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Sample records for human transcripts generates

  1. A Progenitor Cell Expressing Transcription Factor RORγt Generates All Human Innate Lymphoid Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Scoville, Steven D; Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L; Zhang, Michael H; Chen, Li; Zhang, Xiaoli; Keller, Karen A; Hughes, Tiffany; Chen, Luxi; Cheng, Stephanie; Bergin, Stephen M; Mao, Hsiaoyin C; McClory, Susan; Yu, Jianhua; Carson, William E; Caligiuri, Michael A; Freud, Aharon G

    2016-05-17

    The current model of murine innate lymphoid cell (ILC) development holds that mouse ILCs are derived downstream of the common lymphoid progenitor through lineage-restricted progenitors. However, corresponding lineage-restricted progenitors in humans have yet to be discovered. Here we identified a progenitor population in human secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs) that expressed the transcription factor RORγt and was unique in its ability to generate all known ILC subsets, including natural killer (NK) cells, but not other leukocyte populations. In contrast to murine fate-mapping data, which indicate that only ILC3s express Rorγt, these human progenitor cells as well as human peripheral blood NK cells and all mature ILC populations expressed RORγt. Thus, all human ILCs can be generated through an RORγt(+) developmental pathway from a common progenitor in SLTs. These findings help establish the developmental signals and pathways involved in human ILC development. PMID:27178467

  2. Utility of next-generation RNA-sequencing in identifying chimeric transcription involving human endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Martin; Jessen, Karen Margrethe; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that human endogenous retroviruses and endogenous retrovirus-like repeats (here collectively HERVs) impose direct regulation on human genes through enhancer and promoter motifs present in their long terminal repeats (LTRs). Although chimeric transcription in which novel gene isoforms containing retroviral and human sequence are transcribed from viral promoters are commonly associated with disease, regulation by HERVs is beneficial in other settings; for example, in human testis chimeric isoforms of TP63 induced by an ERV9 LTR protect the male germ line upon DNA damage by inducing apoptosis, whereas in the human globin locus the γ- and β-globin switch during normal hematopoiesis is mediated by complex interactions of an ERV9 LTR and surrounding human sequence. The advent of deep sequencing or next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized the way researchers solve important scientific questions and develop novel hypotheses in relation to human genome regulation. We recently applied next-generation paired-end RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) together with chromatin immunoprecipitation with sequencing (ChIP-seq) to examine ERV9 chimeric transcription in human reference cell lines from Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE). This led to the discovery of advanced regulation mechanisms by ERV9s and other HERVs across numerous human loci including transcription of large gene-unannotated genomic regions, as well as cooperative regulation by multiple HERVs and non-LTR repeats such as Alu elements. In this article, well-established examples of human gene regulation by HERVs are reviewed followed by a description of paired-end RNA-seq, and its application in identifying chimeric transcription genome-widely. Based on integrative analyses of RNA-seq and ChIP-seq, data we then present novel examples of regulation by ERV9s of tumor suppressor genes CADM2 and SEMA3A, as well as transcription of an unannotated region. Taken together, this article highlights

  3. Transcriptional Reactivation of OTX2, RX1 and SIX3 during Reprogramming Contributes to the Generation of RPE Cells from Human iPSCs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Sun, Xiaofeng; Ma, Zhizhong; Liu, Yinan; Jin, Ying; Ge, Ruimin; Hao, Limin; Ma, Yanling; Han, Shuo; Sun, Haojie; Zhang, Mingzhi; Li, Ruizhi; Li, Tao; Shen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Directed differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) into retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) holds great promise in cell replacement therapy for patients suffering from degenerative eye diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In this study, we generated iPSCs from human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) by electroporation with episomal plasmid vectors encoding OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, L-MYC together with p53 suppression. Intriguingly, cell reprogramming resulted in a metastable transcriptional activation and selective demethylation of neural and retinal specification-associated genes, such as OTX2, RX1 and SIX3. In contrast, RPE progenitor genes were transcriptionally silent in HDFs and descendant iPSCs. Overexpression of OCT4 and SOX2 directly stimulated the expression of OTX2, RX1 and SIX3 in HDFs and iPSCs. Luciferase and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays further identified an OCT4- and two SOX2-binding sites located in the proximal promoter of OTX2. Histone acetylation and methylation on the local promoter also participated in the reactivation of OTX2. The transcriptional conversion of RX1 and SIX3 genes partially attributed to DNA demethylation. Subsequently, iPSCs were induced into the RPE cells displaying the characteristics of polygonal shapes and pigments, and expressing typical RPE cell markers. Taken together, our results establish readily efficient and safe protocols to produce iPSCs and iPSC-derived RPE cells, and underline that the reactivation of anterior neural transcription factor OTX2, eye field transcription factor RX1 and SIX3 in iPSCs is a feature of pluripotency acquisition and predetermines the potential of RPE differentiation. PMID:27019633

  4. Transcriptional Reactivation of OTX2, RX1 and SIX3 during Reprogramming Contributes to the Generation of RPE Cells from Human iPSCs.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Sun, Xiaofeng; Ma, Zhizhong; Liu, Yinan; Jin, Ying; Ge, Ruimin; Hao, Limin; Ma, Yanling; Han, Shuo; Sun, Haojie; Zhang, Mingzhi; Li, Ruizhi; Li, Tao; Shen, Li

    2016-01-01

    Directed differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) into retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) holds great promise in cell replacement therapy for patients suffering from degenerative eye diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In this study, we generated iPSCs from human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) by electroporation with episomal plasmid vectors encoding OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, L-MYC together with p53 suppression. Intriguingly, cell reprogramming resulted in a metastable transcriptional activation and selective demethylation of neural and retinal specification-associated genes, such as OTX2, RX1 and SIX3. In contrast, RPE progenitor genes were transcriptionally silent in HDFs and descendant iPSCs. Overexpression of OCT4 and SOX2 directly stimulated the expression of OTX2, RX1 and SIX3 in HDFs and iPSCs. Luciferase and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays further identified an OCT4- and two SOX2-binding sites located in the proximal promoter of OTX2. Histone acetylation and methylation on the local promoter also participated in the reactivation of OTX2. The transcriptional conversion of RX1 and SIX3 genes partially attributed to DNA demethylation. Subsequently, iPSCs were induced into the RPE cells displaying the characteristics of polygonal shapes and pigments, and expressing typical RPE cell markers. Taken together, our results establish readily efficient and safe protocols to produce iPSCs and iPSC-derived RPE cells, and underline that the reactivation of anterior neural transcription factor OTX2, eye field transcription factor RX1 and SIX3 in iPSCs is a feature of pluripotency acquisition and predetermines the potential of RPE differentiation. PMID:27019633

  5. Identification of a non-coding KLF4 transcript generated from intron retention and downregulated in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junwei; Lai, Paul Bo-San; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing

    2015-10-01

    The Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) gene is related to various biological processes including stem cell reprogramming and tumorigenesis. In this study, we identified and characterized a non-coding transcript of KLF4, which was designated KLF4‑003, in human liver tissue samples. KLF4‑003 was identified in a number of cell lines by reverse transcription PCR and DNA sequencing. Its expression levels were determined in 54 pairs of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues and a number of HCC cell lines by real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Methylation status of KLF4‑003 CpG islands was determined by bisulfite sequencing. The regulatory effect of KLF4‑003 CpG islands hypermethylation in Hep3B cells was then validated by the 5-aza-dC demethylation treatment, followed by RT-PCR analysis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was created to evaluate the diagnostic value for differentiating between HCC cancer and benign diseases. The association study between KLF4‑003 expression level and clinical traits of HCC patients was performed with SPSS. We found that KLF4‑003 was downregulated in 46 out of 54 HCC samples compared with their adjunct normal tissues. The reduced KLF4‑003 expression was significantly associated with HCC recurrence (P=0.045) in the follow-up of 31 HCC patients. Significant differences were detected between the methylation status of HCC specimens and their adjacent normal controls. Demethylation treatment significantly rescued the expression of KLF4‑003 in Hep3B cells. Such observation indicated that the CpG island hypermethylation was at least partially responsible for the downregulation of KLF4‑003 in HCC. The area under ROC curve for the prediction of HCC reached 0.803 (95% CI=0.719-0.886, P<0.001). Our results suggested that the expression of KLF4‑003 was epigenetically regulated by methylation status of a KLF4‑003 CpG island in HCC. The differential expression of KLF4‑003 might play an important role in HCC development and might

  6. Transcriptional gene silencing in humans.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Marc S; Morris, Kevin V

    2016-08-19

    It has been over a decade since the first observation that small non-coding RNAs can functionally modulate epigenetic states in human cells to achieve functional transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). TGS is mechanistically distinct from the RNA interference (RNAi) gene-silencing pathway. TGS can result in long-term stable epigenetic modifications to gene expression that can be passed on to daughter cells during cell division, whereas RNAi does not. Early studies of TGS have been largely overlooked, overshadowed by subsequent discoveries of small RNA-directed post-TGS and RNAi. A reappraisal of early work has been brought about by recent findings in human cells where endogenous long non-coding RNAs function to regulate the epigenome. There are distinct and common overlaps between the proteins involved in small and long non-coding RNA transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, suggesting that the early studies using small non-coding RNAs to modulate transcription were making use of a previously unrecognized endogenous mechanism of RNA-directed gene regulation. Here we review how non-coding RNA plays a role in regulation of transcription and epigenetic gene silencing in human cells by revisiting these earlier studies and the mechanistic insights gained to date. We also provide a list of mammalian genes that have been shown to be transcriptionally regulated by non-coding RNAs. Lastly, we explore how TGS may serve as the basis for development of future therapeutic agents. PMID:27060137

  7. Generation of long read-through transcripts in vivo and in vitro by deletion of 3' termination and processing sequences in the human tRNAimet gene.

    PubMed Central

    Adeniyi-Jones, S; Romeo, P H; Zasloff, M

    1984-01-01

    The effects of 3' deletions of the coding and flanking regions of the human tRNAimet gene on its transcription and subsequent processing have been studied both in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that in the absence of the oligo T stop signal, polymerase III will read-through efficiently to the next available downstream stop signal. In mutations preserving the 3' terminal sequence of the coding region these read-through transcripts are efficiently processed, irrespective of their length and sequence by an endonucleolytic cleavage to yield both a mature tRNA and an intact trailer RNA. However, deletions involving the terminal regions up to +62 in the coding sequence produce an unprocessed co-transcript of tRNA and downstream sequences. Deletions further within the B promoter box abolish transcription. The use of these mutants as possible "portable" promoters is discussed. Images PMID:6320115

  8. Tunable protein synthesis by transcript isoforms in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genes generate multiple RNA transcript isoforms though alternative transcription, splicing, and polyadenylation. However, the relationship between human transcript diversity and protein production is complex as each isoform can be translated differently. We fractionated a polysome profile and reconstructed transcript isoforms from each fraction, which we term Transcript Isoforms in Polysomes sequencing (TrIP-seq). Analysis of these data revealed regulatory features that control ribosome occupancy and translational output of each transcript isoform. We extracted a panel of 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions that control protein production from an unrelated gene in cells over a 100-fold range. Select 5′ untranslated regions exert robust translational control between cell lines, while 3′ untranslated regions can confer cell type-specific expression. These results expose the large dynamic range of transcript-isoform-specific translational control, identify isoform-specific sequences that control protein output in human cells, and demonstrate that transcript isoform diversity must be considered when relating RNA and protein levels. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10921.001 PMID:26735365

  9. Contributions of in vitro transcription to the understanding of human RNA polymerase III transcription

    PubMed Central

    Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Durrieu-Gaillard, Stéphanie; El Ayoubi, Leyla; Parrot, Camila; Teichmann, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Human RNA polymerase III transcribes small untranslated RNAs that contribute to the regulation of essential cellular processes, including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Analysis of this transcription system by in vitro transcription techniques has largely contributed to the discovery of its transcription factors and to the understanding of the regulation of human RNA polymerase III transcription. Here we review some of the key steps that led to the identification of transcription factors and to the definition of minimal promoter sequences for human RNA polymerase III transcription. PMID:25764111

  10. Transcriptional correlates of human substance use

    PubMed Central

    Lehrmann, Elin; Freed, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Drugs-of-abuse produce both acute and chronic changes in brain function, each of which is reflected in altered gene expression patterns. A number of large-scale gene expression studies have employed microarray analysis of human postmortem brain to identify transcriptional correlates of ante-mortem substance use. These studies have identified changes in transcripts encoding proteins functionally involved in neuronal function and synaptic plasticity, oligodendrocyte function and myelination, lipid and energy metabolism, mitochondrial function, oxidative phoshorylation, and cytoskeleton-related signal transduction. Overall, different types of substance use appear to share some of these effects, but there are more differences than similarities in gene expression for different types of substance use. Moreover, data suggest that transcriptional subtypes within a diagnostic classification of substance use may occur. These transcriptional subtypes, or “endophenotypes”, may reflect complex patterns of substance use and comorbid neuropsychiatric disorders or other disease, which may interact with substance use to differentially impact gene expression. A broader understanding of the manner in which substance abuse causes long-term changes in brain function may be obtained from studies replicating and expanding the present gene expression data. In particular, cross-referencing comprehensive transcriptional data on regional and/or substance use-specific changes with genetic and proteomic data may further aid in identifying candidate biomarkers of altered brain function in substance use disorders. PMID:18991846

  11. Transcriptional analysis of human survivin gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Li, F; Altieri, D C

    1999-01-01

    The preservation of tissue and organ homoeostasis depends on the regulated expression of genes controlling apoptosis (programmed cell death). In this study, we have investigated the basal transcriptional requirements of the survivin gene, an IAP (inhibitor of apoptosis) prominently up-regulated in cancer. Analysis of the 5' flanking region of the human survivin gene revealed the presence of a TATA-less promoter containing a canonical CpG island of approximately 250 nt, three cell cycle dependent elements, one cell cycle homology region and numerous Sp1 sites. PCR-based analysis of human genomic DNA, digested with methylation-sensitive and -insensitive restriction enzymes, indicated that the CpG island was unmethylated in both normal and neoplastic tissues. Primer extension and S1 nuclease mapping of the human survivin gene identified two main transcription start sites at position -72 and within -57/-61 from the initiating ATG. Transfection of cervical carcinoma HeLa cells with truncated or nested survivin promoter-luciferase constructs revealed the presence of both enhancer and repressor sequences and identified a minimal promoter region within the proximal -230 nt of the human survivin gene. Unbiased mutagenesis analysis of the human survivin promoter revealed that targeting the Sp1 sequences at position -171 and -151 abolished basal transcriptional activity by approximately 63-82%. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assay with DNA oligonucleotides confirmed formation of a DNA-protein complex between the survivin Sp1 sequences and HeLa cell extracts in a reaction abolished by mutagenesis of the survivin Sp1 sites. These findings identify the basal transcriptional requirements of survivin gene expression. PMID:10567210

  12. Transcriptional Landscape of the Prenatal Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jeremy A.; Ding, Song-Lin; Sunkin, Susan M.; Smith, Kimberly A; Ng, Lydia; Szafer, Aaron; Ebbert, Amanda; Riley, Zackery L.; Aiona, Kaylynn; Arnold, James M.; Bennet, Crissa; Bertagnolli, Darren; Brouner, Krissy; Butler, Stephanie; Caldejon, Shiella; Carey, Anita; Cuhaciyan, Christine; Dalley, Rachel A.; Dee, Nick; Dolbeare, Tim A.; Facer, Benjamin A. C.; Feng, David; Fliss, Tim P.; Gee, Garrett; Goldy, Jeff; Gourley, Lindsey; Gregor, Benjamin W.; Gu, Guangyu; Howard, Robert E.; Jochim, Jayson M.; Kuan, Chihchau L.; Lau, Christopher; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Lee, Felix; Lemon, Tracy A.; Lesnar, Phil; McMurray, Bergen; Mastan, Naveed; Mosqueda, Nerick F.; Naluai-Cecchini, Theresa; Ngo, Nhan-Kiet; Nyhus, Julie; Oldre, Aaron; Olson, Eric; Parente, Jody; Parker, Patrick D.; Parry, Sheana E.; Player, Allison Stevens; Pletikos, Mihovil; Reding, Melissa; Royall, Joshua J.; Roll, Kate; Sandman, David; Sarreal, Melaine; Shapouri, Sheila; Shapovalova, Nadiya V.; Shen, Elaine H.; Sjoquist, Nathan; Slaughterbeck, Clifford R.; Smith, Michael; Sodt, Andy J.; Williams, Derric; Zöllei, Lilla; Fischl, Bruce; Gerstein, Mark B.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Glass, Ian A.; Hawrylycz, Michael J.; Hevner, Robert F.; Huang, Hao; Jones, Allan R.; Knowles, James A.; Levitt, Pat; Phillips, John W.; Sestan, Nenad; Wohnoutka, Paul; Dang, Chinh; Bernard, Amy; Hohmann, John G.; Lein, Ed S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The anatomical and functional architecture of the human brain is largely determined by prenatal transcriptional processes. We describe an anatomically comprehensive atlas of mid-gestational human brain, including de novo reference atlases, in situ hybridization, ultra-high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and microarray analysis on highly discrete laser microdissected brain regions. In developing cerebral cortex, transcriptional differences are found between different proliferative and postmitotic layers, wherein laminar signatures reflect cellular composition and developmental processes. Cytoarchitectural differences between human and mouse have molecular correlates, including species differences in gene expression in subplate, although surprisingly we find minimal differences between the inner and human-expanded outer subventricular zones. Both germinal and postmitotic cortical layers exhibit fronto-temporal gradients, with particular enrichment in frontal lobe. Finally, many neurodevelopmental disorder and human evolution-related genes show patterned expression, potentially underlying unique features of human cortical formation. These data provide a rich, freely-accessible resource for understanding human brain development. PMID:24695229

  13. Glucocorticoid regulation of human BMP-6 transcription.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunshan; Titus, Louisa; Barghouthi, Mejd; Viggeswarapu, Manjula; Hair, Gregory; Boden, Scott D

    2004-09-01

    Addition of dexamethasone (Dex) to human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) resulted in a 16-fold increase in human bone morphogenetic protein-6 (hBMP-6) mRNA levels 24 h after treatment. Evaluation of luciferase expression after transfection of HeLa cells with hBMP-6 promoter/luciferase reporter constructs indicated that the hBMP-6 promoter activity was contained in a 268-bp region (-1051 to -784 where +1 is the translation start site) over 600 bases 5' to that previously published. It further showed that the promoter activity is regulated by glucocorticoid treatment. Analysis of RNA from hMSCs and HeLa cells by primer extension, RNase protection, and 5' RACE further narrowed the location of the transcription start site to an 84-bp region (-940 to -857). To determine whether this start site was regulated in hMSCs, hBMP-6 mRNA levels in control and Dex-treated cells were quantitated by RT-PCR using one primer set in the translated region of the gene and one located just 3' of the 84-bp region. Both primer sets showed hBMP-6 mRNA levels approximately 16- to 22-fold higher in the Dex-treated cells, demonstrating that hBMP-6 transcription is being regulated by glucocorticoids in the pluripotent hMSCs at the upstream transcription start site. PMID:15336603

  14. Transcriptional regulation of the human biglycan gene.

    PubMed

    Ungefroren, H; Krull, N B

    1996-06-28

    The small leucine-rich proteoglycan biglycan is involved in several physiological and pathophysiological processes through the ability of its core protein to interact with other extracellular matrix molecules and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). To learn more about the regulation of biglycan core protein expression, we have cloned and sequenced 1218 base pairs from the 5'-flanking region of the human biglycan gene, demonstrated functional promoter activity, and investigated the molecular mechanisms through which various agents modulate its transcriptional activity. Sequencing revealed the presence of several cis-acting elements including multiple AP-2 sites and interleukin-6 response elements, a NF-kappaB site, a TGF-beta negative element, and an E-box. The TATA and CAAT box-lacking promoter possesses many features of a growth-related gene, e.g. a GC-rich immediate 5' region, many Sp1 sites, and the use of multiple transcriptional start sites. Transient transfections of the tumor cell lines MG-63, SK-UT-1, and T47D with various biglycan 5'-flanking region-luciferase reporter gene constructs showed that the proximal 78 base pairs are sufficient for full promoter activity. Several agents among them interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. were capable of altering biglycan promoter activity. However, in MG-63 cells, TGF-beta1 failed to increase either activity of the biglycan promoter constructs or specific transcription from the endogenous biglycan gene. Since TGF-beta1 also did not alter the stability of cytoplasmic biglycan mRNA as determined from Northern analysis after inhibition of transcription with 5,6-dichloro-1beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, an as yet unidentified nuclear post-transcriptional mechanism was considered responsible for the TGF-beta effect in this cell type. These results might help to elucidate the molecular pathways leading to pathological alterations of biglycan expression observed in atherosclerosis, glomerulonephritis

  15. The transcriptional activity of human Chromosome 22

    PubMed Central

    Rinn, John L.; Euskirchen, Ghia; Bertone, Paul; Martone, Rebecca; Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Hartman, Stephen; Harrison, Paul M.; Nelson, F. Kenneth; Miller, Perry; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman; Snyder, Michael

    2003-01-01

    A DNA microarray representing nearly all of the unique sequences of human Chromosome 22 was constructed and used to measure global-transcriptional activity in placental poly(A)+ RNA. We found that many of the known, related and predicted genes are expressed. More importantly, our study reveals twice as many transcribed bases as have been reported previously. Many of the newly discovered expressed fragments were verified by RNA blot analysis and a novel technique called differential hybridization mapping (DHM). Interestingly, a significant fraction of these novel fragments are expressed antisense to previously annotated introns. The coding potential of these novel expressed regions is supported by their sequence conservation in the mouse genome. This study has greatly increased our understanding of the biological information encoded on a human chromosome. To facilitate the dissemination of these results to the scientific community, we have developed a comprehensive Web resource to present the findings of this study and other features of human Chromosome 22 at http://array.mbb.yale.edu/chr22. PMID:12600945

  16. THE TRANSCRIPTIONAL SIGNATURES OF CELLS FROM THE HUMAN PEYRONIE'S DISEASE PLAQUE AND THE ABILITY OF THESE CELLS TO GENERATE A PLAQUE IN A RAT MODEL SUGGEST POTENTIAL THERAPEUTIC TARGETS

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, R; Vernet, D; Kovanecz, I; Rajfer, J; Gonzalez-Cadavid, NF

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The success of medical therapies for Peyronie's disease (PD) has not been optimal, possibly because many of them went directly to clinical application without sufficient preclinical scientific research. Previous studies revealed cellular and molecular pathways involved in the formation of the PD plaque, and in particular the role of the myofibroblast. Aims The current work aimed to determine under normal and fibrotic conditions what differentiates PD cells from tunica albuginea (TA) and corpora cavernosa (CC) cells, by defining their global transcriptional signatures and testing in vivo whether PD cells can generate a PD like plaque Main Outcomes Measures Fibroproliferative features of PD cells and identification of related key genes as novel targets to reduce plaque size Methods Human TA, PD, and CC cells were grown with TGFβ1 (TA+, PD+, CC+) or without it (TA−, PD−, CC−) and assayed by: a) immunofluorescence, western blot and RT/PCR for myofibroblast, smooth muscle cell and stem cell markers; b) collagen content; and c) DNA microarray analysis. The ability of PD+ cells to induce a PD like plaque in an immuno-suppressed rat model was assessed by Masson trichrome and Picrosirius Red. Results Upon TGFβ1stimulation, collagen levels were increased by myofibroblasts in the PD+ but not in the CC+ cells. The transcriptional signature of the PD− cells identified fibroproliferative, myogenic (myofibroblasts), inflammatory, and collagen turnover genes, that differentiate them from TA− or CC− cells, and respond to TGFβ1 with a PD+ fibrotic phenotype, by upregulation of IGF1, ACTG2, MYF5, ACTC1, PSTN, COL III, MMP3, and others. The PD+ cells injected into the TA of the rat induce a PD like plaque. Conclusions This suggests a novel combination therapy to eliminate a PD plaque, by targeting the identified genes to: a) improve collagenase action by stimulating endogenous MMPs specific to key collagen types, and b) counteract fibromatosis by inhibiting

  17. Transcription regulates telomere dynamics in human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Rajika; Brun, Catherine M.; Azzalin, Claus M.

    2012-01-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein structures capping the physical ends of linear eukaryotic chromosomes. Although largely heterochromatic, telomeres are transcribed into telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) molecules by RNA polymerase II. The functions associated with telomere transcription and TERRA remain ill defined. Here we show that the transcriptional activity of human telomeres directly regulates their movement during interphase. We find that chemical inhibition of global transcription dampens telomere motion, while global stimulation promotes it. Likewise, when DNA methyltransferase enzymes are deleted to augment telomere transcription, we observe increased telomere movement. Finally, using a cell line engineered with a unique transcriptionally inducible telomere, we show that transcription of one specific telomere stimulates only its own dynamics without overtly affecting its stability or its length. We reveal a new and unforeseen function for telomere transcription as a regulator of telomere motion, and speculate on the intriguing possibility that transcription-dependent telomere motion sustains the maintenance of functional and dysfunctional telomeres. PMID:22357912

  18. Technical Advance: Transcription factor, promoter, and enhancer utilization in human myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Anagha; Pooley, Christopher; Freeman, Tom C.; Lennartsson, Andreas; Babina, Magda; Schmidl, Christian; Geijtenbeek, Teunis; Michoel, Tom; Severin, Jessica; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Kawaji, Hideya; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Rehli, Michael; Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The generation of myeloid cells from their progenitors is regulated at the level of transcription by combinatorial control of key transcription factors influencing cell-fate choice. To unravel the global dynamics of this process at the transcript level, we generated transcription profiles for 91 human cell types of myeloid origin by use of CAGE profiling. The CAGE sequencing of these samples has allowed us to investigate diverse aspects of transcription control during myelopoiesis, such as identification of novel transcription factors, miRNAs, and noncoding RNAs specific to the myeloid lineage. We further reconstructed a transcription regulatory network by clustering coexpressed transcripts and associating them with enriched cis-regulatory motifs. With the use of the bidirectional expression as a proxy for enhancers, we predicted over 2000 novel enhancers, including an enhancer 38 kb downstream of IRF8 and an intronic enhancer in the KIT gene locus. Finally, we highlighted relevance of these data to dissect transcription dynamics during progressive maturation of granulocyte precursors. A multifaceted analysis of the myeloid transcriptome is made available (www.myeloidome.roslin.ed.ac.uk). This high-quality dataset provides a powerful resource to study transcriptional regulation during myelopoiesis and to infer the likely functions of unannotated genes in human innate immunity. PMID:25717144

  19. Landscape of transcription in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Djebali, Sarah; Davis, Carrie A.; Merkel, Angelika; Dobin, Alex; Lassmann, Timo; Mortazavi, Ali M.; Tanzer, Andrea; Lagarde, Julien; Lin, Wei; Schlesinger, Felix; Xue, Chenghai; Marinov, Georgi K.; Khatun, Jainab; Williams, Brian A.; Zaleski, Chris; Rozowsky, Joel; Röder, Maik; Kokocinski, Felix; Abdelhamid, Rehab F.; Alioto, Tyler; Antoshechkin, Igor; Baer, Michael T.; Bar, Nadav S.; Batut, Philippe; Bell, Kimberly; Bell, Ian; Chakrabortty, Sudipto; Chen, Xian; Chrast, Jacqueline; Curado, Joao; Derrien, Thomas; Drenkow, Jorg; Dumais, Erica; Dumais, Jacqueline; Duttagupta, Radha; Falconnet, Emilie; Fastuca, Meagan; Fejes-Toth, Kata; Ferreira, Pedro; Foissac, Sylvain; Fullwood, Melissa J.; Gao, Hui; Gonzalez, David; Gordon, Assaf; Gunawardena, Harsha; Howald, Cedric; Jha, Sonali; Johnson, Rory; Kapranov, Philipp; King, Brandon; Kingswood, Colin; Luo, Oscar J.; Park, Eddie; Persaud, Kimberly; Preall, Jonathan B.; Ribeca, Paolo; Risk, Brian; Robyr, Daniel; Sammeth, Michael; Schaffer, Lorian; See, Lei-Hoon; Shahab, Atif; Skancke, Jorgen; Suzuki, Ana Maria; Takahashi, Hazuki; Tilgner, Hagen; Trout, Diane; Walters, Nathalie; Wang, Huaien; Wrobel, John; Yu, Yanbao; Ruan, Xiaoan; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Harrow, Jennifer; Gerstein, Mark; Hubbard, Tim; Reymond, Alexandre; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Hannon, Gregory; Giddings, Morgan C.; Ruan, Yijun; Wold, Barbara; Carninci, Piero; Guigó, Roderic; Gingeras, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Eukaryotic cells make many types of primary and processed RNAs that are found either in specific sub-cellular compartments or throughout the cells. A complete catalogue of these RNAs is not yet available and their characteristic sub-cellular localizations are also poorly understood. Since RNA represents the direct output of the genetic information encoded by genomes and a significant proportion of a cell’s regulatory capabilities are focused on its synthesis, processing, transport, modifications and translation, the generation of such a catalogue is crucial for understanding genome function. Here we report evidence that three quarters of the human genome is capable of being transcribed, as well as observations about the range and levels of expression, localization, processing fates, regulatory regions and modifications of almost all currently annotated and thousands of previously unannotated RNAs. These observations taken together prompt to a redefinition of the concept of a gene. PMID:22955620

  20. The mesenchymal transcription factor SNAI-1 instructs human liver specification.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Orit; Valdes, Victor Julian; Ezhkova, Elena; Gouon-Evans, Valerie

    2016-07-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) are processes required for embryo organogenesis. Liver develops from the epithelial foregut endoderm from which the liver progenitors, hepatoblasts, are specified. The migrating hepatoblasts acquire a mesenchymal phenotype to form the liver bud. In mid-gestation, hepatoblasts mature into epithelial structures: the hepatocyte cords and biliary ducts. While EMT has been associated with liver bud formation, nothing is known about its contribution to hepatic specification. We previously established an efficient protocol from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) to generate hepatic cells (Hep cells) resembling the hepatoblasts expressing alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and albumin (ALB). Here we show that Hep cells express both epithelial (EpCAM and E-cadherin) and mesenchymal (vimentin and SNAI-1) markers. Similar epithelial and mesenchymal hepatoblasts were identified in human and mouse fetal livers, suggesting a conserved interspecies phenotype. Knock-down experiments demonstrated the importance of SNAI-1 in Hep cell hepatic specification. Moreover, ChIP assays revealed direct binding of SNAI-1 in the promoters of AFP and ALB genes consistent with its transcriptional activator function in hepatic specification. Altogether, our hESC-derived Hep cell cultures reveal the dual mesenchymal and epithelial phenotype of hepatoblast-like cells and support the unexpected transcriptional activator role of SNAI-1 in hepatic specification. PMID:27240252

  1. The generation of promoter-mediated transcriptional noise in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mitarai, Namiko; Dodd, Ian B; Crooks, Michael T; Sneppen, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Noise in the expression of a gene produces fluctuations in the concentration of the gene product. These fluctuations can interfere with optimal function or can be exploited to generate beneficial diversity between cells; gene expression noise is therefore expected to be subject to evolutionary pressure. Shifts between modes of high and low rates of transcription initiation at a promoter appear to contribute to this noise both in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. However, models invoked for eukaryotic promoter noise such as stable activation scaffolds or persistent nucleosome alterations seem unlikely to apply to prokaryotic promoters. We consider the relative importance of the steps required for transcription initiation. The 3-step transcription initiation model of McClure is extended into a mathematical model that can be used to predict consequences of additional promoter properties. We show in principle that the transcriptional bursting observed at an E. coli promoter by Golding et al. (2005) can be explained by stimulation of initiation by the negative supercoiling behind a transcribing RNA polymerase (RNAP) or by the formation of moribund or dead-end RNAP-promoter complexes. Both mechanisms are tunable by the alteration of promoter kinetics and therefore allow the optimization of promoter mediated noise. PMID:18617999

  2. A Transcript Finishing Initiative for Closing Gaps in the Human Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Sogayar, Mari Cleide; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2004-01-01

    We report the results of a transcript finishing initiative, undertaken for the purpose of identifying and characterizing novel human transcripts, in which RT-PCR was used to bridge gaps between paired EST clusters, mapped against the genomic sequence. Each pair of EST clusters selected for experimental validation was designated a transcript finishing unit (TFU). A total of 489 TFUs were selected for validation, and an overall efficiency of 43.1% was achieved. We generated a total of 59,975 bp of transcribed sequences organized into 432 exons, contributing to the definition of the structure of 211 human transcripts. The structure of several transcripts reported here was confirmed during the course of this project, through the generation of their corresponding full-length cDNA sequences. Nevertheless, for 21% of the validated TFUs, a full-length cDNA sequence is not yet available in public databases, and the structure of 69.2% of these TFUs was not correctly predicted by computer programs. The TF strategy provides a significant contribution to the definition of the complete catalog of human genes and transcripts, because it appears to be particularly useful for identification of low abundance transcripts expressed in a restricted set of tissues as well as for the delineation of gene boundaries and alternatively spliced isoforms. PMID:15197164

  3. Transcriptional comparison of human induced and primary midbrain dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ninuo; Zhang, Pengbo; Fang, Fang; Wang, Zhengyuan; Rothstein, Megan; Angulo, Benjamin; Chiang, Rosaria; Taylor, James; Reijo Pera, Renee A.

    2016-01-01

    Generation of induced dopaminergic (iDA) neurons may provide a significant step forward towards cell replacement therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD). To study and compare transcriptional programs of induced cells versus primary DA neurons is a preliminary step towards characterizing human iDA neurons. We have optimized a protocol to efficiently generate iDA neurons from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). We then sequenced the transcriptomes of iDA neurons derived from 6 different hPSC lines and compared them to that of primary midbrain (mDA) neurons. We identified a small subset of genes with altered expression in derived iDA neurons from patients with Parkinson’s Disease (PD). We also observed that iDA neurons differ significantly from primary mDA neurons in global gene expression, especially in genes related to neuron maturation level. Results suggest iDA neurons from patient iPSCs could be useful for basic and translational studies, including in vitro modeling of PD. However, further refinement of methods of induction and maturation of neurons may better recapitulate full development of mDA neurons from hPSCs. PMID:26842779

  4. The transcriptional terminator sequences downstream of the covR gene terminate covR/S operon transcription to generate covR monocistronic transcripts in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Chiang-Ni, Chuan; Tsou, Chih-Cheng; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Lin, Ming-T; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2008-12-31

    CovR/S is an important two component regulatory system, which regulates about 15% of the gene expression in Streptococcus pyogenes. The covR/S locus was identified as an operon generating an RNA transcript around 2.5-kb in size. In this study, we found the covR/S operon produced three RNA transcripts (around 2.5-, 1.0-, and 0.8-kb in size). Using RNA transcriptional terminator sequence prediction and transcriptional terminator analysis, we identified two atypical rho-independent terminator sequences downstream of the covR gene and showed these terminator sequences terminate RNA transcription efficiently. These results indicate that covR/S operon generates covR/S transcript and monocistronic covR transcripts. PMID:18824088

  5. Transcriptional neoteny in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Somel, Mehmet; Franz, Henriette; Yan, Zheng; Lorenc, Anna; Guo, Song; Giger, Thomas; Kelso, Janet; Nickel, Birgit; Dannemann, Michael; Bahn, Sabine; Webster, Maree J.; Weickert, Cynthia S.; Lachmann, Michael; Pääbo, Svante; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2009-01-01

    In development, timing is of the utmost importance, and the timing of developmental processes often changes as organisms evolve. In human evolution, developmental retardation, or neoteny, has been proposed as a possible mechanism that contributed to the rise of many human-specific features, including an increase in brain size and the emergence of human-specific cognitive traits. We analyzed mRNA expression in the prefrontal cortex of humans, chimpanzees, and rhesus macaques to determine whether human-specific neotenic changes are present at the gene expression level. We show that the brain transcriptome is dramatically remodeled during postnatal development and that developmental changes in the human brain are indeed delayed relative to other primates. This delay is not uniform across the human transcriptome but affects a specific subset of genes that play a potential role in neural development. PMID:19307592

  6. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nucleotide excision repair genes in human cells.

    PubMed

    Lefkofsky, Hailey B; Veloso, Artur; Ljungman, Mats

    2015-06-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes DNA helix-distorting lesions induced by UV light and various chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. These lesions efficiently block the elongation of transcription and need to be rapidly removed by transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) to avoid the induction of apoptosis. Twenty-nine genes have been classified to code for proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. Here we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of these NER genes across 13 human cell lines using Bru-seq and BruChase-seq, respectively. Many NER genes are relatively large in size and therefore will be easily inactivated by UV-induced transcription-blocking lesions. Furthermore, many of these genes produce transcripts that are rather unstable. Thus, these genes are expected to rapidly lose expression leading to a diminished function of NER. One such gene is ERCC6 that codes for the CSB protein critical for TC-NER. Due to its large gene size and high RNA turnover rate, the ERCC6 gene may act as dosimeter of DNA damage so that at high levels of damage, ERCC6 RNA levels would be diminished leading to the loss of CSB expression, inhibition of TC-NER and the promotion of cell death. PMID:26255935

  7. Transcriptional and Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Nucleotide Excision Repair Genes in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lefkofsky, Hailey B.; Veloso, Artur; Ljungman, Mats

    2014-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes DNA helix-distorting lesions induced by UV light and various chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. These lesions efficiently block the elongation of transcription and need to be rapidly removed by transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) to avoid the induction of apoptosis. Twenty-nine genes have been classified to code for proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. Here we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of these NER genes across 13 human cell lines using Bru-seq and BruChase-seq, respectively. Many NER genes are relatively large in size and therefore will be easily inactivated by UV-induced transcription-blocking lesions. Furthermore, many of these genes produce transcripts that are rather unstable. Thus, these genes are expected to rapidly lose expression leading to a diminished function of NER. One such gene is ERCC6 that codes for the CSB protein critical for TC-NER. Due to its large gene size and high RNA turnover rate, the ERCC6 gene may act as dosimeter of DNA damage so that at high levels of damage, ERCC6 RNA levels would be diminished leading to the loss of CSB expression, inhibition of TC-NER and the promotion of cell death. PMID:26255935

  8. Human brain evolution: transcripts, metabolites and their regulators.

    PubMed

    Somel, Mehmet; Liu, Xiling; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2013-02-01

    What evolutionary events led to the emergence of human cognition? Although the genetic differences separating modern humans from both non-human primates (for example, chimpanzees) and archaic hominins (Neanderthals and Denisovans) are known, linking human-specific mutations to the cognitive phenotype remains a challenge. One strategy is to focus on human-specific changes at the level of intermediate phenotypes, such as gene expression and metabolism, in conjunction with evolutionary changes in gene regulation involving transcription factors, microRNA and proximal regulatory elements. In this Review we show how this strategy has yielded some of the first hints about the mechanisms of human cognition. PMID:23324662

  9. Human transcription factors contain a high fraction of intrinsically disordered regions essential for transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Minezaki, Yoshiaki; Homma, Keiichi; Kinjo, Akira R; Nishikawa, Ken

    2006-06-16

    Human transcriptional regulation factors, such as activators, repressors, and enhancer-binding factors are quite different from their prokaryotic counterparts in two respects: the average sequence in human is more than twice as long as that in prokaryotes, while the fraction of sequence aligned to domains of known structure is 31% in human transcription factors (TFs), less than half of that in bacterial TFs (72%). Intrinsically disordered (ID) regions were identified by a disorder-prediction program, and were found to be in good agreement with available experimental data. Analysis of 401 human TFs with experimental evidence from the Swiss-Prot database showed that as high as 49% of the entire sequence of human TFs is occupied by ID regions. More than half of the human TFs consist of a small DNA binding domain (DBD) and long ID regions frequently sandwiching unassigned regions. The remaining TFs have structural domains in addition to DBDs and ID regions. Experimental studies, particularly those with NMR, revealed that the transactivation domains in unbound TFs are usually unstructured, but become structured upon binding to their partners. The sequences of human and mouse TF orthologues are 90.5% identical despite a high incidence of ID regions, probably reflecting important functional roles played by ID regions. In general ID regions occupy a high fraction in TFs of eukaryotes, but not in prokaryotes. Implications of this dichotomy are discussed in connection with their functional roles in transcriptional regulation and evolution. PMID:16697407

  10. The CREB Transcription Factor Controls Transcriptional Activity of the Human RIC8B Gene.

    PubMed

    Maureira, Alejandro; Sánchez, Rodolfo; Valenzuela, Nicole; Torrejón, Marcela; Hinrichs, María V; Olate, Juan; Gutiérrez, José L

    2016-08-01

    Proper regulation of gene expression is essential for normal development, cellular growth, and differentiation. Differential expression profiles of mRNA coding for vertebrate Ric-8B during embryo and adult stages have been observed. In addition, Ric-8B is expressed in few cerebral nuclei subareas. These facts point to a dynamic control of RIC8B gene expression. In order to understand the transcriptional regulation of this gene, we searched for cis-elements in the sequence of the human RIC8B promoter region, identifying binding sites for the basic/leucine zipper (bZip) CREB transcription factor family (CRE sites) and C/EBP transcription factor family (C/EBP sites). CRE sites were found clustered near the transcription start site, while the C/EBP sites were found clustered at around 300 bp upstream the CRE sites. Here, we demonstrate the ability of CREB1 and C/EBPβ to bind their respective elements identified in the RIC8B promoter. Comparative protein-DNA interaction analyses revealed only the proximal elements as high affinity sites for CREB1 and only the distal elements as high affinity sites for C/EBPβ. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses, carried out using a human neuroblastoma cell line, confirmed the preferential association of CREB to the proximal region of the RIC8B promoter. By performing luciferase reporter assays, we found the CRE sites as the most relevant elements for its transcriptional activity. Taken together, these data show the existence of functional CREB and C/EBP binding sites in the human RIC8B gene promoter, a particular distribution of these sites and demonstrate a relevant role of CREB in stimulating transcriptional activity of this gene. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1797-1805, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26729411

  11. CpG-island promoters drive transcription of human telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Nergadze, Solomon G.; Farnung, Benjamin O.; Wischnewski, Harry; Khoriauli, Lela; Vitelli, Valerio; Chawla, Raghav; Giulotto, Elena; Azzalin, Claus M.

    2009-01-01

    The longstanding dogma that telomeres, the heterochromatic extremities of linear eukaryotic chromosomes, are transcriptionally silent was overturned by the discovery that DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcribes telomeric DNA into telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA). Here, we show that CpG dinucleotide-rich DNA islands, shared among multiple human chromosome ends, promote transcription of TERRA molecules. TERRA promoters sustain cellular expression of reporter genes, are located immediately upstream of TERRA transcription start sites, and are bound by active RNAPII in vivo. Finally, the identified promoter CpG dinucleotides are methylated in vivo, and cytosine methylation negatively regulates TERRA abundance. The existence of subtelomeric promoters, driving TERRA transcription from independent chromosome ends, supports the idea that TERRA exerts fundamental functions in the context of telomere biology. PMID:19850908

  12. Circuitry and dynamics of human transcription factor regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Neph, Shane; Stergachis, Andrew B.; Reynolds, Alex; Sandstrom, Richard; Borenstein, Elhanan; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The combinatorial cross-regulation of hundreds of sequence-specific transcription factors defines a regulatory network that underlies cellular identity and function. Here we use genome-wide maps of in vivo DNaseI footprints to assemble an extensive core human regulatory network comprising connections among 475 sequence-specific transcription factors, and to analyze the dynamics of these connections across 41 diverse cell and tissue types. We find that human transcription factor networks are highly cell-selective and are driven by cohorts of factors that include regulators with previously unrecognized roles in control of cellular identity. Moreover, we identify many widely expressed factors that impact transcriptional regulatory networks in a cell-selective manner. Strikingly, in spite of their inherent diversity, all cell type regulatory networks independently converge on a common architecture that closely resembles the topology of living neuronal networks. Together, our results provide the first description of the circuitry, dynamics, and organizing principles of the human transcription factor regulatory network. PMID:22959076

  13. Transcriptional promiscuity of the human /alpha/-globin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Whitelaw, E.; Hogben, P.; Hanscombe, O.; Proudfoot, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    The human /alpha/-globin gene displays the unusual property of transcriptional promiscuity: that is, it functions in the absence of an enhancer when transfected into nonerythroid cell lines. It is also unusual in that its promoter region lies in a hypomethylated HpaII tiny fragment (HTF) island containing multiple copies of the consensus sequence for the SP1-binding site. The authors have investigated whether there is a relationship between these two observations. First, they investigated the mouse /alpha/-globin gene since it does not lie in an HTF island. They have demonstrated that it was not transcriptionally promiscuous. Second, they studied the transcriptional activity of the human /alpha/-globin gene in the absence of the GC-rich region containing putative SP1-binding sites and found a small (two- to threefold) but consistent positive effect of this region on transcriptional activity in both nonerythroid and erythroid cell lines. However, this effect did not account for the promiscuous nature of the human /alpha/-globin gene. They found that in a nonreplicating system, the human //a/-globin gene, like that of the mouse, required a simian virus 40 enhancer in order to be transcriptionally active in nonerythroid and erythroid cell lines. Since they only observed enhancer independence of the human /alpha/-globin gene in a high-copy-number replicating system, they suggest that competition for trans-acting factors could explain these results. Finally, the authors' experiments with the erythroid cell line Putko suggest that there are no tissue-specific enhancers within 1 kilobase 5' of the human /alpha/-globin cap site or within the gene itself.

  14. Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease (TALEN)-Mediated CLYBL Targeting Enables Enhanced Transgene Expression and One-Step Generation of Dual Reporter Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) and Neural Stem Cell (NSC) Lines

    PubMed Central

    Cerbini, Trevor; Funahashi, Ray; Luo, Yongquan; Liu, Chengyu; Park, Kyeyoon; Rao, Mahendra; Malik, Nasir; Zou, Jizhong

    2015-01-01

    Targeted genome engineering to robustly express transgenes is an essential methodology for stem cell-based research and therapy. Although designer nucleases have been used to drastically enhance gene editing efficiency, targeted addition and stable expression of transgenes to date is limited at single gene/locus and mostly PPP1R12C/AAVS1 in human stem cells. Here we constructed transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) targeting the safe-harbor like gene CLYBL to mediate reporter gene integration at 38%–58% efficiency, and used both AAVS1-TALENs and CLYBL-TALENs to simultaneously knock-in multiple reporter genes at dual safe-harbor loci in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and neural stem cells (NSCs). The CLYBL-TALEN engineered cell lines maintained robust reporter expression during self-renewal and differentiation, and revealed that CLYBL targeting resulted in stronger transgene expression and less perturbation on local gene expression than PPP1R12C/AAVS1. TALEN-mediated CLYBL engineering provides improved transgene expression and options for multiple genetic modification in human stem cells. PMID:25587899

  15. KeyGenes, a Tool to Probe Tissue Differentiation Using a Human Fetal Transcriptional Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Roost, Matthias S.; van Iperen, Liesbeth; Ariyurek, Yavuz; Buermans, Henk P.; Arindrarto, Wibowo; Devalla, Harsha D.; Passier, Robert; Mummery, Christine L.; Carlotti, Françoise; de Koning, Eelco J.P.; van Zwet, Erik W.; Goeman, Jelle J.; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Differentiated derivatives of human pluripotent stem cells in culture are generally phenotypically immature compared to their adult counterparts. Their identity is often difficult to determine with certainty because little is known about their human fetal equivalents in vivo. Cellular identity and signaling pathways directing differentiation are usually determined by extrapolating information from either human adult tissue or model organisms, assuming conservation with humans. To resolve this, we generated a collection of human fetal transcriptional profiles at different developmental stages. Moreover, we developed an algorithm, KeyGenes, which uses this dataset to quantify the extent to which next-generation sequencing or microarray data resemble specific cell or tissue types in the human fetus. Using KeyGenes combined with the human fetal atlas, we identified multiple cell and tissue samples unambiguously on a limited set of features. We thus provide a flexible and expandable platform to monitor and evaluate the efficiency of differentiation in vitro. PMID:26028532

  16. Transcriptional regulation of human small nuclear RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Jawdekar, Gauri W.; Henry, R. William

    2009-01-01

    The products of human snRNA genes have been frequently described as performing housekeeping functions and their synthesis refractory to regulation. However, recent studies have emphasized that snRNA and other related non-coding RNA molecules control multiple facets of the central dogma, and their regulated expression is critical to cellular homeostasis during normal growth and in response to stress. Human snRNA genes contain compact and yet powerful promoters that are recognized by increasingly well-characterized transcription factors, thus providing a premier model system to study gene regulation. This review summarizes many recent advances deciphering the mechanism by which the transcription of human snRNA and related genes are regulated. PMID:18442490

  17. ASPicDB: a database of annotated transcript and protein variants generated by alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, Pier L.; D’Antonio, Mattia; Bonizzoni, Paola; Castrignanò, Tiziana; D’Erchia, Anna M.; D’Onorio De Meo, Paolo; Fariselli, Piero; Finelli, Michele; Licciulli, Flavio; Mangiulli, Marina; Mignone, Flavio; Pavesi, Giulio; Picardi, Ernesto; Rizzi, Raffaella; Rossi, Ivan; Valletti, Alessio; Zauli, Andrea; Zambelli, Federico; Casadio, Rita; Pesole, Graziano

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing is emerging as a major mechanism for the expansion of the transcriptome and proteome diversity, particularly in human and other vertebrates. However, the proportion of alternative transcripts and proteins actually endowed with functional activity is currently highly debated. We present here a new release of ASPicDB which now provides a unique annotation resource of human protein variants generated by alternative splicing. A total of 256 939 protein variants from 17 191 multi-exon genes have been extensively annotated through state of the art machine learning tools providing information of the protein type (globular and transmembrane), localization, presence of PFAM domains, signal peptides, GPI-anchor propeptides, transmembrane and coiled-coil segments. Furthermore, full-length variants can be now specifically selected based on the annotation of CAGE-tags and polyA signal and/or polyA sites, marking transcription initiation and termination sites, respectively. The retrieval can be carried out at gene, transcript, exon, protein or splice site level allowing the selection of data sets fulfilling one or more features settled by the user. The retrieval interface also enables the selection of protein variants showing specific differences in the annotated features. ASPicDB is available at http://www.caspur.it/ASPicDB/. PMID:21051348

  18. Transcriptional Network of p63 in Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Silvia; Zambelli, Federico; Merico, Daniele; Pavesi, Giulio; Robert, Amélie; Maltère, Peggy; Gidrol, Xavier; Mantovani, Roberto; Vigano, M. Alessandra

    2009-01-01

    p63 is a transcription factor required for the development and maintenance of ectodermal tissues in general, and skin keratinocytes in particular. The identification of its target genes is fundamental for understanding the complex network of gene regulation governing the development of epithelia. We report a list of almost 1000 targets derived from ChIP on chip analysis on two platforms; all genes analyzed changed in expression during differentiation of human keratinocytes. Functional annotation highlighted unexpected GO terms enrichments and confirmed that genes involved in transcriptional regulation are the most significant. A detailed analysis of these transcriptional regulators in condition of perturbed p63 levels confirmed the role of p63 in the regulatory network. Rather than a rigid master-slave hierarchical model, our data indicate that p63 connects different hubs involved in the multiple specific functions of the skin. PMID:19390658

  19. What can digital transcript profiling reveal about human cancers?

    PubMed

    Cerutti, J M; Riggins, G J; de Souza, S J

    2003-08-01

    Important biological and clinical features of malignancy are reflected in its transcript pattern. Recent advances in gene expression technology and informatics have provided a powerful new means to obtain and interpret these expression patterns. A comprehensive approach to expression profiling is serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), which provides digital information on transcript levels. SAGE works by counting transcripts and storing these digital values electronically, providing absolute gene expression levels that make historical comparisons possible. SAGE produces a comprehensive profile of gene expression and can be used to search for candidate tumor markers or antigens in a limited number of samples. The Cancer Genome Anatomy Project has created a SAGE database of human gene expression levels for many different tumors and normal reference tissues and provides online tools for viewing, comparing, and downloading expression profiles. Digital expression profiling using SAGE and informatics have been useful for identifying genes that have a role in tumor invasion and other aspects of tumor progression. PMID:12886451

  20. Human Lineage-Specific Transcriptional Regulation through GA-Binding Protein Transcription Factor Alpha (GABPa).

    PubMed

    Perdomo-Sabogal, Alvaro; Nowick, Katja; Piccini, Ilaria; Sudbrak, Ralf; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Querfurth, Robert

    2016-05-01

    A substantial fraction of phenotypic differences between closely related species are likely caused by differences in gene regulation. While this has already been postulated over 30 years ago, only few examples of evolutionary changes in gene regulation have been verified. Here, we identified and investigated binding sites of the transcription factor GA-binding protein alpha (GABPa) aiming to discover cis-regulatory adaptations on the human lineage. By performing chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing experiments in a human cell line, we found 11,619 putative GABPa binding sites. Through sequence comparisons of the human GABPa binding regions with orthologous sequences from 34 mammals, we identified substitutions that have resulted in 224 putative human-specific GABPa binding sites. To experimentally assess the transcriptional impact of those substitutions, we selected four promoters for promoter-reporter gene assays using human and African green monkey cells. We compared the activities of wild-type promoters to mutated forms, where we have introduced one or more substitutions to mimic the ancestral state devoid of the GABPa consensus binding sequence. Similarly, we introduced the human-specific substitutions into chimpanzee and macaque promoter backgrounds. Our results demonstrate that the identified substitutions are functional, both in human and nonhuman promoters. In addition, we performed GABPa knock-down experiments and found 1,215 genes as strong candidates for primary targets. Further analyses of our data sets link GABPa to cognitive disorders, diabetes, KRAB zinc finger (KRAB-ZNF), and human-specific genes. Thus, we propose that differences in GABPa binding sites played important roles in the evolution of human-specific phenotypes. PMID:26814189

  1. Human Lineage-Specific Transcriptional Regulation through GA-Binding Protein Transcription Factor Alpha (GABPa)

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo-Sabogal, Alvaro; Nowick, Katja; Piccini, Ilaria; Sudbrak, Ralf; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Querfurth, Robert

    2016-01-01

    A substantial fraction of phenotypic differences between closely related species are likely caused by differences in gene regulation. While this has already been postulated over 30 years ago, only few examples of evolutionary changes in gene regulation have been verified. Here, we identified and investigated binding sites of the transcription factor GA-binding protein alpha (GABPa) aiming to discover cis-regulatory adaptations on the human lineage. By performing chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing experiments in a human cell line, we found 11,619 putative GABPa binding sites. Through sequence comparisons of the human GABPa binding regions with orthologous sequences from 34 mammals, we identified substitutions that have resulted in 224 putative human-specific GABPa binding sites. To experimentally assess the transcriptional impact of those substitutions, we selected four promoters for promoter-reporter gene assays using human and African green monkey cells. We compared the activities of wild-type promoters to mutated forms, where we have introduced one or more substitutions to mimic the ancestral state devoid of the GABPa consensus binding sequence. Similarly, we introduced the human-specific substitutions into chimpanzee and macaque promoter backgrounds. Our results demonstrate that the identified substitutions are functional, both in human and nonhuman promoters. In addition, we performed GABPa knock-down experiments and found 1,215 genes as strong candidates for primary targets. Further analyses of our data sets link GABPa to cognitive disorders, diabetes, KRAB zinc finger (KRAB-ZNF), and human-specific genes. Thus, we propose that differences in GABPa binding sites played important roles in the evolution of human-specific phenotypes. PMID:26814189

  2. Oxytocin-Stimulated NFAT Transcriptional Activation in Human Myometrial Cells

    PubMed Central

    McArdle, Craig A.; López Bernal, Andrés

    2012-01-01

    Oxytocin (OXT) is a peptide hormone that binds the OXT receptor on myometrial cells, initiating an intracellular signaling cascade, resulting in accumulation of intracellular calcium and smooth muscle contraction. In other systems, an elevation of intracellular Ca2+ stimulates nuclear translocation of the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), which is transcriptionally active in arterial and ileal smooth muscle. Here we have investigated the role of NFAT in the mechanism of action of OXT. Human myometrial cells expressed all five NFAT isoforms (NFATC1–C4 and -5). Myometrial cells were transduced with a recombinant adenovirus expressing a NFATC1-EFP reporter, and a semi-automated imaging system was used to monitor effects of OXT on reporter localization in live cells. OXT induced a concentration-dependent nuclear translocation of NFATC1-EFP in a reversible manner, which was inhibited by OXT antagonists and calcineurin inhibitors. Pulsatile stimulation with OXT caused intermittent, pulse-frequency-dependent, nuclear translocation of NFATC1-EFP, which was more efficient than sustained stimulation. OXT induced nuclear translocation of endogenous NFAT that was transcriptionally active, because OXT stimulated activity of a NFAT-response element-luciferase reporter and induced calcineurin-NFAT dependent expression of RGS2, RCAN1, and PTGS2 (COX2) mRNA. Furthermore, OXT-dependent transcription was dependent on protein neosynthesis; cycloheximide abolished RGS2 transcription but augmented RCAN1 and COX2 transcriptional readouts. This study identifies a novel signaling mechanism within the myometrium, whereby calcineurin-NFAT signaling mediates OXT-induced transcriptional activity. Furthermore, we show NFATC1-EFP is responsive to pulses of OXT, a mechanism by which myometrial cells could decode OXT pulse frequency. PMID:22902539

  3. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from human blood.

    PubMed

    Loh, Yuin-Han; Agarwal, Suneet; Park, In-Hyun; Urbach, Achia; Huo, Hongguang; Heffner, Garrett C; Kim, Kitai; Miller, Justine D; Ng, Kitwa; Daley, George Q

    2009-05-28

    Human dermal fibroblasts obtained by skin biopsy can be reprogrammed directly to pluripotency by the ectopic expression of defined transcription factors. Here, we describe the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells from CD34+ mobilized human peripheral blood cells using retroviral transduction of OCT4/SOX2/KLF4/MYC. Blood-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells are indistinguishable from human embryonic stem cells with respect to morphology, expression of surface antigens, and pluripotency-associated transcription factors, DNA methylation status at pluripotent cell-specific genes, and the capacity to differentiate in vitro and in teratomas. The ability to reprogram cells from human blood will allow the generation of patient-specific stem cells for diseases in which the disease-causing somatic mutations are restricted to cells of the hematopoietic lineage. PMID:19299331

  4. Post-transcriptional gene silencing, transcriptional gene silencing and human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Catalina; Ahlenstiel, Chantelle L; Kelleher, Anthony D

    2015-01-01

    While human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infection is controlled through continuous, life-long use of a combination of drugs targeting different steps of the virus cycle, HIV-1 is never completely eradicated from the body. Despite decades of research there is still no effective vaccine to prevent HIV-1 infection. Therefore, the possibility of an RNA interference (RNAi)-based cure has become an increasingly explored approach. Endogenous gene expression is controlled at both, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels by non-coding RNAs, which act through diverse molecular mechanisms including RNAi. RNAi has the potential to control the turning on/off of specific genes through transcriptional gene silencing (TGS), as well as fine-tuning their expression through post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). In this review we will describe in detail the canonical RNAi pathways for PTGS and TGS, the relationship of TGS with other silencing mechanisms and will discuss a variety of approaches developed to suppress HIV-1 via manipulation of RNAi. We will briefly compare RNAi strategies against other approaches developed to target the virus, highlighting their potential to overcome the major obstacle to finding a cure, which is the specific targeting of the HIV-1 reservoir within latently infected cells. PMID:26279984

  5. Characterisation of CDKL5 Transcript Isoforms in Human and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Dando, Owen; Landsberger, Nicoletta; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Kind, Peter C.; Bailey, Mark E. S.; Cobb, Stuart R.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-Like 5 gene (CDKL5) cause early onset infantile spasms and subsequent severe developmental delay in affected children. Deleterious mutations have been reported to occur throughout the CDKL5 coding region. Several studies point to a complex CDKL5 gene structure in terms of exon usage and transcript expression. Improvements in molecular diagnosis and more extensive research into the neurobiology of CDKL5 and pathophysiology of CDKL5 disorders necessitate an updated analysis of the gene. In this study, we have analysed human and mouse CDKL5 transcript patterns both bioinformatically and experimentally. We have characterised the predominant brain isoform of CDKL5, a 9.7 kb transcript comprised of 18 exons with a large 6.6 kb 3’-untranslated region (UTR), which we name hCDKL5_1. In addition we describe new exonic regions and a range of novel splice and UTR isoforms. This has enabled the description of an updated gene model in both species and a standardised nomenclature system for CDKL5 transcripts. Profiling revealed tissue- and brain development stage-specific differences in expression between transcript isoforms. These findings provide an essential backdrop for the diagnosis of CDKL5-related disorders, for investigations into the basic biology of this gene and its protein products, and for the rational design of gene-based and molecular therapies for these disorders. PMID:27315173

  6. Characterisation of CDKL5 Transcript Isoforms in Human and Mouse.

    PubMed

    Hector, Ralph D; Dando, Owen; Landsberger, Nicoletta; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Kind, Peter C; Bailey, Mark E S; Cobb, Stuart R

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-Like 5 gene (CDKL5) cause early onset infantile spasms and subsequent severe developmental delay in affected children. Deleterious mutations have been reported to occur throughout the CDKL5 coding region. Several studies point to a complex CDKL5 gene structure in terms of exon usage and transcript expression. Improvements in molecular diagnosis and more extensive research into the neurobiology of CDKL5 and pathophysiology of CDKL5 disorders necessitate an updated analysis of the gene. In this study, we have analysed human and mouse CDKL5 transcript patterns both bioinformatically and experimentally. We have characterised the predominant brain isoform of CDKL5, a 9.7 kb transcript comprised of 18 exons with a large 6.6 kb 3'-untranslated region (UTR), which we name hCDKL5_1. In addition we describe new exonic regions and a range of novel splice and UTR isoforms. This has enabled the description of an updated gene model in both species and a standardised nomenclature system for CDKL5 transcripts. Profiling revealed tissue- and brain development stage-specific differences in expression between transcript isoforms. These findings provide an essential backdrop for the diagnosis of CDKL5-related disorders, for investigations into the basic biology of this gene and its protein products, and for the rational design of gene-based and molecular therapies for these disorders. PMID:27315173

  7. Near-atomic resolution visualization of human transcription promoter opening.

    PubMed

    He, Yuan; Yan, Chunli; Fang, Jie; Inouye, Carla; Tjian, Robert; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Nogales, Eva

    2016-05-19

    In eukaryotic transcription initiation, a large multi-subunit pre-initiation complex (PIC) that assembles at the core promoter is required for the opening of the duplex DNA and identification of the start site for transcription by RNA polymerase II. Here we use cryo-electron microscropy (cryo-EM) to determine near-atomic resolution structures of the human PIC in a closed state (engaged with duplex DNA), an open state (engaged with a transcription bubble), and an initially transcribing complex (containing six base pairs of DNA-RNA hybrid). Our studies provide structures for previously uncharacterized components of the PIC, such as TFIIE and TFIIH, and segments of TFIIA, TFIIB and TFIIF. Comparison of the different structures reveals the sequential conformational changes that accompany the transition from each state to the next throughout the transcription initiation process. This analysis illustrates the key role of TFIIB in transcription bubble stabilization and provides strong structural support for a translocase activity of XPB. PMID:27193682

  8. Structural characterization of human general transcription factor TFIIF in solution

    PubMed Central

    Akashi, Satoko; Nagakura, Shinjiro; Yamamoto, Seiji; Okuda, Masahiko; Ohkuma, Yoshiaki; Nishimura, Yoshifumi

    2008-01-01

    Human general transcription factor IIF (TFIIF), a component of the transcription pre-initiation complex (PIC) associated with RNA polymerase II (Pol II), was characterized by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and chemical cross-linking. Recombinant TFIIF, composed of an equimolar ratio of α and β subunits, was bacterially expressed, purified to homogeneity, and found to have a transcription activity similar to a natural one in the human in vitro transcription system. SEC of purified TFIIF, as previously reported, suggested that this protein has a size >200 kDa. In contrast, ESI-MS of the purified sample gave a molecular size of 87 kDa, indicating that TFIIF is an αβ heterodimer, which was confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MS of the cross-linked TFIIF components. Recent electron microscopy (EM) and photo-cross-linking studies showed that the yeast TFIIF homolog containing Tfg1 and Tfg2, corresponding to the human α and β subunits, exists as a heterodimer in the PIC, so the human TFIIF is also likely to exist as a heterodimer even in the PIC. In the yeast PIC, EM and photo-cross-linking studies showed different results for the mutual location of TFIIE and TFIIF along DNA. We have examined the direct interaction between human TFIIF and TFIIE by ESI-MS, SEC, and chemical cross-linking; however, no direct interaction was observed, at least in solution. This is consistent with the previous photo-cross-linking observation that TFIIF and TFIIE flank DNA separately on both sides of the Pol II central cleft in the yeast PIC. PMID:18218714

  9. Organization of the human mitochondrial transcription initiation complex

    PubMed Central

    Yakubovskaya, Elena; Guja, Kip E.; Eng, Edward T.; Choi, Woo Suk; Mejia, Edison; Beglov, Dmitri; Lukin, Mark; Kozakov, Dima; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Initiation of transcription in human mitochondria involves two factors, TFAM and TFB2M, in addition to the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, POLRMT. We have investigated the organization of the human mitochondrial transcription initiation complex on the light-strand promoter (LSP) through solution X-ray scattering, electron microscopy (EM) and biochemical studies. Our EM results demonstrate a compact organization of the initiation complex, suggesting that protein–protein interactions might help mediate initiation. We demonstrate that, in the absence of DNA, only POLRMT and TFAM form a stable interaction, albeit one with low affinity. This is consistent with the expected transient nature of the interactions necessary for initiation and implies that the promoter DNA acts as a scaffold that enables formation of the full initiation complex. Docking of known crystal structures into our EM maps results in a model for transcriptional initiation that strongly correlates with new and existing biochemical observations. Our results reveal the organization of TFAM, POLRMT and TFB2M around the LSP and represent the first structural characterization of the entire mitochondrial transcriptional initiation complex. PMID:24413562

  10. Transcriptional burst frequency and burst size are equally modulated across the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, Roy D.; Simpson, Michael L; Weinberger, Leor S.; Razooky, B; Cox, Chris D.; McCollum, James M.; Trimeloni, Tom; Singh, A

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression occurs either as an episodic process, characterized by pulsatile bursts or as a constitutive, Poisson-like accumulation of gene products. It is not clear which mode of gene expression (constitutive versus bursty) predominates across a genome or how transcriptional dynamics are influenced by genomic position and promoter sequence. Here, we use time-lapse fluorescence microscopy, building off of theoretical studies that exploit the time-resolved structure of stochastic fluctuations in gene expression, to develop a three-dimensional method for mapping underlying gene-regulatory mechanisms. Over 8,000 individual human genomic loci were analyzed, and at virtually all loci, episodic bursting as opposed to constitutive expression was found to be the predominant mode of expression. Quantitative analysis of the expression dynamics at these 8,000 loci indicates that both frequency and size of transcriptional bursts vary equally across the human genome independent of promoter sequence. Strikingly, weaker expression loci modulate burst frequency to increase activity, while stronger expression loci modulate burst size to increase activity. Transcriptional activators, such as TNF, generate similar patterns of change in burst frequency and burst size. In summary, transcriptional bursting dominates across the human genome, both burst frequency and burst size vary by chromosomal location, and transcriptional activators alter burst frequency and burst size, depending on the expression level of the locus.

  11. TFCat: the curated catalog of mouse and human transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Debra L; Sundararajan, Saravanan; Badis, Gwenael; Hughes, Timothy R; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Roach, Jared C; Sladek, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Unravelling regulatory programs governed by transcription factors (TFs) is fundamental to understanding biological systems. TFCat is a catalog of mouse and human TFs based on a reliable core collection of annotations obtained by expert review of the scientific literature. The collection, including proven and homology-based candidate TFs, is annotated within a function-based taxonomy and DNA-binding proteins are organized within a classification system. All data and user-feedback mechanisms are available at the TFCat portal . PMID:19284633

  12. Transcriptional divergence and conservation of human and mouse erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Pishesha, Novalia; Thiru, Prathapan; Shi, Jiahai; Eng, Jennifer C.; Sankaran, Vijay G.; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2014-01-01

    Mouse models have been used extensively for decades and have been instrumental in improving our understanding of mammalian erythropoiesis. Nonetheless, there are several examples of variation between human and mouse erythropoiesis. We performed a comparative global gene expression study using data from morphologically identical stage-matched sorted populations of human and mouse erythroid precursors from early to late erythroblasts. Induction and repression of major transcriptional regulators of erythropoiesis, as well as major erythroid-important proteins, are largely conserved between the species. In contrast, at a global level we identified a significant extent of divergence between the species, both at comparable stages and in the transitions between stages, especially for the 500 most highly expressed genes during development. This suggests that the response of multiple developmentally regulated genes to key erythroid transcriptional regulators represents an important modification that has occurred in the course of erythroid evolution. In developing a systematic framework to understand and study conservation and divergence between human and mouse erythropoiesis, we show how mouse models can fail to mimic specific human diseases and provide predictions for translating findings from mouse models to potential therapies for human disease. PMID:24591581

  13. RNA polymerase II ternary transcription complexes generated in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, S; Bunick, D; Zandomeni, R; Weinmann, R

    1983-01-01

    Ternary transcription complexes have been formed with a HeLa cell extract, a specific DNA template, and nucleoside triphosphates. The assay depends on the formation of sarkosyl-resistant initiation complexes which contain RNA polymerase II, template DNA, and radioactive nucleoside triphosphates. Separation from the other elements in the in vitro reaction is achieved by electrophoresis in agarose - 0.25% sarkosyl gels. The mobility of the ternary complexes in this system cannot be distinguished from naked DNA. Formation of this complex is dependent on all parameters necessary for faithful in vitro transcription. Complexes are formed with both the plasmid vector and the specific adenovirus DNA insert containing a eucaryotic promoter. The formation of the complex on the eucaryotic DNA is sequence-dependent. An undecaribonucleotide predicted from the template DNA sequence remains associated with the DNA in the ternary complex and can be isolated if the chain terminator 3'-0-methyl GTP is used, or after T1 ribonuclease treatment of the RNA, or if exogenous GTP is omitted from the in vitro reaction. This oligonucleotide is not detected in association with the plasmid vector. Phosphocellulose fractionation of the extract indicates that at least one of the column fractions required for faithful runoff transcription is required for complex formation. A large molar excess of abortive initiation events was detected relative to the level of productive transcription events, indicating a 40-fold higher efficiency of transcription initiation vs. elongation. Images PMID:6193489

  14. A cancer-specific transcriptional signature in human neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Nicassio, Francesco; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Capra, Maria; Vecchi, Manuela; Confalonieri, Stefano; Bianchi, Marco; Pajalunga, Deborah; Crescenzi, Marco; Bonapace, Ian Marc; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo

    2005-01-01

    The molecular anatomy of cancer cells is being explored through unbiased approaches aimed at the identification of cancer-specific transcriptional signatures. An alternative biased approach is exploitation of molecular tools capable of inducing cellular transformation. Transcriptional signatures thus identified can be readily validated in real cancers and more easily reverse-engineered into signaling pathways, given preexisting molecular knowledge. We exploited the ability of the adenovirus early region 1 A protein (E1A) oncogene to force the reentry into the cell cycle of terminally differentiated cells in order to identify and characterize genes whose expression is upregulated in this process. A subset of these genes was activated through a retinoblastoma protein/E2 viral promoter required factor–independent (pRb/E2F-independent) mechanism and was overexpressed in a fraction of human cancers. Furthermore, this overexpression correlated with tumor progression in colon cancer, and 2 of these genes predicted unfavorable prognosis in breast cancer. A proof of principle biological validation was performed on one of the genes of the signature, skeletal muscle cell reentry-induced (SKIN) gene, a previously undescribed gene. SKIN was found overexpressed in some primary tumors and tumor cell lines and was amplified in a fraction of colon adenocarcinomas. Furthermore, knockdown of SKIN caused selective growth suppression in overexpressing tumor cell lines but not in tumor lines expressing physiological levels of the transcript. Thus, SKIN is a candidate oncogene in human cancer. PMID:16224537

  15. DNA methylation presents distinct binding sites for human transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shaohui; Wan, Jun; Su, Yijing; Song, Qifeng; Zeng, Yaxue; Nguyen, Ha Nam; Shin, Jaehoon; Cox, Eric; Rho, Hee Sool; Woodard, Crystal; Xia, Shuli; Liu, Shuang; Lyu, Huibin; Ming, Guo-Li; Wade, Herschel; Song, Hongjun; Qian, Jiang; Zhu, Heng

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation, especially CpG methylation at promoter regions, has been generally considered as a potent epigenetic modification that prohibits transcription factor (TF) recruitment, resulting in transcription suppression. Here, we used a protein microarray-based approach to systematically survey the entire human TF family and found numerous purified TFs with methylated CpG (mCpG)-dependent DNA-binding activities. Interestingly, some TFs exhibit specific binding activity to methylated and unmethylated DNA motifs of distinct sequences. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, we focused on Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), and decoupled its mCpG- and CpG-binding activities via site-directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, KLF4 binds specific methylated or unmethylated motifs in human embryonic stem cells in vivo. Our study suggests that mCpG-dependent TF binding activity is a widespread phenomenon and provides a new framework to understand the role and mechanism of TFs in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00726.001 PMID:24015356

  16. DNA methylation presents distinct binding sites for human transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shaohui; Wan, Jun; Su, Yijing; Song, Qifeng; Zeng, Yaxue; Nguyen, Ha Nam; Shin, Jaehoon; Cox, Eric; Rho, Hee Sool; Woodard, Crystal; Xia, Shuli; Liu, Shuang; Lyu, Huibin; Ming, Guo-Li; Wade, Herschel; Song, Hongjun; Qian, Jiang; Zhu, Heng

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation, especially CpG methylation at promoter regions, has been generally considered as a potent epigenetic modification that prohibits transcription factor (TF) recruitment, resulting in transcription suppression. Here, we used a protein microarray-based approach to systematically survey the entire human TF family and found numerous purified TFs with methylated CpG (mCpG)-dependent DNA-binding activities. Interestingly, some TFs exhibit specific binding activity to methylated and unmethylated DNA motifs of distinct sequences. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, we focused on Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), and decoupled its mCpG- and CpG-binding activities via site-directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, KLF4 binds specific methylated or unmethylated motifs in human embryonic stem cells in vivo. Our study suggests that mCpG-dependent TF binding activity is a widespread phenomenon and provides a new framework to understand the role and mechanism of TFs in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00726.001. PMID:24015356

  17. Transcription factor induction of human oligodendrocyte progenitor fate and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Pol, Suyog U; Haberman, Alexa K; Wang, Chunming; O'Bara, Melanie A; Sim, Fraser J

    2014-07-15

    Human oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) specification and differentiation occurs slowly and limits the potential for cell-based treatment of demyelinating disease. In this study, using FACS-based isolation and microarray analysis, we identified a set of transcription factors expressed by human primary CD140a(+)O4(+) OPCs relative to CD133(+)CD140a(-) neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs). Among these, lentiviral overexpression of transcription factors ASCL1, SOX10, and NKX2.2 in NPCs was sufficient to induce Sox10 enhancer activity, OPC mRNA, and protein expression consistent with OPC fate; however, unlike ASCL1 and NKX2.2, only the transcriptome of SOX10-infected NPCs was induced to a human OPC gene expression signature. Furthermore, only SOX10 promoted oligodendrocyte commitment, and did so at quantitatively equivalent levels to native OPCs. In xenografts of shiverer/rag2 animals, SOX10 increased the rate of mature oligodendrocyte differentiation and axon ensheathment. Thus, SOX10 appears to be the principle and rate-limiting regulator of myelinogenic fate from human NPCs. PMID:24982138

  18. Transcription factor induction of human oligodendrocyte progenitor fate and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Pol, Suyog U.; Haberman, Alexa K.; Wang, Chunming; O’Bara, Melanie A.; Sim, Fraser J.

    2014-01-01

    Human oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) specification and differentiation occurs slowly and limits the potential for cell-based treatment of demyelinating disease. In this study, using FACS-based isolation and microarray analysis, we identified a set of transcription factors expressed by human primary CD140a+O4+ OPCs relative to CD133+CD140a− neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs). Among these, lentiviral overexpression of transcription factors ASCL1, SOX10, and NKX2.2 in NPCs was sufficient to induce Sox10 enhancer activity, OPC mRNA, and protein expression consistent with OPC fate; however, unlike ASCL1 and NKX2.2, only the transcriptome of SOX10-infected NPCs was induced to a human OPC gene expression signature. Furthermore, only SOX10 promoted oligodendrocyte commitment, and did so at quantitatively equivalent levels to native OPCs. In xenografts of shiverer/rag2 animals, SOX10 increased the rate of mature oligodendrocyte differentiation and axon ensheathment. Thus, SOX10 appears to be the principle and rate-limiting regulator of myelinogenic fate from human NPCs. PMID:24982138

  19. Dynamic Transcriptional and Epigenetic Regulation of Human Epidermal Keratinocyte Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cavazza, Alessia; Miccio, Annarita; Romano, Oriana; Petiti, Luca; Malagoli Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio; Peano, Clelia; Severgnini, Marco; Rizzi, Ermanno; De Bellis, Gianluca; Bicciato, Silvio; Mavilio, Fulvio

    2016-04-12

    Human skin is maintained by the differentiation and maturation of interfollicular stem and progenitors cells. We used DeepCAGE, genome-wide profiling of histone modifications and retroviral integration analysis, to map transcripts, promoters, enhancers, and super-enhancers (SEs) in prospectively isolated keratinocytes and transit-amplifying progenitors, and retrospectively defined keratinocyte stem cells. We show that >95% of the active promoters are in common and differentially regulated in progenitors and differentiated keratinocytes, while approximately half of the enhancers and SEs are stage specific and account for most of the epigenetic changes occurring during differentiation. Transcription factor (TF) motif identification and correlation with TF binding site maps allowed the identification of TF circuitries acting on enhancers and SEs during differentiation. Overall, our study provides a broad, genome-wide description of chromatin dynamics and differential enhancer and promoter usage during epithelial differentiation, and describes a novel approach to identify active regulatory elements in rare stem cell populations. PMID:27050947

  20. Dynamic Transcriptional and Epigenetic Regulation of Human Epidermal Keratinocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cavazza, Alessia; Miccio, Annarita; Romano, Oriana; Petiti, Luca; Malagoli Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio; Peano, Clelia; Severgnini, Marco; Rizzi, Ermanno; De Bellis, Gianluca; Bicciato, Silvio; Mavilio, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Human skin is maintained by the differentiation and maturation of interfollicular stem and progenitors cells. We used DeepCAGE, genome-wide profiling of histone modifications and retroviral integration analysis, to map transcripts, promoters, enhancers, and super-enhancers (SEs) in prospectively isolated keratinocytes and transit-amplifying progenitors, and retrospectively defined keratinocyte stem cells. We show that >95% of the active promoters are in common and differentially regulated in progenitors and differentiated keratinocytes, while approximately half of the enhancers and SEs are stage specific and account for most of the epigenetic changes occurring during differentiation. Transcription factor (TF) motif identification and correlation with TF binding site maps allowed the identification of TF circuitries acting on enhancers and SEs during differentiation. Overall, our study provides a broad, genome-wide description of chromatin dynamics and differential enhancer and promoter usage during epithelial differentiation, and describes a novel approach to identify active regulatory elements in rare stem cell populations. PMID:27050947

  1. Massive transcriptional start site analysis of human genes in hypoxia cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Suzuki, Yutaka; Wakaguri, Hiroyuki; Irie, Takuma; Tanimoto, Kousuke; Hashimoto, Shin-ichi; Matsushima, Kouji; Mizushima-Sugano, Junko; Yamashita, Riu; Nakai, Kenta; Bentley, David; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Sugano, Sumio

    2009-04-01

    Combining our full-length cDNA method and the massively parallel sequencing technology, we developed a simple method to collect precise positional information of transcriptional start sites (TSSs) together with digital information of the gene-expression levels in a high throughput manner. We applied this method to observe gene-expression changes in a colon cancer cell line cultured in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. We generated more than 100 million 36-base TSS-tag sequences and revealed comprehensive features of hypoxia responsive alterations in the transcriptional landscape of the human genome. The features include presence of inducible 'hot regions' in 54 genomic regions, 220 novel hypoxia inducible promoters that may drive non-protein-coding transcripts, 191 hypoxia responsive alternative promoters and detailed views of 120 novel as well as known hypoxia responsive genes. We further analyzed hypoxic response of different cells using additional 60 million TSS-tags and found that the degree of the gene-expression changes were different among cell lines, possibly reflecting cellular robustness against hypoxia. The novel dynamic figure of the human gene transcriptome will deepen our understanding of the transcriptional program of the human genome as well as bringing new insights into the biology of cancer cells in hypoxia. PMID:19237398

  2. Telomere Transcripts Target Telomerase in Human Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kreilmeier, Theresa; Mejri, Doris; Hauck, Marlene; Kleiter, Miriam; Holzmann, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding transcripts from telomeres, called telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA), were identified as blocking telomerase activity (TA), a telomere maintenance mechanism (TMM), in tumors. We expressed recombinant TERRA transcripts in tumor cell lines with TA and with alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) to study effects on TMM and cell growth. Adeno- and lentivirus constructs (AV and LV) were established for transient and stable expression of approximately 130 units of telomere hexanucleotide repeats under control of cytomegalovirus (CMV) and human RNase P RNA H1 (hH1) promoters with and without polyadenylation, respectively. Six human tumor cell lines either using telomerase or ALT were infected and analyzed for TA levels. Pre-infection cells using telomerase had 1%-3% of the TERRA expression levels of ALT cells. AV and LV expression of recombinant TERRA in telomerase positive cells showed a 1.3-2.6 fold increase in TERRA levels, and a decrease in TA of 25%-58%. Dominant-negative or small hairpin RNA (shRNA) viral expression against human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) results in senescence, not induced by TERRA expression. Population doubling time, cell viability and TL (telomere length) were not impacted by ectopic TERRA expression. Clonal growth was reduced by TERRA expression in TA but not ALT cell lines. ALT cells were not affected by treatments applied. Established cell models and tools may be used to better understand the role of TERRA in the cell, especially for targeting telomerase. PMID:27537914

  3. Transcriptional control of human p53-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Riley, Todd; Sontag, Eduardo; Chen, Patricia; Levine, Arnold

    2008-05-01

    The p53 protein regulates the transcription of many different genes in response to a wide variety of stress signals. Following DNA damage, p53 regulates key processes, including DNA repair, cell-cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis, in order to suppress cancer. This Analysis article provides an overview of the current knowledge of p53-regulated genes in these pathways and others, and the mechanisms of their regulation. In addition, we present the most comprehensive list so far of human p53-regulated genes and their experimentally validated, functional binding sites that confer p53 regulation. PMID:18431400

  4. Identification of a novel transcript of human MD2 gene.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chen; Shen, A-Dong

    2016-09-15

    Myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD2) regulates bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggered anti-bacterial immune response as a broker between LPS and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). In this study, we identified a novel naturally occurring spliceosome of human MD2, termed as MD2-T3. This transcript lacked two exons of MD2 gene. By protein structure analysis and literature review, we predicted that MD2-T3 isoform might execute regulatory biological effects such as limiting LPS-triggered TLR4 signaling. PMID:27317890

  5. Redundant cooperative interactions for assembly of a human U6 transcription initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Ma, Beicong; Hernandez, Nouria

    2002-11-01

    The core human U6 promoter consists of a proximal sequence element (PSE) located upstream of a TATA box. The PSE is recognized by the snRNA-activating protein complex (SNAP(c)), which consists of five types of subunits, SNAP190, SNAP50, SNAP45, SNAP43, and SNAP19. The TATA box is recognized by TATA box binding protein (TBP). In addition, basal U6 transcription requires the SANT domain protein Bdp1 and the transcription factor IIB-related factor Brf2. SNAP(c) and mini-SNAP(c), which consists of just SNAP43, SNAP50, and the N-terminal third of SNAP190, bind cooperatively with TBP to the core U6 promoter. By generating complexes smaller than mini-SNAP(c), we have identified a 50-amino-acid region within SNAP190 that is (i) required for cooperative binding with TBP in the context of mini-SNAP(c) and (ii) sufficient for cooperative binding with TBP when fused to a heterologous DNA binding domain. We show that derivatives of mini-SNAP(c) lacking this region are active for transcription and that with such complexes, TBP can still be recruited to the U6 promoter through cooperative interactions with Brf2. Our results identify complexes smaller than mini-SNAP(c) that are transcriptionally active and show that there are at least two redundant mechanisms to stably recruit TBP to the U6 transcription initiation complex. PMID:12391172

  6. Redundant Cooperative Interactions for Assembly of a Human U6 Transcription Initiation Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Beicong; Hernandez, Nouria

    2002-01-01

    The core human U6 promoter consists of a proximal sequence element (PSE) located upstream of a TATA box. The PSE is recognized by the snRNA-activating protein complex (SNAPc), which consists of five types of subunits, SNAP190, SNAP50, SNAP45, SNAP43, and SNAP19. The TATA box is recognized by TATA box binding protein (TBP). In addition, basal U6 transcription requires the SANT domain protein Bdp1 and the transcription factor IIB-related factor Brf2. SNAPc and mini-SNAPc, which consists of just SNAP43, SNAP50, and the N-terminal third of SNAP190, bind cooperatively with TBP to the core U6 promoter. By generating complexes smaller than mini-SNAPc, we have identified a 50-amino-acid region within SNAP190 that is (i) required for cooperative binding with TBP in the context of mini-SNAPc and (ii) sufficient for cooperative binding with TBP when fused to a heterologous DNA binding domain. We show that derivatives of mini-SNAPc lacking this region are active for transcription and that with such complexes, TBP can still be recruited to the U6 promoter through cooperative interactions with Brf2. Our results identify complexes smaller than mini-SNAPc that are transcriptionally active and show that there are at least two redundant mechanisms to stably recruit TBP to the U6 transcription initiation complex. PMID:12391172

  7. Post-transcriptional gene silencing activity of human GIGYF2.

    PubMed

    Kryszke, Marie-Hélène; Adjeriou, Badia; Liang, Feifei; Chen, Hong; Dautry, François

    2016-07-01

    In mammalian post-transcriptional gene silencing, the Argonaute protein AGO2 indirectly recruits translation inhibitors, deadenylase complexes, and decapping factors to microRNA-targeted mRNAs, thereby repressing mRNA translation and accelerating mRNA decay. However, the exact composition and assembly pathway of the microRNA-induced silencing complex are not completely elucidated. As the GYF domain of human GIGYF2 was shown to bind AGO2 in pulldown experiments, we wondered whether GIGYF2 could be a novel protein component of the microRNA-induced silencing complex. Here we show that full-length GIGYF2 coimmunoprecipitates with AGO2 in human cells, and demonstrate that, upon tethering to a reporter mRNA, GIGYF2 exhibits strong, dose-dependent silencing activity, involving both mRNA destabilization and translational repression. PMID:27157137

  8. Comparison of the transcriptional landscapes between human and mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Nery, Joseph R; Urich, Mark A; Breschi, Alessandra; Davis, Carrie A; Dobin, Alexander; Zaleski, Christopher; Beer, Michael A; Chapman, William C; Gingeras, Thomas R; Ecker, Joseph R; Snyder, Michael P

    2014-12-01

    Although the similarities between humans and mice are typically highlighted, morphologically and genetically, there are many differences. To better understand these two species on a molecular level, we performed a comparison of the expression profiles of 15 tissues by deep RNA sequencing and examined the similarities and differences in the transcriptome for both protein-coding and -noncoding transcripts. Although commonalities are evident in the expression of tissue-specific genes between the two species, the expression for many sets of genes was found to be more similar in different tissues within the same species than between species. These findings were further corroborated by associated epigenetic histone mark analyses. We also find that many noncoding transcripts are expressed at a low level and are not detectable at appreciable levels across individuals. Moreover, the majority lack obvious sequence homologs between species, even when we restrict our attention to those which are most highly reproducible across biological replicates. Overall, our results indicate that there is considerable RNA expression diversity between humans and mice, well beyond what was described previously, likely reflecting the fundamental physiological differences between these two organisms. PMID:25413365

  9. Comparison of the transcriptional landscapes between human and mouse tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Nery, Joseph R.; Urich, Mark A.; Breschi, Alessandra; Davis, Carrie A.; Dobin, Alexander; Zaleski, Christopher; Beer, Michael A.; Chapman, William C.; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Ecker, Joseph R.; Snyder, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Although the similarities between humans and mice are typically highlighted, morphologically and genetically, there are many differences. To better understand these two species on a molecular level, we performed a comparison of the expression profiles of 15 tissues by deep RNA sequencing and examined the similarities and differences in the transcriptome for both protein-coding and -noncoding transcripts. Although commonalities are evident in the expression of tissue-specific genes between the two species, the expression for many sets of genes was found to be more similar in different tissues within the same species than between species. These findings were further corroborated by associated epigenetic histone mark analyses. We also find that many noncoding transcripts are expressed at a low level and are not detectable at appreciable levels across individuals. Moreover, the majority lack obvious sequence homologs between species, even when we restrict our attention to those which are most highly reproducible across biological replicates. Overall, our results indicate that there is considerable RNA expression diversity between humans and mice, well beyond what was described previously, likely reflecting the fundamental physiological differences between these two organisms. PMID:25413365

  10. Genotype × age interaction in human transcriptional ageing

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Jack W.; Göring, Harald H. H.; Charlesworth, Jac C.; Drigalenko, Eugene; Diego, Vincent P.; Curran, Joanne E.; Johnson, Matthew P.; Dyer, Thomas D.; Cole, Shelley A.; Jowett, Jeremy B. M.; Mahaney, Michael C.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Almasy, Laura; Moses, Eric K.; Blangero, John; Williams-Blangero, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Individual differences in biological ageing (i.e., the rate of physiological response to the passage of time) may be due in part to genotype-specific variation in gene action. However, the sources of heritable variation in human age-related gene expression profiles are largely unknown. We have profiled genome-wide expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1,240 individuals in large families and found 4,472 human autosomal transcripts, representing ~4,349 genes, significantly correlated with age. We identified 623 transcripts that show genotype by age interaction in addition to a main effect of age, defining a large set of novel candidates for characterization of the mechanisms of differential biological ageing. We applied a novel SNP genotype×age interaction test to one of these candidates, the ubiquilin-like gene UBQLNL, and found evidence of joint cis-association and genotype by age interaction as well as trans-genotype by age interaction for UBQLNL expression. Both UBQLNL expression levels at recruitment and cis genotype are associated with longitudinal cancer risk in our study cohort. PMID:22871458

  11. Alternative splicing generates novel Fads3 transcript in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji Yao; Qin, Xia; Park, Hui Gyu; Kim, Ellen; Liu, Guowen; Kothapalli, Kumar S D; Brenna, J Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Fads3 is the third member of the fatty acid desaturase gene cluster; with at least eight evolutionarily conserved alternative transcripts (AT), having no clearly established function as are known for FADS2 and FADS1. Here we present identification of a novel Fads3 transcript in mice (Fads3AT9), characterize Fads3AT9 expression in mouse tissues and evaluate correlations with metabolite profiles. Total RNA obtained from mouse tissues is reverse-transcribed into cDNA and used as template for PCR reactions. Tissue fatty acids were extracted and quantified by gas chromatography. Sequencing analysis revealed complete absence of exon 2 resulting in an open reading frame of 1239 bp, encoding a putative protein of 412 aa with loss of 37 aa compared to classical Fads3 (Fads3CS). FADS3AT9 retains all the conserved regions characteristic of front end desaturase (cytochrome b5 domain and three histidine repeats). Both Fads3CS and Fads3AT9 are ubiquitously expressed in 11 mouse tissues. Fads3AT9 abundance was greater than Fads3CS in pancreas, liver, spleen, brown adipose tissue and thymus. Fads3CS expression is low in pancreas while Fads3AT9 is over ten-fold greater abundance. The eicosanoid precursor fatty acid 20:4n - 6, the immediate desaturation product of the Fads1 coded Δ5-desaturase, was highest in pancreas where Fads3CS is low. Changes in expression patterns and fatty acid profiles suggest that Fads3AT9 may play a role in the regulation and/or biosynthesis of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids from precursors. PMID:27216536

  12. Telomere Transcripts Target Telomerase in Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kreilmeier, Theresa; Mejri, Doris; Hauck, Marlene; Kleiter, Miriam; Holzmann, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding transcripts from telomeres, called telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA), were identified as blocking telomerase activity (TA), a telomere maintenance mechanism (TMM), in tumors. We expressed recombinant TERRA transcripts in tumor cell lines with TA and with alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) to study effects on TMM and cell growth. Adeno- and lentivirus constructs (AV and LV) were established for transient and stable expression of approximately 130 units of telomere hexanucleotide repeats under control of cytomegalovirus (CMV) and human RNase P RNA H1 (hH1) promoters with and without polyadenylation, respectively. Six human tumor cell lines either using telomerase or ALT were infected and analyzed for TA levels. Pre-infection cells using telomerase had 1%–3% of the TERRA expression levels of ALT cells. AV and LV expression of recombinant TERRA in telomerase positive cells showed a 1.3–2.6 fold increase in TERRA levels, and a decrease in TA of 25%–58%. Dominant-negative or small hairpin RNA (shRNA) viral expression against human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) results in senescence, not induced by TERRA expression. Population doubling time, cell viability and TL (telomere length) were not impacted by ectopic TERRA expression. Clonal growth was reduced by TERRA expression in TA but not ALT cell lines. ALT cells were not affected by treatments applied. Established cell models and tools may be used to better understand the role of TERRA in the cell, especially for targeting telomerase. PMID:27537914

  13. The short transcript of Leishmania RNA virus is generated by RNA cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    MacBeth, K J; Patterson, J L

    1995-01-01

    Leishmania RNA virus 1 produces a short viral RNA transcript corresponding to the 5' end of positive-sense single-stranded RNAs both in virally infected cells and in in vitro polymerase assays. We hypothesized that this short transcript was generated via cleavage of full-length positive-sense single-stranded RNA. A putative cleavage site was mapped by primer extension analysis to nucleotide 320 of the viral genome. To address the hypothesis that the short transcript is generated via cleavage at this site, two substrate RNAs that possessed viral sequence encompassing the putative cleavage site were created. When incubated with sucrose-purified viral particles, these substrate RNAs were site-specifically cleaved. The cleavage site of the in vitro-processed RNAs also mapped to viral nucleotide 320. The short-transcript-generating activity could be specifically abolished by proteinase K treatment of sucrose-purified viral particles and high concentrations of EGTA [ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid], suggesting that the activity requires a proteinaceous factor and possibly intact viral particles. The cleavage activity is directly associated with short-transcript-generating activity, since only viral particle preparations which were capable of generating the short transcript in polymerase assays were also active in the cleavage assay. Furthermore, the short-transcript-generating activity is independent of the viral polymerase's transcriptase and replicase activities. We present a working model whereby cleavage of Leishmaniavirus RNA transcripts functions in the maintenance of a low-level persistent infection. PMID:7745692

  14. Characterization of proopiomelanocortin transcripts in human nonpituitary tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Lacaze-Masmonteil, T.; De Keyzer, Y.; Luton, J.P.; Kahn, A.; Bertagna, X.

    1987-10-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC), the precursor to adrenocorticotropic hormone and other related peptides, was originally identified in the corticotropic cell. Recent evidence shows that POMC products are also normally present in a variety of nonpituitary tissues. To investigate this phenomenon in humans the authors looked for the presence and characteristics of POMC transcripts in various adult tissues. Blot hybridization analysis of normal adrenal, thymus, and testis RNAs revealed a small RNA species approximately 400 nucleotides shorter than the 1200-nucleotide pituitary species. Primer extension and S1 nuclease mapping studies showed that this small RNA lacked exon 1 and exon 2 of the gene, and it corresponded to a set of at least six molecules starting 41 to 162 nucleotides downstream from the 5' end of exon 3. These RNAs appear to result from heterogeneous transcription initiation sites presumably under the control of GC box promoter sequences located in the 3' end of intron 2. They cannot encode a complete POMC molecule, and the only truncated POMC molecules that could be translated would lack a signal peptide necessary for membrane translocation and precursor processing. The use of highly sensitive S1 nuclease mapping techniques with uniformly labeled single-stranded DNA probes allowed the detection of a small but definite amount of the normal, 1200-nucleotide, mRNA species. It is suggested that it is this POMC mRNA that is responsible for the local production of all the POMC peptides.

  15. Antioxidant-induced changes of the AP-1 transcription complex are paralleled by a selective suppression of human papillomavirus transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Rösl, F; Das, B C; Lengert, M; Geletneky, K; zur Hausen, H

    1997-01-01

    Considering the involvement of a redox-regulatory pathway in the expression of human papillomaviruses (HPVs), HPV type 16 (HPV-16)-immortalized human keratinocytes were treated with the antioxidant pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate (PDTC). PDTC induces elevated binding of the transcription factor AP-1 to its cognate recognition site within the viral regulatory region. Despite of increased AP-1 binding, normally indispensable for efficient HPV-16 transcription, viral gene expression was selectively suppressed at the level of initiation of transcription. Electrophoretic mobility supershift assays showed that the composition of the AP-1 complex, predominantly consisting of Jun homodimers in untreated cells, was altered. Irrespective of enhanced c-fos expression, c-jun was phosphorylated and became primarily heterodimerized with fra-1, which was also induced after PDTC incubation. Additionally, there was also an increased complex formation between c-jun and junB. Because both fra-1 and junB overexpression negatively interferes with c-jun/c-fos trans-activation of AP-1-responsive genes, our results suggest that the observed block in viral transcription is mainly the consequence of an antioxidant-induced reconstitution of the AP-1 transcription complex. Since expression of the c-jun/c-fos gene family is tightly regulated during cellular differentiation, defined reorganization of a central viral transcription factor may represent a novel mechanism controlling the transcription of pathogenic HPVs during keratinocyte differentiation and in the progression to cervical cancer. PMID:8985358

  16. A symbiotic SNARE protein generated by alternative termination of transcription.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huairong; Oztas, Onur; Zhang, Xiaowei; Wu, Xiaoyi; Stonoha, Christina; Wang, Ertao; Wang, Bin; Wang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Many microbes interact with their hosts across a membrane interface, which is often distinct from existing membranes. Understanding how this interface acquires its identity has significant implications. In the symbiosis between legumes and rhizobia, the symbiosome encases the intracellular bacteria and receives host secretory proteins important for bacterial development. We show that the Medicago truncatula SYNTAXIN 132 (SYP132) gene undergoes alternative cleavage and polyadenylation during transcription, giving rise to two target-membrane soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (t-SNARE) isoforms. One of these isoforms, SYP132A, is induced during the symbiosis, is able to localize to the peribacteroid membrane, and is required for the maturation of symbiosomes into functional forms. The second isoform, SYP132C, has important functions unrelated to symbiosis. The SYP132A sequence is broadly found in flowering plants that form arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, an ancestral mutualism between soil fungi and most land plants. SYP132A silencing severely inhibited arbuscule colonization, indicating that SYP132A is an ancient factor specifying plant-microbe interfaces. PMID:27249189

  17. Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Upregulates the Mitochondrial Transcription and Translation Machineries

    PubMed Central

    Weekes, M. P.; Antrobus, R.; Rorbach, J.; van Haute, L.; Umrania, Y.; Smith, D. L.; Minczuk, M.; Lehner, P. J.; Sinclair, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) profoundly affects cellular metabolism. Like in tumor cells, HCMV infection increases glycolysis, and glucose carbon is shifted from the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle to the biosynthesis of fatty acids. However, unlike in many tumor cells, where aerobic glycolysis is accompanied by suppression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, HCMV induces mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration. Here, we affinity purified mitochondria and used quantitative mass spectrometry to determine how the mitochondrial proteome changes upon HCMV infection. We found that the mitochondrial transcription and translation systems are induced early during the viral replication cycle. Specifically, proteins involved in biogenesis of the mitochondrial ribosome were highly upregulated by HCMV infection. Inhibition of mitochondrial translation with chloramphenicol or knockdown of HCMV-induced ribosome biogenesis factor MRM3 abolished the HCMV-mediated increase in mitochondrially encoded proteins and significantly impaired viral growth under bioenergetically restricting conditions. Our findings demonstrate how HCMV manipulates mitochondrial biogenesis to support its replication. PMID:27025248

  18. Functional polypeptides can be synthesized from human mitochondrial transcripts lacking termination codons.

    PubMed Central

    Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A; Temperley, Richard J; Smith, Paul M; Seneca, Sara H; Lightowlers, Robert N

    2004-01-01

    The human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is a small, circular DNA duplex found in multi-copy in the mitochondrial matrix. It is almost fully transcribed from both strands to produce large polycistronic RNA units that are processed and matured. The 13 mtDNA-encoded polypeptides are translated from mt-mRNAs that have been matured by polyadenylation of their free 3'-termini. A patient with clinical features consistent with an mtDNA disorder was recently shown to carry a microdeletion, resulting in the loss of the termination codon for MTATP6 and in its juxtaposition with MTCO3. Cell lines from this patient exhibited low steady-state levels of RNA14, the bi-cistronic transcript encoding subunits 6 and 8 of the F(o)F(1)-ATP synthase, complex V, consistent with a decreased stability. Recent reports of 'non-stop' mRNA decay systems in the cytosol have failed to determine the fate of gene products derived from transcripts lacking termination codons, although enhanced decay clearly required the 'non-stop' transcripts to be translated. We wished to determine whether functional translation products could still be expressed from non-stop transcripts in the human mitochondrion. Although a minor defect in complex V assembly was noted in the patient-derived cell lines, the steady-state level of ATPase 6 was similar to controls, consistent with the pattern of de novo mitochondrial protein synthesis. Moreover, no significant difference in ATP synthase activity could be detected. We conclude that, in the absence of a functional termination codon, although mitochondrial transcripts are more rapidly degraded, they are also translated to generate stable polypeptides that are successfully integrated into functional enzyme complexes. PMID:14585098

  19. Wnt signaling induces transcription, spatial proximity, and translocation of fusion gene partners in human hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Ugarte, Giorgia D; Vargas, Macarena F; Medina, Matías A; León, Pablo; Necuñir, David; Elorza, Alvaro A; Gutiérrez, Soraya E; Moon, Randall T; Loyola, Alejandra; De Ferrari, Giancarlo V

    2015-10-01

    Chromosomal translocations are frequently associated with a wide variety of cancers, particularly hematologic malignancies. A recurrent chromosomal abnormality in acute myeloid leukemia is the reciprocal translocation t(8;21) that fuses RUNX1 and ETO genes. We report here that Wnt/β-catenin signaling increases the expression of ETO and RUNX1 genes in human hematopoietic progenitors. We found that β-catenin is rapidly recruited into RNA polymerase II transcription factories (RNAPII-Ser5) and that ETO and RUNX1 genes are brought into close spatial proximity upon Wnt3a induction. Notably, long-term treatment of cells with Wnt3a induces the generation a frequent RUNX1-ETO translocation event. Thus, Wnt/β-catenin signaling induces transcription and translocation of RUNX1 and ETO fusion gene partners, opening a novel window to understand the onset/development of leukemia. PMID:26333776

  20. Transcription factors ETS2 and MESP1 transdifferentiate human dermal fibroblasts into cardiac progenitors.

    PubMed

    Islas, Jose Francisco; Liu, Yu; Weng, Kuo-Chan; Robertson, Matthew J; Zhang, Shuxing; Prejusa, Allan; Harger, John; Tikhomirova, Dariya; Chopra, Mani; Iyer, Dinakar; Mercola, Mark; Oshima, Robert G; Willerson, James T; Potaman, Vladimir N; Schwartz, Robert J

    2012-08-01

    Unique insights for the reprograming of cell lineages have come from embryonic development in the ascidian Ciona, which is dependent upon the transcription factors Ci-ets1/2 and Ci-mesp to generate cardiac progenitors. We tested the idea that mammalian v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2 (ETS2) and mesoderm posterior (MESP) homolog may be used to convert human dermal fibroblasts into cardiac progenitors. Here we show that murine ETS2 has a critical role in directing cardiac progenitors during cardiopoiesis in embryonic stem cells. We then use lentivirus-mediated forced expression of human ETS2 to convert normal human dermal fibroblasts into replicative cells expressing the cardiac mesoderm marker KDR(+). However, although neither ETS2 nor the purported cardiac master regulator MESP1 can by themselves generate cardiac progenitors de novo from fibroblasts, forced coexpression of ETS2 and MESP1 or cell treatment with purified proteins reprograms fibroblasts into cardiac progenitors, as shown by the de novo appearance of core cardiac transcription factors, Ca(2+) transients, and sarcomeres. Our data indicate that ETS2 and MESP1 play important roles in a genetic network that governs cardiopoiesis. PMID:22826236

  1. Genome-Wide Reprogramming of Transcript Architecture by Temperature Specifies the Developmental States of the Human Pathogen Histoplasma

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Sarah A.; Voorhies, Mark; Gebhart, Dana; Sil, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells integrate layers of gene regulation to coordinate complex cellular processes; however, mechanisms of post-transcriptional gene regulation remain poorly studied. The human fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum (Hc) responds to environmental or host temperature by initiating unique transcriptional programs to specify multicellular (hyphae) or unicellular (yeast) developmental states that function in infectivity or pathogenesis, respectively. Here we used recent advances in next-generation sequencing to uncover a novel re-programming of transcript length between Hc developmental cell types. We found that ~2% percent of Hc transcripts exhibit 5’ leader sequences that differ markedly in length between morphogenetic states. Ribosome density and mRNA abundance measurements of differential leader transcripts revealed nuanced transcriptional and translational regulation. One such class of regulated longer leader transcripts exhibited tight transcriptional and translational repression. Further examination of these dually repressed genes revealed that some control Hc morphology and that their strict regulation is necessary for the pathogen to make appropriate developmental decisions in response to temperature. PMID:26177267

  2. RegNetwork: an integrated database of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory networks in human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Ping; Wu, Canglin; Miao, Hongyu; Wu, Hulin

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression is of fundamental importance to numerous biological processes. Nowadays, an increasing amount of gene regulatory relationships have been documented in various databases and literature. However, to more efficiently exploit such knowledge for biomedical research and applications, it is necessary to construct a genome-wide regulatory network database to integrate the information on gene regulatory relationships that are widely scattered in many different places. Therefore, in this work, we build a knowledge-based database, named ‘RegNetwork’, of gene regulatory networks for human and mouse by collecting and integrating the documented regulatory interactions among transcription factors (TFs), microRNAs (miRNAs) and target genes from 25 selected databases. Moreover, we also inferred and incorporated potential regulatory relationships based on transcription factor binding site (TFBS) motifs into RegNetwork. As a result, RegNetwork contains a comprehensive set of experimentally observed or predicted transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory relationships, and the database framework is flexibly designed for potential extensions to include gene regulatory networks for other organisms in the future. Based on RegNetwork, we characterized the statistical and topological properties of genome-wide regulatory networks for human and mouse, we also extracted and interpreted simple yet important network motifs that involve the interplays between TF-miRNA and their targets. In summary, RegNetwork provides an integrated resource on the prior information for gene regulatory relationships, and it enables us to further investigate context-specific transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory interactions based on domain-specific experimental data. Database URL: http://www.regnetworkweb.org PMID:26424082

  3. Extensive Transcriptional Regulation of Chromatin Modifiers during Human Neurodevelopment

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Matthias K.; Zimmer, Bastian; Pöltl, Dominik; Broeg, Marc P.; Ivanova, Violeta; Gaspar, John A.; Sachinidis, Agapios; Wüllner, Ullrich

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic changes, including histone modifications or chromatin remodeling are regulated by a large number of human genes. We developed a strategy to study the coordinate regulation of such genes, and to compare different cell populations or tissues. A set of 150 genes, comprising different classes of epigenetic modifiers was compiled. This new tool was used initially to characterize changes during the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) to central nervous system neuroectoderm progenitors (NEP). qPCR analysis showed that more than 60% of the examined transcripts were regulated, and >10% of them had a >5-fold increased expression. For comparison, we differentiated hESC to neural crest progenitors (NCP), a distinct peripheral nervous system progenitor population. Some epigenetic modifiers were regulated into the same direction in NEP and NCP, but also distinct differences were observed. For instance, the remodeling ATPase SMARCA2 was up-regulated >30-fold in NCP, while it remained unchanged in NEP; up-regulation of the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler CHD7 was increased in NEP, while it was down-regulated in NCP. To compare the neural precursor profiles with those of mature neurons, we analyzed the epigenetic modifiers in human cortical tissue. This resulted in the identification of 30 regulations shared between all cell types, such as the histone methyltransferase SETD7. We also identified new markers for post-mitotic neurons, like the arginine methyl transferase PRMT8 and the methyl transferase EZH1. Our findings suggest a hitherto unexpected extent of regulation, and a cell type-dependent specificity of epigenetic modifiers in neurodifferentiation. PMID:22590590

  4. Temporal patterns of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transcripts in human fetal astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Tornatore, C; Meyers, K; Atwood, W; Conant, K; Major, E

    1994-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of the developing central nervous system results in a dementing process in children, termed HIV-1-associated encephalopathy. Infection of astroglial elements of the pediatric nervous system has been demonstrated and suggests that direct infection of some astrocytes may contribute to the neurologic deficit. In this model, HIV-1 establishes a persistent state of infection in astrocytes, which can be reactivated by the cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta). To better understand the natural history of viral persistence in astroglial cells, we characterized infection at the transcriptional level. The most abundant viral transcript during the establishment of persistence was the subgenomic multiply spliced 2-kb message, similar to mononuclear cell models of HIV-1 latency. Following reactivation with TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta the multiply spliced 2-kb message remained the most abundant viral transcript, in contrast to infected mononuclear cells in which reactivation leads to the reemergence of the 9- and 4-kb transcripts. Further characterization of the persistent 2-kb transcript by PCR amplification of in vitro-synthesized viral cDNA showed that, in the absence of cytokine stimulation, the most abundant multiply spliced transcripts were the Nef- and Rev-specific messages. However, following cytokine stimulation, double- and triple-spliced Tat-, Rev-, and Nef-specific messages could be identified. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that, during viral persistence, astrocytes expressed Nef protein but few or no viral structural proteins. These results demonstrate that viral persistence in astrocytes at the transcriptional level is fundamentally different from that seen in mononuclear cells and could account for the virtual absence of astroglial expression of viral structural antigens in vivo. Images PMID:8254781

  5. Transcription factor binding predicts histone modifications in human cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Benveniste, Dan; Sonntag, Hans-Joachim; Sanguinetti, Guido; Sproul, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression in higher organisms is thought to be regulated by a complex network of transcription factor binding and chromatin modifications, yet the relative importance of these two factors remains a matter of debate. Here, we show that a computational approach allows surprisingly accurate prediction of histone modifications solely from knowledge of transcription factor binding both at promoters and at potential distal regulatory elements. This accuracy significantly and substantially exceeds what could be achieved by using DNA sequence as an input feature. Remarkably, we show that transcription factor binding enables strikingly accurate predictions across different cell lines. Analysis of the relative importance of specific transcription factors as predictors of specific histone marks recapitulated known interactions between transcription factors and histone modifiers. Our results demonstrate that reported associations between histone marks and gene expression may be indirect effects caused by interactions between transcription factors and histone-modifying complexes. PMID:25187560

  6. ETS transcription factor ETV2 directly converts human fibroblasts into functional endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Morita, Rimpei; Suzuki, Mayu; Kasahara, Hidenori; Shimizu, Nana; Shichita, Takashi; Sekiya, Takashi; Kimura, Akihiro; Sasaki, Ken-ichiro; Yasukawa, Hideo; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of endothelial cells (ECs) is a promising therapeutic approach for ischemic disorders. In addition, the generation of ECs has become increasingly important for providing vascular plexus to regenerated organs, such as the liver. Although many attempts have been made to generate ECs from pluripotent stem cells and nonvascular cells, the minimum number of transcription factors that specialize in directly inducing vascular ECs remains undefined. Here, by screening 18 transcription factors that are important for both endothelial and hematopoietic development, we demonstrate that ets variant 2 (ETV2) alone directly converts primary human adult skin fibroblasts into functional vascular endothelial cells (ETVECs). In coordination with endogenous FOXC2 in fibroblasts, transduced ETV2 elicits expression of multiple key endothelial development factors, including FLI1, ERG, and TAL1, and induces expression of endothelial functional molecules, including EGFL7 and von Willebrand factor. Consequently, ETVECs exhibits EC characteristics in vitro and forms mature functional vasculature in Matrigel plugs transplanted in NOD SCID mice. Furthermore, ETVECs significantly improve blood flow recovery in a hind limb ischemic model using BALB/c-nu mice. Our study indicates that the creation of ETVECs provides further understanding of human EC development induced by ETV2. PMID:25540418

  7. The Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger Transcription Factor Is Critical for Human Endometrial Stromal Cell Decidualization

    PubMed Central

    Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Szwarc, Maria M.; Vasquez, Yasmin M.; Peavey, Mary C.; Mazur, Erik C.; Gibbons, William E.; Lanz, Rainer B.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Lydon, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Progesterone, via the progesterone receptor (PGR), is essential for endometrial stromal cell decidualization, a cellular transformation event in which stromal fibroblasts differentiate into decidual cells. Uterine decidualization supports embryo implantation and placentation as well as subsequent events, which together ensure a successful pregnancy. Accordingly, impaired decidualization results not only in implantation failure or early fetal miscarriage, but also may lead to potential adverse outcomes in all three pregnancy trimesters. Transcriptional reprogramming on a genome-wide scale underlies progesterone dependent decidualization of the human endometrial stromal cell (hESC). However, identification of the functionally essential signals encoded by these global transcriptional changes remains incomplete. Importantly, this knowledge-gap undercuts future efforts to improve diagnosis and treatment of implantation failure based on a dysfunctional endometrium. By integrating genome-wide datasets derived from decidualization of hESCs in culture, we reveal that the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) transcription factor is rapidly induced by progesterone and that this induction is indispensable for progesterone-dependent decidualization. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) identified at least ten progesterone response elements within the PLZF gene, indicating that PLZF may act as a direct target of PGR signaling. The spatiotemporal expression profile for PLZF in both the human and mouse endometrium offers further support for stromal PLZF as a mediator of the progesterone decidual signal. To identify functional targets of PLZF, integration of PLZF ChIP-Seq and RNA Pol II RNA-Seq datasets revealed that the early growth response 1 (EGR1) transcription factor is a PLZF target for which its level of expression must be reduced to enable progesterone dependent hESC decidualization. Apart from furnishing essential insights

  8. The Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger Transcription Factor Is Critical for Human Endometrial Stromal Cell Decidualization.

    PubMed

    Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Szwarc, Maria M; Vasquez, Yasmin M; Peavey, Mary C; Mazur, Erik C; Gibbons, William E; Lanz, Rainer B; DeMayo, Francesco J; Lydon, John P

    2016-04-01

    Progesterone, via the progesterone receptor (PGR), is essential for endometrial stromal cell decidualization, a cellular transformation event in which stromal fibroblasts differentiate into decidual cells. Uterine decidualization supports embryo implantation and placentation as well as subsequent events, which together ensure a successful pregnancy. Accordingly, impaired decidualization results not only in implantation failure or early fetal miscarriage, but also may lead to potential adverse outcomes in all three pregnancy trimesters. Transcriptional reprogramming on a genome-wide scale underlies progesterone dependent decidualization of the human endometrial stromal cell (hESC). However, identification of the functionally essential signals encoded by these global transcriptional changes remains incomplete. Importantly, this knowledge-gap undercuts future efforts to improve diagnosis and treatment of implantation failure based on a dysfunctional endometrium. By integrating genome-wide datasets derived from decidualization of hESCs in culture, we reveal that the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) transcription factor is rapidly induced by progesterone and that this induction is indispensable for progesterone-dependent decidualization. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) identified at least ten progesterone response elements within the PLZF gene, indicating that PLZF may act as a direct target of PGR signaling. The spatiotemporal expression profile for PLZF in both the human and mouse endometrium offers further support for stromal PLZF as a mediator of the progesterone decidual signal. To identify functional targets of PLZF, integration of PLZF ChIP-Seq and RNA Pol II RNA-Seq datasets revealed that the early growth response 1 (EGR1) transcription factor is a PLZF target for which its level of expression must be reduced to enable progesterone dependent hESC decidualization. Apart from furnishing essential insights

  9. Human Macrophages Support Persistent Transcription From Unintegrated HIV-1 DNA

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Jeremy; Beddall, Margaret H.; Yu, Dongyang; Iyer, Subashini R.; Marsh, Jon W.; Wu, Yuntao

    2008-01-01

    Retroviruses require integration of their RNA genomes for both stability and productive viral replication. In HIV infection of non-dividing, resting CD4 T cells, where integration is greatly impeded, the reverse transcribed HIV DNA has limited biological activity and a short half-life. In metabolically active and proliferating T cells unintegrated DNA rapidly diminishes with cell division. HIV also infects the non-dividing, but metabolically active macrophage population. In an in vitro examination of HIV infection of macrophages, we find that unintegrated viral DNA not only has an unusual stability, but also maintains biological activity. The unintegrated linear DNA, 1-LTR, and 2-LTR circles are stable for at least 30 days. Additionally there is persistent viral gene transcription, which is selective and skewed towards viral early genes such as nef and tat with highly diminished rev and vif. One viral early gene product Nef was measurably synthesized. We also find that independent of integration, the HIV infection process in macrophages leads to generation of numerous chemokines. PMID:18054979

  10. Genome-scale transcriptional analyses of first-generation interspecific sunflower hybrids reveals broad regulatory compatibility

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Interspecific hybridization creates individuals harboring diverged genomes. The interaction of these genomes can generate successful evolutionary novelty or disadvantageous genomic conflict. Annual sunflowers Helianthus annuus and H. petiolaris have a rich history of hybridization in natural populations. Although first-generation hybrids generally have low fertility, hybrid swarms that include later generation and fully fertile backcross plants have been identified, as well as at least three independently-originated stable hybrid taxa. We examine patterns of transcript accumulation in the earliest stages of hybridization of these species via analyses of transcriptome sequences from laboratory-derived F1 offspring of an inbred H. annuus cultivar and a wild H. petiolaris accession. Results While nearly 14% of the reference transcriptome showed significant accumulation differences between parental accessions, total F1 transcript levels showed little evidence of dominance, as midparent transcript levels were highly predictive of transcript accumulation in F1 plants. Allelic bias in F1 transcript accumulation was detected in 20% of transcripts containing sufficient polymorphism to distinguish parental alleles; however the magnitude of these biases were generally smaller than differences among parental accessions. Conclusions While analyses of allelic bias suggest that cis regulatory differences between H. annuus and H. petiolaris are common, their effect on transcript levels may be more subtle than trans-acting regulatory differences. Overall, these analyses found little evidence of regulatory incompatibility or dominance interactions between parental genomes within F1 hybrid individuals, although it is unclear whether this is a legacy or an enabler of introgression between species. PMID:23701699

  11. Inhibition of human insulin gene transcription and MafA transcriptional activity by the dual leucine zipper kinase

    PubMed Central

    Stahnke, Marie-Jeannette; Dickel, Corinna; Schröder, Sabine; Kaiser, Diana; Blume, Roland; Stein, Roland; Pouponnot, Celio; Oetjen, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Insulin biosynthesis is an essential β-cell function and inappropriate insulin secretion and biosynthesis contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus type 2. Previous studies showed that the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) induces β-cell apoptosis. Since β-cell dysfunction precedes β-cell loss, in the present study the effect of DLK on insulin gene transcription was investigated in the HIT-T15 β-cell line. Downregulation of endogenous DLK increased whereas overexpression of DLK decreased human insulin gene transcription. 5′- and 3′-deletion human insulin promoter analyses resulted in the identification of a DLK responsive element that mapped to the DNA binding-site for the β-cell specific transcription factor MafA. Overexpression of DLK wild-type but not its kinase-dead mutant inhibited MafA transcriptional activity conferred by its transactivation domain. Furthermore, in the non-β-cell line JEG DLK inhibited MafA overexpression-induced human insulin promoter activity. Overexpression of MafA and DLK or its kinase-dead mutant into JEG cells revealed that DLK but not its mutant reduced MafA protein content. Inhibition of the down-stream DLK kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by SP600125 attenuated DLK-induced MafA loss. Furthermore, mutation of the serine 65 to alanine, shown to confer MafA protein stability, increased MafA-dependent insulin gene transcription and prevented DLK-induced MafA loss in JEG cells. These data suggest that DLK by activating JNK triggers the phosphorylation and degradation of MafA thereby attenuating insulin gene transcription. Given the importance of MafA for β-cell function, the inhibition of DLK might preserve β-cell function and ultimately retard the development of diabetes mellitus type 2. PMID:24726898

  12. Inhibition of human insulin gene transcription and MafA transcriptional activity by the dual leucine zipper kinase.

    PubMed

    Stahnke, Marie-Jeannette; Dickel, Corinna; Schröder, Sabine; Kaiser, Diana; Blume, Roland; Stein, Roland; Pouponnot, Celio; Oetjen, Elke

    2014-09-01

    Insulin biosynthesis is an essential β-cell function and inappropriate insulin secretion and biosynthesis contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus type 2. Previous studies showed that the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) induces β-cell apoptosis. Since β-cell dysfunction precedes β-cell loss, in the present study the effect of DLK on insulin gene transcription was investigated in the HIT-T15 β-cell line. Downregulation of endogenous DLK increased whereas overexpression of DLK decreased human insulin gene transcription. 5'- and 3'-deletion human insulin promoter analyses resulted in the identification of a DLK responsive element that mapped to the DNA binding-site for the β-cell specific transcription factor MafA. Overexpression of DLK wild-type but not its kinase-dead mutant inhibited MafA transcriptional activity conferred by its transactivation domain. Furthermore, in the non-β-cell line JEG DLK inhibited MafA overexpression-induced human insulin promoter activity. Overexpression of MafA and DLK or its kinase-dead mutant into JEG cells revealed that DLK but not its mutant reduced MafA protein content. Inhibition of the down-stream DLK kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) by SP600125 attenuated DLK-induced MafA loss. Furthermore, mutation of the serine 65 to alanine, shown to confer MafA protein stability, increased MafA-dependent insulin gene transcription and prevented DLK-induced MafA loss in JEG cells. These data suggest that DLK by activating JNK triggers the phosphorylation and degradation of MafA thereby attenuating insulin gene transcription. Given the importance of MafA for β-cell function, the inhibition of DLK might preserve β-cell function and ultimately retard the development of diabetes mellitus type 2. PMID:24726898

  13. Large-scale gene discovery in human airway epithelia reveals novel transcripts.

    PubMed

    Scheetz, Todd E; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J; Coco, Justin; Eyestone, Mari de Fatima; Bonaldo, Maria; Kucaba, Tamara; Casavant, Thomas L; Soares, M Bento; McCray, Paul B

    2004-03-12

    The airway epithelium represents an important barrier between the host and the environment. It is a first site of contact with pathogens, particulates, and other stimuli, and has evolved the means to dynamically respond to these challenges. In an effort to define the transcript profile of airway epithelia, we created and sequenced cDNA libraries from cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF epithelia and from human lung tissue. Sequencing of these libraries produced approximately 53,000 3'-expressed sequence tags (3'-ESTs). From these, a nonredundant UniGene set of more than 19,000 sequences was generated. Despite the relatively small contribution of airway epithelia to the total mass of the lung, focused gene discovery in this tissue yielded novel results. The ESTs included several thousand transcripts (6,416) not previously identified from cDNA sequences as expressed in the lung. Among the abundant transcripts were several genes involved in host defense. Most importantly, the set also included 879 3'-ESTs that appear to be novel sequences not previously represented in the National Center for Biotechnology Information UniGene collection. This UniGene set should be useful for studies of pulmonary diseases involving the airway epithelium including cystic fibrosis, respiratory infections and asthma. It also provides a reagent for large-scale expression profiling. PMID:14701920

  14. Factorbook.org: a Wiki-based database for transcription factor-binding data generated by the ENCODE consortium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Zhuang, Jiali; Iyer, Sowmya; Lin, Xin-Ying; Greven, Melissa C; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Moore, Jill; Pierce, Brian G; Dong, Xianjun; Virgil, Daniel; Birney, Ewan; Hung, Jui-Hung; Weng, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) consortium aims to identify all functional elements in the human genome including transcripts, transcriptional regulatory regions, along with their chromatin states and DNA methylation patterns. The ENCODE project generates data utilizing a variety of techniques that can enrich for regulatory regions, such as chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion and DNase I digestion, followed by deeply sequencing the resulting DNA. As part of the ENCODE project, we have developed a Web-accessible repository accessible at http://factorbook.org. In Wiki format, factorbook is a transcription factor (TF)-centric repository of all ENCODE ChIP-seq datasets on TF-binding regions, as well as the rich analysis results of these data. In the first release, factorbook contains 457 ChIP-seq datasets on 119 TFs in a number of human cell lines, the average profiles of histone modifications and nucleosome positioning around the TF-binding regions, sequence motifs enriched in the regions and the distance and orientation preferences between motif sites. PMID:23203885

  15. White Light Generation in Human Saliva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, C.; Dharmadhikari, A. K.; Dharmadhikari, J. A.; Alti, K.; Mathur, D.

    2011-07-01

    Interaction of intense, femto-second pulses of infrared light (800 nm) with water generates white light supercontinuum due to nonlinear optical effects. This supercontinuum was found to be suppressed by the addition of alpha amylase, a major protein in the human saliva. We have studied the suppression of supper continuum by human saliva, collected from healthy subjects with and without smoking habits. Suppression of the blue-sided components was observed significantly in non-smokers saliva than chain smokers.

  16. Regulation of transcription of the human presenilin-1 gene by ets transcription factors and the p53 protooncogene.

    PubMed

    Pastorcic, M; Das, H K

    2000-11-10

    The expression of the human presenilin-1 cellular gene is suppressed by the p53 protooncogene. The rapid kinetic of the down-regulation has suggested that it may result from a primary mechanism. We show here that p53 also suppresses the transcription of a presenilin-1 promoter-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter synthetic gene in transient infection assays in neuroblastoma (SK-N-SH) and hepatoma (HepG2) cell lines. Only a minimum promoter including sequences from -35 to + 6 from the transcription initiation is sufficient to confer down-regulation. We have previously defined a crucial DNA element controlling 90% of the expression of the gene within the same short area, and the identification of the transcription factors involved should also provide insights into the regulation of PS1 by p53. This region contains an Ets transcription factor binding motif, and a 2-base pair alteration within the core sequence (GGAA to TTAA) of the Ets consensus also reduced transcription by more than 90%. We now show that Ets1 and Ets2 indeed transactivate a PS1 promoter-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter including the (-35 to +6) fragment. Furthermore, in vitro translated Ets2 binds specifically to the -10 Ets motif in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Therefore, Ets1/2 factors bind specifically to the -10 Ets element and activate PS1 transcription. We also show that the coactivator p300 enhances the activation by Ets1 and Ets2 as well as the repression by p53. p300 is known to interact with p53 as well as with Ets1 and Ets2. We show that p53 does not bind directly to the PS1 promoter. Hence the repression of PS1 transcription by p53 is likely to be mediated through protein-protein interactions. PMID:10942770

  17. Direct activation of human and mouse Oct4 genes using engineered TALE and Cas9 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiabiao; Lei, Yong; Wong, Wing-Ki; Liu, Senquan; Lee, Kai-Chuen; He, Xiangjun; You, Wenxing; Zhou, Rui; Guo, Jun-Tao; Chen, Xiongfong; Peng, Xianlu; Sun, Hao; Huang, He; Zhao, Hui; Feng, Bo

    2014-04-01

    The newly developed transcription activator-like effector protein (TALE) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 transcription factors (TF) offered a powerful and precise approach for modulating gene expression. In this article, we systematically investigated the potential of these new tools in activating the stringently silenced pluripotency gene Oct4 (Pou5f1) in mouse and human somatic cells. First, with a number of TALEs and sgRNAs targeting various regions in the mouse and human Oct4 promoters, we found that the most efficient TALE-VP64s bound around -120 to -80 bp, while highly effective sgRNAs targeted from -147 to -89-bp upstream of the transcription start sites to induce high activity of luciferase reporters. In addition, we observed significant transcriptional synergy when multiple TFs were applied simultaneously. Although individual TFs exhibited marginal activity to up-regulate endogenous gene expression, optimized combinations of TALE-VP64s could enhance endogenous Oct4 transcription up to 30-fold in mouse NIH3T3 cells and 20-fold in human HEK293T cells. More importantly, the enhancement of OCT4 transcription ultimately generated OCT4 proteins. Furthermore, examination of different epigenetic modifiers showed that histone acetyltransferase p300 could enhance both TALE-VP64 and sgRNA/dCas9-VP64 induced transcription of endogenous OCT4. Taken together, our study suggested that engineered TALE-TF and dCas9-TF are useful tools for modulating gene expression in mammalian cells. PMID:24500196

  18. Expression of The Embryonic Stem Cell Transcription Factor SOX2 in Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Laga, Alvaro C.; Lai, Chiou-Yan; Zhan, Qian; Huang, Susan J.; Velazquez, Elsa F.; Yang, Qinghong; Hsu, Mei-Yu; Murphy, George F.

    2010-01-01

    SOX2 is a gene located on chromosome 3q26.33 that encodes a transcription factor important to maintenance of embryonic neural crest stem cell pluripotency. We have identified rare SOX2-immunoreactive cells in normal human skin at or near the established stem cell niches. Three subsets of SOX2-positive cells were defined in these regions: those expressing only SOX2 and those that co-expressed SOX2 and either CK20 or microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, which are consistent with dichotomous differentiation of SOX2-expressing precursors along neuroendocrine (Merkel cell) or melanocytic lines, respectively. Examination of Merkel cell carcinomas confirmed nuclear SOX2 expression in this tumor type. In human patient melanoma, strong nuclear expression of SOX2 was noted in a subset of tumors, and the ability to detect SOX2 in lesional cells significantly correlated with primary tumor thickness in a survey cohort. To assess the potential role of SOX2 in melanoma growth, an in vivo tumorigenesis assay was used. Whereas SOX2 knockdown failed to influence proliferation of cultured melanoma cells in vitro, tumor xenografts generated with the SOX2-knockdown cell line showed significant decrease in mean tumor volume as compared with controls. In aggregate, these findings suggest that SOX2 is a novel biomarker for subpopulations of normal skin cells that reside in established stem cell niches and that might relate to Merkel cell and melanocyte ontogeny and tumorigenesis. PMID:20042675

  19. Transcriptional regulation of human paraoxonase 1 by PXR and GR in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Ruiz, N; Rojas-García, A E; Barrón-Vivanco, B S; Elizondo, G; Bernal-Hernández, Y Y; Mejía-García, A; Medina-Díaz, I M

    2015-12-25

    Human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is A-esterase synthesized in the liver and secreted into the plasma, where it associates with HDL. PON1 acts as an antioxidant preventing lipid oxidation and detoxifies a wide range of substrates, including organophosphate compounds. The variability of PON1 (enzyme activity/serum levels) has been attributed to internal and external factors. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the transcriptional regulation of PON1 have not been well-studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize the transcriptional activation of PON1 by nuclear receptors (NR) in human hepatoma cells. In silico analysis was performed on the promoter region of PON1 to determine the response elements of NR. Real-time PCR was used to evaluate the effect of specific NR ligands on the mRNA levels of genes regulated by NR and PON1. The results indicated that NR response elements had 95% homology to pregnenolone (PXR), glucocorticoids (GR), retinoic acid (RXR) and peroxisomes proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). Treatments with Dexamethasone (GR ligand), Rifampicin (PXR ligand) and TCDD (AhR ligand) increased the mRNA levels of PON1 at 24 and 48 h. We showed that the activation of GR by Dexamethasone results in PON1 gene induction accompanied by an increase in activity levels. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that GR regulates PON1 gene transcription through directly binding to NR response elements at -95 to -628 bp of the PON1 promoter. This study suggests new molecular mechanisms for the transcriptional regulation of PON1 through a process involving the activation of PXR. PMID:26434531

  20. Functional Analyses of Transcription Factor Binding Sites that Differ between Present-Day and Archaic Humans.

    PubMed

    Weyer, Sven; Pääbo, Svante

    2016-02-01

    We analyze 25 previously identified transcription factor binding sites that carry DNA sequence changes that are present in all or nearly all present-day humans, yet occur in the ancestral state in Neandertals and Denisovans, the closest evolutionary relatives of humans. When the ancestral and derived forms of the transcription factor binding sites are tested using reporter constructs in 3 neuronal cell lines, the activity of 12 of the derived versions of transcription factor binding sites differ from the respective ancestral variants. This suggests that the majority of this class of evolutionary differences between modern humans and Neandertals may affect gene expression in at least some tissue or cell type. PMID:26454764

  1. Functional Analyses of Transcription Factor Binding Sites that Differ between Present-Day and Archaic Humans

    PubMed Central

    Weyer, Sven; Pääbo, Svante

    2016-01-01

    We analyze 25 previously identified transcription factor binding sites that carry DNA sequence changes that are present in all or nearly all present-day humans, yet occur in the ancestral state in Neandertals and Denisovans, the closest evolutionary relatives of humans. When the ancestral and derived forms of the transcription factor binding sites are tested using reporter constructs in 3 neuronal cell lines, the activity of 12 of the derived versions of transcription factor binding sites differ from the respective ancestral variants. This suggests that the majority of this class of evolutionary differences between modern humans and Neandertals may affect gene expression in at least some tissue or cell type. PMID:26454764

  2. Generative models of the human connectome

    PubMed Central

    Betzel, Richard F.; Avena-Koenigsberger, Andrea; Goñi, Joaquín; He, Ye; de Reus, Marcel A.; Griffa, Alessandra; Vértes, Petra E.; Mišic, Bratislav; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Hagmann, Patric; van den Heuvel, Martijn; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Bullmore, Edward T.; Sporns, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    The human connectome represents a network map of the brain's wiring diagram and the pattern into which its connections are organized is thought to play an important role in cognitive function. The generative rules that shape the topology of the human connectome remain incompletely understood. Earlier work in model organisms has suggested that wiring rules based on geometric relationships (distance) can account for many but likely not all topological features. Here we systematically explore a family of generative models of the human connectome that yield synthetic networks designed according to different wiring rules combining geometric and a broad range of topological factors. We find that a combination of geometric constraints with a homophilic attachment mechanism can create synthetic networks that closely match many topological characteristics of individual human connectomes, including features that were not included in the optimization of the generative model itself. We use these models to investigate a lifespan dataset and show that, with age, the model parameters undergo progressive changes, suggesting a rebalancing of the generative factors underlying the connectome across the lifespan. PMID:26427642

  3. Generative models of the human connectome.

    PubMed

    Betzel, Richard F; Avena-Koenigsberger, Andrea; Goñi, Joaquín; He, Ye; de Reus, Marcel A; Griffa, Alessandra; Vértes, Petra E; Mišic, Bratislav; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Hagmann, Patric; van den Heuvel, Martijn; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Bullmore, Edward T; Sporns, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    The human connectome represents a network map of the brain's wiring diagram and the pattern into which its connections are organized is thought to play an important role in cognitive function. The generative rules that shape the topology of the human connectome remain incompletely understood. Earlier work in model organisms has suggested that wiring rules based on geometric relationships (distance) can account for many but likely not all topological features. Here we systematically explore a family of generative models of the human connectome that yield synthetic networks designed according to different wiring rules combining geometric and a broad range of topological factors. We find that a combination of geometric constraints with a homophilic attachment mechanism can create synthetic networks that closely match many topological characteristics of individual human connectomes, including features that were not included in the optimization of the generative model itself. We use these models to investigate a lifespan dataset and show that, with age, the model parameters undergo progressive changes, suggesting a rebalancing of the generative factors underlying the connectome across the lifespan. PMID:26427642

  4. Macaca specific exon creation event generates a novel ZKSCAN5 transcript.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hyun; Choe, Se-Hee; Song, Bong-Seok; Park, Sang-Je; Kim, Myung-Jin; Park, Young-Ho; Yoon, Seung-Bin; Lee, Youngjeon; Jin, Yeung Bae; Sim, Bo-Woong; Kim, Ji-Su; Jeong, Kang-Jin; Kim, Sun-Uk; Lee, Sang-Rae; Park, Young-Il; Huh, Jae-Won; Chang, Kyu-Tae

    2016-02-15

    ZKSCAN5 (also known as ZFP95) is a zinc-finger protein belonging to the Krűppel family. ZKSCAN5 contains a SCAN box and a KRAB A domain and is proposed to play a distinct role during spermatogenesis. In humans, alternatively spliced ZKSCAN5 transcripts with different 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs) have been identified. However, investigation of our Macaca UniGene Database revealed novel alternative ZKSCAN5 transcripts that arose due to an exon creation event. Therefore, in this study, we identified the full-length sequences of ZKSCAN5 and its alternative transcripts in Macaca spp. Additionally, we investigated different nonhuman primate sequences to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the exon creation event. We analyzed the evolutionary features of the ZKSCAN5 transcripts by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and genomic PCR, and by sequencing various nonhuman primate DNA and RNA samples. The exon-created transcript was only detected in the Macaca lineage (crab-eating monkey and rhesus monkey). Full-length sequence analysis by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) identified ten full-length transcripts and four functional isoforms of ZKSCAN5. Protein sequence analyses revealed the presence of two groups of isoforms that arose because of differences in start-codon usage. Together, our results demonstrate that there has been specific selection for a discrete set of ZKSCAN5 variants in the Macaca lineage. Furthermore, study of this locus (and perhaps others) in Macaca spp. might facilitate our understanding of the evolutionary pressures that have shaped the mechanism of exon creation in primates. PMID:26657034

  5. Transcript analysis of a goat mesenteric lymph node by deep next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    E, G X; Zhao, Y J; Na, R S; Huang, Y F

    2016-01-01

    Deep RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) provides a practical and inexpensive alternative for exploring genomic data in non-model organisms. The functional annotation of non-model mammalian genomes, such as that of goats, is still poor compared to that of humans and mice. In the current study, we performed a whole transcriptome analysis of an intestinal mucous membrane lymph node to comprehensively characterize the transcript catalogue of this tissue in a goat. Using an Illumina HiSeq 4000 sequencing platform, 9.692 GB of raw reads were acquired. A total of 57,526 lymph transcripts were obtained, and the majority of these were mapped to known transcriptional units (42.67%). A comparison of the mRNA expression of the mesenteric lymph nodes during the juvenile and post-adolescent stages revealed 8949 transcripts that were differentially expressed, including 6174 known genes. In addition, we functionally classified these transcripts using Gene Ontology (GO) and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) terms. A total of 6174 known genes were assigned to 64 GO terms, and 3782 genes were assigned to 303 KEGG pathways, including some related to immunity. Our results reveal the complex transcriptome profile of the lymph node and suggest that the immune system is immature in the mesenteric lymph nodes of juvenile goats. PMID:27173308

  6. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Preventing disease spillover from animals to humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... update Transcript Preventing disease spillover from animals to humans : 07/11/2016 To use the sharing features ... accessible by entering the terms 'PREDICT (in all capital letters) - and UC Davis' in any search engine. ...

  7. Transcription factor IIIB generates extended DNA interactions in RNA polymerase III transcription complexes on tRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Kassavetis, G A; Riggs, D L; Negri, R; Nguyen, L H; Geiduschek, E P

    1989-01-01

    Transcription complexes that assemble on tRNA genes in a crude Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell extract extend over the entire transcription unit and approximately 40 base pairs of contiguous 5'-flanking DNA. We show here that the interaction with 5'-flanking DNA is due to a protein that copurifies with transcription factor TFIIIB through several steps of purification and shares characteristic properties that are normally ascribed to TFIIIB: dependence on prior binding of TFIIIC and great stability once the TFIIIC-TFIIIB-DNA complex is formed. SUP4 gene (tRNATyr) DNA that was cut within the 5'-flanking sequence (either 31 or 28 base pairs upstream of the transcriptional start site) was no longer able to stably incorporate TFIIIB into a transcription complex. The TFIIIB-dependent 5'-flanking DNA protein interaction was predominantly not sequence specific. The extension of the transcription complex into this DNA segment does suggest two possible explanations for highly diverse effects of flanking-sequence substitutions on tRNA gene transcription: either (i) proteins that are capable of binding to these upstream DNA segments are also potentially capable of stimulating or interfering with the incorporation of TFIIIB into transcription complexes or (ii) 5'-flanking sequence influences the rate of assembly of TFIIIB into stable transcription complexes. Images PMID:2668737

  8. Inhibition of RNA Polymerase II Transcription in Human Cells by Synthetic DNA-Binding Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Liliane A.; Gulizia, Richard J.; Trauger, John W.; Baird, Eldon E.; Mosier, Donald E.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.; Dervan, Peter B.

    1998-10-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding small molecules that can permeate human cells potentially could regulate transcription of specific genes. Multiple cellular DNA-binding transcription factors are required by HIV type 1 for RNA synthesis. Two pyrrole--imidazole polyamides were designed to bind DNA sequences immediately adjacent to binding sites for the transcription factors Ets-1, lymphoid-enhancer binding factor 1, and TATA-box binding protein. These synthetic ligands specifically inhibit DNA-binding of each transcription factor and HIV type 1 transcription in cell-free assays. When used in combination, the polyamides inhibit virus replication by >99% in isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no detectable cell toxicity. The ability of small molecules to target predetermined DNA sequences located with RNA polymerase II promoters suggests a general approach for regulation of gene expression, as well as a mechanism for the inhibition of viral replication.

  9. Human Transcription Factor hTAFII150 (CIF150) Is Involved in Transcriptional Regulation of Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jay; Halenbeck, Robert; Kaufmann, Jörg

    1999-01-01

    Here we present evidence that CIF150 (hTAFII150), the human homolog of Drosophila TAFII150, plays an important and selective role in establishing gene expression patterns necessary for progression through the cell cycle. Gel filtration experiments demonstrate that CIF150 (hTAFII150) seems to be less tightly associated with human transcription factor IID than hTAFII130 is associated with hTAFII250. The transient functional knockout of CIF150 (hTAFII150) protein led to cell cycle arrest at the G2/M transition in mammalian cell lines. PCR display analysis with the RNA derived from CIF150-depleted cells indicated that CIF150 (hTAFII150) is required for the transcription of only a subset of RNA polymerase II genes. CIF150 (hTAFII150) directly stimulated cyclin B1 and cyclin A transcription in cotransfection assays and in vitro assays, suggesting that the expression of these genes is dependent on CIF150 (hTAFII150) function. We defined a CIF150 (hTAFII150) consensus binding site and demonstrated that a CIF150-responsive cis element is present in the cyclin B1 core promoter. These results suggest that one function of CIF150 (hTAFII150) is to select specific RNA polymerase II core promoter elements involved in cell cycle progression. PMID:10409744

  10. Telomere-surrounding regions are transcription-permissive 3D nuclear compartments in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Quina, Ana Sofia; Parreira, Leonor . E-mail: lparreir@igc.gulbenkian.pt

    2005-07-01

    Positioning of genes relative to nuclear heterochromatic compartments is thought to help regulate their transcriptional activity. Given that human subtelomeric regions are rich in highly expressed genes, we asked whether human telomeres are related to transcription-permissive nuclear compartments. To address this question, we investigated in the nuclei of normal human lymphocytes the spatial relations of two constitutively expressed genes (ACTB and RARA) and three nuclear transcripts (ACTB, IL2RA and TCRB) to telomeres and centromeres, as a function of gene activity and transcription levels. We observed that genes and gene transcripts locate close to telomere clusters and away from chromocenters upon activation of transcription. These findings, together with the observation that SC35 domains, which are enriched in pre-mRNA processing factors, are in close proximity to telomeres, indicate that telomere-neighboring regions are permissive to gene expression in human cells. Therefore, the associations of telomeres observed in the interphase nucleus might contribute, as opposed to chromocenters, for the establishment of transcription-permissive 3D nuclear compartments.

  11. Identification of Multiple Forms of RNA Transcripts Associated with Human-Specific Retrotransposed Gene Copies.

    PubMed

    Mori, Saori; Hayashi, Masaaki; Inagaki, Shun; Oshima, Takuji; Tateishi, Ken; Fujii, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Shunsuke

    2016-01-01

    The human genome contains thousands of retrocopies, mostly as processed pseudogenes, which were recently shown to be prevalently transcribed. In particular, those specifically acquired in the human lineage are able to modulate gene expression in a manner that contributed to the evolution of human-specific traits. Therefore, knowledge of the human-specific retrocopies that are transcribed or their full-length transcript structure contributes to better understand human genome evolution. In this study, we identified 16 human-specific retrocopies that harbor 5' CpG islands by in silico analysis and showed that 12 were transcribed in normal tissues and cancer cell lines with a variety of expression patterns, including cancer-specific expression. Determination of the structure of the transcripts associated with the retrocopies revealed that none were transcribed from their 5' CpG islands, but rather, from inside the 3' UTR and the nearby 5' flanking region of the retrocopies as well as the promoter of neighboring genes. The multiple forms of the transcripts, such as chimeric and individual transcripts in both the sense and antisense orientation, might have introduced novel post-transcriptional regulation into the genome during human evolution. These results shed light on the potential role of human-specific retrocopies in the evolution of gene regulation and genomic disorders. PMID:27389689

  12. Identification of Multiple Forms of RNA Transcripts Associated with Human-Specific Retrotransposed Gene Copies

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Saori; Hayashi, Masaaki; Inagaki, Shun; Oshima, Takuji; Tateishi, Ken; Fujii, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Shunsuke

    2016-01-01

    The human genome contains thousands of retrocopies, mostly as processed pseudogenes, which were recently shown to be prevalently transcribed. In particular, those specifically acquired in the human lineage are able to modulate gene expression in a manner that contributed to the evolution of human-specific traits. Therefore, knowledge of the human-specific retrocopies that are transcribed or their full-length transcript structure contributes to better understand human genome evolution. In this study, we identified 16 human-specific retrocopies that harbor 5′ CpG islands by in silico analysis and showed that 12 were transcribed in normal tissues and cancer cell lines with a variety of expression patterns, including cancer-specific expression. Determination of the structure of the transcripts associated with the retrocopies revealed that none were transcribed from their 5′ CpG islands, but rather, from inside the 3′ UTR and the nearby 5′ flanking region of the retrocopies as well as the promoter of neighboring genes. The multiple forms of the transcripts, such as chimeric and individual transcripts in both the sense and antisense orientation, might have introduced novel post-transcriptional regulation into the genome during human evolution. These results shed light on the potential role of human-specific retrocopies in the evolution of gene regulation and genomic disorders. PMID:27389689

  13. Functional Domains of Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) Modulate INS-VNTR Transcription in Human Thymic Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Avis E; Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S

    2016-05-20

    INS-VNTR (insulin-variable number of tandem repeats) and AIRE (autoimmune regulator) have been associated with the modulation of insulin gene expression in thymus, which is essential to induce either insulin tolerance or the development of insulin autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes. We sought to analyze whether each functional domain of AIRE is critical for the activation of INS-VNTR in human thymic epithelial cells. Twelve missense or nonsense mutations in AIRE and two chimeric AIRE constructs were generated. A luciferase reporter assay and a pulldown assay using biotinylated INS-class I VNTR probe were performed to examine the transactivation and binding activities of WT, mutant, and chimeric AIREs on the INS-VNTR promoter. Confocal microscopy analysis was performed for WT or mutant AIRE cellular localization. We found that all of the AIRE mutations resulted in loss of transcriptional activation of INS-VNTR except mutant P252L. Using WT/mutant AIRE heterozygous forms to modulate the INS-VNTR target revealed five mutations (R257X, G228W, C311fsX376, L397fsX478, and R433fsX502) that functioned in a dominant negative fashion. The LXXLL-3 motif is identified for the first time to be essential for DNA binding to INS-VNTR, whereas the intact PHD1, PHD2, LXXLL-3, and LXXLL-4 motifs were important for successful transcriptional activation. AIRE nuclear localization in the human thymic epithelial cell line was disrupted by mutations in the homogenously staining region domain and the R257X mutation in the PHD1 domain. This study supports the notion that AIRE mutation could specifically affect human insulin gene expression in thymic epithelial cells through INS-VNTR and subsequently induce either insulin tolerance or autoimmunity. PMID:27048654

  14. Where does transcription start? 5′-RACE adapted to next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Leenen, Fleur A.D.; Vernocchi, Sara; Hunewald, Oliver E.; Schmitz, Stephanie; Molitor, Anne M.; Muller, Claude P.; Turner, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    The variability and complexity of the transcription initiation process was examined by adapting RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of 5′ cDNA ends (5′-RACE) to Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS). We oligo-labelled 5′-m7G-capped mRNA from two genes, the simple mono-exonic Beta-2-Adrenoceptor (ADRB2R) and the complex multi-exonic Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR, NR3C1), and detected a variability in TSS location that has received little attention up to now. Transcription was not initiated at a fixed TSS, but from loci of 4 to 10 adjacent nucleotides. Individual TSSs had frequencies from <0.001% to 38.5% of the total gene-specific 5′ m7G-capped transcripts. ADRB2R used a single locus consisting of 4 adjacent TSSs. Unstimulated, the GR used a total of 358 TSSs distributed throughout 38 loci, that were principally in the 5′ UTRs and were spliced using established donor and acceptor sites. Complete demethylation of the epigenetically sensitive GR promoter with 5-azacytidine induced one new locus and 127 TSSs, 12 of which were unique. We induced GR transcription with dexamethasone and Interferon-γ, adding one new locus and 185 additional TSSs distributed throughout the promoter region. In-vitro the TSS microvariability regulated mRNA translation efficiency and the relative abundance of the different GR N-terminal protein isoform levels. PMID:26615195

  15. Transcriptional trans activators of human and simian foamy viruses contain a small, highly conserved activation domain.

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, E D; He, F; Bogerd, H P; Cullen, B R

    1993-01-01

    The Bel-1 protein of human foamy virus is a potent transcriptional trans activator of its homologous long terminal repeat promoter element. Here, we demonstrate that Bel-1 can also efficiently activate gene expression when targeted to a heterologous promoter by fusion to the DNA-binding motif of the yeast GAL4 protein. Analysis of a series of deletion mutants of Bel-1 generated in this hybrid protein context suggests the presence of a single transcription activation domain that is fully contained within a discrete, approximately 30-amino-acid segment located proximal to the Bel-1 carboxy terminus. Although this short motif can be shown to function effectively in eukaryotic cells of mammalian, avian, and fungal origin, it does not bear any evident sequence homology to the known classes of eukaryotic activation domain. However, this Bel-1 activation domain was found to be fully conserved, in terms of both biological activity and location, in the distantly related Taf trans activator of simian foamy virus type 1. Images PMID:8411385

  16. Domain structure of a human general transcription initiation factor, TFIIF.

    PubMed Central

    Yonaha, M; Aso, T; Kobayashi, Y; Vasavada, H; Yasukochi, Y; Weissman, S M; Kitajima, S

    1993-01-01

    The structural and functional domains of a general transcription initiation factor, TFIIF (RAP30/74, FC), have been investigated using various deletion mutants of each subunit, both in vivo and in vitro. An in vivo assay showed that the N-terminal sequence containing residues of 1-110 of RAP30 that is located close to a sigma homology region interacts with a minimum sequence of residues 62-171 of RAP74 to form a heteromeric interaction. Reconstitution of in vitro transcription activity by deletion mutants of RAP74 clearly indicated that both N-terminal residues 73-205 and C-terminal residues 356-517 are essential for full activity, the former interacting with RAP30, thus complexing with RNA polymerase II. From these data, the functional significance of domain structure of TFIIF is discussed in terms of its sigma homology sequences and complex formation with RNA polymerase II in the initiation and elongation of transcription. Images PMID:8441635

  17. Transcriptional networks implicated in human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hua; Liu, Wei

    2015-10-01

    The transcriptome of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) was investigated in several studies. However, the implications of transcriptional networks in progressive NAFLD are not clear and mechanisms inducing transition from nonalcoholic simple fatty liver (NAFL) to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are still elusive. The aims of this study were to (1) construct networks for progressive NAFLD, (2) identify hub genes and functional modules in these networks and (3) infer potential linkages among hub genes, transcription factors and microRNAs (miRNA) for NAFLD progression. A systems biology approach by combining differential expression analysis and weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was utilized to dissect transcriptional profiles in 19 normal, 10 NAFL and 16 NASH patients. Based on this framework, 3 modules related to chromosome organization, proteasomal ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation and immune response were identified in NASH network. Furthermore, 9 modules of co-expressed genes associated with NAFL/NASH transition were found. Further characterization of these modules defined 13 highly connected hub genes in NAFLD progression network. Interestingly, 11 significantly changed miRNAs were predicted to target 10 of the 13 hub genes. Characterization of modules and hub genes that may be regulated by miRNAs could facilitate the identification of candidate genes and pathways responsible for NAFL/NASH transition and lead to a better understanding of NAFLD pathogenesis. The identified modules and hub genes may point to potential targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:25851235

  18. Generation of a transcription map at the HSD17B locus centromeric to BRCA1 at 17q21

    SciTech Connect

    Rommens, J.M.; McArthur, J.; Allen, T.

    1995-08-10

    A detailed transcription map of the 320-kb region containing the HSD17B locus on chromosome 17 was generated. Thirty unique cDNA fragments, retrieved following the hybridization of immobilized YACs to primary pools of cDNAs prepared from RNA of mammary gland, ovary, placenta, and the Caco-2 cell line, were aligned into 10 transcription units by physical mapping and hybridization to RNAs of a series of tissues. The cDNAs were then further characterized by sequencing and used to screen mammary gland DNA libraries. Fragments corresponding to the broadly expressed {gamma}-tubulin and Ki antigen genes were identified. A full-length cDNA clone encoding a 117-amino-acid protein homologous to the rat ribosomal protein L34 was isolated. Portions of genes with restricted patterns of expression were also obtained, including the previously characterized HSD17B1. One new gene, for which a full-length cDNA was isolated, was found to have an interesting tissue-specific pattern of expression with abundant mRNA in both the colon and the testis and in the mammary carcinoma cell line BT-474. This contrasted with the barely detectable level observed in several tissues including normal mammary gland. Of the five additional transcription units identified, one showed no similarity, two showed identity to human expressed sequences, and two displayed similarity to genes of animal species by amino acid alignment. These latter cDNA clones include potential homologues of a rat nuclear tyrosine phosphatase and of a factor of Drosophila that is known to be involved in the negative regulation of transcription of segment identity genes. 44 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Tissue-specific transcript annotation and expression profiling with complementary next-generation sequencing technologies

    PubMed Central

    Hestand, Matthew S.; Klingenhoff, Andreas; Scherf, Matthias; Ariyurek, Yavuz; Ramos, Yolande; van Workum, Wilbert; Suzuki, Makoto; Werner, Thomas; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Harbers, Matthias; 't Hoen, Peter A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing is excellently suited to evaluate the abundance of mRNAs to study gene expression. Here we compare two alternative technologies, cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) and serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), for the same RNA samples. Along with quantifying gene expression levels, CAGE can be used to identify tissue-specific transcription start sites, while SAGE monitors 3′-end usage. We used both methods to get more insight into the transcriptional control of myogenesis, studying differential gene expression in differentiated and proliferating C2C12 myoblast cells with statistical evaluation of reproducibility and differential gene expression. Both CAGE and SAGE provided highly reproducible data (Pearson's correlations >0.92 among biological triplicates). With both methods we found around 10 000 genes expressed at levels 2 transcripts per million (0.3 copies per cell), with an overlap of 86%. We identified 4304 and 3846 genes differentially expressed between proliferating and differentiated C2C12 cells by CAGE and SAGE, respectively, with an overlap of 2144. We identified 196 novel regulatory regions with preferential use in proliferating or differentiated cells. Next-generation sequencing of CAGE and SAGE libraries provides consistent expression levels and can enrich current genome annotations with tissue-specific promoters and alternative 3′-UTR usage. PMID:20615900

  20. Chromatin states reveal functional associations for globally defined transcription start sites in four human cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Deciphering the most common modes by which chromatin regulates transcription, and how this is related to cellular status and processes is an important task for improving our understanding of human cellular biology. The FANTOM5 and ENCODE projects represent two independent large scale efforts to map regulatory and transcriptional features to the human genome. Here we investigate chromatin features around a comprehensive set of transcription start sites in four cell lines by integrating data from these two projects. Results Transcription start sites can be distinguished by chromatin states defined by specific combinations of both chromatin mark enrichment and the profile shapes of these chromatin marks. The observed patterns can be associated with cellular functions and processes, and they also show association with expression level, location relative to nearby genes, and CpG content. In particular we find a substantial number of repressed inter- and intra-genic transcription start sites enriched for active chromatin marks and Pol II, and these sites are strongly associated with immediate-early response processes and cell signaling. Associations between start sites with similar chromatin patterns are validated by significant correlations in their global expression profiles. Conclusions The results confirm the link between chromatin state and cellular function for expressed transcripts, and also indicate that active chromatin states at repressed transcripts may poise transcripts for rapid activation during immune response. PMID:24669905

  1. Reduced DNA methylation patterning and transcriptional connectivity define human skin aging.

    PubMed

    Bormann, Felix; Rodríguez-Paredes, Manuel; Hagemann, Sabine; Manchanda, Himanshu; Kristof, Boris; Gutekunst, Julian; Raddatz, Günter; Haas, Rainer; Terstegen, Lara; Wenck, Horst; Kaderali, Lars; Winnefeld, Marc; Lyko, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Epigenetic changes represent an attractive mechanism for understanding the phenotypic changes associated with human aging. Age-related changes in DNA methylation at the genome scale have been termed 'epigenetic drift', but the defining features of this phenomenon remain to be established. Human epidermis represents an excellent model for understanding age-related epigenetic changes because of its substantial cell-type homogeneity and its well-known age-related phenotype. We have now generated and analyzed the currently largest set of human epidermis methylomes (N = 108) using array-based profiling of 450 000 methylation marks in various age groups. Data analysis confirmed that age-related methylation differences are locally restricted and characterized by relatively small effect sizes. Nevertheless, methylation data could be used to predict the chronological age of sample donors with high accuracy. We also identified discontinuous methylation changes as a novel feature of the aging methylome. Finally, our analysis uncovered an age-related erosion of DNA methylation patterns that is characterized by a reduced dynamic range and increased heterogeneity of global methylation patterns. These changes in methylation variability were accompanied by a reduced connectivity of transcriptional networks. Our findings thus define the loss of epigenetic regulatory fidelity as a key feature of the aging epigenome. PMID:27004597

  2. Regulation of the expression of human C[epsilon] germline transcript

    SciTech Connect

    Ichiki, T.; Takahashi, W.; Watanabe, T. )

    1993-06-15

    Transcriptional regulation for Ig H chain germline transcripts induced by cytokines is a topic of recent interest for the understanding of the mechanism of class switch recombination. Among human B cell lines examined, the authors have found that a human IgM-producing B cell line, DND39 (EBV negative) expressed germ-line transcripts of [epsilon] constant gene (C[epsilon]) when stimulated with lL-4. In this study, the regulatory element responsible for the expression of lL-4-induced human C[epsilon] germ-line transcript was determined using DND39 cells. To identify the lL-4 responsive promotor/enhancer element, deletion analysis of the upstream region of the germ-line exon (l[epsilon]) of the C[epsilon] germ-line transcript which is located 5' to the switch region, was performed by using a luciferase gene as a reporter. Deletion analysis showed that a DNA fragment which lies between [minus]215 and [minus]154 bp upstream from the most 3' transcriptional initiation site of human l[epsilon] gene is fully responsible for the induction of germ-line transcripts by IL-4. According to a mutational analysis, the DNA fragment between [minus]163 and [minus]152 bp was identified to be a novel IL-4 responsive element in a human C[epsilon] gene. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift assay showed the presence of IL-4-induced nuclear factor that specifically bound to this IL-4 responsive element. This novel IL-4 responsive element and an IL-4-induced DNA binding protein may play an important role for the induction of C[epsilon] germ-line transcript as well as class switching to IgE. 54 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Partial Conservation between Mice and Humans in Olfactory Bulb Interneuron Transcription Factor Codes

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Nana; Cave, John W.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian main olfactory bulb (OB) has a large population of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons that contains several subtypes defined by the co-expression other neurotransmitters and calcium binding proteins. The three most commonly studied OB interneuron subtypes co-express either Calretinin, Calbindin, or Tyrosine hydroxylase (Th). Combinations of transcription factors used to specify the phenotype of progenitors are referred to as transcription factor codes, and the current understanding of transcription factor codes that specify OB inhibitory neuron phenotypes are largely based on studies in mice. The conservation of these transcription factor codes in the human OB, however, has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to establish whether transcription factor codes in OB interneurons are conserved between mice and humans. This study compared the co-expression of Foxp2, Meis2, Pax6, and Sp8 transcription factors with Calretinin, Calbindin, or Th in human and mouse OB interneurons. This analysis found strong conservation of Calretinin co-expression with Sp8 and Meis2 as well as Th co-expression with Pax6 and Meis2. This analysis also showed that selective Foxp2 co-expression with Calbindin was conserved between mice and humans, which suggests Foxp2 is a novel determinant of the OB Calbindin interneuron phenotype. Together, the findings in this study provide insight into the conservation of transcription codes for OB interneuron phenotypes between humans and mice, as well as reveal some important differences between the species. This advance in our understanding of transcription factor codes in OB interneurons provides an important complement to the codes that have been established for other regions within the mammalian central nervous system, such as the cortex and spinal cord. PMID:27489533

  4. Partial Conservation between Mice and Humans in Olfactory Bulb Interneuron Transcription Factor Codes.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Nana; Cave, John W

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian main olfactory bulb (OB) has a large population of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons that contains several subtypes defined by the co-expression other neurotransmitters and calcium binding proteins. The three most commonly studied OB interneuron subtypes co-express either Calretinin, Calbindin, or Tyrosine hydroxylase (Th). Combinations of transcription factors used to specify the phenotype of progenitors are referred to as transcription factor codes, and the current understanding of transcription factor codes that specify OB inhibitory neuron phenotypes are largely based on studies in mice. The conservation of these transcription factor codes in the human OB, however, has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to establish whether transcription factor codes in OB interneurons are conserved between mice and humans. This study compared the co-expression of Foxp2, Meis2, Pax6, and Sp8 transcription factors with Calretinin, Calbindin, or Th in human and mouse OB interneurons. This analysis found strong conservation of Calretinin co-expression with Sp8 and Meis2 as well as Th co-expression with Pax6 and Meis2. This analysis also showed that selective Foxp2 co-expression with Calbindin was conserved between mice and humans, which suggests Foxp2 is a novel determinant of the OB Calbindin interneuron phenotype. Together, the findings in this study provide insight into the conservation of transcription codes for OB interneuron phenotypes between humans and mice, as well as reveal some important differences between the species. This advance in our understanding of transcription factor codes in OB interneurons provides an important complement to the codes that have been established for other regions within the mammalian central nervous system, such as the cortex and spinal cord. PMID:27489533

  5. Transcriptional profiling in an MPNST-derived cell line and normal human Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    LEE, PHILIP R.; COHEN, JONATHAN E.; TENDI, ELISABETTA A.; FARRER, ROBERT; DE VRIES, GEORGE H.; BECKER, KEVIN G.; FIELDS, R. DOUGLAS

    2005-01-01

    cDNA microarrays were utilized to identify abnormally expressed genes in a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST)-derived cell line, T265, by comparing the mRNA abundance profiles with that of normal human Schwann cells (nhSCs). The findings characterize the molecular phenotype of this important cell-line model of MPNSTs, and elucidate the contribution of Schwann cells in MPNSTs. In total, 4608 cDNA sequences were screened and hybridizations replicated on custom cDNA microarrays. In order to verify the microarray data, a large selection of differentially expressed mRNA transcripts were subjected to semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR (LightCycler). Western blotting was performed to investigate a selection of genes and signal transduction pathways, as a further validation of the microarray data. The data generated from multiple microarray screens, semi-quantitative RT–PCR and Western blotting are in broad agreement. This study represents a comprehensive gene-expression analysis of an MPNST-derived cell line and the first comprehensive global mRNA profile of nhSCs in culture. This study has identified ~900 genes that are expressed abnormally in the T265 cell line and detected many genes not previously reported to be expressed in nhSCs. The results provide crucial information on the T265 cells that is essential for investigation using this cell line in experimental studies in neurofibromatosis type I (NF1), and important information on normal human Schwann cells that is applicable to a wide range of studies on Schwann cells in cell culture. PMID:16429615

  6. Structure and transcription of the human c-mpl gene (MPL)

    SciTech Connect

    Mignotte, V.; Vigon, I.; De Crevecoeur, E.B.; Romeo, P.H.; Lemarchandel, V. ); Chretien, S. )

    1994-03-01

    The human c-mpl proto-oncogene encodes a member of the cytokine receptor superfamily, expressed mainly in CD 34-positive hematopoietic progenitors and in the megakaryocytic lineage. To investigate the elements required for this tissue-specific expression, the authors cloned the human c-mpl gene (MPL) as well as the 5[prime] end of the mouse gene. The human c-mpl gene contains 12 exons distributed over 17 kb of DNA. Each of the two [open quotes]cytokine receptor domains[close quotes] of Mpl is encoded by a set of four exons, the transmembrane domain by a single exon and the cytoplasmic domain by two exons. They also describe how three types of mRNA, encoding different proteins, are generated. The major species contains all 12 exons; mRNAs encoding a protein with a smaller cytoplasmic domain are produced by termination of the transcript within intron 10, and mrNAs encoding a putatitive soluble form of the c-Mpl protein lack exons 9 and 10. The promoter regions of the human and mouse genes were characterized. These promoters are GC-rich and contain putative binding sites for proteins of the Ets and GATA families. Finally, they show that a 700-bp fragment of the human c-mpl promoter is active in the HEL and K562 cell lines, which express erythroid and megakaryocytic markers, but is inactive in the nonhematopoietic HeLa cell line and the Jurkat T lymphoid cell line. 47 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Reshuffling transcriptional circuits: how microorganisms adapt to colonize the human body

    PubMed Central

    De, Sonakshi; Pérez, J Christian

    2014-01-01

    Several hundred taxa of microorganisms—including bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes—inhabit the human body. What did it take for these species to become stable residents of humans? Recent reports illustrate how evolutionary changes in transcriptional circuits played a pivotal role in the adaptation of single-celled eukaryotes to colonize mammals. PMID:25483603

  8. Regulation of PURA gene transcription by three promoters generating distinctly spliced 5-prime leaders: a novel means of fine control over tissue specificity and viral signals

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Purα is an evolutionarily conserved cellular protein participating in processes of DNA replication, transcription, and RNA transport; all involving binding to nucleic acids and altering conformation and physical positioning. The distinct but related roles of Purα suggest a need for expression regulated differently depending on intracellular and external signals. Results Here we report that human PURA (hPURA) transcription is regulated from three distinct and widely-separated transcription start sites (TSS). Each of these TSS is strongly homologous to a similar site in mouse chromosomal DNA. Transcripts from TSS I and II are characterized by the presence of large and overlapping 5'-UTR introns terminated at the same splice receptor site. Transfection of lung carcinoma cells with wild-type or mutated hPURA 5' upstream sequences identifies different regulatory elements. TSS III, located within 80 bp of the translational start codon, is upregulated by E2F1, CAAT and NF-Y binding elements. Transcription at TSS II is downregulated through the presence of adjacent consensus binding elements for interferon regulatory factors (IRFs). Chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals that IRF-3 protein binds hPURA promoter sequences at TSS II in vivo. By co-transfecting hPURA reporter plasmids with expression plasmids for IRF proteins we demonstrate that several IRFs, including IRF-3, down-regulate PURA transcription. Infection of NIH 3T3 cells with mouse cytomegalovirus results in a rapid decrease in levels of mPURA mRNA and Purα protein. The viral infection alters the degree of splicing of the 5'-UTR introns of TSS II transcripts. Conclusions Results provide evidence for a novel mechanism of transcriptional control by multiple promoters used differently in various tissues and cells. Viral infection alters not only the use of PURA promoters but also the generation of different non-coding RNAs from 5'-UTRs of the resulting transcripts. PMID:21062477

  9. Structural and transcriptional analysis of human papillomavirus type 16 sequences in cervical carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, C C; Phelps, W C; Lindgren, V; Braun, M J; Gonda, M A; Howley, P M

    1987-01-01

    We cloned and analyzed the integrated human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) genomes that are present in the human cervical carcinoma cell lines SiHa and CaSki. The single HPV-16 genome in the SiHa line was cloned as a 10-kilobase (kb) HindIII fragment. Integration of the HPV-16 genome occurred at bases 3132 and 3384 with disruption of the E2 and E4 open reading frames (ORFs). An additional 52-base-pair deletion of HPV-16 sequences fused the E2 and E4 ORFs. the 5' portion of the disrupted E2 ORF terminated immediately in the contiguous human right-flanking sequences. Heteroduplex analysis of this cloned integrated viral genome with the prototype HPV-16 DNA revealed no other deletions, insertions, or rearrangements. DNA sequence analysis of the E1 ORF, however, revealed the presence of an additional guanine at nucleotide 1138, resulting in the fusion of the E1a and E1b ORFs into a single E1 ORF. Sequence analysis of the human flanking sequences revealed one-half of an Alu sequence at the left junction and a sequence highly homologous to the human O repeat in the right-flanking region. Analysis of the three most abundant BamHI clones from the CaSki line showed that these consisted of full-length, 7.9-kb HPV-16 DNA; a 6.5-kb genome resulting from a 1.4-kb deletion of the long control region; and a 10.5-kb clone generated by a 2.6-kb tandem repeat of the 3' early region. These HPV-16 genomes were arranged in the host chromosomes as head-to-tail, tandemly repeated arrays. Transcription analysis revealed expression of the HPV-16 genome in each of these two cervical carcinoma cell lines, albeit at significantly different levels. Preliminary mapping of the viral RNA with subgenomic strand-specific probes indicated that viral transcription appeared to be derived primarily from the E6 and E7 ORFs. Images PMID:3029430

  10. Human SWI-SNF Component BRG1 Represses Transcription of the c-fos Gene

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Daniel J.; Hardy, Stephen; Engel, Daniel A.

    1999-01-01

    Yeast and mammalian SWI-SNF complexes regulate transcription through active modification of chromatin structure. Human SW-13 adenocarcinoma cells lack BRG1 protein, a component of SWI-SNF that has a DNA-dependent ATPase activity essential for SWI-SNF function. Expression of BRG1 in SW-13 cells potentiated transcriptional activation by the glucocorticoid receptor, which is known to require SWI-SNF function. BRG1 also specifically repressed transcription from a transfected c-fos promoter and correspondingly blocked transcriptional activation of the endogenous c-fos gene. Mutation of lysine residue 798 in the DNA-dependent ATPase domain of BRG1 significantly reduced its ability to repress c-fos transcription. Repression by BRG1 required the cyclic AMP response element of the c-fos promoter but not nearby binding sites for Sp1, YY1, or TFII-I. Using human C33A cervical carcinoma cells, which lack BRG1 and also express a nonfunctional Rb protein, transcriptional repression by BRG1 was weak unless wild-type Rb was also supplied. Interestingly, Rb-dependent repression by BRG1 was found to take place through a pathway that is independent of transcription factor E2F. PMID:10082538

  11. Transcriptional signatures of Ral GTPase are associated with aggressive clinicopathologic characteristics in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Steven C.; Baras, Alexander S.; Owens, Charles R.; Dancik, Garrett; Theodorescu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    RalA and RalB are small GTPases which support malignant development and progression in experimental models of bladder, prostate and squamous cancer. However, demonstration of their clinical relevance in human tumors remains lacking. Here, we developed tools to evaluate Ral protein expression, activation and transcriptional output and evaluated their association with clinicopathologic parameters in common human tumor types. In order to evaluate the relevance of Ral activation and transcriptional output, we correlated RalA and RalB activation with the mutational status of key human bladder cancer genes. We also identified and evaluated a “transcriptional signature” of genes that correlates with depletion of RalA and RalB in vivo. The Ral transcriptional signature score, but not protein expression as evaluated by immunohistochemistry, predicted disease stage, progression to muscle invasion, and survival in human bladder cancers, and metastatic and stem cell phenotypes in bladder cancer models. In prostate cancer, the Ral transcriptional signature score was associated with seminal vesicle invasion, androgen-independent progression, and reduced survival. In squamous cell carcinoma, this score was decreased in cancer tissues compared with normal mucosa, validating the experimental findings that Ral acts as a tumor-suppressor in this tumor type. Together, our findings demonstrate the clinical relevance of Ral in human cancer and provide a rationale for the development of Ral-directed therapies. PMID:22586063

  12. Human Mitochondrial Transcription Initiation Complexes Have Similar Topology on the Light and Heavy Strand Promoters.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Yaroslav I; Temiakov, Dmitry

    2016-06-24

    Transcription is a highly regulated process in all domains of life. In human mitochondria, transcription of the circular genome involves only two promoters, called light strand promoter (LSP) and heavy strand promoter (HSP), located in the opposite DNA strands. Initiation of transcription occurs upon sequential assembly of an initiation complex that includes mitochondrial RNA polymerase (mtRNAP) and the initiation factors mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and TFB2M. It has been recently suggested that the transcription initiation factor TFAM binds to HSP and LSP in opposite directions, implying that the mechanisms of transcription initiation are drastically dissimilar at these promoters. In contrast, we found that binding of TFAM to HSP and the subsequent recruitment of mtRNAP results in a pre-initiation complex that is remarkably similar in topology and properties to that formed at the LSP promoter. Our data suggest that assembly of the pre-initiation complexes on LSP and HSP brings these transcription units in close proximity, providing an opportunity for regulatory proteins to simultaneously control transcription initiation in both mtDNA strands. PMID:27226527

  13. The transcriptional regulator network of human inflammatory macrophages is defined by open chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Susanne V; Krebs, Wolfgang; Ulas, Thomas; Xue, Jia; Baßler, Kevin; Günther, Patrick; Hardt, Anna-Lena; Schultze, Hartmut; Sander, Jil; Klee, Kathrin; Theis, Heidi; Kraut, Michael; Beyer, Marc; Schultze, Joachim L

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation of inflammatory macrophages from monocytes is characterized by an orderly integration of epigenetic and transcriptional regulatory mechanisms guided by lineage-determining transcription factors such as PU.1. Further activation of macrophages leads to a stimulus- or microenvironment-specific signal integration with subsequent transcriptional control established by the action of tissue- or signal-associated transcription factors. Here, we assess four histone modifications during human macrophage activation and integrate this information with the gene expression data from 28 different macrophage activation conditions in combination with GM-CSF. Bioinformatically, for inflammatory macrophages we define a unique network of transcriptional and epigenetic regulators (TRs), which was characterized by accessible promoters independent of the activation signal. In contrast to the general accessibility of promoters of TRs, mRNA expression of central TRs belonging to the TR network displayed stimulus-specific expression patterns, indicating a second level of transcriptional regulation beyond epigenetic chromatin changes. In contrast, stringent integration of epigenetic and transcriptional regulation was observed in networks of TRs established from somatic tissues and tissue macrophages. In these networks, clusters of TRs with permissive histone marks were associated with high gene expression whereas clusters with repressive chromatin marks were associated with absent gene expression. Collectively, these results support that macrophage activation during inflammation in contrast to lineage determination is mainly regulated transcriptionally by a pre-defined TR network. PMID:26729620

  14. Transcriptional regulation of human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase genes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dong Gui; Meech, Robyn; McKinnon, Ross A; Mackenzie, Peter I

    2014-11-01

    Glucuronidation is an important metabolic pathway for many small endogenous and exogenous lipophilic compounds, including bilirubin, steroid hormones, bile acids, carcinogens and therapeutic drugs. Glucuronidation is primarily catalyzed by the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A and two subfamilies, including nine functional UGT1A enzymes (1A1, 1A3-1A10) and 10 functional UGT2 enzymes (2A1, 2A2, 2A3, 2B4, 2B7, 2B10, 2B11, 2B15, 2B17 and 2B28). Most UGTs are expressed in the liver and this expression relates to the major role of hepatic glucuronidation in systemic clearance of toxic lipophilic compounds. Hepatic glucuronidation activity protects the body from chemical insults and governs the therapeutic efficacy of drugs that are inactivated by UGTs. UGT mRNAs have also been detected in over 20 extrahepatic tissues with a unique complement of UGT mRNAs seen in almost every tissue. This extrahepatic glucuronidation activity helps to maintain homeostasis and hence regulates biological activity of endogenous molecules that are primarily inactivated by UGTs. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying tissue-specific UGT expression has been the subject of a large number of studies over the last two decades. These studies have shown that the constitutive and inducible expression of UGTs is primarily regulated by tissue-specific and ligand-activated transcription factors (TFs) via their binding to cis-regulatory elements (CREs) in UGT promoters and enhancers. This review first briefly summarizes published UGT gene transcriptional studies and the experimental models and tools utilized in these studies, and then describes in detail the TFs and their respective CREs that have been identified in the promoters and/or enhancers of individual UGT genes. PMID:25336387

  15. GAD2 Alternative Transcripts in the Human Prefrontal Cortex, and in Schizophrenia and Affective Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Gao, Yuan; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C.; Lipska, Barbara K.; Shin, Joo Heon; Xie, Bin; Ye, Tianzhang; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Kleinman, Joel E.; Hyde, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variation and early adverse environmental events work together to increase risk for schizophrenia. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in adult mammalian brain, plays a major role in normal brain development, and has been strongly implicated in the pathobiology of schizophrenia. GABA synthesis is controlled by two glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) genes, GAD1 and GAD2, both of which produce a number of alternative transcripts. Genetic variants in the GAD1 gene are associated with increased risk for schizophrenia, and reduced expression of its major transcript in the human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). No consistent changes in GAD2 expression have been found in brains from patients with schizophrenia. In this work, with the use of RNA sequencing and PCR technologies, we confirmed and tracked the expression of an alternative truncated transcript of GAD2 (ENST00000428517) in human control DLPFC homogenates across lifespan besides the well-known full length transcript of GAD2. In addition, using quantitative RT-PCR, expression of GAD2 full length and truncated transcripts were measured in the DLPFC of patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression. The expression of GAD2 full length transcript is decreased in the DLPFC of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients, while GAD2 truncated transcript is increased in bipolar disorder patients but decreased in schizophrenia patients. Moreover, the patients with schizophrenia with completed suicide or positive nicotine exposure showed significantly higher expression of GAD2 full length transcript. Alternative transcripts of GAD2 may be important in the growth and development of GABA-synthesizing neurons as well as abnormal GABA signaling in the DLPFC of patients with schizophrenia and affective disorders. PMID:26848839

  16. Transcriptional specialization of human dendritic cell subsets in response to microbial vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Banchereau, Romain; Baldwin, Nicole; Cepika, Alma-Martina; Athale, Shruti; Xue, Yaming; Yu, Chun I; Metang, Patrick; Cheruku, Abhilasha; Berthier, Isabelle; Gayet, Ingrid; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ohouo, Marina; Snipes, LuAnn; Xu, Hui; Obermoser, Gerlinde; Blankenship, Derek; Oh, Sangkon; Ramilo, Octavio; Chaussabel, Damien; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, Karolina; Pascual, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms by which microbial vaccines interact with human APCs remain elusive. Herein, we describe the transcriptional programs induced in human DCs by pathogens, innate receptor ligands and vaccines. Exposure of DCs to influenza, Salmonella enterica and Staphylococcus aureus allows us to build a modular framework containing 204 transcript clusters. We use this framework to characterize the responses of human monocytes, monocyte-derived DCs and blood DC subsets to 13 vaccines. Different vaccines induce distinct transcriptional programs based on pathogen type, adjuvant formulation and APC targeted. Fluzone, Pneumovax and Gardasil, respectively, activate monocyte-derived DCs, monocytes and CD1c+ blood DCs, highlighting APC specialization in response to vaccines. Finally, the blood signatures from individuals vaccinated with Fluzone or infected with influenza reveal a signature of adaptive immunity activation following vaccination and symptomatic infections, but not asymptomatic infections. These data, offered with a web interface, may guide the development of improved vaccines. PMID:25335753

  17. Expression and purification of recombinant human c-Fos/c-Jun that is highly active in DNA binding and transcriptional activation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Heather A.; Goodrich, James A.

    2001-01-01

    c-Fos and c-Jun are members of the AP-1 family of transcriptional activators that regulate the expression of genes during cell proliferation. To facilitate in vitro studies of mechanisms of transcriptional activation by c-Jun and c-Fos we developed a method for obtaining recombinant c-Fos/c-Jun that is highly active in DNA binding and transcriptional activation in vitro. Full-length human c-Fos and c-Jun were expressed in Escherichia coli. The expression of c-Fos was dependent on a helper plasmid that encodes rare ArgtRNAs. Both over-expressed c-Fos and c-Jun were recovered from inclusion bodies. A c-Fos/c-Jun complex was generated by co-renaturation and purified via a His-tag on the full-length human c-Fos. The resulting c-Fos/c-Jun bound DNA with high affinity and specificity, and activated transcription in a reconstituted human RNA polymerase II transcription system. The availability of active recombinant human c-Fos/c-Jun will allow future biochemical studies of these important transcriptional activators. PMID:11600717

  18. Transcriptional Regulation of the Human P450 Oxidoreductase Gene: Hormonal Regulation and Influence of Promoter Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Meng Kian; Huang, Ningwu; Damm, Izabella

    2011-01-01

    P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is the flavoprotein that acts as the obligatory electron donor to all microsomal P450 enzymes, including those involved in hepatic drug metabolism as well as three steroidogenic P450 enzymes. The untranslated first exon of human POR was located recently, permitting analysis of human POR transcription. Expression of deletional mutants containing up to 3193 bp of the human POR promoter in human adrenal NCI-H295A and liver Hep-G2 cells located the proximal promoter at −325/−1 bp from the untranslated exon. Common human POR polymorphisms at −208 and −173 had little influence on transcription, but the polymorphism at −152 reduced transcription significantly in both cell lines. EMSA and supershift assays identified binding of Smad3/Smad4 between −249 and −261 and binding of thyroid hormone receptor-β (TRβ) at −240/−245. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that Smad3, Smad4, TRα, TRβ, and estrogen receptor-α were bound between −374 and −149. Cotransfection of vectors for these transcription factors and POR promoter-reporter constructs into both cell types followed by hormonal treatment showed that T3 exerts major tropic effects via TRβ, with TRα, estrogen receptor-α, Smad3, and Smad4 exerting lesser, modulatory effects. T3 also increased POR mRNA in both cell lines. Thyroid hormone also is essential for rat liver POR expression but acts via different transcription factor complexes. These are the first data on human POR gene transcription, establishing roles for TRβ and Smad3/4 in its expression and indicating that the common polymorphism at −152 may play a role in genetic variation in steroid biosynthesis and drug metabolism. PMID:21393444

  19. Transcriptional PROFILING OF MUCOCILIARY DIFFERENTIATION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    When cultured at an air-liquid interface (ALI) in the appropriate medium, primary human airway epithelial cells form a polarized, pseudostratified epithelium composed of ciliated and mucus-secreting cells. This culture system provides a useful tool for the in vitro study of...

  20. Fusion Transcript Discovery in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Human Breast Cancer Tissues Reveals a Link to Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Ambannavar, Ranjana; Stephans, James; Jeong, Jennie; Dei Rossi, Andrew; Liu, Mei-Lan; Friedman, Adam J.; Londry, Jason J.; Abramson, Richard; Beasley, Ellen M.; Baker, Joffre; Levy, Samuel; Qu, Kunbin

    2014-01-01

    The identification of gene fusions promises to play an important role in personalized cancer treatment decisions. Many rare gene fusion events have been identified in fresh frozen solid tumors from common cancers employing next-generation sequencing technology. However the ability to detect transcripts from gene fusions in RNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor tissues, which exist in very large sample repositories for which disease outcome is known, is still limited due to the low complexity of FFPE libraries and the lack of appropriate bioinformatics methods. We sought to develop a bioinformatics method, named gFuse, to detect fusion transcripts in FFPE tumor tissues. An integrated, cohort based strategy has been used in gFuse to examine single-end 50 base pair (bp) reads generated from FFPE RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) datasets employing two breast cancer cohorts of 136 and 76 patients. In total, 118 fusion events were detected transcriptome-wide at base-pair resolution across the 212 samples. We selected 77 candidate fusions based on their biological relevance to cancer and supported 61% of these using TaqMan assays. Direct sequencing of 19 of the fusion sequences identified by TaqMan confirmed them. Three unique fused gene pairs were recurrent across the 212 patients with 6, 3, 2 individuals harboring these fusions respectively. We show here that a high frequency of fusion transcripts detected at the whole transcriptome level correlates with poor outcome (P<0.0005) in human breast cancer patients. This study demonstrates the ability to detect fusion transcripts as biomarkers from archival FFPE tissues, and the potential prognostic value of the fusion transcripts detected. PMID:24727804

  1. Nanoparticle-mediated transcriptional modification enhances neuronal differentiation of human neural stem cells following transplantation in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowei; Tzeng, Stephany Y; Liu, Xiaoyan; Tammia, Markus; Cheng, Yu-Hao; Rolfe, Andrew; Sun, Dong; Zhang, Ning; Green, Jordan J; Wen, Xuejun; Mao, Hai-Quan

    2016-04-01

    Strategies to enhance survival and direct the differentiation of stem cells in vivo following transplantation in tissue repair site are critical to realizing the potential of stem cell-based therapies. Here we demonstrated an effective approach to promote neuronal differentiation and maturation of human fetal tissue-derived neural stem cells (hNSCs) in a brain lesion site of a rat traumatic brain injury model using biodegradable nanoparticle-mediated transfection method to deliver key transcriptional factor neurogenin-2 to hNSCs when transplanted with a tailored hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel, generating larger number of more mature neurons engrafted to the host brain tissue than non-transfected cells. The nanoparticle-mediated transcription activation method together with an HA hydrogel delivery matrix provides a translatable approach for stem cell-based regenerative therapy. PMID:26828681

  2. Molecular cloning of a putative novel human bZIP transcription factor on chromosome 17q22

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, L.; Johnsen, O.; Skartlien, A.H.

    1994-08-01

    We have cloned and characterized cDNA clones representing several mRNA isoforms generated by alternative splicing of a single gene localized to chromosome 17q22. Sequence analysis showed that the predicted translational product of the longest open reading frame (2316 nucleotides, 772 amino acids) is related to transcription factors of the basic elucine zipper (bZIP) class. The sequence contained several regions characteristic of transcriptional regulatory domains. A cluster of amino acids flanking the bZIP region on both sides was highly conserved between TCF11 and p45 NF-E2, a subunit of the human globin locus control region-binding protein, NF-E2. These same regions showed remarkable homology to two invertebrate proteins, CNC and skn-1, postulated to regulate embryonic development in Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans, respectively. 46 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  3. The Human Adult Skeletal Muscle Transcriptional Profile Reconstructed by a Novel Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bortoluzzi, Stefania; d'Alessi, Fabio; Romualdi, Chiara; Danieli, Gian Antonio

    2000-01-01

    By applying a novel software tool, information on 4080 UniGene clusters was retrieved from three adult human skeletal muscle cDNA libraries, which were selected for being neither normalized nor subtracted. Reconstruction of a transcriptional profile of the corresponding tissue was attempted by a computational approach, classifying each transcript according to its level of expression. About 25% of the transcripts accounted for about 80% of the detected transcriptional activity, whereas most genes showed a low level of expression. This in silico transcriptional profile was then compared with data obtained by a SAGE study. A fairly good agreement between the two methods was observed. About 400 genes, highly expressed in skeletal muscle or putatively skeletal muscle-specific, may represent the minimal set of genes needed to determine the tissue specificity. These genes could be used as a convenient reference to monitor major changes in the transcriptional profile of adult human skeletal muscle in response to different physiological or pathological conditions, thus providing a framework for designing DNA microarrays and initiating biological studies. PMID:10720575

  4. TEFM (c17orf42) is necessary for transcription of human mtDNA

    PubMed Central

    Minczuk, Michal; He, Jiuya; Duch, Anna M.; Ettema, Thijs J.; Chlebowski, Aleksander; Dzionek, Karol; Nijtmans, Leo G. J.; Huynen, Martijn A.; Holt, Ian J.

    2011-01-01

    Here we show that c17orf42, hereafter TEFM (transcription elongation factor of mitochondria), makes a critical contribution to mitochondrial transcription. Inactivation of TEFM in cells by RNA interference results in respiratory incompetence owing to decreased levels of H- and L-strand promoter-distal mitochondrial transcripts. Affinity purification of TEFM from human mitochondria yielded a complex comprising mitochondrial transcripts, mitochondrial RNA polymerase (POLRMT), pentatricopeptide repeat domain 3 protein (PTCD3), and a putative DEAD-box RNA helicase, DHX30. After RNase treatment only POLRMT remained associated with TEFM, and in human cultured cells TEFM formed foci coincident with newly synthesized mitochondrial RNA. Based on deletion mutants, TEFM interacts with the catalytic region of POLRMT, and in vitro TEFM enhanced POLRMT processivity on ss- and dsDNA templates. TEFM contains two HhH motifs and a Ribonuclease H fold, similar to the nuclear transcription elongation regulator Spt6. These findings lead us to propose that TEFM is a mitochondrial transcription elongation factor. PMID:21278163

  5. Structural insights into Transcriptional Repression by non-coding RNAs that bind to Human Pol II

    PubMed Central

    Kassube, Susanne A.; Fang, Jie; Grob, Patricia; Yakovchuk, Petro; Goodrich, James A.; Nogales, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Gene transcription is regulated in response to environmental changes as well as developmental cues. In mammalian cells subjected to stress conditions such as heat shock, transcription of most protein-coding genes decreases, while the transcription of heat shock protein genes increases. Repression involves direct binding to RNA polymerase II (Pol II) of certain non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that are upregulated upon heat shock. Another class of ncRNAs is also upregulated and binds to Pol II, but does not inhibit transcription. Incorporation of repressive ncRNAs into pre-initiation complexes prevents transcription initiation, while non-repressive ncRNAs are displaced from Pol II by TFIIF. Here, we present cryo-EM reconstructions of human Pol II in complex with six different ncRNAs from mouse and human. Our structures show that both repressive and non-repressive ncRNAs bind to a conserved binding site within the cleft of Pol II. The site, also shared with a previously characterized yeast aptamer, is close to the active center and thus in an ideal position to regulate transcription. Importantly, additional RNA elements extend flexibly beyond the docking site. We propose that the differences concerning the repressive activity of the ncRNA analyzed must be due to the distinct character of these more unstructured, flexible segments of the RNA that emanate from the cleft. PMID:22954660

  6. Alterations in transcription factor binding in radioresistant human melanoma cells after ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sahijdak, W.M.; Yang, Chin-Rang; Zuckerman, J.S.; Meyers, M.; Boothman, D.A.

    1994-04-01

    We analyzed alterations in transcription factor binding to specific, known promoter DNA consensus sequences between irradiated and unirradiated radioresistant human melanoma (U1-Mel) cells. The goal of this study was to begin to investigate which transcription factors and DNA-binding sites are responsible for the induction of specific transcripts and proteins after ionizing radiation. Transcription factor binding was observed using DNA band-shift assays and oligonucleotide competition analyses. Confluence-arrested U1-Mel cells were irradiated (4.5 Gy) and harvested at 4 h. Double-stranded oligonucleotides containing known DNA-binding consensus sites for specific transcription factors were used. Increased DNA binding activity after ionizing radiation was noted with oligonucleotides containing the CREB, NF-kB and Sp1 consensus sites. No changes in protein binding to AP-1, AP-2, AP-3, or CTF/NF1, GRE or Oct-1 consensus sequences were noted. X-ray activation of select transcription factors, which bind certain consensus sites in promoters, may cause specific induction or repression of gene transcription. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Identification of Diversity-Generating Retroelements in Human Microbiomes

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yuzhen

    2014-01-01

    Diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs) are a unique family of retroelements that confer selective advantages to their hosts by accelerating the evolution of target genes through a specialized, error-prone, reverse transcription process. First identified in a Bordetella phage (BPP-1), which mediates the phage tropism specificity by generating variability in an involved gene, DGRs were predicted to be present in a larger collection of viral and bacterial species. A minimal DGR system is comprised of a reverse transcriptase (RTase) gene, a template sequence (TR) and a variable region (VR) within a target gene. We developed a computational tool, DGRscan, to allow either de novo identification (based on the prediction of potential template-variable region pairs) or similarity-based searches of DGR systems using known template sequences as the reference. The application of DGRscan to the human microbiome project (HMP) datasets resulted in the identification of 271 non-redundant DGR systems, doubling the size of the collection of known DGR systems. We further identified a large number of putative target genes (651, which share no more than 90% sequence identity at the amino acid level) that are potentially under diversification by the DGR systems. Our study provides the first survey of the DGR systems in the human microbiome, showing that the DGR systems are frequently found in human-associated bacterial communities, although they are of low incidence in individual genomes. Our study also provides functional clues for a large number of genes (reverse transcriptases and target genes) that were previously annotated as proteins of unknown functions or nonspecific functions. PMID:25196521

  8. Identification of diversity-generating retroelements in human microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yuzhen

    2014-01-01

    Diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs) are a unique family of retroelements that confer selective advantages to their hosts by accelerating the evolution of target genes through a specialized, error-prone, reverse transcription process. First identified in a Bordetella phage (BPP-1), which mediates the phage tropism specificity by generating variability in an involved gene, DGRs were predicted to be present in a larger collection of viral and bacterial species. A minimal DGR system is comprised of a reverse transcriptase (RTase) gene, a template sequence (TR) and a variable region (VR) within a target gene. We developed a computational tool, DGRscan, to allow either de novo identification (based on the prediction of potential template-variable region pairs) or similarity-based searches of DGR systems using known template sequences as the reference. The application of DGRscan to the human microbiome project (HMP) datasets resulted in the identification of 271 non-redundant DGR systems, doubling the size of the collection of known DGR systems. We further identified a large number of putative target genes (651, which share no more than 90% sequence identity at the amino acid level) that are potentially under diversification by the DGR systems. Our study provides the first survey of the DGR systems in the human microbiome, showing that the DGR systems are frequently found in human-associated bacterial communities, although they are of low incidence in individual genomes. Our study also provides functional clues for a large number of genes (reverse transcriptases and target genes) that were previously annotated as proteins of unknown functions or nonspecific functions. PMID:25196521

  9. Endometrial transcriptional profiling of a bovine fertility model by Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, F.S.; Ramos, R.S.; Pugliesi, G.; Andrade, S.C.S.; Van Hoeck, V.; Langbeen, A.; Oliveira, M.L.; Gonella-Diaza, A.M.; Gasparin, G.; Fukumasu, H.; Pulz, L.H.; Membrive, C.M.; Coutinho, L.L.; Binelli, M.

    2015-01-01

    Studying the multitude of molecular networks and pathways that are potentially involved in a complex trait such as fertility requires an equally complex and broad strategy. Here, we used Next-Generation Sequencing for the characterization of the transcriptional signature of the bovine endometrial tissue. Periovulatory endocrine environments were manipulated to generate two distinctly different fertility phenotypes. Cycling, non-lactating, multiparous Nelore cows were manipulated to ovulate larger (> 13 mm; LF group; high fertility phenotype) or smaller (< 12 mm; SF group) follicles. As a result, greater proestrus estrogen concentrations, corpora lutea and early diestrus progesterone concentrations were also observed in LF group in comparison to SF group. Endometrial cell proliferation was estimated by the protein marker MKI67 on tissues collected 4 (D4) and 7 (D7) days after induction of ovulation. Total RNA extracts from D7 were sequenced and compared according to the transcriptional profile of each experimental group (LF versus SF). Functional enrichment analysis revealed that LF and SF endometria were asynchronous in regards to their phenotype manifestation. Major findings indicated an LF endometrium that was switching phenotypes earlier than the SF one. More specifically, a proliferating SF endometrium was observed on D7, whereas the LF tissue, which expressed a proliferative phenotype earlier at D4, seemed to have already shifted towards a biosynthetically and metabolically active endometrium on D7. Data on MKI67 support the transcriptomic results. RNA-Seq-derived transcriptional profile of the endometrial tissue indicated a temporal effect of the periovulatory endocrine environment, suggesting that the moment of the endometrial exposure to the ovarian steroids, E2 and P4, regulates the timing of phenotype manifestation. Gene expression profiling revealed molecules that may be targeted to elucidate ovarian steroid-dependent mechanisms that regulate

  10. Controlling transcription in human pluripotent stem cells using CRISPR-effectors.

    PubMed

    Genga, Ryan M; Kearns, Nicola A; Maehr, René

    2016-05-15

    The ability to manipulate transcription in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) is fundamental for the discovery of key genes and mechanisms governing cellular state and differentiation. Recently developed CRISPR-effector systems provide a systematic approach to rapidly test gene function in mammalian cells, including hPSCs. In this review, we discuss recent advances in CRISPR-effector technologies that have been employed to control transcription through gene activation, gene repression, and epigenome engineering. We describe an application of CRISPR-effector mediated transcriptional regulation in hPSCs by targeting a synthetic promoter driving a GFP transgene, demonstrating the ease and effectiveness of CRISPR-effector mediated transcriptional regulation in hPSCs. PMID:26525193

  11. The transcriptional architecture of early human hematopoiesis identifies multilevel control of lymphoid commitment

    PubMed Central

    Laurenti, Elisa; Doulatov, Sergei; Zandi, Sasan; Plumb, Ian; Chen, Jing; April, Craig; Fan, Jian-Bing; Dick, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how differentiation programs originate from within the gene expression landscape of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) is crucial to develop new clinical therapies. We mapped the transcriptional dynamics underlying the first steps of commitment by tracking transcriptome changes in human HSC and eight early progenitor populations. Transcriptional programs are extensively shared, extend across lineage-potential boundaries, and are not strictly lineage-affiliated. Elements of stem, lymphoid and myeloid programs are retained in multi-lymphoid progenitors (MLP), reflecting a hybrid transcriptional state. Based on functional single cell analysis, BCL11A, SOX4 and TEAD1 governed transcriptional networks within MLPs, leading to B cell specification. Overall, we show that integrated transcriptome approaches can identify novel regulators of multipotency and uncover additional complexity in lymphoid commitment. PMID:23708252

  12. Helix Unwinding and Base Flipping Enable Human MTERF1 to Terminate Mitochondrial Transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Yakubovskaya, E.; Mejia, E; Byrnes, J; Hambardjieva, E; Garcia-Diaz, M

    2010-01-01

    Defects in mitochondrial gene expression are associated with aging and disease. Mterf proteins have been implicated in modulating transcription, replication and protein synthesis. We have solved the structure of a member of this family, the human mitochondrial transcriptional terminator MTERF1, bound to dsDNA containing the termination sequence. The structure indicates that upon sequence recognition MTERF1 unwinds the DNA molecule, promoting eversion of three nucleotides. Base flipping is critical for stable binding and transcriptional termination. Additional structural and biochemical results provide insight into the DNA binding mechanism and explain how MTERF1 recognizes its target sequence. Finally, we have demonstrated that the mitochondrial pathogenic G3249A and G3244A mutations interfere with key interactions for sequence recognition, eliminating termination. Our results provide insight into the role of mterf proteins and suggest a link between mitochondrial disease and the regulation of mitochondrial transcription.

  13. Distinct DNA-based epigenetic switches trigger transcriptional activation of silent genes in human dermal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Pandian, Ganesh N.; Taniguchi, Junichi; Junetha, Syed; Sato, Shinsuke; Han, Le; Saha, Abhijit; AnandhaKumar, Chandran; Bando, Toshikazu; Nagase, Hiroki; Vaijayanthi, Thangavel; Taylor, Rhys D.; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The influential role of the epigenome in orchestrating genome-wide transcriptional activation instigates the demand for the artificial genetic switches with distinct DNA sequence recognition. Recently, we developed a novel class of epigenetically active small molecules called SAHA-PIPs by conjugating selective DNA binding pyrrole-imidazole polyamides (PIPs) with the histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA. Screening studies revealed that certain SAHA-PIPs trigger targeted transcriptional activation of pluripotency and germ cell genes in mouse and human fibroblasts, respectively. Through microarray studies and functional analysis, here we demonstrate for the first time the remarkable ability of thirty-two different SAHA-PIPs to trigger the transcriptional activation of exclusive clusters of genes and noncoding RNAs. QRT-PCR validated the microarray data, and some SAHA-PIPs activated therapeutically significant genes like KSR2. Based on the aforementioned results, we propose the potential use of SAHA-PIPs as reagents capable of targeted transcriptional activation. PMID:24457603

  14. Maf1, a New Player in the Regulation of Human RNA Polymerase III Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Nouria

    2006-01-01

    Background Human RNA polymerase III (pol III) transcription is regulated by several factors, including the tumor suppressors P53 and Rb, and the proto-oncogene c-Myc. In yeast, which lacks these proteins, a central regulator of pol III transcription, called Maf1, has been described. Maf1 is required for repression of pol III transcription in response to several signal transduction pathways and is broadly conserved in eukaryotes. Methodology/Principal Findings We show that human endogenous Maf1 can be co-immunoprecipitated with pol III and associates in vitro with two pol III subunits, the largest subunit RPC1 and the α-like subunit RPAC2. Maf1 represses pol III transcription in vitro and in vivo and is required for maximal pol III repression after exposure to MMS or rapamycin, treatments that both lead to Maf1 dephosphorylation. Conclusions/Significance These data suggest that Maf1 is a major regulator of pol III transcription in human cells. PMID:17205138

  15. Transcriptional Dynamics of Immortalized Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells during Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Yutaro; Koshiba-Takeuchi, Kazuko; Makino, Hatsune; Monobe, Yoko; Kishida, Marina; Adachi, Jun; Takeuchi, Jun; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Kameoka, Yosuke; Akagi, Ken-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of alterations in gene expression along with neoplastic transformation in human cells provides valuable information about the molecular mechanisms underlying transformation. To further address these questions, we performed whole transcriptome analysis to the human mesenchymal stem cell line, UE6E7T-3, which was immortalized with hTERT and human papillomavirus type 16 E6/E7 genes, in association with progress of transformation in these cells. At early stages of culture, UE6E7T-3 cells preferentially lost one copy of chromosome 13, as previously described; in addition, tumor suppressor genes, DNA repair genes, and apoptosis-activating genes were overexpressed. After the loss of chromosome 13, additional aneuploidy and genetic alterations that drove progressive transformation, were observed. At this stage, the cell line expressed oncogenes as well as genes related to anti-apoptotic functions, cell-cycle progression, and chromosome instability (CIN); these pro-tumorigenic changes were concomitant with a decrease in tumor suppressor gene expression. At later stages after prolong culture, the cells exhibited chromosome translocations, acquired anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenicity in nude mice, (sarcoma) and exhibited increased expression of genes encoding growth factor and DNA repair genes, and decreased expression of adhesion genes. In particular, glypican-5 (GPC5), which encodes a cell-surface proteoglycan that might be a biomarker for sarcoma, was expressed at high levels in association with transformation. Patched (Ptc1), the cell surface receptor for hedgehog (Hh) signaling, was also significantly overexpressed and co-localized with GPC5. Knockdown of GPC5 expression decreased cell proliferation, suggesting that it plays a key role in growth in U3-DT cells (transformants derived from UE6E7T-3 cells) through the Hh signaling pathway. Thus, the UE6E7T-3 cell culture model is a useful tool for assessing the functional contribution of

  16. Transcriptional Dynamics of Immortalized Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells during Transformation.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Masao; Higashino, Atsunori; Takeuchi, Kikuko; Hori, Yutaro; Koshiba-Takeuchi, Kazuko; Makino, Hatsune; Monobe, Yoko; Kishida, Marina; Adachi, Jun; Takeuchi, Jun; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Kameoka, Yosuke; Akagi, Ken-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of alterations in gene expression along with neoplastic transformation in human cells provides valuable information about the molecular mechanisms underlying transformation. To further address these questions, we performed whole transcriptome analysis to the human mesenchymal stem cell line, UE6E7T-3, which was immortalized with hTERT and human papillomavirus type 16 E6/E7 genes, in association with progress of transformation in these cells. At early stages of culture, UE6E7T-3 cells preferentially lost one copy of chromosome 13, as previously described; in addition, tumor suppressor genes, DNA repair genes, and apoptosis-activating genes were overexpressed. After the loss of chromosome 13, additional aneuploidy and genetic alterations that drove progressive transformation, were observed. At this stage, the cell line expressed oncogenes as well as genes related to anti-apoptotic functions, cell-cycle progression, and chromosome instability (CIN); these pro-tumorigenic changes were concomitant with a decrease in tumor suppressor gene expression. At later stages after prolong culture, the cells exhibited chromosome translocations, acquired anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenicity in nude mice, (sarcoma) and exhibited increased expression of genes encoding growth factor and DNA repair genes, and decreased expression of adhesion genes. In particular, glypican-5 (GPC5), which encodes a cell-surface proteoglycan that might be a biomarker for sarcoma, was expressed at high levels in association with transformation. Patched (Ptc1), the cell surface receptor for hedgehog (Hh) signaling, was also significantly overexpressed and co-localized with GPC5. Knockdown of GPC5 expression decreased cell proliferation, suggesting that it plays a key role in growth in U3-DT cells (transformants derived from UE6E7T-3 cells) through the Hh signaling pathway. Thus, the UE6E7T-3 cell culture model is a useful tool for assessing the functional contribution of

  17. Next generation prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Schiller, John T; Müller, Martin

    2015-05-01

    The two licensed bivalent and quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 (the major papillomavirus virion protein) virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines are regarded as safe, effective, and well established prophylactic vaccines. However, they have some inherent limitations, including a fairly high production and delivery cost, virus-type restricted protection, and no reported therapeutic activity, which might be addressed with the development of alternative dosing schedules and vaccine products. A change from a three-dose to a two-dose protocol for the licensed HPV vaccines, especially in younger adolescents (aged 9-13 years), is underway in several countries and is likely to become the future norm. Preliminary evidence suggests that recipients of HPV vaccines might derive prophylactic benefits from one dose of the bivalent vaccine. Substantial interest exists in both the academic and industrial sectors in the development of second-generation L1 VLP vaccines in terms of cost reduction-eg, by production in Escherichia coli or alternative types of yeast. However, Merck's nonavalent vaccine, produced via the Saccharomyces cerevisiae production system that is also used for their quadrivalent vaccine, is the first second-generation HPV VLP vaccine to be available on the market. By contrast, other pharmaceutical companies are developing microbial vectors that deliver L1 genes. These two approaches would add an HPV component to existing live attenuated vaccines for measles and typhoid fever. Prophylactic vaccines that are based on induction of broadly cross-neutralising antibodies to L2, the minor HPV capsid protein, are also being developed both as simple monomeric fusion proteins and as virus-like display vaccines. The strong interest in developing the next generation of vaccines, particularly by manufacturers in middle-to-high income countries, increases the likelihood that vaccine production will become decentralised with the hope that effective HPV vaccines will be

  18. Runx transcription factors repress human and murine c-Myc expression in a DNA-binding and C-terminally dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Paejonette T; Cao, Li; Samon, Jeremy B; Kane, Christyne A; Hedblom, Emmett E; Bowcock, Anne; Telfer, Janice C

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factors Runx1 and c-Myc have individually been shown to regulate important gene targets as well as to collaborate in oncogenesis. However, it is unknown whether there is a regulatory relationship between the two genes. In this study, we investigated the transcriptional regulation of endogenous c-Myc by Runx1 in the human T cell line Jurkat and murine primary hematopoietic cells. Endogenous Runx1 binds to multiple sites in the c-Myc locus upstream of the c-Myc transcriptional start site. Cells transduced with a C-terminally truncated Runx1 (Runx1.d190), which lacks important cofactor interaction sites and can block C-terminal-dependent functions of all Runx transcription factors, showed increased transcription of c-Myc. In order to monitor c-Myc expression in response to early and transiently-acting Runx1.d190, we generated a cell membrane-permeable TAT-Runx1.d190 fusion protein. Murine splenocytes treated with TAT-Runx1.d190 showed an increase in the transcription of c-Myc within 2 hours, peaking at 4 hours post-treatment and declining thereafter. This effect is dependent on the ability of Runx1.d190 to bind to DNA. The increase in c-Myc transcripts is correlated with increased c-Myc protein levels. Collectively, these data show that Runx1 directly regulates c-Myc transcription in a C-terminal- and DNA-binding-dependent manner. PMID:23874874

  19. Runx Transcription Factors Repress Human and Murine c-Myc Expression in a DNA-Binding and C-Terminally Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Paejonette T.; Cao, Li; Samon, Jeremy B.; Kane, Christyne A.; Hedblom, Emmett E.; Bowcock, Anne; Telfer, Janice C.

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factors Runx1 and c-Myc have individually been shown to regulate important gene targets as well as to collaborate in oncogenesis. However, it is unknown whether there is a regulatory relationship between the two genes. In this study, we investigated the transcriptional regulation of endogenous c-Myc by Runx1 in the human T cell line Jurkat and murine primary hematopoietic cells. Endogenous Runx1 binds to multiple sites in the c-Myc locus upstream of the c-Myc transcriptional start site. Cells transduced with a C-terminally truncated Runx1 (Runx1.d190), which lacks important cofactor interaction sites and can block C-terminal-dependent functions of all Runx transcription factors, showed increased transcription of c-Myc. In order to monitor c-Myc expression in response to early and transiently-acting Runx1.d190, we generated a cell membrane-permeable TAT-Runx1.d190 fusion protein. Murine splenocytes treated with TAT-Runx1.d190 showed an increase in the transcription of c-Myc within 2 hours, peaking at 4 hours post-treatment and declining thereafter. This effect is dependent on the ability of Runx1.d190 to bind to DNA. The increase in c-Myc transcripts is correlated with increased c-Myc protein levels. Collectively, these data show that Runx1 directly regulates c-Myc transcription in a C-terminal- and DNA-binding-dependent manner. PMID:23874874

  20. TGF-β stimulation in human and murine cells reveals commonly affected biological processes and pathways at transcription level

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The TGF-β signaling pathway is a fundamental pathway in the living cell, which plays a key role in many central cellular processes. The complex and sometimes contradicting mechanisms by which TGF-β yields phenotypic effects are not yet completely understood. In this study we investigated and compared the transcriptional response profile of TGF-β1 stimulation in different cell types. For this purpose, extensive experiments are performed and time-course microarray data are generated in human and mouse parenchymal liver cells, human mesenchymal stromal cells and mouse hematopoietic progenitor cells at different time points. We applied a panel of bioinformatics methods on our data to uncover common patterns in the dynamic gene expression response in respective cells. Results Our analysis revealed a quite variable and multifaceted transcriptional response profile of TGF-β1 stimulation, which goes far beyond the well-characterized classical TGF-β1 signaling pathway. Nonetheless, we could identify several commonly affected processes and signaling pathways across cell types and species. In addition our analysis suggested an important role of the transcription factor EGR1, which appeared to have a conserved influence across cell-types and species. Validation via an independent dataset on A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells largely confirmed our findings. Network analysis suggested explanations, how TGF-β1 stimulation could lead to the observed effects. Conclusions The analysis of dynamical transcriptional response to TGF-β treatment experiments in different human and murine cell systems revealed commonly affected biological processes and pathways, which could be linked to TGF-β1 via network analysis. This helps to gain insights about TGF-β pathway activities in these cell systems and its conserved interactions between the species and tissue types. PMID:24886091

  1. Identifying and retargeting transcriptional hot spots in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Joseph K; Lewis, Amanda M; Kim, Do Soon; Dyess, Timothy; Alper, Hal S

    2016-08-01

    Mammalian cell line development requires streamlined methodologies that will reduce both the cost and time to identify candidate cell lines. Improvements in site-specific genomic editing techniques can result in flexible, predictable, and robust cell line engineering. However, an outstanding question in the field is the specific site of integration. Here, we seek to identify productive loci within the human genome that will result in stable, high expression of heterologous DNA. Using an unbiased, random integration approach and a green fluorescent reporter construct, we identify ten single-integrant, recombinant human cell lines that exhibit stable, high-level expression. From these cell lines, eight unique corresponding integration loci were identified. These loci are concentrated in non-protein coding regions or intronic regions of protein coding genes. Expression mapping of the surrounding genes reveals minimal disruption of endogenous gene expression. Finally, we demonstrate that targeted de novo integration at one of the identified loci, the 12(th) exon-intron region of the GRIK1 gene on chromosome 21, results in superior expression and stability compared to the standard, illegitimate integration approach at levels approaching 4-fold. The information identified here along with recent advances in site-specific genomic editing techniques can lead to expedited cell line development. PMID:27311394

  2. Specific requirement for ATP at an early step of in vitro transcription of human mitochondrial DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, N.; Attardi, G.

    1987-06-01

    The ATP concentrations allowing transcription of heavy- and light-strand of human mtDNA in a HeLa cell mitochrondrial lysate were found to cover a broad range, with a maximum around 2.5 mM, and with reproducible differences in the ATP response curves for the two transcription events. Direct measurements showed that nonspecific ATP degradation during the assay did not account for the high ATP requirement. 5'-Adenylyl imidodiphosphate (p(NH)ppA), an ATP analog with a nonhydrolyzable ..beta..-..gamma.. bond, was unable to substitute for ATP in supporting mtDNA transcription but greatly stimulated this transcription in the presence of a low concentration of exogenous APT, measured with (/sup 32/P)-labeled nucleotides. Evidence was obtained indicating that p(NH)ppA did not support an early event in mtDNA transcription (formation of preinitiation complex or initiation), whereas this analog could substitute effectively for ATP in the subsequent elongation steps. These results pointed to a specific requirement for ATP at an early step of the transcription process.

  3. Oncogene transcription in normal human IMR-90 fibroblasts: induction by serum and tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, E.A.; Kaji, H.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report studies of oncogene transcription induced by the addition of serum to quiescent cultures of human IMR-90 fibroblasts. Oncogene messenger RNAs for c-myc, c-erbB and c-ras were increased in a specific temporal sequence after the addition of serum. Compounds that are proposed to exert their actions by the stimulation of cell growth were tested for their effect on oncogene transcription in IMR-90 fibroblasts. The tumor promoter tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA) was found to selectively induce the transcription of c-myc without observable effect on the transcription of the other oncogenes studied, and without inducing cell division. The inactive analog, phorbol didecanoate (PDD), and two complete carcinogens dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) and 4-nitro quinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) were without effect on the transcription of the genes studied. These results suggest that the complete ordered sequence of gene transcription is necessary to achieve the physiologic response of cell division, and that classical promoters and complete carcinogens achieve their effects through different pathways.

  4. Insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity through interrogation of cis elements disrupted in human erythroid disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Aoi; Ulirsch, Jacob C.; Ludwig, Leif S.; Fiorini, Claudia; Yasuda, Makiko; Choudhuri, Avik; McDonel, Patrick; Zon, Leonard I.; Sankaran, Vijay G.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing has been incredibly successful in identifying causal genetic variants and has revealed a number of novel genes associated with blood and other diseases. One limitation of this approach is that it overlooks mutations in noncoding regulatory elements. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which mutations in transcriptional cis-regulatory elements result in disease remain poorly understood. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to interrogate three such elements harboring mutations in human erythroid disorders, which in all cases are predicted to disrupt a canonical binding motif for the hematopoietic transcription factor GATA1. Deletions of as few as two to four nucleotides resulted in a substantial decrease (>80%) in target gene expression. Isolated deletions of the canonical GATA1 binding motif completely abrogated binding of the cofactor TAL1, which binds to a separate motif. Having verified the functionality of these three GATA1 motifs, we demonstrate strong evolutionary conservation of GATA1 motifs in regulatory elements proximal to other genes implicated in erythroid disorders, and show that targeted disruption of such elements results in altered gene expression. By modeling transcription factor binding patterns, we show that multiple transcription factors are associated with erythroid gene expression, and have created predictive maps modeling putative disruptions of their binding sites at key regulatory elements. Our study provides insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity and may prove a useful resource for investigating the pathogenicity of noncoding variants in human erythroid disorders. PMID:27044088

  5. Selective suppression of human papillomavirus transcription in non-tumorigenic cells by 5-azacytidine.

    PubMed Central

    Rösl, F; Dürst, M; zur Hausen, H

    1988-01-01

    The transcription of human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV 18) is selectively suppressed in non-tumorigenic HeLa x fibroblast or HeLa x keratinocyte cell hybrids by 5-azacytidine. In contrast, viral gene expression is not influenced by 5-azacytidine in both tumorigenic hybrid segregants and in the parental HeLa cells. The suppression mechanism seems to operate at the level of initiation of transcription since nuclear run-on experiments show the absence of elongated nascent viral RNA, whereas the transcription of cellular reference genes remains unaffected. Down-regulation of HPV 18 mRNA correlates directly with cessation of cellular growth and can be abolished using the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Furthermore human keratinocytes immortalized by HPV 16 but still retaining the non-tumorigenic phenotype reveal the same inhibitory effect on viral transcription after treatment with 5-azacytidine. These results support a model of a postulated intracellular control mechanism, directed against papillomavirus transcription, which can be induced by 5-azacytidine and appears to correlate with the presence of specific chromosomes in non-tumorigenic cells. Images PMID:2457495

  6. A novel intermediate in transcription initiation by human mitochondrial RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Morozov, Yaroslav I.; Agaronyan, Karen; Cheung, Alan C. M.; Anikin, Michael; Cramer, Patrick; Temiakov, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrial genome is transcribed by a single-subunit T7 phage-like RNA polymerase (mtRNAP), structurally unrelated to cellular RNAPs. In higher eukaryotes, mtRNAP requires two transcription factors for efficient initiation—TFAM, a major nucleoid protein, and TFB2M, a transient component of mtRNAP catalytic site. The mechanisms behind assembly of the mitochondrial transcription machinery and its regulation are poorly understood. We isolated and identified a previously unknown human mitochondrial transcription intermediate—a pre-initiation complex that includes mtRNAP, TFAM and promoter DNA. Using protein–protein cross-linking, we demonstrate that human TFAM binds to the N-terminal domain of mtRNAP, which results in bending of the promoter DNA around mtRNAP. The subsequent recruitment of TFB2M induces promoter melting and formation of an open initiation complex. Our data indicate that the pre-initiation complex is likely to be an important target for transcription regulation and provide basis for further structural, biochemical and biophysical studies of mitochondrial transcription. PMID:24393772

  7. Transcriptional regulation of human RANK ligand gene expression by E2F1

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Yan; Sun Meng; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Lou Wei; Pinder, Elaine; Gao, Allen C.

    2008-06-06

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) is a critical osteoclastogenic factor involved in the regulation of bone resorption, immune function, the development of mammary gland and cardiovascular system. To understand the transcriptional regulation of RANKL, we amplified and characterized a 1890 bp 5'-flanking sequence of human RANKL gene (-1782 bp to +108 bp relative to the transcription start site). Using a series of deletion mutations of the 1890 bp RANKL promoter, we identified a 72 bp region (-172 to -100 bp) mediating RANKL basal transcriptional activity. Sequence analysis revealed a putative E2F binding site within this 72 bp region in the human RANKL promoter. Overexpression of E2F1 increased RANKL promoter activity, while down-regulation of E2F1 expression by small interfering RNA decreased RANKL promoter activity. RT-PCR and enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) further demonstrated that E2F1 induced the expression of RANKL. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays (EMSA) and antibody competition assays confirmed that E2F1 proteins bind to the consensus E2F binding site in the RANKL promoter. Mutation of the E2F consensus binding site in the RANKL promoter profoundly reduced the basal promoter activity and abolished the transcriptional modulation of RANKL by E2F1. These results suggest that E2F1 plays an important role in regulating RANKL transcription through binding to the E2F consensus binding site.

  8. Transcript catalogs of human chromosome 21 and orthologous chimpanzee and mouse regions.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, Xiaolu; Gardiner, Katheleen J

    2011-06-01

    A comprehensive representation of the gene content of the long arm of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21q) remains of interest for the study of Down syndrome, its associated phenotypic features, and mouse models. Here we compare transcript catalogs for Hsa21q, chimpanzee chromosome 21 (Ptr21q), and orthologous regions of mouse chromosomes 16, 17, and 10 for open reading frame (ORF) characteristics and conservation. The Hsa21q and mouse catalogs contain 552 and 444 gene models, respectively, of which only 162 are highly conserved. Hsa21q transcripts were used to identify orthologous exons in Ptr21q and assemble 533 putative transcripts. Transcript catalogs for all three organisms are searchable for nucleotide and amino acid sequence features of ORF length, repeat content, experimental support, gene structure, and conservation. For human and mouse comparisons, three additional summaries are provided: (1) the chromosomal distribution of novel ORF transcripts versus potential functional RNAs, (2) the distribution of species-specific transcripts within Hsa21q and mouse models of Down syndrome, and (3) the organization of sense-antisense and putative sense-antisense structures defining potential regulatory mechanisms. Catalogs, summaries, and nucleotide and amino acid sequences of all composite transcripts are available and searchable at http://gfuncpathdb.ucdenver.edu/iddrc/chr21/home.php. These data sets provide comprehensive information useful for evaluation of candidate genes and mouse models of Down syndrome and for identification of potential functional RNA genes and novel regulatory mechanisms involving Hsa21q genes. These catalogs and search tools complement and extend information available from other gene annotation projects. PMID:21400203

  9. A human mitochondrial poly(A) polymerase mutation reveals the complexities of post-transcriptional mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wilson, William C; Hornig-Do, Hue-Tran; Bruni, Francesco; Chang, Jeong Ho; Jourdain, Alexis A; Martinou, Jean-Claude; Falkenberg, Maria; Spåhr, Henrik; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Lewis, Richard J; Hewitt, Lorraine; Baslé, Arnaud; Cross, Harold E; Tong, Liang; Lebel, Robert R; Crosby, Andrew H; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A; Lightowlers, Robert N

    2014-12-01

    The p.N478D missense mutation in human mitochondrial poly(A) polymerase (mtPAP) has previously been implicated in a form of spastic ataxia with optic atrophy. In this study, we have investigated fibroblast cell lines established from family members. The homozygous mutation resulted in the loss of polyadenylation of all mitochondrial transcripts assessed; however, oligoadenylation was retained. Interestingly, this had differential effects on transcript stability that were dependent on the particular species of transcript. These changes were accompanied by a severe loss of oxidative phosphorylation complexes I and IV, and perturbation of de novo mitochondrial protein synthesis. Decreases in transcript polyadenylation and in respiratory chain complexes were effectively rescued by overexpression of wild-type mtPAP. Both mutated and wild-type mtPAP localized to the mitochondrial RNA-processing granules thereby eliminating mislocalization as a cause of defective polyadenylation. In vitro polyadenylation assays revealed severely compromised activity by the mutated protein, which generated only short oligo(A) extensions on RNA substrates, irrespective of RNA secondary structure. The addition of LRPPRC/SLIRP, a mitochondrial RNA-binding complex, enhanced activity of the wild-type mtPAP resulting in increased overall tail length. The LRPPRC/SLIRP effect although present was less marked with mutated mtPAP, independent of RNA secondary structure. We conclude that (i) the polymerase activity of mtPAP can be modulated by the presence of LRPPRC/SLIRP, (ii) N478D mtPAP mutation decreases polymerase activity and (iii) the alteration in poly(A) length is sufficient to cause dysregulation of post-transcriptional expression and the pathogenic lack of respiratory chain complexes. PMID:25008111

  10. Stress-impaired transcription factor expression and insulin secretion in transplanted human islets

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chunhua; Kayton, Nora S.; Shostak, Alena; Poffenberger, Greg; Cyphert, Holly A.; Aramandla, Radhika; Thompson, Courtney; Papagiannis, Ioannis G.; Shiota, Masakazu; Stafford, John M.; Greiner, Dale L.; Herrera, Pedro L.; Shultz, Leonard D.; Stein, Roland; Powers, Alvin C.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and progressive β cell dysfunction. Excess glucose and lipid impair β cell function in islet cell lines, cultured rodent and human islets, and in vivo rodent models. Here, we examined the mechanistic consequences of glucotoxic and lipotoxic conditions on human islets in vivo and developed and/or used 3 complementary models that allowed comparison of the effects of hyperglycemic and/or insulin-resistant metabolic stress conditions on human and mouse islets, which responded quite differently to these challenges. Hyperglycemia and/or insulin resistance impaired insulin secretion only from human islets in vivo. In human grafts, chronic insulin resistance decreased antioxidant enzyme expression and increased superoxide and amyloid formation. In human islet grafts, expression of transcription factors NKX6.1 and MAFB was decreased by chronic insulin resistance, but only MAFB decreased under chronic hyperglycemia. Knockdown of NKX6.1 or MAFB expression in a human β cell line recapitulated the insulin secretion defect seen in vivo. Contrary to rodent islet studies, neither insulin resistance nor hyperglycemia led to human β cell proliferation or apoptosis. These results demonstrate profound differences in how excess glucose or lipid influence mouse and human insulin secretion and β cell activity and show that reduced expression of key islet-enriched transcription factors is an important mediator of glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity. PMID:27064285

  11. Transcription in vivo of an Alu family member upstream from the human epsilon-globin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Allan, M; Paul, J

    1984-01-01

    The more distal Alu repeat flanking the epsilon-globin gene is transcribed in K562 cells to generate transcripts 350-400 nucleotides in length. Initiation occurs at the start of the repeat, upstream of a putative PolIII control signal. These transcripts originate from the strand which does not code epsilon-globin and are oriented in the opposite direction from the gene. They are non-polyadenylated, nucleus-confined and are only detectable in association with expression of the epsilon-globin gene. Images PMID:6320117

  12. Targeting the Central Pocket in Human Transcription Factor TEAD as a Potential Cancer Therapeutic Strategy.

    PubMed

    Pobbati, Ajaybabu V; Han, Xiao; Hung, Alvin W; Weiguang, Seetoh; Huda, Nur; Chen, Guo-Ying; Kang, CongBao; Chia, Cheng San Brian; Luo, Xuelian; Hong, Wanjin; Poulsen, Anders

    2015-11-01

    The human TEAD family of transcription factors (TEAD1-4) is required for YAP-mediated transcription in the Hippo pathway. Hyperactivation of TEAD's co-activator YAP contributes to tissue overgrowth and human cancers, suggesting that pharmacological interference of TEAD-YAP activity may be an effective strategy for anticancer therapy. Here we report the discovery of a central pocket in the YAP-binding domain (YBD) of TEAD that is targetable by small-molecule inhibitors. Our X-ray crystallography studies reveal that flufenamic acid, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), binds to the central pocket of TEAD2 YBD. Our biochemical and functional analyses further demonstrate that binding of NSAIDs to TEAD inhibits TEAD-YAP-dependent transcription, cell migration, and proliferation, indicating that the central pocket is important for TEAD function. Therefore, our studies discover a novel way of targeting TEAD transcription factors and set the stage for therapeutic development of specific TEAD-YAP inhibitors against human cancers. PMID:26592798

  13. Human Disease Modeling Reveals Integrated Transcriptional and Epigenetic Mechanisms of NOTCH1 Haploinsufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Theodoris, Christina V.; Li, Molong; White, Mark P.; Liu, Lei; He, Daniel; Pollard, Katherine S.; Bruneau, Benoit G.; Srivastava, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The mechanisms by which transcription factor haploinsufficiency alters the epigenetic and transcriptional landscape in human cells to cause disease are unknown. Here, we utilized human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived endothelial cells (ECs) to show that heterozygous nonsense mutations in NOTCH1 that cause aortic valve calcification disrupt the epigenetic architecture resulting in derepression of latent pro-osteogenic and -inflammatory gene networks. Hemodynamic shear stress, which protects valves from calcification in vivo, activated anti-osteogenic and anti-inflammatory networks in NOTCH1+/+, but not NOTCH1+/−, iPSC-derived ECs. NOTCH1 haploinsufficiency altered H3K27ac at NOTCH1-bound enhancers, dysregulating downstream transcription of over 1000 genes involved in osteogenesis, inflammation, and oxidative stress. Computational predictions of the disrupted NOTCH1-dependent gene network revealed regulatory nodes that when modulated restored the network toward the wild-type state. Our results highlight how alterations in transcription factor dosage affect gene networks leading to human disease and reveal nodes for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:25768904

  14. Transcriptional regulation of the human TR2 orphan receptor gene by nuclear factor 1-A

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.-L.; Wang, Y.-H.; Lee, H.-J. . E-mail: hjlee@mail.ndhu.edu.tw

    2006-11-17

    The human testicular receptor 2 (TR2), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, has no identified ligand yet. Previous evidence demonstrated that a 63 bp DNA fragment, named the promoter activating cis-element (PACE), has been identified as a positive regulatory region in the 5' promoter region of the human TR2 gene. In the present report, the human nuclear factor 1-A (NF1-A) was identified as a transcriptional activator to recognize the center of the PACE, called the PACE-C. NF1-A could bind to the 18 bp PACE-C region, and enhance about 13- to 17-fold of the luciferase reporter gene activity via the PACE-C in dose-dependent and orientation-independent manners. This transcriptional activation was further confirmed by real-time RT-PCR assay. In conclusion, our results indicated that NF1-A transcription factor plays an important role in the transcriptional activation of the TR2 gene expression via the PACE-C in the minimal promoter region.

  15. Large-scale identification of sequence variants impacting human transcription factor occupancy in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Maurano, Matthew T.; Haugen, Eric; Sandstrom, Richard; Vierstra, Jeff; Shafer, Anthony; Kaul, Rajinder; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The function of human regulatory regions depends exquisitely on their local genomic environment and cellular context, complicating experimental analysis of the expanding pool of common disease- and trait-associated variants that localize within regulatory DNA. We leverage allelically resolved genomic DNaseI footprinting data encompassing 166 individuals and 114 cell types to identify >60,000 common variants that directly impact transcription factor occupancy and regulatory DNA accessibility in vivo. The unprecedented scale of these data enable systematic analysis of the impact of sequence variation on transcription factor occupancy in vivo. We leverage this analysis to develop accurate models of variation affecting the recognition sites for diverse transcription factors, and apply these models to discriminate nearly 500,000 common regulatory variants likely to affect transcription factor occupancy across the human genome. The approach and results provide a novel foundation for analysis and interpretation of noncoding variation in complete human genomes, and for systems-level investigation of disease-associated variants. PMID:26502339

  16. Differentially methylated CpG island within human XIST mediates alternative P2 transcription and YY1 binding

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background X-chromosome inactivation silences one X chromosome in females to achieve dosage compensation with the single X chromosome in males. While most genes are silenced on the inactive X chromosome, the gene for the long non-coding RNA XIST is silenced on the active X chromosome and expressed from the inactive X chromosome with which the XIST RNA associates, triggering silencing of the chromosome. In mouse, an alternative Xist promoter, P2 is also the site of YY1 binding, which has been shown to serve as a tether between the Xist RNA and the DNA of the chromosome. In humans there are many differences from the initial events of mouse Xist activation, including absence of a functional antisense regulator Tsix, and absence of strictly paternal inactivation in extraembryonic tissues, prompting us to examine regulatory regions for the human XIST gene. Results We demonstrate that the female-specific DNase hypersensitivity site within XIST is specific to the inactive X chromosome and correlates with transcription from an internal P2 promoter. P2 is located within a CpG island that is differentially methylated between males and females and overlaps conserved YY1 binding sites that are only bound on the inactive X chromosome where the sites are unmethylated. However, YY1 binding is insufficient to drive P2 expression or establish the DHS, which may require a development-specific factor. Furthermore, reduction of YY1 reduces XIST transcription in addition to causing delocalization of XIST. Conclusions The differentially methylated DNase hypersensitive site within XIST marks the location of an alternative promoter, P2, that generates a transcript of unknown function as it lacks the A repeats that are critical for silencing. In addition, this region binds YY1 on the unmethylated inactive X chromosome, and depletion of YY1 untethers the XIST RNA as well as decreasing transcription of XIST. PMID:25200388

  17. Toward a Functional Annotation of the Human Genome Using Artificial Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-ki; Park, Jin Woo; Kim, Youn-Jae; Kim, Jiwon; Lee, Yangsoon; Kim, Jeonglim; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a novel, high-throughput approach to collecting randomly perturbed gene-expression profiles from the human genome.A human 293 cell library that stably expresses randomly chosen zinc-finger transcription factors was constructed, and the expression profile of each cell line was obtained using cDNA microarray technology.Gene expression profiles from a total of 132 cell lines were collected and analyzed by (1) a simple clustering method based on expression-profile similarity, and (2) the shortest-path analysis method.These analyses identified a number of gene groups, and further investigation revealed that the genes that were grouped together had close biological relationships.The artificial transcription factor-based random genome perturbation method thus provides a novel functional genomic tool for annotation and classification of genes in the human genome and those of many other organisms. PMID:14656973

  18. Generation and gene expression profiling of 48 transcription-factor-inducible mouse embryonic stem cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yamamizu, Kohei; Sharov, Alexei A.; Piao, Yulan; Amano, Misa; Yu, Hong; Nishiyama, Akira; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can differentiate into a wide range – and possibly all cell types in vitro, and thus provide an ideal platform to study systematically the action of transcription factors (TFs) in cell differentiation. Previously, we have generated and analyzed 137 TF-inducible mouse ESC lines. As an extension of this “NIA Mouse ESC Bank,” we generated and characterized 48 additional mouse ESC lines, in which single TFs in each line could be induced in a doxycycline-controllable manner. Together, with the previous ESC lines, the bank now comprises 185 TF-manipulable ESC lines (>10% of all mouse TFs). Global gene expression (transcriptome) profiling revealed that the induction of individual TFs in mouse ESCs for 48 hours shifts their transcriptomes toward specific differentiation fates (e.g., neural lineages by Myt1 Isl1, and St18; mesodermal lineages by Pitx1, Pitx2, Barhl2, and Lmx1a; white blood cells by Myb, Etv2, and Tbx6, and ovary by Pitx1, Pitx2, and Dmrtc2). These data also provide and lists of inferred target genes of each TF and possible functions of these TFs. The results demonstrate the utility of mouse ESC lines and their transcriptome data for understanding the mechanism of cell differentiation and the function of TFs. PMID:27150017

  19. Fenton Reaction-Generated Advanced Oxidation Protein Products Induces Inflammation in Human Embryonic Kidney Cells.

    PubMed

    Bochi, Guilherme Vargas; Torbitz, Vanessa Dorneles; Santos, Roberto Christ Vianna; Cubillos-Rojas, Monica; López, José Luis Rosa; Siebel, Anna Maria; Gomes, Patrícia; de Oliveira, Jarbas Rodrigues; Moresco, Rafael Noal

    2016-08-01

    Fenton reaction is a new mechanism able to generate advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) by exposing the human serum albumin to the Fenton system. Here, we characterized the effects of Fenton reaction-generated advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP-FR) on the gene transcription of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293). To investigate the effects of AOPP-FR and AOPP-HOCl on transcription of inflammatory genes, the NF-κB, COX-2, and IL-6 luciferase promoter activities were analyzed. AOPP-FR and AOPP-HOCl were able to induce the activation of the gene transcription of NF-κB, COX-2, and IL-6 in HEK 293 cells. However, the effects of AOPP-FR were significantly higher than the effects of AOPP-HOCl in relation to COX-2 and IL-6. AOPP-FR induces the activation of the gene transcription of NF-κB, COX-2, and IL-6 and may represent a novel pathogenic mediator of inflammation in kidney. PMID:27145783

  20. Regulation of endogenous human gene expression by ligand-inducible TALE transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Andrew C; Gaj, Thomas; Sirk, Shannon J; Lamb, Brian M; Barbas, Carlos F

    2014-10-17

    The construction of increasingly sophisticated synthetic biological circuits is dependent on the development of extensible tools capable of providing specific control of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Here, we describe a new class of synthetic transcription factors that activate gene expression in response to extracellular chemical stimuli. These inducible activators consist of customizable transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins combined with steroid hormone receptor ligand-binding domains. We demonstrate that these ligand-responsive TALE transcription factors allow for tunable and conditional control of gene activation and can be used to regulate the expression of endogenous genes in human cells. Since TALEs can be designed to recognize any contiguous DNA sequence, the conditional gene regulatory system described herein will enable the design of advanced synthetic gene networks. PMID:24251925

  1. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA): gene structure and characterization of related pseudogenes.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Aurelio; Mezzina, Maria; Gadaleta, Gemma

    2002-05-29

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA or Tfam) is a 25 kDa protein encoded by a nuclear gene and imported to mitochondria, where it functions as a key regulator of mammalian mitochondrial (mt) DNA transcription and replication. The coding sequence of the human mtTFA gene is reported in the literature and the sizes of few introns are known. In this paper we present the genomic structure of the human mtTFA gene along with the complete sequence of its six intronic regions. Three of the introns (I, III, VI) have been found to be less than 600 bp, while the other three were greater than 1.8 kb. In the course of this work, we discovered that, in addition to the active copy, different homologous sequences identified as processed pseudogenes psi h-mtTFA have been isolated and sequenced. Using an 'in silico' mapping approach we determined their locations on chromosomes 7, 11 and X. psi h-mtTFA locations are different from that of the gene, previously reported on chromosome 10. Transcription analysis by means of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction has shown that other than the RNA corresponding to the full-length transcript, an isoform lacking 96 bp is also present. Among the three sequenced pseudogenes only one of them located on chromosome 11 has been found to be transcribed in Jurkat cells under these culture conditions, even though transcription initiation and binding sites for different transcription factors have also been found upstream from the other two pseudogenes. PMID:12095695

  2. Determinants of Plasma Apolipoprotein A-V and APOA5 Gene Transcripts in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Hahne, P.; Krempler, F.; Schaap, F.G.; Soyal, S.M.; Höffinger, H.; Miller, K.; Oberkofler, H.; Strobl, W.; Patsch, W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Apolipoprotein A-V (apoAV) contributes to the regulation of triglyceride metabolism, which plays a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic diseases. We therefore ascertained determinants of hepatic APOA5 transcript and apoAV plasma levels in humans. Design We determined influences of anthropometric variables, biochemical factors related to lipid and glucose metabolism, hepatic mRNA levels transcribed from the APOA1/C3/A4/A5 cluster and transcription factor genes implicated in the regulation of APOA5 as well as common SNPs at the APOA5 locus on APOA5 expression in 89 obese patients and 22 non-obese controls. Results Mean, age and sex adjusted, hepatic APOA5 mRNA or apoAV plasma levels did not differ by obesity status, HOMA-IR or inflammatory markers. In multivariate regression models, the c56C>G SNP, plasma apoCIII, plasma non-esterified fatty acids, hepatic APOA5 transcripts, sex and a weak association with obesity status explained 61% of the variance in apoAV plasma levels. Hepatic transcript levels of CPT1A1 and PPARA, plasma non-esterified fatty acids and the c56C>G SNP explained 48% of the variance in hepatic APOA5 transcript levels. Conclusion ApoAV plasma levels are independently associated with plasma free fatty acid and hepatic APOA5 mRNA levels. Associations of APOA5 transcripts with PPARA and CPT1A1 transcripts suggest that APOA5 expression is intimately linked to hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:18537870

  3. Human transcriptional interactome of chromatin contribute to gene co-expression

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Transcriptional interactome of chromatin is one of the important mechanisms in gene transcription regulation. By chromatin conformation capture and 3D FISH experiments, several chromatin interactions cases among sequence-distant genes or even inter-chromatin genes were reported. However, on genomics level, there is still little evidence to support these mechanisms. Recently based on Hi-C experiment, a genome-wide picture of chromatin interactions in human cells was presented. It provides a useful material for analysing whether the mechanism of transcriptional interactome is common. Results The main work here is to demonstrate whether the effects of transcriptional interactome on gene co-expression exist on genomic level. While controlling the effects of transcription factors control similarities (TCS), we tested the correlation between Hi-C interaction and the mutual ranks of gene co-expression rates (provided by COXPRESdb) of intra-chromatin gene pairs. We used 6,084 genes with both TF annotation and co-expression information, and matched them into 273,458 pairs with similar Hi-C interaction ranks in different cell types. The results illustrate that co-expression is strongly associated with chromatin interaction. Further analysis using GO annotation reveals potential correlation between gene function similarity, Hi-C interaction and their co-expression. Conclusions According to the results in this research, the intra-chromatin interactome may have relation to gene function and associate with co-expression. This study provides evidence for illustrating the effect of transcriptional interactome on transcription regulation. PMID:21156067

  4. Immunoglobulin analysis tool: a novel tool for the analysis of human and mouse heavy and light chain transcripts.

    PubMed

    Rogosch, Tobias; Kerzel, Sebastian; Hoi, Kam Hon; Zhang, Zhixin; Maier, Rolf F; Ippolito, Gregory C; Zemlin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Sequence analysis of immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy and light chain transcripts can refine categorization of B cell subpopulations and can shed light on the selective forces that act during immune responses or immune dysregulation, such as autoimmunity, allergy, and B cell malignancy. High-throughput sequencing yields Ig transcript collections of unprecedented size. The authoritative web-based IMGT/HighV-QUEST program is capable of analyzing large collections of transcripts and provides annotated output files to describe many key properties of Ig transcripts. However, additional processing of these flat files is required to create figures, or to facilitate analysis of additional features and comparisons between sequence sets. We present an easy-to-use Microsoft(®) Excel(®) based software, named Immunoglobulin Analysis Tool (IgAT), for the summary, interrogation, and further processing of IMGT/HighV-QUEST output files. IgAT generates descriptive statistics and high-quality figures for collections of murine or human Ig heavy or light chain transcripts ranging from 1 to 150,000 sequences. In addition to traditionally studied properties of Ig transcripts - such as the usage of germline gene segments, or the length and composition of the CDR-3 region - IgAT also uses published algorithms to calculate the probability of antigen selection based on somatic mutational patterns, the average hydrophobicity of the antigen-binding sites, and predictable structural properties of the CDR-H3 loop according to Shirai's H3-rules. These refined analyses provide in-depth information about the selective forces acting upon Ig repertoires and allow the statistical and graphical comparison of two or more sequence sets. IgAT is easy to use on any computer running Excel(®) 2003 or higher. Thus, IgAT is a useful tool to gain insights into the selective forces and functional properties of small to extremely large collections of Ig transcripts, thereby assisting a researcher to mine a data set

  5. Functional Impact and Evolution of a Novel Human Polymorphic Inversion That Disrupts a Gene and Creates a Fusion Transcript

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Marta; Castellano, David; Pantano, Lorena; Giner-Delgado, Carla; Izquierdo, David; Gayà-Vidal, Magdalena; Lucas-Lledó, José Ignacio; Esko, Tõnu; Terao, Chikashi; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Cáceres, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Despite many years of study into inversions, very little is known about their functional consequences, especially in humans. A common hypothesis is that the selective value of inversions stems in part from their effects on nearby genes, although evidence of this in natural populations is almost nonexistent. Here we present a global analysis of a new 415-kb polymorphic inversion that is among the longest ones found in humans and is the first with clear position effects. This inversion is located in chromosome 19 and has been generated by non-homologous end joining between blocks of transposable elements with low identity. PCR genotyping in 541 individuals from eight different human populations allowed the detection of tag SNPs and inversion genotyping in multiple populations worldwide, showing that the inverted allele is mainly found in East Asia with an average frequency of 4.7%. Interestingly, one of the breakpoints disrupts the transcription factor gene ZNF257, causing a significant reduction in the total expression level of this gene in lymphoblastoid cell lines. RNA-Seq analysis of the effects of this expression change in standard homozygotes and inversion heterozygotes revealed distinct expression patterns that were validated by quantitative RT-PCR. Moreover, we have found a new fusion transcript that is generated exclusively from inverted chromosomes around one of the breakpoints. Finally, by the analysis of the associated nucleotide variation, we have estimated that the inversion was generated ~40,000–50,000 years ago and, while a neutral evolution cannot be ruled out, its current frequencies are more consistent with those expected for a deleterious variant, although no significant association with phenotypic traits has been found so far. PMID:26427027

  6. A Network of Paralogous Stress Response Transcription Factors in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Merhej, Jawad; Thiebaut, Antonin; Blugeon, Corinne; Pouch, Juliette; Ali Chaouche, Mohammed El Amine; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Le Crom, Stéphane; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Devaux, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The yeast Candida glabrata has become the second cause of systemic candidemia in humans. However, relatively few genome-wide studies have been conducted in this organism and our knowledge of its transcriptional regulatory network is quite limited. In the present work, we combined genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq), transcriptome analyses, and DNA binding motif predictions to describe the regulatory interactions of the seven Yap (Yeast AP1) transcription factors of C. glabrata. We described a transcriptional network containing 255 regulatory interactions and 309 potential target genes. We predicted with high confidence the preferred DNA binding sites for 5 of the 7 CgYaps and showed a strong conservation of the Yap DNA binding properties between S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata. We provided reliable functional annotation for 3 of the 7 Yaps and identified for Yap1 and Yap5 a core regulon which is conserved in S. cerevisiae, C. glabrata, and C. albicans. We uncovered new roles for CgYap7 in the regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, for CgYap1 in the regulation of heme biosynthesis and for CgYap5 in the repression of GRX4 in response to iron starvation. These transcription factors define an interconnected transcriptional network at the cross-roads between redox homeostasis, oxygen consumption, and iron metabolism. PMID:27242683

  7. A Network of Paralogous Stress Response Transcription Factors in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Merhej, Jawad; Thiebaut, Antonin; Blugeon, Corinne; Pouch, Juliette; Ali Chaouche, Mohammed El Amine; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Le Crom, Stéphane; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Devaux, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The yeast Candida glabrata has become the second cause of systemic candidemia in humans. However, relatively few genome-wide studies have been conducted in this organism and our knowledge of its transcriptional regulatory network is quite limited. In the present work, we combined genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq), transcriptome analyses, and DNA binding motif predictions to describe the regulatory interactions of the seven Yap (Yeast AP1) transcription factors of C. glabrata. We described a transcriptional network containing 255 regulatory interactions and 309 potential target genes. We predicted with high confidence the preferred DNA binding sites for 5 of the 7 CgYaps and showed a strong conservation of the Yap DNA binding properties between S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata. We provided reliable functional annotation for 3 of the 7 Yaps and identified for Yap1 and Yap5 a core regulon which is conserved in S. cerevisiae, C. glabrata, and C. albicans. We uncovered new roles for CgYap7 in the regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, for CgYap1 in the regulation of heme biosynthesis and for CgYap5 in the repression of GRX4 in response to iron starvation. These transcription factors define an interconnected transcriptional network at the cross-roads between redox homeostasis, oxygen consumption, and iron metabolism. PMID:27242683

  8. Transcriptional interactions suggest niche segregation among microorganisms in the human gut.

    PubMed

    Plichta, Damian Rafal; Juncker, Agnieszka Sierakowska; Bertalan, Marcelo; Rettedal, Elizabeth; Gautier, Laurent; Varela, Encarna; Manichanh, Chaysavanh; Fouqueray, Charlène; Levenez, Florence; Nielsen, Trine; Doré, Joël; Machado, Ana Manuel Dantas; de Evgrafov, Mari Cristina Rodriguez; Hansen, Torben; Jørgensen, Torben; Bork, Peer; Guarner, Francisco; Pedersen, Oluf; Sommer, Morten O A; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Brunak, Søren; Nielsen, H Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the habitat for hundreds of microbial species, of which many cannot be cultivated readily, presumably because of the dependencies between species(1). Studies of microbial co-occurrence in the gut have indicated community substructures that may reflect functional and metabolic interactions between cohabiting species(2,3). To move beyond species co-occurrence networks, we systematically identified transcriptional interactions between pairs of coexisting gut microbes using metagenomics and microarray-based metatranscriptomics data from 233 stool samples from Europeans. In 102 significantly interacting species pairs, the transcriptional changes led to a reduced expression of orthologous functions between the coexisting species. Specific species-species transcriptional interactions were enriched for functions important for H2 and CO2 homeostasis, butyrate biosynthesis, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, flagella assembly and bacterial chemotaxis, as well as for the metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids and cofactors. The analysis gives the first insight into the microbial community-wide transcriptional interactions, and suggests that the regulation of gene expression plays an important role in species adaptation to coexistence and that niche segregation takes place at the transcriptional level. PMID:27564131

  9. The Inflammatory Transcription Factors NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3 Drive Age-Associated Transcriptional Changes in the Human Kidney

    PubMed Central

    O’Brown, Zach K.; Van Nostrand, Eric L.; Higgins, John P.; Kim, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    Human kidney function declines with age, accompanied by stereotyped changes in gene expression and histopathology, but the mechanisms underlying these changes are largely unknown. To identify potential regulators of kidney aging, we compared age-associated transcriptional changes in the human kidney with genome-wide maps of transcription factor occupancy from ChIP-seq datasets in human cells. The strongest candidates were the inflammation-associated transcription factors NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3, the activities of which increase with age in epithelial compartments of the renal cortex. Stimulation of renal tubular epithelial cells with the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 (a STAT3 activator), IFNγ (a STAT1 activator), or TNFα (an NFκB activator) recapitulated age-associated gene expression changes. We show that common DNA variants in RELA and NFKB1, the two genes encoding subunits of the NFκB transcription factor, associate with kidney function and chronic kidney disease in gene association studies, providing the first evidence that genetic variation in NFκB contributes to renal aging phenotypes. Our results suggest that NFκB, STAT1 and STAT3 underlie transcriptional changes and chronic inflammation in the aging human kidney. PMID:26678048

  10. Limitations in the process of transcription and translation inhibit recombinant human chorionic gonadotropin expression in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Yi, Xiaoping; Zhuang, Yingping; Zhang, Siliang

    2015-06-20

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a glycoprotein hormone that exists as a heterodimer with a α subunit and β subunit assembled together with disulfide bridges. This hormone plays an important role in the detection of ovulation induction and in the treatment of certain diseases that cause female infertility. The effects of transcription, subunit expression, assembling and secretion on recombinant hCG expression in CHO cells were studied using stable high-producing and low-producing cell lines generated by the FLP-In™ system. The results indicated that the mRNA and polypeptide levels of the β subunit were always higher than those of the α subunit. Further study confirmed that the differences were caused by the transcription rate rather than by mRNA stability. In the high-producing cell lines, there was obvious transcription level limitation of the α subunit in contrast to the β subunit. In addition, there was obvious limitation of the synthetic steps from mRNA to polypeptide for both the α subunit and the β subunit, especially the β subunit. Significant limitations of the assembly and secretion levels were not observed in this research. This study presents a research methodology for double subunit protein expression and provides valuable evidence for the enhancement of recombinant hCG productivity. PMID:25529346

  11. Sp1 and CREB regulate basal transcription of the human SNF2L gene

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Yu; Jiang Baichun; Zou Yongxin; Gao Guimin; Shang Linshan; Chen Bingxi; Liu Qiji; Gong Yaoqin

    2008-04-04

    Imitation Switch (ISWI) is a member of the SWI2/SNF2 superfamily of ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, which are involved in multiple nuclear functions, including transcriptional regulation, replication, and chromatin assembly. Mammalian genomes encode two ISWI orthologs, SNF2H and SNF2L. In order to clarify the molecular mechanisms governing the expression of human SNF2L gene, we functionally examined the transcriptional regulation of human SNF2L promoter. Reporter gene assays demonstrated that the minimal SNF2L promoter was located between positions -152 to -86 relative to the transcription start site. In this region we have identified a cAMP-response element (CRE) located at -99 to -92 and a Sp1-binding site at -145 to -135 that play a critical role in regulating basal activity of human SNF2L gene, which were proven by deletion and mutation of specific binding sites, EMSA, and down-regulating Sp1 and CREB via RNAi. This study provides the first insight into the mechanisms that control basal expression of human SNF2L gene.

  12. Human Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Genes: Alternatively-Spliced Transcriptional Variants and Their Suggested Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Black, William J.; Stagos, Dimitrios; Marchitti, Satori A.; Nebert, Daniel W.; Tipton, Keith F.; Bairoch, Amos; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The human aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily consists of 19 genes encoding enzymes critical for NAD(P)+-dependent oxidation of endogenous and exogenous aldehydes, including drugs and environmental toxicants. Mutations in ALDH genes are the molecular basis of several disease states (e.g. Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, pyridoxine-dependent seizures, and type II hyperprolinemia) and may contribute to the etiology of complex diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. The aim of this nomenclature update was to identify splice transcriptional variants principally for the human ALDH genes. METHODS Data-mining methods were used to retrieve all human ALDH sequences. Alternatively-spliced transcriptional variants were determined based upon: a) criteria for sequence integrity and genomic alignment; b) evidence of multiple independent cDNA sequences corresponding to a variant sequence; and c) if available, empirical evidence of variants from the literature. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION Alternatively-spliced transcriptional variants and their encoded proteins exist for most of the human ALDH genes; however, their function and significance remain to be established. When compared with the human genome, rat and mouse include an additional gene, Aldh1a7, in the ALDH1A subfamily. In order to avoid confusion when identifying splice variants in various genomes, nomenclature guidelines for the naming of such alternative transcriptional variants and proteins are recommended herein. In addition, a web database (www.aldh.org) has been developed to provide up-to-date information and nomenclature guidelines for the ALDH superfamily. PMID:19823103

  13. Insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity through interrogation of cis elements disrupted in human erythroid disorders.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Aoi; Ulirsch, Jacob C; Ludwig, Leif S; Fiorini, Claudia; Yasuda, Makiko; Choudhuri, Avik; McDonel, Patrick; Zon, Leonard I; Sankaran, Vijay G

    2016-04-19

    Whole-exome sequencing has been incredibly successful in identifying causal genetic variants and has revealed a number of novel genes associated with blood and other diseases. One limitation of this approach is that it overlooks mutations in noncoding regulatory elements. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which mutations in transcriptionalcis-regulatory elements result in disease remain poorly understood. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to interrogate three such elements harboring mutations in human erythroid disorders, which in all cases are predicted to disrupt a canonical binding motif for the hematopoietic transcription factor GATA1. Deletions of as few as two to four nucleotides resulted in a substantial decrease (>80%) in target gene expression. Isolated deletions of the canonical GATA1 binding motif completely abrogated binding of the cofactor TAL1, which binds to a separate motif. Having verified the functionality of these three GATA1 motifs, we demonstrate strong evolutionary conservation of GATA1 motifs in regulatory elements proximal to other genes implicated in erythroid disorders, and show that targeted disruption of such elements results in altered gene expression. By modeling transcription factor binding patterns, we show that multiple transcription factors are associated with erythroid gene expression, and have created predictive maps modeling putative disruptions of their binding sites at key regulatory elements. Our study provides insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity and may prove a useful resource for investigating the pathogenicity of noncoding variants in human erythroid disorders. PMID:27044088

  14. Transcriptional properties of human NANOG1 and NANOG2 in acute leukemic cells

    PubMed Central

    Eberle, Irina; Pless, Birgit; Braun, Miriam; Dingermann, Theo; Marschalek, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Transcripts of NANOG and OCT4 have been recently identified in human t(4;11) leukemia and in a model system expressing both t(4;11) fusion proteins. Moreover, downstream target genes of NANOG/OCT4/SOX2 were shown to be transcriptionally activated. However, the NANOG1 gene belongs to a gene family, including a gene tandem duplication (named NANOG2 or NANOGP1) and several pseudogenes (NANOGP2-P11). Thus, it was unclear which of the NANOG family members were transcribed in t(4;11) leukemia cells. 5′-RACE experiments revealed novel 5′-exons of NANOG1 and NANOG2, which could give rise to the expression of two different NANOG1 and three different NANOG2 protein variants. Moreover, a novel PCR-based method was established that allows distinguishing between transcripts deriving from NANOG1, NANOG2 and all other NANOG pseudogenes (P2–P11). By applying this method, we were able to demonstrate that human hematopoietic stem cells and different leukemic cells transcribe NANOG2. Furthermore, we functionally tested NANOG1 and NANOG2 protein variants by recombinant expression in 293 cells. These studies revealed that NANOG1 and NANOG2 protein variants are functionally equivalent and activate a regulatory circuit that activates specific stem cell genes. Therefore, we pose the hypothesis that the transcriptional activation of NANOG2 represents a ‘gain-of-stem cell function’ in acute leukemia. PMID:20427424

  15. Evidence for Transcript Networks Composed of Chimeric RNAs in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Christelle; Mudge, Jonathan M.; Howald, Cédric; Foissac, Sylvain; Ucla, Catherine; Chrast, Jacqueline; Ribeca, Paolo; Martin, David; Murray, Ryan R.; Yang, Xinping; Ghamsari, Lila; Lin, Chenwei; Bell, Ian; Dumais, Erica; Drenkow, Jorg; Tress, Michael L.; Gelpí, Josep Lluís; Orozco, Modesto; Valencia, Alfonso; van Berkum, Nynke L.; Lajoie, Bryan R.; Vidal, Marc; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; Batut, Philippe; Dobin, Alex; Harrow, Jennifer; Hubbard, Tim; Dekker, Job; Frankish, Adam; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Reymond, Alexandre; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Guigó, Roderic; Gingeras, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    The classic organization of a gene structure has followed the Jacob and Monod bacterial gene model proposed more than 50 years ago. Since then, empirical determinations of the complexity of the transcriptomes found in yeast to human has blurred the definition and physical boundaries of genes. Using multiple analysis approaches we have characterized individual gene boundaries mapping on human chromosomes 21 and 22. Analyses of the locations of the 5′ and 3′ transcriptional termini of 492 protein coding genes revealed that for 85% of these genes the boundaries extend beyond the current annotated termini, most often connecting with exons of transcripts from other well annotated genes. The biological and evolutionary importance of these chimeric transcripts is underscored by (1) the non-random interconnections of genes involved, (2) the greater phylogenetic depth of the genes involved in many chimeric interactions, (3) the coordination of the expression of connected genes and (4) the close in vivo and three dimensional proximity of the genomic regions being transcribed and contributing to parts of the chimeric RNAs. The non-random nature of the connection of the genes involved suggest that chimeric transcripts should not be studied in isolation, but together, as an RNA network. PMID:22238572

  16. Evidence for transcript networks composed of chimeric RNAs in human cells.

    PubMed

    Djebali, Sarah; Lagarde, Julien; Kapranov, Philipp; Lacroix, Vincent; Borel, Christelle; Mudge, Jonathan M; Howald, Cédric; Foissac, Sylvain; Ucla, Catherine; Chrast, Jacqueline; Ribeca, Paolo; Martin, David; Murray, Ryan R; Yang, Xinping; Ghamsari, Lila; Lin, Chenwei; Bell, Ian; Dumais, Erica; Drenkow, Jorg; Tress, Michael L; Gelpí, Josep Lluís; Orozco, Modesto; Valencia, Alfonso; van Berkum, Nynke L; Lajoie, Bryan R; Vidal, Marc; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; Batut, Philippe; Dobin, Alex; Harrow, Jennifer; Hubbard, Tim; Dekker, Job; Frankish, Adam; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Reymond, Alexandre; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Guigó, Roderic; Gingeras, Thomas R

    2012-01-01

    The classic organization of a gene structure has followed the Jacob and Monod bacterial gene model proposed more than 50 years ago. Since then, empirical determinations of the complexity of the transcriptomes found in yeast to human has blurred the definition and physical boundaries of genes. Using multiple analysis approaches we have characterized individual gene boundaries mapping on human chromosomes 21 and 22. Analyses of the locations of the 5' and 3' transcriptional termini of 492 protein coding genes revealed that for 85% of these genes the boundaries extend beyond the current annotated termini, most often connecting with exons of transcripts from other well annotated genes. The biological and evolutionary importance of these chimeric transcripts is underscored by (1) the non-random interconnections of genes involved, (2) the greater phylogenetic depth of the genes involved in many chimeric interactions, (3) the coordination of the expression of connected genes and (4) the close in vivo and three dimensional proximity of the genomic regions being transcribed and contributing to parts of the chimeric RNAs. The non-random nature of the connection of the genes involved suggest that chimeric transcripts should not be studied in isolation, but together, as an RNA network. PMID:22238572

  17. Pervasive Transcription of the Human Genome Produces Thousands of Previously Unidentified Long Intergenic Noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Known protein coding gene exons compose less than 3% of the human genome. The remaining 97% is largely uncharted territory, with only a small fraction characterized. The recent observation of transcription in this intergenic territory has stimulated debate about the extent of intergenic transcription and whether these intergenic RNAs are functional. Here we directly observed with a large set of RNA-seq data covering a wide array of human tissue types that the majority of the genome is indeed transcribed, corroborating recent observations by the ENCODE project. Furthermore, using de novo transcriptome assembly of this RNA-seq data, we found that intergenic regions encode far more long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) than previously described, helping to resolve the discrepancy between the vast amount of observed intergenic transcription and the limited number of previously known lincRNAs. In total, we identified tens of thousands of putative lincRNAs expressed at a minimum of one copy per cell, significantly expanding upon prior lincRNA annotation sets. These lincRNAs are specifically regulated and conserved rather than being the product of transcriptional noise. In addition, lincRNAs are strongly enriched for trait-associated SNPs suggesting a new mechanism by which intergenic trait-associated regions may function. These findings will enable the discovery and interrogation of novel intergenic functional elements. PMID:23818866

  18. Thalassaemia mutations within the 5'UTR of the human beta-globin gene disrupt transcription.

    PubMed

    Sgourou, Argyro; Routledge, Samantha; Antoniou, Michael; Papachatzopoulou, Adamantia; Psiouri, Lambrini; Athanassiadou, Aglaia

    2004-03-01

    The mechanisms by which mutations within the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the human beta-globin gene (HBB) cause thalassaemia are currently not well understood. We present here the first comprehensive comparative functional analysis of four 'silent' mutations in the human beta-globin 5'UTR, namely: +10(-T), +22(G --> A), +33(C --> G) and +(40-43)(-AAAC), which are present in patients with beta-thalassaemia intermedia. Expression of these genes under the control of the beta-globin locus control region in stable transfected murine erythroleukaemia cells showed that all four mutations decreased steady state levels of mRNA to 61.6%, 68%, 85.2% and 70.6%, respectively, compared with the wildtype gene. These mutations did not interfere with either mRNA transport from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, 3' end processing or mRNA stability. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated that mutations +10(-T) and +33(C --> G) reduced the rate of transcription to a degree that fully accounted for the observed lower level of mRNA accumulation, suggesting a disruption of downstream promoter sequences. Interestingly, mutation +22(G --> A) decreased the rate of transcription to a low degree, indicating the existence of a mechanism that acts post-transcriptionally. Generally, our data demonstrated the significance of functionally analysing mutants of this type in the presence of a full complement of transcriptional regulatory elements within a stably integrated chromatin context in an erythroid cell environment. PMID:15009072

  19. Incomplete DNA methylation underlies a transcriptional memory of the somatic cell in human iPS cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohi, Yuki; Qin, Han; Hong, Chibo; Blouin, Laure; Polo, Jose M.; Guo, Tingxia; Qi, Zhongxia; Downey, Sara L.; Manos, Philip D.; Rossi, Derrick J.; Yu, Jingwei; Hebrok, Matthias; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Costello, Joseph F.; Song, Jun S.; Ramalho-Santos, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are remarkably similar to embryonic stem (ES) cells, but recent reports suggest that there may be important differences between them. We performed a systematic comparison of human iPS cells generated from hepatocytes (representative of endoderm), skin fibroblasts (mesoderm) and melanocytes (ectoderm). All low passage iPS cells analyzed retain a transcriptional memory of the original cells. The persistent expression of somatic genes can be partially explained by incomplete promoter DNA methylation. This epigenetic mechanism underlies a robust form of memory that can be found in iPS cells generated by multiple laboratories using different methods, including RNA transfection. Incompletely silenced genes tend to be isolated from other genes that are repressed during reprogramming, indicating that recruitment of the silencing machinery may be inefficient at isolated genes. Knockdown of the incompletely reprogrammed gene C9orf64 reduces the efficiency of human iPS cell generation, suggesting that somatic memory genes may be functionally relevant during reprogramming. PMID:21499256

  20. Genome-wide analysis of human global and transcription-coupled excision repair of UV damage at single-nucleotide resolution

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinchuan; Adar, Sheera; Selby, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a method for genome-wide mapping of DNA excision repair named XR-seq (excision repair sequencing). Human nucleotide excision repair generates two incisions surrounding the site of damage, creating an ∼30-mer. In XR-seq, this fragment is isolated and subjected to high-throughput sequencing. We used XR-seq to produce stranded, nucleotide-resolution maps of repair of two UV-induced DNA damages in human cells: cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and (6-4) pyrimidine–pyrimidone photoproducts [(6-4)PPs]. In wild-type cells, CPD repair was highly associated with transcription, specifically with the template strand. Experiments in cells defective in either transcription-coupled excision repair or general excision repair isolated the contribution of each pathway to the overall repair pattern and showed that transcription-coupled repair of both photoproducts occurs exclusively on the template strand. XR-seq maps capture transcription-coupled repair at sites of divergent gene promoters and bidirectional enhancer RNA (eRNA) production at enhancers. XR-seq data also uncovered the repair characteristics and novel sequence preferences of CPDs and (6-4)PPs. XR-seq and the resulting repair maps will facilitate studies of the effects of genomic location, chromatin context, transcription, and replication on DNA repair in human cells. PMID:25934506

  1. The emerging role of RNA in the regulation of gene transcription in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kevin V.

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that particular species of non-coding RNAs can modulate gene transcription in human cells. While such observations were in the past relegated to imprinted genes, it is now becoming apparent that several different genes in differentiated cells may be under some form of RNA based regulatory control. Studies carried out to date have begun to discern the mechanism of action whereby non-coding RNAs modulate gene transcription by the targeted recruitment of epigenetic silencing complexes to homology containing loci in the genome. The results of these studies will be considered in detail as well as the implications that a vast array of non-coding RNA based regulatory networks may be operative in human cells. PMID:21333746

  2. Selective activation of human heat shock gene transcription by nitrosourea antitumor drugs mediated by isocyanate-induced damage and activation of heat shock transcription factor

    SciTech Connect

    Kroes, R.A. Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL ); Abravaya, K.; Morimoto, R.I. ); Seidenfeld, J. )

    1991-06-01

    Treatment of cultured human tumor cells with the chloroethylnitrosourea antitumor drug 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) selectively induces transcription and protein synthesis of a subset of the human heat shock or stress-induced genes (HSP90 and HSP70) with little effect on other stress genes or on expression of the c-fos, c-myc, or {beta}-actin genes. The active component of BCNU and related compounds appears to be the isocyanate moiety that causes carbamoylation of proteins and nucleic acids. Transcriptional activation of the human HSP70 gene by BCNU is dependent on the heat shock element and correlates with the level of heat shock transcription factor and its binding to the heat shock element in vivo. Unlike activation by heat or heavy metals, BCNU-mediated activation is strongly dependent upon new protein synthesis. This suggests that BCNU-induced, isocyanate-mediated damage to newly synthesized protein(s) may be responsible for activation of the heat shock transcription factor and increased transcription of the HSP90 and HSP70 genes.

  3. Activation of transcription factor AP-2 mediates UVA radiation- and singlet oxygen-induced expression of the human intercellular adhesion molecule 1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Grether-Beck, S.; Olaizola-Horn, S.; Schmitt, H.; Grewe, M.

    1996-12-10

    UVA radiation is the major component of the UV solar spectrum that reaches the earth, and the therapeutic application of UVA radiation is increasing in medicine. Analysis of the cellular effects of UVA radiation has revealed that exposure of human cells to UVA radiation at physiological doses leads to increased gene expression and that this UVA response is primarily mediated through the generation of singlet oxygen. In this study, the mechanisms by which UVA radiation induces transcriptional activation of the human intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) were examined. UVA radiation was capable of inducing activation of the human ICAM-1 promoter and increasing OCAM-1 mRNA and protein expression. These UVA radiation effects were inhibited by singlet oxygen quenchers, augmented by enhancement of singlet oxygen life-time, and mimicked in unirradiated cells by a singlet oxygen-generating system. UVA radiation as well as singlet oxygen-induced ICAM-1 promoter activation required activation of the transcription factor AP-2. Accordingly, both stimuli activated AP-2, and deletion of the putative AP-2-binding site abrogated ICAM-1 promoter activation in this system. This study identified the AP-2 site as the UVA radiation- and singlet oxygen-responsive element of the human ICAM-1 gene. The capacity of UVA radiation and/or singlet oxygen to induce human gene expression through activation of AP-2 indicates a previously unrecognized role of this transcription factor in the mammalian stress response. 38 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Generation of a Conditional Allele of the Transcription Factor Atonal Homolog 8 (Atoh8)

    PubMed Central

    Ejarque, Miriam; Mir-Coll, Joan; Gomis, Ramon; German, Michael S.; Lynn, Francis C.; Gasa, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Atonal Homolog 8 (Atoh8) is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor that is highly conserved across species and expressed in multiple tissues during embryogenesis. In the developing pancreas, Atoh8 is expressed in endocrine progenitors but declines in hormone-positive cells, suggesting a role during early stages of the endocrine differentiation program. We previously generated a whole-body Atoh8 knockout but early lethality of null embryos precluded assessment of Atoh8 functions during organ development. Here we report the generation of a conditional Atoh8 knockout mouse strain by insertion of two loxP sites flanking exon 1 of the Atoh8 gene. Pancreas-specific Atoh8 knockout (Atoh8 Δpanc) mice were obtained by mating this strain with a Pdx1-Cre transgenic line. Atoh8 Δpanc mice were born at the expected mendelian ratio and showed normal appearance and fertility. Pancreas weight and gross pancreatic morphology were normal. All pancreatic cell lineages were present, although endocrine δ (somatostatin) cells were modestly augmented in Atoh8 Δpanc as compared to control neonates. This increase did not affect whole-body glucose tolerance in adult knockout animals. Gene expression analysis in embryonic pancreases at the time of the major endocrine differentiation wave revealed modest alterations in several early endocrine differentiation markers. Together, these data argue that Atoh8 modulates activation of the endocrine program but it is not essential for pancreas formation or endocrine differentiation in the mouse. Given the ubiquitous expression pattern of Atoh8, the availability of a mouse strain carrying a conditional allele for this gene warrants further studies using temporally regulated Cre transgenic lines to elucidate time or cell-autonomous functions of Atoh8 during development and in the adult. PMID:26752640

  5. RBFOX1 regulates both splicing and transcriptional networks in human neuronal development

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Brent L.; Wexler, Eric; Wahnich, Amanda; Friedrich, Tara; Vijayendran, Chandran; Gao, Fuying; Parikshak, Neelroop; Konopka, Genevieve; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2012-01-01

    RNA splicing plays a critical role in the programming of neuronal differentiation and, consequently, normal human neurodevelopment, and its disruption may underlie neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. The RNA-binding protein, fox-1 homolog (RBFOX1; also termed A2BP1 or FOX1), is a neuron-specific splicing factor predicted to regulate neuronal splicing networks clinically implicated in neurodevelopmental disease, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but only a few targets have been experimentally identified. We used RNA sequencing to identify the RBFOX1 splicing network at a genome-wide level in primary human neural stem cells during differentiation. We observe that RBFOX1 regulates a wide range of alternative splicing events implicated in neuronal development and maturation, including transcription factors, other splicing factors and synaptic proteins. Downstream alterations in gene expression define an additional transcriptional network regulated by RBFOX1 involved in neurodevelopmental pathways remarkably parallel to those affected by splicing. Several of these differentially expressed genes are further implicated in ASD and related neurodevelopmental diseases. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis demonstrates a high degree of connectivity among these disease-related genes, highlighting RBFOX1 as a key factor coordinating the regulation of both neurodevelopmentally important alternative splicing events and clinically relevant neuronal transcriptional programs in the development of human neurons. PMID:22730494

  6. Transcriptional promoter of the human alpha 1(V) collagen gene (COL5A1).

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S; Greenspan, D S

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized the 5' region of the human alpha 1(V) collagen gene (COL5A1). The transcriptional promoter is shown to have a number of features characteristic of the promoters of 'housekeeping' and growth-control-related genes. It lacks obvious TATA and CAAT boxes, has multiple transcription start sites, has a high GC content, lies within a well-defined CpG island and has a number of consensus sites for the potential binding of transcription factor Sp1. This type of promoter structure, while unusual for a collagen gene, is consistent with the broad distribution of expression of COL5A1 and is reminiscent of the promoter structures of the genes encoding type VI collagen, which has a similarly broad distribution of expression. Stepwise deletion of COL5A1 5' sequences, placed upstream of a heterologous reporter gene, yielded a gradual decrease in promoter activity, indicating that the COL5A1 promoter is composed of an array of cis-acting elements. A minimal promoter region contained within the 212 bp immediately upstream of the major transcription start site contained no consensus sequences for the binding of known transcription factors, but gel mobility shift assays showed this region to bind nuclear factors, including Sp1, at a number of sites. The major transcription start site is flanked by an upstream 34-bp oligopurine/oligopyrimidine stretch, or 'GAGA' box, and a downstream 56-bp GAGA box which contains a 10-bp mirror repeat and is sensitive to cleavage with S1 nuclease. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:7646438

  7. Saci-1, -2, and -3 and Perere, Four Novel Retrotransposons with High Transcriptional Activities from the Human Parasite Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    DeMarco, Ricardo; Kowaltowski, Andre T.; Machado, Abimael A.; Soares, M. Bento; Gargioni, Cybele; Kawano, Toshie; Rodrigues, Vanderlei; Madeira, Alda M. B. N.; Wilson, R. Alan; Menck, Carlos F. M.; Setubal, João C.; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel; Leite, Luciana C. C.; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio

    2004-01-01

    Using the data set of 180,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni generated recently by our group, we identified three novel long-terminal-repeat (LTR)- and one novel non-LTR-expressed retrotransposon, named Saci-1, -2, and -3 and Perere, respectively. Full-length sequences were reconstructed from ESTs and have deduced open reading frames (ORFs) with several uncorrupted features, characterizing them as possible active retrotransposons of different known transposon families. Alignment of reconstructed sequences to available preliminary genome sequence data confirmed the overall structure of the transposons. The frequency of sequenced transposon transcripts in cercariae was 14% of all transcripts from that stage, twofold higher than that in schistosomula and three- to fourfold higher than that in adults, eggs, miracidia, and germ balls. We show by Southern blot analysis, by EST annotation and tallying, and by counting transposon tags from a Social Analysis of Gene Expression library, that the four novel retrotransposons exhibit a 10- to 30-fold lower copy number in the genome and a 4- to 200-fold-higher transcriptional rate per copy than the four previously described S. mansoni retrotransposons. Such differences lead us to hypothesize that there are two different populations of retrotransposons in S. mansoni genome, occupying different niches in its ecology. Examples of retrotransposon fragment inserts were found into the 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions of four different S. mansoni target gene transcripts. The data presented here suggest a role for these elements in the dynamics of this complex human parasite genome. PMID:14990715

  8. Transcriptional activation of JC virus by human T-lymphotropic virus type I Tax protein in human neuronal cell lines.

    PubMed

    Okada, Y; Sawa, H; Tanaka, S; Takada, A; Suzuki, S; Hasegawa, H; Umemura, T; Fujisawa, J; Tanaka, Y; Hall, W W; Nagashima, K

    2000-06-01

    Polyomavirus JC (JCV) causes the human demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). The recent demonstration of cases of PML in association with human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) infection prompted us to examine whether the HTLV-I-encoded regulatory protein Tax activates JCV transcription. By employing a dual luciferase assay, we initially found that the expression of Tax activated the transcriptional potential of both early and late promoters of JCV in human neuronal but not in non-neuronal cells. We subsequently analyzed the mechanism of Tax-induced activation of the JCV promoter in neuronal cells with the following results: 1) the JCV promoter that lacks the NF-kappaB-binding motif could not be activated by Tax; 2) the overexpression of IkappaBalpha abolished Tax-induced transcriptional activation of the JCV promoter; 3) a Tax mutant (M22) lacking the potential for activation via the NF-kappaB pathway did not activate the JCV promoter. Furthermore, Tax enhances the gene expression of JCV T antigen and VP1. We examined mechanisms of the cell-specific activation of the JCV promoter by Tax. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated the presence of Tax-bound protein(s) that were specifically present in non-neuronal cells. This study is the first demonstration of the activation of JCV promoter by HTLV-I Tax in an NF-kappaB-dependent manner. PMID:10828075

  9. Commensal Streptococcus salivarius Modulates PPARγ Transcriptional Activity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Couvigny, Benoît; de Wouters, Tomas; Kaci, Ghalia; Jacouton, Elsa; Delorme, Christine; Doré, Joël; Renault, Pierre; Blottière, Hervé M.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of commensal bacteria in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation has increasingly been demonstrated over the last decades. A multitude of studies have shown direct effects of commensal bacteria from local transcriptional activity to systemic impact. The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is one of the early bacteria colonizing the oral and gut mucosal surfaces. It has been shown to down-regulate nuclear transcription factor (NF-кB) in human intestinal cells, a central regulator of the host mucosal immune system response to the microbiota. In order to evaluate its impact on a further important transcription factor shown to link metabolism and inflammation in the intestine, namely PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor), we used human intestinal epithelial cell-lines engineered to monitor PPARγ transcriptional activity in response to a wide range of S. salivarius strains. We demonstrated that different strains from this bacterial group share the property to inhibit PPARγ activation independently of the ligand used. First attempts to identify the nature of the active compounds showed that it is a low-molecular-weight, DNase-, proteases- and heat-resistant metabolite secreted by S. salivarius strains. Among PPARγ-targeted metabolic genes, I-FABP and Angptl4 expression levels were dramatically reduced in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to S. salivarius supernatant. Both gene products modulate lipid accumulation in cells and down-regulating their expression might consequently affect host health. Our study shows that species belonging to the salivarius group of streptococci impact both host inflammatory and metabolic regulation suggesting a possible role in the host homeostasis and health. PMID:25946041

  10. Commensal Streptococcus salivarius Modulates PPARγ Transcriptional Activity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Couvigny, Benoît; de Wouters, Tomas; Kaci, Ghalia; Jacouton, Elsa; Delorme, Christine; Doré, Joël; Renault, Pierre; Blottière, Hervé M; Guédon, Eric; Lapaque, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The impact of commensal bacteria in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation has increasingly been demonstrated over the last decades. A multitude of studies have shown direct effects of commensal bacteria from local transcriptional activity to systemic impact. The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is one of the early bacteria colonizing the oral and gut mucosal surfaces. It has been shown to down-regulate nuclear transcription factor (NF-кB) in human intestinal cells, a central regulator of the host mucosal immune system response to the microbiota. In order to evaluate its impact on a further important transcription factor shown to link metabolism and inflammation in the intestine, namely PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor), we used human intestinal epithelial cell-lines engineered to monitor PPARγ transcriptional activity in response to a wide range of S. salivarius strains. We demonstrated that different strains from this bacterial group share the property to inhibit PPARγ activation independently of the ligand used. First attempts to identify the nature of the active compounds showed that it is a low-molecular-weight, DNase-, proteases- and heat-resistant metabolite secreted by S. salivarius strains. Among PPARγ-targeted metabolic genes, I-FABP and Angptl4 expression levels were dramatically reduced in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to S. salivarius supernatant. Both gene products modulate lipid accumulation in cells and down-regulating their expression might consequently affect host health. Our study shows that species belonging to the salivarius group of streptococci impact both host inflammatory and metabolic regulation suggesting a possible role in the host homeostasis and health. PMID:25946041

  11. Cloning of the novel human myeloid-cell-specific C/EBP-epsilon transcription factor.

    PubMed Central

    Chumakov, A M; Grillier, I; Chumakova, E; Chih, D; Slater, J; Koeffler, H P

    1997-01-01

    Chicken NF-M transcription factor, in cooperation with either c-Myb or v-Myb, is active in the combinatorial activation of myeloid-cell-specific genes in heterologous cell types, such as embryonic fibroblasts. In humans, similar effects were observed with homologous members of the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) family of transcriptional regulators, especially the human homolog of chicken NF-M, C/EBP-beta (NF-IL6). However, the NF-IL6 gene is expressed in a variety of nonmyeloid cell types and is strongly inducible in response to inflammatory stimuli, making it an unlikely candidate to have an exclusive role as a combinatorial differentiation switch during myelopoiesis in human cells. By using a reverse transcription-PCR-based approach and a set of primers specific for the DNA-binding domains of highly homologous members of the C/EBP family of transcriptional regulators, we have cloned a novel human gene encoding a member of the C/EBP gene family, identified as the human homolog of CRP1, C/EBP-epsilon. A 1.2-kb cDNA encoding full-length human C/EBP-epsilon was cloned from a promyelocyte-late myeloblast-derived lambda gt11 library. Molecular analysis of the cDNA and genomic clones indicated the presence of two exons encoding a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 32 kDa and a pI of 9.5. Primer extension analysis of C/EBP-epsilon mRNA detected a single major transcription start site approximately 200 bp upstream of the start codon. The putative promoter area is similar to those of several other myeloid-cell-specific genes in that it contains no TATAAA box but has a number of purine-rich stretches with multiple sites for the factors of the Ets family of transcriptional regulators. Northern blot analyses indicated a highly restricted mRNA expression pattern, with the strongest expression occurring in promyelocyte and late-myeloblast-like cell lines. Western blot and immunoprecipitation studies using rabbit anti-C/EBP-epsilon antibodies raised against the N

  12. Generation of improved humanized mouse models for human infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, Michael A.; Wiles, Michael V.; Greiner, Dale L.; Shultz, Leonard D.

    2014-01-01

    The study of human-specific infectious agents has been hindered by the lack of optimal small animal models. More recently development of novel strains of immunodeficient mice has begun to provide the opportunity to utilize small animal models for the study of many human-specific infectious agents. The introduction of a targeted mutation in the IL2 receptor common gamma chain gene (IL2rgnull) in mice already deficient in T and B cells led to a breakthrough in the ability to engraft hematopoietic stem cells, as well as functional human lymphoid cells and tissues, effectively creating human immune systems in immunodeficient mice. These humanized mice are becoming increasingly important as pre-clinical models for the study of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) and other human-specific infectious agents. However, there remain a number of opportunities to further improve humanized mouse models for the study of human-specific infectious agents. This is being done by the implementation of innovative technologies, which collectively will accelerate the development of new models of genetically modified mice, including; i) modifications of the host to reduce innate immunity, which impedes human cell engraftment; ii) genetic modification to provide human-specific growth factors and cytokines required for optimal human cell growth and function; iii) and new cell and tissue engraftment protocols. The development of “next generation” humanized mouse models continues to provide exciting opportunities for the establishment of robust small animal models to study the pathogenesis of human-specific infectious agents, as well as for testing the efficacy of therapeutic agents and experimental vaccines. PMID:24607601

  13. Comprehensive analysis of the transcriptional profile of the Mediator complex across human cancer types.

    PubMed

    Syring, Isabella; Klümper, Niklas; Offermann, Anne; Braun, Martin; Deng, Mario; Boehm, Diana; Queisser, Angela; von Mässenhausen, Anne; Brägelmann, Johannes; Vogel, Wenzel; Schmidt, Doris; Majores, Michael; Schindler, Anne; Kristiansen, Glen; Müller, Stefan C; Ellinger, Jörg; Shaikhibrahim, Zaki; Perner, Sven

    2016-04-26

    The Mediator complex is a key regulator of gene transcription and several studies demonstrated altered expressions of particular subunits in diverse human diseases, especially cancer. However a systematic study deciphering the transcriptional expression of the Mediator across different cancer entities is still lacking.We therefore performed a comprehensive in silico cancer vs. benign analysis of the Mediator complex subunits (MEDs) for 20 tumor entities using Oncomine datasets. The transcriptional expression profiles across almost all cancer entities showed differentially expressed MEDs as compared to benign tissue. Differential expression of MED8 in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and MED12 in lung cancer (LCa) were validated and further investigated by immunohistochemical staining on tissue microarrays containing large numbers of specimen. MED8 in clear cell RCC (ccRCC) associated with shorter survival and advanced TNM stage and showed higher expression in metastatic than primary tumors. In vitro, siRNA mediated MED8 knockdown significantly impaired proliferation and motility in ccRCC cell lines, hinting at a role for MED8 to serve as a novel therapeutic target in ccRCC. Taken together, our Mediator complex transcriptome proved to be a valid tool for identifying cancer-related shifts in Mediator complex composition, revealing that MEDs do exhibit cancer specific transcriptional expression profiles. PMID:27050271

  14. Characterization of human mitochondrial ferritin promoter: identification of transcription factors and evidences of epigenetic control.

    PubMed

    Guaraldo, Michela; Santambrogio, Paolo; Rovelli, Elisabetta; Di Savino, Augusta; Saglio, Giuseppe; Cittaro, Davide; Roetto, Antonella; Levi, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial ferritin (FtMt) is an iron storage protein belonging to the ferritin family but, unlike the cytosolic ferritin, it has an iron-unrelated restricted tissue expression. FtMt appears to be preferentially expressed in cell types characterized by high metabolic activity and oxygen consumption, suggesting a role in protecting mitochondria from iron-dependent oxidative damage. The human gene (FTMT) is intronless and its promoter region has not been described yet. To analyze the regulatory mechanisms controlling FTMT expression, we characterized the 5' flanking region upstream the transcriptional starting site of FTMT by in silico enquiry of sequences conservation, DNA deletion analysis, and ChIP assay. The data revealed a minimal promoter region and identified the presence of SP1, CREB and YY1 as positive regulators, and GATA2, FoxA1 and C/EBPβ as inhibitors of the transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, the FTMT transcription is increased by acetylating and de-methylating agent treatments in K562 and HeLa cells. These treatments up-regulate FtMt expression even in fibroblasts derived from a Friedreich ataxia patient, where it might exert a beneficial effect against mitochondrial oxidative damage. The expression of FTMT appears regulated by a complex mechanism involving epigenetic events and interplay between transcription factors. PMID:27625068

  15. Differential Transcriptional Responses to Interferon-α and Interferon-γ in Primary Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Santosh; Ji, Xuhuai; Calderon-Rodriguez, Gloria M.; Greenberg, Harry B.; Liang, T. Jake

    2010-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) plays a central role in the innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses. While IFN-α is currently approved for treating chronic hepatitis B and hepatitis C, in limited studies, IFN-γ has not been shown to be effective for chronic hepatitis B or C. To identify the potential mechanism underlying the differential antiviral effects of IFN-α and IFN-γ, we used cDNA microarray to profile the global transcriptional response to IFN-α and IFN-γ in primary human hepatocytes, the target cell population of hepatitis viruses. Our results reveal distinct patterns of gene expression induced by these 2 cytokines. Overall, IFN-α induces more genes than IFN-γ at the transcriptional level. Distinct sets of genes were induced by IFN-α and IFN-γ with limited overlaps. IFN-α induces gene transcription at an early time point (6 h) but not at a later time point (18 h), while the effects of IFN-γ are more prominent at 18 h than at 6 h, suggesting a delayed transcriptional response to IFN-γ in the hepatocytes. These findings indicate differential actions of IFN-α and IFN-γ in the context of therapeutic intervention for chronic viral infections in the liver. PMID:20038212

  16. Repression of the human papillomavirus type 18 enhancer by the cellular transcription factor Oct-1.

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe-Seyler, F; Butz, K; zur Hausen, H

    1991-01-01

    The role of cellular factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of the cancer-associated human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV18) is yet poorly understood. The presence of an Oct-1-binding site within the HPV18 upstream regulatory region led us to investigate the influence of Oct-1 on viral transcription. Cotransfection of Oct-1 expression plasmids together with luciferase reporter constructs containing HPV18 regulatory sequences indicated that Oct-1 can transcriptionally repress the HPV18 upstream regulatory region. In contrast, heterologous control regions were not affected by Oct-1. HPV18 cis elements that can be repressed by Oct-1 mapped to a 135-bp subregion of the viral constitutive enhancer. Analysis of an Oct-1 mutant defective in DNA binding suggested that HPV18 down-modulation does not require direct binding of Oct-1 to DNA. These results make Oct-1 a candidate factor involved in the intracellular surveillance of HPV18 transcription and support the notion of a host cell mechanism that can specifically repress HPV E6-E7 transforming gene expression. Images PMID:1654457

  17. METTL23, a transcriptional partner of GABPA, is essential for human cognition.

    PubMed

    Reiff, Rachel E; Ali, Bassam R; Baron, Byron; Yu, Timothy W; Ben-Salem, Salma; Coulter, Michael E; Schubert, Christian R; Hill, R Sean; Akawi, Nadia A; Al-Younes, Banan; Kaya, Namik; Evrony, Gilad D; Al-Saffar, Muna; Felie, Jillian M; Partlow, Jennifer N; Sunu, Christine M; Schembri-Wismayer, Pierre; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Meyer, Brian F; Walsh, Christopher A; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H

    2014-07-01

    Whereas many genes associated with intellectual disability (ID) encode synaptic proteins, transcriptional defects leading to ID are less well understood. We studied a large, consanguineous pedigree of Arab origin with seven members affected with ID and mild dysmorphic features. Homozygosity mapping and linkage analysis identified a candidate region on chromosome 17 with a maximum multipoint logarithm of odds score of 6.01. Targeted high-throughput sequencing of the exons in the candidate region identified a homozygous 4-bp deletion (c.169_172delCACT) in the METTL23 (methyltransferase like 23) gene, which is predicted to result in a frameshift and premature truncation (p.His57Valfs*11). Overexpressed METTL23 protein localized to both nucleus and cytoplasm, and physically interacted with GABPA (GA-binding protein transcription factor, alpha subunit). GABP, of which GABPA is a component, is known to regulate the expression of genes such as THPO (thrombopoietin) and ATP5B (ATP synthase, H+ transporting, mitochondrial F1 complex, beta polypeptide) and is implicated in a wide variety of important cellular functions. Overexpression of METTL23 resulted in increased transcriptional activity at the THPO promoter, whereas knockdown of METTL23 with siRNA resulted in decreased expression of ATP5B, thus revealing the importance of METTL23 as a regulator of GABPA function. The METTL23 mutation highlights a new transcriptional pathway underlying human intellectual function. PMID:24501276

  18. Targeting Tat Inhibitors in the Assembly of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Transcription Complexes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    D'Orso, Iván; Grunwell, Jocelyn R.; Nakamura, Robert L.; Das, Chandreyee; Frankel, Alan D.

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transcription is regulated by the viral Tat protein, which relieves a block to elongation by recruiting an elongation factor, P-TEFb, to the viral promoter. Here, we report the discovery of potent Tat inhibitors that utilize a localization signal to target a dominant negative protein to its site of action. Fusing the Tat activation domain to some splicing factors, particularly to the Arg-Ser (RS) domain of U2AF65, creates Tat inhibitors that localize to subnuclear speckles, sites where pre-mRNA processing factors are stored for assembly into transcription complexes. A U2AF65 fusion named T-RS interacts with the nonphosphorylated C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) via its RS domain and is loaded into RNAP II holoenzyme complexes. T-RS is recruited efficiently to the HIV-1 promoter in a TAR-independent manner before RNAP II hyperphosphorylation but not to cellular promoters. The “preloading” of T-RS into HIV-1 preinitiation complexes prevents the entry of active Tat molecules, leaving the complexes in an elongation-incompetent state and effectively suppressing HIV-1 replication. The ability to deliver inhibitors to transcription complexes through the use of targeting/localization signals may provide new avenues for designing viral and transcription inhibitors. PMID:18667497

  19. Blood transcriptional signature of recombinant human erythropoietin administration and implications for antidoping strategies.

    PubMed

    Durussel, Jérôme; Haile, Diresibachew W; Mooses, Kerli; Daskalaki, Evangelia; Beattie, Wendy; Mooses, Martin; Mekonen, Wondyefraw; Ongaro, Neford; Anjila, Edwin; Patel, Rajan K; Padmanabhan, Neal; McBride, Martin W; McClure, John D; Pitsiladis, Yannis P

    2016-03-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) is frequently abused by athletes as a performance-enhancing drug, despite being prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency. Although the methods to detect blood doping, including rHuEPO injections, have improved in recent years, they remain imperfect. In a proof-of-principle study, we identified, replicated, and validated the whole blood transcriptional signature of rHuEPO in endurance-trained Caucasian males at sea level (n = 18) and Kenyan endurance runners at moderate altitude (n = 20), all of whom received rHuEPO injections for 4 wk. Transcriptional profiling shows that hundreds of transcripts were altered by rHuEPO in both cohorts. The main regulated expression pattern, observed in all participants, was characterized by a "rebound" effect with a profound upregulation during rHuEPO and a subsequent downregulation up to 4 wk postadministration. The functions of the identified genes were mainly related to the functional and structural properties of the red blood cell. Of the genes identified to be differentially expressed during and post-rHuEPO, we further confirmed a whole blood 34-transcript signature that can distinguish between samples collected pre-, during, and post-rHuEPO administration. By providing biomarkers that can reveal rHuEPO use, our findings represent an advance in the development of new methods for the detection of blood doping. PMID:26757800

  20. Transcriptional Adaptation of Drug-tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis During Treatment of Human Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Nicholas D.; Dolganov, Gregory M.; Garcia, Benjamin J.; Worodria, William; Andama, Alfred; Musisi, Emmanuel; Ayakaka, Irene; Van, Tran T.; Voskuil, Martin I.; de Jong, Bouke C.; Davidson, Rebecca M.; Fingerlin, Tasha E.; Kechris, Katerina; Palmer, Claire; Nahid, Payam; Daley, Charles L.; Geraci, Mark; Huang, Laurence; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Strong, Michael; Schoolnik, Gary K.; Davis, John Lucian

    2015-01-01

    Background. Treatment initiation rapidly kills most drug-susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but a bacterial subpopulation tolerates prolonged drug exposure. We evaluated drug-tolerant bacilli in human sputum by comparing messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of drug-tolerant bacilli that survive the early bactericidal phase with treatment-naive bacilli. Methods. M. tuberculosis gene expression was quantified via reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction in serial sputa from 17 Ugandans treated for drug-susceptible pulmonary tuberculosis. Results. Within 4 days, bacterial mRNA abundance declined >98%, indicating rapid killing. Thereafter, the rate of decline slowed >94%, indicating drug tolerance. After 14 days, 16S ribosomal RNA transcripts/genome declined 96%, indicating slow growth. Drug-tolerant bacilli displayed marked downregulation of genes associated with growth, metabolism, and lipid synthesis and upregulation in stress responses and key regulatory categories—including stress-associated sigma factors, transcription factors, and toxin-antitoxin genes. Drug efflux pumps were upregulated. The isoniazid stress signature was induced by initial drug exposure, then disappeared after 4 days. Conclusions. Transcriptional patterns suggest that drug-tolerant bacilli in sputum are in a slow-growing, metabolically and synthetically downregulated state. Absence of the isoniazid stress signature in drug-tolerant bacilli indicates that physiological state influences drug responsiveness in vivo. These results identify novel drug targets that should aid in development of novel shorter tuberculosis treatment regimens. PMID:25762787

  1. Transcription-Associated R-Loop Formation across the Human FMR1 CGG-Repeat Region

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, Erick W.; Sanz, Lionel A.; Chédin, Frédéric; Hagerman, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Expansion of a trinucleotide (CGG) repeat element within the 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR) of the human FMR1 gene is responsible for a number of heritable disorders operating through distinct pathogenic mechanisms: gene silencing for fragile X syndrome (>200 CGG) and RNA toxic gain-of-function for FXTAS (∼55–200 CGG). Existing models have focused almost exclusively on post-transcriptional mechanisms, but co-transcriptional processes could also contribute to the molecular dysfunction of FMR1. We have observed that transcription through the GC-rich FMR1 5′UTR region favors R-loop formation, with the nascent (G-rich) RNA forming a stable RNA:DNA hybrid with the template DNA strand, thereby displacing the non-template DNA strand. Using DNA:RNA (hybrid) immunoprecipitation (DRIP) of genomic DNA from cultured human dermal fibroblasts with both normal (∼30 CGG repeats) and premutation (55human genomic DNA. Using a doxycycline (DOX)-inducible episomal system in which both the CGG-repeat and transcription frequency can be varied, we further show that R-loop formation increases with higher expression levels. Finally, non-denaturing bisulfite mapping of the displaced single-stranded DNA confirmed R-loop formation at the endogenous FMR1 locus and further indicated that R-loops formed over CGG repeats may be prone to structural complexities, including hairpin formation, not commonly associated with other R-loops. These observations introduce a new molecular feature of the FMR1 gene that is directly affected by CGG-repeat expansion and is likely to be involved in the associated cellular dysfunction. PMID:24743386

  2. Differential transcription of the human spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) gene in human lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, L; Casero, R A

    1996-01-01

    The expression of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT), the rate-limiting enzyme in the catabolism of polyamines, is highly regulated by a number of factors including the natural polyamines and their analogues. The phenotype-specific cytotoxicity that occurs in response to a class of polyamine analogues, the diethylpolyamines, is associated with a phenotype-specific superinduction of SSAT in human non-small-cell lung carcinomas, whereas in non-responding cell types, including the small-cell lung carcinomas, the superinduction of SSAT does not occur. In this study, we have investigated the molecular basis of this phenotype-specific SSAT induction in human lung carcinoma cells in response to N1,N12-diethylspermine (BESpm). To facilitate the study of transcriptional regulation, we have cloned and characterized 11 kb of the human SSAT locus, including 3500 bp of the 5' promoter region. Nuclear run-on transcription studies suggest that the initial induction of SSAT results from an increase in the rate of gene transcription. Results from Northern blot analysis and ribonuclease protection assays indicate a differential expression of SSAT mRNA between the analogue-responsive H157 and non-responsive H82 cells. There is no detectable SSAT mRNA in H82 cells, even after a 24-h analogue treatment, whereas SSAT mRNA in H157 cells was detectable by Northern blot analysis and increased more than 100-fold following drug exposure. Furthermore, nuclear run-on transcription assays do not detect any active transcription of SSAT gene in either treated or untreated H82 cells. These results indicate that at least one component of the phenotype-specific induction of SSAT appears to be due to differences in transcriptional regulation of the gene. In addition, mapping of DNase I-hypersensitive sites of the SSAT gene suggest that the cell type-specific promoter/enhancer utilization may control the expression of the SSAT gene in differentially sensitive cell types in vivo. PMID

  3. Distinct Regulatory Mechanisms of the Human Ferritin Gene by Hypoxia and Hypoxia Mimetic Cobalt Chloride at the Transcriptional and Post-transcriptional Levels

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo-Wen; Miyazawa, Masaki; Tsuji, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Cobalt chloride has been used as a hypoxia mimetic because it stabilizes hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1-α) and activates gene transcription through a hypoxia responsive element (HRE). However, differences between hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride in gene regulation remain elusive. Expression of ferritin, the major iron storage protein, is regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels through DNA and RNA regulatory elements. Here we demonstrate that hypoxia and cobalt chloride regulate ferritin heavy chain (ferritin H) expression by two distinct mechanisms. Both hypoxia and cobalt chloride increased HIF1-α but a putative HRE in the human ferritin H gene was not activated. Instead, cobalt chloride but not hypoxia activated ferritin H transcription through an antioxidant responsive element (ARE), to which Nrf2 was recruited. Intriguingly, cobalt chloride downregulated ferritin H protein expression while upregulated other ARE-regulated antioxidant genes in K562 cells. Further characterization demonstrated that cobalt chloride increased interaction between iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) and iron responsive element (IRE) in the 5′UTR of ferritin H mRNA, resulting in translational block of the accumulated ferritin H mRNA. In contrast, hypoxia had marginal effect on ferritin H transcription but increased its translation through decreased IRP1-IRE interaction. These results suggest that hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride employ distinct regulatory mechanisms through the interplay between DNA and mRNA elements at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. PMID:25172425

  4. Transcriptional profiles of supragranular-enriched genes associate with corticocortical network architecture in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Krienen, Fenna M.; Yeo, B. T. Thomas; Ge, Tian; Buckner, Randy L.; Sherwood, Chet C.

    2016-01-01

    The human brain is patterned with disproportionately large, distributed cerebral networks that connect multiple association zones in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes. The expansion of the cortical surface, along with the emergence of long-range connectivity networks, may be reflected in changes to the underlying molecular architecture. Using the Allen Institute’s human brain transcriptional atlas, we demonstrate that genes particularly enriched in supragranular layers of the human cerebral cortex relative to mouse distinguish major cortical classes. The topography of transcriptional expression reflects large-scale brain network organization consistent with estimates from functional connectivity MRI and anatomical tracing in nonhuman primates. Microarray expression data for genes preferentially expressed in human upper layers (II/III), but enriched only in lower layers (V/VI) of mouse, were cross-correlated to identify molecular profiles across the cerebral cortex of postmortem human brains (n = 6). Unimodal sensory and motor zones have similar molecular profiles, despite being distributed across the cortical mantle. Sensory/motor profiles were anticorrelated with paralimbic and certain distributed association network profiles. Tests of alternative gene sets did not consistently distinguish sensory and motor regions from paralimbic and association regions: (i) genes enriched in supragranular layers in both humans and mice, (ii) genes cortically enriched in humans relative to nonhuman primates, (iii) genes related to connectivity in rodents, (iv) genes associated with human and mouse connectivity, and (v) 1,454 gene sets curated from known gene ontologies. Molecular innovations of upper cortical layers may be an important component in the evolution of long-range corticocortical projections. PMID:26739559

  5. Transposable elements, polydactyl proteins and the genesis of human-specific transcription networks

    PubMed Central

    Trono, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) may account for up to two-thirds of the human genome, and as genomic threats they are subjected to epigenetic control mechanisms engaged from the earliest stages of embryonic development. We previously determined that an important component of this process is the sequence-specific recognition of TEs by KRAB-containing zinc finger proteins (KRAB-ZFPs), a large family of tetrapod-restricted transcription factors that act by recruiting inducers of heterochromatin formation and DNA methylation. We further demonstrated that KRAB-ZFPs and their cofactor KAP1 exert a marked influence on the transcription dynamics of embryonic stem cells via their docking of repressor complexes at TE-contained regulatory sequences. It is generally held that, beyond this early embryonic period, TEs become permanently silenced, and that the evolutionary selection of KRAB-ZFPs and other TE controllers is the result of a simple evolutionary arms race between the host and these genetics invaders. Here, I discuss recent evidence that invalidates this dual assumption, and instead suggests that KRAB-ZFPs are the instruments of a massive enterprise of TE domestication, whereby transposon-based regulatory sequences and their cellular ligands establish species-specific transcription regulation networks that influence multiple aspects of human development and physiology. PMID:26763983

  6. Genomic organization and transcriptional analysis of the human l-glutaminase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Gómez, Cristina; Matés, José M; Gómez-Fabre, Pedro M; del Castillo-Olivares, Antonio; Alonso, Francisco J; Márquez, Javier

    2003-01-01

    In mammals, glutaminase (GA) is expressed in most tissues, but the regulation of organ-specific expression is largely unknown. Therefore, as an essential step towards studying the regulation of GA expression, the human liver-type GA (hLGA) gene has been characterized. LGA genomic sequences were isolated using the genome walking technique. Analysis and comparison of these sequences with two LGA cDNA clones and the Human Genome Project database, allowed the determination of the genomic organization of the LGA gene. The gene has 18 exons and is approx. 18 kb long. All exon/intron junction sequences conform to the GT/AG rule. Progressive deletion analysis of LGA promoter-luciferase constructs indicated that the core promoter is located between nt -141 and +410, with several potential regulatory elements: CAAT, GC, TATA-like, Ras-responsive element binding protein and specificity protein 1 (Sp1) sites. The minimal promoter was mapped within +107 and +410, where only an Sp1 binding site is present. Mutation experiments suggested that two CAAT recognition elements near the transcription-initiation site (-138 and -87), play a crucial role for optimal promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays confirmed the importance of CAAT- and TATA-like boxes to enhance basal transcription, and demonstrated that HNF-1 motif is a significant distal element for transcriptional regulation of the hLGA gene. PMID:12444921

  7. Genome editing in nonhuman primates: approach to generating human disease models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Niu, Y; Ji, W

    2016-09-01

    Nonhuman primates (NHPs) are superior than rodents to be animal models for the study of human diseases, due to their similarities in terms of genetics, physiology, developmental biology, social behaviour and cognition. Transgenic animals have become a key tool in functional genomics to generate models for human diseases and validate new drugs. However, until now, progress in the field of transgenic NHPs has been slow because of technological limitations. Many human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, are caused by mutations in endogenous genes. Fortunately, recent developments in precision gene editing have led to the generation of NHP models for human diseases. Since 2014, there have been several reports of the generation of monkey models using transcription activator-like endonucleases (TALENs) or clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/Cas9); some of these NHP models showed symptoms that were much closer to those of human diseases than have been seen previously in mouse models. No off-targeting was observed in the NHP models, and multiple gene knockout and biallelic mutants were feasible with low efficiency. These findings suggest that there are many possibilities to establish NHP models for human diseases that can mimic human diseases more faithfully than rodent models. PMID:27114283

  8. Transcriptional Profiles of Imprinted Genes in Human Embryonic Stem Cells During In vitro Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Wook; Do, Hyo-Sang; Kim, Dongkyu; Ko, Ji-Yun; Lee, Sang-Hun; Han, Yong-Mahn

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Genomic imprinting is an inheritance phenomenon by which a subset of genes are expressed from one allele of two homologous chromosomes in a parent of origin-specific manner. Even though fine-tuned regulation of genomic imprinting process is essential for normal development, no other means are available to study genomic imprinting in human during embryonic development. In relation with this bottleneck, differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into specialized lineages may be considered as an alternative to mimic human development. Methods and Results: In this study, hESCs were differentiated into three lineage cell types to analyze temporal and spatial expression of imprinted genes. Of 19 imprinted genes examined, 15 imprinted genes showed similar transcriptional level among two hESC lines and two human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) lines. Expressional patterns of most imprinted genes were varied in progenitors and fully differentiated cells which were derived from hESCs. Also, no consistence was observed in the expression pattern of imprinted genes within an imprinting domain during in vitro differentiation of hESCs into three lineage cell types. Conclusions: Transcriptional expression of imprinted genes is regulated in a cell type- specific manner in hESCs during in vitro differentiation. PMID:25473448

  9. Resetting transcription factor control circuitry toward ground-state pluripotency in human.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Yasuhiro; Guo, Ge; Loos, Remco; Nichols, Jennifer; Ficz, Gabriella; Krueger, Felix; Oxley, David; Santos, Fatima; Clarke, James; Mansfield, William; Reik, Wolf; Bertone, Paul; Smith, Austin

    2014-09-11

    Current human pluripotent stem cells lack the transcription factor circuitry that governs the ground state of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC). Here, we report that short-term expression of two components, NANOG and KLF2, is sufficient to ignite other elements of the network and reset the human pluripotent state. Inhibition of ERK and protein kinase C sustains a transgene-independent rewired state. Reset cells self-renew continuously without ERK signaling, are phenotypically stable, and are karyotypically intact. They differentiate in vitro and form teratomas in vivo. Metabolism is reprogrammed with activation of mitochondrial respiration as in ESC. DNA methylation is dramatically reduced and transcriptome state is globally realigned across multiple cell lines. Depletion of ground-state transcription factors, TFCP2L1 or KLF4, has marginal impact on conventional human pluripotent stem cells but collapses the reset state. These findings demonstrate feasibility of installing and propagating functional control circuitry for ground-state pluripotency in human cells. PMID:25215486

  10. Human Trefoil Factor 3 induces the transcription of its own promoter through STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yong; Wang, Liangxi; Zhou, Yifang; Mao, Xuefei; Deng, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Human trefoil factor 3 (hTFF3) is a small peptide of potential therapeutic value. The mechanisms underlying the transcriptional regulation of hTFF3 remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to identify the core functional elements for the self-induction action of hTFF3 and transcription factors. First, truncated promoters were constructed to identify the functional regions of the hTFF3 promoter. Next, point mutation, chromatin immunoprecipitation, RNA interference, and gene overexpression experiments were performed to analyze the transcriptional binding sites responsible for the self-induced transcription of hTFF3. Our results revealed the −1450 bp to −1400 bp fragment of the hTFF3 promoter was the functional region for the self-induction action of hTFF3. Bioinformatics analysis confirmed that a STAT3 binding site is present in the −1417 bp to −1409 bp region. Subsequently, site-directed mutagenesis analysis determined that this STAT3 binding site was critical for the self-induction effect of hTFF3. ChIP experiments confirmed that STAT3 binds to the hTFF3 promoter. STAT3 overexpression and knockdown experiments revealed that STAT3 enhanced the self-induction effect and the expression of hTFF3. This study confirmed that hTFF3 exhibits self-induction action, and that STAT3 is the key transcription factor to maintain the function of self-induction. PMID:27453253

  11. Inhibition of p53 transcriptional activity by human cytomegalovirus UL44.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yejin; Kim, Mi-Na; Young Choi, Eun; Heon Kim, Jung; Hwang, Eung-Soo; Cha, Chang-Yong

    2012-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) stimulates cellular synthesis of DNA and proteins and induces transition of the cell cycle from G(1) to S and G(2) /M phase, in spite of increased amounts of p53 in the infected cells. The immediate early protein IE2-86  kDa (IE86) tethers a transcriptional repression domain to p53; however, its repression of p53 function is not enough to abrogate the G(1) checkpoint function of p53. Other HCMV proteins that suppress the activity of p53 were investigated in this study. Of the HCMV proteins that bind to p53 when assessed by immunoprecipitation and immunoblot analysis, HCMV UL44 was chosen as a candidate protein. It was found that reporter gene containing p53 consensus sequence was activated by transfection with wild type p53, but when plasmids of p53 with IE86 or UL44 were co-transfected, p53 transcriptional activity was decreased to 3-7% of the p53 control in a dose-dependent manner. When the deletion mutant of UL44 was co-transected with p53, the carboxyl one-third portion of UL44 had little effect on inhibition of p53 transcriptional activity. The amount of mRNA p21 was measured in H1299 by real time PCR after transfection of the combination of p53 and UL44 vectors and it was found that p21 transcription by p53 was inhibited dose-dependently by UL44. Increased G0/G1 and decreased S phases in p53 wild type-transfected H1299 cells were recovered to the level of p53 mutant type-transfected ones by the additional transfection of UL44 in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, the transcriptional activity of p53 is suppressed by UL44 as well as by IE86. PMID:22376288

  12. Human von Economo neurons express transcription factors associated with Layer V subcerebral projection neurons.

    PubMed

    Cobos, Inma; Seeley, William W

    2015-01-01

    The von Economo neurons (VENs) are large bipolar Layer V projection neurons found chiefly in the anterior cingulate and frontoinsular cortices. Although VENs have been linked to prevalent illnesses such as frontotemporal dementia, autism, and schizophrenia, little is known about VEN identity, including their major projection targets. Here, we undertook a developmental transcription factor expression study, focusing on markers associated with specific classes of Layer V projection neurons. Using mRNA in situ hybridization, we found that VENs prominently express FEZF2 and CTIP2, transcription factors that regulate the fate and differentiation of subcerebral projection neurons, in humans aged 3 months to 65 years. In contrast, few VENs expressed markers associated with callosal or corticothalamic projections. These findings suggest that VENs may represent a specialized Layer V projection neuron for linking cortical autonomic control sites to brainstem or spinal cord regions. PMID:23960210

  13. Plastic downregulation of the transcriptional repressor BCL6 during maturation of human dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pantano, Serafino . E-mail: serafino.pantano@unil.ch; Jarrossay, David; Saccani, Simona; Bosisio, Daniela; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2006-05-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) maturation links peripheral events initiated by the encounter with pathogens to the activation and expansion of antigen-specific T lymphocytes in secondary lymphoid organs. Here, we describe an as yet unrecognized modulator of human DC maturation, the transcriptional repressor BCL6. We found that both myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs constitutively express BCL6, which is rapidly downregulated following maturation triggered by selected stimuli. Both in unstimulated and maturing DCs, control of BCL6 protein levels reflects the convergence of several mechanisms regulating BCL6 stability, mRNA transcription and nuclear export. By regulating the induction of several genes implicated in the immune response, including inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and survival genes, BCL6 may represent a pivotal modulator of the afferent branch of the immune response.

  14. Transcriptionally Driven DNA Replication Program of the Human Parasite Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Lombraña, Rodrigo; Álvarez, Alba; Fernández-Justel, José Miguel; Almeida, Ricardo; Poza-Carrión, César; Gomes, Fábia; Calzada, Arturo; Requena, José María; Gómez, María

    2016-08-01

    Faithful inheritance of eukaryotic genomes requires the orchestrated activation of multiple DNA replication origins (ORIs). Although origin firing is mechanistically conserved, how origins are specified and selected for activation varies across different model systems. Here, we provide a complete analysis of the nucleosomal landscape and replication program of the human parasite Leishmania major, building on a better evolutionary understanding of replication organization in Eukarya. We found that active transcription is a driving force for the nucleosomal organization of the L. major genome and that both the spatial and the temporal program of DNA replication can be explained as associated to RNA polymerase kinetics. This simple scenario likely provides flexibility and robustness to deal with the environmental changes that impose alterations in the genetic programs during parasitic life cycle stages. Our findings also suggest that coupling replication initiation to transcription elongation could be an ancient solution used by eukaryotic cells for origin maintenance. PMID:27477279

  15. Site-Specific Oligonucleotide Binding Represses Transcription of the Human c-myc Gene in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooney, Michael; Czernuszewicz, Graznya; Postel, Edith H.; Flint, S. Jane; Hogan, Michael E.

    1988-07-01

    A 27-base-long DNA oligonucleotide was designed that binds to duplex DNA at a single site within the 5' end of the human c-myc gene, 115 base pairs upstream from the transcription origin P1. On the basis of the physical properties of its bound complex, it was concluded that the oligonucleotide forms a colinear triplex with the duplex binding site. By means of an in vitro assay system, it was possible to show a correlation between triplex formation at -115 base pairs and repression of c-myc transcription. The possibility is discussed that triplex formation (site-specific RNA binding to a DNA duplex) could serve as the basis for an alternative program of gene control in vivo.

  16. Transcription factor AP-2 regulates human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, N D; Agranoff, A B; Duckett, C S; Nabel, G J

    1994-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gene expression is regulated by an enhancer region composed of multiple potential cis-acting regulatory sites. Here, we describe binding sites for the transcription factor AP-2 in the HIV-1 long terminal repeat which modulate HIV enhancer function. One site is embedded within the two previously described kappa B elements, and a second site is detected further downstream. DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay experiments demonstrated that AP-2 binds to the site between the kappa B elements. Interestingly, AP-2 and NF-kappa B bind to this region in a mutually exclusive manner. Mutations which disrupt this AP-2-binding site lower basal levels of transcription but do not affect NF-kappa B-mediated induction by tumor necrosis factor alpha in Jurkat T leukemia cells. Images PMID:8084021

  17. Atomic force microscope observation of branching in single transcript molecules derived from human cardiac muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Jason; Hsueh, Carlin; Mishra, Bud; Gimzewski, James K.

    2008-09-01

    We have used an atomic force microscope to examine a clinically derived sample of single-molecule gene transcripts, in the form of double-stranded cDNA, (c: complementary) obtained from human cardiac muscle without the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. We observed a log-normal distribution of transcript sizes, with most molecules being in the range of 0.4-7.0 kilobase pairs (kb) or 130-2300 nm in contour length, in accordance with the expected distribution of mRNA (m: messenger) sizes in mammalian cells. We observed novel branching structures not previously known to exist in cDNA, and which could have profound negative effects on traditional analysis of cDNA samples through cloning, PCR and DNA sequencing.

  18. Transcriptional activity of human endogenous retrovirus in Albanian children with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Balestrieri, Emanuela; Cipriani, Chiara; Matteucci, Claudia; Capodicasa, Natale; Pilika, Anita; Korca, Ina; Sorrentino, Roberta; Argaw-Denboba, Ayele; Bucci, Ilaria; Miele, Martino Tony; Coniglio, Antonella; Alessandrelli, Riccardo; Sinibaldi Vallebona, Paola

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that autism spectrum disorders (ASD) result from interactions between genetic and environmental factors, whose possible links could be represented by epigenetic mechanisms. Here, we investigated the transcriptional activity of three human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) families, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from Albanian ASD children, by quantitative real-time PCR. We aimed to confirm the different expression profile already found in Italian ASD children, and to highlight any social and family health condition emerging from information gathered through a questionnaire, to be included among environmental risk factors. The presence of increased HERV-H transcriptional activity in all autistic patients could be understood as a constant epigenetic imprinting of the disease, potentially useful for early diagnosis and for the development of effective novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:27602423

  19. Identification of the transcriptional response of human intestinal mucosa to Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Troost, Freddy J; van Baarlen, Peter; Lindsey, Patrick; Kodde, Andrea; de Vos, Willem M; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Brummer, Robert-Jan M

    2008-01-01

    Background There is limited knowledge on the extent and dynamics of the mucosal response to commensal and probiotic species in the human intestinal lumen. This study aimed to identify the acute, time-dependent responses of intestinal mucosa to commensal Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 in vivo in two placebo-controlled human intervention studies in healthy volunteers. Transcriptional changes in duodenal mucosa upon continuous intraduodenal infusion of L. plantarum WCFS1 for one- and six h, respectively, were studied using oro- and nasogastric intubations with dedicated orogastric catheters and tissue sampling by standard flexible gastroduodenoscopy. Results One- and six-h exposure of small intestinal mucosa to L. plantarum WCFS1 induced differential expression of 669 and 424 gene reporters, respectively. While short-term exposure to L. plantarum WCFS1 inhibited fatty acid metabolism and cell cycle progression, cells switched to a more proliferative phase after prolonged exposure with an overall expression profile characterized by upregulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism, cellular growth and development. Cell death and immune responses were triggered, but cell death-executing genes or inflammatory signals were not expressed. Proteome analysis showed differential expression of several proteins. Only the microsomal protein 'microsomal triglyceride transfer protein' was regulated on both the transcriptional and the protein level in all subjects. Conclusion Overall, this study showed that intestinal exposure to L. plantarum WCFS1 induced consistent, time-dependent transcriptional responses in healthy intestinal mucosa. This extensive exploration of the human response to L. plantarum WCFS1 could eventually provide molecular support for specific or probiotic activity of this strain or species, and exemplifies the strength of the applied technology to identify the potential bio-activity of microbes in the human intestine. PMID:18681965

  20. Defining cell-type specificity at the transcriptional level in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Wenjun; Greene, Casey S.; Eichinger, Felix; Nair, Viji; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Bitzer, Markus; Lee, Young-suk; Zhu, Qian; Kehata, Masami; Li, Min; Jiang, Song; Rastaldi, Maria Pia; Cohen, Clemens D.; Troyanskaya, Olga G.; Kretzler, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Cell-lineage–specific transcripts are essential for differentiated tissue function, implicated in hereditary organ failure, and mediate acquired chronic diseases. However, experimental identification of cell-lineage–specific genes in a genome-scale manner is infeasible for most solid human tissues. We developed the first genome-scale method to identify genes with cell-lineage–specific expression, even in lineages not separable by experimental microdissection. Our machine-learning–based approach leverages high-throughput data from tissue homogenates in a novel iterative statistical framework. We applied this method to chronic kidney disease and identified transcripts specific to podocytes, key cells in the glomerular filter responsible for hereditary and most acquired glomerular kidney disease. In a systematic evaluation of our predictions by immunohistochemistry, our in silico approach was significantly more accurate (65% accuracy in human) than predictions based on direct measurement of in vivo fluorescence-tagged murine podocytes (23%). Our method identified genes implicated as causal in hereditary glomerular disease and involved in molecular pathways of acquired and chronic renal diseases. Furthermore, based on expression analysis of human kidney disease biopsies, we demonstrated that expression of the podocyte genes identified by our approach is significantly related to the degree of renal impairment in patients. Our approach is broadly applicable to define lineage specificity in both cell physiology and human disease contexts. We provide a user-friendly website that enables researchers to apply this method to any cell-lineage or tissue of interest. Identified cell-lineage–specific transcripts are expected to play essential tissue-specific roles in organogenesis and disease and can provide starting points for the development of organ-specific diagnostics and therapies. PMID:23950145

  1. Genetic factors affecting gene transcription and catalytic activity of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases in human liver

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wanqing; Ramírez, Jacqueline; Gamazon, Eric R.; Mirkov, Snezana; Chen, Peixian; Wu, Kehua; Sun, Chang; Cox, Nancy J.; Cook, Edwin; Das, Soma; Ratain, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to discover cis- and trans-acting factors significantly affecting mRNA expression and catalytic activity of human hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). Transcription levels of five major hepatic UGT1A (UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, UGT1A6 and UGT1A9) and five UGT2B (UGT2B4, UGT2B7, UGT2B10, UGT2B15 and UGT2B17) genes were quantified in human liver tissue samples (n = 125) using real-time PCR. Glucuronidation activities of 14 substrates were measured in 47 livers. We genotyped 167 tagSNPs (single-nucleotide polymorphisms) in UGT1A (n = 43) and UGT2B (n = 124), as well as the known functional UGT1A1*28 and UGT2B17 CNV (copy number variation) polymorphisms. Transcription levels of 15 transcription factors (TFs) known to regulate these UGTs were quantified. We found that UGT expression and activity were highly variable among the livers (median and range of coefficient of variations: 135%, 74–217% and 52%, 39–105%, respectively). CAR, PXR and ESR1 were found to be the most important trans-regulators of UGT transcription (median and range of correlation coefficients: 46%, 6–58%; 47%, 9–58%; and 52%, 24–75%, respectively). Hepatic UGT activities were mainly determined by UGT gene transcription levels. Twenty-one polymorphisms were significantly (FDR-adjusted P < 0.05) associated with mRNA expression and/or activities of UGT1A1, UGT1A3 and UGT2B17. We found novel SNPs in the UGT2B17 CNV region accounting for variability in UGT2B17 gene transcription and testosterone glucuronidation rate, in addition to that attributable to the UGT2B17 CNV. Our study discovered novel pharmacogenetic markers and provided detailed insight into the genetic network regulating hepatic UGTs. PMID:24879639

  2. Generation of rodent and human osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Sarah E B; Shah, Mittal; Orriss, Isabel R

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the isolation, culture and staining of primary osteoblasts from neonatal rodents and human samples. The calvaria and long-bone assays allow direct measurement of bone matrix deposition and mineralisation, as well as producing osteoblasts at defined stages of differentiation for molecular and histological analysis. Culture of human osteoblasts enables cell function to be investigated in targeted patient groups. The described methods will provide a step-by-step guide of what to expect at each stage of the culture and highlight the varied tissue culture conditions required to successfully grow osteoblasts from different sources. A special focus of this paper is the methods used for analysis of bone mineralisation and how to ensure that nonspecific mineral deposition or staining is not quantified. PMID:25396049

  3. Enhanced Generation of Myeloid Lineages in Hematopoietic Differentiation from Embryonic Stem Cells by Silencing Transcriptional Repressor Twist-2

    PubMed Central

    Sharabi, Andrew B.; Lee, Sung-Hyung; Goodell, Margaret A.; Huang, Xue F.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The self-renewal and multilineage differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESC) is largely governed by transcription factors or repressors. Extensive efforts have focused on elucidating critical factors that control the differentiation of specific cell lineages, for instance, myeloid lineages in hematopoietic development. In this study, we found that Twist-2, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, plays a critical role in inhibiting the differentiation of ESC. Murine ES cells, in which Twist-2 expression is silenced by lentivirally delivered shRNA, exhibit an enhanced formation of primary embryoid bodies (EB) and enhanced differentiation into mesodermally derived hematopoietic colonies. Furthermore, Twist-2 silenced (LV-siTwist-2) ESC display significantly increased generation of myeloid lineages (Gr-1+ and F4/80+ cells) during in vitro hematopoietic differentiation. Treatment with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 ligand synergistically stimulates the generation of primary EB formation as well as of hematopoietic progenitors differentiated from LV-siTwist-2 ES cells. Thus, this study reveals the critical role of the transcriptional repressor Twist-2 in regulating the development of myeloid lineage in hematopoietic differentiation from ESC. This study also suggests a potential strategy for directional differentiation of ESC by inhibiting a transcriptional repressor. PMID:20025523

  4. Repression in vitro, by human adenovirus E1A protein domains, of basal or Tat-activated transcription of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Song, C Z; Loewenstein, P M; Green, M

    1995-01-01

    Human adenovirus E1A proteins can repress the expression of several viral and cellular genes. By using a cell-free transcription system, we demonstrated that the gene product of the E1A 12S mRNA, the 243-residue protein E1A243R, inhibits basal transcription from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat (LTR). The HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat greatly stimulates transcription from the viral promoter in vitro. However, E1A243R can repress Tat-activated transcription in vitro. Strong repression of both basal and Tat-activated transcriptions requires only E1A N-terminal amino acid residues 1 to 80. Deletion analysis showed that E1A N-terminal amino acids 4 to 25 are essential for repression, whereas amino acid residues 30 to 49 and 70 to 80 are dispensable. Transcriptional repression by E1A in the cell-free transcription system is promoter specific, since under identical conditions, transcription of the adenovirus major late promoter and the Rous sarcoma virus LTR promoter was unaffected. The repression of transcription by small E1A peptides in vitro provides an assay for investigation of molecular mechanisms governing E1A-mediated repression of both basal and Tat-activated transcriptions of the HIV-1 LTR promoter. PMID:7707515

  5. The Mission Transcript Collection: U.S. Human Spaceflight Missions from Mercury Redstone 3 to Apollo 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Aboard every U.S. piloted spacecraft, from Mercury through Apollo, NASA installed tape recorders that captured nearly every word spoken by the astronauts during their history-making flights into space. For the first time ever, NASA has digitally scanned all of the transcripts made from both the onboard tapes and those tape recordings made on the ground from the air-to-ground transmissions and placed them on this two CD-ROM set. Gathered in this special collection are 80 transcripts totaling nearly 45,000 pages of text that cover every US human spaceflight from the first human Mercury mission through the last lunar landing flight of Apollo 17. Users of this CD will note that the quantity and type of transcripts made for each mission vary. For example, the Mercury flights each had one transcript whereas the Gemini missions produced several. Starting with the Gemini flights, NASA produced a Public Affairs Office (PAO) commentary version, as well as at least one "technical" air-to-ground transcript version, per mission. Most of the Apollo missions produced four transcripts per flight. These included the onboard voice data recorder transcripts made from the Data Storage Equipment (DSE) on the Command Module (CM), and the Data Storage Electronics Assembly (DSEA) onboard the Lunar Module (LM), in addition to the PAO commentary and air-to-ground technical transcripts. The CD set includes an index listing each transcript file by name. Some of the transcripts include a detailed explanation of their contents and how they were made. Also included in this collection is a listing of all the original air-to-ground audiotapes housed in NASA's archives from which many of these transcripts were made. We hope you find this collection of transcripts interesting and useful.

  6. LncRNA profiling of human lymphoid progenitors reveals transcriptional divergence of B and T lineages

    PubMed Central

    Casero, David; Sandoval, Salemiz; Seet, Christopher S.; Scholes, Jessica; Zhu, Yuhua; Ha, Vi Luan; Luong, Annie; Parekh, Chintan; Crooks, Gay M.

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the transcriptional landscape that regulates human lymphoid commitment during postnatal life, we used RNA sequencing to assemble the long non-coding transcriptome across human bone marrow and thymic progenitors spanning the earliest stages of B and T lymphoid specification. Over 3000 novel long non-coding RNA genes (lncRNAs) were revealed through the analysis of these rare populations. Lymphoid commitment was characterized by lncRNA expression patterns that were highly stage-specific and more lineage-specific than protein coding patterns. Protein-coding genes co-expressed with neighboring lncRNA genes were enriched for ontologies related to lymphoid differentiation. The exquisite cell-type specificity of global lncRNA expression patterns independently revealed new developmental relationships between the earliest progenitors in the human bone marrow and thymus. PMID:26502406

  7. Transcriptional activity of the human pseudogene psi alpha globin compared with alpha globin, its functional gene counterpart.

    PubMed Central

    Whitelaw, E; Proudfoot, N J

    1983-01-01

    Transcriptional analysis of the human pseudogene psi alpha globin has revealed the following features: (1) The promoter with a 23 bp deletion between the CCAAT and ATA boxes is functional both in vitro and in vivo, 3 fold and 10 fold less efficient, respectively, than alpha. (2) Both the psi alpha and alpha globin gene promoters are active in the absence of transcriptional enhancers, either a gene-encoded or viral enhancer. (3) The mutated poly(A) addition signal in psi alpha (AATGAA) appears to be completely nonfunctional. This result provides an explanation for the absence of psi alpha transcripts in human erythroid cells. Images PMID:6316269

  8. Nucleotide sequences of cDNAs for human papillomavirus type 18 transcripts in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki, Yutaka; Tsunokawa, Youko; Takebe, Naoko; Terada, Masaaki; Sugimura, Takashi ); Nawa, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Shigetada )

    1988-05-01

    HeLa cells expressed 3.4- and 1.6-kilobase (kb) transcripts of the integrated human papillomavirus (HPV) type 18 genome. Two types of cDNA clones representing each size of HPV type 18 transcript were isolated. Sequence analysis of these two types of cDNA clones revealed that the 3.4-kb transcript contained E6, E7, the 5{prime} portion of E1, and human sequence and that the 1.6-kb transcript contained spliced and frameshifted E6 (E6{sup *}), E7, and human sequence. There was a common human sequence containing a poly(A) addition signal in the 3{prime} end portions of both transcripts, indicating that they were transcribed from the HPV genome at the same integration site with different splicing. Furthermore, the 1.6-kb transcript contained both of the two viral TATA boxes upstream of E6, strongly indicating that a cellular promoter was used for its transcription.

  9. Isolation of All CD44 Transcripts in Human Epidermis and Regulation of Their Expression by Various Agents

    PubMed Central

    Teye, Kwesi; Numata, Sanae; Ishii, Norito; Krol, Rafal P.; Tsuchisaka, Atsunari; Hamada, Takahiro; Koga, Hiroshi; Karashima, Tadashi; Ohata, Chika; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Saya, Hideyuki; Haftek, Marek; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    CD44, a cell surface proteoglycan, is involved in many biological events. CD44 transcripts undergo complex alternative splicing, resulting in many functionally distinct isoforms. To date, however, the nature of these isoforms in human epidermis has not been adequately determined. In this study, we isolated all CD44 transcripts from normal human epidermis, and studied how their expressions are regulated. By RT-PCR, we found that a number of different CD44 transcripts were expressed in human epidermis, and we obtained all these transcripts from DNA bands in agarose and acrylamide gels by cloning. Detailed sequence analysis revealed 18 CD44 transcripts, 3 of which were novel. Next, we examined effects of 10 different agents on the expression of CD44 transcripts in cultured human keratinocytes, and found that several agents, particularly epidermal growth factor, hydrogen peroxide, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, retinoic acid, calcium and fetal calf serum differently regulated their expressions in various patterns. Furthermore, normal and malignant keratinocytes were found to produce different CD44 transcripts upon serum stimulation and subsequent starvation, suggesting that specific CD44 isoforms are involved in tumorigenesis via different CD44-mediated biological pathways. PMID:27505250

  10. Bacillus anthracis’ lethal toxin induces broad transcriptional responses in human peripheral monocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Anthrax lethal toxin (LT), produced by the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus anthracis, is a highly effective zinc dependent metalloprotease that cleaves the N-terminus of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MAPKK or MEKs) and is known to play a role in impairing the host immune system during an inhalation anthrax infection. Here, we present the transcriptional responses of LT treated human monocytes in order to further elucidate the mechanisms of LT inhibition on the host immune system. Results Western Blot analysis demonstrated cleavage of endogenous MEK1 and MEK3 when human monocytes were treated with 500 ng/mL LT for four hours, proving their susceptibility to anthrax lethal toxin. Furthermore, staining with annexin V and propidium iodide revealed that LT treatment did not induce human peripheral monocyte apoptosis or necrosis. Using Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Arrays, we identified over 820 probe sets differentially regulated after LT treatment at the p <0.001 significance level, interrupting the normal transduction of over 60 known pathways. As expected, the MAPKK signaling pathway was most drastically affected by LT, but numerous genes outside the well-recognized pathways were also influenced by LT including the IL-18 signaling pathway, Toll-like receptor pathway and the IFN alpha signaling pathway. Multiple genes involved in actin regulation, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation and cytokine signaling were identified after treatment with anthrax LT. Conclusion We conclude LT directly targets human peripheral monocytes and causes multiple aberrant gene responses that would be expected to be associated with defects in human monocyte’s normal signaling transduction pathways and function. This study provides further insights into the mechanisms associated with the host immune system collapse during an anthrax infection, and suggests that anthrax LT may have additional downstream targets outside the well-known MAPK