in nitrite release. An inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) blocked nitrite production, indicating that changes in nitrite reflect NO production. Treatment with dexamethasone or cycloheximide had no effect on nitrite production. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the inducible and endothelial NOS isoforms showed no immunoreactivity on Western blots, whereas monoclonal antibodies directed against the neuronal NOS gave specific products. These findings suggest that human aortic SMC express a constitutive neuronal NOS isoform, the enzymatic activity of which is modulated by flow.

  6. CD38 and Airway hyperresponsiveness: Studies on human airway smooth muscle cells and mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Alonso GP; Deshpande, Deepak A; Dileepan, Mythili; Walseth, Timothy F; Panettieri, Reynold A; Subramanian, Subbaya; Kannan, Mathur S

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disease in which altered calcium regulation, contractility and airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness and airway wall remodeling. The enzymatic activity of CD38, a cell-surface protein expressed in human ASM cells, generates calcium mobilizing second messenger molecules such as cyclic ADP-ribose. CD38 expression in human ASM cells is augmented by cytokines (e.g. TNF-α) that requires activation of MAP kinases and the transcription factors, NF-ƙB and AP-1 and post-transcriptionally regulated by miR-140-3p and miR-708 by binding to 3’ Untranslated Region of CD38 as well as by modulating the activation of signaling mechanisms involved in its regulation. Mice deficient in CD38 exhibit reduced airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine relative to response in wild-type mice. Intranasal challenge of CD38 deficient mice with TNF-α or IL-13, or the environmental fungus Alternaria alternata, causes significantly attenuated methacholine responsiveness compared to wild-type mice, with comparable airway inflammation. Reciprocal bone marrow transfer studies revealed partial restoration of airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled methacholine in the Cd38 deficient mice. These studies provide evidence for CD38 involvement in the development of airway hyperresponsiveness, a hallmark feature of asthma. Future studies aimed at drug discovery and delivery targeting CD38 expression and/or activity are warranted. PMID:25594684

  7. Olfactory Receptors Modulate Physiological Processes in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Kalbe, Benjamin; Knobloch, Jürgen; Schulz, Viola M; Wecker, Christine; Schlimm, Marian; Scholz, Paul; Jansen, Fabian; Stoelben, Erich; Philippou, Stathis; Hecker, Erich; Lübbert, Hermann; Koch, Andrea; Hatt, Hanns; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) significantly contribute to the progression of chronic inflammatory airway diseases with limited therapeutic options, such as severe asthma and COPD. These abnormalities include the contractility and hyperproduction of inflammatory proteins. To develop therapeutic strategies, key pathological mechanisms, and putative clinical targets need to be identified. In the present study, we demonstrated that the human olfactory receptors (ORs) OR1D2 and OR2AG1 are expressed at the RNA and protein levels in HASMCs. Using fluorometric calcium imaging, specific agonists for OR2AG1 and OR1D2 were identified to trigger transient Ca(2+) increases in HASMCs via a cAMP-dependent signal transduction cascade. Furthermore, the activation of OR2AG1 via amyl butyrate inhibited the histamine-induced contraction of HASMCs, whereas the stimulation of OR1D2 with bourgeonal led to an increase in cell contractility. In addition, OR1D2 activation induced the secretion of IL-8 and GM-CSF. Both effects were inhibited by the specific OR1D2 antagonist undecanal. We herein provide the first evidence to show that ORs are functionally expressed in HASMCs and regulate pathophysiological processes. Therefore, ORs might be new therapeutic targets for these diseases, and blocking ORs could be an auspicious strategy for the treatment of early-stage chronic inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:27540365

  8. Olfactory Receptors Modulate Physiological Processes in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalbe, Benjamin; Knobloch, Jürgen; Schulz, Viola M.; Wecker, Christine; Schlimm, Marian; Scholz, Paul; Jansen, Fabian; Stoelben, Erich; Philippou, Stathis; Hecker, Erich; Lübbert, Hermann; Koch, Andrea; Hatt, Hanns; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) significantly contribute to the progression of chronic inflammatory airway diseases with limited therapeutic options, such as severe asthma and COPD. These abnormalities include the contractility and hyperproduction of inflammatory proteins. To develop therapeutic strategies, key pathological mechanisms, and putative clinical targets need to be identified. In the present study, we demonstrated that the human olfactory receptors (ORs) OR1D2 and OR2AG1 are expressed at the RNA and protein levels in HASMCs. Using fluorometric calcium imaging, specific agonists for OR2AG1 and OR1D2 were identified to trigger transient Ca2+ increases in HASMCs via a cAMP-dependent signal transduction cascade. Furthermore, the activation of OR2AG1 via amyl butyrate inhibited the histamine-induced contraction of HASMCs, whereas the stimulation of OR1D2 with bourgeonal led to an increase in cell contractility. In addition, OR1D2 activation induced the secretion of IL-8 and GM-CSF. Both effects were inhibited by the specific OR1D2 antagonist undecanal. We herein provide the first evidence to show that ORs are functionally expressed in HASMCs and regulate pathophysiological processes. Therefore, ORs might be new therapeutic targets for these diseases, and blocking ORs could be an auspicious strategy for the treatment of early-stage chronic inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:27540365

  9. Assays for in vitro monitoring of proliferation of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) and human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells.

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Elena A; Lim, Poay; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Eszterhas, Andrew; Panettieri, Reynold A; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2006-01-01

    Vascular and airway remodeling, which are characterized by airway smooth muscle (ASM) and pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) proliferation, contribute to the pathology of asthma, pulmonary hypertension, restenosis and atherosclerosis. To evaluate the proliferation of VSM and ASM cells in response to mitogens, we perform a [3H]thymidine incorporation assay. The proliferation protocol takes approximately 48 h and includes stimulating cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle with agonists, labeling cells with [3H]thymidine and examining levels of [3H]thymidine incorporation by scintillation counting. Although using radiolabeled [3H]thymidine incorporation is a limitation, the greatest benefit of the assay is providing reliable and statistically significant data. PMID:17406550

  10. Mechanisms of tracheal filling in insects.

    PubMed

    Förster, Thomas D; Woods, H Arthur

    2013-02-01

    Insects exchange respiratory gases primarily using tracheal systems that are filled with gas. However, in different developmental and environmental circumstances, liquid can occupy the tracheal system, which can significantly impair its respiratory function. Insects therefore use a suite of mechanisms for tracheal filling, which is the process of replacing tracheal liquids with gas. We review these mechanisms for liquid removal and gas filling. By integrating recent molecular work with older physiological literature, we show that liquid removal likely involves active ion transport in the whole tracheal system. Gas filling reveals fascinating interactions between geometry, surface chemistry of the tracheal walls, the tracheal liquid, and dissolved gases. The temporal proximity to moulting allows for potentially complex interdependencies between gas filling, moult-associated hormone signaling, and cuticle sclerotization. We propose a mechanistic model for tracheal filling. However, because the composition of the liquid is unknown, it remains hypothetical. PMID:22616845

  11. Silodosin Inhibits Noradrenaline-Activated Transcription Factors Elk1 and SRF in Human Prostate Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hennenberg, Martin; Strittmatter, Frank; Beckmann, Christer; Rutz, Beata; Füllhase, Claudius; Waidelich, Raphaela; Montorsi, Francesco; Hedlund, Petter; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Stief, Christian G.; Gratzke, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Background The transcription factors Elk1 and serum response factor (SRF) are central regulators of cell cycle and phenotype in various cell types. Elk1 is activated by phosphorylation (serine-383), while activation of SRF requires its co-factor, myocardin. Activation of Elk1 and SRF results in binding to specific DNA sequences in promoter regions, and may be induced by adrenergic receptor activation in different organs. Objective To examine the effects of adrenergic stimulation on Elk1 and SRF in the human prostate and the ability of the highly selective α1A-adrenoceptor antagonist, silodosin, on transcription factor activation. Methods Prostate tissue was obtained from patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. Expression of Elk1, SRF, and myocardin was estimated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Colocalizations were studied by double immunofluorescence staining. Noradrenaline- (NA-) and phenylephrine- (PE-) induced phosphorylation of Elk1 was assessed by Western blot analysis using a phospho-specific antibody. NA-induced activation of Elk1 and SRF was investigated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Results Immunoreactivity for Elk1, SRF, and myocardin was observed in stromal cells of tissues from each patient. In fluorescence stainings, SRF colocalized with myocardin and α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA). Stimulation of prostate tissues with PE (10 µM) or NA (30 µM) increased the phosphorylation of Elk1 at serine-383. NA-induced Elk1 activation was confirmed by EMSA, where a NA-induced binding of Elk1 to the DNA sequence TTTGCAAAATGCAGGAATTGTTTTCACAGT was observed. Similarly, NA caused SRF binding to the SRF-specific DNA sequence CCATATTAGGCCATATTAGG. Application of silodosin (3 µM) to prostate tissues reduced the activity of Elk1 and SRF in NA-stimulated tissues. Conclusions Silodosin blocks the activation of the two transcription factors, Elk1 and SRF, which is induced by noradrenaline in the human prostate. A role of α1-adrenoceptors

  12. Genetic control of epithelial tube fusion during Drosophila tracheal development.

    PubMed

    Samakovlis, C; Manning, G; Steneberg, P; Hacohen, N; Cantera, R; Krasnow, M A

    1996-11-01

    During development of tubular networks such as the mammalian vascular system, the kidney and the Drosophila tracheal system, epithelial tubes must fuse to each other to form a continuous network. Little is known of the cellular mechanisms or molecular control of epithelial tube fusion. We describe the cellular dynamics of a tracheal fusion event in Drosophila and identify a gene regulatory hierarchy that controls this extraordinary process. A tracheal cell located at the developing fusion point expresses a sequence of specific markers as it grows out and contacts a similar cell from another tube; the two cells adhere and form an intercellular junction, and they become doughnut-shaped cells with the lumen passing through them. The early fusion marker Fusion-1 is identified as the escargot gene. It lies near the top of the regulatory hierarchy, activating the expression of later fusion markers and repressing genes that promote branching. Ectopic expression of escargot activates the fusion process and suppresses branching throughout the tracheal system, leading to ectopic tracheal connections that resemble certain arteriovenous malformations in humans. This establishes a simple genetic system to study fusion of epithelial tubes. PMID:8951068

  13. BMP-2 promotes phosphate uptake, phenotypic modulation, and calcification of human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianwu; Yang, Hsueh-Ying; Giachelli, Cecilia M

    2008-08-01

    Vascular calcification is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events that are the most common cause of death in patients with end-stage renal disease. Clinical and experimental studies indicate that hyperphosphatemia is a risk factor for vascular calcification and cardiovascular mortality in these patients. Our previous studies demonstrated that phosphate transport through the type III sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporter, Pit-1, was necessary for phosphate-induced calcification and osteochondrogenic phenotypic change in cultured human smooth muscle cells (SMC). BMP-2 is a potent osteogenic protein required for osteoblast differentiation and bone formation that has been implicated in vascular calcification. In the present study, we have examined the effects of BMP-2 on human SMC calcification in vitro. We found that treatment of SMC with BMP-2 enhanced elevated phosphate-induced calcification, but did not induce calcification under normal phosphate conditions. mRNAs for BMP receptors, including ALK2, ALK3, ALK6, BMPR-II, ActR-IIA and ActR-IIB were all detected in human SMCs. Mechanistically, BMP-2 dose-dependently stimulated phosphate uptake in SMC (200 ng/ml BMP-2 vs. vehicle: 13.94 vs. 7.09 nmol/30 min/mg protein, respectively). Real-time PCR and Western blot revealed the upregulation of Pit-1 mRNA and protein levels, respectively, by BMP-2. More importantly, inhibition of phosphate uptake by a competitive inhibitor of sodium-dependent phosphate cotransport, phosphonoformic acid, abrogated BMP-2-induced calcification. These results indicate that phosphate transport via Pit-1 is crucial in BMP-2-regulated SMC calcification. In addition, BMP-2-induced Runx2 and inhibited SM22 expression, indicating that it promotes osteogenic phenotype transition in these cells. Thus, BMP-2 may promote vascular calcification via increased phosphate uptake and induction of osteogenic phenotype modulation in SMC. PMID:18179800

  14. Gax regulates human vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic modulation and vascular remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Hu, Zhenlei; Zhai, Xinming; Wang, Yongyi; Liu, Jidong; Wang, Weijun; Xue, Song

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is a hallmark of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, hypertension and restenosis after angioplasty. Transcription factors have emerged as critical regulators for VSMCs function, and recently we verified inhibiting transcription factor Gax was important for controlling VSMCs proliferation and migration. This study aimed to determine its role in phenotypic modulation of VSMCs. Western blot revealed that overexpression of Gax increased expression of VSMCs differentiation marker genes such as calponin and SM-MHC 11. Then, Gax overexpression potently suppressed proliferation and migration of VSMCs with or without platelet-derived growth factor-induced-BB (PDGF-BB) stimuli whereas Gax silencing inhibited these processes. Furthermore, cDNA array analysis indicated that Rap1A gene was the downstream target of Gax in human VSMCs. And overexpression of Gax significantly inhibited expression of Rap1A in VSMCs with or without PDGF-BB stimuli. Moreover, overexpression of Rap1A decreased expression of VSMCs differentiation marker genes and increased proliferation and migration of VSMCs with or without PDGF-BB stimuli. Finally, Gax overexpression significantly inhibited the neointimal formation in carotid artery injury of mouse models, specifically through maintaining VSMCs contractile phenotype by decreasing Rap1A expression. In conclusion, these results indicated that Gax was a regulator of human VSMCs phenotypic modulation by targeting Rap1A gene, which suggested that targeting Gax or its downstream targets in human VSMCs may provide an attractive approach for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27508012

  15. Sex Steroids Influence Brain-Derived Neurotropic Factor Secretion From Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Yu; Freeman, Michelle R; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Thompson, Michael A; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2016-07-01

    Brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) is emerging as an important player in airway inflammation, remodeling, and hyperreactivity. Separately, there is increasing evidence that sex hormones contribute to pathophysiology in the lung. BDNF and sex steroid signaling are thought to be intricately linked in the brain. There is currently little information on BDNF and sex steroid interactions in the airway but is relevant to understanding growth factor signaling in the context of asthma in men versus women. In this study, we assessed the effect of sex steroids on BDNF expression and secretion in human airway smooth muscle (ASM). Human ASM was treated with estrogen (E2 ) or testosterone (T, 10 nM each) and intracellular BDNF and secreted BDNF measured. E2 and T significantly reduced secretion of BDNF; effects prevented by estrogen and androgen receptor inhibitor, ICI 182,780 (1 μM), and flutamide (10 μM), respectively. Interestingly, no significant changes were observed in intracellular BDNF mRNA or protein expression. High affinity BDNF receptor, TrkB, was not altered by E2 or T. E2 (but not T) significantly increased intracellular cyclic AMP levels. Notably, Epac1 and Epac2 expression were significantly reduced by E2 and T. Furthermore, SNARE complex protein SNAP25 was decreased. Overall, these novel data suggest that physiologically relevant concentrations of E2 or T inhibit BDNF secretion in human ASM, suggesting a potential interaction of sex steroids with BDNF in the airway that is different from brain. The relevance of sex steroid-BDNF interactions may lie in their overall contribution to airway diseases such as asthma. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1586-1592, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26566264

  16. Thoracoscopic tracheal reconstruction without surgical field intubation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kejia; Mei, Jiandong; Hai, Yang; Liu, Chengwu; Ma, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A cross‐filed endotracheal intubation is usually applied to maintain single lung ventilation during both open and thoracoscopic tracheal resection and reconstruction. Herein, we report a case of thoracoscopic tracheal resection and reconstruction with interrupted ventilation via transoral endotracheal intubation in a patient with thoracic tracheal adenocarcinoma. Tracheal anastomosis was accomplished using a running suture with a 3‐0 Prolene stitch. PMID:27385994

  17. Radioisotope measurement of the velocity of tracheal mucus.

    PubMed

    Russo, K J; Palmer, D W; Beste, D J; Carl, G A; Belson, T P; Pelc, L R; Toohill, R J

    1985-04-01

    A radioisotope scanning technique for measuring the velocity of tracheal mucus has been developed utilizing a canine model. A solution of stannous phytate labeled with 99mTc is introduced percutaneously into the lower trachea and the upward movement of the leading edge of the radioactivity is followed by repeat scanning at 2-minute intervals using a modified rectilinear scanner, thus allowing calculation of the velocity of the mucus. It is believed that this technique may be of value in studying the effect of experimentally induced tracheal injuries on mucus velocity. Possible applications of the technique for the study of the velocity of mucus in the human trachea are discussed. PMID:3921912

  18. Diversity of Potassium Channels in Human Umbilical Artery Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Pedro; Rebolledo, Alejandro; Palomo, Ana Rocio Roldán; Moncada, Melisa; Piccinini, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Through their control of cell membrane potential, potassium (K+) channels are among the best known regulators of vascular tone. This article discusses the expression and function of K+ channels in human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs). We review the bibliographic reports and also present single-channel data recorded in freshly isolated cells. Electrophysiological properties of big conductance, voltage- and Ca2+-sensitive K+ channel and voltage-dependent K+ channels are clearly established in this vessel, where they are involved in contractile state regulation. Their role in the maintenance of membrane potential is an important control mechanism in the determination of the vessel diameter. Additionally, small conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels, 2-pore domains K+ channels and inward rectifier K+ channels also appear to be present in HUASMCs, while intermediate conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels and ATP-sensitive K+ channels could not be identified. In both cases, additional investigation is necessary to reach conclusive evidence of their expression and/or functional role in HUASMCs. Finally, we discuss the role of K+ channels in pregnancy-related pathologies like gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. PMID:24084522

  19. Effects of cigarette smoke extract on human airway smooth muscle cells in COPD.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Ge, Qi; Tjin, Gavin; Alkhouri, Hatem; Deng, Linghong; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Adcock, Ian; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje; Burgess, Janette K; Black, Judith L; Oliver, Brian G G

    2014-09-01

    We hypothesised that the response to cigarette smoke in airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells from smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) would be intrinsically different from smokers without COPD, producing greater pro-inflammatory mediators and factors relating to airway remodelling. ASM cells were obtained from smokers with or without COPD, and then stimulated with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) or transforming growth factor-β1. The production of chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by ELISA, and the deposition of collagens by extracellular matrix ELISA. The effects of CSE on cell attachment and wound healing were measured by toluidine blue attachment and cell tracker green wound healing assays. CSE increased the release of CXCL8 and CXCL1 from human ASM cells, and cells from smokers with COPD produced more CSE-induced CXCL1. The production of MMP-1, -3 and -10, and the deposition of collagen VIII alpha 1 (COL8A1) were increased by CSE, especially in the COPD group which had higher production of MMP-1 and deposition of COL8A1. CSE decreased ASM cell attachment and wound healing in the COPD group only. ASM cells from smokers with COPD were more sensitive to CSE stimulation, which may explain, in part, why some smokers develop COPD. PMID:24969654

  20. Spatial and temporal traction response in human airway smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Butler, James P.; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Ning

    2002-01-01

    Tractions that cells exert on their substrates are essential in cell spreading, migration, and contraction. These tractions can be determined by plating the cells on a flexible gel and measuring the deformation of the gel by using fluorescent beads embedded just below the surface of the gel. In this article we describe the image correlation method (ICM) optimized for determining the displacement field of the gel under a contracting cell. For the calculation of the traction field from the displacement field we use the recently developed method of Fourier transform traction cytometry (FTTC). The ICM and FTTC methods are applied to human airway smooth muscle cells during stimulation with the contractile agonist histamine or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The overall intensity of the cell contraction (the median traction magnitude, the energy transferred from the cell to the gel, and the net contractile moment) increased after activation with histamine, and decreased after treatment with isoproterenol. Cells exhibited regional differences in the time course of traction during the treatment. Both temporal evolution and magnitude of traction increase induced by histamine varied markedly among different cell protrusions, whereas the nuclear region showed the smallest response. These results suggest that intracellular mediators of cell adhesion and contraction respond to contractile stimuli with different rates and intensities in different regions of the cell.

  1. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy of human smooth muscle cells in bioengineered tissue scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackmann, Christian; Esguerra, Maricris; Olausson, Daniel; Delbro, Dick; Krettek, Alexandra; Gatenholm, Paul; Enejder, Annika

    2011-02-01

    The integration of living, human smooth muscle cells in biosynthesized cellulose scaffolds was monitored by nonlinear microscopy toward contractile artificial blood vessels. Combined coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy was applied for studies of the cell interaction with the biopolymer network. CARS microscopy probing CH2-groups at 2845 cm-1 permitted three-dimensional imaging of the cells with high contrast for lipid-rich intracellular structures. SHG microscopy visualized the fibers of the cellulose scaffold, together with a small signal obtained from the cytoplasmic myosin of the muscle cells. From the overlay images we conclude a close interaction between cells and cellulose fibers. We followed the cell migration into the three-dimensional structure, illustrating that while the cells submerge into the scaffold they extrude filopodia on top of the surface. A comparison between compact and porous scaffolds reveals a migration depth of <10 μm for the former, whereas the porous type shows cells further submerged into the cellulose. Thus, the scaffold architecture determines the degree of cell integration. We conclude that the unique ability of nonlinear microscopy to visualize the three-dimensional composition of living, soft matter makes it an ideal instrument within tissue engineering.

  2. Endothelin receptors and their cellular signal transduction mechanism in human cultured prostatic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Saita, Y; Koizumi, T; Yazawa, H; Morita, T; Takenaka, T; Honda, K

    1997-06-01

    1. Endothelin (ET) receptors, and their cellular signal transduction mechanism, were characterized in a primary culture of human prostatic smooth muscle cells (HP cell). 2. [125I]-ET-1 and [125I]-ET-3 binding studies revealed that both ETA and ETB receptors were present in the HP cells, and the ratio of ETA to ETB receptors was 1.4:1. 3. Analysis of ET receptor mRNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction also demonstrated that HP cells express both ETA and ETB receptors. 4. ET-1 and ET-3 increased intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in the HP cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Use of subtype selective antagonists BQ-123 and BQ-788, indicated that both ETA and ETB receptors were coupled to an increase in [Ca2+]i. 5. Pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin resulted in a significant but partial attenuation of the [Ca2+]i increase mediated through the ETA and ETB receptors. However, sensitivity to pertussis toxin (PTX) was significantly different between them. 6. In conclusion, HP cells possess ETA and ETB receptors. Further, these two endothelin receptor subtypes evoke an increase in [Ca2+]i possibly via the action of different GTP-binding proteins. PMID:9208135

  3. Mechanical stretch regulates TRPC expression and calcium entry in human myometrial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, A; Mahn, K; Poston, L; Songu-Mize, E; Tribe, R M

    2007-03-01

    Stretch is known to stimulate myometrial hyperplasia and hypertrophy in early pregnancy and uterine contraction at term. We propose that transduction of the stretch signal involves alteration of intracellular calcium signalling, including changes in transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) isoform expression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of prolonged mechanical (tonic) stretch in vitro on human myometrial smooth muscle cell calcium signalling and TRPC expression. Cells were cultured from myometrial biopsies, obtained from women undergoing elective Caesarean section at term, grown on Flexiplates and subjected to 25% tonic mechanical stretch for 1, 4 and 14 h. Time-matched control cells were not stretched. Mechanical stretch (14 h) increased basal calcium entry and cyclopiazonic acid (CPA)-induced calcium/Mn(2+) entry (P < 0.05) in Fura-2 loaded cells. The calcium selectivity of CPA-thapsigarin induced inward currents, measured by patch clamp electrophysiology, was also increased in stretched cells compared with control cells (P < 0.05). Real time PCR and Western blot data demonstrated that TRPC3 and TRPC4 mRNA and TRPC3 protein expression were increased by stretch (P < 0.05), respectively. These data support the hypothesis that uterine stretch modulates uterine growth and contractility in pregnancy via alterations in calcium signalling. PMID:17208928

  4. Transcriptional profiling of human smooth muscle cells infected with gingipain and fimbriae mutants of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Boxi; Sirsjö, Allan; Khalaf, Hazem; Bengtsson, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) is considered to be involved in the development of atherosclerosis. However, the role of different virulence factors produced by P. gingivalis in this process is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional profiling of human aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMCs) infected with wild type, gingipain mutants or fimbriae mutants of P. gingivalis. AoSMCs were exposed to wild type (W50 and 381), gingipain mutants (E8 and K1A), or fimbriae mutants (DPG-3 and KRX-178) of P. gingivalis. We observed that wild type P. gingivalis changes the expression of a considerable larger number of genes in AoSMCs compare to gingipain and fimbriae mutants, respectively. The results from pathway analysis revealed that the common differentially expressed genes for AoSMCs infected by 3 different wild type P. gingivalis strains were enriched in pathways of cancer, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, and MAPK signaling pathway. Disease ontology analysis showed that various strains of P. gingivalis were associated with different disease profilings. Our results suggest that gingipains and fimbriae, especially arginine-specific gingipain, produced by P. gingivalis play important roles in the association between periodontitis and other inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis. PMID:26907358

  5. Cigarette smoke-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and dysfunction in human airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Aravamudan, Bharathi; Kiel, Alexander; Freeman, Michelle; Delmotte, Philippe; Thompson, Michael; Vassallo, Robert; Sieck, Gary C.; Pabelick, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    The balance between mitochondrial fission and fusion is crucial for mitochondria to perform its normal cellular functions. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke (CS) disrupts this balance and enhances mitochondrial dysfunction in the airway. In nonasthmatic human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, CS extract (CSE) induced mitochondrial fragmentation and damages their networked morphology in a concentration-dependent fashion, via increased expression of mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and decreased fusion protein mitofusin (Mfn) 2. CSE effects on Drp1 vs. Mfn2 and mitochondrial network morphology involved reactive oxygen species (ROS), activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt), protein kinase C (PKC) and proteasome pathways, as well as transcriptional regulation via factors such as NF-κB and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2. Inhibiting Drp1 prevented CSE effects on mitochondrial networks and ROS generation, whereas blocking Mfn2 had the opposite, detrimental effect. In ASM from asmatic patients, mitochondria exhibited substantial morphological defects at baseline and showed increased Drp1 but decreased Mfn2 expression, with exacerbating effects of CSE. Overall, these results highlight the importance of mitochondrial networks and their regulation in the context of cellular changes induced by insults such as inflammation (as in asthma) or CS. Altered mitochondrial fission/fusion proteins have a further potential to influence parameters such as ROS and cell proliferation and apoptosis relevant to airway diseases. PMID:24610934

  6. On the Visual Input Driving Human Smooth-Pursuit Eye Movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Leland S.; Beutter, Brent R.; Lorenceau, Jean

    1996-01-01

    Current computational models of smooth-pursuit eye movements assume that the primary visual input is local retinal-image motion (often referred to as retinal slip). However, we show that humans can pursue object motion with considerable accuracy, even in the presence of conflicting local image motion. This finding indicates that the visual cortical area(s) controlling pursuit must be able to perform a spatio-temporal integration of local image motion into a signal related to object motion. We also provide evidence that the object-motion signal that drives pursuit is related to the signal that supports perception. We conclude that current models of pursuit should be modified to include a visual input that encodes perceived object motion and not merely retinal image motion. Finally, our findings suggest that the measurement of eye movements can be used to monitor visual perception, with particular value in applied settings as this non-intrusive approach would not require interrupting ongoing work or training.

  7. Endothelin receptors and their cellular signal transduction mechanism in human cultured prostatic smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Saita, Yuji; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Yazawa, Hidenori; Morita, Takashi; Takenaka, Toichi; Honda, Kazuo

    1997-01-01

    Endothelin (ET) receptors, and their cellular signal transduction mechanism, were characterized in a primary culture of human prostatic smooth muscle cells (HP cell). [125I]-ET-1 and [125I]-ET-3 binding studies revealed that both ETA and ETB receptors were present in the HP cells, and the ratio of ETA to ETB receptors was 1.4:1. Analysis of ET receptor mRNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction also demonstrated that HP cells express both ETA and ETB receptors. ET-1 and ET-3 increased intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in the HP cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Use of subtype selective antagonists BQ-123 and BQ-788, indicated that both ETA and ETB receptors were coupled to an increase in [Ca2+]i. Pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin resulted in a significant but partial attenuation of the [Ca2+]i increase mediated through the ETA and ETB receptors. However, sensitivity to pertussis toxin (PTX) was significantly different between them. In conclusion, HP cells possess ETA and ETB receptors. Further, these two endothelin receptor subtypes evoke an increase in [Ca2+]i possibly via the action of different GTP-binding proteins. PMID:9208135

  8. Puerarin Induces Mitochondria-Dependent Apoptosis in Hypoxic Human Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chan; Chen, Chun; Wang, Zhiyi; Wang, Liangxing; Yang, Lehe; Ding, Minjiao; Ding, Cheng; Sun, Yu; Lin, Quan; Huang, Xiaoying; Du, Xiaohong; Zhao, Xiaowei; Wang, Chuangyi

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary vascular medial hypertrophy in hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is caused in part by decreased apoptosis in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Puerarin, an isoflavone purified from the Chinese medicinal herb kudzu, ameliorates chronic hypoxic PAH in animal models. Here we investigated the effects of puerarin on apoptosis of hypoxic human PASMCs (HPASMCs), and to determine the possible underlying mechanisms. Methodology/Principal Findings HPASMCs were cultured for 24 h in normoxia or hypoxia (5% O2) conditions with and without puerarin. Cell number and viability were determined with a hemacytometer or a cell counting kit. Apoptosis was detected with a TUNEL test, rhodamine-123 (R-123) fluorescence, a colorimetric assay, western blots, immunohistochemical staining and RT-PCR. Hypoxia inhibited mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and promoted HPASMC growth. In contrast, after puerarin (50 µM or more) intervention, cell growth was inhibited and apoptosis was observed. Puerarin-induced apoptosis in hypoxic HPASMCs was accompanied by reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, caspase-9 activation, and Bcl-2 down-regulation with concurrent Bax up-regulation. Conclusions/Significance Puerarin promoted apoptosis in hypoxic HPASMCs by acting on the mitochondria-dependent pathway. These results suggest a new mechanism of puerarin relevant to the management of clinical hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:22457823

  9. Human discrimination of visual direction of motion with and without smooth pursuit eye movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krukowski, Anton E.; Pirog, Kathleen A.; Beutter, Brent R.; Brooks, Kevin R.; Stone, Leland S.

    2003-01-01

    It has long been known that ocular pursuit of a moving target has a major influence on its perceived speed (Aubert, 1886; Fleischl, 1882). However, little is known about the effect of smooth pursuit on the perception of target direction. Here we compare the precision of human visual-direction judgments under two oculomotor conditions (pursuit vs. fixation). We also examine the impact of stimulus duration (200 ms vs. 800 ms) and absolute direction (cardinal vs. oblique). Our main finding is that direction discrimination thresholds in the fixation and pursuit conditions are indistinguishable. Furthermore, the two oculomotor conditions showed oblique effects of similar magnitudes. These data suggest that the neural direction signals supporting perception are the same with or without pursuit, despite remarkably different retinal stimulation. During fixation, the stimulus information is restricted to large, purely peripheral retinal motion, while during steady-state pursuit, the stimulus information consists of small, unreliable foveal retinal motion and a large efference-copy signal. A parsimonious explanation of our findings is that the signal limiting the precision of direction judgments is a neural estimate of target motion in head-centered (or world-centered) coordinates (i.e., a combined retinal and eye motion signal) as found in the medial superior temporal area (MST), and not simply an estimate of retinal motion as found in the middle temporal area (MT).

  10. Human Coronary Artery Smooth Muscle Cell Responses to Bioactive Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Newcomer, Robert G.; Moussallem, Maroun D.; Keller, Thomas C. S.; Schlenoff, Joseph B.; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2011-01-01

    Under normal physiological conditions, mature human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASMCs) exhibit a “contractile” phenotype marked by low rates of proliferation and protein synthesis, but these cells possess the remarkable ability to dedifferentiate into a “synthetic” phenotype when stimulated by conditions of pathologic stress. A variety of polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEMU) films are shown here to exhibit bioactive properties that induce distinct responses from cultured hCASMCs. Surfaces terminated with Nafion or poly(styrenesulfonic acid) (PSS) induce changes in the expression and organization of intracellular proteins, while a hydrophilic, zwitterionic copolymer of acrylic acid and 3-[2-(acrylamido)-ethyl dimethylammonio] propane sulfonate (PAA-co-PAEDAPS) is resistant to cell attachment and suppresses the formation of key cytoskeletal components. Differential expression of heat shock protein 90 and actin is observed, in terms of both their magnitude and cellular localization, and distinct cytoplasmic patterns of vimentin are seen. The ionophore A23187 induces contraction in confluent hCASMC cultures on Nafion-terminated surfaces. These results demonstrate that PEMU coatings exert direct effects on the cytoskeletal organization of attaching hCASMCs, impeding growth in some cases, inducing changes consistent with phenotypic modulation in others, and suggesting potential utility for PEMU surfaces as a coating for coronary artery stents and other implantable medical devices. PMID:21350669

  11. Transcriptional profiling of human smooth muscle cells infected with gingipain and fimbriae mutants of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Boxi; Sirsjö, Allan; Khalaf, Hazem; Bengtsson, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) is considered to be involved in the development of atherosclerosis. However, the role of different virulence factors produced by P. gingivalis in this process is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional profiling of human aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMCs) infected with wild type, gingipain mutants or fimbriae mutants of P. gingivalis. AoSMCs were exposed to wild type (W50 and 381), gingipain mutants (E8 and K1A), or fimbriae mutants (DPG-3 and KRX-178) of P. gingivalis. We observed that wild type P. gingivalis changes the expression of a considerable larger number of genes in AoSMCs compare to gingipain and fimbriae mutants, respectively. The results from pathway analysis revealed that the common differentially expressed genes for AoSMCs infected by 3 different wild type P. gingivalis strains were enriched in pathways of cancer, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, and MAPK signaling pathway. Disease ontology analysis showed that various strains of P. gingivalis were associated with different disease profilings. Our results suggest that gingipains and fimbriae, especially arginine-specific gingipain, produced by P. gingivalis play important roles in the association between periodontitis and other inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis. PMID:26907358

  12. Smooth muscle in human bronchi is disposed to resist airway distension.

    PubMed

    Gazzola, Morgan; Henry, Cyndi; Couture, Christian; Marsolais, David; King, Gregory G; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Bossé, Ynuk

    2016-07-15

    Studying airway smooth muscle (ASM) in conditions that emulate the in vivo environment within which the bronchi normally operate may provide important clues regarding its elusive physiological function. The present study examines the effect of lengthening and shortening of ASM on tension development in human bronchial segments. ASM from each bronchial segment was set at a length approximating in situ length (Linsitu). Bronchial tension was then measured during a slow cyclical strain (0.004Hz, from 0.7Linsitu to 1.3Linsitu) in the relaxed state and at graded levels of activation by methacholine. In all cases, tension was greater at longer ASM lengths, and greater during lengthening than shortening. The threshold of methacholine concentration that was required for ASM to account for bronchial tension across the entire range of ASM lengths tested was on average smaller by 2.8 logs during lengthening than during shortening. The length-dependency of ASM tension, together with this lower threshold of methacholine concentration during lengthening versus shortening, suggest that ASM has a greater ability to resist airway dilation during lung inflation than to narrow the airways during lung deflation. More than serving to narrow the airway, as has long been thought, these data suggest that the main function of ASM contraction is to limit airway wall distension during lung inflation. PMID:27095271

  13. Tracheal Sounds Acquisition Using Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Bersain A.; Reljin, Natasa; Chon, Ki H.

    2014-01-01

    Tracheal sounds have received a lot of attention for estimating ventilation parameters in a non-invasive way. The aim of this work was to examine the feasibility of extracting accurate airflow, and automating the detection of breath-phase onset and respiratory rates all directly from tracheal sounds acquired from an acoustic microphone connected to a smartphone. We employed the Samsung Galaxy S4 and iPhone 4s smartphones to acquire tracheal sounds from N = 9 healthy volunteers at airflows ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 L/s. We found that the amplitude of the smartphone-acquired sounds was highly correlated with the airflow from a spirometer, and similar to previously-published studies, we found that the increasing tracheal sounds' amplitude as flow increases follows a power law relationship. Acquired tracheal sounds were used for breath-phase onset detection and their onsets differed by only 52 ± 51 ms (mean ± SD) for Galaxy S4, and 51 ± 48 ms for iPhone 4s, when compared to those detected from the reference signal via the spirometer. Moreover, it was found that accurate respiratory rates (RR) can be obtained from tracheal sounds. The correlation index, bias and limits of agreement were r2 = 0.9693, 0.11 (−1.41 to 1.63) breaths-per-minute (bpm) for Galaxy S4, and r2 = 0.9672, 0.097 (–1.38 to 1.57) bpm for iPhone 4s, when compared to RR estimated from spirometry. Both smartphone devices performed similarly, as no statistically-significant differences were found. PMID:25196108

  14. Tracheal sounds acquisition using smartphones.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Bersain A; Reljin, Natasa; Chon, Ki H

    2014-01-01

    Tracheal sounds have received a lot of attention for estimating ventilation parameters in a non-invasive way. The aim of this work was to examine the feasibility of extracting accurate airflow, and automating the detection of breath-phase onset and respiratory rates all directly from tracheal sounds acquired from an acoustic microphone connected to a smartphone. We employed the Samsung Galaxy S4 and iPhone 4s smartphones to acquire tracheal sounds from N = 9 healthy volunteers at airflows ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 L/s. We found that the amplitude of the smartphone-acquired sounds was highly correlated with the airflow from a spirometer, and similar to previously-published studies, we found that the increasing tracheal sounds' amplitude as flow increases follows a power law relationship. Acquired tracheal sounds were used for breath-phase onset detection and their onsets differed by only 52 ± 51 ms (mean ± SD) for Galaxy S4, and 51 ± 48 ms for iPhone 4s, when compared to those detected from the reference signal via the spirometer. Moreover, it was found that accurate respiratory rates (RR) can be obtained from tracheal sounds. The correlation index, bias and limits of agreement were r² = 0.9693, 0.11 (-1.41 to 1.63) breaths-per-minute (bpm) for Galaxy S4, and r² = 0.9672, 0.097 (-1.38 to 1.57) bpm for iPhone 4s, when compared to RR estimated from spirometry. Both smartphone devices performed similarly, as no statistically-significant differences were found. PMID:25196108

  15. A critical role of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase in human telomerase reverse transcriptase induction by resveratrol in aortic smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peixin; Riordan, Sean M.; Heruth, Daniel P.; Grigoryev, Dmitry N.; Zhang, Li Qin; Ye, Shui Qing

    2015-01-01

    Aging is the predominant risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and contributes to a considerably more severe outcome in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in red wine, is a caloric restriction mimetic with potential anti-aging properties which has emerged as a beneficial nutraceutical for patients with cardiovascular disease. Although resveratrol is widely consumed as a nutritional supplement, its mechanism of action remains to be elucidated fully. Here, we report that resveratrol activates human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), SIRT4 and telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) in human aortic smooth muscle cells. Similar observations were obtained in resveratrol treated C57BL/6J mouse heart and liver tissues. Resverotrol can also augment telomerase activity in both human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and A549 cells. Blocking NAMPT and SIRT4 expression prevents induction of hTERT in human aortic smooth muscle cells while overexpression of NAMPT elevates the telomerase activity induced by resveratrol in A549 cells. Together, these results identify a NAMPT-SIRT4-hTERT axis as a novel mechanism by which resveratrol may affect the anti-aging process in human aortic smooth muscle cells, mouse hearts and other cells. These findings enrich our understanding of the positive effects of resveratrol in human cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25926556

  16. Bidirectional counter-regulation of human lung mast cell and airway smooth muscle β2-adrenoceptors

    PubMed Central

    Newby, Chris; Amrani, Yassine; Bradding, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Human lung mast cells (HLMCs) play a central role in asthma pathogenesis through their relocation to the airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundles. β2 adrenoceptor (β2-AR)-agonists are used to relieve bronchoconstriction in asthma, but may reduce asthma control, particularly when used as monotherapy. We hypothesised that HLMC and human ASM cell (HASMC) responsiveness to β2-AR agonists would be attenuated when HLMCs are in contact with HASMCs. Cells were cultured in the presence of the short-acting β2-agonist albuterol, and the long-acting β2-agonists formoterol and olodaterol. Constitutive and FcεRI-dependent HLMC histamine release, HASMC contraction, and β2-AR phosphorylation at tyrosine 350 (Tyr350) were assessed. Constitutive HLMC histamine release was increased in HLMC-HASMC co-culture and this was enhanced by β2-AR agonists. Inhibition of FcεRI-dependent HLMC mediator release by β2-agonists was greatly reduced in HLMC-HASMC co-culture. These effects were reversed by neutralisation of stem cell factor (SCF) or cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1). β2-AR agonists did not prevent HASMC contraction when HLMCs were present, but this was reversed by fluticasone. β2-AR phosphorylation at Tyr350 occurred within 5 minutes in both HLMCs and HASMCs when the cells were co-cultured, and was inhibited by neutralising SCF or CADM1. HLMC interactions with HASMCs via CADM1 and Kit inhibit the potentially beneficial effects of β2-AR agonists on these cells via phosphorylation of the β2-AR. These results may explain the potentially adverse effects of β2-ARs agonists when used for asthma therapy. Targeting SCF and CADM1 may enhance β2-AR efficacy, particularly in corticosteroid-resistant patients. PMID:26608913

  17. TLR3 activation increases chemokine expression in human fetal airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Faksh, Arij; Britt, Rodney D; Vogel, Elizabeth R; Thompson, Michael A; Pandya, Hitesh C; Martin, Richard J; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2016-01-15

    Viral infections, such as respiratory syncytial virus and rhinovirus, adversely affect neonatal and pediatric populations, resulting in significant lung morbidity, including acute asthma exacerbation. Studies in adults have demonstrated that human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells modulate inflammation through their ability to secrete inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. The role of ASM in the developing airway during infection remains undefined. In our study, we used human fetal ASM cells as an in vitro model to examine the effect of Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists on chemokine secretion. We found that fetal ASM express multiple TLRs, including TLR3 and TLR4, which are implicated in the pathogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus and rhinovirus infection. Cells were treated with TLR agonists, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C)] (TLR3 agonist), lipopolysaccharide (TLR4 agonist), or R848 (TLR7/8 agonist), and IL-8 and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5) secretion were evaluated. Interestingly, poly(I:C), but neither lipopolysaccharide nor R848, increased IL-8 and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 secretion. Examination of signaling pathways suggested that the poly(I:C) effects in fetal ASM involve TLR and ERK signaling, in addition to another major inflammatory pathway, NF-κB. Moreover, there are variations between fetal and adult ASM with respect to poly(I:C) effects on signaling pathways. Pharmacological inhibition suggested that ERK pathways mediate poly(I:C) effects. Overall, our data show that poly(I:C) initiates activation of proinflammatory pathways in developing ASM, which may contribute to immune responses to infection and exacerbation of asthma. PMID:26589477

  18. The human uterine smooth muscle S-nitrosoproteome fingerprint in pregnancy, labor, and preterm labor

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Craig; Quilici, David R.; Schlauch, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms involved in uterine quiescence during gestation and those responsible for induction of labor at term are incompletely known. More than 10% of babies born worldwide are premature and 1,000,000 die annually. Preterm labor results in preterm delivery in 50% of cases in the United States explaining 75% of fetal morbidity and mortality. There is no Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment to prevent preterm delivery. Nitric oxide-mediated relaxation of human uterine smooth muscle is independent of global elevation of cGMP following activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase. S-nitrosation is a likely mechanism to explain cGMP-independent relaxation to nitric oxide and may reveal S-nitrosated proteins as new therapeutic targets for the treatment of preterm labor. Employing S-nitrosoglutathione as an nitric oxide donor, we identified 110 proteins that are S-nitrosated in 1 or more states of human pregnancy. Using area under the curve of extracted ion chromatograms as well as normalized spectral counts to quantify relative expression levels for 62 of these proteins, we show that 26 proteins demonstrate statistically significant S-nitrosation differences in myometrium from spontaneously laboring preterm patients compared with nonlaboring patients. We identified proteins that were up-S-nitrosated as well as proteins that were down-S-nitrosated in preterm laboring tissues. Identification and relative quantification of the S-nitrosoproteome provide a fingerprint of proteins that can form the basis of hypothesis-directed efforts to understand the regulation of uterine contraction-relaxation and the development of new treatment for preterm labor. PMID:23948706

  19. Bidirectional Counterregulation of Human Lung Mast Cell and Airway Smooth Muscle β2 Adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Rebecca J; Chachi, Latifa; Newby, Chris; Amrani, Yassine; Bradding, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Human lung mast cells (HLMCs) play a central role in asthma pathogenesis through their relocation to the airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundles. β2 adrenoceptor (β2-AR)-agonists are used to relieve bronchoconstriction in asthma, but may reduce asthma control, particularly when used as monotherapy. We hypothesized that HLMC and human ASM cell (HASMC) responsiveness to β2-AR agonists would be attenuated when HLMCs are in contact with HASMCs. Cells were cultured in the presence of the short-acting β2-agonist albuterol, and the long-acting β2-agonists formoterol and olodaterol. Constitutive and FcεRI-dependent HLMC histamine release, HASMC contraction, and β2-AR phosphorylation at Tyr(350) were assessed. Constitutive HLMC histamine release was increased in HLMC-HASMC coculture and this was enhanced by β2-AR agonists. Inhibition of FcεRI-dependent HLMC mediator release by β2-agonists was greatly reduced in HLMC-HASMC coculture. These effects were reversed by neutralization of stem cell factor (SCF) or cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1). β2-AR agonists did not prevent HASMC contraction when HLMCs were present, but this was reversed by fluticasone. β2-AR phosphorylation at Tyr(350) occurred within 5 min in both HLMCs and HASMCs when the cells were cocultured, and was inhibited by neutralizing SCF or CADM1. HLMC interactions with HASMCs via CADM1 and Kit inhibit the potentially beneficial effects of β2-AR agonists on these cells via phosphorylation of the β2-AR. These results may explain the potentially adverse effects of β2-ARs agonists when used for asthma therapy. Targeting SCF and CADM1 may enhance β2-AR efficacy, particularly in corticosteroid-resistant patients. PMID:26608913

  20. Human airway smooth muscle maintain in situ cell orientation and phenotype when cultured on aligned electrospun scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Morris, G. E.; Bridge, J. C.; Eltboli, O. M. I.; Lewis, M. P.; Knox, A. J.; Aylott, J. W.; Brightling, C. E.; Ghaemmaghami, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Human airway smooth muscle (HASM) contraction plays a central role in regulating airway resistance in both healthy and asthmatic bronchioles. In vitro studies that investigate the intricate mechanisms that regulate this contractile process are predominantly conducted on tissue culture plastic, a rigid, 2D geometry, unlike the 3D microenvironment smooth muscle cells are exposed to in situ. It is increasingly apparent that cellular characteristics and responses are altered between cells cultured on 2D substrates compared with 3D topographies. Electrospinning is an attractive method to produce 3D topographies for cell culturing as the fibers produced have dimensions within the nanometer range, similar to cells' natural environment. We have developed an electrospun scaffold using the nondegradable, nontoxic, polymer polyethylene terephthalate (PET) composed of uniaxially orientated nanofibers and have evaluated this topography's effect on HASM cell adhesion, alignment, and morphology. The fibers orientation provided contact guidance enabling the formation of fully aligned sheets of smooth muscle. Moreover, smooth muscle cells cultured on the scaffold present an elongated cell phenotype with altered contractile protein levels and distribution. HASM cells cultured on this scaffold responded to the bronchoconstrictor bradykinin. The platform presented provides a novel in vitro model that promotes airway smooth muscle cell development toward a more in vivo-like phenotype while providing topological cues to ensure full cell alignment. PMID:24793171

  1. Pharmacological evidence for a novel cysteinyl-leukotriene receptor subtype in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Walch, Laurence; Norel, Xavier; Bäck, Magnus; Gascard, Jean-Pierre; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Brink, Charles

    2002-01-01

    To characterize the cysteinyl-leukotriene receptors (CysLT receptors) in isolated human pulmonary arteries, ring preparations were contracted with leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and leukotriene D4 (LTD4) in either the absence or presence of the selective CysLT1 receptor antagonists, ICI 198615, MK 571 or the dual CysLT1/CysLT2 receptor antagonist, BAY u9773. Since the contractions induced by the cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cysLTs) in intact preparations failed to attain a plateau response over the concentration range studied, the endothelium was removed and the tissue treated continuously with indomethacin (Rubbed+INDO). In these latter preparations, the pEC50 for LTC4 and LTD4 were not significantly different (7.61±0.07, n=20 and 7.96±0.09, n=22, respectively). However, the LTC4 and LTD4 contractions were markedly potentiated when compared with data from intact tissues. Leukotriene E4 (LTE4) did not contract human isolated pulmonary arterial preparations. In addition, treatment of preparations with LTE4 (1 μM; 30 min) did not modify either the LTC4 or LTD4 contractions. Treatment of preparations with the S-conjugated glutathione (S-hexyl-GSH; 100 μM, 30 min), an inhibitor of the metabolism of LTC4 to LTD4, did not modify LTC4 contractions. The pEC50 values for LTC4 were significantly reduced by treatment of the preparations with either ICI 198615, MK 571 or BAY u9773 and the pKB values were: 7.20, 7.02 and 6.26, respectively. In contrast, these antagonists did not modify the LTD4 pEC50 values. These findings suggest the presence of two CysLT receptors on human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle. A CysLT1 receptor with a low affinity for CysLT1 antagonists and a novel CysLT receptor subtype, both responsible for vasoconstriction. Activation of this latter receptor by LTC4 and LTD4 induced a contractile response which was resistant to the selective CysLT1 antagonists (ICI 198615 and MK 571) as well as the non-selective (CysLT1/CysLT2) antagonist, BAY u9773. PMID

  2. Characterization of human vascular smooth muscle cells transformed by the early genetic region of SV40 virus.

    PubMed Central

    Legrand, A.; Greenspan, P.; Nagpal, M. L.; Nachtigal, S. A.; Nachtigal, M.

    1991-01-01

    Human arterial smooth muscle cells transfected with the plasmid pSV3-neo, which contains the SV40 virus early region and the neor gene, developed colonies of morphologically transformed cells. Five cell strains were initiated from these colonies and could be subcultivated for up to 9 months before entering a stage of crisis that ended their life span. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules containing viral sequences were found free and integrated in the transformed cells. The intranuclear SV40 large T antigen and the p53 cellular protein were expressed in the transformed cells. Most of the transformed cells were spindle shaped but some were large and multinucleated. The modal chromosome numbers were in the triploid range, and aberrations, particularly dicentrics, were common. The transcripts for smooth muscle actins were significantly reduced and there were less alpha-actin filaments detected by immunofluorescence. Cytochemical staining disclosed a large accumulation of lipid droplets in the transformed cells incubated with rabbit hypercholesterolemic beta-very-low-density lipoprotein. Chemical analysis showed that cholesteryl esters were significantly elevated in these cells. Phenotypic changes induced in human vascular smooth muscle cells by SV40 early genes are similar to those found in smooth muscle cells from atherosclerotic lesions and may indicate common pathogenetic mechanisms. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1653520

  3. Overloading human aortic smooth muscle cells with low density lipoprotein-cholesteryl esters reproduces features of atherosclerosis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, J L; Anderson, R G; Buja, L M; Basu, S K; Brown, M S

    1977-01-01

    Human aortic smooth muscle cells accumulate only small amounts of cholesteryl esters in tissue culture, even when incubated for prolonged periods with high levels of plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL). This failure to overaccumulate LDL-cholesteryl esters is due to an LDL-mediated feedback suppression of the activity of the cell surface LDL receptor, a regulatory action that limits the rate at which the cells take up LDL. This regulatory system can be bypassed by incubating smooth muscle cells with LDL that has been given a strong positive charge by covalent linkage with N,N-dimethyl-1,3-propanediamine (DMPA-LDL). The unregulated uptake of DMPA-LDL produces a massive deposition of cholesteryl esters in the form of inclusions within the cell. These inclusions take up lipid stains and exhibit positive birefringence with formée crosses that are typical of liquid crystals of cholesteryl esters. By electron microscopy, the cholesteryl ester inclusions appear as homogeneous gray cytoplasmic lipid droplets. The current studies demonstrate that the unregulated uptake of LDL-cholesteryl esters by human aortic smooth muscle cells can reproduce in vitro the major biochemical and morphological alterations that occur within smooth muscle cells in vivo during the process of atherosclerosis. Images PMID:193874

  4. [Tracheal bronchus and contralateral pneumonectomy].

    PubMed

    Kratz, S; Russo, S G; Hinterthaner, M; Bauer, M; Bräuer, A

    2016-08-01

    One-lung ventilation is a standard procedure for many types of lung surgery. The anesthesiologist can be challenged if unknown anomalies of the bronchial tree occur. We report a patient with a tracheal bronchus on the right side presenting for left pneumonectomy, and present one possible solution to airway management. PMID:27447936

  5. Id proteins are critical downstream effectors of BMP signaling in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Li, Xiaohui; Li, Ying; Southwood, Mark; Ye, Lingying; Long, Lu; Al-Lamki, Rafia S; Morrell, Nicholas W

    2013-08-15

    Bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor (BMPR-II) mutations are responsible for over 70% of cases of heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Loss of BMP signaling promotes pulmonary vascular remodeling via modulation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation. Id proteins (Id1-4) are major downstream transcriptional targets of BMP signaling. However, the impact of BMPR-II mutation on the expression of the range of Id proteins and the contribution of individual Id proteins to abnormal PASMC function remain unclear. Human PASMCs were used to determine the expression of Id proteins (Id1-4) by real-time PCR and immunoblotting. The BMP responses in control cells were compared with PASMCs harboring BMPR-II mutations and cells in which BMPR-II was knocked down by siRNA transfection. Id3 expression in pulmonary vessels was also investigated in BMPR-II mutant mice and in patients with heritable PAH. BMP4 and BMP6, but not BMP9, induced mRNA expression of Id1, Id2, and Id3. The BMP-stimulated induction of Id1 and Id3 was markedly reduced in BMPR-II mutant PASMCs and in control PASMCs following siRNA silencing of BMPR-II. Pulmonary arteries in BMPR-II mutant mice and patients with heritable PAH demonstrated reduced levels of Id3 compared with control subjects. Lentiviral overexpression of Id3 reduced cell cycle progression and inhibited proliferation of PASMCs. Lipopolysaccharide further reduced Id3 expression in mutant PASMCs. In conclusion, Id proteins, and particularly Id1 and Id3, are critical downstream effectors of BMP signaling in PASMCs. Loss of BMPR-II function reduces the induction of Id genes in PASMCs, Id1, and Id3 regulate the proliferation of PASMCs via cell cycle inhibition, an effect that may be exacerbated by inflammatory stimuli. PMID:23771884

  6. MicroRNA Mediated Chemokine Responses in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dileepan, Mythili; Sarver, Anne E.; Rao, Savita P.; Panettieri, Reynold A.; Subramanian, Subbaya; Kannan, Mathur S.

    2016-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells play a critical role in the pathophysiology of asthma due to their hypercontractility and their ability to proliferate and secrete inflammatory mediators. microRNAs (miRNAs) are gene regulators that control many signaling pathways and thus serve as potential therapeutic alternatives for many diseases. We have previously shown that miR-708 and miR-140-3p regulate the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways in human ASM (HASM) cells following TNF-α exposure. In this study, we investigated the regulatory effect of these miRNAs on other asthma-related genes. Microarray analysis using the Illumina platform was performed with total RNA extracted from miR-708 (or control miR)-transfected HASM cells. Inhibition of candidate inflammation-associated gene expression was further validated by qPCR and ELISA. The most significant biologic functions for the differentially expressed gene set included decreased inflammatory response, cytokine expression and signaling. qPCR revealed inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL10, CCL2 and CXCL8, while the release of CCL11 was inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. Transfection of cells with miR-140-3p resulted in inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL12, CXCL10, CCL5 and CXCL8 and of TNF-α-induced CXCL12 release. In addition, expression of RARRES2, CD44 and ADAM33, genes known to contribute to the pathophysiology of asthma, were found to be inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. These results demonstrate that miR-708 and miR-140-3p exert distinct effects on inflammation-associated gene expression and biological function of ASM cells. Targeting these miRNA networks may provide a novel therapeutic mechanism to down-regulate airway inflammation and ASM proliferation in asthma. PMID:26998837

  7. Functional comparison of endothelin receptors in human and rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Bialecki, R A; Fisher, C S; Murdoch, W W; Barthlow, H G; Bertelsen, D L

    1997-02-01

    The receptors mediating arterial smooth muscle contraction to endothelins (ET) differ among species and origin of vascular bed. We characterized ET receptors mediating contraction of endothelium-denuded human intralobar pulmonary artery (hIPA) and rat intralobar (rIPA) and extralobar left branch (rLPA) pulmonary artery with ET-1, ET-2, ET-3, sarafotoxin S6c, sarafotoxin S6b, and ET receptor antagonists in vitro. Rat aorta was studied for comparison. Each vascular segment showed concentration-dependent contraction with a rank order sensitivity (pD2) profile of ET-1 > or = ET-2 = sarafotoxin S6b > ET-3. Maximum contraction to ET-1 was greater than to sarafotoxin S6c in all preparations. Responses of rIPA and rLPA to sarafotoxin S6c were conspicuous when compared with hIPA or aorta. The ET(A) receptor blockers BQ-123 and BMS-182874 competitively antagonized ET-1 responses of hIPA and aorta, but not rLPA. The ET(B) receptor antagonist BQ-788 attenuated contractions of rIPA and rLPA to ET-3 and sarafotoxin S6c, respectively. In conclusion, ET(B)-mediated contraction of endothelium-denuded conduit pulmonary arteries varies among species and may contribute more to contraction of rIPA and rLPA than of hIPA and aorta, although maximum ET(B)-mediated contraction is smaller than that mediated by the ET(A) receptor. PMID:9124371

  8. Id proteins are critical downstream effectors of BMP signaling in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Li, Xiaohui; Li, Ying; Southwood, Mark; Ye, Lingying; Long, Lu; Al-Lamki, Rafia S.

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor (BMPR-II) mutations are responsible for over 70% of cases of heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Loss of BMP signaling promotes pulmonary vascular remodeling via modulation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation. Id proteins (Id1–4) are major downstream transcriptional targets of BMP signaling. However, the impact of BMPR-II mutation on the expression of the range of Id proteins and the contribution of individual Id proteins to abnormal PASMC function remain unclear. Human PASMCs were used to determine the expression of Id proteins (Id1–4) by real-time PCR and immunoblotting. The BMP responses in control cells were compared with PASMCs harboring BMPR-II mutations and cells in which BMPR-II was knocked down by siRNA transfection. Id3 expression in pulmonary vessels was also investigated in BMPR-II mutant mice and in patients with heritable PAH. BMP4 and BMP6, but not BMP9, induced mRNA expression of Id1, Id2, and Id3. The BMP-stimulated induction of Id1 and Id3 was markedly reduced in BMPR-II mutant PASMCs and in control PASMCs following siRNA silencing of BMPR-II. Pulmonary arteries in BMPR-II mutant mice and patients with heritable PAH demonstrated reduced levels of Id3 compared with control subjects. Lentiviral overexpression of Id3 reduced cell cycle progression and inhibited proliferation of PASMCs. Lipopolysaccharide further reduced Id3 expression in mutant PASMCs. In conclusion, Id proteins, and particularly Id1 and Id3, are critical downstream effectors of BMP signaling in PASMCs. Loss of BMPR-II function reduces the induction of Id genes in PASMCs, Id1, and Id3 regulate the proliferation of PASMCs via cell cycle inhibition, an effect that may be exacerbated by inflammatory stimuli. PMID:23771884

  9. Human Lung Mast Cell Products Regulate Airway Smooth Muscle CXCL10 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Alkhouri, H.; Cha, V.; Tong, K.; Moir, L. M.; Armour, C. L.; Hughes, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    In asthma, the airway smooth muscle (ASM) produces CXCL10 which may attract CXCR3+ mast/T cells to it. Our aim was to investigate the effects of mast cell products on ASM cell CXCL10 production. ASM cells from people with and without asthma were stimulated with IL-1β, TNF-α, and/or IFNγ and treated with histamine (1–100 μM) ± chlorpheniramine (H1R antagonist; 1 μM) or ranitidine (H2R antagonist; 50 μM) or tryptase (1 nM) ± leupeptin (serine protease inhibitor; 50 μM), heat-inactivated tryptase, or vehicle for 4 h or 24 h. Human lung mast cells (MC) were isolated and activated with IgE/anti-IgE and supernatants were collected after 2 h or 24 h. The supernatants were added to ASM cells for 48 h and ASM cell CXCL10 production detected using ELISA (protein) and real-time PCR (mRNA). Histamine reduced IL-1β/TNF-α-induced CXCL10 protein, but not mRNA, levels independent of H1 and H2 receptor activation, whereas tryptase and MC 2 h supernatants reduced all cytokine-induced CXCL10. Tryptase also reduced CXCL10 levels in a cell-free system. Leupeptin inhibited the effects of tryptase and MC 2 h supernatants. MC 24 h supernatants contained TNF-α and amplified IFNγ-induced ASM cell CXCL10 production. This is the first evidence that MC can regulate ASM cell CXCL10 production and its degradation. Thus MC may regulate airway myositis in asthma. PMID:24648846

  10. Effect of smooth muscle relaxant drugs on proximal human ureteric activity in vivo: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Kim; Timoney, Anthony G; Keeley, Francis X

    2007-08-01

    Drugs are increasingly being used to promote stone passage in renal colic. Diclofenac, nifedipine and tamsulosin cause ureteric smooth muscle relaxation in vitro; however, in clinical trials nifedipine and tamsulosin promote stone passage whereas diclofenac has no apparent benefit. We adapted a ureteric pressure transducer catheter in an attempt to compare the human ureteric response to these drugs in vivo. The catheter was inserted into the contralateral ureter following ureteroscopy for stone disease. Contraction frequency, pressure and velocity measurements were recorded at 24 h. Each patient was randomly allocated to receive oral diclofenac, nifedipine or tamsulosin. Measurements were taken following drug administration. Eighteen patients (mean age 50 years) were recruited. Two patients were excluded intraoperatively and three required early removal of the catheter. Prior to drug administration, the mean number of contractions recorded was 0-4.1/min and the peak contraction pressure ranged from 11 to 35 mmHg. Conduction velocity ranged from 1.5 to 2.6 cm/s. Ureteric peristalsis persisted in all patients despite these drugs. Diclofenac and nifedipine produced inconsistent ureteric pressure responses but had little effect on contraction frequency. Tamsulosin significantly reduced ureteric pressure but had no effect on contraction frequency. There are many limitations associated with the use of ureteric catheters, however, they may provide some useful information when used to record the response to an intervention in the same patient. These preliminary results suggest a reduction in pressure generation may be the essential factor in the promotion of stone passage. More work is required but these drugs may work by preventing the increased, uncoordinated muscular activity seen in renal colic whilst maintaining peristalsis, thereby promoting stone passage. PMID:17530238

  11. MicroRNA Mediated Chemokine Responses in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Dileepan, Mythili; Sarver, Anne E; Rao, Savita P; Panettieri, Reynold A; Subramanian, Subbaya; Kannan, Mathur S

    2016-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells play a critical role in the pathophysiology of asthma due to their hypercontractility and their ability to proliferate and secrete inflammatory mediators. microRNAs (miRNAs) are gene regulators that control many signaling pathways and thus serve as potential therapeutic alternatives for many diseases. We have previously shown that miR-708 and miR-140-3p regulate the MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways in human ASM (HASM) cells following TNF-α exposure. In this study, we investigated the regulatory effect of these miRNAs on other asthma-related genes. Microarray analysis using the Illumina platform was performed with total RNA extracted from miR-708 (or control miR)-transfected HASM cells. Inhibition of candidate inflammation-associated gene expression was further validated by qPCR and ELISA. The most significant biologic functions for the differentially expressed gene set included decreased inflammatory response, cytokine expression and signaling. qPCR revealed inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL10, CCL2 and CXCL8, while the release of CCL11 was inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. Transfection of cells with miR-140-3p resulted in inhibition of expression of CCL11, CXCL12, CXCL10, CCL5 and CXCL8 and of TNF-α-induced CXCL12 release. In addition, expression of RARRES2, CD44 and ADAM33, genes known to contribute to the pathophysiology of asthma, were found to be inhibited in miR-708-transfected cells. These results demonstrate that miR-708 and miR-140-3p exert distinct effects on inflammation-associated gene expression and biological function of ASM cells. Targeting these miRNA networks may provide a novel therapeutic mechanism to down-regulate airway inflammation and ASM proliferation in asthma. PMID:26998837

  12. Regional differences of energetics, mechanics, and kinetics of myosin cross-bridge in human ureter smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Vargiu, Romina; Perinu, Anna; Tintrup, Frank; Broccia, Francesca; Lisa, Antonello De

    2015-01-01

    This study provides information about baseline mechanical properties of the entire muscle and the molecular contractile mechanism in human ureter smooth muscle and proposed to investigate if changes in mechanical motor performance in different regions of isolated human ureter are attributable to differences in myosin crossbridge interactions. Classic mechanical, contraction and energetic parameters derived from the tension-velocity relationship were studied in ureteral smooth muscle strips oriented longitudinally and circularly from abdominal and pelvic human ureter parts. By applying of Huxley’s mathematical model we calculated the total working crossbridge number per mm2 (Ψ), elementary force per single crossbridge (Π0), duration of maximum rate constant of crossbridge attachment 1/f1 and detachment 1/g2 and peak mechanical efficiency (Eff.max). Abdominal longitudinal smooth muscle strips exhibited significantly higher maximum isometric tension and faster maximum unloaded shortening velocity compared to pelvic ones. Contractile differences were associated with significantly higher crossbridge number per mm2. Abdominal longitudinal muscle strips showed a lower duration of maximum rate constant of crossbridge attachment and detachment and higher peak mechanical efficiency than pelvic ones. Such data suggest that the abdominal human ureter showed better mechanical motor performance mainly related to a higher crossbridge number and crossbridge kinetics differences. Such results were more evident in the longitudinal rather than in the circular layer. PMID:26069527

  13. Regional differences of energetics, mechanics, and kinetics of myosin cross-bridge in human ureter smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Vargiu, Romina; Perinu, Anna; Tintrup, Frank; Broccia, Francesca; Lisa, Antonello De

    2015-01-01

    This study provides information about baseline mechanical properties of the entire muscle and the molecular contractile mechanism in human ureter smooth muscle and proposed to investigate if changes in mechanical motor performance in different regions of isolated human ureter are attributable to differences in myosin crossbridge interactions. Classic mechanical, contraction and energetic parameters derived from the tension-velocity relationship were studied in ureteral smooth muscle strips oriented longitudinally and circularly from abdominal and pelvic human ureter parts. By applying of Huxley's mathematical model we calculated the total working crossbridge number per mm(2) (Ψ), elementary force per single crossbridge (Π0), duration of maximum rate constant of crossbridge attachment 1/f1 and detachment 1/g2 and peak mechanical efficiency (Eff.max). Abdominal longitudinal smooth muscle strips exhibited significantly higher maximum isometric tension and faster maximum unloaded shortening velocity compared to pelvic ones. Contractile differences were associated with significantly higher crossbridge number per mm(2). Abdominal longitudinal muscle strips showed a lower duration of maximum rate constant of crossbridge attachment and detachment and higher peak mechanical efficiency than pelvic ones. Such data suggest that the abdominal human ureter showed better mechanical motor performance mainly related to a higher crossbridge number and crossbridge kinetics differences. Such results were more evident in the longitudinal rather than in the circular layer. PMID:26069527

  14. Marker profile for the evaluation of human umbilical artery smooth muscle cell quality obtained by different isolation and culture methods.

    PubMed

    Mazza, G; Roßmanith, E; Lang-Olip, I; Pfeiffer, D

    2016-08-01

    Even though umbilical cord arteries are a common source of vascular smooth muscle cells, the lack of reliable marker profiles have not facilitated the isolation of human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMC). For accurate characterization of HUASMC and cells in their environment, the expression of smooth muscle and mesenchymal markers was analyzed in umbilical cord tissue sections. The resulting marker profile was then used to evaluate the quality of HUASMC isolation and culture methods. HUASMC and perivascular-Wharton's jelly stromal cells (pv-WJSC) showed positive staining for α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC), desmin, vimentin and CD90. Anti-CD10 stained only pv-WJSC. Consequently, HUASMC could be characterized as α-SMA+ , SM-MHC+ , CD10- cells, which are additionally negative for endothelial markers (CD31 and CD34). Enzymatic isolation provided primary HUASMC batches with 90-99 % purity, yet, under standard culture conditions, contaminant CD10+ cells rapidly constituted more than 80 % of the total cell population. Contamination was mainly due to the poor adhesion of HUASMC to cell culture plates, regardless of the different protein coatings (fibronectin, collagen I or gelatin). HUASMC showed strong attachment and long-term viability only in 3D matrices. The explant isolation method achieved cultures with only 13-40 % purity with considerable contamination by CD10+ cells. CD10+ cells showed spindle-like morphology and up-regulated expression of α-SMA and SM-MHC upon culture in smooth muscle differentiation medium. Considering the high contamination risk of HUASMC cultures by CD10+ neighboring cells and their phenotypic similarities, precise characterization is mandatory to avoid misleading results. PMID:25535117

  15. Systemic overexpression of matricellular protein CCN1 exacerbates obliterative bronchiolitis in mouse tracheal allografts.

    PubMed

    Raissadati, Alireza; Nykänen, Antti I; Tuuminen, Raimo; Syrjälä, Simo O; Krebs, Rainer; Arnaudova, Ralica; Rouvinen, Eeva; Wang, Xiaomin; Poller, Wolfgang; Lemström, Karl B

    2015-12-01

    Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) involves airway epithelial detachment, fibroproliferation, and inflammation, resulting in chronic rejection and transplant failure. Cysteine-rich 61 (CCN1) is an integrin receptor antagonist with a context-dependent role in inflammatory and fibroproliferative processes. We used a mouse tracheal OB model to investigate the role of CCN1 in the development of lung allograft OB. C57Bl/6 mice received a systemic injection of CCN1-expressing adenoviral vectors 2 days prior to subcutaneous implantation of tracheal allografts from major MHC-mismatched BALB/c mice. We treated another group of tracheal allograft recipients with cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide to dissect the role of αvβ3-integrin signaling in mediating CCN1 effects in tracheal allografts. Allografts were removed 4 weeks after transplantation and analyzed for luminal occlusion, inflammation, and vasculogenesis. CCN1 overexpression induced luminal occlusion (P < 0.05), fibroproliferation, and smooth muscle cell proliferation (P < 0.05). Selective activation of αvβ3-integrin receptor failed to mimic the actions of CCN1, and blocking failed to inhibit the effects of CCN1 in tracheal allografts. In conclusion, CCN1 exacerbates tracheal OB by enhancing fibroproliferation via an αvβ3-integrin-independent pathway. Further experiments are required to uncover its potentially harmful role in the development of OB after lung transplantation. PMID:26174800

  16. Decreased vascular smooth muscle cell density in medial degeneration of human abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    López-Candales, A.; Holmes, D. R.; Liao, S.; Scott, M. J.; Wickline, S. A.; Thompson, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are characterized by structural deterioration of the aortic wall leading to progressive aortic dilatation and eventual rupture. The histopathological changes in AAAs are particularly evident within the elastic media, which is normally dominated by vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). To determine whether a decrease in vascular SMCs contributes to medial degeneration, we measured SMC density in 21 normal and pathological human abdominal aortic tissue specimens using immunohistochemistry for alpha-SMC actin and direct cell counts (medial SMCs per high-power field (HPF)). Medial SMC density was not significantly different between normal aorta (n = 5; 199.5 +/- 14.9 SMCs/HPF) and atherosclerotic occlusive disease (n = 6; 176.4 +/- 13.9 SMCs/HPF), but it was reduced by 74% in AAA (n = 10; 50.9 +/- 6.1 SMCs/HPF; P < 0.01 versus normal aorta). Light and electron microscopy revealed no evidence of overt cellular necrosis, but SMCs in AAAs exhibited ultrastructural changes consistent with apoptosis. Using in situ end-labeling (ISEL) of fragmented DNA to detect apoptotic cells, up to 30% of aortic wall cells were ISEL positive in AAAs. By double-labeling techniques, many of these cells were alpha-actin-positive SMCs distributed throughout the degenerative media. In contrast, ISEL-positive cells were observed only within the intimal plaque in atherosclerotic occlusive disease. The amount of p53 protein detected by immunoblotting was increased nearly fourfold in AAA compared with normal aorta and atherosclerotic occlusive disease (P < 0.01), and immunoreactive p53 was localized to lymphocytes and residual SMCs in the aneurysm wall. Using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays a substantial amount of p53 mRNA expression was observed in AAAs. These results demonstrate that medial SMC density is significantly decreased in human AAA tissues associated with evidence of SMC apoptosis and increased production of p53, a potential

  17. Arachidonate-Regulated Ca2+ Influx in Human Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Michael A.; Prakash, Y. S.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+ influx, especially store-operated Ca2+ entry triggered by sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release, is a key component of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) regulation in airway smooth muscle (ASM). Agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in ASM that involve both influx and SR mechanisms have been previously demonstrated. In nonexcitable cells, [Ca2+]i oscillations involve Ca2+ influx via arachidonic acid (AA) –stimulated channels, which show similarities to store-operated Ca2+ entry, although their molecular identity remains undetermined. Little is known about AA-regulated Ca2+ channels or their regulation in ASM. In enzymatically dissociated human ASM cells loaded with the Ca2+ indicator, fura-2, AA (1–10 μM) triggered [Ca2+]i oscillations that were inhibited by removal of extracellular Ca2+. Other fatty acids, such as the diacylglycerol analog, 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-SN-glycerol, oleic acid, and palmitic acid (10 μM each), failed to elicit similar [Ca2+]i responses. Preincubation with LaCl3 (1 μM or 1 mM) inhibited AA-induced oscillations. Inhibition of receptor-operated channels (SKF96,365 [10 μM]), lipoxygenase (zileuton [10 μM]), or cyclooxygenase (indomethacin [10 μM]) did not affect oscillation parameters. Inhibition of SR Ca2+ release (ryanodine [10 μM] or inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor inhibitor, xestospongin C [1 μM]) decreased [Ca2+]i oscillation frequency and amplitude. Small interfering RNA against caveolin-1, stromal interaction molecule 1, or Orai3 (20 nM each) reduced the frequency and amplitude of AA-induced [Ca2+]i oscillations. In ASM cells derived from individuals with asthma, AA increased oscillation amplitude, but not frequency. These results are highly suggestive of a novel AA-mediated Ca2+–regulatory mechanism in human ASM, reminiscent of agonist-induced oscillations. Given the role of AA in ASM intracellular signaling, especially with inflammation, AA-regulated Ca2+ channels could potentially

  18. Human motion perception and smooth eye movements show similar directional biases for elongated apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beutter, B. R.; Stone, L. S.

    1998-01-01

    Although numerous studies have examined the relationship between smooth-pursuit eye movements and motion perception, it remains unresolved whether a common motion-processing system subserves both perception and pursuit. To address this question, we simultaneously recorded perceptual direction judgments and the concomitant smooth eye-movement response to a plaid stimulus that we have previously shown generates systematic perceptual errors. We measured the perceptual direction biases psychophysically and the smooth eye-movement direction biases using two methods (standard averaging and oculometric analysis). We found that the perceptual and oculomotor biases were nearly identical, suggesting that pursuit and perception share a critical motion processing stage, perhaps in area MT or MST of extrastriate visual cortex.

  19. Human Motion Perception and Smooth Eye Movements Show Similar Directional Biases for Elongated Apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beutter, Brent R.; Stone, Leland S.

    1997-01-01

    Although numerous studies have examined the relationship between smooth-pursuit eye movements and motion perception, it remains unresolved whether a common motion-processing system subserves both perception and pursuit. To address this question, we simultaneously recorded perceptual direction judgments and the concomitant smooth eye movement response to a plaid stimulus that we have previously shown generates systematic perceptual errors. We measured the perceptual direction biases psychophysically and the smooth eye-movement direction biases using two methods (standard averaging and oculometric analysis). We found that the perceptual and oculomotor biases were nearly identical suggesting that pursuit and perception share a critical motion processing stage, perhaps in area MT or MST of extrastriate visual cortex.

  20. Differentiation of Human Adipose Derived Stem Cells into Smooth Muscle Cells Is Modulated by CaMKIIγ

    PubMed Central

    Aji, Kaisaier; Maimaijiang, Munila; Aimaiti, Abudusaimi; Rexiati, Mulati; Azhati, Baihetiya; Tusong, Hamulati

    2016-01-01

    The multifunctional Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is known to participate in maintenance and switches of smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypes. However, which isoform of CaMKII is involved in differentiation of adult mesenchymal stem cells into contractile SMCs remains unclear. In the present study, we detected γ isoform of CaMKII in differentiation of human adipose derived stem cells (hASCs) into SMCs that resulted from treatment with TGF-β1 and BMP4 in combination for 7 days. The results showed that CaMKIIγ increased gradually during differentiation of hASCs as determined by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. The siRNA-mediated knockdown of CaMKIIγ decreased the protein levels and transcriptional levels of smooth muscle contractile markers (a-SMA, SM22a, calponin, and SM-MHC), while CaMKIIγ overexpression increases the transcriptional and protein levels of smooth muscle contractile markers. These results suggested that γ isoform of CaMKII plays a significant role in smooth muscle differentiation of hASCs. PMID:27493668

  1. Differentiation of Human Adipose Derived Stem Cells into Smooth Muscle Cells Is Modulated by CaMKIIγ.

    PubMed

    Aji, Kaisaier; Maimaijiang, Munila; Aimaiti, Abudusaimi; Rexiati, Mulati; Azhati, Baihetiya; Tusong, Hamulati; Cui, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The multifunctional Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is known to participate in maintenance and switches of smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypes. However, which isoform of CaMKII is involved in differentiation of adult mesenchymal stem cells into contractile SMCs remains unclear. In the present study, we detected γ isoform of CaMKII in differentiation of human adipose derived stem cells (hASCs) into SMCs that resulted from treatment with TGF-β1 and BMP4 in combination for 7 days. The results showed that CaMKIIγ increased gradually during differentiation of hASCs as determined by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. The siRNA-mediated knockdown of CaMKIIγ decreased the protein levels and transcriptional levels of smooth muscle contractile markers (a-SMA, SM22a, calponin, and SM-MHC), while CaMKIIγ overexpression increases the transcriptional and protein levels of smooth muscle contractile markers. These results suggested that γ isoform of CaMKII plays a significant role in smooth muscle differentiation of hASCs. PMID:27493668

  2. The purinergic component of human bladder smooth muscle cells’ proliferation and contraction under physiological stretch

    SciTech Connect

    Wazir, Romel; Luo, De-Yi; Tian, Ye; Yue, Xuan; Li, Hong; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2013-07-26

    Highlights: •Stretch induces proliferation and contraction. •Optimum applied stretch in vitro is 5% and 10% equibiaxial stretching respectively. •Expression of P2X1 and P2X2 is upregulated after application of stretch. •P2X2 is possibly more susceptible to stretch related changes. •Purinoceptors functioning may explain conditions with atropine resistance. -- Abstract: Objective: To investigate whether cyclic stretch induces proliferation and contraction of human smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs), mediated by P2X purinoceptor 1 and 2 and the signal transduction mechanisms of this process. Methods: HBSMCs were seeded on silicone membrane and stretched under varying parameters; (equibiaxial elongation: 2.5%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%), (Frequency: 0.05 Hz, 0.1 Hz, 0.2 Hz, 0.5 Hz, 1 Hz). 5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine assay was employed for proliferative studies. Contractility of the cells was determined using collagen gel contraction assay. After optimal physiological stretch was established; P2X1 and P2X2 were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction and Western Blot. Specificity of purinoceptors was maintained by employing specific inhibitors; (NF023 for P2X1, and A317491for P2X2), in some experiments. Results: Optimum proliferation and contractility were observed at 5% and 10% equibiaxial stretching respectively, applied at a frequency of 0.1 Hz; At 5% stretch, proliferation increased from 0.837 ± 0.026 (control) to 1.462 ± 0.023%, p < 0.05. Mean contraction at 10% stretching increased from 31.7 ± 2.3%, (control) to 78.28 ±1.45%, p < 0.05. Expression of P2X1 and P2X2 was upregulated after application of stretch. Inhibition had effects on proliferation (1.232 ± 0.051, p < 0.05 NF023) and (1.302 ± 0.021, p < 0.05 A314791) while contractility was markedly reduced (68.24 ± 2.31, p < 0.05 NF023) and (73.2 ± 2.87, p < 0.05 A314791). These findings shows that mechanical stretch can promote magnitude-dependent proliferative and contractile modulation of HBSMCs in

  3. Free Fatty Acid Palmitate Impairs the Vitality and Function of Cultured Human Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oberbach, Andreas; Schlichting, Nadine; Heinrich, Marco; Till, Holger; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Neuhaus, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Background Incidence of urinary tract infections is elevated in patients with diabetes mellitus. Those patients show increased levels of the saturated free fatty acid palmitate. As recently shown metabolic alterations induced by palmitate include production and secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukine-6 (IL-6) in cultured human bladder smooth muscle cells (hBSMC). Here we studied the influence of palmitate on vital cell properties, for example, regulation of cell proliferation, mitochondrial enzyme activity and antioxidant capacity in hBSMC, and analyzed the involvement of major cytokine signaling pathways. Methodology/Principal Findings HBSMC cultures were set up from bladder tissue of patients undergoing cystectomy and stimulated with palmitate. We analyzed cell proliferation, mitochondrial enzyme activity, and antioxidant capacity by ELISA and confocal immunofluorescence. In signal transduction inhibition experiments we evaluated the involvement of NF-κB, JAK/STAT, MEK1, PI3K, and JNK in major cytokine signaling pathway regulation. We found: (i) palmitate decreased cell proliferation, increased mitochondrial enzyme activity and antioxidant capacity; (ii) direct inhibition of cytokine receptor by AG490 even more strongly suppressed cell proliferation in palmitate-stimulated cells, while counteracting palmitate-induced increase of antioxidant capacity; (iii) in contrast knockdown of the STAT3 inhibitor SOCS3 increased cell proliferation and antioxidant capacity; (iv) further downstream JAK/STAT3 signaling cascade the inhibition of PI3K or JNK enhanced palmitate induced suppression of cell proliferation; (v) increase of mitochondrial enzyme activity by palmitate was enhanced by inhibition of PI3K but counteracted by inhibition of MEK1. Conclusions/Significance Saturated free fatty acids (e.g., palmitate) cause massive alterations in vital cell functions of cultured hBSMC involving distinct major cytokine signaling pathways. Thereby, certain

  4. Iptakalim influences the proliferation and apoptosis of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    LI, QINGLIN; YAN, XIAOPEI; KONG, HUI; XIE, WEIPING; WANG, HONG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of an ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel opener iptakalim (IPT) on the proliferation and apoptosis of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMCs), and examine the potential value of IPT to hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) at a cellular level. HPASMCs were divided into the control, ET-1, ET-1+IPT and ET-1+IPT+glibenclamide (GLI) groups. GLI was administered 30 min prior to ET-1 and IPT. The 4 groups were incubated with corresponding reagents for 24 h. Cell viability was evaluated using a CCK-8 assay, cell proliferation by 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation assay, and cell apoptosis via the expression of apoptosis-related proteins, i.e., Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) using western blotting. We incubated HPASMCs with varying concentrations of ET-1 for 24, 48 and 72 h, and found that cell survival rate was increased in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05) rather than in a time-dependent manner (P>0.05). After co-incubation of HPASMCs with varying concentrations of IPT and ET-1 for 24 h, the cell survival rate was decreased in a dose-dependent manner. The cell survival rate in the IPT+ET-1 group was significantly lower than that in the ET-1 group (P<0.05). The cell viability (P<0.05) and proliferation (P<0.05) in the ET-1 group were higher than those in the control group, and the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 was lower than the control group (P<0.05). The cell viability (P<0.05) and proliferation (P<0.05) in the ET-1+IPT group were lower than those in the ET-1 group, and the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 was higher than that in the ET-1 group (P<0.05). The cell viability (P<0.05) and proliferation (P<0.05) in the ET-1+IPT+GLI group were higher than those in the ET-1+IPT group, and the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 was lower than that in the ET-1+IPT group (P<0.05). In conclusion, IPT inhibited ET-1-induced HPASMC proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis. Thus, it may play an

  5. Iptakalim influences the proliferation and apoptosis of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinglin; Yan, Xiaopei; Kong, Hui; Xie, Weiping; Wang, Hong

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of an ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel opener iptakalim (IPT) on the proliferation and apoptosis of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMCs), and examine the potential value of IPT to hypoxic pulmonary hyper-tension (HPH) at a cellular level. HPASMCs were divided into the control, ET-1, ET-1+IPT and ET-1+IPT+glibenclamide (GLI) groups. GLI was administered 30 min prior to ET-1 and IPT. The 4 groups were incubated with corresponding reagents for 24 h. Cell viability was evaluated using a CCK-8 assay, cell proliferation by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation assay, and cell apoptosis via the expression of apoptosis-related proteins, i.e., Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) using western blotting. We incubated HPASMCs with varying concentrations of ET-1 for 24, 48 and 72 h, and found that cell survival rate was increased in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05) rather than in a time-dependent manner (P>0.05). After co-incubation of HPASMCs with varying concentrations of IPT and ET-1 for 24 h, the cell survival rate was decreased in a dose-dependent manner. The cell survival rate in the IPT+ET-1 group was significantly lower than that in the ET-1 group (P<0.05). The cell viability (P<0.05) and proliferation (P<0.05) in the ET-1 group were higher than those in the control group, and the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 was lower than the control group (P<0.05). The cell viability (P<0.05) and proliferation (P<0.05) in the ET-1+IPT group were lower than those in the ET-1 group, and the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 was higher than that in the ET-1 group (P<0.05). The cell viability (P<0.05) and proliferation (P<0.05) in the ET-1+IPT+GLI group were higher than those in the ET-1+IPT group, and the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 was lower than that in the ET-1+IPT group (P<0.05). In conclusion, IPT inhibited ET-1‑induced HPASMC proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis. Thus, it may

  6. Tracheal tissue engineering in rats.

    PubMed

    Jungebluth, Philipp; Haag, Johannes C; Sjöqvist, Sebastian; Gustafsson, Ylva; Beltrán Rodríguez, Antonio; Del Gaudio, Costantino; Bianco, Alessandra; Dehnisch, Ivar; Uhlén, Per; Baiguera, Silvia; Lemon, Greg; Lim, Mei Ling; Macchiarini, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    Tissue-engineered tracheal transplants have been successfully performed clinically. However, before becoming a routine clinical procedure, further preclinical studies are necessary to determine the underlying mechanisms of in situ tissue regeneration. Here we describe a protocol using a tissue engineering strategy and orthotopic transplantation of either natural decellularized donor tracheae or artificial electrospun nanofiber scaffolds into a rat model. The protocol includes details regarding how to assess the scaffolds' biomechanical properties and cell viability before implantation. It is a reliable and reproducible model that can be used to investigate the crucial aspects and pathways of in situ tracheal tissue restoration and regeneration. The model can be established in <6 months, and it may also provide a means to investigate cell-surface interactions, cell differentiation and stem cell fate. PMID:25122525

  7. Gas Exchange Models for a Flexible Insect Tracheal System.

    PubMed

    Simelane, S M; Abelman, S; Duncan, F D

    2016-06-01

    In this paper two models for movement of respiratory gases in the insect trachea are presented. One model considers the tracheal system as a single flexible compartment while the other model considers the trachea as a single flexible compartment with gas exchange. This work represents an extension of Ben-Tal's work on compartmental gas exchange in human lungs and is applied to the insect tracheal system. The purpose of the work is to study nonlinear phenomena seen in the insect respiratory system. It is assumed that the flow inside the trachea is laminar, and that the air inside the chamber behaves as an ideal gas. Further, with the isothermal assumption, the expressions for the tracheal partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide, rate of volume change, and the rates of change of oxygen concentration and carbon dioxide concentration are derived. The effects of some flow parameters such as diffusion capacities, reaction rates and air concentrations on net flow are studied. Numerical simulations of the tracheal flow characteristics are performed. The models developed provide a mathematical framework to further investigate gas exchange in insects. PMID:27209375

  8. In vitro effect of medicinal plants used to treat erectile dysfunction on smooth muscle relaxation and human sperm.

    PubMed

    Rakuambo, N C; Meyer, J J M; Hussein, A; Huyser, C; Mdlalose, S P; Raidani, T G

    2006-04-21

    Chloroform and ethanol extracts of root bark of Securidaca longepedunculata, Wrightia natalensis and Rhoicissus tridentata were investigated for their in vitro activity on the contraction of corpus cavernosal smooth muscle of white New Zealand rabbits. Some of the extracts of these plants relaxed the corpus cavernosal smooth muscle at low concentrations. The highest activity was obtained from Securidaca longepedunculata chloroform extracts at a concentration of 13.0 mg/ml, which induced 66.6% relaxation. Viagra was used as a positive control in this study. Extracts of Securidaca longepedunculata added to human spermatozoa affected certain sperm parameters negatively at 6.5 mg/ml and higher whilst there was no effect at 1.0 mg/ml. PMID:16309865

  9. CD16⁺ monocytes with smooth muscle cell characteristics are reduced in human renal chronic transplant dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Boersema, M; van den Born, J C; van Ark, J; Harms, G; Seelen, M A; van Dijk, M C R F; van Goor, H; Navis, G J; Popa, E R; Hillebrands, J L

    2015-05-01

    In chronic transplant dysfunction (CTD), persistent (allo)immune-mediated inflammation eventually leads to tissue remodeling including neointima formation in intragraft arteries. We previously showed that recipient-derived neointimal α-SMA(+) smooth muscle-like cells are present in human renal allografts with CTD. Human PBMC contain myeloid cells capable of differentiating into α-SMA(+) cells in vitro; the phenotype of the ancestral subset is as yet unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether monocyte subsets contain cells with smooth muscle-like cell differentiation capacity and whether CTD in renal transplant recipients is associated with a shift in these monocyte subsets. To accomplish this goal, monocyte subsets from healthy controls were sorted based on CD14 and CD16 expression to investigate gene expression levels of mesenchymal markers α-SMA and SM22α. CD14(+)/CD16(++) monocytes displayed increased α-SMA and SM22α mRNA expression compared with CD14(++)/CD16(-) monocytes, suggesting increased differentiation potential toward smooth muscle-like cells. Flow cytometry revealed that in non-CTD transplant recipients the percentage of CD14(+)/CD16(++) monocytes was reduced, with an even further reduction in patients with CTD. To determine a potential correlation between CD14(+)/CD16(++) monocytes and α-SMA(+) cell outgrowth potential in vitro, PBMC of healthy controls and transplant recipients with and without CTD were cultured under fibrotic culture conditions, and indeed a significant correlation (p=0.0002, r=0.62) was observed. Finally, double staining for α-SMA and CD16 revealed presence of α-SMA(+)CD16(+) cells in kidney explants from CTD patients, albeit at very low numbers. Our data represent evidence that, compared to CD14(++)CD16(-) monocytes, CD14(+)CD16(++) monocytes have an increased expression of smooth muscle cell-associated genes. This monocyte subpopulation is reduced in renal transplant patients with CTD, possibly due to selective

  10. Tracheal necrosis with surgical emphysema following thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, A; Ganguly, M; Saidha, N; Gulia, P

    2009-01-01

    Tracheal necrosis after thyroidectomy is an extremely rare event with only a few published reports. We present a case of a 65-year-old male who developed rapidly progressive surgical emphysema of face and upper thorax on the seventh day following total thyroidectomy. Prompt surgical exploration of neck revealed a tracheal rent at the level of the second tracheal ring. This hole was then refashioned into a formal tracheostomy. Patient had an eventful recovery. Tracheostomy was closed by the 14th day. The complication was probably related to tracheal injury sustained due to electro-coagulation and subsequent secondary infection. PMID:19884745

  11. Hyperphosphatemia induces cellular senescence in human aorta smooth muscle cells through integrin linked kinase (ILK) up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Troyano, Nuria; Nogal, María Del; Mora, Inés; Diaz-Naves, Manuel; Lopez-Carrillo, Natalia; Sosa, Patricia; Rodriguez-Puyol, Diego; Olmos, Gemma; Ruiz-Torres, María P

    2015-12-01

    Aging is conditioned by genetic and environmental factors. Hyperphosphatemia is related to some pathologies, affecting to vascular cells behavior. This work analyze whether high concentration of extracellular phosphate induces vascular smooth muscle cells senescence, exploring the intracellular mechanisms and highlighting the in vivo relevance of this phenomenon. Human aortic smooth muscle cells treated with β-Glycerophosphate (BGP, 10mM) suffered cellular senescence by increasing p53, p21 and p16 expression and the senescence associated β-galactosidase activity. In parallel, BGP induced ILK overexpression, dependent on the IGF-1 receptor activation, and oxidative stress. Down-regulating ILK expression prevented BGP-induced senescence and oxidative stress. Aortic rings from young rats treated with 10mM BGP for 48h, showed increased p53, p16 and ILK expression and SA-β-gal activity. Seven/eight nephrectomized rats feeding a hyperphosphatemic diet and fifteenth- month old mice showed hyperphosphatemia and aortic ILK, p53 and p16 expression. In conclusion, we demonstrated that high extracellular concentration of phosphate induced senescence in cultured smooth muscle through the activation of IGF-1 receptor and ILK overexpression and provided solid evidences for the in vivo relevance of these results since aged animals showed high levels of serum phosphate linked to increased expression of ILK and senescence genes. PMID:26467393

  12. Molecular responses of rat tracheal epithelial cells to transmembrane pressure.

    PubMed

    Ressler, B; Lee, R T; Randell, S H; Drazen, J M; Kamm, R D

    2000-06-01

    Smooth muscle constriction in asthma causes the airway to buckle into a rosette pattern, folding the epithelium into deep crevasses. The epithelial cells in these folds are pushed up against each other and thereby experience compressive stresses. To study the epithelial cell response to compressive stress, we subjected primary cultures of rat tracheal epithelial cells to constant elevated pressures on their apical surface (i.e., a transmembrane pressure) and examined changes in the expression of genes that are important for extracellular matrix production and maintenance of smooth muscle activation. Northern blot analysis of RNA extracted from cells subjected to transmembrane pressure showed induction of early growth response-1 (Egr-1), endothelin-1, and transforming growth factor-beta1 in a pressure-dependent and time-dependent manner. Increases in Egr-1 protein were detected by immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrate that airway epithelial cells respond rapidly to compressive stresses. Potential transduction mechanisms of transmembrane pressure were also investigated. PMID:10835333

  13. Structure, chromosome location, and expression of the human smooth muscle (enteric type). gamma. -actin gene: Evolution of six human actin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Miwa, Takeshi; Manabe, Yoshihisa; Kamada, Shinji; Kakunaga, Takeo ); Kurokawa, Kiyoshi; Ueyama, Hisao ); Kanda, Naotoshi ); Bruns, G. )

    1991-06-01

    Recombinant phages that carry the human smooth muscle (enteric type) {gamma}-actin gene were isolated from human genomic DNA libraries. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence matches those of cDNAs but differs from the protein sequence previously reported at one amino acid position, codon 359. The gene containing one 5{prime} untranslated exon and eight coding exons extends for 27 kb on human chromosome 2. The intron between codons 84 and 85 (site 3) is unique to the two smooth muscle actin genes. From characterized molecular structures of the six human actin isoform genes, the authors propose a hypothesis of evolutionary pathway of the actin gene family. A presumed ancestral actin isoform gene had introns at least sites, 1, 2, and 4 through 8. Cytoplasmic actin genes may have directly evolved from it through loss of introns at sites 5 and 6. However, through duplication of the ancestral actin gene with substitutions of many amino acids, a prototype of muscle actin genes had been created. Subsequently, striated muscle actin and smooth muscle actin genes may have evolved from this prototype by loss of an intron at site 4 and acquisition of a new intron at site 3, respectively.

  14. Induction of hyaluronic acid synthase 2 (HAS2) in human vascular smooth muscle cells by vasodilatory prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Sussmann, M; Sarbia, M; Meyer-Kirchrath, J; Nüsing, R M; Schrör, K; Fischer, J W

    2004-03-19

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a prominent constituent of the extracellular matrix of atherosclerotic vascular lesions in humans known to modulate vascular smooth muscle phenotype. The regulation of HA synthesis by vasodilatory prostaglandins was analyzed in human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs). The prostacyclin analogue, iloprost (100 nmol/L), markedly increased pericellular formation of HA coats and HA secretion into the cell culture medium in human arterial SMCs (8.7+/-1.6-fold). Expression of HA synthase 2 (HAS2) was determined by semiquantitative RT-PCR and found to be strongly upregulated at concentrations of iloprost between 1 and 100 nmol/L after 3 hours. Furthermore, endogenous cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) activity was required for basal expression of HAS2 mRNA in SMCs in vitro. Total HA secretion in response to iloprost was markedly decreased by RNA interference (RNAi), specific for HAS2. In addition, siRNA targeting HAS2 strongly increased the spreading of human SMCs compared with mock-transfected cells. HAS2 mRNA levels were also stimulated by a selective prostacyclin receptor (IP) agonist, cicaprost (10 nmol/L), prostaglandin E(2) (10 nmol/L), and the EP(2) receptor agonist, butaprost (1 micromol/L). Induction of HAS2 mRNA and HA synthesis by prostaglandins was mimicked by stable cAMP analogues and forskolin. In human atherectomy specimens from the internal carotid artery, HA deposits and COX2 expression colocalized frequently. In addition, strong EP(2) receptor expression was detected in SMCs in HA-rich areas. Therefore, upregulation of HAS2 expression via EP(2) and IP receptors might contribute to the accumulation of HA during human atherosclerosis, thereby mediating proatherosclerotic functions of COX2. PMID:14752026

  15. Iatrogenic tracheal stenosis presenting as persistent asthma.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Timothy J; Ghattas, Christian; Valino, Cherry Ann

    2013-09-01

    Although the incidence of post-intubation tracheal stenosis has markedly decreased with the advent of large volume, low pressure endotracheal tube cuffs, it still occurs, commonly in patients after prolonged intubation. We report a case of tracheal stenosis that developed after a brief period of endotracheal intubation, and that was misdiagnosed and treated as asthma and panic attacks. PMID:23345469

  16. Biocompatibility of Experimental Polymeric Tracheal Matrices.

    PubMed

    Kiselevskii, M V; Chikileva, I O; Vlasenko, R Ya; Sitdikova, S M; Tenchurin, T Kh; Mamagulashvili, V G; Shepelev, A D; Grigoriev, T A; Chvalun, S N

    2016-08-01

    Biocompatibility of a new tracheal matrix is studied. The new matrix is based on polymeric ultra-fiber material colonized by mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells. The experiments demonstrate cytoconductivity of the synthetic matrices and no signs of their degradation within 2 months after their implantation to recipient mice. These data suggest further studies of the synthetic tracheal matrices on large laboratory animals. PMID:27591876

  17. Optical metabolic imaging for monitoring tracheal health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharick, Joe T.; Gil, Daniel A.; Choma, Michael A.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2016-04-01

    The health of the tracheal mucosa and submucosa is a vital yet poorly understood component of critical care medicine, and a minimally-invasive method is needed to monitor tracheal health in patients. Of particular interest are the ciliated cells of the tracheal epithelium that move mucus away from the lungs and prevent respiratory infection. Optical metabolic imaging (OMI) allows cellular-level measurement of metabolism, and is a compelling method for assessing tracheal health because ciliary motor proteins require ATP to function. In this pilot study, we apply multiphoton imaging of the fluorescence intensities and lifetimes of metabolic co-enzymes NAD(P)H and FAD to the mucosa and submucosa of ex vivo mouse trachea. We demonstrate the feasibility and potential diagnostic utility of these measurements for assessing tracheal health and pathophysiology at the single-cell level.

  18. A novel in vitro model system for smooth muscle differentiation from human embryonic stem cell-derived mesenchymal cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xia; Stice, Steven L.; Boyd, Nolan L.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a novel in vitro model for smooth muscle cell (SMC) differentiation from human embryonic stem cell-derived mesenchymal cells (hES-MCs). We found that hES-MCs were differentiated to SMCs by transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in a dose- and time-dependent manner as demonstrated by the expression of SMC-specific genes smooth muscle α-actin, calponin, and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain. Under normal growth conditions, however, the differentiation capacity of hES-MCs was very limited. hES-MC-derived SMCs had an elongated and spindle-shaped morphology and contracted in response to the induction of carbachol and KCl. KCl-induced calcium transient was also evident in these cells. Compared with the parental cells, TGF-β-treated hES-MCs sustained the endothelial tube formation for a longer time due to the sustained SMC phenotype. Mechanistically, TGF-β-induced differentiation was both Smad- and serum response factor/myocardin dependent. TGF-β regulated myocardin expression via multiple signaling pathways including Smad2/3, p38 MAPK, and PI3K. Importantly, we found that a low level of myocardin was present in mesoderm prior to SMC lineage determination, and a high level of myocardin was not induced until the differentiation process was initiated. Taken together, our study characterized a novel SMC differentiation model that can be used for studying human SMC differentiation from mesoderm during vascular development. PMID:23220114

  19. Potential Role of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β in Regulation of Myocardin Activity in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi-Xia; Shi, Zhan; Singh, Pavneet; Yin, Hao; Yu, Yan-Ni; Li, Long; Walsh, Michael P; Gui, Yu; Zheng, Xi-Long

    2016-02-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β, a serine/threonine kinase with an inhibitory role in glycogen synthesis in hepatocytes and skeletal muscle, is also expressed in cardiac and smooth muscles. Inhibition of GSK-3β results in cardiac hypertrophy through reducing phosphorylation and increasing transcriptional activity of myocardin, a transcriptional co-activator for serum response factor. Myocardin plays critical roles in differentiation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). This study, therefore, aimed to examine whether and how inhibition of GSK-3β regulates myocardin activity in human vascular SMCs. Treatment of SMCs with the GSK-3β inhibitors AR-A014418 and TWS 119 significantly reduced endogenous myocardin activity, as indicated by lower expression of myocardin target genes (and gene products), CNN1 (calponin), TAGLN1 (SM22), and ACTA2 (SM α-actin). In human SMCs overexpressing myocardin through the T-REx system, treatment with either GSK-3β inhibitor also inhibited the expression of CNN1, TAGLN1, and ACTA2. These effects of GSK-3β inhibitors were mimicked by transfection with GSK-3β siRNA. Notably, both AR-A014418 and TWS 119 decreased the serine/threonine phosphorylation of myocardin. The chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that AR-A014418 treatment reduced myocardin occupancy of the promoter of the myocardin target gene ACTA2. Overexpression of a dominant-negative GSK-3β mutant in myocardin-overexpressing SMCs reduced the expression of calponin, SM22, and SM α-actin. As expected, overexpression of constitutively active or wild-type GSK-3β in SMCs without myocardin overexpression increased expression of these proteins. In summary, our results indicate that inhibition of GSK-3β reduces myocardin transcriptional activity, suggesting a role for GSK-3β in myocardin transcriptional activity and smooth muscle differentiation. PMID:26129946

  20. The role of selective cyclooxygenase isoforms in human intestinal smooth muscle cell stimulated prostanoid formation and proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Longo, W E; Erickson, B; Panesar, N; Mazuski, J E; Robinson, S; Kaminski, D L

    1998-01-01

    Intestinal smooth muscle plays a major role in the repair of injured intestine and contributes to the prostanoid pool during intestinal inflammatory states. Cyclooxygenase (COX), which catalyzes the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostanoids exists in two isoforms, COX-1 and COX-2. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative contributions of COX-1 and COX-2 in the production of prostanoids by human intestinal smooth muscle (HISM) cells when stimulated by interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Furthermore the effects of specific COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors on the proliferation of smooth muscle cells was also evaluated. Confluent monolayer cultures of HISM cells were incubated with IL-1beta or LPS for 0-24h while control cells received medium alone. PGE2 and PGI2 as 6-keto-PGF1alpha and LTB4 were measured by a specific radioimmunoassay. COX enzymes were evaluated by Western immunoblotting. Unstimulated and stimulated cells were exposed to the specific COX-1 inhibitor valerylsalicylic acid (VSA) and the COX-2 inhibitors NS-398 and SC-58125. The effects of serum on proliferation were then evaluated in the presence of each of the specific COX inhibitors by incorporation of 3H-thymidine into DNA. IL-1beta and LPS increased both PGE2 and 6-keto-PGF1alpha in a dose dependent fashion with enhanced production detected two hours following exposure. Neither stimulus stimulated LTB4 release. Immunoblot analysis using isoform-specific antibodies showed that both COX-1 and COX-2 were present constitutively. Furthermore, COX-1 was upregulated by each inflammatory stimulus. In a separate set of experiments cells were pretreated with either the selective COX-1 inhibitor VSA or the selective COX-2 inhibitors NS-398 or SC-58125 prior to treatment with IL-1beta or LPS. The COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitors decreased both basal and IL-1beta and LPS stimulated prostanoid release. Spontaneous DNA synthesis was present and serum consistently increased

  1. Vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation from human stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Sarah K; Husain, Mansoor

    2016-05-15

    Transplantation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is a promising cellular therapy to promote angiogenesis and wound healing. However, VSMCs are derived from diverse embryonic sources which may influence their role in the development of vascular disease and in its therapeutic modulation. Despite progress in understanding the mechanisms of VSMC differentiation, there remains a shortage of robust methods for generating lineage-specific VSMCs from pluripotent and adult stem/progenitor cells in serum-free conditions. Here we describe a method for differentiating pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as skin-derived precursors, into lateral plate-derived VSMCs including 'coronary-like' VSMCs and neural crest-derived VSMC, respectively. We believe this approach will have broad applications in modeling origin-specific disease vulnerability and in developing personalized cell-based vascular grafts for regenerative medicine. PMID:26678794

  2. The impact of vitamin D on asthmatic human airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hall, Sannette C; Fischer, Kimberly D; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-02-01

    Asthma is a chronic heterogeneous disorder, which involves airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway remodeling. The airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundle regulates the broncho-motor tone and plays a critical role in AHR as well as orchestrating inflammation. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to increased severity and exacerbations of symptoms in asthmatic patients. It has been shown to modulate both immune and structural cells, including ASM cells, in inflammatory diseases. Given that current asthma therapies have not been successful in reversing airway remodeling, vitamin D supplementation as a potential therapeutic option has gained a great deal of attention. Here, we highlight the potential immunomodulatory properties of vitamin D in regulating ASM function and airway inflammation in bronchial asthma. PMID:26634624

  3. Specific high-affinity binding of high density lipoproteins to cultured human skin fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Biesbroeck, R; Oram, J F; Albers, J J; Bierman, E L

    1983-03-01

    Binding of human high density lipoproteins (HDL, d = 1.063-1.21) to cultured human fibroblasts and human arterial smooth muscle cells was studied using HDL subjected to heparin-agarose affinity chromatography to remove apoprotein (apo) E and B. Saturation curves for binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL showed at least two components: low-affinity nonsaturable binding and high-affinity binding that saturated at approximately 20 micrograms HDL protein/ml. Scatchard analysis of high-affinity binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL to normal fibroblasts yielded plots that were significantly linear, indicative of a single class of binding sites. Saturation curves for binding of both 125I-HDL3 (d = 1.125-1.21) and apo E-free 125I-HDL to low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-negative fibroblasts also showed high-affinity binding that yielded linear Scatchard plots. On a total protein basis, HDL2 (d = 1.063-1.10), HDL3 and very high density lipoproteins (VHDL, d = 1.21-1.25) competed as effectively as apo E-free HDL for binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL to normal fibroblasts. Also, HDL2, HDL3, and VHDL competed similarly for binding of 125I-HDL3 to LDL receptor-negative fibroblasts. In contrast, LDL was a weak competitor for HDL binding. These results indicate that both human fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells possess specific high affinity HDL binding sites. As indicated by enhanced LDL binding and degradation and increased sterol synthesis, apo E-free HDL3 promoted cholesterol efflux from fibroblasts. These effects also saturated at HDL3 concentrations of 20 micrograms/ml, suggesting that promotion of cholesterol efflux by HDL is mediated by binding to the high-affinity cell surface sites. PMID:6826722

  4. First-line tracheal resection and primary anastomosis for postintubation tracheal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, H; Mostafa, A M; Soliman, S; Shoukry, T; El-Nori, A A; El-Bawab, H Y

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Tracheal stenosis following intubation is the most common indication for tracheal resection and reconstruction. Endoscopic dilation is almost always associated with recurrence. This study investigated first-line surgical resection and anastomosis performed in fit patients presenting with postintubation tracheal stenosis. Methods Between February 2011 and November 2014, a prospective study was performed involving patients who underwent first-line tracheal resection and primary anastomosis after presenting with postintubation tracheal stenosis. Results A total of 30 patients (20 male) were operated on. The median age was 23.5 years (range: 13-77 years). Seventeen patients (56.7%) had had previous endoscopic tracheal dilation, four (13.3%) had had tracheal stents inserted prior to surgery and one (3.3%) had undergone previous tracheal resection. Nineteen patients (63.3%) had had a tracheostomy. Eight patients (26.7%) had had no previous tracheal interventions. The median time of intubation in those developing tracheal stenosis was 20.5 days (range: 0-45 days). The median length of hospital stay was 10.5 days (range: 7-21 days). The success rate for anastomoses was 96.7% (29/30). One patient needed a permanent tracheostomy. The in-hospital mortality rate was 3.3%: 1 patient died from a chest infection 21 days after surgery. There was no mortality or morbidity in the group undergoing first-line surgery for de novo tracheal lesions. Conclusions First-line tracheal resection with primary anastomosis is a safe option for the treatment of tracheal stenosis following intubation and obviates the need for repeated dilations. Endoscopic dilation should be reserved for those patients with significant co-morbidities or as a temporary measure in non-equipped centres. PMID:27138847

  5. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube in... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770...

  6. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube in... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5770 - Tracheal tube fixation device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5770 Tracheal tube fixation device. (a) Identification. A tracheal tube fixation device is a device used to hold a tracheal tube in... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tracheal tube fixation device. 868.5770...

  8. Sonographic detection of tracheal or esophageal intubation: A cadaver study

    PubMed Central

    Tejesh, CA; Manjunath, AC; Shivakumar, S; Vinayak, PS; Yatish, B; Geetha, CR

    2016-01-01

    Background: The correct position of the endotracheal tube is confirmed by various modalities, most of which are not entirely reliable. Ultrasound is now increasingly available to anesthesiologists in the operating theater and is an attractive alternative. To investigate the usefulness of sonography in identifying the correct tracheal tube position in human cadavers. Materials and Methods: Endotracheal tubes placed randomly into trachea or esophagus was identified with a linear ultrasound probe placed transversely just above the suprasternal notch by a single anesthesiologist. Results: Of the 100 intubations performed at random, 99 were correctly identified to give a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 97.9%. Conclusion: Sonography is a useful technique to identify correct position of the tracheal tube. PMID:27375387

  9. Tissue-Specific Cultured Human Pericytes: Perivascular Cells from Smooth Muscle Tissue Have Restricted Mesodermal Differentiation Ability.

    PubMed

    Pierantozzi, Enrico; Vezzani, Bianca; Badin, Margherita; Curina, Carlo; Severi, Filiberto Maria; Petraglia, Felice; Randazzo, Davide; Rossi, Daniela; Sorrentino, Vincenzo

    2016-05-01

    Microvascular pericytes (PCs) are considered the adult counterpart of the embryonic mesoangioblasts, which represent a multipotent cell population that resides in the dorsal aorta of the developing embryo. Although PCs have been isolated from several adult organs and tissues, it is still controversial whether PCs from different tissues exhibit distinct differentiation potentials. To address this point, we investigated the differentiation potentials of isogenic human cultured PCs isolated from skeletal (sk-hPCs) and smooth muscle tissues (sm-hPCs). We found that both sk-hPCs and sm-hPCs expressed known pericytic markers and did not express endothelial, hematopoietic, and myogenic markers. Both sk-hPCs and sm-hPCs were able to differentiate into smooth muscle cells. In contrast, sk-hPCs, but not sm-hPCs, differentiated in skeletal muscle cells and osteocytes. Given the reported ability of the Notch pathway to regulate skeletal muscle and osteogenic differentiation, sk-hPCs and sm-hPCs were treated with N-[N-(3,5- difluorophenacetyl)-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT), a known inhibitor of Notch signaling. DAPT treatment, as assessed by histological and molecular analysis, enhanced myogenic differentiation and abolished osteogenic potential of sk-hPCs. In contrast, DAPT treatment did not affect either myogenic or osteogenic differentiation of sm-hPCs. In summary, these results indicate that, despite being isolated from the same anatomical niche, cultured PCs from skeletal muscle and smooth muscle tissues display distinct differentiation abilities. PMID:26956507

  10. G-Protein-Coupled Receptor 35 Mediates Human Saphenous Vein Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration and Endothelial Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    McCallum, Jennifer E.; Mackenzie, Amanda E.; Divorty, Nina; Clarke, Carolyn; Delles, Christian; Milligan, Graeme; Nicklin, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and proliferation is central to neointima formation in vein graft failure following coronary artery bypass. However, there are currently no pharmacological interventions that prevent vein graft failure through intimal occlusion. It is hence a therapeutic target. Here, we investigated the contribution of GPR35 to human VSMC and endothelial cell (EC) migration, using a scratch-wound assay, and also the contribution to proliferation, using MTS and BrdU assays, in in vitro models using recently characterized human GPR35 ortholog-selective small-molecule agonists and antagonists. Real-time PCR studies showed GPR35 to be robustly expressed in human VSMCs and ECs. Stimulation of GPR35, with either the human-selective agonist pamoic acid or the reference agonist zaprinast, promoted VSMC migration in the scratch-wound assay. These effects were blocked by coincubation with either of the human GPR35-specific antagonists, CID-2745687 or ML-145. These GPR35-mediated effects were produced by inducing alterations in the actin cytoskeleton via the Rho A/Rho kinase signaling axis. Additionally, the agonist ligands stimulated a proliferative response in ECs. These studies highlight the potential that small molecules that stimulate or block GPR35 activity can modulate vascular proliferation and migration. These data propose GPR35 as a translational therapeutic target in vascular remodeling. PMID:27064272

  11. Tracheal Stenosis and Adenocarcinoma in an Olive Baboon (Papio cynocephalus anubis)

    PubMed Central

    Asselin, Kristina A; Scholz, Jodi A Carlson; Zeiss, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    An adult female baboon (Papio cynocephalus anubis) presented for progressive difficulty in endotracheal intubation. Over a 7-y period prior to presentation, she was anesthetized and intubated 67 times for imaging by using single-photon emission computed tomography or positron emission tomography. Laryngoscopic examination revealed tracheal stenosis. Because of increased anesthetic risk and lack of alternative use, she was euthanized, and partial necropsy focusing on the larynx, trachea, and associated structures was performed. Gross examination revealed rigidity and functional fusion of the proximal 5 or 6 tracheal rings and narrowing of the lumen. Histology revealed ossification of tracheal rings and fibrosis of overlying tissue. In addition, a transmural umbilicated mass was present midway down the cervical trachea on its dorsolateral aspect. Histology of the tracheal mass identified a relatively well-circumscribed transmural adenocarcinoma. The combination of overall histologic pattern, evidence of anaplasia, and results of immunohistochemical staining was consistent with a diagnosis of adenoid cystic carcinoma. Anterior tracheal stenosis is a reported complication of intubation in humans and animals. Primary tracheal neoplasms are rare in domestic and research animals and, to our knowledge, have not previously been reported to occur in nonhuman primates. PMID:22330583

  12. Ultrasonographic evaluation of tracheal collapse in dogs.

    PubMed

    Eom, Kidong; Moon, Kumjung; Seong, Yunsang; Oh, Taeho; Yi, Sungjoon; Lee, Keunwoo; Jang, Kwangho

    2008-12-01

    Tracheal ultrasonography was performed to measure the width of the tracheal ring shadow and to assess the clinical relevance of these measurements for identifying tracheal collapse. The first tracheal ring width (FTRW) and thoracic inlet tracheal ring width (TITRW) were measured on both expiration and inspiration. The mean of the FTRW width (129 dogs) was greater in expiration (10.97 plusmn; 1.02 mm, p = 0.001) than that in inspiration (9.86 plusmn; 1.03 mm). For 51 normal dogs, the mean of the TITRW width was greater in expiration (9.05 plusmn; 1.52 mm, p = 0.001) than in inspiration (8.02 plusmn; 1.43 mm). For 78 tracheal collapse dogs, the mean of the TITRW width was greater in expiration (15.89 plusmn; 1.01 mm, p = 0.001) than in inspiration (14.85 plusmn; 1.17 mm). The TITRW/FTRW ratio of the normal dogs was higher (p = 0.001) in expiration (0.81 plusmn; 0.09) than that in inspiration (0.79 plusmn; 0.10). When compared between the normal and tracheal collapse dogs, the TITRW/FTRW ratio was also increased (p = 0.001) both in expiration (1.54 plusmn; 0.09) and inspiration (1.47 plusmn; 0.08), respectively. Based on these results, the cutoff level of the TITRW/FTRW ratio was statistically analyzed according to the receiver operating characteristic curve and it could be set at 1.16 in expiration and at 1.13 in inspiration. We have demonstrated that tracheal ultrasonography is a useful technique for the evaluation of tracheal collapse and it can be a supportive tool together with the radiographic findings for making the correct diagnosis. PMID:19043316

  13. Vasoactive peptides upregulate mRNA expression and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor in human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Alagappan, Vijay K T; Willems-Widyastuti, Anna; Seynhaeve, Ann L B; Garrelds, Ingrid M; ten Hagen, Timo L M; Saxena, Pramod R; Sharma, Hari S

    2007-01-01

    Airway remodeling and associated angiogenesis are documented features of asthma, of which the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Angiotensin (ANG)II and endothelin (ET)-1 are potent vasoconstricting circulatory hormones implicated in asthma. We investigated the effects of ANG II and ET-1 on human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells proliferation and growth and examined the mRNA expression and release of the angiogenic peptide, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Serum deprived (48 h) human ASM cells were incubated with ANG II (100 nM) or ET-1 (10 nM) for 30 min, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 24 h and the endogenous synthesis of VEGF was examined in relation to control cells receiving serum free culture medium. ET-1 induced time dependent DNA biosynthesis as determined by [3H]-thymidine incorporation assay. Using northern blot hybridization, we detected two mRNA species of 3.9 and 1.7 kb encoding VEGF in the cultured smooth muscle cells. Both ANG II and ET-1 induced the mRNA expression (two- to threefold) and secretion (1.8- to 2.8-fold) of VEGF reaching maximal levels between 4-8 h of incubation. Induced expression and release of VEGF declined after 8 h of ANG II incubation while levels remained elevated in the case of ET-1. The conditioned medium derived from ET-1-treated ASM cells induced [3H]-thymidine incorporation and cell number in porcine pulmonary artery endothelial as well as human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Moreover, the VEGF tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor blocked the conditioned medium induced mitogenesis in endothelial cells. Our results suggest a potential role for ANG II and ET-1 in ASM cell growth and upregulation of VEGF that may participate in endothelial cell proliferation via paracrine mechanisms and thus causing pathological angiogenesis and vascular remodelling seen during asthma. PMID:17406064

  14. Tyk2 mediates effects of urokinase on human vascular smooth muscle cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Patecki, Margret; Schaewen, Markus von; Tkachuk, Sergey; Jerke, Uwe; Dietz, Rainer; Dumler, Inna; Kusch, Angelika . E-mail: angelika.kusch@charite.de

    2007-08-03

    The urokinase (uPA)/uPA receptor (uPAR) system plays a role in the response of the vessel wall to injury, presumably by modulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) functional behaviour. The Jak/Stat signaling pathway has been implicated to mediate the uPA/uPAR-directed cell migration and proliferation in VSMC. We have therefore investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms, which remained not completely understood. In particular, we aimed at identification of the kinase involved in the signaling cascade leading to Stat1 phosphorylation by uPA and its impact on VSMC growth. We performed expression in VSMC of kinase-deficient mutant forms of the Janus kinases Jak1 and Tyk2 and used different cell culture models imitating the response to vascular injury. We provide evidence that Tyk2, but not Jak1, mediates uPA-induced Stat1 phosphorylation and VSMC growth inhibition and suggest a novel function for Tyk2 as an important modulator of the uPA-directed VSMC functional behaviour at the place of injury.

  15. Fibronectin glycation increases IGF-I induced proliferation of human aortic smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The advanced glycation end products, namely AGEs, contribute to long-termed complications of diabetes mellitus, including macroangiopathy, where smooth muscle cells (SMC) proliferation stimulated by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) isoforms and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays an important role. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of an AGE-modified extracellular matrix protein on IGF-I induced SMC proliferation and on the IGF-I-IGF binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4) axis under basal conditions and after stimulation with PDGF-BB. IGF-I resulted in significantly higher thymidine incorporation in SMC seeded on AGE-modified fibronectin (AGE-FN) in comparison to cells seeded on fibronectin (FN). This augmented proliferation could not be accounted for by increased expression of IGF-IR, by decreased secretion of IGFBP-4, a binding protein that inhibits IGF-I mitogenic effects or by increased IGF-IR autophosphorylation. PDGF-BB did not modulate IGF-IR and IGFBP-4 mRNA expression in any of the substrata, however, this growth factor elicited opposite effects on the IGFBP-4 content in the conditioned media, increasing it in cells plated on FN and diminishing it in cells plated on AGE-FN. These findings suggest that one mechanism by which AGE-modified proteins is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes-associated atherosclerosis might be by increasing SMC susceptibility to IGF-I mitogenic effects. PMID:22553932

  16. Biphasic responses of human vascular smooth muscle cells to magnesium ion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-02-01

    Magnesium-based alloys are promising in biodegradable cardiovascular stent applications. The degradation products of magnesium stents may have significant impacts on the surrounding vascular cells. However, knowledge on the interactions between magnesium ion and vascular cells at the molecular and cellular levels is still largely missing. Vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of restenosis and wound healing after stent implantation. This study evaluated the short-term effects of extracellular magnesium ion (Mg(2+)) on the cellular behaviors of SMCs. Cellular responses to Mg(2+) were biphasic and in a concentration-dependent manner. Low concentrations (10 mM) of Mg(2+) increased cell viability, cell proliferation rate, cell adhesion, cell spreading, cell migration rate, and actin expression. In contrast, higher concentrations (40-60 mM) of Mg(2+) had deleterious effects on cells. Gene expression analysis revealed that Mg(2+) altered the expressions of genes mostly related to cell adhesion, cell injury, angiogenesis, inflammation, coagulation, and cell growth. Finding from this study provides some valuable information on SMC responses toward magnesium ions at the cellular and molecular levels, and guidance for future controlled release of magnesium from the stent material. PMID:26402437

  17. Heparin modulates human intestinal smooth muscle (HISM) cell proliferation and matrix production

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, M.; Perr, H.; Drucker, D.E.; Diegelmann, R.F.

    1986-03-01

    (HISM) cell proliferation and collagen production may play a role in the pathogenesis of intestinal stricture in Crohn's disease. The present studies were performed to evaluate the effects of heparin, a known modulator of vascular smooth muscle cells, on HISM cell proliferation and collagen production. Heparin (100 ..mu..g/ml) was added daily to HISM cell cultures for cell proliferation studies and for 24 hours at various time points during culture for collagen synthesis studies. Collagen synthesis was determined by the uptake of /sup 3/H proline into collagenase-sensitive protein. Heparin completely inhibited cell proliferation for 7 days, after which cell numbers increased but at a slower rate than controls. Cells released from heparin inhibition demonstrated catch-up growth to control levels. Collagen production was significantly inhibited by 24 hours exposure to heparin but only at those times during culture when collagen synthesis was maximal (8 to 12 days). Non-collagen protein synthesis was inhibited by heparin at all time points during culture. Heparin through its modulation of HISM cells may play an important role in the control of the extracellular matrix of the intestinal wall.

  18. Effects of Slow, Sustained, and Rate Tunable Nitric Oxide Donors on Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hao; Payne, Thomas J.; Mohanty, Dillip K.

    2011-01-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation has been accepted as a common event in the pathophysiology of vascular diseases, including atherogenesis and intimal hyperplasia. Delivery of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) substrate L-arginine, pharmacological nitric oxide (NO) donors, NO gas or over-expression of NOS proteins can inhibit SMC proliferation and reduce the injury responses within the blood vessel wall. Though commercial development of NO-donors that attempt to provide exogenous delivery of NO has accelerated over the last few years. None of the currently available products can provide controlled, sustained, time tunable release of NO. Nitrosamine-based NO donors, prepared in our laboratory, present a unique and innovative alternative for possible treatments for long-term NO deficiency related diseases including atherosclerosis, asthma, erectile dysfunction, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. A family of secondary amines prepared via nucleophilic aromatic displacement reactions could be readily N-nitrosated to produce NO donors. NO release takes place in three distinct phases. During the initial phase, the release rate is extremely fast. In the second phase, the release is slower and the rate remains essentially the same during the final stage. These compounds inhibited up to 35% human aortic smooth muscle cell (HASMC) proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. PMID:21740530

  19. A novel inhibitory effect of oxazol-5-one compounds on ROCKII signaling in human coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghabkari, Abdulhameed; Deng, Jing-Ti; McDonald, Paul C; Dedhar, Shoukat; Alshehri, Mana; Walsh, Michael P; MacDonald, Justin A

    2016-01-01

    The selectivity of (4Z)-2-(4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl)-4-(pyridin-3-ylmethylidene)-1,3-oxazol-5-one (DI) for zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) was previously described by in silico computational modeling, screening a large panel of kinases, and determining the inhibition efficacy. Our assessment of DI revealed another target, the Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase 2 (ROCKII). In vitro studies showed DI to be a competitive inhibitor of ROCKII (Ki, 132 nM with respect to ATP). This finding was supported by in silico molecular surface docking of DI with the ROCKII ATP-binding pocket. Time course analysis of myosin regulatory light chain (LC20) phosphorylation catalyzed by ROCKII in vitro revealed a significant decrease upon treatment with DI. ROCKII signaling was investigated in situ in human coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells (CASMCs). ROCKII down-regulation using siRNA revealed several potential substrates involved in smooth muscle contraction (e.g., LC20, Par-4, MYPT1) and actin cytoskeletal dynamics (cofilin). The application of DI to CASMCs attenuated LC20, Par-4, LIMK, and cofilin phosphorylations. Notably, cofilin phosphorylation was not significantly decreased with a novel ZIPK selective inhibitor (HS-38). In addition, CASMCs treated with DI underwent cytoskeletal changes that were associated with diminution of cofilin phosphorylation. We conclude that DI is not selective for ZIPK and is a potent inhibitor of ROCKII. PMID:27573465

  20. Chrysin inhibits human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation through the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jing; Zhang, Yun-Shi; Feng, Gan-Zhu; Du, Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway inflammatory disease characterized by an increased mass of airway smooth muscle (ASM). Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural flavonoid, has been shown to exert multiple biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative and anti-oxidant effects, as well as the potency to ameliorate asthma in animal models. The objective of the present study was to identify the underlying mechanism of the therapeutic effects of chrysin. The impact of chrysin on basal and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced proliferation and apoptosis of human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) was investigated. Furthermore, the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) signaling pathway was evaluated in HASMCs. The results revealed that chrysin significantly inhibited basal as well as PDGF-induced HASMC proliferation, most likely through the suppression of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. However, chrysin did not significantly reduce PDGF-induced apoptosis of HASMCs. The present study indicated that chrysin may be a promising medication for controlling airway remodeling and clinical manifestations of asthma. PMID:26502995

  1. A novel inhibitory effect of oxazol-5-one compounds on ROCKII signaling in human coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ghabkari, Abdulhameed; Deng, Jing-Ti; McDonald, Paul C.; Dedhar, Shoukat; Alshehri, Mana; Walsh, Michael P.; MacDonald, Justin A.

    2016-01-01

    The selectivity of (4Z)-2-(4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl)-4-(pyridin-3-ylmethylidene)-1,3-oxazol-5-one (DI) for zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) was previously described by in silico computational modeling, screening a large panel of kinases, and determining the inhibition efficacy. Our assessment of DI revealed another target, the Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase 2 (ROCKII). In vitro studies showed DI to be a competitive inhibitor of ROCKII (Ki, 132 nM with respect to ATP). This finding was supported by in silico molecular surface docking of DI with the ROCKII ATP-binding pocket. Time course analysis of myosin regulatory light chain (LC20) phosphorylation catalyzed by ROCKII in vitro revealed a significant decrease upon treatment with DI. ROCKII signaling was investigated in situ in human coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells (CASMCs). ROCKII down-regulation using siRNA revealed several potential substrates involved in smooth muscle contraction (e.g., LC20, Par-4, MYPT1) and actin cytoskeletal dynamics (cofilin). The application of DI to CASMCs attenuated LC20, Par-4, LIMK, and cofilin phosphorylations. Notably, cofilin phosphorylation was not significantly decreased with a novel ZIPK selective inhibitor (HS-38). In addition, CASMCs treated with DI underwent cytoskeletal changes that were associated with diminution of cofilin phosphorylation. We conclude that DI is not selective for ZIPK and is a potent inhibitor of ROCKII. PMID:27573465

  2. Bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory activities of glaucine: In vitro studies in human airway smooth muscle and polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Cortijo, J; Villagrasa, V; Pons, R; Berto, L; Martí-Cabrera, M; Martinez-Losa, M; Domenech, T; Beleta, J; Morcillo, E J

    1999-08-01

    1. Selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitors are of potential interest in the treatment of asthma. We examined the effects of the alkaloid S-(+)-glaucine, a PDE4 inhibitor, on human isolated bronchus and granulocyte function. 2. Glaucine selectively inhibited PDE4 from human bronchus and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in a non-competitive manner (Ki=3.4 microM). Glaucine displaced [3H]-rolipram from its high-affinity binding sites in rat brain cortex membranes (IC50 approximately 100 microM). 3. Glaucine inhibited the spontaneous and histamine-induced tone in human isolated bronchus (pD2 approximately 4.5). Glaucine (10 microM) did not potentiate the isoprenaline-induced relaxation but augmented cyclic AMP accumulation by isoprenaline. The glaucine-induced relaxation was resistant to H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor. Glaucine depressed the contractile responses to Ca2+ (pD'2 approximately 3.62) and reduced the sustained rise of [Ca2+]i produced by histamine in cultured human airway smooth muscle cells (-log IC50 approximately 4.3). 4. Glaucine augmented cyclic AMP levels in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes challenged with N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP) or isoprenaline, and inhibited FMLP-induced superoxide generation, elastase release, leukotriene B4 production, [Ca2+]i signal and platelet aggregation as well as opsonized zymosan-, phorbol myristate acetate-, and A23187-induced superoxide release. The inhibitory effect of glaucine on superoxide generation by FMLP was reduced by H-89. 5. In conclusion, Ca2+ channel antagonism by glaucine appears mainly responsible for the relaxant effect of glaucine in human isolated bronchus while PDE4 inhibition contributes to the inhibitory effects of glaucine in human granulocytes. The very low PDE4/binding site ratio found for glaucine makes this compound attractive for further structure-activity studies. PMID:10455321

  3. Bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory activities of glaucine: In vitro studies in human airway smooth muscle and polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cortijo, J; Villagrasa, V; Pons, R; Berto, L; Martí-Cabrera, M; Martinez-Losa, M; Domenech, T; Beleta, J; Morcillo, E J

    1999-01-01

    Selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitors are of potential interest in the treatment of asthma. We examined the effects of the alkaloid S-(+)-glaucine, a PDE4 inhibitor, on human isolated bronchus and granulocyte function.Glaucine selectively inhibited PDE4 from human bronchus and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in a non-competitive manner (Ki=3.4 μM). Glaucine displaced [3H]-rolipram from its high-affinity binding sites in rat brain cortex membranes (IC50∼100 μM).Glaucine inhibited the spontaneous and histamine-induced tone in human isolated bronchus (pD2∼4.5). Glaucine (10 μM) did not potentiate the isoprenaline-induced relaxation but augmented cyclic AMP accumulation by isoprenaline. The glaucine-induced relaxation was resistant to H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor. Glaucine depressed the contractile responses to Ca2+ (pD'2∼3.62) and reduced the sustained rise of [Ca2+]i produced by histamine in cultured human airway smooth muscle cells (−log IC50∼4.3).Glaucine augmented cyclic AMP levels in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes challenged with N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP) or isoprenaline, and inhibited FMLP-induced superoxide generation, elastase release, leukotriene B4 production, [Ca2+]i signal and platelet aggregation as well as opsonized zymosan-, phorbol myristate acetate-, and A23187-induced superoxide release. The inhibitory effect of glaucine on superoxide generation by FMLP was reduced by H-89.In conclusion, Ca2+ channel antagonism by glaucine appears mainly responsible for the relaxant effect of glaucine in human isolated bronchus while PDE4 inhibition contributes to the inhibitory effects of glaucine in human granulocytes. The very low PDE4/binding site ratio found for glaucine makes this compound attractive for further structure-activity studies. PMID:10455321

  4. Extraneuronal Monoamine Transporter Mediates the Permissive Action of Cortisol in the Guinea Pig Trachea: Possible Involvement of Tracheal Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Qiu, Wenying; Zheng, Yiqing; Li, Hui; Li, Yijia; Feng, Bing; Guo, Shu; Yan, Li; Cao, Ji-Min

    2013-01-01

    Cortisol, a member of glucocorticoids, could potentiate the action of catecholamine by a non-genomic mechanism. Although this permissive effect has been well appreciated in the anti-asthmatic medication, the underlying signaling pathway has remained mysterious. Here, we show that extraneuronal monoamine transporter (EMT), a membraneous reuptake transporter for circulating catecholamine clearance, is the direct target of cortisol in its permissive effect. We found that BSA-conjugated cortisol, which functions as a cortisol but cannot penetrate cell membrane, enhanced the spasmolytic effect of β-adrenoceptor agonist (isoprenaline) in histamine-sensitized tracheal spirals of guinea pigs, and pharmacological inhibition of EMT with famotidine was powerful enough to imitate the permissive action of cortisol. To our surprise, EMT protein expression was high in the chondrocytes of tracheal cartilage, but was undetectable in tracheal smooth muscle cells. The functionality of EMT was further confirmed with measurement of catecholamine uptake by tracheal chondrocytes. Moreover, cortisol-initiated membrane signaling could activate protein kinase C (PKC), which phosphorylates EMT and induces its internalization via a lipid raft-dependent pathway. Both of the mechanisms slow down the reuptake process by chondrocytes, leading to extracellular catecholamine accumulation and results in a more profound adrenergic signaling activation in tracheal smooth muscle cells. Thus, an EMT-centered pathway was proposed to explain the permissive action of cortisol. Collectively, our results highlight the role of EMT in the crosstalk between glucocorticoid and catecholamine. EMT may represent a promising target for adrenergic signaling modulation. PMID:24098439

  5. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery tracheal resection and carinal reconstruction for tracheal adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    He, Jianxing; Wang, Wei; Li, Jingpei; Yin, Weiqiang; Xu, Xin; Peng, Guilin; Chen, Youping; He, Ping

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) tracheal resection and carinal reconstruction in a patient with tracheal tumor. The patient presented with adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the distal trachea, extending along the right main bronchus with carinal invasion. The reconstruction procedure was assisted with cross-field ventilation. Postoperative clinical course of this case was good. The forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) improved from 0.461 L (17% pred.) to 2.31 L (87% pred.) 1 month after the operation. VATS tracheal resection and carinal reconstruction is a feasible option for patients with tracheal tumor with carina involvement. PMID:26904230

  6. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery tracheal resection and carinal reconstruction for tracheal adenoid cystic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Li, Jingpei; Yin, Weiqiang; Xu, Xin; Peng, Guilin; Chen, Youping; He, Ping

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) tracheal resection and carinal reconstruction in a patient with tracheal tumor. The patient presented with adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the distal trachea, extending along the right main bronchus with carinal invasion. The reconstruction procedure was assisted with cross-field ventilation. Postoperative clinical course of this case was good. The forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) improved from 0.461 L (17% pred.) to 2.31 L (87% pred.) 1 month after the operation. VATS tracheal resection and carinal reconstruction is a feasible option for patients with tracheal tumor with carina involvement. PMID:26904230

  7. Intracellular pH changes in human aortic smooth muscle cells in response to fluid shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; Patrick, C. W. Jr; McIntire, L. V.

    1997-01-01

    The smooth muscle cell (SMC) layers of human arteries may be exposed to blood flow after endothelium denudation, for example, following balloon angioplasty treatment. These SMCs are also constantly subjected to pressure driven transmural fluid flow. Flow-induced shear stress can alter SMC growth and metabolism. Signal transduction mechanisms involved in these flow effects on SMCs are still poorly understood. In this work, the hypothesis that shear stress alters the intracellular pH (pHi) of SMC is examined. When exposed to venous and arterial levels of shear stress, human aortic smooth muscle cells (hASMC) undergo alkalinization. The alkalinization plateau persisted even after 20 min of cell exposure to flow. Addition of amiloride (10 micromoles) or its 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) analog (EIPA, 10 micromoles), both Na+/H+ exchanger inhibitors, attenuated intracellular alkalinization, suggesting the involvement of the Na+/H+ exchanger in this response. The same concentrations of these inhibitors did not show an effect on pHi of hASMCs in static culture. 4-Acetamido-4'-isothio-cyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (SITS, 1 mM), a Cl-/HCO3- exchange inhibitor, affected the pHi of hASMCs both in static and flow conditions. Our results suggest that flow may perturb the Na+/H+ exchanger leading to an alkalinization of hASMCs, a different response from the flow-induced acidification seen with endothelial cells at the same levels of shear stress. Understanding the flow-induced signal transduction pathways in the vascular cells is of great importance in the tissue engineering of vascular grafts. In the case of SMCs, the involvement of pHi changes in nitric oxide production and proliferation regulation highlights further the significance of such studies.

  8. Human vascular smooth muscle cells have at least two distinct PDGF receptors and can secrete PDGF-AA

    SciTech Connect

    Hosang, M.; Rouge, M. )

    1989-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), a potent mitogen and chemoattractant for smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts in culture, is believed to play an important role in the formation of proliferative lesions of arterio-sclerosis. PDGF appears as three different dimeric isoforms: AA, AB, and BB. These were recently found to bind to two different receptors, the A/B receptor (which binds all three isoforms) and the B receptor (which binds only PDGF-BB). To find out whether these receptors exhibit functional differences, we have monitored the binding and mitogenic activities of PDGF-AA and -BB in human umbilical vein smooth muscle cells (HSMCs), human dermal fibroblasts (HFs), and Swiss mouse 3T3 cells. With each cell type, there was a good correlation between the maximal levels of DNA synthesis achieved by these isoforms and the numbers of the appropriate receptor present on the cell surface: HMSCs, which have at least 32,000 B receptors but only 8,000 A/B receptors, responded well to PDGF-BB but responded poorly to PDGF-AA; whereas Swiss 3T3 cells, which have about equal numbers of B and A/B receptors (70,000 and 90,000, respectively), responded equally well to both isoforms. PDGF-AB was a more efficacious mitogen of HSMCs and HFs than was PDGF-AA and inhibited (125I)-PDGF-BB binding to HSMCs more effectively than PDGF-AA. This indicates that there may exist a third PDGF receptor type to which PDGF-BB and -AB but not PDGF-AA can bind.

  9. Inhibitory mechanism of tranilast in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells proliferation, due to blockade of PDGF-BB-receptors

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shinji; Matsuda, Akihisa; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kazunao; Ikeda, Yasuhiko; Hashimoto, Hisakuni; Umemura, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    We have previously reported that tranilast, an anti-allergic drug, prevented the experimental intimal thickening in the rat and mouse femoral arteries and its effect may be exerted through the inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. However, its inhibitory mechanism has yet to be understood. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of tranilast on platelet-derived growth factor BB-homodimer (PDGF-BB) mediated signal transduction pathways in cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (CASMCs). Growth responses to PDGF-BB were measured by [3H]-thymidine incorporation or cell counting. Activation of DNA synthesis and augmentation of cell proliferation stimulated by PDGF-BB in quiescent cultures of CASMCs were inhibited by tranilast in a concentration-dependent manner. Western blot analysis of lysates from CASMCs with an anti-activated mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase antibody revealed that tranilast (10–300 μM) inhibited MAP kinase activation by PDGF-BB in a concentration-dependent manner. Tranilast also reduced PDGF-BB-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of a 180 kDa band, corresponding in mass to the PDGF β-receptor, as shown by immunoblots using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. Receptor-binding study with [125I]-PDGF-BB on CASMCs showed that tranilast (10–1000 μM) inhibited the specific binding of PDGF-BB to cell surface receptors in a concentration-dependent manner. Scatchard analysis revealed that pretreatment with 300 μM tranilast decreased the maximum binding capacity (Bmax) from 27.6 to 18.0 fmol 106 cells−1 without affecting binding affinity (Kd≈0.15 nM), indicating a non-competitive inhibition of the receptor binding. These results suggest that the suppression of human CASMC growth by tranilast might be at least partly due to blockade of PDGF-BB-receptor binding. PMID:10807667

  10. Tungstate-targeting of BKαβ1 channels tunes ERK phosphorylation and cell proliferation in human vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Mariño, Ana Isabel; Cidad, Pilar; Zafra, Delia; Nocito, Laura; Domínguez, Jorge; Oliván-Viguera, Aida; Köhler, Ralf; López-López, José R; Pérez-García, María Teresa; Valverde, Miguel Ángel; Guinovart, Joan J; Fernández-Fernández, José M

    2015-01-01

    Despite the substantial knowledge on the antidiabetic, antiobesity and antihypertensive actions of tungstate, information on its primary target/s is scarce. Tungstate activates both the ERK1/2 pathway and the vascular voltage- and Ca2+-dependent large-conductance BKαβ1 potassium channel, which modulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and function, respectively. Here, we have assessed the possible involvement of BKαβ1 channels in the tungstate-induced ERK phosphorylation and its relevance for VSMC proliferation. Western blot analysis in HEK cell lines showed that expression of vascular BKαβ1 channels potentiates the tungstate-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a Gi/o protein-dependent manner. Tungstate activated BKαβ1 channels upstream of G proteins as channel activation was not altered by the inhibition of G proteins with GDPβS or pertussis toxin. Moreover, analysis of Gi/o protein activation measuring the FRET among heterologously expressed Gi protein subunits suggested that tungstate-targeting of BKαβ1 channels promotes G protein activation. Single channel recordings on VSMCs from wild-type and β1-knockout mice indicated that the presence of the regulatory β1 subunit was essential for the tungstate-mediated activation of BK channels in VSMCs. Moreover, the specific BK channel blocker iberiotoxin lowered tungstate-induced ERK phosphorylation by 55% and partially reverted (by 51%) the tungstate-produced reduction of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced proliferation in human VSMCs. Our observations indicate that tungstate-targeting of BKαβ1 channels promotes activation of PTX-sensitive Gi proteins to enhance the tungstate-induced phosphorylation of ERK, and inhibits PDGF-stimulated cell proliferation in human vascular smooth muscle. PMID:25659150

  11. Mucus glycoprotein secretion by tracheal explants: effects of pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Last, J.A.; Kaizu, T.

    1980-04-01

    Tracheal slices incubated with radioactive precursors in tissue culture medium secrete labeled mucus glycoproteins into the culture medium. We have used an in vivtro approach, a combined method utilizing exposure to pneumotoxins in vivo coupled with quantitation of mucus secretion rates in vitro, to study the effects of inhaled pollutants on mucus biosynthesis by rat airways. In addition, we have purified the mucus glycoproteins secreted by rat tracheal explants in order to determine putative structural changes that might by the basis for the observed augmented secretion rates after exposure of rats to H2SO4 aerosols in combination with high ambient levels of ozone. After digestion with papain, mucus glycoproteins secreted by tracheal explants may be separated into five fractions by ion-exchange chromatography, with recovery in high yield, on columns of DEAE-cellulose. Each of these five fractions, one neutral and four acidic, migrates as a single unique spot upon cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH values of 8.6 and 1.2. The neutral fraction, which is labeled with (3H) glucosamine, does not contain radioactivity when Na2 35SO4 is used as the precursor. Acidic fractions I to IV are all labeled with either 3H-glucosamine or Na2 35SO4 as precursor. Acidic fraction II contains sialic acid as the terminal sugar on its oligosaccharide side chains, based upon its chromatographic behavior on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin-Agarose. Treatment of this fraction with neuraminidase shifts its elution position in the gradient to a lower salt concentration, coincident with acidic fraction I. After removal of terminal sialic acid residues with either neuraminidase or low pH treatment, the resultant terminal sugar on the oligosaccharide side chains is fucose. These results are identical with those observed with mucus glycoproteins secreted by cultured human tracheal explants and purified by these same techniques.

  12. Tracheal intubation: tricks of the trade.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Michael F; Hung, Orlando R; Law, J Adam

    2008-11-01

    This article describes the use of laryngoscopy for tracheal intubation. Maneuvers basic to successful orotracheal laryngoscopic intubation are described, which should be incorporated into the skill sets of individuals called on to manage the airway in an emergency. PMID:19059097

  13. Post Intubation Tracheal Stenosis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Caruselli, Marco; Amici, Mirco; Galante, Dario; Paut, Olivier; De Francisci, Giovanni; Carboni, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Many authors have reported that tracheal stenosis is a complication that can follow tracheal intubation in both adults and children. The symptoms, when they do appear, can be confused with asthma, with subsequent treatment providing only mild and inconsistent relief. We report here the case of an 8 year old girl admitted to our hospital for whooping cough that was not responding to therapy. PMID:25635215

  14. In vitro elastogenesis: instructing human vascular smooth muscle cells to generate an elastic fiber-containing extracellular matrix scaffold.

    PubMed

    Hinderer, Svenja; Shena, Nian; Ringuette, Léa-Jeanne; Hansmann, Jan; Reinhardt, Dieter P; Brucker, Sara Y; Davis, Elaine C; Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2015-06-01

    Elastic fibers are essential for the proper function of organs including cardiovascular tissues such as heart valves and blood vessels. Although (tropo)elastin production in a tissue-engineered construct has previously been described, the assembly to functional elastic fibers in vitro using human cells has been highly challenging. In the present study, we seeded primary isolated human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) onto 3D electrospun scaffolds and exposed them to defined laminar shear stress using a customized bioreactor system. Increased elastin expression followed by elastin deposition onto the electrospun scaffolds, as well as on newly formed fibers, was observed after six days. Most interestingly, we identified the successful deposition of elastogenesis-associated proteins, including fibrillin-1 and -2, fibulin-4 and -5, fibronectin, elastin microfibril interface located protein 1 (EMILIN-1) and lysyl oxidase (LOX) within our engineered constructs. Ultrastructural analyses revealed a developing extracellular matrix (ECM) similar to native human fetal tissue, which is composed of collagens, microfibrils and elastin. To conclude, the combination of a novel dynamic flow bioreactor and an electrospun hybrid polymer scaffold allowed the production and assembly of an elastic fiber-containing ECM. PMID:25784676

  15. Lipid Loading of Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Induces Changes in Tropoelastin Protein Levels and Physical Structure

    PubMed Central

    Samouillan, Valerie; Dandurand, Jany; Nasarre, Laura; Badimon, Lina; Lacabanne, Colette; Llorente-Cortés, Vicenta

    2012-01-01

    Aggregated low-density lipoprotein (agLDL), one of the main LDL modifications in the arterial intima, contributes to massive intracellular cholesteryl ester (CE) accumulation in human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), which are major producers of elastin in the vascular wall. Our aim was to analyze the levels, physical structure, and molecular mobility of tropoelastin produced by agLDL-loaded human VSMC (agLDL-VSMC) versus that produced by control VSMC. Western blot analysis demonstrated that agLDL reduced VSMC-tropoelastin protein levels by increasing its degradation rate. Moreover, our results demonstrated increased levels of precursor and mature forms of cathepsin S in agLDL-VSMC. Fourier transform infrared analysis revealed modifications in the secondary structures of tropoelastin produced by lipid-loaded VSMCs. Thermal and dielectric analyses showed that agLDL-VSMC tropoelastin has decreased glass transition temperatures and distinct chain dynamics that, in addition to a loss of thermal stability, lead to strong changes in its mechanical properties. In conclusion, agLDL lipid loading of human vascular cells leads to an increase in cathepsin S production concomitantly with a decrease in cellular tropoelastin protein levels and dramatic changes in secreted tropoelastin physical structure. Therefore, VSMC-lipid loading likely determines alterations in the mechanical properties of the vascular wall and plays a crucial role in elastin loss during atherosclerosis. PMID:22947869

  16. LC/MS/MS data analysis of the human uterine smooth muscle S-nitrosoproteome fingerprint in pregnancy, labor, and preterm labor

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Craig C.; Quilici, David R.; Schlauch, Karen A.; Burkin, Heather R.; Buxton, Iain L.O.

    2015-01-01

    The data described in this article is the subject of an article in the American Journal of Physiology: Cell Physiology, titled “The Human Uterine Smooth Muscle S-nitrosoproteome Fingerprint in Pregnancy, Labor, and Preterm Labor” (doi:10.1152/ajpcell.00198.2013) (Ulrich et al., 2013) [1]. The data described is a large scale mass spectrometry data set that defines the human uterine smooth muscle S-nitrosoproteome differences among laboring, non-laboring, preterm laboring tissue after treatment with S-nitrosoglutathione. PMID:26322325

  17. Engineering vascular tissue with functional smooth muscle cells derived from human iPS cells and nanofibrous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongyu; Hu, Jiang; Jiao, Jiao; Liu, Zhongning; Zhou, Zhou; Zhao, Chao; Chang, Lung-Ji; Chen, Y Eugene; Ma, Peter X; Yang, Bo

    2014-10-01

    Tissue-engineered blood vessels (TEBVs) are promising in the replacement of diseased vascular tissues. However, it remains a great challenge to obtain a sufficient number of functional smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in a clinical setting to construct patient-specific TEBVs. In addition, it is critical to develop a scaffold to accommodate these cells and retain their functional phenotype for the regeneration of TEBVs. In this study, human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were established from primary human aortic fibroblasts, and characterized with the pluripotency markers expression and cells' capabilities to differentiate into all three germ layer cells. A highly efficient method was then developed to induce these human iPSCs into proliferative SMCs. After multiple times of expansion, the expanded SMCs retained the potential to be induced into the functional contractile phenotype of mature SMCs, which was characterized by the contractile response to carbachol treatment, up-regulation of specific collagen genes under transforming growth factor β1 treatment, and up-regulation of specific matrix metalloproteinase genes under cytokine stimulation. We also developed an advanced macroporous and nanofibrous (NF) poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) scaffold with suitable pore size and interpore connectivity to seed these human iPSC-derived SMCs and maintain their differentiated phenotype. Subcutaneous implantation of the SMC-scaffold construct in nude mice demonstrated vascular tissue formation, with robust collagenous matrix deposition inside the scaffold and the maintenance of differentiated SMC phenotype. Taken together, this study established an exciting approach towards the construction of patient-specific TEBVs. We established patient-specific human iPSCs, derived proliferative SMCs for expansion, turned on their mature contractile SMC phenotype, and developed an advanced scaffold for these cells to regenerate vascular tissue in vivo. PMID:25085858

  18. Endothelin receptor antagonists attenuate the inflammatory response of human pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells to bacterial endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Jürgen; Feldmann, Maria; Wahl, Chiara; Jungck, David; Behr, Jürgen; Stoelben, Erich; Koch, Andrea

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial infections induce exacerbations in chronic lung diseases, e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), by enhancing airway inflammation. Exacerbations are frequently associated with right heart decompensation and accelerate disease progression. Endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs) might have therapeutic potential as pulmonary vasodilators and anti-inflammatory agents, but utility in exacerbations of chronic lung diseases is unknown. We hypothesized that cytokine releases induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major bacterial trigger of inflammation, are reduced by ERAs in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells (PVSMCs). Ex vivo cultivated human PVSMCs were preincubated with the endothelin-A-receptor selective inhibitor ambrisentan, with the endothelin-B-receptor selective inhibitor BQ788 [sodium (2R)-2-{[(2S)-2-({[(2R,6S)-2,6-dimethyl-1-piperidinyl]carbonyl}amino)-4,4-dimethylpentanoyl][1-(methoxycarbonyl)-d-tryptophyl]amino}hexanoate], or with the dual blocker bosentan before stimulation with smooth LPS (S-LPS), rough LPS (Re-LPS), or a mixture of long and short forms (M-LPS). Expression of cytokines and LPS receptors (TLR4, CD14) were analyzed via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and/or quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). All LPS forms induced interleukin (IL)-6-, IL-8-, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) release. Bosentan and BQ788 inhibited M-LPS-induced release of all cytokines and soluble CD14 (sCD14) but not TLR4 expression. Ambrisentan blocked M-LPS-induced IL-6 release but not IL-8, GM-CSF, or LPS receptors. IL-8 release induced by S-LPS, which requires CD14 to activate TLR4, was blocked by bosentan and BQ788. IL-8 release induced by Re-LPS, which does not require CD14 to activate TLR4, was insensitive to both bosentan and BQ788. In conclusion, PVSMCs contribute to inflammation in bacteria-induced exacerbations of chronic lung diseases. Inhibition of the endothelin

  19. Functional vascular smooth muscle cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells via mesenchymal stem cell intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Vivek K.; Mistriotis, Panagiotis; Loh, Yuin-Han; Daley, George Q.; Andreadis, Stelios T.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Smooth muscle cells (SMC) play an important role in vascular homeostasis and disease. Although adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been used as a source of contractile SMC, they suffer from limited proliferation potential and culture senescence, particularly when originating from older donors. By comparison, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) can provide an unlimited source of functional SMC for autologous cell-based therapies and for creating models of vascular disease. Our goal was to develop an efficient strategy to derive functional, contractile SMC from hiPSC. Methods and results We developed a robust, stage-wise, feeder-free strategy for hiPSC differentiation into functional SMC through an intermediate stage of multipotent MSC, which could be coaxed to differentiate into fat, bone, cartilage, and muscle. At this stage, the cells were highly proliferative and displayed higher clonogenic potential and reduced senescence when compared with parental hair follicle mesenchymal stem cells. In addition, when exposed to differentiation medium, the myogenic proteins such as α-smooth muscle actin, calponin, and myosin heavy chain were significantly upregulated and displayed robust fibrillar organization, suggesting the development of a contractile phenotype. Indeed, tissue constructs prepared from these cells exhibited high levels of contractility in response to receptor- and non-receptor-mediated agonists. Conclusion We developed an efficient stage-wise strategy that enabled hiPSC differentiation into contractile SMC through an intermediate population of clonogenic and multipotent MSC. The high yield of MSC and SMC derivation suggests that our strategy may facilitate an acquisition of the large numbers of cells required for regenerative medicine or for studying vascular disease pathophysiology. PMID:22941255

  20. Characterisation of Calcium Phosphate Crystals on Calcified Human Aortic Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells and Potential Role of Magnesium

    PubMed Central

    Louvet, Loïc; Bazin, Dominique; Büchel, Janine; Steppan, Sonja; Passlick-Deetjen, Jutta; Massy, Ziad A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease including vascular calcification (VC) remains the leading cause of death in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD). The process of VC seems likely to be a tightly regulated process where vascular smooth muscle cells are playing a key role rather than just a mere passive precipitation of calcium phosphate. Characterisation of the chemical and crystalline structure of VC was mainly led in patients or animal models with CKD. Likewise, Mg2+ was found to be protective in living cells although a potential role for Mg2+ could not be excluded on crystal formation and precipitation. In this study, the crystal formation and the role of Mg2+ were investigated in an in vitro model of primary human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (HAVSMC) with physical techniques. Methodology/Principal Findings In HAVSMC incubated with increased Ca x Pi medium, only calcium phosphate apatite crystals (CPA) were detected by Micro-Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy (µFTIR) and Field Effect Scanning Electron Microscope (FE — SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) at the cell layer level. Supplementation with Mg2+ did not alter the crystal composition or structure. The crystal deposition was preferentially positioned near or directly on cells as pictured by FE — SEM observations and EDX measurements. Large µFTIR maps revealed spots of CPA crystals that were associated to the cellular layout. This qualitative analysis suggests a potential beneficial effect of Mg2+ at 5 mM in noticeably reducing the number and intensities of CPA µFTIR spots. Conclusions/Significance For the first time in a model of HAVSMC, induced calcification led to the formation of the sole CPA crystals. Our data seems to exclude a physicochemical role of Mg2+ in altering the CPA crystal growth, composition or structure. Furthermore, Mg2+ beneficial role in attenuating VC should be linked to an active cellular role. PMID:25607936

  1. Effects of successive tracheal resection and anastomosis on tracheal diameter and position of lobar bronchi in dogs.

    PubMed

    de Mello Souza, Carlos Henrique; Reinero, Carol R

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of successive large-segment tracheal resection and anastomosis on tracheal diameter and position of lobar bronchi in dogs. ANIMALS 5 adult Beagles. PROCEDURES Right lateral radiographs were obtained for all dogs and used to measure tracheal length. Dogs were then euthanized, and successive segmental tracheal resections (intervals of 10% from 20% to 50% of the tracheal length), each of which was followed by anastomosis, were performed in each cadaver. Tracheobronchoscopy was performed before the first tracheal resection and after each of the anastomoses to evaluate tracheal diameter and changes in position of lobar bronchi. RESULTS Tracheal diameter was minimally affected by resections up to 50% of the tracheal length. Diameter of the trachea and position of bronchi were not affected by resection of 20% of the tracheal length. Changes in the position of various lobar bronchi were detected after resection of 30% of the tracheal length. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINCIAL RELEVANCE In this study, tracheal resections of 20% of the tracheal length were accommodated, possibly as a result of stretching of the annular ligament. Resections of ≥ 30% of the tracheal length altered the position of lobar bronchi. Clinical effects, if any, attributable to these changes in bronchial position remain to be elucidated. PMID:27227506

  2. Use of ultrasonography in the diagnosis of tracheal collapse.

    PubMed

    Rudorf, H; Herrtage, M E; White, R A

    1997-11-01

    Ultrasonographic imaging of the cervical trachea was performed with the neck in both a neutral and a hyperextended position in 10 dogs with tracheal collapse. Tracheoscopy was used to confirm a diagnosis of tracheal collapse. The ultrasound investigation was repeated in 10 dogs of similar size but without tracheal abnormality. The ultrasonographic findings of the affected dogs were compared with those of the normal group and showed an alteration in the shape of the tracheal lumen in the ventrodorsal projection. This study highlights the possibility of identifying changes in the shape of the tracheal lumen during ultrasound investigations as an aid to the diagnosis of tracheal collapse. PMID:9403811

  3. Indications and interventional options for non-resectable tracheal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, Jenny Louise; Patterson, Caroline Marie

    2014-01-01

    Non-specific presentation and normal examination findings in early disease often result in tracheal obstruction being overlooked as a diagnosis until patients present acutely. Once diagnosed, surgical options should be considered, but often patient co-morbidity necessitates other interventional options. Non-resectable tracheal stenosis can be successfully managed by interventional bronchoscopy, with therapeutic options including airway dilatation, local tissue destruction and airway stenting. There are common aspects to the management of tracheal obstruction, tracheomalacia and tracheal fistulae. This paper reviews the pathogenesis, presentation, investigation and management of tracheal disease, with a focus on tracheal obstruction and the role of endotracheal intervention in management. PMID:24624290

  4. Mitophagy acts as a safeguard mechanism against human vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis induced by atherogenic lipids.

    PubMed

    Swiader, Audrey; Nahapetyan, Hripsime; Faccini, Julien; D'Angelo, Romina; Mucher, Elodie; Elbaz, Meyer; Boya, Patricia; Vindis, Cécile

    2016-05-17

    Mitophagy is a critical cellular process that selectively targets damaged mitochondria for autophagosomal degradation both under baseline conditions and in response to stress preventing oxidative damage and cell death. Recent studies have linked alterations in mitochondria function and reduced autophagy with the development of age-related pathologies. However, the significance of mitochondrial autophagy in vessel wall in response to atherogenic lipid stressors is not known. In the present study, we investigated the role of mitophagy on human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) apoptosis induced by oxidized low-density lipoproteins (LDL). We reported for the first time that the engulfment of defective mitochondria by autophagosomes occurred in human VSMC in response to oxidized LDL. The molecular mechanism mediating mitophagy in human VSMC involved dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1)-mediated mitochondrial fission, accumulation of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and the recruitment of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin to mitochondria. Likewise, we found increased voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) and mitofusin 2 (Mnf2) mitochondrial proteins ubiquitination and LC3 association to mitochondria. Using flow cytometry in the presence of lysosomal inhibitors, we showed that PINK1 and Parkin silencing impaired mitophagy flux and enhanced oxidized LDL-induced VSMC apoptosis. In addition, overexpression of PINK1 and Parkin were protective by limiting cell death. Moreover, reduced Bax levels found in VSMC-overexpressing Parkin indicated cross talk among mitophagy and mitochondrial apoptotic signalling pathways. Altogether these data demonstrate that mitophagy is a safeguard mechanism against human VSMC apoptosis induced by atherogenic stressors and highlight mitophagy as a potential target to stabilize atherosclerotic plaque. PMID:27119505

  5. Integrase-Deficient Lentiviral Vectors Mediate Efficient Gene Transfer to Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells with Minimal Genotoxic Risk

    PubMed Central

    Chick, Helen E.; Nowrouzi, Ali; Fronza, Raffaele; McDonald, Robert A.; Kane, Nicole M.; Alba, Raul; Delles, Christian; Sessa, William C.; Schmidt, Manfred; Thrasher, Adrian J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We have previously shown that injury-induced neointima formation was rescued by adenoviral-Nogo-B gene delivery. Integrase-competent lentiviral vectors (ICLV) are efficient at gene delivery to vascular cells but present a risk of insertional mutagenesis. Conversely, integrase-deficient lentiviral vectors (IDLV) offer additional benefits through reduced mutagenesis risk, but this has not been evaluated in the context of vascular gene transfer. Here, we have investigated the performance and genetic safety of both counterparts in primary human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and compared gene transfer efficiency and assessed the genotoxic potential of ICLVs and IDLVs based on their integration frequency and insertional profile in the human genome. Expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) mediated by IDLVs (IDLV-eGFP) demonstrated efficient transgene expression in VSMCs. IDLV gene transfer of Nogo-B mediated efficient overexpression of Nogo-B in VSMCs, leading to phenotypic effects on VSMC migration and proliferation, similar to its ICLV version and unlike its eGFP control and uninfected VSMCs. Large-scale integration site analyses in VSMCs indicated that IDLV-mediated gene transfer gave rise to a very low frequency of genomic integration compared to ICLVs, revealing a close-to-random genomic distribution in VSMCs. This study demonstrates for the first time the potential of IDLVs for safe and efficient vascular gene transfer. PMID:22931362

  6. The tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 controls urokinase-dependent signaling and functions in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyan, Julia Haller, Hermann; Dumler, Inna

    2009-04-01

    The urokinase (uPA)/urokinase receptor (uPAR) multifunctional system is an important mediator of functional behaviour of human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). uPAR associates with platelet-derived growth factor receptor {beta} (PDGFR-{beta}), which serves as a transmembrane adaptor for uPAR in VSMC, to transduce intracellular signaling and initiate functional changes. The precise and rapid propagation of these signaling cascades demands both strict and flexible regulatory mechanisms that remain unexplored. We provide evidence that the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 mediates these processes. uPA regulated SHP-2 phosphorylation, catalytic activity, and its co-localization and association with the PDGFR-{beta}. Active PDGFR-{beta} was required for the uPA-induced SHP-2 phosphorylation. uPAR-directed STAT1 pathway was disturbed in cells expressing SHP-2 inactive mutant. Both, cell proliferation and migration were impaired in VSMC with downregulated SHP-2. Elucidating the underlying mechanisms, we found that uPA induced SHP-2 recruitment to lipid rafts. Disruption of rafts abolished uPA-related control of SHP-2 phosphorylation, its association with PDGFR-{beta} and finally the VSMC functional responses. Our results demonstrate that SHP-2 plays an important role in uPA-directed signaling and functional control of human VSMC and suggest that this phosphatase might contribute to the pathogenesis of the uPA-related vascular remodeling.

  7. Artichoke, cynarin and cyanidin downregulate the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in human coronary smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ning; Pautz, Andrea; Wollscheid, Ursula; Reifenberg, Gisela; Förstermann, Ulrich; Li, Huige

    2014-01-01

    Artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) is one of the world's oldest medicinal plants with multiple health benefits. We have previously shown that artichoke leaf extracts and artichoke flavonoids upregulate the gene expression of endothelial-type nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in human endothelial cells. Whereas NO produced by the eNOS is a vasoprotective molecule, NO derived from the inducible iNOS plays a pro-inflammatory role in the vasculature. The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of artichoke on iNOS expression in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMC). Incubation of HCASMC with a cytokine mixture led to an induction of iNOS mRNA expression. This iNOS induction was concentration- and time-dependently inhibited by an artichoke leaf extract (1-100 µg/mL, 6 h or 24 h). Consistently, the artichoke leaf extract also reduced cytokine-induced iNOS promoter activation and iNOS protein expression. In addition, treatment of HCASMC with four well-known artichoke compounds (cynarin > cyanidin > luteolin ≈ cynaroside) led to a downregulation iNOS mRNA and protein expression, with cynarin being the most potent one. In conclusion, artichoke contains both eNOS-upregulating and iNOS-downregulating compounds. Such compounds may contribute to the beneficial effects of artichoke and may per se have therapeutic potentials. PMID:24662080

  8. Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 4 modulates prostaglandin E2 release from human arterial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Golej, Deidre L.; Askari, Bardia; Kramer, Farah; Barnhart, Shelley; Vivekanandan-Giri, Anuradha; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Bornfeldt, Karin E.

    2011-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs) catalyze the thioesterification of long-chain FAs into their acyl-CoA derivatives. Purified ACSL4 is an arachidonic acid (20:4)-preferring ACSL isoform, and ACSL4 is therefore a probable regulator of lipid mediator production in intact cells. Eicosanoids play important roles in vascular homeostasis and disease, yet the role of ACSL4 in vascular cells is largely unknown. In the present study, the ACSL4 splice variant expressed in human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) was identified as variant 1. To investigate the function of ACSL4 in SMCs, ACSL4 variant 1 was overexpressed, knocked-down by small interfering RNA, or its enzymatic activity acutely inhibited in these cells. Overexpression of ACSL4 resulted in a markedly increased synthesis of arachidonoyl-CoA, increased 20:4 incorporation into phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, and triacylglycerol, and reduced cellular levels of unesterified 20:4. Accordingly, secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was blunted in ACSL4-overexpressing SMCs compared with controls. Conversely, acute pharmacological inhibition of ACSL4 activity resulted in increased release of PGE2. However, long-term downregulation of ACSL4 resulted in markedly reduced PGE2 secretion. Thus, ACSL4 modulates PGE2 release from human SMCs. ACSL4 may regulate a number of processes dependent on the release of arachidonic acid-derived lipid mediators in the arterial wall. PMID:21242590

  9. Phylogenetic Mapping of Recombination Hotspots in Human Immunodeficiency Virus via Spatially Smoothed Change-Point Processes

    PubMed Central

    Minin, Vladimir N.; Dorman, Karin S.; Fang, Fang; Suchard, Marc A.

    2007-01-01

    We present a Bayesian framework for inferring spatial preferences of recombination from multiple putative recombinant nucleotide sequences. Phylogenetic recombination detection has been an active area of research for the last 15 years. However, only recently attempts to summarize information from several instances of recombination have been made. We propose a hierarchical model that allows for simultaneous inference of recombination breakpoint locations and spatial variation in recombination frequency. The dual multiple change-point model for phylogenetic recombination detection resides at the lowest level of our hierarchy under the umbrella of a common prior on breakpoint locations. The hierarchical prior allows for information about spatial preferences of recombination to be shared among individual data sets. To overcome the sparseness of breakpoint data, dictated by the modest number of available recombinant sequences, we a priori impose a biologically relevant correlation structure on recombination location log odds via a Gaussian Markov random field hyperprior. To examine the capabilities of our model to recover spatial variation in recombination frequency, we simulate recombination from a predefined distribution of breakpoint locations. We then proceed with the analysis of 42 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) intersubtype gag recombinants and identify a putative recombination hotspot. PMID:17194781

  10. Effects of the dual TP receptor antagonist and thromboxane synthase inhibitor EV-077 on human endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Petri, Marcelo H.; Tellier, Céline; Michiels, Carine; Ellertsen, Ingvill; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Bäck, Magnus

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •EV-077 reduced TNF-α induced inflammation in endothelial cells. •The thromboxane mimetic U69915 enhanced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. •EV-077 inhibited smooth muscle cell proliferation. -- Abstract: The prothrombotic mediator thromboxane A{sub 2} is derived from arachidonic acid metabolism through the cyclooxygenase and thromboxane synthase pathways, and transduces its effect through the thromboxane prostanoid (TP) receptor. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the TP receptor antagonist and thromboxane synthase inhibitor EV-077 on inflammatory markers in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and on human coronary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation. To this end, mRNA levels of different proinflammatory mediators were studied by real time quantitative PCR, supernatants were analyzed by enzyme immune assay, and cell proliferation was assessed using WST-1. EV-077 significantly decreased mRNA levels of ICAM-1 and PTX3 after TNFα incubation, whereas concentrations of 6-keto PGF1α in supernatants of endothelial cells incubated with TNFα were significantly increased after EV-077 treatment. Although U46619 did not alter coronary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation, this thromboxane mimetic enhanced the proliferation induced by serum, insulin and growth factors, which was significantly inhibited by EV-077. In conclusion, EV-077 inhibited TNFα-induced endothelial inflammation and reduced the enhancement of smooth muscle cell proliferation induced by a thromboxane mimetic, supporting that the thromboxane pathway may be associated with early atherosclerosis in terms of endothelial dysfunction and vascular hypertrophy.

  11. Minimization of Retinal Slip Cannot Explain Human Smooth-Pursuit Eye Movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Leland S.; Beutter, Brent R.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Existing models assume that pursuit attempts a direct minimization of retinal image motion or "slip" (e.g. Robinson et al., 1986; Krauzlis & Weisberger, 1989). Using occluded line-figure stimuli, we have previously shown that humans can accurately pursue stimuli for which perfect tracking does not zero retinal slip (Neurologic ARCO). These findings are inconsistent with the standard control strategy of matching eye motion to a target-motion signal reconstructed by adding retinal slip and eye motion, but consistent with a visual front-end which estimates target motion via a global spatio-temporal integration for pursuit and perception. Another possible explanation is that pursuit simply attempts to minimize slip perpendicular to the segments (and neglects parallel "sliding" motion). To resolve this, 4 observers (3 naive) were asked to pursue the center of 2 types of stimuli with identical velocity-space descriptions and matched motion energy. The line-figure "diamond" stimulus was viewed through 2 invisible 3 deg-wide vertical apertures (38 cd/m2 equal to background) such that only the sinusoidal motion of 4 oblique line segments (44 cd/m2 was visible. The "cross" was identical except that the segments exchanged positions. Two trajectories (8's and infinity's) with 4 possible initial directions were randomly interleaved (1.25 cycles, 2.5s period, Ax = Ay = 1.4 deg). In 91% of trials, the diamond appeared rigid. Correspondingly, pursuit was vigorous (mean Again: 0.74) with a V/H aspect ratio approx. 1 (mean: 0.9). Despite a valid rigid solution, the cross however appeared rigid in 8% of trials. Correspondingly, pursuit was weaker (mean Hgain: 0.38) with an incorrect aspect ratio (mean: 1.5). If pursuit were just minimizing perpendicular slip, performance would be the same in both conditions.

  12. Expression and proliferation profiles of PKC, JNK and p38MAPK in physiologically stretched human bladder smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wazir, Romel; Luo, De-Yi; Dai, Yi; Yue, Xuan; Tian, Ye; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •Stretch induces proliferation in human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMC). •5% Equibiaxial elongation produces maximum proliferation. •Physiologic stretch decreases apoptotic cell death. •PKC is involved in functional modulation of bladder. •JNK and p38 are not involved in proliferating HBSMC. -- Abstract: Objective: To determine protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase (JNK) and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38MAPK) expression levels and effects of their respective inhibitors on proliferation of human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs) when physiologically stretched in vitro. Materials and methods: HBSMCs were grown on silicone membrane and stretch was applied under varying conditions; (equibiaxial elongation: 2.5%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%), (frequency: 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1 Hz). Optimal physiological stretch was established by assessing proliferation with 5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) assay and flow cytometry. PKC, JNK and p38 expression levels were analyzed by Western blot. Specificity was maintained by employing specific inhibitors; (GF109203X for PKC, SP600125 for JNK and SB203580 for p38MAPK), in some experiments. Results: Optimum proliferation was observed at 5% equibiaxial stretch (BrdU: 0.837 ± 0.026 (control) to 1.462 ± 0.023)%, (P < 0.05) and apoptotic cell death rate decreased from 16.4 ± 0.21% (control) to 4.5 ± 0.13% (P < 0.05) applied at 0.1 Hz. Expression of PKC was upregulated with slight increase in JNK and no change in p38MAPK after application of stretch. Inhibition had effects on proliferation (1.075 ± 0.024, P < 0.05 GF109203X); (1.418 ± 0.021, P > 0.05 SP600125) and (1.461 ± 0.01, P > 0.05 SB203580). These findings show that mechanical stretch can promote magnitude-dependent proliferative modulation through PKC and possibly JNK but not via p38MAPK in hBSMCs.

  13. Endotracheal stenting therapy in dogs with tracheal collapse.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Usón, Jesús; Ezquerra, Javier; Crisóstomo, Verónica; Luis, Laura; Maynar, Manuel

    2008-02-01

    Tracheal collapse in dogs is a common respiratory disorder, typically presenting with a history of chronic cough, increasing respiratory difficulties, and episodes of dyspnoea. Medical treatment is the therapy of choice and surgical repair is considered when patients do not respond well. Minimally invasive endotracheal stenting is a promising new therapy under investigation, but there remain significant challenges to overcome potential complications. The purpose of this article is to provide a comparative overview of intra-luminal stenting of the trachea in human and veterinary medicine. The currently available stents and their potential clinical application to the veterinary patient will be discussed. PMID:17368061

  14. Effects of guaifenesin, N-acetylcysteine, and ambroxol on MUC5AC and mucociliary transport in primary differentiated human tracheal-bronchial cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Therapeutic intervention in the pathophysiology of airway mucus hypersecretion is clinically important. Several types of drugs are available with different possible modes of action. We examined the effects of guaifenesin (GGE), N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and ambroxol (Amb) on differentiated human airway epithelial cells stimulated with IL-13 to produce additional MUC5AC. Methods After IL-13 pre-treatment (3 days), the cultures were treated with GGE, NAC or Amb (10–300 μM) in the continued presence of IL-13. Cellular and secreted MUC5AC, mucociliary transport rates (MTR), mucus rheology at several time points, and the antioxidant capacity of the drugs were assessed. Results IL-13 increased MUC5AC content (~25%) and secretion (~2-fold) and decreased MTR, but only slightly affected the G’ (elastic) or G” (viscous) moduli of the secretions. GGE significantly inhibited MUC5AC secretion and content in the IL-13-treated cells in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50s at 24 hr ~100 and 150 μM, respectively). NAC or Amb were less effective. All drugs increased MTR and decreased G’ and G” relative to IL-13 alone. Cell viability was not affected and only NAC exhibited antioxidant capacity. Conclusions Thus, GGE effectively reduces cellular content and secretion of MUC5AC, increases MTR, and alters mucus rheology, and may therefore be useful in treating airway mucus hypersecretion and mucostasis in airway diseases. PMID:23113953

  15. Biological actions of nitroarenes in short-term tests on Salmonella, cultured mammalian cells and cultured human tracheal tissues: possible basis for regulatory control.

    PubMed Central

    Sugimura, T; Takayama, S

    1983-01-01

    Pure synthetic nitropyrene compounds were subjected to a mutation test using Salmonella typhimurium TA 98 and TA 100 with and without S9 mix, a metabolic activation system. Dinitropyrenes were highly mutagenic. Among them, 1,8-dinitropyrene was the most potent mutagen, producing 940,000 revertants of TA 98/micrograms. 1,3,6-Trinitropyrene and 1,3,6,8-tetranitropyrene were also highly mutagenic, producing 708,000 and 221,000 revertants/micrograms, respectively. 1-Nitropyrene was weakly mutagenic. All nitropyrenes were more mutagenic towards TA 98 than TA 100, and all mutagenic activities were abolished by the presence of S9 mix. Di- and trinitropyrenes were demonstrated to be mutagenic to Chinese hamster lung cells without metabolic activation, by using diphtheria toxin resistancy as a marker. The range of mutagenic potential of nitropyrenes was much narrower with cultured mammalian cells than with Salmonella. 1-Nitropyrene was not mutagenic. 1,6-Dinitropyrene and 1-nitropyrene induced unscheduled DNA synthesis in epithelial cells of in vitro cultured human bronchi, as did diol-epoxides of benzo[a]pyrene, while benzo[a]pyrene itself was inert. 1-Nitropyrene and 3-nitrofluoranthene produced subcutaneous fibrosarcomas at the loci of injections in the backs of rats. Tumors were found in 47% and 40% of animals with total doses of 40 mg of 1-nitropyrene and 30 mg of 3-nitrofluoranthene, respectively. The biomedical significance of nitroarenes is discussed. PMID:6337823

  16. TLR4-NOX4-AP-1 signaling mediates lipopolysaccharide-induced CXCR6 expression in human aortic smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Devang N.; Bailey, Steven R.; Gresham, John K.; Schuchman, David B.; Shelhamer, James H.; Goldstein, Barry J.; Foxwell, Brian M.; Stemerman, Michael B.; Maranchie, Jodi K.; Valente, Anthony J.; Mummidi, Srinivas; Chandrasekar, Bysani . E-mail: chandraseka@uthscsa.edu

    2006-09-08

    CXCL16 is a transmembrane non-ELR CXC chemokine that signals via CXCR6 to induce aortic smooth muscle cell (ASMC) proliferation. While bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been shown to stimulate CXCL16 expression in SMC, its effects on CXCR6 are not known. Here, we demonstrate that LPS upregulates CXCR6 mRNA, protein, and surface expression in human ASMC. Inhibition of TLR4 with neutralizing antibodies or specific siRNA interference blocked LPS-mediated CXCR6 expression. LPS stimulated both AP-1 (c-Fos, c-Jun) and NF-{kappa}B (p50 and p65) activation, but only inhibition of AP-1 attenuated LPS-induced CXCR6 expression. Using dominant negative expression vectors and siRNA interference, we demonstrate that LPS induces AP-1 activation via MyD88, TRAF6, ERK1/2, and JNK signaling pathways. Furthermore, the flavoprotein inhibitor diphenyleniodonium chloride significantly attenuated LPS-mediated AP-1-dependent CXCR6 expression, as did inhibition of NOX4 NADPH oxidase by siRNA. Finally, CXCR6 knockdown inhibited CXCL16-induced ASMC proliferation. These results demonstrate that LPS-TLR4-NOX4-AP-1 signaling can induce CXCR6 expression in ASMC, and suggest that the CXCL16-CXCR6 axis may be an important proinflammatory pathway in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  17. HSP70 increases extracellular matrix production by human vascular smooth muscle through TGF-β1 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    González-Ramos, Marta; Calleros, Laura; López-Ongil, Susana; Raoch, Viviana; Griera, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel; de Frutos, Sergio; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego

    2013-02-01

    The circulating levels of heat shock proteins (HSP) are increased in cardiovascular diseases; however, the implication of this for the fibrotic process typical of such diseases remains unclear. HSP70 can interact with the vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC), the major producer of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, through the Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4). The transforming growth factor type-β1 (TGF-β1) is a well known vascular pro-fibrotic cytokine that is regulated in part by AP-1-dependent transcriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that extracellular HSP70 could interact with SMCs, inducing TGF-β1 synthesis and subsequent changes in the vascular ECM. We demonstrate that extracellular HSP70 binds to human aorta SMC TLR4, which up-regulates the AP-1-dependent transcriptional activity of the TGF-β1 promoter. This is achieved through the mitogen activated protein kinases JNK and ERK, as demonstrated by the use of specific blockers and the knockdown of TLR4 with specific small interfering RNAs. The TGF-β1 upregulation increase the expression of the ECM proteins type I collagen and fibronectin. This novel observation may elucidate the mechanisms by which HSP70 contributes in the inflammation and fibrosis present in atherosclerosis and other fibrosis-related diseases. PMID:23084979

  18. Overexpression of human endothelial nitric oxide synthase in rat vascular smooth muscle cells and in balloon-injured carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Daum, G; Forough, R; Clowes, M; Walter, U; Clowes, A W

    1998-05-01

    Endothelial cells in normal blood vessels might prevent the unscheduled proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) by the expression of cell migration and growth inhibitors. NO, a potent vasodilator, generated by endothelium-specific constitutive NO synthase (ecNOS) might be such an inhibitor. To test this hypothesis, we overexpressed human ecNOS in syngeneic rat arterial SMCs using retrovirus-mediated gene transfer. Compared with SMCs transduced with vector alone (LXSN SMCs), DNA synthesis and cell proliferation were inhibited in the ecNOS-expressing SMCs (LCNSN SMCs). Basal and stimulated (by the calcium ionophore A23187) secretion of NO and intracellular cGMP were increased in LCNSN SMCs. Nomega-Nitro-L-arginine (L-NA), an inhibitor of NO synthesis, enhanced the proliferation of LCNSN SMCs but had no effect on LXSN SMCs. LCNSN SMCs seeded onto the luminal surface of balloon-injured rat carotid arteries inhibited neointimal formation by 37% and induced marked dilatation (3-fold increase in vessel diameter) at 2 weeks compared with LXSN SMC-seeded arteries. Orally administered L-NA blocked these changes. Phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, which is regulated in part by NO, was elevated in LCNSN SMCs and in LCNSN SMC-seeded arteries. This study demonstrates that NO generation by ecNOS inhibits SMC proliferation in vitro and modulates vascular tone locally in vivo. PMID:9576106

  19. Regulation of proliferation and gene expression in cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells by resveratrol and standardized grape extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhirong; Chen Yan; Labinskyy, Nazar; Hsieh Tzechen; Ungvari, Zoltan; Wu, Joseph M. . E-mail: Joseph_Wu@nymc.edu

    2006-07-21

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that low to moderate consumption of red wine is inversely associated with the risk of coronary heart disease; the protection is in part attributed to grape-derived polyphenols, notably trans-resveratrol, present in red wine. It is not clear whether the cardioprotective effects of resveratrol can be reproduced by standardized grape extracts (SGE). In the present studies, we determined, using cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC), growth and specific gene responses to resveratrol and SGE provided by the California Table Grape Commission. Suppression of HASMC proliferation by resveratrol was accompanied by a dose-dependent increase in the expression of tumor suppressor gene p53 and heat shock protein HSP27. Using resveratrol affinity chromatography and biochemical fractionation procedures, we showed by immunoblot analysis that treatment of HASMC with resveratrol increased the expression of quinone reductase I and II, and also altered their subcellular distribution. Growth of HASMC was significantly inhibited by 70% ethanolic SGE; however, gene expression patterns in various cellular compartments elicited in response to SGE were substantially different from those observed in resveratrol-treated cells. Further, SGE also differed from resveratrol in not being able to induce relaxation of rat carotid arterial rings. These results indicate that distinct mechanisms are involved in the regulation of HASMC growth and gene expression by SGE and resveratrol.

  20. Sensory versus motor loci for integration of multiple motion signals in smooth pursuit eye movements and human motion perception.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yu-Qiong; Lisberger, Stephen G

    2011-08-01

    We have investigated how visual motion signals are integrated for smooth pursuit eye movements by measuring the initiation of pursuit in monkeys for pairs of moving stimuli of the same or differing luminance. The initiation of pursuit for pairs of stimuli of the same luminance could be accounted for as a vector average of the responses to the two stimuli singly. When stimuli comprised two superimposed patches of moving dot textures, the brighter stimulus suppressed the inputs from the dimmer stimulus, so that the initiation of pursuit became winner-take-all when the luminance ratio of the two stimuli was 8 or greater. The dominance of the brighter stimulus could be not attributed to either the latency difference or the ratio of the eye accelerations for the bright and dim stimuli presented singly. When stimuli comprised either spot targets or two patches of dots moving across separate locations in the visual field, the brighter stimulus had a much weaker suppressive influence; the initiation of pursuit could be accounted for by nearly equal vector averaging of the responses to the two stimuli singly. The suppressive effects of the brighter stimulus also appeared in human perceptual judgments, but again only for superimposed stimuli. We conclude that one locus of the interaction of two moving visual stimuli is shared by perception and action and resides in local inhibitory connections in the visual cortex. A second locus resides deeper in sensory-motor processing and may be more closely related to action selection than to stimulus selection. PMID:21593392

  1. 12S-lipoxygenase protein associates with {alpha}-actin fibers in human umbilical artery vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weisinger, Gary . E-mail: gary_w@tasmc.health.gov.il; Limor, Rona; Marcus-Perlman, Yonit; Knoll, Esther; Kohen, Fortune; Schinder, Vera; Firer, Michael; Stern, Naftali

    2007-05-11

    The current study sets out to characterize the intracellular localization of the platelet-type 12S-lipoxygenase (12-LO), an enzyme involved in angiotensin-II induced signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Immunohistochemical analysis of VSMC in vitro or human umbilical arteries in vivo showed a clear cytoplasmic localization. On immunogold electron microscopy, 12-LO was found primarily associated with cytoplasmic VSMC muscle fibrils. Upon angiotensin-II treatment of cultured VSMC, immunoprecipitated 12-LO was found bound to {alpha}-actin, a component of the cytoplasmic myofilaments. 12-LO/{alpha}-actin binding was blocked by VSMC pretreatment with the 12-LO inhibitors, baicalien or esculetine and the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. Moreover, the binding of 12-LO to {alpha}-actin was not associated with 12-LO serine or tyrosine phosphorylation. These observations suggest a previously unrecognized angiotensin-II dependent protein interaction in VSMC through which 12-LO protein may be trafficked, for yet undiscovered purposes towards the much more abundantly expressed cytoskeletal protein {alpha}-actin.

  2. Cyclic mechanical strain-induced proliferation and migration of human airway smooth muscle cells: role of EMMPRIN and MMPs.

    PubMed

    Hasaneen, Nadia A; Zucker, Stanley; Cao, Jian; Chiarelli, Christian; Panettieri, Reynold A; Foda, Hussein D

    2005-09-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation and migration are major components of airway remodeling in asthma. Asthmatic airways are exposed to mechanical strain, which contributes to their remodeling. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) plays an important role in remodeling. In the present study, we examined if the mechanical strain of human ASM (HASM) cells contributes to their proliferation and migration and the role of MMPs in this process. HASM were exposed to mechanical strain using the FlexCell system. HASM cell proliferation, migration and MMP release, activation, and expression were assessed. Our results show that cyclic strain increased the proliferation and migration of HASM; cyclic strain increased release and activation of MMP-1, -2, and -3 and membrane type 1-MMP; MMP release was preceded by an increase in extracellular MMP inducer; Prinomastat [a MMP inhibitor (MMPI)] significantly decreased cyclic strain-induced proliferation and migration of HASM; and the strain-induced increase in the release of MMPs was accompanied by an increase in tenascin-C release. In conclusion, cyclic mechanical strain plays an important role in HASM cell proliferation and migration. This increase in proliferation and migration is through an increase in MMP release and activation. Pharmacological MMPIs should be considered in the pursuit of therapeutic options for airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:16014803

  3. Functional separation of deep cytoplasmic calcium from subplasmalemmal space calcium in cultured human uterine smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Young, Roger C; Zhang, PeiSheng

    2004-07-01

    For smooth muscle, two important functions of free intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)(i)) are modulation of plasma membrane excitability properties and modulation of the contractile apparatus. As proposed by van Breemen, Ca(2+)(i) can be divided into the subplasmalemmal space (Ca(2+)(sps)) and the deep cytosol (Ca(2+)(d)) by the superficial calcium buffer barrier. Using these distinctions, Ca(2+)(sps) activates the large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (BK), and Ca(2+)(d) binds calcium-dependent fluorescent probes in the cytoplasm. We present here combined fluorescence-patch clamp experiments designed to simultaneously assess Ca(2+)(d) and Ca(2+)(sps) in cultured human uterine smooth muscle cells. Open probabilities (P(o)) of the BK channel were measured using the cell-attached patch clamp technique. P(o) was used to approximate changes of [Ca(2+)(sps)]. Relative concentrations of Ca(2+)(d) were approximated by observing fluorescence of Calcium green-1 (F). Under control conditions, we found similar time courses for rises of P(o) and F following 10nM oxytocin (OT) addition. In parallel experiments, but with lanthanum (La(3+)) added to the bath to block transmembrane calcium flux, P(o) was only slightly affected, but F increases were delayed and blunted. These data paradoxically indicate that following OT stimulation, the primary source of calcium for Ca(2+)(sps) is internal stores, and calcium entry from the extracellular space is required to raise Ca(2+)(d). When cells were exposed to cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) to release SR calcium stores, P(o) increased slowly, then persisted at large values. The persistence of P(o) rises suggests that removal of calcium from the subplasmalemmal space is primarily via reuptake into the SR. In the presence of La(3+), OT-induced rises of F were slightly prolonged, suggesting that transmembrane calcium flux contributes to decreasing Ca(2+)(d), but is not the primary mechanism. In summary, these data demonstrate that Ca(2

  4. NADPH oxidase activation contributes to native low-density lipoprotein-induced proliferation of human aortic smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Il Hwan; Hwang, Hye Mi; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Kwon, Hyung-Joo; Hoe, Kwang Lae; Kim, Young Myeong; Ryoo, Sungwoo

    2015-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentration of native low-density lipoprotein (nLDL) is associated with vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) activation and cardiovascular disease. We investigated the mechanisms of superoxide generation and its contribution to pathophysiological cell proliferation in response to nLDL stimulation. Lucigenin-induced chemiluminescence was used to measure nLDL-induced superoxide production in human aortic smooth muscle cells (hAoSMCs). Superoxide production was increased by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and decreased by NADPH oxidase inhibitors in nLDL-stimulated hAoSMC and hAoSMC homogenates, as well as in prepared membrane fractions. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2), protein kinase C-θ (PKCθ) and protein kinase C-β (PKCβ) were phosphorylated and maximally activated within 3 min of nLDL stimulation. Phosphorylated Erk1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase, PKCθ and PKCβ stimulated interactions between p47phox and p22phox; these interactions were prevented by MEK and PKC inhibitors (PD98059 and calphostin C, respectively). These inhibitors decreased nLDL-dependent superoxide production and blocked translocation of p47phox to the membrane, as shown by epifluorescence imaging and cellular fractionation experiments. Proliferation assays showed that a small interfering RNA against p47phox, as well as superoxide scavenger and NADPH oxidase inhibitors, blocked nLDL-induced hAoSMC proliferation. The nLDL stimulation in deendothelialized aortic rings from C57BL/6J mice increased dihydroethidine fluorescence and induced p47phox translocation that was blocked by PD98059 or calphostin C. Isolated aortic SMCs from p47phox−/− mice (mAoSMCs) did not respond to nLDL stimulation. Furthermore, NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1) was responsible for superoxide generation and cell proliferation in nLDL-stimulated hAoSMCs. These data demonstrated that NADPH oxidase activation contributed to cell proliferation in nLDL-stimulated h

  5. Smooth Sailing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Beverley; Pincott, Maxine; Rebman, Ashley; Northcutt, Jen; Barsanti, Amy; Silkunas, Betty; Brighton, Susan K.; Reitz, David; Winkler, Maureen

    1999-01-01

    Presents discipline tips from several teachers to keep classrooms running smoothly all year. Some of the suggestions include the following: a bear-cave warning system, peer mediation, a motivational mystery, problem students acting as the teacher's assistant, a positive-behavior-reward chain, a hallway scavenger hunt (to ensure quiet passage…

  6. Primary Endoscopic Repair of a Large Tracheal Rupture Through Tracheal Stoma.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Atilla; Aydin, Yener; Altuntas, Bayram; Ahiskalioglu, Ali

    2015-10-01

    We describe the case of an 83-year-old man who presented with a large trauma to the membranous wall of the trachea and was treated with endoscopic primary repair of the tracheal wall through a preexisting tracheal stoma. Assessment with an optical telescope through the tracheal stoma revealed a 5-cm laceration in the membranous wall of the trachea starting immediately above the carina. The laceration was closed using continuous 4-0 monofilament polydioxanone sutures with direct visualization of tissues through a fiberoptic telescope. This approach is particularly effective in cases of traumatic rupture of the membranous trachea. PMID:26434482

  7. Cultured human vascular smooth muscle cells with functional thromboxane A2 receptors: measurement of U46619-induced /sup 45/calcium efflux

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, G.W. II; Sens, D.; Chaikhouni, A.; Mais, D.; Halushka, P.V.

    1987-06-01

    Thromboxane A2 (TXA2)/prostaglandin H2 (PGH2) are potent vasoconstrictors whose contractile effects are mediated by increases in cellular calcium. Stable analogues of these compounds have shown calcium ionophore activity at high concentrations. To determine if effects of TXA2/PGH2 analogues on /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ fluxes are receptor mediated, the effects of the stable TXA2/PGH2 mimetic U46619 and the TXA2/PGH2 receptor antagonist I-PTA-OH on /sup 45/Ca/+ fluxes in cultured human vascular smooth muscle cells were studied. The smooth muscle cells were cultured from human saphenous vein explants, and they retained the morphologic and immunologic characteristics of vascular smooth muscle cells. U46619 stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 of 398 +/- 26 nM (n = 4). The maximal /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux in response to U46619 (5 microM) was significantly greater (p = 0.006) than the /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux induced by KCl (40 mM). I-PTA-OH inhibited the U46619-induced /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux but had no effect on KCl-induced /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux. These results suggest that the effects of U46619 in increasing vascular smooth muscle cell calcium efflux are receptor mediated. Furthermore, vascular smooth muscle cells with functional TXA2/PGH2 receptors were cultured from human saphenous veins and provide a potentially useful in vitro system for the further study of TXA2/PGH2 receptor-mediated phenomena in human vascular tissue.

  8. Nitric oxide stimulates matrix synthesis and deposition by adult human aortic smooth muscle cells within three-dimensional cocultures.

    PubMed

    Simmers, Phillip; Gishto, Arsela; Vyavahare, Narendra; Kothapalli, Chandrasekhar R

    2015-04-01

    Vascular diseases are characterized by the over-proliferation and migration of aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) within the vessel wall, leading to compromise in cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling pathways. Tissue engineering approaches to regulate SMC over-proliferation and enhance healthy ECM synthesis showed promise, but resulted in low crosslinking efficiency. Here, we report the benefits of exogenous nitric oxide (NO) cues, delivered from S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), to cell proliferation and matrix deposition by adult human aortic SMCs (HA-SMCs) within three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic cocultures. A coculture platform with two adjacent, permeable 3D culture chambers was developed to enable paracrine signaling between vascular cells. HA-SMCs were cultured in these chambers within collagen hydrogels, either alone or in the presence of human aortic endothelial cells (HA-ECs) cocultures, and exogenously supplemented with varying GSNO dosages (0-100 nM) for 21 days. Results showed that EC cocultures stimulated SMC proliferation within GSNO-free cultures. With increasing GSNO concentration, HA-SMC proliferation decreased in the presence or absence of EC cocultures, while HA-EC proliferation increased. GSNO (100 nM) significantly enhanced the protein amounts synthesized by HA-SMCs, in the presence or absence of EC cocultures, while lower dosages (1-10 nM) offered marginal benefits. Multi-fold increases in the synthesis and deposition of elastin, glycosaminoglycans, hyaluronic acid, and lysyl oxidase crosslinking enzyme (LOX) were noted at higher GSNO dosages, and coculturing with ECs significantly furthered these trends. Similar increases in TIMP-1 and MMP-9 levels were noted within cocultures with increasing GSNO dosages. Such increases in matrix synthesis correlated with NO-stimulated increases in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression within EC and SMC

  9. Nitric Oxide Stimulates Matrix Synthesis and Deposition by Adult Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells Within Three-Dimensional Cocultures

    PubMed Central

    Simmers, Phillip; Gishto, Arsela; Vyavahare, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Vascular diseases are characterized by the over-proliferation and migration of aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) within the vessel wall, leading to compromise in cell–cell and cell–matrix signaling pathways. Tissue engineering approaches to regulate SMC over-proliferation and enhance healthy ECM synthesis showed promise, but resulted in low crosslinking efficiency. Here, we report the benefits of exogenous nitric oxide (NO) cues, delivered from S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), to cell proliferation and matrix deposition by adult human aortic SMCs (HA-SMCs) within three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic cocultures. A coculture platform with two adjacent, permeable 3D culture chambers was developed to enable paracrine signaling between vascular cells. HA-SMCs were cultured in these chambers within collagen hydrogels, either alone or in the presence of human aortic endothelial cells (HA-ECs) cocultures, and exogenously supplemented with varying GSNO dosages (0–100 nM) for 21 days. Results showed that EC cocultures stimulated SMC proliferation within GSNO-free cultures. With increasing GSNO concentration, HA-SMC proliferation decreased in the presence or absence of EC cocultures, while HA-EC proliferation increased. GSNO (100 nM) significantly enhanced the protein amounts synthesized by HA-SMCs, in the presence or absence of EC cocultures, while lower dosages (1–10 nM) offered marginal benefits. Multi-fold increases in the synthesis and deposition of elastin, glycosaminoglycans, hyaluronic acid, and lysyl oxidase crosslinking enzyme (LOX) were noted at higher GSNO dosages, and coculturing with ECs significantly furthered these trends. Similar increases in TIMP-1 and MMP-9 levels were noted within cocultures with increasing GSNO dosages. Such increases in matrix synthesis correlated with NO-stimulated increases in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression within EC

  10. Stromal cells in the human gut show ultrastructural features of fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells but not myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Eyden, Brian; Curry, Alan; Wang, Guofeng

    2011-07-01

    The free spindled cells of the lamina propria of the gut have been reported as showing fibroblastic, smooth-muscle and myofibroblastic differentiation. A precise understanding of the differentiation of these cells is essential for appreciating their functions, and this paper addresses this question using ultrastructural analysis. Histologically normal samples from different areas of the gastrointestinal tract were studied. Both subepithelial stromal cells, lying immediately beneath the basal lamina, and the deeper interstitial stromal cells, were studied. Subepithelial and interstitial cells had comparable features, reinforcing the idea that these formed a single reticulum of cells. Two major cell types were identified. Some were smooth-muscle cells, on the basis of abundant myofilaments with focal densities, glycogen, an irregular cell surface, focal lamina and multiple attachment plaques alternating with plasmalemmal caveolae. Some cells had a lesser expression of these markers, especially of myofilaments, and were regarded as poorly differentiated smooth-muscle cells and descriptively referred to as 'myoid'. Other cells were fibroblastic to judge by prominent rough endoplasmic reticulum, an absence of myofilaments and lamina, but presence of focal adhesions. The fibronexus junctions of true myofibroblasts were not seen. The study emphasises that the smooth-muscle actin immunoreactivity in this anatomical site resides in smooth-muscle cells and not in myofibroblasts, a view consistent with earlier ultrastructural and immunostaining results. The recognition that these cells are showing smooth-muscle or fibroblastic but not true myofibroblastic differentiation should inform our understanding of the function of these cells. PMID:20662992

  11. Tolerance following organophophate poisoning of tracheal muscle. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Farley, J.M.; Dwyer, T.M.

    1987-07-21

    The effects of subacute exposure to the organophosphate acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (diisoprophylfluorophosphate, soman, sarin, and VX) on the binding properties of muscarinic receptors, the contractile responses, and the electrophysiological properties of swine tracheal smooth muscle were studied. Subacute organophosphate treatment decreased the number of muscarinic receptors in smooth muscle homogenates and in the surface membrane of isolated cells by 50-77%. DFP was the most potent, followed by sarin, VX, and soman. The organophosphates induced a change in the coupling of the receptor to the guanine nucleotide-binding protein, which resulted in a decrease in the number of high-affinity receptors available for agonist-induced actions. The sensitivity of the muscle to acetylcholine and bethanechol was largely unchanged by any of the organophosphates. It is concluded that tolerance development is a complex process and involves: changes in receptor number and coupling of these receptors to intra-cellular processes; changes in the sensitivity of the ganglia to cholinergic agonists; and changes in the membrane processes and channels controlling membrane potential. Surprisingly, the response of the muscle to agonists is not greatly affected even though 70% of the receptors are lost from the cell surface.

  12. Lubrication and load-bearing properties of human salivary pellicles adsorbed ex vivo on molecularly smooth substrata.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Neale M; Yakubov, Gleb E; Stokes, Jason R; Klein, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    In a series of Surface Force Balance experiments, material from human whole saliva was adsorbed to molecularly smooth mica substrata (to form an 'adsorbed salivary film'). Measurements were taken of normal (load bearing, F (n)) and shear (frictional, F (s)*) forces between two interacting surfaces. One investigation involved a salivary film formed by overnight adsorption from undiluted, centrifuged saliva, with the adsorbed film rinsed with pure water before measurement. Measurements were taken under pure water and 70 mM NaNO(3). In a second investigation, a film was formed from and measured under a solution of 7% filtered saliva in 10 mM NaNO(3). F (n) results for both systems showed purely repulsive layers, with an uncompressed thickness of 35-70 nm for the diluted saliva investigation and, prior to the application of shear, 11 nm for the rinsed system. F (s)* was essentially proportional to F (n) for all systems and independent of shear speed (in the range 100-2000 nm s(-1)), with coefficients of friction μ ≈ 0.24 and μ ≈ 0.46 for the unrinsed and rinsed systems, respectively. All properties of the rinsed system remained similar when the pure water measurement environment was changed to 70 mM NaNO(3). For all systems studied, shear gave rise to an approximately threefold increase in the range of normal forces, attributed to the ploughing up of adsorbed material during shear to form debris that stood proud of the adsorbed layer. The results provide a microscopic demonstration of the wear process for a salivary film under shear and may be of particular interest for understanding the implications for in vivo oral lubrication under conditions such as rinsing of the mouth cavity. The work is interpreted in light of earlier studies that showed a structural collapse and increase in friction for an adsorbed salivary film in an environment of low ionic strength. PMID:22881290

  13. IgE induces proliferation in human airway smooth muscle cells: role of MAPK and STAT3 pathways.

    PubMed

    Redhu, Naresh Singh; Shan, Lianyu; Al-Subait, Duaa; Ashdown, Heather L; Movassagh, Hesam; Lamkhioued, Bouchaib; Gounni, Abdelilah S

    2013-01-01

    Airway remodeling is not specifically targeted by current asthma medications, partly owing to the lack of understanding of remodeling mechanisms, altogether posing great challenges in asthma treatment. Increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass due to hyperplasia/hypertrophy contributes significantly to overall airway remodeling and correlates with decline in lung function. Recent evidence suggests that IgE sensitization can enhance the survival and mediator release in inflammatory cells. Human ASM (HASM) cells express both low affinity (FcεRII/CD23) and high affinity IgE Fc receptors (FcεRI), and IgE can modulate the contractile and synthetic function of HASM cells. IgE was recently shown to induce HASM cell proliferation but the detailed mechanisms remain unknown. We report here that IgE sensitization induces HASM cell proliferation, as measured by 3H-thymidine, EdU incorporation, and manual cell counting. As an upstream signature component of FcεRI signaling, inhibition of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) abrogated the IgE-induced HASM proliferation. Further analysis of IgE-induced signaling depicted an IgE-mediated activation of Erk 1/2, p38, JNK MAPK, and Akt kinases. Lastly, lentiviral-shRNA-mediated STAT3 silencing completely abolished the IgE-mediated HASM cell proliferation. Collectively, our data provide mechanisms of a novel function of IgE which may contribute, at least in part, to airway remodeling observed in allergic asthma by directly inducing HASM cell proliferation. PMID:24499258

  14. Cross-talk between angiotensin II and IGF-1-induced connexin 43 expression in human saphenous vein smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Guanghong; Aggarwal, Anshu; Yohannes, Amanuel; Gangahar, Deepak M; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Vascular restenosis following coronary artery bypass graft can cause major clinical complications due to intimal hyperplasia in venous conduits. However, the precise underlying mechanisms of intimal hyperplasia are still unclear. We have recently reported that increased expression of connexin43 (Cx43) is involved in the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in human saphenous vein (SV). In this study, we investigated the signalling transduction pathway involved in Cx43 expression and SV SMC proliferation. Angiotensin-II (AT-II, 100 ng/ml) increased AT-II receptor 1 (AT-1R) protein expression and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) (100 ng/ml) up-regulated IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) protein expression in SV SMCs. Interestingly, AT-1R expression was also increased by IGF-1 treatment, and IGF-1R expression was increased by AT-II treatment, which was blocked by siRNA-IGF-1R and siRNA-AT-1R, respectively. Furthermore, the effect of AT-II and IGF-1 signal cross-talk i nducing up-regulation of their reciprocal receptors was blocked by siRNA against extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (Erk 1/2) in SMCs of SV. Moreover, AT-II and IGF-1-induced Cx43 expression via phosphorylation of Erk 1/2 and activation of transcription factor activator protein 1 (AP-1) through their reciprocal receptors in SV SMCs. These data demonstrate a cross-talk between IGF-1R and AT-1R in AT-II and IGF-1-induced Cx43 expression in SV SMCs involving Erk 1/2 and downstream activation of the AP-1 transcription factor. PMID:20731749

  15. Real-time imaging of ATP release induced by mechanical stretch in human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Norihiro; Ito, Satoru; Furuya, Kishio; Naruse, Keiji; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Sokabe, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-12-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells within the airway walls are continually exposed to mechanical stimuli, and exhibit various functions in response to these mechanical stresses. ATP acts as an extracellular mediator in the airway. Moreover, extracellular ATP is considered to play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, it is not known whether ASM cells are cellular sources of ATP secretion in the airway. We therefore investigated whether mechanical stretch induces ATP release from ASM cells. Mechanical stretch was applied to primary human ASM cells cultured on a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Concentrations of ATP in cell culture supernatants measured by luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence were significantly elevated by cyclic stretch (12 and 20% strain). We further visualized the stretch-induced ATP release from the cells in real time using a luminescence imaging system, while acquiring differential interference contrast cell images with infrared optics. Immediately after a single uniaxial stretch for 1 second, strong ATP signals were produced by a certain population of cells and spread to surrounding spaces. The cyclic stretch-induced ATP release was significantly reduced by inhibitors of Ca(2+)-dependent vesicular exocytosis, 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetraacetoxymethyl ester, monensin, N-ethylmaleimide, and bafilomycin. In contrast, the stretch-induced ATP release was not inhibited by a hemichannel blocker, carbenoxolone, or blockade of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 by short interfering RNA transfection or ruthenium red. These findings reveal a novel property of ASM cells: mechanically induced ATP release may be a cellular source of ATP in the airway. PMID:24885163

  16. Hypoxia Exerts Dualistic Effects on Inflammatory and Proliferative Responses of Healthy and Asthmatic Primary Human Bronchial Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Keglowich, Laura; Baraket, Melissa; Tamm, Michael; Borger, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background For oxygen supply, airway wall cells depend on diffusion though the basement membrane, as well as on delivery by micro-vessels. In the asthmatic lung, local hypoxic conditions may occur due to increased thickness and altered composition of the basement membrane, as well as due to edema of the inflamed airway wall. Objective In our study we investigated the effect of hypoxia on proliferation and pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic parameter production by human bronchial smooth muscle cells (BSMC). Furthermore, conditioned media of hypoxia-exposed BSMC was tested for its ability to induce sprout outgrowth from endothelial cells spheroids. Methods BSMC were cultured in RPMI1640 (5% FCS) under normoxic (21% O2) and hypoxic (1% and 5% O2) conditions. Proliferation was determined by cell count and Western blot analysis for cyclin E and Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA). Secretion of IL-6, IL-8, ENA-78 and VEGF-A was analyzed by ELISA. BSMC conditioned medium was tested for its angiogenic capacity by endothelial cell (EC)-spheroid in vitro angiogenesis assay. Results Proliferation of BSMC obtained from asthmatic and non-asthmatic patients was significantly reduced in the presence of 1% O2, whereas 5% O2 reduced proliferation of asthmatic BSMC only. Hypoxia induced HIF-1α expression in asthmatic and non-asthmatic BSMC, which coincided with significantly increased release of IL-6, IL-8 and VEGF-A, but not ENA-78. Finally, endothelial sprout outgrowth from EC spheroids was increased when exposed to hypoxia conditioned BSMC medium. Conclusion Hypoxia had dualistic effects on proliferative and inflammatory responses of asthmatic and non-asthmatic BSMC. First, hypoxia reduced BSMC proliferation. Second, hypoxia induced a pro-inflammatory, pro-angiogenic response. BSMC and EC may thus be promising new targets to counteract and/or alleviate airway wall remodeling. PMID:24587090

  17. Fetuin-A and Albumin Alter Cytotoxic Effects of Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles on Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dautova, Yana; Kozlova, Diana; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Epple, Matthias; Bootman, Martin D.; Proudfoot, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Calcification is a detrimental process in vascular ageing and in diseases such as atherosclerosis and arthritis. In particular, small calcium phosphate (CaP) crystal deposits are associated with inflammation and atherosclerotic plaque de-stabilisation. We previously reported that CaP particles caused human vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) death and that serum reduced the toxic effects of the particles. Here, we found that the serum proteins fetuin-A and albumin (≥1 µM) reduced intracellular Ca2+ elevations and cell death in VSMCs in response to CaP particles. In addition, CaP particles functionalised with fetuin-A, but not albumin, were less toxic than naked CaP particles. Electron microscopic studies revealed that CaP particles were internalised in different ways; via macropinocytosis, membrane invagination or plasma membrane damage, which occurred within 10 minutes of exposure to particles. However, cell death did not occur until approximately 30 minutes, suggesting that plasma membrane repair and survival mechanisms were activated. In the presence of fetuin-A, CaP particle-induced damage was inhibited and CaP/plasma membrane interactions and particle uptake were delayed. Fetuin-A also reduced dissolution of CaP particles under acidic conditions, which may contribute to its cytoprotective effects after CaP particle exposure to VSMCs. These studies are particularly relevant to the calcification observed in blood vessels in patients with kidney disease, where circulating levels of fetuin-A and albumin are low, and in pathological situations where CaP crystal formation outweighs calcification-inhibitory mechanisms. PMID:24849210

  18. Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids alter oxytocin signaling and receptor density in cultured pregnant human myometrial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Paul Y; Zhong, Miao; Kim, Yoon-Sun; Sanborn, Barbara M; Allen, Kenneth G D

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies and interventional clinical trials indicate that consumption of long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC n-3 PUFA) such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) lengthen gestational duration. Although the mechanisms are not well understood, prostaglandins (PG) of the 2-series are known to play a role in the initiation and progress of labor. In animal studies, modest DHA provision has been shown to reduce placental and uterine PGE(2) and PGF(2α), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 expression, and placental collagenase activity. However, modulation of PG biosynthesis may not account for all the effects of LC n-3 PUFAs in labor. We investigated one potential PG-independent mechanism of LC PUFA action using cultured pregnant human myometrial smooth muscle cells. Our goal was to characterize the effect of LC PUFA treatment on oxytocin signaling, a potent uterotonic hormone involved in labor. The addition of 10 µM-100 µM DHA or arachidonic acid (AA) to the culture media for 48 h resulted in dose dependent enrichment of these fatty acids in membrane lipid. DHA and AA significantly inhibited phosphatidylinositol turnover and [Ca(2+)](i) mobilization with oxytocin stimulation compared to bovine serum albumin control and equimolar oleic acid. DHA and AA significantly reduced oxytocin receptor membrane concentration without altering binding affinity or rate of receptor internalization. These findings demonstrate a role for LC n-3 PUFAs in regulation of oxytocin signaling and provide new insight into additional mechanisms pertaining to reports of dietary fish and fish oil consumption prolonging gestation. PMID:22848573

  19. Effects of high density lipoprotein subfractions on cholesterol homeostasis in human fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Oram, J F

    1983-01-01

    Ultracentrifugally isolated high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles of d greater than 1.125 g/ml promote net transport of cholesterol from cultured cells. Consequently, when cultured human fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells were incubated with HDL3 (d = 1.125-1.21 g/ml) and "very high" density lipoprotein (VHDL, d = 1.21-1.25 g/ml), low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor activity was induced and the rate of LDL degradation by the cells was increased. Enhancement of LDL degradation by HDL3 and VHDL was sustained over incubation periods of 5 days at medium LDL concentrations greater than needed to saturate the LDL receptors. Even during these long-term incubations with LDL, HDL3 and VHDL caused marked reductions in cellular cholesterol content. Thus, an increase in the rate of cholesterol transport from cells may lead to a steady-state decrease in cellular cholesterol content and a sustained increase in the rate of clearance of LDL from the extracellular fluid. In contrast to the effects of HDL3 and VHDL, the major subclasses of HDL2 (HDL2b, d = 1.063-1.100 g/ml; HDL2a, d = 1.100-1.125 g/ml) did not promote net cholesterol transport from cells. Moreover, by apparent direct blockage of the effects that HDL3 and VHDL had on cholesterol transport, HDL2 reversed the increased rate of LDL degradation induced by HDL3 and VHDL. These results suggest that the relative proportion of HDL subfractions in the extracellular fluid may be an important determinant of both the rate of cholesterol transport from cells and the rate of receptor-mediated catabolism of LDL. PMID:6312947

  20. Analysis of Schwalbe’s Line (Limbal Smooth Zone) by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Optical Coherence Tomography in Human Eye Bank Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Breazzano, Mark P; Fikhman, Michael; Abraham, Jerrold L; Barker-Griffith, Ann E

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Implantation of intraocular devices may become critical as they decrease in size in the future. Therefore, it is desirable to evaluate the relationship between radial location and Schwalbe’s line (smooth zone) by examining its width with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and to correlate this with observations by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Methods Full corneoscleral rings were obtained from twenty-six formalin-fixed human phakic donor eyes. SEM of each eye yielded a complete montage of the smooth zone, from which the area was measured, and width was determined in each quadrant. In three different eyes, time domain anterior segment OCT (Visante, Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc., Dublin, CA, USA) and spectral domain OCT (Cirrus 4.0, Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc., Dublin, CA, USA) were used to further characterize Schwalbe’s line. Results The overall smooth zone width was 79±22 µm, (n=15) ranging from 43 to 115 µm. The superior quadrant (103±8 µm, n=19), demonstrated significantly wider smooth zone than both the nasal (71±5 µm, n=19, P<0.001), and inferior (64±5 µm, n=18, P<0.0001) quadrants but not the temporal quadrant (81±7 µm, n=17, P>0.05). SEM findings of the smooth zone were correlated with visualization of Schwalbe’s line by Cirrus and Visante OCT imaging. Conclusion The smooth zone appears widest superiorly and thinnest inferonasally, suggesting that as glaucoma surgical devices become smaller, their placement could be argeted clinically by using OCT with preference to the superior quadrant, to minimize damage to the corneal endothelium. PMID:23825707

  1. Standard methods for tracheal mite research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter, for the COLOSS Beebook from the Bee Research Center in Switzerland, summarizes all the current information about the tracheal mite (Acarapis woodi) infesting honey bees (Apis mellifera). The chapter covers the effects on bees, its life history, and its range, as well as the identifica...

  2. Fluid dynamic factors in tracheal pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Chang, H K; Mortola, J P

    1981-07-01

    Because tracheal pressure measurement generally involves the use of a cannula or an endotracheal tube, fluid dynamic factors may cause a considerable artifact. We present a theoretical explanation of the observed apparent paradox in which the resistance of a tracheal cannula or an endotracheal tube is isolation was found to exceed the resistance of the airways plus the cannula or the tube in situ. By estimating the viscous dissipation and the kinetic energy change in a conduit with sudden variation of cross-sectional area, a predictive model is derived. The predictions are verified by a series of in vitro experiments with both steady and oscillatory flows. The experiments showed that the pressure recorded from the sidearm of a tracheal cannula or endotracheal tube contains an error which, in general, increased with the mean Reynolds' number of the through flow and also depends on the diameter ratio between the trachea and the tube or cannula, the position of the pressure tap, and the frequency of ventilation. When feasible, direct measurement with a needle in the trachea is suggested as a way to avoid the possible artifacts arising from the use fo a side tap of the cannula. Theoretical considerations, as well as in vitro and animal experiments, indicate that adding a properly chosen expansion to the tracheal cannula makes it possible to alter inspiratory and expiratory pressures selectively. This device may prove useful in control of breathing studies. PMID:7263418

  3. Air-Q laryngeal airway for rescue and tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Ads, Ayman; Auerbach, Frederic; Ryan, Kelly; El-Ganzouri, Abdel R

    2016-08-01

    We report the successful use of the Air-Q laryngeal airway (Air-Q LA) as a ventilatory device and a conduit for tracheal intubation to rescue the airway in a patient with difficult airway and tracheal stenosis. This is the first case report of the device to secure the airway after two episodes of hypoxemia in the operating room and intensive care unit. Consent for submission of this case report was obtained from our institution's human studies institutional review board given that the patient died a few months after his discharge from the hospital before his personal consent could be obtained and before preparation of this report. All personal identifiers that could lead to his identification have been removed from this report. A 59-year-old man was scheduled for a flexible and rigid bronchoscopy with possible laser excision of tracheal stenosis. He had a history of hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and diabetes. Assessment of airway revealed a thyromental distance of 6.5 cm, Mallampati class II, and body weight of 110 kg. He had hoarseness and audible inspiratory/expiratory stridor with Spo2 90% breathing room air. After induction and muscle relaxation, tracheal intubation and flexible bronchoscopy were achieved without incident. The patient was then extubated and a rigid bronchoscopy was attempted but failed with Spo2 dropping to 92%; rocuronium 60 mg was given, and reintubation was accomplished with a 7.5-mm endotracheal tube. A second rigid bronchoscopy attempt failed, with Spo2 dropping to 63%. Subsequent direct laryngoscopy revealed a bloody hypopharynx. A size 4.5 Air-Q LA was placed successfully and confirmed with capnography, and Spo2 returned to 100%. The airway was suctioned through the Air-Q LA device, and the airway was secured using a fiberoptic bronchoscope to place an endotracheal tube of 7.5-mm internal diameter. The case was canceled because of edema of the upper airway from multiple attempts with rigid bronchoscopy. The patient was transported

  4. P21-Activated Kinase Inhibitors FRAX486 and IPA3: Inhibition of Prostate Stromal Cell Growth and Effects on Smooth Muscle Contraction in the Human Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiming; Gratzke, Christian; Tamalunas, Alexander; Wiemer, Nicolas; Ciotkowska, Anna; Rutz, Beata; Waidelich, Raphaela; Strittmatter, Frank; Liu, Chunxiao; Stief, Christian G.; Hennenberg, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Prostate smooth muscle tone and hyperplastic growth are involved in the pathophysiology and treatment of male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Available drugs are characterized by limited efficacy. Patients’ adherence is particularly low to combination therapies of 5α-reductase inhibitors and α1-adrenoceptor antagonists, which are supposed to target contraction and growth simultaneously. Consequently, molecular etiology of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and new compounds interfering with smooth muscle contraction or growth in the prostate are of high interest. Here, we studied effects of p21-activated kinase (PAK) inhibitors (FRAX486, IPA3) in hyperplastic human prostate tissues, and in stromal cells (WPMY-1). In hyperplastic prostate tissues, PAK1, -2, -4, and -6 may be constitutively expressed in catecholaminergic neurons, while PAK1 was detected in smooth muscle and WPMY-1 cells. Neurogenic contractions of prostate strips by electric field stimulation were significantly inhibited by high concentrations of FRAX486 (30 μM) or IPA3 (300 μM), while noradrenaline- and phenylephrine-induced contractions were not affected. FRAX486 (30 μM) inhibited endothelin-1- and -2-induced contractions. In WPMY-1 cells, FRAX486 or IPA3 (24 h) induced concentration-dependent (1–10 μM) degeneration of actin filaments. This was paralleled by attenuation of proliferation rate, being observed from 1 to 10 μM FRAX486 or IPA3. Cytotoxicity of FRAX486 and IPA3 in WPMY-1 cells was time- and concentration-dependent. Stimulation of WPMY-1 cells with endothelin-1 or dihydrotestosterone, but not noradrenaline induced PAK phosphorylation, indicating PAK activation by endothelin-1. Thus, PAK inhibitors may inhibit neurogenic and endothelin-induced smooth muscle contractions in the hyperplastic human prostate, and growth of stromal cells. Targeting prostate smooth muscle contraction and stromal growth at once by a single compound is principally possible, at least under

  5. Selective biological response of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells on cold-plasma-modified polyester vascular prostheses.

    PubMed

    Blanchemain, N; Aguilar, M R; Chai, F; Jimenez, M; Jean-Baptiste, E; El-Achari, A; Martel, B; Hildebrand, H F; Roman, J San

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this work was to improve the hemocompatibility and the selectivity according to cells of non-woven poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) membranes. Non-woven PET membranes were modified by a combined plasma-chemical process. The surface of these materials was pre-activated by cold-plasma treatment and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was grafted by the in situ free radical polymerization of acrylic acid (AA). The extent of this reaction and the number of carboxylic groups incorporated were evaluated by colorimetric titration using toluidine blue O. All samples were characterized by SEM, AFM and thermogravimetric analysis, and the mechanical properties of the PAA grafted sample were determined. A selective cell response was observed when human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMC) or human pulmonary micro vascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) were seeded on the modified surfaces. HPASMC proliferation decreased about 60%, while HPMEC proliferation was just reduced about 10%. PAA grafted samples did not present hemolytic activity and the platelet adhesion decreased about 28% on PAA grafted surfaces. PMID:22002636

  6. [Examination of ontogenetic-morphologic growth of cholinergic receptor system in isolated preparation of human trachea in vitro].

    PubMed

    Islami, Hilmi; Sukalo, Aziz; Shabani, R; Disha, M; Kutllovci, S

    2006-01-01

    Morphologic growth of cholinergic bronchial respiratory system was examined at live and dead newborns. Tracheal smooth musculature was examined at 18 experimental preparations taken by the autopsy after exiting from different factors. Samples were divided into three groups based on gestational weeks. First group: from 23-29 gestational weeks (immature, N=5); second group: from 30-37 gestational weeks (premature, N=7); third group: from 38-41 gestational weeks (mature, N=6). Based on morphological examination of isolated preparations human trachea fingings are the following: in 23-29 week are found nerve endings with axo-axonal synapses mainly at ramification phase of lungs blood vessels net, without trachea bronchial innervations with axo-axonal synapses, and with perichondrial localization. In 30-37 gestational weeks axo-xonal synapses are found in between glands acinus's and vessels net, and also emphatic choline reactivity at lung ganglions: this suggests existing of cholinergic system at alive newborns. At 38-41 gestational weeks exists a wealthy nerve neuromuscular net in smooth tracheal musculature with different vesicles. Choline reactivity is emphasized peri and intrachondrial at lamina propria, at most around sensory glands and in smooth musculature. This suggests that there is no choline reactivity at epithelium and of existence of cholinergic system in tracheal bronchial smooth musculature. PMID:16425526

  7. Peripheral Airway Smooth Muscle, but Not the Trachealis, Is Hypercontractile in an Equine Model of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Matusovsky, Oleg S; Kachmar, Linda; Ijpma, Gijs; Bates, Genevieve; Zitouni, Nedjma; Benedetti, Andrea; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2016-05-01

    Heaves is a naturally occurring equine disease that shares many similarities with human asthma, including reversible antigen-induced bronchoconstriction, airway inflammation, and remodeling. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the trachealis muscle is mechanically representative of the peripheral airway smooth muscle (ASM) in an equine model of asthma. Tracheal and peripheral ASM of heaves-affected horses under exacerbation, or under clinical remission of the disease, and control horses were dissected and freed of epithelium to measure unloaded shortening velocity (Vmax), stress (force/cross-sectional area), methacholine effective concentration at which 50% of the maximum response is obtained, and stiffness. Myofibrillar Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, actomyosin in vitro motility, and contractile protein expression were also measured. Horses with heaves had significantly greater Vmax and Mg(2+)-ATPase activity in peripheral airway but not in tracheal smooth muscle. In addition, a significant correlation was found between Vmax and the time elapsed since the end of the corticosteroid treatment for the peripheral airways in horses with heaves. Maximal stress and stiffness were greater in the peripheral airways of the horses under remission compared with controls and the horses under exacerbation, potentially due to remodeling. Actomyosin in vitro motility was not different between controls and horses with heaves. These data demonstrate that peripheral ASM is mechanically and biochemically altered in heaves, whereas the trachealis behaves as in control horses. It is therefore conceivable that the trachealis muscle may not be representative of the peripheral ASM in human asthma either, but this will require further investigation. PMID:26473389

  8. Comparison of smooth pursuit and combined eye-head tracking in human subjects with deficient labyrinthine function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leigh, R. J.; Thurston, S. E.; Sharpe, J. A.; Ranalli, P. J.; Hamid, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of deficient labyrinthine function on smooth visual tracking with the eyes and head were investigated, using ten patients with bilateral peripheral vestibular disease and ten normal controls. Active, combined eye-head tracking (EHT) was significantly better in patients than smooth pursuit with the eyes alone, whereas normal subjects pursued equally well in both cases. Compensatory eye movements during active head rotation in darkness were always less in patients than in normal subjects. These data were used to examine current hypotheses that postulate central cancellation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during EHT. A model that proposes summation of an integral smooth pursuit command and VOR/compensatory eye movements is consistent with the findings. Observation of passive EHT (visual fixation of a head-fixed target during en bloc rotation) appears to indicate that in this mode parametric gain changes contribute to modulation of the VOR.

  9. Isolated congenital tracheal stenosis in a preterm newborn.

    PubMed

    Krause, Ulrich; Rödel, Ralph M W; Paul, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Severe tracheal stenosis, resulting in functional atresia of the trachea is a rare congenital malformation with an estimated occurrence of two in 100,000 newborns. If no esophagotracheal fistula is present to allow for spontaneous breathing, this condition is usually fatal. We report on a male infant born at 32 weeks of gestation. The patient presented with respiratory distress immediately after delivery due to severe congenital tracheal stenosis resulting in functional atresia of the trachea. Endotracheal intubation failed and even emergency tracheotomy did not allow ventilation of the patient lungs. The patient finally succumbed to prolonged hypoxia due to functional tracheal atresia. The etiology of tracheal atresia and tracheal stenosis is still unclear, but both conditions are frequently combined with other anomalies of the VACTERL (vertebral anomalies, anal atresia, cardiovascular anomalies, tracheoesophageal fistula, esophageal atresia, renal/radial anomalies and limb defects) and TACRD (tracheal agenesis, cardiac, renal and duodenal malformations) association. Conclusion Successful treatment of severe congenital tracheal stenosis and tracheal atresia depends on either prenatal diagnosis or recognition of this condition immediately after birth to perform tracheotomy without delay. Nevertheless, despite any efforts, the therapeutical results of severe tracheal stenosis and tracheal atresia are still unsatisfactory. PMID:21590265

  10. Effects of aqueous leaf extract of Bryophyllum pinnatum on guinea pig tracheal ring contractility.

    PubMed

    Ozolua, Raymond I; Eboka, Chuks J; Duru, Comfort N; Uwaya, Dickson O

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous leaf extract of Bryophyllum pinnatum Lam (Crassulaceae) is used as a cough remedy and for the prophylaxis of asthma. Since drugs used for the prophylaxis of asthma may be acting on airway smooth muscles, we investigated the effects of aqueous leaf extract of the plant on the contractile responses of isolated tracheal rings. Guinea pigs were grouped into non-sensitized, ovalbumin (OA)-sensitized, OA-sensitized but 200 mg/kg/day x 21 extract-treated, and OA-sensitized but 400 mg/kg/day x 21 extract-treated. The extract was administered orally. Tracheal rings obtained from the four groups were mounted in organ baths and used to test spasmolytic and antispasmodic effects of the extract on histamine or carbachol-induced contractions. Concentrations of 0.125-1.0 mg/ml of the extract did not relax histamine or carbachol-induced precontractions. The presence of 0.25-1.0 mg/ml of the extract in organ baths significantly reduced the maximal contractile responses (Emax) to cumulative concentrations of histamine or carbachol irrespective of the experimental group. pD2 values were significantly reduced for histamine and carbachol in rings obtained from 400 mg/kg/day x 21 extract-treated group. It is concluded that aqueous leaf extract of B. pinnatum possesses antispasmodic effects on the guinea pig tracheal rings. The results lend credence to the use of the extract for the prophylaxis of asthma in ethnomedicine. PMID:22314954

  11. Laryngo-tracheal profile: a new method for assessing laryngo-tracheal stenoses.

    PubMed

    Kiesler, Karl; Gugatschka, Markus; Sorantin, Erich; Friedrich, Gerhard

    2007-03-01

    We present the clinical application of a new method for objective assessment of both grade and length of laryngo-tracheal stenoses (LTS) on a CT-based skeletonization algorithm, called laryngo-tracheal profile (LTP). Extraction of the laryngo-tracheal tract (LTT)-medial axis was performed after S-CT scanning. Orthogonal to the medial axis, the LTT cross-profile was computed, and the length and degree of LTS were presented as line charts. Clinical application of this newly developed method is demonstrated on three patients who had to undergo preoperative assessment before surgical treatment of tracheal stenoses. LTP provides an objective method of assessment of both the length and degree of tracheal stenoses in precise correlation to defined anatomical landmarks. This method provides important additive information for preoperative evaluation as well as for monitoring of therapeutical success. Current methods used so far are able to evaluate the severity of LTS, but do not provide exact quantitative assessment of complex LTS. Especially in CT-scans of strong curved passages, where an overestimation of the cross-sectional area results by an oblique cut of the tubular structure, LTP may overcome this problem by a simple post processing skeletonization algorithm. PMID:17031659

  12. Tracheobronchial smooth muscle atrophy and separation.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Atul C; Zaki, Khawaja Salman; Banga, Amit; Singh, Jarmanjeet; Gildea, Thomas R; Arrossi, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    We report a case series involving 4 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who were on an appropriate medical regimen including a high dose of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). During bronchoscopy, patients were found to have an excessive dynamic collapse of the posterior wall and its separation from the ends of the adjacent cartilaginous rings. This was causing a near-total occlusion of the tracheal and bronchial lumen during exhalation, thereby presenting with an obstructive pattern on the pulmonary functions. We suspect that this was caused by the atrophy of the smooth muscles of the tracheobronchial wall. We reviewed the literature to explore the mechanisms causing atrophy of the bronchial smooth muscle, focusing on the potential role of long-term ICS use. PMID:26138002

  13. Anesthesia airway management in a patient with upper tracheal tumor.

    PubMed

    Wendi, Chen; Zongming, Jiang; Zhonghua, Chen

    2016-08-01

    The main challenge for surgical resection of tumors located at the upper trachea is contemplate formulated plan for providing maximal surgical access to the trachea while ensuring patent airway and adequate oxygenation at the same time. In this report, we describe a patient who presented with an upper tracheal tumor located 3cm from the vocal cord and severe tracheal constriction, occluding tracheal lumen by 90%. Initial ventilation was established by implantation with a supreme laryngeal mask airway. An emergent tracheotomy and distal tracheal intubation were used to combat bleeding and subsequent airway obstruction. Eventually, tracheal tumor resection plus tracheal reconstruction via median sternotomy was successfully conducted under general anesthesia. The whole process is uneventful. PMID:27290961

  14. Tracheal and airway collapse in dogs.

    PubMed

    Maggiore, Ann Della

    2014-01-01

    Tracheal and airway collapse (bronchomalacia) are common causes of chronic cough in middle-aged to older dogs where weakening of cartilage within the respiratory system leads to narrowing of airways, coughing, wheezing, and other secondary effects. Successful treatment involves correct identification of the problem, recognition of concurrent problems, and appropriate medical therapy. Surgical and noninvasive treatment options are becoming readily available, and it is important to understand indications for such procedures. PMID:24268337

  15. A rare complication of tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Shukeri, Wan Fadzlina Wan Muhd; Hassan, Wan Mohd Nazaruddin Wan; Nadarajan, Chandran

    2016-05-01

    Accidental endobronchial intubation is a frequent complication in critically ill patients requiring tracheal intubation (TI). If such complication occurs, it is more often the right main bronchus that is intubated due to anatomical reasons. Left main bronchus (LMB) intubation is rare. Here, we report a case with auscultatory, bronchoscopic, and radiographic evidence of accidental LMB intubation in a pregnant woman with dengue shock syndrome. We highlight this case to increase awareness about this possible-but-rare complication of TI. PMID:27275080

  16. A rare complication of tracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    Shukeri, Wan Fadzlina Wan Muhd; Hassan, Wan Mohd Nazaruddin Wan; Nadarajan, Chandran

    2016-01-01

    Accidental endobronchial intubation is a frequent complication in critically ill patients requiring tracheal intubation (TI). If such complication occurs, it is more often the right main bronchus that is intubated due to anatomical reasons. Left main bronchus (LMB) intubation is rare. Here, we report a case with auscultatory, bronchoscopic, and radiographic evidence of accidental LMB intubation in a pregnant woman with dengue shock syndrome. We highlight this case to increase awareness about this possible-but-rare complication of TI. PMID:27275080

  17. Equine tracheal epithelial membrane strips - An alternate method for examining epithelial cell arachidonic acid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.R.; Derksen, F.J.; Robinson, N.E.; Peter-Golden, M.L. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor )

    1990-02-26

    Arachidonic acid metabolism by tracheal epithelium can be studied using enzymatically dispersed cell suspensions or cell cultures. Both techniques require considerable tissue disruption and manipulation and may not accurately represent in vivo activity. The authors have developed an alternate method for obtaining strips of equine tracheal epithelium without enzymatic digestion. In the horse, a prominent elastic lamina supports the tracheal epithelium. By physical splitting this lamina, they obtained strips ({le}12 x 1.5 cm) of pseudostratified columnar epithelium attached to a layer of elastic tissue 30-100 {mu}m thick. Epithelial strips (1.2 x 0.5 cm) were attached to plexiglass rods and incubated with ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid in M199 medium (0.5 {mu}Ci/ml) for 24 hours at 37C. The strips incorporated 36{+-}4% (mean {+-} SEM) of the total radioactivity and released 8.0{+-}1.2% of incorporated radioactivity when stimulated by 5.0 {mu}M calcium ionophore A23187. The extracted supernatant was processed using HPLC, resulting in peaks of radioactivity that co-eluted with authentic PGE{sub 2}, PGF{sub 2}{alpha}, and 12-HETE standards. The greatest activity corresponded to the PGE{sub 2} and PGF{sub 2}{alpha} standards, which is a similar pattern to that reported for cultured human tracheal epithelium.

  18. Effects of ozone on the cholinergic secretory responsiveness of ferret tracheal glands

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, R.K.; Oberdoerster, G.; Marin, M.G. )

    1991-06-01

    Oxidant air pollutants exacerbate several pulmonary diseases. Inhalation of ozone has been shown to induce airway smooth muscle hyperresponsiveness. Oxidant injury could also affect airway secretory mechanisms. The authors postulated that oxidant exposure would alter the glycoconjugate secretory function of airway submucosal glands. To test this hypothesis they examined the effects of in vivo ozone exposure on the in vitro secretory responsiveness of ferret tracheal glands. Ferrets were exposed to 1 ppm ozone, 24 hr/day for 3 or 7 days. Following exposure, glandular explants, denuded of surface epithelial cells, were prepared and incubated in medium containing 3H-glucosamine for 18 hr. Basal secretion of labeled glycoconjugates was significantly increased 31% following 3 days of ozone exposure (P less than or equal to 0.05) and remained elevated 11% after 7 days of exposure compared to the air-exposed group. After 3 or 7 days of exposure to ozone, tracheal gland responsiveness to carbachol was increased as indicated by significantly lower EC50 values (log molar concentration) of -6.43 {plus minus} 0.04 (n = 6) and -6.50 {plus minus} 0.11 (n = 5), respectively; compared to -6.20 {plus minus} 0.08 (n = 6) for the air-exposed group. There was no difference in carbachol EC50 values for air and 7-day ozone-exposed animals treated with dexamethasone. Dexamethasone did not attenuate the ozone-induced increase in basal secretion. Tracheal gland responsiveness to {alpha}- or {beta}-adrenergic agonists was not changed by oxidant exposure. These experiments suggest that oxidant injury not only increases basal secretion of respiratory glycoconjugates but also increases tracheal gland sensitivity to a cholinergic agonist.

  19. [Design and study of carbon fiber tracheal prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Qi, L; Liu, D; Han, Z; Wang, F

    1998-12-01

    32 healty adult dogs were selected for this experiment. 10 of them were subjected to the tracheal biomechanics test using indices including the relation between stretcher ratio (lambda) and stress (T), the squeeze stress (delta jy) of medical silk thread on trachea, the side stress (Ts) inducing the tracheal collapse, the functional maximum angle (psi max) of tracheal, and the sever area torsion angle (theta max) of tracheal functional maximum curved. According to the indices measured, two types of tracheal prosthesis were designed, and were made of carbon fiber and silicon. They were the straight tube type tracheal prosthesis and the bifurcate type tracheal prosthesis. The straight tube type tracheal prosthesis was studied with a design of two groups comprising a total of 11 dogs. In the experiment group (n = 6), the outer surface of the tube was not coated with silicon, the average survival period was 379.8 days. In the control group (n = 5), the outer surface of the tube was coated with silicon, the average survival period was 90.4 days. The bifurcate type tracheal prosthesis was studied in 11 dogs, the average survival period was 4.32 days. The main causes of death in the experiment were infection and anastomotic dehiscent. PMID:12552773

  20. Dynamics of tracheal compression in the horned passalus beetle.

    PubMed

    Waters, James S; Lee, Wah-Keat; Westneat, Mark W; Socha, John J

    2013-04-15

    Rhythmic patterns of compression and reinflation of the thin-walled hollow tubes of the insect tracheal system have been observed in a number of insects. These movements may be important for facilitating the transport and exchange of respiratory gases, but observing and characterizing the dynamics of internal physiological systems within live insects can be challenging due to their size and exoskeleton. Using synchrotron X-ray phase-contrast imaging, we observed dynamical behavior in the tracheal system of the beetle, Odontotaenius disjunctus. Similar to observations of tracheal compression in other insects, specific regions of tracheae in the thorax of O. disjunctus exhibit rhythmic collapse and reinflation. During tracheal compression, the opposing sides of a tracheal tube converge, causing the effective diameter of the tube to decrease. However, a unique characteristic of tracheal compression in this species is that certain tracheae collapse and reinflate with a wavelike motion. In the dorsal cephalic tracheae, compression begins anteriorly and continues until the tube is uniformly flattened; reinflation takes place in the reverse direction, starting with the posterior end of the tube and continuing until the tube is fully reinflated. We report the detailed kinematics of this pattern as well as additional observations that show tracheal compression coordinated with spiracle opening and closing. These findings suggest that tracheal compression may function to drive flow within the body, facilitating internal mixing of respiratory gases and ventilation of distal regions of the tracheal system. PMID:23427081

  1. Oxidative stress-dependent activation of collagen synthesis is induced in human pulmonary smooth muscle cells by sera from patients with scleroderma-associated pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a major complication of systemic sclerosis. Although oxidative stress, intima hyperplasia and a progressive vessel occlusion appear to be clearly involved, the fine molecular mechanisms underpinning the onset and progression of systemic sclerosis-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension remain largely unknown. Here we shows for the first time that an increase of NADPH-derived reactive oxygen species production induced by sera from systemic sclerosis patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension drives collagen type I promoter activity in primary human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells, suggesting that antioxidant-based therapies should be considered in the treatment of systemic sclerosis-associated vascular diseases. PMID:25085432

  2. Investigating the relationships between peristaltic contraction and fluid transport in the human colon using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sinnott, M D; Cleary, P W; Arkwright, J W; Dinning, P G

    2012-04-01

    Complex relationships exist between gut contractility and the flow of digesta. We propose here a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model coupling the flow of luminal content and wall flexure to help investigate these relationships. The model indicates that a zone of muscular relaxation preceding the contraction is an important element for transport. Low pressures in this zone generate positive thrust for low viscosity content. The viscosity of luminal content controls the localization of the flow and the magnitude of the radial pressure gradient and together with contraction amplitude they control the transport rate. For high viscosity content, high lumen occlusion is required for effective propulsion. PMID:22297431

  3. Inhibition of Orai1-mediated Ca(2+) entry is a key mechanism of the antiproliferative action of sirolimus in human arterial smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    König, Sarah; Browne, Sara; Doleschal, Bernhard; Schernthaner, Michaela; Poteser, Michael; Mächler, Heinrich; Wittchow, Eric; Braune, Marlen; Muik, Martin; Romanin, Christoph; Groschner, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    Sirolimus (rapamycin) is used in drug-eluting stent strategies and proved clearly superior in this application compared with other immunomodulators such as pimecrolimus. The molecular basis of this action of sirolimus in the vascular system is still incompletely understood. Measurements of cell proliferation in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASM) demonstrated a higher antiproliferative activity of sirolimus compared with pimecrolimus. Although sirolimus lacks inhibitory effects on calcineurin, nuclear factor of activated T-cell activation in hCASM was suppressed to a similar extent by both drugs at 10 μM. Sirolimus, but not pimecrolimus, inhibited agonist-induced and store-operated Ca(2+) entry as well as cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation in human arterial smooth muscle, suggesting the existence of an as-yet unrecognized inhibitory effect of sirolimus on Ca(2+) signaling and Ca(2+)-dependent gene transcription. Electrophysiological experiments revealed that only sirolimus but not pimecrolimus significantly blocked the classical stromal interaction molecule/Orai-mediated, store-operated Ca(2+) current reconstituted in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293). A link between Orai function and proliferation was confirmed by dominant-negative knockout of Orai in hCASM. Analysis of the effects of sirolimus on cell proliferation and CREB activation in an in vitro model of arterial intervention using human aorta corroborated the ability of sirolimus to suppress stent implantation-induced CREB activation in human arteries. We suggest inhibition of store-operated Ca(2+) entry based on Orai channels and the resulting suppression of Ca(2+) transcription coupling as a key mechanism underlying the antiproliferative activity of sirolimus in human arteries. This mechanism of action is specific for sirolimus and not a general feature of drugs interacting with FK506-binding proteins. PMID:24056904

  4. A crosstalk triggered by hypoxia and maintained by MCP-1/miR-98/IL-6/p38 regulatory loop between human aortic smooth muscle cells and macrophages leads to aortic smooth muscle cells apoptosis via Stat1 activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Shu, Chang; Su, Jing; Li, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia and inflammation are central characteristics of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), but the mechanisms for their relationship and actual role remain far from full understood. Here, we showed MCP-1 (monocyte chemotactic protein-1) induced by hypoxia in primary human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells (hASMCs) increased the chemotaxis of THP-1 macrophages and MCP-1 induced IL-6 expression in THP-1 cells via downregulating miR-98 which directly targets IL-6. In addition, IL-6 positively feedback regulated MCP-1 expression in hASMCs via p38 signal that is independent on hypoxia, and inhibition of p38 signal blocked the effect of IL-6 on MCP-1 expression regulation. Moreover, IL-6 exposure time-dependently induces phASMCs apoptosis via Stat1 activation. Collectively, our data provide compelling evidence on the association between hypoxia and inflammation triggered by hypoxia and then mediated by MCP-1/miR-98/IL-6/p38 regulatory loop, which leads to hASMCs apoptosis via Stat1 activation to contribute to AAA formation and progression. PMID:26045772

  5. Detection of small human cerebral cortical lesions with MRI under different levels of Gaussian smoothing: applications in epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantor-Rivera, Diego; Goubran, Maged; Kraguljac, Alan; Bartha, Robert; Peters, Terry

    2010-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the effect of smoothing filter selection in Voxel-Based Morphometry studies on structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. Gaussian filters of 4 mm, 8 mm or 10 mm Full Width at High Maximum are commonly used, based on the assumption that the filter size should be at least twice the voxel size to obtain robust statistical results. The hypothesis of the presented work was that the selection of the smoothing filter influenced the detectability of small lesions in the brain. Mesial Temporal Sclerosis associated to Epilepsy was used as the case to demonstrate this effect. Twenty T1-weighted MRIs from the BrainWeb database were selected. A small phantom lesion was placed in the amygdala, hippocampus, or parahippocampal gyrus of ten of the images. Subsequently the images were registered to the ICBM/MNI space. After grey matter segmentation, a T-test was carried out to compare each image containing a phantom lesion with the rest of the images in the set. For each lesion the T-test was repeated with different Gaussian filter sizes. Voxel-Based Morphometry detected some of the phantom lesions. Of the three parameters considered: location,size, and intensity; it was shown that location is the dominant factor for the detection of the lesions.

  6. Effects of Buscopan on human gastrointestinal smooth muscle activity in an ex vivo model: Are there any differences for various sections?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Song, Jun; Bai, Tao; Lu, Xiaoming; Yang, Guanghai; Qian, Wei; Wang, Ruiyun; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-06-01

    Hyoscine butylbromide (Buscopan ®) is clinically used as an anticholinergic antispasmodic for the treatment of abdominal cramping or visceral pain associated with cramps. However, the spasmolytic efficacy on contractile activity of human gastrointestinal smooth muscle from various sections remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the potentially selective actions of Buscopan on different bowel segments, as well as muscular layers and contractile states. Human smooth muscle tissues of the esophagus, gastric corpus and antrum, jejunum, ileum and colon were obtained. Isometric measurements of circular and longitudinal muscle strips were performed to determine effects of Buscopan on spontaneous activity and induced-contractions by 30mM KCl, 10μM bethanechol and electrical field stimulation (EFS). Buscopan concentration-dependently (10(-9)-10(-5)M) inhibited smooth muscle activity, particularly in spasticity evoked by bethanechol and EFS but not high K(+). The inhibiting effects were mainly responsible for the antagonism on muscarinic M2 and M3 receptors (IC50 values: 3.1×10(-5)M vs. 0.9×10(-5)M). The sensitivity toward Buscopan revealed a tendency of increasing from the esophagus, gastric corpus and antrum to the colon, jejunum and ileum. There was a reversed gradient of mRNA and protein expression of muscarinic M2 and M3 receptors from the blocking effects of Buscopan, which could be ascribed to the fact that a higher concentration of Buscopan was needed to antagonize the spastic contraction to reach the equipotent inhibitory rate in the region with higher muscarinic receptor activity. The findings of different inhibitory effectiveness on various parts of the gastrointestinal tract provide a potential guideline for the clinical application. PMID:27020547

  7. Aligned 3D human aortic smooth muscle tissue via layer by layer technique inside microchannels with novel combination of collagen and oxidized alginate hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Rayatpisheh, Shahrzad; Poon, Yin Fun; Cao, Ye; Feng, Jie; Chan, Vincent; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2011-08-01

    Tissue engineering of the small diameter blood vessel medial layer has been challenging. Recreation of the circumferentially aligned multilayer smooth muscle tissue has been one of the major technical difficulties. Some research has utilized cyclic stress to align smooth muscle cells (SMCs) but due to the long time conditioning needed, it was not possible to use primary human cells because of expeditious senescence occurred . We demonstrate rapid buildup of a homogeneous relatively thick (30-40 μm) aligned smooth muscle tissue via layer by layer (LBL) technique within microchannels and a soft cell-adhesive hydrogel. Using a microchannelled scaffold with gapped microwalls, two layers of primary human SMCs separated by an interlayer hydrogel were cultured to confluence within the microchannels. The SMCs aligned along the microchannels because of the physically constraining microwalls. A novel double layered gel consisting of a mixture of pristine and oxidized alginate hydrogel coated with collagen was designed to place between each layer of cells, leading to a thicker tissue in a shorter time. The SMCs penetrated the soft thin interlayer hydrogel within 6 days of seeding of the 2nd cell layer so that the entire construct became more or less homogeneously populated by the SMCs. The unique LBL technique applied within the micropatterned scaffold using a soft cell-adhesive gel interlayer allows rapid growth and confluence of SMCs on 2D surface but at the same time aligns the cells and builds up multiple layers into a 3D tissue. This pseudo-3D buildup method avoids the typical steric resistance of hydrogel embedding. PMID:21548018

  8. Epigenetic modulation of the protein kinase A RIIα (PRKAR2A) gene by histone deacetylases 1 and 2 in human smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Loughney, Andrew D; Robson, Stephen C; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Recently we reported that the expression of the protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunit RIIα is dynamically regulated in human smooth muscle cells of the uterus. We showed that expression levels of mRNA/protein were substantially increased during pregnancy and decreased upon labour, changes that were mirrored by particulate type II PKA activity. This implied an important role for RIIα in maintaining uterine quiescence during pregnancy. Consequently the purpose of the present study was to identify potential mechanisms by which expression of the RIIα gene was regulated in this tissue. We indicate here that the three SpI-III (GC) binding domains within the proximal promoter region of the human RIIα gene may play important roles in modulating expression of the gene in human myometrial cells. We show that all three GC binding domains are involved in binding Sp1, Sp3, histone deacetylase (HDACs) 1/2 and RbAp48 transcriptional complexes. The functional significance of these binding domains was further analysed employing in vitro luciferase reporter assays with full-length/truncated RIIα promoter constructs. Importantly we show that treatment of primary human myometrial cell cultures with the general class I/II HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A results in an increase in mRNA/protein levels. Moreover the increase in mRNA levels appeared to be preceded by an increase in aH3, PolIIa, Sp3 and HDAC 2 binding to the three SpI-III (GC) binding sites within the RIIα promoter. These results enable us to provide a model whereby RIIα expression is epigenetically regulated in human myometrial smooth muscle cells by histone deacetylase(s) activity within the GC-rich proximal promoter region of the gene. PMID:19818097

  9. Intubated, ventilating patients with complete tracheal transection: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed Central

    Bowley, Douglas M. G.; Plani, Frank; Murillo, Dennis; Smith, Martin; Degiannis, Elias

    2003-01-01

    Tracheal transection is a rare injury after blunt trauma. The presence of complete tracheal transection in the intubated, ventilating patient is even more rare and constitutes a major diagnostic challenge. The liberal use of computed tomography (CT) scans as an adjunct to endoscopy is paramount. PMID:12855026

  10. Synchrotron imaging of the grasshopper tracheal system: morphological and physiological components of tracheal hypermetry

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Joanna R.; Kirkton, Scott D.; Westneat, Mark W.; Fezzaa, Kamel; Lee, Wah-Keat; Harrison, Jon F.

    2009-01-01

    As grasshoppers increase in size during ontogeny, they have mass specifically greater whole body tracheal and tidal volumes and ventilation than predicted by an isometric relationship with body mass and body volume. However, the morphological and physiological bases to this respiratory hypermetry are unknown. In this study, we use synchrotron imaging to demonstrate that tracheal hypermetry in developing grasshoppers (Schistocerca americana) is due to increases in air sacs and tracheae and occurs in all three body segments, providing evidence against the hypothesis that hypermetry is due to gaining flight ability. We also assessed the scaling of air sac structure and function by assessing volume changes of focal abdominal air sacs. Ventilatory frequencies increased in larger animals during hypoxia (5% O2) but did not scale in normoxia. For grasshoppers in normoxia, inflated and deflated air sac volumes and ventilation scaled hypermetrically. During hypoxia (5% O2), many grasshoppers compressed air sacs nearly completely regardless of body size, and air sac volumes scaled isometrically. Together, these results demonstrate that whole body tracheal hypermetry and enhanced ventilation in larger/older grasshoppers are primarily due to proportionally larger air sacs and higher ventilation frequencies in larger animals during hypoxia. Prior studies showed reduced whole body tracheal volumes and tidal volume in late-stage grasshoppers, suggesting that tissue growth compresses air sacs. In contrast, we found that inflated volumes, percent volume changes, and ventilation were identical in abdominal air sacs of late-stage fifth instar and early-stage animals, suggesting that decreasing volume of the tracheal system later in the instar occurs in other body regions that have harder exoskeleton. PMID:19710392

  11. Synchrotron imaging of the grasshopper tracheal system : morphological and physiological components of tracheal hypermetry.

    SciTech Connect

    Greenlee, K. J.; Henry, J. R.; Kirkton, S. D.; Westneat, M. W.; Fezzaa, K.; Lee, W.; Harrison, J. F.; North Dakota State Univ.; Arizona State Univ.; Union Coll.; Field Museum of Natural History

    2009-11-01

    As grasshoppers increase in size during ontogeny, they have mass specifically greater whole body tracheal and tidal volumes and ventilation than predicted by an isometric relationship with body mass and body volume. However, the morphological and physiological bases to this respiratory hypermetry are unknown. In this study, we use synchrotron imaging to demonstrate that tracheal hypermetry in developing grasshoppers (Schistocerca americana) is due to increases in air sacs and tracheae and occurs in all three body segments, providing evidence against the hypothesis that hypermetry is due to gaining flight ability. We also assessed the scaling of air sac structure and function by assessing volume changes of focal abdominal air sacs. Ventilatory frequencies increased in larger animals during hypoxia (5% O{sub 2}) but did not scale in normoxia. For grasshoppers in normoxia, inflated and deflated air sac volumes and ventilation scaled hypermetrically. During hypoxia (5% O{sub 2}), many grasshoppers compressed air sacs nearly completely regardless of body size, and air sac volumes scaled isometrically. Together, these results demonstrate that whole body tracheal hypermetry and enhanced ventilation in larger/older grasshoppers are primarily due to proportionally larger air sacs and higher ventilation frequencies in larger animals during hypoxia. Prior studies showed reduced whole body tracheal volumes and tidal volume in late-stage grasshoppers, suggesting that tissue growth compresses air sacs. In contrast, we found that inflated volumes, percent volume changes, and ventilation were identical in abdominal air sacs of late-stage fifth instar and early-stage animals, suggesting that decreasing volume of the tracheal system later in the instar occurs in other body regions that have harder exoskeleton.

  12. Tracheal agenesis: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Desai, AV; Rao, Sudha; Shanbhag, PR; Rupani, M

    2016-01-01

    Tracheal agenesis is an extremely rare congenital anomaly involving the respiratory system. It is generally associated with anomalies of other systems. Antenatal diagnosis of this condition is difficult; therefore, it presents as a medical emergency in the labor room. Intubation in these babies is difficult. As many of these babies are born prematurely, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) adds to the management difficulties. Here, we describe two babies with this lethal anomaly and RDS where esophageal intubation and surfactant therapy proved beneficial. Furthermore, described are other associated anomalies. PMID:27424553

  13. Processing of targets in smooth or apparent motion along the vertical in the human brain: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Vincenzo; Macaluso, Emiliano; Indovina, Iole; Orban, Guy; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Neural substrates for processing constant speed visual motion have been extensively studied. Less is known about the brain activity patterns when the target speed changes continuously, for instance under the influence of gravity. Using functional MRI (fMRI), here we compared brain responses to accelerating/decelerating targets with the responses to constant speed targets. The target could move along the vertical under gravity (1g), under reversed gravity (-1g), or at constant speed (0g). In the first experiment, subjects observed targets moving in smooth motion and responded to a GO signal delivered at a random time after target arrival. As expected, we found that the timing of the motor responses did not depend significantly on the specific motion law. Therefore brain activity in the contrast between different motion laws was not related to motor timing responses. Average BOLD signals were significantly greater for 1g targets than either 0g or -1g targets in a distributed network including bilateral insulae, left lingual gyrus, and brain stem. Moreover, in these regions, the mean activity decreased monotonically from 1g to 0g and to -1g. In the second experiment, subjects intercepted 1g, 0g, and -1g targets either in smooth motion (RM) or in long-range apparent motion (LAM). We found that the sites in the right insula and left lingual gyrus, which were selectively engaged by 1g targets in the first experiment, were also significantly more active during 1g trials than during -1g trials both in RM and LAM. The activity in 0g trials was again intermediate between that in 1g trials and that in -1g trials. Therefore in these regions the global activity modulation with the law of vertical motion appears to hold for both RM and LAM. Instead, a region in the inferior parietal lobule showed a preference for visual gravitational motion only in LAM but not RM. PMID:19889846

  14. Mesenchymal stromal cells reverse hypoxia-mediated suppression of α-smooth muscle actin expression in human dermal fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Faulknor, Renea A.; Olekson, Melissa A.; Nativ, Nir I.; Ghodbane, Mehdi; Gray, Andrea J.; Berthiaume, François

    2015-02-27

    During wound healing, fibroblasts deposit extracellular matrix that guides angiogenesis and supports the migration and proliferation of cells that eventually form the scar. They also promote wound closure via differentiation into α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)-expressing myofibroblasts, which cause wound contraction. Low oxygen tension typical of chronic nonhealing wounds inhibits fibroblast collagen production and differentiation. It has been suggested that hypoxic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) secrete factors that promote wound healing in animal models; however, it is unclear whether these factors are equally effective on the target cells in a hypoxic wound environment. Here we investigated the impact of MSC-derived soluble factors on the function of fibroblasts cultured in hypoxic fibroblast-populated collagen lattices (FPCLs). Hypoxia alone significantly decreased FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression. MSC-conditioned medium restored hypoxic FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression to levels similar to normoxic FPCLs. (SB431542), an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-β{sub 1} (TGF-β{sub 1})-mediated signaling, blocked most of the MSC effect on FPCL contraction, while exogenous TGF-β{sub 1} at levels similar to that secreted by MSCs reproduced the MSC effect. These results suggest that TGF-β{sub 1} is a major paracrine signal secreted by MSCs that can restore fibroblast functions relevant to the wound healing process and that are impaired in hypoxia. - Highlights: • Fibroblasts were cultured in collagen lattices (FPCLs) as model contracting wounds. • Hypoxia decreased FPCL contraction and fibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression. • Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) restored function of hypoxic fibroblasts. • MSCs regulate fibroblast function mainly via secreted transforming growth factor-β{sub 1}.

  15. Lovastatin stimulates human vascular smooth muscle cell expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2, a potent inhibitor of low-density lipoprotein-stimulated cell growth.

    PubMed

    Emmanuele, Luca; Ortmann, Jana; Doerflinger, Tim; Traupe, Tobias; Barton, Matthias

    2003-02-28

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) stimulate ectopic bone formation in skeletal muscle. Here we show that human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) abundantly express mRNA encoding for BMP receptor type II, BMP-2, and BMP-7 proteins. Treatment with the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A inhibitor lovastatin (34 microM) increased BMP-2 gene transcription >14-fold as measured by real-time PCR analysis (P<0.05 vs. solvent control). Moreover, VSMC proliferation stimulated with native low-density lipoprotein (100 microg of protein/mL) was prevented by either human recombinant BMP-2 or BMP-7 at concentrations of 100 ng/mL (P<0.05). Both BMPs also inhibited basal cell proliferation (P<0.05). Induction of BMPs and subsequent inhibition of VSMC growth and/or induction of vascular bone formation could contribute to the mechanisms by which statins increase plaque stability in patients with coronary atherosclerosis. PMID:12593849

  16. Successful anesthetic management of a patient with thyroid carcinoma invading the trachea with tracheal obstruction, scheduled for total thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Liou, Jing-Yang; Chow, Lok-Hi; Chan, Kwok-Hon; Tsou, Mei-Yung

    2014-09-01

    We report a case of large thyroid carcinoma with tracheal and esophageal invasion who presented with preoperative stridor scheduled for total thyroidectomy and segmental tracheal resection. Careful and comprehensive preoperative anesthetic planning was done. Extracorporeal circulation membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was set up and running prior to induction under local anesthesia, due to an increased international normalized ratio (INR) and fear of bleeding in the airway. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FOB) is the first choice in many circumstances of difficult airway. However, we twice failed to intubate under FOB guidance. Successful intubation was done with traditional laryngoscopy and a Glidescope. The operative course was smooth. The oral endotracheal tube (ETT) was changed to a nasal ETT after surgery with the Glidescope. FOB-assisted intubation carries a chance of failure, and in critical patients, the presence of other intubating modalities such as video-assisted or fiberoptic-assisted technology or safety measures, including ECMO, will greatly increase the safety of anesthesia and surgery. PMID:25150647

  17. Modulation of human aorta smooth muscle cell phenotype: a study of muscle-specific variants of vinculin, caldesmon, and actin expression.

    PubMed Central

    Glukhova, M A; Kabakov, A E; Frid, M G; Ornatsky, O I; Belkin, A M; Mukhin, D N; Orekhov, A N; Koteliansky, V E; Smirnov, V N

    1988-01-01

    Vinculin- and caldesmon-immunoreactive forms and actin isoform patterns were studied in samples of normal and atherosclerotic human aorta. After removal of adventitia and endothelium, the remaining tissue was divided into three layers: media, muscular-elastic (adjacent to media) intima, and subendothelial (juxtaluminal) intima. In media of normal aorta, meta-vinculin accounted for 41.0 +/- 0.9% (mean +/- SEM) of total immunoreactive vinculin (meta-vinculin + vinculin); 150-kDa caldesmon accounted for 78.2 +/- 5.1% of immunoreactive caldesmon (150-kDa + 70-kDa); the fractional contents of alpha-smooth muscle actin, beta-nonmuscle, and gamma-isoactins were 49.0 +/- 0.6%, 30.4 +/- 0.6%, and 20.8 +/- 0.8%, respectively. Muscular-elastic intima was very similar to media by these criteria. In subendothelial intima, the fractional content of meta-vinculin and 150-kDa caldesmon was significantly lower (6.9 +/- 1.5% and 32.7 +/- 7.0%, respectively) than in muscular-elastic intima and media, whereas the isoactin pattern was identical to that in adjacent layers, demonstrating the smooth muscle origin of subendothelial intima cells. In atherosclerotic fibrous plaque, the fractional content of alpha-actin was decreased in subendothelial intima, rather than in media and muscular-elastic intima. Additionally, the proportion of subendothelial intima cells [i.e., the cells that express low amounts of smooth muscle phenotype markers (meta-vinculin, 150-kDa caldesmon, and alpha-actin)] in the total intima cell population increased dramatically in atherosclerotic fibrous plaque. The results suggest that changes in the relative content of meta-vinculin and 150-kDa caldesmon as well as alpha-actin in human aortic intima are associated with atherosclerosis although, in subendothelial intima of normal aorta, a certain smooth muscle cell population exists that expresses reduced amounts of "contractile" phenotype markers, even in the absence of the disease. Images PMID:3143999

  18. Does the length dependency of airway smooth muscle force contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness?

    PubMed

    Lee-Gosselin, Audrey; Pascoe, Chris D; Couture, Christian; Paré, Peter D; Bossé, Ynuk

    2013-11-01

    Airway wall remodeling and lung hyperinflation are two typical features of asthma that may alter the contractility of airway smooth muscle (ASM) by affecting its operating length. The aims of this study were as follows: 1) to describe in detail the "length dependency of ASM force" in response to different spasmogens; and 2) to predict, based on morphological data and a computational model, the consequence of this length dependency of ASM force on airway responsiveness in asthmatic subjects who have both remodeled airway walls and hyperinflated lungs. Ovine tracheal ASM strips and human bronchial rings were isolated and stimulated to contract in response to increasing concentrations of spasmogens at three different lengths. Ovine tracheal strips were more sensitive and generated greater force at longer lengths in response to acetylcholine (ACh) and K(+). Equipotent concentrations of ACh were approximately a log less for ASM stretched by 30% and approximately a log more for ASM shortened by 30%. Similar results were observed in human bronchi in response to methacholine. Morphometric and computational analyses predicted that the ASM of asthmatic subjects may be elongated by 6.6-10.4% (depending on airway generation) due to remodeling and/or hyperinflation, which could increase ACh-induced force by 1.8-117.8% (depending on ASM length and ACh concentration) and enhance the increased resistance to airflow by 0.4-4,432.8%. In conclusion, elongation of ASM imposed by airway wall remodeling and/or hyperinflation may allow ASM to operate at a longer length and to consequently generate more force and respond to lower concentration of spasmogens. This phenomenon could contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness. PMID:23970527

  19. SERCA2a controls the mode of agonist-induced intracellular Ca2+ signal, transcription factor NFAT and proliferation in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Bobe, Regis; Hadri, Lahouaria; Lopez, Jose J; Sassi, Yassine; Atassi, Fabrice; Karakikes, Ioannis; Liang, Lifan; Limon, Isabelle; Lompré, Anne-Marie; Hatem, Stephane N; Hajjar, Roger J; Lipskaia, Larissa

    2011-04-01

    In blood vessels, tone is maintained by agonist-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) oscillations of quiescent/contractile vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). However, in synthetic/proliferative VSMCs, Gq/phosphoinositide receptor-coupled agonists trigger a steady-state increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) followed by a Store Operated Calcium Entry (SOCE) which translates into activation of the proliferation-associated transcription factor NFAT. Here, we report that in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASMCs), the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase type 2a (SERCA2a) expressed in the contractile form of the hCASMCs, controls the nature of the agonist-induced Ca(2+) transient and the resulting down-stream signaling pathway. Indeed, restoring SERCA2a expression by gene transfer in synthetic hCASMCs 1) increased Ca(2+) storage capacity; 2) modified agonist-induced IP(3)R Ca(2+) release from steady-state to oscillatory mode (the frequency of agonist-induced IP(3)R Ca(2+) signal was 11.66 ± 1.40/100 s in SERCA2a-expressing cells (n=39) vs 1.37 ± 0.20/100 s in control cells (n=45), p<0.01); 3) suppressed SOCE by preventing interactions between SR calcium sensor STIM1 and pore forming unit ORAI1; 4) inhibited calcium regulated transcription factor NFAT and its down-stream physiological function such as proliferation and migration. This study provides evidence for the first time that oscillatory and steady-state patterns of Ca(2+) transients have different effects on calcium-dependent physiological functions in smooth muscle cells. PMID:21195084

  20. Simvastatin modulates the heat shock response and cytotoxicity mediated by oxidized LDL in cultured human endothelial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Pirillo, A; Jacoviello, C; Longoni, C; Radaelli, A; Catapano, A L

    1997-02-13

    Oxidized low density lipoproteins (OxLDL) are toxic to cells of the arterial wall and trigger the expression of the inducible form of hsp 70 in cultured endothelial cells (EAhy-926) and smooth muscle cells (HUVSMC). The latter response is believed to protect cells from toxicity since heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) is synthesized by cells under stress condition to protect proteins from irreversible denaturation. Simvastatin (10(-8) M to 10(-5) M), a competitive inhibitor of hydroxy methyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase), a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis, enhanced the toxicity of OxLDL (300 micrograms/mL) to endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells in a dose-dependent manner, as detected by 3H-adenine release and the MTT test. In EAhy, 3H-adenine release with OxLDL was 0.419 +/- 0.048 (ratio of radioactivity released in the medium to total radioactivity) versus 0.337 +/- 0.008 of control; in the presence of simvastatin and OxLDL this value increased from 0.49 +/- 0.01 at 10(-8) M to 0.918 +/- 0.001 at 10(-5) M with simvastatin alone (10(-5) M) this value was 0.463 +/- 0.025. Furthermore simvastatin reduced in a dose-dependent manner the expression of hsp 70 triggered by OxLDL, as detected by immunoblotting. To address whether this finding was due to the effect of simvastatin on the cholesterol pathway, mevalonate (100 microM) was used to bypass the HMG-CoA reductase block. This compound completely prevented the enhancement of OxLDL toxicity by simvastatin and restored the expression of hsp70. To verify whether cholesterol synthesis was required for the induction of hsp70 by OxLDL, squalestatin I (25 nM to 100 nM), an inhibitor of squalene synthase, another key enzyme of the cholesterol pathway, was used: OxLDL toxicity and hsp70 expression were not affected by this compound. These results indicate that simvastatin increases OxLDL cytotoxicity in vitro with a concomitant decrease of hsp70 expression triggered by OxLDL and that the key step in

  1. Embryological outcomes in cycles with human oocytes containing large tubular smooth endoplasmic reticulum clusters after conventional in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Itoi, Fumiaki; Asano, Yukiko; Shimizu, Masashi; Honnma, Hiroyuki; Murata, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    There have been no studies analyzing the effect of large aggregates of tubular smooth endoplasmic reticulum (aSERT) after conventional in vitro fertilization (cIVF). The aim of this study was to investigate whether aSERT can be identified after cIVF and the association between the embryological outcomes of oocytes in cycles with aSERT. This is a retrospective study examining embryological data from cIVF cycles showing the presence of aSERT in oocytes 5-6 h after cIVF. To evaluate embryo quality, cIVF cycles with at least one aSERT-metaphase II (MII) oocyte observed (cycles with aSERT) were compared to cycles with normal-MII oocytes (control cycles). Among the 4098 MII oocytes observed in 579 cycles, aSERT was detected in 100 MII oocytes in 51 cycles (8.8%). The fertilization rate, the rate of embryo development on day 3 and day 5-6 did not significantly differ between cycles with aSERT and control group. However, aSERT-MII oocytes had lower rates for both blastocysts and good quality blastocysts (p < 0.05). aSERT can be detected in the cytoplasm by removing the cumulus cell 5 h after cIVF. However, aSERT-MII oocytes do not affect other normal-MII oocytes in cycles with aSERT. PMID:26607857

  2. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor C Is Upregulated in Human Uterine Fibroids and Regulates Uterine Smooth Muscle Cell Growth1

    PubMed Central

    Suo, Guangli; Jiang, Yong; Cowan, Bryan; Wang, Jean Y.J.

    2009-01-01

    Leiomyomata uteri (i.e., uterine fibroids) are benign tumors arising from the abnormal growth of uterine smooth muscle cells (SMCs). We show here that the expression of platelet-derived growth factor C (PDGFC) is higher in approximately 80% of uterine fibroids than in adjacent myometrial tissues examined. Increased expression of PDGFC is also observed in fibroid-derived SMCs (fSMCs) relative to myometrial-derived SMCs (mSMCs). Recombinant bioactive PDGFCC homodimer stimulates the growth of fSMCs and mSMCs in ex vivo cultures and prolongs the survival of fSMCs in Matrigel plugs implemented subcutaneously in immunocompromised mice. The knockdown of PDGF receptor-alpha (PDGFRA) through lentiviral-mediated RNA interference reduces the growth of fSMCs and mSMCs in ex vivo cultures and in Matrigel implants. Furthermore, two small molecule inhibitors of the PDGFR tyrosine kinase (i.e., imatinib and dasatinib) exerted negative effects on fSMC and mSMC growth in ex vivo cultures, albeit at concentrations that cannot be achieved in vivo. These results suggest that the PDGFCC/PDGFRA signaling module plays an important role in fSMC and mSMC growth, and that the upregulation of PDGFC expression may contribute to the clonal expansion of fSMCs in the development of uterine fibroids. PMID:19553600

  3. TNF-α Suppresses α-Smooth Muscle Actin Expression in Human Dermal Fibroblasts: An Implication for Abnormal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Mytien T.; Han, Yuan-Ping; Yan, Chunli; Shaw, Michael C.; Garner, Warren L.

    2008-01-01

    Abnormal wound healing encompasses a wide spectrum, from chronic wounds to hypertrophic scars. Both conditions are associated with an abnormal cytokine profile in the wound bed. In this study, we sought to understand the dynamic relationships between myofibroblast differentiation and mechanical performance of the collagen matrix under tissue growth factor–β (TGF-β) and tumor necrosis factor–α (TNF-α) stimulation. We found TGF-β increased α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and TNF-α alone decreased the basal α-SMA expression. When TGF-β1 and TNF-α were both added, the α-SMA expression was suppressed below the baseline. Real-time PCR showed that TNF-α suppresses TGF-β1-induced myofibroblast (fibroproliferative) phenotypic genes, for example, α-SMA, collagen type 1A, and fibronectin at the mRNA level. TNF-α suppresses TGF-β1-induced gene expression by affecting its mRNA stability. Our results further showed that TNF-α inhibits TGF-β1-induced Smad-3 phosphorylation via Jun N-terminal kinase signaling. Mechanical testing showed that TNF-α decreases the stiffness and contraction of the lattices after 5 days in culture. We proposed that changes in α-SMA, collagen, and fibronectin expression result in decreased contraction and stiffness of collagen matrices. Therefore, the balance of cytokines in a wound defines the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix and optimal wound healing. PMID:17554369

  4. Effect of lobe pumping on human albumin: development of a lobe pump simulator using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Gomme, Peter T; Prakash, Mahesh; Hunt, Ben; Stokes, Nick; Cleary, Paul; Tatford, Owen C; Bertolini, Joseph

    2006-02-01

    Using SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics), the motion of a lobe pump under load was simulated in order to predict the level of shear stress experienced by a protein solution. By varying the gap size between the lobes and pump housing, variations in pump efficiency and shear stress were determined. The simulations indicated that pump shear was dependent on gap size, with shear stress levels (0-40 Pa) correlating with those estimated in previous albumin-pumping studies. As gap size increased, the number of fluid particles experiencing low shear (<10 Pa) increased, whereas those experiencing high shear (>20 Pa) showed a decreasing trend. The pump efficiency, however, decreased with gap size, requiring more lobe revolutions to pass a unit volume. Taken together, these observations indicate that lobe pumps operated with increased gaps between the rotors and the housing result in larger number of particles within the fluid experiencing shear stresses. Moreover, the simulations indicate that it is best to use larger lobe pumps operated at high efficiency to transfer protein-containing solutions. PMID:16246177

  5. The effects of beta2 adrenoceptor gene polymorphisms on pressor response during laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Kim, N-S; Lee, I-O; Lee, M-K; Lim, S-H; Choi, Y-S; Kong, M-H

    2002-03-01

    We investigated whether human beta2 adrenoceptor (beta2AR) gene polymorphisms are associated with the pressor response to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. Ninety-two patients undergoing elective surgery under general anaesthesia were enrolled into this study. Arterial systolic pressure, heart rate and rate pressure product were measured before induction of anaesthesia and 1 min following laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. Genomic DNA was then used to identify the beta2AR-16 and beta2AR-27 genes using an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction method. Using multiple linear regression models, controlling for age, sex, weight, baseline blood pressure, heart rate and rate pressure product, we found that patients who possessed the glutamic acid homozygote of beta2AR-27 produced significantly greater changes in mean arterial pressure and rate pressure products than patients with the glutamine homozygote of beta2AR-27 (beta coefficient for mean blood pressure = 11.81, beta coefficient for pulse-pressure product = 8.76, both p-values = 0.023). These findings suggest that genetic variability in the human beta2AR gene polymorphisms may be associated with the pressor response to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. PMID:11879211

  6. Wogonin suppresses TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression by blocking the NF-{kappa}B activation via MAPK signaling pathways in human aortic smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Syng-Ook; Jeong, Yun-Jeong; Yu, Mi Hee; Lee, Ji-Won; Hwangbo, Mi Hyang; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Lee, In-Seon . E-mail: inseon@kmu.ac.kr

    2006-12-08

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plays a major role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and restenosis by regulating both migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) after an arterial injury. In this study, we examined the inhibitory effect of three major flavonoids in Scutellariae Radix, baicalin, baicalein, and wogonin, on TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC). Wogonin, but not baicalin and baicalein, significantly and selectively suppressed TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression in HASMC. Reporter gene, electrophoretic mobility shift, and Western blotting assays showed that wogonin inhibits MMP-9 gene transcriptional activity by blocking the activation of NF-{kappa}B via MAPK signaling pathways. Moreover, the Matrigel migration assay showed that wogonin reduced TNF-{alpha}-induced HASMC migration. These results suggest that wogonin effectively suppresses TNF-{alpha}-induced HASMC migration through the selective inhibition of MMP-9 expression and represents a potential agent for the prevention of vascular disorders related to the migration of VSMC.

  7. Human airway smooth muscle cells secrete amphiregulin via bradykinin/COX-2/PGE2, inducing COX-2, CXCL8, and VEGF expression in airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Knox, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMC) contribute to asthma pathophysiology through an increased smooth muscle mass and elevated cytokine/chemokine output. Little is known about how HASMC and the airway epithelium interact to regulate chronic airway inflammation and remodeling. Amphiregulin is a member of the family of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) agonists with cell growth and proinflammatory roles and increased expression in the lungs of asthma patients. Here we show that bradykinin (BK) stimulation of HASMC increases amphiregulin secretion in a mechanism dependent on BK-induced COX-2 expression, increased PGE2 output, and the stimulation of HASMC EP2 and EP4 receptors. Conditioned medium from BK treated HASMC induced CXCL8, VEGF, and COX-2 mRNA and protein accumulation in airway epithelial cells, which were blocked by anti-amphiregulin antibodies and amphiregulin siRNA, suggesting a paracrine effect of HASMC-derived amphiregulin on airway epithelial cells. Consistent with this, recombinant amphiregulin induced CXCL8, VEGF, and COX-2 in airway epithelial cells. Finally, we found that conditioned media from amphiregulin-stimulated airway epithelial cells induced amphiregulin expression in HASMC and that this was dependent on airway epithelial cell COX-2 activity. Our study provides evidence of a dynamic axis of interaction between HASMC and epithelial cells that amplifies CXCL8, VEGF, COX-2, and amphiregulin production. PMID:26047642

  8. Complications after tracheal resection and reconstruction: prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Auchincloss, Hugh G.

    2016-01-01

    Tracheal resection and reconstruction (TRR) and laryngotracheal resection and reconstruction (LTRR) is commonly performed for post-intubation tracheal stenosis, tracheal tumor, idiopathic laryngotracheal stenosis (ILTS), and tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF). Ninety-five percent of patients have a good result from surgery. Complications occur in ~20% of patients, of which half are anastomotic complications. Complications include granulation tissue formation, restenosis of the trachea, anastomotic separation, TEF and tracheoinnominate fistula (TIF), wound infection, laryngeal edema, and glottic dysfunction. Risk factors for anastomotic complication include diabetes, reoperation, previous tracheal appliance, and long-segment tracheal resection. Bronchoscopy should be part of the diagnostic workup when a complication is suspected. Anastomotic separation—the most feared complication of tracheal surgery—may present subtly with stridor and wound infection, or with respiratory distress and extremis. Prompt management is required to prevent devastating consequences. The airway should be secured, bronchoscopy should be performed to address the degree of separation, and the anastomosis should be revised if needed, usually with the addition of t-tube or tracheostomy. Anastomotic complications that are managed aggressively typically yield good results. More than half of such patients will eventually have a satisfactory airway. However, an anastomotic complication is associated with a thirteen-fold increase in the risk of death following tracheal resection. PMID:26981267

  9. Complications after tracheal resection and reconstruction: prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Auchincloss, Hugh G; Wright, Cameron D

    2016-03-01

    Tracheal resection and reconstruction (TRR) and laryngotracheal resection and reconstruction (LTRR) is commonly performed for post-intubation tracheal stenosis, tracheal tumor, idiopathic laryngotracheal stenosis (ILTS), and tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF). Ninety-five percent of patients have a good result from surgery. Complications occur in ~20% of patients, of which half are anastomotic complications. Complications include granulation tissue formation, restenosis of the trachea, anastomotic separation, TEF and tracheoinnominate fistula (TIF), wound infection, laryngeal edema, and glottic dysfunction. Risk factors for anastomotic complication include diabetes, reoperation, previous tracheal appliance, and long-segment tracheal resection. Bronchoscopy should be part of the diagnostic workup when a complication is suspected. Anastomotic separation-the most feared complication of tracheal surgery-may present subtly with stridor and wound infection, or with respiratory distress and extremis. Prompt management is required to prevent devastating consequences. The airway should be secured, bronchoscopy should be performed to address the degree of separation, and the anastomosis should be revised if needed, usually with the addition of t-tube or tracheostomy. Anastomotic complications that are managed aggressively typically yield good results. More than half of such patients will eventually have a satisfactory airway. However, an anastomotic complication is associated with a thirteen-fold increase in the risk of death following tracheal resection. PMID:26981267

  10. Tracheal Decannulation Protocol in Patients Affected by Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zanata, Isabel de Lima; Santos, Rosane Sampaio; Hirata, Gisela Carmona

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The frequency of tracheostomy in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) contrasts with the lack of objective criteria for its management. The study arose from the need for a protocol in the decision to remove the tracheal tube. Objective To evaluate the applicability of a protocol for tracheal decannulation. Methods A prospective study with 20 patients, ranging between 21 and 85 years of age (average 33.55), 4 of whom were women (20%) and 16 were men (80%). All patients had been diagnosed by a neurologist as having TBI, and the anatomical region of the lesion was known. Patients were evaluated following criteria for tracheal decannulation through a clinical evaluation protocol developed by the authors. Results Decannulation was performed in 12 (60%) patients. Fourteen (70%) had a score greater than 8 on the Glasgow Coma Scale and only 2 (14%) of these were not able to undergo decannulation. Twelve (60%) patients maintained the breathing pattern with occlusion of the tube and were successfully decannulated. Of the 20 patients evaluated, 11 (55%) showed no signs suggestive of tracheal aspiration, and of these, 9 (82%) began training on occlusion of the cannula. The protocol was relevant to establish the beginning of the decannulation process. The clinical assessment should focus on the patient's condition to achieve early tracheal decannulation. Conclusion This study allowed, with the protocol, to establish six criteria for tracheal decannulation: level of consciousness, respiration, tracheal secretion, phonation, swallowing, and coughing. PMID:25992074

  11. [Placement of intraluminal stents for treating tracheal collapse in dogs].

    PubMed

    Glaus, T M; Matos, J M; Baloi, P; Wenger, M

    2011-11-01

    Tracheal collapse is a progressive disease particularly of small breed dogs. In the terminal stage, when dyspnea becomes the dominating sign and is no longer manageable with medical treatment, a surgical procedure is necessary. With increasing frequency intraluminal tracheal stents are implanted minimal-invasively. In individual animals this is a lifesaving procedure, leading to immediate elimination of dyspnea. In most dogs cough for some time has to be anticipated as the stent acts as a foreign body, but severe complications like excessive formation of granulation tissue, stent migration or stent fracture are rare. Stents represent an attractive treatment modality for tracheal collapse in dogs with dyspnea. PMID:22045455

  12. Novel sphingosine-containing analogues selectively inhibit sphingosine kinase (SK) isozymes, induce SK1 proteasomal degradation and reduce DNA synthesis in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Hoe-Sup; Pyne, Susan; MacRitchie, Neil; Pyne, Nigel J.

    2013-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is involved in hyper-proliferative diseases such as cancer and pulmonary arterial hypertension. We have synthesized inhibitors that are selective for the two isoforms of sphingosine kinase (SK1 and SK2) that catalyze the synthesis of S1P. A thiourea adduct of sphinganine (F02) is selective for SK2 whereas the 1-deoxysphinganines 55-21 and 77-7 are selective for SK1. (2S,3R)-1-Deoxysphinganine (55-21) induced the proteasomal degradation of SK1 in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells and inhibited DNA synthesis, while the more potent SK1 inhibitors PF-543 and VPC96091 failed to inhibit DNA synthesis. These findings indicate that moderate potency inhibitors such as 55-21 are likely to have utility in unraveling the functions of SK1 in inflammatory and hyperproliferative disorders. PMID:24396570

  13. Regulation of matrix metalloproteinase expression in human vascular smooth muscle cells by T lymphocytes: a role for CD40 signaling in plaque rupture?

    PubMed

    Schönbeck, U; Mach, F; Sukhova, G K; Murphy, C; Bonnefoy, J Y; Fabunmi, R P; Libby, P

    1997-09-01

    Physical disruption of an atheromatous lesion often underlies acute coronary syndromes. Matrix-degrading enzymes, eg, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), may cause loss in mechanical integrity of plaque tissue that favors rupture. T lymphocytes accumulate at sites where atheromata rupture, but the mechanisms by which these immune cells may contribute to plaque destabilization are unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that the T-lymphocyte surface molecule CD40 ligand (CD40L), recently localized in atherosclerotic plaques, regulates the expression of MMPs in human vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), the most numerous cell type in arteries. We report here that stimulated human T lymphocytes induced the expression of the matrix-degrading enzymes, ie, interstitial collagenase (MMP-1), stromelysin (MMP-3), gelatinase B (MMP-9), and activated gelatinase A (MMP-2), in human vascular SMCs by cell contact via CD40 ligation, as demonstrated by Western blot analysis, zymography, and antibody neutralization. Recombinant human CD40L (rCD40L) induced de novo synthesis of MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-9 on vascular SMCs and stimulated the expression of these enzymes to a greater extent than did maximally effective concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-alpha or interleukin-1beta, established agonists of MMP expression. Interferon gamma, another T-lymphocyte- derived cytokine, inhibited the induction of MMPs by rCD40L. Immunohistochemical analysis of human coronary atheromata colocalized MMP-1 and MMP-3 with CD40-positive SMCs. These results demonstrated that CD40 ligand, expressed on T lymphocytes, promoted the expression of matrix-degrading enzymes in vascular SMCs and thus established a new pathway of immune-modulated destabilization in human atheromata. PMID:9285647

  14. Tracheal resection and reconstruction for malignant disease

    PubMed Central

    Zuin, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tracheal neoplasms are rare diseases, mostly represented by squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC). Symptoms presentation is often misleading and diagnosis may be delayed for months or years, so clinical suspicion plays a fundamental role. Corner stones in the diagnostic pathway are represented by rigid endoscopy and computed tomography (CT) scan, necessary to correctly stage the patients and identify the optimal surgical candidate. When appropriate, surgical resection and reconstruction is still the best opportunity to achieve a long-term survival with a good quality of life, but this kind of surgery is always a very challenging procedure and a wide experience with an in-depth knowledge of every technical detail, from selection of patient, to choice of surgical approach to reconstruction techniques, are needed and recommended. PMID:26981265

  15. Identification of the tracheal and laryngeal afferent neurones mediating cough in anaesthetized guinea-pigs

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Brendan J; Mazzone, Stuart B; Meeker, Sonya N; Mori, Nanako; Reynolds, Sandra M; Undem, Bradley J

    2004-01-01

    We have identified the tracheal and laryngeal afferent nerves regulating cough in anaesthetized guinea-pigs. Cough was evoked by electrical or mechanical stimulation of the tracheal or laryngeal mucosa, or by citric acid applied topically to the trachea or larynx. By contrast, neither capsaicin nor bradykinin challenges to the trachea or larynx evoked cough. Bradykinin and histamine administered intravenously also failed to evoke cough. Electrophysiological studies revealed that the majority of capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurones (both Aδ- and C-fibres) innervating the rostral trachea and larynx have their cell bodies in the jugular ganglia and project to the airways via the superior laryngeal nerves. Capsaicin-insensitive afferent neurones with cell bodies in the nodose ganglia projected to the rostral trachea and larynx via the recurrent laryngeal nerves. Severing the recurrent nerves abolished coughing evoked from the trachea and larynx whereas severing the superior laryngeal nerves was without effect on coughing. The data indicate that the tracheal and laryngeal afferent neurones regulating cough are polymodal Aδ-fibres that arise from the nodose ganglia. These afferent neurones are activated by punctate mechanical stimulation and acid but are unresponsive to capsaicin, bradykinin, smooth muscle contraction, longitudinal or transverse stretching of the airways, or distension. Comparing these physiological properties with those of intrapulmonary mechanoreceptors indicates that the afferent neurones mediating cough are quite distinct from the well-defined rapidly and slowly adapting stretch receptors innervating the airways and lungs. We propose that these airway afferent neurones represent a distinct subtype and that their primary function is regulation of the cough reflex. PMID:15004208

  16. Mechanisms of human smooth muscle cell proliferation and transplant vasculopathy induced by HLA class I antibodies: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Trayssac, Magali; Nègre-Salvayre, Anne; Thomsen, Mogens

    2012-12-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) play an important role in the pathophysiology of transplant vasculopathy (TV), a major cause of late death in patients receiving an organ transplant. In this review we describe the proliferative effect in vitro and in vivo of HLA class I antibodies on human SMC. We have developed an experimental model using segments of human mesenteric arteries transplanted in the position of the infrarenal aorta in immunodeficient mice (SCID/beige). Weekly injections of transplanted mice with a monoclonal antibody towards HLA class I provoked typical lesions of TV after 6 weeks in the human graft while transplanted mice receiving an irrelevant antibody did not develop any significant lesion. In vitro, the anti-HLA antibodies were mitogenic to SMC and we showed that they activate a stress-induced signaling pathway implicating matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and neutral sphingomyelinase 2 (nSMase-2). The proliferative effect of anti-HLA antibodies could be blocked by pharmacological inhibitors or by siRNA. Administration of pharmacological inhibitors diminished the development of TV in grafted mice injected with anti-HLA antibodies demonstrating an important role of the MMP/nSMase-2 pathway in antibody-induced TV. This observation opens new perspectives for the management of TV in clinical settings. PMID:22789624

  17. Characterization of Stem-Like Cells in Mucoepidermoid Tracheal Paediatric Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Mei Ling; Ooi, Brandon Nick Sern; Jungebluth, Philipp; Sjöqvist, Sebastian; Hultman, Isabell; Lemon, Greg; Gustafsson, Ylva; Asmundsson, Jurate; Baiguera, Silvia; Douagi, Iyadh; Gilevich, Irina; Popova, Alina; Haag, Johannes Cornelius; Rodríguez, Antonio Beltrán; Lim, Jianri; Liedén, Agne; Nordenskjöld, Magnus; Alici, Evren; Baker, Duncan; Unger, Christian; Luedde, Tom; Vassiliev, Ivan; Inzunza, Jose; Ährlund-Richter, Lars; Macchiarini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells contribute to regeneration of tissues and organs. Cells with stem cell-like properties have been identified in tumors from a variety of origins, but to our knowledge there are yet no reports on tumor-related stem cells in the human upper respiratory tract. In the present study, we show that a tracheal mucoepidermoid tumor biopsy obtained from a 6 year-old patient contained a subpopulation of cells with morphology, clonogenicity and surface markers that overlapped with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs). These cells, designated as MEi (mesenchymal stem cell-like mucoepidermoid tumor) cells, could be differentiated towards mesenchymal lineages both with and without induction, and formed spheroids in vitro. The MEi cells shared several multipotent characteristics with BM-MSCs. However, they displayed differences to BM-MSCs in growth kinectics and gene expression profiles relating to cancer pathways and tube development. Despite this, the MEi cells did not possess in vivo tumor-initiating capacity, as proven by the absence of growth in situ after localized injection in immunocompromised mice. Our results provide an initial characterization of benign tracheal cancer-derived niche cells. We believe that this report could be of importance to further understand tracheal cancer initiation and progression as well as therapeutic development. PMID:25229469

  18. Characterization of stem-like cells in mucoepidermoid tracheal paediatric tumor.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mei Ling; Ooi, Brandon Nick Sern; Jungebluth, Philipp; Sjöqvist, Sebastian; Hultman, Isabell; Lemon, Greg; Gustafsson, Ylva; Asmundsson, Jurate; Baiguera, Silvia; Douagi, Iyadh; Gilevich, Irina; Popova, Alina; Haag, Johannes Cornelius; Rodríguez, Antonio Beltrán; Lim, Jianri; Liedén, Agne; Nordenskjöld, Magnus; Alici, Evren; Baker, Duncan; Unger, Christian; Luedde, Tom; Vassiliev, Ivan; Inzunza, Jose; Ahrlund-Richter, Lars; Macchiarini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells contribute to regeneration of tissues and organs. Cells with stem cell-like properties have been identified in tumors from a variety of origins, but to our knowledge there are yet no reports on tumor-related stem cells in the human upper respiratory tract. In the present study, we show that a tracheal mucoepidermoid tumor biopsy obtained from a 6 year-old patient contained a subpopulation of cells with morphology, clonogenicity and surface markers that overlapped with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs). These cells, designated as MEi (mesenchymal stem cell-like mucoepidermoid tumor) cells, could be differentiated towards mesenchymal lineages both with and without induction, and formed spheroids in vitro. The MEi cells shared several multipotent characteristics with BM-MSCs. However, they displayed differences to BM-MSCs in growth kinectics and gene expression profiles relating to cancer pathways and tube development. Despite this, the MEi cells did not possess in vivo tumor-initiating capacity, as proven by the absence of growth in situ after localized injection in immunocompromised mice. Our results provide an initial characterization of benign tracheal cancer-derived niche cells. We believe that this report could be of importance to further understand tracheal cancer initiation and progression as well as therapeutic development. PMID:25229469

  19. Mechanical stretch of human uterine smooth muscle cells increases IL-8 mRNA expression and peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Loudon, J A Z; Sooranna, S R; Bennett, P R; Johnson, M R

    2004-12-01

    Labour is associated with increased synthesis of interleukin-8 (IL-8) by the fetal membranes and myometrium, which leads to an inflammatory infiltrate. Stretch has been shown to increase the expression of contraction-associated proteins in animal models of labour and in human myocytes in vitro. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that mechanical stretch of human myometrial cells increases IL-8 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression. We isolated myocytes from non-pregnant women undergoing hysterectomy and pregnant women undergoing Caesarean section before and after the onset of labour. Myocytes in culture were subjected to stretch of varying intensity (6-16%) and duration (1 or 6 h) using the Flexercell system. IL-8 mRNA expression was lowest in myocytes from pregnant women not in labour, intermediate in those from non-pregnant women and greatest in those from pregnant women in labour. Stretch increased IL-8 mRNA expression independent of reproductive state. The stretch-induced increase in IL-8 mRNA expression was associated with higher IL-8 levels in the culture supernatant and enhanced promoter activity. These data suggest that stretch contributes to the increase in myometrial IL-8 synthesis associated with the onset of labour in humans. PMID:15489245

  20. MicroRNA-31 controls phenotypic modulation of human vascular smooth muscle cells by regulating its target gene cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jie; Yan, Cheng-Hui; Li, Yang; Xu, Kai; Tian, Xiao-Xiang; Peng, Cheng-Fei; Tao, Jie; Sun, Ming-Yu; Han, Ya-Ling

    2013-05-01

    Phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of a variety of proliferative vascular diseases. The cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes (CREG) has been shown to play an important role in phenotypic modulation of VSMCs. However, the mechanism regulating CREG upstream signaling remains unclear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been found to play a critical role in cell differentiation via target-gene regulation. This study aimed to identify a miRNA that binds directly to CREG, and may thus be involved in CREG-mediated VSMC phenotypic modulation. Computational analysis indicated that miR-31 bound to the CREG mRNA 3′ untranslated region (3′-UTR). miR-31 was upregulated in quiescent differentiated VSMCs and downregulated in proliferative cells stimulated by platelet-derived growth factor and serum starvation, demonstrating a negative relationship with the VSMC differentiation marker genes, smooth muscle α-actin, calponin and CREG. Using gain-of-function and loss-of-function approaches, CREG and VSMC differentiation marker gene expression levels were shown to be suppressed by a miR-31 mimic, but increased by a miR-31 inhibitor at both protein and mRNA levels. Notably, miR-31 overexpression or inhibition affected luciferase expression driven by the CREG 3′-UTR containing the miR-31 binding site. Furthermore, miR-31-mediated VSMC phenotypic modulation was inhibited in CREG-knockdown human VSMCs. We also determined miR-31 levels in the serum of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), with or without in stent restenosis and in healthy controls. miR-31 levels were higher in the serum of CAD patients with restenosis compared to CAD patients without restenosis and in healthy controls. In summary, these data demonstrate that miR-31 not only directly binds to its target gene CREG and modulates the VSMC phenotype through this interaction, but also can be an important biomarker in diseases involving VSMC

  1. Modulation of the contractile responses of guinea pig isolated tracheal rings after chronic intermittent hypobaric hypoxia with and without cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Kaveri; Fahim, M

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies have documented that repetitive exposure to intermittent hypoxia, such as that encountered in preparation to high-altitude ascent, influences breathing. However, the impact of intermittent hypoxia on airway smooth muscle has not been explored. Ascents to high altitude, in addition to hypoxia, expose individuals to cold air. The objective of the present study is to examine the effect of chronic intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (CIH) and CIH combined with cold exposure (CIHC) on tracheal smooth muscle responses to various contractile and relaxant agonists. Experiments were performed on tracheal rings harvested from adult guinea pigs exposed either to CIH or CIHC [14 days (6 h/day) at barometric pressure of 350 mmHg with and without cold exposure of 5 degrees C] or to room air (normoxia). CIH and CIHC attenuated maximum contractile responses to ACh compared with normoxia. The maximum contractile response to histamine decreased with CIH, whereas CIHC restored the response back to normoxia. Both CIH and CIHC attenuated maximum contractile responses to 5-HT. Altered contractile responses after CIH and CIHC were independent of epithelium. Isoproterenol-induced relaxation was not altered by CIH, whereas it was enhanced after CIHC, and these responses were independent of the epithelium. The data demonstrate that intermittent exposure to hypoxia profoundly influences contractile response of tracheal smooth muscle, and cold exposure can further modulate the response, implying the importance of cold at high altitude. PMID:16103517

  2. Reresection for recurrent stenosis after primary tracheal repair

    PubMed Central

    Madariaga, Maria Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Failure of the anastomosis after primary tracheal reconstruction for benign disease is uncommon. Here we review the available evidence on tracheal restenosis and the results of second reconstructions. Factors associated with failed primary anastomosis are examined. Temporizing immediate and alternative long-term management with T-tube or tracheostomy is described, emphasizing the role of tracheal stenting in abating the urgency for reoperation. From available evidence, elective reoperative treatment of failed tracheal reconstruction should be considered in selected patients after careful review and reversal of patient- and operation-specific factors that initiated failure. Referral to a high-volume center with a deep bench of nursing, anesthesiologic and surgical expertise is recommended for reoperation. PMID:26981266

  3. Reresection for recurrent stenosis after primary tracheal repair.

    PubMed

    Madariaga, Maria Lucia; Gaissert, Henning A

    2016-03-01

    Failure of the anastomosis after primary tracheal reconstruction for benign disease is uncommon. Here we review the available evidence on tracheal restenosis and the results of second reconstructions. Factors associated with failed primary anastomosis are examined. Temporizing immediate and alternative long-term management with T-tube or tracheostomy is described, emphasizing the role of tracheal stenting in abating the urgency for reoperation. From available evidence, elective reoperative treatment of failed tracheal reconstruction should be considered in selected patients after careful review and reversal of patient- and operation-specific factors that initiated failure. Referral to a high-volume center with a deep bench of nursing, anesthesiologic and surgical expertise is recommended for reoperation. PMID:26981266

  4. Tracheal Stenosis Because of Wegener Granulomatosis Misdiagnosed as Asthma.

    PubMed

    O'Hear, Kelley E; Ingrande, Jerry; Brodsky, Jay B; Morton, John M; Sung, Chih-Kwang

    2016-05-15

    We describe a patient with Wegener granulomatosis whose complaint of wheezing was incorrectly attributed to asthma. Anesthesiologists must recognize that tracheal stenosis is extremely common in Wegener granulomatosis and can mimic other causes of wheezing. PMID:27075424

  5. Thoracotomy for tracheal disruption after traumatic intubation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Austin, Ryan D

    2010-10-01

    Tracheal dissection is an uncommon complication of endotracheal intubation. A large source of morbidity and mortality in anesthesia is associated with airway issues. Several airway complications can be avoided or minimized by proper technique and vigilance. Emergency thoracotomy surgery is required in patients who suffer lower tracheal trauma. A tracheal tear poses additional challenges to traditional airway management, demanding vigilant planning and collaboration among the entire operative team. This case report details the airway management strategies employed during an emergent thoracotomy for a patient who suffered tracheal perforation during endotracheal intubation. A discussion of airway anatomy, airway considerations, intubation complications, and one-lung ventilation techniques is provided. Airway management techniques for one-lung ventilation are highly variable, requiring an extensive knowledge of equipment, clinical implications, and technical challenges. It is important for clinicians to be skilled in the use of several airway devices and to be prepared for any unexpected situation such as the case being presented. PMID:21067088

  6. An Innovative Operative Method for Correction of Tracheal Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dakshesh R; Mungutwar, Varsha

    2016-09-01

    This is a case of failed attempt of hanging, resulted into cervical injury & injury to the trachea. Patient was put on the ventilator for respiratory support for long period. Poor recovery of the patient resulted into prolong tracheostomy tube. Combine effect of all resulted into suprastomal tracheal stenosis. Due to complexity of the problem a novel method was customized to correct the tracheal stenosis. Strap muscle (Sternohyoid & Sternothyroid) was raised as a flap; free cartilage was sandwiched in between and sutured to the created tracheal defect. Bovine collagen was placed over a stent and placed in the tracheal lumen. Good result was achieved post operatively in the form of adequate lumen, rigid anterior wall during respiration, good mucosal lining without fibrosis and normal speech. PMID:27508127

  7. Postintubation tracheal injuries--case series and literature review.

    PubMed

    Misak, Vilka Bekavac; Beraković, Andrea Persin; Vukusić, Ivana; Kogler, Jana; Pazanin, Leo; Ozegović, Slavica Orehovec

    2012-09-01

    SUMMARY - Post-intubation tracheal injury is a rare and potentially fatal complication. The most common causes are overinflation ofendotracheal tube cuffs and multiple intubation attempts in emergency cases. The diagnosis is based on clinical and radiological suspicion of tracheal injury confirmed by fiberoptic bronchoscopy. Decision between conservative and surgical management of the injury depends on clinical presentation (respiratory instability, concomitant diseases), lesion characteristics (lesion site, size, and number), and time elapsed from injury to diagnosis. We present three cases ofpost-intubation tracheal injury. In two cases, the patients were treated conservatively; in the third case, the patient died from asphyxia caused by thrombus occlusion of the trachea after a longitudinal tracheal lesion. Pre-anesthetic examination did not indicate any possibility of difficult intubation in any of the patients; however, in one of the patients admitted through the emergency department, emergency intubation was performed. PMID:23330416

  8. Ultrastructure of tracheal epithelial cells migrating in an in vivo environment.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Hajime; Tanaka, Hideo; Ono, Michio

    2008-12-01

    The tracheal epithelium can be induced to move as a cellular sheet by heterotopic transplantation, which offers the opportunity to observe migrating cells as a group in an in vivo environment. We therefor investigated the ultrastructural characteristics of migrating tracheal epithelial cells with special reference to the moving front using this transplantation. The migrating epithelial cells underwent squamous metaplasia and lost their differentiated characteristics such as cilia or secretory granules. Several unique observations were made concerning the mechanism of mobility: one is that epithelial cells in the front were elongated in a direction perpendicular to the course of movement, different from previous reports in vitro. The second is that lamellipodia, which are regarded as the major locomotive machinery in the adult wound epithelium, did not make up the major part of the front; the major portion of the anterior fringe of the moving front was usually smooth and gently curved, and actin cables parallel to the elongated cells were observed by confocal laser microscopy, indicating that the purse-string mechanism of epithelial wound healing takes place. The third finding is that the cells in the front had irregular bleb-like structures on their antero-basal surface, which were formed even in the portion where the cells did not attach to the matrix. Few organelles were recognized in these structures. From their location, one might propose that these bleb-like structures play a role in the recognition of the substrate and thus the movement of the cell sheet. PMID:19359805

  9. A modified force-velocity equation for smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Jiang, H; Stephens, N L

    1994-01-01

    It has been suggested that in skeletal muscle the force-velocity relationship may not be a simple hyperbolic one, as defined by Hill's equation. To determine whether smooth muscle demonstrated the same properties, quick-release force-velocity curves were obtained from canine tracheal smooth muscle. The results showed that the observed data points for tracheal smooth muscle systematically deviated from a hyperbola. Such deviation occurred at values of force (P) approaching maximum isometric force (Po) for curves elicited by quick release at 2 and 10 s in the course of isometric contractions. Shortening velocities under a given afterload were overestimated at the high-force end (P > 75% Po) by Hill's equation; this implied that a relationship more complex than a simple hyperbola was involved at high loads. We next focused on finding an equation to also fit those directly measured data points that did not conform to a hyperbola. Our rationale in developing the equation was that a plot of the linearized transform of Hill's equation should yield a straight line over the entire range of loads at which velocities were measured. The plot demonstrated that, in the low-load high-velocity portion of the curve, a peak value was reached at 70-80% Po, which decreased as load increased in the high-load low-velocity portion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8175513

  10. Obstructive fibrinous tracheal pseudomembrane: a rare condition in postextubation stridor.

    PubMed

    Nakwan, Narongwit

    2014-07-01

    Obstructive fibrinous tracheal pseudomembrane (OFTP) is an airway complication that occurs after endotracheal intubation. It originates from superficial mucosal abrasion and desquamation of necrotic tracheal epithelium at the site of cuff pressure. This condition is a rare cause of postextubation stridor. We present a case of postextubation stridor secondary to OFTP, resulting in clinical features of upper airway obstruction > 8 h after extubation. The case features complete obstruction at the tip of the endotracheal tube from OFTP. PMID:24170917

  11. Thoracoscopic tracheal resection and reconstruction for adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Wenjie; Zhu, Dezhang; Cheng, Zhaozhong; Zhao, Yandong

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel technique of thoracoscopic circumferential tracheal resection and end-to-end anastomosis. A 60-year-old woman presented with wheezing and progressive dyspnea. Computed tomography scan revealed a mass at the lower trachea, and a nitinol mesh stent was implanted by bronchoscopy. After 2 weeks, a complete thoracoscopic tracheal resection and reconstruction was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful. The final pathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of primary adenoid cystic carcinoma of the trachea. PMID:25555982

  12. Measurement of tracheal mucous transport rate in the horse

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.; Hampe, D.W.

    1983-06-01

    Tracheal mucous transport rates were measured in 12 nonanesthetized horses after an intratracheal injection of 99mtechnetium-sulfur colloid. The transport rate of the subsequent bolus of radioactivity was determined, using a portable scaler rate meter fitted with a high-energy gamma-scintillation probe. A gamma-scintillation camera was used to verify bolus form and movement in 1 horse. The mean tracheal mucous transport rate was 1.66 +/- 0.24 cm/min.

  13. The M2 selective antagonist AF-DX 116 shows high affinity for muscarine receptors in bovine tracheal membranes.

    PubMed

    Roffel, A F; in't Hout, W G; de Zeeuw, R A; Zaagsma, J

    1987-05-01

    We have characterized the muscarine receptors in bovine tracheal and left ventricular membranes using 3H-dexetimide/pirenzepine and 3H-dexetimide/AF-DX 116 competition studies. Pirenzepine exhibited low (M2) affinity binding to both preparations; Kd was 590 nM in left ventricle and 463 nM in trachea. AF-DX 116 exhibited high (M2) affinity binding to left ventricle (Kd = 95.6 nM); in tracheal membranes it bound with high (M2) affinity (Kd = 40.7 nM) to 74% of the receptors and with low (M3) affinity (Kd = 2.26 microM) to 26% of the receptors. It is concluded that bovine tracheal muscle membranes contain a heterogeneous population of muscarine binding sites, the majority having M2 (heart) subtype characteristics and being located on the smooth muscle membranes; a minority having M3 (exocrine gland) subtype characteristics and presumed to be located in submucosal glands. This is the first report of high affinity binding of AF-DX 116 to non-cardiac peripheral muscarine receptors. PMID:3614390

  14. dysfusion Transcriptional Control of Drosophila Tracheal Migration, Adhesion, and Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lan; Crews, Stephen T.

    2006-01-01

    The Drosophila dysfusion basic-helix-loop-helix-PAS transcription factor gene is expressed in specialized fusion cells that reside at the tips of migrating tracheal branches. dysfusion mutants were isolated, and genetic analysis of live embryos revealed that mutant tracheal branches migrate to close proximity but fail to recognize and adhere to each other. Misexpression of dysfusion throughout the trachea further indicated that dysfusion has the ability to both inhibit cell migration and promote ectopic tracheal fusion. Nineteen genes whose expression either increases or decreases in fusion cells during development were analyzed in dysfusion mutant embryos. dysfusion upregulates the levels of four genes, including the shotgun cell adhesion protein gene and the zona pellucida family transmembrane protein gene, CG13196. Misexpression experiments with CG13196 result in ectopic tracheal fusion events, suggesting that it also encodes a cell adhesion protein. Another target gene of dysfusion is members only, which inhibits protein nuclear export and influences tracheal fusion. dysfusion also indirectly downregulates protein levels of Trachealess, an important regulator of tracheal development. These results indicate that fusion cells undergo dynamic changes in gene expression as they switch from migratory to fusion modes and that dysfusion regulates a discrete, but important, set of these genes. PMID:16914738

  15. Decellularized Tracheal Extracellular Matrix Supports Epithelial Migration, Differentiation, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kutten, Johannes C.; McGovern, David; Hobson, Christopher M.; Luffy, Sarah A.; Nieponice, Alejandro; Tobita, Kimimasa; Francis, Richard J.; Reynolds, Susan D.

    2015-01-01

    Tracheal loss is a source of significant morbidity for affected patients with no acceptable solution. Interest in engineering tracheal transplants has created a demand for small animal models of orthotopic tracheal transplantation. Here, we examine the use of a decellularized graft in a murine model of tracheal replacement. Fresh or decellularized tracheas harvested from age-matched female donor C57BL/6 mice were transplanted into syngeneic recipients. Tracheas were decellularized using repeated washes of water, 3% Triton X-100, and 3 M NaCl under cyclic pressure changes, followed by disinfection with 0.1% peracetic acid/4% ethanol, and terminal sterilization by gamma irradiation. Tracheas were explanted for immunolabeling at 1, 4, and 8 weeks following surgery. Video microscopy and computed tomography were performed to assess function and structure. Decellularized grafts supported complete reepithelialization by 8 weeks and motile cilia were observed. Cartilaginous portions of the trachea were maintained in mice receiving fresh transplants, but repopulation of the cartilage was not seen in mice receiving decellularized transplants. We observed superior postsurgical survival, weight gain, and ciliary function in mice receiving fresh transplants compared with those receiving decellularized transplants. The murine orthotopic tracheal transplant provides an appropriate model to assess the repopulation and functional regeneration of decellularized tracheal grafts. PMID:24980864

  16. Anti-atherogenic effect of trivalent chromium-loaded CPMV nanoparticles in human aortic smooth muscle cells under hyperglycemic conditions in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Rituparna; Wen, Amy M; Myer, Ashley B; Czech, Tori; Sahu, Soumyadip; Steinmetz, Nicole F; Raman, Priya

    2016-03-28

    Atherosclerosis, a major macrovascular complication associated with diabetes, poses a tremendous burden on national health care expenditure. Despite extensive efforts, cost-effective remedies are unknown. Therapies for atherosclerosis are challenged by a lack of targeted drug delivery approaches. Toward this goal, we turn to a biology-derived drug delivery system utilizing nanoparticles formed by the plant virus, Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV). The aim herein is to investigate the anti-atherogenic potential of the beneficial mineral nutrient, trivalent chromium, loaded CPMV nanoparticles in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC) under hyperglycemic conditions. A non-covalent loading protocol is established yielding CrCl3-loaded CPMV (CPMV-Cr) carrying 2000 drug molecules per particle. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we show that CPMV-Cr is readily taken up by HASMC in vitro. In glucose (25 mM)-stimulated cells, 100 nM CPMV-Cr inhibits HASMC proliferation concomitant to attenuated proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, proliferation marker) expression. This is accompanied by attenuation in high glucose-induced phospho-p38 and pAkt expression. Moreover, CPMV-Cr inhibits the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), in glucose-stimulated HASMCs. Finally glucose-stimulated lipid uptake is remarkably abrogated by CPMV-Cr, revealed by Oil Red O staining. Together, these data provide key cellular evidence for an atheroprotective effect of CPMV-Cr in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) under hyperglycemic conditions that may promote novel therapeutic ventures for diabetic atherosclerosis. PMID:26935414

  17. Exogenous H2O2 induces growth inhibition and cell death of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells via glutathione depletion.

    PubMed

    Park, Woo Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with various pathophysiological processes of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Pyrogallol (PG) induces the superoxide anion (O2•‑)‑mediated cell death of numerous cell types. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and PG treatment on the cell growth and death of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMCs), with regards to intracellular ROS and glutathione (GSH) levels, as determined by MTT and cell number assays. H2O2 led to reduced growth of HPASMCs, with a half maximal inhibitory concentration of 250‑500 µM at 24 h, and induced apoptosis, as determined by Annexin V‑staining and benzyloxycarbonyl‑Val‑Ala‑Asp‑fluoromethylketone treatment. However, PG did not strongly induce growth inhibition and death of HPASMCs. In addition, H2O2 led to increased ROS levels, including mitochondrial O2•‑, and induced GSH depletion in HPASMCs. Treatment with N‑acetyl cysteine (NAC) attenuated apoptotic cell death and ROS levels in H2O2‑treated HPASMCs, and also prevented GSH depletion. Notably, PG treatment did not increase ROS levels, including mitochondrial O2•‑. Furthermore, NAC induced a significant increase in mitochondrial O2•‑ levels in PG‑treated HPASMCs, and cell death and GSH depletion were significantly increased. L‑buthionine sulfoximine intensified cell death and GSH depletion in PG‑treated HPASMCs. In conclusion, exogenous H2O2 induced growth inhibition and cell death of HPASMCs via GSH depletion. PMID:27220315

  18. Angiotensin II Downregulates MicroRNA-145 to Regulate Kruppel-like Factor 4 and Myocardin Expression in Human Coronary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells under High Glucose Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Shyu, Kou-Gi; Cheng, Wen-Ping; Wang, Bao-Wei

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miR)-145 is the most abundant miR in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). However, the effect of hyperglycemia on the regulation of miR-145 is unknown. We hypothesized that the hyperglycemic condition activates a proinflammatory response that mediates the expression of miR-145 in VSMCs. We investigated whether miR-145 serves as a critical regulator to regulate the downstream proliferation factors (including Kruppel-like factor 4 [Klf4] and myocardin) in VSMCs under hyperglycemic conditions. Human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs) were cultured under high glucose conditions. Sustained high glucose at 25 mmol/L significantly decreased the expression of miR-145 in HCASMCs. High glucose significantly increased angiotensin II (Ang II) secretion from HCASMCs and Ang II suppressed miR-145 expression in HCASMCs. Ang II repression of miR145 expression resulted in increased Klf4 and decreased myocardin expression under conditions of high glucose. Overexpression of miR-145 significantly decreased Klf4 and increased myocardin expression and inhibited HCASMC proliferation and migration induced by a high glucose state. Balloon injury of the carotid artery in diabetic rats was performed to investigate miR-145, Klf and myocardin expression. The expression of miR-145 was maximally increased at 7 d after carotid injury and gradually declined thereafter. Overexpression of miR-145 and treatment with valsartan reversed Klf4 and myocardin protein expression induced by balloon injury and improved vascular injury. In conclusion, our study reveals that Ang II downregulates miR-145 to regulate Klf4 and myocardin expression in HCASMCs under high glucose conditions. Ang II plays a critical role in the regulation of miR-145 under hyperglycemic conditions. PMID:26181633

  19. Anti-atherogenic effect of trivalent chromium-loaded CPMV nanoparticles in human aortic smooth muscle cells under hyperglycemic conditions in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Rituparna; Wen, Amy M.; Myer, Ashley B.; Czech, Tori; Sahu, Soumyadip; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; Raman, Priya

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis, a major macrovascular complication associated with diabetes, poses a tremendous burden on national health care expenditure. Despite extensive efforts, cost-effective remedies are unknown. Therapies for atherosclerosis are challenged by a lack of targeted drug delivery approaches. Toward this goal, we turn to a biology-derived drug delivery system utilizing nanoparticles formed by the plant virus, Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV). The aim herein is to investigate the anti-atherogenic potential of the beneficial mineral nutrient, trivalent chromium, loaded CPMV nanoparticles in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC) under hyperglycemic conditions. A non-covalent loading protocol is established yielding CrCl3-loaded CPMV (CPMV-Cr) carrying 2000 drug molecules per particle. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we show that CPMV-Cr is readily taken up by HASMC in vitro. In glucose (25 mM)-stimulated cells, 100 nM CPMV-Cr inhibits HASMC proliferation concomitant to attenuated proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, proliferation marker) expression. This is accompanied by attenuation in high glucose-induced phospho-p38 and pAkt expression. Moreover, CPMV-Cr inhibits the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), in glucose-stimulated HASMCs. Finally glucose-stimulated lipid uptake is remarkably abrogated by CPMV-Cr, revealed by Oil Red O staining. Together, these data provide key cellular evidence for an atheroprotective effect of CPMV-Cr in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) under hyperglycemic conditions that may promote novel therapeutic ventures for diabetic atherosclerosis.

  20. Targeting the γ-Aminobutyric Acid A Receptor α4 Subunit in Airway Smooth Muscle to Alleviate Bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Yocum, Gene T; Gallos, George; Zhang, Yi; Jahan, Rajwana; Stephen, Michael Rajesh; Varagic, Zdravko; Puthenkalam, Roshan; Ernst, Margot; Cook, James M; Emala, Charles W

    2016-04-01

    We previously demonstrated that airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells express γ-aminobutyric acid A receptors (GABAARs), and that GABAAR agonists acutely relax ASM. Among the GABAAR α subunits, human ASM cells express only α4 and α5, providing the opportunity for selective pharmacologic targeting. Novel GABAAR-positive allosteric modulators designed for enhanced α4/α6 subunit selectivity were synthesized using iterative computational analyses (CMD-45 and XHe-III-74). Studies using oocyte heterologous expression systems confirmed that CMD-45 and XHe-III-74 led to significantly greater augmentation of currents induced by a 3% maximal effective concentration (EC3) of GABA [EC3]-induced currents in oocytes expressing α4 or α6 subunits (along with β3 and γ2) compared with other α subunits. CMD-45 and XHe-III-74 also led to greater ex vivo relaxation of contracted wild-type mouse tracheal rings compared with tracheal rings from GABAAR α4 subunit (Gabra4) knockout mice. Furthermore, CMD-45 and XHe-III-74 significantly relaxed precontracted human ASM ex vivo, and, at a low concentration, both ligands led to a significant leftward shift in albuterol-mediated ASM relaxation. In vivo, inhaled XHe-III-74 reduced respiratory system resistance in an asthmatic mouse model. Pretreatment of human ASM cells with CMD-45 and XHe-III-74 inhibited histamine-induced increases in intracellular calcium concentrations in vitro, an effect that was lost when calcium was omitted from the extracellular buffer, suggesting that inhibition of calcium influx due to alterations in plasma membrane potential may play a role in the mechanism of ASM relaxation. Selective targeting of the GABAAR α4 subunit with inhaled ligands may be a novel therapeutic pathway to treat bronchoconstriction, while avoiding sedative central nervous system effects, which are largely mediated by α1-3 subunit-containing GABAARs in the brain. PMID:26405827

  1. Extracellular acidification induces connective tissue growth factor production through proton-sensing receptor OGR1 in human airway smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, Shinichi; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Yamada, Hidenori; Kamide, Yosuke; Hisada, Takeshi; Ichimonji, Isao; Aoki, Haruka; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Komachi, Mayumi; Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Ono, Akihiro; Koga, Yasuhiko; Dobashi, Kunio; Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Tomura, Hideaki; Mori, Masatomo; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} The involvement of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling was investigated. {yields} Extracellular acidification alone induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Extracellular acidification enhanced TGF-{beta}-induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Proton-sensing receptor OGR1 was involved in acidic pH-stimulated CTGF production. {yields} OGR1 may play an important role in airway remodeling in asthma. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, hyper-responsiveness and remodeling. Extracellular acidification is known to be associated with severe asthma; however, the role of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling remains elusive. In the present study, the effects of acidification on the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a critical factor involved in the formation of extracellular matrix proteins and hence airway remodeling, were examined in human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Acidic pH alone induced a substantial production of CTGF, and enhanced transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}-induced CTGF mRNA and protein expression. The extracellular acidic pH-induced effects were inhibited by knockdown of a proton-sensing ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor (OGR1) with its specific small interfering RNA and by addition of the G{sub q/11} protein-specific inhibitor, YM-254890, or the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) receptor antagonist, 2-APB. In conclusion, extracellular acidification induces CTGF production through the OGR1/G{sub q/11} protein and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in human ASMCs.

  2. PAF-receptor is preferentially expressed in a distinct synthetic phenotype of smooth muscle cells cloned from human internal thoracic artery: Functional implications in cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Stengel, Dominique; O'Neil, Caroline; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Karabina, Sonia-Athina; Durand, Herve; Caplice, Noel M.; Pickering, J. Geoffrey; Ninio, Ewa . E-mail: ninio@chups.jussieu.fr

    2006-08-04

    Platelet-activating-Factor (PAF) and its structural analogues formed upon low density lipoprotein oxidation are involved in atherosclerotic plaque formation and may signal through PAF-receptor (PAF-R) expressed in human macrophages and in certain smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the media, but rarely in the intima of human plaques. Our aim was to determine which SMC phenotype expresses PAF-R and whether this receptor is functional in cell migration. Circulating SMC progenitors and two phenotypically distinct clones of proliferative, epithelioid phenotype vs contractile, spindle-shaped SMCs from the media of adult internal thoracic artery were studied for the presence of PAF-receptor (PAF-R). The levels of specific mRNA were obtained by reverse transcription/real-time PCR, the protein expression was deduced from immunohistochemistry staining, and the functional transmigration assay was performed by Boyden chamber-type chemotaxis assay. Only SMCs of spindle-shape and synthetic phenotype expressed both mRNA and PAF-R protein and in the functional test migrated at low concentrations of PAF. Two unrelated, specific PAF-R antagonists inhibited PAF-induced migration, but did not modify the migration initiated by PDGF. The presence of functional PAF-R in arterial spindle-shaped SMCs of synthetic phenotype may be important for their migration from the media into the intima and atherosclerotic plaques formation.

  3. Relationship between immune system and gram negative bacteria. I. Spontaneous binding of smooth and rough Salmonella to human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Jirillo, E; Antonaci, S; Michalek, S M; Colwell, D E; McGhee, J R; Bonomo, L

    1984-01-01

    Over the past years many reports have emphasized that either Gram positive or Gram negative bacteria possess the ability to bind spontaneously to human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). Here, bacterial binding to human PBL has been studied by using a smooth (S) Salmonella typhimurium LT-2 and two rough (R) mutants of Salmonella minnesota R 345 (Rb) and R 595 (Re), which possess specific deletions in their lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecule. Our results provide evidence that all three bacterial strains spontaneously bind to PBL, even though Re and mostly Rb cells display the highest degree of adherence. The three major regions of LPS (O-polysaccharide chain, R core and lipid A) seem to be involved in the binding since adherence is specifically inhibited by pretreating PBL with S- or R-LPS extracted from homologous bacteria. Furthermore, using a panel of monoclonal antibodies to lymphocyte surface antigens, S- and R-Salmonella bacteria bind to T lymphocytes (preferentially T8+ cells), while few B cells are coated by bacteria. Additionally, bacterial binding is significantly reduced by trypsin pretreatment of PBL, this suggesting that proteins (or glycoproteins) of the PBL membrane are involved in the binding. PMID:6383666

  4. In vitro reactivity (“organ chamber”) of guinea pig tracheal rings—methodology considerations

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Agnes Afrodite Sumarelli; Carvalho, Marco Túlio Menezes; Evora, Patricia Martinez; de Nadai, Tales Rubens; Celotto, Andrea Carla

    2016-01-01

    The present text was motivated by the difficulties faced by our postgraduate students when using airways studies protocols and will take into consideration the three mechanisms of relaxation: (I) guanosine 3,5-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP)/NO-dependent; (II) adenosine 3,5-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)/PGI2-dependent, and (III) hyperpolarization-dependent. Tracheal rings are studied in an organ bath containing a gassed physiological salt solution, usually at a temperature of 37 °C. An agent or procedure that causes contraction [acetylcholine (Ach) or metacholine] of the smooth muscle is needed before study airway dilator drugs. The presented airways studies protocols are useful to study the bronchial epithelial-dependent reactivity. PMID:27386490

  5. In vitro reactivity ("organ chamber") of guinea pig tracheal rings-methodology considerations.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Agnes Afrodite Sumarelli; Carvalho, Marco Túlio Menezes; Evora, Patricia Martinez; de Nadai, Tales Rubens; Celotto, Andrea Carla; Evora, Paulo Roberto Barbosa

    2016-06-01

    The present text was motivated by the difficulties faced by our postgraduate students when using airways studies protocols and will take into consideration the three mechanisms of relaxation: (I) guanosine 3,5-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP)/NO-dependent; (II) adenosine 3,5-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)/PGI2-dependent, and (III) hyperpolarization-dependent. Tracheal rings are studied in an organ bath containing a gassed physiological salt solution, usually at a temperature of 37 °C. An agent or procedure that causes contraction [acetylcholine (Ach) or metacholine] of the smooth muscle is needed before study airway dilator drugs. The presented airways studies protocols are useful to study the bronchial epithelial-dependent reactivity. PMID:27386490

  6. Tracheal stent placement for the emergency management of tracheal collapse in dogs.

    PubMed

    Beal, Matthew W

    2013-08-01

    Dogs with tracheal collapse may present with life-threatening upper airway obstruction. In most instances, a conservative approach to treatment including oxygen support coupled with sedation and cooling measures will relieve respiratory effort and thus relieve airway obstruction. Dogs that fail this conservative approach require endotracheal intubation to ensure a patent airway. This population of patients would benefit from a more definitive, yet palliative treatment option to acutely relieve upper airway obstruction. Placement of a self-expanding metallic stent that spans the affected portion of the trachea will acutely provide the patient with a sustained patent airway and optimize the likelihood of a positive outcome. PMID:24182999

  7. Divergent effects of 17-{beta}-estradiol on human vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cell function diminishes TNF-{alpha}-induced neointima formation

    SciTech Connect

    Nintasen, Rungrat; Riches, Kirsten; Mughal, Romana S.; Viriyavejakul, Parnpen; Chaisri, Urai; Maneerat, Yaowapa; Turner, Neil A.; Porter, Karen E.

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} augments neointimal hyperplasia in human saphenous vein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} induces detrimental effects on endothelial and smooth muscle cell function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estradiol exerts modulatory effects on TNF-induced vascular cell functions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The modulatory effects of estradiol are discriminatory and cell-type specific. -- Abstract: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a condition characterized by increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}). TNF-{alpha} can induce vascular endothelial cell (EC) and smooth muscle cell (SMC) dysfunction, central events in development of neointimal lesions. The reduced incidence of CHD in young women is believed to be due to the protective effects of estradiol (E2). We therefore investigated the effects of TNF-{alpha} on human neointima formation and SMC/EC functions and any modulatory effects of E2. Saphenous vein (SV) segments were cultured in the presence of TNF-{alpha} (10 ng/ml), E2 (2.5 nM) or both in combination. Neointimal thickening was augmented by incubation with TNF-{alpha}, an effect that was abolished by co-culture with E2. TNF-{alpha} increased SV-SMC proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner that was optimal at 10 ng/ml (1.5-fold increase), and abolished by E2 at all concentrations studied (1-50 nM). Surprisingly, E2 itself at low concentrations (1 and 5 nM) stimulated SV-SMC proliferation to a level comparable to that of TNF-{alpha} alone. SV-EC migration was significantly impaired by TNF-{alpha} (42% of control), and co-culture with E2 partially restored the ability of SV-EC to migrate and repair the wound. In contrast, TNF-{alpha} increased SV-SMC migration by 1.7-fold, an effect that was completely reversed by co-incubation with E2. Finally, TNF-{alpha} potently induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in both SV-EC and SV-SMC. However there

  8. A Novel Method for Quantifying Smooth Regional Variations in Myocardial Contractility Within an Infarcted Human Left Ventricle Based on Delay-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Genet, Martin; Chuan Lee, Lik; Ge, Liang; Acevedo-Bolton, Gabriel; Jeung, Nick; Martin, Alastair; Cambronero, Neil; Boyle, Andrew; Yeghiazarians, Yerem; Kozerke, Sebastian; Guccione, Julius M

    2015-08-01

    Heart failure is increasing at an alarming rate, making it a worldwide epidemic. As the population ages and life expectancy increases, this trend is not likely to change. Myocardial infarction (MI)-induced adverse left ventricular (LV) remodeling is responsible for nearly 70% of heart failure cases. The adverse remodeling process involves an extension of the border zone (BZ) adjacent to an MI, which is normally perfused but shows myofiber contractile dysfunction. To improve patient-specific modeling of cardiac mechanics, we sought to create a finite element model of the human LV with BZ and MI morphologies integrated directly from delayed-enhancement magnetic resonance (DE-MR) images. Instead of separating the LV into discrete regions (e.g., the MI, BZ, and remote regions) with each having a homogeneous myocardial material property, we assumed a functional relation between the DE-MR image pixel intensity and myocardial stiffness and contractility--we considered a linear variation of material properties as a function of DE-MR image pixel intensity, which is known to improve the accuracy of the model's response. The finite element model was then calibrated using measurements obtained from the same patient--namely, 3D strain measurements-using complementary spatial modulation of magnetization magnetic resonance (CSPAMM-MR) images. This led to an average circumferential strain error of 8.9% across all American Heart Association (AHA) segments. We demonstrate the utility of our method for quantifying smooth regional variations in myocardial contractility using cardiac DE-MR and CSPAMM-MR images acquired from a 78-yr-old woman who experienced an MI approximately 1 yr prior. We found a remote myocardial diastolic stiffness of C(0) = 0.102 kPa, and a remote myocardial contractility of T(max) = 146.9 kPa, which are both in the range of previously published normal human values. Moreover, we found a normalized pixel intensity range of 30% for the BZ, which is consistent with

  9. Deletion of STAT5a/b in Vascular Smooth Muscle Abrogates the Male Bias in Hypoxic Pulmonary Hypertension in Mice: Implications in the Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang-Ming; Yuan, Huijuan; Edwards, John G; Skayian, Yester; Ochani, Kanta; Miller, Edmund J; Sehgal, Pravin B

    2014-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia typically elicits pulmonary hypertension (PH) in mice with a male-dominant phenotype. There is an opposite-sex bias in human PH, with a higher prevalence in women, but greater survival (the “estrogen paradox”). We investigated the involvement of the STAT5a/b species, previously established to mediate sexual dimorphism in other contexts, in the sex bias in PH. Mice with heterozygous or homozygous deletions of the STAT5a/b locus in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were generated in crosses between STAT5a/bfl/fl and transgelin (SM22α)-Cre+/+ parents. Wild-type (wt ) males subjected to chronic hypoxia showed significant PH and pulmonary arterial remodeling, with wt females showing minimal changes (a male-dominant phenotype). However, in conditional STAT5+/− or STAT5−/− mice, hypoxic females showed the severest manifestations of PH (a female-dominant phenotype). Immunofluorescence studies on human lung sections showed that obliterative pulmonary arterial lesions in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) or hereditary pulmonary arterial hypertension (HPAH), both male and female, overall had reduced STAT5a/b, reduced PY-STAT5 and reduced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) GTPase atlastin-3 (ATL3). Studies of SMCs and endothelial cell (EC) lines derived from vessels isolated from lungs of male and female IPAH patients and controls revealed instances of coordinate reductions in STAT5a, STAT5b and ATL3 in IPAH-derived cells, including SMCs and ECs from the same patient. Taken together, these data provide the first definitive evidence for a contribution of STAT5a/b to the sex bias in PH in the hypoxic mouse and implicate reduced STAT5 in the pathogenesis of the human disease. PMID:25470773

  10. Activity of Ca2+ -activated Cl- channels contributes to regulating receptor- and store-operated Ca2+ entry in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamamura, Aya; Yamamura, Hisao; Zeifman, Amy; Yuan, Jason X.-J.

    2011-01-01

    Intracellular Ca2+ plays a fundamental role in regulating cell functions in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). A rise in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) triggers pulmonary vasoconstriction and stimulates PASMC proliferation. [Ca2+]cyt is increased mainly by Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and Ca2+ influx through plasmalemmal Ca2+-permeable channels. Given the high concentration of intracellular Cl- in PASMCs, Ca2+-activated Cl-(ClCa) channels play an important role in regulating membrane potential and cell excitability of PASMCs. In this study, we examined whether activity of ClCa channels was involved in regulating [Ca2+]cyt in human PASMCs via regulating receptor- (ROCE) and store- (SOCE) operated Ca2+ entry. The data demonstrated that an angiotensin II (100 nM)-mediated increase in [Ca2+]cyt via ROCE was markedly attenuated by the ClCa channel inhibitors, niflumic acid (100 μM), flufenamic acid (100 μM), and 4,4’-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2’-disulfonic acid (100 μM). The inhibition of ClCa channels by niflumic acid and flufenamic acid significantly reduced both transient and plateau phases of SOCE that was induced by passive depletion of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum by 10 μM cyclopiazonic acid. In addition, ROCE and SOCE were abolished by SKF-96365 (50 μM) and 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate (100 μM), and were slightly decreased in the presence of diltiazem (10 μM). The electrophysiological and immunocytochemical data indicate that ClCa currents were present and TMEM16A was functionally expressed in human PASMCs. The results from this study suggest that the function of ClCa channels, potentially formed by TMEM16A proteins, contributes to regulating [Ca2+]cyt by affecting ROCE and SOCE in human PASMCs. PMID:22034612

  11. Cooperative interactions between RB and p53 regulate cell proliferation, cell senescence, and apoptosis in human vascular smooth muscle cells from atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Bennett, M R; Macdonald, K; Chan, S W; Boyle, J J; Weissberg, P L

    1998-04-01

    Compared with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from normal vessels, VSMCs from human atherosclerotic plaques proliferate more slowly, undergo earlier senescence, and demonstrate higher levels of apoptosis in culture. The tumor suppressor genes p105RB (retinoblastoma, acting through the E2F transcription factor family) and p53 regulate cell proliferation, cell senescence, and apoptosis in many cell types. We have therefore determined whether these stable growth properties of plaque VSMCs reflect altered activity of RB and/or p53. VSMCs were derived from coronary atherectomies or from normal coronary arteries from transplant recipients. Compared with normal VSMCs, plaque VSMCs showed a higher ratio of the active (hypophosphorylated) to the inactive (phosphorylated) form of RB and a lower level of E2F transcriptional activity. Cells were stably transfected with retrovirus constructs that inhibited RB or p53 alone or in combination. Suppression of RB alone increased rates of cell proliferation and apoptosis and inhibited cell senescence in normal VSMCs. Suppression of p53 and RB together had similar effects but, additionally, resulted in immortalization of normal VSMC cultures. In contrast, inhibition of RB binding to E2F or ectopic expression of E2F-1 in plaque VSMCs induced massive apoptosis, which required suppression of p53 to rescue cells. Suppression of RB and p53 together increased cell proliferation and delayed senescence but failed to immortalize plaque VSMCs. Inhibition of p53 alone had minimal effects on plaque VSMCs but increased the lifespan of normal VSMCs. We conclude that human plaque VSMCs have slower rates of cell proliferation and earlier senescence than do cells from normal vessels because of a defect in phosphorylation of RB. Furthermore, both disruption of RB/E2F and inhibition of p53 are required for plaque VSMCs to proliferate without apoptosis. This observation may explain the relatively low level of cell proliferation and high level of

  12. MicroRNA-145 regulates platelet-derived growth factor-induced human aortic vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration by targeting CD40

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yumei; Huang, Jiangnan; Jiang, Zhiyuan; Zhong, Yuanli; Xia, Mingjie; Wang, Hui; Jiao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the expression of microRNA (miR)-145 in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the effect of miR-145 in the biological behavior and expression of CD40 in VSMCs. Cells were treated with either miR-145 or miR-145 inhibitor. Cell proliferation was analyzed by a colony formation assay and a methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. Cell migration and invasion were assessed using a transwell assay, an invasion assay, and a wound healing assay. A luciferase reporter assay was used to detect the interaction between miR-145 and CD40. Expression of α-SMA, calponin, osteopontin (OPN), epiregulin, activator protein-1 (AP-1) and CD40 was measured using real-time RT-PCR for mRNA levels and Western blotting for protein levels. Overexpression of miR-145 significantly inhibited VSMC proliferation, invasion and migration. Furthermore, OPN, epiregulin, AP-1 and CD40 expression at the mRNA and protein levels was down-regulated by overexpression of miR-145. However, α-SMA and calponin expression at the mRNA and protein levels was up-regulated by overexpression of miR-145. In addition, the luciferase reporter assay showed that CD40 may be a direct target gene of miR-145 in VSMC initiation and development. Moreover, these data demonstrate that the up-regulation of CD40 is critical for miR-145-mediated inhibitory effects on platelet-derived growth factor-induced cell proliferation and migration in human VSMCs. In summary, CD40, a direct target of miR-145, reverses the inhibitory effects of miR-145. These results suggest that the specific modulation of miR-145 in human VSMCs may be an attractive approach for the treatment of proliferative vascular diseases. PMID:27186305

  13. Activation of protease-activated receptors (PARs)-1 and -2 promotes alpha-smooth muscle actin expression and release of cytokines from human lung fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Asokananthan, Nithiananthan; Lan, Rommel S; Graham, Peter T; Bakker, Anthony J; Tokanović, Ana; Stewart, Geoffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that protease-activated receptors (PARs) play an important role in various physiological processes. In the present investigation, we determined the expression of PARs on human lung fibroblasts (HLF-1) and whether they were involved in cellular differentiation and pro-inflammatory cytokine and prostaglandin (PGE2) secretion. PAR-1, PAR-2, PAR-3, and PAR-4 were detected in fibroblasts using RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry. Increased expression of PAR-4, but not other PARs, was observed in fibroblasts stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate. The archetypical activators of PARs, namely, thrombin and trypsin, as well as PAR-1 and PAR-2 agonist peptides, stimulated transient increases in intracellular Ca2+, and promoted increased α-smooth muscle actin expression. The proteolytic and peptidic PAR activators also stimulated the release of IL-6 and IL-8, as well as PGE2, with a rank order of potency of PAR-1 > PAR-2. The combined stimulation of PAR-1 and PAR-2 resulted in an additive release of both IL-6 and IL-8. In contrast, PAR-3 and PAR-4 agonist peptides, as well as all the PAR control peptides examined, were inactive. These results suggest an important role for PARs associated with fibroblasts in the modulation of inflammation and remodeling in the airway. PMID:25663523

  14. Biological behaviour of human umbilical artery smooth muscle cell grown on nickel-free and nickel-containing stainless steel for stent implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liming; An, Liwen; Zhou, Xiaohang; Pan, Shuang; Meng, Xin; Ren, Yibin; Yang, Ke; Guan, Yifu

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical potential of high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel (HNNF SS), we have compared the cellular and molecular responses of human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs) to HNNF SS and 316L SS (nickel-containing austenitic 316L stainless steel). CCK-8 analysis and flow cytometric analysis were used to assess the cellular responses (proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle), and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to analyze the gene expression profiles of HUASMCs exposed to HNNF SS and 316L SS, respectively. CCK-8 analysis demonstrated that HUASMCs cultured on HNNF SS proliferated more slowly than those on 316L SS. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that HNNF SS could activate more cellular apoptosis. The qRT-PCR results showed that the genes regulating cell apoptosis and autophagy were up-regulated on HNNF SS. Thus, HNNF SS could reduce the HUASMC proliferation in comparison to 316L SS. The findings furnish valuable information for developing new biomedical materials for stent implantation.

  15. Effects of serotonin on expression of the LDL receptor family member LR11 and 7-ketocholesterol-induced apoptosis in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nagayama, Daiji; Ishihara, Noriko; Bujo, Hideaki; Shirai, Kohji; Tatsuno, Ichiro

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • The dedifferentiation of VSMCs in arterial intima is involved in atherosclerosis. • 5-HT showed proliferative effect on VSMCs which was abolished by sarpogrelate. • 5-HT enhanced expression of LR11 mRNA in VSMCs which was abolished by sarpogrelate. • 5-HT suppressed 7KCHO-induced apoptosis of VSMCs via caspase-3/7-dependent pathway. • The mechanisms explain the 5-HT-induced remodeling of arterial structure. - Abstract: Serotonin (5-HT) is a known mitogen for vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The dedifferentiation and proliferation/apoptosis of VSMCs in the arterial intima represent one of the atherosclerotic changes. LR11, a member of low-density lipoprotein receptor family, may contribute to the proliferation of VSMCs in neointimal hyperplasia. We conducted an in vitro study to investigate whether 5-HT is involved in LR11 expression in human VSMCs and apoptosis of VSMCs induced by 7-ketocholesterol (7KCHO), an oxysterol that destabilizes plaque. 5-HT enhanced the proliferation of VSMCs, and this effect was abolished by sarpogrelate, a selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist. Sarpogrelate also inhibited the 5-HT-enhanced LR11 mRNA expression in VSMCs. Furthermore, 5-HT suppressed the 7KCHO-induced apoptosis of VSMCs via caspase-3/7-dependent pathway. These findings provide new insights on the changes in the differentiation stage of VSMCs mediated by 5-HT.

  16. The ability of AIF-1 to activate human vascular smooth muscle cells is lost by mutations in the EF-hand calcium-binding region

    SciTech Connect

    Autieri, Michael V. . E-mail: mautieri@temple.edu; Chen Xing

    2005-07-01

    Allograft Inflammatory Factor-1 (AIF-1) is a cytoplasmic calcium-binding protein expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in response to injury or cytokine stimulation. AIF-1 contains a partially conserved EF-hand calcium-binding domain, and participates in VSMC activation by activation of Rac1 and induction of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) expression; however, the mechanism whereby AIF-1 mediates these effects is presently uncharacterized. To determine if calcium binding plays a functional role in AIF-1 activity, a single site-specific mutation was made in the EF-hand calcium-binding domain to abrogate binding of calcium (AIF-1{delta}A), which was confirmed by calcium overlay. Functionally, similar to wild-type AIF-1, AIF-1{delta}A was able to polymerize F-actin in vitro. However, in contrast to wild-type AIF-1, over-expression of AIF-1{delta}A was unable to increase migration or proliferation of primary human VSMC. Further, it was unable to activate Rac1, or induce G-CSF expression to the degree as wild-type AIF-1. Taken together, modification of the wild-type EF-hand domain and native calcium-binding activity results in a loss of AIF-1 function. We conclude that appropriate calcium-binding potential is critical in AIF-1-mediated effects on VSMC pathophysiology, and that AIF-1 activity is mediated by Rac1 activation and G-CSF expression.

  17. Biological behaviour of human umbilical artery smooth muscle cell grown on nickel-free and nickel-containing stainless steel for stent implantation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liming; An, Liwen; Zhou, Xiaohang; Pan, Shuang; Meng, Xin; Ren, Yibin; Yang, Ke; Guan, Yifu

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical potential of high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel (HNNF SS), we have compared the cellular and molecular responses of human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs) to HNNF SS and 316L SS (nickel-containing austenitic 316L stainless steel). CCK-8 analysis and flow cytometric analysis were used to assess the cellular responses (proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle), and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to analyze the gene expression profiles of HUASMCs exposed to HNNF SS and 316L SS, respectively. CCK-8 analysis demonstrated that HUASMCs cultured on HNNF SS proliferated more slowly than those on 316L SS. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that HNNF SS could activate more cellular apoptosis. The qRT-PCR results showed that the genes regulating cell apoptosis and autophagy were up-regulated on HNNF SS. Thus, HNNF SS could reduce the HUASMC proliferation in comparison to 316L SS. The findings furnish valuable information for developing new biomedical materials for stent implantation. PMID:26727026

  18. Phorbol ester promotes a sustained down-regulation of endothelin receptors and cellular responses to endothelin in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Resink, T J; Scott-Burden, T; Weber, E; Bühler, F R

    1990-02-14

    The effect of phorbol ester pretreatment of human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMC) was studied with respect to regulation of endothelin (ET)-receptor binding and cellular responses to ET. The capacity of hVSMC to bind ET was decreased (by approximately 50% at maximum) after phorbol exposure, and this reductive effect was both rapid (t 1/2 approximately 10 min.) and sustained (for up to 24 hrs. of chronic phorbol exposure). Phorbol pretreatment inhibited both inositol phosphate and diacylclycerol production responses of hVSMC to ET in a manner that was time-dependent and sustained. Phorbol pretreatment also produced a persistent reduction in the ability of ET to release isotopically-labelled arachidonic and/or its metabolites from hVSMC, but importantly ionomycin-stimulated release was similarly negatively affected. Furthermore, ET-induced accumulation of the phospholipase A2/phospholipase B-derived inositol phospholipid metabolite, glycerophosphoinositol, was not different between control and phorbol-treated hVMSC. The mechanism whereby phorbol exerts differential, but notably sustained inhibitory effects on ET-promoted signal transduction pathways are thus complex and illustrative of the selectivity of protein kinase C in regulating cellular responses. PMID:2154974

  19. Biological behaviour of human umbilical artery smooth muscle cell grown on nickel-free and nickel-containing stainless steel for stent implantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Liming; An, Liwen; Zhou, Xiaohang; Pan, Shuang; Meng, Xin; Ren, Yibin; Yang, Ke; Guan, Yifu

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical potential of high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel (HNNF SS), we have compared the cellular and molecular responses of human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs) to HNNF SS and 316L SS (nickel-containing austenitic 316L stainless steel). CCK-8 analysis and flow cytometric analysis were used to assess the cellular responses (proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle), and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to analyze the gene expression profiles of HUASMCs exposed to HNNF SS and 316L SS, respectively. CCK-8 analysis demonstrated that HUASMCs cultured on HNNF SS proliferated more slowly than those on 316L SS. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that HNNF SS could activate more cellular apoptosis. The qRT-PCR results showed that the genes regulating cell apoptosis and autophagy were up-regulated on HNNF SS. Thus, HNNF SS could reduce the HUASMC proliferation in comparison to 316L SS. The findings furnish valuable information for developing new biomedical materials for stent implantation. PMID:26727026

  20. Steroids and antihistamines synergize to inhibit rat's airway smooth muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shao-Cheng; Chu, Yueng-Hsiang; Kao, Chuan-Hsiang; Wu, Chi-Chung; Wang, Hsing-Won

    2015-06-01

    Both glucocorticoids and H1-antihistamines were widely used on patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) and obstructive airway diseases. However, their direct effects on airway smooth muscle were not fully explored. In this study, we tested the effectiveness of prednisolone (Kidsolone) and levocetirizine (Xyzal) on isolated rat trachea submersed in Kreb's solution in a muscle bath. Changes in tracheal contractility in response to the application of parasympathetic mimetic agents were measured. The following assessments of the drug were performed: (1) effect on tracheal smooth muscle resting tension; (2) effect on contraction caused by 10(-6) M methacholine; (3) effect of the drug on electrical field stimulation (EFS) induced tracheal smooth muscle contractions. The result revealed sole use of Kidsolone or Xyzal elicited no significant effect or only a little relaxation response on tracheal tension after methacholine treatment. The tension was 90.5 ± 7.5 and 99.5 ± 0.8 % at 10(-4) M for Xyzal and 10(-5) M for Kidsolone, respectively. However, a dramatically spasmolytic effect was observed after co-administration of Kidsolone and Xyzal and the tension dropped to 67.5 ± 13.6 %, with statistical significance (p < 0.05). As for EFS-induced contractions, Kidsolone had no direct effect but Xyzal could inhibit it, with increasing basal tension. In conclusion, using glucocorticoids alone had no spasmolytic effect but they can be synergized with antihistamines to dramatically relax the trachea smooth muscle within minutes. Therefore, for AR patients with acute asthma attack, combined use of those two drugs is recommended. PMID:25115316

  1. Cortex phellodendri Extract Relaxes Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qiu-Ju; Chen, Weiwei; Dan, Hong; Tan, Li; Zhu, He; Yang, Guangzhong; Shen, Jinhua; Peng, Yong-Bo; Zhao, Ping; Xue, Lu; Yu, Meng-Fei; Ma, Liqun; Si, Xiao-Tang; Wang, Zhuo; Dai, Jiapei; Qin, Gangjian; Zou, Chunbin; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cortex phellodendri is used to reduce fever and remove dampness and toxin. Berberine is an active ingredient of C. phellodendri. Berberine from Argemone ochroleuca can relax airway smooth muscle (ASM); however, whether the nonberberine component of C. phellodendri has similar relaxant action was unclear. An n-butyl alcohol extract of C. phellodendri (NBAECP, nonberberine component) was prepared, which completely inhibits high K+- and acetylcholine- (ACH-) induced precontraction of airway smooth muscle in tracheal rings and lung slices from control and asthmatic mice, respectively. The contraction induced by high K+ was also blocked by nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type Ca2+ channels. The ACH-induced contraction was partially inhibited by nifedipine and pyrazole 3, an inhibitor of TRPC3 and STIM/Orai channels. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NBAECP can relax ASM by inhibiting L-type Ca2+ channels and TRPC3 and/or STIM/Orai channels, suggesting that NBAECP could be developed to a new drug for relieving bronchospasm. PMID:27239213

  2. How to perform open tracheal suction via an endotracheal tube.

    PubMed

    Credland, Nicola

    2016-04-27

    Rationale and key points Tracheal suction involves the removal of pulmonary secretions from the respiratory tract using negative pressure under sterile conditions. Practitioners should be aware of the indications for, and risks associated with, open tracheal suction via an endotracheal tube. ▶ Respiratory assessment of the patient should be carried out to identify when tracheal suction is required. ▶ A suction pressure of 80-120mmHg is recommended, and suction should last no longer than 15 seconds. ▶ Reassurance and support should be given to the patient to minimise any discomfort and distress that might result from tracheal suction. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence-based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How you think this article will change your practice when performing open tracheal suction via an endotracheal tube. 2. How you could use this resource to educate your colleagues. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:27191318

  3. Tracheal compression in pupae of the beetle Zophobas morio.

    PubMed

    Pendar, Hodjat; Kenny, Melissa C; Socha, John J

    2015-06-01

    Insects that are small or exhibit low metabolic rates are considered to not require active ventilation to augment diffusive gas exchange. Some pupae with low metabolic rates exhibit abdominal pumping, a behaviour that is known to drive tracheal ventilation in the adults of many species. However, previous work on pupae suggests that abdominal pumping may serve a non-respiratory role. To study the role of abdominal pumping in pupa of the beetle Zophobas morio, we visualized tracheal dynamics with X-rays while simultaneously measuring haemolymph pressure, abdominal movement, and CO2 emission. Pupae exhibited frequent tracheal compressions that were coincident with both abdominal pumping and pulsation of pressure in the haemolymph. However, more than 63% of abdominal pumping events occurred without any tracheal collapse and hence ventilation, suggesting that the major function of the abdominal pump is not respiratory. In addition, this study shows that the kinematics of abdominal pumping can be used to infer the status of the spiracles and internal behaviour of the tracheal system. PMID:26085499

  4. Tracheal compression in pupae of the beetle Zophobas morio

    PubMed Central

    Pendar, Hodjat; Kenny, Melissa C.; Socha, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Insects that are small or exhibit low metabolic rates are considered to not require active ventilation to augment diffusive gas exchange. Some pupae with low metabolic rates exhibit abdominal pumping, a behaviour that is known to drive tracheal ventilation in the adults of many species. However, previous work on pupae suggests that abdominal pumping may serve a non-respiratory role. To study the role of abdominal pumping in pupa of the beetle Zophobas morio, we visualized tracheal dynamics with X-rays while simultaneously measuring haemolymph pressure, abdominal movement, and CO2 emission. Pupae exhibited frequent tracheal compressions that were coincident with both abdominal pumping and pulsation of pressure in the haemolymph. However, more than 63% of abdominal pumping events occurred without any tracheal collapse and hence ventilation, suggesting that the major function of the abdominal pump is not respiratory. In addition, this study shows that the kinematics of abdominal pumping can be used to infer the status of the spiracles and internal behaviour of the tracheal system. PMID:26085499

  5. Experimental tests of a superposition hypothesis to explain the relationship between the vestibuloocular reflex and smooth pursuit during horizontal combined eye-head tracking in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, W. P.; Leigh, R. J.; Seidman, S. H.; Thomas, C. W.; Billian, C.; DiScenna, A. O.; Dell'Osso, L. F.

    1992-01-01

    1. We used a modeling approach to test the hypothesis that, in humans, the smooth pursuit (SP) system provides the primary signal for cancelling the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) during combined eye-head tracking (CEHT) of a target moving smoothly in the horizontal plane. Separate models for SP and the VOR were developed. The optimal values of parameters of the two models were calculated using measured responses of four subjects to trials of SP and the visually enhanced VOR. After optimal parameter values were specified, each model generated waveforms that accurately reflected the subjects' responses to SP and vestibular stimuli. The models were then combined into a CEHT model wherein the final eye movement command signal was generated as the linear summation of the signals from the SP and VOR pathways. 2. The SP-VOR superposition hypothesis was tested using two types of CEHT stimuli, both of which involved passive rotation of subjects in a vestibular chair. The first stimulus consisted of a "chair brake" or sudden stop of the subject's head during CEHT; the visual target continued to move. The second stimulus consisted of a sudden change from the visually enhanced VOR to CEHT ("delayed target onset" paradigm); as the vestibular chair rotated past the angular position of the stationary visual stimulus, the latter started to move in synchrony with the chair. Data collected during experiments that employed these stimuli were compared quantitatively with predictions made by the CEHT model. 3. During CEHT, when the chair was suddenly and unexpectedly stopped, the eye promptly began to move in the orbit to track the moving target. Initially, gaze velocity did not completely match target velocity, however; this finally occurred approximately 100 ms after the brake onset. The model did predict the prompt onset of eye-in-orbit motion after the brake, but it did not predict that gaze velocity would initially be only approximately 70% of target velocity. One possible

  6. Identification of a Klf4-dependent upstream repressor region mediating transcriptional regulation of the myocardin gene in human smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Turner, Elizebeth C; Huang, Chien-Ling; Govindarajan, Kalaimathi; Caplice, Noel M

    2013-11-01

    Phenotypic switching of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) plays a central role in the development of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. However, the factors regulating expression of the human myocardin (Myocd) gene, the master gene regulator of SMC differentiation, have yet to be identified. In this study, we sought to identify the critical factors regulating Myocd expression in human SMCs. Using deletion/genetic reporter analyses, an upstream repressor region (URR) was localised within the Myocd promoter, herein termed PrmM. Bioinformatic analysis revealed three evolutionary conserved Klf4 sites within the URR and disruption of those elements led to substantial increases in PrmM-directed gene expression. Furthermore, ectopic expression established that Klf4 significantly decreased Myocd mRNA levels and PrmM-directed gene expression while electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed specific binding of endogenous Klf4, and not Klf5 or Klf2, to the URR of PrmM. Platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB), a potent inhibitor of SMC differentiation, reduced Myocd mRNA levels and PrmM-directed gene expression in SMCs. A PDGF-BB-responsive region (PRR) was also identified within PrmM, overlapping with the previously identified URR, where either siRNA knockdown of Klf4 or the combined disruption of the Klf4 elements completely abolished PDGF-BB-mediated repression of PrmM-directed gene expression in SMCs. Moreover, ChIP analysis established that PDGF-BB-induced repression of Myocd gene expression is most likely regulated by enhanced binding of Klf4 and Klf5 to a lesser extent, to the PRR of PrmM. Taken together, these data provide critical insights into the transcriptional regulation of the Myocd gene in vascular SMCs, including during SMC differentiation. PMID:24060351

  7. Resolvin E1 normalizes contractility, Ca2+ sensitivity and smooth muscle cell migration rate in TNF-α- and IL-6-pretreated human pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed

    Hiram, Roddy; Rizcallah, Edmond; Marouan, Sofia; Sirois, Chantal; Sirois, Marco; Morin, Caroline; Fortin, Samuel; Rousseau, Eric

    2015-10-15

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a rare disease in which pathophysiology is characterized by an increase in proinflammatory mediators, chronic endothelial dysfunctions, and a high migration rate of smooth muscle cells (SMC). Over the course of the last decade, various treatments have been proposed to relax the pulmonary arteries, none of which have been effective in resolving PH. Our hypothesis is that artery-relaxing drugs are not the long-term solution, but rather the inhibition of tissue inflammation, which underlies human pulmonary artery (HPA) dysfunctions that lead to abnormal vasoconstriction. The goal of the present study was to assess the anti-inflammatory effects of resolvin E1 (RvE1) with concomitant effects on SMC migration and on HPA reactivity. The role and mode of action of RvE1 and its precursor, monoacylglyceride eicosapentaenoic acid were assessed on HPA under proinflammatory conditions, involving a combined pretreatment with 10 ng/ml TNF-α and 10 ng/ml IL-6. Our results show that TNF-α and IL-6 treatment induced hyperreactivity and Ca(2+) hypersensitivity in response to pharmaco-mechanical stimuli, including 80 mM KCl, 1 μM phorbol 12-13-dibutyrate, and 30 nM U-46619. Furthermore, the proinflammatory treatment increased the migration rate of SMC isolated from HPA. The phosphorylation level of regulatory contractile proteins (CPI-17, MYPT-1), and proinflammatory signaling pathways (c-Fos, c-Jun, NF-κB) were also significantly increased compared with control conditions. Conversely, 300 nM RvE1 was able to normalize all of the above abnormal events triggered by proinflammation. In conclusion, RvE1 can resolve human arterial hyperreactivity via the resolution of inflammatory markers. PMID:26320154

  8. An ex vivo swine tracheal organ culture for the study of influenza infection

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Sandro F.; Murcia, Pablo R.; Tiley, Laurence S.; Brown, Ian H.; Tucker, Alexander W.; Maskell, Duncan J.; Wood, James Lionel N.

    2009-01-01

    Background  The threat posed by swine influenza viruses with potential to transmit from pig populations to other hosts, including humans, requires the development of new experimental systems to study different aspects of influenza infection. Ex vivo organ culture (EVOC) systems have been successfully used in the study of both human and animal respiratory pathogens. Objectives  We aimed to develop an air interface EVOC using pig tracheas in the study of influenza infection demonstrating that tracheal explants can be effectively maintained in organ culture and support productive influenza infection. Methods  Tracheal explants were maintained in the air interface EVOC system for 7 days. Histological characteristics were analysed with different staining protocols and co‐ordinated ciliary movement on the epithelial surface was evaluated through a bead clearance assay. Explants were infected with a swine H1N1 influenza virus. Influenza infection of epithelial cells was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and viral replication was quantified by plaque assays and real‐time RT‐PCR. Results  Histological analysis and bead clearance assay showed that the tissue architecture of the explants was maintained for up to 7 days, while ciliary movement exhibited a gradual decrease after 4 days. Challenge with swine H1N1 influenza virus showed that the EVOC tracheal system shows histological changes consistent with in vivo influenza infection and supported productive viral replication over multiple cycles of infection. Conclusion  The air interface EVOC system using pig trachea described here constitutes a useful biological tool with a wide range of applications in the study of influenza infection. PMID:20021502

  9. Peripartum general anasthesia without tracheal intubation: incidence of aspiration pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ezri, T; Szmuk, P; Stein, A; Konichezky, S; Hagai, T; Geva, D

    2000-05-01

    This study estimated the incidence of pulmonary aspiration during general anasthesia for obstetric procedures performed in the peripartum period (Caesarean sections were not studied). The records of 1870 patients anasthetised without tracheal intubation were reviewed retrospectively. The diagnosis of aspiration was based on the anasthetist's written remarks and the postoperative course. Eighty per cent of patients received ketamine and a benzodiazepine, and the remaining 20% received methohexital or thiopental and fentanyl. No cricoid pressure or tracheal intubation was performed. A single case of mild aspiration was detected in a woman anasthetised with methohexital (an incidence of 0.053%). These results suggest that the risk of aspiration during general anasthesia without tracheal intubation, during and immediately after delivery, may not be higher in obstetric patients in the peripartum period, as has been reported previously. PMID:10792131

  10. Two Fatal Complications after Parallel Tracheal-Esophageal Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Binkert, Christoph A.; Petersen, Bryan D.

    2002-03-15

    Two patients with malignant obstructions of both the trachea and esophagus underwent parallel stent placement with Gianturco-Roesch Z (GRZ) stents for palliation of symptoms. Fatal hemorrhage occurred in both patients 2 and 3 weeks after stent placement respectively. An autopsy performed on one of these patients demonstrated esophageal tissue necrosis and erosion with perforation of both the tracheal and esophageal walls at sites where the stent struts were in direct opposition, leading to bleeding from the esophageal venous plexus. GRZ stents have been successful in the treatment of both solitary tracheal and esophageal stenoses. However, parallel tracheal-esophageal stenting with GRZ stents places patients at high risk for complications due to the high radial force exerted by this particular stent and the minimal amount of intervening tissue between the two structures.

  11. RAT TRACHEAL CELL CULTURE TRANSFORMATION SYSTEM FOR ASSESSMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL AGENTS AS CARCINOGENS AND PROMOTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A tracheal cell culture system which can be used for detection of hazardous environmental agents is described. The culture system makes use of primary tracheal cells that are isolated from rats by protease digestion of the tracheal epithelium. The epithelial cells are plated on a...

  12. Tracheal Atresia with Segmental Esophageal Duplication: An Unusual Anatomic Arrangement.

    PubMed

    Gaerty, Kirsten; Thomas, Joseph T; Petersen, Scott; Tan, Edwin; Kumar, Sailesh; Gardener, Glenn; Armes, Jane

    2016-01-01

    An unusual anatomic configuration of segmental tracheal agenesis/atresia with esophageal duplication on autopsy in a fetus that demised in utero at 29 weeks is reported. The mother was scanned initially for a cardiac anomaly at 20 weeks and on follow-up scan at 27 weeks had polyhydramnios and underwent amnioreduction. The final autopsy diagnosis was vertebral, ano-rectal, cardiac, tracheoesophageal, renal, and limb malformations (VACTERL). We discuss the autopsy findings along with the embryological mechanisms and compare the configuration with Floyd's classification for tracheal agenesis. The difficulties in prenatal diagnosis are discussed. PMID:26367770

  13. Surgical management of atypical lateral tracheal collapse in a dog.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L R; Krahwinkel, D J; McKiernan, B C

    1993-12-15

    Tracheal collapse is often diagnosed in small-breed dogs through use of conventional radiography or fluoroscopy, by which the dorsoventral orientation of the collapse can be seen. In the dog of this report, an unusual lateral form of tracheal collapse was diagnosed by means of bronchoscopy after multiple radiographic procedures had failed to define a cause for cough and dyspnea. Surgical reinforcement of the abnormal region of the trachea resulted in resolution of clinical signs and in reduction in dynamic airway collapse, which was documented on follow-up bronchoscopy. PMID:8307818

  14. The knockout of miR-143 and -145 alters smooth muscle cell maintenance and vascular homeostasis in mice: correlates with human disease

    PubMed Central

    Elia, Leonardo; Quintavalle, Manuela; Zhang, Jianlin; Contu, Riccardo; Cossu, Luca; Latronico, Michael V. G.; Peterson, Kirk L.; Indolfi, Ciro; Catalucci, Daniele; Chen, Ju; Courtneidge, Sara A.; Condorelli, Gianluigi

    2010-01-01

    Mechanisms controlling vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) plasticity and renewal still remain to be completely elucidated. A class of small RNAs called microRNAs (miRs) regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Here we demonstrate a critical role of the miR-143/145 cluster in SMC differentiation and vascular pathogenesis, also through the generation of a mouse model of miR-143 and -145 knockout. We determined that the expression of miR-143 and -145 is decreased in acute and chronic vascular stress (transverse aortic constriction and in aortas of the ApoE knockout mouse). In human aortic aneurysms, the expression of miR-143 and -145 was significantly decreased compared to control aortas. In addition, overexpression of miR-143 and -145 decreased neointimal formation in a rat model of acute vascular injury. An in-depth analysis of the miR-143/145 knockout mouse model demonstrated that this miR cluster is expressed mostly in the SMC compartment, both during development and post-natally, in vessels and SMC-containing organs. Loss of miR-143 and miR-145 expression induces structural modifications of the aorta, due to an incomplete differentiation of VSMCs. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the miR-143/145 gene cluster plays a critical role during SMC differentiation and strongly suggest its involvement in the reversion of the VSMC differentiation phenotype that occurs during vascular disease. PMID:19816508

  15. Age-associated proinflammatory secretory phenotype in vascular smooth muscle cells from the non-human primate Macaca mulatta: reversal by resveratrol treatment.

    PubMed

    Csiszar, Anna; Sosnowska, Danuta; Wang, Mingyi; Lakatta, Edward G; Sonntag, William E; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2012-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that age-associated chronic low-grade inflammation promotes the development of both large-vessel disease (myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral arterial disease) and small-vessel pathologies (including vascular cognitive impairment) in older persons. However, the source of age-related chronic vascular inflammation remains unclear. To test the hypothesis that cell-autonomous mechanisms contribute to the proinflammatory changes in vascular phenotype that accompanies advancing age, we analyzed the cytokine secretion profile of primary vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) derived from young (∼13 years old) and aged (∼21 years old) Macaca mulatta. Aged VSMCs cultured in the absence of systemic factors exhibited significantly increased secretion of interleukin-1β, MCP-1, and tumor necrosis factorα compared with young control cells. Secretion of interleukin-6 also tended to increase in aged VSMCs. This age-associated proinflammatory shift in the cellular secretory phenotype was associated with an increased mitochondrial O(2)(-) production and nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells activation. Treatment of aged VSMCs with a physiologically relevant concentration of resveratrol (1 μM) exerted significant anti-inflammatory effects, reversing aging-induced alterations in the cellular cytokine secretion profile and inhibiting nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells. Resveratrol also attenuated mitochondrial O(2)(-) production and upregulated the transcriptional activity of Nrf2 in aged VSMCs. Thus, in non-human primates, cell-autonomous activation of nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells and expression of an inflammatory secretome likely contribute to vascular inflammation in aging. Resveratrol treatment prevents the proinflammatory properties of the aged VSMC secretome, an effect that likely contributes to the demonstrated vasoprotective action of resveratrol in animal

  16. Targeted overexpression of the human urotensin receptor transgene in smooth muscle cells: effect of UT antagonism in ApoE knockout mice fed with Western diet.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Panayiota; Bousette, Nicolas; Al-Ramli, Wisam; You, Zhipeng; Behm, David J; Ohlstein, Eliot H; Harrison, Stephen M; Douglas, Stephen A; Giaid, Adel

    2009-06-01

    Urotensin II (UII) and its receptor UT are upregulated in the pathological setting of various cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis. However, their exact role in atherosclerosis remains to be determined. In the present study we used four strains of mice; wild-type (WT), UT(+) (a transgenic strain expressing human UT driven by the alpha-smooth muscle-specific, SM22, promoter), ApoE knockout (ko), and UT(+)/ApoE ko. All animals were fed high fat diet for 12 weeks. Western blot analysis revealed a significant increase in aortic UT expression in UT(+) relative to WT mice (P<0.05). Aortas of ApoE ko mice expressed comparable UT protein level to that of UT(+). Immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of strong expression of UT and UII proteins in the atheroma of UT(+), ApoE ko and UT(+)/ApoE ko mice, particularly in foam cells. Serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels were significantly increased in ApoE ko and in UT(+)/ApoE ko but not in UT(+) mice when compared to WT mice (P<0.0001). Analysis of aortas showed a significant increase in atherosclerotic lesion in the UT(+), ApoE ko and UT(+)/ApoE ko compared to WT mice (P<0.05). Oral administration of the UT receptor antagonist SB-657510A (30 microg/Kg/day gavage) for 10 weeks in a group of ApoE ko mice fed on high fat diet resulted in a significant reduction of lesion (P<0.001). SB-657510A also significantly reduced ACAT-1 protein expression in the atherosclerotic lesion of ApoE ko mice (P<0.05). The present findings demonstrate an important role for UT in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The use of UT receptor antagonists may provide a beneficial tool in the management of this debilitating disease process. PMID:19111831

  17. Rosuvastatin Attenuates CD40L-Induced Downregulation of Extracellular Matrix Production in Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells via TRAF6-JNK-NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Lin; Zhou, Yuan-Li; Sun, Wei; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    CD40L and statins exhibit pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects, respectively. They are both pleiotropic and can regulate extracellular matrix (ECM) degeneration in an atherosclerotic plaque. Statins can decrease both the CD40 expression and the resulting inflammation. However, the effects of CD40L and stains on atherosclerotic plaque ECM production and the underlying mechanisms are not well established. Moreover, prolyl-4-hydroxylase α1 (P4Hα1) is involved in collagen synthesis but its correlations with CD40L and statins are unknown. In the present study, CD40L suppressed P4Hα1 expression in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) in a dose- and time-dependent manner, with insignificant changes in MMP2 expression and negative enzymatic activity of MMP9. CD40L increased TRAF6 expression, JNK phosphorylation, NF-κB nuclear translocation as well as DNA binding. Furthermore, silencing TRAF6, JNK or NF-κB genes abolished CD40L-induced suppression of P4Hα1. Lower NF-κB nuclear import rates were observed when JNK or TRAF6 silenced HASMCs were stimulated with CD40L compared to HASMCs with active JNK or TRAF6. Together, these results indicate that CD40L suppresses P4Hα1 expression in HASMCs by activating the TRAF6-JNK- NF-κB pathway. We also found that rosuvastatin inhibits CD40L-induced activation of the TRAF6-JNK- NF-κB pathway, thereby significantly rescuing the CD40L stimulated P4Hα1 inhibition. The results from this study will help find potential targets for stabilizing vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27120457

  18. T-bet is induced by interferon-γ to mediate chemokine secretion and migration in human airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    An inappropriate balance between T-helper (Th)1 and Th2 cytokine production underlies inflammatory changes that result in airway disease. Expression of the T-box transcription factor T-bet regulates differentiation of Th cells and production of Th1 cytokines, particularly IFNγ. T-bet-deficient mice develop airway hyperreactivity, undergo airway remodeling, and exhibit defects in IFNγ production while overproducing Th2 cytokines. T-bet is also reduced in the airways of asthmatic patients, suggesting loss of T-bet expression or activity promotes development of inflammatory airway disease. We present novel data demonstrating T-bet expression is induced in human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC) by IFNγ. This IFNγ-stimulated expression of T-bet is dependent on signaling through JAK2 and signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1) and activates T-bet-dependent DNA binding activity. Expression of T-bet stimulates IFNγ-stimulated IFNγ expression, secretion, and promoter activity, while inhibiting IFNγ-stimulated release of chemokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1/CCL2, regulated on activation normal T-expressed and secreted (RANTES)/CCL5, and eotaxin/CCL11. This is accompanied by changes in expression of the chemokine receptors CCR3 and IL12Rβ2 and TNFα. T-bet expression also reduces chemotactic migration of ASMC in response to serum and PDGF, which contributes to airway hyperplasia. These results are the first to identify T-bet expression and activity in a structural cell of the lung and may provide new insights into therapeutic targets for inflammatory airway disease. PMID:21239533

  19. Gingipains from the Periodontal Pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis Play a Significant Role in Regulation of Angiopoietin 1 and Angiopoietin 2 in Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Khalaf, Hazem; Sirsjö, Allan; Bengtsson, Torbjörn

    2015-01-01

    Angiopoietin 1 (Angpt1) and angiopoietin 2 (Angpt2) are the ligands of tyrosine kinase (Tie) receptors, and they play important roles in vessel formation and the development of inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative periodontal bacterium that is thought to contribute to the progression of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of P. gingivalis infection in the modulation of Angpt1 and Angpt2 in human aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMCs). We exposed AoSMCs to wild-type (W50 and 381), gingipain mutant (E8 and K1A), and fimbrial mutant (DPG-3 and KRX-178) P. gingivalis strains and to different concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF). The atherosclerosis risk factor TNF was used as a positive control in this study. We found that P. gingivalis (wild type, K1A, DPG3, and KRX178) and TNF upregulated the expression of Angpt2 and its transcription factor ETS1, respectively, in AoSMCs. In contrast, Angpt1 was inhibited by P. gingivalis and TNF. However, the RgpAB mutant E8 had no effect on the expression of Angpt1, Angpt2, or ETS1 in AoSMCs. The results also showed that ETS1 is critical for P. gingivalis induction of Angpt2. Exposure to Angpt2 protein enhanced the migration of AoSMCs but had no effect on proliferation. This study demonstrates that gingipains are crucial to the ability of P. gingivalis to markedly increase the expressed Angpt2/Angpt1 ratio in AoSMCs, which determines the regulatory role of angiopoietins in angiogenesis and their involvement in the development of atherosclerosis. These findings further support the association between periodontitis and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26283334

  20. MiR 3180-5p promotes proliferation in human bladder smooth muscle cell by targeting PODN under hydrodynamic pressure.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Luo, De-Yi; Zhu, Yu-Chun; Zhou, Liang; Yang, Tong-Xin; Tang, Cai; Shen, Hong; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs) were subjected to pressure cycles of up to 200 cm H2O to a pressure of 0 cm H2O for 24 hours. The total RNA extracted from each group was subjected to microarray analysis. miR-3180-5p emerged as the most overexpressed of all the differentially expressed microRNAs, and this finding was validated by PCR. We then used CCK-8 to quantify cell proliferation after liposome-mediated transfection. Subsequently, we investigated the change in PODN and its downstream signaling proteins, including cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdk2) and p21. In addition, flow cytometry was performed to quantify cell-cycle distribution. The results show that miR-3180-5p, the microRNA that was most overexpressed in response to HP, reduced the expression of PODN and podocan (p = 0.004 and p = 0.041, respectively). Silencing of PODN via miR-3180-5p overexpression revealed a significant promotion of cell proliferation increased in the CCK-8 experiment, p = 0.00077). This cell proliferation was accompanied by an increase in cdk2 expression (p = 0.00193) and a decrease in p21 expression (p = 0.0095). The percentage of cells in (S + G2/M) improved after transfection (p = 0.002). It was apparent that HP upregulates miR-3180-5p, which inhibits the expression of PODN and promotes HBSMC proliferation via the cdk2 signaling pathway. PMID:27608612

  1. Transcriptional regulation of NADPH oxidase isoforms, Nox1 and Nox4, by nuclear factor-{kappa}B in human aortic smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Manea, Adrian; Tanase, Laurentia I.; Raicu, Monica; Simionescu, Maya

    2010-06-11

    Inflammation-induced changes in the activity and expression of NADPH oxidases (Nox) play a key role in atherogenesis. The molecular mechanisms of Nox regulation are scantily elucidated. Since nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) controls the expression of many genes associated to inflammation-related diseases, in this study we have investigated the role of NF-{kappa}B signaling in the regulation of Nox1 and Nox4 transcription in human aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Cultured cells were exposed to tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF{alpha}), a potent inducer of both Nox and NF-{kappa}B, up to 24 h. Lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence and dichlorofluorescein assays, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot analysis showed that inhibition of NF-{kappa}B pathway reduced significantly the TNF{alpha}-dependent up-regulation of Nox-derived reactive oxygen species production, Nox1 and Nox4 expression. In silico analysis indicated the existence of typical NF-{kappa}B elements in the promoters of Nox1 and Nox4. Transient overexpression of p65/NF-{kappa}B significantly increased the promoter activities of both isoforms. Physical interaction of p65/NF-{kappa}B proteins with the predicted sites was demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. These findings demonstrate that NF-{kappa}B is an essential regulator of Nox1- and Nox4-containing NADPH oxidase in SMCs. Elucidation of the complex relationships between NF-{kappa}B and Nox enzymes may lead to a novel pharmacological strategy to reduce both inflammation and oxidative stress in atherosclerosis and its associated complications.

  2. MiR 3180-5p promotes proliferation in human bladder smooth muscle cell by targeting PODN under hydrodynamic pressure

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Luo, De-Yi; Zhu, Yu-Chun; Zhou, Liang; Yang, Tong-Xin; Tang, Cai; Shen, Hong; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs) were subjected to pressure cycles of up to 200 cm H2O to a pressure of 0 cm H2O for 24 hours. The total RNA extracted from each group was subjected to microarray analysis. miR-3180-5p emerged as the most overexpressed of all the differentially expressed microRNAs, and this finding was validated by PCR. We then used CCK-8 to quantify cell proliferation after liposome-mediated transfection. Subsequently, we investigated the change in PODN and its downstream signaling proteins, including cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdk2) and p21. In addition, flow cytometry was performed to quantify cell-cycle distribution. The results show that miR-3180-5p, the microRNA that was most overexpressed in response to HP, reduced the expression of PODN and podocan (p = 0.004 and p = 0.041, respectively). Silencing of PODN via miR-3180-5p overexpression revealed a significant promotion of cell proliferation increased in the CCK-8 experiment, p = 0.00077). This cell proliferation was accompanied by an increase in cdk2 expression (p = 0.00193) and a decrease in p21 expression (p = 0.0095). The percentage of cells in (S + G2/M) improved after transfection (p = 0.002). It was apparent that HP upregulates miR-3180-5p, which inhibits the expression of PODN and promotes HBSMC proliferation via the cdk2 signaling pathway. PMID:27608612

  3. Salusin-β induces foam cell formation and monocyte adhesion in human vascular smooth muscle cells via miR155/NOX2/NFκB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hai-Jian; Zhao, Ming-Xia; Liu, Tong-Yan; Ren, Xing-Sheng; Chen, Qi; Li, Yue-Hua; Kang, Yu-Ming; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are indispensible components in foam cell formation. Salusin-β is a stimulator in the progression of atherosclerosis. Here, we showed that salusin-β increased foam cell formation evidenced by accumulation of lipid droplets and intracellular cholesterol content, and promoted monocyte adhesion in human VSMCs. Salusin-β increased the expressions and activity of acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in VSMCs. Silencing of ACAT-1 abolished the salusin-β-induced lipid accumulation, and silencing of VCAM-1 prevented the salusin-β-induced monocyte adhesion in VSMCs. Salusin-β caused p65-NFκB nuclear translocation and increased p65 occupancy at the ACAT-1 and VCAM-1 promoter. Inhibition of NFκB with Bay 11-7082 prevented the salusin-β-induced ACAT-1 and VCAM-1 upregulation, foam cell formation and monocyte adhesion in VSMCs. Scavenging ROS, inhibiting NADPH oxidase or knockdown of NOX2 abolished the effects of salusin-β on ACAT-1 and VCAM-1 expressions, p65-NFκB nuclear translocation, lipid accumulation and monocyte adhesion in VSMCs. Salusin-β increased miR155 expression, and knockdown of miR155 prevented the effects of salusin-β on ACAT-1 and VCAM-1 expressions, p65-NFκB nuclear translocation, lipid accumulation, monocyte adhesion and ROS production in VSMCs. These results indicate that salusin-β induces foam formation and monocyte adhesion via miR155/NOX2/NFκB-mediated ACAT-1 and VCAM-1 expressions in VSMCs. PMID:27004848

  4. Gingipains from the Periodontal Pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis Play a Significant Role in Regulation of Angiopoietin 1 and Angiopoietin 2 in Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Boxi; Khalaf, Hazem; Sirsjö, Allan; Bengtsson, Torbjörn

    2015-11-01

    Angiopoietin 1 (Angpt1) and angiopoietin 2 (Angpt2) are the ligands of tyrosine kinase (Tie) receptors, and they play important roles in vessel formation and the development of inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative periodontal bacterium that is thought to contribute to the progression of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of P. gingivalis infection in the modulation of Angpt1 and Angpt2 in human aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMCs). We exposed AoSMCs to wild-type (W50 and 381), gingipain mutant (E8 and K1A), and fimbrial mutant (DPG-3 and KRX-178) P. gingivalis strains and to different concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF). The atherosclerosis risk factor TNF was used as a positive control in this study. We found that P. gingivalis (wild type, K1A, DPG3, and KRX178) and TNF upregulated the expression of Angpt2 and its transcription factor ETS1, respectively, in AoSMCs. In contrast, Angpt1 was inhibited by P. gingivalis and TNF. However, the RgpAB mutant E8 had no effect on the expression of Angpt1, Angpt2, or ETS1 in AoSMCs. The results also showed that ETS1 is critical for P. gingivalis induction of Angpt2. Exposure to Angpt2 protein enhanced the migration of AoSMCs but had no effect on proliferation. This study demonstrates that gingipains are crucial to the ability of P. gingivalis to markedly increase the expressed Angpt2/Angpt1 ratio in AoSMCs, which determines the regulatory role of angiopoietins in angiogenesis and their involvement in the development of atherosclerosis. These findings further support the association between periodontitis and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26283334

  5. Simvastatin Increases Fibulin-2 Expression in Human Coronary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells via RhoA/Rho-Kinase Signaling Pathway Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Noemí; Rosales, Roser; Masana, Lluís; Vallvé, Joan-Carles

    2015-01-01

    The composition and structure of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in the vascular wall and in the atherosclerotic plaque are important factors that determine plaque stability. Statins can stabilize atherosclerotic plaques by modulating ECM protein expression. Fibulins are important components of the ECM. We evaluated the in vitro effect of simvastatin on the expression of fibulin-1, -2, -4 and -5 in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and the mechanisms involved. Cells were incubated with simvastatin (0.05–1 μM), mevalonate (100 and 200 μM), geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) (15 μM), farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) (15 μM), the Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632 (15 and 20 μM), the Rac-1 inhibitor (another member of Rho family) NSC23766 (100 μM), arachidonic acid (a RhoA/ROCK activator, 25–100 μM) and other fatty acids that are not activators of RhoA/ROCK (25–100 μM). Gene expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR, and fibulin protein levels were analyzed by western blotting and ELISA. Simvastatin induced a significant increase in mRNA and protein levels of fibulin-2 at 24 hours of incubation (p<0.05), but it did not affect fibulin-1, -4, and -5 expression. Mevalonate and GGPP were able to reverse simvastatin’s effect, while FPP did not. In addition, Y-27632, but not NSC23766, significantly increased fibulin-2 expression. Furthermore, activation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway with arachidonic acid decreased fibulin-2 mRNA. Simvastatin increased mRNA levels and protein expression of the ECM protein fibulin-2 through a RhoA and Rho-Kinase-mediated pathway. This increase could affect the composition and structure of the ECM. PMID:26207907

  6. Gene Silencing In Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells Induced by PEI siRNA Complexes Released From Dip-Coated Electrospun Poly(ethylene Terephthalate) Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Nabzdyk, Christoph S.; Chun, Maggie; Oliver-Allen, Hunter; Pathan, Saif G.; Phaneuf, Matthew D.; You, Jin-Oh; Pradhan-Nabzdyk, Leena; LoGerfo, Frank W.

    2014-01-01

    An excessive tissue response to prosthetic arterial graft material leads to intimal hyperplasia (IH), the leading cause of late graft failure. Seroma and abnormal capsule formation may also occur after prosthetic material implantation. The matricellular protein Thrombospondin-2 (TSP-2) has shown to be upregulated in response to biomaterial implantation. This study evaluates the uptake and release of small interfering RNA (siRNA) from unmodified and surface functionalized electrospun PET graft materials. ePET graft materials were synthesized using electrospinning technology. Subsets of the ePET materials were then chemically modified to create surface functional groups. Unmodified and surface-modified ePET grafts were dip-coated in siRNAs alone or siRNAs complexed with transfection reagents polyethyleneimine (PEI) or Lipofectamine RNAiMax. Further, control and TSP-2 siRNA-PEI complex treated ePET samples were placed onto a confluent layer of human aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMCs). Complexation of all siRNAs with PEI led to a significant increase in adsorption to unmodified ePET. TSP-2 siRNA-PEI released from unmodified-ePET silenced TSP-2 in AoSMC. Regardless of the siRNA-PEI complex evaluated, AoSMC migrated into the ePET. siRNA-PEI complexes delivered to AoSMC from dip-coated ePET can result in gene knock-down. This methodology for siRNA delivery may improve the tissue response to vascular and other prosthetics. PMID:24397987

  7. Phosphorylation of the 27-kDa heat shock protein via p38 MAP kinase and MAPKAP kinase in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Larsen, J K; Yamboliev, I A; Weber, L A; Gerthoffer, W T

    1997-11-01

    The 27-kDa heat shock protein (HSP27) is expressed in a variety of tissues in the absence of stress and is thought to regulate actin filament dynamics, possibly by a phosphorylation/dephosphorylation mechanism. HSP27 has also been suggested to be involved in contraction of intestinal smooth muscle. We have investigated phosphorylation of HSP27 in airway smooth muscle in response to the muscarinic agonist carbachol. Carbachol increased 32P incorporation into canine tracheal HSP27 and induced a shift in the distribution of charge isoforms on two-dimensional gels to more acidic, phosphorylated forms. The canine HSP27 amino acid sequence includes three serine residues corresponding to sites in human HSP27 known to be phosphorylated by mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein (MAPKAP) kinase-2. To determine whether muscarinic receptors are coupled to a "stress response" pathway in smooth muscle culminating in phosphorylation of HSP27, we assayed MAPKAP kinase-2 activity and tyrosine phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, the enzyme thought to activate MAPKAP kinase-2. Recombinant canine HSP27 expressed in Escherichia coli was a substrate for MAPKAP kinase-2 in vitro as well as a substrate for endogenous smooth muscle HSP27 kinase, which was activated by carbachol. Carbachol also increased tyrosine phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase. SB-203580, an inhibitor of p38 MAP kinases, reduced activation of endogenous HSP27 kinase activity and blocked the shift in HSP27 charge isoforms to acidic forms. We suggest that HSP27 in airway smooth muscle, in addition to being a stress response protein, is phosphorylated by a receptor-initiated signaling cascade involving muscarinic receptors, tyrosine phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase, and activation of MAPKAP kinase-2. PMID:9374719

  8. [Successful Use of the i-gel and Dexmedetomidine for Tracheal Resection and Construction Surgery in a Patient with Severe Tracheal Stenosis].

    PubMed

    Kashii, Tomoko; Nabatame, Maki; Okura, Nahomi; Fujinaga, Ayumi; Namoto, Kazuko; Mori, Masafumi; Tsujimura, Shigehisa

    2016-04-01

    A 51-year-old man, 170 cm, 86 kg, was diagnosed with a tracheal tumor existing just below the glottis occupying more than 80% of his tracheal lumen, and was scheduled for tracheal resection and construction. The patient had a strider due to the severe tracheal stenosis. We could insert i-gel easily under dexmedetomidine sedation. After successful i-gel insertion, tracheotomy and endotracheal intubation were performed. Until ETT insertion, the patient maintained spontaneous respiration without any hypoxic event. Followed by ETT insertion, tracheal resection and construction were performed under general anesthesia. After the operation, the patient was extubated and transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU), where he was given DEX infusion to keep the tracheal anastomosis immobilized. There was no serious complication during the perioparative period. PMID:27188107

  9. SMOOTH MUSCLE STEM CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) originate from multiple types of progenitor cells. In the embryo, the most well-studied SMC progenitor is the cardiac neural crest stem cell. Smooth muscle differentiation in the neural crest lineage is controlled by a combination of cell intrinsic factors, includ...

  10. Targeted inhibition of survivin with YM155 promotes apoptosis of hypoxic human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells via the upregulation of voltage-dependent K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, SHUAI; LIU, BO; FAN, ZAIWEN; WANG, DONG; LIU, YING; LI, JIAN; WANG, NING; LIU, YI; ZHANG, BO

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common disease characterized by a disturbance to the balance of apoptosis and cell proliferation in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). The anti-apoptotic protein, survivin, has been observed to be upregulated in pulmonary arteries (PAs) of chronic hypoxia-induced PH rats. The present study aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of sepantronium bromide (YM155), a selective survivin inhibitor, on hypoxic human PASMCs and examine the potential underlying mechanisms. Cultured human PASMCs (HPASMCs) were randomly divided into the following groups: i) Normoxia (N); ii) normoxia + 100 nmol/l YM155 (NY100); iii) hypoxia (H); iv) hypoxia + 1 nmol/l YM155 (HY1); v) hypoxia + 10 nmol/l YM155 (HY10); and hypoxia + 100 nmol/l YM155 (HY100) groups. The cells were exposed to the different conditions for 24 h, according to the group. Cell viability was then determined using a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, and apoptosis was detected using a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling assay. The expression levels of survivin were determined using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), immunocytochemistry and Western blot analyses. The expression levels of the voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channels, Kv1.5 and Kv2.1, were measured using RT-qPCR and Western blotting. Cell proliferation in the hypoxic PASMCs was significantly increased by hypoxia, however, apoptosis of the HPASMCs was suppressed, the expression of survivin were upregulated and the expression levels of Kv1.5 and Kv2.1 were downregulated. YM155 treatment ameliorated the hypoxia-induced increase in cell proliferation and expression of survivin in a concentration-dependent manner, increased apoptosis, and increased the expression levels of Kv1.5 and Kv2.1 (P<0.05). By contrast, YM155 treatment in normoxic HPASMCs had no significant effects on proliferation, apop-tosis, or the expression

  11. Targeted inhibition of survivin with YM155 promotes apoptosis of hypoxic human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells via the upregulation of voltage-dependent K⁺ channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Bo; Fan, Zaiwen; Wang, Dong; Liu, Ying; Li, Jian; Wang, Ning; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common disease characterized by a disturbance to the balance of apoptosis and cell proliferation in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). The anti-apoptotic protein, survivin, has been observed to be upregulated in pulmonary arteries (PAs) of chronic hypoxia-induced PH rats. The present study aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of sepantronium bromide (YM155), a selective survivin inhibitor, on hypoxic human PASMCs and examine the potential underlying mechanisms. Cultured human PASMCs (HPASMCs) were randomly divided into the following groups: i) Normoxia (N); ii) normoxia + 100 nmol/l YM155 (NY100); iii) hypoxia (H); iv) hypoxia + 1 nmol/l YM155 (HY1); v) hypoxia + 10 nmol/l YM155 (HY10); and hypoxia + 100 nmol/l YM155 (HY100) groups. The cells were exposed to the different conditions for 24 h, according to the group. Cell viability was then determined using a Cell Counting Kit‑8 assay, and apoptosis was detected using a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling assay. The expression levels of survivin were determined using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), immunocytochemistry and Western blot analyses. The expression levels of the voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channels, Kv1.5 and Kv2.1, were measured using RT-qPCR and Western blotting. Cell proliferation in the hypoxic PASMCs was significantly increased by hypoxia, however, apoptosis of the HPASMCs was suppressed, the expression of survivin were upregulated and the expression levels of Kv1.5 and Kv2.1 were downregulated. YM155 treatment ameliorated the hypoxia‑induced increase in cell proliferation and expression of survivin in a concentration‑dependent manner, increased apoptosis, and increased the expression levels of Kv1.5 and Kv2.1 (P<0.05). By contrast, YM155 treatment in normoxic HPASMCs had no significant effects on proliferation, apoptosis, or the expression

  12. Endotoxin activates human vascular smooth muscle cells despite lack of expression of CD14 mRNA or endogenous membrane CD14.

    PubMed Central

    Loppnow, H; Stelter, F; Schönbeck, U; Schlüter, C; Ernst, M; Schütt, C; Flad, H D

    1995-01-01

    During infection or inflammation, cells of the blood vessel wall, such as endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC), contribute to the regulation of the immune response by production of cytokines or expression of adhesion molecules. Little is known about the mechanism(s) involved in the stimulation of vascular cells by endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]). As reported previously, LPS antagonists reduce LPS-induced cytokine production or adhesion in vitro specifically, suggesting a specific LPS recognition mechanism. We thus investigated the role of CD14 for stimulation of vascular SMC by LPS. Complement-fixing antibodies directed against CD14 (LeuM3, RoMo I, or Mo2) lysed monocytes but failed to mediate lysis of EC or SMC, indicating the lack of endogenous membrane CD14 in vascular cells. In addition, we did not detect expression of CD14 protein on EC and SMC in cell sorting analysis or cell immunoassay experiments. These observations are in line with our finding that a CD14 probe did not hybridize with mRNA or EC or SMC in Northern (RNA) blot experiments, although it hybridized well with monocyte-derived mRNA. We obtained the same results with the much more sensitive reverse transcription-PCR. Since the vascular SMC did not express endogenous CD14, we investigated the role of human serum-derived soluble CD14 (sCD14) for activation of SMC by LPS. In medium containing human serum, anti-CD14 antibodies inhibited activation of SMC by LPS. In contrast, the same antibodies did not inhibit activation of cells cultured in medium containing fetal calf serum. SMC cultured in sCD14-depleted medium responded 1,000-fold less to LPS than cells cultured in presence of sCD14. Reconstitution of sCD14-depleted serum or supplementation of serum-free medium with recombinant CD14 restored the capacity of the cells to respond to LPS. These results show that specific activation of vascular SMC by LPS does not involve binding to endogenous membrane CD14, but that the

  13. Diamond Smoothing Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronov, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Diamond smoothing tools have been proposed for use in conjunction with diamond cutting tools that are used in many finish-machining operations. Diamond machining (including finishing) is often used, for example, in fabrication of precise metal mirrors. A diamond smoothing tool according to the proposal would have a smooth spherical surface. For a given finish machining operation, the smoothing tool would be mounted next to the cutting tool. The smoothing tool would slide on the machined surface left behind by the cutting tool, plastically deforming the surface material and thereby reducing the roughness of the surface, closing microcracks and otherwise generally reducing or eliminating microscopic surface and subsurface defects, and increasing the microhardness of the surface layer. It has been estimated that if smoothing tools of this type were used in conjunction with cutting tools on sufficiently precise lathes, it would be possible to reduce the roughness of machined surfaces to as little as 3 nm. A tool according to the proposal would consist of a smoothing insert in a metal holder. The smoothing insert would be made from a diamond/metal functionally graded composite rod preform, which, in turn, would be made by sintering together a bulk single-crystal or polycrystalline diamond, a diamond powder, and a metallic alloy at high pressure. To form the spherical smoothing tip, the diamond end of the preform would be subjected to flat grinding, conical grinding, spherical grinding using diamond wheels, and finally spherical polishing and/or buffing using diamond powders. If the diamond were a single crystal, then it would be crystallographically oriented, relative to the machining motion, to minimize its wear and maximize its hardness. Spherically polished diamonds could also be useful for purposes other than smoothing in finish machining: They would likely also be suitable for use as heat-resistant, wear-resistant, unlubricated sliding-fit bearing inserts.

  14. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Neonatal Tracheal Aspirates Demonstrate a Pattern of Lung-Specific Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bozyk, Paul D.; Popova, Antonia P.; Bentley, John Kelley; Goldsmith, Adam M.; Linn, Marisa J.; Weiss, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously isolated mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from the tracheal aspirates of premature neonates with respiratory distress. Although isolation of MSCs correlates with the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, the physiologic role of these cells remains unclear. To address this, we further characterized the cells, focusing on the issues of gene expression, origin, and cytokine expression. Microarray comparison of early passage neonatal lung MSC gene expression to cord blood MSCs and human fetal and neonatal lung fibroblast lines demonstrated that the neonatal lung MSCs differentially expressed 971 gene probes compared with cord blood MSCs, including the transcription factors Tbx2, Tbx3, Wnt5a, FoxF1, and Gli2, each of which has been associated with lung development. Compared with lung fibroblasts, 710 gene probe transcripts were differentially expressed by the lung MSCs, including IL-6 and IL-8/CXCL8. Differential chemokine expression was confirmed by protein analysis. Further, neonatal lung MSCs exhibited a pattern of Hox gene expression distinct from cord blood MSCs but similar to human fetal lung fibroblasts, consistent with a lung origin. On the other hand, limiting dilution analysis showed that fetal lung fibroblasts form colonies at a significantly lower rate than MSCs, and fibroblasts failed to undergo differentiation along adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. In conclusion, MSCs isolated from neonatal tracheal aspirates demonstrate a pattern of lung-specific gene expression, are distinct from lung fibroblasts, and secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:21341990

  15. Induction of cyclo-oxygenase-2 by cytokines in human cultured airway smooth muscle cells: novel inflammatory role of this cell type

    PubMed Central

    Belvisi, Maria G; Saunders, Michael A; Haddad, El-Bdaoui; Hirst, Stuart J; Yacoub, Magdi H; Barnes, Peter J; Mitchell, Jane A

    1997-01-01

    Cyclo-oxygenase (COX) is the enzyme that converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandin H2 (PGH2) which can then be further metabolized to prostanoids which modulate various airway functions. COX exists in at least two isoforms. COX-1 is expressed constitutively, whereas COX-2 is expressed in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli. Prostanoids are produced under physiological and pathophysiological conditions by many cell types in the lung. However, the regulation of the different COX isoforms in human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells has not yet been determined.COX-1 and COX-2 protein were measured by Western blot analysis with specific antibodies for COX-1 and COX-2. COX-2 mRNA levels were assessed by Northern blot analysis by use of a COX-2 cDNA probe. COX activity was determined by measuring conversion of either endogenous or exogenous arachidonic acid to three metabolites, PGE2, thromboxane B2 or 6-ketoPGF1α by radioimmunoassay.Under control culture conditions HASM cells expressed COX-1, but not COX-2, protein. However, a mixture of cytokines (interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) and interferon γ (IFNγ) each at 10 ng ml−1) induced COX-2 mRNA expression, which was maximal at 12 h and inhibited by dexamethasone (1 μM; added 30 min before the cytokines). Furthermore, COX-2 protein was detected 24 h after the cytokine treatment and the expression of this protein was also inhibited by dexamethasone (1 μM) and cyclohexamide (10 μg ml−1; added 30 min before the cytokines).Untreated HASM cells released low or undetectable amounts of all COX metabolites measured over a 24 h period. Incubation of the cells with the cytokine mixture (IL-1β, TNFα, IFNγ each at 10 ng ml−1 for 24 h) caused the accumulation of PGE2 and 6-keto-PGF1α.In experiments where COX-2 metabolized endogenous stores of arachidonic acid, treatment of HASM cells with IL-1β in combination with TNFα caused a similar release of PGE2 to that when

  16. A Novel Method for Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Smooth Muscle-Like Cells on Clinically Deliverable Thermally Induced Phase Separation Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Nina; Ahmadi, Raheleh

    2015-01-01

    Muscle degeneration is a prevalent disease, particularly in aging societies where it has a huge impact on quality of life and incurs colossal health costs. Suitable donor sources of smooth muscle cells are limited and minimally invasive therapeutic approaches are sought that will augment muscle volume by delivering cells to damaged or degenerated areas of muscle. For the first time, we report the use of highly porous microcarriers produced using thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) to expand and differentiate adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AdMSCs) into smooth muscle-like cells in a format that requires minimal manipulation before clinical delivery. AdMSCs readily attached to the surface of TIPS microcarriers and proliferated while maintained in suspension culture for 12 days. Switching the incubation medium to a differentiation medium containing 2 ng/mL transforming growth factor beta-1 resulted in a significant increase in both the mRNA and protein expression of cell contractile apparatus components caldesmon, calponin, and myosin heavy chains, indicative of a smooth muscle cell-like phenotype. Growth of smooth muscle cells on the surface of the microcarriers caused no change to the integrity of the polymer microspheres making them suitable for a cell-delivery vehicle. Our results indicate that TIPS microspheres provide an ideal substrate for the expansion and differentiation of AdMSCs into smooth muscle-like cells as well as a microcarrier delivery vehicle for the attached cells ready for therapeutic applications. PMID:25205072

  17. Tracheal trauma from percutaneous tracheostomy using the Griggs method.

    PubMed

    Watters, M; Thorne, G; Cox, C; Monk, C

    2002-03-01

    In a safety evaluation study, relative force and distance measurements during percutaneous tracheostomy were recorded using specially monitored Griggs guidewire dilating tracheostomy forceps on 12 cadavers scheduled to undergo postmortem examination the same day. All measurements were recorded in millivolts and were converted to force and distance via appropriate calibration tables. Markedly more force was required for tracheal destruction than for therapeutic tracheal dilation (87.7 N +/- 19 N vs. 31.6 N +/- 17.1 N, p <0.001). Also relatively less force was required for therapeutic tracheal dilation than for dilation of the pretracheal tissues (44.4 N +/- 17.1 N vs. 31.6 N +/- 17.1 N, p <0.05). These results suggest that the Griggs tracheostomy forceps have a reasonable margin of safety in that tracheal destruction is unlikely to occur inadvertently during therapeutic dilation. Second, the dilation of pretracheal tissues can act as useful guide in knowing how much force to apply in a therapeutic dilation. PMID:11879214

  18. Intraluminal tracheal stent fracture in a Yorkshire terrier.

    PubMed

    Woo, Heung-Myong; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Lee, Seung-Gon; Nam, Hyun-Sook; Kwak, Ho-Hyun; Lee, Joon-Seok; Park, In-Chul; Hyun, Changbaig

    2007-10-01

    An 8-year-old Yorkshire terrier was presented with tracheal collapse. Two intraluminal nitinol stents were implanted. The implanted stents were found to be fractured 4 weeks after implantation. The fractured stents were removed. To restore the collapsed trachea, ring prostheses were applied. However, the dog was euthanized because of a bad outcome following surgery. PMID:17987968

  19. EFFECTS OF CADMIUM AND ZINC ON CANINE TRACHEAL BIOELECTRIC PROPERTIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Euminal exposure of excised tracheal epithelium to Cd(N03)2 inhibited short circuit current by 50% and increased dc conductance 500%. Zn(NO3)2 reduced conductance by 24% but did not affect short circuit current. Exposure to both salts induced a slightly greater inhibition of shor...

  20. MUCUS GLYCOPROTEIN SECRETION BY TRACHEAL EXPLANTS: EFFECTS OF POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tracheal slices incubated with radioactive precursors in tissue culture medium. The authors have used anin vitro approach, a combined method utilizing exposure to pneumotoxins in vivo coupled with quantitation of mucus secretion rates in vitro, to study the effects of inhaled pol...

  1. ONCOGENE ALTERNATIONS IN IN VITRO TRANSFORMED RAT TRACHEAL EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten derivations of rat tracheal epithelial (RTE) cells, including normal cells, normal primary cultures, 7 tumorigenic cell lines and 1 non-tumorigenic cell line transformed by treatment with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and/or 12-0-tetradecanoylphor...

  2. Tracheal Resection With Carinal Reconstruction for Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Timothy S; Krantz, Seth B; Patterson, G Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for primary malignancies of the trachea. We present here the rare case of a lifelong nonsmoker with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the trachea, requiring tracheal resection and anterior carinal reconstruction. Patient preparation, surgical technique, and considerations to avoid airway anastomotic complications are discussed. PMID:27343542

  3. Fluoroscopically Guided Balloon Dilation for Postintubation Tracheal Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Woong Hee; Kim, Jin Hyoung Park, Jung-Hun

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Little was known about the safety and long-term efficacy of fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation for postintubation tracheal stenosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and long-term efficacy of fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation in patients with postintubation tracheal stenosis. Methods: From February 2000 to November 2010, 14 patients underwent fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation for postintubation tracheal stenosis. Technical success, clinical success, and complications were evaluated. Patients were followed up for recurrent symptoms. Results: In all patients, fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation was technically and clinically successful with no major complications. Following the initial procedure, six patients (43 %) remained asymptomatic during a follow-up period. Obstructive symptoms recurred in eight patients (57 %) within 6 months (mean, 1.7 months), who were treated with repeat balloon dilation (n = 4) and other therapies. Of the four patients who underwent repeat balloon dilation, three became asymptomatic. One patient became asymptomatic after a third balloon dilation. On long-term (mean, 74 months) follow-up, 71 % of patients experienced relief of symptoms following fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation. Conclusions: Fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation may be safe, is easy to perform, and resulted in effective treatment in patients with postintubation tracheal stenosis.

  4. The Drosophila dysfusion basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-PAS gene controls tracheal fusion and levels of the trachealess bHLH-PAS protein.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lan; Crews, Stephen T

    2003-08-01

    The development of the mature insect trachea requires a complex series of cellular events, including tracheal cell specification, cell migration, tubule branching, and tubule fusion. Here we describe the identification of the Drosophila melanogaster dysfusion gene, which encodes a novel basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-PAS protein conserved between Caenorhabditis elegans, insects, and humans, and controls tracheal fusion events. The Dysfusion protein functions as a heterodimer with the Tango bHLH-PAS protein in vivo to form a putative DNA-binding complex. The dysfusion gene is expressed in a variety of embryonic cell types, including tracheal-fusion, leading-edge, foregut atrium cells, nervous system, hindgut, and anal pad cells. RNAi experiments indicate that dysfusion is required for dorsal branch, lateral trunk, and ganglionic branch fusion but not for fusion of the dorsal trunk. The escargot gene, which is also expressed in fusion cells and is required for tracheal fusion, precedes dysfusion expression. Analysis of escargot mutants indicates a complex pattern of dysfusion regulation, such that dysfusion expression is dependent on escargot in the dorsal and ganglionic branches but not the dorsal trunk. Early in tracheal development, the Trachealess bHLH-PAS protein is present at uniformly high levels in all tracheal cells, but since the levels of Dysfusion rise in wild-type fusion cells, the levels of Trachealess in fusion cells decline. The downregulation of Trachealess is dependent on dysfusion function. These results suggest the possibility that competitive interactions between basic helix-loop-helix-PAS proteins (Dysfusion, Trachealess, and possibly Similar) may be important for the proper development of the trachea. PMID:12897136

  5. Role of meconium in the reaction of airways smooth musculature in the newborn with meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS).

    PubMed

    Islami, Hilmi; Bexheti, Sadi; Shabani, Ragip; Nuraj, Bajram; Zeqiri, Fehmi; Sukalo, Aziz; Kurtishi, Ilir; Kutllovci, Skender; Qorraj, Hasime; Disha, Mentor

    2009-11-01

    The role of meconium in the respiratory system was studied in newborns, who died from various causes (250 up to 3000 g of weight). We monitored tracheal rings response to dopamine, serotonin and ethanol in different concentrations (dopamine: 0,05 mg/ml, 0,5 mg/ml, 5 mg/ml; serotonin (5-HT): 10-4, 10-3, 10-2, 10-1 mol/dm3; ethanol: 0,02 ml, 0,5 ml, 1,0 ml; 96%). Tracheal smooth musculature tonus (TSM) was examined in 48 tracheal preparations taken after the newborn exitus due to different reasons. Based on functional researche of isolated preparations of tracheas, it may be concluded that: aspiration of meconium has not changed the response of TSM to dopamine, serotonin and ethanol (p>0,1) in comparison with the control group, which have died due to different lung inflammatory processes (e.g. pneumonia, bronchopneumonia, atelectasis, cerebral hemorrhage). The results suggest that meconium does not potentiate the constricting action of dopamine, serotonin and ethanol in tracheobronchial system. Meconium causes mild relaxation of the TSM through a mechanism that is not intermediated by the products of cyclooxygenases (prostaglandins, prostacyclins) from the tracheal epithelium or proteins. Also, as it seems, the direct activity of many tested acids in the smooth musculature has no significant impact on increase of the airways tonus in MAS syndrome. PMID:20002002

  6. Review of 23 cases of postintubation tracheal obstructions in birds.

    PubMed

    Sykes, John M; Neiffer, Donald; Terrell, Scott; Powell, David M; Newton, Alisa

    2013-09-01

    Although recognized as a potential complication after endotracheal intubation in birds, the complication rate of postintubation tracheal obstruction in this taxon is unknown. Twenty-three cases of postintubation obstruction in birds from two institutions are reported. Clinical signs were noted an average of 16.6 days postintubation and consisted primarily of indications of acute respiratory distress. Diagnosis was confirmed via tracheoscopy or radiology. Five birds died before treatment could be initiated. Medical treatment alone was successful in three birds that had mild changes consisting primarily of a luminal mucoid plug that could be manually removed without tracheal surgery but was unsuccessful in an additional six birds. Tracheal resection and anastamosis was successful in four birds and unsuccessful in five birds. Overall mortality was 70%. Postintubation tracheal obstruction in birds appears to be more common in zoo practice than is suggested by the literature, as a total of 1.8% (1.2-2.7%, 95% confidence interval) of intubations or 3.5% (2.3-5.3%, 95% confidence interval) of individual animals intubated in these institutions resulted in this complication. Multiple cases were found in Ciconiiformes (n = 4), Columbiformes (n = 4), Gruiformes (n = 4), Anseriformes (n = 3), Galliformes (n = 3), and Passeriformes (n = 2). No cases were found in Coraciiforms, Falconiforms, or Psittaciformes despite many (>40) recorded intubations. The specific cause of these lesions is unclear, but some type of tracheal mucosa trauma or irritation is suggested by histologic findings. Prevention may include selective intubation, use of a laryngeal mask airway in place of intubation, careful placement of an endotracheal tube, minimal movement of the head and neck after placement, humidification of anesthetic gases, and gentle positive-pressure ventilation. PMID:24063099

  7. The effects of knockdown of rho-associated kinase 1 and zipper-interacting protein kinase on gene expression and function in cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jing-Ti; Wang, Xiu-Ling; Chen, Yong-Xiang; O'Brien, Edward R; Gui, Yu; Walsh, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) have been implicated in diverse physiological functions. ROCK1 phosphorylates and activates ZIPK suggesting that at least some of these physiological functions may require both enzymes. To test the hypothesis that sequential activation of ROCK1 and ZIPK is commonly involved in regulatory pathways, we utilized siRNA to knock down ROCK1 and ZIPK in cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMC). Microarray analysis using a whole-transcript expression chip identified changes in gene expression induced by ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown. ROCK1 knockdown affected the expression of 553 genes, while ZIPK knockdown affected the expression of 390 genes. A high incidence of regulation of transcription regulator genes was observed in both knockdowns. Other affected groups included transporters, kinases, peptidases, transmembrane and G protein-coupled receptors, growth factors, phosphatases and ion channels. Only 76 differentially expressed genes were common to ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified five pathways shared between the two knockdowns. We focused on cytokine signaling pathways since ROCK1 knockdown up-regulated 5 and down-regulated 4 cytokine genes, in contrast to ZIPK knockdown, which affected the expression of only two cytokine genes (both down-regulated). IL-6 gene expression and secretion of IL-6 protein were up-regulated by ROCK1 knockdown, whereas ZIPK knockdown reduced IL-6 mRNA expression and IL-6 protein secretion and increased ROCK1 protein expression, suggesting that ROCK1 may inhibit IL-6 secretion. IL-1β mRNA and protein levels were increased in response to ROCK1 knockdown. Differences in the effects of ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown on cell cycle regulatory genes suggested that ROCK1 and ZIPK regulate the cell cycle by different mechanisms. ROCK1, but not ZIPK knockdown reduced the viability and inhibited proliferation of vascular SMC. We conclude that ROCK1 and

  8. A tailored three-dimensionally printable agarose-collagen blend allows encapsulation, spreading, and attachment of human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Köpf, Marius; Campos, Daniela F Duarte; Blaeser, Andreas; Sen, Kshama S; Fischer, Horst

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, novel biofabrication technologies have enabled the rapid manufacture of hydrogel-cell suspensions into tissue-imitating constructs. The development of novel materials for biofabrication still remains a challenge due to a gap between contradicting requirements such as three-dimensional printability and optimal cytocompatibility. We hypothesise that blending of different hydrogels could lead to a novel material with favourable biological and printing properties. In our work, we combined agarose and type I collagen in order to develop a hydrogel blend capable of long-term cell encapsulation of human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs) and 3D drop-on-demand printing. Different blends were prepared with 0.25%, 0.5%, 0.75%, and 1.5% agarose and 0.2% type I collagen. The cell morphology of HUASMCs and the printing accuracy were assessed for each agarose-collagen combination, keeping the content of collagen constant. The hydrogel blend which displayed sufficient cell spreading and printing accuracy (0.5% agarose, 0.2% type I collagen, AGR0.5COLL0.2) was then characterised based on swelling and degradation over 21 days and mechanical stiffness. The cellular response regarding cell attachment of HUASMCs embedded in the hydrogel blend was further studied using SEM, TEM, and TPLSM. Printing trials were fabricated in a drop-on-demand printing process. The swelling and degradation evaluation showed an average of 20% mass loss and less than 10% swelling. AGR0.5COLL0.2 exhibited significant increase in stiffness compared to pure agarose and type I collagen. In addition, columns of AGR0.5COLL0.2 three centimeters in height were successfully printed submerged in cooled perfluorocarbon, proving the intrinsic printability of the hydrogel blend. Ultimately, a promising novel hydrogel blend showing cell spreading and attachment as well as suitability for bioprinting was identified and could, for example, serve in the manufacture of in vitro 3D models to

  9. The Effects of Knockdown of Rho-Associated Kinase 1 and Zipper-Interacting Protein Kinase on Gene Expression and Function in Cultured Human Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jing-Ti; Wang, Xiu-Ling; Chen, Yong-Xiang; O’Brien, Edward R.; Gui, Yu; Walsh, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) have been implicated in diverse physiological functions. ROCK1 phosphorylates and activates ZIPK suggesting that at least some of these physiological functions may require both enzymes. To test the hypothesis that sequential activation of ROCK1 and ZIPK is commonly involved in regulatory pathways, we utilized siRNA to knock down ROCK1 and ZIPK in cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMC). Microarray analysis using a whole-transcript expression chip identified changes in gene expression induced by ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown. ROCK1 knockdown affected the expression of 553 genes, while ZIPK knockdown affected the expression of 390 genes. A high incidence of regulation of transcription regulator genes was observed in both knockdowns. Other affected groups included transporters, kinases, peptidases, transmembrane and G protein-coupled receptors, growth factors, phosphatases and ion channels. Only 76 differentially expressed genes were common to ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified five pathways shared between the two knockdowns. We focused on cytokine signaling pathways since ROCK1 knockdown up-regulated 5 and down-regulated 4 cytokine genes, in contrast to ZIPK knockdown, which affected the expression of only two cytokine genes (both down-regulated). IL-6 gene expression and secretion of IL-6 protein were up-regulated by ROCK1 knockdown, whereas ZIPK knockdown reduced IL-6 mRNA expression and IL-6 protein secretion and increased ROCK1 protein expression, suggesting that ROCK1 may inhibit IL-6 secretion. IL-1β mRNA and protein levels were increased in response to ROCK1 knockdown. Differences in the effects of ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown on cell cycle regulatory genes suggested that ROCK1 and ZIPK regulate the cell cycle by different mechanisms. ROCK1, but not ZIPK knockdown reduced the viability and inhibited proliferation of vascular SMC. We conclude that ROCK1 and

  10. Postnatal - physiological research of the bronchial receptor system development on the isolated preparation of the human trachea in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sukalo, Aziz; Islami, Hilmi; Shabani, Ragib; Dauti, Hilmi; Kutllovci, Skender; Kastrati, Bashkim

    2006-08-01

    Research was done on pharmacological-physiological development of the bronchial receptor system on the smooth muscles of trachea in the newborn children, alive-born and stillborn children. Monitored was the response on: acetylcholine, dopamine, histamine and serotonin in different molar concentrations 10(-4), 10(-3), 10(-2), 10 mol/dm(-3), micromol/dm(-3)). Research was done on tonus of tracheal smooth muscles of 23 tracheal preparations taken by autopsy after death from different factors. Based on pharmacological-physiological research on the preparations of human isolated trachea it was find out that: acetylcholine stimulation effect is significant (p>0,01) in 38-41 weeks of pregnancy comparing with that in 30-37 weeks of pregnancy (p>0,01), while dopamine stimulation effect is significant (p>0,05) in 30-37 pregnancy weeks comparing with the effect of acetylcholine and dopamine on the still-born infants of the same pregnancy period (p<0,01). Histaminic receptors were developed during intrauterine life after 38 weeks of pregnancy (p>0,025). Serotonin has caused contraction of the bronchial smooth muscles after 30 pregnancy weeks, but response was not significant (p<0,01). This suggests that cholinergic and adrenergic system of the airways in alive newborn infants develops in parallel intrauterine, contrary to other systems which develop in certain extrauterine life phases. PMID:16995853

  11. EDNRA variants associate with smooth muscle mRNA levels, cell proliferation rates, and cystic fibrosis pulmonary disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Darrah, Rebecca; McKone, Edward; O'Connor, Clare; Rodgers, Christine; Genatossio, Alan; McNamara, Sharon; Gibson, Ronald; Stuart Elborn, J.; Ennis, Madeleine; Gallagher, Charles G.; Kalsheker, Noor; Aitken, Moira; Wiese, Dawn; Dunn, John; Smith, Paul; Pace, Rhonda; Londono, Douglas; Goddard, Katrina A. B.; Knowles, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Airway inflammation and pulmonary disease are heterogeneous phenotypes in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, even among patients with the same cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) genotype. Endothelin, a proinflammatory peptide and smooth muscle agonist, is increased in CF airways, potentially contributing to the pulmonary phenotype. Four cohorts of CF patients were screened for variants in endothelin pathway genes to determine whether any of these variants associated with pulmonary function. An initial cohort of 808 CF patients homozygous for the common CF mutation, ΔF508, showed significant association for polymorphisms in the endothelin receptor A gene, EDNRA (P = 0.04), but not in the related endothelin genes (EDN1, EDN2, EDN3, or EDNRB) or NOS1, NOS2A, or NOS3. Variants within EDNRA were examined in three additional cohorts of CF patients, 238 patients from Seattle, WA, 303 from Ireland and the U.K., and 228 from Cleveland, OH, for a total of 1,577 CF patients. The three additional groups each demonstrated a significant association between EDNRA 3′-untranslated region (UTR) variant rs5335 and pulmonary function (P = 0.002). At the molecular level, single nucleotide primer extension assays suggest that the effect of the variants is quantitative. EDNRA mRNA levels from cultured primary tracheal smooth muscle cells are greater for the allele that appears to be deleterious to lung function than for the protective allele, suggesting a mechanism by which increased receptor function is harmful to the CF airway. Finally, cell proliferation studies using human airway smooth muscle cells demonstrated that cells homozygous for the deleterious allele proliferate at a faster rate than those homozygous for the protective allele. PMID:20028935

  12. Effect of tracheal stenosis at different locations on airflow in the trachea and main bronchi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, Nasrul Hadi; Osman, Kahar; Basri, W. M.; Ngali, Zamani

    2012-06-01

    Tracheal stenosis is known to disturb the flow dynamics in human airway which may lead to breathing difficulties. In order to understand the tracheal stenosis effects to the flow behavior, this work investigates the presence of stenosis at different locations along the trachea wall and explores on how significant the flow could possibly be altered. The stenosis was patched to the healthy trachea models at five regular locations proposed by medical practitioners. All of the models were then subjected to moderate breathing conditions with inhalation flow rate of 45 l/min (Reynolds number 3012). The changes in the flow behavior due to the different locations of the stenosis were then examined to determine the pattern of breathing difficulties. K-epsilon model was used to model the turbulent flow conditions. The results show that the presence of stenoses was proven to produce moderate to severe pressure drop as the locations of the stenoses moved closer to the bifurcation region. For all cases studied, significant change in the velocity pattern was observed which suggests distorted flow rates into the bifurcations. The overall conclusion confirms that the presence of stenosis closer to the bifurcation area will have greater effect to the flow dynamics.

  13. Genipin cross-linked decellularized tracheal tubular matrix for tracheal tissue engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fei; Jiang, Yuan; Xu, Yanfei; Shi, Hongcan; Zhang, Siquan; Liu, Xingchen; Pan, Shu; Ye, Gang; Zhang, Weidong; Zhang, Fangbiao; Zhong, Chonghao

    2016-01-01

    Decellularization techniques have been widely used as an alternative strategy for organ reconstruction. This study investigated the mechanical, pro-angiogenic and in vivo biocompatibility properties of decellularized airway matrices cross-linked with genipin. New Zealand rabbit tracheae were decellularized and cross-linked with genipin, a naturally derived agent. The results demonstrated that, a significant (p < 0.05) increase in the secant modulus was computed for the cross-linked tracheae, compared to the decellularized samples. Angiogenic assays demonstrated that decellularized tracheal scaffolds and cross-linked tracheae treated with 1% genipin induce strong in vivo angiogenic responses (CAM analysis). Seven, 15 and 30 days after implantation, decreased (p < 0.01) inflammatory reactions were observed in the xenograft models for the genipin cross-linked tracheae matrices compared with control tracheae, and no increase in the IgM or IgG content was observed in rats. In conclusion, treatment with genipin improves the mechanical properties of decellularized airway matrices without altering the pro-angiogenic properties or eliciting an in vivo inflammatory response. PMID:27080716

  14. Smoothing error pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Clarmann, T.

    2014-09-01

    The difference due to the content of a priori information between a constrained retrieval and the true atmospheric state is usually represented by a diagnostic quantity called smoothing error. In this paper it is shown that, regardless of the usefulness of the smoothing error as a diagnostic tool in its own right, the concept of the smoothing error as a component of the retrieval error budget is questionable because it is not compliant with Gaussian error propagation. The reason for this is that the smoothing error does not represent the expected deviation of the retrieval from the true state but the expected deviation of the retrieval from the atmospheric state sampled on an arbitrary grid, which is itself a smoothed representation of the true state; in other words, to characterize the full loss of information with respect to the true atmosphere, the effect of the representation of the atmospheric state on a finite grid also needs to be considered. The idea of a sufficiently fine sampling of this reference atmospheric state is problematic because atmospheric variability occurs on all scales, implying that there is no limit beyond which the sampling is fine enough. Even the idealization of infinitesimally fine sampling of the reference state does not help, because the smoothing error is applied to quantities which are only defined in a statistical sense, which implies that a finite volume of sufficient spatial extent is needed to meaningfully discuss temperature or concentration. Smoothing differences, however, which play a role when measurements are compared, are still a useful quantity if the covariance matrix involved has been evaluated on the comparison grid rather than resulting from interpolation and if the averaging kernel matrices have been evaluated on a grid fine enough to capture all atmospheric variations that the instruments are sensitive to. This is, under the assumptions stated, because the undefined component of the smoothing error, which is the

  15. Protein Expression by Human Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells Containing a BMPR2 Mutation and the Action of ET-1 as Determined by Proteomic Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chunxiang; Yu, Jun; Taylor, Linda; Polgar, Peter; McComb, Mark E.; Costello, Catherine E.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disease characterized by increased pulmonary vascular resistance and remodeling. Increase in the population of vascular smooth muscle cells is among the key events contributing to the remodeling. Endothelin-1 (ET-1), a potent vasoconstrictor, is linked to the etiology and progression of PAH. Here we analyze changes in protein expressions in response to ET-1 in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC) from a healthy Control (non-PAH) and a PAH subject presenting a bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor (BMPR2) mutation with exon 1–8 deletion. Protein expressions were analyzed by proteomic mass spectrometry using label-free quantitation and the correlations were subjected to Ingenuity™ Pathway Analysis. The results point to eIF2/mTOR/p70S6K, RhoA/actin cytoskeleton/integrin and protein unbiquitination as canonical pathways whose protein expressions increase with the development of PAH. These pathways have an intimal function in the PAH-related physiology of smooth muscle proliferation, apoptosis, contraction and cellular stress. Exposure of the cells to ET-1 further increases protein expression within these pathways. Thus our results show changes in signaling pathways as a consequence of PAH and the effect of ET-1 interference on Control and PAH-affected cells. PMID:25866469

  16. A systematic study on the influence of the main ingredients of an ivy leaves dry extract on the β2-adrenergic responsiveness of human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Greunke, Christian; Hage-Hülsmann, Anne; Sorkalla, Thomas; Keksel, Nelli; Häberlein, Felix; Häberlein, Hanns

    2015-04-01

    The bronchospasmolytic and secretolytic effects of ivy leaves dry extracts can be explained by an increased β2-adrenergic responsiveness of the bronchi. Recently, it was shown that α-hederin inhibits the internalization of β2-adrenergic receptors (ß2AR) under stimulating conditions. α-Hederin pretreated alveolar type II cells and human airway smooth muscle cells revealed an increased ß2AR binding and an elevated intracellular cAMP level, respectively. In order to identify whether additional compounds also mediate an increased β2-adrenergic responsiveness, we examined the ingredients of an ivy leaves dry extract (EA 575) protocatechuic acid, neochlorogenic acid, chlorogenic acid, cryptochlorogenic acid, rutin, kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, 3,4-, 3,5- and 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, hederacoside B, and β-hederin. Within all the tested substances, only β-hederin inhibited the internalization of GFP-tagged ß2AR in stably transfected HEK293 cells. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy β-hederin (1 μM, 24 h) pretreated HASM cells showed a statistically significant increase in the ß2AR binding from 33.0 ± 8.9% to 44.1 ± 11.5% which was distributed with 36.0 ± 9.5% for τbound1 and 8.1 ± 2.6% for τbound2, respectively (n = 8, p < 0.05). The increased binding was selectively found for the receptor-ligand complex with unrestricted lateral mobility (τbound1 of 0.9 ± 0.1 ms, D1 = 9.1 ± 0.2 μm(2)/s, n = 8), whereas the binding of ß2AR with hindered lateral mobility (τbound2 of 64.2 ± 47.6 ms, D2 = 0.15 ± 0.02 μm(2)/s, n = 8) was not affected. Compared to control cells, a statistically significant increase of 17.5 ± 6.4% (n = 4, p < 0.05) and 24.2 ± 5.8% (n = 4, p < 0.001) in the cAMP formation was found for β-hederin pretreated HASM cells after stimulation with 10 μM of terbutaline and simultaneous stimulation with 10 μM terbutaline and 10 μM forskolin, respectively. Within this systematic study

  17. Tracheobronchomegaly associated with laryngo-tracheal amyloidosis: First case report.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Kazuo; Umezaki, Toshiro; Komune, Shizuo

    2016-08-01

    Tracheobronchomegaly (TBM) is a rare enlargement of the tracheal cartilage, also known as Mounier-Kuhn syndrome (MKS). Here, we describe an unusual case of acquired TBM in an adult, caused by amyloid regeneration and associated tracheal weakening, rather than by MKS. CT scan and fiberscopic examination of a 55-year-old woman suffering from severe dyspnea revealed TBM and subglottic stenosis, which was caused by deposition of amyloid tissue. We performed a tracheostomy and vaporized the subglottic stenosis with a CO2 laser, after which we installed a silicone T-tube. After the first operation, re-stenosis occurred, and the procedure was repeated; stenosis was subsequently cured and the dyspnea disappeared, after which the tracheostomy could be closed. This is the first report of adult TBM associated with amyloid deposition in the subglottis and trachea. This diagnosis is very difficult, as amyloid deposition in the trachea can have various clinical presentations. PMID:26791590

  18. Fetal lung growth in laryngeal atresia and tracheal agenesis.

    PubMed

    Scurry, J P; Adamson, T M; Cussen, L J

    1989-02-01

    Three cases of airway obstruction in fetuses born at 21, 32 and 40 weeks gestation are reported. The first had laryngeal atresia, cystic dysplastic kidneys, oligohydramnios and immense fluid-filled lungs. The second had upper tracheal agenesis, a tracheo-oesophageal fistula, a cystic dysplastic horseshoe kidney, oligohydramnios and normal-sized lungs. The third had a pin-hole mucosal tract through an otherwise atretic larynx, normal kidneys, no oligohydramnios and normal-sized lungs. Lung weight:body weight ratios, radial alveolar or radial canalicular counts and point-counting of sections of lungs in cases 1 and 2 show that laryngeal or tracheal obstruction may prevent or reduce the pulmonary hypoplasia associated with renal dysplasia, and in cases 2 and 3, that grossly enlarged, hyperplastic lungs may not be seen unless obstruction is complete. PMID:2730470

  19. Tracheoesophageal fistula - a complication of prolonged tracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    Paraschiv, M

    2014-01-01

    Tracheoesophageal fistula most commonly occurs as a complication of prolonged tracheal intubation. The incidence decreased after the use of low pressure and high volume endotracheal cuffs, but the intensive care units continue to provide such cases. The abnormal tracheoesophageal communication causes pulmonary contamination (with severe suppuration) and impossibility to feed the patient. The prognosis is reserved, because most patients are debilitated and ventilator dependent, with severe neurological and cardiovascular diseases. The therapeutic options are elected based on respiratory, neurological and nutritional status. The aim of conservative treatment is to stop the contamination (drainage gastrostomy, feeding jejunostomy) and to treat the pulmonary infection and biological deficits. Endoscopic therapies can be tried in cases with surgical contraindication. Operation is addressed to selected cases and consists in the dissolution of the fistula, esophageal suture with or without segmental tracheal resection associated. Esophageal diversion is rarely required. The correct indication and timing of surgery, proper surgical technique and postoperative care are prerequisites for adequate results. PMID:25713612

  20. Tracheoesophageal fistula--a complication of prolonged tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Paraschiv, M

    2014-01-01

    Tracheoesophageal fistula most commonly occurs as a complication of prolonged tracheal intubation. The incidence decreased after the use of low pressure and high volume endotracheal cuffs, but the intensive care units continue to provide such cases. The abnormal tracheoesophageal communication causes pulmonary contamination (with severe suppuration) and impossibility to feed the patient. The prognosis is reserved, because most patients are debilitated and ventilator dependent, with severe neurological and cardiovascular diseases. The therapeutic options are elected based on respiratory, neurological and nutritional status. The aim of conservative treatment is to stop the contamination (drainage gastrostomy, feeding jejunostomy) and to treat the pulmonary infection and biological deficits. Endoscopic therapies can be tried in cases with surgical contraindication. Operation is addressed to selected cases and consists in the dissolution of the fistula, esophageal suture with or without segmental tracheal resection associated. Esophageal diversion is rarely required. The correct indication and timing of surgery, proper surgical technique and postoperative care are prerequisites for adequate results. PMID:25713612

  1. Use of modified silicone tracheal cannula for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Strauss, M

    1990-02-01

    Experience with the original Montgomery silicone tracheal cannulas in 47 patients with obstructive sleep apnea has been reported. Further experience with 10 obstructive sleep apnea patients who used modified silicone tracheal cannulas that permit periodic self-removal, cleaning, and reinsertion was analyzed. Two patients used the tube briefly and without complications. The remaining eight patients used the modified cannula for 18 to 24 months. The average number of office visits following insertion was three. Compared to the original cannulas, there were markedly fewer difficulties with granulations, infection, and tube malposition with the modified cannulas. The improvements make this modified device a useful tool worth further study in obstructive sleep apnea patients requiring tracheostomy. PMID:2299956

  2. Antimycoplasmal activity of dimethylphenols in a tracheal explant culture system.

    PubMed Central

    Agee, C C; Engelhardt, J A; Gabridge, M G

    1980-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae induces pneumonia-like symptoms in hamsters and causes ciliostasis and cytonecrosis in hamster tracheal explants. 2,4-Dimethylphenol and, to a lesser extent, its 2,3-, 2,5-, and 2,6-dimethylphenol isomers protected tracheal explants from these changes after exposure to virulent M. pneumoniae strain PI 1428. The effect was concentration, time, and isomer dependent. At concentrations of 10(-9) M or greater, 2,4-dimethylphenol completely prevented the morphological (loss of ciliated cells) and biochemical (decreased dehydrogenase activity) changes normally observed after exposure to M. pneumoniae. Apparently, 2,4-dimethylphenol interfered with an early event in the infection process. Complete protection required that it be present during the first 2 h of exposure of the explants to the infecting mycoplasmas. These xylenols may prove to be useful tools for helping to define the mechanisms of pathogenesis in certain respiratory infections. PMID:6778378

  3. Tracheal Involvement in Crohn Disease: the First Case in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seunghyun; Park, Jongha; Kim, Hyun-Kuk; Kim, Ji Yeon; Hur, So Chong; Lee, Ju Hyung; Jung, Jae Won; Lee, Juwon

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory involvement in Crohn disease (CD) is rare condition with only about a dozen reported cases. We report the first case of CD with tracheal involvement in Korea. An 18-year-old woman with CD was hospitalized because of coughing, dyspnea, and fever sustained for 3 weeks. Because she had stridor in her neck, we performed computed tomography of the neck, which showed circumferential wall thickening of the larynx and hypopharynx. Bronchoscopy revealed mucosal irregularity, ulceration, and exudates debris in the proximal trachea, and bronchial biopsy revealed chronic inflammation with granulation tissue. Based on these findings, we suspected CD with tracheal involvement and began administering intravenous methylprednisolone at 1 mg/kg per day, after which her symptoms and bronchoscopic findings improved. PMID:26879553

  4. [Giant mediastinal thyroid follicular carcinoma with tracheal stenosis].

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Hironori; Ohta, S; Hirose, M; Kitano, M; Kato, T; Yokoyama, J; Muro, H; Morita, T; Takagi, A

    2008-05-01

    A 76-year-old female was admitted to the hospital with dyspnea and hypertention. She had the giant thyroid tumor which had been awared but not treated for 40 years. On a computed tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the tumor was 14 x 10 cm and the tracheal stenosis was completely intrathoracic, which was 5 x 7 mm. Tracheal incubation was performed safety by using percutaneous cardiopulmonary support. A subtotal thyroidectomy was performed by midsternotomy with cervical incision. The weight of the resected specimen was 340 g and the pathological diagnosis was follicular thyroid carcinoma. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient suffered no hoarseness and dyspnea. PMID:18464485

  5. TRPC channels in smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Cobos, Jose C; Trebak, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) proteins constitute a family of seven (TRPC1-7) nonselective cation channels within the wider TRP superfamily. TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5 and TRPC6 channels are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells from human vessels of all calibers and in smooth muscle from organs such as the uterus and the gastrointestinal tract. TRPC channels have recently emerged as important players in the control of smooth muscle function. This review will focus on the retrospective analysis of studies proposing contributions of TRPC channels to native calcium entry pathways in smooth muscle and to physiological and pathophysiological responses with emphasis on the vascular system. PMID:20515740

  6. Tracheal stent prediction using statistical deformable models of tubular shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinho, R.; Huysmans, T.; Vos, W.; Sijbers, J.

    2008-03-01

    Tracheal stenosis is a narrowing of the trachea that impedes normal breathing. Tracheotomy is one solution, but subjects patients to intubation. An alternative technique employs tracheal stents, which are tubular structures that push the walls of the stenotic areas to their original location. They are implanted with endoscopes, therefore reducing the surgical risk to the patient. Stents can also be used in tracheal reconstruction to aid the recovery of reconstructed areas. Correct preoperative stent length and diameter specification is crucial to successful treatment, otherwise stents might not cover the stenotic area nor push the walls as required. The level of stenosis is usually measured from inside the trachea, either with endoscopes or with image processing techniques that, eg compute the distance from the centre line to the walls of the trachea. These methods are not suited for the prediction of stent sizes because they can not trivially estimate the healthy calibre of the trachea at the stenotic region. We propose an automatic method that enables the estimation of stent dimensions with statistical shape models of the trachea. An average trachea obtained from a training set of CT scans of healthy tracheas is placed in a CT image of a diseased person. The shape deforms according to the statistical model to match the walls of the trachea, except at stenotic areas. Since the deformed shape gives an estimation of the healthy trachea, it is possible to predict the size and diameter of the stent to be implanted in that specific subject.

  7. A new endoscopic hand drill for management of tracheal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Batzella, Sandro; Lucantoni, Gabriele; Fiorelli, Alfonso; Iacono, Raffaele Dello; Battistoni, Paolo; Caterino, Umberto; Santini, Mario; Galluccio, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    Tracheal resection and primary anastomosis is the treatment of choice for the management of benign tracheal stenoses. Rigid endoscopy with laser-assisted mechanical dilatation is an alternative to surgery and helps to improve symptoms and quality of life in patients unfit for surgery. Here, we describe the treatment of a simple web-like stenosis, using a new endoscopic hand drill that was assembled by sharpening the blunt tip of a standard endoscopic cotton applicator. The bronchoscopy was positioned proximally to the stenotic lesion and radial holes were made at 12, 3 and 9 o'clock. The tip of instrument touched the target area of the stenotic scar. The proximal end was handily rotated and the force, applied on the instrument's tip, and the hole was drilled. Next, endoscopic scissors was placed in the drill holes and the stenotic scar was cut. Mechanical dilatation with rigid bronchoscopes of increasing diameters completed the procedure. This procedure was successfully applied in 5 patients with simple benign tracheal stenosis and unfit for surgery. No intraoperative and/or postoperative complications occurred. No recurrence of stenosis was detected after a mean follow-up of 26 ± 2 months. PMID:27006182

  8. Cigarette smoke inhibition of ion transport in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, M.J.

    1983-06-01

    To determine the effect of cigarette smoke on airway epithelial ion transport, the electrical properties and transepithelial Na and Cl fluxes were measured in canine tracheal epithelium. In vivo, the inhalation of the smoke from one cigarette acutely and reversibly decreased the electrical potential difference across the tracheal epithelium. In vitro, exposure of the mucosal surface of the epithelium to cigarette smoke decreased the short circuit current and transepithelial resistance. The decrease in short circuit current was due to an inhibition of the rate of Cl secretion with minimal effect on the rate of Na absorption. The effect of cigarette smoke was reversible, was not observed upon exposure of the submucosal surface to smoke, and was most pronounced when secretion was stimulated. The particulate phase of smoke was largely responsible for the inhibitory effect, since filtering the smoke minimized the effect. The effect of cigarette smoke was not prevented by addition of antioxidants to the bathing solutions, suggesting that the inhibition of Cl secretion cannot be entirely attributed to an oxidant mechanism. These results indicate that cigarette smoke acutely inhibits active ion transport by tracheal epithelium, both in vivo and in vitro. This effect may explain, in part, both the abnormal mucociliary clearance and the airway disease observed in cigarette smokers.

  9. Intravenous lidocaine as a suppressant of coughing during tracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Yukioka, H; Yoshimoto, N; Nishimura, K; Fujimori, M

    1985-12-01

    Effects of intravenously administered lidocaine on cough suppression during tracheal intubation under general anesthesia were evaluated in two studies. In study 1, 100 patients received either a placebo or 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, or 2.0 mg/kg lidocaine intravenously 1 min before tracheal intubation. All visible coughs were classified as coughing. The incidence of coughing decreased as the dose of lidocaine increased. A dose of 1 mg/kg or more of intravenous lidocaine suppressed the cough reflex significantly (P less than 0.01). Coughing was suppressed completely by 2 mg/kg of intravenous lidocaine. In study 2, 108 patients received 2 mg/kg lidocaine intravenously or a placebo 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, or 15 min before intubation. The same criteria for determining whether a patient did or did not cough during tracheal intubation were used as in study 1. The incidence of coughing decreased significantly (P less than 0.01) when 2 mg/kg of lidocaine was injected intravenously between 1 and 5 min before our attempting intubation. Cough reflex was suppressed completely by plasma concentrations of lidocaine in excess of 3 micrograms/ml. PMID:4061901

  10. A new tracheal prosthesis made from collagen grafted mesh.

    PubMed

    Okumura, N; Nakamura, T; Takimoto, Y; Natsume, T; Teramachi, M; Tomihata, K; Ikada, Y; Shimizu, Y

    1993-01-01

    The authors studied the efficacy of a new tracheal prosthesis made from mesh. The prosthesis, 50 mm long and 18-22 mm in diameter, is made from a Marlex mesh cylinder reinforced with a continuous polypropylene spiral that is grafted and coated with porcine collagen to increase its biocompatibility and provide an airtight seal during the initial implantation stage. Circumferential surgical resection and replacement of a seven to nine ring segment of the cervical trachea was performed in 20 adult mongrel dogs. At the time of surgery, a silicone tube was inserted into the tracheal prosthetic lumen to promote secretory transportation until the prosthesis was covered with host tissue. The silicone tube was removed during fiber bronchoscopy 1 month after surgery. With the exception of the prostheses in 3 dogs that died of unrelated causes, all were infiltrated by connective tissue and incorporated completely by the host. One of these 17 dogs died of suffocation caused by luminal stenosis 2.5 months after surgery, but the others survived until they were killed at more than 6 months. The luminal surfaces of