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Sample records for human tumor spheroid

  1. Response of human neuroblastoma and melanoma multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) to single dose irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, S.M.; Labs, L.M.; Yuhas, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    The growth characteristics of 6 human cell line derived multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) were studied. Melanoma MTS (C32, HML-A, HML-B) were slow growing with baseline growth rates of 13.9 to 27.3 microns diameter/day. Neuroblastoma MTS (Lan-1, NB-100, NB-134) grew rapidly, with baseline growth rates of 32.1 to 40.3 microns diameter/day, that is, 1.2 to 2.9 times as fast as the melanomas. Delay constants were calculated for all six lines. The neuroblastomas were more sensitive to radiation than melanomas, as reflected in a greater value for the radiation-induced growth delay constant. One neuroblastoma line, Lan-1, was highly radioresponsive; that is, after a subcurative dose of radiation, the MTS diameter decreased beyond the original diameter, which was followed by recovery and regrowth. Irrespective of these initial changes in diameter, growth delay sensitivity (value of delay constant) was the same for Lan-1 and NB-100, an MTS line that did not show the responsive pattern.

  2. Ontogenetic growth of multicellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condat, C. A.; Menchón, S. A.

    2006-11-01

    In ontogenetic growth models, the basal metabolic rate is usually assumed to depend on the individual mass following a power law. Here it is shown that, in the case of multicellular tumor spheroids, the emergence of a necrotic core invalidates this assumption. The implications of this result for spheroid growth are discussed, and a procedure to determine the growth parameters using macroscopic measurements is proposed.

  3. Semiautomatic growth analysis of multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Rodday, Bjoern; Hirschhaeuser, Franziska; Walenta, Stefan; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang

    2011-10-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are routinely employed as three-dimensional in vitro models to study tumor biology. Cultivation of MCTS in spinner flasks provides better growing conditions, especially with regard to the availability of nutrients and oxygen, when compared with microtiter plates. The main endpoint of drug response experiments is spheroid size. It is common practice to analyze spheroid size manually with a microscope and an ocular micrometer. This requires removal of some spheroids from the flask, which entails major limitations such as loss of MCTS and the risk of contamination. With this new approach, the authors present an efficient and highly reproducible method to analyze the size of complete MCTS populations in culture containers with transparent, flat bottoms. MCTS sediments are digitally scanned and spheroid volumes are calculated by computerized image analysis. The equipment includes regular office hardware (personal computer, flatbed scanner) and software (Adobe Photoshop, Microsoft Excel, ImageJ). The accuracy and precision of the method were tested using industrial precision steel beads with known diameter. In summary, in comparison with other methods, this approach provides benefits in terms of semiautomation, noninvasiveness, and low costs. PMID:21908797

  4. Mini-pillar array for hydrogel-supported 3D culture and high-content histologic analysis of human tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jihoon; Lee, Dong Woo; Hwang, Hyun Ju; Yeon, Sang-Eun; Lee, Moo-Yeal; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-06-21

    Three-dimensional (3D) cancer cell culture models mimic the complex 3D organization and microenvironment of human solid tumor tissue and are thus considered as highly predictive models representing avascular tumor regions. Confocal laser scanning microscopy is useful for monitoring drug penetration and therapeutic responses in 3D tumor models; however, photonic attenuation at increasing imaging depths and limited penetration of common fluorescence tracers are significant technical challenges to imaging. Immunohistological staining would be a good alternative, but the preparation of tissue sections from rather fragile spheroids through fixing and embedding procedures is challenging. Here we introduce a novel 3 × 3 mini-pillar array chip that can be utilized for 3D cell culturing and sectioning for high-content histologic analysis. The mini-pillar array chip facilitated the generation of 3D spheroids of human cancer cells within hydrogels such as alginate, collagen, and Matrigel. As expected, visualization of the 3D distribution of calcein AM and doxorubicin by optical sectioning was limited by photonic attenuation and dye penetration. The integrity of the 3D microtissue section was confirmed by immunostaining on paraffin sections and cryo-sections. The applicability of the mini-pillar array for drug activity evaluation was tested by measuring viability changes in spheroids exposed to anti-cancer agents, 5-fluorouracil and tirapazamine. Thus, our novel mini-pillar array platform can potentially promote high-content histologic analysis of 3D cultures and can be further optimized for field-specific needs. PMID:27194205

  5. Method to measure the radio and chemosensitivity of human spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsson, J.; Nederman, T.

    1983-01-01

    A method based on the spontaneous outgrowth of cells from spheroids was tested. Different outgrowth patterns were seen depending on the types of spheroids and on the radiation or drug doses. The method allowed dose-effect relations to be determined. Spheroid survival was defined as when the outgrowing monolayers contained at least thousand cells within five weeks. The method was used as an alternative to cloning of isolated single cells. The glioma and osteosarcoma spheroids could not be disintegrated to single cell suspensions since they resisted enzymatic and mechanical treatments for cell separation. Detection of differences in radio and chemosensitivity between different types of spheroids of human origin might be valuable for the understanding of the large variations in therapeutical response often seen between different types of tumors.

  6. Effects of photodynamic therapy on human glioma spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Steen J.; Sun, Chung-Ho; Chu, Eugene A.; Hirschberg, Henry; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1999-07-01

    The poor prognosis for patients with malignant brain neoplasm has led to a search for better treatment modalities. Although gliomas are considered to be disseminated tumors in the brain, most recur at the site of the previous tumor resection. Improved local control would thus be of clear benefit. The utility of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of brain neoplasms is investigated using a human glioma spheroid model. Specifically, the effects of PDT on human glioma spheroids are investigated using PhotofrinTM and 56-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). The effects of various irradiation schemes were monitored using a simple growth assay. A growth delay was observed at an optical fluence of approximately 35 J cm-2 for spheroids incubated in Photofrin. Spheroids incubated in ALA were unaffected by the PDT treatment regimens examined in this study. This was most likely a result of inadequate photosensitizer concentration.

  7. Diffusion and binding of monoclonal antibody TNT-1 in multicellular tumor spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, F.M.; Hansen, E.B.; Taylor, C.R.; Epstein, A.L. )

    1991-02-06

    Tumor spheroids of HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma and A375 melanoma were established to investigate the uptake and clearance kinetics of TNT-1, a monoclonal antibody that targets necrotic cells of tumors. Our data reveal that there was rapid uptake of TNT-1 and its F(ab')2 fragment in both spheroid models, whereas an antibody of irrelevant specificity, Lym-1, and its F(ab')2 fragment bound poorly to the spheroids. Unlike previously reported monoclonal antibodies to tumor cell-surface antigens, TNT-1 showed (1) a linear uptake that increased over time without saturation in tumor spheroids and (2) an unexpected uptake by a subpopulation of cells in the viable outer rim of the spheroids. These preclinical studies provide important information concerning the therapeutic potential of TNT monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of cancer and micrometastases.

  8. Surface acoustic streaming in microfluidic system for rapid multicellular tumor spheroids generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlHasan, Layla; Qi, Aisha; Al-Aboodi, Aswan; Rezk, Amged; Shilton, Richie R.; Chan, Peggy P. Y.; Friend, James; Yeo, Leslie

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we developed a novel and rapid method to generate in vitro three-dimensional (3D) multicellular tumor spheroids using a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device. A SAW device with single-phase unidirectional transducer electrodes (SPUTD) on lithium niobate substrate was fabricated using standing UV photolithography and wet-etching techniques. To generate spheroids, the SAW device was loaded with medium containing human breast carcinoma (BT474) cells, an oscillating electrical signal at resonant frequency was supplied to the SPUDT to generate acoustic radiation in the medium. Spheroids with uniform size and shape can be obtained using this method in less than 1 minute, and the size of the spheroids can be controlled through adjusting the seeding density. The resulting spheroids were used for further cultivation and were monitored using an optical microscope in real time. The viability and actin organization of the spheroids were assessed using live/dead viability staining and actin cytoskeleton staining, respectively. Compared to spheroids generated using the liquid overlay method, the SAW generated spheroids exhibited higher circularity and higher viability. The F-actin filaments of spheroids appear to aggregate compared to that of untreated cells, indicating that mature spheroids can be obtained using this method. This spheroid generating method can be useful for a variety of biological studies and clinical applications.

  9. Drug testing and flow cytometry analysis on a large number of uniform sized tumor spheroids using a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid possesses great potential as an in vitro model to improve predictive capacity for pre-clinical drug testing. In this paper, we combine advantages of flow cytometry and microfluidics to perform drug testing and analysis on a large number (5000) of uniform sized tumor spheroids. The spheroids are formed, cultured, and treated with drugs inside a microfluidic device. The spheroids can then be harvested from the device without tedious operation. Due to the ample cell numbers, the spheroids can be dissociated into single cells for flow cytometry analysis. Flow cytometry provides statistical information in single cell resolution that makes it feasible to better investigate drug functions on the cells in more in vivo-like 3D formation. In the experiments, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) are exploited to form tumor spheroids within the microfluidic device, and three anti-cancer drugs: Cisplatin, Resveratrol, and Tirapazamine (TPZ), and their combinations are tested on the tumor spheroids with two different sizes. The experimental results suggest the cell culture format (2D monolayer vs. 3D spheroid) and spheroid size play critical roles in drug responses, and also demonstrate the advantages of bridging the two techniques in pharmaceutical drug screening applications.

  10. Drug testing and flow cytometry analysis on a large number of uniform sized tumor spheroids using a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid possesses great potential as an in vitro model to improve predictive capacity for pre-clinical drug testing. In this paper, we combine advantages of flow cytometry and microfluidics to perform drug testing and analysis on a large number (5000) of uniform sized tumor spheroids. The spheroids are formed, cultured, and treated with drugs inside a microfluidic device. The spheroids can then be harvested from the device without tedious operation. Due to the ample cell numbers, the spheroids can be dissociated into single cells for flow cytometry analysis. Flow cytometry provides statistical information in single cell resolution that makes it feasible to better investigate drug functions on the cells in more in vivo-like 3D formation. In the experiments, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) are exploited to form tumor spheroids within the microfluidic device, and three anti-cancer drugs: Cisplatin, Resveratrol, and Tirapazamine (TPZ), and their combinations are tested on the tumor spheroids with two different sizes. The experimental results suggest the cell culture format (2D monolayer vs. 3D spheroid) and spheroid size play critical roles in drug responses, and also demonstrate the advantages of bridging the two techniques in pharmaceutical drug screening applications. PMID:26877244

  11. Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid invasion assay.

    PubMed

    Vinci, Maria; Box, Carol; Eccles, Suzanne A

    2015-01-01

    Invasion of surrounding normal tissues is generally considered to be a key hallmark of malignant (as opposed to benign) tumors. For some cancers in particular (e.g., brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck - SCCHN) it is a cause of severe morbidity and can be life-threatening even in the absence of distant metastases. In addition, cancers which have relapsed following treatment unfortunately often present with a more aggressive phenotype. Therefore, there is an opportunity to target the process of invasion to provide novel therapies that could be complementary to standard anti-proliferative agents. Until now, this strategy has been hampered by the lack of robust, reproducible assays suitable for a detailed analysis of invasion and for drug screening. Here we provide a simple micro-plate method (based on uniform, self-assembling 3D tumor spheroids) which has great potential for such studies. We exemplify the assay platform using a human glioblastoma cell line and also an SCCHN model where the development of resistance against targeted epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors is associated with enhanced matrix-invasive potential. We also provide two alternative methods of semi-automated quantification: one using an imaging cytometer and a second which simply requires standard microscopy and image capture with digital image analysis. PMID:25993495

  12. Three-Dimensional (3D) Tumor Spheroid Invasion Assay

    PubMed Central

    Vinci, Maria; Box, Carol; Eccles, Suzanne A.

    2015-01-01

    Invasion of surrounding normal tissues is generally considered to be a key hallmark of malignant (as opposed to benign) tumors. For some cancers in particular (e.g., brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme and squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck – SCCHN) it is a cause of severe morbidity and can be life-threatening even in the absence of distant metastases. In addition, cancers which have relapsed following treatment unfortunately often present with a more aggressive phenotype. Therefore, there is an opportunity to target the process of invasion to provide novel therapies that could be complementary to standard anti-proliferative agents. Until now, this strategy has been hampered by the lack of robust, reproducible assays suitable for a detailed analysis of invasion and for drug screening. Here we provide a simple micro-plate method (based on uniform, self-assembling 3D tumor spheroids) which has great potential for such studies. We exemplify the assay platform using a human glioblastoma cell line and also an SCCHN model where the development of resistance against targeted epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors is associated with enhanced matrix-invasive potential. We also provide two alternative methods of semi-automated quantification: one using an imaging cytometer and a second which simply requires standard microscopy and image capture with digital image analysis. PMID:25993495

  13. In Vitro, Matrix-Free Formation Of Solid Tumor Spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Marley, Garry M.

    1993-01-01

    Cinostatic bioreactor promotes formation of relatively large solid tumor spheroids exhibiting diameters from 750 to 2,100 micrometers. Process useful in studying efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents and of interactions between cells not constrained by solid matrices. Two versions have been demonstrated; one for anchorage-independent cells and one for anchorage-dependent cells.

  14. Quantitative bioimaging of platinum group elements in tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Niehoff, Ann-Christin; Grünebaum, Jonas; Moosmann, Aline; Mulac, Dennis; Söbbing, Judith; Niehaus, Rebecca; Buchholz, Rebecca; Kröger, Sabrina; Wiehe, Arno; Wagner, Sylvia; Sperling, Michael; von Briesen, Hagen; Langer, Klaus; Karst, Uwe

    2016-09-28

    Limited drug penetration into tumor tissue is a significant factor to the effectiveness of cancer therapy. Tumor spheroids, a 3D cell culture model system, can be used to study drug penetration for pharmaceutical development. In this study, a method for quantitative bioimaging of platinum group elements by laser ablation (LA) coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is presented. Different matrix-matched standards were used to develop a quantitative LA-ICP-MS method with high spatial resolution. To investigate drug penetration, tumor spheroids were incubated with platinum complexes (Pt(II)acetylacetonate, cisplatin) and the palladium tagged photosensitizer 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin (mTHPP). Distribution and accumulation of the pharmaceuticals were determined with the developed method. PMID:27619092

  15. Tumor spheroid assembly on hyaluronic acid-based structures: A review.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Marco P; Costa, Elisabete C; Miguel, Sónia P; Correia, Ilídio J

    2016-10-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) cell culture is the main methodology used for screening anticancer therapeutics. However, these 2D cellular models misrepresent the architecture of native tumors, leading, in some cases, to unsuccessful prediction of cancer cell response to drugs. To overcome such limitations, cell growth in three dimensions (3D) arises as an alternative to reproduce in vitro the cellular arrangement found in tumors. Among the 3D cancer models developed so far, spheroids are the most attractive since these are cellular aggregates that broadly mimic many features of solid tumors affecting humans, like cell-cell interactions. One of the most applied techniques for producing spheroids is the liquid overlay technique, in which cells aggregate due to their limited adhesion to certain biomaterials, usually agarose or agar. Recently, the suitability of hyaluronic acid (HA) for spheroids assembly and HA-cell surface receptor interactions has been investigated. Ergo, this review gathers a summary of different studies where HA-based structures were developed and used for tumor spheroids production in order to be used in vitro as reliable 3D tumor models for therapeutic screening purposes. PMID:27312623

  16. Multicellular tumor spheroids as an in vivo-like tumor model for three-dimensional imaging of chemotherapeutic and nano material cellular penetration.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui-li; Jiang, Qiao; Han, Siyuan; Wu, Yan; Cui Tomshine, Jin; Wang, Dongliang; Gan, Yaling; Zou, Guozhang; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2012-01-01

    We present a flexible and highly reproducible method using three-dimensional (3D) multicellular tumor spheroids to quantify chemotherapeutic and nanoparticle penetration properties in vitro. We generated HeLa cell-derived spheroids using the liquid overlay method. To properly characterize HeLa spheroids, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and multiphoton microscopy were used to obtain high-resolution 3D images of HeLa spheroids. Next, pairing high-resolution optical characterization techniques with flow cytometry, we quantitatively compared the penetration of doxorubicin, quantum dots, and synthetic micelles into 3D HeLa spheroid versus HeLa cells grown in a traditional two-dimensional culturing system. Our data revealed that 3D cultured HeLa cells acquired several clinically relevant morphologic and cellular characteristics (such as resistance to chemotherapeutics) often found in human solid tumors. These characteristic, however, could not be captured using conventional two-dimensional cell culture techniques. This study demonstrated the remarkable versatility of HeLa spheroid 3D imaging. In addition, our results revealed the capability of HeLa spheroids to function as a screening tool for nanoparticles or synthetic micelles that, due to their inherent size, charge, and hydrophobicity, can penetrate into solid tumors and act as delivery vehicles for chemotherapeutics. The development of this image-based, reproducible, and quantifiable in vitro HeLa spheroid screening tool will greatly aid future exploration of chemotherapeutics and nanoparticle delivery into solid tumors. PMID:23084249

  17. Quantification of in vitro mesenchymal stem cell invasion into tumor spheroids using selective plane illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühland, Svenja; Wechselberger, Alexandra; Spitzweg, Christine; Huss, Ralf; Nelson, Peter J.; Harz, Hartmann

    2015-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) homing and integration into tumors are under evaluation for clinical application. This approach requires the identification of conditions for optimal tumor invasion. We describe a tool for the in vitro comparison of parameters influencing invasion. Human MSC added to experimental tumor spheroids variably migrates toward the center of the structure. To determine MSC distribution inside the three-dimensional specimen, spatial analysis was performed using selective plane illumination microscopy. A standardized method to quantify and compare the invasion potential of variably treated MSC into experimental tumor environments allows efficient screening for optimizing conditions.

  18. Spheroid-plug model as a tool to study tumor development, angiogenesis, and heterogeneity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Szade, Krzysztof; Zukowska, Monika; Szade, Agata; Collet, Guillaume; Kloska, Damian; Kieda, Claudine; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef

    2016-02-01

    Subcutaneous injection of the tumor cell suspension is a simple and commonly used tool for studying tumor development in vivo. However, subcutaneous models poorly resemble tumor complexity due to the fast growth not reflecting the natural course. Here, we describe an application of the new spheroid-plug model to combine the simplicity of subcutaneous injection with improved resemblance to natural tumor progression. Spheroid-plug model relies on in vitro formation of tumor spheroids, followed by injection of single tumor spheroid subcutaneously in Matrigel matrix. In spheroid-plug model, tumors grow slower in comparison to tumors formed by injection of cell suspension as assessed by 3D ultrasonography (USG) and in vivo bioluminescence measurements. The slower tumor growth rate in spheroid-plug model is accompanied by reduced necrosis. The spheroid-plug model ensures increased and more stable vascularization of tumor than classical subcutaneous tumor model as demonstrated by 3D USG Power Doppler examination. Flow cytometry analysis showed that tumors formed from spheroids have enhanced infiltration of endothelial cells as well as hematopoietic and progenitor cells with stem cell phenotype (c-Kit(+) and Sca-1(+)). They also contain more tumor cells expressing cancer stem cell marker CXCR4. Here, we show that spheroid-plug model allows investigating efficiency of anticancer drugs. Treatment of spheroid-plug tumors with known antiangiogenic agent axitinib decreased their size and viability. The antiangiogenic activity of axitinib was higher in spheroid-plug model than in classical model. Our results indicate that spheroid-plug model imitates natural tumor growth and can become a valuable tool for cancer research. PMID:26385771

  19. Tensile Forces Originating from Cancer Spheroids Facilitate Tumor Invasion.

    PubMed

    Kopanska, Katarzyna S; Alcheikh, Yara; Staneva, Ralitza; Vignjevic, Danijela; Betz, Timo

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of tumors and the tumor environment provide important information for the progression and characterization of cancer. Tumors are surrounded by an extracellular matrix (ECM) dominated by collagen I. The geometrical and mechanical properties of the ECM play an important role for the initial step in the formation of metastasis, presented by the migration of malignant cells towards new settlements as well as the vascular and lymphatic system. The extent of this cell invasion into the ECM is a key medical marker for cancer prognosis. In vivo studies reveal an increased stiffness and different architecture of tumor tissue when compared to its healthy counterparts. The observed parallel collagen organization on the tumor border and radial arrangement at the invasion zone has raised the question about the mechanisms organizing these structures. Here we study the effect of contractile forces originated from model tumor spheroids embedded in a biomimetic collagen I matrix. We show that contractile forces act immediately after seeding and deform the ECM, thus leading to tensile radial forces within the matrix. Relaxation of this tension via cutting the collagen does reduce invasion, showing a mechanical relation between the tensile state of the ECM and invasion. In turn, these results suggest that tensile forces in the ECM facilitate invasion. Furthermore, simultaneous contraction of the ECM and tumor growth leads to the condensation and reorientation of the collagen at the spheroid's surface. We propose a tension-based model to explain the collagen organization and the onset of invasion by forces originating from the tumor. PMID:27271249

  20. Comparative analysis of tumor spheroid generation techniques for differential in vitro drug toxicity.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Shreya; Mehta, Pooja; Horst, Eric N; Ward, Maria R; Rowley, Katelyn R; Mehta, Geeta

    2016-03-29

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are powerful in vitro models to perform preclinical chemosensitivity assays. We compare different methodologies to generate tumor spheroids in terms of resultant spheroid morphology, cellular arrangement and chemosensitivity. We used two cancer cell lines (MCF7 and OVCAR8) to generate spheroids using i) hanging drop array plates; ii) liquid overlay on ultra-low attachment plates; iii) liquid overlay on ultra-low attachment plates with rotating mixing (nutator plates). Analysis of spheroid morphometry indicated that cellular compaction was increased in spheroids generated on nutator and hanging drop array plates. Collagen staining also indicated higher compaction and remodeling in tumor spheroids on nutator and hanging drop arrays compared to conventional liquid overlay. Consequently, spheroids generated on nutator or hanging drop plates had increased chemoresistance to cisplatin treatment (20-60% viability) compared to spheroids on ultra low attachment plates (10-20% viability). Lastly, we used a mathematical model to demonstrate minimal changes in oxygen and cisplatin diffusion within experimentally generated spheroids. Our results demonstrate that in vitro methods of tumor spheroid generation result in varied cellular arrangement and chemosensitivity. PMID:26918944

  1. Comparative analysis of tumor spheroid generation techniques for differential in vitro drug toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Shreya; Rowley, Katelyn R.; Mehta, Geeta

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are powerful in vitro models to perform preclinical chemosensitivity assays. We compare different methodologies to generate tumor spheroids in terms of resultant spheroid morphology, cellular arrangement and chemosensitivity. We used two cancer cell lines (MCF7 and OVCAR8) to generate spheroids using i) hanging drop array plates; ii) liquid overlay on ultra-low attachment plates; iii) liquid overlay on ultra-low attachment plates with rotating mixing (nutator plates). Analysis of spheroid morphometry indicated that cellular compaction was increased in spheroids generated on nutator and hanging drop array plates. Collagen staining also indicated higher compaction and remodeling in tumor spheroids on nutator and hanging drop arrays compared to conventional liquid overlay. Consequently, spheroids generated on nutator or hanging drop plates had increased chemoresistance to cisplatin treatment (20-60% viability) compared to spheroids on ultra low attachment plates (10-20% viability). Lastly, we used a mathematical model to demonstrate minimal changes in oxygen and cisplatin diffusion within experimentally generated spheroids. Our results demonstrate that in vitro methods of tumor spheroid generation result in varied cellular arrangement and chemosensitivity. PMID:26918944

  2. Colorectal cancer-derived tumor spheroids retain the characteristics of original tumors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Hwa; Hong, Jun Hwa; Park, Hwan Ki; Park, Jun Seok; Kim, Bo-Kyung; Lee, Jung-Yi; Jeong, Ji Yun; Yoon, Ghil Suk; Inoue, Masahiro; Choi, Gyu-Seog; Lee, In-Kyu

    2015-10-10

    Primary cultures of cancer cells are useful for developing personalized medicine. In this study, we characterized three lines of three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroids established directly from tumor tissues of patients with colorectal cancers (CRCs). Each line mainly included EpCAM-positive cells and cells expressing putative cancer stem cell markers such as CD133, CD44, CD24, ALDH1, and LGR5. These characteristic stem cell markers remained identically for months in vitro. Short tandem repeat genotyping suggested that genetic fingerprints of these tumor spheroids were similar to those of the original tumor tissues from which they were derived. Mutational analysis showed that each line had the same mutation profile for APC, KRAS, MLH1, serine-threonine kinase 11, and TP53 as its parental tumor tissue. One line harboring an activating KRAS mutation was resistant to cetuximab while the remaining two lines harboring wild-type KRAS showed different responses to cetuximab. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that xenograft tumors derived from these lines retained the histopathological and mutational patterns of their parental tumors. Collectively, these results clearly showed that 3D tumor spheroids directly generated from tumor tissues of patients with CRCs preserved the characteristics of their parental tumor tissues and could be used for developing personalized medicines for CRCs. PMID:26185002

  3. Tensile Forces Originating from Cancer Spheroids Facilitate Tumor Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Kopanska, Katarzyna S.; Alcheikh, Yara; Staneva, Ralitza; Vignjevic, Danijela; Betz, Timo

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of tumors and the tumor environment provide important information for the progression and characterization of cancer. Tumors are surrounded by an extracellular matrix (ECM) dominated by collagen I. The geometrical and mechanical properties of the ECM play an important role for the initial step in the formation of metastasis, presented by the migration of malignant cells towards new settlements as well as the vascular and lymphatic system. The extent of this cell invasion into the ECM is a key medical marker for cancer prognosis. In vivo studies reveal an increased stiffness and different architecture of tumor tissue when compared to its healthy counterparts. The observed parallel collagen organization on the tumor border and radial arrangement at the invasion zone has raised the question about the mechanisms organizing these structures. Here we study the effect of contractile forces originated from model tumor spheroids embedded in a biomimetic collagen I matrix. We show that contractile forces act immediately after seeding and deform the ECM, thus leading to tensile radial forces within the matrix. Relaxation of this tension via cutting the collagen does reduce invasion, showing a mechanical relation between the tensile state of the ECM and invasion. In turn, these results suggest that tensile forces in the ECM facilitate invasion. Furthermore, simultaneous contraction of the ECM and tumor growth leads to the condensation and reorientation of the collagen at the spheroid’s surface. We propose a tension-based model to explain the collagen organization and the onset of invasion by forces originating from the tumor. PMID:27271249

  4. Cisplatin Resistant Spheroids Model Clinically Relevant Survival Mechanisms in Ovarian Tumors.

    PubMed

    Chowanadisai, Winyoo; Messerli, Shanta M; Miller, Daniel H; Medina, Jamie E; Hamilton, Joshua W; Messerli, Mark A; Brodsky, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    The majority of ovarian tumors eventually recur in a drug resistant form. Using cisplatin sensitive and resistant cell lines assembled into 3D spheroids we profiled gene expression and identified candidate mechanisms and biological pathways associated with cisplatin resistance. OVCAR-8 human ovarian carcinoma cells were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of cisplatin to create a matched cisplatin-resistant cell line, OVCAR-8R. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of sensitive and resistant ovarian cancer spheroids identified 3,331 significantly differentially expressed probesets coding for 3,139 distinct protein-coding genes (Fc >2, FDR < 0.05) (S2 Table). Despite significant expression changes in some transporters including MDR1, cisplatin resistance was not associated with differences in intracellular cisplatin concentration. Cisplatin resistant cells were significantly enriched for a mesenchymal gene expression signature. OVCAR-8R resistance derived gene sets were significantly more biased to patients with shorter survival. From the most differentially expressed genes, we derived a 17-gene expression signature that identifies ovarian cancer patients with shorter overall survival in three independent datasets. We propose that the use of cisplatin resistant cell lines in 3D spheroid models is a viable approach to gain insight into resistance mechanisms relevant to ovarian tumors in patients. Our data support the emerging concept that ovarian cancers can acquire drug resistance through an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. PMID:26986722

  5. Cisplatin Resistant Spheroids Model Clinically Relevant Survival Mechanisms in Ovarian Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel H.; Medina, Jamie E.; Hamilton, Joshua W.; Messerli, Mark A.; Brodsky, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of ovarian tumors eventually recur in a drug resistant form. Using cisplatin sensitive and resistant cell lines assembled into 3D spheroids we profiled gene expression and identified candidate mechanisms and biological pathways associated with cisplatin resistance. OVCAR-8 human ovarian carcinoma cells were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of cisplatin to create a matched cisplatin-resistant cell line, OVCAR-8R. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of sensitive and resistant ovarian cancer spheroids identified 3,331 significantly differentially expressed probesets coding for 3,139 distinct protein-coding genes (Fc >2, FDR < 0.05) (S2 Table). Despite significant expression changes in some transporters including MDR1, cisplatin resistance was not associated with differences in intracellular cisplatin concentration. Cisplatin resistant cells were significantly enriched for a mesenchymal gene expression signature. OVCAR-8R resistance derived gene sets were significantly more biased to patients with shorter survival. From the most differentially expressed genes, we derived a 17-gene expression signature that identifies ovarian cancer patients with shorter overall survival in three independent datasets. We propose that the use of cisplatin resistant cell lines in 3D spheroid models is a viable approach to gain insight into resistance mechanisms relevant to ovarian tumors in patients. Our data support the emerging concept that ovarian cancers can acquire drug resistance through an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. PMID:26986722

  6. Patterning hypoxic multicellular spheroids in a 3D matrix - a promising method for anti-tumor drug screening.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingyun; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Yang; Yu, Haibo; Liu, Lianqing; Shi, Yang; Li, Yanfeng; Qin, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    3D multicellular spheroid models are of great value in the investigation of tumor biology and tumor responses to chemotherapy and radiation. To establish a mimicking tumor microenvironment in vitro, we developed a straightforward method by patterning hypoxic multicellular spheroids in a 3D matrix. The efficacy of this approach was evaluated by characterizing spheroid formation, invasive capability and phenotypic transition in aggressive human glioma cells. We observed enhanced cell proliferation, spheroid formation and invasive capability in U87 glioma cells transfected with hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) compared with non-treated cells. We also demonstrated that the overexpression of HIFs in hypoxic glioma cells may promote cell migration by epithelial-mesenchymal transition within the 3D matrix. Compared with conventional 3D culturing techniques, the simple operation, rapid prototyping, low cost and high throughput format of the micro-patterning method facilitates the characterization of cell proliferation, migration, phenotypic function and drug evaluation in physiologically relevant 3D microenvironments. This in vitro 3D system can recapitulate the physiologically relevant tumor microenvironment and is a promising method for 3D anti-tumor drug screening and the identification of novel targets for tumor invasion and angiogenesis. PMID:26647062

  7. Tumor spheroid model for the biologically targeted radiotherapy of neuroblastoma micrometastases

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, K.A.; Mairs, R.; Murray, T.; Hilditch, T.E.; Wheldon, T.E.; Gregor, A.; Hann, I.M. )

    1990-02-01

    Neuroblastoma is a pediatric malignancy with a poor prognosis at least partly attributable to an early pattern of dissemination. New approaches to treatment of micrometastases include targeted radiotherapy using radiolabeled antibodies or molecules which are taken up preferentially by tumor cells. Multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) resemble micrometastases during the avascular phase of their development. A human neuroblastoma cell line (NBl-G) was grown as MTS and incubated briefly with a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody ({sup 131}I-UJ13A) directed against neuroectodermal antigens. Spheroid response was evaluated in terms of regrowth delay or proportion sterilized. A dose-response relationship was demonstrated in terms of {sup 131}I activity or duration of incubation. Control experiments using unlabeled UJ13A, radiolabeled nonspecific antibody (T2.10), radiolabeled human serum albumin, and radiolabeled sodium iodide showed these to be relatively ineffective compared to {sup 131}I-UJ13A. The cell line NBl-G grown as MTS has also been found to preferentially accumulate the radiolabeled catecholamine precursor molecule m-({sup 131}I)iodobenzylguanidine compared to cell lines derived from other tumor types. NBl-G cells grown as MTS provide a promising laboratory model for targeted radiotherapy of neuroblastoma micrometastases using radiolabeled antibodies or m-iodobenzylguanidine.

  8. Human Cardiac Progenitor Spheroids Exhibit Enhanced Engraftment Potential

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, Donato; Gregoletto, Luca; Reano, Simone; Pietronave, Stefano; Merlin, Simone; Talmon, Maria; Novelli, Eugenio; Diena, Marco; Nicoletti, Carmine; Musarò, Antonio; Filigheddu, Nicoletta; Follenzi, Antonia; Prat, Maria

    2015-01-01

    A major obstacle to an effective myocardium stem cell therapy has always been the delivery and survival of implanted stem cells in the heart. Better engraftment can be achieved if cells are administered as cell aggregates, which maintain their extra-cellular matrix (ECM). We have generated spheroid aggregates in less than 24 h by seeding human cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) onto methylcellulose hydrogel-coated microwells. Cells within spheroids maintained the expression of stemness/mesenchymal and ECM markers, growth factors and their cognate receptors, cardiac commitment factors, and metalloproteases, as detected by immunofluorescence, q-RT-PCR and immunoarray, and expressed a higher, but regulated, telomerase activity. Compared to cells in monolayers, 3D spheroids secreted also bFGF and showed MMP2 activity. When spheroids were seeded on culture plates, the cells quickly migrated, displaying an increased wound healing ability with or without pharmacological modulation, and reached confluence at a higher rate than cells from conventional monolayers. When spheroids were injected in the heart wall of healthy mice, some cells migrated from the spheroids, engrafted, and remained detectable for at least 1 week after transplantation, while, when the same amount of cells was injected as suspension, no cells were detectable three days after injection. Cells from spheroids displayed the same engraftment capability when they were injected in cardiotoxin-injured myocardium. Our study shows that spherical in vivo ready-to-implant scaffold-less aggregates of hCPCs able to engraft also in the hostile environment of an injured myocardium can be produced with an economic, easy and fast protocol. PMID:26375957

  9. Tumor cell-targeted delivery of nanoconjugated oligonucleotides in composite spheroids.

    PubMed

    Carver, Kyle; Ming, Xin; Juliano, Rudy L

    2014-12-01

    Standard tissue culture has often been a poor model for predicting the efficacy of anti-cancer agents including oligonucleotides. In contrast to the simplicity of monolayer tissue cultures, a tumor mass includes tightly packed tumor cells, tortuous blood vessels, high levels of extracellular matrix, and stromal cells that support the tumor. These complexities pose a challenge for delivering therapeutic agents throughout the tumor, with many drugs limited to cells proximal to the vasculature. Multicellular tumor spheroids are superior to traditional monolayer cell culture for the assessment of cancer drug delivery, since they possess many of the characteristics of metastatic tumor foci. However, homogeneous spheroids comprised solely of tumor cells do not account for some of the key aspects of metastatic tumors, particularly the interaction with host cells such as fibroblasts. Further, homogeneous culture does not allow for the assessment of targeted delivery to tumor versus host cells. Here we have evaluated delivery of targeted and untargeted oligonucleotide nanoconjugates and of oligonucleotide polyplexes in both homogeneous and composite tumor spheroids. We find that inclusion of fibroblasts in the spheroids reduces delivery efficacy of the polyplexes. In contrast, targeted multivalent RGD-oligonucleotide nanoconjugates were able to effectively discriminate between melanoma cells and fibroblasts, thus providing tumor-selective uptake and pharmacological effects. PMID:25238564

  10. Anti-gastric cancer activity in three-dimensional tumor spheroids of bufadienolides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jixia; Zhang, Xiuli; Li, Xiaolong; Zhang, Yun; Hou, Tao; Wei, Lai; Qu, Lala; Shi, Liying; Liu, Yanfang; Zou, Lijuan; Liang, Xinmiao

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular spheroids of cancer cells have been increasingly used to screen anti-tumor compounds, owing to their in vivo like microenvironment and structure as well as compatibility to high-throughput/high-content screening. Here we report the potency and efficacy of a family of bufadienolides to inhibit the growth of gastric cancer cell line HGC-27 in three-dimensional (3D) spheroidal models. Examining the morphological and growth patterns of several cell lines in round-bottomed ultra-low attachment microplate suggested that HGC-27 cells formed reproducibly multicellular spheroidal structures. Profiling of 15 natural bufadienolides isolated from toad skin indicated that 8 14-hydroxy bufadienolides displayed inhibitory activity of the growth of HGC-27 spheroids in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, compared to clinical drugs taxol and epirubicin, active bufadienolides were found to penetrate more effectively into the HGC-27 spheroids, but with a narrower effective concentration range and a shorter lasting inhibitory effect. Furthermore, compared to two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayer assays, active bufadienolides exhibited weaker efficacy and different potency in 3D spheroid model, demonstrating the great potential of 3D multicellular cell spheroid models in anti-cancer drug discovery and development. PMID:27098119

  11. Anti-gastric cancer activity in three-dimensional tumor spheroids of bufadienolides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jixia; Zhang, Xiuli; Li, Xiaolong; Zhang, Yun; Hou, Tao; Wei, Lai; Qu, Lala; Shi, Liying; Liu, Yanfang; Zou, Lijuan; Liang, Xinmiao

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular spheroids of cancer cells have been increasingly used to screen anti-tumor compounds, owing to their in vivo like microenvironment and structure as well as compatibility to high-throughput/high-content screening. Here we report the potency and efficacy of a family of bufadienolides to inhibit the growth of gastric cancer cell line HGC-27 in three-dimensional (3D) spheroidal models. Examining the morphological and growth patterns of several cell lines in round-bottomed ultra-low attachment microplate suggested that HGC-27 cells formed reproducibly multicellular spheroidal structures. Profiling of 15 natural bufadienolides isolated from toad skin indicated that 8 14-hydroxy bufadienolides displayed inhibitory activity of the growth of HGC-27 spheroids in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, compared to clinical drugs taxol and epirubicin, active bufadienolides were found to penetrate more effectively into the HGC-27 spheroids, but with a narrower effective concentration range and a shorter lasting inhibitory effect. Furthermore, compared to two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayer assays, active bufadienolides exhibited weaker efficacy and different potency in 3D spheroid model, demonstrating the great potential of 3D multicellular cell spheroid models in anti-cancer drug discovery and development. PMID:27098119

  12. Chromosome Conformation of Human Fibroblasts Grown in 3-Dimensional Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiming; Comment, Nicholas; Chen, Jie; Ronquist, Scott; Hero, Alfred; Ried, Thomas; Rajapakse, Indika

    2015-01-01

    In the study of interphase chromosome organization, genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) maps are often generated using 2-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures. These 2D cells have morphological deviations from cells that exist in 3-dimensional (3D) tissues in vivo, and may not maintain the same chromosome conformation. We used Hi-C maps to test the extent of differences in chromosome conformation between human fibroblasts grown in 2D cultures and those grown in 3D spheroids. Significant differences in chromosome conformation were found between 2D cells and those grown in spheroids. Intra-chromosomal interactions were generally increased in spheroid cells, with a few exceptions, while inter-chromosomal interactions were generally decreased. Overall, chromosomes located closer to the nuclear periphery had increased intra-chromosomal contacts in spheroid cells, while those located more centrally had decreased interactions. This study highlights the necessity to conduct studies on the topography of the interphase nucleus under conditions that mimic an in vivo environment. PMID:25738643

  13. A simple, low-cost staining method for rapid-throughput analysis of tumor spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Eckerdt, Frank; Alvarez, Angel; Bell, Jonathan; Arvanitis, Constadina; Iqbal, Asneha; Arslan, Ahmet D.; Hu, Bo; Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Goldman, Stewart; Platanias, Leonidas C.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor spheroids are becoming an important tool for the investigation of cancer stem cell (CSC) function in tumors; thus, low-cost and high-throughput methods for drug screening of tumor spheroids are needed. Using neurospheres as non-adherent three-dimensional (3-D) cultures, we developed a simple, low-cost acridine orange (AO)–based method that allows for rapid analysis of live neurospheres by fluorescence microscopy in a 96-well format. This assay measures the cross-section area of a spheroid, which corresponds to cell viability. Our novel method allows rapid screening of a panel of anti-proliferative drugs to assess inhibitory effects on the growth of cancer stem cells in 3-D cultures. PMID:26757811

  14. Production of large numbers of size-controlled tumor spheroids using microwell plates.

    PubMed

    Razian, Golsa; Yu, Yang; Ungrin, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Tumor spheroids are increasingly recognized as an important in vitro model for the behavior of tumor cells in three dimensions. More physiologically relevant than conventional adherent-sheet cultures, they more accurately recapitulate the complexity and interactions present in real tumors. In order to harness this model to better assess tumor biology, or the efficacy of novel therapeutic agents, it is necessary to be able to generate spheroids reproducibly, in a controlled manner and in significant numbers. The AggreWell system consists of a high-density array of pyramid-shaped microwells, into which a suspension of single cells is centrifuged. The numbers of cells clustering at the bottom of each microwell, and the number and ratio of distinct cell types involved depend only on the properties of the suspension introduced by the experimenter. Thus, we are able to generate tumor spheroids of arbitrary size and composition without needing to modify the underlying platform technology. The hundreds of microwells per square centimeter of culture surface area in turn ensure that extremely high production levels may be attained via a straightforward, nonlabor-intensive process. We therefore expect that this protocol will be broadly useful to researchers in the tumor spheroid field. PMID:24300192

  15. Spectral mapping of 3D multi-cellular tumor spheroids: time-resolved confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Saswat; Nandi, Somen; Chowdhury, Rajdeep; Das, Gaurav; Ghosh, Surajit; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2016-07-21

    A tumor-like multi-cellular spheroid (3D) differs from a 2D cell in a number of ways. This is demonstrated using time resolved confocal microscopy. Two different tumor spheroids - HeLa (cervical cancer) and A549 (lung cancer) - are studied using 3 different fluorescent dyes - C153 (non-covalent), CPM (covalent) and doxorubicin (non-covalent, anti-cancer drug). The pattern of localization of these three fluorescent probes in the 3D tumor cell exhibits significant differences from that in the conventional 2D cells. For both the cells (HeLa and A549), the total uptake of doxorubicin in the 3D cell is much lower than that in the 2D cell. The uptake of doxorubicin molecules in the A549 spheroid is significantly different compared to the HeLa spheroid. The local polarity (i.e. emission maxima) and solvation dynamics in the 3D tumor cell differ from those in 2D cells. The covalent probe CPM exhibits intermittent fluorescence oscillations in the 1-2 s time scale. This is attributed to redox processes. These results may provide new insights into 3D tumors. PMID:27336201

  16. Improved Methods to Generate Spheroid Cultures from Tumor Cells, Tumor Cells & Fibroblasts or Tumor-Fragments: Microenvironment, Microvesicles and MiRNA

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Zheng; Kelly, Catherine J.; Yang, Xiang-Yang; Jenkins, W. Timothy; Toorens, Erik; Ganguly, Tapan; Evans, Sydney M.; Koch, Cameron J.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic and prognostic indicators are key components to achieve the goal of personalized cancer therapy. Two distinct approaches to this goal include predicting response by genetic analysis and direct testing of possible therapies using cultures derived from biopsy specimens. Optimally, the latter method requires a rapid assessment, but growing xenograft tumors or developing patient-derived cell lines can involve a great deal of time and expense. Furthermore, tumor cells have much different responses when grown in 2D versus 3D tissue environments. Using a modification of existing methods, we show that it is possible to make tumor-fragment (TF) spheroids in only 2–3 days. TF spheroids appear to closely model characteristics of the original tumor and may be used to assess critical therapy-modulating features of the microenvironment such as hypoxia. A similar method allows the reproducible development of spheroids from mixed tumor cells and fibroblasts (mixed-cell spheroids). Prior literature reports have shown highly variable development and properties of mixed-cell spheroids and this has hampered the detailed study of how individual tumor-cell components interact. In this study, we illustrate this approach and describe similarities and differences using two tumor models (U87 glioma and SQ20B squamous-cell carcinoma) with supporting data from additional cell lines. We show that U87 and SQ20B spheroids predict a key microenvironmental factor in tumors (hypoxia) and that SQ20B cells and spheroids generate similar numbers of microvesicles. We also present pilot data for miRNA expression under conditions of cells, tumors, and TF spheroids. PMID:26208323

  17. Optical signature of multicellular tumor spheroid using index-mismatch-induced spherical aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corre, G.; Weiss, P.; Ducommun, B.; Lorenzo, C.

    2014-02-01

    The development of new cancer treatments and the early prediction of their therapeutic potential are often made difficult by the lack of predictive pharmacological models. The 3D multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) model offers a level of complexity that recapitulates the three-dimensional organization of a tumor and appears to be fairly predictive of therapeutic efficiency. The use of spheroids in large-scale automated screening was recently reported to link the power of a high throughput analysis to the predictability of a 3D cell model. The spheroid has a radial symmetry; this simple geometry allows establishing a direct correlation between structure and function. The outmost layers of MCTS are composed of proliferating cells and form structurally uniform domain with an approximate thickness of 100 microns. The innermost layers are composed of quiescent cells. Finally, cells in the center of the spheroid can form a necrotic core. This latest region is structurally heterogeneous and is poorly characterized. These features make the spheroid a model of choice and a paradigm to study the optical properties of various epithelial tissues. In this study, we used an in-vitro optical technique for label-free characterization of multicellular systems based on the index- mismatch induced spherical aberrations. We achieve to monitor and characterize the optical properties of MCTS. This new and original approach might be of major interest for the development of innovative screening strategies dedicated to the identification of anticancer drugs.

  18. Advanced micromachining of concave microwells for long term on-chip culture of multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianqing; Chien, Chia-Chi; Parkinson, Luke; Thierry, Benjamin

    2014-06-11

    A novel approach based on advanced micromachining is demonstrated to fabricate concave microwell arrays for the formation of high quality multicellular tumor spheroids. Microfabricated molds were prepared using a state-of-the-art CNC machining center, containing arrays of 3D convex micropillars with size ranging from 150 μm to 600 μm. Microscopic imaging of the micropillars machined on the mold showed smooth, curved microfeatures of a dramatic 3D shape. Agarose microwells could be easily replicated from the metallic molds. EMT-6 tumor cells seeded in the primary macrowell sedimented efficiently to the bottom of the concave microwells and formed multicellular spheroids within 48 h. Dense and homogeneous multicellular spheroids were obtained after 10 days of culture, confirming the suitability of the proposed approach. To facilitate long term spheroid culture and reliable on-chip drug assay, polydimethylsiloxane microwells were also replicated from the metallic molds. A solvent swelling method was adapted and optimized to Pluronic F127 towards physically entrapping the block copolymer molecules within the polydimethylsiloxane network and in turn to improve long term cell-binding resistance. Homogeneous multicellular spheroids were efficiently formed in the concave microwells and on-chip drug assays could be reliably carried out using curcumin as a model anti-cancer drug. Advanced micromachining provides an excellent technological solution to the fabrication of high quality concave microwells. PMID:24773458

  19. Core-shell hydrogel beads with extracellular matrix for tumor spheroid formation.

    PubMed

    Yu, L; Grist, S M; Nasseri, S S; Cheng, E; Hwang, Y-C E; Ni, C; Cheung, K C

    2015-03-01

    Creating multicellular tumor spheroids is critical for characterizing anticancer treatments since they may provide a better model of the tumor than conventional monolayer culture. Moreover, tumor cell interaction with the extracellular matrix can determine cell organization and behavior. In this work, a microfluidic system was used to form cell-laden core-shell beads which incorporate elements of the extracellular matrix and support the formation of multicellular spheroids. The bead core (comprising a mixture of alginate, collagen, and reconstituted basement membrane, with gelation by temperature control) and shell (comprising alginate hydrogel, with gelation by ionic crosslinking) were simultaneously formed through flow focusing using a cooled flow path into the microfluidic chip. During droplet gelation, the alginate acts as a fast-gelling shell which aids in preventing droplet coalescence and in maintaining spherical droplet geometry during the slower gelation of the collagen and reconstituted basement membrane components as the beads warm up. After droplet gelation, the encapsulated MCF-7 cells proliferated to form uniform spheroids when the beads contained all three components: alginate, collagen, and reconstituted basement membrane. The dose-dependent response of the MCF-7 cell tumor spheroids to two anticancer drugs, docetaxel and tamoxifen, was compared to conventional monolayer culture. PMID:25945144

  20. Core-shell hydrogel beads with extracellular matrix for tumor spheroid formation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, L.; Grist, S. M.; Nasseri, S. S.; Ni, C.; Cheung, K. C.

    2015-01-01

    Creating multicellular tumor spheroids is critical for characterizing anticancer treatments since they may provide a better model of the tumor than conventional monolayer culture. Moreover, tumor cell interaction with the extracellular matrix can determine cell organization and behavior. In this work, a microfluidic system was used to form cell-laden core-shell beads which incorporate elements of the extracellular matrix and support the formation of multicellular spheroids. The bead core (comprising a mixture of alginate, collagen, and reconstituted basement membrane, with gelation by temperature control) and shell (comprising alginate hydrogel, with gelation by ionic crosslinking) were simultaneously formed through flow focusing using a cooled flow path into the microfluidic chip. During droplet gelation, the alginate acts as a fast-gelling shell which aids in preventing droplet coalescence and in maintaining spherical droplet geometry during the slower gelation of the collagen and reconstituted basement membrane components as the beads warm up. After droplet gelation, the encapsulated MCF-7 cells proliferated to form uniform spheroids when the beads contained all three components: alginate, collagen, and reconstituted basement membrane. The dose-dependent response of the MCF-7 cell tumor spheroids to two anticancer drugs, docetaxel and tamoxifen, was compared to conventional monolayer culture. PMID:25945144

  1. Targeted nanosensor aided three-dimensional pH mapping in tumor spheroids using two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Aniruddha; Lee, Yong-Eun Koo; Elbez, Remy; Kopelman, Raoul

    2012-03-01

    Tumors are generally characterized by a pH lower than the surrounding tissues. The mapping of tumor pH is of great importance as it plays a critical role in drug delivery and its effectiveness. Here we present a pH mapping technique in tumor spheroids, using targeted, ratiometric, fluorescent, pH nano-sensor that is based on two-photon excitation. Spheroids are micro-tumors that are widely used as an in-vitro three dimensional tumor model to study the different properties of the tumor for the purpose of drug delivery, therapy etc. The nanosensor consists of 8-Hydroxypyrene- 1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (HPTS), a pH sensitive dye, encapsulated in polyacrylamide hydrogel nanoparticle matrix and F3 peptide, conjugated to the nanoparticle's surface. The nanosensor has an average size of 68nm and contains approximately 0.5% dye by weight. The fluorescence intensity ratio, at the two-photon excitation wavelengths of 900nm and 750nm, increases linearly in the pH range from 6.0 to 8.0 and is used to determine the pH of the local environment. Our study reveals the pH distribution inside human cervix cancer spheroids (of different sizes) during the various stages of their formation. This information can be used to develop more efficient drug delivery mechanisms. The two-photon excitation used for this purpose is especially useful as it drastically minimizes both photobleaching and autofluorescence, thus leading to an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio. It also enables deep tissue imaging due to higher photon penetration depth.

  2. Three-dimensional culture systems in cancer research: Focus on tumor spheroid model.

    PubMed

    Nath, Sritama; Devi, Gayathri R

    2016-07-01

    Cancer cells propagated in three-dimensional (3D) culture systems exhibit physiologically relevant cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, gene expression and signaling pathway profiles, heterogeneity and structural complexity that reflect in vivo tumors. In recent years, development of various 3D models has improved the study of host-tumor interaction and use of high-throughput screening platforms for anti-cancer drug discovery and development. This review attempts to summarize the various 3D culture systems, with an emphasis on the most well characterized and widely applied model - multicellular tumor spheroids. This review also highlights the various techniques to generate tumor spheroids, methods to characterize them, and its applicability in cancer research. PMID:27063403

  3. Bridging the Gap between Mesoscopic and Macroscopic Models: The Case of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delsanto, P. P.; Griffa, M.; Condat, C. A.; Delsanto, S.; Morra, L.

    2005-04-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are valuable experimental tools in cancer research. By introducing an intermediate model, we have been able to successfully relate mesoscopic and macroscopic descriptions of spheroid growth. Since these descriptions stem from completely different roots (cell dynamics, and energy conservation and scaling arguments, respectively), their consistency validates both approaches and allows us to establish a direct correspondence between parameters characterizing processes occurring at different scales. Our approach may find applications as an example of bridging the gap between models at different scale levels in other contexts.

  4. Inhibition of hexokinase-2 with targeted liposomal 3-bromopyruvate in an ovarian tumor spheroid model of aerobic glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Gandham, Srujan Kumar; Talekar, Meghna; Singh, Amit; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the expression levels of glycolytic markers, especially hexokinase-2 (HK2), using a three-dimensional multicellular spheroid model of human ovarian adenocarcinoma (SKOV-3) cells and to develop an epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted liposomal formulation for improving inhibition of HK2 and the cytotoxicity of 3-bromopyruvate (3-BPA). Methods Multicellular SKOV-3 tumor spheroids were developed using the hanging drop method and expression levels of glycolytic markers were examined. Non-targeted and epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted liposomal formulations of 3-BPA were formulated and characterized. Permeability and cellular uptake of the liposomal formulations in three-dimensional SKOV-3 spheroids was evaluated using confocal microscopy. The cytotoxicity and HK2 inhibition potential of solution form of 3-BPA was compared to the corresponding liposomal formulation by using cell proliferation and HK2 enzymatic assays. Results SKOV-3 spheroids were reproducibly developed using the 96-well hanging drop method, with an average size of 900 µm by day 5. HK2 enzyme activity levels under hypoxic conditions were found to be higher than under normoxic conditions (P<0.0001, Student’s t-test, unpaired and two-tailed). Liposomal formulations (both non-targeted and targeted) of 3-BPA showed a more potent inhibitory effect (P<0.001, Student’s t-test, unpaired and two-tailed) at a dose of 50 µM than the aqueous solution form at 3, 6, and 24 hours post administration. Similarly, the cytotoxic activity 3-BPA at various concentrations (10 µM–100 µM) showed that the liposomal formulations had an enhanced cytotoxic effect of 2–5-fold (P<0.0001, Student’s t-test, unpaired and two-tailed) when compared to the aqueous solution form for both 10 µM and 25 µM concentrations. Conclusion SKOV-3 spheroids developed by the hanging drop method can be used as a tumor aerobic glycolysis model for evaluation of therapies

  5. Metabolic Study of Breast MCF-7 Tumor Spheroids after Gamma Irradiation by 1H NMR Spectroscopy and Microimaging

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Alessandra; Grande, Sveva; Luciani, Anna Maria; Mlynárik, Vladimír; Guidoni, Laura; Viti, Vincenza; Rosi, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are an important model system to investigate the response of tumor cells to radio- and chemotherapy. They share more properties with the original tumor than cells cultured as 2D monolayers do, which helps distinguish the intrinsic properties of monolayer cells from those induced during cell aggregation in 3D spheroids. The paper investigates some metabolic aspects of small tumor spheroids of breast cancer and their originating MCF-7 cells, grown as monolayer, by means of high–resolution (HR) 1H NMR spectroscopy and MR microimaging before and after gamma irradiation. The spectra of spheroids were characterized by higher intensity of mobile lipids, mostly neutral lipids, and glutamine (Gln) signals with respect to their monolayer cells counterpart, mainly owing to the lower oxygen supply in spheroids. Morphological changes of small spheroids after gamma-ray irradiation, such as loss of their regular shape, were observed by MR microimaging. Lipid signal intensity increased after irradiation, as evidenced in both MR localized spectra of the single spheroid and in HR NMR spectra of spheroid suspensions. Furthermore, the intense Gln signal from spectra of irradiated spheroids remained unchanged, while the low Gln signal observed in monolayer cells increased after irradiation. Similar results were observed in cells grown in hypoxic conditions. The different behavior of Gln in 2D monolayers and in 3D spheroids supports the hypothesis that a lower oxygen supply induces both an upregulation of Gln synthetase and a downregulation of glutaminases with the consequent increase in Gln content, as already observed under hypoxic conditions. The data herein indicate that 1H NMR spectroscopy can be a useful tool for monitoring cell response to different constraints. The use of spheroid suspensions seems to be a feasible alternative to localized spectroscopy since similar effects were found after radiation treatment. PMID:27200293

  6. Tumor-Endothelial Cell Three-dimensional Spheroids: New Aspects to Enhance Radiation and Drug Therapeutics12

    PubMed Central

    Upreti, Meenakshi; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Koonce, Nathan A; Webber, Jessica S; Sharma, Sunil K; Asea, Alexzander AA; Mader, Mathew J; Griffin, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Classic cancer research for several decades has focused on understanding the biology of tumor cells in vitro. However, extending these findings to in vivo settings has been impeded owing to limited insights on the impact of microenvironment on tumor cells. We hypothesized that tumor cell biology and treatment response would be more informative when done in the presence of stromal components, like endothelial cells, which exist in the tumor microenvironment. To that end, we have developed a system to grow three-dimensional cultures of GFP-4T1 mouse mammary tumor and 2H11 murine endothelial cells in hanging drops of medium in vitro. The presence of 2H11 endothelial cells in these three-dimensional cocultures was found to sensitize 4T1-GFP tumor cells to chemotherapy (Taxol) and, at the same time, protect cells from ionizing radiation. These spheroidal cultures can also be implanted into the dorsal skinfold window chamber of mice for fluorescence imaging of vascularization and disease progression/treatment response. We observed rapid neovascularization of the tumor-endothelial spheroids in comparison to tumor spheroids grown in nude mice. Molecular analysis revealed pronounced up-regulation of several proangiogenic factors in the tumor tissue derived from the tumor-endothelial spheroids compared with tumor-only spheroids. Furthermore, the rate of tumor growth from tumor-endothelial spheroids in mice was faster than the tumor cell-only spheroids, resulting in greater metastasis to the lung. This three-dimensional coculture model presents an improved way to investigate more pertinent aspects of the therapeutic potential for radiation and/or chemotherapy alone and in combination with antiangiogenic agents. PMID:22191001

  7. Effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes on tumor cells viability and formation of multicellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakymchuk, Olena M.; Perepelytsina, Olena M.; Dobrydnev, Alexey V.; Sydorenko, Mychailo V.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes the impact of different concentrations of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on cell viability of breast adenocarcinoma, MCF-7 line, and formation of multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS). Chemical composition and purity of nanotubes is controlled by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The strength and direction of the influence of SWCNTs on the tumor cell population was assessed by cell counting and measurement of the volume of multicellular tumor spheroids. Effect of SWCNTs on the formation of multicellular spheroids was compared with the results obtained by culturing tumor cells with ultra dispersed diamonds (UDDs). Our results demonstrated that SWCNTs at concentrations ranging from 12.5 to 50 μg/ml did not have cytotoxic influence on tumor cells; instead, they had weak cytostatic effect. The increasing of SWCNTs concentration to 100 to 200 μg/ml stimulated proliferation of tumor cells, especially in suspension fractions. The result of this influence was in formation of more MTS in cell culture with SWCNTs compared with UDDs and control samples. In result, the median volume of MTS after cultivation with SWCNTs at 100 to 200 μg/ml concentrations is 3 to 5 times greater than that in samples which were incubated with the UDDs and is 2.5 times greater than that in control cultures. So, if SWCNTs reduced cell adhesion to substrate and stimulated formation of tumor cell aggregates volume near 7 · 10-3 mm3, at the same time, UDDs reduced adhesion and cohesive ability of cells and stimulated generation of cell spheroids volume no more than 4 · 10-3 mm3. Our results could be useful for the control of cell growth in three-dimensional culture.

  8. Suicide gene therapy on spontaneous canine melanoma: correlations between in vivo tumors and their derived multicell spheroids in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gil-Cardeza, M L; Villaverde, M S; Fiszman, G L; Altamirano, N A; Cwirenbaum, R A; Glikin, G C; Finocchiaro, L M E

    2010-01-01

    To validate the use of multicellular spheroids to predict the efficacy of herpes simplex thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSVtk/GCV) suicide gene therapy in the respective in vivo tumors, we established and characterized 15 melanoma-derived cell lines from surgically excised melanoma tumors. Three HSVtk-lipofected cell lines were not sensitive to GCV in any culture configuration, other five displayed similar sensitivity as monolayers or spheroids, and only one resulted more sensitive when grown as spheroids. Other six cell lines manifested a relative multicellular resistance (MCR) phenotype growing as spheroids, compared with the same cells growing as monolayers. The reverse correlation between the MCR and the monolayers survival to HSVtk/GCV suggests that one of the main causes of MCR would be the rapid cell repopulation after suicide gene treatment. The high correlation of MCR with the spheroids radial growth and with the mitotic index of the respective originary tumors supported this re-growth involvement. A remarkable finding was the high correlation in HSVtk/GCV sensitivity between in vivo tumor and the corresponding derived cell lines growing as spheroids (R(2) = 0.85). This strongly encourages the implementation of spheroids as highly realistic experimental model for optimizing and predicting the in vivo response of the respective tumors to therapeutic strategies. PMID:19741734

  9. Multi-parametric imaging of tumor spheroids with ultra-bright and tunable nanoparticle O2 probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Ruslan I.; Borisov, Sergey M.; Jenkins, James; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.

    2015-03-01

    Multi-modal probes allow for flexible choice of imaging equipment when performing quenched-phosphorescence O2 measurements: one- or two-photon, PLIM or intensity-based ratiometric read-outs. Spectral and temporal (e.g. FLIMPLIM) discrimination can be used to image O2 together with pH, Ca2+, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell death markers or cell/organelle specific markers. However, the main challenge of existing nanoparticle probes is their limited diffusion across thick (> 20-50 μm) 3D cell models such as tumor spheroids. Here, we present new class of polymeric nanoparticle probes having tunable size, charge, cell-penetrating ability, and reporter dyes. Being spectrally similar to the recently described MM2, PA2 and other O2 probes, they are 5-10 times brighter, demonstrate improved ratiometric response and their surface chemistry can be easily modified. With cultures of 2D and 3D cell models (fibroblasts, PC12 aggregates, HCT116 human colon cancer spheroids) we found cell-specific staining by these probes. However, the efficient staining of model of interest can be tuned by changing number of positive and negative surface groups at nanoparticle, to allow most efficient loading. We also demonstrate how real-time monitoring of oxygenation can be used to select optimal spheroid production with low variability in size and high cell viability.

  10. CXCR4 receptor positive spheroid forming cells are responsible for tumor invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Krohn, Alexander; Song, Yao-Hua; Muehlberg, Fabian; Droll, Lilly; Beckmann, Christoph; Alt, Eckhard

    2009-07-18

    Stem cells have been found to be involved in breast cancer growth, but the specific contribution of cancer stem cells in tumor biology, including metastasis, is still uncertain. We found that murine breast cancer cell lines 4T1, 4TO7, 167Farn and 67NR contains cancer stem cells defined by CXCR4 expression and their capability of forming spheroids in suspension culture. Importantly, we showed that CXCR4 expression is essential for tumor invasiveness because both CXCR4 neutralizing antibody and shRNA knockdown of the CXCR4 receptor significantly reduced tumor cell invasion. PMID:19286309

  11. Quantitative 1H MRI and MRS Microscopy of Individual V79 Lung Tumor Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minard, Kevin R.; Guo, Xiuling; Wind, Robert A.

    1998-08-01

    In this Communication1H MRI and MRS microscopy experiments of individual V79 lung tumor spheroids with diameters between 550 and 650 μm are reported. The results have been used to determine theT1,T2, andDvalues as well as the concentrations of water, total choline, creatine/phosphocreatine, and mobile lipids in the viable rims and in the necrotic centers.

  12. Optimization of Aqueous Biphasic Tumor Spheroid Microtechnology for Anti-Cancer Drug Testing in 3D Culture

    PubMed Central

    Lemmo, Stephanie; Atefi, Ehsan; Luker, Gary D.; Tavana, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Tumor spheroids are three-dimensional clusters of cancer cells that exhibit characteristics of poorly perfused tumors and hence present a relevant model for testing the efficacy of anti-cancer compounds. The use of spheroids for drug screening is hindered by technological complexities for high throughput generation of consistent size spheroids individually addressable by drug compounds. Here we present and optimize a simple spheroid technology based on the use of an aqueous two-phase system. Cancer cells confined in a drop of the denser aqueous dextran phase are robotically dispensed into a microwell containing the immersion aqueous polyethylene glycol phase. Cells remain within the drop and form a viable spheroid, without a need for any external stimuli. The size of resulting spheroids is sensitive to volume variations of dispensed drops from the air displacement pipetting head of a commercial liquid handling robot. Therefore, we parametrically optimize the process of dispensing of dextran phase drops. For a given cell density, this optimization reproducibly generates consistent size spheroids in standard 96-well plates. In addition, we evaluate the use of a commercial biochemical assay to examine cellular viability of cancer cell spheroids. Spheroids show a dose-dependent response to cisplatin similar to a monolayer culture. However unlike their two-dimensional counterpart, spheroids exhibit resistance to paclitaxel treatment. This technology, which uses only commercially-available reagents and equipment, can potentially expedite anti-cancer drug discovery. Although the use of robotics makes the ATPS spheroid technology particularly useful for drug screening applications, this approach is compatible with simpler liquid handling techniques such as manual micropipetting and offers a straightforward method of 3D cell culture in research laboratories. PMID:25221631

  13. Fibroblast spheroids as a model to study sustained fibroblast quiescence and their crosstalk with tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Salmenperä, Pertteli; Karhemo, Piia-Riitta; Räsänen, Kati; Laakkonen, Pirjo; Vaheri, Antti

    2016-07-01

    Stromal fibroblasts have an important role in regulating tumor progression. Normal and quiescent fibroblasts have been shown to restrict and control cancer cell growth, while cancer-associated, i. e. activated fibroblasts have been shown to enhance proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. In this study we describe generation of quiescent fibroblasts in multicellular spheroids and their effects on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) growth in soft-agarose and xenograft models. Quiescent phenotype of fibroblasts was determined by global down-regulation of expression of genes related to cell cycle and increased expression of p27. Interestingly, microarray analysis showed that fibroblast quiescence was associated with similar secretory phenotype as seen in senescence and they expressed senescence-associated-β-galactosidase. Quiescent fibroblasts spheroids also restricted the growth of RT3 SCC cells both in soft-agarose and xenograft models unlike proliferating fibroblasts. Restricted tumor growth was associated with marginally increased tumor cell senescence and cellular differentiation, showed with senescence-associated-β-galactosidase and cytokeratin 7 staining. Our results show that the fibroblasts spheroids can be used as a model to study cellular quiescence and their effects on cancer cell progression. PMID:27177832

  14. Hypoxia Responsive, Tumor Penetrating Lipid Nanoparticles for Delivery of Chemotherapeutics to Pancreatic Cancer Cell Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Prajakta; Haldar, Manas K; Katti, Preeya; Dawes, Courtney; You, Seungyong; Choi, Yongki; Mallik, Sanku

    2016-08-17

    Solid tumors are often poorly irrigated due to structurally compromised microcirculation. Uncontrolled multiplication of cancer cells, insufficient blood flow, and the lack of enough oxygen and nutrients lead to the development of hypoxic regions in the tumor tissues. As the partial pressure of oxygen drops below the necessary level (10 psi), the cancer cells modulate their genetic makeup to survive. Hypoxia triggers tumor progression by enhancing angiogenesis, cancer stem cell production, remodeling of the extracellular matrix, and epigenetic changes in the cancer cells. However, the hypoxic regions are usually located deep in the tumors and are usually inaccessible to the intravenously injected drug carrier or the drug. Considering the designs of the reported nanoparticles, it is likely that the drug is delivered to the peripheral tumor tissues, close to the blood vessels. In this study, we prepared lipid nanoparticles (LNs) comprising the synthesized hypoxia-responsive lipid and a peptide-lipid conjugate. We observed that the resultant LNs penetrated to the hypoxic regions of the tumors. Under low oxygen partial pressure, the hypoxia-responsive lipid undergoes reduction, destabilizing the lipid membrane, and releasing encapsulated drugs from the nanoparticles. We demonstrated the results employing spheroidal cultures of the pancreatic cancer cells BxPC-3. We observed that the peptide-decorated, drug encapsulated LNs reduced the viability of pancreatic cancer cells of the spheroids to 35% under hypoxic conditions. PMID:27391789

  15. Tumor-penetrating peptide fused EGFR single-domain antibody enhances cancer drug penetration into 3D multicellular spheroids and facilitates effective gastric cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Huizi; Zou, Zhengyun; Xin, Kai; Bian, Xinyu; Cai, Xueting; Lu, Wuguang; Chen, Jiao; Chen, Gang; Huang, Leaf; Blair, Andrew M.; Cao, Peng; Liu, Baorui

    2016-01-01

    Human tumors, including gastric cancer, frequently express high levels of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs), which are associated with a poor prognosis. Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to cancerous tissues shows potential in sparing unaffected tissues. However, it has been a major challenge for drug penetration in solid tumor tissues due to the complicated tumor microenvironment. We have constructed a recombinant protein named anti-EGFR-iRGD consisting of an anti-EGFR VHH (the variable domain from the heavy chain of the antibody) fused to iRGD, a tumor-specific binding peptide with high permeability. Anti-EGFR-iRGD, which targets EGFR and αvβ3, spreads extensively throughout both the multicellular spheroids and the tumor mass. The recombinant protein anti-EGFR-iRGD also exhibited antitumor activity in tumor cell lines, multicellular spheroids, and mice. Moreover, anti-EGFR-iRGD could improve anticancer drugs, such as doxorubicin (DOX), bevacizumab, nanoparticle permeability and efficacy in multicellular spheroids. This study draws attention to the importance of iRGD peptide in the therapeutic approach of anti-EGFR-iRGD. As a consequence, anti-EGFR-iRGD could be a drug candidate for cancer treatment and a useful adjunct of other anticancer drugs. PMID:25553823

  16. Enhanced transcellular penetration and drug delivery by crosslinked polymeric micelles into pancreatic multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongxu; Utama, Robert H; Kitiyotsawat, Uraiphan; Babiuch, Krzysztof; Jiang, Yanyan; Stenzel, Martina H

    2015-07-01

    Many attempts have been made in the application of multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) as a 3D tumor model to investigate their biological responses upon introduction of polymeric micelles as nanocarriers for therapeutic applications. However, the micelle penetration pathways in MCTS are not yet known. In this study, micelles (uncrosslinked, UCM) were prepared by self-assembly of block copolymer poly(N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid)-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) (P(HPMA-co-MAA)-b-PMMA). Subsequently, the shells were crosslinked to form relatively stable micelles (CKM). Both UCM and CKM penetrated deeper and delivered more doxorubicin (DOX) into MCTS than the diffusion of the free DOX. Additionally, CKM revealed higher delivery efficiency than UCM. The inhibition of caveolae-mediated endocytosis, by Filipin treatment, decreased the uptake and penetration of the micelles into MCTS. Treatment with Exo1, an exocytosis inhibitor, produced the same effect. Furthermore, movement of the micelles through the extracellular matrices (ECM), as modelled using collagen micro-spheroids, appeared to be limited to the peripheral layer of the collagen spheroids. Those results indicate that penetration of P(HPMA-co-MAA)-b-PMMA micelles depended more on transcellular transport than on diffusion through ECM between the cells. DOX-loaded CKM inhibited MCTS growth more than their UCM counterpart, due to possible cessation of endocytosis and exocytosis in the apoptotic peripheral cells, caused by faster release of DOX from UCM. PMID:26221942

  17. Predicting diffusive transport of cationic liposomes in 3-dimensional tumor spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Wientjes, Michael G.; Yeung, Bertrand Z.; Lu, Ze; Wientjes, M. Guillaume; Au, Jessie L.S.

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology is widely used in cancer research. Models that predict nanoparticle transport and delivery in tumors (including subcellular compartments) would be useful tools. This study tested the hypothesis that diffusive transport of cationic liposomes in 3-dimensional (3D) systems can be predicted based on liposome-cell biointerface parameters (binding, uptake, retention) and liposome diffusivity.Liposomes comprising different amounts of cationic and fusogenic lipids (10-30 mol% DOTAP or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine,1-20 mol% DOPE or 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane, +25 to +44 mV zeta potential) were studied. We (a) measured liposome-cell biointerface parameters in monolayer cultures, and (b) calculated effective diffusivity based on liposome size and spheroid composition. The resulting parameters were used to simulate the liposome concentration-depth profiles in 3D spheroids. The simulated results agreed with the experimental results for liposomes comprising 10-30 mol% DOTAP and ≤10 mol% DOPE, but not for liposomes with higher DOPE content. For the latter, model modifications to account for time-dependent extracellular concentration decrease and liposomesize increase did not improve the predictions. The difference among low- and high-DOPE liposomessuggestsconcentration-dependent DOPE properties in 3D systems that were not captured in monolayers. Taken together, our earlier and present studies indicate the diffusive transport of neutral, anionic and cationic nanoparticles (polystyrene beads and liposomes, 20-135 nm diameter, -49 to +44 mV) in 3D spheroids, with the exception of liposomes comprising >10 mol% DOPE, can be predicted based on the nanoparticle-cell biointerface and nanoparticle diffusivity. Applying the model to low-DOPE liposomes showed that changes in surface charge affected the liposome localization in intratumoralsubcompartments within spheroids. PMID:24995948

  18. Transcriptome profile of the early stages of breast cancer tumoral spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco-Marín, Rosario; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna; Garcia-Venzor, Alfredo; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Cabrera-Orefice, Alfredo; Gonzalez-Torres, Carolina; Gaytan-Cervantes, Javier; Mitre-Aguilar, Irma B.; Maldonado, Vilma

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen or nutrient deprivation of early stage tumoral spheroids can be used to reliably mimic the initial growth of primary and metastatic cancer cells. However, cancer cell growth during the initial stages has not been fully explored using a genome-wide approach. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the transcriptome of breast cancer cells during the initial stages of tumoral growth using RNAseq in a model of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids (MTS). Network analyses showed that a metastatic signature was enriched as several adhesion molecules were deregulated, including EPCAM, E-cadherin, integrins and syndecans, which were further supported by an increase in cell migration. Interestingly, we also found that the cancer cells at this stage of growth exhibited a paradoxical hyperactivation of oxidative mitochondrial metabolism. In addition, we found a large number of regulated (long non coding RNA) lncRNAs, several of which were co-regulated with neighboring genes. The regulatory role of some of these lncRNAs on mRNA expression was demonstrated with gain of function assays. This is the first report of an early-stage MTS transcriptome, which not only reveals a complex expression landscape, but points toward an important contribution of long non-coding RNAs in the final phenotype of three-dimensional cellular models. PMID:27021602

  19. Transcriptome profile of the early stages of breast cancer tumoral spheroids.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Marín, Rosario; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna; Garcia-Venzor, Alfredo; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Cabrera-Orefice, Alfredo; Gonzalez-Torres, Carolina; Gaytan-Cervantes, Javier; Mitre-Aguilar, Irma B; Maldonado, Vilma

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen or nutrient deprivation of early stage tumoral spheroids can be used to reliably mimic the initial growth of primary and metastatic cancer cells. However, cancer cell growth during the initial stages has not been fully explored using a genome-wide approach. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the transcriptome of breast cancer cells during the initial stages of tumoral growth using RNAseq in a model of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids (MTS). Network analyses showed that a metastatic signature was enriched as several adhesion molecules were deregulated, including EPCAM, E-cadherin, integrins and syndecans, which were further supported by an increase in cell migration. Interestingly, we also found that the cancer cells at this stage of growth exhibited a paradoxical hyperactivation of oxidative mitochondrial metabolism. In addition, we found a large number of regulated (long non coding RNA) lncRNAs, several of which were co-regulated with neighboring genes. The regulatory role of some of these lncRNAs on mRNA expression was demonstrated with gain of function assays. This is the first report of an early-stage MTS transcriptome, which not only reveals a complex expression landscape, but points toward an important contribution of long non-coding RNAs in the final phenotype of three-dimensional cellular models. PMID:27021602

  20. Uptake and photo-toxicity of Foscan®, Foslip® and Fospeg® in multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Gaio, Elisa; Scheglmann, Dietrich; Reddi, Elena; Moret, Francesca

    2016-08-01

    In cancer photodynamic therapy (PDT), an efficient and homogeneous intratumoral accumulation of the photosensitizer (PS) is required to induce cell damages in the entire tumor mass after light activation. Thus, in this study we investigated penetration ability and photodynamic efficiency of meta-tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (m-THPC) in standard formulation (Foscan®) and in its non PEGylated and PEGylated liposomal formulations, Foslip® and Fospeg®, in HeLa multicellular spheroids, as in vitro avascular models of solid tumors. Confocal microscopy studies demonstrated that m-THPC fluorescence was confined in the external cell layers of spheroids with a slightly higher accumulation of Foslip® and Fospeg® with respect to Foscan®. Irradiation with red light, following 24h incubation of spheroids with the m-THPC formulations, caused however photodamages also in cells located in the central part of spheroids, as documented by transmission electron microscopy analyses. Overall, the photodynamic effects of the three m-THPC formulations on HeLa cell spheroids were comparable in terms of cell viability measured with the MTS assay. It is however worth noting that the delivery of m-THPC by liposomes significantly abolished its cytotoxicity in the dark, slightly improved the cellular uptake and, following PDT, promoted cell loss and spheroid disassembling to a higher extent when compared to Foscan®. PMID:27285816

  1. In silico estimates of the free energy rates in growing tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, H.; Verner, S. N.; Mills, K. L.; Kemkemer, R.; Garikipati, K.

    2010-05-01

    The physics of solid tumor growth can be considered at three distinct size scales: the tumor scale, the cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) scale and the sub-cellular scale. In this paper we consider the tumor scale in the interest of eventually developing a system-level understanding of the progression of cancer. At this scale, cell populations and chemical species are best treated as concentration fields that vary with time and space. The cells have chemo-mechanical interactions with each other and with the ECM, consume glucose and oxygen that are transported through the tumor, and create chemical by-products. We present a continuum mathematical model for the biochemical dynamics and mechanics that govern tumor growth. The biochemical dynamics and mechanics also engender free energy changes that serve as universal measures for comparison of these processes. Within our mathematical framework we therefore consider the free energy inequality, which arises from the first and second laws of thermodynamics. With the model we compute preliminary estimates of the free energy rates of a growing tumor in its pre-vascular stage by using currently available data from single cells and multicellular tumor spheroids.

  2. Active and Inactive Metabolic Pathways in Tumor Spheroids: Determination by GC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Hunnewell, Michael; Forbes, Neil S.

    2016-01-01

    Active metabolic pathways in three-dimensional cancer-cell cultures are potential chemotherapeutic targets that would be effective throughout tumors. Chaotic vasculature creates cellular regions in tumors with distinct metabolic behavior that are only present in aggregate cell masses. To quantify cancer cell metabolism, transformed mouse fibroblasts were grown as spheroids and fed isotopically labeled culture medium. Metabolite uptake and production rates were measured as functions of time. Gas chromatography - mass spectrometry was used quantify the extent of labeling on amino acids present in cytoplasmic extracts. The labeling pattern identified several active and inactive metabolic pathways: glutaminolysis was found to be active, and malic enzyme and gluconeogenesis were inactive. Transformed cells in spheroids were also found to actively synthesize serine, cysteine, alanine, aspartate, glutamate, and proline; and not synthesize glutamine. The activities of these pathways suggest that cancer cells consume glutamine for biosynthesis and not to provide cellular energy. Determining active metabolic pathways indicates how cells direct carbon flow and may lead to the discovery of novel molecular targets for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:20014107

  3. Co-Culture of Tumor Spheroids and Fibroblasts in a Collagen Matrix-Incorporated Microfluidic Chip Mimics Reciprocal Activation in Solid Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Su-Yeong; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Yoojin; Chung, Seok; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular 3D culture and interaction with stromal components are considered essential elements in establishing a ‘more clinically relevant’ tumor model. Matrix-embedded 3D cultures using a microfluidic chip platform can recapitulate the microscale interaction within tumor microenvironments. As a major component of tumor microenvironment, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a role in cancer progression and drug resistance. Here, we present a microfluidic chip-based tumor tissue culture model that integrates 3D tumor spheroids (TSs) with CAF in proximity within a hydrogel scaffold. HT-29 human colorectal carcinoma cells grew into 3D TSs and the growth was stimulated when co-cultured with fibroblasts as shown by 1.5-folds increase of % changes in diameter over 5 days. TS cultured for 6 days showed a reduced expression of Ki-67 along with increased expression of fibronectin when co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to mono-cultured TSs. Fibroblasts were activated under co-culture conditions, as demonstrated by increases in α-SMA expression and migratory activity. When exposed to paclitaxel, a survival advantage was observed in TSs co-cultured with activated fibroblasts. Overall, we demonstrated the reciprocal interaction between TSs and fibroblasts in our 7-channel microfluidic chip. The co-culture of 3D TS-CAF in a collagen matrix-incorporated microfluidic chip may be useful to study the tumor microenvironment and for evaluation of drug screening and evaluation. PMID:27391808

  4. Co-Culture of Tumor Spheroids and Fibroblasts in a Collagen Matrix-Incorporated Microfluidic Chip Mimics Reciprocal Activation in Solid Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Su-Yeong; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Yoojin; Chung, Seok; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular 3D culture and interaction with stromal components are considered essential elements in establishing a 'more clinically relevant' tumor model. Matrix-embedded 3D cultures using a microfluidic chip platform can recapitulate the microscale interaction within tumor microenvironments. As a major component of tumor microenvironment, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a role in cancer progression and drug resistance. Here, we present a microfluidic chip-based tumor tissue culture model that integrates 3D tumor spheroids (TSs) with CAF in proximity within a hydrogel scaffold. HT-29 human colorectal carcinoma cells grew into 3D TSs and the growth was stimulated when co-cultured with fibroblasts as shown by 1.5-folds increase of % changes in diameter over 5 days. TS cultured for 6 days showed a reduced expression of Ki-67 along with increased expression of fibronectin when co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to mono-cultured TSs. Fibroblasts were activated under co-culture conditions, as demonstrated by increases in α-SMA expression and migratory activity. When exposed to paclitaxel, a survival advantage was observed in TSs co-cultured with activated fibroblasts. Overall, we demonstrated the reciprocal interaction between TSs and fibroblasts in our 7-channel microfluidic chip. The co-culture of 3D TS-CAF in a collagen matrix-incorporated microfluidic chip may be useful to study the tumor microenvironment and for evaluation of drug screening and evaluation. PMID:27391808

  5. Adaptable stirred-tank culture strategies for large scale production of multicellular spheroid-based tumor cell models.

    PubMed

    Santo, Vítor E; Estrada, Marta F; Rebelo, Sofia P; Abreu, Sofia; Silva, Inês; Pinto, Catarina; Veloso, Susana C; Serra, Ana Teresa; Boghaert, Erwin; Alves, Paula M; Brito, Catarina

    2016-03-10

    Currently there is an effort toward the development of in vitro cancer models more predictive of clinical efficacy. The onset of advanced analytical tools and imaging technologies has increased the utilization of spheroids in the implementation of high throughput approaches in drug discovery. Agitation-based culture systems are commonly proposed as an alternative method for the production of tumor spheroids, despite the scarce experimental evidence found in the literature. In this study, we demonstrate the robustness and reliability of stirred-tank cultures for the scalable generation of 3D cancer models. We developed standardized protocols to a panel of tumor cell lines from different pathologies and attained efficient tumor cell aggregation by tuning hydrodynamic parameters. Large numbers of spheroids were obtained (typically 1000-1500 spheroids/mL) presenting features of native tumors, namely morphology, proliferation and hypoxia gradients, in a cell line-dependent mode. Heterotypic 3D cancer models, based on co-cultures of tumor cells and fibroblasts, were also established in the absence or presence of additional physical support from an alginate matrix, with maintenance of high cell viability. Altogether, we demonstrate that 3D tumor cell model production in stirred-tank culture systems is a robust and versatile approach, providing reproducible tools for drug screening and target verification in pre-clinical oncology research. PMID:26815388

  6. Combined effects of tumor necrosis factor alpha and radiation in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma grown as radia spheroids.

    PubMed

    Van Moorselaar, R J; Schwachöfer, J H; Crooijmans, R P; Van Stratum, P; Debruyne, F M; Schalken, J A

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the antiproliferative effects of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNF) and radiation on a recently described rat renal cell tumor line grown as multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS). Treatment commenced when the spheroids had reached a diameter of 250 microns. TNF was diluted in the tissue culture medium in different concentrations, ranging from 250-1000 ng/ml. TNF monotherapy had a dose-dependent inhibiting effect on spheroid growth. Single-dose irradiation with 2, 4 or 6 Gy also retarded spheroids significantly in their growth. In the combination treatment the highest dose of TNF (1000 ng/ml) was added 4 hours prior to radiation. TNF could not induce a potentiation of the radiation injury at 2 Gy. The combination with 4 Gy, however, had additive and the combination with 6 Gy synergistic antiproliferative effects; in these treatment regimens respectively 2 and 5 out of 24 spheroids were controlled, i.e. cured. These experiments suggest that TNF in combination with radiotherapy may be beneficial for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma or cancer in general. PMID:2285257

  7. Assessing the immunomodulatory role of heteroglycan in a tumor spheroid and macrophage co-culture model system.

    PubMed

    Devi, K Sanjana P; Mishra, Debasish; Roy, Bibhas; Ghosh, Sudip K; Maiti, Tapas K

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic benefits of glycans have garnered much attention over the last few decades with most studies being reported in 2D cultures or in animal models. The present work is therefore aimed to assess the effects of an immunomodulatory heteroglycan in a 3D milieu. Briefly, HT29 tumor spheroids were incubated with THP-1 macrophages at 1:1 ratio in a culture medium supplemented with immune stimulants such as heteroglycans or LPS. Spheroidal distortion, migration of tumor cells from the periphery of the spheroids and 46% of higher macrophage invasiveness was noted in heteroglycan-treated co-cultures with respect to control cultures. Histological sections of the treated co-cultures revealed the presence of high apoptotic tumor cells in the spheroidal periphery. CD11c and CD68 staining further suggested the predominance of macrophages in the vicinity of the apoptotic tumor cells. Such an in vitro created tissue system may thereby confirm the effectiveness of heteroglycan in activating the immune cells to exhibit tumor cytotoxic properties. PMID:25965450

  8. Impact of multicellular tumor spheroids as an in vivo‑like tumor model on anticancer drug response.

    PubMed

    Galateanu, Bianca; Hudita, Ariana; Negrei, Carolina; Ion, Rodica-Mariana; Costache, Marieta; Stan, Miriana; Nikitovic, Dragana; Hayes, A Wallace; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Ginghina, Octav

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer is higher in men than in women, amounting to 15% of cancer-related diseases as a whole. As such, undesirable effects, arising from the administration of current chemotherapeutic agents (the FOLFIRI/FOLFOX combinations), which are exerted on the remaining non-cancerous tissues and/or cells, have contributed to the occurrence of resistance to multiple drugs, thus markedly reducing their efficacy. However, the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents may be improved and their action may be more selectively targeted to diseased tissues/cells by means of developing biotechnologies and nano‑techniques. Thus, the current focus is on creating biological tissue and related tumor models, by means of three‑dimensional (3D) spheres, in an attempt to bridge the gap between results obtained in the pre‑clinical phase and promising outcomes obtained in clinical trials. For this purpose, the characterization and use of so‑called 'multicellular tumor spheroids', may prove to be invaluable. In this study, we focus on describing the efficacy of a model 3D system as compared to the traditional 2D tumor spheres in determining drug response, highlighting a potentially greater effect of the drugs following the encapsulation of respective liposomes. The results obtained demonstrate the successful preparation of a suspension of liposomes loaded with folinic acid, oxaliplatin and 5‑fluorouracil (5‑FU), and loaded with meso‑tetra (4‑sulfonatophenyl) porphyrin. Following its use on HT‑29 colorectal cancer cells, an important comparative reduction was noted in the viability of the HT‑29 cells, demonstrating the efficacy of multicellular tumor spheroids carrying liposomes loaded with therapeutic drugs. These findings indicate that the method of drug encapsulation in liposomes may improve the treatment efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:27035518

  9. Cell proliferation kinetics and radiation response in 9L tumor spheroids

    SciTech Connect

    Sweigert, S.E.

    1984-05-01

    Cell kinetic parameters, including population doubling-time, cell cycle time, and growth fraction, were measured in 9L gliosarcoma spheroids. These parameters were studied as the spheroids grew from 50 ..mu..m to over 900 ..mu..m in diameter. Experiments relating the cell kinetic parameters to the radiation response of 9L spheroids were also carried out. The major findings were that the average cell cycle time (T/sub c/), is considerably longer in large spheroids than in exponentially-growing monolayers, the radiosensitivity of noncycling (but still viable) cells in spheroids is not significantly different from that of cycling spheroid cells, and the radiation-induced division delay is approximately twice as long in spheroid cells as in monolayer cells given equal radiation doses. The cell loss factor for spheroids of various sizes was calculated, by using the measured kinetic parameters in the basic equations for growth of a cell population. 157 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  10. In vitro confirmation of newly established lung cancer cell lines using flow cytometry and multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Takaoka, K; Endo, T; Mizuno, S; Ogawa, Y; Yoshida, M; Ohnuma, T

    1997-05-01

    We report on a simplified method of cytomorphological in vitro confirmation of newly established lung cancer cell lines by using multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) and flow cytometry (FCM). Eleven cell lines were established from 11 patients with lung cancer. The MTS were produced by culturing cells in agar-coated dish. Cytomorphological studies were made using smears of crushed MTS and frozen sections of MTS. The MTS were fixed doubly with paraformaldehyde and osmic acid for scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Bivariate fluorescence of fluorescein isothyocyanate (FITC, tumor associated antigen, TAA) and propidium iodide (DNA) were measured by FCM. The MTS grew anchorage-independently. Cytopathological and electron microscopic findings of MTS were similar to those of the original clinical specimens. The DNA index and TAA were useful in evaluating the presence or absence of contamination by cells of non-tumor origin. The new cell lines satisfied a minimum of four conditions to confirm their establishment: (a) they originated from humans, (b) they were cytomorphologically identified with specimens from primary lesions, (c) they showed tumorigenicity, and (d) they were free from contamination by cells of different origin. From these findings, the establishment of new cell lines can be confirmed in vitro by using MTS and FCM. PMID:9194029

  11. 3D high-content screening for the identification of compounds that target cells in dormant tumor spheroid regions

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, Carsten; Riefke, Björn; Gründemann, Stephan; Krebs, Alice; Christian, Sven; Prinz, Florian; Osterland, Marc; Golfier, Sven; Räse, Sebastian; Ansari, Nariman; Esner, Milan; Bickle, Marc; Pampaloni, Francesco; Mattheyer, Christian; Stelzer, Ernst H.; Parczyk, Karsten; Prechtl, Stefan; Steigemann, Patrick

    2014-04-15

    Cancer cells in poorly vascularized tumor regions need to adapt to an unfavorable metabolic microenvironment. As distance from supplying blood vessels increases, oxygen and nutrient concentrations decrease and cancer cells react by stopping cell cycle progression and becoming dormant. As cytostatic drugs mainly target proliferating cells, cancer cell dormancy is considered as a major resistance mechanism to this class of anti-cancer drugs. Therefore, substances that target cancer cells in poorly vascularized tumor regions have the potential to enhance cytostatic-based chemotherapy of solid tumors. With three-dimensional growth conditions, multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) reproduce several parameters of the tumor microenvironment, including oxygen and nutrient gradients as well as the development of dormant tumor regions. We here report the setup of a 3D cell culture compatible high-content screening system and the identification of nine substances from two commercially available drug libraries that specifically target cells in inner MCTS core regions, while cells in outer MCTS regions or in 2D cell culture remain unaffected. We elucidated the mode of action of the identified compounds as inhibitors of the respiratory chain and show that induction of cell death in inner MCTS core regions critically depends on extracellular glucose concentrations. Finally, combinational treatment with cytostatics showed increased induction of cell death in MCTS. The data presented here shows for the first time a high-content based screening setup on 3D tumor spheroids for the identification of substances that specifically induce cell death in inner tumor spheroid core regions. This validates the approach to use 3D cell culture screening systems to identify substances that would not be detectable by 2D based screening in otherwise similar culture conditions. - Highlights: • Establishment of a novel method for 3D cell culture based high-content screening. • First reported high

  12. Stiffening of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Spheroid Microenvironments Induced by Incorporation of Gelatin Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Baraniak, Priya R.; Cooke, Marissa T.; Saeed, Rabbia; Kinney, Melissa A.; Fridley, Krista M.; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2012-01-01

    Culturing multipotent adult mesenchymal stem cells as 3D aggregates augments their differentiation potential and paracrine activity. One caveat of stem cell spheroids, though, can be the limited diffusional transport barriers posed by the inherent 3D structure of the multicellular aggregates. In order to circumvent such limitations, polymeric microparticles have been incorporated into stem cell aggregates as a means to locally control the biochemical and physical properties of the 3D microenvironment. However, the introduction of biomaterials to the 3D stem cell microenvironment could alter the mechanical forces sensed by cells within aggregates, which in turn could impact various cell behaviors and overall spheroid mechanics. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the acute effects of biomaterial incorporation within mesenchymal stem cell spheroids on aggregate structure and mechanical properties. The results of this study demonstrate that although gelatin microparticle incorporation results in similar multi-cellular organization within human mesenchymal stem cell spheroids, the introduction of gelatin materials significantly impacts spheroid mechanical properties. The marked differences in spheroid mechanics induced by microparticle incorporation may hold major implications for in vitro directed differentiation strategies and offer a novel route to engineer the mechanical properties of tissue constructs ex vivo. PMID:22658155

  13. Scaffold-Free Coculture Spheroids of Human Colonic Adenocarcinoma Cells and Normal Colonic Fibroblasts Promote Tumorigenicity in Nude Mice123

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-il; Lee, Jisu; Kwon, Ju-Lee; Park, Hong-Bum; Lee, Su-Yel; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Sung, Jaekye; Kim, Jin Man; Song, Kyu Sang; Kim, Kyung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to form a scaffold-free coculture spheroid model of colonic adenocarcinoma cells (CACs) and normal colonic fibroblasts (NCFs) and to use the spheroids to investigate the role of NCFs in the tumorigenicity of CACs in nude mice. We analysed three-dimensional (3D) scaffold-free coculture spheroids of CACs and NCFs. CAC Matrigel invasion assays and tumorigenicity assays in nude mice were performed to examine the effect of NCFs on CAC invasive behaviour and tumorigenicity in 3D spheroids. We investigated the expression pattern of fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP-α) by immunohistochemical staining. CAC monocultures did not form densely-packed 3D spheroids, whereas cocultured CACs and NCFs formed 3D spheroids. The 3D coculture spheroids seeded on a Matrigel extracellular matrix showed higher CAC invasiveness compared to CACs alone or CACs and NCFs in suspension. 3D spheroids injected into nude mice generated more and faster-growing tumors compared to CACs alone or mixed suspensions consisting of CACs and NCFs. FAP-α was expressed in NCFs-CACs cocultures and xenograft tumors, whereas monocultures of NCFs or CACs were negative for FAP-α expression. Our findings provide evidence that the interaction between CACs and NCFs is essential for the tumorigenicity of cancer cells as well as for tumor propagation. PMID:26947885

  14. Functional 3D human primary hepatocyte spheroids made by co-culturing hepatocytes from partial hepatectomy specimens and human adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    No, Da Yoon; Lee, Seung-A; Choi, Yoon Young; Park, DoYeun; Jang, Ju Yun; Kim, Dong-Sik; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    We have generated human hepatocyte spheroids with uniform size and shape by co-culturing 1∶1 mixtures of primary human hepatocytes (hHeps) from partial hepatectomy specimens and human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) in concave microwells. The hADSCs in spheroids could compensate for the low viability and improve the functional maintenance of hHeps. Co-cultured spheroids aggregated and formed compact spheroidal shapes more rapidly, and with a significantly higher viability than mono-cultured spheroids. The liver-specific functions of co-cultured spheroids were greater, although they contained half the number of hepatocytes as mono-cultured spheroids. Albumin secretion by co-cultured spheroids was 10% higher on day 7, whereas urea secretion was similar, compared with mono-cultured spheroids. A quantitative cytochrome P450 assay showed that the enzymatic activity of co-cultured spheroids cultured for 9 days was 28% higher than that of mono-cultured spheroids. These effects may be due to the transdifferentiation potential and paracrine healing effects of hADSCs on hHeps. These co-cultured spheroids may be useful for creating artificial three-dimensional hepatic tissue constructs and for cell therapy with limited numbers of human hepatocytes. PMID:23236387

  15. Opportunities and Challenges for use of Tumor Spheroids as Models to Test Drug Delivery and Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Geeta; Hsiao, Amy Y.; Ingram, Marylou; Luker, Gary D.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular spheroids are three dimensional in vitro microscale tissue analogs. The current article examines the suitability of spheroids as an in vitro platform for testing drug delivery systems. Spheroids model critical physiologic parameters present in vivo, including complex multicellular architecture, barriers to mass transport, and extracellular matrix deposition. Relative to two-dimensional cultures, spheroids also provide better target cells for drug testing and are appropriate in vitro model for studies of drug penetration. Key challenges associated with creation of uniformly sized spheroids, spheroids with small number of cells and co-culture spheroids are emphasized in the article. Moreover, the assay techniques required for the characterization of drug delivery and efficacy in spheroids and the challenges associated with such studies are discussed. Examples for the use of spheroids in drug delivery and testing are also emphasized. With these challenges and the possible solutions, multicellular spheroids are becoming an increasingly useful in vitro tool for drug screening and delivery to pathological tissues and organs. PMID:22613880

  16. Formation of multicellular tumor spheroids induced by cyclic RGD-peptides and use for anticancer drug testing in vitro.

    PubMed

    Akasov, Roman; Zaytseva-Zotova, Daria; Burov, Sergey; Leko, Maria; Dontenwill, Monique; Chiper, Manuela; Vandamme, Thierry; Markvicheva, Elena

    2016-06-15

    Development of novel anticancer formulations is a priority challenge in biomedicine. However, in vitro models based on monolayer cultures (2D) which are currently used for cytotoxicity tests leave much to be desired. More and more attention is focusing on 3D in vitro systems which can better mimic solid tumors. The aim of the study was to develop a novel one-step highly reproducible technique for multicellular tumor spheroid (MTS) formation using synthetic cyclic RGD-peptides, and to demonstrate availability of the spheroids as 3D in vitro model for antitumor drug testing. Cell self-assembly effect induced by addition of both linear and cyclic RGD-peptides directly to monolayer cultures was studied for 12 cell lines of various origins, including tumor cells (e.i. U-87 MG, MCF-7, M-3, HCT-116) and normal cells, in particular L-929, BNL.CL2, HepG2. Cyclo-RGDfK and its modification with triphenylphosphonium cation (TPP), namely cyclo-RGDfK(TPP) in a range of 10-100μM were found to induce spheroid formation. The obtained spheroids were unimodal with mean sizes in a range of 60-120μm depending on cell line and serum content in culture medium. The spheroids were used as 3D in vitro model, in order to evaluate cytotoxicity effects of antitumor drugs (doxorubicin, curcumin, temozolomide). The developed technique could be proposed as a promising tool for in vitro test of novel antitumor drugs. PMID:27107900

  17. Low-temperature plasma-induced antiproliferative effects on multi-cellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plewa, Joseph-Marie; Yousfi, Mohammed; Frongia, Céline; Eichwald, Olivier; Ducommun, Bernard; Merbahi, Nofel; Lobjois, Valérie

    2014-04-01

    Biomedical applications of low-temperature plasmas are of growing interest, especially in the field of plasma-induced anti-tumor effects. The present work is aimed at investigating the regionalized antiproliferative effects of low-temperature plasmas on a multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics the 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. We report that a low-temperature plasma jet, using helium flow in open air, inhibits HCT116 colon carcinoma MCTS growth in a dose-dependent manner. This growth inhibition is associated with the loss of Ki67, and the regionalized accumulation of DNA damage detected by histone H2AX phosphorylation. This regionalized genotoxic effect leads to massive cell death and loss of the MCTS proliferative region. The use of reactive oxygen species (ROS), scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and plasma-conditioned media demonstrate that the ROS generated in the media after exposure to low-temperature plasma play a major role in these observed effects. These findings strengthen the interest in the use of MCTS for the evaluation of antiproliferative strategies, and open new perspectives for studies dedicated to demonstrate the potential of low-temperature plasma in cancer therapy.

  18. Label-free mitosis detection in tumor spheroids using tissue dynamics imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ran; Jeong, Kwan; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2012-03-01

    The detection of cellular mitosis inside three-dimensional living tissue at depths up to 1 mm has been beyond the detection limits of conventional microscopies. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of motility contrast imaging and fluctuation spectroscopy to detect motional signatures that we attribute to mitotic events within groups of 100 cells in multicellular tumor spheroids. Motility contrast imaging is a coherence-domain speckle-imaging technique that uses low-coherence off-axis holography as a coherence gate to localize dynamic light scattering from selected depths inside tissue. Fluctuation spectroscopy is performed on a pervoxel basis to generate micro-spectrograms that display frequency content vs. time. Mitosis, especially in Telophase and Cytokinesis, is a relatively fast and high-amplitude phenomenon that should display energetic features within the micro-spectrograms. By choosing an appropriate frequency range and threshold, we detect energetic events with a density and rate that are comparable to the expected mitotic fraction in the UMR cell line. By studying these mitotic events in tumors of two different sizes, we show that micro-spectrograms contain characteristically different information content than macro-spectrograms (averaged over many voxels) in which the mitotic signatures (which are overall a low-probability event) are averaged out. The detection of mitotic fraction in thick living tissue has important consequences for the use of tissue-based assays for drug discovery.

  19. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), heat shock proteins (HSPs) and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) expression in co-culture of colon tumor spheroids with normal cells after incubation with interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and/or camptothecin (CPT-11).

    PubMed

    Paduch, Roman; Jakubowicz-Gil, Joanna; Niedziela, Piotr

    2010-04-01

    Tumor chemoresistance and metastasis are some of the most important problems in colon cancer therapy. In the present study, co-cultures of human colon carcinoma cell spheroids, obtained from different grades of tumor, with human colon epithelium, myofibroblast and endothelial cell monolayers were performed. The purpose of these co-cultures was to reflect, in in vitro conditions, different stages of colon tumor development. In order to investigate the invasive capacities of the tumor cells and their resistance to chemotherapy, HGF, HSP27, HSP72 and MRP levels were analyzed after incubation of the co-cultures with IL-1beta and irinotecan (CPT-11) added as single agents or in combination. Myofibroblasts produced significantly higher amounts of HGF than epithelial cells. Tumor cells released trace amounts of this molecule. In cocultures, IL-1beta induced HGF release, while CPT-11 alone or combined with IL-1beta decreased HGF secretion. An immunoblotting analysis followed by densitometry revealed that the combination of IL-1beta plus CPT-11 added to the cocultures led to a decrease in HSPs and MRP levels. In conclusion, direct and paracrine interactions of colon tumor cell spheroids with normal cells and exogenously added CPT-11 change HSP27, HSP72 and MRP expression in comparison to monocultures. IL-1beta and CPT-11, dependent on whether they are added separately or jointly, differentially modulate HGF expression in monocultures of colon tumor spheroids or normal cells and their co-cultures. PMID:20726333

  20. Impact of multicellular tumor spheroids as an in vivo-like tumor model on anticancer drug response

    PubMed Central

    GALATEANU, BIANCA; HUDITA, ARIANA; NEGREI, CAROLINA; ION, RODICA-MARIANA; COSTACHE, MARIETA; STAN, MIRIANA; NIKITOVIC, DRAGANA; HAYES, A. WALLACE; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDIS M.; GINGHINA, OCTAV

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer is higher in men than in women, amounting to 15% of cancer-related diseases as a whole. As such, undesirable effects, arising from the administration of current chemotherapeutic agents (the FOLFIRI/FOLFOX combinations), which are exerted on the remaining non-cancerous tissues and/or cells, have contributed to the occurrence of resistance to multiple drugs, thus markedly reducing their efficacy. However, the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents may be improved and their action may be more selectively targeted to diseased tissues/cells by means of developing biotechnologies and nano-techniques. Thus, the current focus is on creating biological tissue and related tumor models, by means of three-dimensional (3D) spheres, in an attempt to bridge the gap between results obtained in the pre-clinical phase and promising outcomes obtained in clinical trials. For this purpose, the characterization and use of so-called ‘multicellular tumor spheroids’, may prove to be invaluable. In this study, we focus on describing the efficacy of a model 3D system as compared to the traditional 2D tumor spheres in determining drug response, highlighting a potentially greater effect of the drugs following the encapsulation of respective liposomes. The results obtained demonstrate the successful preparation of a suspension of liposomes loaded with folinic acid, oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and loaded with meso-tetra (4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrin. Following its use on HT-29 colorectal cancer cells, an important comparative reduction was noted in the viability of the HT-29 cells, demonstrating the efficacy of multicellular tumor spheroids carrying liposomes loaded with therapeutic drugs. These findings indicate that the method of drug encapsulation in liposomes may improve the treatment efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:27035518

  1. Evaluation of anti-HER2 scFv-conjugated PLGA-PEG nanoparticles on 3D tumor spheroids of BT474 and HCT116 cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuy Duong Le, Thi; Pham, Thu Hong; Nghia Nguyen, Trong; Giang Ngo, Thi Hong; Nhung Hoang, Thi My; Huan Le, Quang

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional culture cells (spheroids) are one of the multicellular culture models that can be applied to anticancer chemotherapeutic development. Multicellular spheroids more closely mimic in vivo tumor-like patterns of physiologic environment and morphology. In previous research, we designed docetaxel-loaded pegylated poly(D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles conjugated with anti-HER2 single chain antibodies (scFv-Doc-PLGA-PEG) and evaluated them in 2D cell culture. In this study, we continuously evaluate the cellular uptake and cytotoxic effect of scFv-Doc-PLGA-PEG on a 3D tumor spheroid model of BT474 (HER2-overexpressing) and HCT116 (HER2-underexpressing) cancer cells. The results showed that the nanoparticle formulation conjugated with scFv had a significant internalization effect on the spheroids of HER2-overexpressing cancer cells as compared to the spheroids of HER2-underexpressing cancer cells. Therefore, cytotoxic effects of targeted nanoparticles decreased the size and increased necrotic score of HER2-overexpressing tumor spheroids. Thus, these scFv-Doc-PLGA-PEG nanoparticles have potential for active targeting for HER2-overexpressing cancer therapy. In addition, BT474 and HCT116 spheroids can be used as a tumor model for evaluation of targeting therapies.

  2. Optimization of radioimmunotherapy using human malignant melanoma multicell spheroids as a model

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, C.S.; Crivici, A.; MacGregor, W.D.; Unger, M.W. )

    1989-06-15

    In vitro multicell spheroids from a human melanoma cell line and the human colon cancer cell line HT29, used as control, have been established as a model of poorly vascularized micrometastases in vivo. The antimelanoma monoclonal antibody 96.5 was radiolabeled with 131I at specific radioactivities from 1.85 to 3.96 GBq/mg. Cytotoxicity of 131I-96.5 to the spheroids, at an initial size of 300 microns in diameter, was investigated as a function of concentration of 131I-96.5 in the incubation medium, specific radioactivity, and treatment time. Spheroid growth delay and clonogenic survival of cells disaggregated from the spheroids at various times after treatment were used as end points. Therapeutic effects increased with the concentration of 131I-96.5 within the range 0.2 to 2 mg/liter (0.34 to 3.4 GBq/liter) at a fixed specific radioactivity. The effects increased with specific radioactivity at a fixed concentration of 131I-96.5. Difference in therapeutic effect was also observed between treatment times of 8 and 24 h. Radiation doses to the melanoma spheroids varied from 10 to 16 Gy. Unlabeled 96.5 at 2 mg/liter or 131I-iodide at 1.7 GBq/liter did not affect the growth of the melanoma spheroids. The HT29 spheroids, however, only suffered slight cytotoxicity at 1 or 2 mg/liter of 131I-96.5 and for a treatment time of 24 h despite comparable radiosensitivity of HT29 cells and melanoma cells to high-dose-rate radiation. Similar cytotoxicity was observed in the HT29 group treated with 131I-iodide at 1.7 GBq/liter. Present findings therefore demonstrate preferential and adequate killing of the melanoma spheroids by 131I-96.5 at 0.5 mg/liter and 3.96 GBq/mg in 8 h.

  3. Spectroscopic imaging system for high-throughput viability assessment of ovarian spheroids or microdissected tumor tissues (MDTs) in a microfluidic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Georges-Robillard, A.; Masse, M.; Kendall-Dupont, J.; Strupler, M.; Patra, B.; Jermyn, M.; Mes-Masson, A.-M.; Leblond, F.; Gervais, T.

    2016-02-01

    There is a growing effort in the biomicrosystems community to develop a personalized treatment response assay for cancer patients using primary cells, patient-derived spheroids, or live tissues on-chip. Recently, our group has developed a technique to cut tumors in 350 μm diameter microtissues and keep them alive on-chip, enabling multiplexed in vitro drug assays on primary tumor tissue. Two-photon microscopy, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry are the current standard to assay tissue chemosensitivity on-chip. While these techniques provide microscopic and molecular information, they are not adapted for high-throughput analysis of microtissues. We present a spectroscopic imaging system that allows rapid quantitative measurements of multiple fluorescent viability markers simultaneously by using a liquid crystal tunable filter to record fluorescence and transmittance spectra. As a proof of concept, 24 spheroids composed of ovarian cancer cell line OV90 were formed in a microfluidic chip, stained with two live cell markers (CellTrackerTM Green and Orange), and imaged. Fluorescence images acquired were normalized to the acquisition time and gain of the camera, dark noise was removed, spectral calibration was applied, and spatial uniformity was corrected. Spectral un-mixing was applied to separate each fluorophore's contribution. We have demonstrated that rapid and simultaneous viability measurements on multiple spheroids can be achieved, which will have a significant impact on the prediction of a tumor's response to multiple treatment options. This technique may be applied as well in drug discovery to assess the potential of a drug candidate directly on human primary tissue.

  4. Azo-Based Iridium(III) Complexes as Multicolor Phosphorescent Probes to Detect Hypoxia in 3D Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lingli; Li, Guanying; Chen, Xiang; Chen, Yu; Jin, Chengzhi; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important characteristic of malignant solid tumors and is considered as a possible causative factor for serious resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy. The exploration of novel fluorescent probes capable of detecting hypoxia in solid tumors will aid tumor diagnosis and treatment. In this study, we reported the design and synthesis of a series of “off-on” phosphorescence probes for hypoxia detection in adherent and three-dimensional multicellular spheroid models. All of the iridium(III) complexes incorporate an azo group as an azo-reductase reactive moiety to detect hypoxia. Reduction of non-phosphorescent probes Ir1-Ir8 by reductases under hypoxic conditions resulted in the generation of highly phosphorescent corresponding amines for detection of hypoxic regions. Moreover, these probes can penetrate into 3D multicellular spheroids over 100 μm and image the hypoxic regions. Most importantly, these probes display a high selectivity for the detection of hypoxia in 2D cells and 3D multicellular spheroids. PMID:26423609

  5. The influence of NIR femtosecond laser radiation on the viability of 3D stem cell clusters and tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Riemann, Iris; Stracke, Frank; Gorjup, Erwin; LeHarzic, Ronan; König, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    Adult human and rat pancreas stem cells as well as tumor spheroids were irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses in the near infrared (NIR) spectral range at high transient GW/cm2 and TW/cm2 intensities. The cellular response to the laser exposure was probed by the detection of modifications of NAD(P)H autofluorescence, the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA strand breaks (TUNEL-assay), and viability (live/dead test). The results confirm that long-term scanning of stem cells can be performed at appropriate laser exposure parameters without a measurable impact on the cellular metabolism and vitality. In addition, it was proven that a targeted inactivation of a particular single stem cells or a single tumour cell inside a 3D cell cluster using single point illumination at TW/cm2 laser intensities can be performed without affecting neighbouring cells. Therefore multiphoton microscopes can be considered as biosafe tools for long-term analysis of stem cells as well as highly precise optical knocking out of single cells within cell clusters and tissues.

  6. Treatment Efficiency of Free and Nanoparticle-Loaded Mitoxantrone for Magnetic Drug Targeting in Multicellular Tumor Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Annkathrin; Poettler, Marina; Friedrich, Ralf P; Zaloga, Jan; Unterweger, Harald; Lyer, Stefan; Nowak, Johannes; Odenbach, Stefan; Alexiou, Christoph; Janko, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Major problems of cancer treatment using systemic chemotherapy are severe side effects. Magnetic drug targeting (MDT) employing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) loaded with chemotherapeutic agents may overcome this dilemma by increasing drug accumulation in the tumor and reducing toxic side effects in the healthy tissue. For translation of nanomedicine from bench to bedside, nanoparticle-mediated effects have to be studied carefully. In this study, we compare the effect of SPION, unloaded or loaded with the cytotoxic drug mitoxantrone (MTO) with the effect of free MTO, on the viability and proliferation of HT-29 cells within three-dimensional multicellular tumor spheroids. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry showed that both free MTO, as well as SPION-loaded MTO (SPION(MTO)) are able to penetrate into tumor spheroids and thereby kill tumor cells, whereas unloaded SPION did not affect cellular viability. Since SPION(MTO) has herewith proven its effectivity also in complex multicellular tumor structures with its surrounding microenvironment, we conclude that it is a promising candidate for further use in magnetic drug targeting in vivo. PMID:26437393

  7. Co-culture of 3D tumor spheroids with fibroblasts as a model for epithelial–mesenchymal transition in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun-Ah; Lee, Eun Kyung; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2015-07-15

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) acts as a facilitator of metastatic dissemination in the invasive margin of malignant tumors where active tumor–stromal crosstalks take place. Co-cultures of cancer cells with cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are often used as in vitro models of EMT. We established a tumor–fibroblast proximity co-culture using HT-29 tumor spheroids (TSs) with CCD-18co fibroblasts. When co-cultured with TSs, CCD-18co appeared activated, and proliferative activity as well as cell migration increased. Expression of fibronectin increased whereas laminin and type I collagen decreased in TSs co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to TSs alone, closely resembling the margin of in vivo xenograft tissue. Active TGFβ1 in culture media significantly increased in TS co-cultures but not in 2D co-cultures of cancer cells–fibroblasts, indicating that 3D context-associated factors from TSs may be crucial to crosstalks between cancer cells and fibroblasts. We also observed in TSs co-cultured with fibroblasts increased expression of α-SMA, EGFR and CTGF; reduced expression of membranous β-catenin and E-cadherin, together suggesting an EMT-like changes similar to a marginal region of xenograft tissue in vivo. Overall, our in vitro TS–fibroblast proximity co-culture mimics the EMT-state of the invasive margin of in vivo tumors in early metastasis. - Highlights: • An adjacent co-culture of tumor spheroids and fibroblasts is presented as EMT model. • Activation of fibroblasts and increased cell migration were shown in co-culture. • Expression of EMT-related factors in co-culture was similar to that in tumor tissue. • Crosstalk between spheroids and fibroblasts was demonstrated by secretome analysis.

  8. Changes in global gene expression associated with 3D structure of tumors: an ex vivo matrix-free mesothelioma spheroid model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heungnam; Phung, Yen; Ho, Mitchell

    2012-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments present significant barriers to anti-tumor agents. Molecules involved in multicellular tumor microenvironments, however, are difficult to study ex vivo. Here, we generated a matrix-free tumor spheroid model using the NCI-H226 mesothelioma cell line and compared the gene expression profiles of spheroids and monolayers using microarray analysis. Microarray analysis revealed that 142 probe sets were differentially expressed between tumor spheroids and monolayers. Gene ontology analysis revealed that upregulated genes were primarily related to immune response, wound response, lymphocyte stimulation and response to cytokine stimulation, whereas downregulated genes were primarily associated with apoptosis. Among the 142 genes, 27 are located in the membrane and related to biologic processes of cellular movement, cell-to-cell signaling, cellular growth and proliferation and morphology. Western blot analysis validated elevation of MMP2, BAFF/BLyS/TNFSF13B, RANTES/CCL5 and TNFAIP6/TSG-6 protein expression in spheroids as compared to monolayers. Thus, we have reported the first large scale comparison of the transcriptional profiles using an ex vivo matrix-free spheroid model to identify genes specific to the three-dimensional biological structure of tumors. The method described here can be used for gene expression profiling of tumors other than mesothelioma. PMID:22737246

  9. Evaluation of human hepatocytes cultured by three-dimensional spheroid systems for drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ohkura, Takako; Ohta, Kunihiro; Nagao, Takuya; Kusumoto, Kumiko; Koeda, Akiko; Ueda, Tadayoshi; Jomura, Tomoko; Ikeya, Takeshi; Ozeki, Emiko; Wada, Kazuki; Naitoh, Kazushi; Inoue, Yukiko; Takahashi, Naoki; Iwai, Hisakazu; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Takuo

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the utility of three-dimensional (3D) spheroid cultures of human hepatocytes in discovering drug metabolites. Metabolites of acetaminophen, diclofenac, lamotrigine, midazolam, propranolol and salbutamol were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) to measure enzyme activities in this system cultured for 2 and 7 days. Sequential metabolic reactions by Phase I and then Phase II enzymes were found in diclofenac [CYP2C9 and UDP-glucuronyltransferases (UGTs)], midazolam (CYP3A4 and UGTs) and propranolol (CYP1A2/2D6 and UGTs). Moreover, lamotrigine and salbutamol were metabolized to lamotrigine-N-glucuronide and salbutamol 4-O-sulfate, respectively. These metabolites, which are human specific, could be observed in clinical studies, but not in conventional hepatic culture systems as in previous reports. Acetaminophen was metabolized to glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, and N-acetyl-p-benzo-quinoneimine (NAPQI) and its metabolites were not observed. In addition, mRNA of drug-metabolism enzymes [CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, CYP3A4, UGT1A1, UGT2B7, sulfotransferase 1A1 (SULT1A1) and glutathione S-transferase pi 1 (GSTP1)], which were measured by qRT-PCR, were expressed in the human hepatocyte spheroids. In conclusion, these results suggest that human hepatocyte spheroids are useful in discovering drug metabolites. PMID:24695277

  10. Generation of a tumor spheroid in a microgravity environment as a 3D model of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Marrero, Bernadette; Messina, Jane L; Heller, Richard

    2009-10-01

    An in vitro 3D model was developed utilizing a synthetic microgravity environment to facilitate studying the cell interactions. 2D monolayer cell culture models have been successfully used to understand various cellular reactions that occur in vivo. There are some limitations to the 2D model that are apparent when compared to cells grown in a 3D matrix. For example, some proteins that are not expressed in a 2D model are found up-regulated in the 3D matrix. In this paper, we discuss techniques used to develop the first known large, free-floating 3D tissue model used to establish tumor spheroids. The bioreactor system known as the High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARVs) was used to provide a microgravity environment. The HARVs promoted aggregation of keratinocytes (HaCaT) that formed a construct that served as scaffolding for the growth of mouse melanoma. Although there is an emphasis on building a 3D model with the proper extracellular matrix and stroma, we were able to develop a model that excluded the use of matrigel. Immunohistochemistry and apoptosis assays provided evidence that this 3D model supports B16.F10 cell growth, proliferation, and synthesis of extracellular matrix. Immunofluorescence showed that melanoma cells interact with one another displaying observable cellular morphological changes. The goal of engineering a 3D tissue model is to collect new information about cancer development and develop new potential treatment regimens that can be translated to in vivo models while reducing the use of laboratory animals. PMID:19533253

  11. Visualizing the effect of tumor microenvironments on radiation-induced cell kinetics in multicellular spheroids consisting of HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kaida, Atsushi; Miura, Masahiko

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •We visualized radiation-induced cell kinetics in spheroids. •HeLa-Fucci cells were used for detection of cell-cycle changes. •Radiation-induced G2 arrest was prolonged in the spheroid. •The inner and outer cell fractions behaved differently. -- Abstract: In this study, we visualized the effect of tumor microenvironments on radiation-induced tumor cell kinetics. For this purpose, we utilized a multicellular spheroid model, with a diameter of ∼500 μm, consisting of HeLa cells expressing the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator (Fucci). In live spheroids, a confocal laser scanning microscope allowed us to clearly monitor cell kinetics at depths of up to 60 μm. Surprisingly, a remarkable prolongation of G2 arrest was observed in the outer region of the spheroid relative to monolayer-cultured cells. Scale, an aqueous reagent that renders tissues optically transparent, allowed visualization deeper inside spheroids. About 16 h after irradiation, a red fluorescent cell fraction, presumably a quiescent G0 cell fraction, became distinct from the outer fraction consisting of proliferating cells, most of which exhibited green fluorescence indicative of G2 arrest. Thereafter, the red cell fraction began to emit green fluorescence and remained in prolonged G2 arrest. Thus, for the first time, we visualized the prolongation of radiation-induced G2 arrest in spheroids and the differences in cell kinetics between the outer and inner fractions.

  12. Spheroid formation of human thyroid cancer cells under simulated microgravity: a possible role of CTGF and CAV1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) formed scaffold-free under microgravity are of high interest for research and medicine. Their formation mechanism can be studied in space in real microgravity or on Earth using ground-based facilities (GBF), which simulate microgravity. On Earth, these experiments are more cost-efficient and easily performable. However, each GBF might exert device-specific and altered superimposingly gravity-dependent effects on the cells. Results FTC-133 human thyroid cancer cells were cultivated on a 2D clinostat (CN) and a random positioning machine (RPM) and compared with corresponding 1 g control cells. Harvested cell samples were investigated by microscopy, quantitative realtime-PCR and Multi-Analyte Profiling. Spheroid formation and growth occurred during 72 h of cultivation on both devices. Cytokine secretion and gene activation patterns frequently altered in different ways, when the cells were cultured either on the RPM or the CN. A decreased expression of CAV1 and CTGF in MCTS compared to adherent cells was observed after cultivation on both machines. Conclusion The development of MCTS proceeds similarly on the RPM and the CN resembling the situation observed under real microgravity conditions, while no MCTS formation was observed at 1 g under identical experimental conditions. Simultaneously, changes in the regulation of CTGF and CAV1 appeared in a comparable manner on both machines. A relationship between these molecules and MCTS formation is discussed. PMID:24885050

  13. LA-ICP-MS imaging in multicellular tumor spheroids - a novel tool in the preclinical development of metal-based anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Theiner, Sarah; Schreiber-Brynzak, Ekaterina; Jakupec, Michael A; Galanski, Markus; Koellensperger, Gunda; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2016-04-01

    A novel application of advanced elemental imaging offers cutting edge in vitro assays with more predictive power on the efficacy of anticancer drugs in preclinical development compared to two dimensional cell culture models. We propose LA-ICP-MS analysis of multicellular spheroids, which are increasingly being used as three dimensional (3D) models of tumors, for improving the in vitro evaluation of anticancer metallodrugs. The presented strategy is very well suited for screening drug-tumor penetration, a key issue for drug efficacy. A major advantage of tumor spheroid models is that they enable us to create a tissue-like structure and function. With respect to 2D culture on the one hand and in vivo models on the other, multicellular spheroids thus show intermediate complexity, still allowing high repeatability and adequate through-put for drug research. This strongly argues for the use of spheroids as bridging models in preclinical anticancer drug development. Probing the lateral platinum distribution within these tumor models allows visualizing the penetration depth and targeting of platinum-based complexes. In the present study, we show for the first time that spatially-resolved metal accumulation in tumor spheroids upon treatment with platinum compounds can be appropriately assessed. The optimized LA-ICP-MS setup allowed discerning the platinum localization in different regions of the tumor spheroids upon compound treatment at biologically relevant (low micromolar) concentrations. Predominant platinum accumulation was observed at the periphery as well as in the center of the spheroids. This corresponds to the proliferating outermost layers of cells and the necrotic core, respectively, indicating enhanced platinum sequestration in these regions. PMID:26806253

  14. Photothermal therapy of human glioma spheroids with gold-silica nanoshells and gold nanorods: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhetri, Suyog; Hirschberg, Henry; Madsen, Steen J.

    2014-03-01

    The efficacy of gold-silica nanoshells (AuNS) and gold nanorods (AuNR) for photothermal therapy was investigated in an in vitro system consisting of hybrid murine macrophage/human glioma spheroids. Macrophages were used as delivery vectors for the nanoparticles. Hybrid spheroids were formed via centrifugation of human glioma cells and nanoparticleloaded macrophages. Forty-eight hours post-centrifugation, the resultant 400 μm dia. spheroids were exposed to 808 nm laser light for 10 min. at irradiances ranging from 2 - 28 W cm-2. Treatment efficacy was evaluated from spheroid growth kinetics over a 14-day period. AuNS were shown to have greater efficacy compared to AuNR. For example, hybrid spheroids consisting of a 5:1 ratio of glioma cells to AuNS-loaded macrophages exhibited significant growth inhibition when subjected to irradiances of 7 W cm-2. In contrast, no growth inhibition was observed for the AuNR-macrophage hybrid spheroids, even at the highest irradiance investigated (28 W cm-2). Growth inhibition was observed at 28 W cm-2 when the nanorod concentration was increased, i.e., by forming hybrid spheroids with a 2:1 ratio of glioma cells to macrophages.

  15. Modelling kidney disease with CRISPR-mutant kidney organoids derived from human pluripotent epiblast spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Benjamin S.; Brooks, Craig R.; Lam, Albert Q.; Fu, Hongxia; Morizane, Ryuji; Agrawal, Vishesh; Saad, Abdelaziz F.; Li, Michelle K.; Hughes, Michael R.; Werff, Ryan Vander; Peters, Derek T.; Lu, Junjie; Baccei, Anna; Siedlecki, Andrew M.; Valerius, M. Todd; Musunuru, Kiran; McNagny, Kelly M.; Steinman, Theodore I.; Zhou, Jing; Lerou, Paul H.; Bonventre, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Human-pluripotent-stem-cell-derived kidney cells (hPSC-KCs) have important potential for disease modelling and regeneration. Whether the hPSC-KCs can reconstitute tissue-specific phenotypes is currently unknown. Here we show that hPSC-KCs self-organize into kidney organoids that functionally recapitulate tissue-specific epithelial physiology, including disease phenotypes after genome editing. In three-dimensional cultures, epiblast-stage hPSCs form spheroids surrounding hollow, amniotic-like cavities. GSK3β inhibition differentiates spheroids into segmented, nephron-like kidney organoids containing cell populations with characteristics of proximal tubules, podocytes and endothelium. Tubules accumulate dextran and methotrexate transport cargoes, and express kidney injury molecule-1 after nephrotoxic chemical injury. CRISPR/Cas9 knockout of podocalyxin causes junctional organization defects in podocyte-like cells. Knockout of the polycystic kidney disease genes PKD1 or PKD2 induces cyst formation from kidney tubules. All of these functional phenotypes are distinct from effects in epiblast spheroids, indicating that they are tissue specific. Our findings establish a reproducible, versatile three-dimensional framework for human epithelial disease modelling and regenerative medicine applications. PMID:26493500

  16. SMIFH2-mediated mDia formin functional inhibition potentiates chemotherapeutic targeting of human ovarian cancer spheroids.

    PubMed

    Ziske, Megan A; Pettee, Krista M; Khaing, MaNada; Rubinic, Kaitlin; Eisenmann, Kathryn M

    2016-03-25

    Due to a lack of effective screening or prevention protocol for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), there is a critical unmet need to develop therapeutic interventions for EOC treatment. EOC metastasis is unique. Initial dissemination is not primarily hematogenous, yet is facilitated through shedding of primary tumor cells into the peritoneal fluid and accumulating ascites. Increasingly, isolated patient spheroids point to a clinical role for spheroids in EOC metastasis. EOC spheroids are highly invasive structures that disseminate upon peritoneal mesothelium, and visceral tissues including liver and omentum. Selection for this subset of chemoresistant EOC cells could influence disease progression and/or recurrence. Thus, targeting spheroid integrity/structure may improve the chemotherapeutic responsiveness of EOC. We discovered a critical role for mammalian Diaphanous (mDia)-related formin-2 in maintaining EOC spheroid structure. Both mDia2 and the related mDia1 regulate F-actin networks critical to maintain cell-cell contacts and the integrity of multi-cellular epithelial sheets. We investigated if mDia2 functional inhibition via a small molecule inhibitor SMIFH2 combined with chemotherapeutics, such as taxol and cisplatin, inhibits the viability of EOC monolayers and clinically relevant spheroids. SMIFH2-mediated mDia formin inhibition significantly reduced both ES2 and Skov3 EOC monolayer viability while spheroid viability was minimally impacted only at the highest concentrations. Combining either cisplatin or taxol with SMIFH2 did not significantly enhance the effects of either drug alone in ES2 monolayers, while Skov3 monolayers treated with taxol or cisplatin and SMIFH2 showed significant additive inhibition of viability. ES2 spheroids were highly responsive with clear additive anti-viability effects with dual taxol or cisplatin when combined with SMIFH2 treatments. While combined taxol with SMIFH2 in spheroids showed an additive effect relative to single

  17. 3D tumor spheroid models for in vitro therapeutic screening: a systematic approach to enhance the biological relevance of data obtained.

    PubMed

    Zanoni, Michele; Piccinini, Filippo; Arienti, Chiara; Zamagni, Alice; Santi, Spartaco; Polico, Rolando; Bevilacqua, Alessandro; Tesei, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The potential of a spheroid tumor model composed of cells in different proliferative and metabolic states for the development of new anticancer strategies has been amply demonstrated. However, there is little or no information in the literature on the problems of reproducibility of data originating from experiments using 3D models. Our analyses, carried out using a novel open source software capable of performing an automatic image analysis of 3D tumor colonies, showed that a number of morphology parameters affect the response of large spheroids to treatment. In particular, we found that both spheroid volume and shape may be a source of variability. We also compared some commercially available viability assays specifically designed for 3D models. In conclusion, our data indicate the need for a pre-selection of tumor spheroids of homogeneous volume and shape to reduce data variability to a minimum before use in a cytotoxicity test. In addition, we identified and validated a cytotoxicity test capable of providing meaningful data on the damage induced in large tumor spheroids of up to diameter in 650 μm by different kinds of treatments. PMID:26752500

  18. 3D tumor spheroid models for in vitro therapeutic screening: a systematic approach to enhance the biological relevance of data obtained

    PubMed Central

    Zanoni, Michele; Piccinini, Filippo; Arienti, Chiara; Zamagni, Alice; Santi, Spartaco; Polico, Rolando; Bevilacqua, Alessandro; Tesei, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The potential of a spheroid tumor model composed of cells in different proliferative and metabolic states for the development of new anticancer strategies has been amply demonstrated. However, there is little or no information in the literature on the problems of reproducibility of data originating from experiments using 3D models. Our analyses, carried out using a novel open source software capable of performing an automatic image analysis of 3D tumor colonies, showed that a number of morphology parameters affect the response of large spheroids to treatment. In particular, we found that both spheroid volume and shape may be a source of variability. We also compared some commercially available viability assays specifically designed for 3D models. In conclusion, our data indicate the need for a pre-selection of tumor spheroids of homogeneous volume and shape to reduce data variability to a minimum before use in a cytotoxicity test. In addition, we identified and validated a cytotoxicity test capable of providing meaningful data on the damage induced in large tumor spheroids of up to diameter in 650 μm by different kinds of treatments. PMID:26752500

  19. Theoretical analysis of antibody targeting of tumor spheroids: importance of dosage for penetration, and affinity for retention.

    PubMed

    Graff, Christilyn P; Wittrup, K Dane

    2003-03-15

    The interplay among antibody/antigen binding kinetics, antibody diffusion, and antigen metabolic turnover together determines the depth of penetration of antitumor antibodies into prevascular tumor spheroid cell clumps. A sharp boundary between an outer shell of bound high-affinity antibody and an inner antibody-free core has been previously observed and mathematically modeled and was termed the "binding site barrier." We show here that this process is well described by a simplified shrinking core model wherein binding equilibration is much more rapid than diffusion. This analysis provides the following experimentally testable predictions: (a) the binding site barrier is a moving boundary whose velocity is proportional to the time integral of antibody concentration at the spheroid surface (i.e. plasma antibody AUC); (b) the velocity of this moving boundary is independent of binding affinity, if the affinity is sufficiently high to strongly favor antibody/antigen complex formation at prevailing antibody concentrations; and (c) maximum tumor retention is achieved when the antibody/antigen dissociation rate approaches the rate of antigen metabolic turnover. The consistency of these predictions with published experimental results is demonstrated. The shrinking core model provides a simple analytic relationship predicting the effects of altered antibody pharmacokinetics, antibody molecular weight, antigen turnover rate, antigen expression level, and micrometastasis size on antibody penetration and retention. For example, a formula is provided for predicting the bolus dose necessary to accomplish tumor saturation as a function of antibody and tumor properties. Furthermore, this analysis indicates certain attributes necessary for an optimal tumor targeting agent. PMID:12649189

  20. Generation of alveolar epithelial spheroids via isolated progenitor cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Shimpei; Ito, Isao; Nagasaki, Tadao; Yamamoto, Yuki; Konishi, Satoshi; Korogi, Yohei; Matsumoto, Hisako; Muro, Shigeo; Hirai, Toyohiro; Funato, Michinori; Mae, Shin-Ichi; Toyoda, Taro; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Ogawa, Seishi; Osafune, Kenji; Mishima, Michiaki

    2014-09-01

    No methods for isolating induced alveolar epithelial progenitor cells (AEPCs) from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have been reported. Based on a study of the stepwise induction of alveolar epithelial cells (AECs), we identified carboxypeptidase M (CPM) as a surface marker of NKX2-1(+) "ventralized" anterior foregut endoderm cells (VAFECs) in vitro and in fetal human and murine lungs. Using SFTPC-GFP reporter hPSCs and a 3D coculture system with fetal human lung fibroblasts, we showed that CPM(+) cells isolated from VAFECs differentiate into AECs, demonstrating that CPM is a marker of AEPCs. Moreover, 3D coculture differentiation of CPM(+) cells formed spheroids with lamellar-body-like structures and an increased expression of surfactant proteins compared with 2D differentiation. Methods to induce and isolate AEPCs using CPM and consequently generate alveolar epithelial spheroids would aid human pulmonary disease modeling and regenerative medicine. PMID:25241738

  1. Characterization of primary human hepatocyte spheroids as a model system for drug-induced liver injury, liver function and disease.

    PubMed

    Bell, Catherine C; Hendriks, Delilah F G; Moro, Sabrina M L; Ellis, Ewa; Walsh, Joanne; Renblom, Anna; Fredriksson Puigvert, Lisa; Dankers, Anita C A; Jacobs, Frank; Snoeys, Jan; Sison-Young, Rowena L; Jenkins, Rosalind E; Nordling, Åsa; Mkrtchian, Souren; Park, B Kevin; Kitteringham, Neil R; Goldring, Christopher E P; Lauschke, Volker M; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Liver biology and function, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and liver diseases are difficult to study using current in vitro models such as primary human hepatocyte (PHH) monolayer cultures, as their rapid de-differentiation restricts their usefulness substantially. Thus, we have developed and extensively characterized an easily scalable 3D PHH spheroid system in chemically-defined, serum-free conditions. Using whole proteome analyses, we found that PHH spheroids cultured this way were similar to the liver in vivo and even retained their inter-individual variability. Furthermore, PHH spheroids remained phenotypically stable and retained morphology, viability, and hepatocyte-specific functions for culture periods of at least 5 weeks. We show that under chronic exposure, the sensitivity of the hepatocytes drastically increased and toxicity of a set of hepatotoxins was detected at clinically relevant concentrations. An interesting example was the chronic toxicity of fialuridine for which hepatotoxicity was mimicked after repeated-dosing in the PHH spheroid model, not possible to detect using previous in vitro systems. Additionally, we provide proof-of-principle that PHH spheroids can reflect liver pathologies such as cholestasis, steatosis and viral hepatitis. Combined, our results demonstrate that the PHH spheroid system presented here constitutes a versatile and promising in vitro system to study liver function, liver diseases, drug targets and long-term DILI. PMID:27143246

  2. Characterization of primary human hepatocyte spheroids as a model system for drug-induced liver injury, liver function and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Catherine C.; Hendriks, Delilah F. G.; Moro, Sabrina M. L.; Ellis, Ewa; Walsh, Joanne; Renblom, Anna; Fredriksson Puigvert, Lisa; Dankers, Anita C. A.; Jacobs, Frank; Snoeys, Jan; Sison-Young, Rowena L.; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Nordling, Åsa; Mkrtchian, Souren; Park, B. Kevin; Kitteringham, Neil R.; Goldring, Christopher E. P.; Lauschke, Volker M.; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Liver biology and function, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and liver diseases are difficult to study using current in vitro models such as primary human hepatocyte (PHH) monolayer cultures, as their rapid de-differentiation restricts their usefulness substantially. Thus, we have developed and extensively characterized an easily scalable 3D PHH spheroid system in chemically-defined, serum-free conditions. Using whole proteome analyses, we found that PHH spheroids cultured this way were similar to the liver in vivo and even retained their inter-individual variability. Furthermore, PHH spheroids remained phenotypically stable and retained morphology, viability, and hepatocyte-specific functions for culture periods of at least 5 weeks. We show that under chronic exposure, the sensitivity of the hepatocytes drastically increased and toxicity of a set of hepatotoxins was detected at clinically relevant concentrations. An interesting example was the chronic toxicity of fialuridine for which hepatotoxicity was mimicked after repeated-dosing in the PHH spheroid model, not possible to detect using previous in vitro systems. Additionally, we provide proof-of-principle that PHH spheroids can reflect liver pathologies such as cholestasis, steatosis and viral hepatitis. Combined, our results demonstrate that the PHH spheroid system presented here constitutes a versatile and promising in vitro system to study liver function, liver diseases, drug targets and long-term DILI. PMID:27143246

  3. Development of multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) culture from breast cancer cell and a high throughput screening method using the MTT assay.

    PubMed

    Ho, Wan Yong; Yeap, Swee Keong; Ho, Chai Ling; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu

    2012-01-01

    In comparison to monolayer cells, MCTS has been claimed as more suitable candidate for studying drug penetration due to the high resemblance to solid tumors. However, the cultivation of MCTS is cumbersome, time consuming, and most technique fail to generate spheroids with uniform sizes. Therefore, the application of spheroid cultures in high throughput screening has been rather limiting. Besides, the lack of a well established screening protocol method that is applicable to spheroid could also be attributed to this limitation. Here we report a simple way of cultivating homogenous MCTS cultures with compact and rigid structure from the MCF-7 cells. Besides, we had also made some modifications to the standard MTT assay to realize high throughput screening of these spheroids. Using the modified protocol, tamoxifen showed cytotoxicity effect towards MCTS cultures from MCF-7 with high consistency. The results correlated well with the cultures' response assessed by LDH release assay but the latter assay was not ideal for detecting a wide range of cytotoxicity due to high basal background reading. The MTT assay emerged as a better indicator to apoptosis event in comparison to the LDH release assay. Therefore, the method for spheroid generation and the modified MTT assay we reported here could be potentially applied to high throughput screening for response of spheroid cultures generated from MCF-7 as well as other cancer cell lines towards cytotoxic stimuli. PMID:22970274

  4. An in vitro assessment of liposomal topotecan simulating metronomic chemotherapy in combination with radiation in tumor-endothelial spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Jyoti, Amar; Fugit, Kyle D.; Sethi, Pallavi; McGarry, Ronald C.; Anderson, Bradley D.; Upreti, Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    Low dose metronomic chemotherapy (LDMC) refers to prolonged administration of low dose chemotherapy designed to minimize toxicity and target the tumor endothelium, causing tumor growth inhibition. Topotecan (TPT) when administered at its maximum tolerated dose (MTD) is often associated with systemic hematological toxicities. Liposomal encapsulation of TPT enhances efficacy by shielding it from systemic clearance, allowing greater uptake and extended tissue exposure in tumors. Extended release of TPT from liposomal formulations also has the potential to mimic metronomic therapies with fewer treatments. Here we investigate potential toxicities of equivalent doses of free and actively loaded liposomal TPT (LTPT) and compare them to a fractionated low dose regimen of free TPT in tumor-endothelial spheroids (TES) with/without radiation exposure for a prolonged period of 10 days. Using confocal microscopy, TPT fluorescence was monitored to determine the accumulation of drug within TES. These studies showed TES, being more reflective of the in vivo tumor microenvironment, were more sensitive to LTPT in comparison to free TPT with radiation. More importantly, the response of TES to low-dose metronomic TPT with radiation was comparable to similar treatment with LTPT. This TES study suggests nanoparticle formulations designed for extended release of drug can simulate LDMC in vivo. PMID:26468877

  5. An in vitro assessment of liposomal topotecan simulating metronomic chemotherapy in combination with radiation in tumor-endothelial spheroids.

    PubMed

    Jyoti, Amar; Fugit, Kyle D; Sethi, Pallavi; McGarry, Ronald C; Anderson, Bradley D; Upreti, Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    Low dose metronomic chemotherapy (LDMC) refers to prolonged administration of low dose chemotherapy designed to minimize toxicity and target the tumor endothelium, causing tumor growth inhibition. Topotecan (TPT) when administered at its maximum tolerated dose (MTD) is often associated with systemic hematological toxicities. Liposomal encapsulation of TPT enhances efficacy by shielding it from systemic clearance, allowing greater uptake and extended tissue exposure in tumors. Extended release of TPT from liposomal formulations also has the potential to mimic metronomic therapies with fewer treatments. Here we investigate potential toxicities of equivalent doses of free and actively loaded liposomal TPT (LTPT) and compare them to a fractionated low dose regimen of free TPT in tumor-endothelial spheroids (TES) with/without radiation exposure for a prolonged period of 10 days. Using confocal microscopy, TPT fluorescence was monitored to determine the accumulation of drug within TES. These studies showed TES, being more reflective of the in vivo tumor microenvironment, were more sensitive to LTPT in comparison to free TPT with radiation. More importantly, the response of TES to low-dose metronomic TPT with radiation was comparable to similar treatment with LTPT. This TES study suggests nanoparticle formulations designed for extended release of drug can simulate LDMC in vivo. PMID:26468877

  6. Size and Surface Charge of Engineered Poly(amidoamine) Dendrimers Modulate Tumor Accumulation and Penetration: A Model Study Using Multicellular Tumor Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Bugno, Jason; Hsu, Hao-Jui; Pearson, Ryan M; Noh, Hyeran; Hong, Seungpyo

    2016-07-01

    An enormous effort has been put into designing nanoparticles (NPs) with controlled biodistributions, prolonged plasma circulation times, and/or enhanced tissue targeting. However, little is known about how to design NPs with precise distributions in the target tissues. In particular, understanding NP tumor penetration and accumulation characteristics is crucial to maximizing the therapeutic potential of drug molecules carried by the NPs. In this study, we employed poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers, given their well-controlled size (<10 nm) and surface charge, to understand how the physical properties of NPs govern their tumor accumulation and penetration behaviors. We demonstrate for the first time that the size and surface charge of PAMAM dendrimers control their distributions in both a 3D multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) model and a separate extracellular matrix (ECM) model, which mimics the tumor microenvironment. Smaller PAMAM dendrimers not only diffused more rapidly in the ECM model but also efficiently penetrated to the MCTS core compared to their larger counterparts. Furthermore, cationic, amine-terminated PAMAM dendrimers exhibited the greatest accumulation in MCTS compared to either charge-neutral or anionic dendrimers. Our findings indicate that the size and surface charge of PAMAM dendrimers may tailor their tumor accumulation and penetration behaviors. These results suggest that controlled tumor accumulation and distinct intratumoral distributions can be achieved by simply controlling the size and surface charge of dendrimers, which may also be applicable for other similarly sized NPs. PMID:26828309

  7. Fully Automated One-Step Production of Functional 3D Tumor Spheroids for High-Content Screening.

    PubMed

    Monjaret, François; Fernandes, Mathieu; Duchemin-Pelletier, Eve; Argento, Amelie; Degot, Sébastien; Young, Joanne

    2016-04-01

    Adoption of spheroids within high-content screening (HCS) has lagged behind high-throughput screening (HTS) due to issues with running complex assays on large three-dimensional (3D) structures.To enable multiplexed imaging and analysis of spheroids, different cancer cell lines were grown in 3D on micropatterned 96-well plates with automated production of nine uniform spheroids per well. Spheroids achieve diameters of up to 600 µm, and reproducibility was experimentally validated (interwell and interplate CV(diameter) <5%). Biphoton imaging confirmed that micropatterned spheroids exhibit characteristic cell heterogeneity with distinct microregions. Furthermore, central necrosis appears at a consistent spheroid size, suggesting standardized growth.Using three reference compounds (fluorouracil, irinotecan, and staurosporine), we validated HT-29 micropatterned spheroids on an HCS platform, benchmarking against hanging-drop spheroids. Spheroid formation and imaging in a single plate accelerate assay workflow, and fixed positioning prevents structures from overlapping or sticking to the well wall, augmenting image processing reliability. Furthermore, multiple spheroids per well increase the statistical confidence sufficiently to discriminate compound mechanisms of action and generate EC50 values for endpoints of cell death, architectural change, and size within a single-pass read. Higher quality data and a more efficient HCS work chain should encourage integration of micropatterned spheroid models within fundamental research and drug discovery applications. PMID:26385905

  8. Drug cytotoxicity and signaling pathway analysis with three-dimensional tumor spheroids in a microwell-based microfluidic chip for drug screening.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongli; Gao, Dan; Liu, Hongxia; Lin, Shuo; Jiang, Yuyang

    2015-10-22

    Currently, there has been a growing need for developing in vitro models to better reflect organism response to chemotherapy at tissue level. For this reason, a microfluidic platform was developed for mimicking physiological microenvironment of solid tumor with multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) for anticancer drug screening. Importantly, the power of this system over traditional systems is that it is simple to operate and high integration in a more physiologically relevant context. As a proof of concept, long-term MTS cultures with uniform structure were realized on the microfluidic based platform. The response of doxorubicin and paclitaxel on different types of spheroids were simultaneously performed by in situ Live/Dead fluorescence stain to provide spatial distribution of dead cells as well as cytotoxicity information. In addition, the established platform combined with microplate reader was capable to determine the cytotoxicity of different sized MTS, showing a more powerful tool than cell staining examination at the end-point of assay. The HCT116 spheroids were then lysed on chip followed by signaling transduction pathway analysis. To our knowledge, the on chip drug screening study is the first to address the drug susceptibility testing and the offline detailed drug signaling pathway analysis combination on one system. Thus, this novel microfluidic platform provides a useful tool for drug screening with tumor spheroids, which is crucial for drug discovery and development. PMID:26526913

  9. Silica bioreplication preserves three-dimensional spheroid structures of human pluripotent stem cells and HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lou, Yan-Ru; Kanninen, Liisa; Kaehr, Bryan; Townson, Jason L.; Niklander, Johanna; Harjumäki, Riina; Jeffrey Brinker, C.; Yliperttula, Marjo

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures produce more in vivo-like multicellular structures such as spheroids that cannot be obtained in two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures. Thus, they are increasingly employed as models for cancer and drug research, as well as tissue engineering. It has proven challenging to stabilize spheroid architectures for detailed morphological examination. Here we overcome this issue using a silica bioreplication (SBR) process employed on spheroids formed from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells cultured in the nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC) hydrogel. The cells in the spheroids are more round and tightly interacting with each other than those in 2D cultures, and they develop microvilli-like structures on the cell membranes as seen in 2D cultures. Furthermore, SBR preserves extracellular matrix-like materials and cellular proteins. In conclusion, these findings provide the first evidence of intact hPSC spheroid architectures and similar fine structures to 2D-cultured cells, providing a pathway to enable our understanding of morphogenesis in 3D cultures.

  10. Silica bioreplication preserves three-dimensional spheroid structures of human pluripotent stem cells and HepG2 cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lou, Yan-Ru; Kanninen, Liisa; Kaehr, Bryan; Townson, Jason L.; Niklander, Johanna; Harjumäki, Riina; Jeffrey Brinker, C.; Yliperttula, Marjo

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures produce more in vivo-like multicellular structures such as spheroids that cannot be obtained in two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures. Thus, they are increasingly employed as models for cancer and drug research, as well as tissue engineering. It has proven challenging to stabilize spheroid architectures for detailed morphological examination. Here we overcome this issue using a silica bioreplication (SBR) process employed on spheroids formed from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells cultured in the nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC) hydrogel. The cells in the spheroids are more round and tightly interacting with each other than thosemore » in 2D cultures, and they develop microvilli-like structures on the cell membranes as seen in 2D cultures. Furthermore, SBR preserves extracellular matrix-like materials and cellular proteins. In conclusion, these findings provide the first evidence of intact hPSC spheroid architectures and similar fine structures to 2D-cultured cells, providing a pathway to enable our understanding of morphogenesis in 3D cultures.« less

  11. Silica bioreplication preserves three-dimensional spheroid structures of human pluripotent stem cells and HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Yan-Ru; Kanninen, Liisa; Kaehr, Bryan; Townson, Jason L.; Niklander, Johanna; Harjumäki, Riina; Jeffrey Brinker, C.; Yliperttula, Marjo

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures produce more in vivo-like multicellular structures such as spheroids that cannot be obtained in two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures. Thus, they are increasingly employed as models for cancer and drug research, as well as tissue engineering. It has proven challenging to stabilize spheroid architectures for detailed morphological examination. Here we overcome this issue using a silica bioreplication (SBR) process employed on spheroids formed from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells cultured in the nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC) hydrogel. The cells in the spheroids are more round and tightly interacting with each other than those in 2D cultures, and they develop microvilli-like structures on the cell membranes as seen in 2D cultures. Furthermore, SBR preserves extracellular matrix-like materials and cellular proteins. These findings provide the first evidence of intact hPSC spheroid architectures and similar fine structures to 2D-cultured cells, providing a pathway to enable our understanding of morphogenesis in 3D cultures. PMID:26323570

  12. Digital microfluidics for spheroid-based invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Bender, Brian F; Aijian, Andrew P; Garrell, Robin L

    2016-04-21

    Cell invasion is a key process in tissue growth, wound healing, and tumor progression. Most invasion assays examine cells cultured in adherent monolayers, which fail to recapitulate the three-dimensional nuances of the tissue microenvironment. Multicellular cell spheroids have a three-dimensional (3D) morphology and mimic the intercellular interactions found in tissues in vivo, thus providing a more physiologically relevant model for studying the tissue microenvironment and processes such as cell invasion. Spheroid-based invasion assays often require tedious, manually intensive handling protocols or the use of robotic liquid handling systems, which can be expensive to acquire, operate, and maintain. Here we describe a digital microfluidic (DμF) platform that enables formation of spheroids by the hanging drop method, encapsulation of the spheroids in collagen, and the exposure of spheroids to migration-modulating agents. Collagen sol-gel solutions up to 4 mg mL(-1), which form gels with elastic moduli up to ∼50 kPa, can be manipulated on the device. In situ spheroid migration assays show that cells from human fibroblast spheroids exhibit invasion into collagen gels, which can be either enhanced or inhibited by the delivery of exogenous migration modulating agents. Exposing fibroblast spheroids to spheroid secretions from colon cancer spheroids resulted in a >100% increase in fibroblast invasion into the collagen gel, consistent with the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype. These data show that DμF can be used to automate the liquid handling protocols for spheroid-based invasion assays and create a cell invasion model that mimics the tissue microenvironment more closely than two-dimensional culturing techniques do. A DμF platform that facilitates the creation and assaying of 3D in vitro tissue models has the potential to make automated 3D cell-based assays more accessible to researchers in the life sciences. PMID:27020962

  13. Short and long time effects of low temperature Plasma Activated Media on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Judée, Florian; Fongia, Céline; Ducommun, Bernard; Yousfi, Mohammed; Lobjois, Valérie; Merbahi, Nofel

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the regionalized antiproliferative effects of plasma-activated medium (PAM) on colon adenocarcinoma multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. PAM was generated by dielectric barrier plasma jet setup crossed by helium carrier gas. MCTS were transferred in PAM at various times after plasma exposure up to 48 hours and effect on MCTS growth and DNA damage were evaluated. We report the impact of plasma exposure duration and delay before transfer on MCTS growth and DNA damage. Local accumulation of DNA damage revealed by histone H2AX phosphorylation is observed on outermost layers and is dependent on plasma exposure. DNA damage is completely reverted by catalase addition indicating that H2O2 plays major role in observed genotoxic effect while growth inhibitory effect is maintained suggesting that it is due to others reactive species. SOD and D-mannitol scavengers also reduced DNA damage by 30% indicating that and OH* are involved in H2O2 formation. Finally, PAM is able to retain its cytotoxic and genotoxic activity upon storage at +4 °C or −80 °C. These results suggest that plasma activated media may be a promising new antitumor strategy for colorectal cancer tumors. PMID:26898904

  14. Short and long time effects of low temperature Plasma Activated Media on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judée, Florian; Fongia, Céline; Ducommun, Bernard; Yousfi, Mohammed; Lobjois, Valérie; Merbahi, Nofel

    2016-02-01

    This work investigates the regionalized antiproliferative effects of plasma-activated medium (PAM) on colon adenocarcinoma multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. PAM was generated by dielectric barrier plasma jet setup crossed by helium carrier gas. MCTS were transferred in PAM at various times after plasma exposure up to 48 hours and effect on MCTS growth and DNA damage were evaluated. We report the impact of plasma exposure duration and delay before transfer on MCTS growth and DNA damage. Local accumulation of DNA damage revealed by histone H2AX phosphorylation is observed on outermost layers and is dependent on plasma exposure. DNA damage is completely reverted by catalase addition indicating that H2O2 plays major role in observed genotoxic effect while growth inhibitory effect is maintained suggesting that it is due to others reactive species. SOD and D-mannitol scavengers also reduced DNA damage by 30% indicating that and OH* are involved in H2O2 formation. Finally, PAM is able to retain its cytotoxic and genotoxic activity upon storage at +4 °C or -80 °C. These results suggest that plasma activated media may be a promising new antitumor strategy for colorectal cancer tumors.

  15. Short and long time effects of low temperature Plasma Activated Media on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Judée, Florian; Fongia, Céline; Ducommun, Bernard; Yousfi, Mohammed; Lobjois, Valérie; Merbahi, Nofel

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the regionalized antiproliferative effects of plasma-activated medium (PAM) on colon adenocarcinoma multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), a model that mimics 3D organization and regionalization of a microtumor region. PAM was generated by dielectric barrier plasma jet setup crossed by helium carrier gas. MCTS were transferred in PAM at various times after plasma exposure up to 48 hours and effect on MCTS growth and DNA damage were evaluated. We report the impact of plasma exposure duration and delay before transfer on MCTS growth and DNA damage. Local accumulation of DNA damage revealed by histone H2AX phosphorylation is observed on outermost layers and is dependent on plasma exposure. DNA damage is completely reverted by catalase addition indicating that H2O2 plays major role in observed genotoxic effect while growth inhibitory effect is maintained suggesting that it is due to others reactive species. SOD and D-mannitol scavengers also reduced DNA damage by 30% indicating that O(2)(-)* and OH* are involved in H2O2 formation. Finally, PAM is able to retain its cytotoxic and genotoxic activity upon storage at +4 °C or -80 °C. These results suggest that plasma activated media may be a promising new antitumor strategy for colorectal cancer tumors. PMID:26898904

  16. Real-time monitoring of cisplatin cytotoxicity on three-dimensional spheroid tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Baek, NamHuk; Seo, Ok Won; Lee, Jaehwa; Hulme, John; An, Seong Soo A

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultivation is a powerful technique for monitoring and understanding diverse cellular mechanisms in developmental cancer and neuronal biology, tissue engineering, and drug development. 3D systems could relate better to in vivo models than two-dimensional (2D) cultures. Several factors, such as cell type, survival rate, proliferation rate, and gene and protein expression patterns, determine whether a particular cell line can be adapted to a 3D system. The 3D system may overcome some of the limitations of 2D cultures in terms of cell–cell communication and cell networks, which are essential for understanding differentiation, structural organization, shape, and extended connections with other cells or organs. Here, the effect of the anticancer drug cisplatin, also known as cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) or CDDP, on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generation was investigated using 3D spheroid-forming cells and real-time monitoring for 7 days. First, 12 cell lines were screened for their ability to form 3D spheroids: prostate (DU145), testis (F9), embryonic fibroblast (NIH-3T3), muscle (C2C12), embryonic kidney (293T), neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y), adenocarcinomic alveolar basal epithelial cell (A549), cervical cancer (HeLa), HeLa contaminant (HEp2), pituitary epithelial-like cell (GH3), embryonic cell (PA317), and osteosarcoma (U-2OS) cells. Of these, eight cell lines were selected: NIH-3T3, C2C12, 293T, SH-SY5Y, A549, HeLa, PA317, and U-2OS; and five underwent real-time monitoring of CDDP cytotoxicity: HeLa, A549, 293T, SH-SY5Y, and U-2OS. ATP generation was blocked 1 day after addition of 50 μM CDDP, but cytotoxicity in HeLa, A549, SH-SY5Y, and U-2OS cells could be visualized only 4 days after treatment. In 293T cells, CDDP failed to kill entirely the culture and ATP generation was only partially blocked after 1 day. This suggests potential CDDP resistance of 293T cells or metabolic clearance of the drug. Real-time monitoring and ATP

  17. Real-time monitoring of cisplatin cytotoxicity on three-dimensional spheroid tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Baek, NamHuk; Seo, Ok Won; Lee, Jaehwa; Hulme, John; An, Seong Soo A

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell cultivation is a powerful technique for monitoring and understanding diverse cellular mechanisms in developmental cancer and neuronal biology, tissue engineering, and drug development. 3D systems could relate better to in vivo models than two-dimensional (2D) cultures. Several factors, such as cell type, survival rate, proliferation rate, and gene and protein expression patterns, determine whether a particular cell line can be adapted to a 3D system. The 3D system may overcome some of the limitations of 2D cultures in terms of cell-cell communication and cell networks, which are essential for understanding differentiation, structural organization, shape, and extended connections with other cells or organs. Here, the effect of the anticancer drug cisplatin, also known as cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) or CDDP, on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generation was investigated using 3D spheroid-forming cells and real-time monitoring for 7 days. First, 12 cell lines were screened for their ability to form 3D spheroids: prostate (DU145), testis (F9), embryonic fibroblast (NIH-3T3), muscle (C2C12), embryonic kidney (293T), neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y), adenocarcinomic alveolar basal epithelial cell (A549), cervical cancer (HeLa), HeLa contaminant (HEp2), pituitary epithelial-like cell (GH3), embryonic cell (PA317), and osteosarcoma (U-2OS) cells. Of these, eight cell lines were selected: NIH-3T3, C2C12, 293T, SH-SY5Y, A549, HeLa, PA317, and U-2OS; and five underwent real-time monitoring of CDDP cytotoxicity: HeLa, A549, 293T, SH-SY5Y, and U-2OS. ATP generation was blocked 1 day after addition of 50 μM CDDP, but cytotoxicity in HeLa, A549, SH-SY5Y, and U-2OS cells could be visualized only 4 days after treatment. In 293T cells, CDDP failed to kill entirely the culture and ATP generation was only partially blocked after 1 day. This suggests potential CDDP resistance of 293T cells or metabolic clearance of the drug. Real-time monitoring and ATP

  18. II. Capsular vaso-mimicry formed by transgenic mammary tumor spheroids implanted ectopically into mouse dorsal skin fold: implications for cellular mechanisms of metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Witkiewicz, Halina

    2013-01-01

    Most cancer patients die of metastatic disease, not primary tumors, while biological mechanisms leading to metastases remain unclear and effective therapies are missing. Using a mouse dorsal skin chamber model we had observed that tumor growth and vasculature formation could be influenced by the way in vitro cultured (avascular) spheroids of N202 breast tumor cells were implanted; co-implantation of lactating breast tissue created stimulating microenvironment, whereas the absence of the graft resulted in temporary tumor dormancy. This report addressed the issue of cellular mechanisms of the vasculogenic switch that ended the dormancy. In situ ultrastructural analysis revealed that the tumors survived in ectopic microenvironment until some of host and tumor stem cells evolved independently into cells initiating the vasculogenic switch. The tumor cells that survived and proliferated under hypoxic conditions for three weeks were supported by erythrogenic autophagy of others. However, the host microenvironment first responded as it would to non-immunogenic foreign bodies, i.e., by encapsulating the tumor spheroids with collagen-producing fibroblasts. That led to a form of vaso-mimicry consisting of tumor cells amid tumor-derived erythrosomes (synonym of erythrocytes), megakaryocytes and platelets, and encapsulating them all, the host fibroblasts. Such capsular vaso-mimicry could potentially facilitate metastasis by fusing with morphologically similar lymphatic vessels or veins. Once incorporated into the host circulatory system, tumor cells could be carried away passively by blood flow, regardless of their genetic heterogeneity. The fake vascular segment would have permeability properties different from genuine vascular endothelium. The capsular vaso-mimicry was different from vasculogenic mimicry earlier observed in metastases-associated malignant tumors where channels formed by tumor cells were said to contain circulating blood. Structures similar to the vasculogenic

  19. Controllable Production of Transplantable Adult Human High-Passage Dermal Papilla Spheroids Using 3D Matrigel Culture

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yong; Sun, Ya Bin; Liu, Bing Cheng; Jiang, Jin Dou

    2014-01-01

    We have succeeded in culturing human dermal papilla (DP) cell spheroids and developed a three-dimensional (3D) Matrigel (basement membrane matrix) culture technique that can enhance and restore DP cells unique characteristics in vitro. When 1×104 DP cells were cultured on the 96-well plates precoated with Matrigel for 5 days, both passage 2 and passage 8 DP cells formed spheroidal microtissues with a diameter of 150–250 μm in an aggregative and proliferative manner. We transferred and recultured these DP spheroids onto commercial plates. Cells within DP spheres could disaggregate and migrate out, which was similar to primary DP. Moreover, we examined the expression of several genes and proteins associated with hair follicle inductivity of DP cells, such as NCAM, Versican, and α-smooth muscle actin, and confirmed that their expression level was elevated in the spheres compared with the dissociated DP cells. To examine the hair-inducing ability of DP spheres, hair germinal matrix cells (HGMCs) and DP spheres were mixed and cultured on Matrigel. Unlike the dissociated DP cells and HGMCs cocultured in two dimensions, HGMCs can differentiate into hair-like fibers under the induction of the DP spheres made from the high-passage cells (passage 8) in vitro. We are the first to show that passage 3 human HGMCs differentiate into hair-like fibers in the presence of human DP spheroids. These results suggest that the 3D Matrigel culture technique is an ideal culture model for forming DP spheroids and that sphere formation partially models the intact DP, resulting in hair induction, even by high-passage DP cells. PMID:24528213

  20. Spatial distribution of elements in the spheroids by prostate tumor cells using synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Leitao, Roberta G.; Santos, Carlos Antonio N.; Junior, Antonio Palumbo; Souza, Pedro A. V. R.; Canellas, Catarine G. L.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Nasciutti, Luiz E.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2012-05-17

    The formation of three-dimensional cell microspheres such as spheroids has attracted attention as a useful culture technique. In this study, we investigated the trace elemental distribution (mapping) in spheroids derived from tissue prostate cancer (PCa). The measurements were performed in standard geometry of 45 deg. incidence, exciting with a white beam and using an optical capillary with 20 {mu}m diameter collimation in the XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results showed that most elements analyzed presented non-uniform distribution. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed. K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution for the spheroids analyzed. Zinc presented more intense distributions in the spheroid central region for all spheroids analyzed.

  1. Pathways Regulating Spheroid Formation of Human Follicular Thyroid Cancer Cells under Simulated Microgravity Conditions: A Genetic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Riwaldt, Stefan; Bauer, Johann; Wehland, Markus; Slumstrup, Lasse; Kopp, Sascha; Warnke, Elisabeth; Dittrich, Anita; Magnusson, Nils E.; Pietsch, Jessica; Corydon, Thomas J.; Infanger, Manfred; Grimm, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Microgravity induces three-dimensional (3D) growth in numerous cell types. Despite substantial efforts to clarify the underlying mechanisms for spheroid formation, the precise molecular pathways are still not known. The principal aim of this paper is to compare static 1g-control cells with spheroid forming (MCS) and spheroid non-forming (AD) thyroid cancer cells cultured in the same flask under simulated microgravity conditions. We investigated the morphology and gene expression patterns in human follicular thyroid cancer cells (UCLA RO82-W-1 cell line) after a 24 h-exposure on the Random Positioning Machine (RPM) and focused on 3D growth signaling processes. After 24 h, spheroid formation was observed in RPM-cultures together with alterations in the F-actin cytoskeleton. qPCR indicated more changes in gene expression in MCS than in AD cells. Of the 24 genes analyzed VEGFA, VEGFD, MSN, and MMP3 were upregulated in MCS compared to 1g-controls, whereas ACTB, ACTA2, KRT8, TUBB, EZR, RDX, PRKCA, CAV1, MMP9, PAI1, CTGF, MCP1 were downregulated. A pathway analysis revealed that the upregulated genes code for proteins, which promote 3D growth (angiogenesis) and prevent excessive accumulation of extracellular proteins, while genes coding for structural proteins are downregulated. Pathways regulating the strength/rigidity of cytoskeletal proteins, the amount of extracellular proteins, and 3D growth may be involved in MCS formation. PMID:27070589

  2. Looking into Living Cell Systems: Planar Waveguide Microfluidic NMR Detector for in Vitro Metabolomics of Tumor Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Kalfe, Ayten; Telfah, Ahmad; Lambert, Jörg; Hergenröder, Roland

    2015-07-21

    The complex cell metabolism and its link to oncogenic signaling pathways have received huge interest within the last few years. But the lack of advanced analytical tools for the investigation of living cell metabolism is still a challenge to be faced. Therefore, we designed and fabricated a novel miniaturized microslot NMR detector with on-board heater integrated with a microfluidic device as NMR sample holder. For the first time, a tumor spheroid of 500 μm diameter and consisting of 9000 cells has been studied noninvasively and online for 24 h. The dynamic processes of production and degradation of 23 intra- and extracellular metabolites were monitored. Remarkably high concentrations of lactate and alanine were observed, being an indicator for a shift from oxidative to glycolytic metabolism. In summary, this methodical development has proven to be a successful analytical tool for the elucidation of cellular functions and their corresponding biochemical pathways. Additionally, the planar geometry of the microslot NMR detector allows the hyphenation with versatile lab-on-a chip (LOC) technology. This opens a new window for metabolomics studies on living cells and can be implemented into new application fields in biotechnology and life sciences. PMID:26121119

  3. Differential penetration of targeting agents into multicellular spheroids derived from human neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mairs, R.J.; Angerson, W.J.; Babich, J.W.; Murray, T. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have used a multicellular tumour spheroid model for determination of the penetration of various targeting agents of potential use in the treatment of neuroblastoma. Both the radiopharmaceutical meta-iodobenzylguanidine (mIBG) and the {beta} subunit of nerve growth factor ({beta}-NGF) distributed uniformly throughout spheroids, though the latter was poorly concentrated relative to mIBG. In contrast, the anti-neuroectodermal monoclonal antibody. UJ13A bound only to peripheral cell layers with little accumulation in the spheroid interior. Differential penetration of targeting agents may influence the choice of conjugated radionuclide which is likely to achieve maximum therapeutic benefit.

  4. Bioengineered models of solid human tumors for cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Marturano-Kruik, Alessandro; Villasante, Aranzazu; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    Summary The lack of controllable in vitro models that can recapitulate the features of solid tumors such as Ewing’s sarcoma limits our understanding of the tumor initiation and progression and impedes the development of new therapies. Cancer research still relies of the use of simple cell culture, tumor spheroids, and small animals. Tissue-engineered tumor models are now being grown in vitro to mimic the actual tumors in patients. Recently, we have established a new protocol for bioengineering the Ewing’s sarcoma, by infusing tumor cell aggregates into the human bone engineered from the patient’s mesenchymal stem cells. The bone niche allows crosstalk between the tumor cells, osteoblasts and supporting cells of the bone, extracellular matrix and the tissue microenvironment. The bioreactor platform used in these experiments also allows the implementation of physiologically relevant mechanical signals. Here, we describe a method to build an in vitro model of Ewing’s sarcoma that mimics the key properties of the native tumor and provides the tissue context and physical regulatory signals. PMID:27115504

  5. The effect of co-delivery of paclitaxel and curcumin by transferrin-targeted PEG-PE-based mixed micelles on resistant ovarian cancer in 3-D spheroids and in vivo tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sarisozen, Can; Abouzeid, Abraham H.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2014-01-01

    Multicellular 3D cancer cell culture (spheroids) resemble to in vivo tumors in terms of shape, cell morphology, growth kinetics, gene expression and drug response. However, these characteristics cause very limited drug penetration into deeper parts of the spheroids. In this study, we used multi drug resistant (MDR) ovarian cancer cell spheroid and in vivo tumor models to evaluate the co-delivery of paclitaxel (PCL) and a potent NF-κB inhibitor curcumin (CUR). PCL and CUR were co-loaded into the polyethylene glycol-phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PEG-PE) based polymeric micelles modified with Transferrin (TF) as the targeting ligand. Cytotoxicity, cellular association and accumulation into the deeper layers were investigated in the spheroids and compared with the monolayer cell culture. Comparing to non-targeted micelles, flow cytometry and confocal imaging proved significantly deeper and higher micelle penetration into the spheroids with TF-targeting. Both in monolayers and spheroids, PCL cytotoxicity was significantly increased when co-delivered with CUR in non-targeted micelles or as single agent in TF-targeted micelles, whereas TF-modification of co-loaded micelles did not further enhance the cytotoxicity. In vivo tumor inhibition studies showed good correlation with the 3D cell culture experiments, which suggests the current spheroid model can be used as an intermediate model for evaluation of co-delivery of anticancer compounds in targeted micelles. PMID:25016976

  6. Directed Induction of Functional Multi-ciliated Cells in Proximal Airway Epithelial Spheroids from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Satoshi; Gotoh, Shimpei; Tateishi, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Yuki; Korogi, Yohei; Nagasaki, Tadao; Matsumoto, Hisako; Muro, Shigeo; Hirai, Toyohiro; Ito, Isao; Tsukita, Sachiko; Mishima, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Summary Multi-ciliated airway cells (MCACs) play a role in mucociliary clearance of the lung. However, the efficient induction of functional MCACs from human pluripotent stem cells has not yet been reported. Using carboxypeptidase M (CPM) as a surface marker of NKX2-1+-ventralized anterior foregut endoderm cells (VAFECs), we report a three-dimensional differentiation protocol for generating proximal airway epithelial progenitor cell spheroids from CPM+ VAFECs. These spheroids could be induced to generate MCACs and other airway lineage cells without alveolar epithelial cells. Furthermore, the directed induction of MCACs and of pulmonary neuroendocrine lineage cells was promoted by adding DAPT, a Notch pathway inhibitor. The induced MCACs demonstrated motile cilia with a “9 + 2” microtubule arrangement and dynein arms capable of beating and generating flow for mucociliary transport. This method is expected to be useful for future studies on human airway disease modeling and regenerative medicine. PMID:26724905

  7. Directed Induction of Functional Multi-ciliated Cells in Proximal Airway Epithelial Spheroids from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Satoshi; Gotoh, Shimpei; Tateishi, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Yuki; Korogi, Yohei; Nagasaki, Tadao; Matsumoto, Hisako; Muro, Shigeo; Hirai, Toyohiro; Ito, Isao; Tsukita, Sachiko; Mishima, Michiaki

    2016-01-12

    Multi-ciliated airway cells (MCACs) play a role in mucociliary clearance of the lung. However, the efficient induction of functional MCACs from human pluripotent stem cells has not yet been reported. Using carboxypeptidase M (CPM) as a surface marker of NKX2-1(+)-ventralized anterior foregut endoderm cells (VAFECs), we report a three-dimensional differentiation protocol for generating proximal airway epithelial progenitor cell spheroids from CPM(+) VAFECs. These spheroids could be induced to generate MCACs and other airway lineage cells without alveolar epithelial cells. Furthermore, the directed induction of MCACs and of pulmonary neuroendocrine lineage cells was promoted by adding DAPT, a Notch pathway inhibitor. The induced MCACs demonstrated motile cilia with a "9 + 2" microtubule arrangement and dynein arms capable of beating and generating flow for mucociliary transport. This method is expected to be useful for future studies on human airway disease modeling and regenerative medicine. PMID:26724905

  8. Cytochrome P450 induction response in tethered spheroids as a three-dimensional human hepatocyte in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lei; Hong, Xin; Sakban, Rashidah Binte; Qu, Yinghua; Singh, Nisha Hari; McMillian, Michael; Dallas, Shannon; Silva, Jose; Sensenhauser, Carlo; Zhao, Sylvia; Lim, Heng Keang; Yu, Hanry

    2016-02-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) induction is a key risk factor of clinical drug-drug interactions that has to be mitigated in the early phases of drug discovery. Three-dimensional (3D) cultures of hepatocytes in vitro have recently emerged as a potentially better platform to recapitulate the in vivo liver structure and to maintain long-term hepatic functions as compared with conventional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures. However, the majority of published studies on 3D hepatocyte models use rat hepatocytes and the response to CYP inducers between rodents and humans is distinct. In the present study, we constructed tethered spheroids on RGD/galactose-conjugated membranes as an in vitro 3D model using cryopreserved human hepatocytes. CYP3A4 mRNA expression in the tethered spheroids was induced to a significantly greater extent than those in the collagen sandwich cultures, indicating the transcriptional regulation was more sensitive to the CYP inducers in the 3D model. Induction of CYP1A2, CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 activities in the tethered spheroids were comparable to, if not higher than that observed in the collagen sandwich cultures. The membrane-based model is readily integrated into multi-well plates for higher-throughput drug testing applications, which might be an alternative model to screen the CYP induction potential in vitro with more physiological relevance. PMID:26201057

  9. Cetuximab Reconstitutes Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Secretions and Tumor-Infiltrating Capabilities of sMICA-Inhibited NK Cells in HNSCC Tumor Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Klöss, Stephan; Chambron, Nicole; Gardlowski, Tanja; Weil, Sandra; Koch, Joachim; Esser, Ruth; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke; Morgan, Michael A; Arseniev, Lubomir; Seitz, Oliver; Köhl, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive factors, such as soluble major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related peptide A (sMICA) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), are involved in tumor immune escape mechanisms (TIEMs) exhibited by head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) and may represent opportunities for therapeutic intervention. In order to overcome TIEMs, we investigated the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), cytokine release and retargeted tumor infiltration of sMICA-inhibited patient NK cells expressing Fcγ receptor IIIa (FcγRIIIa, CD16a) in the presence of cetuximab, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (HER1) monoclonal antibody (mAb). Compared to healthy controls, relapsed HNSCC patients (n = 5), not currently in treatment revealed decreased levels of circulating regulatory NK cell subsets in relation to increased cytotoxic NK cell subpopulations. Elevated sMICA and TGF-β1 plasma levels correlated with diminished TNFα and IFN-γ release and decreased NKG2D (natural killer group 2 member D)-dependent killing of HNSCC cells by NK cells. Incubation of IL-2-activated patient NK cells with patient plasma containing elevated sMICA or sMICA analogs (shed MICA and recombinant MICA) significantly impaired NKG2D-mediated killing by down-regulation of NKG2D surface expression. Of note, CD16 surface expression levels, pro-apoptotic and activation markers, and viability of patient and healthy donor NK cell subpopulations were not affected by this treatment. Accordingly, cetuximab restored killing activity of sMICA-inhibited patient NK cells against cetuximab-coated primary HNSCC cells via ADCC in a dose-dependent manner. Rapid reconstitution of anti-tumor recognition and enhanced tumor infiltration of treated NK cells was monitored by 24 h co-incubation of HNSCC tumor spheroids with cetuximab (1 μg/ml) and was characterized by increased IFN-γ and TNFα secretion. This data show that the impaired NK cell-dependent tumor

  10. Cetuximab Reconstitutes Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Secretions and Tumor-Infiltrating Capabilities of sMICA-Inhibited NK Cells in HNSCC Tumor Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Klöss, Stephan; Chambron, Nicole; Gardlowski, Tanja; Weil, Sandra; Koch, Joachim; Esser, Ruth; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke; Morgan, Michael A.; Arseniev, Lubomir; Seitz, Oliver; Köhl, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive factors, such as soluble major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related peptide A (sMICA) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), are involved in tumor immune escape mechanisms (TIEMs) exhibited by head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) and may represent opportunities for therapeutic intervention. In order to overcome TIEMs, we investigated the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), cytokine release and retargeted tumor infiltration of sMICA-inhibited patient NK cells expressing Fcγ receptor IIIa (FcγRIIIa, CD16a) in the presence of cetuximab, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (HER1) monoclonal antibody (mAb). Compared to healthy controls, relapsed HNSCC patients (n = 5), not currently in treatment revealed decreased levels of circulating regulatory NK cell subsets in relation to increased cytotoxic NK cell subpopulations. Elevated sMICA and TGF-β1 plasma levels correlated with diminished TNFα and IFN-γ release and decreased NKG2D (natural killer group 2 member D)-dependent killing of HNSCC cells by NK cells. Incubation of IL-2-activated patient NK cells with patient plasma containing elevated sMICA or sMICA analogs (shed MICA and recombinant MICA) significantly impaired NKG2D-mediated killing by down-regulation of NKG2D surface expression. Of note, CD16 surface expression levels, pro-apoptotic and activation markers, and viability of patient and healthy donor NK cell subpopulations were not affected by this treatment. Accordingly, cetuximab restored killing activity of sMICA-inhibited patient NK cells against cetuximab-coated primary HNSCC cells via ADCC in a dose-dependent manner. Rapid reconstitution of anti-tumor recognition and enhanced tumor infiltration of treated NK cells was monitored by 24 h co-incubation of HNSCC tumor spheroids with cetuximab (1 μg/ml) and was characterized by increased IFN-γ and TNFα secretion. This data show that the impaired NK cell-dependent tumor

  11. Developing multi-cellular tumor spheroid model (MCTS) in the chitosan/collagen/alginate (CCA) fibrous scaffold for anticancer drug screening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Zheng; Zhu, Yu-Xia; Ma, Hui-Chao; Chen, Si-Nan; Chao, Ji-Ye; Ruan, Wen-Ding; Wang, Duo; Du, Feng-Guang; Meng, Yue-Zhong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a 3D MCTS-CCA system was constructed by culturing multi-cellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) in the chitosan/collagen/alginate (CCA) fibrous scaffold for anticancer drug screening. The CCA scaffolds were fabricated by spray-spinning. The interactions between the components of the spray-spun fibers were evidenced by methods of Coomassie Blue stain, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Co-culture indicated that MCF-7 cells showed a spatial growth pattern of multi-cellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) in the CCA fibrous scaffold with increased proliferation rate and drug-resistance to MMC, ADM and 5-Aza comparing with the 2D culture cells. Significant increases of total viable cells were found in 3D MCTS groups after drug administration by method of apoptotic analysis. Glucose-lactate analysis indicated that the metabolism of MCTS in CCA scaffold was closer to the tumor issue in vivo than the monolayer cells. In addition, MCTS showed the characteristic of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) which is subverted by carcinoma cells to facilitate metastatic spread. These results demonstrated that MCTS in CCA scaffold possessed a more conservative phenotype of tumor than monolayer cells, and anticancer drug screening in 3D MCTS-CCA system might be superior to the 2D culture system. PMID:26952417

  12. Development of complex-shaped liver multicellular spheroids as a human-based model for nanoparticle toxicity assessment in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dubiak-Szepietowska, Monika; Karczmarczyk, Aleksandra; Jönsson-Niedziółka, Martin; Winckler, Thomas; Feller, Karl-Heinz

    2016-03-01

    The emergence of human-based models is incontestably required for the study of complex physiological pathways and validation of reliable in vitro methods as alternative for in vivo studies in experimental animals for toxicity assessment. With this objective, we have developed and tested three dimensional environments for cells using different types of hydrogels including transglutaminase-cross-linked gelatin, collagen type I, and growth-factor depleted Matrigel. Cells grown in Matrigel exhibited the greatest cell proliferation and spheroid diameter. Moreover, analysis of urea and albumin biosynthesis revealed that the created system allowed the immortalized liver cell line HepG2 to re-establish normal hepatocyte-like properties which were not observed under the conditions of conventional cell cultures. This study presents a scalable technology for production of complex-shaped liver multicellular spheroids as a system which improves the predictive value of cell-based assays for safety and risk assessment. The time- and dose-dependent toxicity of nanoparticles demonstrates a higher cytotoxic effect when HepG2 cells grown as monolayer than embedded in hydrogels. The experimental setup provided evidence that the cell environment has significant influence on cell sensitivity and that liver spheroid is a useful and novel tool to examine nanoparticle dosing effect even at the level of in vitro studies. Therefore, this system can be applied to a wide variety of potentially hostile compounds in basic screening to provide initial warning of adverse effects and trigger subsequent analysis and remedial actions. PMID:26825373

  13. A tumor-penetrating recombinant protein anti-EGFR-iRGD enhance efficacy of paclitaxel in 3D multicellular spheroids and gastric cancer in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sha, Huizi; Li, Rutian; Bian, Xinyu; Liu, Qin; Xie, Chen; Xin, Xiaoyan; Kong, Weiwei; Qian, Xiaoping; Jiang, Xiqun; Hu, Wenjing; Liu, Baorui

    2015-09-18

    It has been a major challenge for drug penetration in solid tumor tissues because of the complicated tumor microenvironment. We have previously constructed a protein of bispecific targets and high permeability named anti-EGFR-iRGD and investigated its inhibiting cell proliferation of gastric cancer. Paclitaxel (PTX) is widely used for treating various kinds of cancer. In this paper, we investigated the effects of anti-EGFR-iRGD in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs including PTX in epidermal growth factor receptor highly expressing gastric cancer. We demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of PTX combined with anti-EGFR-iRGD on monolayer cells (2D), multicellular spheroids (3D) and tumor-bearing mice for the first time and investigated the mechanism of this synergy effect. Our results provide impetus for further studies to use anti-EGFR-iRGD with standard cytotoxic treatment regimens for enhancing therapy of gastric cancer patients. PMID:25998561

  14. Bone regeneration in calvarial defects in a rat model by implantation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell spheroids.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, Hideyuki; Furukawa, Katsuko S; Suzuki, Yukako; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Ushida, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) condensation contributes to membrane ossification by enhancing their osteodifferentiation. We investigated bone regeneration in rats using the human bone marrow-derived MSC-spheroids prepared by rotation culture, without synthetic or exogenous biomaterials. Bilateral calvarial defects (8 mm) were created in nude male rats; the left-sided defects were implanted with MSC-spheroids, β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules, or β-TCP granules + MSC-spheroids, while the right-sided defects served as internal controls. Micro-computed tomography and immunohistochemical staining for osteocalcin/osteopontin indicated formation of new, full-thickness bones at the implantation sites, but not at the control sites in the MSC-spheroid group. Raman spectroscopy revealed similarity in the spectral properties of the repaired bone and native calvarial bone. Mechanical performance of the bones in the MSC-implanted group was good (50 and 60% those of native bones, respectively). All tests showed poor bone regeneration in the β-TCP and β-TCP + MSC-spheroid groups. Thus, significant bone regeneration was achieved with MSC-spheroid implantation into bone defects, justifying further investigation. PMID:26449444

  15. Polyurethane foam/spheroid culture system using human hepatoblastoma cell line (Hep G2) as a possible new hybrid artificial liver.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Y; Shimada, M; Tsujita, E; Tanaka, S; Ijima, H; Nakazawa, K; Sakiyama, R; Fukuda, J; Ueda, T; Funatsu, K; Sugimachi, K

    2001-01-01

    The risk of xenozoonosis infections poses the greatest obstacle against the clinical application of hybrid artificial liver support system (HALSS). Primary human hepatocytes are an ideal source for HALSS, but the shortage of human livers available for hepatocyte isolation limits this modality. To resolve this issue, we used human hepatocytes with replication capacity (fetal hepatocytes, Hep G2, and Huh 7) in a polyurethane foam (PUF)/spheroid culture system in vitro, and analyzed liver functions such as ammonia removal and albumin synthesis capacity; results were compared to those of porcine hepatocytes. Human fetal hepatocytes, Hep G2, and Huh 7 formed spheroids spontaneously within 24 h in a PUF/spheroid culture system; ammonia removal activity (micromol/10(6) nuclei/h) was upregulated, as was albumin synthesis activity (microg/10(6) nuclei/day). In particular, Hep G2 spheroids demonstrated high ammonia removal and albumin synthesis activities: 85% of the ammonia removal activity and 171.7% of the albumin synthesis activity of porcine hepatocytes in the monolayer culture. These results indicate the possibility of the development of a multicapillary PUF (MC-PUF) packed-bed culture system of hepatocyte spheroids as a HALSS using Hep G2. PMID:11814114

  16. Irradiation of prolate spheroidal models of humans and animals in the near field of a small loop antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhtakia, A.; Iskander, M. F.; Durney, C. H.; Massoudi, H.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of the near-field irradiation of prolate spheroidal models of humans and animals by a small coaxial loop antenna is described. The near fields of the antenna are known exactly and hence are used to identify the suitable field parameters involved in the near-field absorption in the spheroidal model. An integral equation is formulated in terms of the transverse dyadic Green's function, and the fields radiated by the current loop are expanded in terms of the vector spherical harmonics. The extended boundary condition method is then employed to solve the integral equation. The power distribution and the average specific absorption rate (SAR) are calculated and plotted, for different human and animal models, as a function of the separation distance from the loop. It is shown that for distances less than 5λ the average SAR values oscillate about the far-field value. In particular, for d/λ < 0.4 an increase in the average SAR values was generally observed. It is also shown that in spite of the complicated nature of the near fields the absorption characteristics can still be explained in terms of the incident radiation. Furthermore, from the calculated SAR distributions at different frequencies it is shown that at all frequencies, excessive heating occurs at the surface of the spheroid while a limited absorption occurs in the central region around the major axis. This result is of particular importance in hyperthermia, where extensive efforts are being directed toward achieving deep-tissue heating by a coaxial coil carrying RF power at about 27 MHz.

  17. Study on the effects of nylon-chitosan-blended membranes on the spheroid-forming activity of human melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sung-Jan; Hsiao, Wen-Chu; Jee, Shiou-Hwa; Yu, Hsin-Su; Tsai, Tsen-Fang; Lai, Juin-Yih; Young, Tai-Horng

    2006-10-01

    Though reported limitedly in tissue engineering, modification of cellular functions can be achieved by culturing them into multicellular spheroids. We have shown melanocytes form spheroids on chitosan surface. However, how biomaterials promote spheroid formation has never been systemically investigated. In this work, nylon, which inhibits melanocyte spheroid formation, and chitosan, which promotes melanocyte spheroid formation, are used to prepare nylon/chitosan-blended membranes. Membranes composed of pure nylon, pure chitosan and various ratios of nylon and chitosan are employed to examine their effects on spheroid formation. Melanocytes show better adhesion to nylon membranes than that to chitosan membranes. In blended membranes, as more nylon is incorporated, cell adhesion increases and the trend for spheroid formation decreases. Melanocytes can only form spheroids on membranes with poorer cell adhesion. Examining the surface of the blended membranes shows phase separation of nylon and chitosan. As nylon content increases, the nylon phase on the membrane surface increases and thereby enhances cell adhesion. The opposite trend for cell adhesion and spheroid formation substantiates our hypothesis of spheroid formation on biomaterials: a balance between cell-substrate interaction and cell-cell interaction. The decrease in cell-substrate interaction tilts the balance to a state more favorable for spheroid formation. Our work can serve as a model to investigate the relative strengths of cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions and also pave way to design blended membranes with desired physical properties while preserving the spheroid-forming activity. PMID:16777216

  18. Biocompatible nanoparticles sensing the matrix metallo-proteinase 2 for the on-demand release of anticancer drugs in 3D tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Marco; Guarnieri, Daniela; Biondi, Marco; Belli, Valentina; Profeta, Martina; Raiola, Luca; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-11-01

    The balance between dose-dependent tolerability, effectiveness and toxicity of systemically administered antitumor drugs is extremely delicate. This issue highlights the striking need for targeted release of chemotherapeutic drugs within tumors. In this work, a smart strategy of drug targeting to tumors relying upon biodegradable/biocompatible nanoparticles releasing cytotoxic drugs after sensing physiological variations intrinsic to the very nature of tumor tissues is exploited. Here, the well-known over-expression of matrix metallo-proteinase 2 (MMP2) enzyme in tumors has been chosen as a trigger for the release of a cytotoxic drug. Nanoparticles made up of a biodegradable poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)--block--polyethylene glycol (PEG) copolymer (namely PELGA), blended with a tumor-activated prodrug (TAP) composed of a MMP2-sensitive peptide bound to doxorubicin (Dox) and to PLGA chain have been produced. The obtained devices are able to release Dox specifically upon MMP2 cleavage of the TAP. More interestingly, they can sense the differences in the expression levels of endogenous MMP2 protein, thus modulating drug penetration within a three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid matrix, accordingly. Therefore, the proposed nanoparticles hold promise as a useful tool for in vivo investigations aimed at an improved therapeutic efficacy of the conjugated drug payload. PMID:26340360

  19. Response of 9L rat brain tumor multicellular spheroids to single and fractionated doses of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea.

    PubMed

    Sano, Y; Hoshino, T; Barker, M; Deen, D F

    1984-02-01

    This study was designed to examine the relative effect of each of four fractions of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) against 9L rat brain tumor multicellular spheroids and to compare the results of the cell survival and growth delay assays. Similar levels of cell kill resulted when BCNU was administered either as single fractions of 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, or 6.0 micrograms/ml for 1 hr or as one to four fractions of 1.5 micrograms/ml that were administered sequentially for 1 hr each. Survival was increased if the assay was delayed until 24 hr after drug treatment, which indicates that 9L cells in spheroids recover from BCNU-induced potentially lethal damage. When BCNU was administered in 1.5-micrograms/ml fractions, plating efficiencies depended markedly on the interval between the fractions. The 12-hr protocol produced an overall higher cell kill. Fractionation schedules of 24 and 36 hr produced less cell kill than did the other schedules. Survival plateaued for the last three treatments with BCNU in the 36-hr schedule. Cells in S phase at the time of administration of the initial 1.5-micrograms/ml fraction of BCNU moved into G1- and G2-M phases by 12 hr after treatment. For time periods longer than 12 hr, cells began to appear in the BCNU-resistant S phase. Thus, the movement of cells into the drug-sensitive and -resistant phases after the first fraction correlates well with the corresponding overall cytotoxic effect produced by treatment with the combined BCNU (1.5 micrograms/ml) fractions. For a higher concentration (3.0 micrograms/ml for 1 hr), maximum cell kill was reached within the 12- to 18-hr interval, after which cell kill plateaued. Cells were not found in the S-phase fraction 12 to 36 hr after the first treatment with 3.0 micrograms/ml; maximum cell kill for the fractionated protocols resulted at these times. Therefore, BCNU, which is classified as a cell cycle-nonspecific drug, can induce a partial synchrony in 9L spheroid cells, which determines

  20. I. Embryonal vasculature formation recapitulated in transgenic mammary tumor spheroids implanted pseudo-orthotopicly into mouse dorsal skin fold: the organoblasts concept

    PubMed Central

    Witkiewicz, Halina

    2013-01-01

    Inadequate understanding of cancer biology is a problem. This work focused on cellular mechanisms of tumor vascularization. According to earlier studies, the tumor vasculature derives from host endothelial cells (angiogenesis) or their precursors of bone marrow origin circulating in the blood (neo-vasculogenesis) unlike in embryos. In this study, we observed the neo-vasculature form in multiple ways from local precursor cells. Recapitulation of primitive as well as advanced embryonal stages of vasculature formation followed co-implantation of avascular ( in vitro cultured) N202 breast tumor spheroids and homologous tissue grafts into mouse dorsal skin chambers. Ultrastructural and immunocytochemical analysis of tissue sections exposed the interactions between the tumor and the graft tissue stem cells. It revealed details of vasculature morphogenesis not seen before in either tumors or embryos. A gradual increase in complexity of the vascular morphogenesis at the tumor site reflected a range of steps in ontogenic evolution of the differentiating cells. Malignant- and surgical injury repair-related tissue growth prompted local cells to initiate extramedullar erythropoiesis and vascular patterning. The new findings included: interdependence between the extramedullar hematopoiesis and assembly of new vessels (both from the locally differentiating precursors); nucleo-cytoplasmic conversion (karyolysis) as the mechanism of erythroblast enucleation; the role of megakaryocytes and platelets in vascular pattern formation before emergence of endothelial cells; lineage relationships between hematopoietic and endothelial cells; the role of extracellular calmyrin in tissue morphogenesis; and calmyrite, a new ultrastructural entity associated with anaerobic energy metabolism. The central role of the extramedullar erythropoiesis in the formation of new vasculature (blood and vessels) emerged here as part of the tissue building process including the lymphatic system and nerves

  1. Quantitative Determination of Irinotecan and the Metabolite SN-38 by Nanoflow Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry in Different Regions of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Hummon, Amanda B.

    2015-04-01

    A new and simple method was developed to evaluate the distribution of therapeutics in three-dimensional multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) by combining serial trypsinization and nanoflow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS). This methodology was validated with quantitative measurements of irinotecan and its bioactive metabolite, SN-38, in distinct spatial regions of HCT 116 MCTS. Irinotecan showed a time-dependent permeability into MCTS with most of the drug accumulating in the core after 24 h of treatment. The amount of SN-38 detected was 30 times lower than that of the parent drug, and was more abundant in the outer rim and intermediate regions of MCTS where proliferating cells were present. This method can be used to investigate novel and established drugs. It enables investigation of drug penetration properties and identification of metabolites with spatial specificity in MCTS. The new approach has great value in facilitating the drug evaluation process.

  2. Quantitative Determination of Irinotecan and the Metabolite SN-38 by Nanoflow Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry in Different Regions of Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Hummon, Amanda B.

    2015-01-01

    A new and simple method was developed to evaluate the distribution of therapeutics in three-dimensional multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) by combining serial trypsinization and nanoflow liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS). This methodology was validated with quantitative measurements of irinotecan and its bioactive metabolite, SN-38, in distinct spatial regions of HCT 116 MCTS. Irinotecan showed a time-dependent permeability into MCTS with most of the drug accumulating in the core after 24 hours of treatment. The amount of SN-38 detected was 30 times lower than that of the parent drug, and was more abundant in the outer rim and intermediate regions of MCTS where proliferating cells were present. This method can be used to investigate novel and established drugs. It enables investigation of drug penetration properties and identification of metabolites with spatial specificity in MCTS. The new approach has great value in facilitating the drug evaluation process. PMID:25604392

  3. Rapid Generation of In Vitro Multicellular Spheroids for the Study of Monoclonal Antibody Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Phung, Yen T.; Barbone, Dario; Broaddus, V. Courtney; Ho, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    Tumor microenvironments present significant barriers to penetration by antibodies and immunoconjugates and are difficult to study in vitro. Cells cultured as monolayers typically exhibit less resistance to therapy than those grown in vivo. Therefore, it is important to develop an alternative research model that better represents in vivo tumors. We have developed a protocol to produce multicellular spheroids, a simple and more relevant model of in vivo tumors that allows for further investigations of the microenvironmental effects on drug penetration and tumor cell killing. The protocol is used to produce in vitro three-dimensional tumor spheroids from established human cancer cell lines and primary cancer cells isolated from patients without the use of any extracellular components. To study the ability of tumor-targeting immunoconjugates to penetrate these tumor spheroids in vitro, we have used an immunotoxin targeting mesothelin, a surface protein expressed in malignant mesotheliomas. This method for producing consistent, reproducible 3D spheroids may allow for improved testing of novel monoclonal antibodies and other agents for their ability to penetrate solid tumors for cancer therapy. PMID:22043235

  4. Elevated CDCP1 predicts poor patient outcome and mediates ovarian clear cell carcinoma by promoting tumor spheroid formation, cell migration and chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    He, Y; Wu, A C; Harrington, B S; Davies, C M; Wallace, S J; Adams, M N; Palmer, J S; Roche, D K; Hollier, B G; Westbrook, T F; Hamidi, H; Konecny, G E; Winterhoff, B; Chetty, N P; Crandon, A J; Oliveira, N B; Shannon, C M; Tinker, A V; Gilks, C B; Coward, J I; Lumley, J W; Perrin, L C; Armes, J E; Hooper, J D

    2016-01-28

    Hematogenous metastases are rarely present at diagnosis of ovarian clear cell carcinoma (OCC). Instead dissemination of these tumors is characteristically via direct extension of the primary tumor into nearby organs and the spread of exfoliated tumor cells throughout the peritoneum, initially via the peritoneal fluid, and later via ascites that accumulates as a result of disruption of the lymphatic system. The molecular mechanisms orchestrating these processes are uncertain. In particular, the signaling pathways used by malignant cells to survive the stresses of anchorage-free growth in peritoneal fluid and ascites, and to colonize remote sites, are poorly defined. We demonstrate that the transmembrane glycoprotein CUB-domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1) has important and inhibitable roles in these processes. In vitro assays indicate that CDCP1 mediates formation and survival of OCC spheroids, as well as cell migration and chemoresistance. Disruption of CDCP1 via silencing and antibody-mediated inhibition markedly reduce the ability of TOV21G OCC cells to form intraperitoneal tumors and induce accumulation of ascites in mice. Mechanistically our data suggest that CDCP1 effects are mediated via a novel mechanism of protein kinase B (Akt) activation. Immunohistochemical analysis also suggested that CDCP1 is functionally important in OCC, with its expression elevated in 90% of 198 OCC tumors and increased CDCP1 expression correlating with poor patient disease-free and overall survival. This analysis also showed that CDCP1 is largely restricted to the surface of malignant cells where it is accessible to therapeutic antibodies. Importantly, antibody-mediated blockade of CDCP1 in vivo significantly increased the anti-tumor efficacy of carboplatin, the chemotherapy most commonly used to treat OCC. In summary, our data indicate that CDCP1 is important in the progression of OCC and that targeting pathways mediated by this protein may be useful for the management of OCC

  5. The retinoblastoma gene in human pituitary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cryns, V.L.; Arnold, A.; Alexander, J.M.; Klibanski, A. )

    1993-09-01

    Functional inactivation of the retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor gene is important in the pathogenesis of many human tumors. Recently, the frequent occurrence of pituitary tumors was reported in mice genetically engineered to have one defective RB allele, a genetic background analogous to that of patients with familial retinoblastoma. The molecular pathogenesis of human pituitary tumors is largely unknown, and the potential role of RB gene inactivation in these neoplasms has not been examined. Consequently, the authors studied 20 human pituitary tumors (12 clinically nonfunctioning tumors, 4 somatotroph adenomas, 2 prolactinomas, and 2 corticotrophy adenomas) for tumor-specific allelic loss of the RB gene using a highly informative polymorphic locus within the gene. Control leukocyte DNA samples from 18 of these 20 patients were heterozygous at this locus, permitting genetic evaluation of their paired tumor specimens. In contrast to the pituitary tumors in the mouse model, none of these 18 human tumors exhibited RB allelic loss. These findings indicate that RB gene inactivation probably does not play an important role in the pathogenesis of common types of human pituitary tumors. 24 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Increasing 3D Matrix Rigidity Strengthens Proliferation and Spheroid Development of Human Liver Cells in a Constant Growth Factor Environment.

    PubMed

    Bomo, Jérémy; Ezan, Frédéric; Tiaho, François; Bellamri, Medjda; Langouët, Sophie; Theret, Nathalie; Baffet, Georges

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical forces influence the growth and shape of virtually all tissues and organs. Recent studies show that increased cell contractibility, growth and differentiation might be normalized by modulating cell tensions. Particularly, the role of these tensions applied by the extracellular matrix during liver fibrosis could influence the hepatocarcinogenesis process. The objective of this study is to determine if 3D stiffness could influence growth and phenotype of normal and transformed hepatocytes and to integrate extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness to tensional homeostasis. We have developed an appropriate 3D culture model: hepatic cells within three-dimensional collagen matrices with varying rigidity. Our results demonstrate that the rigidity influenced the cell phenotype and induced spheroid clusters development whereas in soft matrices, Huh7 transformed cells were less proliferative, well-spread and flattened. We confirmed that ERK1 played a predominant role over ERK2 in cisplatin-induced death, whereas ERK2 mainly controlled proliferation. As compared to 2D culture, 3D cultures are associated with epithelial markers expression. Interestingly, proliferation of normal hepatocytes was also induced in rigid gels. Furthermore, biotransformation activities are increased in 3D gels, where CYP1A2 enzyme can be highly induced/activated in primary culture of human hepatocytes embedded in the matrix. In conclusion, we demonstrated that increasing 3D rigidity could promote proliferation and spheroid developments of liver cells demonstrating that 3D collagen gels are an attractive tool for studying rigidity-dependent homeostasis of the liver cells embedded in the matrix and should be privileged for both chronic toxicological and pharmacological drug screening. PMID:26331987

  7. Calcium Electroporation: Evidence for Differential Effects in Normal and Malignant Cell Lines, Evaluated in a 3D Spheroid Model

    PubMed Central

    Madi, Moinecha; Gehl, Julie; Rols, Marie-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill efficacy–and normal cell sensitivity. Methods Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29), a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). Results The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p<0.0001) or electrochemotherapy using bleomycin (p<0.0001). Strikingly, the size of normal fibroblast spheroids was neither affected after calcium electroporation nor electrochemotherapy using bleomycin, indicating that calcium electroporation, like electrochemotherapy, will have limited adverse effects on the surrounding normal tissue when treating with calcium electroporation. The intracellular ATP level, which has previously been shown to be depleted after calcium electroporation, was measured in the spheroids after treatment. The results showed a dramatic decrease in the intracellular ATP level (p<0.01) in all four spheroid types—malignant as well as normal. Conclusion In conclusion, calcium electroporation seems to be more effective in inducing cell death in cancer cell spheroids than in a normal fibroblast spheroid, even though intracellular ATP level is depleted in all spheroid types after treatment. These results may indicate an important therapeutic window for this therapy; although further studies are needed in vivo and in patients to investigate the effect of calcium electroporation on

  8. Cytogenetics of human brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Finkernagel, S.W.; Kletz, T.; Day-Salvatore, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosome studies of 55 brain tumors, including meningiomas, gliomas, astrocyomas and pituatary adenomas, were performed. Primary and first passage cultures were successfully obtained in 75% of these samples with an average of 18 G-banded metaphases analyzed per tumor. 44% of all the brain tumors showed numerical and or structural abnormalities. 46% of the primary and 38% of the first passage cultures showed similar numerical gains/losses and complex karyotypic changes. The most frequent numerical abnormalities (n {ge} 5) included loss of chromosomes 10, 22, and Y. The structural abnormalities most often seen involved 1p, 2, 5, 7, 17q and 19. This is an ongoing study which will attempt to correlate tumor type with specific karyotypic changes and to see if any of the observed chromosomal abnormalities provide prognostic indicators.

  9. Establishment of human colon cancer cell lines from fresh tumors versus xenografts: comparison of success rate and cell line features.

    PubMed

    Dangles-Marie, Virginie; Pocard, Marc; Richon, Sophie; Weiswald, Louis-Bastien; Assayag, Franck; Saulnier, Patrick; Judde, Jean-Gabriel; Janneau, Jean-Louis; Auger, Nathalie; Validire, Pierre; Dutrillaux, Bernard; Praz, Françoise; Bellet, Dominique; Poupon, Marie-France

    2007-01-01

    Obtaining representative human colon cancer cell lines from fresh tumors is technically difficult. Using 32 tumor fragments from patients with colon cancer, the present study shows that prior xenograft leads to more efficient cell line establishment compared with direct establishment from fresh tumors (P < 0.05). From 26 tumor specimens, we successfully established 20 tumor xenografts in nude mice (77%); among 19 of these xenografts, 9 (47%) led to cell lines, including four from liver metastases. Only 3 of 31 tumor specimens (9.7%) grew immediately in vitro, and all were derived from primary tumors. To compare major phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of human colon cancer cell lines derived from the same tumor fragment using two protocols, the two pairs of cell lines obtained from 2 of 32 tumor fragments were extensively studied. They displayed similar morphology and were able to form compact spheroids. Chemosensitivity to 5-fluorouracil, CPT11, and L-OHP differed between cell lines obtained from patient tumors and those derived from xenografts. Matched cell lines shared a common core of karyotype alterations and distinctive additional chromosomal aberrations. Expression levels of genes selected for their role in oncogenesis evaluated by real-time quantitative PCR were found to be statistically correlated whatever the in vitro culture model used. In conclusion, xenotransplantation in mice of tumor fragments before establishment of cell lines enables generation of more novel human cancer cell lines for investigation of colon cancer cell biology, opening up the opportunity of reproducing the diversity of this disease. PMID:17210723

  10. Restructuring dynamics of DU 145 and LNCaP prostate cancer spheroids.

    PubMed

    Song, Hong; Jain, Shamik K; Enmon, Richard M; O'Connor, Kim C

    2004-01-01

    Neoplastic cells acquire multidrug resistance as they assemble into multicellular spheroids. Image analysis and Monte Carlo simulation provided an insight into the adhesion and motility events during spheroid restructuring in liquid-overlay culture of DU 145 and LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. Irregularly shaped, two-dimensional aggregates restructured through incremental cell movements into three-dimensional spheroids. Of the two cultures examined, restructuring was more pronounced for DU 145 aggregates. Motile DU 145 cells formed spheroids with a minimum cell overlay of 30% for 25-mers as estimated by simulation versus 5% for adhesive LNCaP cells in aggregates of the same size. Over 72 h, the texture ratio increased from 0.55 +/- 0.05 for DU 145 aggregates with projected areas exceeding 2000 microm2 to a value approaching 0.75 +/- 0.02 (P < 0.05). For LNCaP aggregates of comparable size, the increase in texture ratio was more modest, less than 15% during the same time period (P < 0.05). Combined, these data suggest that motility events govern the overall rate of spheroid restructuring. This information has application to the chemosensitization of solid tumors and kinetic modeling of spheroid production. PMID:15723561

  11. A collagen-based multicellular tumor spheroid model for evaluation of the efficiency of nanoparticle drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Le, Van-Minh; Lang, Mei-Dong; Shi, Wei-Bin; Liu, Jian-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery systems, especially those that use nanoparticles, have been the focus of research into cancer therapy during the last decade, to improve the bioavailability and delivery of anticancer drugs to specific tumor sites, thereby reducing the toxicity and side effects to normal tissues. However, the positive antitumor effects of these nanocarriers observed in conventional monolayer cultures frequently fail in vivo, due to the lack of physical and biological barriers resembling those seen in the actual body. Therefore, the collagen-based 3-D multicellular culture system, to screen new nanocarriers for drug delivery and to obtain more adequate and better prediction of therapeutic outcomes in preclinical experiments, was developed. This 3-D culture model was successfully established using optimized density of cells. Our result showed that 3-D cell colonies were successfully developed from 95-D, U87 and HCT116 cell lines respectively, after a seven-day culture in the collagen matrix. The coumarin-conjugated nanoparticles were able to penetrate the matrix gel to reach the tumor cells. The model is supposedly more accurate in reflecting/predicting the dynamics and therapeutic outcomes of candidates for drug transport in vivo, and/or investigation of tumor biology, thus speeding up the pace of discovery of novel drug delivery systems for cancer therapy. PMID:25315504

  12. Human adipose stem cells maintain proliferative, synthetic and multipotential properties when suspension cultured as self-assembling spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Kapur, S K; Wang, X; Shang, H; Yun, S; Li, X; Feng, G; Khurgel, M; Katz, A J

    2012-01-01

    Adipose Derived Stromal/Stem Cells (ASCs) have been gaining recognition as extremely versatile cell source in tissue engineering. The usefulness of ASCs in biofabrication is further enhanced by our demonstration of unique properties of these cells when they are cultured as three dimensional cellular aggregates or spheroids. As described herein, three-dimensional formulations or self-assembling ASC spheroids develop their own extracellular matrix that serves to increase the robustness of the cells to mechanical stresses. The composition of the extracellular matrix can be altered based on the external environment of the spheroids and these constructs can be grown in a reproducible manner and to a consistent size. The spheroid formulation helps preserve the viability and developmental plasticity of ASCs even in defined, serum-free media conditions. For the first time, we show that multiple generations of adherent ASCs produced from these spheroids retain their developmental plasticity and their ability to differentiate into multiple cell/tissue types. These demonstrated properties support the fact that culture expanded ASCs are an excellent candidate cellular material for “organ printing” – the approach of developing complex tissue structures from a standardized cell “ink” or cell formulation. PMID:22522924

  13. Recreating the tumor microenvironment in a bilayer, hyaluronic acid hydrogel construct for the growth of prostate cancer spheroids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xian; Gurski, Lisa A; Zhang, Chu; Harrington, Daniel A; Farach-Carson, Mary C; Jia, Xinqiao

    2012-12-01

    Cancer cells cultured in physiologically relevant, three-dimensional (3D) matrices can recapture many essential features of native tumor tissues. In this study, a hyaluronic acid (HA)-based bilayer hydrogel system that not only supports the tumoroid formation from LNCaP prostate cancer (PCa) cells, but also simulates their reciprocal interactions with the tumor-associated stroma was developed and characterized. HA hydrogels were prepared by mixing solutions of HA precursors functionalized with acrylate groups (HA-AC) and reactive thiols (HA-SH) under physiological conditions. The resultant viscoelastic gels have an average elastic modulus of 234 ± 30 Pa and can be degraded readily by hyaluronidase. The orthogonal and cytocompatible nature of the crosslinking chemistry permits facile incorporation of cytokine-releasing particles and PCa cells. In our bilayer hydrogel construct, the top layer contains heparin (HP)-decorated, HA-based hydrogel particles (HGPs) capable of releasing heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) in a sustained manner at a rate of 2.5 wt%/day cumulatively. LNCaP cells embedded in the bottom layer receive the growth factor signals from the top, and in response form enlarging tumoroids with an average diameter of 85 μm by day 7. Cells in 3D hydrogels assemble into spherical tumoroids, form close cellular contacts through E-cadherin, and show cortical organization of F-actin, whereas those plated as 2D monolayers adopt a spread-out morphology. Compared to cells cultured on 2D, the engineered tumoroids significantly increased the expression of two pro-angiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor-165 (VEGF(165)) and interleukin-8 (IL-8), both at mRNA and protein levels. Overall, the HA model system provides a useful platform for the study of tumor cell responses to growth factors and for screening of anticancer drugs targeting these pathways. PMID:22999468

  14. Recreating the Tumor Microenvironment in a Bilayer, Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogel Construct for the Growth of Prostate Cancer Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xian; Gurski, Lisa A.; Zhang, Chu; Harrington, Daniel A.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Jia, Xinqiao

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells cultured in physiologically relevant, three-dimensional (3D) matrices can recapture many essential features of native tumor tissues. In this study, a hyaluronic acid (HA)-based bilayer hydrogel system that not only supports the tumoroid formation from LNCaP prostate cancer (PCa) cells, but also simulates their reciprocal interactions with the tumor-associated stroma was developed and characterized. HA hydrogels were prepared by mixing solutions of HA precursors functionalized with acrylate groups (HA-AC) and reactive thiols (HA-SH) under physiological conditions. The resultant viscoelastic gels have an average elastic modulus of 234 ± 30 Pa and can be degraded readily by hyaluronidase. The orthogonal and cytocompatible nature of the crosslinking chemistry permits facile incorporation of cytokine-releasing particles and PCa cells. In our bilayer hydrogel construct, the top layer contains heparin (HP)-decorated, HA-based hydrogel particles (HGPs) capable of releasing heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) in a sustained manner at a rate of 2.5wt%/day cumulatively. LNCaP cells embedded in the bottom layer receive the growth factor signals from the top, and in response form enlarging tumoroids with an average diameter of 85 μm by day 7. Cells in 3D hydrogels assemble into spherical tumoroids, form close cellular contacts through E-cadherin, and show cortical organization of F-actin, whereas those plated as 2D monolayers adopt a spread-out morphology. Compared to cells cultured on 2D, the engineered tumoroids significantly increased the expression of two pro-angiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor-165 (VEGF165) and interleukin-8 (IL-8), both at mRNA and protein levels. Overall, the HA model system provides a useful platform for the study of tumor cell responses to growth factors and for screening of anticancer drugs targeting these pathways. PMID:22999468

  15. Efficient and Controlled Generation of 2D and 3D Bile Duct Tissue from Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lipeng; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Ye, Zhaohui; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-08-01

    While in vitro liver tissue engineering has been increasingly studied during the last several years, presently engineered liver tissues lack the bile duct system. The lack of bile drainage not only hinders essential digestive functions of the liver, but also leads to accumulation of bile that is toxic to hepatocytes and known to cause liver cirrhosis. Clearly, generation of bile duct tissue is essential for engineering functional and healthy liver. Differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to bile duct tissue requires long and/or complex culture conditions, and has been inefficient so far. Towards generating a fully functional liver containing biliary system, we have developed defined and controlled conditions for efficient 2D and 3D bile duct epithelial tissue generation. A marker for multipotent liver progenitor in both adult human liver and ductal plate in human fetal liver, EpCAM, is highly expressed in hepatic spheroids generated from human iPSCs. The EpCAM high hepatic spheroids can, not only efficiently generate a monolayer of biliary epithelial cells (cholangiocytes), in a 2D differentiation condition, but also form functional ductal structures in a 3D condition. Importantly, this EpCAM high spheroid based biliary tissue generation is significantly faster than other existing methods and does not require cell sorting. In addition, we show that a knock-in CK7 reporter human iPSC line generated by CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology greatly facilitates the analysis of biliary differentiation. This new ductal differentiation method will provide a more efficient method of obtaining bile duct cells and tissues, which may facilitate engineering of complete and functional liver tissue in the future. PMID:27138846

  16. MicroRNA-212 Regulates the Expression of Olfactomedin 1 and C-Terminal Binding Protein 1 in Human Endometrial Epithelial Cells to Enhance Spheroid Attachment In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Kottawatta, Kottawattage S A; So, Kam-Hei; Kodithuwakku, Suranga P; Ng, Ernest H Y; Yeung, William S B; Lee, Kai-Fai

    2015-11-01

    Successful embryo implantation requires a synchronized dialogue between a competent blastocyst and the receptive endometrium, which occurs in a limited time period known as the "window of implantation." Recent studies suggested that down-regulation of olfactomedin 1 (OLFM1) in the endometrium and fallopian tube is associated with receptive endometrium and tubal ectopic pregnancy in humans. Interestingly, the human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) induces miR-212 expression, which modulates OLFM1 and C-terminal binding protein 1 (CTBP1) expressions in mouse granulosa cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that embryo-derived hCG would increase miR-212 expression and down-regulate OLFM1 and CTBP1 expressions to favor embryo attachment onto the female reproductive tract. We found that hCG stimulated the expression of miR-212 and down-regulated OLFM1 but not CTBP1 mRNA in both human endometrial (Ishikawa) and fallopian (OE-E6/E7) epithelial cells. However, hCG suppressed the expression of OLFM1 and CTBP1 proteins in both cell lines. The 3'UTR of both OLFM1 and CTBP1 contained binding sites for miR-212. The miR-212 precursor suppressed luciferase expression, whereas the miR-212 inhibitor stimulated luciferase expression of the wild-type (WT)-OLFM1 and WT-CTBP1 reporter constructs. Furthermore, hCG (25 IU/ml) treatments stimulated trophoblastic (Jeg-3) spheroid (blastocyst surrogate) attachment onto Ishikawa and OE-E6/E7 cells. Transfection of miR-212 precursor increased Jeg-3 spheroid attachment onto Ishikawa cells and decreased OLFM1 and CTBP1 protein expressions, whereas the opposite occurred with miR-212 inhibitor. Taken together, hCG stimulated miR-212, which in turn down-regulated OLFM1 and CTBP1 expression in fallopian and endometrial epithelial cells to favor spheroid attachment. PMID:26377223

  17. MRI and MRS of human brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Hou, Bob L; Hu, Jiani

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of human brain tumors, including the primary applications and basic terminology involved. Readers who wish to know more about this broad subject should seek out the referenced books (1. Tofts (2003) Quantitative MRI of the brain. Measuring changes caused by disease. Wiley; Bradley and Stark (1999) 2. Magnetic resonance imaging, 3rd Edition. Mosby Inc; Brown and Semelka (2003) 3. MRI basic principles and applications, 3rd Edition. Wiley-Liss) or reviews (4. Top Magn Reson Imaging 17:127-36, 2006; 5. JMRI 24:709-724, 2006; 6. Am J Neuroradiol 27:1404-1411, 2006).MRI is the most popular means of diagnosing human brain tumors. The inherent difference in the magnetic resonance (MR) properties of water between normal tissues and tumors results in contrast differences on the image that provide the basis for distinguishing tumors from normal tissues. In contrast to MRI, which provides spatial maps or images using water signals of the tissues, proton MRS detects signals of tissue metabolites. MRS can complement MRI because the observed MRS peaks can be linked to inherent differences in biochemical profiles between normal tissues and tumors.The goal of MRI and MRS is to characterize brain tumors, including tumor core, edge, edema, volume, types, and grade. The commonly used brain tumor MRI protocol includes T2-weighted images and T1-weighted images taken both before and after the injection of a contrast agent (typically gadolinium: Gd). The commonly used MRS technique is either point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) or stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM). PMID:19381963

  18. Cleavage of E-cadherin and β-catenin by calpain affects Wnt signaling and spheroid formation in suspension cultures of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Konze, Sarah A; van Diepen, Laura; Schröder, Anke; Olmer, Ruth; Möller, Hanna; Pich, Andreas; Weißmann, Robert; Kuss, Andreas W; Zweigerdt, Robert; Buettner, Falk F R

    2014-04-01

    The envisioned clinical and industrial use of human pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives has given major momentum to the establishment of suspension culture protocols that enable the mass production of cells. Understanding molecular changes accompanying the transfer from adherent to suspension culture is of utmost importance because this information can have a direct effect on the development of optimized culture conditions. In this study we assessed the gene expression of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells grown in surface-adherent culture (two-dimensional) versus free-floating suspension culture spheroids (three-dimensional). We combined a quantitative proteomic approach based on stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with deep-sequencing-based transcriptomics. Cells in three-dimensional culture showed reduced expression of proteins forming structural components of cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix junctions. However, fully unexpected, we found up-regulation of secreted inhibitors of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and, concomitantly, a reduction in the level of active β-catenin and in the expression of Wnt target genes. In Western blot analyses the cysteine protease calpain was shown to cleave E-cadherin and β-catenin under three-dimensional culture conditions. Our data allowed the development of a model in which calpain cleavage of E-cadherin induces the disintegration of focal cell contacts and generates a 100-kDa E-cadherin fragment required for the formation of three-dimensional cell-cell contacts in spheroids. The parallel release of β-catenin and its potential activation by calpain cleavage are counterbalanced by the overexpression of soluble Wnt pathway inhibitors. According to this model, calpain has a key function in the interplay between E-cadherin and β-catenin-mediated intercellular adhesion and the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Supporting this model, we show that pharmacological

  19. Cleavage of E-Cadherin and β-Catenin by Calpain Affects Wnt Signaling and Spheroid Formation in Suspension Cultures of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Konze, Sarah A.; van Diepen, Laura; Schröder, Anke; Olmer, Ruth; Möller, Hanna; Pich, Andreas; Weißmann, Robert; Kuss, Andreas W.; Zweigerdt, Robert; Buettner, Falk F. R.

    2014-01-01

    The envisioned clinical and industrial use of human pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives has given major momentum to the establishment of suspension culture protocols that enable the mass production of cells. Understanding molecular changes accompanying the transfer from adherent to suspension culture is of utmost importance because this information can have a direct effect on the development of optimized culture conditions. In this study we assessed the gene expression of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells grown in surface-adherent culture (two-dimensional) versus free-floating suspension culture spheroids (three-dimensional). We combined a quantitative proteomic approach based on stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with deep-sequencing-based transcriptomics. Cells in three-dimensional culture showed reduced expression of proteins forming structural components of cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix junctions. However, fully unexpected, we found up-regulation of secreted inhibitors of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and, concomitantly, a reduction in the level of active β-catenin and in the expression of Wnt target genes. In Western blot analyses the cysteine protease calpain was shown to cleave E-cadherin and β-catenin under three-dimensional culture conditions. Our data allowed the development of a model in which calpain cleavage of E-cadherin induces the disintegration of focal cell contacts and generates a 100-kDa E-cadherin fragment required for the formation of three-dimensional cell–cell contacts in spheroids. The parallel release of β-catenin and its potential activation by calpain cleavage are counterbalanced by the overexpression of soluble Wnt pathway inhibitors. According to this model, calpain has a key function in the interplay between E-cadherin and β-catenin-mediated intercellular adhesion and the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Supporting this model, we show that

  20. Spheroid-Based In Vitro Angiogenesis Model.

    PubMed

    Pfisterer, Larissa; Korff, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In vitro models mimicking capillary sprouting are important tools to investigate the tumor angiogenesis, developmental blood vessel formation, and pathophysiological remodeling processes of the capillary system in the adult. With this focus, in 1998 Korff et al. introduced endothelial cell (EC) spheroids as a three-dimensional in vitro model resembling angiogenic responses and sprouting behavior [1]. As such, EC spheroids are capable of giving rise to capillary-like sprouts which are relatively close to the physiologically and genetically programmed arrangement of endothelial cells in vessels. Co-culture spheroids consisting of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells form a spheroidal core composed of smooth muscle cells and an outer monolayer of endothelial cells, similar to the physiological architecture of larger blood vessels. In practise, a defined number of endothelial cells are cultured in a round-bottom well plate or in "hanging drops" to allow the formation and arrangement of the spheroidal three-dimensional structure. Subsequently, they are harvested and embedded in a collagen gel to allow outgrowth of endothelial cell sprouts originating from each spheroid. To evaluate the pro- or antiangiogenic impact of a cytokine or compound, the number and length of sprouts is determined. PMID:27172953

  1. Development and Characterization of a Scaffold-Free 3D Spheroid Model of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Human Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Philippe; Moritz, Wolfgang; Kelm, Jens M; Ullrich, Nina D; Agarkova, Irina; Anson, Blake D; Suter, Thomas M; Zuppinger, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Cardiomyocytes (CMs) are terminally differentiated cells in the adult heart, and ischemia and cardiotoxic compounds can lead to cell death and irreversible decline of cardiac function. As testing platforms, isolated organs and primary cells from rodents have been the standard in research and toxicology, but there is a need for better models that more faithfully recapitulate native human biology. Hence, a new in vitro model comprising the advantages of 3D cell culture and the availability of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) of human origin was developed and characterized. Human CMs derived from iPSCs were studied in standard 2D culture and as cardiac microtissues (MTs) formed in hanging drops. Two-dimensional cultures were examined using immunofluorescence microscopy and western blotting, while the cardiac MTs were subjected to immunofluorescence, contractility, and pharmacological investigations. iPSC-derived CMs in 2D culture showed well-formed myofibrils, cell-cell contacts positive for connexin-43, and other typical cardiac proteins. The cells reacted to prohypertrophic growth factors with a substantial increase in myofibrils and sarcomeric proteins. In hanging drop cultures, iPSC-derived CMs formed spheroidal MTs within 4 days, showing a homogeneous tissue structure with well-developed myofibrils extending throughout the whole spheroid without a necrotic core. MTs showed spontaneous contractions for more than 4 weeks that were recorded by optical motion tracking, sensitive to temperature and responsive to electrical pacing. Contractile pharmacology was tested with several agents known to modulate cardiac rate and viability. Calcium transients underlay the contractile activity and were also responsive to electrical stimulation, caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release, and extracellular calcium levels. A three-dimensional culture using iPSC-derived human CMs provides an organoid human-based cellular platform that is free of necrosis and recapitulates vital cardiac

  2. Establishment of a human multiple myeloma xenograft model in the chicken to study tumor growth, invasion and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Martowicz, Agnieszka; Kern, Johann; Gunsilius, Eberhard; Untergasser, Gerold

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM), a malignant plasma cell disease, remains incurable and novel drugs are required to improve the prognosis of patients. Due to the lack of the bone microenvironment and auto/paracrine growth factors human MM cells are difficult to cultivate. Therefore, there is an urgent need to establish proper in vitro and in vivo culture systems to study the action of novel therapeutics on human MM cells. Here we present a model to grow human multiple myeloma cells in a complex 3D environment in vitro and in vivo. MM cell lines OPM-2 and RPMI-8226 were transfected to express the transgene GFP and were cultivated in the presence of human mesenchymal cells and collagen type-I matrix as three-dimensional spheroids. In addition, spheroids were grafted on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of chicken embryos and tumor growth was monitored by stereo fluorescence microscopy. Both models allow the study of novel therapeutic drugs in a complex 3D environment and the quantification of the tumor cell mass after homogenization of grafts in a transgene-specific GFP-ELISA. Moreover, angiogenic responses of the host and invasion of tumor cells into the subjacent host tissue can be monitored daily by a stereo microscope and analyzed by immunohistochemical staining against human tumor cells (Ki-67, CD138, Vimentin) or host mural cells covering blood vessels (desmin/ASMA). In conclusion, the onplant system allows studying MM cell growth and angiogenesis in a complex 3D environment and enables screening for novel therapeutic compounds targeting survival and proliferation of MM cells. PMID:25993267

  3. PTEN: Multiple Functions in Human Malignant Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Milella, Michele; Falcone, Italia; Conciatori, Fabiana; Cesta Incani, Ursula; Del Curatolo, Anais; Inzerilli, Nicola; Nuzzo, Carmen M. A.; Vaccaro, Vanja; Vari, Sabrina; Cognetti, Francesco; Ciuffreda, Ludovica

    2015-01-01

    PTEN is the most important negative regulator of the PI3K signaling pathway. In addition to its canonical, PI3K inhibition-dependent functions, PTEN can also function as a tumor suppressor in a PI3K-independent manner. Indeed, the PTEN network regulates a broad spectrum of biological functions, modulating the flow of information from membrane-bound growth factor receptors to nuclear transcription factors, occurring in concert with other tumor suppressors and oncogenic signaling pathways. PTEN acts through its lipid and protein phosphatase activity and other non-enzymatic mechanisms. Studies conducted over the past 10 years have expanded our understanding of the biological role of PTEN, showing that in addition to its ability to regulate proliferation and cell survival, it also plays an intriguing role in regulating genomic stability, cell migration, stem cell self-renewal, and tumor microenvironment. Changes in PTEN protein levels, location, and enzymatic activity through various molecular mechanisms can generate a continuum of functional PTEN levels in inherited syndromes, sporadic cancers, and other diseases. PTEN activity can indeed, be modulated by mutations, epigenetic silencing, transcriptional repression, aberrant protein localization, and post-translational modifications. This review will discuss our current understanding of the biological role of PTEN, how PTEN expression and activity are regulated, and the consequences of PTEN dysregulation in human malignant tumors. PMID:25763354

  4. Primary-like human hepatocytes genetically engineered to obtain proliferation competence display hepatic differentiation characteristics in monolayer and organotypical spheroid cultures.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Natalie; Hansen, Max; Miethbauer, Sebastian; Schmidtke, Kai-Uwe; Anderer, Ursula; Lupp, Amelie; Sperling, Sebastian; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg; Scheibner, Katrin; Küpper, Jan-Heiner

    2016-03-01

    Primary human hepatocytes are in great demand during drug development and in hepatology. However, both scarcity of tissue supply and donor variability of primary cells create a need for the development of alternative hepatocyte systems. By using a lentivirus vector system to transfer coding sequences of Upcyte® proliferation genes, we generated non-transformed stable hepatocyte cultures from human liver tissue samples. Here, we show data on newly generated proliferation-competent HepaFH3 cells investigated as conventional two-dimensional monolayer and as organotypical three-dimensional (3D) spheroid culture. In monolayer culture, HepaFH3 cells show typical cobblestone-like hepatocyte morphology and anchorage-dependent growth for at least 20 passages. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that characteristic hepatocyte marker proteins cytokeratin 8, human serum albumin, and cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 were expressed. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that expression levels of analyzed phase I CYP enzymes were at similar levels compared to those of cultured primary human hepatocytes and considerably higher than in the liver carcinoma cell line HepG2. Additionally, transcripts for phase II liver enzymes and transporter proteins OATP-C, MRP2, Oct1, and BSEP were present in HepaFH3. The cells produced urea and converted model compounds such as testosterone, diclofenac, and 7-OH-coumarin into phases I and II metabolites. Interestingly, phases I and II enzymes were expressed at about the same levels in convenient monolayer cultures and complex 3D spheroids. In conclusion, HepaFH3 cells and related primary-like hepatocyte lines seem to be promising tools for in vitro research of liver functions and as test system in drug development and toxicology analysis. PMID:26715207

  5. N -Methyl- N -nitrosourea-induced Renal Tumors in Rats: Immunohistochemical Comparison to Human Wilms Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Kinoshita, Yuichi; Emoto, Yuko; Kimura, Ayako; Uehara, Norihisa; Yuri, Takashi; Shikata, Nobuaki; Tsubura, Airo

    2013-01-01

    N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced renal tumors in rats and Wilms tumors in humans were compared. Renal mesenchymal tumors (RMTs) and nephroblastomas (blastemal and epithelial components) in female Lewis rats treated with a single intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg/kg MNU at birth and Wilms tumors (blastemal, epithelial and mesenchymal components) in humans were analyzed for the expression of pancytokeratin (CK), vimentin, p63, α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), desmin, S-100, CD57, CD117/c-kit, Wilms tumor 1 protein (WT1) and β-catenin. The mesenchymal components of rat RMTs and human Wilms tumors expressed vimentin, SMA and β-catenin. The blastemal components of rat nephroblastomas and human Wilms tumors expressed vimentin, CD117/c-kit and β-catenin. The epithelial components of rat nephroblastomas and human Wilms tumors expressed vimentin and β-catenin. WT1 was expressed in different cellular components of rat tumors as compared with human Wilms tumors; the expression was seen in mesenchymal tumors and blastemal components of nephroblastomas in rats and epithelial components in human Wilms tumors. CK, p63 and CD57 were not expressed in rat RMTs or nephroblastomas, while CK and WT1 were expressed in epithelial components and CD57 was expressed in blastemal and epithelial components of human Wilms tumors. Rat and human tumors were universally negative for the expression of desmin and S-100. The immunohistochemical characteristics of rat renal tumors and human Wilms tumors may provide valuable information on the differences in renal oncogenesis and biology between the two species. PMID:23914056

  6. Surface Tension Guided Hanging-Drop: Producing Controllable 3D Spheroid of High-Passaged Human Dermal Papilla Cells and Forming Inductive Microtissues for Hair-Follicle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bojie; Miao, Yong; Wang, Jin; Fan, Zhexiang; Du, Lijuan; Su, Yongsheng; Liu, Bingcheng; Hu, Zhiqi; Xing, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    Human dermal papilla (DP) cells have been studied extensively when grown in the conventional monolayer. However, because of great deviation from the real in vivo three-dimensional (3D) environment, these two-dimensional (2D) grown cells tend to lose the hair-inducible capability during passaging. Hence, these 2D caused concerns have motivated the development of novel 3D culture techniques to produce cellular microtissues with suitable mimics. The hanging-drop approach is based on surface tension-based technique and the interaction between surface tension and gravity field that makes a convergence of liquid drops. This study used this technique in a converged drop to form cellular spheroids of dermal papilla cells. It leads to a controllable 3Dspheroid model for scalable fabrication of inductive DP microtissues. The optimal conditions for culturing high-passaged (P8) DP spheroids were determined first. Then, the morphological, histological and functional studies were performed. In addition, expressions of hair-inductive markers including alkaline phosphatase, α-smooth muscle actin and neural cell adhesion molecule were also analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR, immunostaining and immunoblotting. Finally, P8-DP microtissues were coimplanted with newborn mouse epidermal cells (EPCs) into nude mice. Our results indicated that the formation of 3D microtissues not only endowed P8-DP microtissues many similarities to primary DP, but also confer these microtissues an enhanced ability to induce hair-follicle (HF) neogenesis in vivo. This model provides a potential to elucidate the native biology of human DP, and also shows the promising for the controllable and scalable production of inductive DP cells applied in future follicle regeneration. PMID:26886167

  7. Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts Are Susceptible to Formation of Human Lymphocytic Tumors1

    PubMed Central

    Bondarenko, Gennadiy; Ugolkov, Andrey; Rohan, Stephen; Kulesza, Piotr; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Gursel, Demirkan; Mathews, Jeremy; O’Halloran, Thomas V.; Wei, Jian J.; Mazar, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models have emerged as a new approach to evaluate the effects of cancer drugs on patients’ personalized tumor grafts enabling to select the best treatment for the cancer patient and providing a new tool for oncology drug developers. Here, we report that human tumors engrafted in immunodeficient mice are susceptible to formation of B-and T-cell PDX tumors. We xenografted human primary and metastatic tumor samples into immunodeficient mice and found that a fraction of PDX tumors generated from patients’ samples of breast, colon, pancreatic, bladder and renal cancer were histologically similar to lymphocytic neoplasms. Moreover, we found that the first passage of breast and pancreatic cancer PDX tumors after initial transplantation of the tumor pieces from the same human tumor graft could grow as a lymphocytic tumor in one mouse and as an adenocarcinoma in another mouse. Whereas subcutaneous PDX tumors resembling human adenocarcinoma histology were slow growing and non-metastatic, we found that subcutaneous PDX lymphocytic tumors were fast growing and formed large metastatic lesions in mouse lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and spleen. PDX lymphocytic tumors were comprised of B-cells which were Epstein-Barr virus positive and expressed CD45 and CD20. Because B-cells are typically present in malignant solid tumors, formation of B-cell tumor may evolve in a wide range of PDX tumor models. Although PDX tumor models show great promise in the development of personalized therapy for cancer patients, our results suggest that confidence in any given PDX tumor model requires careful screening of lymphocytic markers. PMID:26476081

  8. Experimental chemotherapy of human tumors heterotransplanted in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Giovanella, B C

    1980-01-01

    Human tumors heterotransplanted in nude mice offer the most realistic model for experimental chemotherapy of human neoplasms. Almost all the known human malignancies have been successfully transplanted in the nudes, although the rate of takes varies considerably between different tumor types. So far, a good correlation has been observed between the results obtained treating with the same drug the same tumor in the patient and in the nude mouse. Our experience in this field is, however, still too limited for the direct extrapolation of chemotherapeutic results obtained in the nudes to human tumors. PMID:6998362

  9. Light Scattering by Spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ya-Ming; Ji, Xia

    Nowadays, with the development of technology, particles with size at nanoscale have been synthesized in experiments. It is noticed that anisotropy is an unavoidable problem in the production of nanospheres. Besides, nonspherical nanoparticles have also been extensively used in experiments. Comparing with spherical model, spheroidal model can give a better description for the characteristics of nonspherical particles. Thus the study of analytical solution for light scattering by spheroidal particles has practical implications. By expanding incident, scattered, and transmitted electromagnetic fields in terms of appropriate vector spheroidal wave functions, an analytic solution is obtained to the problem of light scattering by spheroids. Unknown field expansion coefficients can be determined with the combination of boundary conditions and rotational-translational addition theorems for vector spheroidal wave functions. Based on the theoretical derivation, a Fortran code has been developed to calculate the extinction cross section and field distribution, whose results agree well with those obtain by FDTD simulation. This research is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China No. 91230203.

  10. Scalable production of controllable dermal papilla spheroids on PVA surfaces and the effects of spheroid size on hair follicle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Ching; Chan, Chih-Chieh; Lin, Wei-Ting; Chiu, Hsien-Yi; Tsai, Ren-Yeu; Tsai, Tsung-Hua; Chan, Jung-Yi; Lin, Sung-Jan

    2013-01-01

    Organ size and numbers are vital issues in bioengineering for hair follicle (HF) regeneration. Murine HF dermal papilla (DP) cells are able to induce HF neogenesis when transplanted as aggregates. However, how the preparation of murine and human DP aggregates affects HF inductivity and the size of regenerated HF is yet to be determined. Here we report a scalable method for production of controllable human and rat DP spheroids in general labs for reproducible experiments. Compared with more hydrophobic polyethylene and poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol), DP cells are poorly adhesive to hydrophilic polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Seeded in PVA-coated 96-welled commercial PCR tube arrays, DP cells quickly aggregate into single spheroids with progressive compaction. Varying seeded cell numbers and culture periods enables us to control the size and cell number of the spheroids. The spheroids obtained have high viability and preserve DP characters. A proof of principle experiment was conducted to examine the size effect on the efficiency and efficacy of HF regeneration. We found that both human and rat DP spheroids are able to induce HF neogenesis and larger DP spheroids exhibit higher HF inductivity. However, the average diameter of regenerated hair fiber did not significantly change with the increasing size of transplanted DP spheroids. The result suggests that an appropriate size of DP spheroid is essential for HF inductivity, but its size cannot be directly translated to a thicker regenerated hair. Our results also have implications on the efficiency and efficacy in the regeneration of other epithelial organs. PMID:23092862

  11. Heterogeneity in multicell spheroids induced by alterations in the external oxygen and glucose concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Freyer, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    Multicell tumor spheroids are currently being used as in vitro models for investigations of tumor therapy, based on the concept that spheroids exhibit many of the growth characteristics and cell subpopulations of tumors in vivo. At present, the factors which regulate cell proliferation, clonogenicity and viability in spheroids are unknown, as are the effects of alterations in these critical factors on therapeutic results. The symmetrical structure of the EMT6/Ro spheroid and the ease of manipulating the external environment are key features of this spheroid system which are used to investigate the role of oxygen and glucose in the control of spheroid growth and the development of cell subpopulations. A technique is developed for selectivity dissociating a spheroid population into fractions of cells originating from known locations in the spheroid structure. Characterization of these cell subpopulations demonstrates that outer cells are similar to an exponential cell population, while inner region cells are not proliferating and have a reduced cell volume and clonogenic capacity. Oxygen and glucose concentrations at critical depths in the spheroid were determined. It is concluded that the oxygen and glucose supply to cells in spheroids is critical in determining the initial onset of central necrosis. 217 references, 32 figures, 15 tables. (ACR)

  12. Human tumor antigens identified with monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    AlSedairy, S.T.

    1987-01-01

    MoAbLc1 (IgM) and MoAbLc2 (IgG/sub 2a/) were produced against human lung carcinoma cell line (ChaGo). Lc1 recognizes a approx. = 330-kd/approx. = 310-kd glycoprotein complexes, and Lc2 recognizes a approx. = 60-kd/approx. = 47-kd protein complex. With a panel of cell lines of different tissue origin, Lc1 showed a more restricted reactivity to ChaGo; it cross-reacted with another lung carcinoma cell line (SK-Lc-2) and two breast carcinoma cell lines, but failed to react with cell lines of fetal lung, of colon, esophageal, prostate, stomach, and ovarian carcinomas, of B and T lymphoblastoid cells, neuroblastomas, glioblastoma, astrocytoma, and human peripheral blood lymphocytes. New and improved methods were developed for the production of indium-111-labeled MoAbs for tumor imaging. To facilitate the application of bicyclic anhydride diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (BADTPA) to In-111 labeling of antibodies, we have modified the original method by using C-14-labeled BADTPA, which allows precise quantitation of DTPA molecules incorporated. A new heterobifunctional reagent, 2,6-dioxo-N-(carboxyl)morpholine (DCM) was synthesized for chelating In-111 to MoAbs, and demonstrated higher retention of immunoreactivity of the labeled antibody.

  13. Does nutrition support stimulate tumor growth in humans?

    PubMed

    Bossola, Maurizio; Pacelli, Fabio; Rosa, Fausto; Tortorelli, Antonio; Doglietto, Giovan Battista

    2011-04-01

    Many studies have been conducted to ascertain if nutrition support (NS), either as parenteral nutrition (PN) or enteral nutrition (EN), stimulates tumor growth and causes cancer progression, but after almost 30 years, the question remains at least in part unresolved. In this study, previous studies were reviewed to evaluate the effect of NS on tumor growth, tumor proliferation, tumor apoptosis, and cancer-related survival in humans. MEDLINE and PubMed were searched using combinations of the following keywords: PN, EN, tumor growth, tumor proliferation, tumor apoptosis, arginine, ω-3 fatty acids, and glutamine. Unfortunately, the effect of nutrition support on tumor growth has been assessed only in terms of tumor proliferation, whereas the interferences on tumor apoptosis have never been determined. Overall, the results seem conflicting and inconclusive. Similarly, it remains unknown if PN or EN enriched with specific nutrients such as arginine, ω-3 fatty acids, and glutamine can affect tumor growth in humans. It is hoped that further studies will elucidate if NS with conventional or specific nutrients stimulates tumor proliferation, interferes with tumor apoptosis, and causes cancer progression. PMID:21447771

  14. Evaluation of Consistency in Spheroid Invasion Assays

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros Castillo, Liliana R.; Oancea, Andrei-Dumitru; Stüllein, Christian; Régnier-Vigouroux, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids embedded in a matrix represent invaluable tools to analyze cell invasion. Spheroid sizes and invasiveness are the main observables easily measurable to evaluate effects of biological or pharmaceutical manipulations on invasion. They largely account for these 3-D platforms variability, leading to flaws in data interpretation. No method has been established yet that characterizes this variability and guarantees a reliable use of 3-D platforms. Spheroid initial/end sizes and invasiveness were systematically analyzed and compared in spheroids of U87MG cells generated by three different methods and embedded at different times in a collagen matrix. A normality test was used to characterize size distribution. We introduced the linearity-over-yield analysis as a novel mathematical tool to assess end sizes and invasion reproducibility. We further provide a proof of concept by applying these tools to the analysis of a treatment known to be effective beforehand. We demonstrate that implementation of these statistical and mathematical tools warranted a confident quantification and interpretation of in 3-D conducted assays. We propose these tools could be incorporated in a guideline for generation and use of 3-D platforms. PMID:27334575

  15. Establishment and Characterization of a Human Neuroendocrine Tumor Xenograft.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaoying; Zhang, Le; Serra, Stefano; Law, Calvin; Wei, Alice; Stockley, Tracy L; Ezzat, Shereen; Asa, Sylvia L

    2016-06-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are increasing in incidence yet the cause of these tumors remains unknown. Familial associations have shed light on the genetic basis of some of these tumors, but sporadic tumors seem to have primarily epigenetic dysregulation. The rarity of cell lines and animal models has been a barrier to studies of treatment modalities. We set out to develop a xenograft model of gastrointestinal NETs. Primary human NETs were collected at the time of surgery under sterile conditions and xenografted into the flanks of immunodeficient mice. Tumor growth was measured and when tumors reached 1500 mm(3), they were excised and half was re-xenografted through multiple generations. The other half was bisected; a part was frozen and a part was fixed for morphologic and immunohistochemical characterization as well as molecular validation of fidelity of a successful xenograft. Of 106 human NETs, seven were successfully engrafted of which only one tumor was successfully propagated for eight passages. Two years later, the tumor retains its neuroendocrine features and similarity to the original primary human tumor. It has retained expression of keratin as well as chromogranin A reactivity. The establishment of a NET xenograft provides a model for further study of the biological behavior of these tumors and can be used to examine the in vivo effects of various medical and targeted radiotherapeutic agents on tumor growth. PMID:27067082

  16. Digital microfluidics for automated hanging drop cell spheroid culture.

    PubMed

    Aijian, Andrew P; Garrell, Robin L

    2015-06-01

    Cell spheroids are multicellular aggregates, grown in vitro, that mimic the three-dimensional morphology of physiological tissues. Although there are numerous benefits to using spheroids in cell-based assays, the adoption of spheroids in routine biomedical research has been limited, in part, by the tedious workflow associated with spheroid formation and analysis. Here we describe a digital microfluidic platform that has been developed to automate liquid-handling protocols for the formation, maintenance, and analysis of multicellular spheroids in hanging drop culture. We show that droplets of liquid can be added to and extracted from through-holes, or "wells," and fabricated in the bottom plate of a digital microfluidic device, enabling the formation and assaying of hanging drops. Using this digital microfluidic platform, spheroids of mouse mesenchymal stem cells were formed and maintained in situ for 72 h, exhibiting good viability (>90%) and size uniformity (% coefficient of variation <10% intraexperiment, <20% interexperiment). A proof-of-principle drug screen was performed on human colorectal adenocarcinoma spheroids to demonstrate the ability to recapitulate physiologically relevant phenomena such as insulin-induced drug resistance. With automatable and flexible liquid handling, and a wide range of in situ sample preparation and analysis capabilities, the digital microfluidic platform provides a viable tool for automating cell spheroid culture and analysis. PMID:25510471

  17. Comparative Epigenomics of Human and Mouse Mammary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Demircan, Berna; Dyer, Lisa M.; Gerace, Mallory; Lobenhofer, Edward K.; Robertson, Keith D.; Brown, Kevin D.

    2010-01-01

    Gene silencing by aberrant epigenetic chromatin alteration is a well-recognized event contributing to tumorigenesis. While genetically engineered tumor-prone mouse models have proven a powerful tool in understanding many aspects of carcinogenesis, to date few studies have focused on epigenetic alterations in mouse tumors. To uncover epigenetically silenced tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) in mouse mammary tumor cells, we conducted initial genome-wide screening by combining the treatment of cultured cells with the DNA demethylating drug 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-azadC) and the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) with expression microarray. By conducting this initial screen on EMT6 cells and applying protein function and genomic structure criteria to genes identified as upregulated in response to 5-azadC/TSA, we were able to identify 2 characterized breast cancer TSGs (Timp3 and Rprm) and 4 putative TSGs (Atp1B2, Dusp2, FoxJ1 and Smpd3) silenced in this line. By testing a panel of ten mouse mammary tumor lines, we determined that each of these genes is commonly hypermethylated, albeit with varying frequency. Furthermore, by examining a panel of human breast tumor lines and primary tumors we observed that the human orthologs of ATP1B2, FOXJ1 and SMPD3 are aberrantly hypermethylated in the human disease while DUSP2 was not hypermethylated in primary breast tumors. Finally, we examined hypermethylation of several genes targeted for epigenetic silencing in human breast tumors in our panel of ten mouse mammary tumor lines. We observed that the orthologs of Cdh1, RarB, Gstp1, RassF1 genes were hypermethylated, while neither Dapk1 nor Wif1 were aberrantly methylated in this panel of mouse tumor lines. From this study, we conclude that there is significant, but not absolute, overlap in the epigenome of human and mouse mammary tumors. PMID:18836996

  18. Ovarian cancer spheroids use myosin-generated force to clear the mesothelium

    PubMed Central

    Iwanicki, Marcin P.; Davidowitz, Rachel A.; Ng, Mei Rosa; Besser, Achim; Muranen, Taru; Merritt, Melissa; Danuser, Gaudenz; Ince, Tan; Brugge, Joan S.

    2011-01-01

    Dissemination of ovarian tumors involves the implantation of cancer spheroids into the mesothelial monolayer on the walls of peritoneal and pleural cavity organs. Biopsies of tumors attached to peritoneal organs show that mesothelial cells are not present under tumor masses. We have developed a live, image-based in vitro model in which interactions between tumor spheroids and mesothelial cells can be monitored in real time to provide spatial and temporal understanding of mesothelial clearance. Here we provide evidence that ovarian cancer spheroids utilize integrin – and talin - dependent activation of myosin and traction force to promote mesothelial cells displacement from underneath a tumor cell spheroid. These results suggest that ovarian tumor cell clusters gain access to the sub-mesothelial environment by exerting force on the mesothelial cells lining target organs, driving migration and clearance of the mesothelial cells. PMID:22303516

  19. Establishment and characterization of five new human renal tumor xenografts.

    PubMed Central

    Beniers, A. J.; Peelen, W. P.; Schaafsma, H. E.; Beck, J. L.; Ramaekers, F. C.; Debruyne, F. M.; Schalken, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Ten different human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) primary tumors were xenografted into BALB/c nu/nu mice. Five of the tumors (NU-10, NU-12, NU-20, NU-22, and NU-28) gave rise to serially transplantable tumors that were further characterized. Histology, DNA index, immunohistochemical characteristics, growth rate, and clonogenic potential were followed from primary tumor to the 5th to 15th transplant passage. Only one of the tumors (NU-20) showed remarkable instability for all tested parameters in the first five transplant passages. Histology of the other tumors was essentially the same to the histology of the primary tumors, although differences between human and host-derived vessels were apparent. DNA index values in general showed a trend toward an aneuploid character of the xenografts. Immunohistochemical analyses showed a loss of intensity of staining but a concomitant rise in the fraction of positively staining cells with antibodies against cytokeratins, vimentin, tumor-associated antigens, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I antigens. Human leukocyte antigen class II antigen expression showed a loss of intensity as well as a decrease in the fraction of positive cells. Tumor doubling time was lowest in transplant passage number 0, and stable growth was noticed in transplant passages 1 through 4. Clonogenic potential of four of the lines was higher for the xenografts than for the primary tumors. The authors conclude that, on xenografting, histologic characteristics of the primary tumor are essentially conserved. Progression in the first transplant passages, however, results in tumors with a more aggressive character. Images Figure 1 PMID:1739137

  20. Detection of Human Polyomavirus 7 in human thymic epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rennspiess, Dorit; Pujari, Sreedhar; Keijzers, Marlies; Abdul-Hamid, Myrurgia A.; Hochstenbag, Monique; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Kurz, Anna Kordelia; Speel, Ernst-Jan; Haugg, Anke; Pastrana, Diana V.; Buck, Christopher B.; De Baets, Marc H.; zur Hausen, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although the molecular genetics possibly underlying the pathogenesis of human thymoma have been extensively studied, its etiology remains poorly understood. Since murine polyomavirus consistently induces thymomas in mice, we assessed the presence of the novel human polyomavirus 7 (HPyV7) in human thymic epithelial tumors. Methods HPyV7-DNA Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), DNA-PCR and immuno-histochemistry (IHC) were performed in 37 thymomas. Of these, 26 were previously diagnosed with myasthenia gravis (MG). In addition, 20 thymic hyperplasias and 20 fetal thymic tissues were tested. Results HPyV7-FISH revealed specific nuclear hybridization signals within the neoplastic epithelial cells of 23 thymomas (62.2%). With some exceptions, the HPyV7-FISH data correlated with the HPyV7-DNA PCR. By IHC large T antigen (LTAg) expression of HPyV7 was detected, and double staining confirmed its expression in the neoplastic epithelial cells. Eighteen of the 26 MG-positive and 7 of the 11 MG-negative thymomas were HPyV7-positive. 40% of the 20 hyperplastic thymi were HPyV7-positive by PCR as confirmed by FISH and IHC in the follicular lymphocytes. All 20 fetal thymi tested HPyV7-negative. Conclusions The presence of HPyV7-DNA and LTAg expression in the majority of thymomas possibly link HPyV7 to human thymomagenesis. Further investigations are needed to elucidate the possible associations of HPyV7 and MG. PMID:25526237

  1. Prolate spheroidal quantum cloak

    SciTech Connect

    Syue, Cheng-De; Lin, De-Hone

    2015-04-15

    To understand the propagation behavior of an oblique incident matter wave in a three-dimensional non-spherical quantum cloak, we perform the transformation design for the prolate spheroidal coordinate system and obtain a quantum cloak with an ellipsoidal shape. The mass parameters and effective potential for the creation of a perfect prolate spheroidal invisibility region are given. The analytic representations of the cloaked matter wave and probability current in the cloaking shell are presented. Special attention is paid to the discussions of the probability current in the cloaking shell for only that current can manifestly exhibit how the wave vector of the matter wave is curved, rotated, and guided in the cloaking shell to flow around the non-spherically invisible region. With the current analysis, one shows that the presented cloak can perfectly guide the matter wave in the situation of any oblique incidence. The proposed prolate spheroidal cloak for matter waves provides the first non-spherically three-dimensional setup for quantum cloaking.

  2. Prolate spheroidal quantum cloak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syue, Cheng-De; Lin, De-Hone

    2015-04-01

    To understand the propagation behavior of an oblique incident matter wave in a three-dimensional non-spherical quantum cloak, we perform the transformation design for the prolate spheroidal coordinate system and obtain a quantum cloak with an ellipsoidal shape. The mass parameters and effective potential for the creation of a perfect prolate spheroidal invisibility region are given. The analytic representations of the cloaked matter wave and probability current in the cloaking shell are presented. Special attention is paid to the discussions of the probability current in the cloaking shell for only that current can manifestly exhibit how the wave vector of the matter wave is curved, rotated, and guided in the cloaking shell to flow around the non-spherically invisible region. With the current analysis, one shows that the presented cloak can perfectly guide the matter wave in the situation of any oblique incidence. The proposed prolate spheroidal cloak for matter waves provides the first non-spherically three-dimensional setup for quantum cloaking.

  3. Isolation of Mouse and Human Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Cassetta, Luca; Noy, Roy; Swierczak, Agnieszka; Sugano, Gaël; Smith, Harriet; Wiechmann, Lisa; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex network of cells that support tumor progression and malignancy. It has been demonstrated that tumor cells can educate the immune system to promote a tumor-friendly environment. Among all these immune cells, tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are well represented and their presence in mouse models has been shown to promote tumor progression and metastasis. These effects are through the stimulation of angiogenesis, enhancement of tumor cell invasion and intravasation, immunosuppression, and at the metastatic site tumor cell extravasation and growth. However, the precise mechanisms are not fully understood. Furthermore there is limited information on TAMs derived from human cancers. For this reason it is important to be able to extract TAMs from tumors in order to compare their phenotypes, functions, and transcriptomes with normal resident tissue macrophages. Isolation of these cells is challenging due to the lack of markers and standardized protocols. Here we show an optimized protocol for the efficient isolation and extraction of resident macrophages and TAMs from human and mouse tissues by using multicolor flow cytometry. These protocols allow for the extraction of thousands of macrophages in less than 5 h from tissues as small as half a gram. The isolated macrophages can then be used for both “omics” and in vitro studies. PMID:27325269

  4. Isolation of Mouse and Human Tumor-Associated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cassetta, Luca; Noy, Roy; Swierczak, Agnieszka; Sugano, Gaël; Smith, Harriet; Wiechmann, Lisa; Pollard, Jeffrey W

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex network of cells that support tumor progression and malignancy. It has been demonstrated that tumor cells can educate the immune system to promote a tumor-friendly environment. Among all these immune cells, tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are well represented and their presence in mouse models has been shown to promote tumor progression and metastasis. These effects are through the stimulation of angiogenesis, enhancement of tumor cell invasion and intravasation, immunosuppression, and at the metastatic site tumor cell extravasation and growth. However, the precise mechanisms are not fully understood. Furthermore there is limited information on TAMs derived from human cancers. For this reason it is important to be able to extract TAMs from tumors in order to compare their phenotypes, functions, and transcriptomes with normal resident tissue macrophages. Isolation of these cells is challenging due to the lack of markers and standardized protocols. Here we show an optimized protocol for the efficient isolation and extraction of resident macrophages and TAMs from human and mouse tissues by using multicolor flow cytometry. These protocols allow for the extraction of thousands of macrophages in less than 5 h from tissues as small as half a gram. The isolated macrophages can then be used for both "omics" and in vitro studies. PMID:27325269

  5. Modeling Breast Tumor Development with a Humanized Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in breast cancer growth and progression to metastasis. Here, we describe a method to examine stromal-epithelial interactions during tumor formation and progression utilizing human-derived mammary epithelial cells and breast stromal cells. This method outlines the isolation of each cell type from reduction mammoplasty tissue, the culture and genetic modification of both epithelial and stromal cells using lentiviral technology, and the method of humanizing and implantation of transformed epithelial cells into the cleared mammary fat pads of immunocompromised mice. This model system may be a useful tool to dissect signaling interactions that contribute to invasive tumor behavior and therapeutic resistance. PMID:27581027

  6. X-ray sensitivity of human tumor cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Nove, J.; Little, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    Clonally-derived cells from ten human malignant tumors considered radiocurable (breast, neuroblastoma, medulloblastoma) or non-radiocurable (osteosarcoma, hypernephroma, glioblastoma, melanoma) were studied in cell culture and their in vitro x-ray survival curve parameters determined (anti n, D/sub 0/). There were no significant differences among the tumor cell lines suggesting that survival parameters in vitro do not explain differences in clinical radiocurability. Preliminary investigation with density inhibited human tumor cells indicate that such an approach may yield information regarding inherent cellular differences in radiocurability.

  7. Recent advances in managing human papillomavirus-positive oropharyngeal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, Stefano; Colombo, Sarah; Pompilio, Madia; Formillo, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is detected in a subset of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, most frequently in tumors in the Waldeyer's ring (palatine tonsil and base of tongue). Several studies suggest that patients with HPV-positive tumors have better survival with either concurrent chemoradiation therapy or surgery followed by radiation compared with HPV-negative patients. However, some possible confounding clinicopathologic variables may challenge the validity of this statement, for example, some authors used the TNM (tumor, node, metastasis) grouping stage while others used the primary tumor (T stage), and other studies have demonstrated that tumors with advanced T stage were less likely to be infected with HPV. A large clinical trial with stratification of patients according to all known tumor prognostic factors is crucial to solve the question. PMID:20948869

  8. Infrared Spectra of Human Breast Tumor Tissue and Experimental Animal Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Belkov, M. V.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Pekhnyo, V. I.; Kozachkova, A. N.; Tsarik, H. V.; Kutsenko, I. P.; Sharykina, N. I.; Butra, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    We have used Fourier transform IR spectroscopy methods to conduct comparative studies of human breast tumors and sarcoma 180 tumor grafted into mice. The IR spectral parameters used to identify tumor tissue in mice with the sarcoma 180 strain proved to be identical to the parameters for human breast tissue in cancer. In the presence of a malignant tumor in humans, the most intense C=O vibrational bands in the protein molecules are observed in the interval 1710-1680 cm-1. For a benign tumor, in the IR spectra of breast tissue the intense bands are located in the interval 1670-1650 cm-1. We spectroscopically monitored the diagnosis and the chemotherapy process using the model of sarcoma 180 in mice. As the therapeutic drugs, we used synthesized coordination compounds based on palladium complexes with diphosphonic acid derivatives. We demonstrate the promising potential of palladium complexes with zoledronic acid as an effective cytostatic. In therapy using a palladium complex with zoledronic acid, the effect of tumor growth inhibition is accompanied by a change in its spectral characteristics. The parameters of the IR spectra for tumor tissue after treatment are close to those of the IR spectra for healthy tissue.

  9. Tumor-induced remote ECM network orientation steers angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Balcioglu, Hayri E.; van de Water, Bob; Danen, Erik H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis promotes tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we use automated sequential microprinting of tumor and endothelial cells in extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffolds to study its mechanical aspects. Quantitative reflection microscopy shows that tumor spheroids induce radial orientation of the surrounding collagen fiber network up to a distance of five times their radius. Across a panel of ~20 different human tumor cell lines, remote collagen orientation is correlated with local tumor cell migration behavior. Tumor induced collagen orientation requires contractility but is remarkably resistant to depletion of collagen-binding integrins. Microvascular endothelial cells undergo directional migration towards tumor spheroids once they are within the tumor-oriented collagen fiber network. Laser ablation experiments indicate that an intact physical connection of the oriented network with the tumor spheroid is required for mechanical sensing by the endothelial cells. Together our findings indicate that, in conjunction with described activities of soluble angiogenic factors, remote physical manipulation of the ECM network by the tumor can help to steer angiogenesis. PMID:26931404

  10. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Human Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gudkov, Sergey V.; Shilyagina, Natalya Yu.; Vodeneev, Vladimir A.; Zvyagin, Andrei V.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is one of the most intensively developing directions of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, the targeted radionuclide therapy causes less collateral damage to normal tissues and allows targeted drug delivery to a clinically diagnosed neoplastic malformations, as well as metastasized cells and cellular clusters, thus providing systemic therapy of cancer. The methods of targeted radionuclide therapy are based on the use of molecular carriers of radionuclides with high affinity to antigens on the surface of tumor cells. The potential of targeted radionuclide therapy has markedly grown nowadays due to the expanded knowledge base in cancer biology, bioengineering, and radiochemistry. In this review, progress in the radionuclide therapy of hematological malignancies and approaches for treatment of solid tumors is addressed. PMID:26729091

  11. Enhanced angiogenic effect of adipose-derived stromal cell spheroid with low-level light therapy in hindlimb ischemia mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, In-Su; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang

    2014-02-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) are attractive cell source for tissue engineering. However, one obstacle to this approach is that the transplanted ASC population can decline rapidly in the recipient tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on transplanted human ASCs (hASCs) spheroid in a hindlimb ischemia animal model. LLLT, hASCs spheroid and hASCs spheroid transplantation with LLLT (spheroid + LLLT) were applied to the ischemic hindlimbs in athymic mice. The survival, differentiation and secretion of vascular endothelial growth (VEGF) of spheroid ASCs were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The spheroid + LLLT group enhanced the tissue regeneration, including angiogenesis, compared with other groups. The spheroid contributed tissue regeneration via differentiation and secretion of growth factors. In the spheroid + LLLT group, the survival of spheroid hASCs was increased by the decreased apoptosis of spheroid hASCs in the ischemic hindlimb. The secretion of growth factors was stimulated in the spheroid + LLLT group compared with the ASCs group and spheroid group. These data suggest that LLLT is an effective biostimulator of spheroid hASCs in tissue regeneration that enhances the survival of ASCs and stimulates the secretion of growth factors in the ischemic hindlimb.

  12. Analysis of Gene Expression in 3D Spheroids Highlights a Survival Role for ASS1 in Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Barbone, Dario; Van Dam, Loes; Follo, Carlo; Jithesh, Puthen V.; Zhang, Shu-Dong; Richards, William G.; Bueno, Raphael; Fennell, Dean A.; Broaddus, V. Courtney

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the underlying causes of chemoresistance in malignant pleural mesothelioma, we have studied mesothelioma cell lines as 3D spheroids, which acquire increased chemoresistance compared to 2D monolayers. We asked whether the gene expression of 3D spheroids would reveal mechanisms of resistance. To address this, we measured gene expression of three mesothelioma cell lines, M28, REN and VAMT, grown as 2D monolayers and 3D spheroids. A total of 209 genes were differentially expressed in common by the three cell lines in 3D (138 upregulated and 71 downregulated), although a clear resistance pathway was not apparent. We then compared the list of 3D genes with two publicly available datasets of gene expression of 56 pleural mesotheliomas compared to normal tissues. Interestingly, only three genes were increased in both 3D spheroids and human tumors: argininosuccinate synthase 1 (ASS1), annexin A4 (ANXA4) and major vault protein (MVP); of these, ASS1 was the only consistently upregulated of the three genes by qRT-PCR. To measure ASS1 protein expression, we stained 2 sets of tissue microarrays (TMA): one with 88 pleural mesothelioma samples and the other with additional 88 pleural mesotheliomas paired with matched normal tissues. Of the 176 tumors represented on the two TMAs, ASS1 was expressed in 87 (50%; staining greater than 1 up to 3+). For the paired samples, ASS1 expression in mesothelioma was significantly greater than in the normal tissues. Reduction of ASS1 expression by siRNA significantly sensitized mesothelioma spheroids to the pro-apoptotic effects of bortezomib and of cisplatin plus pemetrexed. Although mesothelioma is considered by many to be an ASS1-deficient tumor, our results show that ASS1 is elevated at the mRNA and protein levels in mesothelioma 3D spheroids and in human pleural mesotheliomas. We also have uncovered a survival role for ASS1, which may be amenable to targeting to undermine mesothelioma multicellular resistance. PMID:26982031

  13. Colorectal cancer derived organotypic spheroids maintain essential tissue characteristics but adapt their metabolism in culture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Organotypic tumor spheroids, a 3D in vitro model derived from patient tumor material, preserve tissue heterogeneity and retain structural tissue elements, thus replicating the in vivo tumor more closely than commonly used 2D and 3D cell line models. Such structures harbour tumorigenic cells, as revealed by xenograft implantation studies in animal models and maintain the genetic makeup of the original tumor material. The aim of our work was a morphological and proteomic characterization of organotypic spheroids derived from colorectal cancer tissue in order to get insight into their composition and associated biology. Results Morphological analysis showed that spheroids were of about 250 μm in size and varied in structure, while the spheroid cells differed in shape and size and were tightly packed together by desmosomes and tight junctions. Our proteomic data revealed significant alterations in protein expression in organotypic tumor spheroids cultured as primary explants compared to primary colorectal cancer tissue. Components underlying cellular and tissue architecture were changed; nuclear DNA/ chromatin maintenance systems were up-regulated, whereas various mitochondrial components were down-regulated in spheroids. Most interestingly, the mesenchymal cells appear to be substantial component in such cellular assemblies. Thus the observed changes may partly occur in this cellular compartment. Finally, in the proteomics analysis stem cell-like characteristics were observed within the spheroid cellular assembly, reflected by accumulation of Alcam, Ctnnb1, Aldh1, Gpx2, and CD166. These findings were underlined by IHC analysis of Ctnnb1, CD24 and CD44, therefore warranting closer investigation of the tumorigenic compartment in this 3D culture model for tumor tissue. Conclusions Our analysis of organotypic CRC tumor spheroids has identified biological processes associated with a mixture of cell types and states, including protein markers for mesenchymal

  14. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications. PMID:25665006

  15. SKI knockdown inhibits human melanoma tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dahu; Lin, Qiushi; Box, Neil; Roop, Dennis; Ishii, Shunsuke; Matsuzaki, Koichi; Fan, Tao; Hornyak, Thomas J; Reed, Jon A; Stavnezer, Ed; Timchenko, Nikolai A; Medrano, Estela E

    2009-12-01

    The SKI protein represses the TGF-beta tumor suppressor pathway by associating with the Smad transcription factors. SKI is upregulated in human malignant melanoma tumors in a disease-progression manner and its overexpression promotes proliferation and migration of melanoma cells in vitro. The mechanisms by which SKI antagonizes TGF-beta signaling in vivo have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that human melanoma cells in which endogenous SKI expression was knocked down by RNAi produced minimal orthotopic tumor xenograft nodules that displayed low mitotic rate and prominent apoptosis. These minute tumors exhibited critical signatures of active TGF-beta signaling including high levels of nuclear Smad3 and p21(Waf-1), which are not found in the parental melanomas. To understand how SKI promotes tumor growth we used gain- and loss-of-function approaches and found that simultaneously to blocking the TGF-beta-growth inhibitory pathway, SKI promotes the switch of Smad3 from tumor suppression to oncogenesis by favoring phosphorylations of the Smad3 linker region in melanoma cells but not in normal human melanocytes. In this context, SKI is required for preventing TGF-beta-mediated downregulation of the oncogenic protein c-MYC, and for inducing the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, a mediator of tumor growth and angiogenesis. Together, the results indicate that SKI exploits multiple regulatory levels of the TGF-beta pathway and its deficiency restores TGF-beta tumor suppressor and apoptotic activities in spite of the likely presence of oncogenic mutations in melanoma tumors. PMID:19845874

  16. Type I IFNs induce anti-tumor polarization of tumor associated neutrophils in mice and human.

    PubMed

    Andzinski, Lisa; Kasnitz, Nadine; Stahnke, Stephanie; Wu, Ching-Fang; Gereke, Marcus; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Schilling, Bastian; Brandau, Sven; Weiss, Siegfried; Jablonska, Jadwiga

    2016-04-15

    The importance of tumor associated neutrophils (TANs) in cancer development is in the meantime well established. Numerous of clinical data document the adverse prognostic effects of neutrophil infiltration in solid tumors. However, certain tumor therapies need functional neutrophils to be effective, suggesting altered neutrophil polarization associated with different outcomes for cancer patients. Therefore, modulation of neutrophilic phenotypes represents a potent therapeutic option, but factors mediating neutrophil polarization are still poorly defined. In this manuscript we provide evidence that type I IFNs alter neutrophilic phenotype into anti-tumor, both in mice and human. In the absence of IFN-β, pro-tumor properties, such as reduced tumor cytotoxicity with low neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) expression, low ICAM1 and TNF-α expression, dominated neutrophil phenotypes in primary lesion and premetastatic lung. Interestingly, such neutrophils have significantly prolonged life-span. Notably, interferon therapy in mice altered TAN polarization towards anti-tumor N1. Similar changes in neutrophil activation could be observed in melanoma patients undergoing type I IFN therapy. Altogether, these data highlight the therapeutic potential of interferons, suggesting optimization of its clinical use as potent anti-tumor agent. PMID:26619320

  17. Human Tumor Antigens and Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vigneron, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    With the recent developments of adoptive T cell therapies and the use of new monoclonal antibodies against the immune checkpoints, immunotherapy is at a turning point. Key players for the success of these therapies are the cytolytic T lymphocytes, which are a subset of T cells able to recognize and kill tumor cells. Here, I review the nature of the antigenic peptides recognized by these T cells and the processes involved in their presentation. I discuss the importance of understanding how each antigenic peptide is processed in the context of immunotherapy and vaccine delivery. PMID:26161423

  18. Lrig1 Expression in Human Sebaceous Gland Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pünchera, Jöri; Barnes, Laurent; Kaya, Gürkan

    2016-01-01

    Background Sebaceous glands contribute significantly to the barrier functions of the skin. However, little is known about their homeostasis and tumorigenesis. Recently, increased expression of stem cell marker Lrig1 has been reported in sebaceous carcinoma-like tumors of K14ΔNLef1 transgenic mice. In this study, we analyzed the Lrig1 expression in human sebaceous tumors. Methods Twenty-eight formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sebaceous tumor specimens (7 sebaceous hyperplasias, 7 sebaceous adenomas, 10 sebaceomas and 4 sebaceous carcinomas) were stained with anti-Lrig1, anti-CD44v3 and anti-Ki67 antibody. Results Four (100%) sebaceous carcinomas, 8 (80%) sebaceomas, 3 (43%) sebaceous adenomas and no sebaceous hyperplasia showed Lrig1 overexpression. Discussion and Conclusion Lrig1 is a known tumor suppressor gene and is usually considered to be an indicator of poorly aggressive tumors. In human sebaceous tumors, the stronger Lrig1 staining in sebaceous carcinoma compared to other sebaceous tumors might be a feature of an advanced stage in tumorigenesis and a bad prognosis. In our study, 100% of sebaceous carcinomas revealed Lrig1 overexpression. We propose that Lrig1 may be used as a possible new marker of poorly differentiated sebaceous carcinoma. PMID:27504445

  19. MiRNA Transcriptome Profiling of Spheroid-Enriched Cells with Cancer Stem Cell Properties in Human Breast MCF-7 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Boo, Lily; Ho, Wan Yong; Ali, Norlaily Mohd; Yeap, Swee Keong; Ky, Huynh; Chan, Kok Gan; Yin, Wai Fong; Satharasinghe, Dilan Amila; Liew, Woan Charn; Tan, Sheau Wei; Ong, Han Kiat; Cheong, Soon Keng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide as most patients often suffer cancer relapse. The reason is often attributed to the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Recent studies revealed that dysregulation of microRNA (miRNA) are closely linked to breast cancer recurrence and metastasis. However, no specific study has comprehensively characterised the CSC characteristic and miRNA transcriptome in spheroid-enriched breast cells. This study described the generation of spheroid MCF-7 cell in serum-free condition and the comprehensive characterisation for their CSC properties. Subsequently, miRNA expression differences between the spheroid-enriched CSC cells and their parental cells were evaluated using next generation sequencing (NGS). Our results showed that the MCF-7 spheroid cells were enriched with CSCs properties, indicated by the ability to self-renew, increased expression of CSCs markers, and increased resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. Additionally, spheroid-enriched CSCs possessed greater cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and wound healing ability. A total of 134 significantly (p<0.05) differentially expressed miRNAs were identified between spheroids and parental cells using miRNA-NGS. MiRNA-NGS analysis revealed 25 up-regulated and 109 down-regulated miRNAs which includes some miRNAs previously reported in the regulation of breast CSCs. A number of miRNAs (miR-4492, miR-4532, miR-381, miR-4508, miR-4448, miR-1296, and miR-365a) which have not been previously reported in breast cancer were found to show potential association with breast cancer chemoresistance and self-renewal capability. The gene ontology (GO) analysis showed that the predicted genes were enriched in the regulation of metabolic processes, gene expression, DNA binding, and hormone receptor binding. The corresponding pathway analyses inferred from the GO results were closely related to the function of signalling pathway, self

  20. MiRNA Transcriptome Profiling of Spheroid-Enriched Cells with Cancer Stem Cell Properties in Human Breast MCF-7 Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Boo, Lily; Ho, Wan Yong; Ali, Norlaily Mohd; Yeap, Swee Keong; Ky, Huynh; Chan, Kok Gan; Yin, Wai Fong; Satharasinghe, Dilan Amila; Liew, Woan Charn; Tan, Sheau Wei; Ong, Han Kiat; Cheong, Soon Keng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide as most patients often suffer cancer relapse. The reason is often attributed to the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Recent studies revealed that dysregulation of microRNA (miRNA) are closely linked to breast cancer recurrence and metastasis. However, no specific study has comprehensively characterised the CSC characteristic and miRNA transcriptome in spheroid-enriched breast cells. This study described the generation of spheroid MCF-7 cell in serum-free condition and the comprehensive characterisation for their CSC properties. Subsequently, miRNA expression differences between the spheroid-enriched CSC cells and their parental cells were evaluated using next generation sequencing (NGS). Our results showed that the MCF-7 spheroid cells were enriched with CSCs properties, indicated by the ability to self-renew, increased expression of CSCs markers, and increased resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. Additionally, spheroid-enriched CSCs possessed greater cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and wound healing ability. A total of 134 significantly (p<0.05) differentially expressed miRNAs were identified between spheroids and parental cells using miRNA-NGS. MiRNA-NGS analysis revealed 25 up-regulated and 109 down-regulated miRNAs which includes some miRNAs previously reported in the regulation of breast CSCs. A number of miRNAs (miR-4492, miR-4532, miR-381, miR-4508, miR-4448, miR-1296, and miR-365a) which have not been previously reported in breast cancer were found to show potential association with breast cancer chemoresistance and self-renewal capability. The gene ontology (GO) analysis showed that the predicted genes were enriched in the regulation of metabolic processes, gene expression, DNA binding, and hormone receptor binding. The corresponding pathway analyses inferred from the GO results were closely related to the function of signalling pathway, self

  1. MUC-1 Tumor Antigen Agonist Epitopes for Enhancing T-cell Responses to Human Tumors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at NIH have identified 7 new agonist epitopes of the MUC-1 tumor associated antigen. Compared to their native epitope counterparts, peptides reflecting these agonist epitopes have been shown to enhance the generation of human tumor cells, which in turn have a greater ability to kill human tumor cells endogenously expressing the native MUC-1 epitope.

  2. Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary We analyzed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, mRNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously-defined gene expression subtypes and demonstrated the existence of four main breast cancer classes when combining data from five platforms, each of which shows significant molecular heterogeneity. Somatic mutations in only three genes (TP53, PIK3CA and GATA3) occurred at > 10% incidence across all breast cancers; however, there were numerous subtype-associated and novel gene mutations including the enrichment of specific mutations in GATA3, PIK3CA and MAP3K1 with the Luminal A subtype. We identified two novel protein expression-defined subgroups, possibly contributed by stromal/microenvironmental elements, and integrated analyses identified specific signaling pathways dominant in each molecular subtype including a HER2/p-HER2/HER1/p-HER1 signature within the HER2-Enriched expression subtype. Comparison of Basal-like breast tumors with high-grade Serous Ovarian tumors showed many molecular commonalities, suggesting a related etiology and similar therapeutic opportunities. The biologic finding of the four main breast cancer subtypes caused by different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities raises the hypothesis that much of the clinically observable plasticity and heterogeneity occurs within, and not across, these major biologic subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:23000897

  3. CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 expression levels are differentially regulated in three-dimensional spheroids of liver cancer cells compared to two-dimensional monolayer cultures.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Jun; Goto, Shinpei; Hattori, Hiroki; Hoshi, Sawaka; Ushirokawa, Midori; Kudo, Kenzo; Habano, Wataru; Ozawa, Shogo

    2015-12-01

    Compared to two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cultures, three-dimensional (3D) tumor cell culture models are thought to be structurally more similar to the in vivo tumor microenvironment. We investigated the regulation of the expression of genes encoding the drug-metabolizing enzymes CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 in 3D spheroids comprised of cells of the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell JHH1, Huh7, and HepG2. Expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 in the spheroids was higher than that in 2D cultured cells. Expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 is regulated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in 2D cultured cells. Knockdown of AhR in spheroids suppressed CYP1A1 expression; however, CYP1A2 expression levels remained unchanged. Moreover, we found that pregnane X receptor (PXR) likely regulated CYP1A2 expression in JHH1, HepG2, and Huh7 spheroids and that CYP1A1 expression in JHH1 and Huh7 3D spheroids is regulated not only by AhR but also by PXR. It is well known that gene expression levels are different between 3D spheroids and 2D monolayer cultured cells, and our results indicate that the regulation of gene expression also varies between the two culture conditions. Taken together, these results underlie a novel finding regarding the regulation of drug-metabolizing enzyme expression in liver cancer cells growing as 3D spheroids. PMID:26643992

  4. Loss of N-Cadherin Expression in Tumor Transplants Produced From As+3- and Cd+2-Transformed Human Urothelial (UROtsa) Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Sandquist, Elizabeth J.; Somji, Seema; Dunlevy, Jane R.; Garrett, Scott H.; Zhou, Xu Dong; Slusser-Nore, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background Epithelial to mesenchymal transition is a process in which a cell experiences a loss of epithelial cell characteristics and acquires a more mesenchymal cell phenotype. In cancer, epithelial to mesenchymal transition has been proposed to play an important role during specific stages of tumor progression. The role epithelial to mesenchymal transition and mesenchymal to epithelial transition might play in toxicant-induced urothelial cancer is unknown. Methods Real-time PCR, Western blotting, immuno-histochemistry and immuno-fluorescence were used to determine the expression of E- and N-cadherin in the UROtsa parent, the As+3- and Cd+2-transformed cell lines, the spheroids isolated from these cell lines as well as the tumor heterotransplants that were produced by the injection of the transformed cells into immune compromised mice. Results This study showed that N-cadherin expression was increased in 6 As+3- and 7 Cd+2- transformed cell lines generated from human urothelial cells (UROtsa). The expression varied within each cell line, with 10% to 95% of the cells expressing N-cadherin. Tumors produced from these cell lines showed no expression of the N-cadherin protein. Spheroids which are made up of putative cancer initiating cells produced from these cell lines showed only background expression of N-cadherin mRNA, increased expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 mRNA and produced tumors which did not express N-cadherin. There was no change in the expression of E-cadherin in the tumors, and the tumors formed by all the As+3 and Cd+2-transformed cell lines and cancer initiating cells stained intensely and uniformly for E-cadherin. Conclusions The finding that the cells expressing N-cadherin gave rise to tumors with no expression of N-cadherin is in agreement with the classical view of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition and N-cadherin are associated with dissemination and not with the ability to establish new tumor growth

  5. Comparative expression pathway analysis of human and canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Uva, Paolo; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Watters, James; Loboda, Andrey; Kulkarni, Amit; Castle, John; Palombo, Fabio; Viti, Valentina; Mesiti, Giuseppe; Zappulli, Valentina; Marconato, Laura; Abramo, Francesca; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Lahm, Armin; La Monica, Nicola; de Rinaldis, Emanuele

    2009-01-01

    Background Spontaneous tumors in dog have been demonstrated to share many features with their human counterparts, including relevant molecular targets, histological appearance, genetics, biological behavior and response to conventional treatments. Mammary tumors in dog therefore provide an attractive alternative to more classical mouse models, such as transgenics or xenografts, where the tumour is artificially induced. To assess the extent to which dog tumors represent clinically significant human phenotypes, we performed the first genome-wide comparative analysis of transcriptional changes occurring in mammary tumors of the two species, with particular focus on the molecular pathways involved. Results We analyzed human and dog gene expression data derived from both tumor and normal mammary samples. By analyzing the expression levels of about ten thousand dog/human orthologous genes we observed a significant overlap of genes deregulated in the mammary tumor samples, as compared to their normal counterparts. Pathway analysis of gene expression data revealed a great degree of similarity in the perturbation of many cancer-related pathways, including the 'PI3K/AKT', 'KRAS', 'PTEN', 'WNT-beta catenin' and 'MAPK cascade'. Moreover, we show that the transcriptional relationships between different gene signatures observed in human breast cancer are largely maintained in the canine model, suggesting a close interspecies similarity in the network of cancer signalling circuitries. Conclusion Our data confirm and further strengthen the value of the canine mammary cancer model and open up new perspectives for the evaluation of novel cancer therapeutics and the development of prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers to be used in clinical studies. PMID:19327144

  6. Prospective clinical trial of a human tumor cloning system.

    PubMed

    Von Hoff, D D; Clark, G M; Stogdill, B J; Sarosdy, M F; O'Brien, M T; Casper, J T; Mattox, D E; Page, C P; Cruz, A B; Sandbach, J F

    1983-04-01

    A prospective clinical trial was performed to evaluate the usefulness of a human tumor cloning system for selecting single-agent chemotherapy for patients with advanced cancers. Six hundred four single-agent trials were performed in the 470 patients whose tumors were submitted for drug sensitivity testing. Only 246 of these 604 trials (41%) could be directed by the cloning system results because of inadequate tumor growth and other difficulties. In these 246 prospective trials, there was a 60% true positive and an 85% true negative rate for predicting for response or lack of response of an individual patient's tumor to the single agent. There was also a relationship between the percentage of decrease in survival of tumor colony-forming units and the probability of a clinical response of the patient's tumor to the same drug used in vivo. Despite these encouraging findings, work to improve tumor growth and additional prospective clinical trials of the system are needed before the system can be recommended for routine clinical use. PMID:6339044

  7. Thymidine analogues to assess microperfusion in human tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, Hilde L.; Ljungkvist, Anna S.; Rijken, Paul F.; Sprong, Debbie; Bussink, Jan; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Haustermans, Karin M.; Begg, Adrian C. . E-mail: a.begg@nki.nl

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To validate the use of the thymidine analogues as local perfusion markers in human tumors (no labeling indicates no perfusion) by comparison with the well-characterized perfusion marker Hoechst 33342. Methods and Materials: Human tumor xenografts from gliomas and head-and-neck cancers were injected with iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) or bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) and the fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342. In frozen sections, each blood vessel was scored for the presence of IdUrd/BrdUrd labeling and Hoechst in surrounding cells. The percentage of analogue-negative vessels was compared with the fraction of Hoechst-negative vessels. Collocalization of the two markers was also scored. Results: We found considerable intertumor variation in the fraction of perfused vessels, measured by analogue labeling, both in the human tumor xenografts and in a series of tumor biopsies from head-and-neck cancer patients. There was a significant correlation between the Hoechst-negative and IdUrd/BrdUrd-negative vessels in the xenografts (r 85, p = 0.0004), despite some mismatches on a per-vessel basis. Conclusions: Thymidine analogues can be successfully used to rank tumors according to their fraction of perfused vessels. Whether this fraction correlates with the extent of acute hypoxia needs further confirmation.

  8. Bee venom inhibits growth of human cervical tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Lim; Park, Sang Ho; Kim, Tae Myoung; Jung, Yu Yeon; Park, Mi Hee; Oh, Sang Hyun; Yun, Hye Seok; Jun, Hyung Ok; Yoo, Hwan Soo; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Ung Soo; Yoon, Joo Hee; Song, Min Jong; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-03-30

    We studied whether bee venom (BV) inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of death receptor (DR) expressions and inactivation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in mice. In vivo study showed that BV (1 mg/kg) inhibited tumor growth. Similar inhibitory effects of BV on cancer growth in primary human cervical cancer cells were also found. BV (1-5 μg/ml) also inhibited the growth of cancer cells, Ca Ski and C33Aby the induction of apoptotic cell death in a dose dependent manner. Agreed with cancer cell growth inhibition, expression of death receptors; FAS, DR3 and DR6, and DR downstream pro-apoptotic proteins including caspase-3 and Bax was concomitantly increased, but the NF-κB activity and the expression of Bcl-2 were inhibited by treatment with BV in tumor mice, human cancer cell and human tumor samples as well as cultured cancer cells. In addition, deletion of FAS, DR3 and DR6 by small interfering RNA significantly reversed BV-induced cell growth inhibitory effects as well as NF-κB inactivation. These results suggest that BV inhibits cervical tumor growth through enhancement of FAS, DR3 and DR6 expression via inhibition of NF-κB pathway. PMID:25730901

  9. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates tumor angiogenesis of human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Sunamura, Makoto; Duda, Dan G; Ghattas, Maivel H; Lozonschi, Lucian; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Yamauchi, Jun-Ichiro; Matsuno, Seiki; Shibahara, Shigeki; Abraham, Nader G

    2003-01-01

    Angiogenesis is necessary for the continued growth of solid tumors, invasion and metastasis. Several studies clearly showed that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in angiogenesis. In this study, we used the vital microscope system, transparent skinfold model, lung colonization model and transduced pancreatic cancer cell line (Panc-1)/human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) cells, to precisely analyze, for the first time, the effect of hHO-1 gene on tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Our results revealed that HO-1 stimulates angiogenesis of pancreatic carcinoma in severe combined immune deficient mice. Overexpression of human hHO-1 after its retroviral transfer into Panc-1 cells did not interfere with tumor growth in vitro. While in vivo the development of tumors was accelerated upon transfection with hHO-1. On the other hand, inhibition of heme oxygenase (HO) activity by stannous mesoporphyrin was able transiently to delay tumor growth in a dose dependent manner. Tumor angiogenesis was markedly increased in Panc-1/hHO-1 compared to mock transfected and wild type. Lectin staining and Ki-67 proliferation index confirmed these results. In addition hHO-1 stimulated in vitro tumor angiogenesis and increased endothelial cell survival. In a lung colonization model, overexpression of hHO-1 increased the occurrence of metastasis, while inhibition of HO activity by stannous mesoporphyrin completely inhibited the occurrence of metastasis. In conclusion, overexpression of HO-1 genes potentiates pancreatic cancer aggressiveness, by increasing tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis and that the inhibition of the HO system may be of useful benefit for the future treatment of the disease. PMID:14517400

  10. Nitrosylhemoglobin in photodynamically stressed human tumors growing in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Jakubowska, Monika; Michalczyk-Wetula, Dominika; Pyka, Janusz; Susz, Anna; Urbanska, Krystyna; Płonka, Beata K; Kuleta, Patryk; Łącki, Piotr; Krzykawska-Serda, Martyna; Fiedor, Leszek; Płonka, Przemysław M

    2013-11-30

    The role of nitric oxide in human tumor biology and therapy has been the subject of extensive studies. However, there is only limited knowledge about the mechanisms of NO production and its metabolism, and about the role NO can play in modern therapeutic procedures, such as photodynamic therapy. Here, for the first time, we report the presence of nitrosylhemoglobin, a stable complex of NO, in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 tumors growing in situ in nude mice. Using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy we show that the level of nitrosylhemoglobin increases in the course of photodynamic therapy and that the phenomenon is local. Even the destruction of strongly vascularized normal liver tissue did not induce the paramagnetic signal, despite bringing about tissue necrosis. We conclude that photodynamic stress substantiates NO production and blood extravasation in situ, both processes on-going even in non-treated tumors, although at a lower intensity. PMID:23973529

  11. Human antiglioma monoclonal antibodies from patients with astrocytic tumors.

    PubMed

    Dan, M D; Schlachta, C M; Guy, J; McKenzie, R G; Dorscheid, D R; Sandor, V A; Villemure, J G; Price, G B

    1992-04-01

    The current management of malignant gliomas is unsatisfactory compared to that of other solid tumors; the expected median survival period is less than 1 year with the patient undergoing conventional surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy treatment. Immunological reagents could be a useful adjunct. Human monoclonal antibodies derived from patients with astrocytic tumors might recognize subtle antigenic specificities that would differ from those recognized by xenogeneic (murine) systems. Five hybridomas, designated as BT27/1A2, BT27/2A3, BT32/A6, BT34/A5, and BT54/B8, were produced from the fusion of peripheral blood lymphocytes of four patients with astrocytic tumors to the human myeloma-like cell line TM-H2-SP2. This cell line has a 46, XX karyotype and is negative for hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. All five human monoclonal antibodies produced 2.4 to 44 micrograms/ml of immunoglobulin M, had a similar but not identical pattern of reactivity against a panel of human tumor cell lines, and failed to react with normal human astrocytes. Labeling of four neuroectodermal tumor explant cultures by BT27/2A3 was demonstrated by flow cytometry. Karyotyping of three of the five hybridomas demonstrated that two were pseudodiploid (2-3n) and one hypodiploid (less than 2n). The monoclonality of the hybridomas was evaluated by Southern blot analysis of JH gene rearrangements, revealing two types of rearrangements for each hybridoma, both consistent with monoclonality. Preliminary antigen characterization indicated that at least four of the five human monoclonal antibodies were directed to cell-surface glycolipids. PMID:1545260

  12. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A.; Salomon, Matthew P.; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F.; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-01-01

    What happens in the early, still undetectable human malignancy is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a “Big Bang” model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed sub-clones that are not subject to stringent selection, and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors revealed the absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intra-tumor heterogeneity (ITH), and sub-clone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations, and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear born-to-be-bad, with sub-clone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH with significant clinical implications. PMID:25665006

  13. Cimetidine induces apoptosis of human salivary gland tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Masakatsu; Tanaka, Shin; Suzuki, Seiji; Kusama, Kaoru; Kaneko, Tadayoshi; Sakashita, Hideaki

    2007-03-01

    It has been reported that cimetidine, a histamine type-2 receptor (H2R) antagonist, inhibits the growth of glandular tumors such as colorectal cancer. However, its effects against salivary gland tumors are still unknown. We demonstrated previously that human salivary gland tumor (HSG) cells spontaneously express the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and also that HSG cell proliferation could be controlled via a homophilic (NCAM-NCAM) binding mechanism and that NCAM may be associated with perineural invasion by malignant salivary gland tumors. In the present study, we investigated the effects of cimetidine via the expression of NCAM on tumor growth and perineural/neural invasion in salivary gland tumor cells. Expression of both NCAM mRNA and protein was found to decrease in a dose-dependent manner upon treatment with cimetidine for 24 h. The MTT assay and confocal laser microscopy clearly showed that HSG cells underwent apoptosis after treatment with cimetidine. Activation of caspases 3, 7, 8 and 9 was observed in HSG cells after cimetidine treatment, thus confirming that the apoptosis was induced by the activated caspases. Apaf-1 activity was also detected in HSG cells in a dose-dependent manner after treatment with cimetidine. We also found that the cimetidine-mediated down-regulation of NCAM expression in HSG cells did not occur via blocking of the histamine receptor, even though H2R expression was observed on HSG cells, as two other H2R antagonists, famotidine and ranitidine, did not show similar effects. We demonstrated for the first time that cimetidine can induce significant apoptosis of salivary gland tumor cells, which express NCAM, at least in part by down-regulation of NCAM expression on the cells. These findings suggest that the growth, development and perineural/neural invasion of salivary gland tumor cells can be blocked by cimetidine administration through down-regulation of NCAM expression, as well as induction of apoptosis. PMID:17273750

  14. Diagnose human tumors by THz near-field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua; Wang, Xiaozhou; Zhao, Tian; Yang, Jinwen

    2014-09-01

    Based on a THz pipe-based near-field imaging system, we demonstrated the capability of THz imaging to diagnose human breast and liver cancers. Through THz near-field mapping of the absorption constants of cancer tissues, the acquired images can not only clearly distinguish cancer from normal tissues fast, automatically, and correctly without pathological H&E staining, but also identify the distribution region of cancer, which matches well with the identification with pathological examination. Due to its capability to perform quantitative analysis, our study indicates the potential of the THz pipe-based near-field imaging for future automation on human tumor pathological examinations and for quick definition of the tumor margins during the surgical procedure such as breast-conserving surgery. With the help of THz imaging, we can expect to economize the use of hospital and human resources.

  15. Identification of Novel Tumor-Associated Cell Surface Sialoglycoproteins in Human Glioblastoma Tumors Using Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Autelitano, François; Loyaux, Denis; Roudières, Sébastien; Déon, Catherine; Guette, Frédérique; Fabre, Philippe; Ping, Qinggong; Wang, Su; Auvergne, Romane; Badarinarayana, Vasudeo; Smith, Michael; Guillemot, Jean-Claude; Goldman, Steven A.; Natesan, Sridaran; Ferrara, Pascual; August, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiform (GBM) remains clinical indication with significant “unmet medical need”. Innovative new therapy to eliminate residual tumor cells and prevent tumor recurrences is critically needed for this deadly disease. A major challenge of GBM research has been the identification of novel molecular therapeutic targets and accurate diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers. Many of the current clinical therapeutic targets of immunotoxins and ligand-directed toxins for high-grade glioma (HGG) cells are surface sialylated glycoproteins. Therefore, methods that systematically and quantitatively analyze cell surface sialoglycoproteins in human clinical tumor samples would be useful for the identification of potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for malignant gliomas. In this study, we used the bioorthogonal chemical reporter strategy (BOCR) in combination with label-free quantitative mass spectrometry (LFQ-MS) to characterize and accurately quantify the individual cell surface sialoproteome in human GBM tissues, in fetal, adult human astrocytes, and in human neural progenitor cells (NPCs). We identified and quantified a total of 843 proteins, including 801 glycoproteins. Among the 843 proteins, 606 (72%) are known cell surface or secreted glycoproteins, including 156 CD-antigens, all major classes of cell surface receptor proteins, transporters, and adhesion proteins. Our findings identified several known as well as new cell surface antigens whose expression is predominantly restricted to human GBM tumors as confirmed by microarray transcription profiling, quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining. This report presents the comprehensive identification of new biomarkers and therapeutic targets for the treatment of malignant gliomas using quantitative sialoglycoproteomics with clinically relevant, patient derived primary glioma cells. PMID:25360666

  16. [In vitro chemosensitivity of lung cancer and other chest tumors evaluated by human tumor colony assay].

    PubMed

    Lee, K; Kuze, F; Hashimura, T; Tanigawa, N

    1984-12-01

    In vitro chemosensitivity of lung cancer and other chest tumors was evaluated by human tumor colony assay (HTCA). From 61 specimens 33 (54%) grew more than 30 colonies from which evaluation of chemosensitivity could be performed. Of 41 specimens of lung cancer, 26 (63%) yielded adequate growth for drug testing. Nine out of 26 specimens of non-small cell lung cancer showed more than 50% reduction in colony formation, and in 4 of the 26 specimens, more than 70% reduction was obtained with more than one of the drugs tested. Specimens obtained from metastatic lesions of lung cancer showed higher plating efficiency and drug sensitivity than those from primary lesions. Plating efficiency of non-epithelial tumors was lower than that of epithelial tumors. HTCA has a potential value for screening anticancer agents against lung cancer and other chest tumors. However, the assay still has many problems to be resolved, such as difficulty in obtaining single-cell suspensions and poor plating efficiency. PMID:6095761

  17. Axisymmetric scattering of scalar waves by spheroids.

    PubMed

    Lekner, John; Boyack, Rufus

    2011-06-01

    A phase shift formulation of scattering by oblate and prolate spheroids is presented, in parallel with the partial-wave theory of scattering by spherical obstacles. The crucial step is application of a finite Legendre transform to the Helmholtz equation in spheroidal coordinates. In the long-wavelength limit the spheroidal analog of the spherical scattering length immediately gives the cross section. Analytical results are readily obtained for scattering of Schrödinger particle waves by impenetrable spheroids, and for scattering of sound waves by acoustically soft spheroidal objects. The method is restricted to scattering by spheroids whose symmetry axis is coincident with the direction of the incident plane wave. PMID:21682372

  18. Significance of rat mammary tumors for human risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Russo, Jose

    2015-02-01

    We have previously indicated that the ideal animal tumor model should mimic the human disease. This means that the investigator should be able to ascertain the influence of host factors on the initiation of tumorigenesis, mimic the susceptibility of tumor response based on age and reproductive history, and determine the response of the tumors induced to chemotherapy. The utilization of experimental models of mammary carcinogenesis in risk assessment requires that the influence of ovarian, pituitary, and placental hormones, among others, as well as overall reproductive events are taken into consideration, since they are important modifiers of the susceptibility of the organ to neoplastic development. Several species, such as rodents, dogs, cats, and monkeys, have been evaluated for these purposes; however, none of them fulfills all the criteria specified previously. Rodents, however, are the most widely used models; therefore, this work will concentrate on discussing the rat rodent model of mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:25714400

  19. Physiologically Low Oxygen Enhances Biomolecule Production and Stemness of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Shearier, Emily; Xing, Qi; Qian, Zichen; Zhao, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Multicellular human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) spheroids have been demonstrated to be valuable in a variety of applications, including cartilage regeneration, wound healing, and neoangiogenesis. Physiological relevant low oxygen culture can significantly improve in vitro hMSC expansion by preventing cell differentiation. We hypothesize that hypoxia-cultured hMSC spheroids can better maintain the regenerative properties of hMSCs. In this study, hMSC spheroids were fabricated using hanging drop method and cultured under 2% O2 and 20% O2 for up to 96 h. Spheroid diameter and viability were examined, as well as extracellular matrix (ECM) components and growth factor levels between the two oxygen tensions at different time points. Stemness was measured among the spheroid culture conditions and compared to two-dimensional cell cultures. Spheroid viability and structural integrity were studied using different needle gauges to ensure no damage would occur when implemented in vivo. Spheroid attachment and integration within a tissue substitute were also demonstrated. The results showed that a three-dimensional hMSC spheroid cultured at low oxygen conditions can enhance the production of ECM proteins and growth factors, while maintaining the spheroids' stemness and ability to be injected, attached, and potentially be integrated within a tissue. PMID:26830500

  20. Sigma and opioid receptors in human brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.E.; Szuecs, M.; Mamone, J.Y.; Bem, W.T.; Rush, M.D.; Johnson, F.E.; Coscia, C.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Human brain tumors and nude mouse-borne human neuroblastomas and gliomas were analyzed for sigma and opioid receptor content. Sigma binding was assessed using ({sup 3}H) 1, 3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG), whereas opioid receptor subtypes were measured with tritiated forms of the following: {mu}, (D-ala{sup 2}, mePhe{sup 4}, gly-ol{sup 5}) enkephalin (DAMGE); {kappa}, ethylketocyclazocine (EKC) or U69,593; {delta}, (D-pen{sup 2}, D-pen{sup 5}) enkephalin (DPDPE) or (D-ala{sup 2}, D-leu{sup 5}) enkephalin (DADLE) with {mu} suppressor present. Binding parameters were estimated by homologous displacement assays followed by analysis using the LIGAND program. Sigma binding was detected in 15 of 16 tumors examined with very high levels found in a brain metastasis from an adenocarcinoma of lung and a human neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC) passaged in nude mice. {kappa} opioid receptor binding was detected in 4 of 4 glioblastoma multiforme specimens and 2 of 2 human astrocytoma cell lines tested but not in the other brain tumors analyzed.

  1. Generation and functional assessment of 3D multicellular spheroids in droplet based microfluidics platform.

    PubMed

    Sabhachandani, P; Motwani, V; Cohen, N; Sarkar, S; Torchilin, V; Konry, T

    2016-02-01

    Here we describe a robust, microfluidic technique to generate and analyze 3D tumor spheroids, which resembles tumor microenvironment and can be used as a more effective preclinical drug testing and screening model. Monodisperse cell-laden alginate droplets were generated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices that combine T-junction droplet generation and external gelation for spheroid formation. The proposed approach has the capability to incorporate multiple cell types. For the purposes of our study, we generated spheroids with breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 drug sensitive and resistant) and co-culture spheroids of MCF-7 together with a fibroblast cell line (HS-5). The device has the capability to house 1000 spheroids on chip for drug screening and other functional analysis. Cellular viability of spheroids in the array part of the device was maintained for two weeks by continuous perfusion of complete media into the device. The functional performance of our 3D tumor models and a dose dependent response of standard chemotherapeutic drug, doxorubicin (Dox) and standard drug combination Dox and paclitaxel (PCT) was analyzed on our chip-based platform. Altogether, our work provides a simple and novel, in vitro platform to generate, image and analyze uniform, 3D monodisperse alginate hydrogel tumors for various omic studies and therapeutic efficiency screening, an important translational step before in vivo studies. PMID:26686985

  2. Absence of human cytomegalovirus infection in childhood brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Sardi, Iacopo; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Becciani, Sabrina; Facchini, Ludovica; Guidi, Milena; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Moriondo, Maria; Baroni, Gianna; Stival, Alessia; Farina, Silvia; Genitori, Lorenzo; de Martino, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common human pathogen which induces different clinical manifestations related to the age and the immune conditions of the host. HCMV infection seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of adult glioblastomas. The aim of our study was to detect the presence of HCMV in high grade gliomas and other pediatric brain tumors. This hypothesis might have important therapeutic implications, offering a new target for adjuvant therapies. Among 106 pediatric patients affected by CNS tumors we selected 27 patients with a positive HCMV serology. The serological analysis revealed 7 patients with positive HCMV IGG (≥14 U/mL), whom had also a high HCMV IgG avidity, suggesting a more than 6 months-dated infection. Furthermore, HCMV IGM were positive (≥22 U/mL) in 20 patients. Molecular and immunohistochemical analyses were performed in all the 27 samples. Despite a positive HCMV serology, confirmed by ELISA, no viral DNA was shown at the PCR analysis in the patients' neoplastic cells. At immunohistochemistry, no expression of HCMV antigens was observed in tumoral cells. Our results are in agreement with recent results in adults which did not evidence the presence of HCMV genome in glioblastoma lesions. We did not find any correlation between HCMV infection and pediatric CNS tumors. PMID:26396923

  3. Absence of human cytomegalovirus infection in childhood brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sardi, Iacopo; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Becciani, Sabrina; Facchini, Ludovica; Guidi, Milena; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Moriondo, Maria; Baroni, Gianna; Stival, Alessia; Farina, Silvia; Genitori, Lorenzo; de Martino, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a common human pathogen which induces different clinical manifestations related to the age and the immune conditions of the host. HCMV infection seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of adult glioblastomas. The aim of our study was to detect the presence of HCMV in high grade gliomas and other pediatric brain tumors. This hypothesis might have important therapeutic implications, offering a new target for adjuvant therapies. Among 106 pediatric patients affected by CNS tumors we selected 27 patients with a positive HCMV serology. The serological analysis revealed 7 patients with positive HCMV IGG (≥14 U/mL), whom had also a high HCMV IgG avidity, suggesting a more than 6 months-dated infection. Furthermore, HCMV IGM were positive (≥22 U/mL) in 20 patients. Molecular and immunohistochemical analyses were performed in all the 27 samples. Despite a positive HCMV serology, confirmed by ELISA, no viral DNA was shown at the PCR analysis in the patients’ neoplastic cells. At immunohistochemistry, no expression of HCMV antigens was observed in tumoral cells. Our results are in agreement with recent results in adults which did not evidence the presence of HCMV genome in glioblastoma lesions. We did not find any correlation between HCMV infection and pediatric CNS tumors. PMID:26396923

  4. Conserved Expression Signatures between Medaka and Human Pigment Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schartl, Manfred; Kneitz, Susanne; Wilde, Brigitta; Wagner, Toni; Henkel, Christiaan V.; Spaink, Herman P.; Meierjohann, Svenja

    2012-01-01

    Aberrations in gene expression are a hallmark of cancer cells. Differential tumor-specific transcript levels of single genes or whole sets of genes may be critical for the neoplastic phenotype and important for therapeutic considerations or useful as biomarkers. As an approach to filter out such relevant expression differences from the plethora of changes noted in global expression profiling studies, we searched for changes of gene expression levels that are conserved. Transcriptomes from massive parallel sequencing of different types of melanoma from medaka were generated and compared to microarray datasets from zebrafish and human melanoma. This revealed molecular conservation at various levels between fish models and human tumors providing a useful strategy for identifying expression signatures strongly associated with disease phenotypes and uncovering new melanoma molecules. PMID:22693581

  5. Matrix metalloproteinase-mediation of tumor targeting human recombinant tumor necrosis factor-α fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hui; Shao, Xin; Zeng, Liang; Wang, Fa; Huang, Di-Nan; Hou, Gan

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to use genetic engineering in order to establish an efficient tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α fusion protein with low toxicity, which may be used to target tumors. Four types of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-mediated tumor targeting human recombinant TNF-α (rhTNF-α) fusion protein vectors were constructed. These were subsequently introduced into Escherichia coli. rhTNF-α fusion protein with a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tag was purified using GST resin affinity chromatography, and GST-tags were digested using factor Xa. The cytotoxic effects of the fusion protein on L929 cells were determined using MTT assays. At a concentration of 1 pM, the GST-tagged fusion protein exerted no cytotoxic effects on the cells, compared with the negative control cells (P=0.975>0.05). However, at a concentration of 1000 pM, the deblocking fusion protein exerted greater cytotoxic effects on L929 cells, compared with positive control cells (P<0.05). Treatment with the fusion protein also induced cell apoptosis in the nasopharyngeal cancer cell line, CNE-2Z, which secretes high levels of MMP-1. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that MMP-mediated rhTNF-α fusion protein induces CNE-2Z cells apoptosis. rhTNF-α exhibits high efficacy and tumor cell targeting capability, with low toxicity effects on healthy cells. PMID:25891416

  6. Differential expression of SKALP/Elafin in human epidermal tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Alkemade, H. A.; Molhuizen, H. O.; van Vlijmen-Willems, I. M.; van Haelst, U. J.; Schalkwijk, J.

    1993-01-01

    Recently we described a new epidermal serine proteinase inhibitor, skin-derived antileukoproteinase (SKALP), also known as elafin. SKALP/elafin was found to be absent in normal human epidermis, but can be induced in vitro and in vivo under hyperproliferative conditions. Here we studied the expression of SKALP/elafin in several types of epidermal tumors (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, Bowen's disease, actinic keratosis, and keratoacanthoma). Using immunohistochemical staining SKALP/elafin appeared to be differentially expressed in these tumors. Functional measurements of anti-proteinase activity, and Western blotting of tumor extracts confirmed our findings at the histological level. In well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, SKALP/elafin messenger RNA was demonstrated by non-radioactive in situ hybridization. We conclude that SKALP/elafin is a marker for abnormal or disturbed squamous differentiation. A possible role of SKALP/elafin in the control of tumor cell invasion is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8256855

  7. Divergent viral presentation among human tumors and adjacent normal tissues.

    PubMed

    Cao, Song; Wendl, Michael C; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A; Wylie, Kristine; Ye, Kai; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Xie, Mingchao; Wu, Song; Niu, Beifang; Grubb, Robert; Johnson, Kimberly J; Gay, Hiram; Chen, Ken; Rader, Janet S; Dipersio, John F; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-01

    We applied a newly developed bioinformatics system called VirusScan to investigate the viral basis of 6,813 human tumors and 559 adjacent normal samples across 23 cancer types and identified 505 virus positive samples with distinctive, organ system- and cancer type-specific distributions. We found that herpes viruses (e.g., subtypes HHV4, HHV5, and HHV6) that are highly prevalent across cancers of the digestive tract showed significantly higher abundances in tumor versus adjacent normal samples, supporting their association with these cancers. We also found three HPV16-positive samples in brain lower grade glioma (LGG). Further, recurrent HBV integration at the KMT2B locus is present in three liver tumors, but absent in their matched adjacent normal samples, indicating that viral integration induced host driver genetic alterations are required on top of viral oncogene expression for initiation and progression of liver hepatocellular carcinoma. Notably, viral integrations were found in many genes, including novel recurrent HPV integrations at PTPN13 in cervical cancer. Finally, we observed a set of HHV4 and HBV variants strongly associated with ethnic groups, likely due to viral sequence evolution under environmental influences. These findings provide important new insights into viral roles of tumor initiation and progression and potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:27339696

  8. Divergent viral presentation among human tumors and adjacent normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Wendl, Michael C.; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Wylie, Kristine; Ye, Kai; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Xie, Mingchao; Wu, Song; Niu, Beifang; Grubb, Robert; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Gay, Hiram; Chen, Ken; Rader, Janet S.; Dipersio, John F.; Chen, Feng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-01

    We applied a newly developed bioinformatics system called VirusScan to investigate the viral basis of 6,813 human tumors and 559 adjacent normal samples across 23 cancer types and identified 505 virus positive samples with distinctive, organ system- and cancer type-specific distributions. We found that herpes viruses (e.g., subtypes HHV4, HHV5, and HHV6) that are highly prevalent across cancers of the digestive tract showed significantly higher abundances in tumor versus adjacent normal samples, supporting their association with these cancers. We also found three HPV16-positive samples in brain lower grade glioma (LGG). Further, recurrent HBV integration at the KMT2B locus is present in three liver tumors, but absent in their matched adjacent normal samples, indicating that viral integration induced host driver genetic alterations are required on top of viral oncogene expression for initiation and progression of liver hepatocellular carcinoma. Notably, viral integrations were found in many genes, including novel recurrent HPV integrations at PTPN13 in cervical cancer. Finally, we observed a set of HHV4 and HBV variants strongly associated with ethnic groups, likely due to viral sequence evolution under environmental influences. These findings provide important new insights into viral roles of tumor initiation and progression and potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:27339696

  9. An mDia2/ROCK Signaling Axis Regulates Invasive Egress from Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Pettee, Krista M.; Dvorak, Kaitlyn M.; Nestor-Kalinoski, Andrea L.; Eisenmann, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-cellular spheroids are enriched in ascites of epithelial ovarian cancer (OvCa) patients. They represent an invasive and chemoresistant cellular population fundamental to metastatic dissemination. The molecular mechanisms triggering single cell invasive egress from spheroids remain enigmatic. mDia formins are Rho GTPase effectors that are key regulators of F-actin cytoskeletal dynamics. We hypothesized that mDia2-driven F-actin dynamics promote single cell invasive transitions in clinically relevant three-dimensional (3D) OvCa spheroids. The current study is a dissection of the contribution of the F-actin assembly factor mDia2 formin in invasive transitions and using a clinically relevant ovarian cancer spheroid model. We show that RhoA-directed mDia2 activity is required for tight spheroid organization, and enrichment of mDia2 in the invasive cellular protrusions of collagen-embedded OVCA429 spheroids. Depleting mDia2 in ES-2 spheroids enhanced invasive dissemination of single amoeboid-shaped cells. This contrasts with spheroids treated with control siRNA, where a mesenchymal invasion program predominated. Inhibition of another RhoA effector, ROCK, had no impact on ES-2 spheroid formation but dramatically inhibited spheroid invasion through induction of a highly elongated morphology. Concurrent inhibition of ROCK and mDia2 blocked single cell invasion from ES-2 spheroids more effectively than inhibition of either protein alone, indicating that invasive egress of amoeboid cells from mDia2-depleted spheroids is ROCK-dependent. Our findings indicate that multiple GTPase effectors must be suppressed in order to fully block invasive egress from ovarian cancer spheroids. Furthermore, tightly regulated interplay between ROCK and mDia2 signaling pathways dictates the invasive capacities and the type of invasion program utilized by motile spheroid-derived ovarian cancer cells. As loss of the gene encoding mDia2, DRF3, has been linked to cancer progression and

  10. Triparanol suppresses human tumor growth in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Xinyu; Han, Xingpeng; Zhang, Fang; He, Miao; Zhang, Yi; Zhi, Xiu-Yi; Zhao, Hong

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can block proliferation in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can induce apoptosis in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proved Triparanol can inhibit Hedgehog signaling in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrated Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo in mouse xenograft model. -- Abstract: Despite the improved contemporary multidisciplinary regimens treating cancer, majority of cancer patients still suffer from adverse effects and relapse, therefore posing a significant challenge to uncover more efficacious molecular therapeutics targeting signaling pathways central to tumorigenesis. Here, our study have demonstrated that Triparanol, a cholesterol synthesis inhibitor, can block proliferation and induce apoptosis in multiple human cancer cells including lung, breast, liver, pancreatic, prostate cancer and melanoma cells, and growth inhibition can be rescued by exogenous addition of cholesterol. Remarkably, we have proved Triparanol can significantly repress Hedgehog pathway signaling in these human cancer cells. Furthermore, study in a mouse xenograft model of human lung cancer has validated that Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo. We have therefore uncovered Triparanol as potential new cancer therapeutic in treating multiple types of human cancers with deregulated Hedgehog signaling.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to surface molecules of mammalian tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, three dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture; therefore, MCS make better in vitro model systems to study the interactions of mammalian cells. Additionally, they provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules.

  12. Electron spin resonance microscopic imaging of oxygen concentration in cancer spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashem, Mada; Weiler-Sagie, Michal; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Neufeld, Gera; Neeman, Michal; Blank, Aharon

    2015-07-01

    Oxygen (O2) plays a central role in most living organisms. The concentration of O2 is important in physiology and pathology. Despite the importance of accurate knowledge of the O2 levels, there is very limited capability to measure with high spatial resolution its distribution in millimeter-scale live biological samples. Many of the current oximetric methods, such as oxygen microelectrodes and fluorescence lifetime imaging, are compromised by O2 consumption, sample destruction, invasiveness, and difficulty to calibrate. Here, we present a new method, based on the use of the pulsed electron spin resonance (ESR) microimaging technique to obtain a 3D mapping of oxygen concentration in millimeter-scale biological samples. ESR imaging requires the incorporation of a suitable stable and inert paramagnetic spin probe into the desirable object. In this work, we use microcrystals of a paramagnetic spin probe in a new crystallographic packing form (denoted tg-LiNc-BuO). These paramagnetic species interact with paramagnetic oxygen molecules, causing a spectral line broadening that is linearly proportional to the oxygen concentration. Typical ESR results include 4D spatial-spectral images that give an indication about the oxygen concentration in different regions of the sample. This new oximetry microimaging method addresses all the problems mentioned above. It is noninvasive, sensitive to physiological oxygen levels, and easy to calibrate. Furthermore, in principle, it can be used for repetitive measurements without causing cell damage. The tissue model used in this research is spheroids of Human Colorectal carcinoma cell line (HCT-116) with a typical diameter of ∼600 μm. Most studies of the microenvironmental O2 conditions inside such viable spheroids carried out in the past used microelectrodes, which require an invasive puncturing of the spheroid and are also not applicable to 3D O2 imaging. High resolution 3D oxygen maps could make it possible to evaluate the

  13. Light scattering by randomly oriented spheroidal particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asano, S.; Sato, M.

    1980-01-01

    A study of the light scattering properties of randomly oriented, identical spheroidal particles is presented. A computation method was developed to integrate the Asano and Yamomoto solution (1975) for scattering from a homogeneous spheroid over all particle orientations; the extinction and scattering cross-sections, the asymmetry factor, and scattering matrix elements are calculated for randomly oriented prolate and oblate spheroids and compared with the calculations for spheres and laboratory measurements. The angular scattering behavior of spheroids is found to be different from that of the spheres for side scattering to backscattering directions, and prolate and oblate spheroids of the same shape parameter have similar angular scattering patterns.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonial antibodies (MAbs) directed against surface molecules of tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues which are not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. In brief, MCS combine the relevance or organized tissues with in vitro methodology making the MCS a good model system to study the interactions of mammalian cells, and thereby provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. This project also involves investigations of cell-cell interactions in a gravity-based environment. It will provide an important base of scientific information for future comparative studies on the effects of hypergravity and simulated microgravity environments on cell-cell interactions. This project also has the potential to yield important materials (e.g. cellular products) which may be useful for the diagnosis and/or treatment of certain human diseases. Moreover, this project supports the training of one undergraduate and one graduate student; thus, it will also assist in developing a pool of future scientists with research experience in gravitational biology research.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against surface molecules of tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, 3-dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture. Therefore MCS make better in vitro model systems to study the interactions of mammalian cells, and provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules. This project also involves investigations of cell-cell interactions in a gravity-based environment. It will provide a base of scientific information necessary to expand the focus of the project in future years to microgravity and hypergravity-based environments. This project also has the potential to yield important materials (e.g., cellular products) which may prove useful in the diagnosis and/or treatment of certain human diseases. Moreover, this project supports the training of both undergraduate and graduate students; thus, it will assist in developing a pool of future scientists with research experience in an area (gravitational biology) of interest to NASA.

  16. Rapid formation of multicellular spheroids in double-emulsion droplets with controllable microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hon Fai; Zhang, Ying; Ho, Yi-Ping; Chiu, Ya-Ling; Jung, Youngmee; Leong, Kam W.

    2013-01-01

    An attractive option for tissue engineering is to use of multicellular spheroids as microtissues, particularly with stem cell spheroids. Conventional approaches of fabricating spheroids suffer from low throughput and polydispersity in size, and fail to supplement cues from extracellular matrix (ECM) for enhanced differentiation. In this study, we report the application of microfluidics-generated water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) double-emulsion (DE) droplets as pico-liter sized bioreactor for rapid cell assembly and well-controlled microenvironment for spheroid culture. Cells aggregated to form size-controllable (30–80 μm) spheroids in DE droplets within 150 min and could be retrieved via a droplet-releasing agent. Moreover, precursor hydrogel solution can be adopted as the inner phase to produce spheroid-encapsulated microgels after spheroid formation. As an example, the encapsulation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) spheroids in alginate and alginate-arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (-RGD) microgel was demonstrated, with enhanced osteogenic differentiation further exhibited in the latter case. PMID:24322507

  17. Scalable Differentiation of Human iPSCs in a Multicellular Spheroid-based 3D Culture into Hepatocyte-like Cells through Direct Wnt/β-catenin Pathway Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Pettinato, Giuseppe; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Fisher, Robert A; Mangino, Martin J; Zhang, Ning; Wen, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of acute liver failure by cell transplantation is hindered by a shortage of human hepatocytes. Current protocols for hepatic differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) result in low yields, cellular heterogeneity, and limited scalability. In the present study, we have developed a novel multicellular spheroid-based hepatic differentiation protocol starting from embryoid bodies of hiPSCs (hiPSC-EBs) for robust mass production of human hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) using two novel inhibitors of the Wnt pathway. The resultant hiPSC-EB-HLCs expressed liver-specific genes, secreted hepatic proteins such as Albumin, Alpha Fetoprotein, and Fibrinogen, metabolized ammonia, and displayed cytochrome P450 activities and functional activities typical of mature primary hepatocytes, such as LDL storage and uptake, ICG uptake and release, and glycogen storage. Cell transplantation of hiPSC-EB-HLC in a rat model of acute liver failure significantly prolonged the mean survival time and resolved the liver injury when compared to the no-transplantation control animals. The transplanted hiPSC-EB-HLCs secreted human albumin into the host plasma throughout the examination period (2 weeks). Transplantation successfully bridged the animals through the critical period for survival after acute liver failure, providing promising clues of integration and full in vivo functionality of these cells after treatment with WIF-1 and DKK-1. PMID:27616299

  18. Spontaneously-forming spheroids as an in vitro cancer cell model for anticancer drug screening

    PubMed Central

    Theodoraki, Maria A.; Rezende, Celso O.; Chantarasriwong, Oraphin; Corben, Adriana D.; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A.; Alpaugh, Mary L.

    2015-01-01

    The limited translational value in clinic of analyses performed on 2-D cell cultures has prompted a shift toward the generation of 3-dimensional (3-D) multicellular systems. Here we present a spontaneously-forming in vitro cancer spheroid model, referred to as spheroidsMARY-X, that precisely reflects the pathophysiological features commonly found in tumor tissues and the lymphovascular embolus. In addition, we have developed a rapid, inexpensive means to evaluate response following drug treatment where spheroid dissolution indices from brightfield image analyses are used to construct dose-response curves resulting in relevant IC50 values. Using the spheroidsMARY-X model, we demonstrate the unique ability of a new class of molecules, containing the caged Garcinia xanthone (CGX) motif, to induce spheroidal dissolution and apoptosis at IC50 values of 0.42 +/−0.02 μM for gambogic acid and 0.66 +/−0.02 μM for MAD28. On the other hand, treatment of spheroidsMARY-X with various currently approved chemotherapeutics of solid and blood-borne cancer types failed to induce any response as indicated by high dissolution indices and subsequent poor IC50 values, such as 7.8 +/−3.1 μM for paclitaxel. Our studies highlight the significance of the spheroidsMARY-X model in drug screening and underscore the potential of the CGX motif as a promising anticancer pharmacophore. PMID:26101913

  19. Spontaneously-forming spheroids as an in vitro cancer cell model for anticancer drug screening.

    PubMed

    Theodoraki, Maria A; Rezende, Celso O; Chantarasriwong, Oraphin; Corben, Adriana D; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A; Alpaugh, Mary L

    2015-08-28

    The limited translational value in clinic of analyses performed on 2-D cell cultures has prompted a shift toward the generation of 3-dimensional (3-D) multicellular systems. Here we present a spontaneously-forming in vitro cancer spheroid model, referred to as spheroids(MARY-X), that precisely reflects the pathophysiological features commonly found in tumor tissues and the lymphovascular embolus. In addition, we have developed a rapid, inexpensive means to evaluate response following drug treatment where spheroid dissolution indices from brightfield image analyses are used to construct dose-response curves resulting in relevant IC50 values. Using the spheroids(MARY-X) model, we demonstrate the unique ability of a new class of molecules, containing the caged Garcinia xanthone (CGX) motif, to induce spheroidal dissolution and apoptosis at IC50 values of 0.42 +/-0.02 μM for gambogic acid and 0.66 +/-0.02 μM for MAD28. On the other hand, treatment of spheroids(MARY-X) with various currently approved chemotherapeutics of solid and blood-borne cancer types failed to induce any response as indicated by high dissolution indices and subsequent poor IC50 values, such as 7.8 +/-3.1 μM for paclitaxel. Our studies highlight the significance of the spheroids(MARY-X) model in drug screening and underscore the potential of the CGX motif as a promising anticancer pharmacophore. PMID:26101913

  20. Magnetoacoustic imaging of human liver tumor with magnetic induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Gang; Cressman, Erik; He, Bin

    2011-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is an imaging technique under development to achieve imaging of electrical impedance contrast in biological tissues with spatial resolution close to ultrasound imaging. However, previously reported MAT-MI experimental results are obtained either from low salinity gel phantoms, or from normal animal tissue samples. In this study, we report the experimental study on the performance of the MAT-MI imaging method for imaging in vitro human liver tumor tissue. The present promising experimental results suggest the feasibility of MAT-MI to image electrical impedance contrast between the cancerous tissue and its surrounding normal tissues.

  1. Investigating the effects of combined photodynamic and anti-angiogenic therapies using a three-dimensional in-vivo brain tumor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Magalhães, Nzola; Liaw, Lih-Huei L.; Li, Linda; Liogys, Angela; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2006-02-01

    An in-vivo tumor model composed of multicellular human glioma spheroids implanted on a shell-less chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), has been developed. Following removal of a portion of the ectodermal epithelium layer of the CAM, human glioma spheroids were implanted on day 7 of embryonic development. Tumor invasion, rapid growth and vasculature formation were observed 7 days post implantation. Single tumor cell migration towards blood vessels, angiogenesis and satellite tumor growth were also evident. The human tumor/CAM model is being used to examine the effects of combined ALA PDT and anti-angiogenic agents. The shell-less CAM is well suited for topical, i.p. and i.v. photosensitizer and/or drug application.

  2. Analysis of human tumor associated Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, J.; Noujaim, A.A.; MacLean, G.D.; Suresh, M.R.; Longenecker, B.M. )

    1990-08-01

    The Thomsen-Friedenrich (TF) antigen is a precursor structure of MN blood group antigens and is also expressed by about 90% of human carcinomas. The immunodominant group of TF antigen (beta-galactosyl(1-3)-alpha-N-acetylglactosamine) is present in cryptic form in normal RBC and is revealed by neuraminidase treatment. A murine monoclonal antibody (Mab 49H.8) developed against neuraminidase treated human RBC was reactive against a variety of human tumors. We have characterized the human tumor associated TF antigen detected by this antibody from a human transitional bladder carcinoma cell line (647V), a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (LS174T), and a pleural effusion fluid of a breast adenocarcinoma patient (PE 89). A heterologous sandwich radioimmunoassay for TF antigen was developed using Mab 49H.8 as the catcher and 125I-peanut agglutinin as the probe. Detergent extracts of 647V and LS174T cells, media conditioned by culturing these cells, and PE 89 were shown to contain the antigen by this assay. The specificity of the antigen capture by Mab 49H.8 in this assay was demonstrated by its selective inhibition by nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactoside, phenyl-beta-D-galactoside, and a TF hapten. Preliminary studies on TF antigen in serum samples using this assay showed that about 53.7% of the carcinoma samples contained an antigen concentration greater than 200 units/ml whereas for 90.9% of the normal samples the antigen concentration was below 200 units/ml. These studies demonstrated that the TF antigen is shed by the tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. The TF antigen was sensitive to treatment with alkali (0.1 M NaOH for 5 h at 37 degrees C) and periodate (10 mM sodium periodate for 1 h at room temperature), was resistant to acidic pH (50 mM acetate buffer, pH 4.5, for 5 h at 37 degrees C), and could be extracted with perchloric acid.

  3. IL-12 Delivered Intratumorally by Multilamellar Liposomes Reactivates Memory T Cells in Human Tumor Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Simpson-Abelson, Michelle R.; Purohit, Vivek S.; Pang, Wing Man; Iyer, Vandana; Odunsi, Kunle; Demmy, Todd L; Yokota, Sandra J.; Loyall, Jenni L.; Kelleher, Raymond J.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy; Bankert, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    Using a novel loading technique, IL-12 is reported here to be efficiently encapsulated within large multilamellar liposomes. The preclinical efficacy of the cytokine loaded liposomes to deliver IL-12 into human tumors and to reactive tumor-associated T cells in situ is tested using a human tumor xenograft model. IL-12 is released in vivo from these liposomes in a biologically active form when injected into tumor xenografts that are established by the subcutaneous implantation of non-disrupted pieces of human lung, breast or ovarian tumors into immunodeficient mice. The histological architecture of the original tumor tissue, including tumor-associated leukocytes, tumor cells and stromal cells is preserved anatomically and the cells remain functionally responsive to cytokines in these xenografts. The local and sustained release of IL-12 into the tumor microenvironment reactivates tumor-associated quiescent effector memory T cells to proliferate, produce and release IFN-γ resulting in the killing of tumor cells in situ. Very little IL-12 is detected in the serum of mice for up to 5 days after an intratumoral injection of the IL-12 liposomes. We conclude that IL-12 loaded large multilamellar liposomes provide a safe method for the local and sustained delivery of IL-12 to tumors and a therapeutically effective way of reactivating existing tumor-associated T cells in human solid tumor microenvironments. The potential of this local in situ T cell re-stimulation to induce a systemic anti-tumor immunity is discussed. PMID:19395317

  4. T Cells and Stromal Fibroblasts in Human Tumor Microenvironments Represent Potential Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Barnas, Jennifer L.; Simpson-Abelson, Michelle R.; Yokota, Sandra J.; Kelleher, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    The immune system of cancer patients recognizes tumor-associated antigens expressed on solid tumors and these antigens are able to induce tumor-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. Diverse immunotherapeutic strategies have been used in an attempt to enhance both antibody and T cell responses to tumors. While several tumor vaccination strategies significantly increase the number of tumor-specific lymphocytes in the blood of cancer patients, most vaccinated patients ultimately experience tumor progression. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with an effector memory phenotype infiltrate human tumor microenvironments, but most are hyporesponsive to stimulation via the T cell receptor (TCR) and CD28 under conditions that activate memory T cells derived from the peripheral blood of the cancer patients or normal donors. Attempts to identify cells and molecules responsible for the TCR signaling arrest of tumor-infiltrating T cells have focused largely upon the immunosuppressive effects of tumor cells, tolerogenic dendritic cells and regulatory T cells. Here we review potential mechanisms by which human T cell function is arrested in the tumor microenvironment with a focus on the immunomodulatory effects of stromal fibroblasts. Determining in vivo which cells and molecules are responsible for the TCR arrest in human tumor-infiltrating T cells will be necessary to formulate and test strategies to prevent or reverse the signaling arrest of the human T cells in situ for a more effective design of tumor vaccines. These questions are now addressable using novel human xenograft models of tumor microenvironments. PMID:21209773

  5. Human Dynactin-Associated Protein Transforms NIH3T3 Cells to Generate Highly Vascularized Tumors with Weak Cell-Cell Interaction.

    PubMed

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Wang, Weixiang; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Matsuzaki, Daisuke; Togo, Yuki; Tokuyama, Masahiro; Hosoi, Miho; Koseki, Koichi; Wada, Shu-Ichi; Nagai, Nobuo; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Nomura, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Makoto; Sasaki, Ryuzo; Mizukami, Tamio

    2015-01-01

    Human dynactin-associated protein (dynAP) is a transmembrane protein that promotes AktSer473 phosphorylation. Here, we report the oncogenic properties of dynAP. In contrast to control NIH3T3 cells expressing LacZ (NIH3T3LacZ), NIH3T3dynAP cells vigorously formed foci in two-dimensional culture, colonies on soft agar, and spheroids in anchorage-deficient three-dimensional culture. NIH3T3dynAP cells injected into nude mice produced tumors with abundant blood vessels and weak cell-cell contacts. Expression of dynAP elevated the level of rictor (an essential subunit of mTORC2) and promoted phosphorylation of FOXO3aSer253. FOXO3a is a transcriptional factor that stimulates expression of pro-apoptotic genes and phosphorylation of FOXO3a abrogates its function, resulting in promoted cell survival. Knockdown of rictor in NIH3T3dynAP cells reduced AktSer473 phosphorylation and formation of foci, colony in soft agar and spheroid, indicating that dynAP-induced activation of the mTORC2/AktSer473 pathway for cell survival contributes to cell transformation. E-cadherin and its mRNA were markedly reduced upon expression of dynAP, giving rise to cells with higher motility, which may be responsible for the weak cell-cell adhesion in tumors. Thus, dynAP could be a new oncoprotein and a target for cancer therapy. PMID:26284361

  6. Human Dynactin-Associated Protein Transforms NIH3T3 Cells to Generate Highly Vascularized Tumors with Weak Cell-Cell Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Wang, Weixiang; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Matsuzaki, Daisuke; Togo, Yuki; Tokuyama, Masahiro; Hosoi, Miho; Koseki, Koichi; Wada, Shu-ichi; Nagai, Nobuo; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Nomura, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Makoto; Sasaki, Ryuzo; Mizukami, Tamio

    2015-01-01

    Human dynactin-associated protein (dynAP) is a transmembrane protein that promotes AktSer473 phosphorylation. Here, we report the oncogenic properties of dynAP. In contrast to control NIH3T3 cells expressing LacZ (NIH3T3LacZ), NIH3T3dynAP cells vigorously formed foci in two-dimensional culture, colonies on soft agar, and spheroids in anchorage-deficient three-dimensional culture. NIH3T3dynAP cells injected into nude mice produced tumors with abundant blood vessels and weak cell—cell contacts. Expression of dynAP elevated the level of rictor (an essential subunit of mTORC2) and promoted phosphorylation of FOXO3aSer253. FOXO3a is a transcriptional factor that stimulates expression of pro-apoptotic genes and phosphorylation of FOXO3a abrogates its function, resulting in promoted cell survival. Knockdown of rictor in NIH3T3dynAP cells reduced AktSer473 phosphorylation and formation of foci, colony in soft agar and spheroid, indicating that dynAP-induced activation of the mTORC2/AktSer473 pathway for cell survival contributes to cell transformation. E-cadherin and its mRNA were markedly reduced upon expression of dynAP, giving rise to cells with higher motility, which may be responsible for the weak cell-cell adhesion in tumors. Thus, dynAP could be a new oncoprotein and a target for cancer therapy. PMID:26284361

  7. Label-free electrochemical detection of human methyltransferase from tumors.

    PubMed

    Furst, Ariel L; Muren, Natalie B; Hill, Michael G; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2014-10-21

    The role of abnormal DNA methyltransferase activity in the development and progression of cancer is an essential and rapidly growing area of research, both for improved diagnosis and treatment. However, current technologies for the assessment of methyltransferase activity, particularly from crude tumor samples, limit this work because they rely on radioactivity or fluorescence and require bulky instrumentation. Here, we report an electrochemical platform that overcomes these limitations for the label-free detection of human DNA(cytosine-5)-methyltransferase1 (DNMT1) methyltransferase activity, enabling measurements from crude cultured colorectal cancer cell lysates (HCT116) and biopsied tumor tissues. Our multiplexed detection system involving patterning and detection from a secondary electrode array combines low-density DNA monolayer patterning and electrocatalytically amplified DNA charge transport chemistry to measure selectively and sensitively DNMT1 activity within these complex and congested cellular samples. Based on differences in DNMT1 activity measured with this assay, we distinguish colorectal tumor tissue from healthy adjacent tissue, illustrating the effectiveness of this two-electrode platform for clinical applications. PMID:25288757

  8. Cell cycle arrest or survival signaling through αv integrins, activation of PKC and ERK1/2 lead to anoikis resistance of ovarian cancer spheroids.

    PubMed

    Carduner, Ludovic; Picot, Cédric R; Leroy-Dudal, Johanne; Blay, Lyvia; Kellouche, Sabrina; Carreiras, Franck

    2014-01-15

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic cancer mainly due to spheroids organization of cancer cells that disseminate within the peritoneal cavity. We have investigated the molecular mechanisms by which ovarian cancer spheroids resist anoikis, choosing as models the 2 well-characterized human ovarian cancer cell lines IGROV1 and SKOV3. These cell lines have the propensity to float as clusters, and were isolated from tumor tissue and ascites, respectively. To form spheroids, IGROV1 and SKOV3 ovarian adenocarcinoma cells were maintained under anchorage-independent culture conditions, in which both lines survive at least a week. A short apoptotic period prior to a survival signaling commitment was observed for IGROV1 cells whereas SKOV3 cells entered G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. This difference in behavior was due to different signals. With regard to SKOV3 cells, activation of p38 and an increase in p130/Rb occurred once anchorage-independent culture was established. Analyses of the survival signaling pathway switched on by IGROV1 cells showed that activation of ERK1/2 was required to evade apoptosis, an effect partly dependent on PKC activation and αv integrins. αv-integrin expression is essential for survival through activation of ERK1/2 phosphorylation. The above data indicate that ovarian cancer cells can resist anoikis in the spheroid state by arrest in the cell cycle or through activation of αv-integrin-ERK-mediated survival signals. Such signaling might result in the selection of resistant cells within disseminating spheroids, favoring further relapse in ovarian cancers. PMID:24291221

  9. Targeting Tumor Vasculature Endothelial Cells and Tumor Cells for Immunotherapy of Human Melanoma in a Mouse Xenograft Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Sun, Ying; Garen, Alan

    1999-07-01

    An immunotherapy treatment for cancer that targets both the tumor vasculature and tumor cells has shown promising results in a severe combined immunodeficient mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. The treatment involves systemic delivery of an immunoconjugate molecule composed of a tumor-targeting domain conjugated to the Fc effector domain of human IgG1. The effector domain induces a cytolytic immune response against the targeted cells by natural killer cells and complement. Two types of targeting domains were used. One targeting domain is a human single-chain Fv molecule that binds to a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the surface of most human melanoma cells. Another targeting domain is factor VII (fVII), a zymogen that binds with high specificity and affinity to the transmembrane receptor tissue factor (TF) to initiate the blood coagulation cascade. TF is expressed by endothelial cells lining the tumor vasculature but not the normal vasculature, and also by many types of tumor cells including melanoma. Because the binding of a fVII immunoconjugate to TF might cause disseminated intravascular coagulation, the active site of fVII was mutated to inhibit coagulation without affecting the affinity for TF. The immunoconjugates were encoded as secreted molecules in a replication-defective adenovirus vector, which was injected into the tail vein of severe combined immunodeficient mice. The results demonstrate that a mutated fVII immunoconjugate, administered separately or together with a single-chain Fv immunoconjugate that binds to the tumor cells, can inhibit the growth or cause regression of an established human tumor xenograft. This procedure could be effective in treating a broad spectrum of human solid tumors that express TF on vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells.

  10. Three dimensional spheroid cell culture for nanoparticle safety testing.

    PubMed

    Sambale, Franziska; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Stahl, Frank; Blume, Cornelia; Stiesch, Meike; Kasper, Cornelia; Bahnemann, Detlef; Scheper, Thomas

    2015-07-10

    Nanoparticles are widely employed for many applications and the number of consumer products, incorporating nanotechnology, is constantly increasing. A novel area of nanotechnology is the application in medical implants. The widespread use of nanoparticles leads to their higher prevalence in our environment. This, in turn, raises concerns regarding potential risks to humans. Previous studies have shown possible hazardous effects of some nanoparticles on mammalian cells grown in two-dimensional (2D) cultures. However, 2D in vitro cell cultures display several disadvantages such as changes in cell shape, cell function, cell responses and lack of cell-cell contacts. For this reason, the development of better models for mimicking in vivo conditions is essential. In the present work, we cultivated A549 cells and NIH-3T3 cells in three-dimensional (3D) spheroids and investigated the effects of zinc oxide (ZnO-NP) and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP). The results were compared to cultivation in 2D monolayer culture. A549 cells in 3D cell culture formed loose aggregates which were more sensitive to the toxicity of ZnO-NP in comparison to cells grown in 2D monolayers. In contrast, NIH-3T3 cells showed a compact 3D spheroid structure and no differences in the sensitivity of the NIH-3T3 cells to ZnO-NP were observed between 2D and 3D cultures. TiO2-NP were non-toxic in 2D cultures but affected cell-cell interaction during 3D spheroid formation of A549 and NIH-3T3 cells. When TiO2-NP were directly added during spheroid formation in the cultures of the two cell lines tested, several smaller spheroids were formed instead of a single spheroid. This effect was not observed if the nanoparticles were added after spheroid formation. In this case, a slight decrease in cell viability was determined only for A549 3D spheroids. The obtained results demonstrate the importance of 3D cell culture studies for nanoparticle safety testing, since some effects cannot be revealed in 2D

  11. Human melanoma immunotherapy using tumor antigen-specific T cells generated in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zheng; Xia, Jinxing; Fan, Wei; Wargo, Jennifer; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-01-01

    A major factor hindering the exploration of adoptive immunotherapy in preclinical settings is the limited availability of tumor-reactive human T cells. Here we developed a humanized mouse model that permits large-scale production of human T cells expressing the engineered melanoma antigen MART-1-specific TCR. Humanized mice, made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue and CD34+ cells virally-transduced with HLA class I-restricted melanoma antigen (MART-1)-specific TCR gene, showed efficient development of MART-1-TCR+ human T cells with predominantly CD8+ cells. Importantly, MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells developing in these mice were capable of mounting antigen-specific responses in vivo, as evidenced by their proliferation, phenotypic conversion and IFN-γ production following MART-1 peptide immunization. Moreover, these MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells mediated efficient killing of melanoma cells in an HLA/antigen-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells induced potent antitumor responses that were further enhanced by IL-15 treatment in melanoma-bearing recipients. Finally, a short incubation of MART-1-specific T cells with rapamycin acted synergistically with IL-15, leading to significantly improved tumor-free survival in recipients with metastatic melanoma. These data demonstrate the practicality of using humanized mice to produce potentially unlimited source of tumor-specific human T cells for experimental and preclinical exploration of cancer immunotherapy. This study also suggests that pretreatment of tumor-reactive T cells with rapamycin in combination with IL-15 administration may be a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:26824989

  12. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    PubMed

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis. PMID:26038756

  13. Moxifloxacin increases anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic activity of irinotecan in human xenograft tumors.

    PubMed

    Reuveni, Debby; Halperin, Drora; Fabian, Ina; Tsarfaty, Galia; Askenasy, Nadir; Shalit, Itamar

    2010-04-15

    Camptothecins (CPTs) are topoisomerase I inhibitors chemotherapeutic agents used in combination chemotherapy. We showed previously that combination of moxifloxacin (MXF) and CPT induced inhibitory effects on topoisomerase I activity, on proliferation of HT-29 cells in vitro and enhanced apoptosis, compared to CPT alone. Analysis of secretion of the pro-angiogenic factors IL-8 and VEGF showed significant reduction by MXF. Using a murine model of human colon carcinoma xenograft, we compared the effects of MXF/CPT in vitro to MXF/irinotecan combination in vivo. We show that the MXF/CPT inhibitory effects observed in vitro are reflected in the inhibition of the progressive growth of HT-29 cells implanted in SCID mice. Using caliper measurements, Doppler ultrasonography, image analyses and immunohistochemistry of nuclear proteins (Ki-67) and vascular endothelial cells (CD-31) we show that addition of MXF (45mg/kg) to a relatively ineffective dose of irinotecan (20mg/kg), results in a 50% and 30% decrease, respectively, in tumor size and a decrease in Ki-67 staining. Power Doppler Ultrasound showed a significant, pronounced decrease in the number of blood vessels, as did CD-31 staining, indicating decreased blood flow in tumors in mice treated with MXF alone or MXF/irinotecan compared to irinotecan. These results suggest that the combination of MXF/irinotecan may result in enhanced anti-neoplastic/anti-angiogenic activity. PMID:20025849

  14. Spheroid Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cesarz, Zoe; Tamama, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Compared with traditional 2D adherent cell culture, 3D spheroidal cell aggregates, or spheroids, are regarded as more physiological, and this technique has been exploited in the field of oncology, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured in spheroids have enhanced anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, and tissue reparative/regenerative effects with improved cell survival after transplantation. Cytoskeletal reorganization and drastic changes in cell morphology in MSC spheroids indicate a major difference in mechanophysical properties compared with 2D culture. Enhanced multidifferentiation potential, upregulated expression of pluripotency marker genes, and delayed replicative senescence indicate enhanced stemness in MSC spheroids. Furthermore, spheroid formation causes drastic changes in the gene expression profile of MSC in microarray analyses. In spite of these significant changes, underlying molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways triggering and sustaining these changes are largely unknown. PMID:26649054

  15. Multiplexing spheroid volume, resazurin and acid phosphatase viability assays for high-throughput screening of tumour spheroids and stem cell neurospheres.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Delyan P; Parker, Terry L; Walker, David A; Alexander, Cameron; Ashford, Marianne B; Gellert, Paul R; Garnett, Martin C

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity) were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money. PMID:25119185

  16. Multiplexing Spheroid Volume, Resazurin and Acid Phosphatase Viability Assays for High-Throughput Screening of Tumour Spheroids and Stem Cell Neurospheres

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Delyan P.; Parker, Terry L.; Walker, David A.; Alexander, Cameron; Ashford, Marianne B.; Gellert, Paul R.; Garnett, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional cell culture has many advantages over monolayer cultures, and spheroids have been hailed as the best current representation of small avascular tumours in vitro. However their adoption in regular screening programs has been hindered by uneven culture growth, poor reproducibility and lack of high-throughput analysis methods for 3D. The objective of this study was to develop a method for a quick and reliable anticancer drug screen in 3D for tumour and human foetal brain tissue in order to investigate drug effectiveness and selective cytotoxic effects. Commercially available ultra-low attachment 96-well round-bottom plates were employed to culture spheroids in a rapid, reproducible manner amenable to automation. A set of three mechanistically different methods for spheroid health assessment (Spheroid volume, metabolic activity and acid phosphatase enzyme activity) were validated against cell numbers in healthy and drug-treated spheroids. An automated open-source ImageJ macro was developed to enable high-throughput volume measurements. Although spheroid volume determination was superior to the other assays, multiplexing it with resazurin reduction and phosphatase activity produced a richer picture of spheroid condition. The ability to distinguish between effects on malignant and the proliferating component of normal brain was tested using etoposide on UW228-3 medulloblastoma cell line and human neural stem cells. At levels below 10 µM etoposide exhibited higher toxicity towards proliferating stem cells, whereas at concentrations above 10 µM the tumour spheroids were affected to a greater extent. The high-throughput assay procedures use ready-made plates, open-source software and are compatible with standard plate readers, therefore offering high predictive power with substantial savings in time and money. PMID:25119185

  17. CBX7 is a tumor suppressor in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Forzati, Floriana; Federico, Antonella; Pallante, Pierlorenzo; Abbate, Adele; Esposito, Francesco; Malapelle, Umberto; Sepe, Romina; Palma, Giuseppe; Troncone, Giancarlo; Scarfò, Marzia; Arra, Claudio; Fedele, Monica; Fusco, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    The CBX7 gene encodes a polycomb group protein that is known to be downregulated in many types of human cancers, although the role of this protein in carcinogenesis remains unclear. To shed light on this issue, we generated mice null for Cbx7. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from these mice had a higher growth rate and reduced susceptibility to senescence compared with their WT counterparts. This was associated with upregulated expression of multiple cell cycle components, including cyclin E, which is known to play a key role in lung carcinogenesis in humans. Adult Cbx7-KO mice developed liver and lung adenomas and carcinomas. In in vivo and in vitro experiments, we demonstrated that CBX7 bound to the CCNE1 promoter in a complex that included HDAC2 and negatively regulated CCNE1 expression. Finally, we found that the lack of CBX7 protein expression in human lung carcinomas correlated with CCNE1 overexpression. These data suggest that CBX7 is a tumor suppressor and that its loss plays a key role in the pathogenesis of cancer. PMID:22214847

  18. Multiplexed ion beam imaging (MIBI) of human breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    Angelo, Michael; Bendall, Sean C.; Finck, Rachel; Hale, Matthew B.; Hitzman, Chuck; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Levenson, Richard M.; Lowe, John B.; Liu, Scot D.; Zhao, Shuchun; Natkunam, Yasodha; Nolan, Garry P.

    2014-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a tool for visualizing protein expression employed as part of the diagnostic work-up for the majority of solid tissue malignancies. Existing IHC methods use antibodies tagged with fluorophores or enzyme reporters that generate colored pigments. Because these reporters exhibit spectral and spatial overlap when used simultaneously, multiplexed IHC is not routinely used in clinical settings. We have developed a method that uses secondary ion mass spectrometry to image antibodies tagged with isotopically pure elemental metal reporters. Multiplexed ion beam imaging (MIBI) is capable of analyzing up to 100 targets simultaneously over a five-log dynamic range. Here, we used MIBI to analyze formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human breast tumor tissue sections stained with ten labels simultaneously. The resulting data suggest that MIBI will provide new insights by integrating tissue microarchitecture with highly multiplexed protein expression patterns, and will be valuable for basic research, drug discovery and clinical diagnostics. PMID:24584119

  19. Human papillomavirus tumor infection in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ludmir, Ethan B.; Stephens, Sarah J.; Palta, Manisha; Willett, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    The association between human papillomavirus (HPV) and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has been recognized for over three decades. Recently, multiple meta-analyses have drawn upon existing literature to assess the strength of the HPV-ESCC linkage. Here, we review these analyses and attempt to provide a clinically-relevant overview of HPV infection in ESCC. HPV-ESCC detection rates are highly variable across studies. Geographic location likely accounts for a majority of the variation in HPV prevalence, with high-incidence regions including Asia reporting significantly higher HPV-ESCC infection rates compared with low-incidence regions such as Europe, North America, and Oceania. Based on our examination of existing data, the current literature does not support the notion that HPV is a prominent carcinogen in ESCC. We conclude that there is no basis to change the current clinical approach to ESCC patients with respect to tumor HPV status. PMID:26029456

  20. Functional atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in human adrenal tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Shionoiri, H.; Hirawa, N.; Takasaki, I.; Ishikawa, Y.; Oda, H.; Minamisawa, K.; Sugimoto, K.; Matsukawa, T.; Ueda, S.; Miyajima, E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of synthetic human atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the release of catecholamines, aldosterone, or cortisol were observed in human adrenal tumors obtained surgically from patients with pheochromocytoma, primary aldosteronism, or Cushing's syndrome, respectively. Each tumor tissue or adjacent normal cortical tissue was sectioned into slices, which were incubated in medium-199 in the presence or absence of adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) and ANP. The amounts of epinephrine, norepinephrine, aldosterone, or cortisol released into the medium were measured. Existence of ANP receptors on the adrenal tissues was examined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry. Release of catecholamines from pheochromocytoma tissues was inhibited by ANP, and the presence of the ANP receptor on pheochromocytoma was further demonstrated by both binding assays and affinity labeling; Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of binding sites for ANP with a Kd of 1.0 nM and a Bmax of 0.4 pmol/mg of protein and the molecular size was estimated as 140 and a 70 kDa under nonreducing and reducing conditions, respectively. The presence of ANP receptors in pheochromocytoma was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. ANP inhibited both basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone secretion in the slices of normal cortex, and localization of ANP receptors in zona glomerulosa cells was also demonstrated. However, ANP did not inhibit basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone and cortisol secretion in both tissue slices from aldosteronoma and Cushing's adenoma. Consistent with these observations, the absence of ANP receptors in adenoma tissues was determined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry.

  1. Hexabrachion proteins in embryonic chicken tissues and human tumors.

    PubMed

    Erickson, H P; Taylor, H C

    1987-09-01

    Cell cultures of chicken embryo and human fibroblasts produce a large extracellular matrix molecule with a six-armed structure that we called a hexabrachion (Erickson, H. P., and J. L. Iglesias, 1984, Nature (Lond.), 311:267-269. In the present work we have determined that the myotendinous (M1) antigen described by M. Chiquet and D. M. Fambrough in chicken tissues (1984, J. Cell Biol., 98:1926-1936), and the glioma mesenchymal extracellular matrix protein described by Bourdon et al. in human tumors (Bourdon, M. A., C. J. Wikstrand, H. Furthmayr, T. J. Matthews, and D. D. Bigner, 1983, Cancer Res. 43:2796-2805) have the structure of hexabrachions. We also demonstrate that the M1 antigen is present in embryonic brain, where it was previously reported absent, and have purified hexabrachions from brain homogenates. The recently described cytotactin (Grumet, M., S. Hoffman, K. L. Crossin, and G. M. Edelman, 1985, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 82:8075-8079) now appears to be identical to the chicken hexabrachion protein. In a search for functional roles, we looked for a possible cell attachment activity. A strong, fibronectin-like attachment activity was present in (NH4)2SO4 precipitates of cell supernatant and sedimented with hexabrachions in glycerol gradients. Hexabrachions purified by antibody adsorption, however, had lost this activity, suggesting that it was due to a separate factor associated with hexabrachions in the gradient fractions. The combined information in the several, previously unrelated studies suggests that hexabrachions may play a role in organizing localized regions of extracellular matrix. The protein is prominently expressed at specific times and locations during embryonic development, is retained in certain adult tissues, and is reexpressed in a variety of tumors. PMID:3654758

  2. Peritoneal Dissemination Requires an Sp1-Dependent CXCR4/CXCL12 Signaling Axis and Extracellular Matrix-Directed Spheroid Formation.

    PubMed

    Kasagi, Yuta; Harada, Yui; Morodomi, Yosuke; Iwai, Toshiki; Saito, Satoru; Yoshida, Kumi; Oki, Eiji; Saeki, Hiroshi; Ohgaki, Kippei; Sugiyama, Masahiko; Onimaru, Mitsuho; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-15

    Peritonitis carcinomatosa is an advanced and intractable state of gastrointestinal and ovarian cancer, where mechanistic elucidation might enable the development of more effective therapies. Peritoneal dissemination of this type of malignancy has been generally thought to initiate from "milky spots" of primitive lymphoid tissues in the peritoneal cavity. In this study, we offer evidence challenging this idea, based on the finding that tumor implantation and directional dissemination was not required for the presence of milky spots, but rather SCF/CXCL12-expressing niche-like cells located at the border regions of perivascular adipose tissue. Interestingly, we found that peritoneal cavity lavage fluid, which specifically contains peritoneal collagen type IV and plasma fibronectin, dramatically facilitated spheroid formation of murine and human colon cancer cells. Spheroid formation strongly induced the expression of CXCR4 in an Sp1-dependent manner to promote niche-directed metastasis. Notably, disrupting sphere formation or inhibiting Sp1 activity was sufficient to suppress tumor dissemination and potentiated chemosensitivity to 5-fluorouracil. Our findings illuminate mechanisms of peritoneal cancer dissemination and highlight the Sp1/CXCR4/CXCL12 signaling axis as a rational target for the development of therapeutics to manage this intractable form of malignancy. PMID:26744523

  3. GENES FOR TUMOR MARKERS ARE CLUSTERED WITH CELLULAR PROTO-ONCOGENES ON HUMAN CHROMOSOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relative mapping positions of genes for polypeptides expressed abnormally in tumors (tumor markers) and cellular proto-oncogenes were analyzed and a remarkable degree of co-mapping of tumor marker genes with oncogenes in the human karyotype were found. It is proposed that abe...

  4. Metabolic imaging in microregions of tumors and normal tissues with bioluminescence and photon counting

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Klieser, W.; Walenta, S.; Paschen, W.; Kallinowski, F.; Vaupel, P.

    1988-08-03

    A method has been developed for metabolic imaging on a microscopic level in tumors, tumor spheroids, and normal tissues. The technique makes it possible to determine the spatial distribution of glucose, lactate, and ATP in absolute terms at similar locations within tissues or cell aggregates. The substrate distributions are registered in serial cryostat sections from tissue cryobiopsies or from frozen spheroids with the use of bioluminescence reactions. The light emission is measured directly by a special imaging photon counting system enabling on-line image analysis. The technique has been applied to human breast cancer xenografts, to spheroids originating from a human colon adenocarcinoma, and to skeletal rat muscle. Preliminary data obtained indicate that heterogeneities in the substrate distributions measured are much more pronounced in tumors than in normal tissue. There was no obvious correlation among the three quantities measured at similar locations within the tissues. The distribution of ATP corresponded well with the histological structure of larger spheroids; values were low in the necrotic center and high in the viable rim of these cell aggregates.

  5. Direct tumor recognition by a human CD4+ T-cell subset potently mediates tumor growth inhibition and orchestrates anti-tumor immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel F.; Shiku, Hiroshi; Mineno, Junichi; Okamoto, Sachiko; Old, Lloyd J.; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2015-01-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells generally orchestrate and regulate immune cells to provide immune surveillance against malignancy. However, activation of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells is restricted at local tumor sites where antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are frequently dysfunctional, which can cause rapid exhaustion of anti-tumor immune responses. Herein, we characterize anti-tumor effects of a unique human CD4+ helper T-cell subset that directly recognizes the cytoplasmic tumor antigen, NY-ESO-1, presented by MHC class II on cancer cells. Upon direct recognition of cancer cells, tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells (TR-CD4) potently induced IFN-γ-dependent growth arrest in cancer cells. In addition, direct recognition of cancer cells triggers TR-CD4 to provide help to NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells by enhancing cytotoxic activity, and improving viability and proliferation in the absence of APCs. Notably, the TR-CD4 either alone or in collaboration with CD8+ T cells significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo in a xenograft model. Finally, retroviral gene-engineering with T cell receptor (TCR) derived from TR-CD4 produced large numbers of functional TR-CD4. These observations provide mechanistic insights into the role of TR-CD4 in tumor immunity, and suggest that approaches to utilize TR-CD4 will augment anti-tumor immune responses for durable therapeutic efficacy in cancer patients. PMID:26447332

  6. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells improve motor functions and are neuroprotective in the 6-hydroxydopamine-rat model for Parkinson's disease when cultured in monolayer cultures but suppress hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal memory function when cultured in spheroids.

    PubMed

    Berg, Jürgen; Roch, Manfred; Altschüler, Jennifer; Winter, Christine; Schwerk, Anne; Kurtz, Andreas; Steiner, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    Adult human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been reported to induce neuroprotective effects in models for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, these effects strongly depend on the most optimal application of the transplant. In the present study we compared monolayer-cultured (aMSC) and spheroid (sMSC) MSC following transplantation into the substantia nigra (SN) of 6-OHDA lesioned rats regarding effects on the local microenvironment, degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, neurogenesis in the hippocampal DG as well as motor and memory function in the 6-OHDA-rat model for PD. aMSC transplantation significantly increased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the SN, increased the levels of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and improved motor functions compared to untreated and sMSC treated animals. In contrast, sMSC grafting induced an increased local microgliosis, decreased TH levels in the SN and reduced numbers of newly generated cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) without yet affecting hippocampal learning and memory function. We conclude that the neuroprotective potential of adipose-derived MSC in the rat model of PD crucially depends on the applied cellular phenotype. PMID:25120226

  7. Potentiation of platinum antitumor effects in human lung tumor xenografts by the angiogenesis inhibitor squalamine: effects on tumor neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Schiller, J H; Bittner, G

    1999-12-01

    Squalamine is a novel anti-angiogenic aminosterol that is postulated to inhibit neovascularization by selectively inhibiting the sodium-hydrogen antiporter exchanger. To determine how to most effectively use this agent in patients with cancer, we examined the antitumor effects of squalamine with or without cytotoxic agents in human lung cancer xenografts and correlated these observations with the degree of tumor neovascularization. No direct cytotoxic effects of squalamine against tumor cells were observed in vitro with or without cisplatin. Squalamine was effective in inhibiting the establishment of H460 human tumors in BALBc nude mice but was ineffective in inhibiting the growth of H460, CALU-6, or NL20T-A human tumor xenografts when administered i.p. to mice bearing established tumors. However, when combined with cisplatin or carboplatin, squalamine increased tumor growth delay by > or =1.5-fold in the three human lung carcinoma cell lines compared with cisplatin or carboplatin alone. No enhancement of antitumor activity was observed when squalamine was combined with paclitaxel, vinorelbine, gemcitabine, or docetaxel. Repeated cycles of squalamine plus cisplatin administration delayed H460 tumor growth >8.6-fold. Squalamine plus cisplatin reduced CD31 vessel formation by 25% compared with controls, squalamine alone, or cisplatin alone; however, no inhibition in CD31 vessel formation was observed when squalamine was combined with vinorelbine. These data demonstrate that the combination of squalamine and a platinum analog has significant preclinical antitumor activity against human lung cancer that is related to the anti-angiogenic effects of squalamine. PMID:10632372

  8. Spheroid formation of mesenchymal stem cells on chitosan and chitosan-hyaluronan membranes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guo-Shiang; Dai, Lien-Guo; Yen, Betty L; Hsu, Shan-hui

    2011-10-01

    Stem cells can lose their primitive properties during in vitro culture. The culture substrate may affect the behavior of stem cells as a result of cell-substrate interaction. The maintenance of self-renewal for adult human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by a biomaterial substrate, however, has not been reported in literature. In this study, MSCs isolated from human adipose (hADAS) and placenta (hPDMC) were cultured on chitosan membranes and those further modified by hyaluronan (chitosan-HA). It was observed that the MSCs of either origin formed three-dimensional spheroids that kept attached on the membranes. Spheroid formation was associated with the increased MMP-2 expression. Cells on chitosan-HA formed spheroids more quickly and the size of spheroids were larger than on chitosan alone. The expression of stemness marker genes (Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog) for MSCs on the materials was analyzed by the real-time RT-PCR. It was found that formation of spheroids on chitosan and chitosan-HA membranes helped to maintain the expression of stemness marker genes of MSCs compared to culturing cells on polystyrene dish. The maintenance of stemness marker gene expression was especially remarkable in hPDMC spheroids (vs. hADAS spheroids). Blocking CD44 by antibodies prevented the spheroid formation and decreased the stemness gene expression moderately; while treatment by Y-27632 compound inhibited the spheroid formation and significantly decreased the stemness gene expression. Upon chondrogenic induction, the MSC spheroids showed higher levels of Sox9, aggrecan, and collagen type II gene expression and were stained positive for glycosaminoglycan and collagen type II. hPDMC had better chondrogenic differentiation potential than hADAS upon induction. Our study suggested that the formation of adhered spheroids on chitosan and chitosan-HA membranes may sustain the expression of stemness marker genes of MSCs and increase their chondrogenic differentiation capacity. The Rho

  9. Spheroid culture of LuCaP 136 patient-derived xenograft enables versatile preclinical models of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Valta, Maija P; Zhao, Hongjuan; Saar, Matthias; Tuomela, Johanna; Nolley, Rosalie; Linxweiler, Johannes; Sandholm, Jouko; Lehtimäki, Jaakko; Härkönen, Pirkko; Coleman, Ilsa; Nelson, Peter S; Corey, Eva; Peehl, Donna M

    2016-04-01

    LuCaP serially transplantable patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) are valuable preclinical models of locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. Using spheroid culture methodology, we recently established cell lines from several LuCaP PDXs. Here, we characterized in depth the features of xenografts derived from LuCaP 136 spheroid cultures and found faithful retention of the phenotype of the original PDX. In vitro culture enabled luciferase transfection into LuCaP 136 spheroids, facilitating in vivo imaging. We showed that LuCaP 136 spheroids formed intratibial, orthotopic, and subcutaneous tumors when re-introduced into mice. Intratibial tumors responded to castration and were highly osteosclerotic. LuCaP 136 is a realistic in vitro-in vivo preclinical model of a subtype of bone metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:26873136

  10. Enhanced In Vivo Tumor Detection by Active Tumor Cell Targeting Using Multiple Tumor Receptor-Binding Peptides Presented on Genetically Engineered Human Ferritin Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Koo Chul; Ko, Ho Kyung; Lee, Jiyun; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Lee, Jeewon

    2016-08-01

    Human ferritin heavy-chain nanoparticle (hFTH) is genetically engineered to present tumor receptor-binding peptides (affibody and/or RGD-derived cyclic peptides, named 4CRGD here) on its surface. The affibody and 4CRGD specifically and strongly binds to human epidermal growth factor receptor I (EGFR) and human integrin αvβ3, respectively, which are overexpressed on various tumor cells. Through in vitro culture of EGFR-overexpressing adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-468) and integrin-overexpressing glioblastoma cells (U87MG), it is clarified that specific interactions between receptors on tumor cells and receptor-binding peptides on engineered hFTH is critical in active tumor cell targeting. After labeling with the near-infrared fluorescence dye (Cy5.5) and intravenouse injection into MDA-MB-468 or U87MG tumor-bearing mice, the recombinant hFTHs presenting either peptide or both of affibody and 4CRGD are successfully delivered to and retained in the tumor for a prolonged period of time. In particular, the recombinant hFTH presenting both affibody and 4CRGD notably enhances in vivo detection of U87MG tumors that express heterogeneous receptors, integrin and EGFR, compared to the other recombinant hFTHs presenting either affibody or 4CRGD only. Like affibody and 4CRGD used in this study, other multiple tumor receptor-binding peptides can be also genetically introduced to the hFTH surface for actively targeting of in vivo tumors with heterogenous receptors. PMID:27356892

  11. Micro FT-IR Characterization Of Human Lung Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Enzo; Teodori, L.; Vergamini, Piergiorgio; Trinca, M. L.; Mauro, F.; Salvati, F.; Spremolla, Giuliano

    1989-12-01

    FT-IR spectroscopy has opened up a new approach to the analytical study of cell transformation. Investigations carried out in normal and leukemic lymphocytes have evidenced an increase in DNA with respect to proteic components in neoplastic cells.(1) The evaluation of the ratio of the integrated areas(A) of the bands at 1080 cm-1 (mainly DNA) and at 1540 cm-1 (proteic components) has allowed us to establish a parameter which indicates, for values above 1.5, the neoplastic nature of cells. Recently, this approach has been applied to the study of human lung tumor cells. Several monocellular suspension procedures of the tissue fragment (mechanical and/or chemical) were tested to obtain reproducible and reliable spectra able to differentiate clearly between normal and patological cells. Chemical treatment (EDTA, Pepsin, Collagenase, etc.) produced additional bands in the spectra of the cells causing distortion of the profiles of some absorptions, and as a result, mechanical treatment was preferred. The normal and neoplastic cells homogeneously distributed by cytospin preparation on BaF2 windows were examined by means of FT-IR microscopy. An examination of several microareas of each sample yielded reproducible spectra, with values of the A 1080 cm-1 / A 1540 cm-1 parameter within a very narrow range for each sample, even if certain differences still remained among the different cases, in good agreement with the results obtained for leukemic cells.(1) The value of this parameter was found to be lower for cells isolated from the normal area of lung, than in the case of those corresponding to the tumoral area, meaning that an increase occurs in DNA with respect to the proteic components. These insights, which provide a basis to obtain indications at the molecular level, can open up new possibilities in clinical practice, in order to obtain diagnosis confirmation, to detect early stages of disease and to offer additional indications in cases of dubious interpretation.

  12. Tumor necrosis factor-beta in human pregnancy and labor.

    PubMed

    Laham, N; Van Dunné, F; Abraham, L J; Farrugia, W; Bendtzen, K; Brennecke, S P; Rice, G E

    1997-04-01

    The aims of this study were to determine tumor necrosis factor-beta (TNF-beta) concentration profiles in peripheral venous plasma and amniotic fluid during pregnancy and at the time of labor and to characterise TNF-beta mRNA expression and TNF-beta release from human gestational tissues. In addition, we investigated the expression of TNF-beta binding protein, lymphotoxin-beta (LT-beta), in human gestational tissues. The mean (+/-S.E.M.) TNF-beta concentrations in maternal plasma (TIL, 78 +/- 12 pg/ml, n = 7 vs. TNIL, 304 +/- 88 pg/ml, n = 7) and amniotic fluid (TIL, 8 +/- 5 pg/ml, n = 6 vs. TNIL, 73 +/- 20 pg/ml, n = 20) were significantly (P < 0.05) decreased in association with term labor-onset (TIL) compared to term not-in-labor (TNIL). TNF-beta concentration in maternal plasma and amniotic fluid did not change significantly either with preterm labor (PIL), or during pregnancy. Group-matched comparison of maternal plasma and amniotic fluid TNF-beta concentrations demonstrated that amniotic fluid TNF-beta concentrations were 6-8 fold lower than maternal plasma TNF-beta concentrations. Furthermore, no detectable TNF-beta was secreted from cultured human amniotic, choriodecidual and placental explants. Although, TNF-beta mRNA was detected in amnion, choriodecidual and placenta, LT-beta was similarly expressed in these tissues, suggesting that TNF-beta may be cell membrane bound. These data demonstrate that TNF-beta is present at low levels within the intrauterine environment and may suggest that TNF-beta is specifically inhibited at the maternal-fetal interface. PMID:9185077

  13. Receptor tyrosine kinase targeting in multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Susan; O'Driscoll, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    While growing cells as a monolayer is the traditional method for cell culture, the incorporation of multicellular spheroids into experimental design is becoming increasingly popular. This is due to the understanding that cells grown as spheroids tend to replicate the in vivo situation more reliably than monolayer cells. Thus, the use of multicellular spheroids may be more clinically relevant than monolayer cell cultures. Here, we describe methods for multicellular 3D spheroid generation that may be used to provide samples for receptor tyrosine kinase (and other protein) detection. Methods described include the forced-floating poly-HEMA method, the hanging-drop method, and the use of ECM to form multicellular 3D spheroids. PMID:25319898

  14. Frequent loss of heterozygosity and altered expression of the candidate tumor suppressor gene 'FAT' in human astrocytic tumors

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background We had earlier used the comparison of RAPD (Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA) DNA fingerprinting profiles of tumor and corresponding normal DNA to identify genetic alterations in primary human glial tumors. This has the advantage that DNA fingerprinting identifies the genetic alterations in a manner not biased for locus. Methods In this study we used RAPD-PCR to identify novel genomic alterations in the astrocytic tumors of WHO grade II (Low Grade Diffuse Astrocytoma) and WHO Grade IV (Glioblastoma Multiforme). Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the altered region was studied by microsatellite and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers. Expression study of the gene identified at the altered locus was done by semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR). Results Bands consistently altered in the RAPD profile of tumor DNA in a significant proportion of tumors were identified. One such 500 bp band, that was absent in the RAPD profile of 33% (4/12) of the grade II astrocytic tumors, was selected for further study. Its sequence corresponded with a region of FAT, a putative tumor suppressor gene initially identified in Drosophila. Fifty percent of a set of 40 tumors, both grade II and IV, were shown to have Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) at this locus by microsatellite (intragenic) and by SNP markers. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed low FAT mRNA levels in a major subset of tumors. Conclusion These results point to a role of the FAT in astrocytic tumorigenesis and demonstrate the use of RAPD analysis in identifying specific alterations in astrocytic tumors. PMID:19126244

  15. Inactivation of X-linked tumor suppressor genes in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Runhua; Kain, Mandy; Wang, Lizhong

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells silence autosomal tumor suppressor genes by Knudson’s two-hit mechanism in which loss-of-function mutations and then loss of heterozygosity occur at the tumor suppressor gene loci. However, the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes has challenged the traditional theory of “two-hit inactivation” in tumor suppressor genes, introducing the novel concept that a single genetic hit can cause loss of tumor suppressor function. The mechanism through which these genes are silenced in human cancer is unclear, but elucidating the details will greatly enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of human cancer. Here, we review the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes and discuss the potential mechanisms of their inactivation. In addition, we also discuss how the identification of X-linked tumor suppressor genes can potentially lead to new approaches to cancer therapy. PMID:22515449

  16. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) inhibits human colon tumor growth by promoting apoptosis of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuguang; Li, Bingji; Liu, Jie; He, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) has recently been suggested in several epithelial cancers, either pro-tumor or anti-tumor. However, the role of TSLP in colon cancer remains unknown. We here found significantly decreased TSLP levels in tumor tissues compared with tumor-surrounding tissues of patients with colon cancer and TSLP levels negatively correlated with the clinical staging score of colon cancer. TSLPR, the receptor of TSLP, was expressed in all three colon cancer cell lines investigated and colon tumor tissues. The addition of TSLP significantly enhanced apoptosis of colon cancer cells in a TSLPR-dependent manner. Interestingly, TSLP selectively induced the apoptosis of colon cancer cells, but not normal colonic epithelial cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that TSLP induced JNK and p38 activation and initiated apoptosis mainly through the extrinsic pathway, as caspase-8 inhibitor significantly reversed the apoptosis-promoting effect of TSLP. Finally, using a xenograft mouse model, we demonstrated that peritumoral administration of TSLP greatly reduced tumor growth accompanied with extensive tumor apoptotic response, which was abolished by tumor cell-specific knockdown of TSLPR. Collectively, our study reveals a novel anti-tumor effect of TSLP via direct promotion of the apoptosis of colon cancer cells, and suggests that TSLP could be of value in treating colon cancer. PMID:26919238

  17. Drug screening and grouping by sensitivity with a panel of primary cultured cancer spheroids derived from endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Kiyohara, Yumiko; Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Kubota, Satoshi; Okuyama, Hiroaki; Endo, Hiroko; Ueda, Yutaka; Kimura, Toshihiro; Kimura, Tadashi; Kamiura, Shoji; Inoue, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    Several molecular targeting drugs are being evaluated for endometrial cancer; selecting patients whose cancers are sensitive to these agents is of paramount importance. Previously, we developed the cancer tissue-originated spheroid method for primary cancer cells taken from patients' tumors as well as patient-derived xenografts. In this study, we successfully prepared and cultured cancer tissue-originated spheroids from endometrial cancers. Characteristics of the original tumors were well retained in cancer tissue-originated spheroids including morphology and expression of p53 or neuroendocrine markers. We screened 79 molecular targeting drugs using two cancer tissue-originated spheroid lines derived from endometrioid adenocarcinoma grade 3 and serous adenocarcinoma. Among several hits, we focused on everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitor, and YM155, a survivin inhibitor. When sensitivity to everolimus or YM155 was assessed in 12 or 11 cancer tissue-originated spheroids, respectively, from different endometrial cancer patients, the sensitivity varied substantially. The cancer tissue-originated spheroids sensitive to everolimus showed remarkable suppression of proliferation. The phosphorylation status of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 downstream molecules before and after everolimus treatment did not predict the effect of the drug. In contrast, the cancer tissue-originated spheroids sensitive to YM155 showed remarkable cell death. The effect of YM155 was also confirmed in vivo. The histological type correlated with YM155 sensitivity; non-endometrioid adenocarcinomas were sensitive and endometrioid adenocarcinomas were resistant. Non-canonical autophagic cell death was the most likely cause of cell death in a sensitive cancer tissue-originated spheroid. Thus, sensitivity assays using cancer tissue-originated spheroids from endometrial cancers may be useful for screening drugs and finding biomarkers. PMID:26825848

  18. Human Organotypic Lung Tumor Models: Suitable For Preclinical 18F-FDG PET-Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fecher, David; Hofmann, Elisabeth; Buck, Andreas; Bundschuh, Ralph; Nietzer, Sarah; Dandekar, Gudrun; Walles, Thorsten; Walles, Heike; Lückerath, Katharina; Steinke, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Development of predictable in vitro tumor models is a challenging task due to the enormous complexity of tumors in vivo. The closer the resemblance of these models to human tumor characteristics, the more suitable they are for drug-development and –testing. In the present study, we generated a complex 3D lung tumor test system based on acellular rat lungs. A decellularization protocol was established preserving the architecture, important ECM components and the basement membrane of the lung. Human lung tumor cells cultured on the scaffold formed cluster and exhibited an up-regulation of the carcinoma-associated marker mucin1 as well as a reduced proliferation rate compared to respective 2D culture. Additionally, employing functional imaging with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) these tumor cell cluster could be detected and tracked over time. This approach allowed monitoring of a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in the in vitro lung tumor model non-destructively. Surprisingly, FDG-PET assessment of single tumor cell cluster on the same scaffold exhibited differences in their response to therapy, indicating heterogeneity in the lung tumor model. In conclusion, our complex lung tumor test system features important characteristics of tumors and its microenvironment and allows monitoring of tumor growth and -metabolism in combination with functional imaging. In longitudinal studies, new therapeutic approaches and their long-term effects can be evaluated to adapt treatment regimes in future. PMID:27501455

  19. Human Organotypic Lung Tumor Models: Suitable For Preclinical 18F-FDG PET-Imaging.

    PubMed

    Fecher, David; Hofmann, Elisabeth; Buck, Andreas; Bundschuh, Ralph; Nietzer, Sarah; Dandekar, Gudrun; Walles, Thorsten; Walles, Heike; Lückerath, Katharina; Steinke, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Development of predictable in vitro tumor models is a challenging task due to the enormous complexity of tumors in vivo. The closer the resemblance of these models to human tumor characteristics, the more suitable they are for drug-development and -testing. In the present study, we generated a complex 3D lung tumor test system based on acellular rat lungs. A decellularization protocol was established preserving the architecture, important ECM components and the basement membrane of the lung. Human lung tumor cells cultured on the scaffold formed cluster and exhibited an up-regulation of the carcinoma-associated marker mucin1 as well as a reduced proliferation rate compared to respective 2D culture. Additionally, employing functional imaging with 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) these tumor cell cluster could be detected and tracked over time. This approach allowed monitoring of a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in the in vitro lung tumor model non-destructively. Surprisingly, FDG-PET assessment of single tumor cell cluster on the same scaffold exhibited differences in their response to therapy, indicating heterogeneity in the lung tumor model. In conclusion, our complex lung tumor test system features important characteristics of tumors and its microenvironment and allows monitoring of tumor growth and -metabolism in combination with functional imaging. In longitudinal studies, new therapeutic approaches and their long-term effects can be evaluated to adapt treatment regimes in future. PMID:27501455

  20. Expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor in Human Acute Cardiac Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Arbustini, Eloisa; Grasso, Maurizia; Diegoli, Marta; Bramerio, Manuela; Foglieni, Andrea Scotti; Albertario, Marco; Martinelli, Luigi; Gavazzi, Antonello; Goggi, Claudio; Campana, Carlo; Vigano, Mario

    1991-01-01

    The authors performed an immunohistochemical study on expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) in endomyocardial biopsies from human cardiac allografts. TNFα immunoreactivity was found in 45% biopsies with mild acute rejection, in 83% biopsies with focal moderate rejection, in 80% biopsies with diffuse moderate rejection. Biopsies with absent rejection did not show immunoreactive cells. In mild rejection, positive cells were few and scanty monocytes and macrophages (MAC-387 and LN5 positive cells) and T lymphocytes (UCHL-1/CD45 RO positive cells) (up to 20% of all infiltrating cells). Expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens on infiltrating and endothelial cells occurred earlier and independent of TNFα reactivity. Number of immunoreactive cells increased in moderate rejection (up to 50%). Immunoreactivity was also present in nonpigmented macrophages in part of the biopsies with resolving rejection (45%). The authors conclude that TNFα is expressed in acute cardiac rejection by immunologically activated inflammatory cells. Immunoreactive cells increase in number with increasing severity of the reaction. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:1928295

  1. Functional involvement of human discs large tumor suppressor in cytokinesis

    SciTech Connect

    Unno, Kenji; Hanada, Toshihiko; Chishti, Athar H.

    2008-10-15

    Cytokinesis is the final step of cell division that completes the separation of two daughter cells. We found that the human discs large (hDlg) tumor suppressor homologue is functionally involved in cytokinesis. The guanylate kinase (GUK) domain of hDlg mediates the localization of hDlg to the midbody during cytokinesis, and over-expression of the GUK domain in U2OS and HeLa cells impaired cytokinesis. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from dlg mutant mice contained an increased number of multinucleated cells and showed reduced proliferation in culture. A kinesin-like motor protein, GAKIN, which binds directly to the GUK domain of hDlg, exhibited a similar intracellular distribution pattern with hDlg throughout mitosis and localized to the midbody during cytokinesis. However, the targeting of hDlg and GAKIN to the midbody appeared to be independent of each other. The midbody localization of GAKIN required its functional kinesin-motor domain. Treatment of cells with the siRNA specific for hDlg and GAKIN caused formation of multinucleated cells and delayed cytokinesis. Together, these results suggest that hDlg and GAKIN play functional roles in the maintenance of midbody architecture during cytokinesis.

  2. Salinomycin efficiency assessment in non-tumor (HB4a) and tumor (MCF-7) human breast cells.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Andressa Megumi; D Epiro, Gláucia Fernanda Rocha; Marques, Lilian Areal; Semprebon, Simone Cristine; Sartori, Daniele; Ribeiro, Lúcia Regina; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio

    2016-06-01

    The search for anticancer drugs has led researchers to study salinomycin, an ionophore antibiotic that selectively destroys cancer stem cells. In this study, salinomycin was assessed in two human cell lines, a breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and a non-tumor breast cell line (HB4a), to verify its selective action against tumor cells. Real-time assessment of cell proliferation showed that HB4a cells are more resistant to salinomycin than MCF-7 tumor cell line, and these data were confirmed in a cytotoxicity assay. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values show the increased sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to salinomycin. In the comet assay, only MCF-7 cells showed the induction of DNA damage. Flow cytometric analysis showed that cell death by apoptosis/necrosis was only induced in the MCF-7 cells. The increased expression of GADD45A and CDKN1A genes was observed in all cell lines. Decreased expression of CCNA2 and CCNB1 genes occurred only in tumor cells, suggesting G2/M cell cycle arrest. Consequently, cell death was activated in tumor cells through strong inhibition of the antiapoptotic genes BCL-2, BCL-XL, and BIRC5 genes in MCF-7 cells. These data demonstrate the selectivity of salinomycin in killing human mammary tumor cells. The cell death observed only in MCF-7 tumor cells was confirmed by gene expression analysis, where there was downregulation of antiapoptotic genes. These data contribute to clarifying the mechanism of action of salinomycin as a promising antitumor drug and, for the first time, we observed the higher resistance of HB4a non-tumor breast cells to salinomycin. PMID:26932586

  3. Mutation analysis of large tumor suppressor genes LATS1 and LATS2 supports a tumor suppressor role in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tian; Bachman, John; Lai, Zhi-Chun

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, human cancer genome projects provide unprecedented opportunities for the discovery of cancer genes and signaling pathways that contribute to tumor development. While numerous gene mutations can be identified from each cancer genome, what these mutations mean for cancer is a challenging question to address, especially for those from less understood putative new cancer genes. As a powerful approach, in silico bioinformatics analysis could efficiently sort out mutations that are predicted to damage gene function. Such an analysis of human large tumor suppressor genes, LATS1 and LATS2, has been carried out and the results support a role of hLATS1//2 as negative growth regulators and tumor suppressors. PMID:25482410

  4. Detection of human brain tumor infiltration with quantitative stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Minbiao; Lewis, Spencer; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Snuderl, Matija; Venneti, Sriram; Fisher-Hubbard, Amanda; Garrard, Mia; Fu, Dan; Wang, Anthony C.; Heth, Jason A.; Maher, Cormac O.; Sanai, Nader; Johnson, Timothy D.; Freudiger, Christian W.; Sagher, Oren; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Orringer, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiating tumor from normal brain is a major barrier to achieving optimal outcome in brain tumor surgery. New imaging techniques for visualizing tumor margins during surgery are needed to improve surgical results. We recently demonstrated the ability of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a non-destructive, label-free optical method, to reveal glioma infiltration in animal models. Here we show that SRS reveals human brain tumor infiltration in fresh, unprocessed surgical specimens from 22 neurosurgical patients. SRS detects tumor infiltration in near-perfect agreement with standard hematoxylin and eosin light microscopy (κ=0.86). The unique chemical contrast specific to SRS microscopy enables tumor detection by revealing quantifiable alterations in tissue cellularity, axonal density and protein:lipid ratio in tumor-infiltrated tissues. To ensure that SRS microscopic data can be easily used in brain tumor surgery, without the need for expert interpretation, we created a classifier based on cellularity, axonal density and protein:lipid ratio in SRS images capable of detecting tumor infiltration with 97.5% sensitivity and 98.5% specificity. Importantly, quantitative SRS microscopy detects the spread of tumor cells, even in brain tissue surrounding a tumor that appears grossly normal. By accurately revealing tumor infiltration, quantitative SRS microscopy holds potential for improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery. PMID:26468325

  5. Detection of human brain tumor infiltration with quantitative stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Minbiao; Lewis, Spencer; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Ramkissoon, Shakti H; Snuderl, Matija; Venneti, Sriram; Fisher-Hubbard, Amanda; Garrard, Mia; Fu, Dan; Wang, Anthony C; Heth, Jason A; Maher, Cormac O; Sanai, Nader; Johnson, Timothy D; Freudiger, Christian W; Sagher, Oren; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Orringer, Daniel A

    2015-10-14

    Differentiating tumor from normal brain is a major barrier to achieving optimal outcome in brain tumor surgery. New imaging techniques for visualizing tumor margins during surgery are needed to improve surgical results. We recently demonstrated the ability of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a nondestructive, label-free optical method, to reveal glioma infiltration in animal models. We show that SRS reveals human brain tumor infiltration in fresh, unprocessed surgical specimens from 22 neurosurgical patients. SRS detects tumor infiltration in near-perfect agreement with standard hematoxylin and eosin light microscopy (κ = 0.86). The unique chemical contrast specific to SRS microscopy enables tumor detection by revealing quantifiable alterations in tissue cellularity, axonal density, and protein/lipid ratio in tumor-infiltrated tissues. To ensure that SRS microscopic data can be easily used in brain tumor surgery, without the need for expert interpretation, we created a classifier based on cellularity, axonal density, and protein/lipid ratio in SRS images capable of detecting tumor infiltration with 97.5% sensitivity and 98.5% specificity. Quantitative SRS microscopy detects the spread of tumor cells, even in brain tissue surrounding a tumor that appears grossly normal. By accurately revealing tumor infiltration, quantitative SRS microscopy holds potential for improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery. PMID:26468325

  6. Characterization of NADPH oxidase 5 expression in human tumors and tumor cell lines with a novel mouse monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Smitha; Wu, Yongzhong; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Anver, Miriam R.; Butcher, Donna; Jiang, Guojian; Meitzler, Jennifer L.; Liu, Han; Juhasz, Agnes; Lu, Jiamo; Roy, Krishnendu K.; Doroshow, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species generated by NADPH oxidase 5 (Nox5) have been implicated in physiological and pathophysiological signaling pathways, including cancer development and progression. However, because immunological tools are lacking, knowledge of the role of Nox5 in tumor biology has been limited; the expression of Nox5 protein across tumors and normal tissues is essentially unknown. Here, we report the characterization and use of a mouse monoclonal antibody against a recombinant Nox5 protein (600–746) for expression profiling of Nox5 in human tumors by tissue microarray analysis. Using our novel antibody, we also report the detection of endogenous Nox5 protein in human UACC-257 melanoma cells. Immunofluorescence, confocal microscopy, and immunohistochemical techniques were employed to demonstrate Nox5 localization throughout UACC-257 cells, with perinuclear enhancement. Tissue microarray analysis revealed, for the first time, substantial Nox5 overexpression in several human cancers including those of prostate, breast, colon, lung, brain, and ovary as well as in malignant melanoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma; expression in most non-malignant tissues was negative to weak. This validated mouse monoclonal antibody will promote further exploration of the functional significance of Nox5 in human pathophysiology, including tumor cell growth and proliferation. PMID:23851018

  7. Constrained spheroids for prolonged hepatocyte culture.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wen Hao; Fang, Yu; Yan, Jie; Hong, Xin; Hari Singh, Nisha; Wang, Shu Rui; Nugraha, Bramasta; Xia, Lei; Fong, Eliza Li Shan; Iliescu, Ciprian; Yu, Hanry

    2016-02-01

    Liver-specific functions in primary hepatocytes can be maintained over extended duration in vitro using spheroid culture. However, the undesired loss of cells over time is still a major unaddressed problem, which consequently generates large variations in downstream assays such as drug screening. In static culture, the turbulence generated by medium change can cause spheroids to detach from the culture substrate. Under perfusion, the momentum generated by Stokes force similarly results in spheroid detachment. To overcome this problem, we developed a Constrained Spheroids (CS) culture system that immobilizes spheroids between a glass coverslip and an ultra-thin porous Parylene C membrane, both surface-modified with poly(ethylene glycol) and galactose ligands for optimum spheroid formation and maintenance. In this configuration, cell loss was minimized even when perfusion was introduced. When compared to the standard collagen sandwich model, hepatocytes cultured as CS under perfusion exhibited significantly enhanced hepatocyte functions such as urea secretion, and CYP1A1 and CYP3A2 metabolic activity. We propose the use of the CS culture as an improved culture platform to current hepatocyte spheroid-based culture systems. PMID:26708088

  8. Steroid Tumor Environment in Male and Female Mice Model of Canine and Human Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Caceres, Sara; Peña, Laura; Silvan, Gema; Illera, Maria J.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Reuben, James M.; Illera, Juan C.

    2016-01-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) shares clinical and histopathological characteristics with human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) and has been proposed as a good model for studying the human disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of female and male mice to reproduce IMC and IBC tumors and identify the hormonal tumor environment. To perform the study sixty 6–8-week-old male and female mice were inoculated subcutaneously with a suspension of 106IPC-366 and SUM149 cells. Tumors and serum were collected and used for hormonal analysis. Results revealed that IPC-366 reproduced tumors in 90% of males inoculated after 2 weeks compared with 100% of females that reproduced tumor at the same time. SUM149 reproduced tumors in 40% of males instead of 80% of females that reproduced tumors after 4 weeks. Both cell lines produce distant metastasis in lungs being higher than the metastatic rates in females. EIA analysis revealed that male tumors had higher T and SO4E1 concentrations compared to female tumors. Serum steroid levels were lower than those found in tumors. In conclusion, IBC and IMC male mouse model is useful as a tool for IBC research and those circulating estrogens and intratumoral hormonal levels are crucial in the development and progression of tumors. PMID:27195300

  9. Steroid Tumor Environment in Male and Female Mice Model of Canine and Human Inflammatory Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Sara; Peña, Laura; Silvan, Gema; Illera, Maria J; Woodward, Wendy A; Reuben, James M; Illera, Juan C

    2016-01-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary cancer (IMC) shares clinical and histopathological characteristics with human inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) and has been proposed as a good model for studying the human disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of female and male mice to reproduce IMC and IBC tumors and identify the hormonal tumor environment. To perform the study sixty 6-8-week-old male and female mice were inoculated subcutaneously with a suspension of 10(6)IPC-366 and SUM149 cells. Tumors and serum were collected and used for hormonal analysis. Results revealed that IPC-366 reproduced tumors in 90% of males inoculated after 2 weeks compared with 100% of females that reproduced tumor at the same time. SUM149 reproduced tumors in 40% of males instead of 80% of females that reproduced tumors after 4 weeks. Both cell lines produce distant metastasis in lungs being higher than the metastatic rates in females. EIA analysis revealed that male tumors had higher T and SO4E1 concentrations compared to female tumors. Serum steroid levels were lower than those found in tumors. In conclusion, IBC and IMC male mouse model is useful as a tool for IBC research and those circulating estrogens and intratumoral hormonal levels are crucial in the development and progression of tumors. PMID:27195300

  10. Human tumor-derived genomic DNA transduced into a recipient cell induces tumor-specific immune responses ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Whiteside, Theresa L.; Gambotto, Andrea; Albers, Andreas; Stanson, Joanna; Cohen, Edward P.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes a DNA-based vaccination strategy evaluated ex vivo with human cells. The vaccine was prepared by transferring tumor-derived genomic DNA to PCI-13 cells, a highly immunogenic tumor cell line (“recipient cell”), which had been genetically modified to secrete IL-2 (PCI-13/IL-2). PCI-13 cells expressed class I MHC determinants (HLA-A2) shared with the tumor from which the DNA was obtained as well as allogeneic determinants. DNA from a gp100+ melanoma cell line was transduced into gp100− PCI-13/IL-2 cells (PCI-13/IL-2/DNA). A T cell line specific for the gp100 epitope responded to PCI-13/IL-2/DNA cells by IFN-γ-secretion measured in enzyme-linked immunospot assays. The T cell line also recognized the gp100 epitope presented by dendritic cells that ingested PCI-13/IL-2/DNA cells, which had been induced by UVB irradiation to undergo apoptosis. After up-take and processing of apoptotic PCI-13/IL-2/DNA cells, the dendritic cells primed normal peripheral blood lymphocytes to generate effector T cells specific for the tumor donating the DNA. The results indicate that tumor epitopes encoded in such DNA are expressed in recipient cells and can induce tumor-specific T cells. The findings support translation of this vaccination strategy to a phase I trial in patients with cancer. PMID:12080146

  11. Accessing key steps of human tumor progression in vivo by using an avian embryo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, Martin; Javerzat, Sophie; Gilges, Delphine; Meyre, Aurélie; de Lafarge, Benjamin; Eichmann, Anne; Bikfalvi, Andreas

    2005-02-01

    Experimental in vivo tumor models are essential for comprehending the dynamic process of human cancer progression, identifying therapeutic targets, and evaluating antitumor drugs. However, current rodent models are limited by high costs, long experimental duration, variability, restricted accessibility to the tumor, and major ethical concerns. To avoid these shortcomings, we investigated whether tumor growth on the chick chorio-allantoic membrane after human glioblastoma cell grafting would replicate characteristics of the human disease. Avascular tumors consistently formed within 2 days, then progressed through vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-dependent angiogenesis, associated with hemorrhage, necrosis, and peritumoral edema. Blocking of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor signaling pathways by using small-molecule receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors abrogated tumor development. Gene regulation during the angiogenic switch was analyzed by oligonucleotide microarrays. Defined sample selection for gene profiling permitted identification of regulated genes whose functions are associated mainly with tumor vascularization and growth. Furthermore, expression of known tumor progression genes identified in the screen (IL-6 and cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61) as well as potential regulators (lumican and F-box-only 6) follow similar patterns in patient glioma. The model reliably simulates key features of human glioma growth in a few days and thus could considerably increase the speed and efficacy of research on human tumor progression and preclinical drug screening. angiogenesis | animal model alternatives | glioblastoma

  12. AnaSP: a software suite for automatic image analysis of multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    Piccinini, Filippo

    2015-04-01

    Today, more and more biological laboratories use 3D cell cultures and tissues grown in vitro as a 3D model of in vivo tumours and metastases. In the last decades, it has been extensively established that multicellular spheroids represent an efficient model to validate effects of drugs and treatments for human care applications. However, a lack of methods for quantitative analysis limits the usage of spheroids as models for routine experiments. Several methods have been proposed in literature to perform high throughput experiments employing spheroids by automatically computing different morphological parameters, such as diameter, volume and sphericity. Nevertheless, these systems are typically grounded on expensive automated technologies, that make the suggested solutions affordable only for a limited subset of laboratories, frequently performing high content screening analysis. In this work we propose AnaSP, an open source software suitable for automatically estimating several morphological parameters of spheroids, by simply analyzing brightfield images acquired with a standard widefield microscope, also not endowed with a motorized stage. The experiments performed proved sensitivity and precision of the segmentation method proposed, and excellent reliability of AnaSP to compute several morphological parameters of spheroids imaged in different conditions. AnaSP is distributed as an open source software tool. Its modular architecture and graphical user interface make it attractive also for researchers who do not work in areas of computer vision and suitable for both high content screenings and occasional spheroid-based experiments. PMID:25737369

  13. Detection of Human Papillomavirus-16 E6-Oncoprotein in Epithelial Ovarian Tumors Samples of Iraqi Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Fahem Mohsin; Kadhim, Haider Sabah; Mousa Al Khuzaee, Liqaa Riadh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causal factor for cervical cancer. However, the role of HPV infection in ovarian cancer is unclear. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the presence of human papillomavirus-16 (HPV-16) in ovarian tumor tissues. Patients and Methods: This was a retrospective study, which included 61 Archived human ovarian tumor tissues embedded in paraffin blocks. The ovarian tumor tissues were divided into four groups. The first group was the malignant ovarian epithelial tumor group; it included 31 cases with invasive surface epithelial ovarian tumors. The second group was the borderline epithelial ovarian tumor group: it included four cases with borderline intermediate malignancy. The third group was the benign epithelial ovarian tumors group: it included 18 cases with benign epithelial ovarian tumors. The fourth group had functional ovarian cystic lesions: it included eight cases with non-neoplastic functional ovarian cysts. Sections were made from each of the paraffin embedded blocks and examined using immunohistochemistry to detect HPV 16-E6-oncoprotein in ovarian tumor tissues. Results: Out of the eight cases with functional cysts only one case (12.5%) expressed HPV. No HPV expression was seen in cases with benign and borderline tumors. Out of the 31 cases with one malignant surface epithelial ovarian tumor only three (9.67%) cases expressed HPV. There was no significant statistical difference in HPV expression among neoplastic and non-neoplastic ovarian tumors included in the present study (P= 0.476). Conclusions: HPV type 16 was detected in only 9.67% of malignant epithelial tumors. It appears that HPV infection plays a relatively minor role in the pathogenesis of ovarian carcinomas. PMID:25485061

  14. Activation of proto-oncogenes in human and mouse lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, S.H.; Anderson, M.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in several nations. Epidemiological studies have indicated that 85% of all lung cancer deaths and 30% of all cancer deaths in the US are associated with tobacco smoking. Various chemicals in tobacco smoke are thought to react with DNA and to ultimately yield heritable mutations. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung tumorigenesis, the authors have analyzed proto-oncogene activation in a series of human lung tumors from smokers and spontaneously occurring and chemically induced lung tumors in mice. Approximately 86% of the human lung tumors and > 90% of the mouse lung tumors were found to contain activated oncogenes. ras Oncogenes activated by point mutations were detected in many of the human lung adenocarcinomas and virtually all of the mouse lung adenomas and adenocarcinomas. The mutation profiles of the activated K-ras genes detected in the chemically induced mouse lung tumors suggest that the observed mutations result from genotoxic effects of the chemicals. Comparison of the K-ras mutations observed in the human lung adenocarcinomas with mutation profiles observed in the mouse lung tumors suggest that bulky hydrophobic DNA adducts may be responsible for the majority of the mutations observed in the activated human K-ras genes. Other data indicate that approximately 20% of human lung tumors contain potentially novel transforming genes that may also be targets for mutagens in cigarette smoke.

  15. Maximum recovery potential of human tumor cells may predict clinical outcome in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Beckett, M.

    1987-05-01

    We studied inherent radiosensitivity/resistance (D0), ability to accumulate sublethal damage (n) and repair of potentially lethal damage (PLDR) in established human tumor cell lines as well as early passage human tumor cell lines derived from patients with known outcome following radiotherapy. Survival 24 hrs after treatment of human tumor cells with X rays in plateau phase cultures is a function of initial damage (D0, n), as well as recovery over 24 hrs (PLDR). A surviving fraction greater than .1 24 hrs following treatment with 7 Gy in plateau phase cultures is associated with tumor cell types (melanoma, osteosarcoma) with a high probability of radiotherapy failure or tumor cells derived from patients who actually failed radiotherapy. Therefore, total cellular recovery following radiation may be an important determinant of radiocurability. Accurate assays of radiotherapy outcome may need to account for all these radiobiological parameters.

  16. Oncolytic newcastle disease virus triggers cell death of lung cancer spheroids and is enhanced by pharmacological inhibition of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lulu; Sun, Sulan; Wang, Tianpeng; Li, Yingchun; Jiang, Ke; Lin, Guibin; Ma, Yan; Barr, Martin P; Song, Fei; Zhang, Guirong; Meng, Songshu

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer stem cells (CSCs) have recently been isolated from lung cancer patient samples and have been reported to be responsible for tumor initiation, treatment resistance and tumor recurrence. We have previously shown that oncolytic Newcastle disease virus (NDV), strain FMW (NDV/FMW) induces apoptosis in drug-resistant lung cancer cells. However, how NDV exerts its oncolytic effect on lung CSCs remains to be investigated. Here we show that NDV/FMW replicates in, and lyses CSC-enriched lung cancer spheroids and inhibits the 3D growth potential of lung cancer spheroid and agar colonies. We demonstrate that NDV/FMW triggers caspase-dependent apoptosis in lung cancer spheroids as shown by increased caspase-3 processing and Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Notably, NDV/FMW infection results in the degradation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) II and P62, two hallmarks of autophagy maturation, indicating that NDV/FMW promotes autophagy flux in lung cancer cell spheroids. This was further confirmed by the appearance of an increased number of double-membrane vesicles as detected by transmission electron microscopy. We also show that NDV/FMW promotes autophagy degradation in lung cancer spheroids via inhibition of the AKT/mTOR pathway. In addition, treatment of spheroids with the autophagy inhibitor, chloroquine increases NDV/FMW-induced cytotoxicity. Collectively, our data show that oncolytic NDV/FMW may be a potential strategy in targeting lung CSCs. PMID:26885450

  17. Rapid Formation of Cell Aggregates and Spheroids Induced by a "Smart" Boronic Acid Copolymer.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Adérito J R; Pasparakis, George

    2016-09-01

    Cell surface engineering has emerged as a powerful approach to forming cell aggregates/spheroids and cell-biomaterial ensembles with significant uses in tissue engineering and cell therapeutics. Herein, we demonstrate that cell membrane remodeling with a thermoresponsive boronic acid copolymer induces the rapid formation of spheroids using either cancer or cardiac cell lines under conventional cell culture conditions at minute concentrations. It is shown that the formation of well-defined spheroids is accelerated by at least 24 h compared to non-polymer-treated controls, and, more importantly, the polymer allows for fine control of the aggregation kinetics owing to its stimulus response to temperature and glucose content. On the basis of its simplicity and effectiveness to promote cellular aggregation, this platform holds promise in three-dimensional tissue/tumor modeling and tissue engineering applications. PMID:27571512

  18. Bar-spheroid interaction in galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars; Weinberg, Martin D.

    1992-01-01

    N-body simulation and linear analysis is employed to investigate the secular evolution of barred galaxies, with emphasis on the interaction between bars and spheroidal components of galaxies. This interaction is argued to drive secular transfer of angular momentum from bars to spheroids, primarily through resonant coupling. A moderately strong bar, having mass within corotation about 0.3 times the enclosed spheroid mass, is predicted to shed all its angular momentum typically in less than about 10 exp 9 yr. Even shorter depletion time scales are found for relatively more massive bars. It is suggested either that spheroids around barred galaxies are structured so as to inhibit strong coupling with bars, or that bars can form by unknown processes long after disks are established. The present models reinforce the notion that bars can drive secular evolution in galaxies.

  19. Chemically-induced mouse lung tumors: applications to human health assessments [Poster 2014

    EPA Science Inventory

    A state-of-the-science workshop on chemically-induced mouse lung tumors was conducted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to discuss issues related to the use of mouse lung tumor data in human health assessments. Naphthalene, styrene, and ethylbenzene were chosen for the anal...

  20. Chemically-induced Mouse Lung Tumors: Applications to Human Health Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    A state-of-the-science workshop on chemically-induced mouse lung tumors was conducted by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to better understand the mouse lung tumor data’s role in human health assessments. Three environmental chemicals - naphthalene, styrene, and ethylbe...

  1. GT198 Expression Defines Mutant Tumor Stroma in Human Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zheqiong; Peng, Min; Cheng, Liang; Jones, Kimya; Maihle, Nita J; Mivechi, Nahid F; Ko, Lan

    2016-05-01

    Human breast cancer precursor cells remain to be elucidated. Using breast cancer gene product GT198 (PSMC3IP; alias TBPIP or Hop2) as a unique marker, we revealed the cellular identities of GT198 mutant cells in human breast tumor stroma. GT198 is a steroid hormone receptor coactivator and a crucial factor in DNA repair. Germline mutations in GT198 are present in breast and ovarian cancer families. Somatic mutations in GT198 are present in ovarian tumor stromal cells. Herein, we show that human breast tumor stromal cells carry GT198 somatic mutations and express cytoplasmic GT198 protein. GT198(+) stromal cells share vascular smooth muscle cell origin, including myoepithelial cells, adipocytes, capillary pericytes, and stromal fibroblasts. Frequent GT198 mutations are associated with GT198(+) tumor stroma but not with GT198(-) tumor cells. GT198(+) progenitor cells are mostly capillary pericytes. When tested in cultured cells, mutant GT198 induces vascular endothelial growth factor promoter, and potentially promotes angiogenesis and adipogenesis. Our results suggest that multiple lineages of breast tumor stromal cells are mutated in GT198. These findings imply the presence of mutant progenitors, whereas their descendants, carrying the same GT198 mutations, are collectively responsible for forming breast tumor microenvironment. GT198 expression is, therefore, a specific marker of mutant breast tumor stroma and has the potential to facilitate diagnosis and targeted treatment of human breast cancer. PMID:27001628

  2. The human prohibitin (PHB) gene family and its somatic mutations in human tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Takaaki; Sakamoto, Takashi; Takita, Ken-ichi; Saito, Hiroko; Okui, Keiko; Nakamura, Yusuke )

    1993-09-01

    Five cosmid clones, isolated by procedures to screen genomic libraries for homologous variants of the human prohibitin gene (PHB), were analyzed to determine their genomic structures. Four of these (PHBP1-4) were found to be processed pseudogenes, each located on a different chromosome from their counter-parts on chromosome 17q21. The DNA sequence of one clone (PHBP1, on chromosome 6q25) shared a 91.3% identity at the nucleotide level with the cDNA of functional prohibitin. A large number of human tumors of the breast, ovary, liver, and lung were examined for somatic mutations in the PHB gene. Although mutations were observed in a few sporadic breast cancers, none were identified in any of the other cancers. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Approximating spheroid inductive responses using spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J. Torquil; Morrison, H. Frank

    2003-12-12

    The response of high permeability ({mu}{sub r} {ge} 50) conductive spheroids of moderate aspect ratios (0.25 to 4) to excitation by uniform magnetic fields in the axial or transverse directions is approximated by the response of spheres of appropriate diameters, of the same conductivity and permeability, with magnitude rescaled based on the differing volumes, D.C. magnetizations, and high frequency limit responses of the spheres and modeled spheroids.

  4. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies and resonant orbital coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, J. R.; Miller, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    The structural properties of the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies of the Milky Way may be strongly affected by their time-dependent interactions with the 'tidal' field of the Milky Way. A low Q resonance of the tidal driving force with collective oscillation modes of the dwarf system can produce many of the observed properties of the Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies, including large velocity dispersions that would normally be interpreted as indicating large dynamical masses.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy at 14 Tesla and Correlative Histopathology of Human Brain Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Segura, Ana; Morales, Jose Manuel; Gonzalez-Darder, Jose Manuel; Cardona-Marsal, Ramon; Lopez-Gines, Concepcion; Cerda-Nicolas, Miguel; Monleon, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Microscopy (MRM) can provide high microstructural detail in excised human lesions. Previous MRM images on some experimental models and a few human samples suggest the large potential of the technique. The aim of this study was the characterization of specific morphological features of human brain tumor samples by MRM and correlative histopathology. We performed MRM imaging and correlative histopathology in 19 meningioma and 11 glioma human brain tumor samples obtained at surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first MRM direct structural characterization of human brain tumor samples. MRM of brain tumor tissue provided images with 35 to 40 µm spatial resolution. The use of MRM to study human brain tumor samples provides new microstructural information on brain tumors for better classification and characterization. The correlation between MRM and histopathology images allowed the determination of image parameters for critical microstructures of the tumor, like collagen patterns, necrotic foci, calcifications and/or psammoma bodies, vascular distribution and hemorrhage among others. Therefore, MRM may help in interpreting the Clinical Magnetic Resonance images in terms of cell biology processes and tissue patterns. Finally, and most importantly for clinical diagnosis purposes, it provides three-dimensional information in intact samples which may help in selecting a preferential orientation for the histopathology slicing which contains most of the informative elements of the biopsy. Overall, the findings reported here provide a new and unique microstructural view of intact human brain tumor tissue. At this point, our approach and results allow the identification of specific tissue types and pathological features in unprocessed tumor samples. PMID:22110653

  6. Droplet-based microfluidic system to form and separate multicellular spheroids using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sungjun; Kim, Jeong Ah; Lee, Seung Hwan; Kim, Minsoo; Park, Tai Hyun

    2013-04-21

    The importance of creating a three-dimensional (3-D) multicellular spheroid has recently been gaining attention due to the limitations of monolayer cell culture to precisely mimic in vivo structure and cellular interactions. Due to this emerging interest, researchers have utilized new tools, such as microfluidic devices, that allow high-throughput and precise size control to produce multicellular spheroids. We have developed a droplet-based microfluidic system that can encapsulate both cells and magnetic nanoparticles within alginate beads to mimic the function of a multicellular tumor spheroid. Cells were entrapped within the alginate beads along with magnetic nanoparticles, and the beads of a relatively uniform size (diameters of 85% of the beads were 170-190 μm) were formed in the oil phase. These beads were passed through parallel streamlines of oil and culture medium, where the beads were magnetically transferred into the medium phase from the oil phase using an external magnetic force. This microfluidic chip eliminates additional steps for collecting the spheroids from the oil phase and transferring them to culture medium. Ultimately, the overall spheroid formation process can be achieved on a single microchip. PMID:23426090

  7. Lactate Activates HIF-1 in Oxidative but Not in Warburg-Phenotype Human Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Saedeleer, Christophe J.; Copetti, Tamara; Porporato, Paolo E.; Verrax, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Cancer can be envisioned as a metabolic disease driven by pressure selection and intercellular cooperativeness. Together with anaerobic glycolysis, the Warburg effect, formally corresponding to uncoupling glycolysis from oxidative phosphorylation, directly participates in cancer aggressiveness, supporting both tumor progression and dissemination. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a key contributor to glycolysis. It stimulates the expression of glycolytic transporters and enzymes supporting high rate of glycolysis. In this study, we addressed the reverse possibility of a metabolic control of HIF-1 in tumor cells. We report that lactate, the end-product of glycolysis, inhibits prolylhydroxylase 2 activity and activates HIF-1 in normoxic oxidative tumor cells but not in Warburg-phenotype tumor cells which also expressed lower basal levels of HIF-1α. These data were confirmed using genotypically matched oxidative and mitochondria-depleted glycolytic tumor cells as well as several different wild-type human tumor cell lines of either metabolic phenotype. Lactate activates HIF-1 and triggers tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth in vivo, an activity that we found to be under the specific upstream control of the lactate transporter monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) expressed in tumor cells. Because MCT1 also gates lactate-fueled tumor cell respiration and mediates pro-angiogenic lactate signaling in endothelial cells, MCT1 inhibition is confirmed as an attractive anticancer strategy in which a single drug may target multiple tumor-promoting pathways. PMID:23082126

  8. Self-diffusion of water in multicellular spheroids measured by magnetic resonance microimaging.

    PubMed

    Neeman, M; Jarrett, K A; Sillerud, L O; Freyer, J P

    1991-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging measurements of the self-diffusion coefficient of water in large (greater than 2 mm) EMT-6 multicellular spheroids were performed in order to elucidate diffusion mechanisms in tumors. Pulsed gradient spin echo-imaging methods were developed for measuring diffusion in an intravoxel multicompartment system. The self-diffusion coefficient (at 22 degrees C) for water in the medium (Dm) consisted of only a single diffusion compartment [Dm = 1.99 +/- 0.03 (SE) x 10(-5) cm2/s]. Similarly, the spheroid necrotic center showed a single water diffusion compartment with a self-diffusion coefficient (Dc) significantly lower than that of the medium (Dc = 1.54 +/- 0.05 x 10(-5) cm2/s). The spheroid viable rim region showed two distinct compartments of approximately equal volume, one with a large diffusion coefficient (1.70 +/- 0.12 x 10(-5) cm2/s) and a second with a significantly smaller diffusion coefficient (0.25 +/- 0.01 x 10(-5) cm2/s). We propose that these two experimentally distinguishable compartments correspond to the extra- and intracellular regions, respectively, of the viable rim of the spheroid. Although the diffusion coefficients were significantly different in the medium, the necrotic center, and the viable rim, the activation energy for diffusion was the same in the three regions (0.20 eV). Studies of perfused spheroids at 37 degrees C show the same dependence of the diffusion coefficients on the diffusion filter as observed for unperfused spheroids at 22 degrees C. These results demonstrate the ability of nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging to investigate diffusion at the cellular level, which will lead to a better understanding of microenvironmental regulation in tumors. PMID:1855222

  9. MOUSE SKIN TUMORS AND HUMAN LUNG CANCER: RELATIONSHIPS WITH COMPLEX ENVIRONMENTAL EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Historically, mouse skin tumorigenesis has been used to evaluate the tumorigenic effects of complex mixtures including human respiratory carcinogens. his study examines the quantitative relationships between tumor induction in SENCAR mouse skin and the induction of respiratory ca...

  10. Canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling drives human schwann cell transformation, progression, and tumor maintenance.

    PubMed

    Watson, Adrienne L; Rahrmann, Eric P; Moriarity, Branden S; Choi, Kwangmin; Conboy, Caitlin B; Greeley, Andrew D; Halfond, Amanda L; Anderson, Leah K; Wahl, Brian R; Keng, Vincent W; Rizzardi, Anthony E; Forster, Colleen L; Collins, Margaret H; Sarver, Aaron L; Wallace, Margaret R; Schmechel, Stephen C; Ratner, Nancy; Largaespada, David A

    2013-06-01

    Genetic changes required for the formation and progression of human Schwann cell tumors remain elusive. Using a Sleeping Beauty forward genetic screen, we identified several genes involved in canonical Wnt signaling as potential drivers of benign neurofibromas and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). In human neurofibromas and MPNSTs, activation of Wnt signaling increased with tumor grade and was associated with downregulation of β-catenin destruction complex members or overexpression of a ligand that potentiates Wnt signaling, R-spondin 2 (RSPO2). Induction of Wnt signaling was sufficient to induce transformed properties in immortalized human Schwann cells, and downregulation of this pathway was sufficient to reduce the tumorigenic phenotype of human MPNST cell lines. Small-molecule inhibition of Wnt signaling effectively reduced the viability of MPNST cell lines and synergistically induced apoptosis when combined with an mTOR inhibitor, RAD-001, suggesting that Wnt inhibition represents a novel target for therapeutic intervention in Schwann cell tumors. PMID:23535903

  11. Flow cytometric monitoring of hormone receptor expression in human solid tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishan, Awtar

    2002-05-01

    Hormone receptor expression in human breast and prostate tumors is of diagnostic and therapeutic importance. With the availability of anti-estrogen, androgen and progesterone antibodies, immunohistochemistry has become a standard tool for determination of receptor expression in human tumor biopsies. However, this method is dependent on examination of a small number of cells under a microscope and the data obtained in most cases is not quantitative. As most of the commercially used anti-hormone antibodies have nuclear specificity, we have developed methods for isolation and antigen unmasking of nuclei from formalin fixed/paraffin embedded archival human tumors. After immunostaining with the antibodies and propidium iodide (for DNA content and cell cycle analysis), nuclei are analyzed by multiparametric laser flow cytometry for hormone receptor expression, DNA content, aneuploidy and cell cycle determination. These multiparametric methods are especially important for retrospective studies seeking to correlate hormone receptor expression with clinical response to anti-hormonal therapy of human breast and prostate tumors.

  12. Absence of tumor growth stimulation in a panel of 16 human tumor cell lines by mistletoe extracts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maier, Gerhard; Fiebig, Heinz-Herbert

    2002-04-01

    Extracts of Viscum album (mistletoe) are widely used as complementary cancer therapies in Europe. The mistletoe lectins have been identified as the main active principle of mistletoe extracts. They have been shown to exhibit cytotoxic effects as well as immunomodulatory activities. The latter is exemplified by induction of cytokine secretion and increased activity of natural killer cells. Recent reports, however, indicated possible tumor growth stimulation by mistletoe extracts. Therefore, the three aqueous mistletoe extracts (Iscador M special, Iscador Qu special and Iscador P) were evaluated for antiproliferative and/or stimulatory effects in a panel of 16 human tumor cell lines in vitro using a cellular proliferation assay. The results show no evidence of stimulation of tumor growth by any of the three Iscador preparations, comprising central nervous system, gastric, non-small cell lung, mammary, prostate, renal and uterine cancer cell lines, as well as cell lines from hematological malignancies and melanomas. On the contrary, Iscador preparations containing a high lectin concentration (Iscador M special and Iscador Qu special) showed antitumor activity in the mammary cancer cell line MAXF 401NL at the 15 microg/ml dose level with a more than 70% growth inhibition compared to untreated control cells. In addition, a slight antitumor activity (growth inhibition 30-70%) was found in three tumor cell lines for Iscador M special and in seven tumor cell lines for Iscador Qu special, respectively. Iscador P, which contains no mistletoe lectin I, showed no antiproliferative activity. PMID:11984083

  13. Inhibition of subcutaneously implanted human pituitary tumor cells in nude mice by LRIG1.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; He, X J; Xu, H Q; Chen, Z W; Fan, H H

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the inhibition of subcutaneously implanted human pituitary tumor cells in nude mice by LRIG1 and its mechanism. For this study, athymic nude mice were injected with either normal pituitary tumor RC-4B/C cells or LRIG1-transfected RC-4B/C cells. We then calculated the volume inhibition rate of the tumors, as well as the apoptosis index of tumor cells and the expression of Ras, Raf, AKt, and ERK mRNA in tumor cells. Tumor cell morphological and structural changes were also observed under electron microscope. Our data showed that subcutaneous tumor growth was slowed or even halted in LRIG1-transfected tumors. The tumor volumes were significantly different between the two groups of mice (χ2 = 2.14, P < 0.05). The tumor apoptosis index was found to be 8.72% in the control group and 39.7% in LRIG1-transfected mice (χ2 = 7.59, P < 0.05). The levels of Ras, Raf, and AKt mRNA in LRIG1-transfected RC-4B/C cells were significantly reduced after transfection (P < 0.01). Transfected subcutaneous tumor cells appeared to be in early or late apoptosis under an electron microscope, while only a few subcutaneous tumor cells appeared to be undergoing apoptosis in the control group. In conclusion, the LRIG1 gene is able to inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis in subcutaneously implanted human pituitary tumors in nude mice. The mechanism of LRIG1 may involve the inhibition of the PI3K/ Akt and Ras/Raf/ERK signal transduction pathways. PMID:27173312

  14. Human saliva as route of inter-human infection for mouse mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, Chiara Maria; Lessi, Francesca; Armogida, Ivana; Zavaglia, Katia; Franceschi, Sara; Al Hamad, Mohammad; Roncella, Manuela; Ghilli, Matteo; Boldrini, Antonio; Aretini, Paolo; Fanelli, Giovanni; Marchetti, Ivo; Scatena, Cristian; Hochman, Jacob; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Generoso

    2015-07-30

    Etiology of human breast cancer is unknown, whereas the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) is recognized as the etiologic agent of mouse mammary carcinoma. Moreover, this experimental model contributed substantially to our understanding of many biological aspects of the human disease. Several data strongly suggest a causative role of MMTV in humans, such as the presence of viral sequences in a high percentage of infiltrating breast carcinoma and in its preinvasive lesions, the production of viral particles in primary cultures of breast cancer, the ability of the virus to infect cells in culture. This paper demonstrates that MMTV is present in human saliva and salivary glands. MMTV presence was investigated by fluorescent PCR, RT-PCR, FISH, immunohistochemistry, and whole transcriptome analysis. Saliva was obtained from newborns, children, adults, and breast cancer patients. The saliva of newborns is MMTV-free, whereas MMTV is present in saliva of children (26.66%), healthy adults (10.60%), and breast cancer patients (57.14% as DNA and 33.9% as RNA). MMTV is also present in 8.10% of salivary glands. RNA-seq analysis performed on saliva of a breast cancer patient demonstrates a high expression of MMTV RNA in comparison to negative controls. The possibility of a contamination by murine DNA was excluded by murine mtDNA and IAP LTR PCR. These findings confirm the presence of MMTV in humans, strongly suggest saliva as route in inter-human infection, and support the hypothesis of a viral origin for human breast carcinoma. PMID:26214095

  15. Human saliva as route of inter-human infection for mouse mammary tumor virus

    PubMed Central

    Armogida, Ivana; Zavaglia, Katia; Franceschi, Sara; Al Hamad, Mohammad; Roncella, Manuela; Ghilli, Matteo; Boldrini, Antonio; Aretini, Paolo; Fanelli, Giovanni; Marchetti, Ivo; Scatena, Cristian; Hochman, Jacob; Naccarato, Antonio Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Generoso

    2015-01-01

    Etiology of human breast cancer is unknown, whereas the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) is recognized as the etiologic agent of mouse mammary carcinoma. Moreover, this experimental model contributed substantially to our understanding of many biological aspects of the human disease. Several data strongly suggest a causative role of MMTV in humans, such as the presence of viral sequences in a high percentage of infiltrating breast carcinoma and in its preinvasive lesions, the production of viral particles in primary cultures of breast cancer, the ability of the virus to infect cells in culture. This paper demonstrates that MMTV is present in human saliva and salivary glands. MMTV presence was investigated by fluorescent PCR, RT-PCR, FISH, immunohistochemistry, and whole transcriptome analysis. Saliva was obtained from newborns, children, adults, and breast cancer patients. The saliva of newborns is MMTV-free, whereas MMTV is present in saliva of children (26.66%), healthy adults (10.60%), and breast cancer patients (57.14% as DNA and 33.9% as RNA). MMTV is also present in 8.10% of salivary glands. RNA-seq analysis performed on saliva of a breast cancer patient demonstrates a high expression of MMTV RNA in comparison to negative controls. The possibility of a contamination by murine DNA was excluded by murine mtDNA and IAP LTR PCR. These findings confirm the presence of MMTV in humans, strongly suggest saliva as route in inter-human infection, and support the hypothesis of a viral origin for human breast carcinoma. PMID:26214095

  16. Third harmonic generation imaging for fast, label-free pathology of human brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmin, N. V.; Wesseling, P.; Hamer, P. C. de Witt; Noske, D. P.; Galgano, G. D.; Mansvelder, H. D.; Baayen, J. C.; Groot, M. L.

    2016-01-01

    In brain tumor surgery, recognition of tumor boundaries is key. However, intraoperative assessment of tumor boundaries by the neurosurgeon is difficult. Therefore, there is an urgent need for tools that provide the neurosurgeon with pathological information during the operation. We show that third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy provides label-free, real-time images of histopathological quality; increased cellularity, nuclear pleomorphism, and rarefaction of neuropil in fresh, unstained human brain tissue could be clearly recognized. We further demonstrate THG images taken with a GRIN objective, as a step toward in situ THG microendoscopy of tumor boundaries. THG imaging is thus a promising tool for optical biopsies. PMID:27231629

  17. Decrease of reactive oxygen species-related biomarkers in the tissue-mimic 3D spheroid culture of human lung cells exposed to zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunjoo; Jeon, Won Bae; Kim, Soonhyun; Lee, Soo-Keun

    2014-05-01

    Common 2-dimensional (2D) cell cultures do not adequately represent cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling and substantially different diffusion/transport pathways. To obtain tissue-mimic information on nanoparticle toxicity from in vitro cell tests, we used a 3-dimensional (3D) culture of human lung cells (A549) prepared with elastin-like peptides modified with an arginine-glycine-aspartate motif. The 3D cells showed different cellular phenotypes, gene expression profiles, and functionalities compared to the 2D cultured cells. In gene array analysis, 3D cells displayed the induced extracellular matrix (ECM)-related biological functions such as cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cellular function and maintenance, connective tissue development and function, molecular transport, and tissue morphology. Additionally, the expression of ECM-related molecules, such as laminin, fibronectin, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), was simultaneously induced at both mRNA and protein levels. When 0.08-50 microg/ml zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) were administered to 2D and 3D cells, the cell proliferation was not significantly changed. The level of molecular markers for oxidative stress, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), Bcl-2, ATP synthase, and Complex IV (cytochrome C oxidase), was significantly reduced in 2D culture when exposed to 10 microg/ml ZnO-NPs, but no significant decrease was detected in 3D culture when exposed to the same concentration of ZnO-NPs. In conclusion, the tissue-mimic phenotype and functionality of 3D cells could be achieved through the elevated expression of ECM components. The 3D cells were expected to help to better predict the nanotoxicity of ZnO-NPs at tissue-level by increased cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesion and signaling. The tissue-mimic morphology would also be useful to simulate the diffusion/transport of the nanoparticles in vitro. PMID:24734552

  18. Mouse Models Recapitulating Human Adrenocortical Tumors: What Is Lacking?

    PubMed Central

    Leccia, Felicia; Batisse-Lignier, Marie; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Val, Pierre; Lefrançois-Martinez, A-Marie; Martinez, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortex tumors are divided into benign forms, such as primary hyperplasias and adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs), and malignant forms or adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs). Primary hyperplasias are rare causes of adrenocorticotropin hormone-independent hypercortisolism. ACAs are the most common type of adrenal gland tumors and they are rarely “functional,” i.e., producing steroids. When functional, adenomas result in endocrine disorders, such as Cushing’s syndrome (hypercortisolism) or Conn’s syndrome (hyperaldosteronism). By contrast, ACCs are extremely rare but highly aggressive tumors that may also lead to hypersecreting syndromes. Genetic analyses of patients with sporadic or familial forms of adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) led to the identification of potentially causative genes, most of them being involved in protein kinase A (PKA), Wnt/β-catenin, and P53 signaling pathways. Development of mouse models is a crucial step to firmly establish the functional significance of candidate genes, to dissect mechanisms leading to tumors and endocrine disorders, and in fine to provide in vivo tools for therapeutic screens. In this article, we will provide an overview on the existing mouse models (xenografted and genetically engineered) of ACTs by focusing on the role of PKA and Wnt/β-catenin pathways in this context. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of models that have been developed heretofore and we will point out necessary improvements in the development of next generation mouse models of adrenal diseases. PMID:27471492

  19. Effects of Charged Particles on Human Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Held, Kathryn D.; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Kaminuma, Takuya; Paz, Athena Evalour S.; Yoshida, Yukari; Liu, Qi; Willers, Henning; Takahashi, Akihisa

    2016-01-01

    The use of charged particle therapy in cancer treatment is growing rapidly, in large part because the exquisite dose localization of charged particles allows for higher radiation doses to be given to tumor tissue while normal tissues are exposed to lower doses and decreased volumes of normal tissues are irradiated. In addition, charged particles heavier than protons have substantial potential clinical advantages because of their additional biological effects, including greater cell killing effectiveness, decreased radiation resistance of hypoxic cells in tumors, and reduced cell cycle dependence of radiation response. These biological advantages depend on many factors, such as endpoint, cell or tissue type, dose, dose rate or fractionation, charged particle type and energy, and oxygen concentration. This review summarizes the unique biological advantages of charged particle therapy and highlights recent research and areas of particular research needs, such as quantification of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for various tumor types and radiation qualities, role of genetic background of tumor cells in determining response to charged particles, sensitivity of cancer stem-like cells to charged particles, role of charged particles in tumors with hypoxic fractions, and importance of fractionation, including use of hypofractionation, with charged particles. PMID:26904502

  20. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... be removed because of their location or harmful effect on the surrounding normal brain tissue. If a tumor is cancer , possible treatments may include: Chemotherapy Radiation Surgery Targeted cancer therapy Biologic therapy Other treatment options

  1. Modulation of tumor growth by inhibitory Fcγ receptor expressed by human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cassard, Lydie; Cohen-Solal, Joël F.G.; Galinha, Annie; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Mathiot, Claire; Galon, Jérôme; Dorval, Thierry; Bernheim, Alain; Fridman, Wolf H.; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    The efficacy of anti-tumor IgG reflects the balance between opposing signals mediated by activating and inhibitory Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) expressed by effector cells. Here, we show that human malignant melanoma cells express the inhibitory low-affinity Fcγ receptor FcγRIIB1 in 40% of tested metastases. When melanoma cells were grafted in nude mice, a profound inhibition of FcγRIIB1 tumor growth that required the intracytoplasmic region of the receptor was observed. IgG immune complexes (ICs) may be required for this inhibition, since sera from nude mice bearing tumors contained IgG that decreased the proliferation of FcγRIIB1-positive cells in vitro, and tumor development of FcγRIIB1-positive melanoma lines was not inhibited in antibody-defective severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Passive immunization of SCID mice with anti–ganglioside GD2 antibody resulted in significant inhibition of growth of FcγRIIB1-positive tumors in an intracytoplasmic-dependent manner. Altogether, these data suggest that human melanoma cells express biologically active inhibitory FcγRIIB1, which regulates their development upon direct interaction with anti-tumor antibodies. Therefore, FcγR expression on human tumors may be one component of the efficacy of antibody-mediated therapies, and FcγR-positive tumors could be the most sensitive candidates for such treatments. PMID:12438452

  2. Three-Dimensional Spheroid Cell Culture Model for Target Identification Utilizing High-Throughput RNAi Screens.

    PubMed

    Iles, LaKesla R; Bartholomeusz, Geoffrey A

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic limitations of 2D monolayer cell culture models have prompted the development of 3D cell culture model systems for in vitro studies. Multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) models closely simulate the pathophysiological milieu of solid tumors and are providing new insights into tumor biology as well as differentiation, tissue organization, and homeostasis. They are straightforward to apply in high-throughput screens and there is a great need for the development of reliable and robust 3D spheroid-based assays for high-throughput RNAi screening for target identification and cell signaling studies highlighting their potential in cancer research and treatment. In this chapter we describe a stringent standard operating procedure for the use of MCTS for high-throughput RNAi screens. PMID:27581289

  3. Cytomegalovirus in human brain tumors: Role in pathogenesis and potential treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia; Johnsen, John Inge

    2015-01-01

    During the last years increasing evidence implies that human cytomegalovirus (CMV) can be attributed to human malignancies arising from numerous tissues. In this perspective, we will review and discuss the potential mechanisms through which CMV infection may contribute to brain tumors by affecting tumor cell initiation, progression and metastasis formation. Recent evidence also suggests that anti-CMV treatment results in impaired tumor growth of CMV positive xenografts in animal models and potentially increased survival in CMV positive glioblastoma patients. Based on these observations and the high tumor promoting capacity of this virus, the classical and novel antiviral therapies against CMV should be revisited as they may represent a great promise for halting tumor progression and lower cancer deaths. PMID:25699229

  4. Rearrangement of a common cellular DNA domain on chromosome 4 in human primary liver tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquinelli, C.; Garreau, F.; Bougueleret, L.; Cariani, E.; Thiers, V.; Croissant, O.; Hadchouel, M.; Tiollais, P.; Brechot, C. ); Grzeschik, K.H. )

    1988-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA integration has been shown to occur frequently in human hepatocellular carcinomas. The authors have investigated whether common cellular DNA domains might be rearranged, possibly by HBV integration, in human primary liver tumors. Unique cellular DNA sequences adjacent to an HBV integration site were isolated from a patient with hepatitis B surface antigen-positive hepatocellular carcinoma. These probes detected rearrangement of this cellular region of chromosomal DNA in 3 of 50 additional primary liver tumors studied. Of these three tumor samples, two contained HBV DNA, without an apparent link between the viral DNA and the rearranged allele; HBV DNA sequences were not detected in the third tumor sample. By use of a panel of somatic cell hybrids, these unique cellular DNA sequences were shown to be located on chromosome 4. Therefore, this region of chromosomal DNA might be implicated in the formation of different tumors at one step of liver cell transformation, possible related to HBV integration.

  5. [Microvascular architecture of human tumors transplanted in nude mice--its relationship to sensitivity to antineoplastic agents].

    PubMed

    Okazaki, M; Kubota, T; Hanatani, Y; Maruyama, K; Tsuyuki, K; Nakada, M; Asanuma, F; Ishibiki, K; Abe, O

    1982-08-01

    Microangiographic study was performed with ten human tumors serially transplanted into nude mice to clarify the role of tumor vessels on the chemosensitivity of the human tumors. Five gastric carcinomas, two colon carcinomas, one breast carcinoma, one cholangiocarcinoma, and one hemangiopericytoma were used for the experiments. Seven tumors revealed hypervascular network of vessels, whereas hypovascular patterns of tumor vessels were observed in the other three tumors. It was found that the histologically differentiated tumors were hypervascular and undifferentiated tumors were hypovascular, with statistically significant differences (p less than 0.05). Each tumor possessed the vascular network similar to human tumors originated from the same organs. No discernible changes of microangiographic features were noticed by serial transfers. As the chemosensitivities of these tumors depended mainly on their original tissues, these chemosensitivities could not be explained only by tumor vascularities or drug transferences. However, in the tumors with similar chemosensitive spectra, less susceptible tumors were observed to possess the irregular vascular networks in comparison with sensitive strains. From these considerations, tumor vessels were thought to have some role on vascular flow and drug transference which affected chemosensitivity of human tumors. PMID:7184456

  6. Imaging of bone tumors using a monoclonal antibody raised against human osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, N.C.; Perkins, A.C.; Pimm, M.V.; Wastie, M.; Hopkins, J.S.; Dowling, F.; Baldwin, R.W.; Hardcastle, J.D.

    1986-07-01

    The radiolabeled monoclonal antibody 791T/36 raised against a human osteosarcoma was injected into 20 patients with known or suspected bone tumors. Gamma camera images were acquired at 48 or 72 hours after injection, and assessed for antibody localization. Positive images were obtained in all five osteosarcomas and four other primary malignant sarcomas. Two of the four other primary bone tumors gave positive images. Three patients with trauma had negative images as did one patient with Paget's disease. Two patients with suppurative disease gave positive images. The antibody localized in the majority of malignant sarcomas tested. In one tumor where tissue was available, a tumor:non-tumor ratio of 2.8:1 was measured. Repeat imaging was performed in five patients. Immunoscintigraphy using the monoclonal antibody 791T/36 has shown tumor localization in patients with bone and soft tissue sarcomas.

  7. Over-expression of HOX-8, the human homologue of the mouse Hox-8 homeobox gene, in human tumors.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M; Tanaka, M; Iwase, T; Naito, Y; Sugimura, H; Kino, I

    1993-07-15

    A human ovarian yolk sac tumor cDNA library was screened for homeobox genes with an oligonucleotide probe under low stringent condition. Three homeobox genes were isolated, two of which were identified as HHO.c1 and HB24. The third was highly homologous with the mouse Hox-8 gene and was designated as HOX-8. Studies on RNAs from 25 human tumor tissues and cell lines showed that the profile of HOX-8 expression was different from those of HHO.c1 and HB24. The expression of HOX-8 was not detected in hematopoietic tumor cells, in which HHO.c1 and HB24 were highly expressed. HOX-8 was expressed at higher levels in a variety of tumors of epithelial origin than in their corresponding normal tissues more frequently than HHO.c1 and HB24. All three homeobox genes were highly expressed in a yolk sac tumor, an immature tumor of gonadal origin. These results suggest that HOX-8 plays a more important role in human tumors of epithelial origin than those of hematopoietic origin. PMID:7687426

  8. CRLX101 nanoparticles localize in human tumors and not in adjacent, nonneoplastic tissue after intravenous dosing

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrew J.; Wiley, Devin T.; Zuckerman, Jonathan E.; Webster, Paul; Chao, Joseph; Lin, James; Yen, Yun; Davis, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based therapeutics are being used to treat patients with solid tumors. Whereas nanoparticles have been shown to preferentially accumulate in solid tumors of animal models, there is little evidence to prove that intact nanoparticles localize to solid tumors of humans when systemically administered. Here, tumor and adjacent, nonneoplastic tissue biopsies are obtained through endoscopic capture from patients with gastric, gastroesophageal, or esophageal cancer who are administered the nanoparticle CRLX101. Both the pre- and postdosing tissue samples adjacent to tumors show no definitive evidence of either the nanoparticle or its drug payload (camptothecin, CPT) contained within the nanoparticle. Similar results are obtained from the predosing tumor samples. However, in nine of nine patients that were evaluated, CPT is detected in the tumor tissue collected 24–48 h after CRLX101 administration. For five of these patients, evidence of the intact deposition of CRLX101 nanoparticles in the tumor tissue is obtained. Indications of CPT pharmacodynamics from tumor biomarkers such as carbonic anhydrase IX and topoisomerase I by immunohistochemistry show clear evidence of biological activity from the delivered CPT in the posttreatment tumors. PMID:27001839

  9. Magnetic Fluorescent Nanoformulation for Intracellular Drug Delivery to Human Breast Cancer, Primary Tumors, and Tumor Biopsies: Beyond Targeting Expectations.

    PubMed

    El-Boubbou, Kheireddine; Ali, Rizwan; Bahhari, Hassan M; AlSaad, Khaled O; Nehdi, Atef; Boudjelal, Mohamed; AlKushi, Abdulmohsen

    2016-06-15

    We report the development of a chemotherapeutic nanoformulation made of polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized magnetofluorescent nanoparticles (Fl-PMNPs) loaded with anticancer drugs as a promising drug carrier homing to human breast cancer cells, primary tumors, and solid tumors. First, nanoparticle uptake and cell death were evaluated in three types of human breast cells: two metastatic cancerous MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells and nontumorigenic MCF-10A cells. While Fl-PMNPs were not toxic to cells even at the highest concentrations used, Dox-loaded Fl-PMNPs showed significant potency, effectively killing the different breast cancer cells, albeit at different affinities. Interestingly and superior to free Dox, Dox-loaded Fl-PMNPs were found to be more effective in killing the metastatic cells (2- to 3-fold enhanced cytotoxicities for MDA-MB-231 compared to MCF-7), compared to the normal noncancerous MCF-10A cells (up to 8-fold), suggesting huge potentials as selective anticancer agents. Electron and live confocal microscopy imaging mechanistically confirmed that the nanoparticles were successfully endocytosed and packaged into vesicles inside the cytoplasm, where Dox is released and then translocated to the nucleus exerting its cytotoxic action and causing apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, commendable and enhanced penetration in 3D multilayered primary tumor cells derived from primary lesions as well as in patient breast tumor biopsies was observed, killing the tumor cells inside. The designed nanocarriers described here can potentially open new opportunities for breast cancer patients, especially in theranostic imaging and hyperthermia. While many prior studies have focused on targeting ligands to specific receptors to improve efficacies, we discovered that even with passive-targeted tailored delivery system enhanced toxic responses can be attained. PMID:27269304

  10. EMBEDDED MULTICELLULAR SPHEROIDS AS A BIOMIMETIC 3D CANCER MODEL FOR EVALUATING DRUG AND DRUG-DEVICE COMBINATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Charoen, Kristie M.; Fallica, Brian; Colson, Yolonda L.; Zaman, Muhammad H.; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Multicellular aggregates of cells, termed spheroids, are of interest for studying tumor behavior and for evaluating the response of pharmacologically active agents. Spheroids more faithfully reproduce the tumor macrostructure found in vivo compared to classical 2D monolayers. We present a method for embedding spheroids within collagen gels followed by quantitative and qualitative whole spheroid and single cell analyses enabling characterization over the length scales from molecular to macroscopic. Spheroid producing and embedding capabilities are demonstrated for U2OS and MDAMB 231 cell lines, of osteosarcoma and breast adenocarncinoma origin, respectively. Finally, using the MDA-MB-231 tumor model, the chemotherapeutic response between paclitaxel delivery as a bolus dose, as practiced in the clinic, is compared to delivery within an expansile nanoparticle. The expansile nanoparticle delivery route provides a superior outcome and the results mirror those observed in a murine xenograft model. These findings highlight the synergistic beneficial results that may arise from the use of a drug delivery system, and the need to evaluate both drug candidates and delivery systems in the research and pre-clinical screening phases of a new cancer therapy development program. PMID:24360576

  11. A Spectrum of Monoclonal Antibodies Reactive with Human Mammary Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colcher, D.; Horan Hand, P.; Nuti, M.; Schlom, J.

    1981-05-01

    Splenic lymphocytes of mice, immunized with membrane-enriched fractions of metastatic human mammary carcinoma tissues, were fused with the NS-1 non-immunoglobulin-secreting murine myeloma cell line. This resulted in the generation of hybridoma cultures secreting immunoglobulins reactive in solid-phase radioimmunoassays with extracts of metastatic mammary carcinoma cells from involved livers, but not with extracts of apparently normal human liver. As a result of further screening of immunoglobulin reactivities and double cloning of cultures, 11 monoclonal antibodies were chosen that demonstrated reactivities with human mammary tumor cells and not with apparently normal human tissues. These monoclonal antibodies could be placed into at least five major groups on the basis of their differential binding to the surface of various live human mammary tumor cells in culture, to extracts of mammary tumor tissues, or to tissue sections of mammary tumor cells studied by the immunoperoxidase technique. Whereas a spectrum of reactivities to mammary tumors was observed with the 11 monoclonal antibodies, no reactivity was observed to apparently normal cells of the following human tissues: breast, lymph node, lung, skin, testis, kidney, thymus, bone marrow, spleen, uterus, thyroid, intestine, liver, bladder, tonsils, stomach, prostate, and salivary gland. Several of the antibodies also demonstrated a ``pancarcinoma'' reactivity, showing binding to selected non-breast carcinomas. None of the monoclonal antibodies showed binding to purified ferritin or carcinoembryonic antigen. Monoclonal antibodies of all five major groups, however, demonstrated binding to human metastatic mammary carcinoma cells both in axillary lymph nodes and at distal sites.

  12. Sliced Magnetic Polyacrylamide Hydrogel with Cell-Adhesive Microarray Interface: A Novel Multicellular Spheroid Culturing Platform.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ke; Zhou, Naizhen; Li, Yang; Ma, Siyu; Guo, Zhaobin; Cao, Meng; Zhang, Qiying; Sun, Jianfei; Zhang, Tianzhu; Gu, Ning

    2016-06-22

    Cell-adhesive properties are of great significance to materials serving as extracellular matrix mimics. Appropriate cell-adhesive property of material interface can balance the cell-matrix interaction and cell-cell interaction and can promote cells to form 3D structures. Herein, a novel magnetic polyacrylamide (PAM) hydrogel fabricated via combining magnetostatic field induced magnetic nanoparticles assembly and hydrogel gelation was applied as a multicellular spheroids culturing platform. When cultured on the cell-adhesive microarray interface of sliced magnetic hydrogel, normal and tumor cells from different cell lines could rapidly form multicellular spheroids spontaneously. Furthermore, cells which could only form loose cell aggregates in a classic 3D cell culture model (such as hanging drop system) were able to be promoted to form multicellular spheroids on this platform. In the light of its simplicity in fabricating as well as its effectiveness in promoting formation of multicellular spheroids which was considered as a prevailing tool in the study of the microenvironmental regulation of tumor cell physiology and therapeutic problems, this composite material holds promise in anticancer drugs or hyperthermia therapy evaluation in vitro in the future. PMID:27258682

  13. The Methanol Extract of Angelica sinensis Induces Cell Apoptosis and Suppresses Tumor Growth in Human Malignant Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Wen-Lin; Harn, Horng-jyh; Hung, Pei-Hsiu; Hsieh, Ming-Chang; Chang, Kai-Fu; Huang, Xiao-Fan; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Lee, Ming-Shih; Tsai, Nu-Man

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly vascularized and invasive neoplasm. The methanol extract of Angelica sinensis (AS-M) is commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat several diseases, such as gastric mucosal damage, hepatic injury, menopausal symptoms, and chronic glomerulonephritis. AS-M also displays potency in suppressing the growth of malignant brain tumor cells. The growth suppression of malignant brain tumor cells by AS-M results from cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. AS-M upregulates expression of cyclin kinase inhibitors, including p16, to decrease the phosphorylation of Rb proteins, resulting in arrest at the G0-G1 phase. The expression of the p53 protein is increased by AS-M and correlates with activation of apoptosis-associated proteins. Therefore, the apoptosis of cancer cells induced by AS-M may be triggered through the p53 pathway. In in vivo studies, AS-M not only suppresses the growth of human malignant brain tumors but also significantly prolongs patient survival. In addition, AS-M has potent anticancer effects involving cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and antiangiogenesis. The in vitro and in vivo anticancer effects of AS-M indicate that this extract warrants further investigation and potential development as a new antibrain tumor agent, providing new hope for the chemotherapy of malignant brain cancer. PMID:24319475

  14. Quantitative analysis of MDR1 (multidrug resistance) gene expression in human tumors by polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Noonan, K.E.; Beck, C.; Holzmayer, T.A.; Chin, J.E.; Roninson, I.B. ); Wunder, J.S.; Andrulis, I.L. ); Gazdar, A.F. ); Willman, C.L.; Griffith, B. ); Von Hoff, D.D. )

    1990-09-01

    The resistance of tumor cells ot chemotheraprutic drugs is a major obstacle to successful cancer chemotherapy. In human cells, expression of the MDR1 gene, encoding a transmembrane efflux pump (P-glycoprotein), leads to decreased intracellular accumulation and resistance to a variety of lipophilic drugs (multidrug resistance; MDR). The levels of MDR in cell lines selected in bitro have been shown to correlate with the steady-state levels of MDR1 mRNA and P-glycoprotein. In cells with a severalfold increase in cellular drug resistance, MDR1 expression levels are close to the limits of detection by conventional assays. MDR1 expression has been frequently observed in human tumors after chemotherapy and in some but not all types of clinically refactory tumors untreated with chemotherapeutic drugs. The authors have devised a highly sensitive, specific, and quantitative protocol for measuring the levels of MDR1 mRNA in clincal samples, based on the polymerase chain reaction. They have used this assay to measure MDR1 gene expression in MDR cell lines and >300 normal tissues, tumor-derived cell lines, and clinical specimens of untreated tumors of the types in which MDR1 expression was rarely observed by standard assays. Low levels of MDR1 expression were found by polymerase chain reaction in most solid tumors and leukemias tested. The frequency of samples without detectable MDR1 expression varied among different types of tumors; MDR1-negative samples were ost common among tumor types known to be relatively responsive to chemotherapy.

  15. Effectivity of pazopanib treatment in orthotopic models of human testicular germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cisplatin (CDDP) resistance in testicular germ cell tumors (GCTs) is still a clinical challenge, and one associated with poor prognosis. The purpose of this work was to test pazopanib, an anti-tumoral and anti-angiogenic multikinase inhibitor, and its combination with lapatinib (an anti-ErbB inhibitor) in mouse orthotopic models of human testicular GCTs. Methods We used two different models of human testicular GCTs orthotopically grown in nude mice; a CDDP-sensitive choriocarcinoma (TGT38) and a new orthotopic model generated from a metastatic GCT refractory to first-line CDDP chemotherapy (TGT44). Nude mice implanted with these orthotopic tumors were treated with the inhibitors and the effect on tumoral growth and angiogenesis was evaluated. Results TGT44 refractory tumor had an immunohistochemical profile similar to the original metastasis, with characteristics of yolk sac tumor. TGT44 did not respond when treated with cisplatin. In contrast, pazopanib had an anti-angiogenic effect and anti-tumor efficacy in this model. Pazopanib in combination with lapatinib in TGT38, an orthotopic model of choriocarcinoma had an additive effect blocking tumor growth. Conclusions We present pazopanib as a possible agent for the alternative treatment of CDDP-sensitive and CDDP-refractory GCT patients, alone or in combination with anti-ErbB therapies. PMID:23937707

  16. Suppressive effects of tumor cell-derived 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine on human T cells.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Frederik C; Singer, Katrin; Poller, Kerstin; Bernhardt, Luise; Strobl, Carolin D; Limm, Katharina; Ritter, Axel P; Gottfried, Eva; Völkl, Simon; Jacobs, Benedikt; Peter, Katrin; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Dettmer, Katja; Oefner, Peter J; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin; Kreutz, Marina P; Aigner, Michael; Mackensen, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment represents one of the main obstacles for immunotherapy of cancer. The tumor milieu is among others shaped by tumor metabolites such as 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA). Increased intratumoral MTA levels result from a lack of the MTA-catabolizing enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) in tumor cells and are found in various tumor entities. Here, we demonstrate that MTA suppresses proliferation, activation, differentiation, and effector function of antigen-specific T cells without eliciting cell death. Conversely, if MTA is added to highly activated T cells, MTA exerts cytotoxic effects on T cells. We identified the Akt pathway, a critical signal pathway for T cell activation, as a target of MTA, while, for example, p38 remained unaffected. Next, we provide evidence that MTA exerts its immunosuppressive effects by interfering with protein methylation in T cells. To confirm the relevance of the suppressive effects of exogenously added MTA on human T cells, we used an MTAP-deficient tumor cell-line that was stably transfected with the MTAP-coding sequence. We observed that T cells stimulated with MTAP-transfected tumor cells revealed a higher proliferative capacity compared to T cells stimulated with Mock-transfected cells. In conclusion, our findings reveal a novel immune evasion strategy of human tumor cells that could be of interest for therapeutic targeting. PMID:27622058

  17. Identification of internalizing human single chain antibodies targeting brain tumor sphere cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaodong; Bidlingmaier, Scott; Hashizume, Rintaro; James, C. David; Berger, Mitchel S.; Liu, Bin

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive form of primary brain tumor and there is no curative treatment to date. Resistance to conventional therapies and tumor recurrence pose major challenges to treatment and management of this disease, and therefore new therapeutic strategies need to be developed. Previous studies by other investigators have shown that a subpopulation of GBM cells can grow as neurosphere-like cells when cultured in restrictive media, and exhibit enhanced tumor initiating ability and resistance to therapy. We report here the identification of internalizing human single chain antibodies (scFvs) targeting GBM tumor sphere cells. We selected a large naive phage antibody display library on the glycosylation-dependent CD133 epitope-positive subpopulation of GBM cells grown as tumor spheres and identified internalizing scFvs that target tumor sphere cells broadly, as well as scFvs that target the CD133 positive subpopulation. These scFvs were found to be efficiently internalized by GBM tumor sphere cells. One scFv GC4 inhibited self-renewal of GBM tumor sphere cells in vitro. We have further developed a full-length human IgG1 based on this scFv and found that it potently inhibits proliferation of GBM tumor sphere cells and GBM cells grown in regular non-selective media. Taken together, these results show that internalizing human scFvs targeting brain tumor sphere cells can be readily identified from a phage antibody display library, which could be useful for further development of novel therapies that target subpopulations of GBM cells to combat recurrence and resistance to treatment. PMID:20587664

  18. Evaluation of bioreductive drugs in multicell spheroids.

    PubMed

    Durand, R E; Olive, P L

    1992-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of a variety of bioreductive agents, including misonidazole, RSU-1069, NFVO, mitomycin C, porfiromycin, and SR-4233 was evaluated using Chinese hamster V79 multicell spheroids in vitro. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting techniques were used to selectively recover cells from various depths within the spheroids to measure the differential cytotoxicity in the cells near the hypoxic core of the spheroid relative to the well oxygenated peripheral cells. At the high cell density found in spheroids (as in tissues in vivo) the differential toxicity observed was typically much less than expected, based on data from single cell systems. In some cases, this was due to lack of sufficient hypoxia in the spheroids; in other cases, drug treatment itself produced reoxygenation through metabolic or toxic effects during treatment. An unexpected observation of considerable concern was rapid bioreduction of the more active agents; this sometimes occurred at rates that exceeded drug delivery, resulting in considerably less efficacy when large hypoxic fractions were present (e.g. mitomycin C, NFVO, and SR-4233). This suggests that induction of hypoxia prior to bioreductive agent therapy may not be the most productive approach. Though none of the agents showed "ideal" properties, porfiromycin was judged to give the best combination of differential toxicity, longevity in situ, and ability to reach the entire hypoxic cell subpopulation. PMID:1544838

  19. Transport processes in biological systems: Tumoral cells and human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucia, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    The entropy generation approach has been developed for the analysis of complex systems, with particular regards to biological systems, in order to evaluate their stationary states. The entropy generation is related to the transport processes related to exergy flows. Moreover, cancer can be described as an open complex dynamic and self-organizing system. Consequently, it is used as an example useful to evaluate the different thermo-chemical quantities of the transport processes in normal and in tumoral cells systems.

  20. High Expression of Ecto-Nucleotidases CD39 and CD73 in Human Endometrial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Aliagas, Elisabet; Vidal, August; Texidó, Laura; Ponce, Jordi; Condom, Enric; Martín-Satué, Mireia

    2014-01-01

    One of the strategies used by tumors to evade immunosurveillance is the accumulation of extracellular adenosine, which has immunosupressive and tumor promoting effects. The study of the mechanisms leading to adenosine formation at the tumor interstitium are therefore of great interest in oncology. The dominant pathway generating extracellular adenosine in tumors is the dephosphorylation of ATP by ecto-nucleotidases. Two of these enzymes acting sequentially, CD39 and CD73, efficiently hydrolyze extracellular ATP to adenosine. They have been found to play a crucial role in a variety of tumors, but there were no data concerning endometrial cancer, the most frequent of the invasive tumors of the female genital tract. The aim of the present work is to study the expression of CD39 and CD73 in human endometrial cancer. We have analyzed protein and gene expression, as well as enzyme activity, in type I endometrioid adenocarcinomas and type II serous adenocarcinomas and their nonpathological endometrial counterparts. High levels of both enzymes were found in tumor samples, with significantly increased expression of CD39 in type II serous tumors, which also coincided with the higher tumor grade. Our results reinforce the involvement of the adenosinergic system in cancer, emphasizing the relevance of ecto-nucleotidases as emerging therapeutic targets in oncology. PMID:24707115

  1. Expansion of human tumor infiltrating lymphocytes for use in immunotherapy trials.

    PubMed

    Topalian, S L; Muul, L M; Solomon, D; Rosenberg, S A

    1987-08-24

    The potential utility of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in the adoptive immunotherapy of human tumors has been suggested by murine experiments showing these cells to be 50-100 times more powerful than LAK cells in treating advanced metastatic disease. A method for the large-scale expansion of human TIL for the use of these cells in clinical trials is described in this report. TIL were successfully expanded on an experimental scale from 24 of 25 consecutive human tumors, including six melanomas, ten sarcomas, and eight adenocarcinomas. Tumors were digested enzymatically to yield single cell suspensions which were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium with 10% human serum and 1000 U/ml recombinant interleukin-2. Lymphocytes constituted from 3% to 74% of single cell tumor suspensions, and expanded from 2.9-fold to 9.1 X 10(8)-fold over a culture period ranging from 14 to 100 days. Nine of 24 TIL cultures lysed fresh autologous tumor targets in 4 h chromium release assays. Cell surface phenotyping identified cultured TIL as activated cytotoxic/suppressor T cells. Subsequently, large-scale expansion of TIL was successful in generating more than 10(10) lymphocytes in five of eight consecutive cases. Clinical trials employing the adoptive transfer of expanded TIL to patients with metastatic disease have begun. PMID:3305708

  2. Tumor-Associated Neutrophils Show Phenotypic and Functional Divergence in Human Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Saha, Shilpi; Biswas, Subhra K

    2016-07-11

    Studies in murine cancer models have demonstrated the phenotypic and functional divergence of neutrophils; however, their role in pro- or anti-tumor responses in human remains elusive. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Singhal et al. report the existence of specialized subsets of neutrophils in human lung cancer with diverging functions. PMID:27411583

  3. Nonlinear 3D projection printing of concave hydrogel microstructures for long-term multicellular spheroid and embryoid body culture.

    PubMed

    Hribar, K C; Finlay, D; Ma, X; Qu, X; Ondeck, M G; Chung, P H; Zanella, F; Engler, A J; Sheikh, F; Vuori, K; Chen, S C

    2015-06-01

    Long-term culture and monitoring of individual multicellular spheroids and embryoid bodies (EBs) remains a challenge for in vitro cell propagation. Here, we used a continuous 3D projection printing approach - with an important modification of nonlinear exposure - to generate concave hydrogel microstructures that permit spheroid growth and long-term maintenance, without the need for spheroid transfer. Breast cancer spheroids grown to 10 d in the concave structures showed hypoxic cores and signs of necrosis using immunofluorescent and histochemical staining, key features of the tumor microenvironment in vivo. EBs consisting of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) grown on the hydrogels demonstrated narrow size distribution and undifferentiated markers at 3 d, followed by signs of differentiation by the presence of cavities and staining of the three germ layers at 10 d. These findings demonstrate a new method for long-term (e.g. beyond spheroid formation at day 2, and with media exchange) 3D cell culture that should be able to assist in cancer spheroid studies as well as embryogenesis and patient-derived disease modeling with iPSC EBs. PMID:25900329

  4. Nonlinear 3D Projection Printing of Concave Hydrogel Microstructures for Long-Term Multicellular Spheroid and Embryoid Body Culture

    PubMed Central

    Hribar, K.C; Finlay, D.; Ma, X.; Qu, X.; Ondeck, M. G.; Chung, P. H.; Zanella, F.; Engler, A. J.; Sheikh, F.; Vuori, K.; Chen, S.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term culture and monitoring of individual multicellular spheroids and embryoid bodies (EBs) remains a challenge for in vitro cell propogation. Here, we used a continuous 3D projection printing approach – with an important modification of nonlinear exposure — to generate concave hydrogel microstructures that permit spheroid growth and long-term maintenance, without the need for spheroid transfer. Breast cancer spheroids grown to 10 d in the concave structures showed hypoxic cores and signs of necrosis using immunofluorescent and histochemical staining, key features of the tumor microenvironment in vivo. EBs consisting of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) grown on the hydrogels demonstrated narrow size distribution and undifferentiated markers at 3 d, followed by signs of differentiation by the presence of cavities and staining of the three germ layers at 10 d. These findings demonstrate a new method for long-term (e.g. beyond spheroid formation at day 2, and with media exchange) 3D cell culture that should be able to assist in cancer spheroid studies as well as embryogenesis and patient-derived disease modeling with iPSC EBs. PMID:25900329

  5. The Significance of the Discordant Occurrence of Lens Tumors in Humans versus Other Species

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Daniel M.; Phelps, Paul O.; Surapaneni, Krishna R.; Thuro, Bradley A.; Potter, Heather D.; Ikeda, Akihiro; Teixeira, Leandro B. C.; Dubielzig, Richard R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine in which species and under what conditions lens tumors occur. Design A review of data bases of available human and veterinary ocular pathological material and the previously reported literature. Participants Approximately 18,000 patients who had ocular surgical specimens submitted and studied at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health (UWSMPH) between 1920 and 2014 and 45,000 ocular veterinary cases from the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin (COPLOW) between 1983 and 2014. Methods Material in two major archived collections at the University of Wisconsin medical and veterinary schools were studied for occurrence of lens tumors. Tumor was defined as “a new growth of tissue characterized by progressive, uncontrolled proliferation of cells.” In addition, cases presented at 3 major eye pathology societies (Verhoeff-Zimmerman Ophthalmic Pathology Society, Eastern Ophthalmic Pathology Society, and The Armed Forces Institute of Pathology Ophthalmic Alumni Society) from 1975 through 2014 were reviewed. Finally, a careful search of the literature was carried out. Approval from the IRB to carry out this study was obtained. Main Outcome Measures The presence of tumors of the lens. Results The database search and literature review failed to find an example of a lens tumor in humans. In contrast, examples of naturally occurring lens tumors were found in cats, dogs, rabbits, and birds. 4.5% of feline intraocular and adnexal neoplasms (234/5153) in the veterinary school database were designated as feline ocular post-traumatic sarcoma (FOPTS), a tumor previously demonstrated to be of lens epithelial origin. Similar tumors were seen in rabbit eyes, a bird, and in a dog. All four species with lens tumors had a history of either ocular trauma or protracted uveitis. The literature search also revealed cases where lens tumors were induced in zebrafish, rainbow trout, hamsters, and mice, by

  6. Development of size-customized hepatocarcinoma spheroids as a potential drug testing platform using a sacrificial gelatin microsphere system.

    PubMed

    Leong, Wenyan; Kremer, Antje; Wang, Dong-An

    2016-06-01

    Sacrificial gelatin microspheres can be developed as a cell delivery vehicle for non-anchorage dependent cells - its incorporation into a macroscopic scaffold system not only allows the cells to be cultured in suspension within cavities left behind by the sacrificial material, it also allows scaffold-free tissue development to be confined within the cavities. In this study, dense and highly viable hepatocarcinoma spheroids were developed by means of encapsulation in sacrificial gelatin microspheres produced via a simple water-in-oil emulsion technique. By initial selection of microsphere size and distribution, spheroid size can be controlled for various applications such as uniform tumor spheroids as a reproducible three-dimensional drug screening and testing platform that better mimics the in vivo nature of tumors (instead of conventional monolayer culture), as this study has suggested as a proof-of-concept with chemotherapy drug Doxorubicin. PMID:27040260

  7. Combination Therapy with Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate and Doxorubicin in Human Prostate Tumor Modeling Studies

    PubMed Central

    Stearns, Mark E.; Amatangelo, Michael D.; Varma, Devika; Sell, Chris; Goodyear, Shaun M.

    2010-01-01

    The polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) in combination with doxorubicin (Dox) exhibits a synergistic activity in blocking the growth and colony-forming ability of human prostate cell lines in vitro. EGCG has been found to disrupt the mitochondrial membrane potential, induce vesiculation of mitochondria, and induce elevated poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and apoptosis. EGCG in combination with low levels of Dox had a synergistic effect in blocking tumor cell growth. In vivo tumor modeling studies with a highly metastatic tumor line, PC-3ML cells, revealed that EGCG (228 mg/kg or 200 μmol/L) appeared to sensitize tumors to Dox. EGCG combined with low levels of Dox (0.14 mg/kg or 2 μmol/L) blocked tumor growth by PC-3ML cells injected intraperitoneally (ie, in CB17 severe combined immunodeficiencies) and significantly increased mouse survival rates. Similarly, relatively low levels of EGCG (57 mg/kg or 50 μmol/L) plus Dox (0.07 mg/kg or 1 μmol/L) eradicated established tumors (ie, in nonobese diabetic–severe combined immunodeficiencies) that were derived from CD44hi tumor-initiating cells isolated from PCa-20a cells. Flow cytometry results showed that EGCG appeared to enhance retention of Dox by tumor cells to synergistically inhibit tumor growth and eradicate tumors. These data suggest that localized delivery of high dosages of EGCG combined with low levels of Dox may have significant clinical application in the treatment of metastatic prostate and/or eradication of primary tumors derived from tumor-initiating cells. PMID:20971741

  8. Cytotoxic activity and absence of tumor growth stimulation of standardized mistletoe extracts in human tumor models in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kelter, Gerhard; Schierholz, Jörg M; Fischer, Imma U; Fiebig, Heinz-Herbert

    2007-01-01

    Mistletoe extracts are widely used in complementary and alternative cancer therapy in Europe. The extracts possess cytotoxic, as well as immunostimulatory effects. However, some investigators have suggested that low doses of mistletoe extracts could also induce tumor growth. The mistletoe extracts Helixor A, Helixor M and Helixor P were investigated for growth inhibitory and stimulatory effects in a panel of 38 human tumor cell lines in vitro. Mistletoe lectin I (ML-1), adriamycin and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were used as reference compounds. All three mistletoe preparations showed cytotoxic activity [T/C (Test/Control) < 30%]: Helixor P was the most potent, followed by Helixor M and Helixor A with IC50 (50% inhibitory concentration) values of 68.4, 114 and 133 microg/ml, respectively. The IC50 values of ML-1 and adriamycin were 0.026 and 0.069 microg/ml. None of the human tumor cell lines in the panel showed growth stimulation (T/C (Test/Control) > 125%) by the mistletoe extracts or ML-1, apart from two exceptions in the colon carcinoma cell line HCC-2998, in which Helixor M and ML-1 showed a marginal stimulation (TIC 128% and 131%, respectively) at one concentration only. Further investigations into the latter effect of Helixor M and ML-1 in the HCC-2998 line using five different proliferation assays, modified cell culture conditions and the identical production charge of mistletoe extract, as well as a new one, did not confirm the previous observation. It was concluded that the marginal stimulation found in the earlier experiments was a statistical coincidence. Helixor mistletoe preparations and ML-1 have cytotoxic activity and do not stimulate tumor cell proliferation in vitro which is in accordance with previous scientifically based observations on aqueous mistletoe extracts. PMID:17352237

  9. Misorientations in spheroidal graphite: some new insights about spheroidal graphite growth in cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacaze, J.; Theuwissen, K.; Laffont, L.; Véron, M.

    2016-03-01

    Local diffraction patterning, orientation mapping and high resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging have been used to characterize misorientations in graphite spheroids of cast irons. Emphasis is put here on bulk graphite, away from the nucleus as well as from the outer surface of the spheroids in order to get information on their growth during solidification. The results show that spheroidal graphite consists in conical sectors made of elementary blocks piled up on each other. These blocks are elongated along the prismatic a direction of graphite with the c axes roughly parallel to the radius of the spheroids. This implies that the orientation of the blocks rotates around the spheroid centre giving low angle tilting misorientations along tangential direction within each sector. Misorientations between neighbouring sectors are of higher values and their interfaces show rippled layers which are characteristic of defects in graphene. Along a radius of the spheroid, clockwise and anticlockwise twisting between blocks is observed. These observations help challenging some of the models proposed to explain spheroidal growth in cast ions.

  10. Dystrophin is a tumor suppressor in human cancers with myogenic programs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexiang; Marino-Enriquez, Adrian; Bennett, Richard R; Zhu, Meijun; Shen, Yiping; Eilers, Grant; Lee, Jen-Chieh; Henze, Joern; Fletcher, Benjamin S; Gu, Zhizhan; Fox, Edward A; Antonescu, Cristina R; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Guo, Xiangqian; Raut, Chandrajit P; Demetri, George D; van de Rijn, Matt; Ordog, Tamas; Kunkel, Louis M; Fletcher, Jonathan A

    2014-06-01

    Many common human mesenchymal tumors, including gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) and leiomyosarcoma (LMS), feature myogenic differentiation. Here we report that intragenic deletion of the dystrophin-encoding and muscular dystrophy-associated DMD gene is a frequent mechanism by which myogenic tumors progress to high-grade, lethal sarcomas. Dystrophin is expressed in the non-neoplastic and benign counterparts of GIST, RMS and LMS tumors, and DMD deletions inactivate larger dystrophin isoforms, including 427-kDa dystrophin, while preserving the expression of an essential 71-kDa isoform. Dystrophin inhibits myogenic sarcoma cell migration, invasion, anchorage independence and invadopodia formation, and dystrophin inactivation was found in 96%, 100% and 62% of metastatic GIST, embryonal RMS and LMS samples, respectively. These findings validate dystrophin as a tumor suppressor and likely anti-metastatic factor, suggesting that therapies in development for muscular dystrophies may also have relevance in the treatment of cancer. PMID:24793134

  11. Electrostatic disruption of a charged conducting spheroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. R.; Mendis, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Electrostatic disruption of elongated parent grains following sudden charging to high electrostatic potentials is proposed as a specific mechanism for the appearance of striae or pseudosynchronic bands which have been observed in several comets. The polar and equatorial electrostatic tension for axis ratios between 0.01 and 1000 are calculated, and the polar pressure is found to be larger than the equatorial pressure for prolate spheroids. The electrostatic polar pressure profile along the polar axis for prolate spheroids is calculated, and the pressure is found to increase monotonically from a minimum at the center to a maxima at the ends. This indicates that as a prolate spheroid of uniform tensile strength is charged up, it will continue to chip off at the ends when the electrostatic pressure there exceeds the uniform tensile strength of the grain. The result can be a prolate grain or a grain which continues chipping until it explodes.

  12. Prolate spheroidal harmonic expansion of gravitational field

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2014-06-01

    As a modification of the oblate spheroidal case, a recursive method is developed to compute the point value and a few low-order derivatives of the prolate spheroidal harmonics of the second kind, Q{sub nm} (y), namely the unnormalized associated Legendre function (ALF) of the second kind with its argument in the domain, 1 < y < ∞. They are required in evaluating the prolate spheroidal harmonic expansion of the gravitational field in addition to the point value and the low-order derivatives of P-bar {sub nm}(t), the 4π fully normalized ALF of the first kind with its argument in the domain, |t| ≤ 1. The new method will be useful in the gravitational field computation of elongated celestial objects.

  13. The expression of BST2 in human and experimental mouse brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Derek A; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Han, Yu; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2011-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (grade IV astrocytoma) is a highly malignant brain tumor with poor treatment options and an average lifespan of 15 months after diagnosis. Previous work has demonstrated that BST2 (bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2; also known as PDCA-1, CD137 and HM1.24) is expressed by multiple myeloma, endometrial cancer and primary lung cancer cells. BST2 is expressed on the plasma membrane, which makes it an ideal target for immunotherapy. Accordingly, several groups have shown BST2 mAb to be effective for targeting tumor cells. In this report, we hypothesized that BST2 is expressed in human and mouse brain tumors and plays a critical role in brain tumor progression. We show that BST2 expression is upregulated at both the mRNA and protein level in high grade when compared to low grade human astrocytoma (p<0.05). To test the relevance of BST2, we utilized the intracranially (IC)-injected GL261 cell-based malignant brain tumor mouse model. We show that BST2 mRNA expression is increased in mouse brain IC-injected with GL261 cells, when compared to mouse brain IC-injected with saline at 3 weeks post-operative (p<0.05). Furthermore, BST2 immunofluorescence predominantly localized to mouse brain tumor cells. Finally, mice IC-injected with GL261 cells transduced with shRNA for BST2±preincubated with BST2 mAb show no difference in overall lifespan when compared to mice IC-injected with GL261 cells transduced with a scrambled shRNA±preincubated with BST2 mAb. Collectively, these data show that while BST2 expression increases during brain tumor progression in both human and mouse brain tumors, it has no apparent consequences to overall lifespan in an orthotopic mouse brain tumor model. PMID:21565182

  14. Eribulin mesylate reduces tumor microenvironment abnormality by vascular remodeling in preclinical human breast cancer models.

    PubMed

    Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Kiyoshi; Adachi, Yusuke; Semba, Taro; Uesugi, Mai; Ozawa, Yoichi; Tohyama, Osamu; Uehara, Taisuke; Kimura, Takayuki; Watanabe, Hideki; Asano, Makoto; Kawano, Satoshi; Tizon, Xavier; McCracken, Paul J; Matsui, Junji; Aoshima, Ken; Nomoto, Kenichi; Oda, Yoshiya

    2014-10-01

    Eribulin mesylate is a synthetic macrocyclic ketone analog of the marine sponge natural product halichondrin B and an inhibitor of microtubule dynamics. Some tubulin-binding drugs are known to have antivascular (antiangiogenesis or vascular-disrupting) activities that can target abnormal tumor vessels. Using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI analyses, here we show that eribulin induces remodeling of tumor vasculature through a novel antivascular activity in MX-1 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenograft models. Vascular remodeling associated with improved perfusion was shown by Hoechst 33342 staining and by increased microvessel density together with decreased mean vascular areas and fewer branched vessels in tumor tissues, as determined by immunohistochemical staining for endothelial marker CD31. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of normal host cells in the stroma of xenograft tumors showed that eribulin altered the expression of mouse (host) genes in angiogenesis signaling pathways controlling endothelial cell-pericyte interactions, and in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition pathway in the context of the tumor microenvironment. Eribulin also decreased hypoxia-associated protein expression of mouse (host) vascular endothelial growth factor by ELISA and human CA9 by immunohistochemical analysis. Prior treatment with eribulin enhanced the anti-tumor activity of capecitabine in the MDA-MB-231 xenograft model. These findings suggest that eribulin-induced remodeling of abnormal tumor vasculature leads to a more functional microenvironment that may reduce the aggressiveness of tumors due to elimination of inner tumor hypoxia. Because abnormal tumor microenvironments enhance both drug resistance and metastasis, the apparent ability of eribulin to reverse these aggressive characteristics may contribute to its clinical benefits. PMID:25060424

  15. Eribulin mesylate reduces tumor microenvironment abnormality by vascular remodeling in preclinical human breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Kiyoshi; Adachi, Yusuke; Semba, Taro; Uesugi, Mai; Ozawa, Yoichi; Tohyama, Osamu; Uehara, Taisuke; Kimura, Takayuki; Watanabe, Hideki; Asano, Makoto; Kawano, Satoshi; Tizon, Xavier; McCracken, Paul J; Matsui, Junji; Aoshima, Ken; Nomoto, Kenichi; Oda, Yoshiya

    2014-01-01

    Eribulin mesylate is a synthetic macrocyclic ketone analog of the marine sponge natural product halichondrin B and an inhibitor of microtubule dynamics. Some tubulin-binding drugs are known to have antivascular (antiangiogenesis or vascular-disrupting) activities that can target abnormal tumor vessels. Using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI analyses, here we show that eribulin induces remodeling of tumor vasculature through a novel antivascular activity in MX-1 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenograft models. Vascular remodeling associated with improved perfusion was shown by Hoechst 33342 staining and by increased microvessel density together with decreased mean vascular areas and fewer branched vessels in tumor tissues, as determined by immunohistochemical staining for endothelial marker CD31. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of normal host cells in the stroma of xenograft tumors showed that eribulin altered the expression of mouse (host) genes in angiogenesis signaling pathways controlling endothelial cell–pericyte interactions, and in the epithelial–mesenchymal transition pathway in the context of the tumor microenvironment. Eribulin also decreased hypoxia-associated protein expression of mouse (host) vascular endothelial growth factor by ELISA and human CA9 by immunohistochemical analysis. Prior treatment with eribulin enhanced the anti-tumor activity of capecitabine in the MDA-MB-231 xenograft model. These findings suggest that eribulin-induced remodeling of abnormal tumor vasculature leads to a more functional microenvironment that may reduce the aggressiveness of tumors due to elimination of inner tumor hypoxia. Because abnormal tumor microenvironments enhance both drug resistance and metastasis, the apparent ability of eribulin to reverse these aggressive characteristics may contribute to its clinical benefits. PMID:25060424

  16. Strategies for Human Tumor Virus Discoveries: From Microscopic Observation to Digital Transcriptome Subtraction

    PubMed Central

    Mirvish, Ezra D.; Shuda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Over 20% of human cancers worldwide are associated with infectious agents, including viruses, bacteria, and parasites. Various methods have been used to identify human tumor viruses, including electron microscopic observations of viral particles, immunologic screening, cDNA library screening, nucleic acid hybridization, consensus PCR, viral DNA array chip, and representational difference analysis. With the Human Genome Project, a large amount of genetic information from humans and other organisms has accumulated over the last decade. Utilizing the available genetic databases, Feng et al. (2007) developed digital transcriptome subtraction (DTS), an in silico method to sequentially subtract human sequences from tissue or cellular transcriptome, and discovered Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) from Merkel cell carcinoma. Here, we review the background and methods underlying the human tumor virus discoveries and explain how DTS was developed and used for the discovery of MCV. PMID:27242703

  17. Strategies for Human Tumor Virus Discoveries: From Microscopic Observation to Digital Transcriptome Subtraction.

    PubMed

    Mirvish, Ezra D; Shuda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Over 20% of human cancers worldwide are associated with infectious agents, including viruses, bacteria, and parasites. Various methods have been used to identify human tumor viruses, including electron microscopic observations of viral particles, immunologic screening, cDNA library screening, nucleic acid hybridization, consensus PCR, viral DNA array chip, and representational difference analysis. With the Human Genome Project, a large amount of genetic information from humans and other organisms has accumulated over the last decade. Utilizing the available genetic databases, Feng et al. (2007) developed digital transcriptome subtraction (DTS), an in silico method to sequentially subtract human sequences from tissue or cellular transcriptome, and discovered Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) from Merkel cell carcinoma. Here, we review the background and methods underlying the human tumor virus discoveries and explain how DTS was developed and used for the discovery of MCV. PMID:27242703

  18. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor mRNA expression by human pituitary tumors in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, J M; Klibanski, A

    1994-01-01

    An important question in the pathogenesis and regulation of human gonadotroph adenomas is whether heterogeneous gonadotropin responses to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) are due to dysregulation of GnRH receptor biosynthesis and/or cell-signaling pathways. We investigated gonadotropin responsiveness to pulsatile GnRH in 13 gonadotroph adenomas. All tumors had evidence of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) beta and alpha subunit biosynthesis using reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR) techniques. Four tumors significantly increased gonadotropin and/or free subunit secretion during pulsatile 10(-8) M GnRH administration. The GnRH antagonist Antide (10(-6) to 10(-8) M) blocked secretory increases in all GnRH-responsive tumors. Gonadotropin and/or free subunit secretion increased after 60 mM KCl, confirming that GnRH nonresponsiveness was not due to intracellular gonadotropin depletion. We hypothesized that GnRH nonresponsiveness in these tumors may be due to GnRH receptor (GnRH-Rc) biosynthetic defects. RTPCR analyses detected GnRH-Rc transcripts only in responsive tumors and normal human pituitary. This is the first demonstration of a cell-surface receptor biosynthetic defect in human pituitary tumors. We conclude (a) one third of gonadotroph tumors respond to pulsatile GnRH in vitro, (b) GnRH-Rc mRNA is detected in human gonadotroph adenomas and predicts GnRH responsiveness, and (c) GnRH-Rc biosynthetic defects may underlie GnRH nonresponsiveness in gonadotroph tumors. Images PMID:8200967

  19. The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor controls androgen signaling and human prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ankur; Yeow, Wen-Shuz; Ertel, Adam; Coleman, Ilsa; Clegg, Nigel; Thangavel, Chellappagounder; Morrissey, Colm; Zhang, Xiaotun; Comstock, Clay E S; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K; Gomella, Leonard; Knudsen, Erik S; Nelson, Peter S; Knudsen, Karen E

    2010-12-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB; encoded by RB1) is a tumor suppressor that is frequently disrupted in tumorigenesis and acts in multiple cell types to suppress cell cycle progression. The role of RB in tumor progression, however, is poorly defined. Here, we have identified a critical role for RB in protecting against tumor progression through regulation of targets distinct from cell cycle control. In analyses of human prostate cancer samples, RB loss was infrequently observed in primary disease and was predominantly associated with transition to the incurable, castration-resistant state. Further analyses revealed that loss of the RB1 locus may be a major mechanism of RB disruption and that loss of RB function was associated with poor clinical outcome. Modeling of RB dysfunction in vitro and in vivo revealed that RB controlled nuclear receptor networks critical for tumor progression and that it did so via E2F transcription factor 1-mediated regulation of androgen receptor (AR) expression and output. Through this pathway, RB depletion induced unchecked AR activity that underpinned therapeutic bypass and tumor progression. In agreement with these findings, disruption of the RB/E2F/nuclear receptor axis was frequently observed in the transition to therapy resistance in human disease. Together, these data reveal what we believe to be a new paradigm for RB function in controlling prostate tumor progression and lethal tumor phenotypes. PMID:21099110

  20. Single cells from human primary colorectal tumors exhibit polyfunctional heterogeneity in secretions of ELR+ CXC chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Adalsteinsson, Viktor; Tahirova, Narmin; Tallapragada, Naren; Yao, Xiaosai; Campion, Liam; Angelini, Alessandro; Douce, Thomas B.; Huang, Cindy; Bowman, Brittany; Williamson, Christina; Kwon, Douglas S.; Wittrup, K. Dane; Love, J. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is an inflammatory disease of tissue that is largely influenced by the interactions between multiple cell types, secreted factors, and signal transduction pathways. While single-cell sequencing continues to refine our understanding of the clonotypic heterogeneity within tumors, the complex interplay between genetic variations and non-genetic factors ultimately affects therapeutic outcome. Much has been learned through bulk studies of secreted factors in the tumor microenvironment, but the secretory behavior of single cells has been largely uncharacterized. Here we directly profiled the secretions of ELR+ CXC chemokines from thousands of single colorectal tumor and stromal cells, using an array of subnanoliter wells and a technique called microengraving to characterize both the rates of secretion of several factors at once and the numbers of cells secreting each chemokine. The ELR+ CXC chemokines are highly redundant, pro-angiogenic cytokines that signal via either or both of the CXCR1 and CXCR2 receptors, exerting profound impacts on tumor growth and progression. We find that human primary colorectal tumor and stromal cells exhibit polyfunctional heterogeneity in the combinations and magnitudes of secretions for these chemokines. In cell lines, we observe similar variance: phenotypes observed in bulk can be largely absent among the majority of single cells, and discordances exist between secretory states measured and gene expression for these chemokines among single cells. Together, these measures suggest secretory states among tumor cells are complex and can evolve dynamically. Most importantly, this study reveals new insight into the intratumoral phenotypic heterogeneity of human primary tumors. PMID:23995780

  1. Metabolic shifts induced by human H460 cells in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linsheng; Wang, Yaqiong; Zheng, Tian; Cao, Bei; Li, Mengjie; Shi, Jian; Aa, Nan; Wang, Xinwen; Zhao, Chunyan; Aa, Jiye; Wang, Guangji

    2016-03-01

    Tumor markers are most popularly used in diagnosis of various cancers clinically. However, the confounding factors of individual background diversities, such as genetics, food preferences, living styles, physical exercises, etc., greatly challenge the identification of tumor markers. Study of the metabolic impact of inoculated tumors on model animals can facilitate the identification of metabolomic markers relevant to tumor insult. In this study, serum metabolites from nude mice (n = 14) inoculated with human H460 cells (human nonsmall cell lung carcinoma) were profiled using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The mice with inoculated tumors showed an obviously different metabolic pattern from the control; identification of the discriminatory metabolites suggested the metabolic perturbation of free fatty acids, amino acids, glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle turnover. The significantly decreased TCA intermediates, free fatty acids, 3-hydroxybutyric acid and fluctuating amino acids (t-test, p < 0.05) in serum of tumor-bearing mice characterized the metabolic impact of local inoculated H460 tumor cells on the whole system. This indicates that they are candidate metabolomic markers for translational study of lung cancer, clinically. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26147780

  2. The dwarf spheroidal galaxy Andromeda I

    SciTech Connect

    Mould, J.; Kristian, J. Mount Wilson and Las Campanas Observatories, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-05-01

    Images of Andromeda I in the visual and near-infrared show a giant branch characteristic of galactic globular clusters of intermediate metallicity. The distance of the galaxy is estimated from the tip of the giant branch to be 790 + or - 60 kpc. The physical dimensions and luminosity are similar to those of the dwarf spheroidal in Sculptor. There is no evidence for an intermediate age population in Andromeda I, and appropriate upper limits are specified. There is marginal evidence for a color gradient in the galaxy, a phenomenon not previously noted in a dwarf spheroidal. 21 refs.

  3. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies: Keystones of galaxy evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1994-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the most insignificant extragalactic stellar systems in terms of their visibility, but potentially very significant in terms of their role in the formation and evolution of much more luminous galaxies. We discuss the present observational data and their implications for theories of the formation and evolution of both dwarf and giant galaxies. The putative dark-matter content of these low-surface-brightness systems is of particular interest, as is their chemical evolution. Surveys for new dwarf spheroidals hidden behind the stars of our Galaxy and those which are not bound to giant galaxies may give new clues as to the origins of this unique class of galaxy.

  4. Tumor control by human cytomegalovirus in a murine model of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Coquard, Laurie; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Russo, Laetitia; Valmary-Degano, Séverine; Borg, Christophe; Pothier, Pierre; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Although viruses can cause cancer, other studies reported the regression of human tumors upon viral infections. We investigated the cytoreductive potential of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in a murine model of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in severe-immunodeficient mice. Infection of HepG2 cells with HCMV resulted in the absence of tumor or in a limited tumor growth following injection of cells subcutaneously. By contrast all mice injected with uninfected HepG2 cells and with HepG2 cells infected with UV-treated HCMV did develop tumors without any significant restriction. Analysis of tumors indicated that in mice injected with HCMV-infected-HepG2 cells, but not in controls, a restricted cellular proliferation was observed parallel to a limited activation of the STAT3-cyclin D1 axis, decreased formation of colonies in soft agar, and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. We conclude that HCMV can provide antitumoral effects in a murine model of HCC which requires replicative virus at some stages that results in limitation of tumor cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis mediated through the intrinsic caspase pathway. PMID:27626063

  5. Morphological evidence of neutrophil-tumor cell phagocytosis (cannibalism) in human gastric adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Caruso, R A; Muda, A O; Bersiga, A; Rigoli, L; Inferrera, C

    2002-01-01

    The phenomenon of neutrophil-tumor cell emperipolesis or phagocytosis has been documented by light microscopy in various human carcinomas, but little is known about the cellular pathological processes and the morphological changes involved. In an attempt to clarify the nature of this phenomenon, the authors' ultrastructural studies on the relationships among neutrophils and tumor cells in human gastric carcinomas are reviewed and analyzed. At the electron microscopy level, apoptotic neutrophils were found within vacuoles of adenocarcinoma cells in 2 cases. They showed either early apoptotic morphology with perinuclear chromatin aggregation but cytoplasm integrity or late apoptotic morphology with uniform, collapsed nucleus and tightly packed cytoplasmic granules. A light microscopy review of 200 cases of resected gastric carcinomas identified 22 cases (11%) that were characterized by neutrophil-tumor cell phagocytosis (cannibalism). TUNEL staining confirmed the presence of apoptotic neutrophils within the cytoplasm of the tumor cells. This study provides light and electron microscopic evidence of apoptotic neutrophils phagocytosed by gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The morphological features of neutrophil-tumor cell phagocytosis (cannibalism) would suggest a particular mechanism of tumor-immune escape in human gastric carcinoma. PMID:12396242

  6. Synergistic action of tiazofurin with hypoxanthine and allopurinol in human neuroectodermal tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Szekeres, T; Schuchter, K; Chiba, P; Ressmann, G; Lhotka, C; Gharehbaghi, K; Szalay, S M; Pillwein, K

    1993-12-01

    The activity of IMP dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.14), the key enzyme of de novo guanylate biosynthesis, was shown to be increased in tumor cells. Tiazofurin (TR), a potent and specific inhibitor of this enzyme, proved to be effective in the treatment of refractory granulocytic leukemia in blast crisis. We examined the effects of tiazofurin as a single agent and in combination with hypoxanthine and allopurinol in six different neuroectodermal tumor cell lines, the STA-BT-3 and 146-18 human glioblastoma cell lines, the SK-N-SH, LA-N-1 and LA-N-5 human neuroblastoma cell lines, and the STA-ET-1 Ewing tumor cell line. Tiazofurin inhibited tumor cell growth with IC50 values between 2.2 microM (LA-N-1 cell line) and 550 microM (LA-N-5 cells) and caused a significant decrease of intracellular GTP pools (GTP concentrations decreased to 39-79% of control). Incorporation of [8-14C]guanine into GTP pools was determined as a measure of guanylate salvage activity; incubation with 100 microM hypoxanthine caused a 62-96% inhibition of the salvage pathway. Incubation with tiazofurin (100 microM) and hypoxanthine (100 microM) synergistically inhibited tumor cell growth, and the addition of allopurinol (100 microM) strengthened these effects. Therefore, this drug combination, inhibiting guanylate de novo and salvage pathways, may prove useful in the treatment of human neuroectodermal tumors. PMID:7903533

  7. Tumor control by human cytomegalovirus in a murine model of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Coquard, Laurie; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Russo, Laetitia; Valmary-Degano, Séverine; Borg, Christophe; Pothier, Pierre; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Although viruses can cause cancer, other studies reported the regression of human tumors upon viral infections. We investigated the cytoreductive potential of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) in a murine model of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in severe-immunodeficient mice. Infection of HepG2 cells with HCMV resulted in the absence of tumor or in a limited tumor growth following injection of cells subcutaneously. By contrast all mice injected with uninfected HepG2 cells and with HepG2 cells infected with UV-treated HCMV did develop tumors without any significant restriction. Analysis of tumors indicated that in mice injected with HCMV-infected-HepG2 cells, but not in controls, a restricted cellular proliferation was observed parallel to a limited activation of the STAT3-cyclin D1 axis, decreased formation of colonies in soft agar, and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. We conclude that HCMV can provide antitumoral effects in a murine model of HCC which requires replicative virus at some stages that results in limitation of tumor cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis mediated through the intrinsic caspase pathway. PMID:27626063

  8. Vav promotes differentiation of human tumoral myeloid precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Bertagnolo, Valeria; Brugnoli, Federica; Mischiati, Carlo; Sereni, Alessia; Bavelloni, Alberto; Carini, Cinzia; Capitani, Silvano . E-mail: cps@unife.it

    2005-05-15

    Vav is one of the genetic markers that correlate with the differentiation of hematopoietic cells. In T and B cells, it appears crucial for both development and functions, while, in non-lymphoid hematopoietic cells, Vav seems not involved in cell maturation, but rather in the response of mature cells to agonist-dependent proliferation and phagocytosis. We have previously demonstrated that the amount and the tyrosine phosphorylation of Vav are up-regulated in both whole cells and nuclei of tumoral promyelocytes induced to granulocytic maturation by ATRA and that tyrosine-phosphorylated Vav does not display any ATRA-induced GEF activity but contributes to the regulation of PI 3-K activity. In this study, we report that Vav accumulates in nuclei of ATRA-treated APL-derived cells and that the down-modulation of Vav prevents differentiation of tumoral promyelocytes, indicating that it is a key molecule in ATRA-dependent myeloid maturation. On the other hand, the overexpression of Vav induces an increased expression of surface markers of granulocytic differentiation without affecting the maturation-related changes of the nuclear morphology. Consistent with an effect of Vav on the transcriptional machinery, array profiling shows that the inhibition of the Syk-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of Vav reduces the number of ATRA-induced genes. Our data support the unprecedented notion that Vav plays crucial functions in the maturation process of myeloid cells, and suggest that Vav can be regarded as a potential target for the therapeutic treatment of myeloproliferative disorders.

  9. Effect of soy isoflavones on the growth of human breast tumors: findings from preclinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Youngjoo

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide, and many women with breast cancer live more than 5 years after their diagnosis. Breast cancer patients and survivors have a greater interest in taking soy foods and isoflavone supplements. However, the effect of isoflavones on breast cancer remains controversial. Thus, it is critical to determine if and when isoflavones are beneficial or detrimental to breast cancer patients. According to the available preclinical data, high concentrations of isoflavones inhibit the proliferation of breast cancer cells, regardless of their estrogen receptor (ER) status. In comparison, genistein, a major isoflavone, has stimulated tumor growth at low concentrations and mitigated tamoxifen efficacy in ER-positive breast cancer. Studies have indicated that the relative levels of genistein and estrogen at the target site are important to determine the genistein effect on the ER-positive tumor growth. However, studies using ovariectomized mice and subcutaneous xenograft models might not truly reflect estrogen concentrations in human breast tumors. Moreover, it may be an oversimplification that isoflavones stimulate hormone-dependent tumor growth due to their potential estrogenic effect since studies also suggest nonestrogenic anticancer effects of isoflavones and ER-independent anticancer activity of tamoxifen. Therefore, the concentrations of isoflavones and estrogen in human breast tumors should be considered better in future preclinical studies and the parameters that can estimate those levels in breast tumors are required in human clinical/epidemiological investigation. In addition, it will be important to identify the molecular mechanisms that either inhibit or promote the growth of breast cancer cells by soy isoflavones, and use those molecules to evaluate the relevance of the preclinical findings to the human disease and to predict the health effects of isoflavones in human breast tumors. PMID:25493176

  10. Expression of endothelial cell-specific receptor tyrosine kinases and growth factors in human brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Hatva, E.; Kaipainen, A.; Mentula, P.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Paetau, A.; Haltia, M.; Alitalo, K.

    1995-01-01

    Key growth factor-receptor interactions involved in angiogenesis are possible targets for therapy of CNS tumors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a highly specific endothelial cell mitogen that has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis, a requirement for solid tumor growth. The expression of VEGF, the closely related placental growth factor (PIGF), the newly cloned endothelial high affinity VEGF receptors KDR and FLT1, and the endothelial orphan receptors FLT4 and Tie were analyzed by in situ hybridization in normal human brain tissue and in the following CNS tumors: gliomas, grades II, III, IV; meningiomas, grades I and II; and melanoma metastases to the cerebrum. VEGF mRNA was up-regulated in the majority of low grade tumors studied and was highly expressed in cells of malignant gliomas. Significantly elevated levels of Tie, KDR, and FLT1 mRNAs, but not FLT4 mRNA, were observed in malignant tumor endothelia, as well as in endothelia of tissues directly adjacent to the tumor margin. In comparison, there was little or no receptor expression in normal brain vasculature. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that these endothelial receptors are induced during tumor progression and may play a role in tumor angiogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7856749

  11. Warburg metabolism in tumor-conditioned macrophages promotes metastasis in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Penny, Hweixian Leong; Sieow, Je Lin; Adriani, Giulia; Yeap, Wei Hseun; See Chi Ee, Peter; San Luis, Boris; Lee, Bernett; Lee, Terence; Mak, Shi Ya; Ho, Ying Swan; Lam, Kong Peng; Ong, Choon Kiat; Huang, Ruby Y J; Ginhoux, Florent; Rotzschke, Olaf; Kamm, Roger D; Wong, Siew Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) face a clinically intractable disease with poor survival rates, attributed to exceptionally high levels of metastasis. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is pronounced at inflammatory foci within the tumor; however, the immunological mechanisms promoting tumor dissemination remain unclear. It is well established that tumors exhibit the Warburg effect, a preferential use of glycolysis for energy production, even in the presence of oxygen, to support rapid growth. We hypothesized that the metabolic pathways utilized by tumor-infiltrating macrophages are altered in PDAC, conferring a pro-metastatic phenotype. We generated tumor-conditioned macrophages in vitro, in which human peripheral blood monocytes were cultured with conditioned media generated from normal pancreatic or PDAC cell lines to obtain steady-state and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), respectively. Compared with steady-state macrophages, TAMs promoted vascular network formation, augmented extravasation of tumor cells out of blood vessels, and induced higher levels of EMT. TAMs exhibited a pronounced glycolytic signature in a metabolic flux assay, corresponding with elevated glycolytic gene transcript levels. Inhibiting glycolysis in TAMs with a competitive inhibitor to Hexokinase II (HK2), 2-deoxyglucose (2DG), was sufficient to disrupt this pro-metastatic phenotype, reversing the observed increases in TAM-supported angiogenesis, extravasation, and EMT. Our results indicate a key role for metabolic reprogramming of tumor-infiltrating macrophages in PDAC metastasis, and highlight the therapeutic potential of using pharmacologics to modulate these metabolic pathways. PMID:27622062

  12. Avastin® in combination with gemcitabine and cisplatin significantly inhibits tumor angiogenesis and increases the survival rate of human A549 tumor-bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YING; XIA, XIZHENG; ZHOU, MINGKAI; LIU, XIAOJUN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Avastin® in combination with gemcitabine and cisplatin (GP) on the tumor growth of A549 tumor-bearing mice and the potential anti-tumor mechanism. A total of 30 human A549 tumor-bearing nude mice were randomly divided into the Avastin, chemotherapy and combined treatment groups for treatment with an intraperitoneal injection of Avastin (5 mg/kg) (Avastin group); an intraperitoneal injection of gemcitabine (4 mg/kg) and cisplatin (4 mg/kg) (chemotherapy group); or intraperitoneal injections of Avastin and GP (combined treatment group). The mice were observed for 30 days and the tumor growth, survival and body weight of the mice in the three groups were analyzed. The protein level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the tumor tissues was analyzed by ELISA. The vascular density and structural changes of the tumor were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Compared with the Avastin and chemotherapy groups, the tumor growth of mice in the combined treatment group was significantly inhibited, and the survival rate of the mice was increased significantly. No difference in body weight was observed among the three groups of mice (P>0.05). The levels of VEGF in the combined treatment group tumor tissues were significantly reduced compared with those in the chemotherapy group tumor tissues (P<0.05). Furthermore, the vessel density of the tumor tissue in the combined treatment group was significantly reduced compared with that in the chemotherapy group (P<0.05), and the number of normal vessels in the combined treatment group tumors was significantly higher than that in the chemotherapy group tumors after 7 days of treatment (P<0.05). In conclusion, Avastin can significantly decrease the level of VEGF in tumor tissue, inhibit tumor angiogenesis and promote the normalization of tumor vascular structure, which may explain the enhanced efficacy of Avastin in combination with chemotherapy. PMID:26136956

  13. At a crossroads: human DNA tumor viruses and the host DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, Pavel A; Luftig, Micah A

    2011-07-01

    Human DNA tumor viruses induce host cell proliferation in order to establish the necessary cellular milieu to replicate viral DNA. The consequence of such viral-programmed induction of proliferation coupled with the introduction of foreign replicating DNA structures makes these viruses particularly sensitive to the host DNA damage response machinery. In fact, sensors of DNA damage are often activated and modulated by DNA tumor viruses in both latent and lytic infection. This article focuses on the role of the DNA damage response during the life cycle of human DNA tumor viruses, with a particular emphasis on recent advances in our understanding of the role of the DNA damage response in EBV, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and human papillomavirus infection. PMID:21927617

  14. In vivo multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Kantelhardt, Sven R; Kalasauskas, Darius; König, Karsten; Kim, Ella; Weinigel, Martin; Uchugonova, Aisada; Giese, Alf

    2016-05-01

    High resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging differentiates glioma from adjacent brain in native tissue samples ex vivo. Presently, multiphoton tomography is applied in clinical dermatology and experimentally. We here present the first application of multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging for in vivo imaging on humans during a neurosurgical procedure. We used a MPTflex™ Multiphoton Laser Tomograph (JenLab, Germany). We examined cultured glioma cells in an orthotopic mouse tumor model and native human tissue samples. Finally the multiphoton tomograph was applied to provide optical biopsies during resection of a clinical case of glioblastoma. All tissues imaged by multiphoton tomography were sampled and processed for conventional histopathology. The multiphoton tomograph allowed fluorescence intensity- and fluorescence lifetime imaging with submicron spatial resolution and 200 picosecond temporal resolution. Morphological fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging of tumor-bearing mouse brains and native human tissue samples clearly differentiated tumor and adjacent brain tissue. Intraoperative imaging was found to be technically feasible. Intraoperative image quality was comparable to ex vivo examinations. To our knowledge we here present the first intraoperative application of high resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumors in situ. It allowed in vivo identification and determination of cell density of tumor tissue on a cellular and subcellular level within seconds. The technology shows the potential of rapid intraoperative identification of native glioma tissue without need for tissue processing or staining. PMID:26830089

  15. Survivin, a novel target of the Hedgehog/GLI signaling pathway in human tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Vlčková, K; Ondrušová, L; Vachtenheim, J; Réda, J; Dundr, P; Zadinová, M; Žáková, P; Poučková, P

    2016-01-01

    Survivin, an important antiapoptotic protein, is expressed in tumors, whereas in normal tissues the expression of this protein is extremely low, defining a role for survivin as a cancer gene. Survivin exhibits multifunctional activity in tumor cells. However, why survivin expression is sharply and invariably restricted to tumor tissue remains unclear. Here, we identified 11 putative consensus binding sites for GLI transcription factors in the survivin promoter and characterized the promoter activity. Inhibitors of the Hedgehog/GLI pathway, cyclopamine and GANT61, decreased the promoter activity in reporter assays. ΔNGLI2 (which lacks the repressor domain) was the most potent vector in activating the survivin promoter–reporter. Moreover, GANT61, a GLI1/2 inhibitor, repressed endogenous survivin protein and mRNA expression in most cells across a large panel of tumor cell lines. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed GLI2 binding to the survivin promoter. The ectopic GLI2-evoked expression of endogenous survivin was observed in normal human fibroblasts. GANT61 decreased survivin level in nude mice tumors, mimicking the activity of GANT61 in cultured cells. The immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence of human tumors revealed a correlation between the tissue regions showing high GLI2 and survivin positivity. Thus, these results demonstrated that survivin is a classical transcriptional target of GLI2, a Hedgehog pathway signaling effector. This potentially reflects the high expression of survivin in human tumor cells. As the Hedgehog pathway is upregulated in virtually all types of cancer cells, these findings substantially contribute to the explanation of uniform survivin expression in tumors as a potential target for the development of a more effective treatment of cancers through the inhibition of GLI2 to restrain survivin activity. PMID:26775700

  16. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts express pro-inflammatory factors in human breast and ovarian tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Erez, Neta; Glanz, Sarah; Raz, Yael; Avivi, Camilla; Barshack, Iris

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •CAFs in human breast and ovarian tumors express pro-inflammatory factors. •Expression of pro-inflammatory factors correlates with tumor invasiveness. •Expression of pro-inflammatory factors is associated with NF-κb activation in CAFs. -- Abstract: Inflammation has been established in recent years as a hallmark of cancer. Cancer Associated Fibroblasts (CAFs) support tumorigenesis by stimulating angiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation and invasion. We previously demonstrated that CAFs also mediate tumor-enhancing inflammation in a mouse model of skin carcinoma. Breast and ovarian carcinomas are amongst the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in women and cancer-related inflammation is linked with both these tumor types. However, the role of CAFs in mediating inflammation in these malignancies remains obscure. Here we show that CAFs in human breast and ovarian tumors express high levels of the pro-inflammatory factors IL-6, COX-2 and CXCL1, previously identified to be part of a CAF pro-inflammatory gene signature. Moreover, we show that both pro-inflammatory signaling by CAFs and leukocyte infiltration of tumors are enhanced in invasive ductal carcinoma as compared with ductal carcinoma in situ. The pro-inflammatory genes expressed by CAFs are known NF-κB targets and we show that NF-κB is up-regulated in breast and ovarian CAFs. Our data imply that CAFs mediate tumor-promoting inflammation in human breast and ovarian tumors and thus may be an attractive target for stromal-directed therapeutics.

  17. The expression of BST2 in human and experimental mouse brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, Derek A.; Balyasnikova, Irina V.; Han, Yu; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (grade IV astrocytoma) is a highly malignant brain tumor with poor treatment options and an average lifespan of 15 months after diagnosis. Previous work has demonstrated that BST2 (bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2; also known as PDCA-1, CD137 and HM1.24) is expressed by multiple myeloma, endometrial cancer and primary lung cancer cells. BST2 is expressed on the plasma membrane, which makes it an ideal target for immunotherapy. Accordingly, several groups have shown BST2 mAb to be effective for targeting tumor cells. In this report, we hypothesized that BST2 is expressed in human and mouse brain tumors and plays a critical role in brain tumor progression. We show that BST2 mRNA expression is increased in mouse brain IC-injected with GL261 cells, when compared to mouse brain IC-injected with saline at 3 weeks post-operative (p < 0.05). To test the relevance of BST2, we utilized the intracranially (IC)-injected GL261 cell-based malignant brain tumor mouse model. We show that BST2 mRNA expression is increased in mouse brain IC-injected GL261 cells, when compared to mouse brain IC-injected saline at 3 weeks post-operative (p < 0.05). Furthermore, BST2 immunofluorescence predominantly localized to mouse brain tumor cells. Finally, mice IC-injected with GL261 cells transduced with shRNA for BST2 ± pre-incubation with BST2 mAb show no difference in overall lifespan when compared to mice IC-injected with GL261 cells transduced with a scrambled shRNA ± pre-incubation with BST2 mAb. Collectively, these data show that while BST2 expression increases during brain tumor progression in both human and mouse brain tumors, it has no apparent consequences to overall lifespan in an orthotopic mouse brain tumor model. PMID:21565182

  18. Bisected, complex N-glycans and galectins in mouse mammary tumor progression and human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Hazuki E; Koba, Wade R; Fine, Eugene J; Giricz, Orsi; Kenny, Paraic A; Stanley, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Bisected, complex N-glycans on glycoproteins are generated by the glycosyltransferase MGAT3 and cause reduced cell surface binding of galectins. Previously, we showed that MGAT3 reduces growth factor signaling and retards mammary tumor progression driven by the Polyoma middle T antigen (PyMT) expressed in mammary epithelium under the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter. However, the penetrance of the tumor phenotype became variable in mixed FVB/N and C57BL/6 female mice and we therefore investigated a congenic C57BL/6 Mgat3−/−/MMTV-PyMT model. In the absence of MGAT3, C57BL/6 Mgat3−/−/MMTV-PyMT females exhibited accelerated tumor appearance and increased tumor burden, glucose uptake in tumors and lung metastasis. Nevertheless, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 or protein kinase B (AKT) was reduced in ∼20-week C57BL/6 MMTV-PyMT tumors lacking MGAT3. Activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), protein tyrosine kinase Src, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase were similar to that of controls. All the eight mouse galectin genes were expressed in mammary tumors and tumor epithelial cells (TECs), but galectin-2 and -12 were not detected by western analysis in tumors, and galectin-7 was not detected in 60% of the TEC lines. From microarray data reported for human breast cancers, at least 10 galectin and 7 N-glycan N-acetylglucosaminyl (GlcNAc)-transferase (MGAT) genes are expressed in tumor tissue, and expression often varies significantly between different breast cancer subtypes. Thus, in summary, while MGAT3 and bisected complex N-glycans retard mouse mammary tumor progression, genetic background may modify this effect; identification of key galectins that promote mammary tumor progression in mice is not straightforward because all the eight galectin genes are expressed; and high levels of MGAT3, galectin-4, -8, -10, -13 and -14 transcripts correlate with better relapse-free survival in human breast cancer. PMID:24037315

  19. Immortalized Human Schwann Cell Lines Derived From Tumors of Schwannomatosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Ostrow, Kimberly Laskie; Donaldson, Katelyn; Blakeley, Jaishri; Belzberg, Allan; Hoke, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Schwannomatosis, a rare form of neurofibromatosis, is characterized predominantly by multiple, often painful, schwannomas throughout the peripheral nervous system. The current standard of care for schwannomatosis is surgical resection. A major obstacle to schwannomatosis research is the lack of robust tumor cell lines. There is a great need for mechanistic and drug discovery studies of schwannomatosis, yet appropriate tools are not currently available. Schwannomatosis tumors are difficult to grow in culture as they survive only a few passages before senescence. Our lab has extensive experience in establishing primary and immortalized human Schwann cell cultures from normal tissue that retain their phenotypes after immortalization. Therefore we took on the challenge of creating immortalized human Schwann cell lines derived from tumors from schwannomatosis patients. We have established and fully characterized 2 schwannomatosis cell lines from 2 separate patients using SV40 virus large T antigen. One patient reported pain and the other did not. The schwannomatosis cell lines were stained with S100B antibodies to confirm Schwann cell identity. The schwannomatosis cells also expressed the Schwann cell markers, p75NTR, S100B, and NGF after multiple passages. Cell morphology was retained following multiple passaging and freeze/ thaw cycles. Gene expression microarray analysis was used to compare the cell lines with their respective parent tumors. No differences in key genes were detected, with the exception that several cell cycle regulators were upregulated in the schwannomatosis cell lines when compared to their parent tumors. This upregulation was apparently a product of cell culturing, as the schwannomatosis cells exhibited the same expression pattern of cell cycle regulatory genes as normal primary human Schwann cells. Cell growth was also similar between normal primary and immortalized tumor cells in culture. Accurate cell lines derived directly from human tumors

  20. Immortalized Human Schwann Cell Lines Derived From Tumors of Schwannomatosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ostrow, Kimberly Laskie; Donaldson, Katelyn; Blakeley, Jaishri; Belzberg, Allan; Hoke, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Schwannomatosis, a rare form of neurofibromatosis, is characterized predominantly by multiple, often painful, schwannomas throughout the peripheral nervous system. The current standard of care for schwannomatosis is surgical resection. A major obstacle to schwannomatosis research is the lack of robust tumor cell lines. There is a great need for mechanistic and drug discovery studies of schwannomatosis, yet appropriate tools are not currently available. Schwannomatosis tumors are difficult to grow in culture as they survive only a few passages before senescence. Our lab has extensive experience in establishing primary and immortalized human Schwann cell cultures from normal tissue that retain their phenotypes after immortalization. Therefore we took on the challenge of creating immortalized human Schwann cell lines derived from tumors from schwannomatosis patients. We have established and fully characterized 2 schwannomatosis cell lines from 2 separate patients using SV40 virus large T antigen. One patient reported pain and the other did not. The schwannomatosis cell lines were stained with S100B antibodies to confirm Schwann cell identity. The schwannomatosis cells also expressed the Schwann cell markers, p75NTR, S100B, and NGF after multiple passages. Cell morphology was retained following multiple passaging and freeze/ thaw cycles. Gene expression microarray analysis was used to compare the cell lines with their respective parent tumors. No differences in key genes were detected, with the exception that several cell cycle regulators were upregulated in the schwannomatosis cell lines when compared to their parent tumors. This upregulation was apparently a product of cell culturing, as the schwannomatosis cells exhibited the same expression pattern of cell cycle regulatory genes as normal primary human Schwann cells. Cell growth was also similar between normal primary and immortalized tumor cells in culture. Accurate cell lines derived directly from human tumors

  1. Squalamine treatment of human tumors in nu/nu mice enhances platinum-based chemotherapies.

    PubMed

    Williams, J I; Weitman, S; Gonzalez, C M; Jundt, C H; Marty, J; Stringer, S D; Holroyd, K J; Mclane, M P; Chen, Q; Zasloff, M; Von Hoff, D D

    2001-03-01

    Squalamine, an antiangiogenic aminosterol, is presently undergoing Phase II clinical trials in cancer patients. To broaden our understanding of the clinical potential for squalamine, this agent was evaluated in nu/nu mouse xenograft models using the chemoresistant MV-522 human non-small cell lung carcinoma and the SD human neuroblastoma lines. Squalamine was studied alone and in combination with either cisplatin or paclitaxel plus carboplatin. Squalamine alone produced a modest MV-522 tumor growth inhibition (TGI) and yielded a TGI with cisplatin that was better than cisplatin alone. Squalamine also significantly enhanced the activity of paclitaxel/carboplatin combination therapy in the MV-522 tumor model. Squalamine similarly improved the effectiveness of cisplatin in producing TGI when screened against the SD human neuroblastoma xenograft. Xenograft tumor shrinkage was seen for the MV-522 tumor in combination treatments including squalamine, whereas no tumor shrinkage was seen when squalamine was omitted from the treatment regimen. To gain a greater understanding of the mechanism by which squalamine inhibited tumor growth in the xenograft studies, in vitro experiments were carried out with vascular endothelial growth factor-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells in culture exposed to squalamine. Squalamine treatment was found to retard two cellular events necessary for angiogenesis, inducing disorganization of F-actin stress fibers and causing a concomitant reduction of detectable cell the surface molecular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin). We propose that the augmentation by squalamine of cytotoxicity from platinum-based therapies is attributable to interference by squalamine with the ability of stimuli to promote endothelial cell movement and cell-cell communication necessary for growth of new blood vessels in xenografts after chemotherapeutic injury to the tumor. PMID:11297269

  2. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  3. Microcavity substrates casted from self-assembled microsphere monolayers for spheroid cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Keyue; Lee, Jungwoo; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    Multicellular spheroids are an important 3-dimensional cell culture model that reflects many key aspects of in vivo microenvironments. This paper presents a scalable, self-assembly based approach for fabricating microcavity substrates for multicellular spheroid cell culture. Hydrophobic glass microbeads were self-assembled into a tightly packed monolayer through the combined actions of surface tension, gravity, and lateral capillary forces at the water-air interface of a polymer solution. The packed bead monolayer was subsequently embedded in the dried polymer layer. The surface was used as a template for replicating microcavity substrates with perfect spherical shapes. We demonstrated the use of the substrate in monitoring the formation process of tumor spheroids, a proof-of-concept scale-up fabrication procedure into standard microplate formats, and its application in testing cancer drug responses in the context of bone marrow stromal cells. The presented technique offers a simple and effective way of forming high-density uniformlysized spheroids without microfabrication equipment for biological and drug screening applications. PMID:24781882

  4. A humanized anti-DLL4 antibody promotes dysfunctional angiogenesis and inhibits breast tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xuelian; Wang, Wenyi; Xu, Zhuobin; Wang, Shijing; Wang, Tong; Wang, Min; Wu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Blockage of Delta-like 4 (DLL4)-directed Notch signaling induces excessive tip cell formation and endothelial proliferation resulting in dysfunctional angiogenesis in tumors. MMGZ01, as a murine anti-human DLL4 monoclonal antibody, specifically binds to human DLL4 and blocks Notch pathway. Here, the structure of MMGZ01 variable fragment (Fv) was established and framework region (FR) residues which supported complementarily determining region (CDR) loop conformation were identified. Important residues interactions were also identified through docking MMGZ01 Fv with antigen epitope in DLL4. To humanize the murine antibody, we modified MMGZ01 Fv through CDR grafting and the reconstructed antibody (H3L2) maintained similar structure and binding affinity to parental MMGZ01 after back mutation of 12 canonical murine residues in the FRs. Meanwhile, H3L2 promoted human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation through inhibiting DLL4-directed Notch pathway. Moreover, in MDA-MB-231-bearing nude mice, H3L2 induced dysfunctional angiogenesis and tumor cell apoptosis and showed superior anti-tumor activity. In conclusion, H3L2 is an ideal humanized antibody that inhibits tumor growth through targeting DLL4-Notch pathway and has attracting potentials for clinical applications. PMID:27301650

  5. A humanized anti-DLL4 antibody promotes dysfunctional angiogenesis and inhibits breast tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xuelian; Wang, Wenyi; Xu, Zhuobin; Wang, Shijing; Wang, Tong; Wang, Min; Wu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Blockage of Delta-like 4 (DLL4)-directed Notch signaling induces excessive tip cell formation and endothelial proliferation resulting in dysfunctional angiogenesis in tumors. MMGZ01, as a murine anti-human DLL4 monoclonal antibody, specifically binds to human DLL4 and blocks Notch pathway. Here, the structure of MMGZ01 variable fragment (Fv) was established and framework region (FR) residues which supported complementarily determining region (CDR) loop conformation were identified. Important residues interactions were also identified through docking MMGZ01 Fv with antigen epitope in DLL4. To humanize the murine antibody, we modified MMGZ01 Fv through CDR grafting and the reconstructed antibody (H3L2) maintained similar structure and binding affinity to parental MMGZ01 after back mutation of 12 canonical murine residues in the FRs. Meanwhile, H3L2 promoted human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation through inhibiting DLL4-directed Notch pathway. Moreover, in MDA-MB-231-bearing nude mice, H3L2 induced dysfunctional angiogenesis and tumor cell apoptosis and showed superior anti-tumor activity. In conclusion, H3L2 is an ideal humanized antibody that inhibits tumor growth through targeting DLL4-Notch pathway and has attracting potentials for clinical applications. PMID:27301650

  6. Expression of neurotensin messenger RNA in a human carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, B M; Ishizuka, J; Townsend, C M; Rajaraman, S; Thompson, J C

    1991-01-01

    Neurotensin (NT), a distal gut peptide, has important regulatory and trophic effects throughout the gut; however the intracellular mechanisms that regulate the gene expression and release of human NT are not known. The purpose of this endeavor was to study a functioning human pancreatic carcinoid cell line (called BON) in vitro that expresses the NT gene, and to study the effect of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signal-transduction pathway on the expression and release of human NT. RNA was prepared from BON cell line (which has been established in this laboratory); the RNA was analyzed for NT mRNA expression by Northern hybridization with a complementary DNA probe. RNA blot analysis demonstrated that the NT gene is expressed in BON and is transcribed to two mRNAs of 1.0- and 1.5-kb sizes. In the second part of this study, BON cells were treated with either forskolin (FSK), which increases intracellular levels of cAMP, or with serotonin (5-HT), which reduces cAMP in BON cells. Forskolin produced a dose-dependent increase in NT peptide release and, furthermore, FSK (10(-6) mol/L) rapidly increased NT mRNA abundance 1 hour after addition; conversely, 5-HT (10(-5) mol/L) decreased NT mRNA at 1 hour. Neurotensin mRNA levels returned to control values by 3 hours after either FSK or 5-HT, which suggests that the transcript half-life for NT is relatively short. These findings show that the expression and peptide release of human NT is mediated, in part, by the cAMP signal-transduction pathway. Our human carcinoid cell line will provide a useful model to study the in vitro regulation of NT gene expression and peptide release. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:1659338

  7. The Development and Characterization of a Human Mesothelioma In Vitro 3D Model to Investigate Immunotoxin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Mingqian; Nagashima, Kunio; Zhang, Jingli; Broaddus, V. Courtney; Hassan, Raffit; FitzGerald, David; Ho, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    Background Tumor microenvironments present significant barriers to penetration by antibodies and immunoconjugates. Tumor microenvironments, however, are difficult to study in vitro. Cells cultured as monolayers exhibit less resistance to therapy than those grown in vivo and an alternative research model more representative of the in vivo tumor is more desirable. SS1P is an immunotoxin composed of the Fv portion of a mesothelin-specific antibody fused to a bacterial toxin that is presently undergoing clinical trials in mesothelioma. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we examined how the tumor microenvironment affects the penetration and killing activity of SS1P in a new three-dimensional (3D) spheroid model cultured in vitro using the human mesothelioma cell line (NCI-H226) and two primary cell lines isolated from the ascites of malignant mesothelioma patients. Mesothelioma cells grown as monolayers or as spheroids expressed comparable levels of mesothelin; however, spheroids were at least 100 times less affected by SS1P. To understand this disparity in cytotoxicity, we made fluorescence-labeled SS1P molecules and used confocal microscopy to examine the time course of SS1P penetration within spheroids. The penetration was limited after 4 hours. Interestingly, we found a significant increase in the number of tight junctions in the core area of spheroids by electron microscopy. Expression of E-Cadherin, a protein involved in the assembly and sealing of tight junctions and highly expressed in malignant mesothelioma, was found significantly increased in spheroids as compared to monolayers. Moreover, we found that siRNA silencing and antibody inhibition targeting E-Cadherin could enhance SS1P immunotoxin therapy in vitro. Conclusion/Significance This work is one of the first to investigate immunotoxins in 3D tumor spheroids in vitro. This initial description of an in vitro tumor model may offer a simple and more representative model of in vivo tumors and will allow for

  8. The roles of tumor- and metastasis-promoting carcinoma-associated fibroblasts in human carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Mezawa, Yoshihiro; Orimo, Akira

    2016-09-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) constitute a substantial proportion of the non-neoplastic mesenchymal cell compartment in various human tumors. These fibroblasts are phenotypically converted from their progenitors via interactions with nearby cancer cells during the course of tumor progression. The resulting CAFs, in turn, support the growth and progression of carcinoma cells. These fibroblasts have a major influence on the hallmarks of carcinoma and promote tumor malignancy through the secretion of tumor-promoting growth factors, cytokines and exosomes, as well as through the remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Coevolution of CAFs and carcinoma cells during tumorigenesis is therefore essential for progression into fully malignant tumors. Recent studies have revealed the molecular mechanisms underlying CAF functions, especially in tumor invasion, metastasis and drug resistance and have highlighted the significant heterogeneity among these cells. In this review, we summarize the impacts of recently identified roles of tumor-promoting CAFs and discuss the therapeutic implications of targeting the heterotypic interactions of these fibroblasts with carcinoma cells. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27506216

  9. Ciliated Adenosquamous Carcinoma: Expanding the Phenotypic Diversity of Human Papillomavirus-Associated Tumors.

    PubMed

    Radkay-Gonzalez, Lisa; Faquin, William; McHugh, Jonathan B; Lewis, James S; Tuluc, Madalina; Seethala, Raja R

    2016-06-01

    This study describes a unique subset of ciliated, human papillomavirus (HPV) related, adenosquamous carcinomas (AsqCA) of the head and neck that in contrast to most AsqCA, often show areas with lower grade cytonuclear features. They are comprised of largely non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma components with cystic change, gland formation, mucin production, and cilia in tumor cells. Seven cases of ciliated AsqCA were retrieved. Site distribution was as follows: palatine tonsil-3/7, base of tongue-1/7, and neck (unknown primary site)-3/7. Despite the occasional resemblance to mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC), the tumors showed focal keratinizing morphology and atypia, and all tumors were negative for MAML2 rearrangements. Oropharyngeal and neck tumors were uniformly p16 positive and showed punctate staining by in situ hybridization for high risk HPV DNA. There were two distant metastases (lung), and one tumor related death. Thus, ciliated AsqCA are HPV-associated lesions that pose unique pitfalls, closely mimicking MEC and other salivary gland tumors. These tumors add to the list of those which defy the dogma that ciliated epithelium always equates to a benign process. PMID:26411881

  10. A humanized antibody for imaging immune checkpoint ligand PD-L1 expression in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielson, Matthew; Lisok, Ala; Wharram, Bryan; Sysa-Shah, Polina; Azad, Babak Behnam; Pomper, Martin G.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint lead to tumor regression and improved survival in several cancers. PD-L1 expression in tumors may be predictive of response to checkpoint blockade therapy. Because tissue samples might not always be available to guide therapy, we developed and evaluated a humanized antibody for non-invasive imaging of PD-L1 expression in tumors. Radiolabeled [111In]PD-L1-mAb and near-infrared dye conjugated NIR-PD-L1-mAb imaging agents were developed using the mouse and human cross-reactive PD-L1 antibody MPDL3280A. We tested specificity of [111In]PD-L1-mAb and NIR-PD-L1-mAb in cell lines and in tumors with varying levels of PD-L1 expression. We performed SPECT/CT imaging, biodistribution and blocking studies in NSG mice bearing tumors with constitutive PD-L1 expression (CHO-PDL1) and in controls (CHO). Results were confirmed in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) (MDAMB231 and SUM149) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (H2444 and H1155) xenografts with varying levels of PD-L1 expression. There was specific binding of [111In]PD-L1-mAb and NIR-PD-L1-mAb to tumor cells in vitro, correlating with PD-L1 expression levels. In mice bearing subcutaneous and orthotopic tumors, there was specific and persistent high accumulation of signal intensity in PD-L1 positive tumors (CHO-PDL1, MDAMB231, H2444) but not in controls. These results demonstrate that [111In]PD-L1-mAb and NIR-PD-L1-mAb can detect graded levels of PD-L1 expression in human tumor xenografts in vivo. As a humanized antibody, these findings suggest clinical translation of radiolabeled versions of MPDL3280A for imaging. Specificity of NIR-PD-L1-mAb indicates the potential for optical imaging of PD-L1 expression in tumors in relevant pre-clinical as well as clinical settings. PMID:26848870

  11. Atrasentan (ABT-627) enhances perfusion and reduces hypoxia in a human tumor xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kwang Mo; Russell, James; Lupu, Mihaela E.; Cho, HyungJoon; Li, Xiao-Feng; Koutcher, Jason A.; Ling, C. Clifton

    2010-01-01

    The endothelin-1 antagonist, Atrasentan (ABT-627) was used to modify perfusion in the human tumor xenograft model, HT29, growing in nude mice. Atrasentan produced a significant increase in perfusion, as measured in vivo by Gd-DTPA DCE-MRI. Changes in tumor hypoxia were assessed by comparing the binding of two hypoxia tracers, pimonidazole and EF5 given before and after Atrasentan administration. In vehicle-treated controls, the distribution of EF5 and pimonidazole was very similar. However, Atrasentan treatment was associated with decreased uptake of the second hypoxia tracer (EF5), relative to the first (pimonidazole). Although Atrasentan had no independent effect on the growth of HT29 tumors, Atrasentan combined with 20 Gy radiation led to a modest but significant increase in tumor growth delay compared to radiation alone. PMID:19717985

  12. Correlation between retinoblastoma gene expression and differentiation in human testicular tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmeyer, T. Heinrich-Heine-Univ. of Duesseldorf ); Reissmann, P.; Slamon, D. ); Cordon-Cardo, C. ); Hartmann, M. ); Ackermann, R. )

    1991-08-01

    Inactivation of the retinoblastoma gene (RB gene) is associated with the development of several human malignancies including retinoblastomas, come osteo- and soft tissue sarcomas, small cell lung cancer, and possibly breast and bladder cancers. To the authors' knowledge, this gene has not been evaluated in human germ-cell malignancies. In this study 67 primary testicular germ-cell tumors and 4 testicular non-germ-cell malignancies were examined to determine the prevalence and nature of RB gene alterations. Decreased expression of RB gene mRNA was found in all testicular germ-cell tumors examined. The RB protein could not be detected by immunohistochemical analysis in the undifferentiated cells of any germ-cell tumors whereas the differentiated malignant cells present in 14/15 teratocarcinomas expressed the protein. No gross alterations of the RB gene were found at DNA level in any of the examined specimens. This and the presence of the RB protein in the more differentiated tumor cells of teratocarcinomas suggest that changes in transcript levels rather than mutation(s) of the gene may be responsible for the absent of decreased RB expression in human germ-cell tumors. To date studies on the mechanism of RB regulation have demonstrated that it occurs at the protein level by phosphorylation of the p105 gene product. The findings presented here indicate that additional regulation might occur at the transcript level.

  13. The Dual Role of TGFβ in Human Cancer: From Tumor Suppression to Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lebrun, Jean-Jacques

    2012-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) superfamily encompasses widespread and evolutionarily conserved polypeptide growth factors that regulate and orchestrate growth and differentiation in all cell types and tissues. While they regulate asymmetric cell division and cell fate determination during early development and embryogenesis, TGFβ family members play a major regulatory role in hormonal and immune responses, cell growth, cell death and cell immortalization, bone formation, tissue remodeling and repair, and erythropoiesis throughout adult life. The biological and physiological functions of TGFβ, the founding member of this family, and its receptors are of central importance to human diseases, particularly cancer. By regulating cell growth, death, and immortalization, TGFβ signaling pathways exert tumor suppressor effects in normal cells and early carcinomas. Thus, it is not surprising that a high number of human tumors arise due to mutations or deletions in the genes coding for the various TGFβ signaling components. As tumors develop and progress, these protective and cytostatic effects of TGFβ are often lost. TGFβ signaling then switches to promote cancer progression, invasion, and tumor metastasis. The molecular mechanisms underlying this dual role of TGFβ in human cancer will be discussed in depth in this paper, and it will highlight the challenge and importance of developing novel therapeutic strategies specifically aimed at blocking the prometastatic arm of the TGFβ signaling pathway without affecting its tumor suppressive effects. PMID:27340590

  14. The human ARF tumor suppressor senses blastema activity and suppresses epimorphic tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Robert G; Kouklis, Gayle K; Ahituv, Nadav; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    The control of proliferation and differentiation by tumor suppressor genes suggests that evolution of divergent tumor suppressor repertoires could influence species’ regenerative capacity. To directly test that premise, we humanized the zebrafish p53 pathway by introducing regulatory and coding sequences of the human tumor suppressor ARF into the zebrafish genome. ARF was dormant during development, in uninjured adult fins, and during wound healing, but was highly expressed in the blastema during epimorphic fin regeneration after amputation. Regenerative, but not developmental signals resulted in binding of zebrafish E2f to the human ARF promoter and activated conserved ARF-dependent Tp53 functions. The context-dependent activation of ARF did not affect growth and development but inhibited regeneration, an unexpected distinct tumor suppressor response to regenerative versus developmental environments. The antagonistic pleiotropic characteristics of ARF as both tumor and regeneration suppressor imply that inducing epimorphic regeneration clinically would require modulation of ARF –p53 axis activation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07702.001 PMID:26575287

  15. Oncogenic relevant defensins: expression pattern and proliferation characteristics of human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jochen; Kraus, Dominik; Reckenbeil, Jan; Probstmeier, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate gene expression levels of oncogenic relevant human defensins and their impact on proliferation rates of 29 cell lines derived from main types of different tumor origins. Differential gene expression analysis of human defensins was performed by real-time PCR experiments. The proliferation rate of tumor cells that had been cultivated in the absence or presence of biologically active peptides was analyzed with a lactate dehydrogenase assay kit. At least one member of the defensin family was expressed in each tumor cell line, whereby α-defensin (DEFA1), DEFA2, or DEFA3 transcripts could be ubiquitously detected. Cell lines of neural origin (glioma, neuroblastoma, and small-cell lung carcinoma) expressed far less human β-defensins (hBDs) in comparison to other tumor types. The expression level of a specific defensin in various cell lines could vary by more than five orders of magnitude. Compensatory mechanisms on the expression levels of the different defensins could not be strictly observed. Only in 3 out of 29 tumor cell lines the proliferation rate was affected after defensin stimulation. The variable appearance of defensins, as well as the cell line-restricted functional activity, argues for the integration of defensins in complex cellular and molecular networks that tolerate rather flexible expression patterns. PMID:26711780

  16. A genomics-based classification of human lung tumors.

    PubMed

    2013-10-30

    We characterized genome alterations in 1255 clinically annotated lung tumors of all histological subgroups to identify genetically defined and clinically relevant subtypes. More than 55% of all cases had at least one oncogenic genome alteration potentially amenable to specific therapeutic intervention, including several personalized treatment approaches that are already in clinical evaluation. Marked differences in the pattern of genomic alterations existed between and within histological subtypes, thus challenging the original histomorphological diagnosis. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed many of these reassigned subtypes. The reassignment eliminated almost all cases of large cell carcinomas, some of which had therapeutically relevant alterations. Prospective testing of our genomics-based diagnostic algorithm in 5145 lung cancer patients enabled a genome-based diagnosis in 3863 (75%) patients, confirmed the feasibility of rational reassignments of large cell lung cancer, and led to improvement in overall survival in patients with EGFR-mutant or ALK-rearranged cancers. Thus, our findings provide support for broad implementation of genome-based diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:24174329

  17. A Genomics-Based Classification of Human Lung Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We characterized genome alterations in 1255 clinically annotated lung tumors of all histological subgroups to identify genetically defined and clinically relevant subtypes. More than 55% of all cases had at least one oncogenic genome alteration potentially amenable to specific therapeutic intervention, including several personalized treatment approaches that are already in clinical evaluation. Marked differences in the pattern of genomic alterations existed between and within histological subtypes, thus challenging the original histomorphological diagnosis. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed many of these reassigned subtypes. The reassignment eliminated almost all cases of large cell carcinomas, some of which had therapeutically relevant alterations. Prospective testing of our genomics-based diagnostic algorithm in 5145 lung cancer patients enabled a genome-based diagnosis in 3863 (75%) patients, confirmed the feasibility of rational reassignments of large cell lung cancer, and led to improvement in overall survival in patients with EGFR-mutant or ALK-rearranged cancers. Thus, our findings provide support for broad implementation of genome-based diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:24174329

  18. Fully humanized neutralizing antibodies to interleukin-8 (ABX-IL8) inhibit angiogenesis, tumor growth, and metastasis of human melanoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Suyun; Mills, Lisa; Mian, Badar; Tellez, Carmen; McCarty, Marya; Yang, X-D; Gudas, Jean M; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2002-07-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) has recently been shown to contribute to human melanoma progression by functioning as a mitogenic and angiogenic factor. In the present study, we investigated whether targeting IL-8 by a fully human anti-IL-8 antibody (ABX-IL8) could be a potential therapeutic strategy to control angiogenesis, growth, and metastasis of melanoma. The human melanoma cells A375SM (high IL-8 producer) and TXM-13 (intermediate IL-8 producer) were injected subcutaneously into nude mice, which were then treated with ABX-IL8 (1 mg/3 times weekly, i.p., for 3 weeks). Tumor growth of both melanomas in ABX-IL8-treated mice was significantly inhibited when compared with control IgG-treated animals. ABX-IL8 treatment also suppressed experimental metastasis when the melanoma cells were injected intravenously. IL-8 blockade by ABX-IL8 significantly inhibited the promoter activity and the collagenase activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in human melanoma cells, resulting in decreased invasion through reconstituted basement membrane in vitro. In vivo, ABX-IL8 treatment resulted in decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2, and decreased vascularization (angiogenesis) of tumors concomitant with increased apoptosis of tumor cells. Moreover, in an in vitro vessel formation assay, ABX-IL8 directly interfered with the tubule formation by human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, these results point to the potential utility of ABX-IL8 as a modality to treat melanoma and other solid tumors either alone or in combination with conventional chemotherapy or other anti-tumor agents. PMID:12107097

  19. Engineered three-dimensional microfluidic device for interrogating cell-cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Hockemeyer, K.; Janetopoulos, C.; Terekhov, A.; Hofmeister, W.; Vilgelm, A.; Costa, Lino; Wikswo, J. P.; Richmond, A.

    2014-01-01

    Stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment play a key role in the metastatic properties of a tumor. It is recognized that cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and endothelial cells secrete factors capable of influencing tumor cell migration into the blood or lymphatic vessels. We developed a microfluidic device that can be used to image the interactions between stromal cells and tumor cell spheroids in a three dimensional (3D) microenvironment while enabling external control of interstitial flow at an interface, which supports endothelial cells. The apparatus couples a 200-μm channel with a semicircular well to mimic the interface of a blood vessel with the stroma, and the design allows for visualization of the interactions of interstitial flow, endothelial cells, leukocytes, and fibroblasts with the tumor cells. We observed that normal tissue-associated fibroblasts (NAFs) contribute to the “single file” pattern of migration of tumor cells from the spheroid in the 3D microenvironment. In contrast, CAFs induce a rapid dispersion of tumor cells out of the spheroid with migration into the 3D matrix. Moreover, treatment of tumor spheroid cultures with the chemokine CXCL12 mimics the effect of the CAFs, resulting in similar patterns of dispersal of the tumor cells from the spheroid. Conversely, addition of CXCL12 to co-cultures of NAFs with tumor spheroids did not mimic the effects observed with CAF co-cultures, suggesting that NAFs produce factors that stabilize the tumor spheroids to reduce their migration in response to CXCL12. PMID:25379090

  20. Engineered three-dimensional microfluidic device for interrogating cell-cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Hockemeyer, K; Janetopoulos, C; Terekhov, A; Hofmeister, W; Vilgelm, A; Costa, Lino; Wikswo, J P; Richmond, A

    2014-07-01

    Stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment play a key role in the metastatic properties of a tumor. It is recognized that cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and endothelial cells secrete factors capable of influencing tumor cell migration into the blood or lymphatic vessels. We developed a microfluidic device that can be used to image the interactions between stromal cells and tumor cell spheroids in a three dimensional (3D) microenvironment while enabling external control of interstitial flow at an interface, which supports endothelial cells. The apparatus couples a 200-μm channel with a semicircular well to mimic the interface of a blood vessel with the stroma, and the design allows for visualization of the interactions of interstitial flow, endothelial cells, leukocytes, and fibroblasts with the tumor cells. We observed that normal tissue-associated fibroblasts (NAFs) contribute to the "single file" pattern of migration of tumor cells from the spheroid in the 3D microenvironment. In contrast, CAFs induce a rapid dispersion of tumor cells out of the spheroid with migration into the 3D matrix. Moreover, treatment of tumor spheroid cultures with the chemokine CXCL12 mimics the effect of the CAFs, resulting in similar patterns of dispersal of the tumor cells from the spheroid. Conversely, addition of CXCL12 to co-cultures of NAFs with tumor spheroids did not mimic the effects observed with CAF co-cultures, suggesting that NAFs produce factors that stabilize the tumor spheroids to reduce their migration in response to CXCL12. PMID:25379090

  1. Extract of Cordyceps militaris inhibits angiogenesis and suppresses tumor growth of human malignant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ruma, I Made Winarsa; Putranto, Endy Widya; Kondo, Eisaku; Watanabe, Risayo; Saito, Ken; Inoue, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Ken-Ichi; Nakata, Susumu; Kaihata, Masaji; Murata, Hitoshi; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo

    2014-07-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for tumor development and metastasis. Among several angiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGF) is important for tumor-derived angiogenesis and commonly overexpressed in solid tumors. Thus, many antitumor strategies targeting VEGF have been developed to inhibit cancer angiogenesis, offering insights into the successful treatment of solid cancers. However, there are a number of issues such as harmful effects on normal vascularity in clinical trials. Taking this into consideration, we employed Cordyceps militaris as an antitumor approach due to its biological safety in vivo. The herbal medicinal mushroom Cordyceps militaris has been reported to show potential anticancer properties including anti-angiogenic capacity; however, its concrete properties have yet to be fully demonstrated. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the biological role of Cordyceps militaris extract in tumor cells, especially in regulating angiogenesis and tumor growth of a human malignant melanoma cell line. We demonstrated that Cordyceps militaris extract remarkably suppressed tumor growth via induction of apoptotic cell death in culture that links to the abrogation of VEGF production in melanoma cells. This was followed by mitigation of Akt1 and GSK-3β activation, while p38α phosphorylation levels were increased. Extract treatment in mouse model xenografted with human melanoma cells resulted in a dramatic antitumor effect with down-regulation of VEGF expression. The results suggest that suppression of tumor growth by Cordyceps militaris extract is, at least, mediated by its anti-angiogenicity and apoptosis induction capacities. Cordyceps militaris extract may be a potent antitumor herbal drug for solid tumors. PMID:24789042

  2. Infrared absorption spectra of human malignant tumor tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skornyakov, I. V.; Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Butra, V. A.

    2008-05-01

    We used infrared spectroscopy methods to study the molecular structure of tissues from human organs removed during surgery. The IR spectra of the surgical material from breast, thyroid, and lung are compared with data from histological examination. We show that in malignant neoplasms, a change occurs in the hydrogen bonds of protein macromolecules found in the tissue of the studied organs. We identify the spectral signs of malignant pathology.

  3. [INVITED] Time reversal optical tomography: Detecting and locating tumors in an ex vivo model human breast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Binlin; Alrubaiee, Mohammad; Gayen, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    Time reversal optical tomography (TROT), a recently introduced diffuse optical imaging approach, is used to detect, locate, and obtain cross-section images of tumors inside a "model human breast." The model cancerous breast is assembled as a semi-cylindrical slab of uniform thickness using ex vivo human breast tissues with two pieces of tumors embedded in it. The experimental arrangement used a 750-nm light beam from a Ti:sapphire laser to illuminate an end face (source plane) of the sample in a multi-source probing scheme. A multi-detector signal acquisition scheme measured transmitted light intensity distribution on the other end face (detector plane). The perturbations in light intensity distribution in the detector plane were analyzed using TROT to obtain locations of the tumor pieces in three dimensions and estimate their cross sections. The estimated locations and dimensions of targets are in good agreement with the results of a corroborating magnetic resonance imaging experiment.

  4. The expression of SPARC in human tumors is consistent with its role during cell competition

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Evgeniya

    2011-01-01

    In Drosophila, the elimination of viable but suboptimal cells is mediated by cell competition, ensuring that these cells do not accumulate during development. In addition, certain genes such as the Drosophila homologue of human c-myc (dmyc) are able to transform cells into supercompetitors, which eliminate neighboring wild-type cells by apoptosis and overproliferate leaving total cell numbers unchanged. We have recently identified Drosophila SPARC as an early marker transcriptionally upregulated in loser cells that provides a transient protection by inhibiting caspase activation in outcompeted cells. Here, we explore whether the expression of SPARC in human tumors is consistent with a role for cell competition during human cancer and find that, consistent with the existence of competitive interactions between cancer and normal cells, SPARC is upregulated at the tumor-host boundaries in several types of human cancer. PMID:21655431

  5. Progenitor Cell Line (hPheo1) Derived from a Human Pheochromocytoma Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Stastny, Victor; Click, Arielle; Ding, Liang-Hao; Mizrachi, Dario; Zou, Ying S.; Chari, Raj; Lam, Wan L.; Bachoo, Robert M.; Smith, Alice L.; Story, Michael D.; Sidhu, Stan; Robinson, Bruce G.; Nwariaku, Fiemu E.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Auchus, Richard J.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pheochromocytomas are rare tumors generally arising in the medullary region of the adrenal gland. These tumors release excessive epinephrine and norepinephrine resulting in hypertension and cardiovascular crises for which surgery is the only definitive treatment. Molecular mechanisms that control tumor development and hormone production are poorly understood, and progress has been hampered by the lack of human cellular model systems. To study pheochromocytomas, we developed a stable progenitor pheochromocytoma cell line derived from a primary human tumor. Methods After IRB approval and written informed consent, human pheochromocytoma tissue was excised, minced, dispersed enzymatically, and cultured in vitro. Primary pheochromocytoma cells were infected with a lentivirus vector carrying the catalytic subunit of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). The hTERT immortalized cells (hPheo1) have been passaged >300 population doublings. The resulting cell line was characterized morphologically, biochemically and for expression of neuroendocrine properties. The expression of marker enzymes and proteins was assessed by immunofluorescence staining and immunoblotting. Telomerase activity was determined by using the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay. Results We have established a human pheochromocytoma precursor cell line that expresses the neuroendocrine marker, chromogranin A, when differentiated in the presence of bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4), nerve growth factor (NGF), and dexamethasone. Phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) expression is also detected with this differentiation regimen. CD-56 (also known as NCAM, neural cell adhesion molecule) is expressed in these cells, but CD31 (also known as PECAM-1, a marker of endothelial cells) is negative. Conclusions We have maintained hTERT-immortalized progenitor cells derived from a pheochromocytoma (hPheo1) in culture for over 300 population doublings. This progenitor human

  6. Influence of Anti-Mouse Interferon Serum on the Growth and Metastasis of Tumor Cells Persistently Infected with Virus and of Human Prostatic Tumors in Athymic Nude Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Lola M.; Minato, Nagahiro; Gresser, Ion; Holland, John; Kadish, Anna; Bloom, Barry R.

    1981-02-01

    Baby hamster kidney or HeLa cells form tumors in 100% of athymic nude mice. When such cells are persistently infected (PI) with RNA viruses, such as mumps or measles virus, the tumor cells either fail to grow or form circumscribed benign nodules. Neither the parental nor the virus PI tumor cells form invasive or metastatic lesions in nude mice. Previous studies have indicated a correlation between the susceptibility of virus-PI tumor cells in vitro and the cytolytic activity of natural killer (NK) cells and their failure to grow in vivo. Because interferon (IF) is the principal regulatory molecule governing the differentiation of NK cells, it was possible to test the relevance of the IF--NK cell system in vivo to restriction of tumor growth by treatment of nude mice with anti-IF globulin. This treatment was shown to reduce both IF production and NK activity in spleen cells. Both parental and virus-PI tumor cells grew and formed larger tumors in nude mice treated with anti-IF globulin than in control nude mice. The viral-PI tumor cells and the uninfected parental cells formed tumors in treated mice that were highly invasive and often metastatic. Some human tumor types have been notoriously difficult to establish as tumor lines in nude mice (e.g., primary human prostatic carcinomas). When transplanted into nude mice treated either with anti-IF globulin or anti-lymphocyte serum, two prostatic carcinomas grew and produced neoplasms with local invasiveness and some metastases. The results are consistent with the view that interferon may be important in restricting the growth, invasiveness, and metastases of tumor cells by acting indirectly through components of the immune system, such as NK cells.

  7. Stereotaxic administrations of allogeneic human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells efficiently control the development of human glioblastoma brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Jarry, Ulrich; Chauvin, Cynthia; Joalland, Noémie; Léger, Alexandra; Minault, Sandrine; Robard, Myriam; Bonneville, Marc; Oliver, Lisa; Vallette, François M; Vié, Henri; Pecqueur, Claire; Scotet, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) represents the most frequent and deadliest primary brain tumor. Aggressive treatment still fails to eliminate deep brain infiltrative and highly resistant tumor cells. Human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, the major peripheral blood γδ T cell subset, react against a wide array of tumor cells and represent attractive immune effector T cells for the design of antitumor therapies. This study aims at providing a preclinical rationale for immunotherapies in GBM based on stereotaxic administration of allogeneic human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. The feasibility and the antitumor efficacy of stereotaxic Vγ9Vδ2 T cell injections have been investigated in orthotopic GBM mice model using selected heterogeneous and invasive primary human GBM cells. Allogeneic human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells survive and patrol for several days within the brain parenchyma following adoptive transfer and can successfully eliminate infiltrative GBM primary cells. These striking observations pave the way for optimized stereotaxic antitumor immunotherapies targeting human allogeneic Vγ9Vδ2 T cells in GBM patients. PMID:27471644

  8. Cysteine Dioxygenase 1 Is a Tumor Suppressor Gene Silenced by Promoter Methylation in Multiple Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Brait, Mariana; Ling, Shizhang; Nagpal, Jatin K.; Chang, Xiaofei; Park, Hannah Lui; Lee, Juna; Okamura, Jun; Yamashita, Keishi; Sidransky, David; Kim, Myoung Sook

    2012-01-01

    The human cysteine dioxygenase 1 (CDO1) gene is a non-heme structured, iron-containing metalloenzyme involved in the conversion of cysteine to cysteine sulfinate, and plays a key role in taurine biosynthesis. In our search for novel methylated gene promoters, we have analyzed differential RNA expression profiles of colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines with or without treatment of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Among the genes identified, the CDO1 promoter was found to be differentially methylated in primary CRC tissues with high frequency compared to normal colon tissues. In addition, a statistically significant difference in the frequency of CDO1 promoter methylation was observed between primary normal and tumor tissues derived from breast, esophagus, lung, bladder and stomach. Downregulation of CDO1 mRNA and protein levels were observed in cancer cell lines and tumors derived from these tissue types. Expression of CDO1 was tightly controlled by promoter methylation, suggesting that promoter methylation and silencing of CDO1 may be a common event in human carcinogenesis. Moreover, forced expression of full-length CDO1 in human cancer cells markedly decreased the tumor cell growth in an in vitro cell culture and/or an in vivo mouse model, whereas knockdown of CDO1 increased cell growth in culture. Our data implicate CDO1 as a novel tumor suppressor gene and a potentially valuable molecular marker for human cancer. PMID:23028699

  9. Human gene transfer: Characterization of human tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes as vehicles for retroviral-mediated gene transfer in man

    SciTech Connect

    Kasid, A.; Morecki, S.; Aebersold, P.; Cornetta, K.; Culver, K.; Freeman, S.; Director, E.; Lotze, M.T.; Blaese, R.M.; Anderson, W.F.; Rosenberg, S.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are cells generated from tumor suspensions cultured in interleukin 2 that can mediate cancer regression when adoptively transferred into mice or humans. Since TILs proliferate rapidly in vitro, recirculate, and preferentially localize at the tumor site in vivo, they provide an attractive model for delivery of exogenous genetic material into man. To determine whether efficient gene transfer into TILs is feasible. The authors transduced human TILs with the bacterial gene for neomycin-resistance (Neo{sup R}) using the retroviral vector N2. The transduced TIL populations were stable and polyclonal with respect to the intact Neo{sup R} gene integration and expressed high levels of neomycin phosphotransferase activity. The Neo{sup R} gene insertion did not alter the in vitro growth pattern and interleukin 2 dependence of the transduced TILs. Analyses of T-cell receptor gene rearrangement for {beta}- and {gamma}-chain genes revealed the oligoclonal nature of the TIL populations with no major change in the DNA rearrangement patterns or the levels of mRNA expression of the {beta} and {gamma} chains following transduction and selection of TILs in the neomycin analog G418. Human TILs expressed mRNA for tumor necrosis factors ({alpha} and {beta}) and interleukin 2 receptor P55. This pattern of cytokine-mRNA expression was not significantly altered following the transduction of TILs. The studies demonstrate the feasibility of TILs as suitable cellular vehicles for the introduction of therapeutic genes into patients receiving autologous TILs.

  10. Revisiting a role for a mammary tumor retrovirus in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Salmons, Brian; Gunzburg, Walter H

    2013-10-01

    There remains great controversy as to whether mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), the etiological agent of mammary cancer in mice, or a closely related human retrovirus, plays a role in the development of breast cancer in humans. On one hand, retroviruses such as human T-cell lymphotropic virus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are known causative agents of cancer (in the case of HIV, albeit, indirectly), but attempts to associate other retroviruses with human cancers have been difficult. A recent, high profile, example has been the postulated involvement of another mouse virus, xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus, in human prostate cancer, which is now thought to be due to contamination. Here, we review some of the more recent evidence for and against the involvement of MMTV in human breast cancer and suggest future studies that may allow a definitive answer to this conundrum. PMID:23580334

  11. Lysophosphatidic Acid Acyltransferase β (LPAATβ) Promotes the Tumor Growth of Human Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Rastegar, Farbod; Gao, Jian-Li; Shenaq, Deana; Luo, Qing; Shi, Qiong; Kim, Stephanie H.; Jiang, Wei; Wagner, Eric R.; Huang, Enyi; Gao, Yanhong; Shen, Jikun; Yang, Ke; He, Bai-Cheng; Chen, Liang; Zuo, Guo-Wei; Luo, Jinyong; Luo, Xiaoji; Bi, Yang; Liu, Xing; Li, Mi; Hu, Ning; Wang, Linyuan; Luther, Gaurav; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.; He, Tong-Chuan

    2010-01-01

    Background Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignancy of bone with poorly characterized molecular pathways important in its pathogenesis. Increasing evidence indicates that elevated lipid biosynthesis is a characteristic feature of cancer. We sought to investigate the role of lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase β (LPAATβ, aka, AGPAT2) in regulating the proliferation and growth of human osteosarcoma cells. LPAATβ can generate phosphatidic acid, which plays a key role in lipid biosynthesis as well as in cell proliferation and survival. Although elevated expression of LPAATβ has been reported in several types of human tumors, the role of LPAATβ in osteosarcoma progression has yet to be elucidated. Methodology/Principal Findings Endogenous expression of LPAATβ in osteosarcoma cell lines is analyzed by using semi-quantitative PCR and immunohistochemical staining. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of LPAATβ and silencing LPAATβ expression is employed to determine the effect of LPAATβ on osteosarcoma cell proliferation and migration in vitro and osteosarcoma tumor growth in vivo. We have found that expression of LPAATβ is readily detected in 8 of the 10 analyzed human osteosarcoma lines. Exogenous expression of LPAATβ promotes osteosarcoma cell proliferation and migration, while silencing LPAATβ expression inhibits these cellular characteristics. We further demonstrate that exogenous expression of LPAATβ effectively promotes tumor growth, while knockdown of LPAATβ expression inhibits tumor growth in an orthotopic xenograft model of human osteosarcoma. Conclusions/Significance Our results strongly suggest that LPAATβ expression may be associated with the aggressive phenotypes of human osteosarcoma and that LPAATβ may play an important role in regulating osteosarcoma cell proliferation and tumor growth. Thus, targeting LPAATβ may be exploited as a novel therapeutic strategy for the clinical management of osteosarcoma. This is especially

  12. The Fractalkine-Receptor Axis Improves Human Colorectal Cancer Prognosis by Limiting Tumor Metastatic Dissemination.

    PubMed

    Erreni, Marco; Siddiqui, Imran; Marelli, Giulia; Grizzi, Fabio; Bianchi, Paolo; Morone, Diego; Marchesi, Federica; Celesti, Giuseppe; Pesce, Samantha; Doni, Andrea; Rumio, Cristiano; Roncalli, Massimo G; Laghi, Luigi; Mantovani, Alberto; Allavena, Paola

    2016-01-15

    Human colorectal cancer (CRC) is a frequent neoplasia in Western countries, and its metastatic progression is a major cause of cancer-related death. In search of specific molecules upregulated in CRC, with possible clinical relevance, we performed a differential gene-profiling analysis in surgery-derived CRC samples and adjacent uninvolved intestinal mucosa. The chemokine CX3CL1 and its specific receptor CX3CR1 were significantly upregulated in tumors. Higher expression of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in 100 CRC tumor samples (stages I-III). Unexpectedly, high immune scores of CX3CL1 did not correlate with the density of tumor-infiltrating CD3(+) T cells or CD68(+) macrophages. Coexpression of ligand and receptor by tumor cells (axis-positive tumors) significantly associated with longer disease-free (p = 0.01) and disease-specific survival (p = 0.001). Conversely, axis-negative tumors (with low expression of both ligand and receptor) had increased risk of tumor relapse (p = 0.02), and increased likelihood of metachronous metastasis (p = 0.001), including after stage adjustment (p = 0.006). Transduction of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 in CRC tumor cell lines induced cell aggregation that strongly inhibited in vitro migration in chemotaxis assays. In a mouse model of spleen-liver metastases, cancer dissemination to liver was dramatically reduced in CX3CL1-CX3CR1-expressing tumors, and ligand-receptor interaction was confirmed in cancer cells in vivo by fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis. In conclusion, tumoral expression of the CX3CL1-CX3CR1 chemokine axis functions as a retention factor, increasing homotypic cell adhesion and limiting tumor spreading to metastatic sites. Lack or low levels of expression of CX3CL1-CX3CR1 by tumor cells identifies a group of CRC patients at increased risk of metastatic progression. PMID:26673138

  13. Monitoring the Bystander Killing Effect of Human Multipotent Stem Cells for Treatment of Malignant Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Leten, Cindy; Trekker, Jesse; Struys, Tom; Roobrouck, Valerie D; Dresselaers, Tom; Vande Velde, Greetje; Lambrichts, Ivo; Verfaillie, Catherine M; Himmelreich, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Tumor infiltrating stem cells have been suggested as a vehicle for the delivery of a suicide gene towards otherwise difficult to treat tumors like glioma. We have used herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase expressing human multipotent adult progenitor cells in two brain tumor models (hU87 and Hs683) in immune-compromised mice. In order to determine the best time point for the administration of the codrug ganciclovir, the stem cell distribution and viability were monitored in vivo using bioluminescence (BLI) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Treatment was assessed by in vivo BLI and MRI of the tumors. We were able to show that suicide gene therapy using HSV-tk expressing stem cells can be followed in vivo by MRI and BLI. This has the advantage that (1) outliers can be detected earlier, (2) GCV treatment can be initiated based on stem cell distribution rather than on empirical time points, and (3) a more thorough follow-up can be provided prior to and after treatment of these animals. In contrast to rodent stem cell and tumor models, treatment success was limited in our model using human cell lines. This was most likely due to the lack of immune components in the immune-compromised rodents. PMID:26880961

  14. A comparative study of peanut agglutinin and amaranthin binding to human urinary bladder tumor glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Langkilde, N C; Orntoft, T F

    1995-01-01

    The reactivity of two T-antigen specific lectins, Amaranthin (ACA) and Peanut Agglutinin (PNA), was compared by immunohistochemical staining of serial sections of human bladder tumors and by Western Blot analysis of glycoproteins extracted from human bladder tumors prior to and after sialic acid removal. In low grade tumors ACA reacted prior to neuraminidase treatment. PNA on the other hand only showed positive reaction in these tumors after neuraminidase treatment. The two lectins showed identical staining patterns after neuraminidase treatment in tumors. In Western blottings both lectins detected a 28 kD glycoprotein. PNA also reacted with several other bands after neuraminidase treatment. The reactivity of ACA was not enhanced after neuraminidase treatment. In monosaccharide inhibition tests ACA- and PNA-binding to different T-antigens was most efficiently inhibited by GalNAc and Gal respectively. PNA binding was also inhibited by Glc, GlcNAc and GalNAc at higher concentrations, while the binding of ACA was only scarcely affected by Glc, GlcNAc and Gal. PMID:8578258

  15. Human Hemochromatosis Protein (HFE) Immunoperoxidase Stain Highlights Choriocarcinoma within Mixed Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jesse L; Talmon, Geoffrey A; Koepsell, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    Identification of choriocarcinoma within a germ cell tumor can have major implications for the subsequent staging and treatment of testicular neoplasms. Immunoperoxidase staining greatly enhances the speed and sensitivity of identifying occult, though clinically significant, tumor components. In mixed germ cell tumors, staining for beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) has been historically used to assess for the presence and burden of choriocarcinoma. However, current β-hCG stains produce variable, intense staining of trophoblastic elements and surrounding tissues, clouding the assessment of true-positive staining. Human hemochromatosis protein (HFE) is a membrane bound mediator of iron transport expressed at high levels within placenta. Additionally, previous reports have demonstrated that choriocarcinoma cell lines express HFE, although in vivo expression had not been examined. To address whether HFE can stain trophoblastic elements, HFE immunohistochemistry was conducted in choriocarcinoma (n = 4), mixed germ cell tumors (n = 11), seminoma (n = 4), and placenta (n = 11). HFE consistently demonstrated cytoplasmic and membranous staining, highlighting both syncytiotrophoblasts and cytotrophoblasts within choriocarcinoma and placenta. Staining of intratumoral white blood cells was observed within seminomas and mixed germ cell tumors, corroborating prior reports stating that HFE highlights monocytes and macrophages. Taken together, HFE may serve as an alternative target from β-hCG for immunoperoxidase studies when highlighting choriocarcinoma. PMID:27034532

  16. Human Hemochromatosis Protein (HFE) Immunoperoxidase Stain Highlights Choriocarcinoma within Mixed Germ Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Talmon, Geoffrey A.; Koepsell, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of choriocarcinoma within a germ cell tumor can have major implications for the subsequent staging and treatment of testicular neoplasms. Immunoperoxidase staining greatly enhances the speed and sensitivity of identifying occult, though clinically significant, tumor components. In mixed germ cell tumors, staining for beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) has been historically used to assess for the presence and burden of choriocarcinoma. However, current β-hCG stains produce variable, intense staining of trophoblastic elements and surrounding tissues, clouding the assessment of true-positive staining. Human hemochromatosis protein (HFE) is a membrane bound mediator of iron transport expressed at high levels within placenta. Additionally, previous reports have demonstrated that choriocarcinoma cell lines express HFE, although in vivo expression had not been examined. To address whether HFE can stain trophoblastic elements, HFE immunohistochemistry was conducted in choriocarcinoma (n = 4), mixed germ cell tumors (n = 11), seminoma (n = 4), and placenta (n = 11). HFE consistently demonstrated cytoplasmic and membranous staining, highlighting both syncytiotrophoblasts and cytotrophoblasts within choriocarcinoma and placenta. Staining of intratumoral white blood cells was observed within seminomas and mixed germ cell tumors, corroborating prior reports stating that HFE highlights monocytes and macrophages. Taken together, HFE may serve as an alternative target from β-hCG for immunoperoxidase studies when highlighting choriocarcinoma. PMID:27034532

  17. Monitoring the Bystander Killing Effect of Human Multipotent Stem Cells for Treatment of Malignant Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Leten, Cindy; Trekker, Jesse; Struys, Tom; Roobrouck, Valerie D.; Dresselaers, Tom; Vande Velde, Greetje; Lambrichts, Ivo; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Himmelreich, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Tumor infiltrating stem cells have been suggested as a vehicle for the delivery of a suicide gene towards otherwise difficult to treat tumors like glioma. We have used herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase expressing human multipotent adult progenitor cells in two brain tumor models (hU87 and Hs683) in immune-compromised mice. In order to determine the best time point for the administration of the codrug ganciclovir, the stem cell distribution and viability were monitored in vivo using bioluminescence (BLI) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Treatment was assessed by in vivo BLI and MRI of the tumors. We were able to show that suicide gene therapy using HSV-tk expressing stem cells can be followed in vivo by MRI and BLI. This has the advantage that (1) outliers can be detected earlier, (2) GCV treatment can be initiated based on stem cell distribution rather than on empirical time points, and (3) a more thorough follow-up can be provided prior to and after treatment of these animals. In contrast to rodent stem cell and tumor models, treatment success was limited in our model using human cell lines. This was most likely due to the lack of immune components in the immune-compromised rodents. PMID:26880961

  18. AMPK Promotes Aberrant PGC1β Expression To Support Human Colon Tumor Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Kurt W.; Das, Binita; Kim, Hyun Seok; Clymer, Beth K.; Gehring, Drew; Smith, Deandra R.; Costanzo-Garvey, Diane L.; Fernandez, Mario R.; Brattain, Michael G.; Kelly, David L.; MacMillan, John

    2015-01-01

    A major goal of cancer research is the identification of tumor-specific vulnerabilities that can be exploited for the development of therapies that are selectively toxic to the tumor. We show here that the transcriptional coactivators peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1β (PGC1β) and estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) are aberrantly expressed in human colon cell lines and tumors. With kinase suppressor of Ras 1 (KSR1) depletion as a reference standard, we used functional signature ontology (FUSION) analysis to identify the γ1 subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as an essential contributor to PGC1β expression and colon tumor cell survival. Subsequent analysis revealed that a subunit composition of AMPK (α2β2γ1) is preferred for colorectal cancer cell survival, at least in part, by stabilizing the tumor-specific expression of PGC1β. In contrast, PGC1β and ERRα are not detectable in nontransformed human colon epithelial cells, and depletion of the AMPKγ1 subunit has no effect on their viability. These data indicate that Ras oncogenesis relies on the aberrant activation of a PGC1β-dependent transcriptional pathway via a specific AMPK isoform. PMID:26351140

  19. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Tumor Targeted Delivery of Gold Nanorods and Enhanced Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanlei; Yang, Meng; Zhang, Jingpu; Zhi, Xiao; Li, Chao; Zhang, Chunlei; Pan, Fei; Wang, Kan; Yang, Yuming; Martinez de la Fuentea, Jesus; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-02-23

    How to improve effective accumulation and intratumoral distribution of plasmonic gold nanoparticles has become a great challenge for photothermal therapy of tumors. Herein, we reported a nanoplatform with photothermal therapeutic effects by fabricating Au nanorods@SiO2@CXCR4 nanoparticles and loading the prepared nanoparticles into the human induced pluripotent stem cells(AuNRs-iPS). In virtue of the prominent optical properties of Au nanorods@SiO2@CXCR4 and remarkable tumor target migration ability of iPS cells, the Au nanorods delivery mediated by iPS cells via the nanoplatform AuNRs-iPS was found to have a prolonged retention time and spatially even distribution in MGC803 tumor-bearing nude mice observed by photoacoustic tomography and two-photon luminescence. On the basis of these improvements, the nanoplatform displayed a robust migration capacity to target the tumor site and to improve photothermal therapeutic efficacy on inhibiting the growth of tumors in xenograft mice under a low laser power density. The combination of gold nanorods with human iPS cells as a theranostic platform paves an alternative road for cancer theranostics and holds great promise for clinical translation in the near future. PMID:26761620

  20. Oxygen Partial Pressure Is a Rate-Limiting Parameter for Cell Proliferation in 3D Spheroids Grown in Physioxic Culture Condition

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Aurélie; Guillaume, Ludivine; Grimes, David Robert; Fehrenbach, Jérôme; Lobjois, Valérie; Ducommun, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The in situ oxygen partial pressure in normal and tumor tissues is in the range of a few percent. Therefore, when studying cell growth in 3D culture systems, it is essential to consider how the physiological oxygen concentration, rather than the one in the ambient air, influences the proliferation parameters. Here, we investigated the effect of reducing oxygen partial pressure from 21% to 5% on cell proliferation rate and regionalization in a 3D tumor spheroid model. We found that 5% oxygen concentration strongly inhibited spheroid growth, changed the proliferation gradient and reduced the 50% In Depth Proliferation index (IDP50), compared with culture at 21% oxygen. We then modeled the oxygen partial pressure profiles using the experimental data generated by culturing spheroids in physioxic and normoxic conditions. Although hypoxia occurred at similar depth in spheroids grown in the two conditions, oxygen partial pressure was a major rate-limiting factor with a critical effect on cell proliferation rate and regionalization only in spheroids grown in physioxic condition and not in spheroids grown at atmospheric normoxia. Our findings strengthen the need to consider conducting experiment in physioxic conditions (i.e., tissue normoxia) for proper understanding of cancer cell biology and the evaluation of anticancer drugs in 3D culture systems. PMID:27575790

  1. Oxygen Partial Pressure Is a Rate-Limiting Parameter for Cell Proliferation in 3D Spheroids Grown in Physioxic Culture Condition.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Aurélie; Guillaume, Ludivine; Grimes, David Robert; Fehrenbach, Jérôme; Lobjois, Valérie; Ducommun, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The in situ oxygen partial pressure in normal and tumor tissues is in the range of a few percent. Therefore, when studying cell growth in 3D culture systems, it is essential to consider how the physiological oxygen concentration, rather than the one in the ambient air, influences the proliferation parameters. Here, we investigated the effect of reducing oxygen partial pressure from 21% to 5% on cell proliferation rate and regionalization in a 3D tumor spheroid model. We found that 5% oxygen concentration strongly inhibited spheroid growth, changed the proliferation gradient and reduced the 50% In Depth Proliferation index (IDP50), compared with culture at 21% oxygen. We then modeled the oxygen partial pressure profiles using the experimental data generated by culturing spheroids in physioxic and normoxic conditions. Although hypoxia occurred at similar depth in spheroids grown in the two conditions, oxygen partial pressure was a major rate-limiting factor with a critical effect on cell proliferation rate and regionalization only in spheroids grown in physioxic condition and not in spheroids grown at atmospheric normoxia. Our findings strengthen the need to consider conducting experiment in physioxic conditions (i.e., tissue normoxia) for proper understanding of cancer cell biology and the evaluation of anticancer drugs in 3D culture systems. PMID:27575790

  2. Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Profiling of Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schweppe, Devin K.; Rigas, James R.; Gerber, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Within the molecular scope of NCSLC, a complex landscape of dysregulated cellular signaling has emerged, defined largely by mutations in select mediators of signal transduction, including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma (ALK) kinases. Consequently, these mutant kinases become constitutively activated and targets for chemotherapeutic intervention. Encouragingly, small molecule inhibitors of these pathways have shown promise in clinical trials or are approved for clinical use. However, many protein kinases are dysregulated in NSCLC without genetic mutations. To quantify differences in tumor cell signaling that are transparent to genomic methods, we established a super-SILAC internal standard derived from NSCLC cell lines grown in vitro and labeled with heavy lysine and arginine, and deployed them in a phosphoproteomics workflow. We identified 9019 and 8753 phosphorylation sites in two separate tumors. Relative quantification of phosphopeptide abundance between tumor samples allowed for the determination of specific hubs and pathways differing between each tumor. Sites downstream of Ras showed decreased inhibitory phosphorylation (Raf/Mek) and increased activating phosphorylation (Erk1/2) in one tumor versus another. In this way, we were able to quantitatively access oncogenic kinase signaling in primary human tumors. PMID:23911959

  3. Absence of preferential uptake of ( sup 125 I)iododihydrorhodamine 123 by four human tumor xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsey, B.M.; Van den Abbeele, A.D.; Adelstein, S.J.; Kassis, A.I. )

    1989-11-01

    The biodistribution of ({sup 125}I)iododihydrorhodamine 123 has been studied over a 96-h period in four human tumor xenograft models: HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma, PC-3 prostate carcinoma, HT-1080 fibrosarcoma, and PaCa-2 pancreatic carcinoma. Elimination of radioactivity in the tumor-bearing nude mice was rapid during the first 24 h and slow thereafter. The lack of uptake in the thyroid indicated there was little, if any, deiodination of the molecule. Activity was found mainly in the liver and spleen. Accumulation of radioactivity was low in all four tumors examined. At 4 h postinjection, as well as at 24 and 48 h, however, the total radioactive content in each of the four tumors was directly proportional to the weight of the tumor sample. This correlation was independent of tumor type, route of injection (i.v./i.p.) or dose (1.2-6 microCi/mouse). This was not true for any of the normal tissues, suggesting that this accumulation may be governed by certain intrinsic characteristics of the cancers tested.

  4. Human BCAS3 Expression in Embryonic Stem Cells and Vascular Precursors Suggests a Role in Human Embryogenesis and Tumor Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Siva, Kavitha; Venu, Parvathy; Mahadevan, Anita; S. K., Shankar; Inamdar, Maneesha S.

    2007-01-01

    Cancer is often associated with multiple and progressive genetic alterations in genes that are important for normal development. BCAS3 (Breast Cancer Amplified Sequence 3) is a gene of unknown function on human chromosome 17q23, a region associated with breakpoints of several neoplasms. The normal expression pattern of BCAS3 has not been studied, though it is implicated in breast cancer progression. Rudhira, a murine WD40 domain protein that is 98% identical to BCAS3 is expressed in embryonic stem (ES) cells, erythropoiesis and angiogenesis. This suggests that BCAS3 expression also may not be restricted to mammary tissue and may have important roles in other normal as well as malignant tissues. We show that BCAS3 is also expressed in human ES cells and during their differentiation into blood vascular precursors. We find that BCAS3 is aberrantly expressed in malignant human brain lesions. In glioblastoma, hemangiopericytoma and brain abscess we note high levels of BCAS3 expression in tumor cells and some blood vessels. BCAS3 may be associated with multiple cancerous and rapidly proliferating cells and hence the expression, function and regulation of this gene merits further investigation. We suggest that BCAS3 is mis-expressed in brain tumors and could serve as a human ES cell and tumor marker. PMID:18030336

  5. Ellipsoid Segmentation Model for Analyzing Light-Attenuated 3D Confocal Image Stacks of Fluorescent Multi-Cellular Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, Michaël; Jaensch, Steffen; Cornelissen, Frans; Vidic, Suzana; Gjerde, Kjersti; de Hoogt, Ronald; Graeser, Ralph; Gustin, Emmanuel; Chong, Yolanda T.

    2016-01-01

    In oncology, two-dimensional in-vitro culture models are the standard test beds for the discovery and development of cancer treatments, but in the last decades, evidence emerged that such models have low predictive value for clinical efficacy. Therefore they are increasingly complemented by more physiologically relevant 3D models, such as spheroid micro-tumor cultures. If suitable fluorescent labels are applied, confocal 3D image stacks can characterize the structure of such volumetric cultures and, for example, cell proliferation. However, several issues hamper accurate analysis. In particular, signal attenuation within the tissue of the spheroids prevents the acquisition of a complete image for spheroids over 100 micrometers in diameter. And quantitative analysis of large 3D image data sets is challenging, creating a need for methods which can be applied to large-scale experiments and account for impeding factors. We present a robust, computationally inexpensive 2.5D method for the segmentation of spheroid cultures and for counting proliferating cells within them. The spheroids are assumed to be approximately ellipsoid in shape. They are identified from information present in the Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) and the corresponding height view, also known as Z-buffer. It alerts the user when potential bias-introducing factors cannot be compensated for and includes a compensation for signal attenuation. PMID:27303813

  6. Ellipsoid Segmentation Model for Analyzing Light-Attenuated 3D Confocal Image Stacks of Fluorescent Multi-Cellular Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Michaël; Jaensch, Steffen; Cornelissen, Frans; Vidic, Suzana; Gjerde, Kjersti; de Hoogt, Ronald; Graeser, Ralph; Gustin, Emmanuel; Chong, Yolanda T

    2016-01-01

    In oncology, two-dimensional in-vitro culture models are the standard test beds for the discovery and development of cancer treatments, but in the last decades, evidence emerged that such models have low predictive value for clinical efficacy. Therefore they are increasingly complemented by more physiologically relevant 3D models, such as spheroid micro-tumor cultures. If suitable fluorescent labels are applied, confocal 3D image stacks can characterize the structure of such volumetric cultures and, for example, cell proliferation. However, several issues hamper accurate analysis. In particular, signal attenuation within the tissue of the spheroids prevents the acquisition of a complete image for spheroids over 100 micrometers in diameter. And quantitative analysis of large 3D image data sets is challenging, creating a need for methods which can be applied to large-scale experiments and account for impeding factors. We present a robust, computationally inexpensive 2.5D method for the segmentation of spheroid cultures and for counting proliferating cells within them. The spheroids are assumed to be approximately ellipsoid in shape. They are identified from information present in the Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) and the corresponding height view, also known as Z-buffer. It alerts the user when potential bias-introducing factors cannot be compensated for and includes a compensation for signal attenuation. PMID:27303813

  7. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Associates with Maintenance of Stemness in Spheroid-Derived Stem-Like Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jia-Feng; Zhang, Shi; Zhang, Fu-Cheng; Zhang, Hai-Bo; Lan, Tian-Yun; Lu, Hui-Qiong; Wei, Hong-Bo

    2013-01-01

    Despite earlier studies demonstrating characteristics of colon cancer stem cells (CCSCs) and the role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in tumor development, it remains controversial as to the relationship between CCSCs and EMT. In this study, in order to present an insight into this relationship in colon cancer, we developed HCT116 and HT29 sphere models, which are known to be the cells enriching cancer stem cells. Compared to their parental counterparts, spheroid cells displayed lower homotypic/heterotypic adhesion but higher in vitro migratory/invasive capacity, as well as higher tumorigenic and metastatic potential in vivo. The spheroid cells also demonstrated down-regulated E-cadherin and up-regulated α-SMA and Vimentin expression, which is the typical phenotype of EMT. In order to explore whether this phenomenon is associated to activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, we detected several key signaling molecules. Compared with their parental cells, HCT116 and HT29 spheroid cells demonstrated down-regulated expression of GSK3β, but up-regulated expression of Slug and Snail. And also, the up-regulation of nucleus β-catenin in spheroid cells indicated that the free β-catenin transferred from cytoplasm to cell nucleus. Our findings indicate that spheroid cells have the characteristics of colon cancer stem cells, and EMT may account for their stemness and malignancy. And persistent activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway may play an important role in the EMT of CCSCs. PMID:24039918

  8. Expression of a multidrug-resistance gene in human tumors and tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Fojo, A.T.; Ueda, K.; Slamon, D.J.; Poplack, D.G.; Gottesman, M.M.; Pastan, I.

    1987-01-01

    The identification and cloning of a segment of a human multidrug resistance gene (mdr1) was reported recently. To examine, the molecular basis of one type of multidrug resistance, the authors have prepared RNA from human tumors and normal tissues and measured their content of mdr1 RNA. They find that the mdr1 gene is expressed at a very high level in the adrenal gland; at a high level in the kidney; at intermediate levels in the lung, liver, lower jejunum, colon, and rectum; and at low levels in many other tissues. The mdr1 gene is also expressed in several human tumors, including many but not all tumors derived from the adrenal gland and the colon. In addition, increased expression was detected in a few tumors at the time of relapse following initial chemotherapy. Although controlled clinical studies will be required, the results suggest that measurement of mdr1 RNA may prove to be a valuable tool in the design of chemotherapy protocols.

  9. Here, there be dragons: charting autophagy-related alterations in human tumors.

    PubMed

    Lebovitz, Chandra B; Bortnik, Svetlana B; Gorski, Sharon M

    2012-03-01

    Macroautophagy (or autophagy) is a catabolic cellular process that is both homeostatic and stress adaptive. Normal cells rely on basal levels of autophagy to maintain cellular integrity (via turnover of long-lived proteins and damaged organelles) and increased levels of autophagy to buoy cell survival during various metabolic stresses (via nutrient and energy provision through lysosomal degradation of cytoplasmic components). Autophagy can function in both tumor suppression and tumor progression, and is under investigation in clinical trials as a novel target for anticancer therapy. However, its role in cancer pathogenesis has yet to be fully explored. In particular, it remains unknown whether in vitro observations will be applicable to human cancer patients. Another outstanding question is whether there exists tumor-specific selection for alterations in autophagy function. In this review, we survey reported mutations in autophagy genes and key autophagy regulators identified in human tumor samples and summarize the literature regarding expression levels of autophagy genes and proteins in various cancer tissues. Although it is too early to draw inferences from this collection of in vivo studies of autophagy-related alterations in human cancers, their results highlight the challenges that must be overcome before we can accurately assess the scope of autophagy's predicted role in tumorigenesis. PMID:22253413

  10. The retinoblastoma gene functions as a growth and tumor suppressor in human bladder carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Rei; Hashimoto, Tomoko; Hongji Xu; Shixu Hu; Bigo-Marshall, H.; Benedict, W.F. ); Matsui, Toshimitsu Kobe Univ. School of Medicine ); Miki, Toru; Aaronson, S.A. )

    1991-06-15

    The product of the human retinoblastoma gene (RB) is a nuclear phosphoprotein that is thought to function as a tumor suppressor. Mutations of RB frequently occur in human bladder carcinoma. To investigate the significance of the functional loss of this gene in bladder cancer, an RB expression plasmid (pBARB) under control of the human {beta}-actin promoter was transfected into the bladder carcinoma cell line HTB9, which lacks RB expression. Marker-selected transfectants that expressed RB protein were identified by immunoblotting and immunohistochemical staining. In selected clones, stable RB expression has persisted over 1 yr under standard culture conditions with 10% serum. However, RB expression caused major alterations of HTB9 growth properties both in vitro and in vivo. RB{sup +} tranfectants lacked the ability to form colonies in semi-solid medium, and their growth rate was significantly decreased in 3% serum. In addition, the tumorigenicity of these transfectants was markedly decreased. Tumors that formed in nude mice were much smaller and had a longer latency period but were indistinguishable microscopically from those produced by parental cells. Slower growing tumors were RB{sup +}, as measured by nuclear staining of their RB protein and by a normal RB protein pattern on immunoblots. These findings support the concept that the RB gene acts as both a growth and tumor suppressor in bladder cancer cells.

  11. A high-affinity human antibody that targets tumoral blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Tarli, L; Balza, E; Viti, F; Borsi, L; Castellani, P; Berndorff, D; Dinkelborg, L; Neri, D; Zardi, L

    1999-07-01

    Angiogenesis is a characteristic feature of many aggressive tumors and of other relevant disorders. Molecules capable of specifically binding to new-forming blood vessels, but not to mature vessels, could be used as selective vehicles and would, therefore, open diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities. We have studied the distribution of the ED-B oncofetal domain of fibronectin, a marker of angiogenesis, in four different tumor animal models: the F9 murine teratocarcinoma, SKMEL-28 human melanoma, N592 human small cell lung carcinoma, and C51 human colon carcinoma. In all of these experimental models we observed accumulation of the fibronectin isoform containing the ED-B domain around neovascular structures when the tumors were in the exponentially growing phase, but not in the slow-growing phase. Then we performed biodistribution studies in mice bearing a subcutaneously implanted F9 murine teratocarcinoma, using a high-affinity human antibody fragment (L19) directed against the ED-B domain of fibronectin. Radiolabeled L19, but not an irrelevant anti-lysozyme antibody fragment (D1.3), efficiently localizes in the tumoral vessels. The maximal dose of L19 accumulated in the tumor was observed 3 hours after injection (8.2% injected dose per gram). By virtue of the rapid clearance of the antibody fragment from the circulation, tumor-to-blood ratios of 1.9, 3.7, and 11.8 were obtained at 3, 5, and 24 hours, respectively. The tumor-targeting performance of L19 was not dose-dependent in the 0.7 to 10 microg range of injected antibody. The integral of the radioactivity localized in tumoral vessels over 24 hours was greater than 70-fold higher than the integral of the radioactivity in blood over the same time period, normalized per gram of tissue or fluid. These findings quantitatively show that new-forming blood vessels can selectively be targeted in vivo using specific antibodies, and suggest that L19 may be of clinical utility for the immunoscintigraphic detection of

  12. Dielectric and phase behavior of dipolar spheroids.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lewis E; Benight, Stephanie J; Barnes, Robin; Robinson, Bruce H

    2015-04-23

    The Stockmayer fluid, composed of dipolar spheres, has a well-known isotropic-ferroelectric phase transition at high dipole densities. However, there has been little investigation of the ferroelectric transition in nearly spherical fluids at dipole densities corresponding to those found in many polar solvents and in guest-host organic electro-optic materials. In this work, we examine the transition to ordered phases of low-aspect-ratio spheroids under both unperturbed and poled conditions, characterizing both the static dielectric response and thermodynamic properties of spheroidal systems. Spontaneous ferroelectric ordering was confined to a small region of aspect ratios about unity, indicating that subtle changes in sterics can have substantial influence on the behavior of coarse-grained liquid models. Our results demonstrate the importance of molecular shape in obtaining even qualitatively correct dielectric responses and provide an explanation for the success of the Onsager model as a phenomenological representation for the dielectric behavior of polar organic liquids. PMID:25821921

  13. Long waves induced motions to rigid spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongkun; Hong, Lianjin

    2015-05-01

    Responses of unconstrained and rigid spheroidal bodies subjected to long sound waves are analyzed by means of approaching hydrodynamic method. It is shown that in the low-frequency approximation the amplitude of translational velocity is completely determined by the density as well as the acoustic added mass which is equal to hydrodynamic one associated with the body. The inconformity of responses to sound waves in virtue of geometric asymmetry is also presented. In addition, rotational movement engendered by acoustic oblique incidence is discussed, and it represents as the modulated angular oscillation similar to the beat-frequency vibration. All these analyses on acoustically induced motions provide a theoretical evidence for developing spheroidal inertial vector receivers.

  14. Phase behavior of shape-changing spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, P. I. C.; Masters, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a simple model for a biaxial nematic liquid crystal. This consists of hard spheroids that can switch shape between prolate (rodlike) and oblate (platelike) subject to an energy penalty Δ ɛ . The spheroids are approximated as hard Gaussian overlap particles and are treated at the level of Onsager's second-virial description. We use both bifurcation analysis and a numerical minimization of the free energy to show that, for additive particle shapes, (i) there is no stable biaxial phase even for Δ ɛ =0 (although there is a metastable biaxial phase in the same density range as the stable uniaxial phase) and (ii) the isotropic-to-nematic transition is into either one of two degenerate uniaxial phases, rod rich or plate rich. We confirm that even a small amount of shape nonadditivity may stabilize the biaxial nematic phase.

  15. The LKB1 Tumor Suppressor as a Biomarker in Mouse and Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Christopher G.; Zhang, Song; Zhao, Ni; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Sharpless, Norman E.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Hayes, D. Neil; Castrillon, Diego H.

    2013-01-01

    Germline mutations in the LKB1 gene (also known as STK11) cause the Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome, and somatic loss of LKB1 has emerged as causal event in a wide range of human malignancies, including melanoma, lung cancer, and cervical cancer. The LKB1 protein is a serine-threonine kinase that phosphorylates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and other downstream targets. Conditional knockout studies in mouse models have consistently shown that LKB1 loss promotes a highly-metastatic phenotype in diverse tissues, and human studies have demonstrated a strong association between LKB1 inactivation and tumor recurrence. Furthermore, LKB1 deficiency confers sensitivity to distinct classes of anticancer drugs. The ability to reliably identify LKB1-deficient tumors is thus likely to have important prognostic and predictive implications. Previous research studies have employed polyclonal antibodies with limited success, and there is no widely-employed immunohistochemical assay for LKB1. Here we report an assay based on a rabbit monoclonal antibody that can reliably detect endogenous LKB1 protein (and its absence) in mouse and human formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. LKB1 protein levels determined through this assay correlated strongly with AMPK phosphorylation both in mouse and human tumors, and with mRNA levels in human tumors. Our studies fully validate this immunohistochemical assay for LKB1 in paraffin-embedded formalin tissue sections. This assay should be broadly useful for research studies employing mouse models and also for the development of human tissue-based assays for LKB1 in diverse clinical settings. PMID:24086281

  16. Establishment, characterization, and successful adaptive therapy against human tumors of NKG cell, a new human NK cell line.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Min; Ma, Juan; Chen, Yongyan; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhao, Weidong; Zhang, Jian; Wei, Haiming; Ling, Bin; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play important roles in adoptive cellular immunotherapy against certain human cancers. This study aims to establish a new human NK cell line and to study its role for adoptive cancer immunotherapy. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 54 patients to establish the NK cell line. A new human NK cell line, termed as NKG, was established from a Chinese male patient with rapidly progressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. NKG cells showed LGL morphology and were phenotypically identified as CD56(bright) NK cell with CD16(-), CD27(-), CD3(-), αβTCR(-), γδTCR(-), CD4(-), CD8(-), CD19(-), CD161(-), CD45(+), CXCR4(+), CCR7(+), CXCR1(-), and CX3CR1(-). NKG cells showed high expression of adhesive molecules (CD2, CD58, CD11a, CD54, CD11b, CD11c), an array of activating receptors (NKp30, NKp44, NKp46, NKG2D, NKG2C), and cytolysis-related receptors and molecules (TRAIL, FasL, granzyme B, perforin, IFN-γ). The cytotoxicity of NKG cells against tumor cells was higher than that of the established NK cell lines NK-92, NKL, and YT. NKG cell cytotoxicity depended on the presence of NKG2D and NKp30. When irradiated with 8 Gy, NKG cells were still with high cytotoxicity and activity in vitro and with safety in vivo, but without proliferation. Further, the irradiated NKG cells exhibited strong cytotoxicity against human primary ovarian cancer cells in vitro, and against human ovarian cancer in a mouse xenograft model. The adoptive transfer of NKG cells significantly inhibited the ovarian tumor growth, decreased the mortality rate and prolonged the survival, even in cases of advanced diseases. A number of NKG cells were detected in the ovarian tumor tissues during cell therapy. In use of the new human NK cell line, NKG would a promising cellular candidate for adoptive immunotherapy of human cancer. PMID:21669033

  17. Acanthamoeba royreba sp. n. from a human tumor cell culture.

    PubMed

    Willaert, E; Stevens, A R; Tyndall, R L

    1978-02-01

    A new species of Acanthamoeba was isolated from a culture of an established line of human choriocarcinoma cells. The identification of this strain, originally called the Oak Ridge strain, and the establishment of a new species for it were based on morphologic, serologic, and immunochemical studies. In general, the structure of the trophozoite did not differ significantly from that of other species of Acanthamoeba, except that a body which more closely resembled a centriole than material described previously as centriolar satellites was observed in trophozoites examined with the electron microscope. The dimensions of the trophozoite were the smallest among the species of Acanthamoeba. The cyst was typical of the genus, but differed from those of other species by its smaller size and the presence of numerous ostioles. Studies of the Oak Ridge strain by immunofluorescence using antisera developed against the isolate and Acanthamoeba culbertsoni, A. castellanii, A. polyphaga, A. rhysodes, A. astronyxis, and A. palestinensis revealed the antigenic uniqueness of the Oak Ridge strain. It was demonstrated by immunoelectrophoretic analyses of the soluble proteins of the Oak Ridge strain that shared approximately 1/2 of its antigenic structure with A. castellanii and A. culbertsoni. The antigenic differences of the isolate from other species of Acanthamoeba were deduced from comparison of the antigenic constitution of these species and the Oak Ridge strain with A. culbertsoni and A. castellanii. Although the strain was initially recognized by its cytopathogenicity for cultures, it did not produce acute infections in mice after intranasal inoculation of 1 X 10(4) ameba/mouse. The foregoing results constituted the basis for the establishment of the Oak Ridge strain as a new species, A. royreba sp. n., in the genus Acanthamoeba. PMID:566323

  18. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging on fresh human brain tumor biopsies at microscopic resolution.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Bisbal, M Carmen; Martínez-Granados, Beatriz; Rovira, Vicente; Celda, Bernardo; Esteve, Vicent

    2015-09-01

    The metabolic composition and concentration knowledge provided by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) liquid and high-resolution magic angle spinning spectroscopy (HR-MAS) has a relevant impact in clinical practice during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) monitoring of human tumors. In addition, the combination of morphological and chemical information by MRI and MRS has been particularly useful for diagnosis and prognosis of tumor evolution. MRI spatial resolution reachable in human beings is limited for safety reasons and the demanding necessary conditions are only applicable on experimental model animals. Nevertheless, MRS and MRI can be performed on human biopsies at high spatial resolution, enough to allow a direct correlation between the chemical information and the histological features observed in such biopsies. Although HR-MAS is nowadays a well-established technique for spectroscopic analysis of tumor biopsies, with this approach just a mean metabolic profile of the whole sample can be obtained and thus the high histological heterogeneity of some important tumors is mostly neglected. The value of metabolic HR-MAS data strongly depends on a wide statistical analysis and usually the microanatomical rationale for the correlation between histology and spectroscopy is lost. We present here a different approach for the combined use of MRI and MRS on fresh human brain tumor biopsies with native contrast. This approach has been designed to achieve high spatial (18 × 18 × 50 μm) and spectral (0.031 μL) resolution in order to obtain as much spatially detailed morphological and metabolical information as possible without any previous treatment that can alter the sample. The preservation of native tissue conditions can provide information that can be translated to in vivo studies and additionally opens the possibility of performing other techniques to obtain complementary information from the same sample. PMID:26123440

  19. Apoptotic human neutrophil peptide-1 anti-tumor activity revealed by cellular biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Diana; Freire, João M; Pacheco, Teresa R; Barata, João T; Castanho, Miguel A R B

    2015-02-01

    Cancer remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although progress has been made regarding chemotherapeutic agents, new therapies that combine increased selectivity and efficacy with low resistance are still needed. In the search for new anticancer agents, therapies based on biologically active peptides, in particular, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), have attracted attention for their decreased resistance development and low cytotoxicity. Many AMPs have proved to be tumoricidal agents against human cancer cells, but their mode of action is still controversial. The existence of common properties shared by the membranes of bacteria and tumor cells points to similar lipid-targeting mechanisms in both cases. On the other hand, anticancer peptides (ACPs) also induce apoptosis and inhibit angiogenesis. Human neutrophil peptide-1 (HNP-1) is an endogenous AMP that has been implicated in different cellular phenomena such as tumor proliferation. The presence of HNP-1 in the serum/plasma of oncologic patients turns this peptide into a potential tumor biomarker. The present work reveals the different effects of HNP-1 on the biophysical and nanomechanical properties of solid and hematological tumor cells. Studies on cellular morphology, cellular stiffness, and membrane ultrastructure and charge using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and zeta potential measurements show a preferential binding of HNP-1 to solid tumor cells from human prostate adenocarcinoma when compared to human leukemia cells. AFM also reveals induction of apoptosis with cellular membrane defects at very low peptide concentrations. Understanding ACPs mode(s) of action will certainly open innovative pathways for drug development in cancer treatment. PMID:25447543

  20. Dendritic Cells in the Context of Human Tumors: Biology and Experimental Tools.

    PubMed

    Volovitz, Ilan; Melzer, Susanne; Amar, Sarah; Bocsi, József; Bloch, Merav; Efroni, Sol; Ram, Zvi; Tárnok, Attila

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most potent and versatile antigen-presenting cells (APC) in the immune system. DC have an exceptional ability to comprehend the immune context of a captured antigen based on molecular signals identified from its vicinity. The analyzed information is then conveyed to other immune effector cells. Such capability enables DC to play a pivotal role in mediating either an immunogenic response or immune tolerance towards an acquired antigen. This review summarizes current knowledge on DC in the context of human tumors. It covers the basics of human DC biology, elaborating on the different markers, morphology and function of the different subsets of human DC. Human blood-borne DC are comprised of at least three subsets consisting of one plasmacytoid DC (pDC) and two to three myeloid DC (mDC) subsets. Some tissues have unique DC. Each subset has a different phenotype and function and may induce pro-tumoral or anti-tumoral effects. The review also discusses two methods fundamental to the research of DC on the single-cell level: multicolor flow cytometry (FCM) and image-based cytometry (IC). These methods, along with new genomics and proteomics tools, can provide high-resolution information on specific DC subsets and on immune and tumor cells with which they interact. The different layers of collected biological data may then be integrated using Immune-Cytomics modeling approaches. Such novel integrated approaches may help unravel the complex network of cellular interactions that DC carry out within tumors, and may help harness this complex immunological information into the development of more effective treatments for cancer. PMID:27007190

  1. Dipolophoresis of dielectric spheroids under asymmetric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, Itzchak; Yossifon, Gilad; Miloh, Touvia

    2012-01-01

    Non-spherical particles are common in colloidal science. Spheroidal shapes are particularly convenient for the analysis of the pertinent electrostatic and hydrodynamic problems and are thus widely used to model the manipulation of biological cells as well as deformed drops and bubbles. We study the rotary motion of a dielectric spheroidal micro-particle which is freely suspended in an unbounded electrolyte solution in the presence of a uniform applied electric field, assuming a thin Debye layer. For the common case of a uniform distribution of the native surface-charge density, the rotary motion of the particle is generated by the contributions of the induced-charge electro-osmotic (ICEO) slip and the dielectrophoresis associated with the distribution of the Maxwell stress, respectively. Series solutions are obtained by using spheroidal (prolate or oblate) coordinates. Explicit results are presented for the angular velocity of particles spanning the entire spectrum from rod-like to disk-like shapes. These results demonstrate the non-monotonic variation of the angular speed with the eccentricity of particle shape and the singularity of the multiple limits corresponding to conducting (ideally polarizable) particles of extreme eccentricity (e ≈ 1). The non-monotonic variation of the angular speed with the particle dielectric permittivity is related to the induced-charge contribution. We apply these results to describe the motion of particles subject to a uniform field rotating in the plane. For a sufficiently slow rotation rate, prolate particles eventually become "locked" to the external field with their stationary relative orientation in the plane of rotation being determined by the particle eccentricity and dielectric constant. This effect may be of potential use in the manipulation of poly-disperse suspensions of dielectric non-spherical particles. Oblate spheroids invariably approach a uniform orientation with their symmetry axes directed normal to the external

  2. Increased expression of CYP4Z1 promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Wei; Chai, Hongyan; Li, Ying; Zhao, Haixia; Xie, Xianfei; Zheng, Hao; Wang, Chenlong; Wang, Xue; Yang, Guifang; Cai, Xiaojun; Falck, John R.; Yang, Jing

    2012-10-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4Z1, a novel CYP4 family member, is over-expressed in human mammary carcinoma and associated with high-grade tumors and poor prognosis. However, the precise role of CYP4Z1 in tumor progression is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CYP4Z1 overexpression promotes tumor angiogenesis and growth in breast cancer. Stable expression of CYP4Z1 in T47D and BT-474 human breast cancer cells significantly increased mRNA expression and production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, and decreased mRNA levels and secretion of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), without affecting cell proliferation and anchorage-independent cell growth in vitro. Notably, the conditioned medium from CYP4Z1-expressing cells enhanced proliferation, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and promoted angiogenesis in the zebrafish embryo and chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo. In addition, there were lower levels of myristic acid and lauric acid, and higher contents of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in CYP4Z1-expressing T47D cells compared with vector control. CYP4Z1 overexpression significantly increased tumor weight and microvessel density by 2.6-fold and 1.9-fold in human tumor xenograft models, respectively. Moreover, CYP