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Sample records for humanized anti-her2 monoclonal

  1. Radiobromination of humanized anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody trastuzumab using N-succinimidyl 5-bromo-3-pyridinecarboxylate, a potential label for immunoPET.

    PubMed

    Mume, Eskender; Orlova, Anna; Malmström, Per-Uno; Lundqvist, Hans; Sjöberg, Stefan; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2005-08-01

    Combining the specificity of radioimmunoscintigraphy and the high sensitivity of PET in an in vivo detection technique could improve the quality of nuclear diagnostics. Positron-emitting nuclide (76)Br (T(1/2)=16.2 h) might be a possible candidate for labeling monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and their fragments, provided that the appropriate labeling chemistry has been established. For internalizing antibodies, such as the humanized anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab, radiobromine label should be residualizing, i.e., ensuring that radiocatabolites are trapped intracellularly after the proteolytic degradation of antibody. This study evaluated the chemistry of indirect radiobromination of trastuzumab using N-succinimidyl 5-(tributylstannyl)-3-pyridinecarboxylate. Literature data indicated that the use of this method provided residualizing properties for iodine and astatine labels on some antibodies. An optimized "one-pot" procedure produced an overall labeling efficiency of 45.5+/-1.2% over 15 min. The bromine label was stable under physiological and denaturing conditions. The labeled trastuzumab retained its capacity to bind specifically to HER2-expressing SKOV-3 ovarian carcinoma cells in vitro (immunoreactivity more than 75%). However, in vitro cell test did not demonstrate that the radiobromination of trastuzumab using N-succinimidyl 5-bromo-3-pyridinecarboxylate improves cellular retention of radioactivity in comparison with the use of N-succinimidyl 4-bromobenzoate. PMID:16026708

  2. Development and Characterization of a Humanized Anti-HER2 Antibody HuA21 with Potent Anti-Tumor Properties in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruilin; Hu, Siyi; Chang, Yan; Zhang, Zhihui; Zha, Zhao; Huang, Hui; Shen, Guodong; Liu, Jing; Song, Lihua; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is one of the most studied tumor-associated antigens for cancer immunotherapy. An engineered anti-HER-2 chimeric A21 antibody (chA21) is a chimeric antibody targeted to subdomain I of the HER2 extracellular domain. Here, we report the anti-tumor activity of the novel engineered monoclonal antibody humanized chA21 (HuA21) that targets HER2 on the basis of chA21, and we describe the underlying mechanisms. Our results reveal that HuA21 markedly inhibits the proliferation and migration of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells and causes enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity potency against HER2-overexpressing tumor cells. In particular, HuA21, but not trastuzumab (Tra), markedly suppresses growth and enhances the internalization of the antibody in Tra-resistant BT-474 breast cancer cells. These characteristics are highly associated with the intrinsic ability of HuA21 to down-regulate HER2 activation and inhibit the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathways. Furthermore, the combination of HuA21 with Tra synergistically enhances the anti-tumor effects in vitro and in vivo and inhibits HER2 activation and the ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways. Altogether, our results suggest that HuA21 may represent a unique anti-HER2 antibody with potential as a therapeutic candidate alone or in combination with other anti-HER2 reagents in cancer therapy. PMID:27092488

  3. Development and Characterization of a Humanized Anti-HER2 Antibody HuA21 with Potent Anti-Tumor Properties in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruilin; Hu, Siyi; Chang, Yan; Zhang, Zhihui; Zha, Zhao; Huang, Hui; Shen, Guodong; Liu, Jing; Song, Lihua; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is one of the most studied tumor-associated antigens for cancer immunotherapy. An engineered anti-HER-2 chimeric A21 antibody (chA21) is a chimeric antibody targeted to subdomain I of the HER2 extracellular domain. Here, we report the anti-tumor activity of the novel engineered monoclonal antibody humanized chA21 (HuA21) that targets HER2 on the basis of chA21, and we describe the underlying mechanisms. Our results reveal that HuA21 markedly inhibits the proliferation and migration of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells and causes enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity potency against HER2-overexpressing tumor cells. In particular, HuA21, but not trastuzumab (Tra), markedly suppresses growth and enhances the internalization of the antibody in Tra-resistant BT-474 breast cancer cells. These characteristics are highly associated with the intrinsic ability of HuA21 to down-regulate HER2 activation and inhibit the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathways. Furthermore, the combination of HuA21 with Tra synergistically enhances the anti-tumor effects in vitro and in vivo and inhibits HER2 activation and the ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways. Altogether, our results suggest that HuA21 may represent a unique anti-HER2 antibody with potential as a therapeutic candidate alone or in combination with other anti-HER2 reagents in cancer therapy. PMID:27092488

  4. Glycoengineered Pichia produced anti-HER2 is comparable to trastuzumab in preclinical study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ningyan; Liu, Liming; Dumitru, Calin Dan; Cummings, Nga Rewa Houston; Cukan, Michael; Jiang, Youwei; Li, Yuan; Li, Fang; Mitchell, Teresa; Mallem, Muralidhar R; Ou, Yangsi; Patel, Rohan N; Vo, Kim; Wang, Hui; Burnina, Irina; Choi, Byung-Kwon; Huber, Hans; Stadheim, Terrance A

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian cell culture systems are used predominantly for the production of therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) products. A number of alternative platforms, such as Pichia engineered with a humanized N-linked glycosylation pathway, have recently been developed for the production of mAbs. The glycosylation profiles of mAbs produced in glycoengineered Pichia are similar to those of mAbs produced in mammalian systems. This report presents for the first time the comprehensive characterization of an anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) mAb produced in glycoengineered Pichia, and a study comparing the anti-HER2 from Pichia, which had an amino acid sequence identical to trastuzumab, with trastuzumab. The comparative study covered a full spectrum of preclinical evaluation, including bioanalytical characterization, in vitro biological functions, in vivo anti-tumor efficacy and pharmacokinetics in both mice and non-human primates. Cell signaling and proliferation assays showed that anti-HER2 from Pichia had antagonist activities comparable to trastuzumab. However, Pichia-produced material showed a 5-fold increase in binding affinity to FcγIIIA and significantly enhanced antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity, presumably due to the lack of fucose on N-glycans. In a breast cancer xenograft mouse model, anti-HER2 was comparable to trastuzumab in tumor growth inhibition. Furthermore, comparable pharmacokinetic profiles were observed for anti-HER2 and trastuzumab in both mice and cynomolgus monkeys. We conclude that glycoengineered Pichia provides an alternative production platform for therapeutic mAbs and may be of particular interest for production of antibodies for which ADCC is part of the clinical mechanism of action. PMID:21487242

  5. Current therapeutic strategies of anti-HER2 treatment in advanced breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Nowara, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    The HER2/neu (ERBB2) oncogene is amplified and/or overexpressed in approximately 20% of breast cancers, and is a strong prognostic factor for relapse and poor overall survival, particularly in node-positive patients. It is also an important predictor for response to trastuzumab, which has established efficacy against breast cancer with overexpression or amplification of the HER2 oncogene. Treatment with the anti-HER2 humanized monoclonal antibody – trastuzumab significantly improves progression-free and overall survival among patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. However, in most patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, the disease progresses occurred, what cause the need for new targeted therapies for advanced disease. In clinical trials, there are tested new drugs to improve the results of treatment for this group of patients. This paper presents new drugs introduced into clinical practice for treatment of advanced breast cancer, whose molecular target are receptors of the HER2 family. In addition, new therapeutic strategies and drugs that are currently in clinical researches are discussed. PMID:27095932

  6. High HER2 protein levels correlate with increased survival in breast cancer patients treated with anti-HER2 therapy

    PubMed Central

    Aura, Claudia; Garrido-Castro, Ana; Vilaro, Marta; Peg, Vicente; Jimenez, José; Vicario, Rocio; Cecchi, Fabiola; Hoos, William; Burrows, Jon; Hembrough, Todd; Ferreres, Juan Carles; Perez-Garcia, José; Arribas, Joaquin; Cortes, Javier; Scaltriti, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Current methods to determine HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) status are affected by reproducibility issues and do not reliably predict benefit from anti-HER2 therapy. Quantitative measurement of HER2 may more accurately identify breast cancer (BC) patients who will respond to anti-HER2 treatments. Methods Using selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (SRM-MS), we quantified HER2 protein levels in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples that had been classified as HER2 0, 1+, 2+ or 3+ by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Receiver operator curve (ROC) analysis was conducted to obtain optimal HER2 protein expression thresholds predictive of HER2 status (by standard IHC or in situ hybridization [ISH]) and of survival benefit after anti-HER2 therapy. Results Absolute HER2 amol/μg levels were significantly correlated with both HER2 IHC and amplification status by ISH (p < 0.0001). A HER2 threshold of 740 amol/μg showed an agreement rate of 94% with IHC and ISH standard HER2 testing (p < 0.0001). Discordant cases (SRM-MS-negative/ISH-positive) showed a characteristic amplification pattern known as double minutes. HER2 levels >2200 amol/μg were significantly associated with longer disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in an adjuvant setting and with longer OS in a metastatic setting. Conclusion Quantitative HER2 measurement by SRM-MS is superior to IHC and ISH in predicting outcome after treatment with anti-HER2 therapy. PMID:26422389

  7. ICG-loaded polymeric nanocapsules functionalized with anti-HER2 for targeted fluorescence imaging and photodestruction of ovarian cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahmani, Baharak; Guerrero, Yadir; Vullev, Valentine; Singh, Sheela P.; Kundra, Vikas; Anvari, Bahman

    2013-03-01

    Optical nano-materials present a promising platform for targeted molecular imaging of cancer biomarkers and its photodestruction. Our group is investigating the use of polymeric nanoparticles, loaded with indocyanine green, an FDA-approved chromophore, as a theranostic agent for targeted intraoperative optical imaging and laser-mediated destruction of ovarian cancer. These ICG-loaded nanocapsules (ICG-NCs) can be functionalized by covalent attachment of targeting moieties onto their surface. Here, we investigate ICG-NCs functionalized with anti-HER2 for targeted fluorescence imaging and laser-mediated destruction of ovarian cancer cells in vitro. ICG-NCs are formed through ionic cross-linking between polyallylamine hydrochloride chains and sodium phosphate ions followed by diffusion-mediated loading with ICG. Before functionalization with antibodies, the surface of ICG-NCs is coated with single and double aldehyde terminated polyethylene glycol (PEG). The monoclonal anti-HER2 is covalently coupled to the PEGylated ICG-NCs using reductive amination to target the HER2 receptor, a biomarker whose over-expression is associated with increased risk of cancer progression. We quantify uptake of anti-HER2 conjugated ICG-NCs by ovarian cancer cells using flow cytometery. The in-vitro laser-mediated destruction of SKOV3 cells incubated with anti-HER2 functionalized ICG-NCs is performed using an 808 nm diode laser. Cell viability is characterized using the Calcein and Ethidium homodimer-1 assays following laser irradiation. Our results indicate that anti-HER2 functionalized ICG-NCs can be used as theranostic agents for optical molecular imaging and photodestruction of ovarian cancers in-vitro.

  8. Anti-HER-2 DNA vaccine protects Syrian hamsters against squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Berta, G N; Mognetti, B; Spadaro, M; Trione, E; Amici, A; Forni, G; Di Carlo, F; Cavallo, F

    2005-01-01

    This paper illustrates the efficacy of DNA vaccination through electroporation in the prevention of oral transplantable carcinoma in Syrian hamsters. At 21 and 7 days before tumour challenge, 19 hamsters were vaccinated with plasmids coding for the extracellular and transmembrane domains of rat HER-2 receptor (EC-TM plasmids), whereas 19 control hamsters were injected intramuscularly with the empty plasmid. Immediately following plasmid injection, hamsters of both groups received two square-wave 25 ms, 375 V cm−1 electric pulses via two electrodes placed on the skin of the injection area. At day 0, all hamsters were challenged in the submucosa of the right cheek pouch with HER-2-positive HCPC I cells established in vitro from an 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced oral carcinoma. This challenge gave rise to HER-2-positive buccal neoplastic lesions in 14 controls (73.37%), compared with only seven (36.8%, P<0.0027) vaccinated hamsters. In addition, the vaccinated hamsters displayed both a stronger proliferative and cytotoxic response than the controls and a significant anti-HER-2 antibody response. Most of the hamsters that rejected the challenge displayed the highest antibody titres. These findings suggest that DNA vaccination may have a future in the prevention of HER-2-positive human oral cancer. PMID:16265350

  9. Brain metastases in Asian HER2-positive breast cancer patients: anti-HER2 treatments and their impact on survival

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Y S; Cornelio, G H; Devi, B C R; Khorprasert, C; Kim, S B; Kim, T Y; Lee, S C; Park, Y H; Sohn, J H; Sutandyo, N; Wong, D W Y; Kobayashi, M; Landis, S H; Yeoh, E M; Moon, H; Ro, J

    2012-01-01

    Background: In Asia, large-scale studies on anti-HER2 treatment in HER2-positive breast cancer patients with brain metastases are limited. We studied the treatment patterns of these patients in Asia to evaluate the impact of anti-HER2 treatment on the time to occurrence of brain metastases (TTBM) and survival after brain metastasis (BM). Methods: A retrospective study of HER2-positive breast cancer patients diagnosed with BM between January 2006 and December 2008 in six Asian countries was conducted. Demographics, tumour characteristics, treatment details, and events dates were collected from medical records. Results: Data from 280 patients were analysed. Before BM, 63% received anti-HER2 treatment. These patients had significantly longer TTBM than those without anti-HER2 treatment (median 33 vs 19 months; P<0.002). After BM, 93% received radiotherapy, 57% received chemotherapy, and 41% received anti-HER2 treatment (trastuzumab and/or lapatinib). Use of both anti-HER2 agents, primarily sequentially, after BM demonstrated the longest survival after BM and was associated with a significant survival benefit over no anti-HER2 treatment (median 26 vs 6 months; hazard ratio 0.37; 95% CI 0.19–0.72). Conclusion: Anti-HER2 treatment before BM was associated with longer TTBM. Anti-HER2 treatment after BM was associated with a survival benefit, especially when both trastuzumab and lapatinib were utilised. PMID:22918394

  10. Targeting HER2+ breast cancer cells: lysosomal accumulation of anti-HER2 antibodies is influenced by antibody binding site and conjugation to polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Owen, Shawn C; Patel, Nish; Logie, Jennifer; Pan, Guohua; Persson, Helena; Moffat, Jason; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Shoichet, Molly S

    2013-12-10

    Humanized monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against HER2 are being engineered to treat cancer. We utilized phage-display technology to generate a novel anti-HER2 mAb (named 73JIgG) that binds an epitope of HER2 distinct from that of trastuzumab. Although these mAbs bind to the same cell surface receptor, they have different cell distribution profiles. After 3h of incubation, almost 10% of the total 73JIgG reaches the lysosome compared to less than 3% of trastuzumab. Interestingly, 73JIgG disassociates from HER2 whereas trastuzumab remains bound to the receptor. Importantly, HER2 distribution is not affected by the antibody binding epitope, thus negating this mechanism as the reason for the difference in intracellular trafficking of 73JIgG versus trastuzumab. Each of trastuzumab and 73JIgG was chemically-modified with either a small molecule or polymeric nanoparticle to better understand the influence of conjugation on cellular localization. Relative to antibody alone, antibody-nanoparticle conjugates resulted in a higher concentration of antibodies in the lysosome whereas antibody-small molecule conjugates did not affect cell trafficking to the lysosome. Given the importance of lysosomal targeting, these results demonstrate the importance of understanding the influence of the antibody-conjugate on cell trafficking for ultimate optimization of treatment selection. PMID:23880472

  11. Anti-HER2/neu peptide-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted delivery of paclitaxel to breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Qingxin; Kievit, Forrest M.; Kant, Rajeev J.; Lin, Guanyou; Jeon, Mike; Zhang, Miqin

    2015-10-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) for targeted therapy are required to have appropriate size, stability, drug loading and release profiles, and efficient targeting ligands. However, many of the existing NPs such as albumin, liposomes, polymers, gold NPs, etc. encounter size limit, toxicity and stability issues when loaded with drugs, fluorophores, and targeting ligands. Furthermore, antibodies are bulky and this can greatly affect the physicochemical properties of the NPs, whereas many small molecule-based targeting ligands lack specificity. Here, we report the utilization of biocompatible, biodegradable, small (~30 nm) and stable iron oxide NPs (IONPs) for targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to HER2/neu positive breast cancer cells using an anti-HER2/neu peptide (AHNP) targeting ligand. We demonstrate the uniform size and high stability of these NPs in biological medium, their effective tumour targeting in live mice, as well as their efficient cellular targeting and selective killing in human HER2/neu-positive breast cancer cells.Nanoparticles (NPs) for targeted therapy are required to have appropriate size, stability, drug loading and release profiles, and efficient targeting ligands. However, many of the existing NPs such as albumin, liposomes, polymers, gold NPs, etc. encounter size limit, toxicity and stability issues when loaded with drugs, fluorophores, and targeting ligands. Furthermore, antibodies are bulky and this can greatly affect the physicochemical properties of the NPs, whereas many small molecule-based targeting ligands lack specificity. Here, we report the utilization of biocompatible, biodegradable, small (~30 nm) and stable iron oxide NPs (IONPs) for targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to HER2/neu positive breast cancer cells using an anti-HER2/neu peptide (AHNP) targeting ligand. We demonstrate the uniform size and high stability of these NPs in biological medium, their effective tumour targeting in live mice, as well as their efficient cellular

  12. Development of anti-HER2 conjugated ICG-loaded polymeric nanoparticles for targeted optical imaging of ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahmani, Baharak; Vullev, Valentine; Anvari, Bahman

    2012-03-01

    Targeted delivery of therapeutic and imaging agents using surface modified nanovectors has been explored immensely in recent years. The growing demand for site-specific and efficient delivery of nanovectors entails stable surface conjugation of targeting moieties. We have developed a polymeric nanocapsule doped with Indocyanine green (ICG) with potential for targeted and deep tissue optical imaging and phototherapy. Our ICG-loaded nanocapsules (ICG-NCs) have potential for covalent coupling of various targeting moieties and materials due to presence of amine groups on the surface. Here, we covalently bioconjugate polyethylene glycol(PEG)-coated ICG-NCs with monoclonal antibody against HER2 through reductive amination-mediated procedures. The irreversible and stable bonds are formed between anti- EGFR and aldehyde termini of PEG chains on the surface of ICG-NCs. We confirm the uptake of conjugated ICG-NCs by ovarian cancer cells over-expressing HER2 using fluorescent confocal microscopy. The proposed process for covalent attachment of anti-HER2 to PEGylated ICG-NCs can be used as a methodology for bioconjugation of various antibodies to such nano-constrcuts, and provides the capability to use these optically active nano-probes for targeted optical imaging of ovarian and other cancer types.

  13. Patterns of HER2 Gene Amplification and Response to Anti-HER2 Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Morancho, Beatriz; Zacarias-Fluck, Mariano; Zhang, Junjie; Martínez-Barriocanal, Águeda; Navarro Jiménez, Alexandra; Aura, Claudia; Burgues, Octavio; Lluch, Ana; Cortés, Javier; Nuciforo, Paolo; Rubio, Isabel T.; Marangoni, Elisabetta; Deeds, James; Boehm, Markus; Schlegel, Robert; Tabernero, Josep; Mosher, Rebecca; Arribas, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    A chromosomal region that includes the gene encoding HER2, a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), is amplified in 20% of breast cancers. Although these tumors tend to respond to drugs directed against HER2, they frequently become resistant and resume their malignant progression. Gene amplification in double minutes (DMs), which are extrachromosomal entities whose number can be dynamically regulated, has been suggested to facilitate the acquisition of resistance to therapies targeting RTKs. Here we show that ~30% of HER2-positive tumors show amplification in DMs. However, these tumors respond to trastuzumab in a similar fashion than those with amplification of the HER2 gene within chromosomes. Furthermore, in different models of resistance to anti-HER2 therapies, the number of DMs containing HER2 is maintained, even when the acquisition of resistance is concomitant with loss of HER2 protein expression. Thus, both clinical and preclinical data show that, despite expectations, loss of HER2 protein expression due to loss of DMs containing HER2 is not a likely mechanism of resistance to anti-HER2 therapies. PMID:26075403

  14. Combined treatment with everolimus and fulvestrant reversed anti-HER2 resistance in a patient with refractory advanced breast cancer: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bing; Ding, Lijuan; Wu, Shikai; Meng, Xiangying; Song, Santai

    2016-01-01

    Background Everolimus, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin, shows promising antitumor activity when combined with trastuzumab and chemotherapy for human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer or when combined with endocrine agents for hormone receptor (HR)-positive tumors. However, data are limited regarding the effect of everolimus in combination with endocrine drugs in HER2-positive advanced breast cancer regardless of the HR status. Case presentation A 44-year-old female was diagnosed with recurrent HER2-positive breast cancer. The primary tumor was HR positive; however, the metastatic tumor was HR negative. The patient was resistant to classical chemotherapeutic agents and anti-HER2 treatment. Thus, the combination of everolimus and fulvestrant, a selective estrogen receptor downregulator, was chosen to reverse the resistance to anti-HER2 therapy. Indeed, the patient experienced long-term disease stabilization. Adverse events associated with the treatment were manageable by dose adjustments. We performed genetic testing of the metastatic tumor, which harbored a PIK3CA gene mutation but was positive for phosphatase and tensin homologue expression, which might result in resistance to the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor. Conclusion This case study indicates that combined treatment with everolimus and fulvestrant might be a viable option for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer patients who are HER2 positive and carry a PIK3CA gene mutation but are resistant to anti-HER2 therapy and classical chemotherapeutic agents. Further prospective randomized trials are needed to confirm this finding. PMID:27445490

  15. HER2 specific delivery of methotrexate by dendrimer conjugated anti-HER2 mAb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Rameshwer; Thomas, Thommey P.; Desai, Ankur M.; Kotlyar, Alina; Park, Steve J.; Baker, James R., Jr.

    2008-07-01

    Herceptin, a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to human growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), was covalently attached to a fifth-generation (G5) polyamidoamine dendrimer containing the cytotoxic drug methotrexate. The specific binding and internalization of this conjugate labeled with FITC was clearly demonstrated in cell lines overexpressing HER2 by flow cytometry as well as confocal microscopic analysis. In addition, binding and uptake of antibody conjugated dendrimers was completely blocked by excess non-conjugated herceptin. The dendrimer conjugate was also shown to inhibit the dihydrofolate reductase with similar activity to methotrexate. Co-localization experiments with lysotracker red indicate that antibody conjugate, although internalized efficiently into cells, has an unusually long residence time in the lysosome. Somewhat lower cytotoxicity of the conjugate in comparison to free methotrexate was attributed to the slow release of methotrexate from the conjugate and its long retention in the lysosomal pocket.

  16. Protective effect of naturally occurring anti-HER2 autoantibodies on breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Yukiko; Shimoda, Masafumi; Kagara, Naofumi; Naoi, Yasuto; Tanei, Tomonori; Shimomura, Atsushi; Shimazu, Kenzo; Kim, Seung Jin; Noguchi, Shinzaburo

    2016-05-01

    Anti-HER2-autoantibodies (HER2-AAbs) are found in breast cancer patients as well as healthy individuals. However, the clinical relevance of the antibodies is unknown. We established an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with high sensitivity and quantified serum HER2-AAbs in 100 healthy women, 100 untreated patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and 500 untreated patients with invasive breast carcinoma (IBC). The associations between the levels of HER2-AAbs and breast cancer risk, and recurrence-free survival, were examined. High levels of HER2-AAbs were significantly associated with a reduced risk of DCIS (odds ratio [OR] 0.19, P = 4.6 × 10(-7)) or IBC (OR 0.31, P = 3.7 × 10(-7)). Subgroup analysis of IBC revealed a stronger association of HER2-AAbs with a reduced risk of the hormone receptor (HR)(-)/HER2(+) subtype (OR 0.12) than the other subtypes (HR(+)/HER2(-) [OR = 0.32], HR(+)/HER2(+) [OR 0.38], and HR(-)/HER2(-) [OR 0.29]). When we set the cutoff of HER2-AAbs at 20 ng/mL, recurrence-free survival of HER2-AAb-positive patients (N = 74) was significantly better than that of HER2-AAb-negative patients (N = 426) (P = 0.015). Univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated that HER2-AAbs, as well as histological grade, were independently and significantly (P = 0.0065 and 0.049, respectively) associated with recurrence-free survival. Our exploratory study suggests a protective effect of naturally occurring HER2-AAbs on the development of primary and recurrent breast cancer. Further studies on HER2-AAbs are warranted. PMID:27113738

  17. Cancer Cell Targeting Using Folic Acid/Anti-HER2 Antibody Conjugated Fluorescent CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA and CdTe-MSA Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurpal; Kumar, Manoj; Soni, Udit; Arora, Vikas; Bansal, Vivek; Gupta, Dikshi; Bhat, Madhusudan; Dinda, Amit K; Sapra, Sameer; Singh, Harpal

    2015-12-01

    CdSe/CdS/ZnS and CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized by successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique and direct aqueous synthesis respectively using thiol stabilizers. Synthesized CdSe/CdS/ZnS and CdTe QDs stabilized with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) were used as fluorescent labels after conjugation with folic acid (FA) and anti-HER2 antibodies. Photoluminescence quantum yield of folated CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA and CdTe-MSA QDs was 59% and 77% than that of non-folated hydrophilic QDs. The folate receptor-mediated delivery of folic acid-conjugated CdTe-MSA and CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs showed higher cellular internalization as observed by confocal laser scanning microscopic studies. Folated and non-folated CdTe-MSA QDs were highly toxic and exhibited only 10% cell viability as compared to > 80% cell viability with CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs over the concentration ranging from 3.38 to 50 pmoles. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) results of human breast cancer tissue samples showed positive results with anti-HER2 antibody conjugated CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs with better sensitivity and specificity as compared to conventional IHC analysis using diaminobenzedene staining. PMID:26682358

  18. Anti-HER2 antibody and ScFvEGFR-conjugated antifouling magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for targeting and magnetic resonance imaging of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongwei; Wang, Liya; Yu, Qiqi; Qian, Weiping; Tiwari, Diana; Yi, Hong; Wang, Andrew Y; Huang, Jing; Yang, Lily; Mao, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Antifouling magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) coated with block copolymer poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(γ-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane) (PEO-b-PγMPS) were investigated for improving cell targeting by reducing nonspecific uptake. Conjugation of a HER2 antibody, Herceptin®, or a single chain fragment (ScFv) of antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor (ScFvEGFR) to PEO-b-PγMPS-coated IONPs resulted in HER2-targeted or EGFR-targeted IONPs (anti-HER2-IONPs or ScFvEGFR-IONPs). The anti-HER2-IONPs bound specifically to SK-BR-3, a HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cell line, but not to MDA-MB-231, a HER2-underexpressing cell line. On the other hand, the ScFvEGFR-IONPs showed strong reactivity with MDA-MB-231, an EGFR-positive human breast cancer cell line, but not with MDA-MB-453, an EGFR-negative human breast cancer cell line. Transmission electron microscopy revealed internalization of the receptor-targeted nanoparticles by the targeted cancer cells. In addition, both antibody-conjugated and non-antibody-conjugated IONPs showed reduced nonspecific uptake by RAW264.7 mouse macrophages in vitro. The developed IONPs showed a long blood circulation time (serum half-life 11.6 hours) in mice and low accumulation in both the liver and spleen. At 24 hours after systemic administration of ScFvEGFR-IONPs into mice bearing EGFR-positive breast cancer 4T1 mouse mammary tumors, magnetic resonance imaging revealed signal reduction in the tumor as a result of the accumulation of the targeted IONPs. PMID:24124366

  19. Anti-HER2 antibody and ScFvEGFR-conjugated antifouling magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for targeting and magnetic resonance imaging of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongwei; Wang, Liya; Yu, Qiqi; Qian, Weiping; Tiwari, Diana; Yi, Hong; Wang, Andrew Y; Huang, Jing; Yang, Lily; Mao, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Antifouling magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) coated with block copolymer poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(γ-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane) (PEO-b-PγMPS) were investigated for improving cell targeting by reducing nonspecific uptake. Conjugation of a HER2 antibody, Herceptin®, or a single chain fragment (ScFv) of antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor (ScFvEGFR) to PEO-b-PγMPS-coated IONPs resulted in HER2-targeted or EGFR-targeted IONPs (anti-HER2-IONPs or ScFvEGFR-IONPs). The anti-HER2-IONPs bound specifically to SK-BR-3, a HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cell line, but not to MDA-MB-231, a HER2-underexpressing cell line. On the other hand, the ScFvEGFR-IONPs showed strong reactivity with MDA-MB-231, an EGFR-positive human breast cancer cell line, but not with MDA-MB-453, an EGFR-negative human breast cancer cell line. Transmission electron microscopy revealed internalization of the receptor-targeted nanoparticles by the targeted cancer cells. In addition, both antibody-conjugated and non-antibody-conjugated IONPs showed reduced nonspecific uptake by RAW264.7 mouse macrophages in vitro. The developed IONPs showed a long blood circulation time (serum half-life 11.6 hours) in mice and low accumulation in both the liver and spleen. At 24 hours after systemic administration of ScFvEGFR-IONPs into mice bearing EGFR-positive breast cancer 4T1 mouse mammary tumors, magnetic resonance imaging revealed signal reduction in the tumor as a result of the accumulation of the targeted IONPs. PMID:24124366

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Anti-HER2 Antibody Conjugated CdSe/CdZnS Quantum Dots for Fluorescence Imaging of Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Dhermendra K; Tanaka, Shin-Ichi; Inouye, Yasushi; Yoshizawa, Keiko; Watanabe, Tomonobu M; Jin, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    The early detection of HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) status in breast cancer patients is very important for the effective implementation of anti-HER2 antibody therapy. Recently, HER2 detections using antibody conjugated quantum dots (QDs) have attracted much attention. QDs are a new class of fluorescent materials that have superior properties such as high brightness, high resistance to photo-bleaching, and multi-colored emission by a single-light source excitation. In this study, we synthesized three types of anti-HER2 antibody conjugated QDs (HER2Ab-QDs) using different coupling agents (EDC/sulfo-NHS, iminothiolane/sulfo-SMCC, and sulfo-SMCC). As water-soluble QDs for the conjugation of antibody, we used glutathione coated CdSe/CdZnS QDs (GSH-QDs) with fluorescence quantum yields of 0.23∼0.39 in aqueous solution. Dispersibility, hydrodynamic size, and apparent molecular weights of the GSH-QDs and HER2Ab-QDs were characterized by using dynamic light scattering, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, atomic force microscope, and size-exclusion HPLC. Fluorescence imaging of HER2 overexpressing cells (KPL-4 human breast cancer cell line) was performed by using HER2Ab-QDs as fluorescent probes. We found that the HER2Ab-QD prepared by using SMCC coupling with partially reduced antibody is a most effective probe for the detection of HER2 expression in KPL-4 cells. We have also studied the size dependency of HER2Ab-QDs (with green, orange, and red emission) on the fluorescence image of KPL-4 cells. PMID:22291567

  1. Is the skin a sanctuary for breast cancer cells during treatment with anti-HER2 antibodies?

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Vincenzo; Scognamiglio, Maria Teresa; Zilli, Marinella; Giampietro, Jamara; Vici, Patrizia; Natoli, Clara; Grassadonia, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of skin metastases is a common event in patients affected by advanced breast cancer, usually associated with systemic disease progression. Here we describe 2 cases of diffuse cutaneous metastases from HER2-overexpressing breast cancer occurring despite a dramatic response in liver and bone, respectively, during treatment with anti-HER2 antibodies Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab. We discuss the reasons for this discrepancy and suggest a possible implication of impaired immune response in the skin. Future research should provide strategies to overcome the induction of immune privilege in the skin in order to avoid discontinuation of effective treatments. PMID:26552483

  2. Bio-distribution and toxicity assessment of intravenously injected anti-HER2 antibody conjugated CdSe/ZnS quantum dots in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Dhermendra K; Jin, Takashi; Behari, Jitendra

    2011-01-01

    Anti-HER2 antibody conjugated with quantum dots (anti-HER2ab-QDs) is a very recent fluorescent nanoprobe for HER2+ve breast cancer imaging. In this study we investigated in-vivo toxicity of anti-HER2ab conjugated CdSe/ZnS QDs in Wistar rats. For toxicity evaluation of injected QDs sample, body weight, organ coefficient, complete blood count (CBC), biochemistry panel assay (AST, ALT, ALP, and GGTP), comet assay, reactive oxygen species, histology, and apoptosis were determined. Wistar rat (8–10 weeks old) were randomly divided into 4 treatment groups (n = 6). CBC and biochemistry panel assay showed nonsignificant changes in the anti-HER2ab-QDs treated group but these changes were significant (P < 0.05) in QDs treated group. No tissue damage, inflammation, lesions, and QDs deposition were found in histology and TEM images of the anti-HER2ab-QDs treated group. Apoptosis in liver and kidney was not found in the anti-HER2ab-QDs treated group. Animals treated with nonconjugated QDs showed comet formation and apoptosis. Cadmium deposition was confirmed in the QDs treated group compared with the anti-HER2ab-QDs treated group. The QDs concentration (500 nM) used for this study is suitable for in-vivo imaging. The combine data of this study support the biocompatibility of anti-HER2ab-QDs for breast cancer imaging, suggesting that the antibody coating assists in controlling any possible adverse effect of quantum dots. PMID:21499435

  3. Giacomo Castelvetro's salads. Anti-HER2 oncogene nutraceuticals since the 17th century?

    PubMed

    Colomer, R; Lupu, R; Papadimitropoulou, A; Vellón, L; Vázquez-Martín, A; Brunet, J; Fernández-Gutiérrez, A; Segura-Carretero, A; Menéndez, J A

    2008-01-01

    We are accumulating evidence to suggest that 17(th) century Renaissance foodways -largely based on the old "Mediterranean dietary traditions"- may provide new nutraceutical management strategies against HER2-positive breast cancer disease in the 21st century. Epidemiological and experimental studies begin to support the notion that "The Sacred Law of Salads" (i.e., "raw vegetables... plenty of generous (olive) oil") -originally proposed in 1614 by Giacomo Castelvetro in its book The Fruit, Herbs & Vegetables of Italy- might be considered the first (unintended) example of customised diets for breast cancer prevention based on individual genetic make-up (i.e., nutraceuticals against human breast carcinomas bearing HER2 oncogene amplification/overexpression). First, the so-called salad vegetables dietary pattern (i.e., a high consumption of raw vegetables and olive oil) appears to exert a protective effect mostly confined to the HER2-positive breast cancer subtype, with no significant influence on the occurrence of HER2-negative breast cancers. Second, all the main olive oil constituents (i.e., the omega-9 monounsaturated fatty acid oleic acid and polyphenolic compounds such as the secoiridoid oleuropein or the lignan 1-[+]-acetoxypinoresinol) dramatically reduce HER2 expression and specifically induce apoptotic cell death in cultured HER2- positive breast cancer cells, with marginal effects against HER2-negative cells. Third, an olive oil-rich diet negatively influences experimental mammary tumorigenesis in rats likewise decreasing HER2 expression levels. If early 1600s Castelvetro's salads can be used as dietary protocols capable to protecting women against biologically aggressive HER2-positive breast cancer subtypes is an intriguing prospect that warrants to be evaluated in human pilot studies in the future. Here, at least, we would like to recognise Giacomo Castelvetro as the father of modern nutritional genomics in oncology. PMID:18208790

  4. Targeting, bio distributive and tumor growth inhibiting characterization of anti-HER2 affibody coupling to liposomal doxorubicin using BALB/c mice bearing TUBO tumors.

    PubMed

    Akhtari, Javad; Rezayat, Seyed Mahdi; Teymouri, Manouchehr; Alavizadeh, Seyedeh Hoda; Gheybi, Fatemeh; Badiee, Ali; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2016-05-30

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is overexpressed in 20-30% of breast cancer tumors. In the current investigation, we exploited such a feature and utilized an anti-HER2 affibody (ZHER2:477) in combination with a pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) for concurrent passive and active targeting of HER2 overexpressing TUBO tumor, using BALB/c mice. It was determined that the affibody coupled liposomes (affisomes) was capable of increasing doxorubicin (Dox) delivery to HER2+ cells (SK-BR-3 and TUBO cells), while transferring drug similarly as low as naïve PLD to HER2- MDA-MB-231 cells. This also resulted in selectively enhance cytotoxicity. The veracity of targeting was further assessed utilizing DiD lipophilic tracer model liposomes via competition assay. An approximated 10 ligand/liposome integration caused Dox delivery at 50% of maximal delivery capacity (Kd). Such integration did not alter Dox release in vitro, while it affected the serum clearance profile. Affibody integration to PLD increased drug concentration in tumor and led to significantly further augmentation of drug in liver and spleen compared to those of PLD. Overall, such differences led to prolonging the mice life spans as compared to PLD. PMID:27039149

  5. Intratumoral Delivery of IL-21 Overcomes Anti-Her2/Neu Resistance through Shifting Tumor-Associated Macrophages from M2 to M1 Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Liu, Mingyue; Du, Xuexiang; Li, Sirui; Li, Hang; Li, Xiaozhu; Li, Ying; Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhihai; Fu, Yang-Xin; Wang, Shengdian

    2015-05-15

    Tumor resistance is a major hurdle to anti-Her2/neu Ab-based cancer therapy. Current strategies to overcome tumor resistance focus on tumor cell-intrinsic resistance. However, the extrinsic mechanisms, especially the tumor microenvironment, also play important roles in modulating the therapeutic response and resistance of the Ab. In this study, we demonstrate that tumor progression is highly associated with TAMs with immune-suppressive M2 phenotypes, and deletion of TAMs markedly enhanced the therapeutic effects of anti-Her2/neu Ab in a HER2/neu-dependent breast cancer cell TUBO model. Tumor local delivery of IL-21 can skew TAM polarization away from the M2 phenotype to a tumor-inhibiting M1 phenotype, which rapidly stimulates T cell responses against tumor and dramatically promotes the therapeutic effect of anti-Her2 Ab. Skewing of TAM polarization by IL-21 relies substantially on direct action of IL-21 on TAMs rather than stimulation of T and NK cells. Thus, our findings identify the abundant TAMs as a major extrinsic barrier for anti-Her2/neu Ab therapy and present a novel approach to combat this extrinsic resistance by tumor local delivery of IL-21 to skew TAM polarization. This study offers a therapeutic strategy to modulate the tumor microenvironment to overcome tumor-extrinsic resistance. PMID:25876763

  6. Cancer Cell Targeting Using Folic Acid/Anti-HER2 Antibody Conjugated Fluorescent CdSe/CdS/ZnS-Mercaptopropionic Acid and CdTe-Mercaptosuccinic Acid Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurpal; Kumar, Manoj; Soni, Udit; Arora, Vikas; Bansal, Vivek; Gupta, Dikshi; Bhat, Madhusudan; Dinda, Amit K; Sapra, Sameer; Singh, Harpal

    2016-01-01

    CdSe/CdS/ZnS and CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized by successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique and direct aqueous synthesis respectively using thiol stabilizers. Synthesized CdSe/CdS/ZnS and CdTe QDs stabilized with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) were used as fluorescent labels after conjugation with folic acid (FA) and anti-HER2 antibodies. Photoluminescence quantum yield of folated CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA and CdTe-MSA QDs was 59% and 77% than that of non-folated hydrophilic QDs. The folate receptor-mediated delivery of folic acid-conjugated CdTe-MSA and CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs showed higher cellular internalization as observed by confocal laser scanning microscopic studies. Folated and non-folated CdTe-MSA QDs were highly toxic and exhibited only 10% cell viability as compared to > 80% cell viability with CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs over the concentration ranging from 3.38 to 50 pmoles. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) results of human breast cancer tissue samples showed positive results with anti-HER2 antibody conjugated CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs with better sensitivity and specificity as compared to conventional IHC analysis using diaminobenzedene staining. PMID:27398438

  7. Improved biological activity of a single chain antibody fragment against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) expressed in the periplasm of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Vajihe; Sadeghi, Hamid Mir Mohammad; Jafarian-Dehkordi, Abbas; Abedi, Daryoush; Chou, C Perry

    2015-12-01

    A novel monoclonal antibody against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), i.e., pertuzumab (Perjeta®) developed by Genentech, has been verified to be effective in treating metastatic HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. The fact that the presence of the Fc region of the anti-HER2 is uncritical for growth inhibition of tumor cells suggests the potential biological activity of the associated antibody fragments. In the present study, we report functional expression of anti-HER2his-scFv, a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) derived from pertuzumab, in the periplasm of Escherichia coli and its purification. Biological activity of the soluble scFv produced in this manner was characterized using immunofluorescent staining, immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry and cytotoxicity assay. The effect of anti-HER2his-scFv on HER2 dimerization was also assessed by tyrosine kinase assay. It was observed that the purified scFv had a high specificity and affinity to HER2 receptors expressed on the surface of tumor cells with a selective cytotoxic effect on HER2-overexpressing SK-OV-3 cells. In addition, anti-HER2his-scFv was able to suppress phosphorylation of HER2 in the presence of heregulin. The results suggest that anti-HER2his-scFv can be a potential candidate for various therapeutic and diagnosis applications. PMID:26166178

  8. Progressive loss of anti-HER2 CD4+ T-helper type 1 response in breast tumorigenesis and the potential for immune restoration

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Jashodeep; Rosemblit, Cinthia; Berk, Erik; Showalter, Lori; Namjoshi, Prachi; Mick, Rosemarie; Lee, Kathreen P; Brod, Andrew M; Yang, Rachel L; Kelz, Rachel R; Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth; Hoyt, Clifford; Feldman, Michael D; Zhang, Paul J; Xu, Shuwen; Koski, Gary K; Czerniecki, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    Genomic profiling has identified several molecular oncodrivers in breast tumorigenesis. A thorough understanding of endogenous immune responses to these oncodrivers may provide insights into immune interventions for breast cancer (BC). We investigated systemic anti-HER2/neu CD4+ T-helper type-1 (Th1) responses in HER2-driven breast tumorigenesis. A highly significant stepwise Th1 response loss extending from healthy donors (HD), through HER2pos-DCIS, and ultimately to early stage HER2pos-invasive BC patients was detected by IFNγ ELISPOT. The anti-HER2 Th1 deficit was not attributable to host-level T-cell anergy, loss of immune competence, or increase in immunosuppressive phenotypes (Treg/MDSCs), but rather associated with a functional shift in IFNγ:IL-10-producing phenotypes. HER2high, but not HER2low, BC cells expressing IFNγ/TNF-α receptors were susceptible to Th1 cytokine-mediated apoptosis in vitro, which could be significantly rescued by neutralizing IFNγ and TNF-α, suggesting that abrogation of HER2-specific Th1 may reflect a mechanism of immune evasion in HER2-driven tumorigenesis. While largely unaffected by cytotoxic or HER2-targeted (trastuzumab) therapies, depressed Th1 responses in HER2pos-BC patients were significantly restored following HER2-pulsed dendritic cell (DC) vaccinations, suggesting that this Th1 defect is not “fixed” and can be corrected by immunologic interventions. Importantly, preserved anti-HER2 Th1 responses were associated with pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant trastuzumab/chemotherapy, while depressed responses were observed in patients incurring locoregional/systemic recurrence following trastuzumab/chemotherapy. Monitoring anti-HER2 Th1 reactivity following HER2-directed therapies may identify vulnerable subgroups at risk of clinicopathologic failure. In such patients, combinations of existing HER2-targeted therapies with strategies to boost anti-HER2 CD4+ Th1 immunity may decrease the risk of recurrence and

  9. tabAnti-HER2 (erbB-2) oncogene effects of phenolic compounds directly isolated from commercial Extra-Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO)

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, Javier A; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Garcia-Villalba, Rocio; Carrasco-Pancorbo, Alegria; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Alberto; Segura-Carretero, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Background The effects of the olive oil-rich Mediterranean diet on breast cancer risk might be underestimated when HER2 (ERBB2) oncogene-positive and HER2-negative breast carcinomas are considered together. We here investigated the anti-HER2 effects of phenolic fractions directly extracted from Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO) in cultured human breast cancer cell lines. Methods Solid phase extraction followed by semi-preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to isolate phenolic fractions from commercial EVOO. Analytical capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry was performed to check for the composition and to confirm the identity of the isolated fractions. EVOO polyphenolic fractions were tested on their tumoricidal ability against HER2-negative and HER2-positive breast cancer in vitro models using MTT, crystal violet staining, and Cell Death ELISA assays. The effects of EVOO polyphenolic fractions on the expression and activation status of HER2 oncoprotein were evaluated using HER2-specific ELISAs and immunoblotting procedures, respectively. Results Among the fractions mainly containing the single phenols hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol, the polyphenol acid elenolic acid, the lignans (+)-pinoresinol and 1-(+)-acetoxypinoresinol, and the secoiridoids deacetoxy oleuropein aglycone, ligstroside aglycone, and oleuropein aglycone, all the major EVOO polyphenols (i.e. secoiridoids and lignans) were found to induce strong tumoricidal effects within a micromolar range by selectively triggering high levels of apoptotic cell death in HER2-overexpressors. Small interfering RNA-induced depletion of HER2 protein and lapatinib-induced blockade of HER2 tyrosine kinase activity both significantly prevented EVOO polyphenols-induced cytotoxicity. EVOO polyphenols drastically depleted HER2 protein and reduced HER2 tyrosine autophosphorylation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. EVOO polyphenols-induced HER2 downregulation occurred regardless the

  10. Dual Fatty Acid Synthase and HER2 Signaling Blockade Shows Marked Antitumor Activity against Breast Cancer Models Resistant to Anti-HER2 Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Blancafort, Adriana; Giró-Perafita, Ariadna; Oliveras, Glòria; Palomeras, Sònia; Turrado, Carlos; Campuzano, Òscar; Carrión-Salip, Dolors; Massaguer, Anna; Brugada, Ramon; Palafox, Marta; Gómez-Miragaya, Jorge; González-Suárez, Eva; Puig, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Blocking the enzyme Fatty Acid Synthase (FASN) leads to apoptosis of HER2-positive breast carcinoma cells. The hypothesis is that blocking FASN, in combination with anti-HER2 signaling agents, would be an effective antitumor strategy in preclinical HER2+ breast cancer models of trastuzumab and lapatinib resistance. We developed and molecularly characterized in vitro HER2+ models of resistance to trastuzumab (SKTR), lapatinib (SKLR) and both (SKLTR). The cellular interactions of combining anti-FASN polyphenolic compounds (EGCG and the synthetic G28UCM) with anti-HER2 signaling drugs (trastuzumab plus pertuzumab and temsirolimus) were analyzed. Tumor growth inhibition after treatment with EGCG, pertuzumab, temsirolimus or the combination was evaluated in two in vivo orthoxenopatients: one derived from a HER2+ patient and another from a patient who relapsed on trastuzumab and lapatinib-based therapy. SKTR, SKLR and SKLTR showed hyperactivation of EGFR and p-ERK1/2 and PI3KCA mutations. Dual-resistant cells (SKLTR) also showed hyperactivation of HER4 and recovered levels of p-AKT compared with mono-resistant cells. mTOR, p-mTOR and FASN expression remained stable in SKTR, SKLR and SKLTR. In vitro, anti-FASN compounds plus pertuzumab showed synergistic interactions in lapatinib- and dual- resistant cells and improved the results of pertuzumab plus trastuzumab co-treatment. FASN inhibitors combined with temsirolimus displayed the strongest synergistic interactions in resistant cells. In vivo, both orthoxenopatients showed strong response to the antitumor activity of the combination of EGCG with pertuzumab or temsirolimus, without signs of toxicity. We showed that the simultaneous blockade of FASN and HER2 pathways is effective in cells and in breast cancer models refractory to anti-HER2 therapies. PMID:26107737

  11. Comparison between Internalizing Anti-HER2 mAbs and Non-Internalizing Anti-CEA mAbs in Alpha-Radioimmunotherapy of Small Volume Peritoneal Carcinomatosis Using 212Pb

    PubMed Central

    Busson, Muriel; Garambois, Véronique; Jarlier, Marta; Charalambatou, Paraskevi; Pèlegrin, André; Paillas, Salomé; Chouin, Nicolas; Quenet, François; Maquaire, Patrick; Torgue, Julien; Navarro-Teulon, Isabelle; Pouget, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose We assessed the contribution of antibody internalization in the efficacy and toxicity of intraperitoneal α-radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of small volume carcinomatosis using 212Pb-labeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target HER2 (internalizing) or CEA (non-internalizing) receptors. Materials and Methods Athymic nude mice bearing 2–3 mm intraperitoneal tumor xenografts were intraperitoneally injected with similar activities (370, 740 and 1480 kBq; 37 MBq/mg) of 212Pb-labeled 35A7 (anti-CEA), trastuzumab (anti-HER2) or PX (non-specific) mAbs, or with equivalent amounts of unlabeled mAbs, or with NaCl. Tumor volume was monitored by bioluminescence and survival was reported. Hematologic toxicity and body weight were assessed. Biodistribution of 212Pb-labeled mAbs and absorbed dose-effect relationships using MIRD formalism were established. Results Transient hematological toxicity, as revealed by white blood cells and platelets numbering, was reported in mice treated with the highest activities of 212Pb-labeled mAbs. The median survival (MS) was significantly higher in mice injected with 1.48 MBq of 212Pb-35A7 (non-internalizing mAbs) (MS = 94 days) than in animals treated with the same activity of 212Pb-PX mAbs or with NaCl (MS = 18 days). MS was even not reached after 130 days when follow-up was discontinued in mice treated with 1.48 MBq of 212Pb-trastuzumab. The later efficacy was unexpected since final absorbed dose resulting from injection of 1.48 MBq, was higher for 212Pb-35A7 (35.5 Gy) than for 212Pb-trastuzumab (27.6 Gy). These results also highlight the lack of absorbed dose-effect relationship when mean absorbed dose was calculated using MIRD formalism and the requirement to perform small-scale dosimetry. Conclusions These data indicate that it might be an advantage of using internalizing anti-HER2 compared with non-internalizing anti-CEA 212Pb-labeled mAbs in the therapy of small volume xenograft tumors. They support clinical

  12. Monoclonal Antibody That Defines Human Myoepithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dairkee, Shahnaz Hashmi; Blayney, Carlene; Smith, Helene S.; Hackett, Adeline J.

    1985-11-01

    We have isolated a mouse monoclonal antibody that, upon immunohistochemical localization in frozen sections, displays specificity for human myoepithelial cells in the resting mammary gland, sweat glands, and salivary glands. Furthermore, this antibody was strongly and homogeneously reactive with frozen sections of 3 of 60 breast carcinoma specimens. Using immunolocalization techniques in conjunction with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we have determined that the reactivity of this monoclonal antibody is directed toward a 51,000-dalton keratin polypeptide. The potential uses of this antibody in the prognosis of human mammary carcinoma and in understanding the role of the myoepithelium in development and differentiation are discussed.

  13. Improved drug delivery and therapeutic efficacy of PEgylated liposomal doxorubicin by targeting anti-HER2 peptide in murine breast tumor model.

    PubMed

    Zahmatkeshan, Masoumeh; Gheybi, Fatemeh; Rezayat, Seyed Mahdi; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2016-04-30

    Targeted cancer therapy is a powerful therapeutic strategy to management of cancer. HER2 as an anticancer target has long been studied. Its overexpression plays an important role in the pathogenesis and progressiveness of breast and other cancers. To establish efficient and reliable drug delivery to HER2-overexpressing cells, the authors of this study have developed anti-HER2 (ErbB2) peptide-liposomal formulations of doxorubicin (DOX) by an engineered breast tumor-targeting peptide ligand, AHNP, Anti-HER2/neu peptide, (FCDGFYACYADV) with three glycine amino acids as spacer before its original sequencing. Towards this goal, PEGylated liposome doxorubicin (PLD) bearing different ligand densities of AHNP was prepared and characterized for their size, zeta potential and peptide conjugation. The AHNP functionalization and density effects on breast tumor cell uptake, selective cytotoxicity, prevention of tumor growth and the tissue biodistribution of encapsulated DOX were studied in mice bearing TUBO breast cancer tumor model. The findings demonstrated that increasing the ligand density of AHNP increases cytotoxicity and cell-uptake in SKBR3 and TUBO cells which overexpress HER2 but not in MDA-MB-231with low HER2 expression profile. The anticancer activity was also superior for targeted liposomal DOX with more AHNP densities. Overall, the results showed that optimum AHNP density functionalization of PLD can significantly improve selectivity and the therapeutic index of liposomal DOX in the treatment of HER2 positive breast cancer and merits further investigation. PMID:26972276

  14. Improved Treatment of Breast Cancer with Anti-HER2 Therapy Requires Interleukin-21 Signaling in CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Deepak; Caramia, Franco; Michiels, Stefan; Joensuu, Heikki; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Sotiriou, Christos; Loi, Sherene; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-01-15

    The HER2/ErbB2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) trastuzumab is combined with chemotherapy as a standard-of-care for newly diagnosed HER2(+) breast cancer patients, but some patients treated with this combination therapy experience early relapse. Our analysis of data from a clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of chemotherapy plus/minus trastuzumab suggested that the magnitude of trastuzumab benefit on distant disease-free survival was higher for increasing expression of the IL21 receptor (IL21R). Therefore, we investigated a possible role for IL21 signaling in promoting HER2 mAb therapeutic efficacy. We found that IL21R-deficient mice and wild-type mice treated with a neutralizing anti-IL21 mAb were less susceptible to trastuzumab-like anti-ErbB2 therapy. Furthermore, IL21R expression on CD8(+) T cells, but not on natural killer cells, was required for optimal anti-ErbB2 mAb efficacy, and IL21 expression was enhanced in tumor-infiltrating CD4(+) T lymphocytes after anti-ErbB2 therapy. Finally, we found that administering recombinant IL21 in combination with anti-ErbB2 therapy was therapeutic against primary tumors and experimental metastases in mice. Collectively, our findings suggest that elevating IL21 signaling may enhance trastuzumab efficacy, thus constituting a novel candidate strategy to overcome trastuzumab resistance and improve patient survival. Cancer PMID:26744522

  15. Targeted delivery of doxorubicin-utilizing chitosan nanoparticles surface-functionalized with anti-Her2 trastuzumab

    PubMed Central

    Yousefpour, Parisa; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Vasheghani-Farahani, Ebrahim; Movahedi, Ali-Akbar Mousavi; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2011-01-01

    Background Targeting drugs to their sites of action to overcome the systemic side effects associated with most antineoplastic agents is still a major challenge in pharmaceutical research. In this study, the monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab, was used as a targeting agent in nanoparticles carrying the antitumor drug, doxorubicin, specifically to its site of action. Methods Chitosan-doxorubicin conjugation was carried out using succinic anhydride as a crosslinker. Trastuzumab was conjugated to self-assembled chitosan-doxorubin conjugate (CS-DOX) nanoparticles (particle size, 200 nm) via thiolation of lysine residues and subsequent linking of the resulted thiols to chitosan. Conjugation was confirmed by gel permeation chromatography, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies. Dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and zeta potential determination were used to characterize the nanoparticles. Results CS-DOX conjugated nanoparticles had a spherical shape and smooth surface with a narrow size distribution and core-shell structure. Increasing the ratio of doxorubicin to chitosan in the conjugation reaction gave rise to a higher doxorubicin content but lower conjugation efficiency. Trastuzumab-decorated nanoparticles (CS-DOX-mAb) contained 47 μg/mg doxorubicin and 33.5 μg/mg trastuzumab. Binding of trastuzumab to the nanoparticles was further probed thermodynamically by isothermal titration calorimetry. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated enhanced and selective uptake of CS-DOX-mAb by Her2+ cancer cells compared with nontargeted CS-DOX nanoparticles and free drug. Conclusion Antibody-conjugated nanoparticles were shown to discriminate between Her2+ and Her2− cells, and thus have the potential to be used in active targeted drug delivery, with reduction of drug side effects in Her2+ breast and ovarian cancers. PMID:21976974

  16. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-04-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140-250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such as ELISA, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot assays. PMID:23407796

  17. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin

    PubMed Central

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-01-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140–250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such as ELISA, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot assays. PMID:23407796

  18. HER2-positive breast cancer, how far away from the cure?-on the current situation of anti-HER2 therapy in breast cancer treatment and survival of patients.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ning

    2016-06-01

    With the diagnosis and treatment of tumor enter into the area of precision medical, based on selected targeted molecular typing of patients with individualized diagnosis and treatment play an important role. HER gene encoded epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) leading to increased early distant metastasis of breast cancer in patients and poor prognosis. However, a number of clinical studies provided evidence-based anti-HER2 targeted therapy and confirmed the benefit of anti-HER2 targeted therapy in patient survival. In recent years, through the tireless efforts of scholars in the field of breast cancer in our country, the whole diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer has accomplished an international standard. But based on a variety of factors, the anti-HER2 targeted therapy between China and the developed countries, and between different areas in China still exists certain gaps, is now a problem need to be solved. This article will analyzing the diagnostic and treatment on HER2-positive breast cancer in the United States and China, exploring reasons and looking for answers to narrow down the gap in the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer between China and the United States. Improve the anti-HER2 targeted therapy in our country, let the patients get maximum benefit from anti-HER2 targeted therapy. PMID:27265303

  19. Evaluation of anti-HER2 scFv-conjugated PLGA-PEG nanoparticles on 3D tumor spheroids of BT474 and HCT116 cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuy Duong Le, Thi; Pham, Thu Hong; Nghia Nguyen, Trong; Giang Ngo, Thi Hong; Nhung Hoang, Thi My; Huan Le, Quang

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional culture cells (spheroids) are one of the multicellular culture models that can be applied to anticancer chemotherapeutic development. Multicellular spheroids more closely mimic in vivo tumor-like patterns of physiologic environment and morphology. In previous research, we designed docetaxel-loaded pegylated poly(D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles conjugated with anti-HER2 single chain antibodies (scFv-Doc-PLGA-PEG) and evaluated them in 2D cell culture. In this study, we continuously evaluate the cellular uptake and cytotoxic effect of scFv-Doc-PLGA-PEG on a 3D tumor spheroid model of BT474 (HER2-overexpressing) and HCT116 (HER2-underexpressing) cancer cells. The results showed that the nanoparticle formulation conjugated with scFv had a significant internalization effect on the spheroids of HER2-overexpressing cancer cells as compared to the spheroids of HER2-underexpressing cancer cells. Therefore, cytotoxic effects of targeted nanoparticles decreased the size and increased necrotic score of HER2-overexpressing tumor spheroids. Thus, these scFv-Doc-PLGA-PEG nanoparticles have potential for active targeting for HER2-overexpressing cancer therapy. In addition, BT474 and HCT116 spheroids can be used as a tumor model for evaluation of targeting therapies.

  20. A humanized monoclonal antibody targeting Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Patti, Joseph M

    2004-12-01

    This current presentation describes the in vitro and in vivo characterization of Aurexis (tefibazumab), a humanized monoclonal antibody that exhibits a high affinity and specificity and for the Staphylococcus aureus MSCRAMM (Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules) protein ClfA. Aurexis inhibited ClfA binding to human fibrinogen, and enhanced the opsonophagocytic uptake of ClfA-coated beads. Preclinical in vivo testing revealed that a single administration of Aurexis significantly protected against an IV challenge with a methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain in murine septicemia and rabbit infective endocarditis (IE) models. Safety and pharmacokinetic data from a 19-patient phase I study support continued evaluation of Aurexis in phase II studies. PMID:15576200

  1. Orientation and density control of bispecific anti-HER2 antibody on functionalized carbon nanotubes for amplifying effective binding reactivity to cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hye-In; Hwang, Dobeen; Jeon, Su-Ji; Lee, Sangyeop; Park, Jung Hyun; Yim, Dabin; Yang, Jin-Kyoung; Kang, Homan; Choo, Jaebum; Lee, Yoon-Sik; Chung, Junho; Kim, Jong-Ho

    2015-03-01

    Nanomaterial bioconjugates have gained unabated interest in the field of sensing, imaging and therapy. As a conjugation process significantly affects the biological functions of proteins, it is crucial to attach them to nanomaterials with control over their orientation and the nanomaterial-to-protein ratio in order to amplify the binding efficiency of nanomaterial bioconjugates to targets. Here, we describe a targeting nanomaterial platform utilizing carbon nanotubes functionalized with a cotinine-modified dextran polymer and a bispecific anti-HER2 × cotinine tandem antibody. This new approach provides an effective control over antibody orientation and density on the surface of carbon nanotubes through site-specific binding between the anti-cotinine domain of the bispecific tandem antibody and the cotinine group of the functionalized carbon nanotubes. The developed synthetic carbon nanotube/bispecific tandem antibody conjugates (denoted as SNAs) show an effective binding affinity against HER2 that is three orders of magnitude higher than that of the carbon nanotubes bearing a randomly conjugated tandem antibody prepared by carbodiimide chemistry. As the density of a tandem antibody on SNAs increases, their effective binding affinity to HER2 increases as well. SNAs exhibit strong resonance Raman signals for signal transduction, and are successfully applied to the selective detection of HER2-overexpressing cancer cells.Nanomaterial bioconjugates have gained unabated interest in the field of sensing, imaging and therapy. As a conjugation process significantly affects the biological functions of proteins, it is crucial to attach them to nanomaterials with control over their orientation and the nanomaterial-to-protein ratio in order to amplify the binding efficiency of nanomaterial bioconjugates to targets. Here, we describe a targeting nanomaterial platform utilizing carbon nanotubes functionalized with a cotinine-modified dextran polymer and a bispecific anti-HER2

  2. 77 FR 5036 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Human Anti-Mesothelin Monoclonal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... entitled ``Human Monoclonal Antibody Against Mesothelin'' , Australian patent application AU 2009228361 entitled ''Human Monoclonal Antibody Against Mesothelin'' , Canadian patent application CA 2718321 entitled... ``Human Monoclonal Antibody Against Mesothelin'' , U.S. patent application 12/ 934,060 entitled...

  3. First FDA approval of dual anti-HER2 regimen: pertuzumab in combination with trastuzumab and docetaxel for HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Gideon M; Scher, Nancy S; Cortazar, Patricia; Chattopadhyay, Somesh; Tang, Shenghui; Song, Pengfei; Liu, Qi; Ringgold, Kimberly; Pilaro, Anne M; Tilley, Amy; King, Kathryn E; Graham, Laurie; Rellahan, Barbara L; Weinberg, Wendy C; Chi, Bo; Thomas, Colleen; Hughes, Patricia; Ibrahim, Amna; Justice, Robert; Pazdur, Richard

    2013-09-15

    On June 8, 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved pertuzumab (Perjeta, Genentech) for use in combination with trastuzumab (Herceptin, Genentech) and docetaxel for the treatment of patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC) who have not received prior anti-HER2 therapy or chemotherapy for metastatic disease. Approval was based on the results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted in 808 patients with HER2-positive MBC. Patients were randomized (1:1) to receive pertuzumab (n = 402) or placebo (n = 406) in combination with trastuzumab and docetaxel. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) and a key secondary endpoint was overall survival (OS). A statistically significant improvement in PFS (difference in medians of 6.1 months) was observed in patients receiving pertuzumab [HR, 0.62; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.51-0.75; P < 0.0001]. A planned interim analysis suggested an improvement in OS (HR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.47-0.88; P = 0.0053) but the HR and P value did not cross the stopping boundary. Common adverse reactions (>30%) observed in patients on the pertuzumab arm included diarrhea, alopecia, neutropenia, nausea, fatigue, rash, and peripheral neuropathy. No additive cardiac toxicity was observed. Significant manufacturing issues were identified during the review. On the basis of substantial evidence of efficacy for pertuzumab in MBC and the compelling public health need, FDA did not delay availability to patients pending final resolution of all manufacturing concerns. Therefore, FDA approved pertuzumab but limited its approval to lots not affected by manufacturing problems. The applicant agreed to multiple manufacturing and testing postmarketing commitments under third-party oversight to resolve manufacturing issues. PMID:23801166

  4. A novel dendritic cell-based immunization approach for the induction of durable Th1-polarized anti-HER-2/neu responses in women with early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koski, Gary K.; Koldovsky, Ursula; Xu, Shuwen; Mick, Rosemarie; Sharma, Anupama; Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth; Weinstein, Susan; Nisenbaum, Harvey; Levine, Bruce L; Fox, Kevin; Zhang, Paul; Czerniecki, Brian J

    2011-01-01

    Twenty-seven subjects with HER-2/neu over-expressing ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast were enrolled in a neoadjuvant immunization trial for safety and immunogenicity of DC1-polarized dendritic cells (DC1) pulsed with six HER-2/neu promiscuous MHC class II-binding peptides, plus two additional HLA-A2.1 class I-binding peptides. DC1 were generated with IFN-γ plus a special clinical-grade bacterial endotoxin (LPS) and administered directly into groin lymph nodes four times at weekly intervals prior to scheduled surgical resection of DCIS. Subjects were monitored for the induction of new or enhanced anti-peptide reactivity by IFN-γ ELIspot and ELISA assays performed on Th cells obtained from peripheral blood or excised sentinel lymph nodes. Responses by CTL against HLA-A2.1-binding peptides were measured using peptide-pulsed T2 target cells or HER-2/neu-expressing or non-expressing tumor cell lines. DC1 showed surface phenotype indistinct from “gold standard” inflammatory cocktail-activated DC, but displayed a number of distinguishing functional characteristics including the secretion of soluble factors and enhanced “killer DC” capacity against tumor cells in vitro. Post-immunization, we observed sensitization of Th cells to at least 1 class II peptide in 22 of 25 (88%, 95% exact CI 68.8 – 97.5%) evaluable subjects, while eleven of 13 (84.6%, 95% exact CI 64 – 99.8%) HLA-A2.1 subjects were successfully sensitized to class I peptides. Perhaps most importantly, anti-HER-2/neu peptide responses were observed up to 52 months post-immunization. These data show even in the presence of early breast cancer such DC1 are potent inducers of durable type I-polarized immunity, suggesting potential clinical value for development of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:22130160

  5. Evaluation of the anti-HER2 C6.5 diabody as a PET radiotracer to monitor HER2 status and predict response to trastuzumab treatment

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Smitha; Shaller, Calvin C.; Doss, Mohan; Shchaveleva, Irina; Marks, James D.; Yu, Jian Q.; Robinson, Matthew K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The rapid tumor targeting and pharmacokinetic properties of engineered antibodies make them potentially suitable for use in imaging strategies to predict and monitor response to targeted therapies. This study aims to evaluate C6.5 diabody (C6.5db), a non-covalent anti-HER2 single chain-Fv dimer, as a radiotracer for predicting response to HER2-targeted therapies such as trastuzumab. Experimental Design Immunodeficient mice bearing established HER2-positive tumor xenografts were injected with radioiodinated C6.5db and imaged using PET/CT. Radiotracer biodistribution was quantified using biopsied tumor and normal tissues. Potential competition between trastuzumab and C6.5db was examined in vitro by flow cytometry and co-immunoprecipitations. Results Biodistribution analysis of mice bearing xenografts with varying HER2 density revealed that the tumor uptake of 125I-C6.5db correlates with HER2 tumor density. In vitro competition experiments suggest that the C6.5db targets an epitope on HER2 that is distinct from that bound by trastuzumab. Treatment of SK-OV-3-tumored mice with trastuzumab for 3 d caused a 42% (P=0.002) decrease in tumor uptake of 125I-C6.5db. This is consistent with a dramatic decrease in the tumor PET signal of 124I-C6.5db after trastuzumab treatment. Furthermore, BT-474-tumored mice showed a ∼60% decrease (P=0.0026) in C6.5db uptake after 6 d of trastuzumab treatment. Immunohistochemistry of excised xenograft sections and in vitro flow cytometry revealed that the decreased C6.5db uptake upon trastuzumab treatment is not associated with HER2 downregulation. Conclusions These studies suggest that 124I-C6.5db-based imaging can be used to evaluate HER2 levels as a predictor of respone to HER2-directed therapies. PMID:21177408

  6. Structural Basis of Human Parechovirus Neutralization by Human Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Shakeel, Shabih; Westerhuis, Brenda M.; Ora, Ari; Koen, Gerrit; Bakker, Arjen Q.; Claassen, Yvonne; Wagner, Koen; Beaumont, Tim; Wolthers, Katja C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Since it was first recognized in 2004 that human parechoviruses (HPeV) are a significant cause of central nervous system and neonatal sepsis, their clinical importance, primarily in children, has started to emerge. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment is the only treatment available in such life-threatening cases and has given moderate success. Direct inhibition of parechovirus infection using monoclonal antibodies is a potential treatment. We have developed two neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against HPeV1 and HPeV2, namely, AM18 and AM28, which also cross-neutralize other viruses. Here, we present the mapping of their epitopes using peptide scanning, surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence-based thermal shift assays, electron cryomicroscopy, and image reconstruction. We determined by peptide scanning and surface plasmon resonance that AM18 recognizes a linear epitope motif including the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid on the C terminus of capsid protein VP1. This epitope is normally used by the virus to attach to host cell surface integrins during entry and is found in 3 other viruses that AM18 neutralizes. Therefore, AM18 is likely to cause virus neutralization by aggregation and by blocking integrin binding to the capsid. Further, we show by electron cryomicroscopy, three-dimensional reconstruction, and pseudoatomic model fitting that ordered RNA interacts with HPeV1 VP1 and VP3. AM28 recognizes quaternary epitopes on the capsid composed of VP0 and VP3 loops from neighboring pentamers, thereby increasing the RNA accessibility temperature for the virus-AM28 complex compared to the virus alone. Thus, inhibition of RNA uncoating probably contributes to neutralization by AM28. IMPORTANCE Human parechoviruses can cause mild infections to severe diseases in young children, such as neonatal sepsis, encephalitis, and cardiomyopathy. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment is the only treatment available in such life-threatening cases. In order to develop more

  7. Humanization of a chicken anti-IL-12 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Tsurushita, Naoya; Park, Minha; Pakabunto, Kanokwan; Ong, Kelly; Avdalovic, Anamarija; Fu, Helen; Jia, Audrey; Vásquez, Max; Kumar, Shankar

    2004-12-01

    Chicken anti-IL-12 monoclonal antibodies were isolated by phage display using spleen cells from a chicken immunized with human and mouse IL-12 as a source for library construction. One of the chicken monoclonal antibodies, DD2, exhibited binding to both human and mouse IL-12 in the single-chain Fv form and also after conversion to chicken-human chimeric IgG1/lambda antibody. The chicken DD2 variable regions were humanized by transferring their CDRs and several framework amino acids onto human acceptor variable regions. In the Vlambda, six chicken framework amino acids were identified to be important for the conformation of the CDR structure by computer modeling and therefore were retained in the humanized form; likewise, five chicken amino acids in the VH framework regions were retained in the humanized VH. The affinities of humanized DD2 IgG1/lambda to human and mouse IL-12 measured by competitive binding were nearly identical to those of chicken-human chimeric DD2 IgG1/lambda. This work demonstrates that humanization of chicken monoclonal antibodies assisted by computer modeling is possible, leading to a new way to generate therapeutic humanized antibodies against antigens to which the rodent immune system may fail to efficiently raise high affinity antibodies. PMID:15627607

  8. Human antiglioma monoclonal antibodies from patients with astrocytic tumors.

    PubMed

    Dan, M D; Schlachta, C M; Guy, J; McKenzie, R G; Dorscheid, D R; Sandor, V A; Villemure, J G; Price, G B

    1992-04-01

    The current management of malignant gliomas is unsatisfactory compared to that of other solid tumors; the expected median survival period is less than 1 year with the patient undergoing conventional surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy treatment. Immunological reagents could be a useful adjunct. Human monoclonal antibodies derived from patients with astrocytic tumors might recognize subtle antigenic specificities that would differ from those recognized by xenogeneic (murine) systems. Five hybridomas, designated as BT27/1A2, BT27/2A3, BT32/A6, BT34/A5, and BT54/B8, were produced from the fusion of peripheral blood lymphocytes of four patients with astrocytic tumors to the human myeloma-like cell line TM-H2-SP2. This cell line has a 46, XX karyotype and is negative for hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. All five human monoclonal antibodies produced 2.4 to 44 micrograms/ml of immunoglobulin M, had a similar but not identical pattern of reactivity against a panel of human tumor cell lines, and failed to react with normal human astrocytes. Labeling of four neuroectodermal tumor explant cultures by BT27/2A3 was demonstrated by flow cytometry. Karyotyping of three of the five hybridomas demonstrated that two were pseudodiploid (2-3n) and one hypodiploid (less than 2n). The monoclonality of the hybridomas was evaluated by Southern blot analysis of JH gene rearrangements, revealing two types of rearrangements for each hybridoma, both consistent with monoclonality. Preliminary antigen characterization indicated that at least four of the five human monoclonal antibodies were directed to cell-surface glycolipids. PMID:1545260

  9. Immunohistochemical identification of cytotoxic lymphocytes using human perforin monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, A.; Olsen, K. J.; Cheng, L.; Fox, W. M.; Hruban, R. H.; Podack, E. R.

    1992-01-01

    Perforin is a potent cytolytic pore-forming protein expressed in cytoplasmic granules of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. A new monoclonal antibody raised against human perforin was used to detect both in vitro and in vivo perforin expression in cytotoxic cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells cultured in recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) showed strong granular cytoplasmic staining of the IL-2 activated cytotoxic cells. Fresh-frozen tissue sections from patients with heart allograft rejection were also stained. Strong granular cytoplasmic staining of the mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate characteristic for perforin in cardiac allograft rejection was observed. The detection and quantitative analysis of perforin-associated cytotoxic cells by the human anti-perforin monoclonal antibody will help to evaluate the significance of these functionally distinct cytotoxic cells in human tissue. Images Figure 1 PMID:1374586

  10. Development of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against Respiratory Syncytial Virus Using a High Efficiency Human Hybridoma Technique.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Gabriela; Crowe, James E

    2016-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies against RSV have high potential for use as prophylaxis or therapeutic molecules, and they also can be used to define the structure of protective epitopes for rational vaccine design. In the past, however, isolation of human monoclonal antibodies was difficult and inefficient. Here, we describe contemporary methods for activation and proliferation of primary human memory B cells followed by cytofusion to non-secreting myeloma cells by dielectrophoresis to generate human hybridomas secreting RSV-specific monoclonal antibodies. We also provide experimental methods for screening human B cell lines to obtain RSV-specific lines, especially lines secreting neutralizing antibodies. PMID:27464688

  11. 78 FR 7438 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against DR4

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against DR4 AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service... Monoclonal Antibodies Against DR4'' (HHS Ref. No. E-158-2010/0) to Customized Biosciences, Inc., which is... relates to the development of two human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to death receptor 4...

  12. Human tumor antigens identified with monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    AlSedairy, S.T.

    1987-01-01

    MoAbLc1 (IgM) and MoAbLc2 (IgG/sub 2a/) were produced against human lung carcinoma cell line (ChaGo). Lc1 recognizes a approx. = 330-kd/approx. = 310-kd glycoprotein complexes, and Lc2 recognizes a approx. = 60-kd/approx. = 47-kd protein complex. With a panel of cell lines of different tissue origin, Lc1 showed a more restricted reactivity to ChaGo; it cross-reacted with another lung carcinoma cell line (SK-Lc-2) and two breast carcinoma cell lines, but failed to react with cell lines of fetal lung, of colon, esophageal, prostate, stomach, and ovarian carcinomas, of B and T lymphoblastoid cells, neuroblastomas, glioblastoma, astrocytoma, and human peripheral blood lymphocytes. New and improved methods were developed for the production of indium-111-labeled MoAbs for tumor imaging. To facilitate the application of bicyclic anhydride diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (BADTPA) to In-111 labeling of antibodies, we have modified the original method by using C-14-labeled BADTPA, which allows precise quantitation of DTPA molecules incorporated. A new heterobifunctional reagent, 2,6-dioxo-N-(carboxyl)morpholine (DCM) was synthesized for chelating In-111 to MoAbs, and demonstrated higher retention of immunoreactivity of the labeled antibody.

  13. Initial Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies against Human Monocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolini, Valentina; Nunez, Gabriel; Smith, R. Graham; Stastny, Peter; Capra, J. Donald

    1980-11-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies against human monocytes have been produced by somatic cell fusion. Extensive specificity analysis suggests that these antibodies react with most if not all human peripheral blood monocytes and not with highly purified T or B cells. Initial chemical characterization of the monocyte antigen recognized by two of these antibodies is presented. The molecule is a single polypeptide chain with an apparent molecular weight of 200,000. These reagents should prove useful in the clinical definition of disorders of monocyte differentiation, in studies of monocyte function, and in the elucidation of the genetics and structure of monocyte cell surface antigens.

  14. Monoclonal Antibody Cross-Reactions between Drosophila and Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Carol A.; Benzer, Seymour

    1983-12-01

    A panel of 146 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), obtained with Drosophila melanogaster tissue as primary immunogen, was tested for cross-reactivity with the human central nervous system. Sites examined included spinal cord, cerebellum, hippocampus, and optic nerve. Nonnervous tissues tested were liver and lymph node. Approximately half of the antibodies reacted with one or more sites in the human central nervous system, identifying regional, cell class, and subcellular antigens. Some recognized neuronal, glial, or axonal subsets. Immunoblot analysis revealed that some antibodies reacted with similar antigen patterns in both species.

  15. The Use of Monoclonal Antibodies in Human Prion Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodemer, Walter

    Detection of PrP and its pathological isoform(s) is the key to understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. There is ample evidence that PrP isoforms constitute a major component of an unknown and perhaps unconventional infectious agent. An etiological relationship between human and zoonotic transmissible spongiform encephalopathies may be revealed with monoclonal antibodies. Knowledge of the conformational transition rendering a nonpathogenic, almost ubiquitous cellular protein into a pathogenic one is crucial to defining pathomechanisms. The stepwise or even continuous formation of pathogenic molecules can be monitored. Any improvement in the early diagnosis could help to conceive new therapeutic measures which are not currently available. Determination of PrP isoforms in tissue, cells, or body fluids may be of prognostic value. Many experimental approaches in molecular medicine and molecular biology of the prion protein already rely on monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies such as the single-chain Fv may soon replace traditional hybridoma techniques. Binding affinity can easily be manipulated by a number of techniques, including in vitro mutagenesis - a step which could never be carried out using the traditional hybridoma technology. Monoclonal antibodies are and will remain an essential support for ongoing research on the prion protein in general and on the unconventional infectious prions.

  16. Current status of cancer immunodetection with radiolabeled human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    De Jager, R; Abdel-Nabi, H; Serafini, A; Pecking, A; Klein, J L; Hanna, M G

    1993-04-01

    The use of radiolabeled murine monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) for cancer immunodetection has been limited by the development of human antimouse antibodies (HAMA). Human monoclonal antibodies do not elicit a significant human antihuman (HAHA) response. The generation and production of human monoclonal antibodies met with technical difficulties that resulted in delaying their clinical testing. Human monoclonal antibodies of all isotypes have been obtained. Most were immunoglobulin (Ig) M directed against intracellular antigens. Two antibodies, 16.88 (IgM) and 88BV59 (IgG3k), recognize different epitopes on a tumor-associated antigen, CTA 16.88, homologous to cytokeratins 8, 18, and 19. CTA 16.88 is expressed by most epithelial-derived tumors including carcinomas of the colon, pancreas, breast, ovary, and lung. The in vivo targeting by these antibodies is related to their localization in nonnecrotic areas of tumors. Repeated administration of 16.88 over 5 weeks to a cumulative dose of 1,000 mg did not elicit a HAHA response. Two of 53 patients developed a low titer of HAHA 1 to 3 months after a single administration of 88BV59. Planar imaging of colorectal cancer with Iodine-131 (131I)-16.88 was positive in two studies in 9 of 12 and 16 of 20 patients preselected by immunohistochemistry. Tumors less than 2 cm in diameter are usually not detected. The lack of immunogenicity and long tumor residence time (average = 17 days) makes 16.88 a good candidate for therapy. Radioimmunlymphoscintigraphy with indium-111 (111In)-LiLo-16.88 administered by an intramammary route was used in the presurgical staging of primary breast cancer. The negative predictive value of lymph node metastases for tumors less than 3 cm was 90.5%. Planar and single photon emission computed tomography imaging of colorectal carcinoma with technetium-99m (99mTc) 88BV59 was compared with computed tomography (CT) scan in 36 surgical patients. The antibody scan was more sensitive than the CT scan in detecting

  17. Isolation of human monoclonal antibodies from peripheral blood B cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinghe; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Longo, Nancy S; Laub, Leo; Lin, Chien-Li; Turk, Ellen; Kang, Byong H; Migueles, Stephen A; Bailer, Robert T; Mascola, John R; Connors, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Isolation of monoclonal antibodies is an important technique for understanding the specificities and characteristics of antibodies that underlie the humoral immune response to a given antigen. Here we describe a technique for isolating monoclonal antibodies from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The protocol includes strategies for the isolation of switch-memory B cells from peripheral blood, the culture of B cells, the removal of the supernatant for screening and the lysis of B cells in preparation for immunoglobulin heavy-chain and light-chain amplification and cloning. We have observed that the addition of cytokines IL-2, IL-21 and irradiated 3T3-msCD40L feeder cells can successfully stimulate switch-memory B cells to produce high concentrations of IgG in the supernatant. The supernatant may then be screened by appropriate assays for binding or for other functions. This protocol can be completed in 2 weeks. It is adaptable to use in other species and enables the efficient isolation of antibodies with a desired functional characteristic without prior knowledge of specificity. PMID:24030440

  18. A novel high affinity human monoclonal antibody to mesothelin

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Mitchell; Feng, Mingqian; Fisher, Robert J.; Rader, Christoph; Pastan, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Mesothelin is a glycosylphosphatidylinisotol-anchored glycoprotein that is highly expressed on the cell surface of mesothelioma, ovarian cancer and other malignant tumors. The interaction between mesothelin and CA125 (also called MUC16) may facilitate the implantation and metastasis of tumors in the peritoneal cavity. A desirable therapeutic agent involves finding a fully human monoclonal antibody (mAb) that binds to mesothelin or CA125 and inhibits their interaction. Here we report the identification of a novel human mAb to mesothelin. HN1, a human single chain Fv specific for mesothelin, was isolated from a naïve human scFv phage display library. To investigate HN1 as a potential therapeutic, we generated a fully human IgG with the γ 1 heavy chain and the κ light chain, and an immuntoxin by fusing the HN1 scFv to a truncated Pseudomonas exotoxin A. The HN1 IgG kills cancer cells with very strong antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. HN1 binds a conformation-sensitive epitope in human mesothelin with high affinity (KD = 3 nM). The HN1 epitope is different from that of SS1, a mouse Fv used to develop therapeutic antibodies that are currently in clinical trials. HN1 binds to cell surface-associated mesothelin on human mesothelioma, ovarian cancer, lung adenocarcinoma and pancreatic cancer cells. In addition, HN1 can functionally block the interaction of mesothelin and CA125 on cancer cells. Most importantly, because the HN1 immuntoxin kills mesothelin-expressing cancer cells with high cytotoxic activity, we believe that it has significant potential for mesothelin-expressing cancer treatment and diagnosis. PMID:20635390

  19. Characterization of novel neutralizing monoclonal antibodies specific to human neurturin.

    PubMed

    Hongo, J A; Tsai, S P; Moffat, B; Schroeder, K A; Jung, C; Chuntharapai, A; Lampe, P A; Johnson, E M; de Sauvage, F J; Armanini, M; Phillips, H; Devaux, B

    2000-08-01

    Neurturin (NTN) a structural and functional relative of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, was originally identified based on its ability to support the survival of sympathetic neurons in culture. Similar to glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), Neurturin has been shown to bind to a high affinity glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked receptor (GFRalpha2) and induce phosphorylation of the tyrosine kinase receptor Ret, resulting in the activation of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway. A panel of six novel murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to human Neurturin has been developed and characterized. Four of the MAbs tested inhibit, to varying degrees, binding of NTN to the GPI-linked GFRalpha2 receptor. Three MAbs cross-react with the murine homolog. These antibodies have been shown to be useful reagents for Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and also for the development of a sensitive, quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for human NTN. Novel, specific MAbs with varying epitope specificities and blocking activity will be valuable tools for both the in vitro and in vivo characterization of NTN and its relationship to the GFRalpha2 and Ret receptors. PMID:11001403

  20. Tau Monoclonal Antibody Generation Based on Humanized Yeast Models

    PubMed Central

    Rosseels, Joëlle; Van den Brande, Jeff; Violet, Marie; Jacobs, Dirk; Grognet, Pierre; Lopez, Juan; Huvent, Isabelle; Caldara, Marina; Swinnen, Erwin; Papegaey, Anthony; Caillierez, Raphaëlle; Buée-Scherrer, Valerie; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Lippens, Guy; Colin, Morvane; Buée, Luc; Galas, Marie-Christine; Vanmechelen, Eugeen; Winderickx, Joris

    2015-01-01

    A link between Tau phosphorylation and aggregation has been shown in different models for Alzheimer disease, including yeast. We used human Tau purified from yeast models to generate new monoclonal antibodies, of which three were further characterized. The first antibody, ADx201, binds the Tau proline-rich region independently of the phosphorylation status, whereas the second, ADx215, detects an epitope formed by the Tau N terminus when Tau is not phosphorylated at Tyr18. For the third antibody, ADx210, the binding site could not be determined because its epitope is probably conformational. All three antibodies stained tangle-like structures in different brain sections of THY-Tau22 transgenic mice and Alzheimer patients, and ADx201 and ADx210 also detected neuritic plaques in the cortex of the patient brains. In hippocampal homogenates from THY-Tau22 mice and cortex homogenates obtained from Alzheimer patients, ADx215 consistently stained specific low order Tau oligomers in diseased brain, which in size correspond to Tau dimers. ADx201 and ADx210 additionally reacted to higher order Tau oligomers and presumed prefibrillar structures in the patient samples. Our data further suggest that formation of the low order Tau oligomers marks an early disease stage that is initiated by Tau phosphorylation at N-terminal sites. Formation of higher order oligomers appears to require additional phosphorylation in the C terminus of Tau. When used to assess Tau levels in human cerebrospinal fluid, the antibodies permitted us to discriminate patients with Alzheimer disease or other dementia like vascular dementia, indicative that these antibodies hold promising diagnostic potential. PMID:25540200

  1. Monoclonal antibodies to human butyrylcholinesterase reactive with butyrylcholinesterase in animal plasma.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong; Brimijoin, Stephen; Hrabovska, Anna; Krejci, Eric; Blake, Thomas A; Johnson, Rudolph C; Masson, Patrick; Lockridge, Oksana

    2016-01-01

    Five mouse anti-human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) monoclonal antibodies bind tightly to native human BChE with nanomolar dissociation constants. Pairing analysis in the Octet system identified the monoclonal antibodies that bind to overlapping and independent epitopes on human BChE. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of 4 monoclonal antibodies are deposited in GenBank. Our goal was to determine which of the 5 monoclonal antibodies recognize BChE in the plasma of animals. Binding of monoclonal antibodies 11D8, B2 18-5, B2 12-1, mAb2 and 3E8 to BChE in animal plasma was measured using antibody immobilized on Pansorbin cells and on Dynabeads Protein G. A third method visualized binding by the shift of BChE activity bands on nondenaturing gels stained for BChE activity. Gels were counterstained for carboxylesterase activity. The three methods agreed that B2 18-5 and mAb2 have broad species specificity, but the other monoclonal antibodies interacted only with human BChE, the exception being 3E8, which also bound chicken BChE. B2 18-5 and mAb2 recognized BChE in human, rhesus monkey, horse, cat, and tiger plasma. A weak response was found with rabbit BChE. Monoclonal mAb2, but not B2 18-5, bound pig and bovine BChE. Gels stained for carboxylesterase activity confirmed that plasma from humans, monkey, pig, chicken, and cow does not contain carboxylesterase, but plasma from horse, cat, tiger, rabbit, guinea pig, mouse, and rat has carboxylesterase. Rabbit plasma carboxylesterase hydrolyzes butyrylthiocholine. In conclusion monoclonal antibodies B2 18-5 and mAb2 can be used to immuno extract BChE from the plasma of humans, monkey and other animals. PMID:26585590

  2. Monoclonal antibodies specific for human monocytes, granulocytes and endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, N; MacDonald, S; Slusarenko, M; Beverley, P C

    1984-01-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies against antigens of human myeloid cells have been produced and thoroughly characterized in terms of their reactions with peripheral blood cells, cell lines, nine lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues and the polypeptides with which they react. UCHM1 and SmO identify antigens present on the majority of blood monocytes and a variable, but lower, proportion of tissue macrophages. From their morphology and location in tissues, these cells appear to be recirculating monocytes. SMO antigen is also present on platelets. In addition, both antibodies stained endothelial cells, SMO in all tissues examined and UCHM1 variably. Biochemical investigation indicated that the UCHM1 antigen is a protein of 52,000 MW while the SMO antigen could not be indentified. The antibodies TG1 and 28 identify antigens mainly present on granulocytes. While mAb 28 reacted with neutrophils, TG1 also stained eosinophils and stained strongly a proportion of monocytes. TG1 also reacted variably with some non-haemopoietic cell lines. Both antibodies reacted predominantly with granulocytes in tissue sections. MAb TG1 precipitated a single polypeptide of 156,000 MW from monocytes and granulocytes, while mAb 28 precipitated non-convalently associated polypeptides of 83,000 and 155,000 MW from granulocytes but only a single molecule from monocytes, corresponding to the lower MW chain of 83,000. The epitope with which mAb 28 reacts appears not to be exposed on the surface of intact monocytes. This suggests that a similar or identical 83,000 MW molecule is made by both neutrophils and monocytes, but that its expression differs according to cell type. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:6389324

  3. The Use of Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies for the Prevention of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Arcuri, Santo; Galletti, Silvia; Faldella, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are widely used both in infants and in adults for several indications. Humanized monoclonal antibodies (palivizumab) have been used for many years for the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection in pediatric populations (preterm infants, infants with chronic lung disease or congenital heart disease) at high risk of severe and potentially lethal course of the infection. This drug was reported to be safe, well tolerated and effective to decrease the hospitalization rate and mortality in these groups of infants by several clinical trials. In the present paper we report the development and the current use of monoclonal antibodies for prophylaxis against respiratory syncytial virus. PMID:23840240

  4. A Spectrum of Monoclonal Antibodies Reactive with Human Mammary Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colcher, D.; Horan Hand, P.; Nuti, M.; Schlom, J.

    1981-05-01

    Splenic lymphocytes of mice, immunized with membrane-enriched fractions of metastatic human mammary carcinoma tissues, were fused with the NS-1 non-immunoglobulin-secreting murine myeloma cell line. This resulted in the generation of hybridoma cultures secreting immunoglobulins reactive in solid-phase radioimmunoassays with extracts of metastatic mammary carcinoma cells from involved livers, but not with extracts of apparently normal human liver. As a result of further screening of immunoglobulin reactivities and double cloning of cultures, 11 monoclonal antibodies were chosen that demonstrated reactivities with human mammary tumor cells and not with apparently normal human tissues. These monoclonal antibodies could be placed into at least five major groups on the basis of their differential binding to the surface of various live human mammary tumor cells in culture, to extracts of mammary tumor tissues, or to tissue sections of mammary tumor cells studied by the immunoperoxidase technique. Whereas a spectrum of reactivities to mammary tumors was observed with the 11 monoclonal antibodies, no reactivity was observed to apparently normal cells of the following human tissues: breast, lymph node, lung, skin, testis, kidney, thymus, bone marrow, spleen, uterus, thyroid, intestine, liver, bladder, tonsils, stomach, prostate, and salivary gland. Several of the antibodies also demonstrated a ``pancarcinoma'' reactivity, showing binding to selected non-breast carcinomas. None of the monoclonal antibodies showed binding to purified ferritin or carcinoembryonic antigen. Monoclonal antibodies of all five major groups, however, demonstrated binding to human metastatic mammary carcinoma cells both in axillary lymph nodes and at distal sites.

  5. Modulation of p36 phosphorylation in human cells: studies using anti-p36 monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Isacke, C M; Trowbridge, I S; Hunter, T

    1986-01-01

    We have characterized two monoclonal antibodies which recognize human p36. These have been used to examine the sites and extent of serine and tyrosine phosphorylation of p36 in human cells treated with epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor and in human cells transformed with viruses whose oncogenes encode protein-tyrosine kinases. Images PMID:2946941

  6. Localization of human tumour xenografts after i.v. administration of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Moshakis, V; McIlhinney, R A; Raghavan, D; Neville, A M

    1981-07-01

    A mouse monoclonal antibody (LICR-LON/HT13) has been developed to a cell-surface antigen carried on a human germ-cell tumour xenograft (HX39). After radioiodination, the antibody localized in vivo preferentially in xenografted tumours as opposed to normal mouse tissue, whereas tumor uptake did not occur with normal mouse IgG or nonspecific monoclonal IgG. This selective localization could be abolished by simultaneous injection of an excess of the unlabelled LICR-LON/HT13. The kinetics of and factors influencing localization have been examined. Tumour weight was important in that the smaller the tumour the better the localization. LICR-LON/HT13 was found to localize also in other xenografted germ-cell tumours, but not in non-germ-cell tumour xenografts. Thus monoclonal antibodies are capable of selective in vivo localization of human tumours in an animal model, and their clinical value should now be assessed. PMID:6789857

  7. Characterization of pathogenic human monoclonal autoantibodies against GM-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanni; Thomson, Christy A.; Allan, Lenka L.; Jackson, Linda M.; Olson, Melanie; Hercus, Timothy R.; Nero, Tracy L.; Turner, Amanda; Parker, Michael W.; Lopez, Angel L.; Waddell, Thomas K.; Anderson, Gary P.; Hamilton, John A.; Schrader, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of pathogenic autoantibodies remains unknown. Idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is caused by autoantibodies against granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We generated 19 monoclonal autoantibodies against GM-CSF from six patients with idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The autoantibodies used multiple V genes, excluding preferred V-gene use as an etiology, and targeted at least four nonoverlapping epitopes on GM-CSF, suggesting that GM-CSF is driving the autoantibodies and not a B-cell epitope on a pathogen cross-reacting with GM-CSF. The number of somatic mutations in the autoantibodies suggests that the memory B cells have been helped by T cells and re-entered germinal centers. All autoantibodies neutralized GM-CSF bioactivity, with general correlations to affinity and off-rate. The binding of certain autoantibodies was changed by point mutations in GM-CSF that reduced binding to the GM-CSF receptor. Those monoclonal autoantibodies that potently neutralize GM-CSF may be useful in treating inflammatory disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, cancer, and pain. PMID:23620516

  8. Human monoclonal antibodies specific to hepatitis B virus generated in a human/mouse radiation chimera: the Trimera system.

    PubMed

    Eren, R; Lubin, I; Terkieltaub, D; Ben-Moshe, O; Zauberman, A; Uhlmann, R; Tzahor, T; Moss, S; Ilan, E; Shouval, D; Galun, E; Daudi, N; Marcus, H; Reisner, Y; Dagan, S

    1998-02-01

    An approach to develop fully human monoclonal antibodies in a human/mouse radiation chimera, the Trimera system, is described. In this system, functional human lymphocytes are engrafted in normal strains of mice which are rendered immuno-incompetent by lethal total body irradiation followed by radioprotection with severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse bone marrow. Following transplantation, human lymphocytes colonize murine lymphatic organs and secrete human immunoglobulins. We have established this system as a tool to develop fully human monoclonal antibodies, and applied it for the generation of monoclonal antibodies specific for hepatitis B virus surface antigen. A strong memory response to hepatitis B surface antigen was elicited in Trimera engrafted with lymphocytes from human donors positive for antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen. The human specific antibody fraction in the Trimera was 10(2)-10(3)-fold higher as compared with that found in the donors. Spleens were harvested from Trimera mice showing high specific-antibody titres and cells were fused to a human-mouse heteromyeloma fusion partner. Several stable hybridoma clones were isolated and characterized. These hybridomas produce high-affinity, IgG, anti-hepatitis B surface antigen antibodies demonstrating the potential of the Trimera system for generating fully human monoclonal antibodies. The biological function and the neutralizing activity of these antibodies are currently being tested. PMID:9616363

  9. Harnessing the immune system's arsenal: producing human monoclonal antibodies for therapeutics and investigating immune responses.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Meghan; Kaur, Kaval; Pauli, Noel; Wilson, Patrick C

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody technology has undergone rapid and innovative reinvention over the last 30 years. Application of these technologies to human samples revealed valuable therapeutic and experimental insights. These technologies, each with their own benefits and flaws, have proven indispensable for immunological research and in our fight to provide new treatments and improved vaccines for infectious disease. PMID:21876728

  10. Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-2 in Neuroblastoma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology (NCI LMB) have developed and isolated several single domain monoclonal human antibodies against GPC2. NCI seeks parties interested in licensing or co-developing GPC2 antibodies and/or conjugates.

  11. Development of human neutralizing monoclonal antibodies for prevention and therapy of MERS-CoV infections

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Tianlei; Li, Haoyang; Lu, Lu; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Jiang, Shibo

    2014-01-01

    The recent Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) outbreak poses a serious threat to public health. Here, we summarize recent advances in identifying human neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against MERS-CoV, describe their mechanisms of action, and analyze their potential for treatment of MERS-CoV infections. PMID:25456101

  12. Characterization of a humanized monoclonal antibody recognizing clumping factor A expressed by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Domanski, Paul J; Patel, Pratiksha R; Bayer, Arnold S; Zhang, Li; Hall, Andrea E; Syribeys, Peter J; Gorovits, Elena L; Bryant, Dawn; Vernachio, John H; Hutchins, Jeff T; Patti, Joseph M

    2005-08-01

    We report the humanization and characterization of monoclonal antibody (MAb) T1-2 or tefibazumab, a monoclonal antibody that recognizes clumping factor A expressed on the surface of Staphylococcus aureus. We demonstrate that the binding kinetics of MAb T1-2 is indistinguishable compared to that of its murine parent. Furthermore, MAb T1-2 is shown to enhance the opsonophagocytic uptake of ClfA-coated latex beads, protect against an intravenous challenge in a prophylactic model of rabbit infective endocarditis, and enhance the efficacy of vancomycin therapy in a therapeutic model of established infective endocarditis. PMID:16041045

  13. Sequential Antigen Panning for Selection of Broadly Cross-Reactive HIV-1-Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei-Yun; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Many phage display techniques drive selection toward the isolation of highly specific antibodies. However, the identification of monoclonal antibodies that are cross-reactive has implications for the development of diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines against pathogens or cancer cells that are able to rapidly generate variants and escape mutants. To identify human monoclonal antibodies with high activity against HIV and broad-spectrum activity, we developed a technique termed sequential antigen panning. This methodology could be used to isolated recombinant antibodies against any antigen that shares epitopes with other antigens. PMID:19554293

  14. Monoclonal antibodies to antigens on human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemia blast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miterev, G.Yu.; Burova, G.F.; Puzhitskaya, M.S.; Danilevich, S.V.; Bulycheva, T.I.

    1987-11-01

    The authors describe the production of two mouse hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies to antigenic determinants of the surface membranes of human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemic blast cells. The degree of lymphocyte stimulation was estimated from incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine with parallel microculture. Monoclonal antibodies of supernatants of hybridoma cultures shown here reacted in both immunofluorescence test and cytotoxicity test with surface membrane antigens on the majority of neutrophils and PHA-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy subjects, but did not give positive reactions with unactivated lymphocytes, adherent monocytes, erythrocytes, and alloantigen-stimulated lymphocytes.

  15. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-09-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases.

  16. Identification of human plasma cells with a lamprey monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cuiling; Liu, Yanling; Chan, Justin Tze Ho; Tong, Jiefei; Li, Zhihua; Shi, Mengyao; Davani, Dariush; Parsons, Marion; Khan, Srijit; Zhan, Wei; Kyu, Shuya; Grunebaum, Eyal; Campisi, Paolo; Propst, Evan J.; Jaye, David L.; Trudel, Suzanne; Moran, Michael F.; Ostrowski, Mario; Herrin, Brantley R.; Lee, F. Eun-Hyung; Sanz, Ignacio; Cooper, Max D.; Ehrhardt, Götz R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Ab-producing plasma cells (PCs) serve as key participants in countering pathogenic challenges as well as being contributors to autoimmune and malignant disorders. Thus far, only a limited number of PC–specific markers have been identified. The characterization of the unique variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) Abs that are made by evolutionarily distant jawless vertebrates prompted us to investigate whether VLR Abs could detect novel PC antigens that have not been recognized by conventional Abs. Here, we describe a monoclonal lamprey Ab, VLRB MM3, that was raised against primary multiple myeloma cells. VLRB MM3 recognizes a unique epitope of the CD38 ectoenzyme that is present on plasmablasts and PCs from healthy individuals and on most, but not all, multiple myelomas. Binding by the VLRB MM3 Ab coincides with CD38 dimerization and NAD glycohydrolase activity. Our data demonstrate that the lamprey VLRB MM3 Ab is a unique reagent for the identification of plasmablasts and PCs, with potential applications in the diagnosis and therapeutic intervention of PC or autoimmune disorders. PMID:27152361

  17. 76 FR 63317 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Human Anti-Mesothelin Monoclonal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ...This is notice, in accordance with 35 U.S.C. 209(c)(1) and 37 CFR part 404.7(a)(1)(i), that the National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, is contemplating the grant of an exclusive patent license to practice the inventions embodied in U.S. Patent Application 61/040,005 entitled ``Human Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Mesothelin'' [HHS Ref. E-079-2008/0-US-01],......

  18. Neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies to conformational epitopes of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 gp46.

    PubMed Central

    Hadlock, K G; Rowe, J; Perkins, S; Bradshaw, P; Song, G Y; Cheng, C; Yang, J; Gascon, R; Halmos, J; Rehman, S M; McGrath, M S; Foung, S K

    1997-01-01

    Ten human monoclonal antibodies derived from peripheral B cells of a patient with human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-associated myelopathy are described. One monoclonal antibody recognized a linear epitope within the carboxy-terminal 43 amino acids of HTLV gp21, and two monoclonal antibodies recognized linear epitopes within HTLV type 1 (HTLV-1) gp46. The remaining seven monoclonal antibodies recognized denaturation-sensitive epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46 that were expressed on the surfaces of infected cells. Two of these antibodies also bound to viable HTLV-2 infected cells and immunoprecipitated HTLV-2 gp46. Virus neutralization was determined by syncytium inhibition assays. Eight monoclonal antibodies, including all seven that recognized denaturation-sensitive epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46, possessed significant virus neutralization activity. By competitive inhibition analysis it was determined that these antibodies recognized at least four distinct conformational epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46. These findings indicate the importance of conformational epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46 in mediating a neutralizing antibody response to HTLV infection. PMID:9223472

  19. Generation and Characterization of Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibodies against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Tat Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Emmanuel; Hoebeke, Johan; Zagury, Daniel; Muller, Sylviane; Desgranges, Claude

    2004-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus Tat regulatory protein is essential for virus replication and pathogenesis. From human peripheral blood mononuclear cells of three Tat toxoid-immunized volunteers, we isolated five Tat-specific human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs): two full-length immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies and three single-chain fragment-variable (scFv) antibodies. The two IgGs were mapped to distinct epitopes within the basic region of Tat, and the three scFvs were mapped to the N-terminal domain of Tat. The three scFvs were highly reactive with recombinant Tat in Western blotting or immunoprecipitation, but results were in contrast to those for the two IgGs, which are sensitive to a particular folding of the protein. In transactivation assays, scFvs were able to inhibit both active recombinant Tat and native Tat secreted by a transfected CEM cell line while IgGs neutralized only native Tat. These HMAbs were able to reduce viral p24 production in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strain IIIB chronically infected cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:15016898

  20. Directed Selection of Recombinant Human Monoclonal Antibodies to Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoproteins from Phage Display Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, Pietro Paolo; Williamson, R. Anthony; de Logu, Alessandro; Bloom, Floyd E.; Burton, Dennis R.

    1995-07-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies have considerable potential in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral disease. However, only a few such antibodies suitable for clinical use have been produced to date. We have previously shown that large panels of human recombinant monoclonal antibodies against a plethora of infectious agents, including herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, can be established from phage display libraries. Here we demonstrate that facile cloning of recombinant Fab fragments against specific viral proteins in their native conformation can be accomplished by panning phage display libraries against viral glycoproteins "captured" from infected cell extracts by specific monoclonal antibodies immobilized on ELISA plates. We have tested this strategy by isolating six neutralizing recombinant antibodies specific for herpes simplex glycoprotein gD or gB, some of which are against conformationally sensitive epitopes. By using defined monoclonal antibodies for the antigen-capture step, this method can be used for the isolation of antibodies to specific regions and epitopes within the target viral protein. For instance, monoclonal antibodies to a nonneutralizing epitope can be used in the capture step to clone antibodies to neutralizing epitopes, or antibodies to a neutralizing epitope can be used to clone antibodies to a different neutralizing epitope. Furthermore, by using capturing antibodies to more immunodominant epitopes, one can direct the cloning to less immunogenic ones. This method should be of value in generating antibodies to be used both in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral infections and in the characterization of the mechanisms of antibody protective actions at the molecular level.

  1. The Cloning and Expression of Human Monoclonal Antibodies: Implications for Allergen Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    James, Louisa K

    2016-02-01

    Allergic responses are dependent on the highly specific effector functions of IgE antibodies. Conversely, antibodies that block the activity of IgE can mediate tolerance to allergen. Technologies that harness the unparalleled specificity of antibody responses have revolutionized the way that we diagnose and treat human disease. This area of research continues to advance at a rapid pace and has had a significant impact on our understanding of allergic disease. This review will present an overview of humoral responses and provide an up-to-date summary of technologies used in the generation of human monoclonal antibodies. The impact that monoclonal antibodies have on allergic disease will be discussed, with a particular focus on allergen immunotherapy, which remains the only form of treatment that can modulate the underlying immune mechanisms and induce long-term clinical tolerance. PMID:26780523

  2. Monoclonal antibodies to human hemoglobin S and cell lines for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.; Branscomb, E.W.; Grabske, R.J.

    1984-11-29

    The present invention provides monoclonal antibodies specific to and distinguishing between hemoglobin S and hemoglobin A and methods for their production and use. These antibodies are capable of distinguishing between two hemoglobin types which differ from each other by only a single amino acid residue. The antibodies produced according to the present method are useful as immunofluorescent markers to enumerate circulating red blood cells which have the property of altered expression of the hemoglobin gene due to somatic mutation in stem cells. Such a measurement is contemplated as an assay for in vivo cellular somatic mutations in humans. Since the monoclonal antibodies produced in accordance with the instant invention exhibit a high degree of specificity to and greater affinity for hemoglobin S, they are suitable for labeling human red blood cells for flow cytometric detection of hemoglobin genotype. 4 figs.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies to human hemoglobin S and cell lines for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Ronald H.; Vanderlaan, Martin; Bigbee, William L.; Stanker, Larry H.; Branscomb, Elbert W.; Grabske, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    The present invention provides monoclonal antibodies specific to and distinguish between hemoglobin S and hemoglobin A and methods for their production and use. These antibodies are capable of distinguishing between two hemoglobin types which differ from each other by only a single amino acid residue. The antibodies produced according to the present method are useful as immunofluorescent markers to enumerate circulating red blood cells which have the property of altered expression of the hemoglobin gene due to somatic mutation in stem cells. Such a measurement is contemplated as an assay for in vivo cellular somatic mutations in humans. Since the monoclonal antibodies produced in accordance with the instant invention exhibit a high degree of specificity to and greater affinity for hemoglobin S, they are suitable for labeling human red blood cells for flow cytometric detection of hemoglobin genotype.

  4. New monoclonal-antibody two-site solid-phase immunoradiometric assay for human thyrotropin evaluated

    SciTech Connect

    Pekary, A.E.; Hershman, J.M.

    1984-07-01

    The authors compared results with a commercial solid-phase two-site immunoradiometric assay kit for human thyrotropin in which monoclonal antibodies are used with those by our radioimmunoassay, which is optimized for measurement of low concentrations of thyrotropin. In the immunoradiometric assay a specific antibody to the beta subunit of human thyrotropin is immobilized on a polystyrene bead, and a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody directed against the alpha subunit provides a measure of bead-immobilized hormone. The mean thyrotropin concentrations in 70 euthyroid serum samples were similar in the two assays. Values for hypothyroid patients were clearly higher in both assays than values for euthyroid individuals. In commercial assays the major source of error in measurement of thyrotropin response to thyroliberin in terms of the increment over the basal concentration of thyrotropin has been systematic errors in the measurement of those basal concentrations. With the present assay, however, basal values are obtained with good precision and accuracy.

  5. Structure of a human monoclonal antibody Fab fragment against gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, X. M.; Ruker, F.; Casale, E.; Carter, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a human monoclonal antibody (Fab), which binds specifically to a major epitope of the transmembrane protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1, has been determined by crystallographic methods to a resolution of 2.7 A. It has been previously determined that this antibody recognizes the epitope SGKLICTTAVPWNAS, belongs to the subclass IgG1 (kappa), and exhibits antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The quaternary structure of the Fab is in an extended conformation with an elbow bend angle between the constant and variable domains of 175 degrees. Structurally, four of the hypervariable loops can be classified according to previously recognized canonical structures. The third hypervariable loops of the heavy (H3) and light chain (L3) are structurally distinct. Hypervariable loop H3, residues 102H-109H, is unusually extended from the surface. The complementarity-determining region forms a hydrophobic binding pocket that is created primarily from hypervariable loops L3, H3, and H2.

  6. A high affinity monoclonal antibody recognizing the light chain of human coagulating factor VII.

    PubMed

    Sarial, Sheila; Asadi, Farzad; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Hadavi, Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Taghizadeh-Jahed, Masoud; Shokri, Fazel; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2012-12-01

    Factor VII (FVII) is a serine protease-coagulating element responsible for the initiation of an extrinsic pathway of clot formation. Here we generated and characterized a high affinity monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes human FVII. Recombinant human FVII (rh-FVII) was used for the production of a monoclonal antibody using BALB/c mice. The specificity of the antibody was determined by Western blot using plasma samples from human, mouse, sheep, goat, bovine, rabbit, and rat. Furthermore, the antibody was used to detect transiently expressed rh-FVII in BHK21 cell line using Western blot and sandwich ELISA. A mouse IgG1 (kappa chain) monoclonal antibody clone 1F1-B11 was produced against rh-FVII. The affinity constant (K(aff)) of the antibody was calculated to be 6.4×10(10) M(-1). The antibody could specifically recognize an epitope on the light chain of hFVII, with no reactivity with factor VII from several other animals. In addition, transiently expressed rh-FVII in BHK21 cells was recognized by 1F1-B11. The high affinity as well as the specificity of 1F1-B11 for hFVII will facilitate the affinity purification of hFVII and also production of FVII deficient plasma and minimizes the risk of bovine FVII contamination when fetal bovine serum-supplemented media are used for production and subsequent purification of rh-FVII. PMID:23244324

  7. Monoclonal antibodies directed against VP7 protein of human group B rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiaojie; Xiong, Guomei; Cong, Wenjuan; Liu, Zhonglai; Qi, Chao; Yang, Jihong

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare and identify a monoclonal antibody that binds the viral proteins 7 (VP7 protein) of human group B rotavirus (GBRV) and to describe its immunologic characterization. Human group B rotavirus vp7 gene was successfully ligated into pGEX-KG vector and transformed into Escherichia coli TOP10 cells. The glutathione S-transferases (GST)-fusion protein GST-VP7 was induced by Isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) and immediately purified to immunize BALB/c mice. Splenocytes were then prepared from the immunized mouse and fused with SP2/0 myeloma cell line. In the end we obtained one positive hybridoma cell line stably secreting monoclonal antibody against GST-VP7 protein by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and limiting dilution. The production of the monoclonal antibody against GBRV will benefit the further study of GBRV's structures and functions and also lay a solid foundation for the research of disease prevention, clinical diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24555935

  8. Imaging of bone tumors using a monoclonal antibody raised against human osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, N.C.; Perkins, A.C.; Pimm, M.V.; Wastie, M.; Hopkins, J.S.; Dowling, F.; Baldwin, R.W.; Hardcastle, J.D.

    1986-07-01

    The radiolabeled monoclonal antibody 791T/36 raised against a human osteosarcoma was injected into 20 patients with known or suspected bone tumors. Gamma camera images were acquired at 48 or 72 hours after injection, and assessed for antibody localization. Positive images were obtained in all five osteosarcomas and four other primary malignant sarcomas. Two of the four other primary bone tumors gave positive images. Three patients with trauma had negative images as did one patient with Paget's disease. Two patients with suppurative disease gave positive images. The antibody localized in the majority of malignant sarcomas tested. In one tumor where tissue was available, a tumor:non-tumor ratio of 2.8:1 was measured. Repeat imaging was performed in five patients. Immunoscintigraphy using the monoclonal antibody 791T/36 has shown tumor localization in patients with bone and soft tissue sarcomas.

  9. Development of monoclonal antibodies against parathyroid hormone: genetic control of the immune response to human PTH

    SciTech Connect

    Nussbaum, S.R.; Lin, C.S.; Potts, J.T. Jr.; Rosenthal, A.S.; Rosenblatt, M.

    1985-01-01

    Seventeen monocloanl antibodies against the aminoterminal portion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) were generated by using BALB/c mouse for immunization fully biologically active synthetic human PTH-(1-34) and bovine PTH-(1-84) as immunogens, monoclonal antibody methods, and a solid-phase screening assay. Isotypic analysis of these monoclonal antibodies was performed using affinity purified goat antimouse immunoglobulins specific for IgG heavy chains and ..mu..(IgM). All antibodies were IgM as evidenced by 40 times greater than background activity when 25,000 cpm of /sup 125/I-labelled goat anti-mouse IgM was used as second antibody in a radioimmunoassay.

  10. Characterization of Two Human Monoclonal Antibodies Neutralizing Influenza A H7N9 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianmin; Chen, Zhe; Bao, Linlin; Zhang, Weijia; Xue, Ying; Pang, XingHuo; Zhang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    H7N9 was a cause of significant global health concern due to its severe infection and approximately 35% mortality in humans. By screening a Fab antibody phage library derived from patients who recovered from H7N9 infections, we characterized two human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs), HNIgGD5 and HNIgGH8. The epitope of these two antibodies was dependent on two residues in the receptor binding site at positions V186 and L226 of the hemagglutinin glycoprotein. Both antibodies possessed high neutralizing activity. PMID:26063436

  11. A Fully Human Inhibitory Monoclonal Antibody to the Wnt Receptor RYK

    PubMed Central

    Parish, Clare L.; Takano, Elena A.; Fox, Stephen; Layton, Daniel; Nice, Edouard; Stacker, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    RYK is an unusual member of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family that is classified as a putative pseudokinase. RYK regulates fundamental biological processes including cell differentiation, migration and target selection, axon outgrowth and pathfinding by transducing signals across the plasma membrane in response to the high affinity binding of Wnt family ligands to its extracellular Wnt inhibitory factor (WIF) domain. Here we report the generation and initial characterization of a fully human inhibitory monoclonal antibody to the human RYK WIF domain. From a naïve human single chain fragment variable (scFv) phage display library, we identified anti-RYK WIF domain–specific scFvs then screened for those that could compete with Wnt3a for binding. Production of a fully human IgG1κ from an inhibitory scFv yielded a monoclonal antibody that inhibits Wnt5a-responsive RYK function in a neurite outgrowth assay. This antibody will have immediate applications for modulating RYK function in a range of settings including development and adult homeostasis, with significant potential for therapeutic use in human pathologies. PMID:24058687

  12. A fully human inhibitory monoclonal antibody to the Wnt receptor RYK.

    PubMed

    Halford, Michael M; Macheda, Maria L; Parish, Clare L; Takano, Elena A; Fox, Stephen; Layton, Daniel; Nice, Edouard; Stacker, Steven A

    2013-01-01

    RYK is an unusual member of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family that is classified as a putative pseudokinase. RYK regulates fundamental biological processes including cell differentiation, migration and target selection, axon outgrowth and pathfinding by transducing signals across the plasma membrane in response to the high affinity binding of Wnt family ligands to its extracellular Wnt inhibitory factor (WIF) domain. Here we report the generation and initial characterization of a fully human inhibitory monoclonal antibody to the human RYK WIF domain. From a naïve human single chain fragment variable (scFv) phage display library, we identified anti-RYK WIF domain-specific scFvs then screened for those that could compete with Wnt3a for binding. Production of a fully human IgG1κ from an inhibitory scFv yielded a monoclonal antibody that inhibits Wnt5a-responsive RYK function in a neurite outgrowth assay. This antibody will have immediate applications for modulating RYK function in a range of settings including development and adult homeostasis, with significant potential for therapeutic use in human pathologies. PMID:24058687

  13. Development of new versions of anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies with potentially reduced immunogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Weizhu; Wang Ling; Li Bohua; Wang Hao; Hou Sheng; Hong Xueyu; Zhang Dapeng; Guo Yajun

    2008-03-07

    Despite the widespread clinical use of CD34 antibodies for the purification of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, all the current anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are murine, which have the potential to elicit human antimouse antibody (HAMA) immune response. In the present study, we developed three new mouse anti-human CD34 mAbs which, respectively, belonged to class I, class II and class III CD34 epitope antibodies. In an attempt to reduce the immunogenicity of these three murine mAbs, their chimeric antibodies, which consisted of mouse antibody variable regions fused genetically to human antibody constant regions, were constructed and characterized. The anti-CD34 chimeric antibodies were shown to possess affinity and specificity similar to that of their respective parental murine antibodies. Due to the potentially better safety profiles, these chimeric antibodies might become alternatives to mouse anti-CD34 antibodies routinely used for clinical application.

  14. Expression of CR2/EBV receptors on human thymocytes detected by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tsoukas, C D; Lambris, J D

    1988-08-01

    The biologic effects of the third component of complement, C3, are mediated via receptors which specifically bind the enzymatic degradation products resulting from the cleavage of C3. One of the products, C3d, has been associated with binding to the second complement receptor CR2 (CD21). This receptor, which is identical to the receptor for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), has been primarily found on cells of the B lineage, but not on mature T cells or other cells of erythroid or myeloid lineages. In the present investigation, we report the presence of CR2 on human thymocytes. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis employing monoclonal anti-CR2 antibodies revealed a range of thymocyte reactivity from 15% to 63% in thirteen experiments using cells of different donors. Reactivity was always greater with the monoclonal anti-CR2 (CD21) antibody HB-5 than with two other antibodies which recognize distinct epitopes on the CR2 molecule. Two-color immunofluorescence analysis indicated that the brightest of the HB-5-stained thymocytes also reacted with the monoclonal anti-CD1 antibody T6 (immature thymocyte marker) while some of the duller HB-5-staining cells reacted with the monoclonal anti-CD3 antibody Leu-4 (mature thymocyte marker). Immunoprecipitation of CR2 on thymocytes with antibody HB-5 and polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis revealed a protein of 145 kDa molecular mass which is consistent with the size of CR2 found on B lymphocytes. These findings raise several questions regarding the biologic role of CR2-EBV receptor on cells of the T lineage. PMID:2970972

  15. Topographic antigenic determinants recognized by monoclonal antibodies on human choriogonadotropin beta-subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Bidart, J.M.; Troalen, F.; Salesse, R.; Bousfield, G.R.; Bohuon, C.J.; Bellet, D.H.

    1987-06-25

    We describe a first attempt to study the antibody-combining sites recognized by monoclonal antibodies raised against the beta-subunit of human choriogonadotropin (hCG). Two groups of antibodies were first defined by their ability to recognize only the free beta-subunit or the free and combined subunit. Antibodies FBT-11 and FBT-11-L bind only to hCG beta-subunit but not to hCG, whereas antibodies FBT-10 and D1E8 bind to both the beta-subunit and the hormone. In both cases, the antigenic determinants were localized to the core of the protein (residues 1-112), indicating the weak immunogenicity of the specific carboxyl-terminal extension of hCG-beta. Nine synthetic peptides spanning different regions of hCG-beta and lutropin-beta were assessed for their capacity to inhibit antibody binding. A synthetic peptide inclusive of the NH2-terminal region (residues 1-7) of the hCG beta-subunit was found to inhibit binding to the radiolabeled subunit of a monoclonal antibody specific for free hCG-beta (FBT-11). Further delineation of the antigenic site recognized by this antibody provided evidence for the involvement of fragment 82-92. Moreover, monoclonal antibody FBT-11 inhibited the recombination of hCG-beta to hCG-alpha, indicating that its antigenic determinant might be located nearby or in the hCG-beta portion interacting with the alpha-subunit. Binding of monoclonal antibody FBT-10, corresponding to the second antigenic determinant, was weakly inhibited by fragment 82-105 and did not impair the recombination of the hCG beta-subunit to the hCG alpha-subunit. Its combining site appeared to be located in a region of the intact native choriogonadotropin present at the surface of the hormone-receptor complex.

  16. Preparation of Recombinant Human Monoclonal Antibody Fab Fragments Specific for Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Hiroshi; Cheng, Xun-Jia; Watanabe, Katsuomi; Takekoshi, Masataka; Maeda, Fumiko; Aotsuka, Satoshi; Kaneda, Yoshimasa; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Ihara, Seiji

    1999-01-01

    Genes coding for human antibody Fab fragments specific for Entamoeba histolytica were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Lymphocytes were separated from the peripheral blood of a patient with an amebic liver abscess. Poly(A)+ RNA was isolated from the lymphocytes, and then genes coding for the light chain and Fd region of the heavy chain were amplified by a reverse transcriptase PCR. The amplified DNA fragments were ligated with a plasmid vector and were introduced into Escherichia coli. Three thousand colonies were screened for the production of antibodies to E. histolytica HM-1:IMSS by an indirect fluorescence-antibody (IFA) test. Lysates from five Escherichia coli clones were positive. Analysis of the DNA sequences of the five clones showed that three of the five heavy-chain sequences and four of the five light-chain sequences differed from each other. When the reactivities of the Escherichia coli lysates to nine reference strains of E. histolytica were examined by the IFA test, three Fab fragments with different DNA sequences were found to react with all nine strains and another Fab fragment was found to react with seven strains. None of the four human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments reacted with Entamoeba dispar reference strains or with other enteric protozoan parasites. These results indicate that the bacterial expression system reported here is effective for the production of human monoclonal antibodies specific for E. histolytica. The recombinant human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments may be applicable for distinguishing E. histolytica from E. dispar and for use in the serodiagnosis of amebiasis. PMID:10225840

  17. Development of broad-spectrum human monoclonal antibodies for rabies post-exposure prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    De Benedictis, Paola; Minola, Andrea; Rota Nodari, Elena; Aiello, Roberta; Zecchin, Barbara; Salomoni, Angela; Foglierini, Mathilde; Agatic, Gloria; Vanzetta, Fabrizia; Lavenir, Rachel; Lepelletier, Anthony; Bentley, Emma; Weiss, Robin; Cattoli, Giovanni; Capua, Ilaria; Sallusto, Federica; Wright, Edward; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Bourhy, Hervé; Corti, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Currently available rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) for use in humans includes equine or human rabies immunoglobulins (RIG). The replacement of RIG with an equally or more potent and safer product is strongly encouraged due to the high costs and limited availability of existing RIG. In this study, we identified two broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies that represent a valid and affordable alternative to RIG in rabies PEP. Memory B cells from four selected vaccinated donors were immortalized and monoclonal antibodies were tested for neutralizing activity and epitope specificity. Two antibodies, identified as RVC20 and RVC58 (binding to antigenic site I and III, respectively), were selected for their potency and broad-spectrum reactivity. In vitro, RVC20 and RVC58 were able to neutralize all 35 rabies virus (RABV) and 25 non-RABV lyssaviruses. They showed higher potency and breath compared to antibodies under clinical development (namely CR57, CR4098, and RAB1) and commercially available human RIG. In vivo, the RVC20-RVC58 cocktail protected Syrian hamsters from a lethal RABV challenge and did not affect the endogenous hamster post-vaccination antibody response. PMID:26992832

  18. Serrumab: a human monoclonal antibody that counters the biochemical and immunological effects of Tityus serrulatus venom.

    PubMed

    Pucca, Manuela Berto; Zoccal, Karina Furlan; Roncolato, Eduardo Crosara; Bertolini, Thaís Barboza; Campos, Lucas Benício; Cologna, Camila Takeno; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena; Arantes, Eliane Candiani; Barbosa, José Elpidio

    2012-01-01

    In Brazil, the species Tityus serrulatus is responsible for the most severe cases of scorpion envenomation. There is currently a need for new scorpion anti-venoms that are more effective and less harmful. This study attempted to produce human monoclonal antibodies capable of inhibiting the activity of T. serrulatus venom (TsV), using the Griffin.1 library of human single-chain fragment-variable (scFv) phage antibodies. Four rounds of phage antibody selection were performed, and the round with the highest phage antibody titer was chosen for the production of monoclonal phage antibodies and for further analysis. The scFv 2A, designated serrumab, was selected for the production and purification of soluble antibody fragments. In a murine peritoneal macrophage cell line (J774.1), in vitro assays of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and IL-10 were performed. In male BALB/c mice, in vivo assays of plasma urea, creatinine, aspartate transaminase, and glucose were performed, as well as of neutrophil recruitment and leukocyte counts. It was found that serrumab inhibited the TsV-induced increases in the production of IL-6, TNFα, and IL-10 in J774.1 cells. The in vivo inhibition assay showed that serrumab also prevented TsV-induced increases in the plasma levels of urea, creatinine, aspartate transaminase, and glucose, as well as preventing the TsV-induced increase in neutrophil recruitment. The results indicate that the human monoclonal antibody serrumab is a candidate for inclusion in a mixture of specific antibodies to the various toxins present in TsV. Therefore, serrumab shows promise for use in the production of new anti-venom. PMID:22424317

  19. In situ detection of acetylaminofluorene-DNA adducts in human cells using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Taka-aki; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Imoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Aya; Nakamura, Yu; Yamauchi, Yukika; Okumura, Hiromi; Tanaka, Akiko; Hanaoka, Fumio; Shibutani, Shinya; Miyagawa, Sachiko; Mori, Toshio

    2004-11-01

    The present study was performed to generate monoclonal antibodies capable of detecting N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene (NA-AAF)-derived DNA adducts in human cells in situ. As an immunogen, we employed NA-AAF-modified single-stranded DNA coupled electrostatically to methylated protein and we produced five different monoclonal antibodies. All of them showed strong binding to NA-AAF-modified DNA, but had undetectable or minimal binding to undamaged DNA. Competitive inhibition experiments revealed that the epitope recognized by these antibodies is N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-acetylaminofluorene (dG-C8-AAF) in DNA, although deacetylated N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-2-aminofluorene in DNA is also recognized with slightly less efficiency. In contrast, these antibodies did not bind to 3-(deoxyguanosin-N(2)-yl)-2-acetylaminofluorene in DNA or to UV-induced lesions in DNA. Interestingly, they showed only minimal binding to small AAF-nucleoside adducts (dG-C8-AAF), indicating that DNA regions flanking a DNA-bound adduct, in addition to the adduct itself, are essential for the stable binding of the antibodies. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with the most promising antibody (AAF-1), we detected the concentration-dependent induction of NA-AAF-modified adducts in DNA from repair deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells treated with physiological concentrations of NA-AAF. Moreover, the assay enabled to confirm that normal human cells efficiently repaired NA-AAF-induced DNA adducts but not XP-A cells. Most importantly, the formation of NA-AAF-induced DNA adducts in individual nuclei of XP cells could be clearly visualized using indirect immunofluorescence. Thus, we succeeded in establishing novel monoclonal antibodies capable of the in situ detection of NA-AAF-induced DNA adducts in human cells. PMID:15380103

  20. Human Monoclonal Antibodies to Pf 155, a Major Antigen of Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udomsangpetch, Rachanee; Lundgren, Katarina; Berzins, Klavs; Wahlin, Birgitta; Perlmann, Hedvig; Troye-Blomberg, Marita; Carlsson, Jan; Wahlgren, Mats; Perlmann, Peter; Bjorkman, Anders

    1986-01-01

    Pf 155, a protein of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, is strongly immunogenic in humans and is believed to be a prime candidate for the preparation of a vaccine. Human monoclonal antibodies to Pf 155 were obtained by cloning B cells that had been prepared from an immune donor and transformed with Epstein-Barr virus. When examined by indirect immunofluorescence, these antibodies stained the surface of infected erythrocytes, free merozoites, segmented schizonts, and gametocytes. They bound to a major polypeptide with a relative molecular weight of 155K and to two minor ones (135K and 120K), all having high affinity for human glycophorin. The antibodies strongly inhibited merozoite reinvasion in vitro, suggesting that they might be appropriate reagents for therapeutic administration in vivo.

  1. Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against a Plethora of Viral Pathogens From Single Combinatorial Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, R. Anthony; Burioni, Roberto; Sanna, Pietro P.; Partridge, Lynda J.; Barbas, Carlos F., III; Burton, Dennis R.

    1993-05-01

    Conventional antibody generation usually requires active immunization with antigen immediately prior to the preparation procedure. Combinatorial antibody library technology offers the possibility of cloning a range of antibody specificities at a single point in time and then accessing these specificities at will. Here we show that human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments against a plethora of infectious agents can be readily derived from a single library. Further examination of a number of libraries shows that whenever antibody against a pathogen can be detected in the serum of the donor, then specific antibodies can be derived from the corresponding library. We describe the generation of human Fab fragments against herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, human cytomegalovirus, varicella zoster virus, rubella, human immunodeficiency virus type 1, and respiratory syncytial virus. The antibodies are shown to be highly specific and a number are effective in neutralizing virus in vitro.

  2. Human monoclonal antibodies against a plethora of viral pathogens from single combinatorial libraries.

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, R A; Burioni, R; Sanna, P P; Partridge, L J; Barbas, C F; Burton, D R

    1993-01-01

    Conventional antibody generation usually requires active immunization with antigen immediately prior to the preparation procedure. Combinatorial antibody library technology offers the possibility of cloning a range of antibody specificities at a single point in time and then accessing these specificities at will. Here we show that human monoclonal antibody Fab fragments against a plethora of infectious agents can be readily derived from a single library. Further examination of a number of libraries shows that whenever antibody against a pathogen can be detected in the serum of the donor, then specific antibodies can be derived from the corresponding library. We describe the generation of human Fab fragments against herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, human cytomegalovirus, varicella zoster virus, rubella, human immunodeficiency virus type 1, and respiratory syncytial virus. The antibodies are shown to be highly specific and a number are effective in neutralizing virus in vitro. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7683424

  3. Rapid generation of a human monoclonal antibody to combat Middle East respiratory syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corti, Davide; Passini, Nadia; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Zambon, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The last century has witnessed the emergence of several previously unknown viruses as life-threatening human pathogens. Several examples include HIV, Ebola, Lujo, and, most recently, the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and Ebola. In this study, we describe a method for the swift generation of a human-derived monoclonal antibody, known as LCA60, as a treatment for MERS infections. LCA60 antibody was generated using the Cellclone Technology from the immortalized B cells of a human donor recovering from MERS. Only four months were required from the initial screening of B cells to the development of a stable CHO cell line suitable for the production of clinical grade antibody, thereby delineating a rapid pathway for the development of antiviral therapies against emerging viruses. Currently, the LCA60 antibody is being considered for clinical development, which includes prophylaxis in individuals at risk and a treatment for severe MERS-CoV infections. PMID:27102927

  4. A human monoclonal antibody specific to placental alkaline phosphatase, a marker of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ravenni, Niccolò; Weber, Marcel; Neri, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) is a promising ovarian cancer biomarker. Here, we describe the isolation, affinity-maturation and characterization of two fully human monoclonal antibodies (termed B10 and D9) able to bind to human PLAP with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 10 and 30 nM, respectively. The ability of B10 and D9 antibodies to recognize the native antigen was confirmed by Biacore analysis, FACS and immunofluorescence studies using ovarian cancer cell lines and freshly-frozen human tissues. A quantitative biodistribution study in nude mice revealed that the B10 antibody preferentially localizes to A431 tumors, following intravenous administration. Anti-PLAP antibodies may serve as a modular building blocks for the development of targeted therapeutic products, armed with cytotoxic drugs, radionuclides or cytokines as payloads. PMID:24247025

  5. Generation of monoclonal antibodies against human prion proteins in PrP0/0 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Krasemann, S.; Groschup, M. H.; Harmeyer, S.; Hunsmann, G.; Bodemer, W.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prion diseases belong to a group of neurodegenerative disorders affecting humans and animals. The human diseases include kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS), and fatal familial insomnia (FFI). The pathogenic mechanisms of the prion diseases are not yet understood. Monoclonal antibodies provide valuable tools in the diagnosis, as well as in the basic research, of several diseases; however, monospecific antisera or monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human prion proteins were, until now, not available. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We have developed an immunization protocol based on nucleic acid injection into nontolerant PrP0/0 mice. DNA or RNA coding for different human prion proteins including the mutated sequences associated with CJD, GSS, and FFI were injected into muscle tissue. Mice were primarily inoculated with DNA plasmids encoding the prion protein (PRNP) gene and boosted either with DNA, RNA, or recombinant Semliki Forest Virus particles expressing PRNP. Hybridomas were then prepared. RESULTS: Different mAbs against human prion proteins were obtained, and their binding behavior was analyzed by peptide enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot, immunofluorescence, and immunoprecipitation. Their cross-reactivity with prion protein from other species was also determined. Our mAbs are directed against four different linear epitopes and may also recognize discontinuous regions of the native prion protein. CONCLUSIONS: These antibodies should allow us to address questions concerning the nature of the prion protein as well as the initiation and progression of prion diseases. Moreover, these mAbs can now be used for the diagnosis of prion diseases of humans and animals. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:8972487

  6. Antitumor effects of a monoclonal antibody to human CCR9 in leukemia cell xenografts.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Sonia; Vela, Maria; Franco-Villanueva, Ana; Carramolino, Laura; Gutiérrez, Julio; Gómez, Lucio; Lozano, María; Salvador, Beatriz; García-Gallo, Mónica; Martínez-A, Carlos; Kremer, Leonor

    2014-01-01

    Tumor expression of certain chemokine receptors is associated with resistance to apoptosis, migration, invasiveness and metastasis. Because CCR9 chemokine receptor expression is very restricted in healthy tissue, whereas it is present in tumors of distinct origins including leukemias, melanomas, prostate and ovary carcinomas, it can be considered a suitable candidate for target-directed therapy. Here, we report the generation and characterization of 91R, a mouse anti-human CCR9 IgG2b monoclonal antibody that recognizes an epitope within the CCR9 N-terminal domain. This antibody inhibits the growth of subcutaneous xenografts from human acute T lymphoblastic leukemia MOLT-4 cells in immunodeficient Rag2(-/-) mice. Tumor size in 91R-treated mice was reduced by 85% compared with isotype-matched antibody-treated controls. Tumor reduction in 91R-treated mice was concomitant with an increase in the apoptotic cell fraction and tumor necrotic areas, as well as a decrease in the fraction of proliferating cells and in tumor vascularization. In the presence of complement or murine natural killer cells, 91R promoted in vitro lysis of MOLT-4 leukemia cells, indicating that this antibody might eliminate tumor cells via complement- and cell-dependent cytotoxicity. The results show the potential of the 91R monoclonal antibody as a therapeutic agent for treatment of CCR9-expressing tumors. PMID:24870448

  7. Protection against gram-negative bacteremia and endotoxemia with human monoclonal IgM antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Teng, N N; Kaplan, H S; Hebert, J M; Moore, C; Douglas, H; Wunderlich, A; Braude, A I

    1985-01-01

    Hybridomas producing human monoclonal IgM antibodies (mAbs) against bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were generated by fusion of B lymphocytes from sensitized human spleen with heteromyeloma cells. The splenocytes were from patients undergoing splenectomy during staging for Hodgkin disease after vaccination with the J5 mutant of Escherichia coli, which is deficient in O antigenic side chains. This deficiency exposes the core oligosaccharide, common to LPS of all Gram-negative bacteria. The mAbs cross-reacted strongly with endotoxins from a wide range of unrelated species of Gram-negative bacteria. The mAbs also gave strong protection against LPS in the dermal Shwartzman reaction and against lethal Gram-negative bacteremia in mice. These findings indicate that monoclonal IgM against LPS endotoxin can neutralize its toxicity in vivo and might be valuable for treatment of patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. Analysis of one of the hybridoma clones, A6(H4C5), showed that the IgM mAb is directed against the covalently bound lipid A, which represents the most conservative and least variable structural element of LPS. Images PMID:3856860

  8. 77 FR 9678 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Human Anti-CD22 Monoclonal Antibodies...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... Human Anti-CD22 Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Human Cancers and Autoimmune Disease AGENCY... autoimmune disease. The Licensed Field of Use includes the use of the antibodies in the form of an... disease such as lupus and Sjogren's syndrome. The specific antibodies covered by this technology...

  9. Monoclonal antibody (H107) inhibiting IgE binding to Fc epsilon R(+) human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Noro, N; Yoshioka, A; Adachi, M; Yasuda, K; Masuda, T; Yodoi, J

    1986-08-15

    A hybridoma-producing monoclonal antibody blocking the binding of human IgE to lymphocytes Fc receptor (Fc epsilon R) was established by the fusion of murine myeloma cells. P3X63.653.Ag8, with BALB/c spleen cells immunized with Fc epsilon R(+) human B lymphoblastoid cell line cells, RPMI1788. A clone of the hybridoma (H107) produced a monoclonal IgG2b antibody that inhibited the rosette formation of Fc epsilon R(+) human B lymphoblastoid cell line cells (RPMI1788, RPMI8866, CESS, Dakiki, and IM9) with fixed ox red blood cells (ORBC) conjugated with human IgE (IgE-ORBC). In contrast, the rosette formation with IgG-conjugated ORBC (IgG-ORBC) on Fc gamma R(+), Fc epsilon R(-) Daudi cells were not affected by the H107 antibodies. A close association of Fc epsilon R and the antigenic determinant recognized by H107 antibody was suggested by the following results. First, the bindings of 125I-labeled IgE (125I-IgE) or 125I-labeled H107 IgG2b antibody (125I-H107) to RPMI8866 cells were inhibited by cold human IgE and H107 IgG2b but not by other classes of human Ig (IgA and IgG), MPC11 IgG2b, or unrelated monoclonal antibodies. Second, H107 antibody reacted with Fc epsilon R(+) B cell lines but not with Fc epsilon R(-) B cell lines as determined by an indirect immunofluorescence. Third, Fc epsilon R(+) cells were depleted by the incubation in the dish coated with H107 antibody or IgE but not in the dish coated with unrelated antibodies. Finally, there was a correlation between the increase of Fc epsilon R(+) cells and that of H107(+) cells in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of the patients with atopic dermatitis. The surface antigens on Fc epsilon R(+) RPMI8866 cells recognized by H107 antibodies had the molecular size of 45,000 as determined by immunoprecipitation and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis. PMID:2942602

  10. Biochemical and pharmacological characterization of human c-Met neutralizing monoclonal antibody CE-355621

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, Neil R.; Jani, Jitesh P.; Hillerman, Stephen; Tsaparikos, Konstantinos E.; Barbacci-Tobin, Elsa G.; Knauth, Elisabeth; Putz Jr., Henry; Campbell, Mary; Karam, George A.; Chrunyk, Boris; Gebhard, David F.; Green, Larry L.; Xu, Jinghai J.; Dunn, Margaret C.; Coskran, Tim M.; Lapointe, Jean-Martin; Cohen, Bruce D.; Coleman, Kevin G.; Bedian, Vahe; Vincent, Patrick; Kajiji, Shama; Steyn, Stefan J.; Borzillo, Gary V.; Los, Gerrit

    2012-01-01

    The c-Met proto-oncogene is a multifunctional receptor tyrosine kinase that is stimulated by its ligand, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), to induce cell growth, motility and morphogenesis. Dysregulation of c-Met function, through mutational activation or overexpression, has been observed in many types of cancer and is thought to contribute to tumor growth and metastasis by affecting mitogenesis, invasion, and angiogenesis. We identified human monoclonal antibodies that bind to the extracellular domain of c-Met and inhibit tumor growth by interfering with ligand-dependent c-Met activation. We identified antibodies representing four independent epitope classes that inhibited both ligand binding and ligand-dependent activation of c-Met in A549 cells. In cells, the antibodies antagonized c-Met function by blocking receptor activation and by subsequently inducing downregulation of the receptor, translating to phenotypic effects in soft agar growth and tubular morphogenesis assays. Further characterization of the antibodies in vivo revealed significant inhibition of c-Met activity (≥ 80% lasting for 72–96 h) in excised tumors corresponded to tumor growth inhibition in multiple xenograft tumor models. Several of the antibodies identified inhibited the growth of tumors engineered to overexpress human HGF and human c-Met (S114 NIH 3T3) when grown subcutaneously in athymic mice. Furthermore, lead candidate antibody CE-355621 inhibited the growth of U87MG human glioblastoma and GTL-16 gastric xenografts by up to 98%. The findings support published pre-clinical and clinical data indicating that targeting c-Met with human monoclonal antibodies is a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer. PMID:23007574

  11. Cellular distribution of monoclonal antibody in human tumours after i.v. administration.

    PubMed Central

    Moshakis, V.; McIlhinney, R. A.; Neville, A. M.

    1981-01-01

    Immune-suppressed mice carrying xenografts of several different types of human germ-cell tumours were injected with a radiolabelled monoclonal antibody (LICR LON/HT13) raised against membrane components of a human germ-cell tumour (HX39). Subsequent assessment of radioactivity in excised organs and tumours showed a selective accretion of antibody in the tumour. Quantitative autoradiography supported the results of radiolocalization observed in vivo in different tumours, and also showed that the antibody localized to viable tumour cells and in close association with their cell membrane. The vascular architecture of tumours was found to be an important factor governing antibody distribution. No localization occurred with radiolabelled normal mouse IgG. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:6172141

  12. Human monoclonal antibodies as candidate therapeutics against emerging viruses and HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhongyu; Prabakaran, Ponraj; Chen, Weizao; Broder, Christopher C; Gong, Rui; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2013-04-01

    More than 40 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been approved for a number of disease indications with only one of these (Synagis) - for a viral disease, and not for therapy but for prevention. However, in the last decade novel potent mAbs have been discovered and characterized with potential as therapeutics against viruses of major importance for public health and biosecurity including Hendra virus (HeV), Nipah virus (NiV), severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), Ebola virus (EBOV), West Nile virus (WNV), influenza virus (IFV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Here, we review such mAbs with an emphasis on antibodies of human origin, and highlight recent results as well as technologies and mechanisms related to their potential as therapeutics. PMID:23575729

  13. Structural Insights into the Neutralization Properties of the Fully Human, Anti-interferon Monoclonal Antibody Sifalimumab.

    PubMed

    Oganesyan, Vaheh; Peng, Li; Woods, Robert M; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F

    2015-06-12

    We report the three-dimensional structure of human interferon α-2A (IFN-α2A) bound to the Fab fragment of a therapeutic monoclonal antibody (sifalimumab; IgG1/κ). The structure of the corresponding complex was solved at a resolution of 3.0 Å using molecular replacement and constitutes the first reported structure of a human type I IFN bound to a therapeutic antibody. This study revealed the major contribution made by the first complementarity-determining region in each of sifalimumab light and heavy chains. These data also provided the molecular basis for sifalimumab mechanism of action. We propose that its interferon-neutralizing properties are the result of direct competition for IFN-α2A binding to the IFN receptor subunit 1 (IFNAR1) and do not involve inhibiting IFN-α2A binding to the IFN receptor subunit 2 (IFNAR2). PMID:25925951

  14. Development and Characterization of a New Antipeptide Monoclonal Antibody Directed to Human CD20 Antigen.

    PubMed

    Habibi-Anbouhi, Mahdi; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Behdani, Mahdi; Hajizadeh-Saffar, Ensiyeh; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2015-09-01

    The rapid expansion of immunotherapeutic approaches for treatment of various diseases, including cancers, has been greatly facilitated by the invention of new generation of antibodies. Clinical studies have indicated that anti-CD20 mAb-based therapies represent an effective treatment for various diseases with overexpression of CD20 on their cell surface, such as non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, hemolytic anemia, as well as autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis. Technically, due to a short extra membrane domain, the recombinant CD20 protein is a difficult antigen to raise immune responses. In search for new monoclonal antibodies, the authors used an antigenic polypeptide, which yielded numbers of new binders that may lead to production of anti-CD20 antibodies, with improved diagnostic or clinical attributes. Mice were immunized with extra membrane loop of human CD20 (exCD20) polypeptide. The exCD20 antigen showed a desired immune response and was able to develop a monoclonal antibody, 3B4C10, which reacted well with peptide antigen as well as native antigen on the surface of Raji B-cell line. The antibody 3B4C10 with a balanced K(on) and K(off) may be applicable in the construction of affinity columns or beads for isolation and purification of CD20-positive cells and cancer stem cells. PMID:26352927

  15. Effects of a human antiflagellar monoclonal antibody in combination with antibiotics on Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    PubMed Central

    Uezumi, I; Terashima, M; Kohzuki, T; Kato, M; Irie, K; Ochi, H; Noguchi, H

    1992-01-01

    The in vivo activity of human immunoglobulin M monoclonal antibody IN-2A8, which is specific for flagellum type b of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, was evaluated in comparison to anti-O antigen (serotype B) MAb KO-2F2 and in combination with antibiotics. IN-2A8 showed stronger activity than KO-2F2 against subcutaneous infection in burned mice, while it was much less active against intraperitoneal infection in normal mice. In a burn infection model, IN-2A8 inhibited the increase of bacteria in skin lesions weakly and that in blood significantly, suggesting that it strongly suppressed bacterial spread to blood. The activity of IN-2A8 in combination with 10 antipseudomonal antibiotics against intraperitoneal infection was examined. Clear additive effect was observed with a combination of either carbapenem or aminoglycoside antibiotics in terms of mouse survival. The administration of an antibiotic, imipenem-cilastatin, simultaneously with or before that of IN-2A8 gave a combined effect, but the reverse order did not. The combination of IN-2A8 with imipenem-cilastatin decreased numbers of viable bacteria in the peritoneal cavity and blood and kept them low for a longer time than did either treatment alone. These results suggest that an antiflagellar monoclonal antibody would be effective against systemic infection in combination with some kinds of antibiotics. Images PMID:1416830

  16. Human immunoglobulin allotypes: previously unrecognized determinants and alleles defined with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Zelaschi, D; Newby, C; Parsons, M; van West, B; Cavalli-Sforza, L L; Herzenberg, L A; Herzenberg, L A

    1983-01-01

    The highly polymorphic system of serologically defined genetic markers on human IgG heavy chains (Gm allotypes) is second only to the HLA complex in terms of the large number of determinants, alleles, and haplotypes that can be used for analyses of disease associations and other genetic studies. However, present typing methods are based on the use of anti-Gm antisera that are derived mainly from fortuitously immunized human donors, often requiring processing before use, and must be used in a hemagglutination-inhibition assay that cannot be used in typing for isoallotypic determinants (currently termed "non-markers"). In studies presented here, we describe an allotyping system that utilizes monoclonal antibodies in a "sandwich" modification of the solid-phase radioimmunoassay, which is capable of reliable quantitative typing of allotypic, isoallotypic, and isotypic immunoglobulin determinants. We show that these highly reproducible, easily disseminated, and essentially inexhaustible reagents can be used for rapid, sensitive, and quantitative Gm typing. Using this system we define two previously unrecognized Gm determinants, one of which, found to date only in Caucasians, is different from all known Gm markers and thus defines previously unrecognized alleles and haplotypes. The other determinant co-segregates with the conventional G3m(b1) marker but is distinct from that marker on serological grounds. The successful preparation of mouse monoclonal antibodies that detect human Gm allotypic differences and the development of an assay system capable of typing isoallotypic as well as allotypic determinants opens the way to further dissection and application of this rich genetic system. PMID:6190180

  17. Distribution of radiolabeled human and mouse monoclonal IgM antibodies in murine models

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, S.E.; Hagan, P.L.; Chen, A.; Birdwell, C.R.; Bartholomew, R.M.; Burnett, K.G.; David, G.S.; Poggenburg, K.; Merchant, B.; Carlo, D.J.

    1988-10-01

    The distribution and kinetics of six human and one murine monoclonal IgM antibodies (MoAb) were studied in BALB/c mice. Labeling was with /sup 111/In, /sup 75/Se, and /sup 125/I. The monomers and pentamers of certain MoAbs were studied. Human distribution studies were also performed. The serum containing (/sup 111/In)MoAb was obtained from one of the patients 24 hr after administration and injected into mice which were then killed and assayed for /sup 111/In distribution. In general, the (/sup 75/Se) and (/sup 111/In)MoAbs had distribution and kinetic patterns that were similar while the /sup 125/I-labeled MoAbs dehalogenated after 4 hr. Monomers and pentamers had highly similar distributions suggesting that the distribution of IgMs may be based on factors other than molecular size. The murine IgM showed a somewhat different distribution in mice than did human IgMs. Serum from the patient containing (/sup 111/In)MoAb had a distribution in mice similar to that of the patient with high liver and gastrointestinal uptake. The human imaging indicates that it is possible to target tumor with human IgM MoAbs, but significant problems remain in regard to their clinical use.

  18. Inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3-dependent lung adenocarcinoma with a human monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yongjun; Ren, Xiaodi; Smith, Craig; Guo, Qianxu; Malabunga, Maria; Guernah, Ilhem; Zhang, Yiwei; Shen, Juqun; Sun, Haijun; Chehab, Nabil; Loizos, Nick; Ludwig, Dale L; Ornitz, David M

    2016-05-01

    Activating mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) have been identified in multiple types of human cancer and in congenital birth defects. In human lung cancer, fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9), a high-affinity ligand for FGFR3, is overexpressed in 10% of primary resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) specimens. Furthermore, in a mouse model where FGF9 can be induced in lung epithelial cells, epithelial proliferation and ensuing tumorigenesis is dependent on FGFR3. To develop new customized therapies for cancers that are dependent on FGFR3 activation, we have used this mouse model to evaluate a human monoclonal antibody (D11) with specificity for the extracellular ligand-binding domain of FGFR3, that recognizes both human and mouse forms of the receptor. Here, we show that D11 effectively inhibits signaling through FGFR3 in vitro, inhibits the growth of FGFR3-dependent FGF9-induced lung adenocarcinoma in mice, and reduces tumor-associated morbidity. Given the potency of FGF9 in this mouse model and the absolute requirement for signaling through FGFR3, this study validates the D11 antibody as a potentially useful and effective reagent for treating human cancers or other pathologies that are dependent on activation of FGFR3. PMID:27056048

  19. Inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3-dependent lung adenocarcinoma with a human monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yongjun; Ren, Xiaodi; Smith, Craig; Guo, Qianxu; Malabunga, Maria; Guernah, Ilhem; Zhang, Yiwei; Shen, Juqun; Sun, Haijun; Chehab, Nabil; Loizos, Nick; Ludwig, Dale L.; Ornitz, David M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Activating mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) have been identified in multiple types of human cancer and in congenital birth defects. In human lung cancer, fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9), a high-affinity ligand for FGFR3, is overexpressed in 10% of primary resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) specimens. Furthermore, in a mouse model where FGF9 can be induced in lung epithelial cells, epithelial proliferation and ensuing tumorigenesis is dependent on FGFR3. To develop new customized therapies for cancers that are dependent on FGFR3 activation, we have used this mouse model to evaluate a human monoclonal antibody (D11) with specificity for the extracellular ligand-binding domain of FGFR3, that recognizes both human and mouse forms of the receptor. Here, we show that D11 effectively inhibits signaling through FGFR3 in vitro, inhibits the growth of FGFR3-dependent FGF9-induced lung adenocarcinoma in mice, and reduces tumor-associated morbidity. Given the potency of FGF9 in this mouse model and the absolute requirement for signaling through FGFR3, this study validates the D11 antibody as a potentially useful and effective reagent for treating human cancers or other pathologies that are dependent on activation of FGFR3. PMID:27056048

  20. Expression of POTE protein in human testis detected by novel monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Ise, Tomoko; Das, Sudipto; Nagata, Satoshi; Maeda, Hiroshi; Lee, Yoomi; Onda, Masanori; Anver, Miriam R.; Pastan, Ira

    2008-01-25

    The POTE gene family is composed of 13 highly homologous paralogs preferentially expressed in prostate, ovary, testis, and placenta. We produced 10 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against three representative POTE paralogs: POTE-21, POTE-2{gamma}C, and POTE-22. One reacted with all three paralogs, six MAbs reacted with POTE-2{gamma}C and POTE-22, and three MAbs were specific to POTE-21. Epitopes of all 10 MAbs were located in the cysteine-rich repeats (CRRs) motifs located at the N-terminus of each POTE paralog. Testing the reactivity of each MAb with 12 different CRRs revealed slight differences among the antigenic determinants, which accounts for differences in cross-reactivity. Using MAbs HP8 and PG5 we were able to detect a POTE-actin fusion protein in human testis by immunoprecipitation followed by Western blotting. By immunohistochemistry we demonstrated that the POTE protein is expressed in primary spermatocytes, implying a role in spermatogenesis.

  1. Rapid assessment of the antigenic integrity of tetrameric HLA complexes by human monoclonal HLA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Eijsink, Chantal; Kester, Michel G D; Franke, Marry E I; Franken, Kees L M C; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Claas, Frans H J; Mulder, Arend

    2006-08-31

    The ability of tetrameric major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-peptide complexes (tetramers) to detect antigen-specific T lymphocyte responses has yielded significant information about the generation of in vivo immunity in numerous antigenic systems. Here we present a novel method for rapid validation of tetrameric HLA molecules based on the presence of allodeterminants. Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing polymorphic determinants on HLA class I were immobilized on polystyrene microparticles and used to probe the structural integrity of tetrameric HLA class I molecules by flow cytometry. A total of 22 tetramers, based on HLA-A1, A2, A3, A24, B7 and B8 were reactive with their counterpart mAbs, thus confirming their antigenic integrity. A positive outcome of this mAb test ensures that tetrameric HLA class I can be used with greater confidence in subsequent functional assays. PMID:16973172

  2. Novel monoclonal antibody against beta 1 integrin enhances cisplatin efficacy in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Young; Cho, Woon-Dong; Hong, Kwon Pyo; Choi, Da Bin; Hong, Jeong won; Kim, Soseul; Moon, Yoo Ri; Son, Seung-Myoung; Lee, Ok-Jun; Lee, Ho-Chang; Song, Hyung Geun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The use of anti-beta 1 integrin monoclonal antibody in lung cancer treatment has proven beneficial. Here, we developed a novel monoclonal antibody (mAb), called P5, by immunizing mice with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Its anti-tumor effect is now being tested, in a clinical phase III trial, in combinatorial treatments with various chemical drugs. To confirm that P5 indeed binds to beta 1 integrin, cell lysates were immunoprecipitated with commercial anti-beta 1 integrin mAb (TS2/16) and immunoblotted against P5 to reveal a 140 kDa molecular weight band, as expected. Immunoprecipitation with P5 followed by LC/MS protein sequence analysis further verified P5 antigen to be beta 1 integrin. Cisplatin treatment upregulated cell surface expression of beta 1 integrin in A549 cells, while causing inhibition of cell growth. When cells were co-treated with different concentrations of P5 mAb, the cisplatin-mediated inhibitory effect was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings show that a combinatorial treatment of P5 mAb and cisplatin in A549 cells resulted in a 30% increase in apoptosis, compared to baseline, and significantly more when compared to either the cisplatin or P5 alone group. The entire peptide sequences in CDR from variable region of Ig heavy and light chain gene for P5 mAb are also disclosed. Together, these results provide evidence of the beneficial effect of P5 mAb in combinatorial treatment of human lung adenocarcinoma.

  3. Radioimmunoimaging of human lymphomas with I-131 tumor-specific monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, A.M.; Epstein, A.L.; Spies, S.M.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to radiolabel an IgG2a monoclonal antibody (Lym-1) and fragments (Fab and F(ab')2) directed against human lymphomas (Raji) and to determine the biodistribution and feasibility of radioimmunoimaging. Radiolabeling with I-131 was achieved using Iodogen to which the monoclonal antibody (MA) and NaI-131 were added. Radioimmunoreactivity was performed utilizing a live cell assay of lymphoma cells (Raji). Athymic nude mice, each bearing a right thigh human lymphoma (Raji), were injected with 150-300 ..mu..Ci of I-131 labeled Ma, including Fab and F(ab')2 fragments, imaged up to 7 days after injection, sacrificed, and organ biodistribution performed. Results of the study demonstrated significant loss of immunoreactivity with the radioiodinated Fab fragments (11% binding) as opposed to F(ab')2 fragments (61% binding) or the whole antibody (65% binding). Highest tumor uptake was observed for the whole I-131 labeled antibody (8.2%) followed by F(ab')2 fragments (4.4%) and Fab fragments (0.9%). The most rapid whole body excretion was observed for radioiodinated Fab fragments followed by F(ab')2 fragments and whole antibody. Optimum tumor visualization for the radioiodinated F(ab')2 fragments and whole antibody was observed at 3 and 7 days after injection, with tumor/whole body ratios of 0.65 and 0.60 for F(ab')2 fragments and whole antibody, respectively. Biodistribution data obtained 7 days after injection confirmed high tumor uptake and low soft tissue distribution with tumor/liver ratios of 20.3 and 30.1 for the radioiodinated whole antibody and F(ab')2 fragments, respectively.

  4. Development and characterization of a monoclonal antibody to human embryonal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Khazaeli, M.B.; Beierwaltes, W.H.; Pitt, G.S.; Kabza, G.A.; Rogers, K.J.; LoBuglio, A.F.

    1987-06-01

    A monoclonal anti-testicular carcinoma antibody was obtained via the somatic cell fusion technique by immunization of BALB/c mice with freshly prepared single cell suspension from a patient with testicular embryonal carcinoma with choriocarcinoma components. The hybridoma supernates were screened against the testicular carcinoma cells used in the immunization as well as normal mononuclear white blood cells isolated from the same patient. An antibody (5F9) was selected which bound to fresh tumor cells from two patients with embryonal testicular carcinoma and failed to bind to fresh tumor cells from 24 patients (2 seminoma, 2 melanoma, 3 neck, 2 esophageal, 1 ovarian, 3 colon, 1 prostate, 2 breast, 1 liposarcoma, 3 endometrial, 1 kidney, 1 adrenal, 1 larynx and 1 bladder tumors) or cell suspensions prepared from normal liver, lung, spleen, ovary, testes, kidney, red blood cells or white blood cells. The antibody was tested for its binding to several well established cancer cell lines, and was found to bind to the BeWo human choriocarcinoma and two human embryonal carcinoma cell lines. The antibody did not react with 22 other cell lines or with hCG. The antibody was labeled with /sup 131/I and injected into nude mice bearing BeWo tumors and evaluated for tumor localization by performing whole body scans with a gamma camera 5 days later. Six mice injected with the antibody showed positive tumor localization without the need for background subtraction while six mice injected with MOPC-21, a murine myeloma immunoglobulin, demonstrated much less tumor localization. Tissue distribution studies performed after scanning showed specific tumor localization (8:1 tumor: muscle) for the monoclonal antibody and no specific localization for MOPC-21.

  5. Rheumatoid factor interference in immunogenicity assays for human monoclonal antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tatarewicz, Suzanna; Miller, Jill M; Swanson, Steven J; Moxness, Michael S

    2010-05-31

    Rheumatoid factors (RFs) are endogenous human antibodies that bind to human gamma globulins. RFs demonstrate preferential binding to aggregated gamma globulins and are involved in the clearing mechanism of immune complexes. Immunoassays designed to measure human anti-human antibodies (HAHA) after administration of monoclonal antibody therapeutics are thus vulnerable to interference from RFs. When using a sensitive electrochemiluminescent (ECL) bridging immunoassay, samples from subjects with rheumatoid arthritis demonstrated much higher baseline reactivity than healthy subjects. Interference was found to be dependent on the aggregation state of the therapeutic antibody that had been conjugated with the detection reagent (ruthenium). Size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography (SE-HPLC) demonstrated that of the total integrated peaks, as little as 0.55% high molecular weight aggregates (>600kDa) were sufficient to cause increased reactivity. Stability studies of the ruthenium and biotin conjugated therapeutic antibody indicated that storage time, temperature and buffer formulation were critical in maintaining the integrity of the reagents. Through careful SE-HPLC monitoring we were able to choose appropriate storage and buffer conditions which led to a reduction in the false reactivity rate in therapeutic-naïve serum from a rheumatoid arthritis population. PMID:20347831

  6. Unique glycoprotein antigen defined by monoclonal antibody on human neurobiastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mujoo, K.; Spiro, R.C.; Reisfeld, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have characterized a new target antigen on the surface of human neuroblastoma cells and defined it with a monoclonal antibody (Mab) 5G3. This antibody is of IgG2a type and has an association constant of 8 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/. In ELISA assays, Mab 5G3 reacted with human neuroblastoma as well as melanoma, squamous lung, skin carcinoma, and osteogenic sarcoma. Immunocytochemical analysis of frozen tissue sections revealed strong reactivity with all neuroblastoma tissues and marginal reactivity with melanoma and glioma tissues. There was no reactivity with fetal or normal tissues with the exception of cerebellum. The antigen recognized by Mab 5G3 is a glycoprotein of 200 and 215 kDa expressed on the SK-N-AS neuroblastoma cells. The antigen appears to contain N-linked carbohydrates based on treatment of human neuroblastoma cells with tunicamycin before and after intrinsic radiolabeling followed by indirect immunoprecipitation. The pulse-chase biosynthetic studies followed by indirect immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE indicated the precursor/product relationship between 200 and 215 kDa molecules. The 200 kDa component is endoglycosidase H-sensitive, whereas 215 kDa molecule is Endo-H resistant. The 215 kDa component is also sulfated, sialylated, and phosphorylated at serine residues. Preliminary data suggests that Mab, aside from identifying a unique target antigen on human neuroblastoma cells, may be suited as a targeting device for chemotherapeutic drugs.

  7. A novel human anti-interleukin-1β neutralizing monoclonal antibody showing in vivo efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Angeline XH; Bertin-Maghit, Sebastien; Ping Yeo, Siok; Ho, Adrian; Derks, Heidi; Mortellaro, Alessandra; Wang, Cheng-I

    2014-01-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β is a clinical target in many conditions involving dysregulation of the immune system; therapeutics that block IL-1β have been approved to treat diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), neonatal onset multisystem inflammatory diseases, cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes, active systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Here, we report the generation and engineering of a new fully human antibody that binds tightly to IL-1β with a neutralization potency more than 10 times higher than that of the marketed antibody canakinumab. After affinity maturation, the derived antibody shows a >30-fold increased affinity to human IL-1β compared with its parent antibody. This anti-human IL-1β IgG also cross-reacts with mouse and monkey IL-1β, hence facilitating preclinical development. In a number of mouse models, this antibody efficiently reduced or abolished signs of disease associated with IL-1β pathology. Due to its high affinity for the cytokine and its potency both in vitro and in vivo, we propose that this novel fully human anti-IL-1β monoclonal antibody is a promising therapeutic candidate and a potential alternative to the current therapeutic arsenal. PMID:24671001

  8. Monoclonal antibody GB3, a new probe for the study of human basement membranes and hemidesmosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Verrando, P.; Pisani, A.; Serieys, N.; Ortonne, J.P. ); Hsi, Baeli; Yeh, Changjing )

    1987-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody, GB3, has been raised against human amnion. Not only does GB3 bind to amniotic basement membrane, but it also recognizes an antigenic structure expressed by epidermal as well as by some other human basement membranes. This antigen is synthesized (and excreted) by cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes. It is expressed to a lesser extent by the A431 epidermoid carcinoma cell line, but is not expressed by the SV40 virus-transformed SVK14 keratinocyte cell line. In ultrastructural studies, this antigen was located in the epidermal basement membrane, both in the lamina densa and in the lamina lucida, associated with hemidesmosomes. It was identified as a protein by in vitro proteolytic cleavage studies. The radio-immunoprecipitates from cultured human keratinocytes, analyzed by SDS-PAGE, showed that GB3 recognized five polypeptides of 93.5, 125, 130, 146 and 150 kD under reducing conditions. The tissue distribution of the antigen and the molecular weights (MWs) of its constitutive polypeptides suggest that it is different from other known components of basement membranes. It may provide a biochemical marker for hemidesmosomes. Furthermore, GB3 represents an interesting and original clinical probe, since the antigenic structure recognized by GB3 is lacking in Junctional Epidermolysis Bullosa, a lethal genodermatosis in which a dermo-epidermal splitting occurs at the level of lamina lucida.

  9. Human Monoclonal Antiphospholipid Antibodies Disrupt the Annexin A5 Anticoagulant Crystal Shield on Phospholipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Jacob H.; Wu, Xiao-Xuan; Quinn, Anthony S.; Chen, Pojen P.; McCrae, Keith R.; Bovill, Edwin G.; Taatjes, Douglas J.

    2003-01-01

    The antiphospholipid (aPL) syndrome is an autoimmune condition that is marked by recurrent pregnancy losses and/or systemic vascular thrombosis in patients who have antibodies against phospholipid/co-factor complexes. The mechanism(s) for pregnancy losses and thrombosis in this condition is (are) not known. Annexin A5 is a potent anticoagulantprotein, expressed by placental trophoblasts and endothelial cells, that crystallizes over anionic phospholipids, shielding them from availability for coagulation reactions. We previously presented data supporting the hypothesis that aPL antibody-mediated disruption of the anticoagulant annexin A5 shield could be a thrombogenic mechanism in the aPL syndrome. However, this has remained a subject of controversy. We therefore used atomic force microscopy, a method previously used to study the crystallization of annexin A5, to image the effects of monoclonal human aPL antibodies on the crystal structure of the protein over phospholipid bilayers. In the presence of the aPL monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and β2-GPI, the major aPL co-factor, structures presumed to be aPL mAb-antigen complexes were associated with varying degrees of disruption to the annexin A5 crystallization pattern over the bilayer. In addition, measurements of prothrombinase activity on the phospholipid bilayers showed that the aPL mAbs reduced the anti-coagulant effect of annexin A5 and promoted thrombin generation. These data provide morphological evidence that support the hypothesis that aPL antibodies can disrupt annexin A5 binding to phospholipid membranes and permit increased generation of thrombin. The aPL antibody-mediated disruption of the annexin A5 anticoagulant shield may be an important prothrombotic mechanism in the aPL syndrome. PMID:12937161

  10. Human anti-murine immune response following administration of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.C.; Carrasquillo, J.C.; Larson, S.M.

    1985-05-01

    The author's purpose is to measure circulating anti-murine immunoglobulin antibodies (HAMA) in patients who previously received radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) for tumor imaging and therapy. Because the presence of HAMA may negate further use of MoAb in patients, it is important to determine the frequency and rate of HAMA development. Patients received radiolabeled MoAb Fab 96.5 (IgG2a), Fab 48.7 (IgG1), T101 (IgG2a), B72.3 (IgG1), 9.2.27 (IgG2a) and 791T/36 (IgG2b). HAMA was measured by incubating I-125 labeled 96.5, 48.7 or B72.3 with serum and isolating human IgG with Staphyloccocal protein A cells by centrifugation. The assays were capable of detecting HAMA concentrations which bound 20 ng/ml of monoclonal antibody. 12 of 37 patients who received IgG developed HAMA within 4 months of a single injection. For one patient this occurred as early as 1 week post injection. 2 of 18 patients who received Fab developed HAMA. One of these patients received multiple injections of MoAb. 2 of 3 patients who received IgG2B were positive for HAMA. There was no apparent difference in the positive HAMA when antibody or fragment was given SubQ or IV. The authors conclude that the use of IgG MoAb are more likely to lead to the development of antimurine immunoglobulin antibodies.

  11. Epitope location for two monoclonal antibodies against human cystatin C, representing opposite aggregation inhibitory properties.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Izabela; Prądzińska, Martyna; Spodzieja, Marta; Kołodziejczyk, Aleksandra S; Rodziewicz-Motowidło, Sylwia; Szymańska, Aneta; Czaplewska, Paulina

    2016-07-01

    Human cystatin C (hCC), like many other amyloidogenic proteins, dimerizes and possibly makes aggregates by subdomain swapping. Inhibition of the process should suppress the fibrillogenesis leading to a specific amyloidosis (hereditary cystatin C amyloid angiopathy, HCCAA). It has been reported that exogenous agents like monoclonal antibodies against cystatin C are able to suppress formation of cystatin C dimers and presumably control the neurodegenerative disease. We have studied in detail two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) representing very different aggregation inhibitory potency, Cyst10 and Cyst28, to find binding sites in hCC sequence responsible for the immunocomplex formation and pave the way for possible immunotherapy of HCCAA. We used the epitope extraction/excision mass spectrometry approach with the use of different enzymes complemented by affinity studies with synthetic hCC fragments as a basic technique for epitope identification. The results were analyzed in the context of hCC structure allowing us to discuss the binding sites for both antibodies. Epitopic sequences for clone Cyst28 which is a highly potent dimerization inhibitor were found in N-terminus, loop 1 and 2 (L1, L2) and fragments of β2 and β3 strands. The crucial difference between conformational epitope sequences found for both mAbs seems to be the lack of interactions with hCC via N-terminus and the loop 1 in the case of mAb Cyst10. Presumably the interactions of mAbs with hCC via L1 and β sheet fragments make the hCC structure rigid and unable to undergo the swapping process. PMID:27143169

  12. Characterization of a recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody and its Fab fragment.

    PubMed

    Kirley, Terence L; Norman, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    Variations of post-translational modifications are important for stability and in vivo behavior of therapeutic antibodies. A recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody (h2E2) was characterized for heterogeneity of N-linked glycosylation and disulfide bonds. In addition, charge heterogeneity, which is partially due to the presence or absence of C-terminal lysine on the heavy chains, was examined. For cocaine overdose therapy, Fab fragments may be therapeutic, and thus, a simplified method of generation, purification, and characterization of the Fab fragment generated by Endoproteinase Lys-C digestion was devised. Both the intact h2E2 antibody and purified Fab fragments were analyzed for their affinities for cocaine and 2 of its metabolites, benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene, by fluorescence quenching of intrinsic antibody tyrosine and tryptophan fluorescence resulting from binding of these drugs. Binding constants obtained from fluorescence quenching measurements are in agreement with recently published radioligand and ELISA binding assays. The dissociation constants determined for the h2E2 monoclonal and its Fab fragment are approximately 1, 5, and 20 nM for cocaethylene, cocaine, and benzoylecgonine, respectively. Tryptophan fluorescence quenching (emission at 330 nm) was measured after either excitation of tyrosine and tryptophan (280 nm) or selective excitation of tryptophan alone (295 nm). More accurate binding constants are obtained using tryptophan selective excitation at 295 nm, likely due to interfering absorption of cocaine and metabolites at 280 nm. These quenching results are consistent with multiple tryptophan and tyrosine residues in or near the predicted binding location of cocaine in a previously published 3-D model of this antibody's variable region. PMID:25692880

  13. Characterization of a recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody and its Fab fragment

    PubMed Central

    Kirley, Terence L; Norman, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    Variations of post-translational modifications are important for stability and in vivo behavior of therapeutic antibodies. A recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody (h2E2) was characterized for heterogeneity of N-linked glycosylation and disulfide bonds. In addition, charge heterogeneity, which is partially due to the presence or absence of C-terminal lysine on the heavy chains, was examined. For cocaine overdose therapy, Fab fragments may be therapeutic, and thus, a simplified method of generation, purification, and characterization of the Fab fragment generated by Endoproteinase Lys-C digestion was devised. Both the intact h2E2 antibody and purified Fab fragments were analyzed for their affinities for cocaine and 2 of its metabolites, benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene, by fluorescence quenching of intrinsic antibody tyrosine and tryptophan fluorescence resulting from binding of these drugs. Binding constants obtained from fluorescence quenching measurements are in agreement with recently published radioligand and ELISA binding assays. The dissociation constants determined for the h2E2 monoclonal and its Fab fragment are approximately 1, 5, and 20 nM for cocaethylene, cocaine, and benzoylecgonine, respectively. Tryptophan fluorescence quenching (emission at 330 nm) was measured after either excitation of tyrosine and tryptophan (280 nm) or selective excitation of tryptophan alone (295 nm). More accurate binding constants are obtained using tryptophan selective excitation at 295 nm, likely due to interfering absorption of cocaine and metabolites at 280 nm. These quenching results are consistent with multiple tryptophan and tyrosine residues in or near the predicted binding location of cocaine in a previously published 3-D model of this antibody's variable region. PMID:25692880

  14. Human monoclonal antibodies targeting the haemagglutinin glycoprotein can neutralize H7N9 influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Wang, Jianmin; Bao, Linlin; Guo, Li; Zhang, Weijia; Xue, Ying; Zhou, Hongli; Xiao, Yan; Wang, Jianwei; Wu, Fan; Deng, Ying; Qin, Chuan; Jin, Qi

    2015-01-01

    The recently identified avian-originated influenza H7N9 virus causes severe pulmonary disease and may lead to death in humans. Currently, treatment options for the prevention and control of fatal H7N9 infections in humans remain limited. Here we characterize two human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs), HNIgGA6 and HNIgGB5, by screening a Fab antibody phage library derived from patients who recovered from H7N9 infection. Both antibodies exhibit high neutralizing activity against H7N9 virus in cells. Two amino acids in the receptor-binding site, 186V and 226L, are crucial for the binding of these two HuMAbs to viral haemagglutinin antigens. Prophylaxis with HNIgGA6 and HNIgGB5 confers significant immunity against H7N9 virus in a mouse model and significantly reduces the pulmonary virus titre. When administered post infection, therapeutic doses of the HuMAbs also provide robust protection against lethality. These antibodies might represent a potential alternative or adjunct to H7N9 pandemic interventions. PMID:25819694

  15. Inhibition of gallium-67 uptake in melanoma by an anti-human transferrin receptor monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S.M.; Hoffer, P.B.; Maric, N.; Duray, P.

    1987-08-01

    The effect of an anti-human transferrin receptor (anti-TFR) monoclonal antibody (MoAb), designated B3/25, and an anti-melanoma antibody, designated 96.5, on the uptake of gallium-67 (/sup 67/Ga) by tumor was studied. Three groups of six athymic mice bearing a human melanoma were injected via tail vein with (a) 0.55 mg human serum albumin (HSA) (control group), (b) 0.5 mg MoAb B3/25 + 0.55 mg HSA, and (c) 0.5 mg MoAb 96.5 + 0.55 mg HSA, respectively. Twenty-four hours later, each mouse was given an intravenous dose of 5 microCi (/sup 67/Ga) citrate. Biodistribution of activity (percent injected dose per gram) determined 48 hr after injection of /sup 67/Ga showed a 75% decrease in tumor uptake in the group of mice that received B3/25 (anti-TFR MoAb) compared with the control group. In contrast, MoAb 96.5 did not show any effect on melanoma uptake of /sup 67/Ga. Histologic findings suggest that the decreased uptake was not due to cellular damage resulting from binding of B3/25 to TFR. The results of this study strongly suggest the involvement of TFR in the in vivo tumor uptake of /sup 67/Ga.

  16. Most neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies target novel epitopes requiring both Lassa virus glycoprotein subunits

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, James E.; Hastie, Kathryn M.; Cross, Robert W.; Yenni, Rachael E.; Elliott, Deborah H.; Rouelle, Julie A.; Kannadka, Chandrika B.; Smira, Ashley A.; Garry, Courtney E.; Bradley, Benjamin T.; Yu, Haini; Shaffer, Jeffrey G.; Boisen, Matt L.; Hartnett, Jessica N.; Zandonatti, Michelle A.; Rowland, Megan M.; Heinrich, Megan L.; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Cheng, Benson; de la Torre, Juan C.; Andersen, Kristian G.; Goba, Augustine; Momoh, Mambu; Fullah, Mohamed; Gbakie, Michael; Kanneh, Lansana; Koroma, Veronica J.; Fonnie, Richard; Jalloh, Simbirie C.; Kargbo, Brima; Vandi, Mohamed A.; Gbetuwa, Momoh; Ikponmwosa, Odia; Asogun, Danny A.; Okokhere, Peter O.; Follarin, Onikepe A.; Schieffelin, John S.; Pitts, Kelly R.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Kulakoski, Peter C.; Wilson, Russell B.; Happi, Christian T.; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Gevao, Sahr M.; Khan, S. Humarr; Grant, Donald S.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Branco, Luis M.; Garry, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Lassa fever is a severe multisystem disease that often has haemorrhagic manifestations. The epitopes of the Lassa virus (LASV) surface glycoproteins recognized by naturally infected human hosts have not been identified or characterized. Here we have cloned 113 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for LASV glycoproteins from memory B cells of Lassa fever survivors from West Africa. One-half bind the GP2 fusion subunit, one-fourth recognize the GP1 receptor-binding subunit and the remaining fourth are specific for the assembled glycoprotein complex, requiring both GP1 and GP2 subunits for recognition. Notably, of the 16 mAbs that neutralize LASV, 13 require the assembled glycoprotein complex for binding, while the remaining 3 require GP1 only. Compared with non-neutralizing mAbs, neutralizing mAbs have higher binding affinities and greater divergence from germline progenitors. Some mAbs potently neutralize all four LASV lineages. These insights from LASV human mAb characterization will guide strategies for immunotherapeutic development and vaccine design. PMID:27161536

  17. Broad neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies against influenza virus from vaccinated healthy donors

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Mizuta, Hiroyuki; Oshita, Masatoshi; Ideno, Shoji; Yunoki, Mikihiro; Kuhara, Motoki; Yamamoto, Naomasa; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2009-09-11

    Human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) prepared from patients with viral infections could provide information on human epitopes important for the development of vaccines as well as potential therapeutic applications. Through the fusion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a total of five influenza-vaccinated volunteers, with newly developed murine-human chimera fusion partner cells, named SPYMEG, we obtained 10 hybridoma clones stably producing anti-influenza virus antibodies: one for influenza A H1N1, four for influenza A H3N2 and five for influenza B. Surprisingly, most of the HuMAbs showed broad reactivity within subtype and four (two for H3N2 and two for B) showed broad neutralizing ability. Importantly, epitope mapping revealed that the two broad neutralizing antibodies to H3N2 derived from different donors recognized the same epitope located underneath the receptor-binding site of the hemagglutinin globular region that is highly conserved among H3N2 strains.

  18. Human monoclonal antibodies to West Nile virus identify epitopes on the prM protein

    SciTech Connect

    Calvert, Amanda E.; Kalantarov, Gavreel F.; Chang, Gwong-Jen J.; Trakht, Ilya; Blair, Carol D.; Roehrig, John T.

    2011-02-05

    Hybridoma cell lines (2E8, 8G8 and 5G12) producing fully human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) specific for the pre-membrane (prM) protein of West Nile virus (WNV) were prepared using a human fusion partner cell line, MFP-2, and human peripheral blood lymphocytes from a blood donor diagnosed with WNV fever in 2004. Using site-directed mutagenesis of a WNV-like particle (VLP) we identified 4 amino acid residues in the prM protein unique to WNV and important in the binding of these hMAbs to the VLP. Residues V19 and L33 are important epitopes for the binding of all three hMAbs. Mutations at residue, T20 and T24 affected the binding of hMAbs, 8G8 and 5G12 only. These hMAbs did not significantly protect AG129 interferon-deficient mice or Swiss Webster outbred mice from WNV infection.

  19. Efficacy of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody PG16 in HIV-infected humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Stoddart, Cheryl A; Galkina, Sofiya A; Joshi, Pheroze; Kosikova, Galina; Long, Brian R; Maidji, Ekaterina; Moreno, Mary E; Rivera, Jose M; Sanford, Ukina R; Sloan, Barbara; Cieplak, Witold; Wrin, Terri; Chan-Hui, Po-Ying

    2014-08-01

    Highly potent broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies hold promise for HIV prophylaxis and treatment. We used the SCID-hu Thy/Liv and BLT humanized mouse models to study the efficacy of these antibodies, primarily PG16, against HIV-1 clades A, B, and C. PG16 targets a conserved epitope in the V1/V2 region of gp120 common to 70-80% of HIV-1 isolates from multiple clades and has extremely potent in vitro activity against HIVJR-CSF. PG16 was highly efficacious in SCID-hu mice as a single intraperitoneal administration the day before inoculation of R5-tropic HIV directly into their Thy/Liv implants and demonstrated even greater efficacy if PG16 administration was continued after Thy/Liv implant HIV inoculation. However, PG16 as monotherapy had no activity in humanized mice with established R5-tropic HIV infection. These results provide evidence of tissue penetration of the antibodies, which could aid in their ability to prevent infection if virus crosses the mucosal barrier. PMID:24971704

  20. Efficacy of Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody PG16 in HIV-infected Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stoddart, Cheryl A.; Galkina, Sofiya A.; Joshi, Pheroze; Kosikova, Galina; Long, Brian R.; Maidji, Ekaterina; Moreno, Mary E.; Rivera, Jose M.; Sanford, Ukina R.; Sloan, Barbara; Cieplak, Witold; Wrin, Terri; Chan-Hui, Po-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Highly potent broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies hold promise for HIV prophylaxis and treatment. We used the SCID-hu Thy/Liv and BLT humanized mouse models to study the efficacy of these antibodies, primarily PG16, against HIV-1 clade A, B, and C. PG16 targets a conserved epitope in the V1/V2 region of gp120 common to 70–80% of HIV-1 isolates from multiple clades and has extremely potent in vitro activity against HIVJR-CSF. PG16 was highly efficacious in SCID-hu mice as a single intraperitoneal administration the day before inoculation of R5-tropic HIV-1 directly into their Thy/Liv implants and demonstrated even greater efficacy if PG16 administration was continued after Thy/Liv implant HIV-1 infection. However, PG16 as monotherapy had no activity in humanized mice with established R5-tropic HIV-1 infection. These results provide evidence of tissue penetration of the antibodies, which could aid in their ability to prevent infection if virus crosses the mucosal barrier. PMID:24971704

  1. Most neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies target novel epitopes requiring both Lassa virus glycoprotein subunits.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James E; Hastie, Kathryn M; Cross, Robert W; Yenni, Rachael E; Elliott, Deborah H; Rouelle, Julie A; Kannadka, Chandrika B; Smira, Ashley A; Garry, Courtney E; Bradley, Benjamin T; Yu, Haini; Shaffer, Jeffrey G; Boisen, Matt L; Hartnett, Jessica N; Zandonatti, Michelle A; Rowland, Megan M; Heinrich, Megan L; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Cheng, Benson; de la Torre, Juan C; Andersen, Kristian G; Goba, Augustine; Momoh, Mambu; Fullah, Mohamed; Gbakie, Michael; Kanneh, Lansana; Koroma, Veronica J; Fonnie, Richard; Jalloh, Simbirie C; Kargbo, Brima; Vandi, Mohamed A; Gbetuwa, Momoh; Ikponmwosa, Odia; Asogun, Danny A; Okokhere, Peter O; Follarin, Onikepe A; Schieffelin, John S; Pitts, Kelly R; Geisbert, Joan B; Kulakoski, Peter C; Wilson, Russell B; Happi, Christian T; Sabeti, Pardis C; Gevao, Sahr M; Khan, S Humarr; Grant, Donald S; Geisbert, Thomas W; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Branco, Luis M; Garry, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    Lassa fever is a severe multisystem disease that often has haemorrhagic manifestations. The epitopes of the Lassa virus (LASV) surface glycoproteins recognized by naturally infected human hosts have not been identified or characterized. Here we have cloned 113 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for LASV glycoproteins from memory B cells of Lassa fever survivors from West Africa. One-half bind the GP2 fusion subunit, one-fourth recognize the GP1 receptor-binding subunit and the remaining fourth are specific for the assembled glycoprotein complex, requiring both GP1 and GP2 subunits for recognition. Notably, of the 16 mAbs that neutralize LASV, 13 require the assembled glycoprotein complex for binding, while the remaining 3 require GP1 only. Compared with non-neutralizing mAbs, neutralizing mAbs have higher binding affinities and greater divergence from germline progenitors. Some mAbs potently neutralize all four LASV lineages. These insights from LASV human mAb characterization will guide strategies for immunotherapeutic development and vaccine design. PMID:27161536

  2. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies against Human Nuclear Protein FAM76B.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaojing; Li, Yanqing; Zhao, Junli; Wang, Dongyang; Xia, Haibin; Mao, Qinwen

    2016-01-01

    Human FAM76B (hFAM76B) is a 39 kDa protein that contains homopolymeric histidine tracts, a targeting signal for nuclear speckles. FAM76B is highly conserved among different species, suggesting that it may play an important physiological role in normal cellular functions. However, a lack of appropriate tools has hampered study of this potentially important protein. To facilitate research into the biological function(s) of FAM76B, murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against hFAM76B were generated by using purified, prokaryotically expressed hFAM76B protein. Six strains of MAbs specific for hFAM76B were obtained and characterized. The specificity of MAbs was validated by using FAM76B-/- HEK 293 cell line. Double immunofluorescence followed by laser confocal microscopy confirmed the nuclear speckle localization of hFAM76B, and the specific domains recognized by different MAbs were further elucidated by Western blot. Due to the high conservation of protein sequences between mouse and human FAM76B, MAbs against hFAM76B were shown to react with mouse FAM76B (mFAM76B) specifically. Lastly, FAM76B was found to be expressed in the normal tissues of most human organs, though to different extents. The MAbs produced in this study should provide a useful tool for investigating the biological function(s) of FAM76B. PMID:27018871

  3. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies against Human Nuclear Protein FAM76B

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaojing; Li, Yanqing; Zhao, Junli; Wang, Dongyang; Xia, Haibin; Mao, Qinwen

    2016-01-01

    Human FAM76B (hFAM76B) is a 39 kDa protein that contains homopolymeric histidine tracts, a targeting signal for nuclear speckles. FAM76B is highly conserved among different species, suggesting that it may play an important physiological role in normal cellular functions. However, a lack of appropriate tools has hampered study of this potentially important protein. To facilitate research into the biological function(s) of FAM76B, murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against hFAM76B were generated by using purified, prokaryotically expressed hFAM76B protein. Six strains of MAbs specific for hFAM76B were obtained and characterized. The specificity of MAbs was validated by using FAM76B-/- HEK 293 cell line. Double immunofluorescence followed by laser confocal microscopy confirmed the nuclear speckle localization of hFAM76B, and the specific domains recognized by different MAbs were further elucidated by Western blot. Due to the high conservation of protein sequences between mouse and human FAM76B, MAbs against hFAM76B were shown to react with mouse FAM76B (mFAM76B) specifically. Lastly, FAM76B was found to be expressed in the normal tissues of most human organs, though to different extents. The MAbs produced in this study should provide a useful tool for investigating the biological function(s) of FAM76B. PMID:27018871

  4. Fully-human Monoclonal Antibodies Against Human EphrinB2 and EphB4 | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cacner Institute's Nanobiology Program is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize fully-human monoclonal antibodies against human EphrinB2 and EphB4.

  5. Human colonic goblet cells. Demonstration of distinct subpopulations defined by mucin-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Podolsky, D K; Fournier, D A; Lynch, K E

    1986-01-01

    We studied glycoprotein content of human colonic goblet cells, using a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against purified human colonic mucin (HCM). Using indirect immunofluorescence (IIF), we found that 17 of 23 anti-HCM MAbs stained some or all goblet cells of normal human colonic mucosa. We observed a variety of cellular staining patterns, including (a) diffuse (homogeneous) staining of intracellular mucin, (b) speckled (inhomogeneous) staining of mucin droplets, (c) peripheral staining of intracellular droplets, (d) cytoplasmic staining of goblet cells, and (e) apical (luminal) surface staining. Staining patterns were not associated with particular HCM species. In addition to variable patterns of IIF within individual cells, anti-HCM MAbs varied in the proportion of goblet cells stained. Some MAbs stained all goblet cells, while others stained a limited number of goblet cells. Although each goblet cell contained more than one type mucin, HCM species III, and IV and V appeared to exist in mutually exclusive goblet cell populations and it was possible to define at least seven subpopulations of goblet cells in colonic mucosa by their content of various combinations of HCM species. Anti-HCM MAbs stained goblet cells from other sites within the gastrointestinal tract to a varying extent. Anti-HCM MAbs also showed extensive cross-reactivity with rodent, rabbit, and monkey colonic mucosa. However, several anti-HCM MAbs stained only human colonic mucosa. These data show that human colonic mucosa contains discrete subpopulations of goblet cells that produce distinctive combinations of specific mucin glycoprotein species. Images PMID:2420829

  6. Development of human monoclonal antibodies against diseases caused by emerging and biodefense-related viruses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Antony S; Chakraborti, Samitabh; Dimitrova, Dimana; Xiao, Xiaodong; Broder, Christopher C; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2006-02-01

    Polyclonal antibodies have a century-old history of being effective against some viruses; recently, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have also shown success. The humanized mAb Synagis (palivizumab), which is still the only mAb against a viral disease approved by the US FDA, has been widely used as a prophylactic measure against respiratory syncytial virus infections in neonates and immunocompromised individuals. The first fully human mAbs against two other paramyxoviruses, Hendra and Nipah virus, which can cause high (up to 75%) mortality, were recently developed; one of them, m101, showed exceptional potency against infectious virus. In an amazing pace of research, several potent human mAbs targeting the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus S glycoprotein that can affect infections in animal models have been developed months after the virus was identified in 2003. A potent humanized mAb with therapeutic potential was recently developed against the West Nile virus. The progress in developing neutralizing human mAbs against Ebola, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, vaccinia and other emerging and biodefense-related viruses is slow. A major problem in the development of effective therapeutic agents against viruses, including therapeutic antibodies, is the viruses' heterogeneity and mutability. A related problem is the low binding affinity of crossreactive antibodies able to neutralize a variety of primary isolates. Combinations of mAbs or mAbs with other drugs, and/or the identification of potent new mAbs and their derivatives that target highly conserved viral structures, which are critical for virus entry into cells, are some of the possible solutions to these problems, and will continue to be a major focus of antiviral research. PMID:16441209

  7. Monoclonal Antibodies to the Human Insulin Receptor that Activate Glucose Transport but not Insulin Receptor Kinase Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsayeth, John R.; Caro, Jose F.; Sinha, Madhur K.; Maddux, Betty A.; Goldfine, Ira D.

    1987-05-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies were produced that reacted with the α subunit of the human insulin receptor. All three both immunoprecipitated 125I-labeled insulin receptors from IM-9 lymphocytes and competitively inhibited 125I-labeled insulin binding to its receptor. Unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor autophosphorylation in both intact IM-9 lymphocytes and purified human placental insulin receptors. Moreover, unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor-mediated phosphorylation of exogenous substrates. However, like insulin, two of the three antibodies stimulated glucose transport in isolated human adipocytes. One antibody, on a molar basis, was as potent as insulin. These studies indicate, therefore, that monoclonal antibodies to the insulin receptor can mimic a major function of insulin without activating receptor kinase activity. They also raise the possibility that certain actions of insulin such as stimulation of glucose transport may not require the activation of receptor kinase activity.

  8. Discovery and Characterization of Phage Display-Derived Human Monoclonal Antibodies against RSV F Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Aimin; Callahan, Cheryl; Pristatsky, Pavlo; Swoyer, Ryan; Cejas, Pedro; Nahas, Debbie; Galli, Jennifer; Cosmi, Scott; DiStefano, Daniel; Hoang, Van M.; Bett, Andrew; Casimiro, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants, the elderly and in immunosuppressed populations. The vast majority of neutralizing antibodies isolated from human subjects target the RSV fusion (F) glycoprotein, making it an attractive target for the development of vaccines and therapeutic antibodies. Currently, Synagis® (palivizumab) is the only FDA approved antibody drug for the prevention of RSV infection, and there is a great need for more effective vaccines and therapeutics. Phage display is a powerful tool in antibody discovery with the advantage that it does not require samples from immunized subjects. In this study, Morphosys HuCAL GOLD® phage libraries were used for panning against RSV prefusion and postfusion F proteins. Panels of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against RSV F protein were discovered following phage library panning and characterized. Antibodies binding specifically to prefusion or postfusion F proteins and those binding both conformations were identified. 3B1 is a prototypic postfusion F specific antibody while 2E1 is a prototypic prefusion F specific antibody. 2E1 is a potent broadly neutralizing antibody against both RSV A and B strains. Epitope mapping experiments identified a conformational epitope spanning across three discontinuous sections of the RSV F protein, as well as critical residues for antibody interaction. PMID:27258388

  9. Novel monoclonal antibodies to normal and pathologically altered human TDP-43 proteins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The RNA/DNA-binding protein, TDP-43, is the key component of ubiquitinated inclusions characteristic of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and the majority of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-TDP) referred to collectively as TDP-43 proteinopathies. To further elucidate mechanisms of pathological TDP-43 processing and identify TDP-43 epitopes that could be useful as potential biomarkers of TDP-43 proteinopathies, we developed a panel of novel monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed at regions extending across the length of TDP-43. Here, we confirm previous observations that there is no or minimal accumulation of TDP-43 N-terminal domains in neocortical inclusions in human TDP-43 proteinopathy tissues and we identify a subset of these MAbs that are specific for human versus mouse TDP-43. Notably, one of these MAbs recognized an epitope that preferentially detected pathological TDP-43 inclusions with negligible reactivity for normal nuclear TDP-43 resembling anti-phospho-TDP-43 specific antibodies that only bind pathological TDP-43. Hence, we infer that this new MAb recognizes a phosphorylation independent but disease-specific pathologic conformation in abnormal TDP-43. These data suggest that the novel MAbs reported here will be useful for patient-oriented research as well as for studies of animal and cell-based models of TDP-43 proteinopathies including ALS and FTLD-TDP. PMID:24690345

  10. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with human breast or ovarian carcinoma: In vivo applications

    SciTech Connect

    Thor, A.D.; Edgerton, S.M. )

    1989-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) are unique and useful bioprobes that allow in vivo targeting of membrane-associated or circulating antigens. Most of the clinical trials to date have used low dosages of radiolabeled MoAb given in a single dose. Newer studies have included antibody fragments, repeated injections, intraperitoneal (IP) administration, and other labels such as 90Y. Clinical MoAb trials are often arduous, expensive, and time-consuming to perform. Before human use, animal studies and extensive MoAb characterization are required. The production of pharmaceutical grade, radiolabeled MoAb is technically difficult and costly. Clinical trials require administrative and patient consent as well as extensive written protocols. These studies necessitate interdepartmental and intradepartmental cooperation and coordination. Furthermore, the use of in vivo radiolabeled probes impacts many levels of health care providers from janitorial, nursing, and technical staff to laboratories and physicians. Simple blood tests or disposal of body excretions may concern nursing or technical staff with the possibility of radiation exposure. The responsibility for study design, personnel involvement, and prospective use in patients without a definitive cancer diagnosis ultimately rests with the physician. While many issues have been addressed, additional clinical trials, consideration of safety issues, and standardization between institutions will be necessary before the use of radiolabeled MoAb for diagnosis, management, or therapy of human tumors becomes routine. Continued cooperation and funding should ensure its achievement. 136 references.

  11. Radiolocalization of monoclonal antibodies in hepatic metastases from human colon cancer in congenitally athymic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, K.; Rivoire, M.; Divgi, C.; Welt, S.; Cohen, A.M.; Sigurdson, E.R. )

    1990-02-01

    Intrasplenic injection of the HT-29 LMM metastatic human colon cancer line reproducibly results in hepatic metastasis formation in congenitally athymic mice. HT-29-15, a murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) of the IgG1 class reactive with the HT-29 LMM line, and BL-3, an isotype-matched control antibody, were labeled with 125I. Labeled mAbs were injected i.v. in mice with hepatic metastases, and animals were sacrificed on days 3, 5, and 7. Specific mAb uptake by tumor was significantly greater than nonspecific mAb uptake, as evidenced by specific/nonspecific tumor/blood ratios (radiolocalization indices) of 3.47/1-25.6/1. Relative mAb uptake was greater by the hepatic tumors than by the splenic tumors from day 3 to day 7, although this was significant (P less than 0.05) only on day 7 (5.12 {plus minus} 2.97 versus 1.79 {plus minus} 0.71). Tumor/uninvolved tissue ratios were also significantly greater (P less than 0.05) for the hepatic metastases than for the splenic tumors on day 7 (12.23 {plus minus} 3.85 versus 6.63 {plus minus} 2.63). This murine hepatic metastasis model appears useful for evaluation of localization of mAbs to hepatic metastases from human colon carcinoma.

  12. Novel monoclonal antibodies to normal and pathologically altered human TDP-43 proteins.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Linda K; Irwin, David J; Walker, Adam K; Xu, Yan; Riddle, Dawn M; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M Y

    2014-01-01

    The RNA/DNA-binding protein, TDP-43, is the key component of ubiquitinated inclusions characteristic of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and the majority of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-TDP) referred to collectively as TDP-43 proteinopathies. To further elucidate mechanisms of pathological TDP-43 processing and identify TDP-43 epitopes that could be useful as potential biomarkers of TDP-43 proteinopathies, we developed a panel of novel monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed at regions extending across the length of TDP-43. Here, we confirm previous observations that there is no or minimal accumulation of TDP-43 N-terminal domains in neocortical inclusions in human TDP-43 proteinopathy tissues and we identify a subset of these MAbs that are specific for human versus mouse TDP-43. Notably, one of these MAbs recognized an epitope that preferentially detected pathological TDP-43 inclusions with negligible reactivity for normal nuclear TDP-43 resembling anti-phospho-TDP-43 specific antibodies that only bind pathological TDP-43. Hence, we infer that this new MAb recognizes a phosphorylation independent but disease-specific pathologic conformation in abnormal TDP-43. These data suggest that the novel MAbs reported here will be useful for patient-oriented research as well as for studies of animal and cell-based models of TDP-43 proteinopathies including ALS and FTLD-TDP. PMID:24690345

  13. Epitope mapping of 10 monoclonal antibodies against the pig analogue of human membrane cofactor protein (MCP)

    PubMed Central

    PéRez De La Lastra, J M; Van Den Berg, C W; Bullido, R; Almazán, F; Domínguez, J; Llanes, D; Morgan, B P

    1999-01-01

    Pig membrane cofactor protein (MCP; CD46) is a 50 000–60 000 MW glycoprotein that is expressed on a wide variety of cells, including erythrocytes. Pig MCP has cofactor activity for factor I-mediated cleavage of C3b and is an efficient regulator of the classical and alternative pathway of human and pig complement. A panel of 10 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was collected from two different laboratories; all of these mAbs were raised against pig leucocytes and all recognized the same complex banding pattern on sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS–PAGE) of erythrocyte membranes. All were shown to be reactive with pig MCP and were divided into four groups of mutually competitive antibodies based on competition studies for membrane-bound MCP and for soluble MCP, the latter by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis. The antigenic properties of membrane-bound and soluble MCP were similar, although some interesting differences were revealed. None of the 10 mAbs were cross-reactive with human MCP and only one showed cross-reactivity with leucocytes from a panel of large mammals – a weak cross-reactivity with a subset of dog leucocytes. All antibodies in one of the epitope groups and some in a second epitope group were able to block the functional activity of pig MCP, as measured by inhibition of MCP-catalysed C3 degradation by factor I. PMID:10233756

  14. Purification of human placental aromatase cytochrome P-450 with monoclonal antibody and its characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Nobutaka; Osawa, Yoshio )

    1991-03-26

    A simple and efficient method is described for the purification of microsomal aromatase cytochrome P-450 from human placenta. The enzyme was solubilized with Emulgen 913 and sodium cholate and subjected to chromatography on a column of Sepharose 4B couples with a specific monoclonal antibody, followed by hydroxyapatite column chromatography. The specific cytochrome P-450 content of purified aromatase was 13.1 (12-14.8) nmol/mg of protein. Aromatase assays were carried out with reconstituted systems of bovine liver P-450 reductase and dilauroyl-L-{alpha}-phosphatidylcholine with (1{beta}-{sup 3}H,4-{sup 14}C)androstenedione as substrate. The total recovery of purified aromatase activity was 32.2%, and P-450 recovery was 17.6%. The very high K{sub m} value for 16{alpha}-hydroxytestosterone aromatization gives a reasonable indication that estriol is not the directly aromatized product in the fetoplacental unit of human pregnancy. The aromatase P-450 was subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in increasing quantities. Silver stain detection techniques indicated a single band having a molecular mass of 55 kDa with greater than 97% purity. The stability analysis showed a half-life of over 4 years on storage at {minus}80C.

  15. Simulation of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics in humans using a minimal physiologically based model.

    PubMed

    Li, Linzhong; Gardner, Iain; Dostalek, Miroslav; Jamei, Masoud

    2014-09-01

    Compared to small chemical molecules, monoclonal antibodies and Fc-containing derivatives (mAbs) have unique pharmacokinetic behaviour characterised by relatively poor cellular permeability, minimal renal filtration, binding to FcRn, target-mediated drug disposition, and disposition via lymph. A minimal physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to describe the pharmacokinetics of mAbs in humans was developed. Within the model, the body is divided into three physiological compartments; plasma, a single tissue compartment and lymph. The tissue compartment is further sub-divided into vascular, endothelial and interstitial spaces. The model simultaneously describes the levels of endogenous IgG and exogenous mAbs in each compartment and sub-compartment and, in particular, considers the competition of these two species for FcRn binding in the endothelial space. A Monte-Carlo sampling approach is used to simulate the concentrations of endogenous IgG and mAb in a human population. Existing targeted-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) models are coupled with the minimal PBPK model to provide a general platform for simulating the pharmacokinetics of therapeutic antibodies using primarily pre-clinical data inputs. The feasibility of utilising pre-clinical data to parameterise the model and to simulate the pharmacokinetics of adalimumab and an anti-ALK1 antibody (PF-03446962) in a population of individuals was investigated and results were compared to published clinical data. PMID:25004823

  16. Discovery and Characterization of Phage Display-Derived Human Monoclonal Antibodies against RSV F Glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhifeng; Zhang, Lan; Tang, Aimin; Callahan, Cheryl; Pristatsky, Pavlo; Swoyer, Ryan; Cejas, Pedro; Nahas, Debbie; Galli, Jennifer; Cosmi, Scott; DiStefano, Daniel; Hoang, Van M; Bett, Andrew; Casimiro, Danilo; Vora, Kalpit A

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants, the elderly and in immunosuppressed populations. The vast majority of neutralizing antibodies isolated from human subjects target the RSV fusion (F) glycoprotein, making it an attractive target for the development of vaccines and therapeutic antibodies. Currently, Synagis® (palivizumab) is the only FDA approved antibody drug for the prevention of RSV infection, and there is a great need for more effective vaccines and therapeutics. Phage display is a powerful tool in antibody discovery with the advantage that it does not require samples from immunized subjects. In this study, Morphosys HuCAL GOLD® phage libraries were used for panning against RSV prefusion and postfusion F proteins. Panels of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against RSV F protein were discovered following phage library panning and characterized. Antibodies binding specifically to prefusion or postfusion F proteins and those binding both conformations were identified. 3B1 is a prototypic postfusion F specific antibody while 2E1 is a prototypic prefusion F specific antibody. 2E1 is a potent broadly neutralizing antibody against both RSV A and B strains. Epitope mapping experiments identified a conformational epitope spanning across three discontinuous sections of the RSV F protein, as well as critical residues for antibody interaction. PMID:27258388

  17. Early short-term treatment with neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies halts SHIV infection in infant macaques.

    PubMed

    Hessell, Ann J; Jaworski, J Pablo; Epson, Erin; Matsuda, Kenta; Pandey, Shilpi; Kahl, Christoph; Reed, Jason; Sutton, William F; Hammond, Katherine B; Cheever, Tracy A; Barnette, Philip T; Legasse, Alfred W; Planer, Shannon; Stanton, Jeffrey J; Pegu, Amarendra; Chen, Xuejun; Wang, Keyun; Siess, Don; Burke, David; Park, Byung S; Axthelm, Michael K; Lewis, Anne; Hirsch, Vanessa M; Graham, Barney S; Mascola, John R; Sacha, Jonah B; Haigwood, Nancy L

    2016-04-01

    Prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV remains a major objective where antenatal care is not readily accessible. We tested HIV-1-specific human neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (NmAbs) as a post-exposure therapy in an infant macaque model for intrapartum MTCT. One-month-old rhesus macaques were inoculated orally with the simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIVSF162P3. On days 1, 4, 7 and 10 after virus exposure, we injected animals subcutaneously with NmAbs and quantified systemic distribution of NmAbs in multiple tissues within 24 h after antibody administration. Replicating virus was found in multiple tissues by day 1 in animals that were not treated. All NmAb-treated macaques were free of virus in blood and tissues at 6 months after exposure. We detected no anti-SHIV T cell responses in blood or tissues at necropsy, and no virus emerged after CD8(+) T cell depletion. These results suggest that early passive immunotherapy can eliminate early viral foci and thereby prevent the establishment of viral reservoirs. PMID:26998834

  18. A sensitive and specific two-site enzyme-immunoassay for human calcitonin using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Seth, R; Motté, P; Kehely, A; Wimalawansa, S J; Self, C H; Bellet, D; Bohuon, C; MacIntyre, I

    1988-11-01

    A highly sensitive, specific and rapid two-site enzyme-immunometric assay (EIA) for the measurement of immunoreactive (ir) human calcitonin (hCT) in human plasma was developed using high-affinity monoclonal antibodies. The assay was validated in terms of sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility and its performance compared with that of a radioimmunoassay (RIA) employing a polyclonal antiserum. The sensitivity of the overnight EIA (2 pmol/l) was comparable with the long-incubation (7 days) RIA. The overnight RIA had a sensitivity of 10 pmol/l. The inter- and intra-assay variations of the EIA were less than 12%. Some related and non-related peptides were compared with synthetic hCT for cross-reactivity in the assay and were found to be negative. The mean recovery of added synthetic hCT from plasma of normal volunteers was 96%. Both RIA and EIA have been applied to the measurement of ir-hCT in normal volunteers and in patients with medullary carcinoma of the thyroid. In both groups, the level of ir-hCT measured by EIA was found to be lower than that measured by RIA, presumably due to the ability of the more specific EIA to detect only the 'mature' form of the hormone. EIA offers an attractive alternative to the more cumbersome and lengthy RIA in current usage, with the added advantage of employing a non-isotopic label. PMID:3058855

  19. Large Scale Generation and Characterization of Anti-Human IgA Monoclonal Antibody in Ascitic Fluid of Balb/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ezzatifar, Fatemeh; Majidi, Jafar; Baradaran, Behzad; Aghebati Maleki, Leili; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies are potentially powerful tools used in biomedical research, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious diseases and cancers. The monoclonal antibody against Human IgA can be used as a diagnostic application to detect infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to improve an appropriate protocol for large-scale production of mAbs against IgA. Methods: For large-scale production of the monoclonal antibody, hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibodies against Human IgA were injected intraperitoneally into Balb/c mice that were previously primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. After ten days, ascitic fluid was harvested from the peritoneum of each mouse. The ELISA method was carried out for evaluation of the titration of produced mAbs. The ascitic fluid was investigated in terms of class and subclass by a mouse mAb isotyping kit. MAb was purified from the ascitic fluid by ion exchange chromatography. The purity of the monoclonal antibody was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with HRP. Results: Monoclonal antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity against Human IgA were prepared by hybridoma technology. The subclass of antibody was IgG1 and its light chain was the kappa type. Conclusion: This conjugated monoclonal antibody could have applications in designing ELISA kits in order to diagnose different infectious diseases such as toxoplasmosis and H. Pylori. PMID:25789225

  20. Crystallization of the Fab from a human monoclonal antibody against gp 41 of human immunodeficiency virus type I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casale, Elena; He, Xiao-Min; Snyder, Robert S.; Carter, Daniel C.; Wenisch, Elisabeth; Jungbauer, Alois; Tauer, Christa; Ruker, Florian; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    1990-01-01

    A monoclonal IgG antibody directed against gp 41 from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) has been crystallized in both intact and Fab forms. Crystals of the intact antibody grow as tetragonal-like prisms too small for conventional X-ray analysis. However, the Fab portion of the antibody produces suitable platelike crystals which belong to the space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with unit cell constants of a = 66.5 A, b = 74.3 A, and c = 105.3 A. There is one molecule of Fab in the asymmetric unit. The Fab crystals show diffraction to d-spacings less than 3.0 A.

  1. A Monoclonal IgM Protein with Antibody-like Activity for Human Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Hauptman, Stephen; Tomasi, Thomas B.

    1974-01-01

    The serum of a patient (L'ec) with an IgM lambda monoclonal protein was noted to bind albumin on immunoelectrophoresis. Analytical ultracentrifugation of the L'ec serum demonstrated 23S and 12S peaks, but no 4S (albumin) boundary. Immunologically identical 20S and 9S IgM proteins were isolated from the serum and the addition in vitro of either the patient's albumin or albumin isolated from normal serum was shown to reconstitute the 23S and 12S boundaries. The binding of high molecular weight IgM to albumin was demonstated by Sephadex G200 chromatography with 125I-labeled albumin and isolated IgM. Immunoelectrophoresis of the L'ec IgM developed with aggregated albumin (reverse immunoelectrophoresis) also demonstrated the binding of albumin to IgM. That all of the patient's IgM complexed with albumin was shown by affinity chromatography employing an aggregated albumin-immunoadsorbent column. Binding was shown to be of the noncovalent type by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in 8 M urea. With hot trypsin proteolysis, Fabμ and Fcμ5 fragments were isolated, and monomer albumin was shown to complex only with the Fabμ fragment by both analytical ultracentrifugation and molecular sieve chromatogaphy employing 125I-labeled Fab fragments. 1 mol of Fabμ fragment bound 1 mol of monomer albumin. Polymers of human albumin, produced by heat aggregation, precipitated with the isolated L'ec protein on gel diffusion analysis and, when coated on sheep red blood cells, gave a hemagglutination titer greater than 1 million with the whole L'ec serum. 50 additional monoclonal IgM, 33 IgA, and 80 IgG sera failed to show precipitation or hemagglutination with aggregated albumin. Native monomer albumin inhibited precipitation only at high concentrations (> 50 mg/ml); dimer albumin or fragments of albumin produced by trypsin digestion inhibited at low concentrations (0.4 mg/ml). No reactivity occurred with the albumin of five other mammalian species, including bovine. The L'ec protein

  2. Preparation and application of a novel monoclonal antibody specific for human B7-H3.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jian; Zhang, Dong-Lei; Cui, Zhi-Chu; Wang, Hui-Min

    2016-07-01

    Human B7-H3 (CD276), as a new member of the B7 family has been demonstrated to mediate T cell proliferation and the production of interferon‑γ. Two isoforms of B7-H3 have been identified in humans, 2IgB7‑H3 and 4IgB7‑H3. Since the costimulatory functions of the two isoforms remains to be fully elucidated, there are disagreements regarding their expression patterns as well as the T cell responses. In the present study, a single mouse anti‑human monoclonal antibody (mAb), specific for 2IgB7‑H3 and 4IgB7‑H3 was established, termed 11F4. Using this antibody, the expression of B7‑H3 was observed extensively in tumor cell lines, with the exception of certain human hematopoietic cell lines. Subsequently, the fusion proteins of the two B7‑H3 isoforms were produced to analyze the biological function of 4IgB7‑H3 and 2IgB7‑H3 using a Cell Counting Kit‑8 assay, and the data revealed that the two isoforms exhibited a similar function in promoting T cell proliferation. In addition, the effect of B7‑H3 on the T cells was inhibited by the 11F4 mAb. Overall, the novel antibody produced was observed to exhibit an inhibitory effect offering a useful tool in further investigations of the function of B7-H3 isoforms. PMID:27222007

  3. Fully human monoclonal antibody inhibitors of the neonatal fc receptor reduce circulating IgG in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Andrew E; Chen, Jie; Sexton, Daniel J; Muruganandam, Arumugam; Bitonti, Alan J; Dumont, Jennifer; Viswanathan, Malini; Martik, Diana; Wassaf, Dina; Mezo, Adam; Wood, Clive R; Biedenkapp, Joseph C; TenHoor, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic management of antibody-mediated autoimmune disease typically involves immunosuppressant and immunomodulatory strategies. However, perturbing the fundamental role of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) in salvaging IgG from lysosomal degradation provides a novel approach - depleting the body of pathogenic immunoglobulin by preventing IgG binding to FcRn and thereby increasing the rate of IgG catabolism. Herein, we describe the discovery and preclinical evaluation of fully human monoclonal IgG antibody inhibitors of FcRn. Using phage display, we identified several potent inhibitors of human-FcRn in which binding to FcRn is pH-independent, with over 1000-fold higher affinity for human-FcRn than human IgG-Fc at pH 7.4. FcRn antagonism in vivo using a human-FcRn knock-in transgenic mouse model caused enhanced catabolism of exogenously administered human IgG. In non-human primates, we observed reductions in endogenous circulating IgG of >60% with no changes in albumin, IgM, or IgA. FcRn antagonism did not disrupt the ability of non-human primates to mount IgM/IgG primary and secondary immune responses. Interestingly, the therapeutic anti-FcRn antibodies had a short serum half-life but caused a prolonged reduction in IgG levels. This may be explained by the high affinity of the antibodies to FcRn at both acidic and neutral pH. These results provide important preclinical proof of concept data in support of FcRn antagonism as a novel approach to the treatment of antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:25954273

  4. Growth-stimulatory monoclonal antibodies against human insulin-like growth factor I receptor.

    PubMed

    Xiong, L; Kasuya, J; Li, S L; Kato, J; Fujita-Yamaguchi, Y

    1992-06-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against purified human placental insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptors were prepared and characterized. Three IgG mAbs were specific for the human IGF-I receptor and displayed negligible crossreactivity with the human insulin receptor. They stimulated 125I-labeled IGF-I (125I-IGF-I) or 125I-IGF-II binding to purified human placental IGF-I receptors and to IGF-I receptors expressed in NIH 3T3 cells in contrast to the well-studied mAb alpha IR-3, which inhibits 125I-IGF-I or 125I-IGF-II binding to both forms of IGF-I receptors. The mAbs introduced in this study stimulated DNA synthesis in NIH 3T3 cells expressing human IGF-I receptors approximately 1.5-fold above the basal level and the IGF-I- or IGF-II-stimulated level. In contrast, alpha IR-3 inhibited both basal and IGF-I or IGF-II-stimulated DNA synthesis by approximately 30%. Inhibition of IGF-II-stimulated DNA synthesis by alpha IR-3 was as potent as its inhibition of IGF-I-stimulated DNA synthesis, although IGF-II binding to the IGF-I receptors was not inhibited by IGF-II as potently as was IGF-I. With the purified IGF-I receptors, both inhibitory and stimulatory mAbs were shown to activate autophosphorylation of the IGF-I receptor beta subunit and to induce microaggregation of the receptors. These results suggest that conformational changes resulting from receptor dimerization in the presence of either type of mAb may affect the signal-transducing function of the IGF-I receptor differently. These additional mAbs and alpha IR-3 immunoprecipitated nearly 90% of IGF-I binding activity from Triton X-100-solubilized human placental membranes, indicating that IGF-I receptor reactive with these mAbs is the major form of the IGF-I receptor in human placenta. PMID:1319060

  5. Immunosuppressive human anti-CD83 monoclonal antibody depletion of activated dendritic cells in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Seldon, T A; Pryor, R; Palkova, A; Jones, M L; Verma, N D; Findova, M; Braet, K; Sheng, Y; Fan, Y; Zhou, E Y; Marks, J D; Munro, T; Mahler, S M; Barnard, R T; Fromm, P D; Silveira, P A; Elgundi, Z; Ju, X; Clark, G J; Bradstock, K F; Munster, D J; Hart, D N J

    2016-03-01

    Current immunosuppressive/anti-inflammatory agents target the responding effector arm of the immune response and their nonspecific action increases the risk of infection and malignancy. These effects impact on their use in allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation and other forms of transplantation. Interventions that target activated dendritic cells (DCs) have the potential to suppress the induction of undesired immune responses (for example, graft versus host disease (GVHD) or transplant rejection) and to leave protective T-cell immune responses intact (for example, cytomegalovirus (CMV) immunity). We developed a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb), 3C12, specific for CD83, which is expressed on activated but not resting DC. The 3C12 mAb and an affinity improved version, 3C12C, depleted CD83(+) cells by CD16(+) NK cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, and inhibited allogeneic T-cell proliferation in vitro. A single dose of 3C12C prevented human peripheral blood mononuclear cell-induced acute GVHD in SCID mouse recipients. The mAb 3C12C depleted CMRF-44(+)CD83(bright) activated DC but spared CD83(dim/-) DC in vivo. It reduced human T-cell activation in vivo and maintained the proportion of CD4(+) FoxP3(+) CD25(+) Treg cells and also viral-specific CD8(+) T cells. The anti-CD83 mAb, 3C12C, merits further evaluation as a new immunosuppressive agent in transplantation. PMID:26286117

  6. Typing of human rotavirus VP4 by an enzyme immunoassay using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Coulson, B S

    1993-01-01

    Two different neutralization specificities exist on the outer capsid of group A rotaviruses. At least seven VP7 (G) antigenic types are distinguishable among human rotaviruses. Four distinct antigenic (P) types of human rotavirus VP4 corresponding to separate rotavirus gene 4 groups have been described. The aim of this study was to identify P types in clinical specimens by developing an enzyme immunoassay, using P-type-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (N-MAbs). Three N-MAbs primarily or solely recognizing each of P types 4, 6, and 8 and binding to VP4 or its subunit VP5* were derived. These N-MAbs served as detector antibodies in an enzyme immunoassay P-typing system similar to that in use for G typing. P-type specificity was highest when the G-type specificity of the capture antiserum was matched to the G type of the rotavirus in the test sample. The method correctly identified the P types of 13 well-characterized, cell culture-adapted human rotaviruses and was used to classify a further six strains. P typing of 118 rotavirus-positive stools gave results consistent with the P type inferred from the G type for 98 (83%) samples. Twelve (10%) of the stools showed no reaction with any N-MAb and eight (7%) samples were untypeable because of cross-reactivity between N-MAbs or high background readings. This P-typing enzyme immunoassay system is economical and amenable to large-scale use in epidemiological studies. Its use will facilitate assessment of the distribution of P types worldwide and of the role of VP4 in eliciting protective immune responses. PMID:7678015

  7. Identification of a Human Monoclonal Antibody To Replace Equine Diphtheria Antitoxin for Treatment of Diphtheria Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Sevigny, Leila M.; Booth, Brian J.; Rowley, Kirk J.; Leav, Brett A.; Cheslock, Peter S.; Garrity, Kerry A.; Sloan, Susan E.; Thomas, William; Babcock, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Diphtheria antitoxin (DAT) has been the cornerstone of the treatment of Corynebacterium diphtheriae infection for more than 100 years. Although the global incidence of diphtheria has declined steadily over the last quarter of the 20th century, the disease remains endemic in many parts of the world, and significant outbreaks still occur. DAT is an equine polyclonal antibody that is not commercially available in the United States and is in short supply globally. A safer, more readily available alternative to DAT would be desirable. In the current study, we obtained human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) directly from antibody-secreting cells in the circulation of immunized human volunteers. We isolated a panel of diverse hMAbs that recognized diphtheria toxoid, as well as a variety of recombinant protein fragments of diphtheria toxin. Forty-five unique hMAbs were tested for neutralization of diphtheria toxin in in vitro cytotoxicity assays with a 50% effective concentration of 0.65 ng/ml for the lead candidate hMAb, 315C4. In addition, 25 μg of 315C4 completely protected guinea pigs from intoxication in an in vivo lethality model, yielding an estimated relative potency of 64 IU/mg. In comparison, 1.6 IU of DAT was necessary for full protection from morbidity and mortality in this model. We further established that our lead candidate hMAb binds to the receptor-binding domain of diphtheria toxin and physically blocks the toxin from binding to the putative receptor, heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor. The discovery of a specific and potent human neutralizing antibody against diphtheria toxin holds promise as a potential therapeutic. PMID:23940209

  8. First human study of a chimeric anti-methamphetamine monoclonal antibody in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Misty W; Henry, Ralph L; Owens, S Michael; Schutz, Ralph; Gentry, W Brooks

    2014-01-01

    This first-in-human study examined the safety and pharmacokinetics of ch-mAb7F9, an anti-methamphetamine monoclonal antibody, in healthy volunteers. Single, escalating doses of ch-mAb7F9 over the range of 0.2 to 20 mg/kg were administered to 42 subjects who were followed for 147 d. Safety was measured by physical examinations, adverse events, vital signs, electrocardiograms, and clinical laboratory testing. Serum ch-mAb7F9 concentration and immunogenicity analyses were performed. There were no serious adverse reactions or discontinuations from the study due to adverse events. No trends emerged in the frequency, relatedness, or severity of adverse events with increased dose or between active and placebo treated subjects. Ch-mAb7F9 displayed expected IgG pharmacokinetic parameters, including a half-life of 17-19 d in the 3 highest dose groups and volume of distribution of 5-6 L, suggesting the antibody is confined primarily to the vascular compartment. Four (12.5%) of the 32 subjects receiving ch-mAb7F9 were confirmed to have developed a human anti-chimeric antibody response by the end of the study; however, this response did not appear to be dose related. Overall, no apparent safety or tolerability concerns were identified; a maximum tolerated dose was not reached in this Phase 1 study. Ch-mAb7F9 therefore appears safe for human administration. PMID:25484042

  9. Internalization and re-expression of antigens of human melanoma cells following exposure to monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.S.; Lumanglas, A.L.; Silva, J.; Ruszala-Mallon, V.; Durr, F.E.

    1987-04-15

    Modulation of the surface membrane of human Sk-Mel-28 melanoma cells by monoclonal antibody (MoAb) 96.5 recognizing p97 determinants was examined using direct radioimmunoassay and indirect fluorescent antibody-staining techniques. It was determined that the majority of /sup 111/In-labeled antibody that remained associated with cells after a 24-hr incubation at 37 degrees C had been internalized because MoAb 96.5 was no longer visible on the cell surface. A second treatment of these cells with the same antibody 24 hr later not only increased the cell-associated radioactivity, reflecting an increase of total antibody bound, but also rendered these cells membrane immunofluorescent again, indicating the re-expression of surface antigens. Autoradiographs of the electrophoretically analyzed membrane components of Sk-Mel-28 cells further demonstrated the appearance of newly synthesized 97-kDa proteins that were immunoprecipitable with MoAb 96.5. Taken together, the present findings suggest that p97 antigens undergo endocytosis in Sk-Mel-28 cells following exposure to MoAb 96.5. However, the same antigens were regenerated and expressed on the cell surface within a period of 24 hr. The re-expression of tumor cell surface antigen following initial internalization of the MoAb-antigen complex may have implications for diagnosis and therapy.

  10. TRAIL-R2 Superoligomerization Induced by Human Monoclonal Agonistic Antibody KMTR2.

    PubMed

    Tamada, Taro; Shinmi, Daisuke; Ikeda, Masahiro; Yonezawa, Yasushi; Kataoka, Shiro; Kuroki, Ryota; Mori, Eiji; Motoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The fully human monoclonal antibody KMTR2 acts as a strong direct agonist for tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor 2 (TRAIL-R2), which is capable of inducing apoptotic cell death without cross-linking. To investigate the mechanism of direct agonistic activity induced by KMTR2, the crystal structure of the extracellular region of TRAIL-R2 and a Fab fragment derived from KMTR2 (KMTR2-Fab) was determined to 2.1 Å resolution. Two KMTR2-Fabs assembled with the complementarity-determining region 2 of the light chain via two-fold crystallographic symmetry, suggesting that the KMTR2-Fab assembly tended to enhance TRAIL-R2 oligomerization. A single mutation at Asn53 to Arg located at the two-fold interface in the KMTR2 resulted in a loss of its apoptotic activity, although it retained its antigen-binding activity. These results indicate that the strong agonistic activity, such as apoptotic signaling and tumor regression, induced by KMTR2 is attributed to TRAIL-R2 superoligomerization induced by the interdimerization of KMTR2. PMID:26672965

  11. Applications of monoclonal antibodies and recombinant cytokines for the treatment of human colorectal and other carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, J.W.; Smalley, R.V.; Borden, E.C.; Martin, E.W.; Guadagni, F.; Roselli, M.; Schlom, J. )

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) which recognize a human tumor antigen, termed tumor-associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72), have successfully been used to localize primary as well as metastatic colorectal tumor lesions in patients. The localization of the anti-TAG-72 MAbs has also been exploited intraoperatively using a hand-held gamma probe. That procedure, termed radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS), has identified occult tumors which were not detected using standard external imaging techniques. In another clinical trial, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was administered intraperitoneally to patients diagnosed with either gastrointestinal or ovarian carcinoma with secondary ascites. Analysis of the tumor cells isolated from the malignant ascites revealed a substantial increase in TAG-72 expression on the surface of tumor cells isolated from seven of eight patients. The results provide evidence that the combination of an anti-carcinoma MAb with the administration of a cytokine, such as IFN-gamma, may be an effective approach for the detection and subsequent treatment, of colorectal carcinoma. 15 references.

  12. TRAIL-R2 Superoligomerization Induced by Human Monoclonal Agonistic Antibody KMTR2

    PubMed Central

    Tamada, Taro; Shinmi, Daisuke; Ikeda, Masahiro; Yonezawa, Yasushi; Kataoka, Shiro; Kuroki, Ryota; Mori, Eiji; Motoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    The fully human monoclonal antibody KMTR2 acts as a strong direct agonist for tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptor 2 (TRAIL-R2), which is capable of inducing apoptotic cell death without cross-linking. To investigate the mechanism of direct agonistic activity induced by KMTR2, the crystal structure of the extracellular region of TRAIL-R2 and a Fab fragment derived from KMTR2 (KMTR2-Fab) was determined to 2.1 Å resolution. Two KMTR2-Fabs assembled with the complementarity-determining region 2 of the light chain via two-fold crystallographic symmetry, suggesting that the KMTR2-Fab assembly tended to enhance TRAIL-R2 oligomerization. A single mutation at Asn53 to Arg located at the two-fold interface in the KMTR2 resulted in a loss of its apoptotic activity, although it retained its antigen-binding activity. These results indicate that the strong agonistic activity, such as apoptotic signaling and tumor regression, induced by KMTR2 is attributed to TRAIL-R2 superoligomerization induced by the interdimerization of KMTR2. PMID:26672965

  13. Production and characterization of domain-specific monoclonal antibodies against human ECM1.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya; Li, Yanqing; Zhao, Junli; Wang, Dongyang; Mao, Qinwen; Xia, Haibin

    2016-05-01

    Human extracellular matrix protein-1 (hECM1), a secreted glycoprotein, is widely expressed in different tissues and organs. ECM1 has been implicated in multiple biological functions, which are potentially mediated by the interaction of different ECM1 domains with its ligands. However, the exact biological functions of ECM1 have not been elucidated yet, and the functional study of ECM1 has been partially hampered by the lack of sensitive and specific antibodies, especially those targeting different ECM1 domains. In this study, six strains of monoclonal antibody (MAb) against hECM1 were generated using purified, prokaryotically-expressed hECM1 as an immunogen. The MAbs were shown to be highly sensitive and specific, and suitable for western blot, immunoprecipitation assays and immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, the particular ECM1 domains recognized by different MAbs were identified. Lastly, the MAbs were found to have neutralizing activities, inhibiting the proliferation, migration and metastasis of MDA-MB-231 cells. In conclusion, the domain-specific anti-ECM1 MAbs produced in this study should provide a useful tool for investigating ECM1's biological functions, and cellular pathways in which it is involved. PMID:26826312

  14. ANGPTL3 blockade with a human monoclonal antibody reduces plasma lipids in dyslipidemic mice and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Gusarova, Viktoria; Alexa, Corey A; Wang, Yan; Rafique, Ashique; Kim, Jee Hae; Buckler, David; Mintah, Ivory J; Shihanian, Lisa M; Cohen, Jonathan C; Hobbs, Helen H; Xin, Yurong; Valenzuela, David M; Murphy, Andrew J; Yancopoulos, George D; Gromada, Jesper

    2015-07-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 3 (ANGPTL3) is a circulating protein synthesized exclusively in the liver that inhibits LPL and endothelial lipase (EL), enzymes that hydrolyze TGs and phospholipids in plasma lipoproteins. Here we describe the development and testing of a fully human monoclonal antibody (REGN1500) that binds ANGPTL3 with high affinity. REGN1500 reversed ANGPTL3-induced inhibition of LPL activity in vitro. Intravenous administration of REGN1500 to normolipidemic C57Bl/6 mice increased LPL activity and decreased plasma TG levels by ≥50%. Chronic administration of REGN1500 to dyslipidemic C57Bl/6 mice for 8 weeks reduced circulating plasma levels of TG, LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) without any changes in liver, adipose, or heart TG contents. Studies in EL knockout mice revealed that REGN1500 reduced serum HDL-C through an EL-dependent mechanism. Finally, administration of a single dose of REGN1500 to dyslipidemic cynomolgus monkeys caused a rapid and pronounced decrease in plasma TG, nonHDL-C, and HDL-C. REGN1500 normalized plasma TG levels even in monkeys with a baseline plasma TG greater than 400 mg/dl. Collectively, these data demonstrate that neutralization of ANGPTL3 using REGN1500 reduces plasma lipids in dyslipidemic mice and monkeys, and thus provides a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of patients with hyperlipidemia. PMID:25964512

  15. Anti-human CD138 monoclonal antibodies and their bispecific formats: generation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan; Zou, Jianxuan; Zong, Yunhui; Meng, Huimin; An, Gangli; Yang, Lin

    2016-06-01

    Syndecan-1 (CD138), a heparan sulfate proteoglycan, acts as a co-receptor for growth factors and chemokines and is a molecular marker associated with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition during development and carcinogenesis. In this study, we generated two specific mouse anti-human CD138 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, clone ID: 480CT5.4.3, 587CT7.3.6.5) using hybridoma technology and identified their immunological characteristics. After hybridoma sequencing, the single-chain variable fragments (ScFvs) cloned from two hybridoma cells were combined with anti-CD3 OKT-3 ScFv to generate two recombinant bispecific antibodies (h-STL002, m-STL002) against CD138 and CD3 molecules, respectively. The bispecific antibodies were able to specifically target CD138 + multiple myeloma (MM) cells and CD3 + T cells, and showed the potent cytotoxicity against MM RPMI-8226 cell line through T cell activation. However, these bispecific antibodies without T cells did not cause toxic side effect on MM cells. Overall, the two hybridoma clones and their bispecific formats have great potential to promote diagnosis and immunotherapy of plasma cell malignancy. PMID:26954291

  16. Efficacy of monoclonal antibody against human recombinant tumor necrosis factor in E. coli-challenged swine.

    PubMed Central

    Jesmok, G.; Lindsey, C.; Duerr, M.; Fournel, M.; Emerson, T.

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody against human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF MAb) prevents death induced by intravenous gram-negative bacteria or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in primates. Although these studies have demonstrated that TNF plays a prominent role in the development of lethal septic shock, exploration of dose-response relationships and possible mechanisms of protection have been limited. We addressed these questions in a series of experiments conducted in E. coli-challenged pigs. First, we determined that TNF MAb neutralized the cytotoxic activity found in septic pig plasma and in culture media from pig monocytes incubated with LPS. Second, we demonstrated that pretreatment with TNF MAb promotes survival, in a dose-dependent fashion, in an otherwise lethal E. coli bacteremic pig model. The results of the survival study highly correlate (r = 0.96, P < 0.01) the presence of TNF in the circulation with mortality. In an additional series of physiologic monitoring experiments designed to delineate possible mechanisms of protection, the authors demonstrate that TNF MAb pretreatment abrogates the prolonged leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and microvascular leakiness resulting from intravenous bacterial challenge and maintains arterial blood pressure while diminishing pulmonary edema. These findings may provide a mechanism whereby neutralization of TNF systemically affords protection against the lethal sequelae of bacteremia. PMID:1443053

  17. [Preparation and characterization of a monoclonal antibody against human tissue factor with anticoagulation activity].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Wang, Xinghua; He, Yongji; Pan, Weiwei; Cao, Pengcheng; Zhao, Fengmei; Zhang, Quanai; Zhao, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Objective To prepare and characterize a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against human tissue factor (hTF) with anticoagulation activity. Methods BALB/c mice were immunized with truncated recombinant protein (rhTF243). Hybridoma cell lines were generated from cell fusion, and screened using indirect ELISA and prothrombin time (PT). After ascites was developed in BALB/c mice, antibody titers were determined using indirect ELISA. Western blotting was performed to study the antibody specificity. Anticoagulant activity of the antibody was detected by PT assay. Results A mAb to hTF with excellent anticoagulation activity was identified. Its immunoglobulin subclass belonged to IgG1. Titer of ascites fluid was 1:200 000. Western blotting and PT analysis confirmed the specificity and anticoagulant activity of the antibody. The mAb reacted specifically to both recombinant hTF243 and natural TF on SW620 colon cancer cell surface. Conclusion A hTF mAb with anticoagulation activity and high specificity has been successfully prepared. PMID:27053623

  18. Production of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against human alphafetoprotein, a hepatocellular tumor marker.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shu-Fen; Hsu, Wen-Lin; Hwang, Jing-Min; Chen, Chien-Yuan

    2002-08-01

    The objective of this study is to produce and purify monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal antibodies (PAbs) against human alphafetoprotein (AFP). Hyperimmune ICR mice produced PAbs after injection with 0.5 mL pristane, and were injected with NS-1 myeloma cells 2 weeks later. Hyperimmune Balb/c mice were used for the production of MAbs. Mice were immunized four times, given a final boost, and their spleen cells were collected and fused with NS-1 myeloma cells under the presence of PEG 1500. The fused cells were then selected in the hypoxanthine, aminopterine, and thymidine (HAT)-RPMIX medium. Anti-AFP antibody-secreting hybridoma cell lines with high titer were cloned by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and then subcloned by limiting dilution in 15% fetal bovine serum (FBS), hypoxanthine, thymidine (HT)-RPMIX medium. Twelve murine hybridoma producing anti-AFP MAbs were obtained and designated as A73F3, A73E8, B73C5, A73G3, A73F8, 67B3, B73C2, B73E1, A73G2, B73G7, B73D7, and B73F4. Isotypes of these MAbs were identified as IgG(1) heavy chain and kappa light chain. The MAbs with high purity were obtained by affinity chromatography. The purity analysis of AFP and the MAbs was performed by capillary electrophoresis. PMID:12193284

  19. Development of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies for oncogenic human papillomavirus types 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58.

    PubMed

    Brown, Martha J; Seitz, Hanna; Towne, Victoria; Müller, Martin; Finnefrock, Adam C

    2014-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the etiological agent for all cervical cancers, a significant number of other anogenital cancers, and a growing number of head and neck cancers. Two licensed vaccines offer protection against the most prevalent oncogenic types, 16 and 18, responsible for approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases worldwide and one of these also offers protection against types 6 and 11, responsible for 90% of genital warts. The vaccines are comprised of recombinantly expressed major capsid proteins that self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) and prevent infection by eliciting neutralizing antibodies. Adding the other frequently identified oncogenic types 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 to a vaccine would increase the coverage against HPV-induced cancers to approximately 90%. We describe the generation and characterization of panels of monoclonal antibodies to these five additional oncogenic HPV types, and the selection of antibody pairs that were high affinity and type specific and recognized conformation-dependent neutralizing epitopes. Such characteristics make these antibodies useful tools for monitoring the production and potency of a prototype vaccine as well as monitoring vaccine-induced immune responses in the clinic. PMID:24574536

  20. CD5 monoclonal antibodies react with human peripheral blood dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, G. S.; Freudenthal, P. S.

    1992-01-01

    CD5 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) define a 67,000 kd monomeric glycoprotein expressed predominantly by thymocytes, mature T cells and a subpopulation of B cells. CD5 is believed to be an alternative signaling molecules capable of increasing the supply of second messengers and thereby altering the cellular response threshold to other activation stimuli. Human peripheral blood dendritic cells (PBDC) are a circulating component of the immune dendritic cell family, which also includes Langerhans' cells in epithelia and interdigitating cells in the T-cell domains of lymphoid tissues. PBDC comprise less than 1% of the peripheral blood mononuclear cell fraction. They are morphologically, immunophenotypically, and functionally distinct from monocytes. In this study, we report that at least a subpopulation of PBDC react with the anti-CD5 MAbs Leu-1 and UCHT2, which define the two major non-crossblocking CD5 epitopes. In contrast, Langerhans' cells, interdigitating cells, monocytes, and macrophages were uniformly CD5-. These findings suggest that PBDC can express the CD5 molecule. Furthermore, they define an additional feature of many enriched PBDC that distinguishes them from monocytes and certain other mononuclear leukocytes, and may provide insights into their activation pathways. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 3 PMID:1384337

  1. Immunoscintigraphy of human tumors transplanted in nude mice with radiolabeled anti-ras p21 monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Y.; Nakata, K.; Kohno, K.; Shima, M.; Satoh, A.; Kusumoto, Y.; Ishii, N.; Kohji, T.; Shiku, H.; Nagataki, S. )

    1990-09-01

    Anti-ras p21 monoclonal antibody (RASK-3) was used for immunoscintigraphy of human cancer cell lines in nude mice. Iodine-125-labeled RASK-3 was injected into nude mice with either human colon cancers (FCC-1 or BM-314) or lung cancer (KNS-62). Clear images were obtained in all three cancers 7 days after the injection of antibody. No localization of {sup 125}I-labeled control monoclonal antibody was observed. The ratio of tissue/blood radioactivity and % ID/g in the tumor were significantly higher than other organs by Day 8. The specific localization index examined by {sup 131}I-RASK-3 and {sup 125}I-control monoclonal antibody was also higher in the tumor than in other tissues. In the in vitro study, binding of RASK-3 to tumor cells increased significantly by treatment of cells with either lysolecithin or periodate-lysine-paraformaldehyde, which confirmed the intracellular localization of ras p21. The mechanism by which anti-ras p21 antibodies accumulate in tumor sites could be the necrotic changes in tumor cells or changes in membrane permeability of non-necrotic cells. These results provide a strong rationale for the utilization of ras p21 as a target antigen in the imaging of a variety of human cancers.

  2. Mechanistic Study of Broadly Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibodies against Dengue Virus That Target the Fusion Loop

    PubMed Central

    Costin, Joshua M.; Zaitseva, Elena; Kahle, Kristen M.; Nicholson, Cindo O.; Rowe, Dawne K.; Graham, Amanda S.; Bazzone, Lindsey E.; Hogancamp, Greg; Figueroa Sierra, Marielys; Fong, Rachel H.; Yang, Sung-Tae; Lin, Li; Robinson, James E.; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Chernomordik, Leonid V.; Michael, Scott F.; Schieffelin, John S.

    2013-01-01

    There are no available vaccines for dengue, the most important mosquito-transmitted viral disease. Mechanistic studies with anti-dengue virus (DENV) human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) provide a rational approach to identify and characterize neutralizing epitopes on DENV structural proteins that can serve to inform vaccine strategies. Here, we report a class of hMAbs that is likely to be an important determinant in the human humoral response to DENV infection. In this study, we identified and characterized three broadly neutralizing anti-DENV hMAbs: 4.8A, D11C, and 1.6D. These antibodies were isolated from three different convalescent patients with distinct histories of DENV infection yet demonstrated remarkable similarities. All three hMAbs recognized the E glycoprotein with high affinity, neutralized all four serotypes of DENV, and mediated antibody-dependent enhancement of infection in Fc receptor-bearing cells at subneutralizing concentrations. The neutralization activities of these hMAbs correlated with a strong inhibition of virus-liposome and intracellular fusion, not virus-cell binding. We mapped epitopes of these antibodies to the highly conserved fusion loop region of E domain II. Mutations at fusion loop residues W101, L107, and/or G109 significantly reduced the binding of the hMAbs to E protein. The results show that hMAbs directed against the highly conserved E protein fusion loop block viral entry downstream of virus-cell binding by inhibiting E protein-mediated fusion. Characterization of hMAbs targeting this region may provide new insights into DENV vaccine and therapeutic strategies. PMID:23077306

  3. Tau monoclonal antibody generation based on humanized yeast models: impact on Tau oligomerization and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Rosseels, Joëlle; Van den Brande, Jeff; Violet, Marie; Jacobs, Dirk; Grognet, Pierre; Lopez, Juan; Huvent, Isabelle; Caldara, Marina; Swinnen, Erwin; Papegaey, Anthony; Caillierez, Raphaëlle; Buée-Scherrer, Valerie; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Lippens, Guy; Colin, Morvane; Buée, Luc; Galas, Marie-Christine; Vanmechelen, Eugeen; Winderickx, Joris

    2015-02-13

    A link between Tau phosphorylation and aggregation has been shown in different models for Alzheimer disease, including yeast. We used human Tau purified from yeast models to generate new monoclonal antibodies, of which three were further characterized. The first antibody, ADx201, binds the Tau proline-rich region independently of the phosphorylation status, whereas the second, ADx215, detects an epitope formed by the Tau N terminus when Tau is not phosphorylated at Tyr(18). For the third antibody, ADx210, the binding site could not be determined because its epitope is probably conformational. All three antibodies stained tangle-like structures in different brain sections of THY-Tau22 transgenic mice and Alzheimer patients, and ADx201 and ADx210 also detected neuritic plaques in the cortex of the patient brains. In hippocampal homogenates from THY-Tau22 mice and cortex homogenates obtained from Alzheimer patients, ADx215 consistently stained specific low order Tau oligomers in diseased brain, which in size correspond to Tau dimers. ADx201 and ADx210 additionally reacted to higher order Tau oligomers and presumed prefibrillar structures in the patient samples. Our data further suggest that formation of the low order Tau oligomers marks an early disease stage that is initiated by Tau phosphorylation at N-terminal sites. Formation of higher order oligomers appears to require additional phosphorylation in the C terminus of Tau. When used to assess Tau levels in human cerebrospinal fluid, the antibodies permitted us to discriminate patients with Alzheimer disease or other dementia like vascular dementia, indicative that these antibodies hold promising diagnostic potential. PMID:25540200

  4. Cellular cytotoxicity mediated by isotype-switch variants of a monoclonal antibody to human neuroblastoma.

    PubMed Central

    d'Uscio, C. H.; Jungi, T. W.; Blaser, K.

    1991-01-01

    The biological property of an antibody is determined by its antigen binding characteristics and its isotype-related effector functions. We have established monoclonal antibodies of different isotypes by stepwise selection and cloning of the hybridoma CE7. The original CE7 secretes an IgG1/kappa (CE7 gamma 1) antibody that recognises a 185 kD cell surface glycoprotein expressed on all human sympatho-adrenomedullary cells. Isotype-switch variants were isolated in the following sequence: from the original CE7 gamma 1, CE7 gamma 2b variants were isolated, and from a CE7 gamma 2b variant CE7 gamma 2a variants were isolated. The antibodies of three different isotype variant cell lines possess identical antigen binding characteristics, but display distinct effector functions as demonstrated by antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). ADCC was performed with the neuroblastoma line IMR-32 as the target cells, and different FcR gamma positive cells were either freshly isolated from human peripheral blood leukocytes or cultured for 6-10 days and tested as potential effector cells. Tumour lysis mediated by monocyte-derived macrophages depended on the presence of CE7 gamma 2a antibodies; antibodies from the CE7 hybridomas of gamma 2b and gamma 1 isotypes were virtually inactive in ADCC assay. Pre-exposure of macrophages to rIFN-gamma enhanced their ADCC activity, a result that is compatible with the notion that the high affinity Fc IgG receptor (FcR gamma I/CD64) is involved in the triggering of ADCC in macrophages. In contrast to macrophages, mononuclear cells, nonadherent cells and monocytes displayed considerable non-specific lytic activity, which was little influenced by the presence of antibody regardless of the isotype added. PMID:1911183

  5. Generation and characterization of a protective mouse monoclonal antibody against human enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yong-Qiang; Ma, Jie; Xu, Li-Juan; Li, Yue-Xiang; Zhao, Hui; Han, Jian-Feng; Tao, Jiang; Li, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Shun-Ya; Qin, E-De; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2015-09-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection has emerged as a major threat to children; however, no effective antiviral treatment or vaccine is currently available. Antibody-based treatment shows promises to control this growing public health problem of EV71 infection, and a few potent monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting viral capsid protein have been well described. Here, we generated an EV71-specific mouse mAb 2G8 that conferred full protection against lethal EV71 challenge in a suckling mouse model. 2G8 belonged to IgM isotype and neutralized EV71 at the attachment stage. Biochemical assays mapped the binding epitope of 2G8 to the SP70 peptide, which spanning amino acid residues 208-222 on the VP1 protein. Alanine scanning mutagenesis defined the essential roles of multiple residues, including Y208, T210, G212, K215, K218, L220, E221, and Y222, for 2G8 binding. Then, a panel of single mutation was individually introduced into the EV71 infectious clone by reverse genetics, and three mutant viruses, K215A, K218A, and L220A, were successfully recovered and characterized. Biochemical and neutralization assays revealed that K218A mutant partially escaped 2G8 neutralization, while L220A completely abolished 2G8 binding and neutralization. In particular, neutralization assays with human sera demonstrated that K218A and L220A substitutions are also critical for antibody neutralization in natural infection population. These findings not only generate a protective mAb candidate with therapeutic potential but also provide insights into antibody-mediated EV71 neutralization mechanism. PMID:25967656

  6. Biodistribution of 211At-labeled humanized monoclonal antibody A33.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, Ylva; Steffen, Ann-Charlott; Lundqvist, Hans; Jensen, Holger; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Sundin, Anders

    2007-08-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) could be a possible adjuvant treatment method for patients with colorectal carcinoma. The A33 antigen is a promising RIT target, as it is highly and homogenously expressed in 95% of all colorectal carcinomas. In this study, the humanized monoclonal antibody A33 (huA33), targeting the A33 antigen, was labeled with the therapeutic nuclide 211At, and the biodistribution and in vivo targeting ability of the conjugate was investigated in an athymic mouse xenograft model. There was an accumulation of 211At in tumor tissue over time, but no substantial accumulation was seen in any organ apart from the skin and thyroid, indicating no major release of free 211At in vivo. At all time points, the uptake of 211At-huA33 was higher in tumor tissue than in most organs, and at 8 hours postinjection (p.i.), no organ had a higher uptake than tumor tissue. The tumor-to-blood ratio of 211At-huA33 increased with time, reaching 2.5 after 21 hours p.i. The highest absorbed dose was found in the blood, but the tumor received a higher dose than any organ other than the thyroid. An in vivo blocking experiment showed that 211At-huA33 binds specifically to human tumor xenografts in athymic mice. In conclusion, the favorable biodistribution and specific in vivo targeting ability of 211At-huA33 makes it a potential therapeutic agent for the RIT of metastatic colorectal carcinoma. PMID:17803442

  7. Tumor necrosis treatment of ME-180 human cervical carcinoma model with sup 131 I-labeled TNT-1 monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.M.; Taylor, C.R.; Epstein, A.L. )

    1989-08-15

    In contrast to normal tissues, many malignant tumors contain a high proportion of dead and dying cells. The loss of membrane integrity that accompanies cellular degeneration permits macromolecules, including antibodies, to freely enter the cell cytoplasm. Based upon these observations, it was hypothesized that monoclonal antibodies to intracellular antigens, which are integral structural components and are retained by degenerating cells, may be used to target a wide range of human malignancies. Previous studies by our laboratory utilizing these principles have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging four different histological types of human cancer in a nude mouse model, using monoclonal antibodies directed against insoluble intranuclear antigens. The present study describes the application of this approach, designated tumor necrosis treatment, for the radioimmunotherapy of transplantable ME-180 human cervical carcinomas in the nude mouse. Groups of tumor-bearing nude mice received three weekly treatments of 150 or 300 microCi of 131I-labeled experimental (TNT-1) or control (Lym-1) monoclonal antibodies. Detailed biodistribution data, dosimetric evaluations, and therapeutic results are presented to demonstrate the effective and preferential targeting of 131I-labeled TNT-1 monoclonal antibody within the tumor. In the experimental groups, the dose delivered to the tumor was sufficient to induce clinical regressions in 88% of treated animals, without evidence of toxicity to normal tissues. Complete regressions were obtained in 25% of the mice treated with high dose TNT-1. Microscopic examination of the implantation sites of these mice demonstrated the presence of acute radiation damage and residual keratin-positive tumor cells showing marked evidence of degeneration.

  8. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  9. Epitope Mapping of Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies to Human Interferon-γ Using Human-Bovine Interferon-γ Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Bartek; Rudström, Karin; Ehrnfelt, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to identify conformational epitopes, recognized by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) made against human (h) interferon (IFN)-γ. Based on the mAbs' (n = 12) ability to simultaneously bind hIFN-γ in ELISA, 2 epitope clusters with 5 mAbs in each were defined; 2 mAbs recognized unique epitopes. Utilizing the mAbs' lack of reactivity with bovine (b) IFN-γ, epitopes were identified using 7 h/bIFN-γ chimeras where the helical regions (A-F) or the C terminus were substituted with bIFN-γ residues. Chimeras had a N-terminal peptide tag enabling the analysis of mAb recognition of chimeras in ELISA. The 2 mAb clusters mapped to region A and E, respectively; the epitopes of several mAbs also involved additional regions. MAbs in cluster A neutralized, to various degrees, IFN-γ-mediated activation of human cells, in line with the involvement of region A in the IFN-γ receptor interaction. MAbs mapping to region E displayed a stronger neutralizing capacity although this region has not been directly implicated in the receptor interaction. The results corroborate earlier studies and provide a detailed picture of the link between the epitope specificity and neutralizing capacity of mAbs. They further demonstrate the general use of peptide-tagged chimeric proteins as a powerful and straightforward method for efficient mapping of conformational epitopes. PMID:27336613

  10. Structure of a human monoclonal antibody Fab fragment against gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Xiao M.; Rueker, Florian; Casale, Elena; Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a human monoclonal antibody (Fab), which binds specifically to a major epitope of the transmembrane protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1, has been determined by crystallographic methods to a resolution of 2.7 A. It has been previously determined that this antibody recognizes the epitope SGKLICTTAVPWNAS, belongs to the subclass IgG1 (kappa), and exhibits antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The quaternary structure of the Fab is in an extended conformation with an elbow bend angle between the constant and variable domains of 175 deg. Structurally, four of the hypervariable loops can be classified according to previously recognized canonical structures. The third hypervariable loops of the heavy (H3) and light chain (L3) are structurally distinct. Hypervariable loop H3, residues 102H-109H, is unusually extended from the surface. The complementarity-determining region forms a hydrophobic binding pocket that is created primarily from hypervariable loops L3, H3, and H2.

  11. Epitope Mapping of Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies to Human Interferon-γ Using Human-Bovine Interferon-γ Chimeras.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Bartek; Rudström, Karin; Ehrnfelt, Cecilia; Ahlborg, Niklas

    2016-09-01

    Our aim was to identify conformational epitopes, recognized by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) made against human (h) interferon (IFN)-γ. Based on the mAbs' (n = 12) ability to simultaneously bind hIFN-γ in ELISA, 2 epitope clusters with 5 mAbs in each were defined; 2 mAbs recognized unique epitopes. Utilizing the mAbs' lack of reactivity with bovine (b) IFN-γ, epitopes were identified using 7 h/bIFN-γ chimeras where the helical regions (A-F) or the C terminus were substituted with bIFN-γ residues. Chimeras had a N-terminal peptide tag enabling the analysis of mAb recognition of chimeras in ELISA. The 2 mAb clusters mapped to region A and E, respectively; the epitopes of several mAbs also involved additional regions. MAbs in cluster A neutralized, to various degrees, IFN-γ-mediated activation of human cells, in line with the involvement of region A in the IFN-γ receptor interaction. MAbs mapping to region E displayed a stronger neutralizing capacity although this region has not been directly implicated in the receptor interaction. The results corroborate earlier studies and provide a detailed picture of the link between the epitope specificity and neutralizing capacity of mAbs. They further demonstrate the general use of peptide-tagged chimeric proteins as a powerful and straightforward method for efficient mapping of conformational epitopes. PMID:27336613

  12. Construction of an immunotoxin by linking a monoclonal antibody against the human epidermal growth factor receptor and a hemolytic toxin.

    PubMed

    Avila, Ana D; Calderón, Carlos F; Pérez, Rita M; Pons, Carmen; Pereda, Celia M; Ortiz, Ana R

    2007-01-01

    Hybrid molecules obtained through conjugation of monoclonal antibodies and toxins constitute an approach under exploration to generate potential agents for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. A frequently employed toxic component in the construction of such immunotoxins is ricin, a plant toxin which inhibits protein synthesis at ribosomal level and so requires to be internalized by the cell. A hemolytic toxin isolated from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus, which is active at the cell membrane level, was linked through a disulfide bond to the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody ior egf/r3. The resulting immunotoxin did not exhibit hemolytic activity except under reducing conditions. It was toxic for H125 cells that express the human epidermal growth factor receptor, but non-toxic for U1906 cells that do not express this receptor. PMID:18064354

  13. Human pancreatic cancer fusion 2 (HPC2) 1-B3: a novel monoclonal antibody to screen for pancreatic ductal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Terry K; Hardiman, Karin; Corless, Christopher L; White, Sandra L; Bonnah, Robert; Van de Vrugt, Henry; Sheppard, Brett C; Grompe, Markus; Cosar, Ediz F; Streeter, Philip R

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND.: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is rarely detected early enough for patients to be cured. The objective of the authors was to develop a monoclonal antibody to distinguish adenocarcinoma and precancerous intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia (IPMN) from benign epithelium. METHODS.: Mice were immunized with human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells and monoclonal antibodies were screened against a panel of archived pancreatic tissue sections, including pancreatitis (23 cases), grade 1 IPMN (16 cases), grade 2 IPMN (9 cases), grade 3 IPMN (13 cases), and various grades of adenocarcinoma (17 cases). One monoclonal antibody, human pancreatic cancer fusion 2 (HPC2) 1-B3, which specifically immunostained adenocarcinoma and all grades of IPMN, was isolated. Subsequently, HPC2 1-B3 was evaluated in a retrospective series of 31 fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsies from clinically suspicious pancreatic lesions that had long-term clinical follow-up. RESULTS.: HPC2 1-B3 was negative in all 31 cases of chronic pancreatitis that were tested. In contrast, HPC2 1-B3 immunostained the cytoplasm and luminal surface of all 16 well- to moderately differentiated pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. It demonstrated only weak focal staining of poorly differentiated carcinomas. All high-grade IPMNs were found to be positive for HPC2 1-B3. The majority of low-grade to intermediate-grade IPMNs were positive (66% of cases). Immunostaining a separate series of pancreatic FNA cell blocks for HPC2 1-B3 demonstrated that the relative risk for detecting at least low-grade dysplasia (2.0 [95% confidence interval, 1.23-3.26]) was statistically significant (P = .002 by the Fisher exact test). CONCLUSIONS.: To reduce the mortality of pancreatic cancer, more effective early screening methods are necessary. The data from the current study indicate that a novel monoclonal antibody, HPC2 1-B3, may facilitate the diagnosis of early pancreatic dysplasia. PMID:22811080

  14. Novel Monoclonal Antibodies for Studies of Human and Rhesus Macaque Secretory Component and Human J-Chain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruijun; Alam, S Munir; Yu, Jae-Sung; Scearce, Richard; Lockwood, Bradley; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Parks, Robert; Permar, Sallie; Brandtzaeg, Per; Haynes, Barton F; Liao, Hua-Xin

    2016-08-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies exist in monomeric, dimeric, and secretory forms. Dimerization of IgA depends on a 15-kD polypeptide termed "joining (J) chain," which is also part of the binding site for an epithelial glycoprotein called "secretory component (SC)," whether this after apical cleavage on secretory epithelia is ligand bound in secretory IgA (SIgA) or in a free form. Uncleaved membrane SC, also called the "polymeric Ig receptor," is thus crucial for transcytotic export of SIgA to mucosal surfaces, where it interacts with and modulates commensal bacteria and mediates protective immune responses against exogenous pathogens. To evaluate different forms of IgA, we have produced mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against human J-chain and free SC. We found that J-chain MAb 9A8 and SC MAb 9H7 identified human dimeric IgA and SIgA in enzyme-linked immunoassay and western blot analysis, as well as functioning in immunohistochemistry to identify cytoplasmic IgA of intestinal lamina propria plasmablasts/plasma cells and crypt epithelium of distal human intestine. Finally, we demonstrated that SC MAb 9H7 cross-reacted with rhesus macaque SIgA. These novel reagents should be of use in the study of the biology of various forms of IgA in humans and SIgA in macaques, as well as in monitoring the production and/or isolation of these forms of IgA. PMID:27386924

  15. A Human Monoclonal Antibody with Neutralizing Activity against Highly Divergent Influenza Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Solforosi, Laura; Moreno, Guisella J.; Gubareva, Larisa V.; Mishin, Vasiliy; Di Pietro, Andrea; Vicenzi, Elisa; Siccardi, Antonio G.; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    The interest in broad-range anti-influenza A monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has recently been strengthened by the identification of anti-hemagglutinin (HA) mAbs endowed with heterosubtypic neutralizing activity to be used in the design of “universal” prophylactic or therapeutic tools. However, the majority of the single mAbs described to date do not bind and neutralize viral isolates belonging to highly divergent subtypes clustering into the two different HA-based influenza phylogenetic groups: the group 1 including, among others, subtypes H1, H2, H5 and H9 and the group 2 including, among others, H3 subtype. Here, we describe a human mAb, named PN-SIA28, capable of binding and neutralizing all tested isolates belonging to phylogenetic group 1, including H1N1, H2N2, H5N1 and H9N2 subtypes and several isolates belonging to group 2, including H3N2 isolates from the first period of the 1968 pandemic. Therefore, PN-SIA28 is capable of neutralizing isolates belonging to subtypes responsible of all the reported pandemics, as well as other subtypes with pandemic potential. The region recognized by PN-SIA28 has been identified on the stem region of HA and includes residues highly conserved among the different influenza subtypes. A deep characterization of PN-SIA28 features may represent a useful help in the improvement of available anti-influenza therapeutic strategies and can provide new tools for the development of universal vaccinal strategies. PMID:22162996

  16. Curative radioimmunotherapy of human mammary carcinoma xenografts with iodine-131-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Senekowitsch, R.; Reidel, G.; Moellenstaedt, S.Kr.; Kriegel, H.; Pabst, H.W. )

    1989-04-01

    The radioiodinated monoclonal antibody BW 495/36 showed an exceptionally high uptake and long residence time in human ductal mammary carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. There was a mean tumor uptake of 82%/g 24 hr p.i., decreasing with a biologic half-life of approximately 6 days, to 15%/g by Day 16. The tumor-to-blood ratio increased from 2.8 to 21.4 and the percentage of the whole-body retention recovered in the tumor from 47% to 80% during the same time interval. The therapeutic efficiency of two injections of 7.4 MBq {sup 131}I-BW 495/36 was evaluated by comparing the tumor size with that in mice injected with either the same amount of the unlabeled MoAb, the same radioactivity of an {sup 131}I-labeled nonspecific MoAb, or with saline only. The high tumor accumulation of {sup 131}I-BW 495/36 led to a total tumor dose of 77 Gy resulting in a mean reduction in tumor diameter of 50%, corresponding to a reduction in tumor volume of 88% within 42 days p.i. Unlabeled MoAb had no effect on tumor growth compared with controls, whereas {sup 131}I nonspecific antibody caused a slight inhibition of tumor growth. Histologic tumor sections showed large areas of necrosis and a pronounced vacuolation of the tumor cell cytoplasm between Days 7 and 30 p.i. By Day 42 all remaining tissue in the tumor was identified as mouse connective tissue.

  17. Affinity Maturation to Improve Human Monoclonal Antibody Neutralization Potency and Breadth against Hepatitis C Virus*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Keck, Zhen-yong; Saha, Anasuya; Xia, Jinming; Conrad, Fraser; Lou, Jianlong; Eckart, Michael; Marks, James D.; Foung, Steven K. H.

    2011-01-01

    A potent neutralizing antibody to a conserved hepatitis C virus (HCV) epitope might overcome its extreme variability, allowing immunotherapy. The human monoclonal antibody HC-1 recognizes a conformational epitope on the HCV E2 glycoprotein. Previous studies showed that HC-1 neutralizes most HCV genotypes but has modest potency. To improve neutralization, we affinity-matured HC-1 by constructing a library of yeast-displayed HC-1 single chain Fv (scFv) mutants, using for selection an E2 antigen from one of the poorly neutralized HCVpp. We developed an approach by parallel mutagenesis of the heavy chain variable (VH) and κ-chain variable (Vk) genes separately, then combining the optimized VH and Vk mutants. This resulted in the generation of HC-1-related scFv variants exhibiting improved affinities. The best scFv variant had a 92-fold improved affinity. After conversion to IgG1, some of the antibodies exhibited a 30-fold improvement in neutralization activity. Both surface plasmon resonance and solution kinetic exclusion analysis showed that the increase in affinity was largely due to a lowering of the dissociation rate constant, Koff. Neutralization against a panel of HCV pseudoparticles and infectious 2a HCV virus improved with the affinity-matured IgG1 antibodies. Interestingly, some of these antibodies neutralized a viral isolate that was not neutralized by wild-type HC-1. Moreover, propagating 2a HCVcc under the selective pressure of WT HC-1 or affinity-matured HC-1 antibodies yielded no viral escape mutants and, with the affinity-matured IgG1, needed 100-fold less antibody to achieve complete virus elimination. Taken together, these findings suggest that affinity-matured HC-1 antibodies are excellent candidates for therapeutic development. PMID:22002064

  18. Native oligomeric human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein elicits diverse monoclonal antibody reactivities.

    PubMed Central

    Earl, P L; Broder, C C; Long, D; Lee, S A; Peterson, J; Chakrabarti, S; Doms, R W; Moss, B

    1994-01-01

    We synthesized and purified a recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein, lacking the gp120/gp41 cleavage site as well as the transmembrane domain, that is secreted principally as a stable oligomer. Mice were immunized with separated monomeric and oligomeric HIV-1 Env glycoproteins to analyze the repertoire of antibody responses to the tertiary and quaternary structure of the protein. Hybridomas were generated and assayed for reactivity by immunoprecipitation of nondenatured Env protein. A total of 138 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were generated and cloned, 123 of which were derived from seven animals immunized with oligomeric Env. Within this group, a significant response was obtained against the gp41 ectodomain; 49 MAbs recognized epitopes in gp41, 82% of which were conformational. The influence of conformation on gp120 antigenicity was less pronounced, with 40% of the anti-gp120 MAbs binding to conformational epitopes, many of which blocked CD4 binding. Surprisingly, less than 7% of the MAbs derived from mice immunized with oligomeric Env recognized the V3 loop. In addition, MAbs to linear epitopes in the C-terminal domain of gp120 were not obtained, suggesting that this region of the protein may be partially masked in the oligomeric molecule. A total of 15 MAbs were obtained from two mice immunized with monomeric Env. Nearly half of these recognized the V3 loop, suggesting that this region may be a less predominant epitope in the context of oligomeric Env than in monomeric protein. Thus, immunization with oligomeric Env generates a large proportion of antibodies to conformational epitopes in both gp120 and gp41, many of which may be absent from monomeric Env. Images PMID:7512157

  19. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies against Human Prostate Specific Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Ghods, Roya; Shabani, Mahdi; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Yeganeh, Omid; Hassannia, Hadi; Sadeghitabar, Ali; Balay-Goli, Leila; Noutash-Haghighat, Farzaneh; Sarrafzadeh, Ali reza; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Background Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) is an important laboratory marker for diagnosis of prostatic cancer. Thus, development of diagnostic tools specific for PSA plays an important role in screening, monitoring and early diagnosis of prostate cancer. In this paper, the production and characterization of a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against PSA have been presented. Methods Balb/c mice were immunized with PSA, which was purified from seminal plasma. Splenocytes of hyperimmunized mice were extracted and fused with Sp2/0 cells. By adding selective HAT medium, hybridoma cells were established and positive clones were selected by ELISA after four times of cloning. The isotypes of produced mAbs were determined by ELISA and then purified from ascitic fluids using Hi-Trap protein G column. The reactivities of the mAbs were examined with the purified PSA and seminal plasma by ELISA and western blot techniques. Furthermore, the reactivities of the mAbs were assessed in Prostate Cancer (PCa), Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) and brain cancer tissues by Immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results Five anti-PSA mAbs (clones: 2G2-B2, 2F9-F4, 2D6-E8, IgG1/К) and clones (2C8-E9, 2G3-E2, IgG2a/К) were produced and characterized. All mAbs, except 2F9-F4 detected the expression of PSA in PCa and BPH tissues and none of them reacted with PSA in brain cancer tissue in IHC. Besides, all mAbs could detect a protein band around 33 kDa in human seminal plasma in western blot. Conclusion These mAbs can specifically recognize PSA and may serve as a component of PSA diagnostic kit in various biological fluids. PMID:25926946

  20. Cellular processing of copper-67-labeled monoclonal antibody chCE7 by human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Novak-Hofer, I; Amstutz, H P; Mäcke, H R; Schwarzbach, R; Zimmermann, K; Morgenthaler, J J; Schubiger, P A

    1995-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody chCE7, an internalizing neuroblastoma-specific chimeric antibody, was derivatized with the macrocyclic amine ligand 4-[(1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradec-1-yl)-methyl] benzoic acid tetrahydrochloride and labeled with the potential therapeutic nuclide 67Cu. Using pulse labeling and an acid elution endocytosis assay, 67Cu-chCE7 was found to be internalized into human neuroblastoma (SKN-AS) cells at a similar rate and to a similar extent as 125I-labeled chCE7. Uptake of 67Cu-chCE7 and 125I-chCE7 into the acid stable (intracellular) pool proceeded with similar kinetics during the first 2 h of internalization. However, in contrast to 125I-chCE7-loaded cells, at later times intracellular radioactivity kept increasing in the case of 67Cu-chCE7-loaded cells. It was shown that this effect is due to the intracellular accumulation of a low M(r) degradation product consisting of the 67Cu-4[(1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradec-1-yl)-methyl] benzoic acid complex, possibly with a short peptide attached to it. Degradation of both 125I-chCE7 and 67Cu-chCE7 was inhibited by chloroquine, indicating endosomal or lysosomal degradation, and a 43,000 M(r) fragment was found to be the major high M(r) degradation product in both cases. Although at times between 4 and 6 h of internalization intracellular breakdown of 67Cu-chCE7 was found to proceed more slowly, the major difference between the two immunoconjugates resides in the prolonged cellular retention of the 67Cu-chCE7 metabolite. PMID:7805039

  1. Trophoblast glycoprotein recognised by monoclonal antibody 5T4 maps to human chromosome 6q14-q15.

    PubMed

    Boyle, J M; Grzeschik, K H; Heath, P R; Morten, J E; Stern, P L

    1990-04-01

    Human X rodent hybrids were stained by indirect immunofluorescence with 5T4, a murine monoclonal antibody that recognises a 72 kdalton glycoprotein expressed by human trophoblasts and a very restricted range of adult tissues; they were analysed by flow cytometry. Concordance analysis supported by segregation data allowed assignment of the gene controlling glycoprotein expression (M6P1) to chromosome 6. Similar analysis with translocation hybrids gave a regional assignment to 6q14-q15. M6P1 is distinct from NT5, coding for 5' nucleotidase, which maps to the same region. PMID:2323778

  2. Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Human IgM Fc Receptor Inhibit Ligand-binding Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kubagawa, Yoshiki; Honjo, Kazuhito; Kang, Dong-Won

    2014-01-01

    A panel of six different murine hybridoma clones secreting IgG monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the human IgM Fc receptor (FcμR) was generated. All MAbs specifically precipitated a major protein of ∼60 kDa from membrane lysates of FcμR-bearing, but not FcμR-negative, cells as did IgM-ligands. Pre-incubation of membrane lysate of FcμR-bearing cells with these MAbs completely removed the ∼60 kDa IgM-reactive protein. By using recombinant human/mouse chimeric FcμR proteins, the epitope recognized by HM7 and HM10 MAbs was mapped to the Ig-like domain of human FcμR, whereas the other MAbs recognized the stalk region. Pre-incubation of FcμR+ cells with the Ig-like domain-specific MAbs, but not with others, markedly inhibited subsequent IgM-ligand binding. A similar, but much weaker, inhibition was also observed when the incubation order was reversed. When FcμR+ cells were simultaneously incubated with both IgM-ligands and MAbs, HM7 MAb efficiently competed with IgM for FcμR binding. Unlike control Jurkat cells, FcμR-bearing cells were resistant to apoptosis induced by agonistic IgM anti-Fas MAb (CH11); however, addition of the HM7 MAb inhibited the interaction of the Fc portion of CH11 MAb with FcμR, thereby promoting apoptosis of FcμR-bearing Jurkat cells. The variable regions of the HM7 MAb were composed of Ighv14-3, Ighd1-2, and Ighj2 for the γ2b heavy chain and Igk3-4 and Igkj2 for the κ light chain. These findings suggest that HM7 MAb efficiently blocks the ligand-binding activity of FcμR. PMID:25545208

  3. Development of a Mouse Monoclonal Antibody Cocktail for Post-exposure Rabies Prophylaxis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Thomas; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Ertl, Hildegund; Fooks, Anthony R.; Freuling, Conrad; Fehlner-Gardiner, Christine; Kliemt, Jeannette; Meslin, Francois X.; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Tordo, Noël; Wanderler, Alexander I.; Kieny, Marie Paule

    2009-01-01

    As the demand for rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) treatments has increased exponentially in recent years, the limited supply of human and equine rabies immunoglobulin (HRIG and ERIG) has failed to provide the required passive immune component in PEP in countries where canine rabies is endemic. Replacement of HRIG and ERIG with a potentially cheaper and efficacious alternative biological for treatment of rabies in humans, therefore, remains a high priority. In this study, we set out to assess a mouse monoclonal antibody (MoMAb) cocktail with the ultimate goal to develop a product at the lowest possible cost that can be used in developing countries as a replacement for RIG in PEP. Five MoMAbs, E559.9.14, 1112-1, 62-71-3, M727-5-1, and M777-16-3, were selected from available panels based on stringent criteria, such as biological activity, neutralizing potency, binding specificity, spectrum of neutralization of lyssaviruses, and history of each hybridoma. Four of these MoMAbs recognize epitopes in antigenic site II and one recognizes an epitope in antigenic site III on the rabies virus (RABV) glycoprotein, as determined by nucleotide sequence analysis of the glycoprotein gene of unique MoMAb neutralization-escape mutants. The MoMAbs were produced under Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) conditions. Unique combinations (cocktails) were prepared, using different concentrations of the MoMAbs that were capable of targeting non-overlapping epitopes of antigenic sites II and III. Blind in vitro efficacy studies showed the MoMab cocktails neutralized a broad spectrum of lyssaviruses except for lyssaviruses belonging to phylogroups II and III. In vivo, MoMAb cocktails resulted in protection as a component of PEP that was comparable to HRIG. In conclusion, all three novel combinations of MoMAbs were shown to have equal efficacy to HRIG and therefore could be considered a potentially less expensive alternative biological agent for use in PEP and prevention of rabies in humans

  4. Monoclonal antibodies reveal multiple forms of expression of human microsomal epoxide hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Hongying; Takagi, Akira; Kayano, Hidekazu; Koyama, Isamu; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Akatsuka, Toshitaka

    2012-04-01

    In a previous study, we developed five kinds of monoclonal antibodies against different portions of human mEH: three, anti-N-terminal; one, anti-C-terminal; one, anti-conformational epitope. Using them, we stained the intact and the permeabilized human cells of various kinds and performed flow cytometric analysis. Primary hepatocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) showed remarkable differences. On the surface, hepatocytes exhibited 4 out of 5 epitopes whereas PBMC did not show any of the epitopes. mEH was detected inside both cell types, but the most prominent expression was observed for the conformational epitope in the hepatocytes and the two N-terminal epitopes in PBMC. These differences were also observed between hepatocyte-derived cell lines and mononuclear cell-derived cell lines. In addition, among each group, there were several differences which may be related to the cultivation, the degree of differentiation, or the original cell subsets. We also noted that two glioblastoma cell lines reveal marked expression of the conformational epitope on the surface which seemed to correlate with the brain tumor-associated antigen reported elsewhere. Several cell lines also underwent selective permeabilization before flow cytometric analysis, and we noticed that the topological orientation of mEH on the ER membrane in those cells was in accordance with the previous report. However, the orientation on the cell surface was inconsistent with the report and had a great variation between the cells. These findings show the multiple mode of expression of mEH which may be possibly related to the multiple roles that mEH plays in different cells. -- Highlights: ► We examine expression of five mEH epitopes in human cells. ► Remarkable differences exist between hepatocytes and PBMC. ► mEH expression in cell lines differs depending on several factors. ► Some glioblastoma cell lines reveal marked surface expression of mEH. ► Topology of mEH on the cell

  5. Human Monoclonal Islet Cell Antibodies From a Patient with Insulin- Dependent Diabetes Mellitus Reveal Glutamate Decarboxylase as the Target Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Wiltrud; Endl, Josef; Eiermann, Thomas H.; Brandt, Michael; Kientsch-Engel, Rosemarie; Thivolet, Charles; Jungfer, Herbert; Scherbaum, Werner A.

    1992-09-01

    The autoimmune phenomena associated with destruction of the β cell in pancreatic islets and development of type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (IDDM) include circulating islet cell antibodies. We have immortalized peripheral blood lymphocytes from prediabetic individuals and patients with newly diagnosed IDDM by Epstein-Barr virus transformation. IgG-positive cells were selected by anti-human IgG-coupled magnetic beads and expanded in cell culture. Supernatants were screened for cytoplasmic islet cell antibodies using the conventional indirect immunofluorescence test on cryostat sections of human pancreas. Six islet cell-specific B-cell lines, originating from a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM, could be stabilized on a monoclonal level. All six monoclonal islet cell antibodies (MICA 1-6) were of the IgG class. None of the MICA reacted with human thyroid, adrenal gland, anterior pituitary, liver, lung, stomach, and intestine tissues but all six reacted with pancreatic islets of different mammalian species and, in addition, with neurons of rat cerebellar cortex. MICA 1-6 were shown to recognize four distinct antigenic epitopes in islets. Islet cell antibody-positive diabetic sera but not normal human sera blocked the binding of the monoclonal antibodies to their target epitopes. Immunoprecipitation of 35S-labeled human islet cell extracts revealed that a protein of identical size to the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.15) was a target of all MICA. Furthermore, antigen immunotrapped by the MICA from brain homogenates showed glutamate decarboxylase enzyme activity. MICA 1-6 therefore reveal glutamate decarboxylase as the predominant target antigen of cytoplasmic islet cell autoantibodies in a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM.

  6. Differences in human skin between the epidermal growth factor receptor distribution detected by EGF binding and monoclonal antibody recognition.

    PubMed

    Green, M R; Couchman, J R

    1985-09-01

    Two methods have been used to examine epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor distribution in human scalp and foreskin. The first employed [125I]EGF viable explants and autoradiography to determine the EGF binding pattern while the second used a monoclonal antibody to the human EGF receptor to map the distribution on frozen skin sections of an extracellular epitope on the EGF receptor. The [125I]EGF binding experiments showed accessible, unoccupied EGF receptors to be present on the epidermal basal cells (with reduced binding to spinous cells), the basal cells of the hair shaft and sebaceous gland, the eccrine sweat glands, capillary system, and the hair follicle outer root sheath, generally similar in pattern to that previously reported for full-thickness rat skin and human epidermis. The same areas also bound EGF-R1 but in addition the monoclonal antibody recognized a cone of melanin containing presumptive cortex cells, excluding the medulla, lying around and above the upper dermal papilla of anagen hair follicles, epithelial cells around the lower dermal papilla region, and in some tissue samples the cell margins of the viable differentiating layers of the epidermis. In a control study, to clarify whether EGF-R1 could recognize molecules unrelated to the EGF receptor, the EGF binding and EGF-R1 recognition profiles were compared on cultures of SVK14 cells, a SV40 transformed human keratinocyte cell line. EGF binding and EGF-R1 monoclonal antibody distribution on these cells was found to be similar, indicating that, at least for SVK14 cells, EGF-R1 binding provides a reliable marker for EGF binding. Explanations for the discrepancies between these two methods for determining EGF receptor distribution in human skin are discussed, including the possibility that latent EGF receptors, unable to bind [125I]EGF, may be present in some differentiating epithelial compartments. PMID:2411822

  7. Seroepidemiology of Human Papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) L2 and Generation of L2-Specific Human Chimeric Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joshua W.; Jagu, Subhashini; Wu, Wai-Hong; Viscidi, Raphael P.; Macgregor-Das, Anne; Fogel, Jessica M.; Kwak, Kihyuck; Daayana, Sai; Kitchener, Henry; Stern, Peter L.; Gravitt, Patti E.; Trimble, Cornelia L.

    2015-01-01

    Presently, the seroprevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) minor capsid antigen L2-reactive antibody is not well understood, and no serologic standard exists for L2-specific neutralizing antibodies. Therefore, we screened a total of 1,078 serum samples for HPV16 L2 reactivity, and these were obtained from four prior clinical studies: a population-based (n = 880) surveillance study with a high-risk HPV DNA prevalence of 10.8%, a cohort study of women (n = 160) with high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and two phase II trials in women with high-grade vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) receiving imiquimod therapy combined with either photodynamic therapy (PDT) (n = 19) or vaccination with a fusion protein comprising HPV16 L2, E7, and E6 (TA-CIN) (n = 19). Sera were screened sequentially by HPV16 L2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and then Western blot. Seven of the 1,078 serum samples tested had L2-specific antibodies, but none were detectably neutralizing for HPV16. To develop a standard, we substituted human IgG1 sequences into conserved regions of two rodent monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for neutralizing epitopes at HPV16 L2 residues 17 to 36 and 58 to 64, creating JWW-1 and JWW-2, respectively. These chimeric MAbs retained neutralizing activity and together reacted with 33/34 clinically relevant HPV types tested. In conclusion, our inability to identify an HPV16 L2-specific neutralizing antibody response even in the sera of patients with active genital HPV disease suggests the subdominance of L2 protective epitopes and the value of the chimeric MAbs JWW-1 and JWW-2 as standards for immunoassays to measure L2-specific human antibodies. PMID:25972404

  8. Seroepidemiology of Human Papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) L2 and Generation of L2-Specific Human Chimeric Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Joshua W; Jagu, Subhashini; Wu, Wai-Hong; Viscidi, Raphael P; Macgregor-Das, Anne; Fogel, Jessica M; Kwak, Kihyuck; Daayana, Sai; Kitchener, Henry; Stern, Peter L; Gravitt, Patti E; Trimble, Cornelia L; Roden, Richard B S

    2015-07-01

    Presently, the seroprevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) minor capsid antigen L2-reactive antibody is not well understood, and no serologic standard exists for L2-specific neutralizing antibodies. Therefore, we screened a total of 1,078 serum samples for HPV16 L2 reactivity, and these were obtained from four prior clinical studies: a population-based (n = 880) surveillance study with a high-risk HPV DNA prevalence of 10.8%, a cohort study of women (n = 160) with high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and two phase II trials in women with high-grade vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) receiving imiquimod therapy combined with either photodynamic therapy (PDT) (n = 19) or vaccination with a fusion protein comprising HPV16 L2, E7, and E6 (TA-CIN) (n = 19). Sera were screened sequentially by HPV16 L2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and then Western blot. Seven of the 1,078 serum samples tested had L2-specific antibodies, but none were detectably neutralizing for HPV16. To develop a standard, we substituted human IgG1 sequences into conserved regions of two rodent monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for neutralizing epitopes at HPV16 L2 residues 17 to 36 and 58 to 64, creating JWW-1 and JWW-2, respectively. These chimeric MAbs retained neutralizing activity and together reacted with 33/34 clinically relevant HPV types tested. In conclusion, our inability to identify an HPV16 L2-specific neutralizing antibody response even in the sera of patients with active genital HPV disease suggests the subdominance of L2 protective epitopes and the value of the chimeric MAbs JWW-1 and JWW-2 as standards for immunoassays to measure L2-specific human antibodies. PMID:25972404

  9. Astrocytes and microglia in human brain share an epitope recognized by a B-lymphocyte-specific monoclonal antibody (LN-1).

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, D. W.; Mattiace, L. A.

    1989-01-01

    A B-lymphocyte-specific mouse monoclonal antibody, LN-1, recognizes two morphologic classes of glial cells in human brain. The nature and duration of tissue fixation and processing are critical in the detection of the two cell types. In tissue that is lightly fixed, LN-1 recognizes astrocytes. The astrocytic nature of the LN-1 reactive glial cell was confirmed by cytologic features, tissue distribution, immunoelectron microscopy, double labeling immunofluorescent microscopy, and staining of serial sections with antibodies to glial fibrillary acidic protein. In tissue that is fixed for longer periods or in Bouin's fixative, two glial cell types are recognized: astrocytes and microglia. The identity of the latter cell type as microglia was confirmed by morphologic features, tissue distribution, immunoelectron microscopy, and double staining with monoclonal antibodies or lectins to macrophage markers, including class II major histocompatibility antigens. The two cell types had different disposition in senile plaques of elderly individuals and of those with Alzheimer's disease. Astrocytes were present at the periphery of the plaques, whereas microglial cells were centrally placed, often in juxtaposition to amyloid. The results are discussed with respect to ontogeny of glial cells and the ability of monoclonal antibodies to recognize epitopes on unrelated proteins. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:2476034

  10. Preclinical characterization of an anti-methamphetamine monoclonal antibody for human use

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Misty W; Stevens, Misty W; Stevens, Misty W; Stevens, Misty W; Tawney, Rachel L; Tawney, Rachel L; Tawney, Rachel L; Tawney, Rachel L; West, C Michael; West, C Michael; West, C Michael; West, C Michael; Kight, Alicia D; Kight, Alicia D; Kight, Alicia D; Kight, Alicia D; Henry, Ralph L; Henry, Ralph L; Henry, Ralph L; Henry, Ralph L; Owens, S Michael; Owens, S Michael; Owens, S Michael; Owens, S Michael; Gentry, W Brooks; Gentry, W Brooks; Gentry, W Brooks; Gentry, W Brooks

    2014-01-01

    Ch-mAb7F9, a human-mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) designed to bind (+)-methamphetamine (METH) with high affinity and specificity, was produced as a treatment medication for METH abuse. In these studies, we present the preclinical characterization that provided predictive evidence that ch-mAb7F9 may be safe and effective in humans. In vitro ligand binding studies showed that ch-mAb7F9 is specific for and only binds its target ligands (METH, (+)-amphetamine, and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine) with high affinity. It did not bind endogenous neurotransmitters or other medications and was not bound by protein C1q, thus it is unlikely to stimulate in vivo complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Isothermal titration calorimetry potency studies showed that METH binding by ch-mAb7F9 is efficient. Pharmacokinetic studies of METH given after ch-mAb7F9 doses in rats demonstrated the in vivo application of these in vitro METH-binding characteristics. While METH had little effect on ch-mAb7F9 disposition, ch-mAb7F9 substantially altered METH disposition, dramatically reducing the volume of distribution and clearance of METH. The elimination half-life of METH was increased by ch-mAb7F9, but it was still very fast compared with the elimination of ch-mAb7F9. Importantly, the rapid elimination of unbound METH combined with previous knowledge of mAb:target ligand binding dynamics suggested that ch-mAb7F9 binding capacity regenerates over time. This finding has substantial therapeutic implications regarding the METH doses against which ch-mAb7F9 will be effective, on the duration of ch-mAb7F9 effects, and on the safety of ch-mAb7F9 in METH users who use METH while taking ch-mAb7F9. These results helped to support initiation of a Phase 1a study of ch-mAb7F9. PMID:24492290

  11. Monoclonal antibody imaging of human melanoma. Radioimmunodetection by subcutaneous or systemic injection.

    PubMed Central

    Lotze, M T; Carrasquillo, J A; Weinstein, J N; Bryant, G J; Perentesis, P; Reynolds, J C; Matis, L A; Eger, R R; Keenan, A M; Hellström, I

    1986-01-01

    Fab fragments of monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to melanoma, radiolabeled with 131I, were evaluated as diagnostic reagents to determine their ability to localize systemic--MoAb injected intravenously (IV)--or nodal metastatic disease--injected subcutaneously (SQ) at a site proximal to draining lymph nodes. Sixty-one scans were performed (40 IV, 21 SQ) in 59 patients who had injections of 0.2-50 mg of 131I coupled (0.2-12 mCi) antibody. These included 48.7, which identifies a high molecular weight antigen (HMW), or 96.5, which identifies a transferrin like molecule, p97. 125I coupled nonspecific Fab 1.4, reacting with murine leukemia virus, or the whole antibody BL3, reactive with a human B cell idiotypic determinant, was generally used in tandem with the patients injected SQ as a nonspecific control. All patients had immunohistochemical studies performed on biopsied lesions and demonstrated binding to the antibodies injected. Of the IV patients, 22/38 (58%) had (+) scans, 13 at SQ or nodal sites, four at visceral sites, and five at visceral and SQ sites. Patients with clinical stage II disease had SQ injection of MoAb, including 11 additional patients injected with the whole antibody 9.2.27 (anti-HMW) labeled with 111In (6 patients) or 131I (5 patients). Nodal dissection was performed 2-4 days later. All 111In coupled antibodies demonstrated excellent nodal delineation without specific identification of tumor deposits. Of the 21 patients injected SQ with MoAb, 17 had confirmed tumor in nodes. Of patients injected with Fab fragments, 4/8 (50%) had specific uptake of MoAb, although only two were successfully imaged. Increased uptake of antimelanoma antibodies was observed in some patients in lymph nodes not containing tumor and was possibly related to antigen shedding. Clearance of labeled antibody from the injection site occurred with a half life of 16-50 hours. Toxicity was limited to local discomfort at the site of SQ injection. Melanoma metastases can be identified

  12. Further characterization of the binding properties of two monoclonal antibodies recognizing human Tn red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Wua, Albert M; Wub, June H; Kuoa, Hsiang-Wei; Herpa, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    The terminal alpha anomeric Ga1NAc residue is an essential sugar for the Tn glycotope, human blood group A determinant, and Forssman antigen. In a previous study [King M.J., Parson S.F., Wu A,M., Jones N., Transfusion 31: 142-149, 1991] we defined two monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs, BRIC66 and BRIC111) reacting with human Tn red blood cells. However, more advanced studies of these two MoAbs were hampered by the lack of availability of Gal/GalNAc related glycotopes. In order to use these antibodies as powerful probes to elucidate structural changes during life processes, we have characterized in detail the combining sites of these two MoAbs using enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) and inhibition assays with an extended glycan/ligand collection. From the results, it has been established that BRIC66 demonstrated multiple specificities and its reactivity towards glycotopes was defined as: Ga1NAc alpha1-->Ser/Thr (Tn) > or = Ga1NAc alpha1-->3(LFuc alpha1-->2)Gal (Ah) > Ga1NAcalpha1-->3Galbeta1-->4Glc (AL) > Ga1NAalpha1-->3Gal (A) GalNAc alpha1-->3GalNAc > Gal or Glc. Another MoAb, BRIC111, mainly bound Tn-glycophorin. The best ligand for this MoAb was Tn-containing glycopeptides (M.W. < 3.0 x 10(3) Da) from asialo ovine salivary mucin (OSM), which was approximately 70 and 58 times more active than Ga1NAc and monomeric Ga1NAc alpha1-->Ser/Thr (Tn), respectively, suggesting that the active glycotopes present in glycophorin for BRIC111 binding also exist in OSM. The N-acetyl group at carbon-2 and configuration at carbon-2 and carbon-4 of the alpha anomeric Ga1NAc are required for the binding of either MoAb. Identification of these binding properties should aid in the selection of these MoAbs and the conditions required for biological studies and clinical applications. PMID:15864747

  13. Immunohistochemical detection of the human cytochrome P4507B1: production of a monoclonal antibody after cDNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Trap, Catherine; Nato, Farida; Chalbot, Sonia; Kim, Sae-Bom; Lafaye, Pierre; Morfin, Robert

    2005-02-01

    The cytochrome P4507B1 (P4507B1) is responsible for the 7alpha-hydroxylation of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and other 3beta-hydroxysteroids in the brain and other organs. The cDNA of human P4507B1 was used for DNA immunization of mice. The best responding mouse led to the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The clone D16-37 produced an IgM specific for P4507B1 with no cross-reaction with other human P450s. This antibody permitted the immunohistochemical detection of P4507B1 in slices of human hippocampus. P4507B1 was expressed in neurons only. This new tool will be used for the extensive examination of the P4507B1 presence and determination of its levels in slices of human normal and diseased brain and in other human tissues. PMID:15652401

  14. A Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibody Protects against Lethal Disease in a New Ferret Model of Acute Nipah Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bossart, Katharine N.; Zhu, Zhongyu; Middleton, Deborah; Klippel, Jessica; Crameri, Gary; Bingham, John; McEachern, Jennifer A.; Green, Diane; Hancock, Timothy J.; Chan, Yee-Peng; Hickey, Andrew C.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Wang, Lin-Fa; Broder, Christopher C.

    2009-01-01

    Nipah virus is a broadly tropic and highly pathogenic zoonotic paramyxovirus in the genus Henipavirus whose natural reservoirs are several species of Pteropus fruit bats. Nipah virus has repeatedly caused outbreaks over the past decade associated with a severe and often fatal disease in humans and animals. Here, a new ferret model of Nipah virus pathogenesis is described where both respiratory and neurological disease are present in infected animals. Severe disease occurs with viral doses as low as 500 TCID50 within 6 to 10 days following infection. The underlying pathology seen in the ferret closely resembles that seen in Nipah virus infected humans, characterized as a widespread multisystemic vasculitis, with virus replicating in highly vascular tissues including lung, spleen and brain, with recoverable virus from a variety of tissues. Using this ferret model a cross-reactive neutralizing human monoclonal antibody, m102.4, targeting the henipavirus G glycoprotein was evaluated in vivo as a potential therapeutic agent. All ferrets that received m102.4 ten hours following a high dose oral-nasal Nipah virus challenge were protected from disease while all controls died. This study is the first successful post-exposure passive antibody therapy for Nipah virus using a human monoclonal antibody. PMID:19888339

  15. Characterization of NADPH oxidase 5 expression in human tumors and tumor cell lines with a novel mouse monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Smitha; Wu, Yongzhong; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Anver, Miriam R.; Butcher, Donna; Jiang, Guojian; Meitzler, Jennifer L.; Liu, Han; Juhasz, Agnes; Lu, Jiamo; Roy, Krishnendu K.; Doroshow, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species generated by NADPH oxidase 5 (Nox5) have been implicated in physiological and pathophysiological signaling pathways, including cancer development and progression. However, because immunological tools are lacking, knowledge of the role of Nox5 in tumor biology has been limited; the expression of Nox5 protein across tumors and normal tissues is essentially unknown. Here, we report the characterization and use of a mouse monoclonal antibody against a recombinant Nox5 protein (600–746) for expression profiling of Nox5 in human tumors by tissue microarray analysis. Using our novel antibody, we also report the detection of endogenous Nox5 protein in human UACC-257 melanoma cells. Immunofluorescence, confocal microscopy, and immunohistochemical techniques were employed to demonstrate Nox5 localization throughout UACC-257 cells, with perinuclear enhancement. Tissue microarray analysis revealed, for the first time, substantial Nox5 overexpression in several human cancers including those of prostate, breast, colon, lung, brain, and ovary as well as in malignant melanoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma; expression in most non-malignant tissues was negative to weak. This validated mouse monoclonal antibody will promote further exploration of the functional significance of Nox5 in human pathophysiology, including tumor cell growth and proliferation. PMID:23851018

  16. Critical Epitopes in the Nucleocapsid Protein of SFTS Virus Recognized by a Panel of SFTS Patients Derived Human Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li; Zhang, Li; Sun, Lina; Lu, Jing; Wu, Wei; Li, Chuan; Zhang, Quanfu; Zhang, Fushun; Jin, Cong; Wang, Xianjun; Bi, Zhenqiang; Li, Dexin; Liang, Mifang

    2012-01-01

    Background SFTS virus (SFTSV) is a newly discovered pathogen to cause severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) in human. Successful control of SFTSV epidemic requires better understanding of the antigen target in humoral immune responses to the new bunyavirus infection. Methodology/Principal Findings We have generated a combinatorial Fab antibody phage library from two SFTS patients recovered from SFTSV infection. To date, 94 unique human antibodies have been generated and characterized from over 1200 Fab antibody clones obtained by screening the library with SFTS purified virions. All those monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) recognized the nucleocapsid (N) protein of SFTSV while none of them were reactive to the viral glycoproteins Gn or Gc. Furthermore, over screening 1000 mouse monoclonal antibody clones derived from SFTSV virions immunization, 462 clones reacted with N protein, while only 16 clones were reactive to glycoprotein. Furthermore, epitope mapping of SFTSV N protein was performed through molecular simulation, site mutation and competitive ELISA, and we found that at least 4 distinct antigenic epitopes within N protein were recognized by those human and mouse MAbs, in particular mutation of Glu10 to Ala10 abolished or significantly reduced the binding activity of nearly most SFTS patients derived MAbs. Conclusions/Significance The large number of human recombinant MAbs derived from SFTS patients recognized the viral N protein indicated the important role of the N protein in humoral responses to SFTSV infection, and the critical epitopes we defined in this study provided molecular basis for detection and diagnosis of SFTSV infection. PMID:22719874

  17. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    PubMed

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush. PMID:17691940

  18. A novel multipurpose monoclonal antibody for evaluating human c-MET expression in preclinical and clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Beatrice S.; Zhao, Ping; Resau, James; Cottingham, Sandra; Gherardi, Ermanno; Xu, Eric; Berghuis, Bree; Daugherty, Jennifer; Grabinski, Tessa; Toro, Jose; Giambernardi, Troy; Skinner, R. Scot; Gross, Milton; Hudson, Eric; Kort, Eric; Lengyel, Ernst; Ventura, Aviva; Xie, Qian; Hay, Rick; Woude, George Vande; Cao, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The inappropriate expression of the c-MET cell surface receptor in many human solid tumors necessitates the development of companion diagnostics to identify those patients who could benefit from c-MET targeted therapies. Tumor tissues are formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) for histopathological evaluation, making the development of an antibody against c-MET that accurately and reproducibly detects the protein in FFPE samples an urgent need. We have developed a monoclonal antibody, designated MET4, from a panel of MET-avid monoclonal antibodies, based on its specific staining pattern in FFPE preparations of normal human prostate tissues. The accuracy of MET4 immunohistochemistry (MET4-IHC) was assessed by comparing MET4-IHC in FFPE cell pellets with immunoblotting analysis. The technical reproducibility of MET4-IHC possessed a percentage coefficient of variability (%CV) of 6.25% in intra-assay and inter-assay testing. Comparison with other commercial c-MET antibody detection reagents demonstrated equal specificity and increased sensitivity for c-MET detection in prostate tissues. In two cohorts of ovarian cancers and gliomas, MET4 reacted with ovarian cancers of all histological subtypes (strong staining in 25%) and with 63% of gliomas. In addition, MET4 bound c-Met on the surfaces of cultured human cancer cells and tumor xenografts. In summary, the MET4 monoclonal antibody accurately and reproducibly measures c-MET expression by IHC in FFPE tissues and can be used for molecular imaging in-vivo. These properties encourage further development of MET4 as a multipurpose molecular diagnostics reagent to help to guide appropriate selection of patients being considered for treatment with c-MET-antagonistic drugs. PMID:18815565

  19. Adsorption behavior of a human monoclonal antibody at hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Couston, Ruairidh G.; Skoda, Maximilian W.; Uddin, Shahid; van der Walle, Christopher F.

    2013-01-01

    One aspiration for the formulation of human monoclonal antibodies (mAb) is to reach high solution concentrations without compromising stability. Protein surface activity leading to instability is well known, but our understanding of mAb adsorption to the solid-liquid interface in relevant pH and surfactant conditions is incomplete. To investigate these conditions, we used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) and neutron reflectometry (NR). The mAb tested (“mAb-1”) showed highest surface loading to silica at pH 7.4 (~12 mg/m2), with lower surface loading at pH 5.5 (~5.5 mg/m2, further from its pI of 8.99) and to hydrophobized silica (~2 mg/m2). The extent of desorption of mAb-1 from silica or hydrophobized silica was related to the relative affinity of polysorbate 20 or 80 for the same surface. mAb-1 adsorbed to silica on co-injection with polysorbate (above its critical micelle concentration) and also to silica pre-coated with polysorbate. A bilayer model was developed from NR data for mAb-1 at concentrations of 50–5000 mg/L, pH 5.5, and 50–2000 mg/L, pH 7.4. The inner mAb-1 layer was adsorbed to the SiO2 surface at near saturation with an end-on” orientation, while the outer mAb-1 layer was sparse and molecules had a “side-on” orientation. A non-uniform triple layer was observed at 5000 mg/L, pH 7.4, suggesting mAb-1 adsorbed to the SiO2 surface as oligomers at this concentration and pH. mAb-1 adsorbed as a sparse monolayer to hydrophobized silica, with a layer thickness increasing with bulk concentration - suggesting a near end-on orientation without observable relaxation-unfolding. PMID:23196810

  20. Microdistribution of specific rat monoclonal antibodies to mouse tissues and human tumor xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Kennel, S.J.; Falcioni, R.; Wesley, J.W. )

    1991-03-01

    Detailed evaluations of the microdistribution of 125I-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to normal tissue antigens were conducted in BALB/c mice. MoAb 273-34A, which binds to a target molecule on the lumenal surface of lung endothelial cells, localizes quickly and efficiently throughout the lung vasculature. MoAb 133-13A, which binds to an antigen on macrophage-like cells expressed in nearly equal amounts in lung, liver, and spleen, localizes most efficiently to spleen and less well to liver and lung. The microdistribution of MoAb 133-13A in liver and spleen is consistent with the antigen distribution in these organs, but in the lung a more diffuse microdistribution is observed, indicating poor access of MoAb to the antigen-positive alveolar macrophages. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that tight endothelium (lung) represents a significant barrier to extravasation of MoAb into tissue while fenestrated (spleen) and sinusoidal (liver) endothelium are more easily penetrated. In human tumor bearing nu/nu mice, the microdistribution of MoAb to the beta 4 and alpha 6 subunits of integrin was studied. These MoAbs do not cross-react with murine integrins and thus are tumor-specific in the nu/nu mouse model. Localization of 125I-labeled MoAb 450-11A, which reacts with an intercellular domain of beta 4 integrin, is very weak and diffuse. All MoAbs to extracellular domains localize well to the tumor. Microdistribution of these MoAbs in the 3 different tumors is nonuniform with heavy distribution near the blood vessels, whereas antigen distribution as determined by immunoperoxidase shows a much more uniform pattern throughout the tumors. In experiments with 125I-labeled MoAb 439-9B F(ab')2, the nonuniform pattern of distribution was not changed. Gross and microdistribution of different doses of 125I-labeled MoAb 439-9B were studied.

  1. Monoclonal antibody imaging of human melanoma. Radioimmunodetection by subcutaneous or systemic injection

    SciTech Connect

    Lotze, M.T.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Weinstein, J.N.; Bryant, G.J.; Perentesis, P.; Reynolds, J.C.; Matis, L.A.; Eger, R.R.; Keenan, A.M.; Hellstroem, Ie.

    1986-09-01

    Fab fragments of monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to melanoma, radiolabeled with /sup 131/I, were evaluated as diagnostic reagents to determine their ability to localize systemic--MoAb injected intravenously (IV)--or nodal metastatic disease--injected subcutaneously (SQ) at a site proximal to draining lymph nodes. Sixty-one scans were performed (40 IV, 21 SQ) in 59 patients who had injections of 0.2-50 mg of /sup 131/I coupled (0.2-12 mCi) antibody. These included 48.7, which identifies a high molecular weight antigen (HMW), or 96.5, which identifies a transferrin like molecule, p97. 125I coupled nonspecific Fab 1.4, reacting with murine leukemia virus, or the whole antibody BL3, reactive with a human B cell idiotypic determinant, was generally used in tandem with the patients injected SQ as a nonspecific control. All patients had immunohistochemical studies performed and demonstrated binding to the antibodies injected. Of the IV patients, 22/38 (58%) had (+) scans, 13 at SQ or nodal sites, four at visceral sites, and five at visceral and SQ sites. Patients with clinical stage II disease had SQ injection of MoAb, including 11 additional patients injected with the whole antibody 9.2.27 (anti-HMW) labeled with 111In (6 patients) or /sup 131/I (5 patients). Nodal dissection was performed 2-4 days later. All 111In coupled antibodies demonstrated excellent nodal delineation without specific identification of tumor deposits. Of the 21 patients injected SQ with MoAb, 17 had confirmed tumor in nodes. Of patients injected with Fab fragments, 50% had specific uptake of MoAb, although only two were successfully imaged. Increased uptake of antimelanoma antibodies was observed in some patients in lymph nodes not containing tumor. Clearance of labeled antibody from the injection site occurred with a half life of 16-50 hours. Toxicity was limited to local discomfort at the site of SQ injection.

  2. Biokinetics of a radioiodinated antibreast carcinoma monoclonal antibody and fragment in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.; Noska, M.; Kaplan, W.D.; Hayes, D.; Colcher, D.; Schlom, J.; Kufe, D.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody B6.2 is promising for the detection of breast cancers; it binds to >80% of human breast carcinoma (hbc) lines, its antigen is not seen in serum, and it localizes selectively in hbc xenografts in nude mice. The authors have studied the biokinetics of I-131 activity following injection of I-131-IgG and F(ab')/sub 2/ each in 4 patients (pts). The antibody was labeled using iodogen and tested for specific binding to hbc membrane extracts prior to injection. Pts received 0.6-1.1 mCi of I-131 and 50-100 ..mu..g of protein. Blood clearance of I-131 activity was biphasic with half times of 2 and 15.4 hrs for IgG; 1 and 30 hrs for F(ab')/sub 2/. Dehalogenation was noted: by 72 hrs post-injection, 22% (IgG) and 21% (F(ab')/sub 2/) of the injected dose of I-131 was found in the urine. In 2 pts receiving I-131 IgG, stomach uptake was 7-10% at 24 hrs. Protein associated activity in the blood was >90% for the first 8 hrs and gradually decreased to 79% (IgG) and 58% (F(ab')/sub 2/) at 48 hrs. High liver uptake, reported with other antibody systems, was not observed; <20% of the activity was seen in the liver at all time points for both proteins. In 1/4 pts receiving IgG and 4/4 receiving F(ab')/sub 2/, bone marrow uptake was clearly noted. In these pts, >20% of the activity present in blood was cell associated. This is not inconsistent with the observation that B6.2 binds to granulocytes in vitro. Increased binding to cells in the blood for F(ab')/sub 2/ probably accounts for the anomolously longer blood clearance half times observed for F(ab')/sub 2/ vs IgG and low liver accumulation most likely reflects the absence of hepatic or circulating B6.2 antigen.

  3. Limited proteolysis of human leukocyte interferon-. cap alpha. 2 and localization of the monoclonal antibody-binding antigenic determinant

    SciTech Connect

    Kostrov, S.V.; Chernovskaya, T.V.; Khodova, O.M.; Borukhov, S.I.; Ryzhavskaya, A.S.; Izotova, L.S.; Strongin, A.Ya.

    1986-05-20

    Large peptide fragments of human leukocyte interferon-..cap alpha..2 (INF-..cap alpha..2) were produced by limited proteolysis with trypsin, pepsin, thermolysin, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens serine proteinase, and the ability of the fragments to react with murine monoclonal antibodies NK2, directed toward INF-..cap alpha..2, was studied by the immunoblotting technique. The region of the sequence 110-149 is the most sensitive to proteinase attack and evidently is exposed on the surface of the INF-..cap alpha..2 molecule. The INF-..cap alpha..2 fragments 1-139, 1-147, and 1-149 react with antibodies, whereas the fragments 1-109 and 1-112 do not bind NK2 antibodies. A comparison of the primary structure of the families of human leukocyte and murine leukocyte INF in the region of the sequence 110-139 and an analysis of the ability of human INF differing in amino acid sequence to interact with NK2 antibodies suggested that the antigenic determinant that binds monoclonal antibodies NK2 is the sequence Glu/sub 114/-Asp/sub 115/-Ser/sub 116/-He/sub 117/ of the INF-..cap alpha..2 molecule.

  4. Human monoclonal antibodies targeting carbonic anhydrase IX for the molecular imaging of hypoxic regions in solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Ahlskog, J K J; Schliemann, C; Mårlind, J; Qureshi, U; Ammar, A; Pedley, R B; Neri, D

    2009-01-01

    Background: Hypoxia, which is commonly observed in areas of primary tumours and of metastases, influences response to treatment. However, its characterisation has so far mainly been restricted to the ex vivo analysis of tumour sections using monoclonal antibodies specific to carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) or by pimonidazole staining, after the intravenous administration of this 2-nitroimidazole compound in experimental animal models. Methods: In this study, we describe the generation of high-affinity human monoclonal antibodies (A3 and CC7) specific to human CA IX, using phage technology. Results: These antibodies were able to stain CA IX ex vivo and to target the cognate antigen in vivo. In one of the two animal models of colorectal cancer studied (LS174T), CA IX imaging closely matched pimonidazole staining, with a preferential staining of tumour areas characterised by little vascularity and low perfusion. In contrast, in a second animal model (SW1222), distinct staining patterns were observed for pimonidazole and CA IX targeting. We observed a complementary pattern of tumour regions targeted in vivo by the clinical-stage vascular-targeting antibody L19 and the anti-CA IX antibody A3, indicating that a homogenous pattern of in vivo tumour targeting could be achieved by a combination of the two antibodies. Conclusion: The new human anti-CA IX antibodies are expected to be non-immunogenic in patients with cancer and may serve as broadly applicable reagents for the non-invasive imaging of hypoxia and for pharmacodelivery applications. PMID:19623173

  5. In vitro and in vivo properties of human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody specific for common acute lymphocytic leukemia antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Saga, T.; Endo, K.; Koizumi, M.; Kawamura, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Konishi, J.; Ueda, R.; Nishimura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Watanabe, T. )

    1990-06-01

    A human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody specific for a common acute lymphocytic leukemia antigen was efficiently obtained by ligating human heavy-chain enhancer element to the chimeric heavy- and light-chain genes. Cell binding and competitive inhibition assays of both radioiodine and indium-111- (111In) labeled chimeric antibodies demonstrated in vitro immunoreactivity identical with that of the parental murine monoclonal antibodies. The biodistribution of the radiolabeled chimeric antibody in tumor-bearing nude mice was similar to that of the parental murine antibody. Tumor accumulation of radioiodinated parental and chimeric antibodies was lower than that of {sup 111}In-labeled antibodies, probably because of dehalogenation of the radioiodinated antibodies. Indium-111-labeled chimeric antibody clearly visualized xenografted tumor. These results suggest that a human/mouse chimeric antibody can be labeled with {sup 111}In and radioiodine without the loss of its immunoreactivity, and that chimeric antibody localizes in vivo in the same way as the parental murine antibody.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies produced against sporozoites of the human parasite Plasmodium malariae abolish infectivity of sporozoites of the simian parasite Plasmodium brasilianum.

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, A H; Barnwell, J W; Collins, W E; Nussenzweig, R S

    1985-01-01

    We have used a sporozoite neutralization assay to define the biological relevance of the cross-reactivity of two monoclonal antibodies, raised against sporozoites of the human parasite Plasmodium malariae (Uganda 1/CDC), with sporozoites of the simian parasite Plasmodium brasilianum (Colombian). In vitro incubation of each of these two monoclonal antibodies with sporozoites of P. brasilianum totally abolished the infectivity of these parasites for Saimiri sciureus. Using Western blot analysis and one of the P. malariae monoclonal antibodies, we identified two sporozoite proteins characteristic of the Colombian isolate of P. brasilianum with apparent molecular weights of 56,000 and 66,000. The same monoclonal antibody identified two proteins in an extract of the Peruvian isolate of P. brasilianum with apparent molecular weights of 59,000 and 69,000. Images PMID:3899939

  7. [Monoclonal human immunoglobulin (IgG lambda) with antiethinylestradiol activity, oral contraceptives, and arterial pulmonary thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Beaumont, J L; Lemort, N

    1975-06-23

    In a 36-year-old woman taking an oral contraceptive containing 50 mug of ethinyloestradiol each day, a pulmonary arterial thrombosis and a monoclonal gammapathia were associated. The monoclonal IgI lambda Mai... was prepared. When purified, this IgG lambda binds ethinyloestradiol with strong affinity (Ka= 2.7 times 10(7)M-1) and also 17-beta-oestradiol with a little less affinity (Ka = 0.4 times 10(7)M-1. For those ligands each IgG lambda Mai... molecule has two sites of same affinity and specificity so that a Scatchard plot of the experimental values gives a straight line. It is likely that the antibody sites of the IgG lambda Mai... are the binding sites. These facts support the hypothesis of an immunological mechanism of the thromboembolic disease which may be induced by oral contraceptives. PMID:808320

  8. Distribution of monoclonal antibody-defined monosialoganglioside in normal and cancerous human tissues: an immunoperoxidase study.

    PubMed

    Arends, J W; Verstynen, C; Bosman, F T; Hilgers, J; Steplewski, Z

    1983-01-01

    The immunoreactivity of a monosialoganglioside antigen defined by monoclonal antibody 116NS19-9 (19-9) was studied in neoplastic and normal glandular and mucosal epithelia using an indirect immunoperoxidase method. In neoplastic mucosae, the antigen was detected in the majority of colorectal and endometrial carcinomas, predominantly in a focal staining pattern. A substantial proportion of gastric and pancreatic tumors and an occasional breast carcinoma also reacted with the monoclonal antibody. Expression of the monosialoganglioside in normal colonic mucosa appeared to be restricted to areas adjacent to tumor tissue. In gastric mucosa, the antigen was confined to some areas showing intestinal metaplasia. The antigen was also detected in the epithelium of normal mucosa of the gall bladder and endocervix, as well as in some ductal epithelia of the pancreas and salivary glands. Most other mucosae were negative for antigen expression. PMID:6381289

  9. Phase I Trial of Weekly Tigatuzumab, an Agonistic Humanized Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Death Receptor 5 (DR5)

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jatin; Wood, Tina; Posey, James; Carlisle, Ronda; Copigneaux, Catherine; Luo, Feng (Roger); Wojtowicz-Praga, Slawomir; Percent, Ivor; Saleh, Mansoor

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background TRA-8 is a murine agonist monoclonal antibody to death receptor 5 (DR5), which is able to trigger apoptosis in DR5 positive human tumor cells without the aid of crosslinking. It has demonstrated cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo antitumor efficacy to a wide range of solid tumors in murine xenograft models. Tigatuzumab is a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody derived from TRA-8. Methods A phase I trial of tigatuzumab in patients with relapsed/refractory carcinomas (n = 16) or lymphoma (n = 1) was designed to determine the maximal tolerated dose (MTD), pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, and safety. Three to six (3–6) patients were enrolled in successive escalating cohorts at doses ranging from 1 to 8 mg/kg weekly. Results Seventeen (17) patients enrolled, 9 in the 1-, 2-, and 4-mg/kg dose cohorts (3 in each cohort) and 8 in the 8-mg/kg dose cohort. Tigatuzumab was well tolerated with no DLTs observed, and the MTD was not reached. There were no study-drug–related grade 3 or 4, renal, hepatic, or hematologic toxicities. Plasma half-life was 6–10 days, and no anti-tigatuzumab responses were detected. Seven (7) patients had stable disease, with the duration of response ranging from 81 to 798 days. Conclusions Tigatuzumab is well tolerated, and the MTD was not reached. The high number of patients with stable disease suggests antitumor activity. PMID:20187792

  10. A new human chromogranin A (CgA) immunoradiometric assay involving monoclonal antibodies raised against the unprocessed central domain (145-245)

    PubMed Central

    Degorce, F; Goumon, Y; Jacquemart, L; Vidaud, C; Bellanger, L; Pons-Anicet, D; Seguin, P; Metz-Boutigue, M H; Aunis, D

    1999-01-01

    Chromogranin A (CgA), a major protein of chromaffin granules, has been described as a potential marker for neuroendocrine tumours. Because of an extensive proteolysis which leads to a large heterogeneity of circulating fragments, its presence in blood has been assessed in most cases either by competitive immunoassays or with polyclonal antibodies. In the present study, 24 monoclonal antibodies were raised against native or recombinant human CgA. Their mapping with proteolytic peptides showed that they defined eight distinct epitopic groups which spanned two-thirds of the C-terminal part of human CgA. All monoclonal antibodies were tested by pair and compared with a reference radioimmunoassay (RIA) involving CGS06, one of the monoclonal antibodies against the 198–245 sequence. It appears that CgA C-terminal end seems to be highly affected by proteolysis and the association of C-terminal and median-part monoclonal antibodies is inadequate for total CgA assessment. Our new immunoradiometric assay involves two monoclonal antibodies, whose contiguous epitopes lie within the median 145–245 sequence. This assay allows a sensitive detection of total human CgA and correlates well with RIA because dibasic cleavage sites present in the central domain do not seem to be affected by degradation. It has been proved to be efficient in measuring CgA levels in patients with neuroendocrine tumours. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408695

  11. Antitumor effects of methotrexate-monoclonal anti-prostatic acid phosphatase antibody conjugate on human prostate tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Deguchi, T.; Chu, T.M.; Leong, S.S.; Horoszewicz, J.S.; Lee, C.L.

    1986-03-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) was conjugated to an IgG/sub 1/ monoclonal antibody (MCA) specific for human prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) by an active ester method, resulting in a molar ratio of MTX to IgG/sub 1/ of 14. MTX-MCA conjugate retained 94% of free antibody activity and preserved 90% of dihydrofolate reductase inhibitory activity of free MTX. MTX-MCA conjugate was shown to be accumulated in vitro by prostate tumor cells (LNCaP) 1.3 times higher than that of MTX conjugate to normal mouse IgG (NIgG) and 6.2 times higher than that of free MTX. Antitumor activity in vitro exhibited that MTX-MCA conjugate is more effective on inhibition (52%) of /sup 3/H-deoxyuridine incorporation into LNCaP cells than that of MTX-NIgG (39%), but both were less effective than free MTX (70%). The in vivo distribution of /sup 3/H-MTX-MCA conjugate in human prostate tumor xenograft (tumor: blood ratio 5.1) was higher than those of /sup 3/H-MTX-NIgG conjugate (1.1) and of free /sup 3/H-MTX (1.5). Anti-tumor activity in vivo demonstrated that MTX-MCA conjugate retarded the growth of xenografted human prostate tumor greatly and persistently, as compared with the control groups. These results suggested that MTX-monoclonal anti-PAP antibody conjugate represents a potential reagent for immunochemotherapy of human prostate tumor (NIH CA-34536, CA-15437 and ACS CH-269.

  12. Stable, continuous large-scale production of human monoclonal HIV-1 antibody using a computer-controlled pilot plant.

    PubMed

    Unterluggauer, F; Doblhoff-Dier, O; Tauer, C; Jungbauer, A; Gaida, T; Reiter, M; Schmatz, C; Zach, N; Katinger, H

    1994-01-01

    A completely automated pilot plant used for fermentation has been employed with direct digital control (DDC) technology for monitoring and regulating growth of human cells. A human hybridoma cell line (3D6) producing anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 antibodies was used as a model for large-scale production (300-liter airlift fermentor) in continuous culture. Parameters controlled were pH, dissolved oxygen, temperature and the flow rate of four gases used in the process. A control strategy was implemented to achieve constant fluid velocity and mixing by maintaining the rate of gas flow at a constant level. Another advantage of this approach was that the total gas flow required for optimal fluid circulation was reduced from 1 volume gas/volume fermenter/hour (vvh) to 0.3 vvh. Use of a low flow rate eliminated the serious problems of foaming, which contributed significantly to cell destruction, shorter filter-life and other considerations. Dilution rate was optimized at laboratory scale for maximum productivity, which results in relatively low viability. At a dilution rate of 0.0076 h-1, a total cell density of 6-7 x 10(5) cells/ml with a viability of approximately 75% was maintained during long-term continuous cultivation. These growth conditions resulted in a product titer stabilized in the range of 35 micrograms IgG/ml. Batchwise purification was achieved with a recovery of more than 50% and a final purification of active monoclonal antibody representing about 99% product. Results from isoelectric focusing and Western blotting demonstrated batch-to-batch consistency of the purified human monoclonal antibody to HIV-1 during the continuous growth process.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8136128

  13. An ultra-sensitive monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosobent assay for dibutyl phthalate in human urinary.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lifang; Lei, Yajing; Zhang, Dai; Ahmed, Shabbir; Chen, Shuqing

    2016-01-15

    Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) has been extensively used as a plasticizer in many daily products, which is highly toxic to human, notably affecting the reproductive and developmental function. As the previous method is expensive, time-consuming, low sensitivity and just focused on the environment. Present study was aimed to establish an ultra-sensitive and simple method based on good quality monoclonal antibody, applying to evaluate excretion level of DBP in urine samples of Chinese population directly. A monoclonal antibody was generated and characterized after fusion of myeloma cells with spleen cells isolated from BALB/c mouse. The mouse was previously immunized using a specially designed amino derivative of DBP conjugated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) as immunogen. Cross-reactivity values of the monoclonal antibody against DBP, di-isobutyl phthalate (DIBP) were observed 100% and 1.25%, while for dimethyl phthalate (DMP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) and didecyl phthalate (DDP) the values were <0.06%. The standard curve was constructed at 0-50 ng mL(-1) and good linearity (R(2)=0.994) was achieved. The observed IC50 (7.34 ng mL(-1)) and LOD (0.06 ng mL(-1)) values was improved 1000-fold to polyclonal antibody and 5-fold to other monoclonal antibodies. A total 1246 urine samples were analyzed and the detection frequency of DBP was observed 72.87% by ic-ELISA. The 95th percentile and mean concentration of DBP were 12.07 and 3.00 ng mL(-1). Acceptable recovery rates of DBP were 97.8-114.3% and coefficients variation 5.93-11.09%. The concentrations of DBP in females were found significantly higher (p<0.05) than males. Similarly, the DBP in middle aged and low educated individuals was found higher (p<0.001) than the others. Considering the adverse health effects, DBP internal exposure in the Chinese population should be reduced. The ic-ELISA method has been proved as a cost effective, specific, and highly sensitive screening tool to detect DBP in urinary samples. PMID

  14. [Targeted therapy by monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Kei; Morimoto, Chikao

    2010-10-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies are virtually indispensable for immunotherapy of cancer, infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, or organ transplantation. The hybridoma technique, developed by Georges Köhler and César Milstein in 1975, has been shown to be most and highly producible method for generating murine monoclonal antibodies. However, poor results were obtained when it was administered in human bodies. With development of biotechnology, human monoclonal antibodies have been manufactured with higher efficiency. A major hindrance of producing therapeutic human monoclonal antibodies is the lack of an appropriate strategy for determining and selecting the antibodies that would be effective in vivo. In this review, we give an overview of the present techniques on therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. PMID:20954327

  15. Identification and Characterization of a New Cross-Reactive Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei-Yun; Xiao, Xiaodong; Sidorov, Igor A.; Choudhry, Vidita; Cham, Fatim; Zhang, Peng Fei; Bouma, Peter; Zwick, Michael; Choudhary, Anil; Montefiori, David C.; Broder, Christopher C.; Burton, Dennis R.; Quinnan, Gerald V.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2004-01-01

    The identification and characterization of new human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) able to neutralize primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates from different subtypes may help in our understanding of the mechanisms of virus entry and neutralization and in the development of entry inhibitors and vaccines. For enhanced selection of broadly cross-reactive antibodies, soluble HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs proteins) from two isolates complexed with two-domain soluble CD4 (sCD4) were alternated during panning of a phage-displayed human antibody library; these two Env proteins (89.6 and IIIB gp140s), and one additional Env (JR-FL gp120) alone and complexed with sCD4 were used for screening. An antibody with relatively long HCDR3 (17 residues), designated m14, was identified that bound to all antigens and neutralized heterologous HIV-1 isolates in multiple assay formats. Fab m14 potently neutralized selected well-characterized subtype B isolates, including JRCSF, 89.6, IIIB, and Yu2. Immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) m14 was more potent than Fab m14 and neutralized 7 of 10 other clade B isolates; notably, although the potency was on average significantly lower than that of IgG1 b12, IgG1 m14 neutralized two of the isolates with significantly lower 50% inhibitory concentrations than did IgG1 b12. IgG1 m14 neutralized four of four selected clade C isolates with potency higher than that of IgG1 b12. It also neutralized 7 of 17 clade C isolates from southern Africa that were difficult to neutralize with other hMAbs and sCD4. IgG1 m14 neutralized four of seven primary HIV-1 isolates from other clades (A, D, E, and F) much more efficiently than did IgG1 b12; for the other three isolates, IgG b12 was much more potent. Fab m14 bound with high (nanomolar range) affinity to gp120 and gp140 from various isolates; its binding was reduced by soluble CD4 and antibodies recognizing the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) on gp120, and its footprint as defined by alanine

  16. Elicited antibody nature of human monoclonal protein with anti-streptolysin O activity--analysis with monoclonal anti-idiotype antibody.

    PubMed

    Sawada, S; Shida, M; Suenaga, R; Mizuma, H; Karasaki, M; Hashimoto, M; Kawano, K; Amaki, I

    1986-01-01

    Sera from 7 patients with multiple myeloma having antistreptolysin O (ASO) activity in high titers were detected by a streptolysin O (SLO) inhibition assay. However, activity was in low titer when assayed by a passive agglutination assay. The discrepancy between these 2 assays raised some doubts as to whether these monoclonal proteins (M.protein) bond to SLO in the same manner as elicited antibodies. Immunochemical analysis and idiotope analysis using monoclonal antibody to one of these M.proteins strongly suggest that M.protein with ASO activity bind to SLO in a manner similar to elicited antibody. The discrepancy between the 2 assays might be due to differences in the antigenic structure of different forms of the SLO molecule. PMID:2422380

  17. A Unique Report: Development of Super Anti-Human IgG Monoclone with Optical Density Over Than 3

    PubMed Central

    Aghebati Maleki, Leili; Baradaran, Behzad; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Ezzatifar, Fatemeh; Majidi, Jafar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies and related conjugates are key reagents used in biomedical researches as well as, in treatment, purification and diagnosis of infectious and non- infectious diseases. Methods: Balb/c mice were immunized with purified human IgG. Spleen cells of the most immune mouse were fused with SP2/0 in the presence of Poly Ethylene Glycol (PEG). Supernatant of hybridoma cells was screened for detection of antibody by ELISA. Then, the sample was assessed for cross-reactivity with IgM & IgA by ELISA and confirmed by immunoblotting. The subclasses of the selected mAbs were determined. The best clone was injected intraperitoneally to some pristane-injected mice. Anti-IgG mAb was purified from the animals' ascitic fluid by Ion exchange chromatography and then, mAb was conjugated with HRP. Results: In the present study, over than 50 clones were obtained that 1 clone had optical density over than 3. We named this clone as supermonoclone which was selected for limiting dilution. The result of the immunoblotting, showed sharp band in IgG position and did not show any band in IgM&IgA position. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, the conjugated monoclonal antibody could have application in diagnosis of infectious diseases like Toxoplasmosis, Rubella and IgG class of other infectious and non- infectious diseases. PMID:24312857

  18. Local distribution and concentration of intravenously injected sup 131 I-9. 2. 27 monoclonal antibody in human malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Del Vecchio, S.; Reynolds, J.C.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Blasberg, R.G.; Neumann, R.D.; Lotze, M.T.; Bryant, G.J.; Farkas, R.J.; Larson, S.M. )

    1989-05-15

    Regional measurements of {sup 131}I-9.2.27 distribution in human melanoma tumors were obtained using quantitative autoradiography. Tumors were removed from patients 72-96 h after they had received an i.v. injection of 9.15 mCi (100 mg) of {sup 131}I-9.2.27. The autoradiographic images showed that the radioactivity reaching the tumor was heterogeneously distributed. Areas of relative high and low uptake were selected in each tumor. Regions of high activity contained from 51 to 1371 nCi/g, while areas with low uptake had radioactivity ranging from 12 to 487 nCi/g. The reliability of the autoradiographic measurements was demonstrated by the strong positive correlation with direct tissue sample counting (r = 0.994 P less than 0.001). Since comparative immunocytochemistry showed a homogeneous and diffuse staining of target antigen on viable tumor cells, variability of monoclonal antibody uptake within individual tumors was not primarily due to heterogeneity of antigen expression in these cases. However, antigen levels accounted for some of the variation from tumor to tumor. When immunoperoxidase staining was repeated on adjacent sections without the addition of 9.2.27, it confirmed the nonuniform distribution of monoclonal antibody found at autoradiography. Thus, quantitative autoradiography gives information about the distribution and the local concentration of radioactive antibody in tumors allowing calculation of the radiation dose delivered to small regions within tumors.

  19. Characterization of two anti-dengue human monoclonal antibodies prepared from PBMCs of patients with dengue illness in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Li, Z-Y; Yamashita, A; Kawashita, N; Sasaki, T; Pan, Y; Ono, K-I; Ikuta, K; Li, Y-G

    2016-06-01

    The global spread of the four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes (dengue-1 to -4) has made this virus a major and growing public health concern. Generally, pre-existing neutralizing antibodies derived from primary infection play a significant role in protecting against subsequent infection with the same serotype. By contrast, these pre-existing antibodies are believed to mediate a non-protective response to subsequent heterotypic DENV infections, leading to the onset of dengue illness. In this study, two monoclonal antibodies prepared by using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with dengue fever were characterized. Epitope mapping revealed that amino acid residues 254-278 in domain II of the viral envelope protein E were the target region of these antibodies. A database search revealed that certain sequences in this epitope region showed high conservation among the four serotypes of DENV. These two human monoclonal antibodies could neutralize DENV-2,-4 more effectively than DENV-1,-3. The amino acid sequences could not explain this difference in neutralizing activity. However, the 3D structure results showed that amino acid 274 could be the critical residue for the difference in neutralization. These results may provide basic information for the development of a dengue vaccine. PMID:27265466

  20. A Humanized Anti-VEGF Rabbit Monoclonal Antibody Inhibits Angiogenesis and Blocks Tumor Growth in Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongke; Yu, Qiu; Lee, Jonathan; Li, Mingzhen; Song, Jialiang; Chen, Jungang; Dai, Jihong; Couto, Fernando Jose Rebelo Do; An, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Weimin; Yu, Guo-Liang

    2010-01-01

    Rabbit antibodies have been widely used in research and diagnostics due to their high antigen specificity and affinity. Though these properties are also highly desirable for therapeutic applications, rabbit antibodies have remained untapped for human disease therapy. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of rabbit monoclonal antibodies (RabMAbs), we generated a panel of neutralizing RabMAbs against human vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF). These neutralizing RabMAbs are specific to VEGF and do not cross-react to other members of the VEGF protein family. Guided by sequence and lineage analysis of a panel of neutralizing RabMAbs, we humanized the lead candidate by substituting non-critical residues with human residues within both the frameworks and the CDR regions. We showed that the humanized RabMAb retained its parental biological properties and showed potent inhibition of the growth of H460 lung carcinoma and A673 rhabdomyosarcoma xenografts in mice. These studies provide proof of principle for the feasibility of developing humanized RabMAbs as therapeutics. PMID:20140208

  1. Pertuzumab in human epidermal growth-factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer: clinical and economic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Lamond, Nathan WD; Younis, Tallal

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of specific therapy, the 15%–20% of breast cancers demonstrating human epidermal growth-factor receptor 2 (HER2) protein overexpression and/or gene amplification are characterized by a more aggressive phenotype and poorer prognosis compared to their HER2-negative counterparts. Trastuzumab (Herceptin), the first anti-HER2-targeted therapy, has been associated with improved survival outcomes in HER2-positive breast cancer. However, many patients with early stage disease continue to relapse, and metastatic disease remains incurable. In order to further improve these outcomes, several novel HER2-targeted agents have recently been developed. Pertuzumab (Perjeta), a monoclonal antibody against the HER2 dimerization domain, has also been associated with improved patient outcomes in clinical trials, and has recently been approved in combination with chemotherapy and trastuzumab for neoadjuvant therapy of early stage, HER2-positive breast cancer and first-line treatment of metastatic disease. This review briefly summarizes pertuzumab’s clinical development as well as the published evidence supporting its use, and highlights some of the currently unanswered questions that will influence pertuzumab’s incorporation into clinical practice. PMID:24876795

  2. Brain metastasis in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer: from biology to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Taeryool

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is found in about 20% of breast cancer patients. With treatment using trastuzumab, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, systemic control is improved. Nonetheless, the incidence of brain metastasis does not be improved, rather seems to be increased in HER2-positive breast cancer. The mainstay treatment for brain metastases is radiotherapy. According to the number of metastatic lesions and performance status of patients, radiosurgery or whole brain radiotherapy can be performed. The concurrent use of a radiosensitizer further improves intracranial control. Due to its large molecular weight, trastuzumab has a limited ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. However, small tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as lapatinib, has been noted to be a promising agent that can be used as a radiosensitizer to affect HER2-positive breast cancer. This review will outline general management of brain metastases and will focus on preclinical findings regarding the radiosensitizing effect of small molecule HER2 targeting agents. PMID:27104161

  3. Cross-species immunoreactivity of airway mucin as revealed by monoclonal antibodies directed against mucins from human, hamster, and rat.

    PubMed

    Shin, C Y; Lee, W J; Kim, D J; Park, C S; Choi, E Y; Ko, K H

    2000-10-01

    Airway mucin plays crucial role in host-defense and has been implicated in pathophysiology of various airway diseases including asthma and cystic fibrosis. The analysis of airway mucin has been hampered mostly by the lack of specific and efficient methods for the detection of mucin. Recent production of antibodies against airway mucin from several species and also the development of immunoassay procedures make it more efficient to study the airway mucin. However, the cross-species immunoreactivity of antibodies against airway mucin has not been clearly demonstrated and this prompted us to investigate the cross-species immunoreactivity of monoclonal antibodies against human (HM02), hamster (HTA), and rat airway mucin (RT03), which is three most widely used species in the study of mucin. All the monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) used in this study is IgM isotype and recognizes N-acetyl-galactosamine-linked carbohydrate core or backbone portion of airway mucin. In enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot, immunoprecipitation, and immunohistochemical staining experiments, it was demonstrated that human and hamster airway mucin showed strong cross-species immunoreactivity. However, rat airway mucin did not show any cross-species immunoreactivity against human and hamster airway mucin. Endotoxin-induced secretory cell metaplasia and hence the increase in mucin release from hamster airway mucin could be detected with antibodies against hamster and human airway mucin in vivo and in vitro. However, the same increase from rat airway could only be detected with antibody against rat airway mucin but not with antibodies against human and hamster airway mucin. In addition, the increase in mucin release from asthmatic patients could be detected with antibodies against human and hamster airway mucin but not with the antibody against rat airway mucin. The data from the present study implicates that the carbohydrate chain of human and hamster airway mucin, but not that

  4. Complement-Dependent Lysis of Influenza A Virus-Infected Cells by Broadly Cross-Reactive Human Monoclonal Antibodies ▿

    PubMed Central

    Terajima, Masanori; Cruz, John; Co, Mary Dawn T.; Lee, Jane-Hwei; Kaur, Kaval; Wilson, Patrick C.; Ennis, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    We characterized human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) cloned from influenza virus-infected patients and from influenza vaccine recipients by complement-dependent lysis (CDL) assay. Most MAbs active in CDL were neutralizing, but not all neutralizing MAbs can mediate CDL. Two of the three stalk-specific neutralizing MAbs tested were able to mediate CDL and were more cross-reactive to temporally distant H1N1 strains than the conventional hemagglutination-inhibiting and neutralizing MAbs. One of the stalk-specific MAbs was subtype cross-reactive to H1 and H2 hemagglutinins, suggesting a role for stalk-specific antibodies in protection against influenza illness, especially by a novel viral subtype which can cause pandemics. PMID:21994454

  5. Control of pro-inflammatory cytokine release from human monocytes with the use of an interleukin-10 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hardik; Davidson, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    The monocytes (MONOs) can be considered as "double-edge swords"; they have both important pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory functions manifested in part by cytokine production and release. Although MONOs are circulating cells, they are the major precursors of a variety of tissue-specific immune cells such as the alveolar macrophage, dendritic cells, microglial cells, and Kupffer cells. Unlike the polymorphonuclear leukocyte, which produces no or very little interleukin-10 (IL-10), the monocyte can produce this potent anti-inflammatory cytokine to control inflammation. IL-10, on an equimolar basis, is a more potent inhibitor of pro-inflammatory cytokines produced by monocytes than many anti-inflammatory glucocorticoids which are used clinically. This chapter describes how to isolate monocytes from human blood and the use of IL-10 monoclonal antibody to determine the effect and timing of endogenous IL-10 release on the production and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:24908297

  6. An anti-human monocyte/macrophage monoclonal antibody, reacting most strongly with macrophages in lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed

    Hogg, N; Selvendran, Y

    1985-05-01

    In this report, we have described monoclonal antibody (mAb) 24 which bound specifically to a 174,000 polypeptide present on 45 +/- 16% of human monocytes. Expression of the 24 molecule increased on monocytes when they were cultured. When tissues were examined using immunohistochemical techniques, macrophages (Mph) associated with skin and with lymphoid organs strongly expressed the mAb 24 molecule, whereas, Mph in nonlymphoid organs were only weakly positive. mAb 24 reacted with cells of Mph morphology plus cells of interdigitating appearance in T-cell areas, suggesting that these cells might belong to the Mph cell lineage. There was no reaction with other types of cells, such as Langerhans cells, osteoclasts, dendritic reticulum cells, and endothelial cells. The fact that the molecule recognised by mAb 24 is particularly associated with Mph in lymphoid tissue suggests that it might have a function in immune responses. PMID:2581704

  7. Clearance of persistent hepatitis C virus infection in humanized mice using a claudin-1-targeting monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Mailly, Laurent; Xiao, Fei; Lupberger, Joachim; Wilson, Garrick K; Aubert, Philippe; Duong, François H T; Calabrese, Diego; Leboeuf, Céline; Fofana, Isabel; Thumann, Christine; Bandiera, Simonetta; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Volz, Tassilo; Davis, Christopher; Harris, Helen J; Mee, Christopher J; Girardi, Erika; Chane-Woon-Ming, Béatrice; Ericsson, Maria; Fletcher, Nicola; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Pessaux, Patrick; Vercauteren, Koen; Meuleman, Philip; Villa, Pascal; Kaderali, Lars; Pfeffer, Sébastien; Heim, Markus H; Neunlist, Michel; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Dandri, Maura; McKeating, Jane A; Robinet, Eric; Baumert, Thomas F

    2015-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis and cancer. Cell entry of HCV and other pathogens is mediated by tight junction (TJ) proteins, but successful therapeutic targeting of TJ proteins has not been reported yet. Using a human liver-chimeric mouse model, we show that a monoclonal antibody specific for the TJ protein claudin-1 (ref. 7) eliminates chronic HCV infection without detectable toxicity. This antibody inhibits HCV entry, cell-cell transmission and virus-induced signaling events. Antibody treatment reduces the number of HCV-infected hepatocytes in vivo, highlighting the need for de novo infection by means of host entry factors to maintain chronic infection. In summary, we demonstrate that an antibody targeting a virus receptor can cure chronic viral infection and uncover TJ proteins as targets for antiviral therapy. PMID:25798937

  8. Anti-phospholipid human monoclonal antibodies inhibit CCR5-tropic HIV-1 and induce β-chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hua-Xin; Alam, S. Munir; Scearce, Richard M.; Plonk, M. Kelly; Kozink, Daniel M.; Drinker, Mark S.; Zhang, Ruijun; Xia, Shi-Mao; Sutherland, Laura L.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Giles, Ian P.; Kappes, John C.; Ochsenbauer-Jambor, Christina; Edmonds, Tara G.; Soares, Melina; Barbero, Gustavo; Forthal, Donald N.; Landucci, Gary; Chang, Connie; King, Steven W.; Kavlie, Anita; Denny, Thomas N.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Chen, Pojen P.; Thorpe, Philip E.; Montefiori, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional antibody-mediated neutralization of HIV-1 infection is thought to result from the binding of antibodies to virions, thus preventing virus entry. However, antibodies that broadly neutralize HIV-1 are rare and are not induced by current vaccines. We report that four human anti-phospholipid monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (PGN632, P1, IS4, and CL1) inhibit HIV-1 CCR5-tropic (R5) primary isolate infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with 80% inhibitory concentrations of <0.02 to ∼10 µg/ml. Anti-phospholipid mAbs inhibited PBMC HIV-1 infection in vitro by mechanisms involving binding to monocytes and triggering the release of MIP-1α and MIP-1β. The release of these β-chemokines explains both the specificity for R5 HIV-1 and the activity of these mAbs in PBMC cultures containing both primary lymphocytes and monocytes. PMID:20368576

  9. Monoclonal antibodies raised against 167-180 aa sequence of human carbonic anhydrase XII inhibit its enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Dekaminaviciute, Dovile; Kairys, Visvaldas; Zilnyte, Milda; Petrikaite, Vilma; Jogaite, Vaida; Matuliene, Jurgita; Gudleviciene, Zivile; Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Zvirbliene, Aurelija

    2014-12-01

    Abstract Human carbonic anhydrase XII (CA XII) is a single-pass transmembrane protein with an extracellular catalytic domain. This enzyme is being recognized as a potential biomarker for different tumours. The current study was aimed to generate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) neutralizing the enzymatic activity of CA XII. Bioinformatics analysis of CA XII structure revealed surface-exposed sequences located in a proximity of its catalytic centre. Two MAbs against the selected antigenic peptide spanning 167-180 aa sequence of CA XII were generated. The MAbs were reactive with recombinant catalytic domain of CA XII expressed either in E. coli or mammalian cells. Inhibitory activity of the MAbs was demonstrated by a stopped flow CO2 hydration assay. The study provides new data on the surface-exposed linear CA XII epitope that may serve as a target for inhibitory antibodies with a potential immunotherapeutic application. PMID:24400872

  10. Enhancement of monoclonal antibody uptake in human colon tumor xenografts following irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalofonos, H.; Rowlinson, G.; Epenetos, A.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Indium-111-labeled AUA1 tumor-associated monoclonal antibody raised against an antigen of colon adenocarcinoma was used to evaluate the effect of ionizing radiation on antibody uptake by the LoVo adenocarcinoma cell line grown as a xenograft in nude mice. Tumors were exposed to single doses of external X-irradiation of between 400 and 1600 cGy followed, 24 h later, by administration of specific or nonspecific antibody. Animals were sacrificed 3 days after antibody administration. At doses higher than 400 cGy, tumor uptake with both specific and nonspecific antibody was significantly increased. No difference in changes in tumor volume was observed between the groups receiving irradiation and the controls. Specific antibody uptake by tumors was always significantly higher than nonspecific having an approximate 4-fold binding advantage. Vascular permeability and the vascular volume of irradiated and control tumors was measured 24 and 72 h after irradiation, using iodine-125-labeled nonspecific antibody and labelling of the red blood cells in vivo with 99mTcO4. At doses higher than 400 cGy, vascular permeability in the tumor 24 h after irradiation was significantly increased (P less than 0.05), while the vascular volume decreased (P less than 0.001) compared to control values. However at 72 h after irradiation there was no difference between treated and control groups. The results obtained in this study suggest a potential value of external irradiation to increase monoclonal antibody uptake by tumors governed mainly by the increased vascular permeability of the tumor vasculature soon after the irradiation exposure.

  11. In silico design, construction and cloning of Trastuzumab humanized monoclonal antibody: A possible biosimilar for Herceptin

    PubMed Central

    Akbarzadeh-Sharbaf, Soudabeh; Yakhchali, Bagher; Minuchehr, Zarrin; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Zeinali, Sirous

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is a novel hypothesis in that antibodies may have specificity for two distinct antigens that have been named “dual specificity”. This hypothesis was evaluated for some defined therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) such as Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab, Bevacizumab, and Cetuximab. In silico design and construction of expression vectors for trastuzumab monoclonal antibody also in this work were performed. Materials and Methods: First, in bioinformatics studies the 3D structures of concerned mAbs were obtained from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Three-dimensional structural alignments were performed with SIM and MUSTANG softwares. AutoDock4.2 software also was used for the docking analysis. Second, the suitable genes for trastuzumab heavy and light chains were designed, synthesized, and cloned in the prokaryotic vector. These fragments individually were PCR amplified and cloned into pcDNA™ 3.3-TOPO® and pOptiVEC™ TOPO® shuttle vectors, using standard methods. Results: First, many bioinformatics tools and softwares were applied but we did not meet any new dual specificity in the selected antibodies. In the following step, the suitable expression cascade for the heavy and light chains of Trastuzumab therapeutic mAb were designed and constructed. Gene cloning was successfully performed and created constructs were confirmed using gene mapping and sequencing. Conclusions: This study was based on a recently developed technology for mAb expression in mammalian cells. The obtained constructs could be successfully used for biosimilar recombinant mAb production in CHO DG44 dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene deficient cell line in the suspension culture medium. PMID:23210080

  12. Cross reaction of anti-human CD monoclonal antibodies on guinea pig cells: A summary of the guinea pig section of the HLDA8 Animal Homologues data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A panel of 377 commercially available monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for a total of 144 CD antigens was submitted to the 8th International Workshop on Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens (HLDA8, Adelaide, Australia) for cross-reactivity studies in a range of vertebrate species. Each of ...

  13. Safety, pharmacokinetics and neutralization of the broadly neutralizing HIV-1 human monoclonal antibody VRC01 in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Ledgerwood, J E; Coates, E E; Yamshchikov, G; Saunders, J G; Holman, L; Enama, M E; DeZure, A; Lynch, R M; Gordon, I; Plummer, S; Hendel, C S; Pegu, A; Conan-Cibotti, M; Sitar, S; Bailer, R T; Narpala, S; McDermott, A; Louder, M; O'Dell, S; Mohan, S; Pandey, J P; Schwartz, R M; Hu, Z; Koup, R A; Capparelli, E; Mascola, J R; Graham, B S

    2015-12-01

    VRC-HIVMAB060-00-AB (VRC01) is a broadly neutralizing HIV-1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) isolated from the B cells of an HIV-infected patient. It is directed against the HIV-1 CD4 binding site and is capable of potently neutralizing the majority of diverse HIV-1 strains. This Phase I dose-escalation study in healthy adults was conducted at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center (Bethesda, MD, USA). Primary objectives were the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics (PK) of VRC01 intravenous (i.v.) infusion at 5, 20 or 40 mg/kg, given either once (20 mg/kg) or twice 28 days apart (all doses), and of subcutaneous (s.c.) delivery at 5 mg/kg compared to s.c. placebo given twice, 28 days apart. Cumulatively, 28 subjects received 43 VRC01 and nine received placebo administrations. There were no serious adverse events or dose-limiting toxicities. Mean 28-day serum trough concentrations after the first infusion were 35 and 57 μg/ml for groups infused with 20 mg/kg (n = 8) and 40 mg/kg (n = 5) doses, respectively. Mean 28-day trough concentrations after the second infusion were 56 and 89 μg/ml for the same two doses. Over the 5-40 mg/kg i.v. dose range (n = 18), the clearance was 0.016 l/h and terminal half-life was 15 days. After infusion VRC01 retained expected neutralizing activity in serum, and anti-VRC01 antibody responses were not detected. The human monoclonal antibody (mAb) VRC01 was well tolerated when delivered i.v. or s.c. The mAb demonstrated expected half-life and pharmacokinetics for a human immunoglobulin G. The safety and PK results support and inform VRC01 dosing schedules for planning HIV-1 prevention efficacy studies. PMID:26332605

  14. Generation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to the putative CD4-binding domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, N C; Ho, D D; Sun, C R; Liou, R S; Gordon, W; Fung, M S; Li, X L; Ting, R C; Lee, T H; Chang, N T

    1989-01-01

    A panel of seven monoclonal antibodies against the relatively conserved CD4-binding domain on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 was generated by immunizing mice with purified gp120. These monoclonal antibodies reacted specifically with gp120 in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blots (immunoblots). By using synthetic peptides as antigens in the immunosorbent assay, the epitopes of these seven monoclonal antibodies were mapped to amino acid residues 423 to 437 of gp120. Further studies with radioimmunoprecipitation assays showed that they cross-reacted with both gp120 and gp160 of diverse HIV-1 isolates (HTLV-IIIB, HTLV-IIIRF, HTLV-IIIAL, and HTLV-IIIWMJ). They also bound specifically to H9 cells infected with HTLV-IIIB, HTLV-IIIRF, HTLV-IIIAL, HTLV-IIIZ84, and HTLV-IIIZ34 in indirect immunofluorescence studies. In addition, they blocked effectively the binding of HIV-1 to CD4+ C8166 cells. Despite the similarity of these properties, the monoclonal antibodies differed in neutralizing activity against HTLV-IIIB, HTLV-IIIRF, and HTLV-IIIAL, as demonstrated in both syncytium-forming assays and infectivity assays. Our findings suggest that these group-specific monoclonal antibodies to the putative CD4-binding domain on gp120 are potential candidates for development of therapeutic agents against acquired immunodeficiency disease syndrome. PMID:2474670

  15. Anti-Human Embryonic Stem Cell Monoclonal Antibody Hesca-2 Binds to a Glycan Epitope Commonly Found on Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Crystal L.; Price, Paul W.; Meagher, Richard; Godwin, Andrew K.; Cai, Qi; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    Hesca-2, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) IgM raised to the human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line BG-01v, binds with high affinity (nM) to the disaccharide epitope (Galβ1-3GlcNAc) on a glycan microarray. This epitope was expressed on pluripotent progenitor hESCs in culture, but not in various differentiated cells derived from hESC based on immunofluorescence microscopy. Hesca-2 stains a limited subset of cells in adult human tissues (eg, esophagus and breast). This mAb also crossreacts in immunofluorescence microscopy studies with several human ovarian cancer cell lines and is cytotoxic to them based on the release of cytosolic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase into the media. Hesca-2 immunohistochemically stained tissue from a number of human tumors, including ovary, breast, colon, and esophageal cancer. These data suggest that Hesca-2 recognizes a surface marker found both in stem cells and certain cancer cells. PMID:20887211

  16. In vitro inhibition of human malignant brain tumour cell line proliferation by anti-urokinase-type plasminogen activator monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Abaza, M. S.; Shaban, F. A.; Narayan, R. K.; Atassi, M. Z.

    1998-01-01

    A brain tumour-associated marker, urokinase (UK), was investigated using rabbit anti-UK polyclonal and murine anti-UK monoclonal antibodies, which were prepared by immunization with low molecular weight UK (LMW-UK) and high molecular weight urokinase (HMW-UK) synthetic peptide respectively. The polyclonal antibody cross-reacted with both LMW-UK and HMW-UK, whereas the murine MAbs were specific for HMW-UK. These immunological probes were used to study urokinase in glioma extracts, tissues, sera and cell lines that had been prepared from primary cultures of freshly dissected gliomas. Radioimmunoassays showed that glioma extracts had much higher level (5- to 44-fold) of UK than normal human brain extracts. This result was confirmed by immunoblotting of electrophoresis gels of glioma and human brain extracts. Immunohistochemical study using anti-UK MAb demonstrated much higher levels of UK in glioma tissue than normal brain tissue. Immunohistochemical study using anti-UK MAbs localized UK on the cell surface of glioma cells. Anti-UK MAbs inhibited the proliferation of AA cell lines and GB cell lines (50% to > 90%) and exerted minor effects (< or = 20%) on normal human liver, intestine and lymphocyte cell lines. Taken together, these results suggest that anti-UK MAbs may have therapeutic potential for human gliomas and cancer metastasis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9862567

  17. Crystal structure of the Hendra virus attachment G glycoprotein bound to a potent cross-reactive neutralizing human monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kai; Rockx, Barry; Xie, Yihu; DeBuysscher, Blair L; Fusco, Deborah L; Zhu, Zhongyu; Chan, Yee-Peng; Xu, Yan; Luu, Truong; Cer, Regina Z; Feldmann, Heinz; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Broder, Christopher C; Nikolov, Dimitar B

    2013-01-01

    The henipaviruses, represented by Hendra (HeV) and Nipah (NiV) viruses are highly pathogenic zoonotic paramyxoviruses with uniquely broad host tropisms responsible for repeated outbreaks in Australia, Southeast Asia, India and Bangladesh. The high morbidity and mortality rates associated with infection and lack of licensed antiviral therapies make the henipaviruses a potential biological threat to humans and livestock. Henipavirus entry is initiated by the attachment of the G envelope glycoprotein to host cell membrane receptors. Previously, henipavirus-neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies (hmAb) have been isolated using the HeV-G glycoprotein and a human naïve antibody library. One cross-reactive and receptor-blocking hmAb (m102.4) was recently demonstrated to be an effective post-exposure therapy in two animal models of NiV and HeV infection, has been used in several people on a compassionate use basis, and is currently in development for use in humans. Here, we report the crystal structure of the complex of HeV-G with m102.3, an m102.4 derivative, and describe NiV and HeV escape mutants. This structure provides detailed insight into the mechanism of HeV and NiV neutralization by m102.4, and serves as a blueprint for further optimization of m102.4 as a therapeutic agent and for the development of entry inhibitors and vaccines. PMID:24130486

  18. Differential effects of immunosuppressants and antibiotics on human monoclonal antibody production in SCID mouse ascites by five heterohybridomas.

    PubMed

    Yoshinari, K; Arai, K

    1998-02-01

    SCID mice were inoculated with five human-mouse heterohybridomas derived by fusion of human lymph node lymphocytes from lung cancer patients with murine myeloma cells or human-mouse heteromyeloma cells, and the production of their human monoclonal antibodies (MAb) in the mouse ascites was investigated. In a comparison of the effects of pretreatment by i.p. (intraperitoneal) injection of pristane and anti-asialo GM1 serum on the antibody production of three of the hybridomas, pristane pretreatment resulted in substantial antibody production by all three, and pretreatment with anti-asialo GM1 serum resulted in similar or slightly lower levels of antibody production by two of the hybridomas but none by the third. In a second series of experiments using four of the hybridomas with pristane pretreatment, the co-injection of either penicillin G and streptomycin or kanamycin together with the hybridoma at the time of i.p. inoculation resulted in enhanced MAb production by the two heterohybridomas that had been propagated in medium containing hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine (HAT) but not by the two that had been propagated in HAT-free medium. PMID:9523236

  19. [Towards an industrial control of the cloning of lymphocytes B human for the manufacturing of monoclonal antibodies stemming from the human repertoire].

    PubMed

    Guillot-Chene, P; Lebecque, S; Rigal, D

    2009-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are efficient drugs for treating infectious, inflammatory and cancer diseases. Antibodies secreted by human lymphocytes that have been isolated from either peripheral blood or tissues present the definite interest of being part of the physiological or disease-related response to antigens present in the human body. However, attempts to generate hybridomas with human B cells have been largely unsuccessful, and cloning of human B cells has been achieved only via their inefficient immortalization with Epstein Barr Virus (EBV). However, recent progress in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of polyclonal B cell activation has dramatically increased the capacity to clone human B cells. In particular, activation of human naïve and memory B cells through CD40 or memory B cells only through TLR9 was shown to greatly facilitate their immortalization by EBV. Industrial development based on these observations will soon provide large collections of high affinity human mAbs of every isotype directly selected by the human immune system directed to recognize epitopes relevant for individual patients. Moreover, after CD40 activation, these mAbs will cover the full human repertoire, including the natural auto-immune repertoire. Full characterization of the biological activity of these mAbs will in turn bring useful information for selecting vaccine epitopes. This breakthrough in human B cell cloning opens the way into new areas for therapeutic use of mAbs. PMID:19446667

  20. Limitations of the semisynthetic library approach for obtaining human monoclonal autoantibodies to the thyrotropin receptor of Graves' disease

    PubMed Central

    Van Der Heijden, J H W; De Bruin, T W A; Glaudemans, K A F M; De Kruif, J; Banga, J P; Logtenberg, T

    1999-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is characterized by the presence of autoantibodies against the TSH-receptor (TSH-R) which are pathogenic and, upon binding to the receptor, trigger intracellular signal transduction. The autoantibodies are oligoclonal and as they are responsible for disease activity, their characterization would lead to a better understanding of the development of GD. Attempts to isolate anti-TSH-R antibodies from patients have proved to be difficult due to the exceedingly low serum levels due to rarity of these B cells, together with difficulties in obtaining purified TSH-R capable of interacting with patients autoantibodies. We employed phage antibody display technology and performed selection with a previously characterized semisynthetic antibody library on the purified extracellular ectodomain of the TSH-R. We report the isolation of six different anti-TSH-R monoclonal phage antibodies (moPhabs) from this library. All the moPhabs recognized TSH-R and its recombinant fragments by Western blotting, but failed to recognize the native TSH-R by flow cytometry. Consequently, the moPhabs did not lead to TSH-R activation. As these were the first moPhabs to TSH-R, they were analysed in terms of nucleotide and amino acid sequence and epitope specificity on the receptor. The moPhabs used immunoglobulin VH1 and VH3 germ line genes, all associated with Vλ3 genes. Interestingly, the CDR3 regions of all moPhabs were remarkably similar, though not identical. In light of the common CDR3 usage, the epitopes recognized on TSH-R appeared to be restricted to amino acids residues 405–411 and 357–364. In summary, our results show that semisynthetic libraries may be limited in isolating human monoclonal antibodies that resemble pathogenic antithyrotropin receptor autoantibodies present in patients with GD. It is likely that until preparations of purified TSH-R that can be recognized by patients autoantibodies become available, similar to the recently described

  1. Immunogenicity screening assay development for a novel human-mouse chimeric anti-CD147 monoclonal antibody (Metuzumab).

    PubMed

    Mi, Li; Li, Wei; Li, Maohua; Chen, Tao; Wang, Muyang; Sun, Le; Chen, Zhinan

    2016-06-01

    The clinical effect of patient immune responses to therapeutic antibodies affect product safety and efficacy, which makes the development of valid, sensitive immune assays a key aspect of antibody drug development. In this paper, we reported the generations of mouse monoclonal and Cynomolgus monkey polyclonal antibodies against the anti-CD147 antibody (Metuzumab) as the internal standards and the positive controls. Seven mouse monoclonal antibodies were shown to recognize both (Fab)2 and full length of Metuzumab, but not the control normal human IgGs, and monoclonal anti-Metuzumab, Clone 2D9 was chosen to be used as the internal standard for anti-Metuzumab study. A Bridging ELISA assay was developed by coating the wells with the antibody drug, and the anti-drug antibody (ADA) in the animal sera were detected by enzyme-labeled antibody. Its limit of detection (LOD) was determined to be 0.39ng/ml of anti-Metuzumab antibody (ADA) with linear range between 0.39-50ng/ml and R(2)=0.994. For normal monkey sera, a minimal dilution was determined to be 1:80. However, very different from peptide or other protein drugs, strong interferences from the residual antibody drugs were observed from most of the testing monkey sera in the preclinical study. It was experimentally determined that the concentration of the residual antibody drug in the assay have to be lower than 1μg/ml, so the assays were carried out at 1:100 dilution of the monkey sera. In the pre-clinical study, 32 monkeys were treated with escalating doses of Metuzumab between 0, 10, 50, 200mg/kg for 13 times over 13weeks of time period. 16 of them were terminated right after the last injection, while the other 16 were rested for additional 4weeks before termination. Afraid to miss any positive response to antibody drug, sera samples were collected at six time points, including 2-, 6- and 10-weeks post 1st dose, prior to last dose, and 2-, 4-weeks into recovery. The highest positive rates were seen with the Medium

  2. In Vitro and In Vivo Pharmacology and Pharmacokinetics of a Human Engineered™ Monoclonal Antibody to Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Ammons, W Steve; Bauer, Robert J; Horwitz, Arnold H; Chen, Zhi J; Bautista, Eddie; Ruan, Harry H; Abramova, Marina; Scott, Kristen R; Dedrick, Russell L

    2003-01-01

    Abstract ING-1(heMAb), a Human Engineered™ monoclonal antibody to epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM), was evaluated for its in vitro and in vivo activity. The dissociation constant of ING-1(heMAb) for binding to Ep-CAM on HT-29 human colon tumor cells was 2 to 5 nM, similar to chimeric ING-1. In antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity assays, ING-1(heMAb) caused a concentration -dependent lysis of BT-20 breast, MCF-7 breast, HT-29 colon, and CACO-2 colon tumor cells, with maximum cytolysis at approximately 1 µg/ml. After an intravenous injection in rats, plasma ING-1(heMAb) levels declined with an alpha half-life of 8 to 11 hours, and a beta half-life of 20 days, typical of an IgG in a species without the target for ING-1. In nude mice with human HT-29 colon tumors, plasma ING-1(heMAb) levels declined more rapidly than in non-tumor-bearing mice, suggesting an enhanced clearance via the tumor-associated human Ep-CAM. In nude mice, intravenous treatments with ING-1(heMAb) twice a week for 3 weeks significantly suppressed the growth of human HT-29 colon and PC-3 prostate tumors in a dose-dependent manner, with 1.0 mg/kg providing the greatest benefit. These results indicate that Human Engineered™ ING-1(heMAb) is a high-affinity antibody with potent in vitro activity that targets and suppresses the growth of human tumors in vivo. PMID:12659687

  3. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive (HER2+) metastatic breast cancer: how the latest results are improving therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hanfang; Rugo, Hope S.

    2015-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive (HER2+) metastatic breast cancer (MBC) remains an incurable disease, and approximately 25% of patients with HER2+ early breast cancer still relapse after adjuvant trastuzumab-based treatment. HER2 is a validated therapeutic target that remains relevant throughout the disease process. Recently, a number of novel HER2 targeted agents have become available, including lapatinib (a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor of both HER2 and the epidermal growth factor receptor), pertuzumab (a new anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody) and ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1, a novel antibody–drug conjugate), which provide additional treatment options for patients with HER2+ MBC. The latest clinical trials have demonstrated improved outcome with treatment including pertuzumab or T-DM1 compared with standard HER2 targeted therapy. Here we review the clinical development of approved and investigational targeted agents for the treatment of HER2+ MBC, summarize the latest results of important clinical trials supporting use of these agents in the treatment of HER2+ MBC, and discuss how these results impact therapeutic options in clinical practice. PMID:26557900

  4. Broadly neutralizing human monoclonal JC polyomavirus VP1–specific antibodies as candidate therapeutics for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jelcic, Ivan; Combaluzier, Benoit; Jelcic, Ilijas; Faigle, Wolfgang; Senn, Luzia; Reinhart, Brenda J.; Ströh, Luisa; Nitsch, Roger M.; Stehle, Thilo; Sospedra, Mireia; Grimm, Jan; Martin, Roland

    2016-01-01

    In immunocompromised individuals, JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) may mutate and gain access to the central nervous system resulting in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), an often fatal opportunistic infection for which no treatments are currently available. Despite recent progress, the contribution of JCPyV-specific humoral immunity to controlling asymptomatic infection throughout life and to eliminating JCPyV from the brain is poorly understood. We examined antibody responses against JCPyV major capsid protein VP1 (viral protein 1) variants in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of healthy donors (HDs), JCPyV-positive multiple sclerosis patients treated with the anti-VLA-4 monoclonal antibody natalizumab (NAT), and patients with NAT-associated PML. Before and during PML, CSF antibody responses against JCPyV VP1 variants show “recognition holes”; however, upon immune reconstitution, CSF antibody titers rise, then recognize PML-associated JCPyV VP1 variants, and may be involved in elimination of the virus. We therefore reasoned that the memory B cell repertoire of individuals who recovered from PML could be a source for the molecular cloning of broadly neutralizing antibodies for passive immunization. We generated a series of memory B cell-derived JCPyV VP1-specific human monoclonal antibodies from HDs and a patient with NAT-associated PML-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). These antibodies exhibited diverse binding affinity, cross-reactivity with the closely related BK polyomavirus, recognition of PML-causing VP1 variants, and JCPyV neutralization. Almost all antibodies with exquisite specificity for JCPyV, neutralizing activity, recognition of all tested JCPyV PML variants, and high affinity were derived from one patient who had recovered from PML. These antibodies are promising drug candidates for the development of a treatment of PML. PMID:26400911

  5. G glycoprotein amino acid residues required for human monoclonal antibody RAB1 neutralization are conserved in rabies virus street isolates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Rowley, Kirk J; Booth, Brian J; Sloan, Susan E; Ambrosino, Donna M; Babcock, Gregory J

    2011-08-01

    Replacement of polyclonal anti-rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) used in rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) with a monoclonal antibody will eliminate cost and availability constraints that currently exist using RIG in the developing world. The human monoclonal antibody RAB1 has been shown to neutralize all rabies street isolates tested; however for the laboratory-adapted fixed strain, CVS-11, mutation in the G glycoprotein of amino acid 336 from asparagine (N) to aspartic acid (D) resulted in resistance to neutralization. Interestingly, this same mutation in the G glycoprotein of a second laboratory-adapted fixed strain (ERA) did not confer resistance to RAB1 neutralization. Using cell surface staining and lentivirus pseudotyped with rabies virus G glycoprotein (RABVpp), we identified an amino acid alteration in CVS-11 (K346), not present in ERA (R346), which was required in combination with D336 to confer resistance to RAB1. A complete analysis of G glycoprotein sequences from GenBank demonstrated that no identified rabies isolates contain the necessary combination of G glycoprotein mutations for resistance to RAB1 neutralization, consistent with the broad neutralization of RAB1 observed in direct viral neutralization experiments with street isolates. All combinations of amino acids 336 and 346 reported in the sequence database were engineered into the ERA G glycoprotein and RAB1 was able to neutralize RABVpp bearing ERA G glycoprotein containing all known combinations at these critical residues. These data demonstrate that RAB1 has the capacity to neutralize all identified rabies isolates and a minimum of two distinct mutations in the G glycoprotein are required for abrogation of RAB1 neutralization. PMID:21693135

  6. Pseudovirion Particles Bearing Native HIV Envelope Trimers Facilitate a Novel Method for Generating Human Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies against HIV

    PubMed Central

    Hicar, Mark D.; Chen, Xuemin; Briney, Bryan; Hammonds, Jason; Wang, Jaang-Jiun; Kalams, Spyros; Spearman, Paul W.; Crowe, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Monomeric HIV envelope vaccines fail to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies or to protect against infection. Neutralizing antibodies against HIV bind to native, functionally active Env trimers on the virion surface. Gag-Env pseudovirions recapitulate the native trimer, and could serve as an effective epitope presentation platform for study of the neutralizing antibody response in HIV-infected individuals. To address if pseudovirions can recapitulate native HIV virion epitope structures, we carefully characterized these particles, concentrating on the antigenic structure of the coreceptor binding site. By blue native gel shift assays, Gag-Env pseudovirions were shown to contain native trimers that were competent for binding to neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. In ELISA, pseudovirions exhibited increased binding of known CD4-induced antibodies following addition of CD4. Using flow cytometric analysis, fluorescently labeled pseudovirions specifically identified a subset of antigen-specific B cells in HIV-infected subjects. Interestingly, the sequence of one of these novel human antibodies, identified during cloning of single HIV-specific B cells and designated 2C6, exhibited homology to mAb 47e, a known anti-CD4-induced coreceptor binding site antibody. The secreted monoclonal antibody 2C6 did not bind monomeric gp120, but specifically bound envelope on pseudovirions. A recombinant form of the antibody 2C6 acted as a CD4-induced epitope-specific antibody in neutralization assays, yet did not bind monomeric gp120. These findings imply specificity against a quaternary epitope presented on the pseudovirion envelope spike. These data demonstrate that Gag-Env pseudovirions recapitulate CD4 and coreceptor binding pocket antigenic structures and can facilitate identification of B cell clones that secrete neutralizing antibodies. PMID:20531016

  7. Broadly neutralizing human monoclonal JC polyomavirus VP1-specific antibodies as candidate therapeutics for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Jelcic, Ivan; Combaluzier, Benoit; Jelcic, Ilijas; Faigle, Wolfgang; Senn, Luzia; Reinhart, Brenda J; Ströh, Luisa; Nitsch, Roger M; Stehle, Thilo; Sospedra, Mireia; Grimm, Jan; Martin, Roland

    2015-09-23

    In immunocompromised individuals, JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) may mutate and gain access to the central nervous system resulting in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), an often fatal opportunistic infection for which no treatments are currently available. Despite recent progress, the contribution of JCPyV-specific humoral immunity to controlling asymptomatic infection throughout life and to eliminating JCPyV from the brain is poorly understood. We examined antibody responses against JCPyV major capsid protein VP1 (viral protein 1) variants in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of healthy donors (HDs), JCPyV-positive multiple sclerosis patients treated with the anti-VLA-4 monoclonal antibody natalizumab (NAT), and patients with NAT-associated PML. Before and during PML, CSF antibody responses against JCPyV VP1 variants show "recognition holes"; however, upon immune reconstitution, CSF antibody titers rise, then recognize PML-associated JCPyV VP1 variants, and may be involved in elimination of the virus. We therefore reasoned that the memory B cell repertoire of individuals who recovered from PML could be a source for the molecular cloning of broadly neutralizing antibodies for passive immunization. We generated a series of memory B cell-derived JCPyV VP1-specific human monoclonal antibodies from HDs and a patient with NAT-associated PML-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). These antibodies exhibited diverse binding affinity, cross-reactivity with the closely related BK polyomavirus, recognition of PML-causing VP1 variants, and JCPyV neutralization. Almost all antibodies with exquisite specificity for JCPyV, neutralizing activity, recognition of all tested JCPyV PML variants, and high affinity were derived from one patient who had recovered from PML. These antibodies are promising drug candidates for the development of a treatment of PML. PMID:26400911

  8. Monoclonal antibodies - a proven and rapidly expanding therapeutic modality for human diseases.

    PubMed

    An, Zhiqiang

    2010-04-01

    The study of antibodies has been a focal point in modern biology and medicine since the early 1900s. However, progress in therapeutic antibody development was slow and intermittent until recently. The first antibody therapy, murine-derived murononab OKT3 for acute organ rejection, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1986, more than a decade after César Milstein and Georges Köhler developed methods for the isolation of mouse monoclonal antibodies from hybridoma cells in 1975. As a result of the scientific, technological, and clinical breakthroughs in the 1980s and 1990s, the pace of therapeutic antibody discovery and development accelerated. Antibodies are becoming a major drug modality with more than two dozen therapeutic antibodies in the clinic and hundreds more in development. Despite the progress, need for improvement exists at every level. Antibody therapeutics provides fertile ground for protein scientists to fulfill the dream of personalized medicine through basic scientific discovery and technological innovation. PMID:21203944

  9. Ber-MAC3: new monoclonal antibody that defines human monocyte/macrophage differentiation antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Backé, E; Schwarting, R; Gerdes, J; Ernst, M; Stein, H

    1991-01-01

    A new monoclonal antibody Ber-MAC3 is reported. It recognises a formol sensitive epitope of a not yet clustered monocyte/macrophage specific 140 kilodalton glycoprotein that is expressed on the cell surface and in the cytoplasm. In 30 cases of acute and chronic leukaemia, Ber-MAC3 staining was restricted to 15 myeloid leukaemias of M4 and M5 types. The tumour cells of two cases of true histiocytic malignancies were Ber-MAC3 positive, whereas those of all 280 malignancies of lymphocytic origin were negative. The latter included 52 cases of Hodgkin's disease and 41 cases of Ki-1 positive anaplastic large cell lymphomas which had previously been classified as true histiocytic lymphomas. Ber-MAC3 therefore seems to be of considerable value for selective identification of monocytes and macrophages at a certain stage of differentiation and seems to be suitable for diagnosing myelomonocytic or monocytic leukaemia and neoplasms of true histiocytic origin. Images PMID:1721628

  10. Cytokeratin 20 in human carcinomas. A new histodiagnostic marker detected by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Moll, R.; Löwe, A.; Laufer, J.; Franke, W. W.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have recently identified a new cytokeratin (CK) polypeptide, CK 20, whose expression is almost entirely confined to the gastric and intestinal epithelium, urothelium, and Merkel cells. Seven monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for CK 20 were raised and characterized by applying immunoblotting and immunocytochemical screening. All of them reacted on frozen tissue sections. A further MAb, IT-Ks20.8, recognized CK 20 in sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples. A total of 711 cases of primary and metastatic cancer, mostly carcinomas, were analyzed immunohistochemically for CK-20 expression, using CK-20 specific guinea-pig antibodies and MAbs. The expression spectrum of CK 20 in carcinomas resembled that seen in the corresponding normal epithelia of origin. CK-20 positivity was seen in the vast majority of adenocarcinomas of the colon (89/93 cases), mucinous ovarian tumors, transitional-cell and Merkel-cell carcinomas and frequently also in adenocarcinomas of the stomach, bile system, and pancreas. Most squamous cell carcinomas in general and most adenocarcinomas from other sites (breast, lung, endometrium), nonmucinous tumors of the ovary, and small-cell lung carcinomas were essentially or completely negative. The authors propose to use CK 20 as a diagnostic marker valuable in distinguishing different types of carcinomas, notably when presenting as metastases. Images Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:1371204

  11. First-in-man Study With Inclacumab, a Human Monoclonal Antibody Against P-selectin

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Markus; Ciorciaro, Cornelia; Kling, Dorothee; Jamois, Candice; Schick, Eginhard; Solier, Corinne; Benghozi, Renée; Gaudreault, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Inclacumab, a novel monoclonal antibody against P-selectin in development for the treatment and prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases, was administered in an ascending single-dose study as intravenous infusion to evaluate safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics. Fifty-six healthy subjects were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study. Each dose level (0.03–20 mg/kg) was investigated in separate groups of 8 subjects (6 on inclacumab, 2 on placebo). Platelet–leukocyte aggregates, free/total soluble P-selectin concentration ratio, drug concentrations, bleeding time, platelet aggregation, antibody formation, and routine laboratory parameters were measured frequently until 32 weeks. Pharmacokinetic profiles were indicative of target-mediated drug disposition. Platelet–leukocyte aggregate inhibition and soluble P-selectin occupancy showed dose dependency and were strongly correlated to inclacumab plasma concentrations, with IC50 of 740 and 4600 ng/mL, respectively. Inclacumab was well tolerated by the majority of subjects and did neither affect bleeding time nor platelet aggregation. These findings allowed the investigation of the potential beneficial therapeutic use of inclacumab in patient study. PMID:25714598

  12. New method to quantitate platelets adhered on biomaterials using monoclonal antibodies to human platelet membrane glycoprotein SZ-21

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, T.F.; Zhang, J.C.; Tian, W.H.; Wang, C.R.; Lei, X.H.; Wai, H.Y.; Ruan, C.G. )

    1990-01-01

    This study developed a new technique to quantitate platelets adhered on biomaterials surfaces in vitro, based on a surface phased radioimmunoassay using a monoclonal antibody SZ-21, directed specifically against the membrane glycoprotein complex IIIa of human platelets. In vitro perfusion is performed in system which consists of testing tubes and infusion pump. After 5 minutes perfusion with fresh ACD anticoagulated human whole blood at 2,000s-1 platelets deposition on surface precoated with proteins determined using anti-human platelet antibody (125 I-SZ-21) are 4,173 +/- 932 (Albumin), 59,032 +/- 25,554 (Fibrinogen), and 71,253 +/- 11,484 (Collagen). Meanwhile, platelets adhered on surfaces of four polymers were determined (platelet/mm2): 19,493 +/- 2,050 (Silicone), 48,193 +/- 4,055 (Polytetrafluoroethylene), 50,375 +/- 8,675 (Polyvinyl chloride) and 101,906 +/- 5,916 (Polyethylene). These results were confirmed by SEM. This method is not only applied for evaluating rapidly and reliably blood compatibility of biomaterials in vitro, but will be used at basic study for interaction of blood materials.

  13. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words.

    PubMed

    Mirick, G R; Bradt, B M; Denardo, S J; Denardo, G L

    2004-12-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ((90)yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ((131)I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) anti-CD20 MAbs for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, assays were developed to determine HAGA (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to ''humanize'' MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades. PMID:15640788

  14. Cryo-EM structures elucidate neutralizing mechanisms of anti-chikungunya human monoclonal antibodies with therapeutic activity

    PubMed Central

    Long, Feng; Fong, Rachel H.; Austin, Stephen K.; Chen, Zhenguo; Klose, Thomas; Fokine, Andrei; Liu, Yue; Porta, Jason; Sapparapu, Gopal; Akahata, Wataru; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Crowe, James E.; Diamond, Michael S.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes severe acute and chronic disease in humans. Although highly inhibitory murine and human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been generated, the structural basis of their neutralizing activity remains poorly characterized. Here, we determined the cryo-EM structures of chikungunya virus-like particles complexed with antibody fragments (Fab) of two highly protective human mAbs, 4J21 and 5M16, that block virus fusion with host membranes. Both mAbs bind primarily to sites within the A and B domains, as well as to the B domain’s β-ribbon connector of the viral glycoprotein E2. The footprints of these antibodies on the viral surface were consistent with results from loss-of-binding studies using an alanine scanning mutagenesis-based epitope mapping approach. The Fab fragments stabilized the position of the B domain relative to the virus, particularly for the complex with 5M16. This finding is consistent with a mechanism of neutralization in which anti-CHIKV mAbs that bridge the A and B domains impede movement of the B domain away from the underlying fusion loop on the E1 glycoprotein and therefore block the requisite pH-dependent fusion of viral and host membranes. PMID:26504196

  15. Cryo-EM structures elucidate neutralizing mechanisms of anti-chikungunya human monoclonal antibodies with therapeutic activity.

    PubMed

    Long, Feng; Fong, Rachel H; Austin, Stephen K; Chen, Zhenguo; Klose, Thomas; Fokine, Andrei; Liu, Yue; Porta, Jason; Sapparapu, Gopal; Akahata, Wataru; Doranz, Benjamin J; Crowe, James E; Diamond, Michael S; Rossmann, Michael G

    2015-11-10

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes severe acute and chronic disease in humans. Although highly inhibitory murine and human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been generated, the structural basis of their neutralizing activity remains poorly characterized. Here, we determined the cryo-EM structures of chikungunya virus-like particles complexed with antibody fragments (Fab) of two highly protective human mAbs, 4J21 and 5M16, that block virus fusion with host membranes. Both mAbs bind primarily to sites within the A and B domains, as well as to the B domain's β-ribbon connector of the viral glycoprotein E2. The footprints of these antibodies on the viral surface were consistent with results from loss-of-binding studies using an alanine scanning mutagenesis-based epitope mapping approach. The Fab fragments stabilized the position of the B domain relative to the virus, particularly for the complex with 5M16. This finding is consistent with a mechanism of neutralization in which anti-CHIKV mAbs that bridge the A and B domains impede movement of the B domain away from the underlying fusion loop on the E1 glycoprotein and therefore block the requisite pH-dependent fusion of viral and host membranes. PMID:26504196

  16. Cross-protection of newly emerging HPAI H5 viruses by neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies: A viable alternative to oseltamivir.

    PubMed

    Ren, Huanhuan; Wang, Guiqin; Wang, Shuangshuang; Chen, Honglin; Chen, Zhiwei; Hu, Hongxing; Cheng, Genhong; Zhou, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Newly emerging highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N2, H5N3, H5N5, H5N6, H5N8 and H5N9 viruses have been spreading in poultry and wild birds. The H5N6 viruses have also caused 10 human infections with 4 fatal cases in China. Here, we assessed the cross-neutralization and cross-protection of human and mouse monoclonal antibodies against 2 viruses: a HPAI H5N8 virus, A/chicken/Netherlands/14015526/2014 (NE14) and a HPAI H5N6 virus, A/Sichuan/26221/2014 (SC14). The former was isolated from an infected chicken in Netherlands in 2014 and the latter was isolated from an infected human patient in Sichuan, China. We show that antibodies FLA5.10, FLD21.140, 100F4 and 65C6, but not AVFluIgG01, AVFluIgG03, S139/1 and the VRC01 control, potently cross-neutralize the H5N8 NE14 and H5N6 SC14 viruses. Furthermore, we show that a single injection of >1 mg/kg of antibody 100F4 at 4 hours before, or 20 mg/kg antibody 100F4 at 72 hours after, a lethal dose of H5N8 NE14 enables mice to withstand the infection. Finally, we show that a single injection of 0.5 or 1 mg/kg antibody 100F4 prophylactically or 10 mg/kg 100F4 therapeutically outperforms a 5-day course of 10 mg/kg/day oseltamivir treatment against lethal H5N8 NE14 or H5N6 SC14 infection in mice. Our results suggest that further preclinical evaluation of human monoclonal antibodies against newly emerging H5 viruses is warranted. PMID:27167234

  17. Cell lines for the production of monoclonal antibodies to human glycophorin A

    SciTech Connect

    Bigbee, W.L.; Fong, S.S.N.; Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Langlois, R.G.

    1988-08-30

    Cloned mouse hybridoma cell lines have been established which continuously produce antibodies that differentiate between the M and N forms of human glycophorin A. These antibodies have potential application as human blood group reagents, as markers for terminally differentiated erythroid cells and as immunofluorescent labels of somatically variant human erythrocytes.

  18. Method and cell lines for the production of monoclonal antibodies to human glycophorin A

    DOEpatents

    Bigbee, W.L.; Fong, S.S.N.; Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.

    Cloned mouse hybridoma cell lines have been established which continuously produce antibodies that differentiate between the M and N forms of human glycophorin A. These antibodies have potential application as human blood group reagents, as markers for terminally differentiated erythroid cells and as immunofluorescent labels of somatically variant human erythrocytes.

  19. Cell lines for the production of monoclonal antibodies to human glycophorin A

    DOEpatents

    Bigbee, William L.; Fong, Stella S. N.; Jensen, Ronald H.; Vanderlaan, Martin; Langlois, Richard G.

    1988-01-01

    Cloned mouse hybridoma cell lines have been established which continuously produce antibodies that differentiate between the M and N forms of human glycophorin A. These antibodies have potential application as human blood group reagents, as markers for terminally differentiated erythroid cells and as immunofluorescent labels of somatically variant human erythrocytes.

  20. Structural Basis for Recognition of Human Enterovirus 71 by a Bivalent Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Zhiqiang; Zuo, Teng; Kong, Liangliang; Zhang, Chao; Shi, Jinping; Liu, Qingwei; Chen, Tan; Zhang, Yingyi; Jiang, Wen; Zhang, Linqi; Huang, Zhong; Cong, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the main pathogen responsible for hand, foot and mouth disease with severe neurological complications and even death in young children. We have recently identified a highly potent anti-EV71 neutralizing monoclonal antibody, termed D5. Here we investigated the structural basis for recognition of EV71 by the antibody D5. Four three-dimensional structures of EV71 particles in complex with IgG or Fab of D5 were reconstructed by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) single particle analysis all at subnanometer resolutions. The most critical EV71 mature virion-Fab structure was resolved to a resolution of 4.8 Å, which is rare in cryo-EM studies of virus-antibody complex so far. The structures reveal a bivalent binding pattern of D5 antibody across the icosahedral 2-fold axis on mature virion, suggesting that D5 binding may rigidify virions to prevent their conformational changes required for subsequent RNA release. Moreover, we also identified that the complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) of D5 heavy chain directly interacts with the extremely conserved VP1 GH-loop of EV71, which was validated by biochemical and virological assays. We further showed that D5 is indeed able to neutralize a variety of EV71 genotypes and strains. Moreover, D5 could potently confer protection in a mouse model of EV71 infection. Since the conserved VP1 GH-loop is involved in EV71 binding with its uncoating receptor, the scavenger receptor class B, member 2 (SCARB2), the broadly neutralizing ability of D5 might attribute to its inhibition of EV71 from binding SCARB2. Altogether, our results elucidate the structural basis for the binding and neutralization of EV71 by the broadly neutralizing antibody D5, thereby enhancing our understanding of antibody-based protection against EV71 infection. PMID:26938634

  1. Structural Basis for Recognition of Human Enterovirus 71 by a Bivalent Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaohua; Fan, Chen; Ku, Zhiqiang; Zuo, Teng; Kong, Liangliang; Zhang, Chao; Shi, Jinping; Liu, Qingwei; Chen, Tan; Zhang, Yingyi; Jiang, Wen; Zhang, Linqi; Huang, Zhong; Cong, Yao

    2016-03-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the main pathogen responsible for hand, foot and mouth disease with severe neurological complications and even death in young children. We have recently identified a highly potent anti-EV71 neutralizing monoclonal antibody, termed D5. Here we investigated the structural basis for recognition of EV71 by the antibody D5. Four three-dimensional structures of EV71 particles in complex with IgG or Fab of D5 were reconstructed by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) single particle analysis all at subnanometer resolutions. The most critical EV71 mature virion-Fab structure was resolved to a resolution of 4.8 Å, which is rare in cryo-EM studies of virus-antibody complex so far. The structures reveal a bivalent binding pattern of D5 antibody across the icosahedral 2-fold axis on mature virion, suggesting that D5 binding may rigidify virions to prevent their conformational changes required for subsequent RNA release. Moreover, we also identified that the complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) of D5 heavy chain directly interacts with the extremely conserved VP1 GH-loop of EV71, which was validated by biochemical and virological assays. We further showed that D5 is indeed able to neutralize a variety of EV71 genotypes and strains. Moreover, D5 could potently confer protection in a mouse model of EV71 infection. Since the conserved VP1 GH-loop is involved in EV71 binding with its uncoating receptor, the scavenger receptor class B, member 2 (SCARB2), the broadly neutralizing ability of D5 might attribute to its inhibition of EV71 from binding SCARB2. Altogether, our results elucidate the structural basis for the binding and neutralization of EV71 by the broadly neutralizing antibody D5, thereby enhancing our understanding of antibody-based protection against EV71 infection. PMID:26938634

  2. Biochemical Characterization of Human Anti-Hepatitis B Monoclonal Antibody Produced in the Microalgae Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Vanier, Gaëtan; Hempel, Franziska; Chan, Philippe; Rodamer, Michael; Vaudry, David; Maier, Uwe G.; Lerouge, Patrice; Bardor, Muriel

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent actually the major class of biopharmaceuticals. They are produced recombinantly using living cells as biofactories. Among the different expression systems currently available, microalgae represent an emerging alternative which displays several biotechnological advantages. Indeed, microalgae are classified as generally recognized as safe organisms and can be grown easily in bioreactors with high growth rates similarly to CHO cells. Moreover, microalgae exhibit a phototrophic lifestyle involving low production costs as protein expression is fueled by photosynthesis. However, questions remain to be solved before any industrial production of algae-made biopharmaceuticals. Among them, protein heterogeneity as well as protein post-translational modifications need to be evaluated. Especially, N-glycosylation acquired by the secreted recombinant proteins is of major concern since most of the biopharmaceuticals including mAbs are N-glycosylated and it is well recognized that glycosylation represent one of their critical quality attribute. In this paper, we assess the quality of the first recombinant algae-made mAbs produced in the diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum. We are focusing on the characterization of their C- and N-terminal extremities, their signal peptide cleavage and their post-translational modifications including N-glycosylation macro- and microheterogeneity. This study brings understanding on diatom cellular biology, especially secretion and intracellular trafficking of proteins. Overall, it reinforces the positioning of P. tricornutum as an emerging host for the production of biopharmaceuticals and prove that P. tricornutum is suitable for producing recombinant proteins bearing high mannose-type N-glycans. PMID:26437211

  3. Biochemical Characterization of Human Anti-Hepatitis B Monoclonal Antibody Produced in the Microalgae Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Vanier, Gaëtan; Hempel, Franziska; Chan, Philippe; Rodamer, Michael; Vaudry, David; Maier, Uwe G; Lerouge, Patrice; Bardor, Muriel

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent actually the major class of biopharmaceuticals. They are produced recombinantly using living cells as biofactories. Among the different expression systems currently available, microalgae represent an emerging alternative which displays several biotechnological advantages. Indeed, microalgae are classified as generally recognized as safe organisms and can be grown easily in bioreactors with high growth rates similarly to CHO cells. Moreover, microalgae exhibit a phototrophic lifestyle involving low production costs as protein expression is fueled by photosynthesis. However, questions remain to be solved before any industrial production of algae-made biopharmaceuticals. Among them, protein heterogeneity as well as protein post-translational modifications need to be evaluated. Especially, N-glycosylation acquired by the secreted recombinant proteins is of major concern since most of the biopharmaceuticals including mAbs are N-glycosylated and it is well recognized that glycosylation represent one of their critical quality attribute. In this paper, we assess the quality of the first recombinant algae-made mAbs produced in the diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum. We are focusing on the characterization of their C- and N-terminal extremities, their signal peptide cleavage and their post-translational modifications including N-glycosylation macro- and microheterogeneity. This study brings understanding on diatom cellular biology, especially secretion and intracellular trafficking of proteins. Overall, it reinforces the positioning of P. tricornutum as an emerging host for the production of biopharmaceuticals and prove that P. tricornutum is suitable for producing recombinant proteins bearing high mannose-type N-glycans. PMID:26437211

  4. Isolation of HIV-1-Neutralizing Mucosal Monoclonal Antibodies from Human Colostrum

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, James; Alam, S. Munir; Shen, Xiaoying; Xia, Shi-Mao; Stewart, Shelley; Anasti, Kara; Pollara, Justin; Fouda, Genevieve G.; Yang, Guang; Kelsoe, Garnett; Ferrari, Guido; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Haynes, Barton F.; Liao, Hua-Xin

    2012-01-01

    Background Generation of potent anti-HIV antibody responses in mucosal compartments is a potential requirement of a transmission-blocking HIV vaccine. HIV-specific, functional antibody responses are present in breast milk, and these mucosal antibody responses may play a role in protection of the majority of HIV-exposed, breastfeeding infants. Therefore, characterization of HIV-specific antibodies produced by B cells in milk could guide the development of vaccines that elicit protective mucosal antibody responses. Methods We isolated B cells from colostrum of an HIV-infected lactating woman with a detectable neutralization response in milk and recombinantly produced and characterized the resulting HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Results The identified HIV-1 Env-specific colostrum mAbs, CH07 and CH08, represent two of the first mucosally-derived anti-HIV antibodies yet to be reported. Colostrum mAb CH07 is a highly-autoreactive, weakly-neutralizing gp140-specific mAb that binds to linear epitopes in the gp120 C5 region and gp41 fusion domain. In contrast, colostrum mAb CH08 is a nonpolyreactive CD4-inducible (CD4i) gp120-specific mAb with moderate breadth of neutralization. Conclusions These novel HIV-neutralizing mAbs isolated from a mucosal compartment provide insight into the ability of mucosal B cell populations to produce functional anti-HIV antibodies that may contribute to protection against virus acquisition at mucosal surfaces. PMID:22624058

  5. Pharmacologic Characterization of AMG 334, a Potent and Selective Human Monoclonal Antibody against the Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Receptor.

    PubMed

    Shi, Licheng; Lehto, Sonya G; Zhu, Dawn X D; Sun, Hong; Zhang, Jianhua; Smith, Brian P; Immke, David C; Wild, Kenneth D; Xu, Cen

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic agents that block the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) signaling pathway are a highly anticipated and promising new drug class for migraine therapy, especially after reports that small-molecule CGRP-receptor antagonists are efficacious for both acute migraine treatment and migraine prevention. Using XenoMouse technology, we successfully generated AMG 334, a fully human monoclonal antibody against the CGRP receptor. Here we show that AMG 334 competes with [(125)I]-CGRP binding to the human CGRP receptor, with a Ki of 0.02 nM. AMG 334 fully inhibited CGRP-stimulated cAMP production with an IC50 of 2.3 nM in cell-based functional assays (human CGRP receptor) and was 5000-fold more selective for the CGRP receptor than other human calcitonin family receptors, including adrenomedullin, calcitonin, and amylin receptors. The potency of AMG 334 at the cynomolgus monkey (cyno) CGRP receptor was similar to that at the human receptor, with an IC50 of 5.7 nM, but its potency at dog, rabbit, and rat receptors was significantly reduced (>5000-fold). Therefore, in vivo target coverage of AMG 334 was assessed in cynos using the capsaicin-induced increase in dermal blood flow model. AMG 334 dose-dependently prevented capsaicin-induced increases in dermal blood flow on days 2 and 4 postdosing. These results indicate AMG 334 is a potent, selective, full antagonist of the CGRP receptor and show in vivo dose-dependent target coverage in cynos. AMG 334 is currently in clinical development for the prevention of migraine. PMID:26559125

  6. IL-6 blockade by monoclonal antibodies inhibits apolipoprotein (a) expression and lipoprotein (a) synthesis in humans[S

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Nike; Schulte, Dominik M.; Türk, Kathrin; Freitag-Wolf, Sandra; Hampe, Jochen; Zeuner, Rainald; Schröder, Johann O.; Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna; Berthold, Heiner K.; Krone, Wilhelm; Rose-John, Stefan; Schreiber, Stefan; Laudes, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] is a highly atherogenic lipid particle. Although earlier reports suggested that Lp(a) levels are mostly determined by genetic factors, several recent studies have revealed that Lp(a) induction is also caused by chronic inflammation. Therefore, we aimed to examine whether cytokine blockade by monoclonal antibodies may inhibit Lp(a) metabolism. We found that interleukin 6 (IL-6) blockade by tocilizumab (TCZ) reduced Lp(a) while TNF-α-inhibition by adalimumab in humans had no effect. The specificity of IL-6 in regulating Lp(a) was further demonstrated by serological measurements of human subjects (n = 1,153) revealing that Lp(a) levels are increased in individuals with elevated serum IL-6. Transcriptomic analysis of human liver biopsies (n = 57) revealed typical IL-6 response genes being correlated with the LPA gene expression in vivo. On a molecular level, we found that TCZ inhibited IL-6-induced LPA mRNA and protein expression in human hepatocytes. Furthermore, examination of IL-6-responsive signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 binding sites within the LPA promoter by reporter gene assays, promoter deletion experiments, and electrophoretic mobility shift assay analysis showed that the Lp(a)-lowering effect of TCZ is specifically mediated via a responsive element at −46 to −40. Therefore, IL-6 blockade might be a potential therapeutic option to treat elevated Lp(a) serum concentrations in humans and might be a noninvasive alternative to lipid apheresis in the future. PMID:25713100

  7. Prospective isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from multiple mammalian species using cross-reacting anti-human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rozemuller, Henk; Prins, Henk-Jan; Naaijkens, Benno; Staal, Jojet; Bühring, Hans-Jörg; Martens, Anton C

    2010-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) of human and nonhuman mammalian species are often studied for various applications in regenerative medicine research. These MSCs can be derived from human bone marrow (BM) and identified by their ability to form fibroblast-like colony forming units that develop into stromal like cells when expanded in culture. These cells are characterized by their spindle-shaped morphology, their characteristic phenotype (CD73(+), CD90(+), CD105(+), CD45⁻, and CD34⁻), and their ability to differentiate into cells of the osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. However, the identification and purification of MSCs from nonhuman mammalian species is hampered by the lack of suitable monoclonal antibodies (mAb). In this report, primary BM and cultured BM-derived MSCs of human and monkey, goat, sheep, dog, and pig were screened for cross-reactivity using a panel of 43 mAb, of which 22 react with either human BM mononuclear cells or cultured human MSCs. We found 7 mAb with specificity for CD271, MSCA-1 (W8B2 antigen), W4A5, CD56, W3C4 (CD349), W5C4, and 58B1, which showed interspecies cross-reactivity. These mAb proved to be useful for prospective sorting of MSCs from the BM of the 6 mammalian species studied as well as for the characterization of their cultured offspring. Flow sorting with the cross-reacting mAb resulted in up to 2400-fold enrichment of the clonogenic cell fraction (fibroblast-like colony forming units). This study provides an important contribution for the comparative prospective isolation of primary BM-MSCs and the characterization of cultured MSCs from multiple mammalian species for preclinical research. PMID:20367498

  8. The molecular mode of action and species specificity of canakinumab, a human monoclonal antibody neutralizing IL-1β

    PubMed Central

    Rondeau, Jean-Michel; Ramage, Paul; Zurini, Mauro; Gram, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) plays a key role in autoinflammatory diseases, such as systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) or cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS). Canakinumab, a human monoclonal anti-IL-1β antibody, was recently approved for human use under the brand name Ilaris®. Canakinumab does not cross-react with IL-1β from mouse, rat, rabbit, or macaques. The crystal structure of the canakinumab Fab bound to human IL-1β was determined in an attempt to rationalize the species specificity. The X-ray analysis reveals a complex surface epitope with an intricate network of well-ordered water molecules at the antibody-antigen interface. The canakinumab paratope is largely pre-organized, as demonstrated by the structure determination of the free Fab. Glu 64 of human IL-1β is a pivotal epitope residue explaining the exquisite species specificity of canakinumab. We identified marmoset as the only non-human primate species that carries Glu 64 in its IL-1β and demonstrates full cross-reactivity of canakinumab, thereby enabling toxicological studies in this species. As demonstrated by the X-ray structure of the complex with IL-1β, canakinumab binds IL-1β on the opposite side with respect to the IL-1RAcP binding site, and in an approximately orthogonal orientation with respect to IL-1RI. However, the antibody and IL-1RI binding sites slightly overlap and the VH region of canakinumab would sterically interfere with the D1 domain of IL-1RI, as shown by a structural overlay with the IL-1β:IL-1RI complex. Therefore, direct competition with IL-1RI for IL-1β binding is the molecular mechanism of neutralization by canakinumab, which is also confirmed by competition assays with recombinant IL-1RI and IL-1RII. PMID:26284424

  9. Differentiation of human monocytes and derived subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells by the HLDA10 monoclonal antibody panel

    PubMed Central

    Ohradanova-Repic, Anna; Machacek, Christian; Fischer, Michael B; Stockinger, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    The mononuclear phagocyte system, consisting of monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), has an important role in tissue homeostasis as well as in eliciting immune responses against invading pathogens. Blood monocytes have been viewed for decades as precursors of tissue macrophages. Although the newest data show that in the steady state resident macrophages of many organs are monocyte independent, blood monocytes critically contribute to tissue macrophage and DC pools upon inflammation. To better understand the relationship between these populations and their phenotype, we isolated and differentiated human blood CD14+ monocytes in vitro into immature and mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) as well as into seven different monocyte-derived macrophage subsets. We used the panel of 70 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) submitted to the 10th Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigen Workshop to determine the expression profiles of these 10 populations by flow cytometry. We now can compile subpanels of mAbs to differentiate the 10 monocyte/macrophage/MoDC subsets, providing the basis for novel diagnostic and therapeutic tools. PMID:26900469

  10. Human Monoclonal Antibodies to Pandemic 1957 H2N2 and Pandemic 1968 H3N2 Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Jens C.; Tsibane, Tshidi; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Huffman, Chelsey J.; Albrecht, Randy; Blum, David L.; Ramos, Irene; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Edwards, Kathryn M.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Basler, Christopher F.

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of the human antibody response to the 1957 pandemic H2N2 influenza A virus has been largely limited to serologic studies. We generated five influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA)-reactive human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) by hybridoma technology from the peripheral blood of healthy donors who were born between 1950 and 1968. Two MAbs reacted with the pandemic H2N2 virus, two recognized the pandemic H3N2 virus, and remarkably, one reacted with both the pandemic H2N2 and H3N2 viruses. Each of these five naturally occurring MAbs displayed hemagglutination inhibition activity, suggesting specificity for the globular head domain of influenza virus HA. When incubated with virus, MAbs 8F8, 8M2, and 2G1 each elicited H2N2 escape mutations immediately adjacent to the receptor-binding domain on the HA globular head in embryonated chicken eggs. All H2N2-specific MAbs were able to inhibit a 2006 swine H2N3 influenza virus. MAbs 8M2 and 2G1 shared the VH1-69 germ line gene, but these antibodies were otherwise not genetically related. Each antibody was able to protect mice in a lethal H2N2 virus challenge. Thus, even 43 years after circulation of H2N2 viruses, these subjects possessed peripheral blood B cells encoding potent inhibiting antibodies specific for a conserved region on the globular head of the pandemic H2 HA. PMID:22457520

  11. Monoclonal antibodies to human type IV collagen: useful reagents to demonstrate the heterotrimeric nature of the molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Odermatt, B F; Lang, A B; Rüttner, J R; Winterhalter, K H; Trüeb, B

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been prepared against type IV collagen isolated from human kidney. Two mAbs, designated CIV 22 and CIV 16, were extensively characterized. CIV 22 reacted only with native type IV collagen, whereas CIV 16 also bound to fragments derived from the alpha 1(IV) chain after reduction and alkylation of the molecule. Therefore, CIV 22 recognizes a conformational epitope on the triple helical type IV collagen, whereas CIV 16 binds to a sequential determinant in the carboxyl-terminal half of the alpha 1(IV) chain. By immunofluorescence, typical basement membrane structures were stained with both mAbs on frozen sections of different human organs. The mAbs were used to investigate the chain composition of type IV collagen. Radiolabeled type IV collagen bound to CIV 22, proving its triple helical configuration. These native probes, containing both the alpha 1(IV) and the alpha 2(IV) chains, also bound to CIV 16. Since CIV 16 does not react with the isolated alpha 2(IV) chain, both chains must be arranged in a single triple helical molecule (heterotrimer). Images PMID:6209713

  12. PEGylated gold nanoparticles conjugated to monoclonal F19 antibodies as targeted labeling agents for human pancreatic carcinoma tissue.

    PubMed

    Eck, Wolfgang; Craig, Gary; Sigdel, Aruna; Ritter, Gerd; Old, Lloyd J; Tang, Laura; Brennan, Murray F; Allen, Peter J; Mason, Michael D

    2008-11-25

    In this study, we describe optical detection of antibody-conjugated nanoparticles bound to surgically resected human pancreatic cancer tissue. Gold nanoparticles stabilized by heterobifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) were prepared using approximately 15 nm spherical gold cores and covalently coupled to F19 monoclonal antibodies. The heterobifunctional PEG ligands contain a dithiol group for stable anchoring onto the gold surface and a terminal carboxy group for coupling of antibodies to the outside of the PEG shell. The nanoparticle-antibody bioconjugates form highly stable dispersions and exhibit long-term resistance to agglomeration. This has been demonstrated by dynamic light scattering, size exclusion chromatography, and transmission electron microscopy. The nanoparticle bioconjugates were used to label tumor stroma in approximately 5 mum thick sections of resected human pancreatic adenocarcinoma. After rinsing away nonbound nanoparticles and fixation, the tissue samples were imaged by darkfield microscopy near the nanoparticle resonance scattering maximum (approximately 560 nm). The images display pronounced tissue features and suggest that this novel labeling method could provide for facile identification of cancer tissue. Tumor samples treated with gold nanoparticles conjugated to nonspecific control antibodies and noncancerous pancreatic tissue treated with mAb-F19-conjugated gold nanoparticles both exhibited correctly negative results and showed no tissue staining. PMID:19206392

  13. Therapeutic effects of a human antiflagella monoclonal antibody in a neutropenic murine model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, K; Sonoda, F; Iwagaki, A; Ponglertnapagorn, P; Watanabe, K; Nagatake, T; Siadak, A; Pollack, M; Matsumoto, K

    1993-01-01

    Human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) reactive with type-specific Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and flagella were compared for their protective activities against Fisher immunotype 2 P. aeruginosa pneumonia in neutropenic mice. The activity of the antiflagella MAb at a dose of 500 micrograms per mouse was comparable to that of the anti-LPS MAb at the same dose. In vivo protection was correlated with bacterial density in the lung tissue and blood of infected mice. In vitro data suggested that the protective activity of the antiflagella MAb was due more to inhibition of bacterial motility than to opsonophagocytosis of bacteria by alveolar macrophages. In contrast, the protective activity of the anti-LPS MAb was primarily related to alveolar macrophage-mediated opsonophagocytosis. Antiflagella MAb at a dose of 500 micrograms combined with oral sparfloxacin at a subtherapeutic dose of 62.5 micrograms produced a significant increase in survival (P < 0.05) compared with that produced by either agent alone or no treatment. The additive effects between the antiflagella MAb and sparfloxacin at sub-MICs on the inhibitory effects of bacterial motility supported the in vivo effect of the combination. These data suggest that human isotype-matched antiflagella and anti-LPS MAbs have similar protective activities against Pseudomonas pneumonia in neutropenic mice, despite discrete mechanisms of antibody-matched protection. In addition, in vivo synergy was demonstrated between antiflagella MAb and sparfloxacin in this model. PMID:8383936

  14. Structural basis for the neutralization of MERS-CoV by a human monoclonal antibody MERS-27

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Senyan; Jiang, Liwei; Cui, Ye; Li, Dongxia; Wang, Dongli; Wang, Nianshuang; Fu, Lili; Shi, Xuanlin; Li, Ziqiang; Zhang, Linqi; Wang, Xinquan

    2015-01-01

    The recently reported Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes severe respiratory illness in humans with an approximately 30% mortality rate. The envelope spike glycoprotein on the surface of MERS-CoV mediates receptor binding, membrane fusion, and viral entry. We previously reported two human monoclonal antibodies that target the receptor binding domain (RBD) of the spike and exhibit strong neutralization activity against live and pesudotyped MERS-CoV infection. Here we determined the crystal structure of MERS-CoV RBD bound to the Fab fragment of MERS-27 antibody at 3.20 Å resolution. The MERS-27 epitope in the RBD overlaps with the binding site of the MERS-CoV receptor DPP4. Further biochemical, viral entry, and neutralization analyses identified two critical residues in the RBD for both MERS-27 recognition and DPP4 binding. One of the residues, Trp535, was found to function as an anchor residue at the binding interface with MERS-27. Upon receptor binding, Trp535 interacts with the N-linked carbohydrate moiety of DPP4. Thus, MERS-27 inhibits MERS-CoV infection by directly blocking both protein-protein and protein-carbohydrate interactions between MERS-CoV RBD and DPP4. These results shed light on the molecular basis of MERS-27 neutralization and will assist in the optimization of MERS-27 as a tool to combat MERS-CoV infection. PMID:26281793

  15. Both Neutralizing and Non-Neutralizing Human H7N9 Influenza Vaccine-Induced Monoclonal Antibodies Confer Protection.

    PubMed

    Henry Dunand, Carole J; Leon, Paul E; Huang, Min; Choi, Angela; Chromikova, Veronika; Ho, Irvin Y; Tan, Gene S; Cruz, John; Hirsh, Ariana; Zheng, Nai-Ying; Mullarkey, Caitlin E; Ennis, Francis A; Terajima, Masanori; Treanor, John J; Topham, David J; Subbarao, Kanta; Palese, Peter; Krammer, Florian; Wilson, Patrick C

    2016-06-01

    Pathogenic H7N9 avian influenza viruses continue to represent a public health concern, and several candidate vaccines are currently being developed. It is vital to assess if protective antibodies are induced following vaccination and to characterize the diversity of epitopes targeted. Here we characterized the binding and functional properties of twelve H7-reactive human antibodies induced by a candidate A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) vaccine. Both neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies protected mice in vivo during passive transfer challenge experiments. Mapping the H7 hemagglutinin antigenic sites by generating escape mutant variants against the neutralizing antibodies identified unique epitopes on the head and stalk domains. Further, the broadly cross-reactive non-neutralizing antibodies generated in this study were protective through Fc-mediated effector cell recruitment. These findings reveal important properties of vaccine-induced antibodies and provide a better understanding of the human monoclonal antibody response to influenza in the context of vaccines. PMID:27281570

  16. Novel Rabies Virus-Neutralizing Epitope Recognized by Human Monoclonal Antibody: Fine Mapping and Escape Mutant Analysis†

    PubMed Central

    Marissen, Wilfred E.; Kramer, R. Arjen; Rice, Amy; Weldon, William C.; Niezgoda, Michael; Faber, Milosz; Slootstra, Jerry W.; Meloen, Rob H.; Clijsters-van der Horst, Marieke; Visser, Therese J.; Jongeneelen, Mandy; Thijsse, Sandra; Throsby, Mark; de Kruif, John; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Goudsmit, Jaap; Bakker, Alexander B. H.

    2005-01-01

    Anti-rabies virus immunoglobulin combined with rabies vaccine protects humans from lethal rabies infections. For cost and safety reasons, replacement of the human or equine polyclonal immunoglobulin is advocated, and the use of rabies virus-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is recommended. We produced two previously described potent rabies virus-neutralizing human MAbs, CR57 and CRJB, in human PER.C6 cells. The two MAbs competed for binding to rabies virus glycoprotein. Using CR57 and a set of 15-mer overlapping peptides covering the glycoprotein ectodomain, a neutralization domain was identified between amino acids (aa) 218 and 240. The minimal binding region was identified as KLCGVL (aa 226 to 231), with key residues K-CGV- identified by alanine replacement scanning. The critical binding region of this novel nonconformational rabies virus epitope is highly conserved within rabies viruses of genotype 1. Subsequently, we generated six rabies virus variants escaping neutralization by CR57 and six variants escaping CRJB. The CR57 escape mutants were only partially covered by CRJB, and all CRJB-resistant variants completely escaped neutralization by CR57. Without exception, the CR57-resistant variants showed a mutation at key residues within the defined minimal binding region, while the CRJB escape viruses showed a single mutation distant from the CR57 epitope (N182D) combined with mutations in the CR57 epitope. The competition between CR57 and CRJB, the in vitro escape profile, and the apparent overlap between the recognized epitopes argues against including both CR57 and CRJB in a MAb cocktail aimed at replacing classical immunoglobulin preparations. PMID:15795253

  17. Serological analysis of human anti-human antibody responses in colon cancer patients treated with repeated doses of humanized monoclonal antibody A33.

    PubMed

    Ritter, G; Cohen, L S; Williams, C; Richards, E C; Old, L J; Welt, S

    2001-09-15

    Mouse monoclonal antibody A33 (mAb A33) recognizes a M(r) 43,000 cell surface glycoprotein (designated A33) expressed in human colonic epithelium and colon cancer but absent from most other normal tissues. In patients, mAb A33 localizes with high specificity to colon cancer and is retained for up to 6 weeks in the cancer but cleared rapidly from normal colon (5-6 days). As a carrier of (125)I or (131)I, mAb A33 has shown antitumor activity. Induction of strong human anti-mouse antibody (immunoglobulin; HAMA) responses in patients, however, limits the use of the murine mAb A33 to very few injections. A humanized version of this antibody (huAb A33) has been prepared for Phase I and II clinical studies in patients with colon cancer. In those studies, immunogenicity of huAb A33 has been monitored using a novel, highly sensitive BIACORE method, which allows measurement of human anti-human antibodies (HAHAs) without the use of secondary reagents. We found that 63% (26 of 41) of the patients treated with repeated doses of huAb A33 developed HAHAs against a conformational antigenic determinant located in the V(L) and V(H) regions of huAb A33. Detailed serological analysis showed two distinct types of HAHAs. HAHA of type I (49% of patients) was characterized by an early onset with peak HAHA levels after 2 weeks of treatment, which declined with ongoing huAb A33 treatment. HAHA of type II (17% of patients) was characterized by a typically later onset of HAHA than in type I and by progressively increasing HAHA levels with each subsequent huAb A33 administration. Colon cancer patients with type I HAHAs did not develop infusion-related adverse events. In contrast, HAHA of type II was indicative of infusion-related adverse events. By using this new method, we were able to distinguish these two types of HAHAs in patients while on antibody treatment, allowing patients to be removed from study prior to the onset of severe infusion-related adverse events. PMID:11559561

  18. Multi-Angle Effector Function Analysis of Human Monoclonal IgG Glycovariants

    PubMed Central

    Dashivets, Tetyana; Thomann, Marco; Rueger, Petra; Knaupp, Alexander; Buchner, Johannes; Schlothauer, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic performance of recombinant antibodies relies on two independent mechanisms: antigen recognition and Fc-mediated antibody effector functions. Interaction of Fc-fragment with different FcR triggers antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity and determines longevity of the antibody in serum. In context of therapeutic antibodies FcγRs play the most important role. It has been demonstrated that the Fc-attached sugar moiety is essential for IgG effector functionality, dictates its affinity to individual FcγRs and determines binding to different receptor classes: activating or inhibitory. In this study, we systematically analyze effector functions of monoclonal IgG1 and its eight enzymatically engineered glycosylation variants. The analysis of interaction of glycovariants with FcRs was performed for single, as well as for antigen-bound antibodies and IgGs in a form of immune complex. In addition to functional properties we addressed impact of glycosylation on the structural properties of the tested glycovariants. We demonstrate a clear impact of glycosylation pattern on antibody stability and interaction with different FcγRs. Consistent with previous reports, deglycosylated antibodies failed to bind all Fcγ-receptors, with the exception of high affinity FcγRI. The FcγRII and FcγRIIIa binding activity of IgG1 was observed to depend on the galactosylation level, and hypergalactosylated antibodies demonstrated increased receptor interaction. Sialylation did not decrease the FcγR binding of the tested IgGs; in contrast, sialylation of antibodies improved binding to FcγRIIa and IIb. We demonstrate that glycosylation influences to some extent IgG1 interaction with FcRn. However, independent of glycosylation pattern the interaction of IgG1 with a soluble monomeric target surprisingly resulted in an impaired receptor binding. Here, we demonstrate, that immune complexes (IC), induced by multimeric ligand, compensated for the

  19. A novel human IgA monoclonal antibody protects against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Balu, Sucharitha; Reljic, Rajko; Lewis, Melanie J; Pleass, Richard J; McIntosh, Richard; van Kooten, Cees; van Egmond, Marjolein; Challacombe, Stephen; Woof, Jenny M; Ivanyi, Juraj

    2011-03-01

    Abs have been shown to be protective in passive immunotherapy of tuberculous infection using mouse experimental models. In this study, we report on the properties of a novel human IgA1, constructed using a single-chain variable fragment clone (2E9), selected from an Ab phage library. The purified Ab monomer revealed high binding affinities for the mycobacterial α-crystallin Ag and for the human FcαRI (CD89) IgA receptor. Intranasal inoculations with 2E9IgA1 and recombinant mouse IFN-γ significantly inhibited pulmonary H37Rv infection in mice transgenic for human CD89 but not in CD89-negative littermate controls, suggesting that binding to CD89 was necessary for the IgA-imparted passive protection. 2E9IgA1 added to human whole-blood or monocyte cultures inhibited luciferase-tagged H37Rv infection although not for all tested blood donors. Inhibition by 2E9IgA1 was synergistic with human rIFN-γ in cultures of purified human monocytes but not in whole-blood cultures. The demonstration of the mandatory role of FcαRI (CD89) for human IgA-mediated protection is important for understanding of the mechanisms involved and also for translation of this approach toward development of passive immunotherapy of tuberculosis. PMID:21257971

  20. Rapid Generation of Human-Like Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies in Urgent Preparedness for Influenza Pandemics and Virulent Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Weixu; Pan, Weiqi; Zhang, Anna J. X.; Li, Zhengfeng; Wei, Guowei; Feng, Liqiang; Dong, Zhenyuan; Li, Chufang; Hu, Xiangjing; Sun, Caijun; Luo, Qinfang; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Zhong, Nanshan; Chen, Ling

    2013-01-01

    Background The outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases caused by pathogens such as SARS coronavirus, H5N1, H1N1, and recently H7N9 influenza viruses, have been associated with significant mortality and morbidity in humans. Neutralizing antibodies from individuals who have recovered from an infection confer therapeutic protection to others infected with the same pathogen. However, survivors may not always be available for providing plasma or for the cloning of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Methodology/Principal Findings The genome and the immunoglobulin genes in rhesus macaques and humans are highly homologous; therefore, we investigated whether neutralizing mAbs that are highly homologous to those of humans (human-like) could be generated. Using the H5N1 influenza virus as a model, we first immunized rhesus macaques with recombinant adenoviruses carrying a synthetic gene encoding hemagglutinin (HA). Following screening an antibody phage display library derived from the B cells of immunized monkeys, we cloned selected macaque immunoglobulin heavy chain and light chain variable regions into the human IgG constant region, which generated human-macaque chimeric mAbs exhibiting over 97% homology to human antibodies. Selected mAbs demonstrated potent neutralizing activities against three clades (0, 1, 2) of the H5N1 influenza viruses. The in vivo protection experiments demonstrated that the mAbs effectively protected the mice even when administered up to 3 days after infection with H5N1 influenza virus. In particular, mAb 4E6 demonstrated sub-picomolar binding affinity to HA and superior in vivo protection efficacy without the loss of body weight and obvious lung damage. The analysis of the 4E6 escape mutants demonstrated that the 4E6 antibody bound to a conserved epitope region containing two amino acids on the globular head of HA. Conclusions/Significance Our study demonstrated the generation of neutralizing mAbs for potential application in humans in urgent

  1. Demonstration of cross-reactivity between bacterial antigens and class I human leukocyte antigens by using monoclonal antibodies to Shigella flexneri.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, K M; Raybourne, R B

    1990-01-01

    Bacterial envelope proteins which share immunodeterminants with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I histocompatibility antigen HLA-B27 may invoke spondyloarthritic disease through the process of molecular mimicry in patients expressing this phenotype. Monoclonal antibodies generated by the immunization of BALB/c mice with envelope proteins of Shigella flexneri type 2a were tested for reactivity against cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines of defined HLA phenotype. As measured by flow microfluorometry, four immunoglobulin M monoclonal antibodies reacted preferentially with HLA-B27-positive lymphocytes (HOM-2, MM) as compared with a B27-loss mutant line (1065) or cells lacking major histocompatibility complex class I antigen (Daudi, K562). Monoclonal antibodies also reacted with mouse EL-4 cells transfected with and expressing the HLA-B7 gene. Western immunoblot analysis of isolated enterobacterial envelopes demonstrated that the reactive epitope was present on bacterial proteins with an apparent relative molecular mass of 36 and 19 kilodaltons. The structural basis for the cross-reactivity of bacterial antigen and HLA-B27 appeared to reside in the portion of the HLA molecule that is responsible for allotypic specificity (amino acids 63 through 83), since monoclonal antibodies were positive by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with synthetic polypeptides corresponding to this segment. Images PMID:2187807

  2. Monoclonal antibodies to human glycophorin a and cell lines for the production thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderlaan, M.; Bigbee, W.L.; Jensen, R.H.; Fong, S.S.N.; Langlois, R.G.

    1988-06-21

    Cloned mouse hybridoma cell lines have been established which continuously produce antibodies that are highly specific to and exhibit high affinity for glycophorin A/sup N/ and differentiate between the M and N forms of human glycophorin A.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies to human glycophorin A and cell lines for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, Martin; Bigbee, William L.; Jensen, Ronald H.; Fong, Stella S. N.; Langlois, Richard G.

    1988-01-01

    Cloned mouse hybridoma cell lines have been established which continuously produce antibodies that are highly specific to and exhibit high affinity for glycophorin A.sup.N and differentiate between the M and N forms of human glycophorin A.

  4. Efficacy and Safety of AVP-21D9, an Anthrax Monoclonal Antibody, in Animal Models and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Malkevich, Nina V.; Hopkins, Robert J.; Bernton, Edward; Meister, Gabriel T.; Vela, Eric M.; Atiee, George; Johnson, Virginia; Nabors, Gary S.; Aimes, Ronald T.; Ionin, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Anthrax is an acute infectious disease caused by the spore-forming bacterium Bacillus anthracis. Timely administration of antibiotics approved for the treatment of anthrax disease may prevent associated morbidity and mortality. However, any delay in initiating antimicrobial therapy may result in increased mortality, as inhalational anthrax progresses rapidly to the toxemic phase of disease. An anthrax antitoxin, AVP-21D9, also known as Thravixa (fully human anthrax monoclonal antibody), is being developed as a therapeutic agent against anthrax toxemia. The efficacy of AVP-21D9 in B. anthracis-infected New Zealand White rabbits and in cynomolgus macaques was evaluated, and its safety and pharmacokinetics were assessed in healthy human volunteers. The estimated mean elimination half-life values of AVP-21D9 in surviving anthrax-challenged rabbits and nonhuman primates (NHPs) ranged from approximately 2 to 4 days and 6 to 11 days, respectively. In healthy humans, the mean elimination half-life was in the range of 20 to 27 days. Dose proportionality was observed for the maximum serum concentration (Cmax) of AVP-21D9 and the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC). In therapeutic efficacy animal models, treatment with AVP-21D9 resulted in survival of up to 92% of the rabbits and up to 67% of the macaques. Single infusions of AVP-21D9 were well tolerated in healthy adult volunteers across all doses evaluated, and no serious adverse events were reported. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01202695.) PMID:24733473

  5. Dextrose-mediated aggregation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in human plasma: Implication of isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are clinically administered through intravenous infusion after mixing with a diluent, e.g., saline, 5% dextrose. Such a clinical setting increases the likelihood of interactions among mAb molecules, diluent, and plasma components, which may adversely affect product safety and efficacy. Avastin® (bevacizumab) and Herceptin® (trastuzumab), but not Remicade® (infliximab), were shown to undergo rapid aggregation upon dilution into 5% dextrose when mixed with human plasma in vitro; however, the biochemical pathways leading to the aggregation were not clearly defined. Here, we show that dextrose-mediated aggregation of Avastin or Herceptin in plasma involves isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins. Using mass spectrometry, we found that dextrose-induced insoluble aggregates were composed of mAb itself and multiple abundant plasma proteins, namely complement proteins C3, C4, factor H, fibronectin, and apolipoprotein. These plasma proteins, which are characterized by an isoelectronic point of 5.5–6.7, lost solubility at the resulting pH in the mixture with formulated Avastin (pH 6.2) and Herceptin (pH 6.0). Notably, switching formulation buffers for Avastin (pH 6.2) and Remicade (pH 7.2) reversed their aggregation profiles. Avastin formed little, if any, insoluble aggregates in dextrose-plasma upon raising the buffer pH to 7.2 or above. Furthermore, dextrose induced pH-dependent precipitation of plasma proteins, with massive insoluble aggregates being detected at pH 6.5–6.8. These data show that isoelectric precipitation of complement proteins is a prerequisite of dextrose-induced aggregation of mAb in human plasma. This finding highlights the importance of assessing the compatibility of a therapeutic mAb with diluent and human plasma during product development. PMID:26338058

  6. A Recombinant Humanized Anti-Cocaine Monoclonal Antibody Inhibits the Distribution of Cocaine to the Brain in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gooden, Felicia C. T.; Tabet, Michael R.; Ball, William J.

    2014-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody (mAb), h2E2, is a humanized version of the chimeric human/murine anti-cocaine mAb 2E2. The recombinant h2E2 protein was produced in vitro from a transfected mammalian cell line and retained high affinity (4 nM Kd) and specificity for cocaine over its inactive metabolites benzoylecgonine (BE) and ecgonine methyl ester. In rats, pharmacokinetic studies of h2E2 (120 mg/kg i.v.) showed a long terminal elimination half-life of 9.0 days and a low volume of distribution at steady state (Vdss) of 0.3 l/kg. Pretreatment with h2E2 produced a dramatic 8.8-fold increase in the area under the plasma cocaine concentration-time curve (AUC) and in brain a concomitant decrease of 68% of cocaine’s AUC following an i.v. injection of an equimolar cocaine dose. Sequestration of cocaine in plasma by h2E2, shown via reduction of cocaine’s Vdss, indicates potential clinical efficacy. Although the binding of cocaine to h2E2 in plasma should inhibit distribution and metabolism, the elimination of cocaine remained multicompartmental and was still rapidly eliminated from plasma despite the presence of h2E2. BE was the major cocaine metabolite, and brain BE concentrations were sixfold higher than in plasma, indicating that cocaine is normally metabolized in the brain. In the presence of h2E2, brain BE concentrations were decreased and plasma BE was increased, consistent with the observed h2E2-induced changes in cocaine disposition. The inhibition of cocaine distribution to the brain confirms the humanized mAb, h2E2, as a lead candidate for development as an immunotherapy for cocaine abuse. PMID:24733787

  7. Monoclonal antibody to a subset of human monocytes found only in the peripheral blood and inflammatory tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Zwadlo, G.; Schlegel, R.; Sorg, C.

    1986-07-15

    A monoclonal antibody is described that was generated by immunizing mice with cultured human blood monocytes. The antibody (27E10) belongs to the IgG1 subclass and detects a surface antigen at M/sub r/ 17,000 that is found on 20% of peripheral blood monocytes. The antigen is increasingly expressed upon culture of monocytes, reaching a maximum between days 2 and 3. Stimulation of monocytes with interferon-..gamma.. (IFN-..gamma..), 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Ylalanine (fMLP) increased the 27E10 antigen density. The amount of 27E10-positive cells is not or is only weakly affected. The antigen is absent from platelets, lymphotyces, and all tested human cell lines, yet it cross-reacts with 15% of freshly isolated granulocytes. By using the indirect immunoperoxidase technique, the antibody is found to be negative on cryostat sections of normal human tissue (skin, lung, and colon) and positive on only a few monocyte-like cells in liver and on part of the cells of the splenic red pulp. In inflammatory tissue, however, the antibody is positive on monocytes/macrophages and sometimes on endothelial cells and epidermal cells, depending on the stage and type of inflammation, e.g., BCG ranulomas are negative, whereas psoriasis vulgaris, atopic dermatitis, erythrodermia, pressure urticaria, and periodontitis contain positively staining cells. In contact eczemas at different times after elicitation (6 hr, 24 hr, and 72 hr), the 27E10 antigen is seen first after 24 hr on a few infiltrating monocytes/macrophages, which increase in numbers after 72 hr.

  8. Modeling neutralization of Shiga 2 toxin by A-and B-subunit-specific human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Skakauskas, Vladas; Katauskis, Pranas

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model for Shiga 2 toxin neutralization by A-and B-subunit-specific human monoclonal antibodies initially delivered in the extracellular domain is presented, taking into account toxin and antibodies interaction in the extracellular domain, diffusion of toxin, antibodies, and their reaction products toward the cell, the receptor-mediated toxin and complex composed of toxin and antibody to A-subunit internalization from the extracellular into the intracellular medium and excretion of this complex back to the extracellular environment via recycling endosomal carriers. The retrograde transport of the intact toxin to the endoplasmic reticulum and its anterograde movement back to the vicinity of the plasma membrane with its subsequent exocytotic removal to the extracellular space via the secretory vesicle pathway is also taken into account. The model is composed of a set of coupled PDEs. A mathematical model based on a system of ODEs for Shiga 2 toxin neutralization by antibodies in the absence of cell is also studied. Both PDE and ODE systems are solved numerically. Numerical results are illustrated by figures and discussed. PMID:27155978

  9. HHF35, a muscle actin-specific monoclonal antibody. II. Reactivity in normal, reactive, and neoplastic human tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Tsukada, T.; McNutt, M. A.; Ross, R.; Gown, A. M.

    1987-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody HHF35 has previously been characterized biochemically as recognizing isotypes of actin (alpha and gamma) which are specific to muscle cells. In this study, the authors have investigated the normal and pathologic tissue distribution of HHF35-positive cells using the avidin-biotin immunoperoxidase method on methacarn-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of human tissue. In addition to muscle tissues (smooth, skeletal, and cardiac) the antibody localizes to myoepithelium, as well as most of the capsular cells of several parenchymal organs, including liver, kidney, and spleen, with extension of the latter cells into the splenic trabeculaes. In pathologic tissues, the antibody localizes to cells, identified by some investigators as "myofibroblasts," in the stroma of certain tumors, within hyperplastic fibrous tissue responses ("fibromatoses") such as Dupuytren's contracture, and within fibrotic lung tissue. HHF35 also localizes to cells that proliferate within the intima in lesions of atherosclerosis and to a unique population of reactive mesothelial and submesothelial cells. Among tumors, it is positive only on leiomyomas, leiomyosarcomas, and rhabdomyosarcomas, and negative on all nonmuscle sarcomas. This antibody thus shows great potential utility as a diagnostic reagent in various pathologic conditions, most especially in the diagnosis of tumors of muscle origin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 p392-a Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 p397-a p398-a Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:3555106

  10. Characterization of the cDNA of a broadly reactive neutralizing human anti-gp120 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Marasco, W A; Bagley, J; Zani, C; Posner, M; Cavacini, L; Haseltine, W A; Sodroski, J

    1992-01-01

    The F105 mAb, identified in an HIV-1-infected individual, binds to a discontinuous epitope on the HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein, blocks the binding of gp120 to the CD4 viral receptor, and neutralizes a broad range of HIV-1 isolates. This study reports the primary nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the rearranged heavy and light chains of the mAb F105. This IgG1k mAb uses a VH gene member of the VH4 gene family (V71-4) and is productively rearranged with a D-D fusion product of the dlr4 and da4 germline DH genes and the JH5 gene. This rearranged heavy chain gene expresses the VH4-HV2a idiotope, which is seen in human monoclonal IgM cold agglutinins. The F105 Vk appears to be derived from the Humvk325 germline gene and is rearranged with a Jk2 gene. For both chains, the mutational pattern in the rearranged VH and VL genes is indicative of an antigen-driven process. These studies show that production of a broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibody that recognizes determinants within the CD4 recognition site of the envelope glycoprotein is achieved by rearrangement of the V71-4 and Humvk325 germline variable region genes along with selected individual point mutations in the rearranged genes. PMID:1401079

  11. Immunoreactivity of anti-streptococcal monoclonal antibodies to human heart valves. Evidence for multiple cross-reactive epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Gulizia, J. M.; Cunningham, M. W.; McManus, B. M.

    1991-01-01

    Association of group A streptococci with acute rheumatic fever and valvular heart disease is well established; however the basis of valve injury remains unclear. In this study, anti-streptococcal monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) cross-reactive with myocardium were reacted with sections from 22 rheumatic valves, nine normal, five endocarditic, one 'floppy,' and one Marfan valve. In immunohistochemical studies, MAb reactivity was observed with cardiac myocytes, smooth muscle cells, cell surface and cytoplasm of endothelial cells lining valves, and valvular interstitial cells. Endothelial basement membrane and elastin fibrils reacted with the MAbs, whereas collagen was unreactive. Similar reactivity was seen with sera from acute rheumatic fever patients. The anti-streptococcal MAbs reacted with intravalvular myosin and vimentin in Western blots, and purified elastin competitively inhibited the binding of the anti-streptococcal MAbs to whole group A streptococci. The data show that human heart valves have numerous sites of immunoreactivity with anti-streptococcal MAbs and acute rheumatic fever sera of potential importance in the pathogenesis of rheumatic valvular injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:1704188

  12. An epitope tag derived from human transcription factor IIB that reacts with a polyol-responsive monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Duellman, Sarah J; Thompson, Nancy E; Burgess, Richard R

    2004-05-01

    Polyol-responsive monoclonal antibodies (PR-mAbs) provide a strategy to purify active, nondenatured proteins by a single-step immunoaffinity chromatography procedure. The high affinity interaction between these antibodies and the antigen can be dissociated in the presence of a nonchaotropic salt and a low molecular weight polyhydroxylated compound (polyol). The epitope for PR-mAb IIB8 is located near the N-terminus of the human transcription factor IIB (TFIIB). The epitope is an eight amino acid sequence, TKDPSRVG, that can be fused to a desired protein for use as a purification tag. This epitope tag (termed hIIB) was fused to the C-terminus of green fluorescent protein (GFP). An additional GFP fusion protein utilized another version of hIIB containing a point mutation at position two. These fusion proteins, expressed in Escherichia coli, allowed successful separation of the desired protein in a single chromatographic step. This strategy extends PR-mAb gentle-release purification to numerous expressed proteins. PMID:15039078

  13. Itolizumab - a humanized anti-CD6 monoclonal antibody with a better side effects profile for the treatment of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Menon, Roshni; David, Brinda G

    2015-01-01

    Management of psoriasis is a challenge to the treating physician. The chronic inflammatory state of psoriasis with exacerbations and remissions necessitate "on-and-off" treatment schedules. The safety profiles of drugs and tolerability issues for patients are important factors to be considered during treatment. Various biological agents targeting T-cells and the inflammatory cytokines are available for systemic treatment of psoriasis. However, major causes of concern while using these drugs are risk of susceptibility to infection and development of anti-drug antibodies, which will affect the pharmacokinetic properties, efficacy, and safety profile of the drug. Itolizumab, a humanized anti-CD6 monoclonal antibody, is a new molecule that acts by immunomodulating the CD6 molecule. CD6 is a co-stimulatory molecule required for optimal T-cell stimulation by the antigen-presenting cells. This step is crucial in T-cell proliferation to form Th1 and Th17 cells, which play a major role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. This article deals with the properties of Itolizumab and its role in the treatment of psoriasis. Based on the available published data, Itolizumab seems to have a better adverse effects profile and at the same time comparatively less efficacy when compared to other biological agents available for treating psoriasis. Larger studies with longer duration are required to clearly depict the long-term side effects profile. PMID:25945063

  14. A potent broad-spectrum protective human monoclonal antibody crosslinking two haemagglutinin monomers of influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ying; Cho, MyungSam; Shore, David; Song, Manki; Choi, JungAh; Jiang, Tao; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Bourgeois, Melissa; Almli, Lynn; Yang, Hua; Chen, Li-Mei; Shi, Yi; Qi, Jianxu; Li, An; Yi, Kye Sook; Chang, MinSeok; Bae, Jin Soo; Lee, HyunJoo; Shin, JiYoung; Stevens, James; Hong, SeoungSuh; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Gao, George F.; Chang, Shin Jae; Donis, Ruben O.

    2015-01-01

    Effective annual influenza vaccination requires frequent changes in vaccine composition due to both antigenic shift for different subtype hemagglutinins (HAs) and antigenic drift in a particular HA. Here we present a broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody with an unusual binding modality. The antibody, designated CT149, was isolated from convalescent patients infected with pandemic H1N1 in 2009. CT149 is found to neutralize all tested group 2 and some group 1 influenza A viruses by inhibiting low pH-induced, HA-mediated membrane fusion. It promotes killing of infected cells by Fc-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. X-ray crystallographic data reveal that CT149 binds primarily to the fusion domain in HA2, and the light chain is also largely involved in binding. The epitope recognized by this antibody comprises amino-acid residues from two adjacent protomers of HA. This binding characteristic of CT149 will provide more information to support the design of more potent influenza vaccines. PMID:26196962

  15. Fully human monoclonal antibodies to TRAIL-R1 enhance TRAIL-induced apoptosis via activation of caspase-8 pathway.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhichao; Han, Xiaojian; Sun, Xin; Shen, Meiying; Huang, Jingjing; Li, Yaying; Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Pang, Da; Jin, Shoude; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Muraguchi, Atsushi; Jin, Aishun

    2016-06-24

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) or agonistic antibodies targeting TRAIL-receptors (TRAIL-Rs) can selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells. However, they have limited antitumor efficacy in clinical trials. We previously generated ten fully human monoclonal Abs to TRAIL-receptor type 1 (TR1-mAbs) using immunospot array assay on a chip (ISAAC technology). We found that the TR1-mAbs exhibited different effects on TRAIL-induced apoptosis (enhanced or blocked apoptosis). Here, we further demonstrated that some mAbs competed with TRAIL for binding to TRAIL-R1 expressed on tumor cells that blocked TRAIL-induced apoptosis (B-TR1-Ab), whereas others did not compete with TRAIL that enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis (E-TR1-Ab). Combination of E-TR1-Ab (TR1-419) with TRAIL leads to enhanced antitumor activity in various tumor cells in vitro. E-TR1-419 and TRAIL could cooperate to upregulate the mRNA expression and protein levels of TRAIL-R1 and to promote caspase-8 cleavage and increased JNK phosphorylation. Our results suggest that combining E-TR1 Ab with TRAIL could provide a new therapeutic strategy for tumor immunotherapies. PMID:27208782

  16. ANGPTL3 blockade with a human monoclonal antibody reduces plasma lipids in dyslipidemic mice and monkeys1[S

    PubMed Central

    Gusarova, Viktoria; Alexa, Corey A.; Wang, Yan; Rafique, Ashique; Kim, Jee Hae; Buckler, David; Mintah, Ivory J.; Shihanian, Lisa M.; Cohen, Jonathan C.; Hobbs, Helen H.; Xin, Yurong; Valenzuela, David M.; Murphy, Andrew J.; Yancopoulos, George D.; Gromada, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 3 (ANGPTL3) is a circulating protein synthesized exclusively in the liver that inhibits LPL and endothelial lipase (EL), enzymes that hydrolyze TGs and phospholipids in plasma lipoproteins. Here we describe the development and testing of a fully human monoclonal antibody (REGN1500) that binds ANGPTL3 with high affinity. REGN1500 reversed ANGPTL3-induced inhibition of LPL activity in vitro. Intravenous administration of REGN1500 to normolipidemic C57Bl/6 mice increased LPL activity and decreased plasma TG levels by ≥50%. Chronic administration of REGN1500 to dyslipidemic C57Bl/6 mice for 8 weeks reduced circulating plasma levels of TG, LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) without any changes in liver, adipose, or heart TG contents. Studies in EL knockout mice revealed that REGN1500 reduced serum HDL-C through an EL-dependent mechanism. Finally, administration of a single dose of REGN1500 to dyslipidemic cynomolgus monkeys caused a rapid and pronounced decrease in plasma TG, nonHDL-C, and HDL-C. REGN1500 normalized plasma TG levels even in monkeys with a baseline plasma TG greater than 400 mg/dl. Collectively, these data demonstrate that neutralization of ANGPTL3 using REGN1500 reduces plasma lipids in dyslipidemic mice and monkeys, and thus provides a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of patients with hyperlipidemia. PMID:25964512

  17. Development of monoclonal antibodies to human microsomal epoxide hydrolase and analysis of “preneoplastic antigen”-like molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Hongying; Yoshimura, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Nobuharu; Sugiyama, Kazuo; Sawada, Jun-ichi; Saito, Yoshiro; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Akatsuka, Toshitaka

    2012-04-01

    Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) is a drug metabolizing enzyme which resides on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and catalyzes the hydration of reactive epoxide intermediates that are formed by cytochrome P450s. mEH is also thought to have a role in bile acid transport on the plasma membrane of hepatocytes. It is speculated that efficient execution of such multiple functions is secured by its orientation and association with cytochrome P450 enzymes on the ER membrane and formation of a multiple transport system on the plasma membrane. In certain disease status, mEH loses its association with the membrane and can be detected as distinct antigens in the cytosol of preneoplastic foci of liver (preneoplastic antigen), in the serum in association with hepatitis C virus infection (AN antigen), or in some brain tumors. To analyze the antigenic structures of mEH in physiological and pathological conditions, we developed monoclonal antibodies against different portions of mEH. Five different kinds of antibodies were obtained: three, anti-N-terminal portions; one anti-C-terminal; and one, anti-conformational epitope. By combining these antibodies, we developed antigen detection methods which are specific to either the membrane-bound form or the linearized form of mEH. These methods detected mEH in the culture medium released from a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line and a glioblastoma cell line, which was found to be a multimolecular complex with a unique antigenic structure different from that of the membrane-bound form of mEH. These antibodies and antigen detection methods may be useful to study pathological changes of mEH in various human diseases. -- Highlights: ► Monoclonal antibodies against different portions of mEH were developed. ► They discriminate between the membrane-bound and the linearized forms of mEH. ► We analyze the antigenic structure of the altered form of mEH in tumor cells. ► Preneoplastic antigen is a multimolecular complex of mEH with

  18. Radioimmunoscintigraphy of colorectal carcinoma using technetium-99m-labeled, totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59H21-2.

    PubMed

    Gulec, S A; Serafini, A N; Moffat, F L; Vargas-Cuba, R D; Sfakianakis, G N; Franceschi, D; Crichton, V Z; Subramanian, R; Klein, J L; De Jager, R L

    1995-12-01

    Radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS) using human monoclonal antibodies offers the important clinical advantage of repeated imaging over murine monoclonal antibodies by eliminating the cross-species antibody response. This article reports a Phase I-II clinical trial with Tc-99m-labeled, totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59H21-2 in patients with colorectal carcinoma. The study population consisted of 34 patients with colorectal cancer (20 men and 14 women; age range, 44-81 years). Patients were administered 5-10 mg antibody labeled with 21-41 mCi Tc-99m by the i.v. route and imaged at 3-10 and 16-24 h after infusion using planar and single-photon emission computed tomographic (CT) techniques. Pathological confirmation was obtained in 25 patients who underwent surgery. Human antihuman antibody (HAHA) titers were checked prior to and 1 and 3 months after the infusion. RIS with Tc-99m-labeled 88BV59H21-2 revealed a better detection rate in the abdomen-pelvis region compared with axial CT. The combined use of both modalities increased the sensitivity in both the liver and abdomen-pelvis regions. Ten patients developed mild adverse reactions (chills and fever). No HAHA response was detected in this series. Tc-99m-labeled human monoclonal antibody 88BV59H21-2 RIS shows promise as a useful diagnostic modality in patients with colorectal cancer. RIS alone or in combination with CT is more sensitive than CT in detecting tumor within the abdomen and pelvis. Repeated RIS studies may be possible, due to the lack of a HAHA response. PMID:7493345

  19. Human Monoclonal Antibodies against Clostridium difficile Toxins A and B Inhibit Inflammatory and Histologic Responses to the Toxins in Human Colon and Peripheral Blood Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Koon, Hon Wai; Shih, David Q.; Hing, Tressia C.; Yoo, Jun Hwan; Ho, Samantha; Chen, Xinhua; Kelly, Ciarán P.; Targan, Stephan R.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common and debilitating nosocomial infection with high morbidity and mortality. C. difficile mediates diarrhea and colitis by releasing two toxins, toxin A and toxin B. Since both toxins stimulate proinflammatory signaling pathways in human colonocytes and both are involved in the pathophysiology of CDI, neutralization of toxin A and B activities may represent an important therapeutic approach against CDI. Recent studies indicated that human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against toxins A and B reduce their cytotoxic and secretory activities and prevent CDI in hamsters. Moreover, anti-toxin A and anti-toxin B MAbs together with antibiotics also effectively reduced recurrent CDI in humans. However, whether these MAbs neutralize toxin A- and toxin B-associated immune responses in human colonic mucosa or human peripheral blood monocyte cells (PBMCs) has never been examined. We used fresh human colonic biopsy specimens and peripheral blood monocytes to evaluate the effects of these antibodies against toxin A- and B-associated cytokine release, proinflammatory signaling, and histologic damage. Incubation of anti-toxin A (MK3415) or anti-toxin B (MK6072) MAbs with human PBMCs significantly inhibited toxin A- and toxin B-mediated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression. MK3415 and MK6072 also diminished toxin A- and toxin B-mediated NF-κB p65 phosphorylation in human monocytes, respectively, and significantly reduced toxin A- and B-induced TNF-α and IL-1β expression as well as histologic damage in human colonic explants. Our results underline the effectiveness of MK3415 and MK6072 in blocking C. difficile toxin A- and toxin B-mediated inflammatory responses and histologic damage. PMID:23629713

  20. Prophylactic and postexposure efficacy of a potent human monoclonal antibody against MERS coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Corti, Davide; Zhao, Jincun; Pedotti, Mattia; Simonelli, Luca; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Fett, Craig; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Blanca; Foglierini, Mathilde; Agatic, Gloria; Vanzetta, Fabrizia; Gopal, Robin; Langrish, Christopher J.; Barrett, Nicholas A; Sallusto, Federica; Baric, Ralph S.; Varani, Luca; Zambon, Maria; Perlman, Stanley; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a highly lethal pulmonary infection caused by a previously unidentified coronavirus (CoV), likely transmitted to humans by infected camels. There is no licensed vaccine or antiviral for MERS, therefore new prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to combat human infections are needed. In this study, we describe, for the first time, to our knowledge, the isolation of a potent MERS-CoV–neutralizing antibody from memory B cells of an infected individual. The antibody, named LCA60, binds to a novel site on the spike protein and potently neutralizes infection of multiple MERS-CoV isolates by interfering with the binding to the cellular receptor CD26. Importantly, using mice transduced with adenovirus expressing human CD26 and infected with MERS-CoV, we show that LCA60 can effectively protect in both prophylactic and postexposure settings. This antibody can be used for prophylaxis, for postexposure prophylaxis of individuals at risk, or for the treatment of human cases of MERS-CoV infection. The fact that it took only 4 mo from the initial screening of B cells derived from a convalescent patient for the development of a stable chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line producing neutralizing antibodies at more than 5 g/L provides an example of a rapid pathway toward the generation of effective antiviral therapies against emerging viruses. PMID:26216974

  1. Stimulation of angiogenesis and survival of endothelial cells by human monoclonal Tie2 receptor antibody.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Byungtae; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Jang-Seong; Moon, Ji Hyun; Jeung, In Cheul; Lee, Na Geum; Park, Jongjin; Hong, Hyo Jeong; Cho, Young-Lai; Jung, Haiyoung; Park, Young-Jun; Lee, Seon-Jin; Lee, Hee Gu; Kim, Won Kon; Han, Baek Soo; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Chung, Sang J; Kwon, Young-Guen; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Sang Jik; Min, Jeong-Ki

    2015-05-01

    Angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) and its endothelium-specific receptor, tyrosine kinase with Ig and epidermal growth factor homology domain 2 (Tie2), play critical roles in vascular development. Although the Ang1/Tie2 system has been considered a promising target for therapeutic neovascularization, several imitations of large-scale production have hampered the development of recombinant Ang1 for therapeutics. In this study, we produced a fully human agonistic antibody against Tie2, designated 1-4h, and tested the applicability of 1-4h as an alternative to native Ang1 in therapeutic angiogenesis. 1-4h significantly enhanced the phosphorylation of Tie2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner in human Tie2-expressing HEK293 cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Moreover, 1-4h induced the activation of Tie2-mediated intracellular signaling such as AKT, eNOS, MAPK, and Focal Adhesion Kinase p125(FAK). In addition, 1-4h increased the chemotactic motility and capillary-like tube formation of endothelial cells in vitro and enhanced the survival of serum-deprived endothelial cells. Taken together, our data clearly suggest that a human Tie2 agonistic antibody is a potentially useful therapeutic approach for the treatment of several ischemic diseases including delayed-wound healing and ischemic heart and limb diseases. PMID:25771003

  2. A murine monoclonal antibody (VM-1) against human basal cells inhibits the growth of human keratinocytes in culture.

    PubMed

    Oseroff, A R; Pfendt, E A; DiCicco, L; Morhenn, V B

    1985-04-01

    Using epidermal cells from psoriatic plaques as the immunogen, an IgG1 murine monoclonal antibody, VM-1, has been produced which stains basal keratinocytes on frozen sections of skin obtained from normal individuals and from psoriatic plaques. In some areas of both normal and psoriatic epidermis, the cell layer immediately above the basal cells is also stained. Cells in the external root sheath of the hair follicles also bind VM-1. The antibody binding site is trypsin-resistant, and is not blocked by bullous pemphigoid serum. If dispersed epidermal cells are preincubated with VM-1 for 1 h or more before plating, the majority of the cells do not attach and spread out on a collagen-coated Petri dish surface or on a fibroblast feeder layer. When added to attached, preconfluent cultures of keratinocytes, VM-1 inhibits growth and alters cell morphology. The growth inhibition is specific for keratinocytes, and viability studies show that it is not due to an immediate toxic effect of the antibody. The VM-1-induced inhibition of keratinocyte growth is not reversed by soy bean or lima bean trypsin inhibitors added at the time of cell plating or at the time of addition of antibody. PMID:3981036

  3. A protein-conjugate approach to develop a monoclonal antibody-based antigen detection test for the diagnosis of human brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Patra, Kailash P; Saito, Mayuko; Atluri, Vidya L; Rolán, Hortensia G; Young, Briana; Kerrinnes, Tobias; Smits, Henk; Ricaldi, Jessica N; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Gilman, Robert H; Tsolis, Renee M; Vinetz, Joseph M

    2014-06-01

    Human brucellosis is most commonly diagnosed by serology based on agglutination of fixed Brucella abortus as antigen. Nucleic acid amplification techniques have not proven capable of reproducibly and sensitively demonstrating the presence of Brucella DNA in clinical specimens. We sought to optimize a monoclonal antibody-based assay to detect Brucella melitensis lipopolysaccharide in blood by conjugating B. melitensis LPS to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, an immunogenic protein carrier to maximize IgG affinity of monoclonal antibodies. A panel of specific of monoclonal antibodies was obtained that recognized both B. melitensis and B. abortus lipopolysaccharide epitopes. An antigen capture assay was developed that detected B. melitensis in the blood of experimentally infected mice and, in a pilot study, in naturally infected Peruvian subjects. As a proof of principle, a majority (7/10) of the patients with positive blood cultures had B. melitensis lipopolysaccharide detected in the initial blood specimen obtained. One of 10 patients with relapsed brucellosis and negative blood culture had a positive serum antigen test. No seronegative/blood culture negative patients had a positive serum antigen test. Analysis of the pair of monoclonal antibodies (2D1, 2E8) used in the capture ELISA for potential cross-reactivity in the detection of lipopolysaccharides of E. coli O157:H7 and Yersinia enterocolitica O9 showed specificity for Brucella lipopolysaccharide. This new approach to develop antigen-detection monoclonal antibodies against a T cell-independent polysaccharide antigen based on immunogenic protein conjugation may lead to the production of improved rapid point-of-care-deployable assays for the diagnosis of brucellosis and other infectious diseases. PMID:24901521

  4. Detection of kappa and lambda light chain monoclonal proteins in human serum: automated immunoassay versus immunofixation electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Jaskowski, Troy D; Litwin, Christine M; Hill, Harry R

    2006-02-01

    Recently, turbidimetric immunoassays for detecting and quantifying kappa and lambda free light chains (FLC) have become available and are promoted as being more sensitive than immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) in detecting FLC monoclonal proteins. In this study, we assessed the ability of these turbidimetric assays to detect serum monoclonal proteins involving both free and heavy-chain-bound kappa and lambda light chains compared to standard immunofixation electrophoresis. Sera demonstrating a restricted band of protein migration (other than a definite M spike) by serum protein electrophoresis (SPE), which may represent early monoclonal proteins, were also examined. When compared to IFE, percent agreement, sensitivity, and specificity for the kappa-FLC and lambda-FLC were 94.6, 72.9, and 99.5% and 98.5, 91.4, and 99.7%, respectively, in detecting monoclonal proteins involving free and heavy-chain-bound light chains. The majority of sera (73.7%) demonstrating a restricted band of protein migration on SPE demonstrated abnormal IFE patterns suggestive of multiple myeloma or monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance, but gave normal kappa/lambda FLC ratios using the turbidimetric immunoassays. In conclusion, the kappa and lambda FLC assays are significantly less sensitive (72.9 to 91.4%) than IFE, but specific in detecting serum monoclonal proteins. Moreover, the kappa/lambda ratio has little value in routine screening since the majority of sera with abnormal IFE patterns had normal kappa/lambda FLC ratios. PMID:16467338

  5. A monoclonal antibody directed against a human cell membrane antigen prevents cell substrate adhesion and tumor invasion.

    PubMed Central

    De Potter, C. R.; Schelfhout, A. M.; De Smet, F. H.; Van Damme, S.; de Ridder, L.; Dhont, E.; van Emmelo, J.

    1994-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to design mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that can inhibit the invasion of breast cancer cells in the host tissue. Therefore, MAbs were raised against epitopes on the extracellular domain of SK-BR-3 human breast cancer cells, and biological assays were performed to test the capability of the MAbs to inhibit cell substrate adhesion. MAb 14C5 bound an extracellular plasma membrane antigen of SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and inhibited the cell substrate adhesion of these cells in vitro. The MAb delayed the adhesion of MCF-7 and SK-BR-3 cells on precultured embryonic heart fragments (PHFS). It inhibited the destruction of the PHF by MCF-7 cells and the invasion of the PHF by SK-BR-3 cells. The MAb reacted with an epitope on the cell membrane of in situ and invasive ductal carcinomas of the breast in immunohistochemistry. Poorly differentiated, highly invasive ductal carcinomas show extensive staining of long plasma membrane extensions. Normal multilayered epithelia, normal connective tissue, and tumors derived from these tissues as well as normal breast tissue were negative. From both cell lines a protein complex consisting of two subunits with molecular weight of 50 and 90 kd, respectively, was immunoprecipitated. It is concluded that the 14C5 antigen plays a role in cell substrate adhesion and subsequently also in invasion of breast cancer cells. The 14C5 MAb was able to inhibit cell substrate adhesion and invasion in vitro of breast cancer cells. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8291615

  6. Sensitive and Specific Immunohistochemical Diagnosis of Human Alveolar Echinococcosis with the Monoclonal Antibody Em2G11

    PubMed Central

    Tappe, Dennis; Stark, Lorenz; Grüner, Beate; Buttenschoen, Klaus; Hillenbrand, Andreas; Juchems, Markus; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Kern, Petra; Seitz, Hanns M.; Möller, Peter; Rausch, Robert L.; Deplazes, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is caused by the metacestode stage of Echinococcus multilocularis. Differential diagnosis with cystic echinococcosis (CE) caused by E. granulosus and AE is challenging. We aimed at improving diagnosis of AE on paraffin sections of infected human tissue by immunohistochemical testing of a specific antibody. Methodology/Principal Findings We have analysed 96 paraffin archived specimens, including 6 cutting needle biopsies and 3 fine needle aspirates, from patients with suspected AE or CE with the monoclonal antibody (mAb) Em2G11 specific for the Em2 antigen of E. multilocularis metacestodes. In human tissue, staining with mAb Em2G11 is highly specific for E. multilocularis metacestodes while no staining is detected in CE lesions. In addition, the antibody detects small particles of E. multilocularis (spems) of less than 1 µm outside the main lesion in necrotic tissue, liver sinusoids and lymphatic tissue most probably caused by shedding of parasitic material. The conventional histological diagnosis based on haematoxylin and eosin and PAS stainings were in accordance with the immunohistological diagnosis using mAb Em2G11 in 90 of 96 samples. In 6 samples conventional subtype diagnosis of echinococcosis had to be adjusted when revised by immunohistology with mAb Em2G11. Conclusions/Significance Immunohistochemistry with the mAb Em2G11 is a new, highly specific and sensitive diagnostic tool for AE. The staining of small particles of E. multilocularis (spems) outside the main lesion including immunocompetent tissue, such as lymph nodes, suggests a systemic effect on the host. PMID:23145198

  7. Characterization of the antigens recognized by two monoclonal antibodies reactive with basal-layer keratinocytes of human epidermis.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, G P

    1994-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies, GR3 and GR4, reactive with the basal-layer keratinocytes of human epidermis, were derived by immunization of Balb/c mice with glycoproteins isolated from cultured keratinocytes by lectin-affinity chromatography. Immunoprecipitation of Triton X-100 extracts from human keratinocytes metabolically labelled with D-[1-14C]glucosamine revealed that GR3 recognized a major glycoprotein with migration properties identical with those of a glycoprotein (reduced form M(r) 126,000) which was previously shown to be implicated in intercellular adhesion [Roberts and Brunt (1985) Biochem J. 232, 67-70]. In their unreduced forms the antigens recognized by GR3 and GR4 both migrated as two bands with M(r) values of 118,000 and 147,000. Comparison of 125I-labelled glycoproteins immunoprecipitated by GR3, GR4 and integrin antibodies revealed that, under reducing conditions, the major band immunoprecipitated by both GR3 and GR4 co-migrated with the alpha 3 and beta 1 integrin chains. In addition the immunoprecipitate obtained with GR4 contained an additional band co-migrating with the alpha 2 integrin chain. Sequential immunoprecipitation studies with GR3, GR4 and integrin antibodies confirmed that GR3 is directed against the alpha 3 integrin chain, whereas GR4 is directed against the beta 1 chain. These studies also indicate that some of the alpha 2 integrin chains on keratinocytes may be associated with a beta-chain not recognized by the antisera against the beta 1 integrin chain used in this study. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8192654

  8. Antigenic features of human follicle stimulating hormone delineated by monoclonal antibodies and construction of an immunoradiomometric assay

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, P.; Panmoung, W.; Khaschabi, D.; Mayregger, B.; Wick, G.

    1988-11-01

    The characterization of human (h) FSH with 181 monoclonal antibodies (MCA) allowed the elucidation of its antigenic topography. One- and two-site, limited as well as excess reagent type radioimmuno- and enzymoimmunoassays revealed three main categories of MCA molecular binding specificities; two thirds of all antibodies were directed against the alpha-subunit and one fourth toward the beta-chain, and less than one tenth recognized the conformationally (c) intact holohormone. With high frequency immunization schedules these specificities were shifted toward a higher proportion of beta-MCA. On the basis of intra- and interspecies cross-reaction studies as well as epitope contiguity analyses by sandwich assays, the three main categories could be further subdivided into nine epitopes: 1) five epitopes associated with the alpha-subunit, two of which were suprisingly shared by other species, and two being iodination sensitive, 2) two evolutionary conserved structures on the beta-subunit, adjacent to each other, and 3) two c-determinants, one of these present also on hTSH. The epitopes were arranged in three major antigenic domains, which seems to be a common homologous construction principle of the four human glycoprotein hormones: a central domain, consisting of three identically arranged alpha- and similarly located c-epitopes, is flanked by a single spatially distinct domain on each subunit. The establishment of an epitope map was followed by the construction of an immunoradiometric assay with a sensitivity of 0.25 ng hFSH/ml and an apparent cross-reactivity vs. hLH, hTSH, and hCG of less than 1%.

  9. Developmental Toxicity and Fertility Assessment in Rabbits with Tabalumab: A Human IgG4 Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Breslin, William J; Hilbish, Kim G; Martin, Jennifer A; Halstead, Carolyn A; Edwards, Tammy L

    2015-06-01

    Tabalumab is a human immunoglobulin G subclass 4 monoclonal antibody that has been under development for autoimmune disorders. Tabalumab has full neutralizing activity against both soluble and membrane B-cell activating factor, a B-cell survival factor. The objectives of these studies were to assess the effects of tabalumab on embryo-fetal development and on male (M) and female (F) fertility in rabbits, a pharmacologically relevant species. Doses were administered at 0 (vehicle control), 0.3 (embryo-fetal study only), 1.0, and 30 mg/kg. In the embryo-fetal study, pregnant rabbits does were given a single dose by intravenous injection on gestation day (GD) 7. In the fertility studies, tabalumab was administered by intravenous injection every 7 days starting 2 (F) or 4 (M) weeks before mating, during cohabitation, and until necropsy (M) or through GD 18 (F). Treated animals were mated with untreated partners. Parental clinical signs, body weight, food consumption, blood lymphocyte phenotyping, organ weights, morphologic pathology, ovarian and uterine observations, sperm parameters, and fertility indices were evaluated along with conceptus viability, weight, and morphology. Exposure assessments were made in all main study animals and satellite animals. No adverse parental, reproductive, or developmental effects were observed in any study at any dose. A pharmacodynamic response consisting of dose-dependent decreases in the percent and number of total B lymphocytes and increases in the percent and/or number of total T lymphocytes was observed in parental rabbits at 1.0 and 30 mg/kg. In conclusion, no adverse reproductive or developmental effects were observed in rabbits following exposure to tabalumab at doses as high as 30 mg/kg and exposures at least 14-fold greater than human exposure levels. PMID:26195315

  10. Structures of complexes formed by H5 influenza hemagglutinin with a potent broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiaoli; Corti, Davide; Liu, Junfeng; Pinna, Debora; Foglierini, Mathilde; Calder, Lesley J.; Martin, Stephen R.; Lin, Yi Pu; Walker, Philip A.; Collins, Patrick J.; Monne, Isabella; Suguitan, Amorsolo L.; Santos, Celia; Temperton, Nigel J.; Subbarao, Kanta; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Gamblin, Steven J.; Skehel, John J.

    2015-01-01

    H5N1 avian influenza viruses remain a threat to public health mainly because they can cause severe infections in humans. These viruses are widespread in birds, and they vary in antigenicity forming three major clades and numerous antigenic variants. The most important features of the human monoclonal antibody FLD194 studied here are its broad specificity for all major clades of H5 influenza HAs, its high affinity, and its ability to block virus infection, in vitro and in vivo. As a consequence, this antibody may be suitable for anti-H5 therapy and as a component of stockpiles, together with other antiviral agents, for health authorities to use if an appropriate vaccine was not available. Our mutation and structural analyses indicate that the antibody recognizes a relatively conserved site near the membrane distal tip of HA, near to, but distinct from, the receptor-binding site. Our analyses also suggest that the mechanism of infectivity neutralization involves prevention of receptor recognition as a result of steric hindrance by the Fc part of the antibody. Structural analyses by EM indicate that three Fab fragments are bound to each HA trimer. The structure revealed by X-ray crystallography is of an HA monomer bound by one Fab. The monomer has some similarities to HA in the fusion pH conformation, and the monomer’s formation, which results from the presence of isopropanol in the crystallization solvent, contributes to considerations of the process of change in conformation required for membrane fusion. PMID:26170284

  11. A Pharmacologically Active Monoclonal Antibody against the Human Melanocortin-4 Receptor: Effectiveness After Peripheral and Central Administration

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Jean-Christophe; Lecourt, Anne-Catherine; Weckering, Marjorie; Zipfel, Géraldine; Niehoff, Michael L.; Banks, William A.; Hofbauer, Karl G.

    2010-01-01

    The hypothalamic melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is a constituent of an important pathway regulating food intake and energy expenditure. We produced a monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against the N-terminal domain of the MC4R and evaluated its potential as a possible therapeutic agent. This mAb (1E8a) showed specific binding to the MC4R in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing the human MC4R and blocked the activity of the MC4R under basal conditions and after stimulation with α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH). The inverse agonist action of Agouti-related protein was significantly enhanced in the presence of mAb 1E8a. After a single intracerebroventricular injection into the third ventricle, mAb 1E8a (1 μg) increased 24-h food intake in rats. After 7 days of continuous intracerebroventricular administration, mAb 1E8a increased food intake, body weight, and fat pad weight and induced hyperglycemia. Because the complete mAb was ineffective after intravenous injection, we produced single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) derived from mAb 1E8a. In pharmacokinetic studies it was demonstrated that these scFvs crossed the blood-brain barrier and reached the hypothalamus. Consequently, the scFv 1E8a increased significantly food intake and body weight in rats after intravenous administration (300 μg/kg). The pharmacological profile of mAb 1E8a and the fact that its scFv was active after peripheral administration suggest that derivatives of anti-MC4R mAbs may be useful in the treatment of patients with anorexia or cachexia. PMID:20118207

  12. Monoclonal antibody-based therapy of a human tumor xenograft with a 177lutetium-labeled immunoconjugate

    SciTech Connect

    Schlom, J.; Siler, K.; Milenic, D.E.; Eggensperger, D.; Colcher, D.; Miller, L.S.; Houchens, D.; Cheng, R.; Kaplan, D.; Goeckeler, W. )

    1991-06-01

    {sup 177}Lutetium ({sup 177}Lu) is a member of the family of elements known as lanthanides or rare earths. Monoclonal antibody (MAb) CC49, a murine IgG1, which is reactive with the tumor-associated antigen, TAG-72, has been shown previously to react with a wide range of human carcinomas; CC49 reacts to a different epitope on the TAG-72 molecule than MAb B72.3 and has a higher binding affinity. We report here the first use of a {sup 177}Lu-labeled immunoconjugate, {sup 177}Lu-CC49, in an experimental therapy model for human carcinoma. {sup 177}Lu-CC49 was shown to delay the growth of established LS-174T human colon carcinomas in athymic mice at a single dose of 50 microCi. Overt toxicity was observed with the administration of approximately 500 microCi of {sup 177}Lu-CC49 in which 5 of 9 mice died of apparent marrow toxicity. A single administration of 200 or 350 microCi of {sup 177}Lu-CC49, however, was shown to eliminate established tumors through the 77-day observation period after MAb administration. Dose fractionation experiments revealed that at least 750 microCi of {sup 177}Lu-CC49 (250 microCi/week for 3 consecutive weeks) was well tolerated in that 9 of 10 mice survived. Moreover, this dose schedule was able to eliminate the growth of relatively large (300 mm3) human colon tumor xenografts in 90% of the animals treated. Single-dose and dose fractionation studies were also carried out with an isotype-matched control MAb, {sup 177}Lu-MOPC-21. In all dose schedules, a large differential was seen between the therapeutic effects of the {sup 177}Lu-CC49 versus that of the {sup 177}Lu-control MAb. The merits and limitations of the use of {sup 177}Lu-labeled immunoconjugates (in particular, {sup 177}Lu-CC49) are discussed in terms of potential novel therapeutics for human carcinoma.

  13. Generation and characterization of ixekizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody that neutralizes interleukin-17A

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ling; Lu, Jirong; Allan, Barrett W; Tang, Ying; Tetreault, Jonathan; Chow, Chi-kin; Barmettler, Barbra; Nelson, James; Bina, Holly; Huang, Lihua; Wroblewski, Victor J; Kikly, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17A exists as a homodimer (A/A) or as a heterodimer (A/F) with IL-17F. IL-17A is expressed by a subset of T-cells, called Th17 cells, at inflammatory sites. Most cell types can respond to the local production of IL-17A because of the near ubiquitous expression of IL-17A receptors, IL-17RA and IL-17RC. IL-17A stimulates the release of cytokines and chemokines designed to recruit and activate both neutrophils and memory T-cells to the site of injury or inflammation and maintain a proinflammatory state. IL-17A-producing pathogenic T-cells contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, including psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. This study describes the generation and characterization of ixekizumab, a humanized IgG4 variant IL-17A-neutralizing antibody. Ixekizumab binds human and cynomolgus monkey IL-17A with high affinity and binds rabbit IL-17A weakly but does not bind to rodent IL-17A or other IL-17 family members. Ixekizumab effectively inhibits the interaction between IL-17A and its receptor in binding assays and potently blocks IL-17A-induced GRO or KC secretion in cell-based assays. In an in vivo mouse pharmcodynamic model, ixekizumab blocks human IL-17A-induced mouse KC secretion. These data provide a comprehensive preclinical characterization of ixekizumab, for which the efficacy and safety have been demonstrated in human clinical trials in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. PMID:27143947

  14. Specificities and binding properties of 2 monoclonal antibodies against carcinoma cells of the human urinary bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Aissa, H.; Paulie, S.; Koho, H.; Biberfeld, P.; Hansson, Y.; Lundblad, M. L.; Gustafson, H.; Jonsdottir, I.; Perlmann, P.

    1985-01-01

    Mice were immunized with cultured cells derived from transitional cell carcinoma of the human urinary bladder (TCC). Spleen cells were fused with mouse myeloma cell line Sp2/0-Ag14 and the hybridomas obtained screened for antibody production against a panel of human cells. Two hybridomas were selected for further studies. The antibodies from one of these hybridomas (P7A5-4) could clearly discriminate between malignant and normal cells from the bladder, both when tested with cultured cells and fresh tissue. The P7A5-4 antibodies, however, also reacted with some non-TCC cultured carcinoma and melanoma cells but to a lesser extent. This difference in reactivity was even more pronounced in the fresh tumours tested, thus indicating a quantitative difference in antigen expression between TCC and other cells. From extracts of TCC cells, P7A5-4 bound three polypeptides of mol. wts 92Kd (ConA+), 23 and 17Kd (ConA-). The antibody derived from hybridoma SK4H-12 bound a ConA reactive glycopeptide of 100Kd mol. wt, the expression of which was almost entirely restricted to urothelial cell lines and tissue of TCC origin, as shown by immunocytochemical studies. The finding in this study of new antigens associated with urinary bladder carcinoma, extend the results obtained previously in our laboratory (Koho et al., 1984; Paulie et al., 1984) and further delineate the heterogeneity of tumour-associated antigens in this human tumour system. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:4015953

  15. Neutralization of Japanese Encephalitis Virus by heme-induced broadly reactive human monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nimesh; de Wispelaere, Mélissanne; Lecerf, Maxime; Kalia, Manjula; Scheel, Tobias; Vrati, Sudhanshu; Berek, Claudia; Kaveri, Srinivas V.; Desprès, Philippe; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Dimitrov, Jordan D.

    2015-01-01

    Geographical expansion and re-emerging new genotypes of the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) require the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Here, we studied a non-conventional approach for antibody therapy and show that, upon exposure to heme, a fraction of natural human immunoglobulins acquires high-affinity reactivity with the antigenic domain-III of JEV E glycoprotein. These JEV-reactive antibodies exhibited neutralizing activity against recently dominant JEV genotypes. This study opens new therapeutic options for Japanese encephalitis. PMID:26542535

  16. Utility of a human FcRn transgenic mouse model in drug discovery for early assessment and prediction of human pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Avery, Lindsay B; Wang, Mengmeng; Kavosi, Mania S; Joyce, Alison; Kurz, Jeffrey C; Fan, Yao-Yun; Dowty, Martin E; Zhang, Minlei; Zhang, Yiqun; Cheng, Aili; Hua, Fei; Jones, Hannah M; Neubert, Hendrik; Polzer, Robert J; O'Hara, Denise M

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic antibodies continue to develop as an emerging drug class, with a need for preclinical tools to better predict in vivo characteristics. Transgenic mice expressing human neonatal Fc receptor (hFcRn) have potential as a preclinical pharmacokinetic (PK) model to project human PK of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Using a panel of 27 mAbs with a broad PK range, we sought to characterize and establish utility of this preclinical animal model and provide guidance for its application in drug development of mAbs. This set of mAbs was administered to both hemizygous and homozygous hFcRn transgenic mice (Tg32) at a single intravenous dose, and PK parameters were derived. Higher hFcRn protein tissue expression was confirmed by liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry in Tg32 homozygous versus hemizygous mice. Clearance (CL) was calculated using non-compartmental analysis and correlations were assessed to historical data in wild-type mouse, non-human primate (NHP), and human. Results show that mAb CL in hFcRn Tg32 homozygous mouse correlate with human (r(2) = 0.83, r = 0.91, p < 0.01) better than NHP (r(2) = 0.67, r = 0.82, p < 0.01) for this dataset. Applying simple allometric scaling using an empirically derived best-fit exponent of 0.93 enabled the prediction of human CL from the Tg32 homozygous mouse within 2-fold error for 100% of mAbs tested. Implementing the Tg32 homozygous mouse model in discovery and preclinical drug development to predict human CL may result in an overall decreased usage of monkeys for PK studies, enhancement of the early selection of lead molecules, and ultimately a decrease in the time for a drug candidate to reach the clinic. PMID:27232760

  17. Expression in systemic lupus erythematosus of an idiotype common to DNA-binding and nonbinding monoclonal antibodies produced by normal human lymphoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, E; Massicotte, H; Bell, D A

    1989-01-01

    Rabbit antiserum raised against a normal-derived monoclonal anti-DNA antibody KIM 4.6.3 (IgM lambda) was used for idiotype analyses. This anti-serum (anti-4.6.3 ID) was rendered specific for KIM 4.6.3 idiotype (4.6.3 ID) by absorption with normal human IgM and IgG. The specificity of anti-4.6.3 was shown by its ability to bind to KIM 4.6.3 antibody but not to normal human IgM and IgG, by inhibition of anti-4.6.3 ID reactivity with KIM 4.6.3 antibody by the homologous monoclonal antibody and by the ability of anti-4.6.3 ID to inhibit the binding of single stranded DNA with KIM 4.6.3 antibody. The 4.6.3 ID was found to be commonly expressed since it was detected among 33% (10/30) DNA and 32% (23/72) non-DNA-reactive monoclonal antibodies that were obtained from five different unrelated normal individuals. The binding to ssDNA of the majority of idiotype positive anti-DNA antibodies however was not blocked by anti-4.6.3 ID suggesting that among these other monoclonal antibodies its expression is outside of the antigen binding site. The 4.6.3 ID, which was present among some normal-derived monoclonal IgM molecules was also found at a high frequency (90%) in the sera of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but only at a low frequency (24%) and concentration in normal sera. The level of 4.6.3 ID in SLE did not correlate with serum IgM and IgG nor with anti-DNA antibody concentrations. Idiotypic relatedness between SLE serum antibodies and monoclonal anti-DNA antibodies of normals implies the existence of a cross-reactive idiotype family and implies that a conserved common gene or closely related genes exist in the germ line encoding these 4.6.3 ID positive antibodies some of which are not exclusively associated with nucleic acid reactivity. The expression of these germ line genes in vivo thus distinguishes SLE from normals. PMID:2493481

  18. Isolation and characterization of novel human monoclonal antibodies possessing neutralizing ability against rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takashi; Yamada, Kentaro; Noguchi, Kazuko; Nakajima, Kantou; Takada, Kenzo; Khawplod, Pakamatz; Nishizono, Akira

    2010-11-01

    Rabies is a fatal viral encephalitis which is transmitted by exposure to the bite of rabid animals. Human and equine rabies immunoglobulins are indispensable pharmacological agents for severe bite exposure, as is vaccine. However, several disadvantages, including limited supply, adverse reactions, and high cost, hamper their wide application in developing countries. In the present study, two novel huMabs which neutralize rabies virus were established from vaccinated hyperimmune volunteers using the Epstein-Barr virus transformation method. One MAb (No. 254), which was subclass IgG3, effectively neutralized fixed rabies viruses of CVS, ERA, HEP-Flury, and Nishigahara strains and recognized a well-conserved epitope located in antigenic site II of the rabies virus glycoprotein. No. 254 possessed 68 ng/ml of FRNT₅₀ activity against CVS, 3.7 × 10⁻⁷ M of the Kd value, and the enhancing effect of complement-dependent virolysis. In addition, No. 254 showed effective neutralization potency in vivo in the mouse challenge test. The other MAb, 4D4, was subclass IgM and showed neutralizing activity against CVS and Nishigahara strains. 4D4 recognized a novel antigenic site which is associated with the neurovirulence of rabies, a glycoprotein located between antigenic site I and VI. Both human MAbs against rabies are expected to be utilized as a tool for future post-exposure prophylaxis. PMID:21044141

  19. Disruption of desmosome assembly by monovalent human pemphigus vulgaris monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xuming; Choi, Eun Jung; Payne, Aimee S.

    2009-01-01

    The intercellular interactions of the desmosomal cadherins, desmoglein and desmocollin, are required for epidermal cell adhesion. Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a potentially fatal autoimmune blistering disease characterized by autoantibodies against desmoglein (Dsg) 3. During calcium-induced desmosome assembly, treatment of primary human keratinocytes with pathogenic monovalent anti-Dsg3 mAbs produced from a PV patient causes a decrease of Dsg3 and desmoplakin but not desmocollin (Dsc) 3 in the Triton-insoluble fraction of cell lysates within 2 hours. Immunofluorescence and antibody ELISA studies suggest that pathogenic mAbs cause internalization of cell surface Dsg3 but not Dsc3 via early endosomes. Electron microscopy demonstrated a lack of well-formed desmosomes in keratinocytes treated with pathogenic compared to nonpathogenic mAbs. In contrast, pathogenic mAbs caused late depletion of Dsg3 from preformed desmosomes at 24 hours, with effects on multiple desmosomal proteins including Dsc3 and plakoglobin. Together, these studies indicate that pathogenic PV mAbs specifically cause internalization of newly synthesized Dsg3 during desmosome assembly, correlating with their pathogenic activity. Monovalent human PV anti-Dsg mAbs reproduce the effects of polyclonal PV IgG on Dsg3 and will facilitate future studies to further dissect the cellular mechanisms for the loss of cell adhesion in pemphigus. PMID:19037235

  20. Epitope-mapped monoclonal antibodies as tools for functional and morphological analyses of the human urokinase receptor in tumor tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Luther, T.; Magdolen, V.; Albrecht, S.; Kasper, M.; Riemer, C.; Kessler, H.; Graeff, H.; Müller, M.; Schmitt, M.

    1997-01-01

    uPAR (CD87), the receptor for the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) facilitates tumor cell invasion and metastasis by focusing uPA proteolytic activity to the cell surface. As uPAR exists in various molecular forms, it is desirable to use well defined antibodies for analyses of uPAR antigen expression in human malignant tumors by immunological methods. Therefore, twelve monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against uPAR were generated by using nonglycosylated, recombinant human uPAR (spanning amino acids 1 to 284), expressed in Escherichia coli, as the immunogen. The reaction pattern of these MAbs with the immunogen and a series of carboxyl-terminally truncated versions of uPAR demonstrated that at least six different epitopes of uPAR are recognized. All MAbs reacted under reducing conditions in immunoblot analyses with E. coli-expressed uPA and also with highly glycosylated, functionally intact, recombinant human uPAR expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Seven of the MAbs recognized CHO uPAR under nonreducing conditions as well. By flow cytofluorometric analyses, three of these MAbs were shown to bind to native human uPAR present on the cell surface of monocytoid U937 cells with MAb IIIF10 being the best. Saturation of uPAR with uPA on U937 cells completely blocked interaction of MAb IIIF10 with uPAR (mapped epitope, amino acids 52 to 60 of domain I of uPAR). In turn, preincubation of U937 cells with MAb IIIF10 efficiently reduced binding of uPA to uPAR, indicating that the epitope detected by MAb IIIF10 is located within or closely to the uPA-binding site of uPAR, and thus, this site may be a target to influence uPA/uPAR-mediated proteolysis in tumors. Binding of MAbs IID7 or IIIB11 (mapped epitope, amino acids 125 to 132 of domain II of uPAR) to uPAR is not affected when uPAR is occupied by uPA. As these MAbs reacted strongly with cellular uPAR antigen in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor sections, the domain-II-specific antibodies IID7

  1. Monoclonal antibodies directed against major histocompatibility complex antigens bind to the surface of Treponema pallidum isolated from infected rabbits or humans.

    PubMed

    Marchitto, K S; Kindt, T J; Norgard, M V

    1986-09-01

    Evidence is presented for the association of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens with the surface of Treponema pallidum during infection. A monoclonal antibody (IgG2a) directed against a murine H-2Kb epitope of public specificity reacted with the cell surface of T. pallidum, as assayed by the binding of protein A-colloidal gold in immunoelectron microscopy. Monoclonal antibodies directed against class I rabbit MHC antigens also reacted in immunofluorescence assays with material on the surface of rabbit-cultivated T. pallidum. In addition, impression smears of human syphilitic genital ulcers that were darkfield-positive for the presence of spirochetes were tested in immunofluorescence assays with monoclonal antibodies directed against human MHC antigens; antibody directed against HLA-ABC (class I) was reactive whereas antibody directed against HLA-DR (class II) was nonreactive. Results of the study suggest that the association of host-derived class I MHC antigens or molecular mimicry may play a role in T. pallidum evasion of host immune defenses. PMID:2428519

  2. Development and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Mouse and Human Fcγ Receptors.

    PubMed

    Tutt, Alison L; James, Sonya; Laversin, Stéphanie A; Tipton, Thomas R W; Ashton-Key, Margaret; French, Ruth R; Hussain, Khiyam; Vaughan, Andrew T; Dou, Lang; Earley, Alexander; Dahal, Lekh N; Lu, Chen; Dunscombe, Melanie; Chan, H T Claude; Penfold, Christine A; Kim, Jinny H; Potter, Elizabeth A; Mockridge, C Ian; Roghanian, Ali; Oldham, Robert J; Cox, Kerry L; Lim, Sean H; Teige, Ingrid; Frendéus, Bjorn; Glennie, Martin J; Beers, Stephen A; Cragg, Mark S

    2015-12-01

    FcγRs are key regulators of the immune response, capable of binding to the Fc portion of IgG Abs and manipulating the behavior of numerous cell types. Through a variety of receptors, isoforms, and cellular expression patterns, they are able to fine-tune and direct appropriate responses. Furthermore, they are key determinants of mAb immunotherapy, with mAb isotype and FcγR interaction governing therapeutic efficacy. Critical to understanding the biology of this complex family of receptors are reagents that are robust and highly specific for each receptor. In this study, we describe the development and characterization of mAb panels specific for both mouse and human FcγR for use in flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, and immunocytochemistry. We highlight key differences in expression between the two species and also patterns of expression that will likely impact on immunotherapeutic efficacy and translation of therapeutic agents from mouse to clinic. PMID:26512139

  3. Xenohybridization of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cells for the production of human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tiebout, R F; Stricker, E A; Oosterhof, F; van Heemstra, D J; Zeijlemaker, W P

    1985-12-01

    Transformation of human B lymphocytes, obtained from hyperimmune donors with Epstein-Barr virus, yields polyclonal cell populations in which a minority of cells produce IgG antibodies of predetermined specificity, whereas the majority of cells produce 'non-specific' immunoglobulin (mainly of the IgM class). Such lymphoblastoid cell lines can be easily propagated in high-density cultures. Because cloning at 1 cell per well is not possible, stabilization of lymphoblastoid cell lines by limiting dilution is not feasible and most newly established lines cease to produce specific antibody within a few weeks. Xenohybrids, resulting from fusion of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cells with NS1 mouse plasmacytoma cells, can be cloned at 1 cell per well. Stable xenohybridoma subclones, producing antibody of the desired specificity, can be isolated after a series of limiting dilutions. In a model system, we have studied the efficiency of xenohybridization of human lymphoblastoid cells. Using this system, we have constructed IgG anti-tetanus-toxoid- and IgG anti-HBsAg-producing cell lines. Next, we investigated whether transformation with Epstein-Barr virus is essential in such a two-step procedure or whether a polyclonal stimulator, such as pokeweed mitogen, could also be used. It was found that antibody-producing xenohybrids can be obtained after stimulation with pokeweed mitogen. However, this latter system is subject to more variations and lacks the advantage of pre-selection of antibody-producing cells as compared to xenohybridization after transformation. PMID:3003887

  4. Development and characterization of human monoclonal antibodies that neutralize multiple TGFβ isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Bedinger, Daniel; Lao, Llewelyn; Khan, Shireen; Lee, Steve; Takeuchi, Toshihiko; Mirza, Amer M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transforming growth factor (TGF)β levels are elevated in, and drive the progression of, numerous disease states such as advanced metastatic cancer and systemic and ocular fibrosis. There are 3 main isoforms, TGFβ1, 2, and 3. As multiple TGFβ isoforms are involved in disease processes, maximal therapeutic efficacy may require neutralization of 2 or more of the TGFβ isoforms. Fully human antibody phage display libraries were used to discover a number of antibodies that bind and neutralize various combinations of TGFβ1, 2 or 3. The primary panning did not yield any uniformly potent pan-isoform neutralizing antibodies; therefore, an antibody that displayed potent TGFβ 1, 2 inhibition, but more modest affinity versus TGFβ3, was affinity matured by shuffling with a light chain sub-library and further screening. This process yielded a high affinity pan-isoform neutralizing clone. Antibodies were analyzed and compared by binding affinity, as well as receptor and epitope competition by surface plasmon resonance methods. The antibodies were also shown to neutralize TGFβ effects in vitro in 3 assays: 1) interleukin (IL)-4 induced HT-2 cell proliferation; 2) TGFβ-mediated IL-11 release by A549 cells; and 3) decreasing SMAD2 phosphorylation in Detroit 562 cells. The antibodies’ potency in these in vitro assays correlated well with their isoform-specific affinities. Furthermore, the ability of the affinity-matured clone to decrease tumor burden in a Detroit 562 xenograft study was superior to that of the parent clone. This affinity-matured antibody acts as a very potent inhibitor of all 3 main isoforms of TGFβ and may have utility for therapeutic intervention in human disease. PMID:26563652

  5. HCMV Infection of Human Trophoblast Progenitor Cells of the Placenta Is Neutralized by a Human Monoclonal Antibody to Glycoprotein B and Not by Antibodies to the Pentamer Complex

    PubMed Central

    Zydek, Martin; Petitt, Matthew; Fang-Hoover, June; Adler, Barbara; Kauvar, Lawrence M.; Pereira, Lenore; Tabata, Takako

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the major viral cause of congenital infection and birth defects. Primary maternal infection often results in virus transmission, and symptomatic babies can have permanent neurological deficiencies and deafness. Congenital infection can also lead to intrauterine growth restriction, a defect in placental transport. HCMV replicates in primary cytotrophoblasts (CTBs), the specialized cells of the placenta, and inhibits differentiation/invasion. Human trophoblast progenitor cells (TBPCs) give rise to the mature cell types of the chorionic villi, CTBs and multi-nucleated syncytiotrophoblasts (STBs). Here we report that TBPCs are fully permissive for pathogenic and attenuated HCMV strains. Studies with a mutant virus lacking a functional pentamer complex (gH/gL/pUL128-131A) showed that virion entry into TBPCs is independent of the pentamer. In addition, infection is blocked by a potent human neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb), TRL345, reactive with glycoprotein B (gB), but not mAbs to the pentamer proteins pUL130/pUL131A. Functional studies revealed that neutralization of infection preserved the capacity of TBPCs to differentiate and assemble into trophospheres composed of CTBs and STBs in vitro. Our results indicate that mAbs to gB protect trophoblast progenitors of the placenta and could be included in antibody treatments developed to suppress congenital infection and prevent disease. PMID:24651029

  6. Regulatory approval and a first-in-human phase I clinical trial of a monoclonal antibody produced in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Julian K-C; Drossard, Jürgen; Lewis, David; Altmann, Friedrich; Boyle, Julia; Christou, Paul; Cole, Tom; Dale, Philip; van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Isitt, Valerie; Katinger, Dietmar; Lobedan, Martin; Mertens, Hubert; Paul, Mathew J; Rademacher, Thomas; Sack, Markus; Hundleby, Penelope A C; Stiegler, Gabriela; Stoger, Eva; Twyman, Richard M; Vcelar, Brigitta; Fischer, Rainer

    2015-10-01

    Although plant biotechnology has been widely investigated for the production of clinical-grade monoclonal antibodies, no antibody products derived from transgenic plants have yet been approved by pharmaceutical regulators for clinical testing. In the Pharma-Planta project, the HIV-neutralizing human monoclonal antibody 2G12 was expressed in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The scientific, technical and regulatory demands of good manufacturing practice (GMP) were addressed by comprehensive molecular characterization of the transgene locus, confirmation of genetic and phenotypic stability over several generations of transgenic plants, and by establishing standard operating procedures for the creation of a master seed bank, plant cultivation, harvest, initial processing, downstream processing and purification. The project developed specifications for the plant-derived antibody (P2G12) as an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) based on (i) the guidelines for the manufacture of monoclonal antibodies in cell culture systems; (ii) the draft European Medicines Agency Points to Consider document on quality requirements for APIs produced in transgenic plants; and (iii) de novo guidelines developed with European national regulators. From the resulting process, a GMP manufacturing authorization was issued by the competent authority in Germany for transgenic plant-derived monoclonal antibodies for use in a phase I clinical evaluation. Following preclinical evaluation and ethical approval, a clinical trial application was accepted by the UK national pharmaceutical regulator. A first-in-human, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, dose-escalation phase I safety study of a single vaginal administration of P2G12 was carried out in healthy female subjects. The successful completion of the clinical trial marks a significant milestone in the commercial development of plant-derived pharmaceutical proteins. PMID:26147010

  7. [CD226 monoclonal antibody induces variation of intracytosolic free calcium level in human umbilical vein endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Hua; Liu, Xue-Song; Liu, Fei; Jin, Bo-Quan

    2003-06-25

    In order to study the possible mechanism of CD226 monoclonal antibody (mAb)-mediated intracellular message transduction in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), the influence of CD226 mAb and its cross-linking by secondary antibody (II Ab) on the concentration changes in [Ca(2+)](i) in the HUVECs under different conditions were determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The main results are as follows. (1) When the culture medium was balanced by Hanks Buffer, [Ca(2+)](i) in HUVECs increased slowly after stimulation by CD226 mAb, whereas [Ca(2+)](i) increase was accompanied by [Ca(2+)](o) decrease after the mAb was cross-linked by goat anti-mouse IgG. Then [Ca(2+)](i) and [Ca(2+)](o) all returned to the normal level. (2) When the culture medium was balanced by D-Hanks buffer, [Ca(2+)](i) in HUVECs showed little variation when the cells were stimulated by CD226 mAb, but [Ca(2+)](i) decreased markedly after cross-linking. (3) When HUVECs were pretreated with EGTA, there was no variation in [Ca(2+)](i) of HUVECs after CD226 mAb stimulation alone or cross-linking of the mAb. Our results suggest that stimulation by CD226 mAb and cross-linking by goat anti-mouse IgG induce the variation of [Ca(2+)](i) in HUVECs under different conditions and the variation of [Ca(2+)](i) in HUVECs may play an important role in many physiological and pathological processes. PMID:12817306

  8. Use of monoclonal antibodies to identify four neutralization immunogens on a common cold picornavirus, human rhinovirus 14.

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, B; Mosser, A G; Colonno, R J; Rueckert, R R

    1986-01-01

    A collection of 35 mouse monoclonal antibodies, raised against human rhinovirus 14 (HRV-14), was used to isolate 62 neutralization-resistant mutants. When cross-tested against the antibodies in a neutralization assay, the mutants fell into four antigenic groups, here called neutralization immunogens: NIm-IA, -IB, -II, and -III. Sequencing the mutant RNA in segments corresponding to serotype-variable regions revealed that the amino acid substitutions segregated into clusters, which correlated exactly with the immunogenic groups (NIm-IA mutants at VP1 amino acid residue 91 or 95; NIm-II mutants at VP2 residue 158, 159, 161, or 162; NIm-III mutants at VP3 residue 72, 75, or 78; and NIm-IB mutants at two sites, either VP1 residue 83 or 85, or residue 138 or 139). Examination of the three-dimensional structure of the virus (M. G. Rossmann, E. Arnold, J. W. Erickson, E. A. Frankenberger, J. P. Griffith, H.-J. Hecht, J. E. Johnson, G. Kamer, M. Luo, A. G. Mosser, R. R. Rueckert, B. Sherry, and G. Vriend, Nature [London], 317:145-153, 1985) revealed that each of the substitution clusters formed a protrusion from the virus surface, and the side chains of the substituted amino acids pointed outward. Moreover, four of the amino acid substitutions, which initially appeared to be anomalous because they were encoded well outside the cluster groups, could be traced to surface positions immediately adjacent to the appropriate viral protrusions. We conclude that three of the four antigens, NIm-IB, -II, and -III, are discontinuous. Thus, the amino acid substitutions in all 62 mutants fell within the proposed immunogenic sites; there was no evidence for alteration of any antigenic site by a distal mutation. Images PMID:2416951

  9. Generation and Characterization of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Anthrax Protective Antigen following Vaccination with a Recombinant Protective Antigen Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Xiangyang; Li, Jianmin; Liu, Weicen; Wang, Xiaolin; Yin, Kexin; Liu, Ju; Zai, Xiaodong; Li, Liangliang; Song, Xiaohong; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yin, Ying; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    The anthrax protective antigen (PA) is the central component of the three-part anthrax toxin, and it is the primary immunogenic component in the approved AVA anthrax vaccine and the “next-generation” recombinant PA (rPA) anthrax vaccines. Animal models have indicated that PA-specific antibodies (AB) are sufficient to protect against infection with Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we investigated the PA domain specificity, affinity, mechanisms of neutralization, and synergistic effects of PA-specific antibodies from a single donor following vaccination with the rPA vaccine. Antibody-secreting cells were isolated 7 days after the donor received a boost vaccination, and 34 fully human monoclonal antibodies (hMAb) were identified. Clones 8H6, 4A3, and 22F1 were able to neutralize lethal toxin (LeTx) both in vitro and in vivo. Clone 8H6 neutralized LeTx by preventing furin cleavage of PA in a dose-dependent manner. Clone 4A3 enhanced degradation of nicked PA, thereby interfering with PA oligomerization. The mechanism of 22F1 is still unclear. A fourth clone, 2A6, that was protective only in vitro was found to be neutralizing in vivo in combination with a toxin-enhancing antibody, 8A7, which binds to domain 3 of PA and PA oligomers. These results provide novel insights into the antibody response elicited by the rPA vaccine and may be useful for PA-based vaccine and immunotherapeutic cocktail design. PMID:25787135

  10. Development of monoclonal antibodies to human microsomal epoxide hydrolase and analysis of "preneoplastic antigen"-like molecules.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hongying; Yoshimura, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Nobuharu; Sugiyama, Kazuo; Sawada, Jun-Ichi; Saito, Yoshiro; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D; Akatsuka, Toshitaka

    2012-04-01

    Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) is a drug metabolizing enzyme which resides on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and catalyzes the hydration of reactive epoxide intermediates that are formed by cytochrome P450s. mEH is also thought to have a role in bile acid transport on the plasma membrane of hepatocytes. It is speculated that efficient execution of such multiple functions is secured by its orientation and association with cytochrome P450 enzymes on the ER membrane and formation of a multiple transport system on the plasma membrane. In certain disease status, mEH loses its association with the membrane and can be detected as distinct antigens in the cytosol of preneoplastic foci of liver (preneoplastic antigen), in the serum in association with hepatitis C virus infection (AN antigen), or in some brain tumors. To analyze the antigenic structures of mEH in physiological and pathological conditions, we developed monoclonal antibodies against different portions of mEH. Five different kinds of antibodies were obtained: three, anti-N-terminal portions; one anti-C-terminal; and one, anti-conformational epitope. By combining these antibodies, we developed antigen detection methods which are specific to either the membrane-bound form or the linearized form of mEH. These methods detected mEH in the culture medium released from a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line and a glioblastoma cell line, which was found to be a multimolecular complex with a unique antigenic structure different from that of the membrane-bound form of mEH. These antibodies and antigen detection methods may be useful to study pathological changes of mEH in various human diseases. PMID:22310175

  11. Comprehensive Cross-Clade Neutralization Analysis of a Panel of Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Binley, James M.; Wrin, Terri; Korber, Bette; Zwick, Michael B.; Wang, Meng; Chappey, Colombe; Stiegler, Gabriela; Kunert, Renate; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Katinger, Hermann; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Burton, Dennis R.

    2004-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are potentially important tools in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine design. A few rare MAbs have been intensively studied, but we still have a limited appreciation of their neutralization breadth. Using a pseudovirus assay, we evaluated MAbs from clade B-infected donors and a clade B HIV+ plasma against 93 viruses from diverse backgrounds. Anti-gp120 MAbs exhibited greater activity against clade B than non-B viruses, whereas anti-gp41 MAbs exhibited broad interclade activity. Unexpectedly, MAb 4E10 (directed against the C terminus of the gp41 ectodomain) neutralized all 90 viruses with moderate potency. MAb 2F5 (directed against an epitope adjacent to that of 4E10) neutralized 67% of isolates, but none from clade C. Anti-gp120 MAb b12 (directed against an epitope overlapping the CD4 binding site) neutralized 50% of viruses, including some from almost every clade. 2G12 (directed against a high-mannose epitope on gp120) neutralized 41% of the viruses, but none from clades C or E. MAbs to the gp120 V3 loop, including 447-52D, neutralized a subset of clade B viruses (up to 45%) but infrequently neutralized other clades (≤7%). MAbs b6 (directed against the CD4 binding site) and X5 (directed against a CD4-induced epitope of gp120) neutralized only sensitive primary clade B viruses. The HIV+ plasma neutralized 70% of the viruses, including some from all major clades. Further analysis revealed five neutralizing immunotypes that were somewhat associated with clades. As well as the significance for vaccine design, our data have implications for passive-immunization studies in countries where clade C viruses are common, given that only MAbs b12 and 4E10 were effective against viruses from this clade. PMID:15542675

  12. An Enhanced Pre- and Postnatal Development Study in Cynomolgus Monkeys with Tabalumab: A Human IgG4 Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Breslin, William J; Hilbish, Kim G; Martin, Jennifer A; Halstead, Carolyn A; Newcomb, Deanna L; Chellman, Gary J

    2015-06-01

    Tabalumab, a human IgG4 monoclonal antibody (mAb) with neutralizing activity against both soluble and membrane B-cell activating factor (BAFF), has been under development for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this study was to determine the potential adverse effects of maternal tabalumab exposure on pregnancy, parturition, and lactation of the mothers and on the growth, viability, and development of the offspring through postnatal day (PND) 204. Tabalumab was administered by subcutaneous injection to presumed pregnant cynomolgus monkeys (16-19 per group) every 2 weeks from gestation day (GD) 20 to 22 until parturition at doses of 0, 0.3, or 30 mg/kg. Evaluations in mothers and infants included clinical signs, body weight, toxicokinetics, blood lymphocyte phenotyping, T-cell-dependent antibody response (infants only), antitherapeutic antibody (ATA), organ weights (infants only), and gross and microscopic histopathology. Infants were also examined for external and visceral morphologic and neurobehavioral development. There were no adverse tabalumab-related effects on maternal or infant endpoints. An expected pharmacological decrease in peripheral blood B-lymphocytes occurred in adults and infants; however, B-cell recovery was evident by PND154 in adults and infants at 0.3 mg/kg and by PND204 in infants at 30 mg/kg. At 30 mg/kg, a reduced IgM antibody response to T-cell-dependent antigen keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) was observed following primary immunization. Following secondary KLH immunization, all infants in both dose groups mounted anti-KLH IgM and IgG antibody responses similar to control. Placental and mammary transfer of tabalumab was demonstrated. In conclusion, the no-observed-adverse-effect level for maternal and developmental toxicity was 30 mg/kg, the highest dose tested. Exposures at 30 mg/kg provide a margin of safety of 16× the anticipated clinical exposure. PMID:26195230

  13. Identification of the Single Immunodominant Region of the Native Human CC Chemokine Receptor 6 Recognized by Mouse Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Dorgham, Karim; Dejou, Cécile; Piesse, Christophe; Gorochov, Guy; Pène, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines and their receptors play an important role in cell trafficking and recruitment. The CCR6 chemokine receptor, selectively expressed on leukocyte populations, has been shown to play a deleterious role in the pathogenesis of various chronic inflammatory diseases and, as such, may constitute a prime target in the development of immunotherapeutic treatment. However, to date no neutralizing mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for this chemokine receptor have been reported, whereas information on small molecules capable of interfering with the interaction of CCR6 and its ligands is scant. Here, we report the failure to generate neutralizing mouse mAbs specific for human (hu)CCR6. Immunization of mice with peptides mimicking extracellular domains, potentially involved in CCR6 function, failed to induce Abs reactive with the native receptor. Although the use of NIH-3T3 cells expressing huCCR6 resulted in the isolation of mAbs specific for this receptor, they were not able to block the interaction between huCCR6 and huCCL20. Investigation of the anti-huCCR6 mAbs generated in the present study, as well as those commercially available, show that all mAbs invariably recognize a unique, non-neutralizing, immunodominant region in the first part of its N-terminal domain. Together, these results indicate that the generation of potential neutralizing anti-huCCR6 mAbs in the mouse is unlikely to succeed and that alternative techniques, such as the use of other animal species for immunization, might constitute a better approach to generate such a potentially therapeutic tool for the treatment of inflammatory disease. PMID:27336468

  14. Generation and Characterization of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Anthrax Protective Antigen following Vaccination with a Recombinant Protective Antigen Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chi, Xiangyang; Li, Jianmin; Liu, Weicen; Wang, Xiaolin; Yin, Kexin; Liu, Ju; Zai, Xiaodong; Li, Liangliang; Song, Xiaohong; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yin, Ying; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Yu, Changming; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The anthrax protective antigen (PA) is the central component of the three-part anthrax toxin, and it is the primary immunogenic component in the approved AVA anthrax vaccine and the "next-generation" recombinant PA (rPA) anthrax vaccines. Animal models have indicated that PA-specific antibodies (AB) are sufficient to protect against infection with Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we investigated the PA domain specificity, affinity, mechanisms of neutralization, and synergistic effects of PA-specific antibodies from a single donor following vaccination with the rPA vaccine. Antibody-secreting cells were isolated 7 days after the donor received a boost vaccination, and 34 fully human monoclonal antibodies (hMAb) were identified. Clones 8H6, 4A3, and 22F1 were able to neutralize lethal toxin (LeTx) both in vitro and in vivo. Clone 8H6 neutralized LeTx by preventing furin cleavage of PA in a dose-dependent manner. Clone 4A3 enhanced degradation of nicked PA, thereby interfering with PA oligomerization. The mechanism of 22F1 is still unclear. A fourth clone, 2A6, that was protective only in vitro was found to be neutralizing in vivo in combination with a toxin-enhancing antibody, 8A7, which binds to domain 3 of PA and PA oligomers. These results provide novel insights into the antibody response elicited by the rPA vaccine and may be useful for PA-based vaccine and immunotherapeutic cocktail design. PMID:25787135

  15. A broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody is effective against H7N9

    PubMed Central

    Tharakaraman, Kannan; Subramanian, Vidya; Viswanathan, Karthik; Sloan, Susan; Yen, Hui-Ling; Barnard, Dale L.; Leung, Y. H. Connie; Szretter, Kristy J.; Koch, Tyree J.; Delaney, James C.; Babcock, Gregory J.; Wogan, Gerald N.; Sasisekharan, Ram; Shriver, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    Emerging strains of influenza represent a significant public health threat with potential pandemic consequences. Of particular concern are the recently emerged H7N9 strains which cause pneumonia with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Estimates are that nearly 80% of hospitalized patients with H7N9 have received intensive care unit support. VIS410, a human antibody, targets a unique conserved epitope on influenza A. We evaluated the efficacy of VIS410 for neutralization of group 2 influenza strains, including H3N2 and H7N9 strains in vitro and in vivo. VIS410, administered at 50 mg/kg, protected DBA mice infected with A/Anhui/2013 (H7N9), resulting in significant survival benefit upon single-dose (−24 h) or double-dose (−12 h, +48 h) administration (P < 0.001). A single dose of VIS410 at 50 mg/kg (−12 h) combined with oseltamivir at 50 mg/kg (−12 h, twice daily for 7 d) in C57BL/6 mice infected with A/Shanghai 2/2013 (H7N9) resulted in significant decreased lung viral load (P = 0.002) and decreased lung cytokine responses for nine of the 11 cytokines measured. Based on these results, we find that VIS410 may be effective either as monotherapy or combined with antivirals in treating H7N9 disease, as well as disease from other influenza strains. PMID:26283346

  16. Generation and tumor recognition properties of two human monoclonal antibodies specific to cell surface anionic phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Bujak, Emil; Pretto, Francesca; Neri, Dario

    2015-08-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) and other anionic phospholipids, which become exposed on the surface of proliferating endothelial cells, tumor cells and certain leukocytes, have been used as targets for the development of clinical-stage biopharmaceuticals. One of these products (bavituximab) is currently being investigated in Phase 3 clinical trials. There are conflicting reports on the ability of bavituximab and other antibodies to recognize PS directly or through beta-2 glycoprotein 1, a serum protein that is not highly conserved across species. Here, we report on the generation and characterization of two fully human antibodies directed against phosphatidylserine. One of these antibodies (PS72) bound specifically to phosphatidylserine and to phosphatidic acid, but did not recognize other closely related phospholipids, while the other antibody (PS41) also bound to cardiolipin. Both PS72 and PS41 stained 8/9 experimental tumor models in vitro, but both antibodies failed to exhibit a preferential tumor accumulation in vivo, as revealed by quantitative biodistribution analysis. Our findings indicate that anionic phospholipids are exposed and accessible in most tumor types, but cast doubts about the possibility of efficiently targeting tumors in vivo with PS-specific reagents. PMID:25983040

  17. Neutralization of Botulinum Neurotoxin by a Human Monoclonal Antibody Specific for the Catalytic Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Adekar, Sharad P.; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Jones, R. Mark; Al-Saleem, Fetweh H.; Ancharski, Denise M.; Root, Michael J.; Kapadnis, B. P.; Simpson, Lance L.; Dessain, Scott K.

    2008-01-01

    Background Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are a family of category A select bioterror agents and the most potent biological toxins known. Cloned antibody therapeutics hold considerable promise as BoNT therapeutics, but the therapeutic utility of antibodies that bind the BoNT light chain domain (LC), a metalloprotease that functions in the cytosol of cholinergic neurons, has not been thoroughly explored. Methods and Findings We used an optimized hybridoma method to clone a fully human antibody specific for the LC of serotype A BoNT (BoNT/A). The 4LCA antibody demonstrated potent in vivo neutralization when administered alone and collaborated with an antibody specific for the HC. In Neuro-2a neuroblastoma cells, the 4LCA antibody prevented the cleavage of the BoNT/A proteolytic target, SNAP-25. Unlike an antibody specific for the HC, the 4LCA antibody did not block entry of BoNT/A into cultured cells. Instead, it was taken up into synaptic vesicles along with BoNT/A. The 4LCA antibody also directly inhibited BoNT/A catalytic activity in vitro. Conclusions An antibody specific for the BoNT/A LC can potently inhibit BoNT/A in vivo and in vitro, using mechanisms not previously associated with BoNT-neutralizing antibodies. Antibodies specific for BoNT LC may be valuable components of an antibody antidote for BoNT exposure. PMID:18714390

  18. A human monoclonal antibody neutralizes diverse HIV-1 isolates by binding a critical gp41 epitope

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michael D.; Geleziunas, Romas; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Lennard, Simon; Hrin, Renee; Zhang, Hangchun; Lu, Meiqing; An, Zhiqiang; Ingallinella, Paolo; Finotto, Marco; Mattu, Marco; Finnefrock, Adam C.; Bramhill, David; Cook, James; Eckert, Debra M.; Hampton, Richard; Patel, Mayuri; Jarantow, Stephen; Joyce, Joseph; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Cortese, Riccardo; Lu, Ping; Strohl, William; Schleif, William; McElhaugh, Michael; Lane, Steven; Lloyd, Christopher; Lowe, David; Osbourn, Jane; Vaughan, Tristan; Emini, Emilio; Barbato, Gaetano; Kim, Peter S.; Hazuda, Daria J.; Shiver, John W.; Pessi, Antonello

    2005-01-01

    HIV-1 entry into cells is mediated by the envelope glycoprotein receptor-binding (gp120) and membrane fusion-promoting (gp41) subunits. The gp41 heptad repeat 1 (HR1) domain is the molecular target of the fusion-inhibitor drug enfuvirtide (T20). The HR1 sequence is highly conserved and therefore considered an attractive target for vaccine development, but it is unknown whether antibodies can access HR1. Herein, we use gp41-based peptides to select a human antibody, 5H/I1-BMV-D5 (D5), that binds to HR1 and inhibits the assembly of fusion intermediates in vitro. D5 inhibits the replication of diverse HIV-1 clinical isolates and therefore represents a previously unknown example of a crossneutralizing IgG selected by binding to designed antigens. NMR studies and functional analyses map the D5-binding site to a previously identified hydrophobic pocket situated in the HR1 groove. This hydrophobic pocket was proposed as a drug target and subsequently identified as a common binding site for peptide and peptidomimetic fusion inhibitors. The finding that the D5 fusion-inhibitory antibody shares the same binding site suggests that the hydrophobic pocket is a “hot spot” for fusion inhibition and an ideal target on which to focus a vaccine-elicited antibody response. Our data provide a structural framework for the design of new immunogens and therapeutic antibodies with crossneutralizing potential. PMID:16203977

  19. A humanized monoclonal antibody specific for invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells for in vivo depletion.

    PubMed

    Scheuplein, Felix; Thariath, Abraham; Macdonald, Susan; Truneh, Alemseged; Mashal, Robert; Schaub, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells are a subset of T cells recognizing glycolipid antigens presented by CD1d. Human iNKT cells express a conserved T cell receptor (TCR)-α chain (Vα24-Jα18) paired with a specific beta chain, Vβ11. The cells are both innate-like, with rapid cytokine release, and adaptive-like, including thymic positive selection. Over activation of iNKT cells can mediate tissue injury and inflammation in multiple organ systems and play a role in mediating the pathology associated with clinically important inflammatory diseases. At the same time, iNKT cell activation can play a role in protecting against infectious disease and cancer or modulate certain autoimmune diseases through its impact on both the innate and adaptive immune system. This suggests that approaches to cause iNKT cell reduction and/or depletion could treat inflammatory diseases while approaches to promote activation may have therapeutic potential in certain infections, cancer or autoimmune disease. This report summarizes the characterization of a humanized monoclonal depleting antibody (NKTT120) in the cynomolgus macaque. NKTT120 is being developed to treat iNKT mediated inflammation that is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions like sickle cell disease and asthma. NKTT120 binds to human iTCRs and to FCγRI and FCγRIII and has been shown to kill target cells in an ADCC assay at low concentrations consistent with the FCγR binding. iNKT cells were depleted within 24 hours in cynomolgus macaques, but T cell, B cell, and NK cell frequencies were unchanged. iNKT cell recovery was dose and time dependent. T cell dependent antigen responses were not impaired by NKTT120 mediated iNKT depletion as measured by response to KLH challenge. NKTT120 administration did not induce an inflammatory cytokine release at doses up to 10 mg/kg. These data support the use of NKTT120 as an intervention in inflammatory diseases where iNKT reduction or depletion could be beneficial. PMID

  20. Human B cell activation. Evidence for diverse signals provided by various monoclonal anti-IgM antibodies

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Seven murine monoclonal antibodies (mAb) with different binding characteristics for human IgM varied markedly in their ability to induce proliferation of T cell-depleted human splenocytes. Two mAb (HB57 and 5D7) that bound to distinct epitopes on IgM were highly effective initiators of B cell proliferation at very low concentrations, in the presence of a T cell factor source. In the absence of T cell supernatant, both HB57 and 5D7 mAbs produced a markedly reduced degree of stimulation at all concentrations. Two additional anti-IgM mAb (VIIIE11 and Mu53) were distinctive in that, even at high concentrations, only limited proliferation was observed compared with the first group of mAb. This proliferation depended on the presence of T cell supernatant. Competitive-binding studies revealed that the epitope recognized by mAb Mu53 may be identical or very proximate to that recognized by HB57. Three other mAb (1G6, XG9, and P24) induced little or no proliferation. 1G6 bound to a unique epitope on the IgM molecule, whereas XG9 shared a determinant with VIIIE11 mAb. Regulatory influences of Fc receptor binding cannot account for all the diversity in proliferation observed with the individual anti-IgM mAb. Markedly augmented proliferation was obtained when B cells were cultured with certain combinations of anti-IgM mAb in the presence of exogenous T cell supernatant. The proliferation induced in the absence of T cell supernatant by high concentrations of mAb mixtures that included 1G6 approached that observed for the same mixtures in the presence of T cell supernatant. The data suggest that certain signals delivered through membrane IgM can bypass the need for T cell supernatant in the activation of human B lymphocytes. PMID:2413155

  1. Development of a multi-product leached protein A assay for bioprocess samples containing recombinant human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ren, Diya; Darlucio, Maria R; Chou, Judy H

    2011-03-01

    The detection of low level of protein A leached from monoclonal antibody downstream purification process is often interfered by the presence of excess amount of product antibody. In order to prevent this interference, we developed a new multi-product leached protein A assay that used acidification to completely dissociate the IgG-ProteinA complex, followed by neutralization under selected condition to prevent re-formation of the IgG-ProteinA complex. The amount of protein A was then determined by a sandwich immunoassay using Meso Scale Discovery technology. The assay takes approximately 3h to complete for one 96-well plate of samples, and this has been successfully applied to samples containing different monoclonal antibody products examined so far. The data demonstrates that this assay is robust and efficient in determining leached protein A contamination during purification of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. PMID:21315722

  2. Recognition of N-glycoforms in human chorionic gonadotropin by monoclonal antibodies and their interaction motifs.

    PubMed

    Li, Daoyuan; Zhang, Ping; Li, Fei; Chi, Lequan; Zhu, Deyu; Zhang, Qunye; Chi, Lianli

    2015-09-11

    The glycosylation of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) plays an important role in reproductive tumors. Detecting hCG N-glycosylation alteration may significantly improve the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity of related cancers. However, developing an immunoassay directly against the N-linked oligosaccharides is unlikely because of the heterogeneity and low immunogenicity of carbohydrates. Here, we report a hydrogen/deuterium exchange and MS approach to investigate the effect of N-glycosylation on the binding of antibodies against different hCG glycoforms. Hyperglycosylated hCG was purified from the urine of invasive mole patients, and the structure of its N-linked oligosaccharides was confirmed to be more branched by MS. The binding kinetics of the anti-hCG antibodies MCA329 and MCA1024 against hCG and hyperglycosylated hCG were compared using biolayer interferometry. The binding affinity of MCA1024 changed significantly in response to the alteration of hCG N-linked oligosaccharides. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange-MS reveals that the peptide β65-83 of the hCG β subunit is the epitope for MCA1024. Site-specific N-glycosylation analysis suggests that N-linked oligosaccharides at Asn-13 and Asn-30 on the β subunit affect the binding affinity of MCA1024. These results prove that some antibodies are sensitive to the structural change of N-linked oligosaccharides, whereas others are not affected by N-glycosylation. It is promising to improve glycoprotein biomarker-based cancer diagnostics by developing combined immunoassays that can determine the level of protein and measure the degree of N-glycosylation simultaneously. PMID:26240146

  3. Assessment of placental transfer and the effect on embryo-fetal development of a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting lymphotoxin-alpha in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Schuetz, Chris; Arima, Akihiro; Chihaya, Yutaka; Weinbauer, Gerhard F; Habermann, Gunnar; Xiao, Jim; Woods, Cynthia; Grogan, Jane; Gelzleichter, Thomas; Cain, Gary

    2016-08-01

    An enhanced embryo-fetal development study was conducted in cynomolgus monkeys using pateclizumab, a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) targeting lymphotoxin-alpha. Pateclizumab administration between gestation days (GD) 20 and 132 did not induce maternal or developmental toxicities. The ratio of fetal-to-maternal serum concentration of pateclizumab was 0.73% on GD 50 and 61% by GD 139. Decreased fetal inguinal lymph node-to-body weight ratio was present in the high-dose group without microscopic abnormalities, a change attributable to inhibition of lymphocyte recruitment, which is a pharmacologic effect of pateclizumab during late lymph node development. The effect was observed in inguinal but not submandibular or mesenteric lymph nodes; this was attributed to differential susceptibility related to sequential lymph node development. Placental transfer of therapeutic IgG1 antibodies; thus, begins during the first trimester in non-human primates. Depending on the potency and dose levels administered, antibody levels in the fetus may be pharmacologically or toxicologically relevant. PMID:27211603

  4. Distribution of apoptosis-mediating Fas antigen in human skin and effects of anti-Fas monoclonal antibody on human epidermal keratinocyte and squamous cell carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Oishi, M; Maeda, K; Sugiyama, S

    1994-01-01

    Fast antigen is a cell surface protein that mediates apoptosis. Using immunohistological, flow cytometry and electron microscopic analyses, we investigated the expression of Fas antigen on various skin tissues, and on cultured SV40-transformed human epidermal keratinocyte cell line KJD and human skin squamous cell carcinoma cell line HSC. The Fas antigen was widely distributed in skin components such as the keratinocytes in the lower portion of the epidermis, epidermal dendritic cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, apocrine glands, eccrine sweat glands, sebaceous glands, some normal melanocytes and infiltrating lymphoid cells. It was also strongly expressed on the keratinocytes of lichenoid eruptions seen in lupus erythematosus and lichen planus, and on the spongiotic or acanthotic epidermis seen in chronic eczema, adult T-cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL) and atopic dermatitis. Its expression was closely correlated with lymphoid infiltrating cells and it was strongly expressed in lymphoid neoplastic cells, particularly ATLL cells, and fibroblasts seen in dermatofibroma. However, the antigen was not detected on basal cell epithelioma cells, some malignant melanomas or any junctional naevi. The cell lines KJD and HSC strongly expressed the Fas antigen, and crosslinking of the Fas antigen by an anti-Fas monoclonal antibody induced apoptosis of these cell lines. These results indicate that the apoptosis-mediating Fas antigen may play an important role in normal skin turnover and cell differentiation, in immune regulation of skin tumours, and in the pathogenesis of various skin diseases. PMID:7529480

  5. Monoclonal antibody 1.6.1 against human MPL receptor allows HSC enrichment of CB and BM CD34(+)CD38(-) populations.

    PubMed

    Petit Cocault, Laurence; Fleury, Maud; Clay, Denis; Larghero, Jérôme; Vanneaux, Valérie; Souyri, Michèle

    2016-04-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) and its receptor Mpl (CD110) play a crucial role in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Functional study of Mpl-expressing HSCs has, however, been hampered by the lack of efficient monoclonal antibodies, explaining the very few data available on Mpl(+) HSCs during human embryonic development and after birth. Investigating the main monoclonal antibodies used so far to sort CD110(+) cells from cord blood (CB) and adult bone marrow (BM), we found that only the recent monoclonal antibody 1.6.1 engineered by Immunex Corporation was specific. Using in vitro functional assays, we found that this antibody can be used to sort a CD34(+)CD38(-)CD110(+) population enriched in hematopoietic progenitor stem cells, both in CB and in adult BM. In vivo injection into NSG mice further indicated that the CB CD34(+)CD38(-)CD110(+) population is highly enriched in HSCs compared with both CD34(+)CD38(-)CD110(-) and CD34(+)CD38(-) populations. Together our results validate MAb1.6.1 as an important tool, which has so far been lacking, in the HSC field. PMID:26733047

  6. [Neoadjuvant treatment in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yinhua; Liu, Shiwei; Zhang, Hong; Xu, Ling; Li, Ting; Duan, Xuening

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent malignancy among females worldwide. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer represents a subtype with aggressive behavior, poor response to treatment and unfavorable prognosis. Anti-HER2-based neoadjuvant treatment has improved clinical outcomes of patients with HER2-positive disease. Pathological complete response (pCR) after neoadjuvant treatment indicates a favorable prognosis. With the development of HER2-targeted therapy and neoadjuvant treatment, numerous studies focus on the predictive factors of pCR or therapeutic resistance of anti-HER2 therapy. Identification of novel predictive factors in HER2-positive breast cancer, such as tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, will be helpful for clinical decision. PMID:26850663

  7. Advances in monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Li-na; He, Shuang; Wang, Yu-tang; Yang, Li-ming; Liu, Si-yu; Zhang, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become a part of daily preparation technologies in many laboratories. Attempts have been made to apply monoclonal antibodies to open a new train of thought for clinical treatments of autoimmune diseases, inflammatory diseases, cancer, and other immune-associated diseases. This paper is a prospective review to anticipate that monoclonal antibody application in the treatment of myocarditis, an inflammatory disease of the heart, could be a novel approach in the future. In order to better understand the current state of the art in monoclonal antibody techniques and advance applications in myocarditis, we, through a significant amount of literature research both domestic and abroad, developed a systematic elaboration of monoclonal antibodies, pathogenesis of myocarditis, and application of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis. This paper presents review of the literature of some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy to demonstrate the advance of monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis and a strong anticipation that monoclonal antibody application may supply an effective therapeutic approach to relieve the severity of myocarditis in the future. Under conventional therapy, myocarditis is typically associated with congestive heart failure as a progressive outcome, indicating the need for alternative therapeutic strategies to improve long-term results. Reviewing some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis, we recently found that monoclonal antibodies with high purity and strong specificity can accurately act on target and achieve definite progress in the treatment of viral myocarditis in rat model and may meet the need above. However, several issues remain. The technology on how to make a higher homologous and weak immunogenic humanized or human source antibody and the treatment mechanism of monoclonal antibodies may provide solutions for these open issues. If we are to

  8. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy with A 177Lu-labeled Anti-HER2 Nanobody

    PubMed Central

    D'Huyvetter, Matthias; Vincke, Cécile; Xavier, Catarina; Aerts, An; Impens, Nathalie; Baatout, Sarah; De Raeve, Hendrik; Muyldermans, Serge; Caveliers, Vicky; Devoogdt, Nick; Lahoutte, Tony

    2014-01-01

    RIT has become an attractive strategy in cancer treatment, but still faces important drawbacks due to poor tumor penetration and undesirable pharmacokinetics of the targeting vehicles. Smaller radiolabeled antibody fragments and peptides feature highly specific target accumulation, resulting in low accumulation in healthy tissue, except for the kidneys. Nanobodies are the smallest (MW < 15 kDa) functional antigen-binding fragments that are derived from heavy chain-only camelid antibodies. Here, we show that the extend of kidney retention of nanobodies is predominantly dictated by the number of polar residues in the C-terminal amino acid tag. Three nanobodies were produced with different C-terminal amino-acid tag sequences (Myc-His-tagged, His-tagged, and untagged). Dynamic planar imaging of Wistar rats with 111In-DTPA-nanobodies revealed that untagged nanobodies showed a 70 % drop in kidney accumulation compared to Myc-His-tagged nanobodies at 50 min p.i.. In addition, coinfusion of untagged nanobodies with the plasma expander Gelofusin led to a final reduction of 90 %. Similar findings were obtained with different 177Lu-DTPA-2Rs15d nanobody constructs in HER2pos tumor xenografted mice at 1 h p.i.. Kidney accumulation decreased 88 % when comparing Myc-His-tagged to untagged 2Rs15d nanobody, and 95 % with a coinfusion of Gelofusin, without affecting the tumor targeting capacity. Consequently, we identified a generic method to reduce kidney retention of radiolabeled nanobodies. Dosimetry calculations of Gelofusin-coinfused, untagged 177Lu-DTPA-2Rs15d revealed a dose of 0.90 Gy/MBq that was delivered to both tumor and kidneys and extremely low doses to healthy tissues. In a comparative study, 177Lu-DTPA-Trastuzumab supplied 6 times more radiation to the tumor than untagged 177Lu-DTPA-2Rs15d, but concomitantly also a 155, 34, 80, 26 and 4180 fold higher radioactivity burden to lung, liver, spleen, bone and blood. Most importantly, nanobody-based targeted radionuclide therapy in mice bearing small estiblashed HER2pos tumors led to an almost complete blockade of tumor growth and a significant difference in event-free survival between the treated and the control groups (P < 0.0001). Based on histology analyses, no evidence of renal inflammation, apoptosis or necrosis was obtained. In conclusion, these data highlight the importance of the amino acid composition of the nanobody's C-terminus, as it has a predominant effect on kidney retention. Moreover, we show successful nanobody-based targeted radionuclide therapy in a xenograft model and highlight the potential of radiolabeled nanobodies as a valuable adjuvant therapy candidate for treatment of minimal residual and metastatic disease. PMID:24883121

  9. The synthesis of multifunctional nanoparticles conjugated with anti-Her2 affibody and monomethylauristatin E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pala, Katarzyna; Jakimowicz, Piotr; Cyranka-Czaja, Anna; Otlewski, Jacek

    2015-04-01

    Conjugation of bioactive xenobiotics with innert particles often improves their efficacy and/or specificity. In this work we designed superparamagnetic ferric oxide nanoparticles (NPs) conjugated with a strong cytotoxic drug, monomethylauristatin E (MMAE), and evaluated their potential against cancer cells. Cytotoxicity tests showed that the conjugate was at least twice as toxic as the free drug. We then studied the cytotoxic potential of the conjugate at an elevated temperature achieved due to the superparamagnetic properties of the NPs, finding no enhancement of cytotoxicity in comparison with that at 37 °C. Next, multifunctional NPs containing MMAE and a targeting agent were synthesized. The targeting agent was the ZHer2:342 affibody specific to Her2 receptor. The selectivity and effectiveness of the conjugates was evaluated using SK-BR3 (Her2-positive) and U-87 MG (a negative control) cell lines. The multifunctional NPs selectively decrease of the viability of the SK-BR3 cells, showing their specificity towards cells overexpressing the Her2 receptor.

  10. Passive Transfer of A Germline-like Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibody Protects Transgenic Mice Against Lethal Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Anurodh Shankar; Ying, Tianlei; Tao, Xinrong; Garron, Tania; Algaissi, Abdullah; Wang, Yanping; Wang, Lili; Peng, Bi-Hung; Jiang, Shibo; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Tseng, Chien-Te K.

    2016-01-01

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has repeatedly caused outbreaks in the Arabian Peninsula. To date, no approved medical countermeasures (MCM) are available to combat MERS-CoV infections. Several neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), including m336, a germline-like human mAb, have been chosen as promising MCM for MERS-CoV. However, their clinical development has been hindered by the lack of a robust animal model that recapitulate the morbidity and mortality of human infections. We assessed the prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy of m336 by using well-characterized transgenic mice shown to be highly sensitive to MERS-CoV infection and disease. We found that mice treated with m336 prior to or post lethal MERS-CoV challenging were fully protected, compared to control mice which sufferered from profound weight loss and uniform death within days after infection. Taken together, these results support further development of m336 and other human monoclonal antibodies as potential therapeutics for MERS-CoV infection. PMID:27538452

  11. Characterization of the biological anti-staphylococcal functionality of hUK-66 IgG1, a humanized monoclonal antibody as substantial component for an immunotherapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    Oesterreich, Babett; Lorenz, Birgit; Schmitter, Tim; Kontermann, Roland; Zenn, Michael; Zimmermann, Bastian; Haake, Markus; Lorenz, Udo; Ohlsen, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Multi-antigen immunotherapy approaches against Staphylococcus aureus are expected to have the best chance of clinical success when used in combinatorial therapy, potentially incorporating opsonic killing of bacteria and toxin neutralization. We recently reported the development of a murine monoclonal antibody specific for the immunodominant staphylococcal antigen A (IsaA), which showed highly efficient staphylococcal killing in experimental infection models of S. aureus. If IsaA-specific antibodies are to be used as a component of combination therapy in humans, the binding specificity and biological activity of the humanized variant must be preserved. Here, we describe the functional characterization of a humanized monoclonal IgG1 variant designated, hUK-66. The humanized antibody showed comparable binding kinetics to those of its murine parent, and recognized the target antigen IsaA on the surface of clinically relevant S. aureus lineages. Furthermore, hUK-66 enhances the killing of S. aureus in whole blood (a physiological environment) samples from healthy subjects and patients prone to staphylococcal infections such as diabetes and dialysis patients, and patients with generalized artery occlusive disease indicating no interference with already present natural antibodies. Taken together, these data indicate that hUK-66 mediates bacterial killing even in high risk patients and thus, could play a role for immunotherapy strategies to combat severe S. aureus infections. PMID:24495867

  12. Effector functions of a monoclonal aglycosylated mouse IgG2a: binding and activation of complement component C1 and interaction with human monocyte Fc receptor.

    PubMed

    Leatherbarrow, R J; Rademacher, T W; Dwek, R A; Woof, J M; Clark, A; Burton, D R; Richardson, N; Feinstein, A

    1985-04-01

    Aglycosylated monoclonal anti-DNP mouse IgG2a produced in the presence of tunicamycin was compared with the native monoclonal IgG2a with respect to its ability to interact with the first component of complement, C1, and to compete with human IgG for binding to human monocyte Fc receptors. The aglycosylated IgG2a was found to bind subcomponent C1q with an equivalent capacity to the native IgG2a, but the dissociation constant was found to be increased three-fold. When activation of C1 by the glycosylated and aglycosylated IgG2a was compared, the rate of C1 activation by the aglycosylated IgG2a was reduced approximately three-fold. In contrast aglycosylation was accompanied by a large decrease (greater than or equal to 50-fold) in the apparent binding constant of monomeric IgG2a to human monocytes. The data suggest that the aglycosylated IgG2a has a structure which differs in the CH2 domain from the native IgG2a, and that the heterogeneous N-linked oligosaccharides of this monoclonal IgG2a which occur at a conserved position in the CH2 domain play a role in maintaining the integrity of its monocyte-binding site. This lack of monocyte binding may result either from a localized conformational change occurring in a single CH2 domain or from an alteration in the CH2-CH2 cross-domain architecture which is normally structured by a pair of opposing and interacting oligosaccharides. The minimal changes in C1q binding and C1 activation suggest that the oligosaccharides are, at most, indirectly involved in these events. PMID:4033665

  13. Nonclinical safety of mavrilimumab, an anti-GMCSF receptor alpha monoclonal antibody, in cynomolgus monkeys: Relevance for human safety

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Patricia C.; Sleeman, Matthew A.; Rebelatto, Marlon; Wang, Bing; Lu, Hong; Chen, Xiaomin; Wu, Chi-Yuan; Hinrichs, Mary Jane; Roskos, Lorin; Towers, Heidi; McKeever, Kathleen; Dixit, Rakesh

    2014-09-01

    Mavrilimumab (CAM-3001) is an investigational human IgG4 monoclonal antibody (MAb) targeting GM-CSF receptor alpha which is currently being developed for the treatment of RA. GM-CSF plays a central role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) through the activation, differentiation, and survival of macrophages and neutrophils. To support clinical development, the nonclinical safety of mavrilimumab was evaluated in several studies with cynomolgus monkeys as the pharmacologically relevant species. Comprehensive toxicity parameters were assessed in each study, and treatment duration ranged from 4 to 26 weeks. Mavrilimumab has an acceptable safety profile in monkeys with no changes in any parameters other than microscopic findings in lung. In several studies, minimal accumulation of foamy alveolar macrophages was observed. This finding was only seen in studies of at least 11 weeks duration, was reversible following a dose-free recovery period and was considered non-adverse. At higher dose levels (≥ 30 mg/kg/week), in a 26-week repeat-IV dose study, the presence of lung foreign material, cholesterol clefts, and granulomatous inflammation was also observed in a few animals and was considered adverse. The dose- and time-related accumulation of foamy macrophages in lung following exposure to mavrilimumab observed in several NHP studies was expected based upon the known role of GM-CSFRα signaling in the function of alveolar macrophages. Overall, a clean no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) without any effects in lung was established and provided adequate clinical safety margins. In clinical studies in RA patients, mavrilimumab has demonstrated good clinical activity with adequate safety to support further clinical development. A Phase 2b study of mavrilimumab in subjects with RA is in progress. - Highlights: • Mavrilimumab is a MAB targeting GM-CSFRα being developed for RA therapy. • Mavrilimumab has an acceptable safety profile in cynomolgus monkeys.

  14. Use of heteropolymeric monoclonal antibodies to attach antigens to the C3b receptor of human erythrocytes: A potential therapeutic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.P.; Sutherland, W.M.; Reist, C.J.; Webb, D.J.; Wright, E.L.; Labuguen, R.H. )

    1991-04-15

    The authors prepared bispecific, cross-linked monoclonal antibodies (heteropolymers) with specificity for both targeted antigens and the human erythrocyte (RBC) complement receptor. These heteropolymers facilitate binding of target antigens (human IgG and dinitrophenylated bovine {gamma} globulin) to human RBCs under conditions that either allow or preclude complement activation. Radioimmuno-assay analyses of this binding agree well with the number of complement receptors per RBC. In vitro whole-blood model experiments indicate heteropolymer-facilitated binding of antigens to RBCs is rapid and stable at 37C. It may be possible to extend these prototype experiments to the in vivo situation and use heteropolymer-attached RBCs for the safe and rapid binding, neutralization, and removal from the circulation of pathogenic antigens associated with infectious disease.

  15. Human monoclonal antibody 99mTc-88BV59: detection of colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease and immunogenicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Krause, B J; Baum, R P; Staib-Sebler, E; Lorenz, M; Niesen, A; Hör, G

    1997-01-01

    This study presents immunoscintigraphic results in 24 patients suffering from primary colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease after the injection of 1197-1351 MBq technetium-99m labelled totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59. Labelling efficacy of 99mTc-88BV59 ranged from 97% to 99%. Immunoscintigraphy was performed 18-20 h after injection. Scintigraphic findings were compared with those of computed tomography (CT). Patients underwent surgery in order to evaluate immunoscintigraphic findings histologically. Sera of the patients (before injection and 1 and 3 months post infusion) were analysed for the presence of human anti-human antibodies (HAHA). None of the patients showed a HAHA response as assessed by a solid-phase ELISA assay. The antibody scan detected about 25% more lesions than CT. In the detection of extrahepatic disease, the sensitivity of the antibody scan proved to be 68%, whereas the sensitivity of CT was 41%. PMID:9044881

  16. Development of a novel monoclonal antibody to human inducible co-stimulator ligand (ICOSL): Biological characteristics and application for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaohan; Wu, Jian; An, Jingnan; Hu, Yumin; Shen, Yu; Liu, Cuiping; Zhang, Xueguang

    2016-07-01

    ICOSL (B7-H2, CD275), a co-stimulatory molecule of the B7 superfamily, functions as a positive signal in immune response. To investigate whether ICOSL could be released into sera and the possible biological function of soluble ICOS (sICOSL), we generated and characterized a functional anti-human ICOSL monoclonal antibody (mAb), 20B10, and developed a novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on two anti-human ICOSL antibodies with different epitope specificities. Using the ELISA system, we found that sICOSL in the serum of healthy donors increases in an age-dependent manner and that the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor (MMPI) could suppress sICOSL production. Together, these data demonstrate that the existence of circulating sICOSL in human serum might play an important role in immunoregulation. PMID:27138044

  17. Monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  18. Monoclonal antibody production to human and bovine 2':3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase): high-specificity recognition in whole brain acetone powders and conservation of sequence between CNP1 and CNP2.

    PubMed

    Sprinkle, T J; Agee, J F; Tippins, R B; Chamberlain, C R; Faguet, G B; De Vries, G H

    1987-11-24

    Monoclonal antibodies against human and bovine 2':3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) were generated by fusing FOX-NY myeloma cells with spleen cells from RBF/Dn mice previously immunized with the purified brain antigens. The enzyme isolated from bovine brain was quite basic, with an isoelectric point of 9.71 and both the bovine and human enzymes consisted of a closely spaced doublet at approximately 44 and 46 kDa on SDS-PAGE. Six monoclonals were were identified as strongly recognizing the enzyme on both ELISA plates and on immunoblots of whole brain protein. Four monoclonals very weakly cross-reacted with guinea pig myelin basic protein. In contrast with two previous reports, some of our monoclonal antibodies did immunostain 2 or 3 protein bands in peripheral nerve, two bands closely corresponding to those immunostained in central nervous system (CNS) myelin, the Wolfgram protein fraction and in acetone powders of whole brain. Each of the 6 monoclonals reacting strongly on immunoblots recognized the enzyme in from 2 to 5 of the species examined (human, bovine, rat, mouse and rabbit). In addition, all 6 monoclonals that immunostained the enzyme in whole brain, myelin and Wolfgram protein immunoblots recognized both CNP1 (44 kDa) and CNP2 (46 kDa). The two closely spaced protein bands observed on SDS-PAGE and previously stained on immunoblots of CNS CNPase using polyvalent rabbit anti-bovine CNPase antisera, and now different monoclonal antibodies, appear to be immunologically related and to contain highly conserved sequences. PMID:2446713

  19. Induction of Fc receptors for IgA on murine T cell hybridoma by human monoclonal IgA and by high molecular weight IgA in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Chevailler, A; Monteiro, R C; Daëron, M; Lesavre, P

    1987-01-01

    A reproducible immunocyto-adherence assay has been developed to study the modulation of Fc receptors for IgA (Fc alpha R), using a murine T cell hybridoma (T2D4), which expresses Fc receptors for all known isotypes of secreted immunoglobulins. By using sheep red blood cells coated with the hapten 2-4-6 trinitrophenyl (TNP), as indicator cells, and a murine monoclonal IgA (MOPC 315) antibody with anti-TNP activity, we were able to study the Fc alpha R on T2D4 cells. We found that: (a) murine Fc alpha R can bind human monoclonal IgA, and this binding is isotype specific since it was inhibited by human monoclonal IgA but not by human monoclonal IgG or IgM; (b) the expression of murine Fc alpha R is unducible by human monoclonal IgA, and this effect is isotype specific since it is not observed with human monoclonal IgM or IgG (c) sera from patients with IgA nephropathy can also induce Fc alpha R expression; by contrast, no induction was observed with normal human sera, (d) in one serum from an IgA-nephropathy patient, the inducer factor was characterized by affinity chromatography on anti-IgA-Sepharose and by gel filtration: high molecular weight IgA, probably IgA aggregates or immune complexes were recognized to be responsible for the induction of murine Fc alpha R expression. PMID:3497739

  20. Prophylaxis With a Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV)-Specific Human Monoclonal Antibody Protects Rabbits From MERS-CoV Infection.

    PubMed

    Houser, Katherine V; Gretebeck, Lisa; Ying, Tianlei; Wang, Yanping; Vogel, Leatrice; Lamirande, Elaine W; Bock, Kevin W; Moore, Ian N; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Subbarao, Kanta

    2016-05-15

    With >1600 documented human infections with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and a case fatality rate of approximately 36%, medical countermeasures are needed to prevent and limit the disease. We examined the in vivo efficacy of the human monoclonal antibody m336, which has high neutralizing activity against MERS-CoV in vitro. m336 was administered to rabbits intravenously or intranasally before infection with MERS-CoV. Prophylaxis with m336 resulted in a reduction of pulmonary viral RNA titers by 40-9000-fold, compared with an irrelevant control antibody with little to no inflammation or viral antigen detected. This protection in rabbits supports further clinical development of m336. PMID:26941283

  1. Binding specificities of eight monoclonal antibodies to human glycophorin A - studies with M/sup c/M, and M/sub k/En(UK) variant human erythrocytes and M- and MN/sup V/-type chimpanzee erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bigbee, W.L.; Langlois, R.G.; Vanderlaan, M.; Jensen, R.H.

    1984-12-01

    Four newly derived mouse monoclonal antibodies to human glycophorin A are described. Three of these antibodies bind preferentially to the N form of glycophorin A; the fourth recognizes a shared determinant of the M and N forms. All four antibodies are directed toward the 39 amino acid, amino-terminal portion of the protein, and the N-specific antibodies require for binding the presence of N-acetyl-neuraminic acid on the glycosidically linked oligosaccharides. Cross-reaction of the N-specific antibodies to homozygous MM erythrocytes appears to result from binding to glycophorin B. In addition, these antibodies together with four previously reported glycophorin monoclonal antibodies, including two that specifically recognize the M form of glycophorin A, were tested for binding to M/sup c/M and M/sup k/En(UK) variant human erythrocytes. Results obtained for five of the six M- or N-specific monoclonal antibodies point to the general immunodominance of the amino-terminal serine-leucine polymorphism and the requirement for sialic acid. The epitopes for all three N-specific monoclonal antibodies include the amino terminal leucine that occurs in the N form of glycophorin A and may also include the glutamic acid that occurs at position five. Their studies support the proposed Lepore-type glycophorin A-B hybrid gene rearrangement for the En(UK) allele found in the English En(a-) family. The data also confirm the expression of the M-like glycoprotein on chimpanzee erythrocytes and the presence of a human glycophorin B-like antigen on the MN/sup V/-type cells.

  2. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific for the six-helix bundle of the human respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein as probes of the protein post-fusion conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Palomo, Concepción; Mas, Vicente; Vázquez, Mónica; Cano, Olga; Luque, Daniel; Terrón, María C.; Calder, Lesley J.; Melero, José A.

    2014-07-15

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) has two major surface glycoproteins (G and F) anchored in the lipid envelope. Membrane fusion promoted by hRSV{sub F} occurs via refolding from a pre-fusion form to a highly stable post-fusion state involving large conformational changes of the F trimer. One of these changes results in assembly of two heptad repeat sequences (HRA and HRB) into a six-helix bundle (6HB) motif. To assist in distinguishing pre- and post-fusion conformations of hRSV{sub F}, we have prepared polyclonal (α-6HB) and monoclonal (R145) rabbit antibodies specific for the 6HB. Among other applications, these antibodies were used to explore the requirements of 6HB formation by isolated protein segments or peptides and by truncated mutants of the F protein. Site-directed mutagenesis and electron microscopy located the R145 epitope in the post-fusion hRSV{sub F} at a site distantly located from previously mapped epitopes, extending the repertoire of antibodies that can decorate the F molecule. - Highlights: • Antibodies specific for post-fusion respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein are described. • Polyclonal antibodies were obtained in rabbit inoculated with chimeric heptad repeats. • Antibody binding required assembly of a six-helix bundle in the post-fusion protein. • A monoclonal antibody with similar structural requirements is also described. • Binding of this antibody to the post-fusion protein was visualized by electron microscopy.

  3. Comparison of the therapeutic efficacy of 211At- and 131I-labelled monoclonal antibody MOv18 in nude mice with intraperitoneal growth of human ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Andersson, H; Palm, S; Lindegren, S; Bäck, T; Jacobsson, L; Leser, G; Horvath, G

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the therapeutic efficacy of the alpha-emitter Astatine-211 with the beta-emitter Iodine-131 bound to the specific monoclonal antibody MOv18. The measurements were performed in an ovarian cancer cell line (NIH:OVCAR 3) growing intraperitoneally in nude mice. Two weeks after the intraperitoneal inoculation of 1 x 10(7) cells of the human ovarian cancer cell line NIH:OVCAR-3 twenty mice were treated intraperitoneally with the specific monoclonal antibody MOv-18 labelled with either 211At (310-400 kBq) or 131I (5100-6200 kBq). The pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of labelled antibody in tumour-free animals were studied and the resulting bone marrow dose was estimated. When the mice were treated with 211At-labelled antibody 9 out of 10 mice were free of macro- and microscopic tumour compared to 3 out of 10 when Iodine-131 was used. The equivalent dose to the bone marrow was 2.4-3.1 Sv from 211At- and 3.4-4.1 Sv from 131I-irradiation. The therapeutic efficacy of 211At-labelled specific antibody is very good and, at approximately equivalent bone marrow doses, better than that of 131I. PMID:11299770

  4. Fully human broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against influenza A viruses generated from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Weibin; Chen, Aizhong; Miao, Yi; Xia, Shengli; Ling, Zhiyang; Xu, Ke; Wang, Tongyan; Xu, Ying; Cui, Jun; Wu, Hongqiang; Hu, Guiyu; Tian, Lin; Wang, Lingling; Shu, Yuelong; Ma, Xiaowei; Xu, Bianli; Zhang, Jin; Lin, Xiaojun; Bian, Chao; Sun, Bing

    2013-01-20

    Whether the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine can induce heterosubtypic cross-protective anti-hemagglutinin (HA) neutralizing antibodies is an important issue. We obtained a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient. Most of the monoclonal antibodies targeted the HA protein but not the HA1 fragment. Among the analyzed antibodies, seven mAbs exhibited neutralizing activity against several influenza A viruses of different subtypes. The conserved linear epitope targeted by the neutralizing mAbs (FIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHH) is part of the fusion peptide on HA2. Our work suggests that a heterosubtypic neutralizing antibody response primarily targeting the HA stem region exists in recipients of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine. The HA stem region contains various conserved neutralizing epitopes with the fusion peptide as an important one. This work may aid in the design of a universal influenza A virus vaccine.

  5. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Monoclonal Antibodies Suppress Acute Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Viremia and Limit Seeding of Cell-Associated Viral Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Pegu, Amarendra; Wang, Keyun; McGinnis, Kathleen; Nason, Martha; Foulds, Kathryn; Letukas, Valerie; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Chen, Xuejun; Todd, John Paul; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Rao, Srinivas; Michael, Nelson L.; Robb, Merlin L.; Mascola, John R.; Koup, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) administered shortly after human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection can suppress viremia and limit seeding of the viral reservoir, but lifelong treatment is required for the majority of patients. Highly potent broadly neutralizing HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) can reduce plasma viremia when administered during chronic HIV-1 infection, but the therapeutic potential of these antibodies during acute infection is unknown. We tested the ability of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein-specific broadly neutralizing MAbs to suppress acute simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) replication in rhesus macaques. Four groups of macaques were infected with SHIV-SF162P3 and received (i) the CD4-binding-site MAb VRC01; (ii) a combination of a more potent clonal relative of VRC01 (VRC07-523) and a V3 glycan-dependent MAb (PGT121); (iii) daily cART, all on day 10, just prior to expected peak plasma viremia; or (iv) no treatment. Daily cART was initiated 11 days after MAb administration and was continued for 13 weeks in all treated animals. Over a period of 11 days after a single administration, MAb treatment significantly reduced peak viremia, accelerated the decay slope, and reduced total viral replication compared to untreated controls. Proviral DNA in lymph node CD4 T cells was also diminished after treatment with the dual MAb. These data demonstrate the virological effect of potent MAbs and support future clinical trials that investigate HIV-1-neutralizing MAbs as adjunctive therapy with cART during acute HIV-1 infection. IMPORTANCE Treatment of chronic HIV-1 infection with potent broadly neutralizing HIV-1 MAbs has been shown to significantly reduce plasma viremia. However, the antiviral effect of MAb treatment during acute HIV-1 infection is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that MAbs targeting the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein both suppress acute SHIV plasma viremia and limit CD4 T cell-associated viral DNA. These

  6. Identification of a monoclonal antibody against the leptin receptor that acts as an antagonist and blocks human monocyte and T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Fazeli, Mehdi; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Hamid; Wu, Zida; Maamra, Mabrouka; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Pockley, A Graham; Watson, Philip; Matarese, Giuseppe; Strasburger, Christian J; Ross, Richard J M

    2006-05-30

    Nutritional status has a major impact on the immune response and this is in part mediated by leptin, a pro-inflammatory cytokine. Preliminary data suggest that antagonism of leptin may offer a therapeutic approach for the treatment of some inflammatory disorders. We have tested monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to the human leptin receptor (ObR) for antagonist activity using a leptin signalling bioassay. We identified a mAb, 9F8, which demonstrated dose-dependent antagonist activity in the leptin bioassay. Specificity of the mAb for ObR was confirmed using a plate binding assay. The 9F8 mAb displaced leptin binding to human ObR and enzymatically generated Fab fragments of 9F8 retained antagonist activity. Therefore the Fab fragment of 9F8 was cloned and recombinant 9F8 Fab (rFab) was purified from E. coli periplasmic fraction using a C-terminal His tag. Purified 9F8 rFab bound to human ObR and exhibited leptin antagonist activity. In vitro studies demonstrated that the 9F8 mAb inhibited leptin induced TNF-alpha production from human monocytes and anti-CD3 mAb induced proliferation of human T cells in PBMC culture. In conclusion, this study has identified a mAb to the human leptin receptor which inhibits leptin signalling and acts as a leptin antagonist in vitro. PMID:16690078

  7. Cross-reactivity of anti-human cytokine monoclonal antibodies used as a tool to identify novel immunological biomarkers in domestic ruminants.

    PubMed

    Dorneles, E M S; Araújo, M S S; Teixeira-Carvalho, A; Martins-Filho, O A; Lage, A P

    2015-01-01

    Eleven commercially available PE-labeled anti-human (IL-1-α, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, IL-17A, IL-5, IL-10, IL-12 and IL-13) and anti-mouse (IL-10, TNF-α) cytokine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were tested for cross-reactivity with cattle, goat, and sheep cytokines. Cross-reactivity was assessed by comparative analysis with the standard reactivity of the target species. Our data demonstrated that anti-human IL-1-α, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17A and IL-10 mAbs cross-react with all ruminant species tested. Anti-human IL-5 mAb showed a strong cross-reactivity with cattle and goat IL-5, while anti-human TNF-α mAb showed a selective cross-reactivity with goat TNF-α. No cross-reactivity with the ruminant cytokines was observed for anti-human IL-12 and IL-13 mAbs or for the two anti-mouse cytokine mAbs tested. The present study demonstrated the cross-reactivity of various anti-human cytokine mAbs with cattle, sheep, and goat cytokines, increasing the range of immunological biomarkers for studies in veterinary medicine. PMID:25730032

  8. Mechanistic analysis of the antitumor efficacy of human natural killer cells against breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kajitani, Keiko; Tanaka, Yuka; Arihiro, Koji; Kataoka, Tsuyoshi; Ohdan, Hideki

    2012-07-01

    We investigated the role of human natural killer (NK) cells in the peripheral blood (PB) and liver in controlling breast cancer. The proportion of NK cells among liver mononuclear cells was significantly higher than among PB mononuclear cells. Liver NK cells inductively expressed higher levels of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) than PB NK cells in response to interleukin-2 (IL-2). Liver NK cells displayed higher cytotoxicity against various breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB231, MDA-MB453, MDA-MB468, and MCF-7) after IL-2 stimulation than did PB NK cells. Anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) promoted the cytotoxicity of both the types of NK cells toward HER2-expressing cell lines. All breast cancer cell lines highly expressed death-inducing TRAIL receptors, death receptor 4, but did not express death-inhibitory receptors (DcR1 and DcR2). Both PB and liver NK cell-induced cytotoxicity was inhibited partially by anti-TRAIL mAb and more profoundly by the combination of anti-TRAIL mAb and concanamycin A, indicating that TRAIL and perforin are involved. IL-2-stimulated liver and PB NK cells exhibited upregulated expression of CXCR3, which bind to the chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 secreted by breast cancer cells. We also found that IFN-γ promoted the production of CXCL10 from breast cancer cells. The results of this study show that IFN-γ secreted from NK cells likely promotes the production of CXCL10 from breast cancer cells, which in turn accelerates the migration of CXCR3-expressing NK cells into the tumor site. These findings suggest the possibility of a therapeutic approach by either activation of endogenous PB and liver NK cells or adoptive transfer of in vitro-activated autologous NK cells. PMID:22261932

  9. Human monoclonal antibodies derived from a patient infected with 2009 pandemic influenza A virus broadly cross-neutralize group 1 influenza viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Yang; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Du, Anariwa; and others

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Influenza infection can elicit heterosubtypic antibodies to group 1 influenza virus. • Three human monoclonal antibodies were generated from an H1N1-infected patient. • The antibodies predominantly recognized α-helical stem of viral hemagglutinin (HA). • The antibodies inhibited HA structural activation during the fusion process. • The antibodies are potential candidates for future antibody therapy to influenza. - Abstract: Influenza viruses are a continuous threat to human public health because of their ability to evolve rapidly through genetic drift and reassortment. Three human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) were generated in this study, 1H11, 2H5 and 5G2, and they cross-neutralize a diverse range of group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H5N1 and H9N2. The three HuMAbs were prepared by fusing peripheral blood lymphocytes from an H1N1pdm-infected patient with a newly developed fusion partner cell line, SPYMEG. All the HuMAbs had little hemagglutination inhibition activity but had strong membrane-fusion inhibition activity against influenza viruses. A protease digestion assay showed the HuMAbs targeted commonly a short α-helix region in the stalk of the hemagglutinin. Furthermore, Ile45Phe and Glu47Gly double substitutions in the α-helix region made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAbs. These two amino acid residues are highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1, H5N1 and H9N2 viruses. The HuMAbs reported here may be potential candidates for the development of therapeutic antibodies against group 1 influenza viruses.

  10. Humanized mouse G6 anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibody has therapeutic potential against IGHV1-69 germline gene-based B-CLL.

    PubMed

    Chang, De-Kuan; Kurella, Vinodh B; Biswas, Subhabrata; Avnir, Yuval; Sui, Jianhua; Wang, Xueqian; Sun, Jiusong; Wang, Yanyan; Panditrao, Madhura; Peterson, Eric; Tallarico, Aimee; Fernandes, Stacey; Goodall, Margaret; Zhu, Quan; Brown, Jennifer R; Jefferis, Roy; Marasco, Wayne A

    2016-01-01

    In 10-20% of the cases of chronic lymphocytic leukemia of B-cell phenotype (B-CLL), the IGHV1-69 germline is utilized as VH gene of the B cell receptor (BCR). Mouse G6 (MuG6) is an anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibody discovered in a screen against rheumatoid factors (RFs) that binds with high affinity to an idiotope expressed on the 51p1 alleles of IGHV1-69 germline gene encoded antibodies (G6-id(+)). The finding that unmutated IGHV1-69 encoded BCRs are frequently expressed on B-CLL cells provides an opportunity for anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody immunotherapy. In this study, we first showed that MuG6 can deplete B cells encoding IGHV1-69 BCRs using a novel humanized GTL mouse model. Next, we humanized MuG6 and demonstrated that the humanized antibodies (HuG6s), especially HuG6.3, displayed ∼2-fold higher binding affinity for G6-id(+) antibody compared to the parental MuG6. Additional studies showed that HuG6.3 was able to kill G6-id(+) BCR expressing cells and patient B-CLL cells through antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). Finally, both MuG6 and HuG6.3 mediate in vivo depletion of B-CLL cells in NSG mice. These data suggest that HuG6.3 may provide a new precision medicine to selectively kill IGHV1-69-encoding G6-id(+) B-CLL cells. PMID:26963739

  11. Heterosubtypic Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies Cross-Protective against H5N1 and H1N1 Recovered from Human IgM+ Memory B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Throsby, Mark; van den Brink, Edward; Jongeneelen, Mandy; Poon, Leo L. M.; Alard, Philippe; Cornelissen, Lisette; Bakker, Arjen; Cox, Freek; van Deventer, Els; Guan, Yi; Cinatl, Jindrich; ter Meulen, Jan; Lasters, Ignace; Carsetti, Rita; Peiris, Malik; de Kruif, John; Goudsmit, Jaap

    2008-01-01

    Background The hemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein is the principal target of protective humoral immune responses to influenza virus infections but such antibody responses only provide efficient protection against a narrow spectrum of HA antigenic variants within a given virus subtype. Avian influenza viruses such as H5N1 are currently panzootic and pose a pandemic threat. These viruses are antigenically diverse and protective strategies need to cross protect against diverse viral clades. Furthermore, there are 16 different HA subtypes and no certainty the next pandemic will be caused by an H5 subtype, thus it is important to develop prophylactic and therapeutic interventions that provide heterosubtypic protection. Methods and Findings Here we describe a panel of 13 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recovered from combinatorial display libraries that were constructed from human IgM+ memory B cells of recent (seasonal) influenza vaccinees. The mAbs have broad heterosubtypic neutralizing activity against antigenically diverse H1, H2, H5, H6, H8 and H9 influenza subtypes. Restriction to variable heavy chain gene IGHV1-69 in the high affinity mAb panel was associated with binding to a conserved hydrophobic pocket in the stem domain of HA. The most potent antibody (CR6261) was protective in mice when given before and after lethal H5N1 or H1N1 challenge. Conclusions The human monoclonal CR6261 described in this study could be developed for use as a broad spectrum agent for prophylaxis or treatment of human or avian influenza infections without prior strain characterization. Moreover, the CR6261 epitope could be applied in targeted vaccine strategies or in the design of novel antivirals. Finally our approach of screening the IgM+ memory repertoire could be applied to identify conserved and functionally relevant targets on other rapidly evolving pathogens. PMID:19079604

  12. Isoelectric focusing-affinity immunoblot analysis of mouse monoclonal antibodies to the four human IgG subclasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Robert G.; Roebber, Marianne; Rodkey, L. Scott; Reimer, Charles B.

    1987-01-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF)/affinity immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used for parallel analysis of murine monoclonal antihuman IgG-subclass antisera (MoAbs). Coomassie Blue-stained protein bands in the pH region 5.5-8.0 were shown to be murine IgG by direct blotting onto nitrocellulose followed by detection with conjugated antimouse IgG. Use of IgG myeloma antigen-coated nitrocellulose in the IEF-affinity immunoblot allowed detection of the charge microheterogeneity of MoAbs. The MoAb group contained one to five major dense bands flanked by up to four minor fainter bands, all with pIs ranging from 6.1 to 7.8. Semiquantitative estimates of binding specificity in the IEF-affinity blot compared well with cross-reactivity data obtained from a quantitative ELISA.

  13. Production of a monoclonal antibody reactive with human dendritic reticulum cells and its use in the immunohistological analysis of lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Naiem, M; Gerdes, J; Abdulaziz, Z; Stein, H; Mason, D Y

    1983-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody (designated R4/23) which reacts strongly with human dendritic reticulum cells (DRC) is described. Immunoperoxidase staining of tissue cryostat sections revealed that this antibody reacts strongly with DRC in lymphoid follicles (both primary and secondary), and also weakly with marginal zone splenic B cells and with some peripheral follicular mantle B lymphocytes in lymph node cortical follicles. The value of antibody R4/23 is that it allows the distribution of DRC in reactive and neoplastic lymphoid tissue to be clearly delineated. Of particular interest is the fact that all cases of follicular lymphoma of germinal centre cell origin are consistently accompanied by a proliferation of DRC, even when the neoplasm is present in non-lymphoid tissue--for example, in the kidney. In contrast, DRC in B cell lymphomas of non-germinal centre origin are partially or totally obliterated. Images PMID:6338047

  14. Recognition of native and/or thermally induced denatured forms of the major food allergen, ovomucoid, by human IgE and mouse monoclonal IgG antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Junko; Kitabatake, Naofumi; Kimura, Akihiro; Narita, Hiroshi

    2004-12-01

    Human sera obtained from children with egg allergy reacted well with both native and heated ovomucoid (OM). Ovalbumin is present in egg white in a 5 times greater quantity than OM; however, it easily aggregates and becomes difficult to extract by heating. For accurate food allergen labeling of processed food, therefore, OM should be evaluated with the determination of egg white protein in consideration of heat denaturation. Three kinds of monoclonal antibodies and sandwich ELISA tests were established which are able to recognize the native and/or heat-denatured forms of OM. The usefulness of these characteristic mAbs and ELISA tests are discussed in relation to allergen labeling, monitoring food processing, and movement or change of dietary protein in vivo. PMID:15618619

  15. Structural Analysis of Human and Macaque Monoclonal Antibodies 2909 and 2.5B: Implications for the Configuration of the Quaternary Neutralizing Epitope of HIV-1 gp120

    SciTech Connect

    B Spurrier; J Sampson; M Totrov; H Li; T ONeal; C Williams; J Robinson; M Gorny; S Zolla-Pazner; X Kong

    2011-12-31

    The quaternary neutralizing epitope (QNE) of HIV-1 gp120 is preferentially expressed on the trimeric envelope spikes of intact HIV virions, and QNE-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) potently neutralize HIV-1. Here, we present the crystal structures of the Fabs of human mAb 2909 and macaque mAb 2.5B. Both mAbs have long beta hairpin CDR H3 regions >20 {angstrom} in length that are each situated at the center of their respective antigen-binding sites. Computational analysis showed that the paratopes include the whole CDR H3, while additional CDR residues form shallow binding pockets. Structural modeling suggests a way to understand the configuration of QNEs and the antigen-antibody interaction for QNE mAbs. Our data will be useful in designing immunogens that may elicit potent neutralizing QNE Abs.

  16. Recombinant Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Monoclonal Antibody Fab is Effective Therapeutically when Introduced Directly into the Lungs of RSV-Infected Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, James E., Jr.; Murphy, Brian R.; Chanock, Robert M.; Williamson, R. Anthony; Barbas, Carlos F., III; Burton, Dennis R.

    1994-02-01

    Previously, recombinant human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) monoclonal antibody Fabs were generated by antigen selection from random combinatorial libraries displayed at the tip of filamentous phage. Two such Fabs, which exhibited high binding affinity for RSV F glycoprotein (a major protective antigen), were evaluated for therapeutic efficacy in infected mice just before or at the time of peak virus replication in the lungs. Fab 19, which neutralized RSV infectivity with high efficiency in tissue culture, was effective therapeutically when delivered directly into the lungs by intranasal instillation under anesthesia. In contrast, RSV Fab 126, which failed to neutralize virus in cell culture, did not exhibit a therapeutic effect under these conditions. The amount of Fab 19 required to effect a 5000- to 12,000-fold reduction in titer of RSV in the lungs within 24 hr was rather small. In four separate experiments, a single instillation of 12.9-50 μg of RSV Fab 19 was sufficient to achieve such a reduction in pulmonary virus in a 25g mouse. The use of Fabs instead of the whole immunoglobulin molecules from which they are derived reduced the protein content of a therapeutic dose. This is important because the protein load that can be delivered effectively into the lungs is limited. The therapeutic effect of a single treatment with Fab 19 was not sustained, so that a rebound in pulmonary virus titer occurred on the 2nd day after treatment. This rebound in pulmonary RSV titer could be prevented by treating infected mice with a single dose of Fab 19 daily for 3 days. These observations suggest that human monoclonal Fabs grown in Escherichia coli may prove useful in the treatment of serious RSV disease as well as diseases caused by other viruses where replication in vivo is limited primarily to the lumenal lining of the respiratory tract.

  17. A human monoclonal antibody derived from a vaccinated volunteer recognizes heterosubtypically a novel epitope on the hemagglutinin globular head of H1 and H9 influenza A viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Panthong, Sumolrat; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Phuygun, Siripaporn; Waicharoen, Sunthareeya; Prachasupap, Apichai; Yasugi, Mayo; Ono, Ken-ichiro; and others

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • A human monoclonal antibody against influenza virus was produced from a volunteer. • The antibody was generated from the PBMCs of the volunteer using the fusion method. • The antibody neutralized heterosubtypically group 1 influenza A viruses (H1 and H9). • The antibody targeted a novel epitope in globular head region of the hemagglutinin. • Sequences of the identified epitope are highly conserved among H1 and H9 subtypes. - Abstract: Most neutralizing antibodies elicited during influenza virus infection or by vaccination have a narrow spectrum because they usually target variable epitopes in the globular head region of hemagglutinin (HA). In this study, we describe a human monoclonal antibody (HuMAb), 5D7, that was prepared from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of a vaccinated volunteer using the fusion method. The HuMAb heterosubtypically neutralizes group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H9N2, with a strong hemagglutinin inhibition activity. Selection of an escape mutant showed that the HuMAb targets a novel conformational epitope that is located in the HA head region but is distinct from the receptor binding site. Furthermore, Phe114Ile substitution in the epitope made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAb. Amino acid residues in the predicted epitope region are also highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1 and H9N2. The HuMAb reported here may be a potential candidate for the development of therapeutic/prophylactic antibodies against H1 and H9 influenza viruses.

  18. Trastuzumab, but Not Pertuzumab, Dysregulates HER2 Signaling to Mediate Inhibition of Autophagy and Increase in Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Human Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Nishant; Shen, Yi; Endo, Yukinori; ElZarrad, M Khair; Wu, Wen Jin

    2016-06-01

    Dysregulation of autophagy has been implicated in various cardiovascular diseases. Trastuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody, binds to HER2 domain IV and is approved for the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer. Trastuzumab therapy is associated with considerable cardiotoxicity, the mechanism of which remains unclear. HER2 signaling plays a pivotal role in cardiomyocyte development and survival and is essential for the prevention of cardiomyopathy. However, a direct link has not been confirmed between trastuzumab-induced cardiomyopathy and impaired HER2 signaling. Our data reveal a novel mechanism by which trastuzumab dysregulates HER2 signaling and impairs basal autophagic process in human primary cardiomyocytes. Specifically, trastuzumab treatment leads to the phosphorylation of HER1-Y845 and HER2-Y1248 and the activation of Erk. This in turn results in upregulation of mTOR signaling pathway and subsequently inhibition of autophagy in primary cardiomyocytes and C57BL/6 mice. Trastuzumab-induced downregulation of autophagy is further supported by the fact that trastuzumab treatment reduces protein levels of autophagosome-associated signaling molecules such as Atg 5-12, Atg 7, Atg 14, and Beclin 1. We further demonstrated that trastuzumab-mediated inhibition of autophagy resulted in the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiomyocytes. Pertuzumab, another anti-HER2 therapeutic mAb binding to HER2 domain II, fails to modulate HER2 signaling and is unable to inhibit autophagy and to increase ROS production in cardiomyocytes. This study provides novel mechanistic insights into trastuzumab-induced cardiotoxicity, which may assist in formulating novel approaches for clinical management of trastuzumab-induced cardiomyopathy. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1321-31. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197303

  19. A human monoclonal antibody against HPV16 recognizes an immunodominant and neutralizing epitope partially overlapping with that of H16.V5

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Lin; Xian, Yangfei; Wang, Daning; Chen, Yuanzhi; Huang, Xiaofen; Bi, Xingjian; Yu, Hai; Fu, Zheng; Liu, Xinlin; Li, Shaowei; An, Zhiqiang; Luo, Wenxin; Zhao, Qinjian; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-01-01

    The presence of neutralizing epitopes in human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 virus-like particles (VLPs) is the structural basis of prophylactic vaccines. An anti-HPV16 neutralizing monoclonal antibody (N-mAb) 26D1 was isolated from a memory B cell of a human vaccinee. The pre-binding of heparan sulfate to VLPs inhibited the binding of both N-mAbs to the antigen, indicating that the epitopes are critical for viral cell attachment/entry. Hybrid VLP binding with surface loop swapping between types indicated the essential roles of the DE and FG loops for both 26D1 (DEa in particular) and H16.V5 binding. Specifically, Tyr135 and Val141 on the DEa loop were shown to be critical residues for 26D1 binding via site-directed mutagenesis. Partially overlap between the epitopes between 26D1 and H16.V5 was shown using pairwise epitope mapping, and their binding difference is demonstrated to be predominantly in DE loop region. In addition, 26D1 epitope is immunodominant epitope recognized by both antibodies elicited by the authentic virus from infected individuals and polyclonal antibodies from vaccinees. Overall, a partially overlapping but distinct neutralizing epitope from that of H16.V5 was identified using a human N-mAb, shedding lights to the antibody arrays as part of human immune response to vaccination and infection. PMID:26750243

  20. Conserved epitopes on the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase proteins of human and bovine parainfluenza type 3 viruses: nucleotide sequence analysis of variants selected with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Coelingh, K J; Winter, C C; Murphy, B R; Rice, J M; Kimball, P C; Olmsted, R A; Collins, P L

    1986-01-01

    We have previously identified 11 epitopes located in two topologically nonoverlapping antigenic sites (A and B) and a third bridging site (C) on the human type 3 parainfluenza virus (PIV3) hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein by using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) which inhibit hemagglutination and virus infectivity (K. L. Coelingh, C. C. Winter, and B. R. Murphy, Virology 143:569-582, 1985). We have identified three additional antigenic sites (D, E, and F) on the HN molecule by competitive-binding assays of anti-HN MAbs which have no known biological activity. Epitopes in sites A, D, and F are conserved on the bovine PIV3 HN glycoprotein and also among a wide range of human isolates. The dideoxy method was used to identify nucleotide substitutions in the HN genes of antigenic variants selected with neutralizing MAbs representing epitopes in site A which are shared by human and bovine PIV3. The deduced amino acid substitutions in the variants were located in separate hydrophilic stretches of HN residues which are conserved in the primary structures of the HN proteins of both human and bovine PIV3 strains. Images PMID:2427750

  1. In situ characterization of antigenic and functional tissue factor expression in human tumors utilizing monoclonal antibodies and recombinant factor VIIa as probes.

    PubMed Central

    Contrino, J.; Hair, G. A.; Schmeizl, M. A.; Rickles, F. R.; Kreutzer, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF), the primary initiator of blood coagulation in vivo, is expressed in vitro by a variety of cells. Previous efforts to localize TF in tissue and cells have been limited principally to the use of immunological techniques. In the present study, we describe a novel functional probe for TF expression, which can be utilized to localize functional TF in situ in human cells and tissues. This probe, a biotinylated phe-pro-arg-chloro-methyl-ketone-labeled rVIIa (FPR-ck-VIIa), interacts with TF via high-affinity binding sites. The binding of FPR-ck-VIIa, therefore, can be correlated with the ability of TF to activate clotting. In the described studies, TF antigen (TF:Ag) expression was examined immunohistochemically with various TF-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and was correlated with functional TF expression using our novel TF-binding probe (eg, FPR-ck-VIIa). Initial results indicate that TF:Ag expression correlates with the expression of functional TF (TF:VIIa), and the specificity of both types of probes was confirmed. Parallel antigenic and functional TF expression in situ was demonstrated in various human tumors. We believe this to be the first demonstration of functional TF in situ in human cells and tissues. We suggest that FPR-ck-VIIa should prove a useful reagent for studying the role of TF in the pathogenesis of clotting complications of human disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:7992837

  2. A human monoclonal antibody against HPV16 recognizes an immunodominant and neutralizing epitope partially overlapping with that of H16.V5.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lin; Xian, Yangfei; Wang, Daning; Chen, Yuanzhi; Huang, Xiaofen; Bi, Xingjian; Yu, Hai; Fu, Zheng; Liu, Xinlin; Li, Shaowei; An, Zhiqiang; Luo, Wenxin; Zhao, Qinjian; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-01-01

    The presence of neutralizing epitopes in human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 virus-like particles (VLPs) is the structural basis of prophylactic vaccines. An anti-HPV16 neutralizing monoclonal antibody (N-mAb) 26D1 was isolated from a memory B cell of a human vaccinee. The pre-binding of heparan sulfate to VLPs inhibited the binding of both N-mAbs to the antigen, indicating that the epitopes are critical for viral cell attachment/entry. Hybrid VLP binding with surface loop swapping between types indicated the essential roles of the DE and FG loops for both 26D1 (DEa in particular) and H16.V5 binding. Specifically, Tyr(135) and Val(141) on the DEa loop were shown to be critical residues for 26D1 binding via site-directed mutagenesis. Partially overlap between the epitopes between 26D1 and H16.V5 was shown using pairwise epitope mapping, and their binding difference is demonstrated to be predominantly in DE loop region. In addition, 26D1 epitope is immunodominant epitope recognized by both antibodies elicited by the authentic virus from infected individuals and polyclonal antibodies from vaccinees. Overall, a partially overlapping but distinct neutralizing epitope from that of H16.V5 was identified using a human N-mAb, shedding lights to the antibody arrays as part of human immune response to vaccination and infection. PMID:26750243

  3. Anti-CS1 humanized monoclonal antibody HuLuc63 inhibits myeloma cell adhesion and induces antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in the bone marrow milieu.

    PubMed

    Tai, Yu-Tzu; Dillon, Myles; Song, Weihua; Leiba, Merav; Li, Xian-Feng; Burger, Peter; Lee, Alfred I; Podar, Klaus; Hideshima, Teru; Rice, Audie G; van Abbema, Anne; Jesaitis, Lynne; Caras, Ingrid; Law, Debbie; Weller, Edie; Xie, Wanling; Richardson, Paul; Munshi, Nikhil C; Mathiot, Claire; Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Afar, Daniel E H; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2008-08-15

    Currently, no approved monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapies exist for human multiple myeloma (MM). Here we characterized cell surface CS1 as a novel MM antigen and further investigated the potential therapeutic utility of HuLuc63, a humanized anti-CS1 mAb, for treating human MM. CS1 mRNA and protein was highly expressed in CD138-purified primary tumor cells from the majority of MM patients (more than 97%) with low levels of circulating CS1 detectable in MM patient sera, but not in healthy donors. CS1 was expressed at adhesion-promoting uropod membranes of polarized MM cells, and short interfering RNA (siRNA) targeted to CS1 inhibited MM cell adhesion to bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). HuLuc63 inhibited MM cell binding to BMSCs and induced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against MM cells in dose-dependent and CS1-specific manners. HuLuc63 triggered autologous ADCC against primary MM cells resistant to conventional or novel therapies, including bortezomib and HSP90 inhibitor; and pretreatment with conventional or novel anti-MM drugs markedly enhanced HuLuc63-induced MM cell lysis. Administration of HuLuc63 significantly induces tumor regression in multiple xenograft models of human MM. These results thus define the functional significance of CS1 in MM and provide the preclinical rationale for testing HuLuc63 in clinical trials, either alone or in combination. PMID:17906076

  4. Dengue Virus prM-Specific Human Monoclonal Antibodies with Virus Replication-Enhancing Properties Recognize a Single Immunodominant Antigenic Site

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Scott A.; Nivarthi, Usha K.; de Alwis, Ruklanthi; Kose, Nurgun; Sapparapu, Gopal; Bombardi, Robin; Kahle, Kristen M.; Pfaff, Jennifer M.; Lieberman, Sherri; Doranz, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The proposed antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) mechanism for severe dengue virus (DENV) disease suggests that non-neutralizing serotype cross-reactive antibodies generated during a primary infection facilitate entry into Fc receptor bearing cells during secondary infection, resulting in enhanced viral replication and severe disease. One group of cross-reactive antibodies that contributes considerably to this serum profile target the premembrane (prM) protein. We report here the isolation of a large panel of naturally occurring human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) obtained from subjects following primary DENV serotype 1, 2, or 3 or secondary natural DENV infections or following primary DENV serotype 1 live attenuated virus vaccination to determine the antigenic landscape on the prM protein that is recognized by human antibodies. We isolated 25 prM-reactive human MAbs, encoded by diverse antibody-variable genes. Competition-binding studies revealed that all of the antibodies bound to a single major antigenic site on prM. Alanine scanning-based shotgun mutagenesis epitope mapping studies revealed diverse patterns of fine specificity of various clones, suggesting that different antibodies use varied binding poses to recognize several overlapping epitopes within the immunodominant site. Several of the antibodies interacted with epitopes on both prM and E protein residues. Despite the diverse genetic origins of the antibodies and differences in the fine specificity of their epitopes, each of these prM-reactive antibodies was capable of enhancing the DENV infection of Fc receptor-bearing cells. IMPORTANCE Antibodies may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of enhanced DENV infection and disease during secondary infections. A substantial proportion of enhancing antibodies generated in response to natural dengue infection are directed toward the prM protein. The fine specificity of human prM antibodies is not understood. Here, we isolated a panel of dengue pr

  5. Reactivity of anti-glycophorin monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) in tests with red cells of non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Blancher, A; Socha, W W; Reid, M E

    1997-01-01

    Seventy Mabs against human glycophorins (GP) and band 3 were tested with red blood cells (RBCs) of various non-human primates, from anthropoid apes to monkeys. Differences among Mabs reactivity in tests with non-human primate RBCs reflect the complexity of the immune reactions to human GPs and provide insights into aspects of evolution and a tool to epitope map. PMID:9095507

  6. Human monoclonal antiphospholipid antibodies disrupt the annexin A5 anticoagulant crystal shield on phospholipid bilayers: evidence from atomic force microscopy and functional assay.

    PubMed

    Rand, Jacob H; Wu, Xiao-Xuan; Quinn, Anthony S; Chen, Pojen P; McCrae, Keith R; Bovill, Edwin G; Taatjes, Douglas J

    2003-09-01

    The antiphospholipid (aPL) syndrome is an autoimmune condition that is marked by recurrent pregnancy losses and/or systemic vascular thrombosis in patients who have antibodies against phospholipid/co-factor complexes. The mechanism(s) for pregnancy losses and thrombosis in this condition is (are) not known. Annexin A5 is a potent anticoagulant protein, expressed by placental trophoblasts and endothelial cells, that crystallizes over anionic phospholipids, shielding them from availability for coagulation reactions. We previously presented data supporting the hypothesis that aPL antibody-mediated disruption of the anticoagulant annexin A5 shield could be a thrombogenic mechanism in the aPL syndrome. However, this has remained a subject of controversy. We therefore used atomic force microscopy, a method previously used to study the crystallization of annexin A5, to image the effects of monoclonal human aPL antibodies on the crystal structure of the protein over phospholipid bilayers. In the presence of the aPL monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and beta(2)-GPI, the major aPL co-factor, structures presumed to be aPL mAb-antigen complexes were associated with varying degrees of disruption to the annexin A5 crystallization pattern over the bilayer. In addition, measurements of prothrombinase activity on the phospholipid bilayers showed that the aPL mAbs reduced the anti-coagulant effect of annexin A5 and promoted thrombin generation. These data provide morphological evidence that support the hypothesis that aPL antibodies can disrupt annexin A5 binding to phospholipid membranes and permit increased generation of thrombin. The aPL antibody-mediated disruption of the annexin A5 anticoagulant shield may be an important prothrombotic mechanism in the aPL syndrome. PMID:12937161

  7. A humanized monoclonal antibody neutralizes yellow fever virus strain 17D-204 in vitro but does not protect a mouse model from disease.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Amanda E; Dixon, Kandice L; Piper, Joseph; Bennett, Susan L; Thibodeaux, Brett A; Barrett, Alan D T; Roehrig, John T; Blair, Carol D

    2016-07-01

    The yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D-204 is considered safe and effective, yet rare severe adverse events (SAEs), some resulting in death, have been documented following vaccination. Individuals exhibiting post-vaccinal SAEs are ideal candidates for antiviral monoclonal antibody (MAb) therapy; the time until appearance of clinical signs post-exposure is usually short and patients are quickly hospitalized. We previously developed a murine-human chimeric monoclonal antibody (cMAb), 2C9-cIgG, reactive with both virulent YFV and 17D-204, and demonstrated its ability to prevent and treat YF disease in both AG129 mouse and hamster models of infection. To counteract possible selection of 17D-204 variants that escape neutralization by treatment with a single MAb (2C9-cIgG), we developed a second cMAb, 864-cIgG, for use in combination with 2C9-cIgG in post-vaccinal therapy. MAb 864-cIgG recognizes/neutralizes only YFV 17D-204 vaccine substrain and binds to domain III (DIII) of the viral envelope protein, which is different from the YFV type-specific binding site of 2C9-cIgG in DII. Although it neutralized 17D-204 in vitro, administration of 864-cIgG had no protective capacity in the interferon receptor-deficient AG129 mouse model of 17D-204 infection. The data presented here show that although DIII-specific 864-cIgG neutralizes virus infectivity in vitro, it does not have the ability to abrogate disease in vivo. Therefore, combination of 864-cIgG with 2C9-cIgG for treatment of YF vaccination SAEs does not appear to provide an improvement on 2C9-cIgG therapy alone. PMID:27126613

  8. Correlation of ADCC activity with cytokine release induced by the stably expressed, glyco-engineered humanized Lewis Y-specific monoclonal antibody MB314

    PubMed Central

    Kircheis, Ralf; Halanek, Nicole; Koller, Iris; Jost, Wolfgang; Schuster, Manfred; Gorr, Gilbert; Hajszan, Klaus; Nechansky, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    A major limitation to the application of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is their reduced in vivo efficacy compared with the high efficacy measured in vitro. Effector functions such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) are dramatically reduced in vivo by the presence of high amounts of endogenous IgG in the serum. Recent studies have shown that modification of the glycosylation moieties attached to the Fc part of the mAb can enhance binding affinity to FcγRIIIα receptors on natural killer cells and thus may counteract the reduced in vivo efficacy. In the present study, a humanized IgG1/κ monoclonal antibody recognizing the tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen Lewis Y was stably produced in a moss expression system that allows glyco-engineering. The glyco-modified mAb (designated MB314) showed a highly homogeneous N-glycosylation pattern lacking core-fucose. A side-by-side comparison to its parental counterpart produced in conventional mammalian cell-culture (MB311, formerly known as IGN311) by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis confirmed that the target specificity of MB314 is similar to that of MB311. In contrast, ADCC effector function of MB314 was increased up to 40-fold whereas complement dependent cytotoxicity activity was decreased 5-fold. Notably, a release of immunostimulatory cytokines, including interferon γ, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was particularly induced with the glyco-modified antibody. TNF release was associated with CD14+ cells, indicating activation of monocytes. PMID:22665069

  9. Human cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis in Santiago del Estero, Argentina: identification of parasites by monoclonal antibodies and isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Cuba, C A; Torno, C O; Ledesma, O; Visciarelli, E; Garcia, S; Prat, M I; Costamagna, R; Barbieri, L; Evans, D A

    1996-01-01

    Diagnostic and parasite characterization and identification studies were carried out in human patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions in Santiago del Estero, Northern Province of Argentina. Diagnostic procedures were biopsies of lesions for smears and inoculations in hamster, needle aspirations of material from ulcers for "in vitro" cultures. Immunodiagnostic techniques applied were IFAT-IgG and Montenegro skin test. Primary isolation of eight stocks of leishmanial parasites was achieved from patients with active lesions. All stocks were biologically characterized by their behaviour in hamster, measurements of amastigote and promastigotes and growth "in vitro". Eight stocks were characterized and identified at species level by their reactivity to a cross-panel of sub-genus and species-specific Monoclonal Antibodies through an Indirect Immunofluorescence technique and a Dot-ELISA. We conclude from the serodeme analysis of Argentina stocks that: stocks MHOM/AR/92/SE-1; SE-2; SE-4; SE-8; SE-8-I; SE-30; SE-34 and SE-36 are Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis. Three Leishmania stocks (SE-1; SE-2 and SE-30) did not react with one highly species-specific Monoclonal Antibody (Clone: B-18, Leishmania-(Viannia) braziliensis marker) disclosing two serodeme group patterns. Five out of eight soluble extracts of leishmanial promastigotes were electrophoresed on thin-layer starch gels and examined for the enzyme MPI, Mannose Phosphate Isomerase; MDH, Malate Dehydrogenase; 6PGD, 6 Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase; NH, Nucleoside Hydrolase, 2-deoxyinosine as substrate; SOD, Superoxide Dismutase; GPI, Glucose Phosphate Isomerase and ES, Esterase. From the isoenzyme studies we concluded that stocks: MHOM/AR/92/SE-1; SE-2; SE-4; SE-8 and SE-8-I are isoenzymatically Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis. We need to analyze more enzymes before assigning them to a braziliensis zymodeme. PMID:9293087

  10. The human epithelial carcinoma antigen recognized by monoclonal antibody AE3 is expressed on a sulfoglycolipid in addition to neoplastic mucins

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Angelina S.; Liu, Yan; Childs, Robert A.; Herbert, Colin; Wang, Denong; Chai, Wengang; Feizi, Ten

    2011-01-01

    The term human epithelial carcinoma antigen (HCA) has been applied collectively to mucin-type high molecular weight (>1000 kDa) glycoproteins that are over-expressed in epithelial cancers. Since the 1990s, over 40 monoclonal antibodies have been raised that recognize HCA. There has been evidence that the antigenic determinants are mostly carbohydrates, but details have been elusive. Here we have carried out carbohydrate microarray in analyses of one of the monoclonal antibodies, AE3, that has been regarded the ‘most carcinoma specific’ in respect to its ability to detect HCA in sera of patients with epithelial cancers. The microarrays encompassed a series of 492 sequence-defined glycan probes in the form of glycolipids and neoglycolipids. We have thus established that the antigen recognized by antibody AE3 is a carbohydrate sequence distinct from the A, B, H, Lewisa/b, Lewisx/y and T antigens, but that it is strongly expressed on the monosulfated tetra-glycosyl ceramide, SM1a, Galβ1-3GalNAcβ1-4(3-O-sulfate)Galβ1-4GlcCer. This is the first report of an anti-HCA to be characterized with respect to its recognition sequence and of the occurrence of the antigen on a glycolipid as well as on glycoproteins. Knowledge of a discrete glycan sequence as target antigen now opens the way to its exploration as a serologic cancer biomarker, namely to determine if the antigen elicits an autoantibody response in early non-metastatic cancer, or if it is shed and immunochemically detectable in more advanced disease. PMID:21527252

  11. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, R.O.

    1984-01-01

    Potential uses of monoclonal antibodies in anti-cancer treatment include passive serotherapy, radioisotope conjugates, toxin-linked conjugates, and chemotherapy-monoclonal antibody conjugates. The bases for these applications have been founded in research with heterologous antisera, and in some cases with monoclonal antibodies in animal tumor models. Human trials with passive serotherapy have already begun in both hematopoietic and solid tumor malignancies. Promising results have been reported in cutaneous T cell lymphoma with anti-T cell monoclonal antibody, and in nodular lymphoma with anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody. Radioisotope conjugate work appears promising for imaging in both animals and humans, and this work will lay the foundation for possible therapeutic application of radio-immunotherapy. Toxin-linked conjugates are promising in vitro and may have application in autologous bone marrow transplantation. Research with chemotherapy conjugates is also underway. Preliminary results suggest that murine monoclonal antibodies will be well tolerated clinically except in the setting of circulating cells which bear the target antigen, where rapid infusions may be associated with intolerable side effects. In certain diseases, production of endogenous anti-mouse antibodies may also limit application. Advances in the technology for human-human hybridoma production may help solve some of these problems. 132 references.

  12. Isolation and characterization of the integral glycosaminoglycan constituents of human amyloid A and monoclonal light-chain amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, S R; Lyon, M; Gallagher, J T; Johnson, E A; Pepys, M B

    1991-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils were isolated by extraction in water from the livers and spleens of four patients who had died of monoclonal, light-chain (AL)-type, systemic amyloidosis and one with reactive systemic, amyloid A protein (AA)-type amyloidosis. Each fibril preparation contained 1-2% by weight of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) which was tightly associated with the fibrils and not just co-isolated from the tissues with them. After exhaustive digestion of the fibrils with papain and Pronase, the GAGs were specifically precipitated with cetylpyridinium chloride and were identified by cellulose acetate electrophoresis and selective susceptibility to specific glycosidases. All the preparations contained approximately equal amounts of heparan sulphate and dermatan sulphate. There was no evidence for the presence of chondroitin sulphate or other GAGs. Fine structural analysis by oligosaccharide mapping in gradient polyacrylamide gels, following partial digestion with specific glycosidases, showed very similar structures among the heparan sulphates and the dermatan sulphates, respectively. GAGs were also extracted by solubilizing amyloid fibrils in 4 M-guanidinium chloride followed by CsCl density-gradient ultracentrifugation. Although a minor proportion of the GAG material obtained in this way was apparently in the form of proteoglycan molecules, most of it was free GAG chains. The presence in amyloid fibrils of different types, in different organs and from different patients of particular GAG classes with similar structures supports the view that these molecules may be of pathogenic significance. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:1902087

  13. Characterization of a Novel Anti-Human HB-EGF Monoclonal Antibody Applicable for Paraffin-Embedded Tissues and Diagnosis of HB-EGF-Related Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Ryo; Takagi, Mika; Akatsuka, Jun-ichi; Ono, Ken-ichiro; Kishi, Yoshiro

    2016-01-01

    Heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is a member of the EGF family of growth factors that bind to and activate the EGF receptor (EGFR/ErbB1) and ErbB4. HB-EGF plays pivotal roles in pathophysiological processes, including cancer. Thus, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for HB-EGF detection could be an important tool in the therapeutic diagnosis of HB-EGF-related cancers and other diseases. However, few mAbs, especially those applicable for immunohistochemistry (IHC), have been established to date. In this study, we generated a clone of hybridoma-derived mAb 2-108 by immunizing mice with recombinant human HB-EGF protein expressed by human cells. The mAb 2-108 specifically bound to human HB-EGF but not to mouse HB-EGF and was successful in immunoblotting, even under reducing conditions, immunoprecipitation, and immunofluorescence for unfixed as well as paraformaldehyde-fixed cells. Notably, this mAb was effective in IHC of paraffin-embedded tumor specimens. Epitope mapping analysis showed that mAb 2-108 recognized the N-terminal prodomain in HB-EGF. These results indicate that this new anti-HB-EGF mAb 2-108 would be useful in the diagnosis of HB-EGF-related cancers and would be a strong tool in both basic and clinical research on HB-EGF. PMID:26974561

  14. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies to human group B rotavirus and their use in an antigen detection enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, J W; Welch, S K; Nakata, S; Estes, M K

    1989-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs)--B5C9, B5E4, and B10G10--to human group B rotavirus, an agent implicated in epidemic outbreaks of diarrhea in the People's Republic of China, primarily in adults, were prepared. MAb reactivity was decreased when virus preparations were treated with EDTA, suggesting reactivity with the outer-capsid protein(s). Competition experiments suggested that these MAbs recognize overlapping epitopes within a single antigenic site. A simple antigen detection enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) specific for the human group B rotavirus was established by using these MAbs as capture antibodies. Fifteen clinical samples obtained from three epidemic areas in the People's Republic of China and previously shown by Chinese scientists to contain group B virus were all positive in the MAb capture antigen detection ELISA, whereas none of the 57 samples lacking the group B virus reacted in the test. The results suggest that this MAb capture antigen detection ELISA will be useful to identify outbreaks caused by the human group B rotavirus and to monitor possible spread of the virus. Images PMID:2536755

  15. Antibody response to HER2 extracellular domain and subdomains in mouse following DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Sadri-Ardalani, Fateme; Shabani, Mahdi; Amiri, Mohammad Mehdi; Bahadori, Motahareh; Emami, Shaghayegh; Sarrafzadeh, Ali Reza; Noutash-Haghighat, Farzaneh; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Shokri, Fazel

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is overexpressed in 15-20 % of breast cancer patients and is an appropriate target for immunotherapy in these patients. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific to HER2 are currently applied to treat breast cancer patients with HER2 overexpression. Active immunization with HER2 DNA or protein has been considered as a suitable alternative. The aim of this study is to evaluate anti-HER2 antibody response in serum of mice immunized with DNA constructs containing full extracellular domain (fECD) or subdomains of human HER2. Four extracellular subdomains and also fECD of HER2 were cloned into pCMV6-Neo vector. Different groups of Balb/C mice were immunized with HER2 DNA constructs and boosted with HER2 recombinant protein. The anti-HER2 antibody was subsequently determined by ELISA, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemistry. Anti-HER2 antibody was detected only in serum of mice immunized with fECD DNA. None of HER2 extracellular subdomains induced appreciable levels of anti-HER2 antibody. However, boosting with fECD or extracellular subdomain III (DIII) recombinant protein resulted in enhanced anti-HER2 fECD as well as anti-HER2 subdomain antibody responses. In this regard, almost all (99 %) of HER2-overexpressing BT474 cells could be detected by serum antibody from mice immunized with HER2 subdomain DNA and boosted with recombinant HER2 protein by flow cytometry. Similarly, serum of mice immunized with DIII DNA construct and boosted with recombinant DIII protein could also recognize these cells, but to a lesser extent (50 %). Our findings suggest that combination of HER2 DNA and protein immunization could effectively induce anti-HER2 antibody response in Balb/C mice. PMID:26282003

  16. AGIA Tag System Based on a High Affinity Rabbit Monoclonal Antibody against Human Dopamine Receptor D1 for Protein Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Tomoya; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Uematsu, Atsushi; Yamanaka, Satoshi; Nomura, Shunsuke; Nemoto, Keiichirou; Iwasaki, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sawasaki, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Polypeptide tag technology is widely used for protein detection and affinity purification. It consists of two fundamental elements: a peptide sequence and a binder which specifically binds to the peptide tag. In many tag systems, antibodies have been used as binder due to their high affinity and specificity. Recently, we obtained clone Ra48, a high-affinity rabbit monoclonal antibody (mAb) against dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1). Here, we report a novel tag system composed of Ra48 antibody and its epitope sequence. Using a deletion assay, we identified EEAAGIARP in the C-terminal region of DRD1 as the minimal epitope of Ra48 mAb, and we named this sequence the “AGIA” tag, based on its central sequence. The tag sequence does not include the four amino acids, Ser, Thr, Tyr, or Lys, which are susceptible to post-translational modification. We demonstrated performance of this new tag system in biochemical and cell biology applications. SPR analysis demonstrated that the affinity of the Ra48 mAb to the AGIA tag was 4.90 × 10−9 M. AGIA tag showed remarkably high sensitivity and specificity in immunoblotting. A number of AGIA-fused proteins overexpressed in animal and plant cells were detected by anti-AGIA antibody in immunoblotting and immunostaining with low background, and were immunoprecipitated efficiently. Furthermore, a single amino acid substitution of the second Glu to Asp (AGIA/E2D) enabled competitive dissociation of AGIA/E2D-tagged protein by adding wild-type AGIA peptide. It enabled one-step purification of AGIA/E2D-tagged recombinant proteins by peptide competition under physiological conditions. The sensitivity and specificity of the AGIA system makes it suitable for use in multiple methods for protein analysis. PMID:27271343

  17. AGIA Tag System Based on a High Affinity Rabbit Monoclonal Antibody against Human Dopamine Receptor D1 for Protein Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yano, Tomoya; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Uematsu, Atsushi; Yamanaka, Satoshi; Nomura, Shunsuke; Nemoto, Keiichirou; Iwasaki, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sawasaki, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Polypeptide tag technology is widely used for protein detection and affinity purification. It consists of two fundamental elements: a peptide sequence and a binder which specifically binds to the peptide tag. In many tag systems, antibodies have been used as binder due to their high affinity and specificity. Recently, we obtained clone Ra48, a high-affinity rabbit monoclonal antibody (mAb) against dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1). Here, we report a novel tag system composed of Ra48 antibody and its epitope sequence. Using a deletion assay, we identified EEAAGIARP in the C-terminal region of DRD1 as the minimal epitope of Ra48 mAb, and we named this sequence the "AGIA" tag, based on its central sequence. The tag sequence does not include the four amino acids, Ser, Thr, Tyr, or Lys, which are susceptible to post-translational modification. We demonstrated performance of this new tag system in biochemical and cell biology applications. SPR analysis demonstrated that the affinity of the Ra48 mAb to the AGIA tag was 4.90 × 10-9 M. AGIA tag showed remarkably high sensitivity and specificity in immunoblotting. A number of AGIA-fused proteins overexpressed in animal and plant cells were detected by anti-AGIA antibody in immunoblotting and immunostaining with low background, and were immunoprecipitated efficiently. Furthermore, a single amino acid substitution of the second Glu to Asp (AGIA/E2D) enabled competitive dissociation of AGIA/E2D-tagged protein by adding wild-type AGIA peptide. It enabled one-step purification of AGIA/E2D-tagged recombinant proteins by peptide competition under physiological conditions. The sensitivity and specificity of the AGIA system makes it suitable for use in multiple methods for protein analysis. PMID:27271343

  18. Improved performance and quantitative detection of copro-antigens by a monoclonal antibody based ELISA to diagnose human opisthorchiasis.

    PubMed

    Watwiengkam, Nattaya; Sithithaworn, Jiraporn; Duenngai, Kunyarat; Sripa, Banchob; Laha, Thewarach; Johansen, Maria Vang; Sithithaworn, Paiboon

    2013-12-01

    Copro-antigen detection has been advocated as a promising method for diagnosis of opisthorchiasis, particularly in people that harbored light infection or have had recent drug treatment. This study aimed to improve performance of a monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Mab-ELISA) for detection of Opisthorchis viverrini copro-antigen and assess the correlation between copro-antigen and intensity of infection. Four different treatment methods of 71 samples from the Lawa endemic area, Khon Kaen province were assessed for copro-antigen detection, namely (1) phosphate buffer saline (PBS), (2) heating (70°C 30min), (3) alkaline (pH 9.6 in carbonate buffer), and (4) trichloroacetic acid (TCA) treatment. Comparison of these protocols showed that the TCA method gave the best performance in discriminating O. viverrini positive and negative samples with high sensitivity (97.9%) and moderate specificity (54.2%) compared with other methods. Application of TCA-based Mab-ELISA method for antigen detection in fecal samples obtained from an endemic area of opisthorchiasis revealed that 86 of 141 samples (61.0%) were positive compared with 68 (48.2%) by PBS-based protocol, while the formalin ethyl-acetate concentration technique (FECT) yielded a positive proportion of 71.6%. Among 40 egg-negative samples confirmed by a gold standard parasitological method (FECT) from the same endemic area, 19 (47.5%) were positive by the TCA-based while only 6 (15%) were positive by PBS-based Mab-ELISA protocol. In addition, levels of antigen detection significantly correlated with intensity of infection (egg per gram feces). The results show that the improved Mab-ELISA method has high sensitivity and also quantifiable diagnosis of opisthorchiasis. PMID:24055716

  19. A Non-VH1-69 Heterosubtypic Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibody Protects Mice against H1N1 and H5N1 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Solforosi, Laura; Moreno, Guisella J.; Sun, Xiangjie; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Gubareva, Larisa V.; Mishin, Vasiliy; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Influenza viruses are among the most important human pathogens and are responsible for annual epidemics and sporadic, potentially devastating pandemics. The humoral immune response plays an important role in the defense against these viruses, providing protection mainly by producing antibodies directed against the hemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein. However, their high genetic variability allows the virus to evade the host immune response and the potential protection offered by seasonal vaccines. The emergence of resistance to antiviral drugs in recent years further limits the options available for the control of influenza. The development of alternative strategies for influenza prophylaxis and therapy is therefore urgently needed. In this study, we describe a human monoclonal antibody (PN-SIA49) that recognizes a highly conserved epitope located on the stem region of the HA and able to neutralize a broad spectrum of influenza viruses belonging to different subtypes (H1, H2 and H5). Furthermore, we describe its protective activity in mice after lethal challenge with H1N1 and H5N1 viruses suggesting a potential application in the treatment of influenza virus infections. PMID:22496802

  20. Neutralization of West Nile virus by cross-linking of its surface proteins with Fab fragments of the human monoclonal antibody CR4354

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, Bärbel; Vogt, Matthew R.; Goudsmit, Jaap; Holdaway, Heather A.; Aksyuk, Anastasia A.; Chipman, Paul R.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Diamond, Michael S.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-11-15

    Many flaviviruses are significant human pathogens, with the humoral immune response playing an essential role in restricting infection and disease. CR4354, a human monoclonal antibody isolated from a patient, neutralizes West Nile virus (WNV) infection at a postattachment stage in the viral life-cycle. Here, we determined the structure of WNV complexed with Fab fragments of CR4354 using cryoelectron microscopy. The outer glycoprotein shell of a mature WNV particle is formed by 30 rafts of three homodimers of the viral surface protein E. CR4354 binds to a discontinuous epitope formed by protein segments from two neighboring E molecules, but does not cause any detectable structural disturbance on the viral surface. The epitope occurs at two independent positions within an icosahedral asymmetric unit, resulting in 120 binding sites on the viral surface. The cross-linking of the six E monomers within one raft by four CR4354 Fab fragments suggests that the antibody neutralizes WNV by blocking the pH-induced rearrangement of the E protein required for virus fusion with the endosomal membrane.

  1. Epitope map of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 derived from 47 monoclonal antibodies produced by immunization with oligomeric envelope protein.

    PubMed Central

    Earl, P L; Broder, C C; Doms, R W; Moss, B

    1997-01-01

    The biologically relevant form of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein is oligomeric, with the major points of contact between oligomeric partners located in the ectodomain of gp41. To identify and map conserved epitopes and regions in gp41 where structure is influenced by quaternary interactions, we used a panel of 38 conformation-dependent and 9 conformation-independent anti-gp41 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) produced by immunization of mice with oligomeric Env protein. By cross-competition experiments using these MAbs and several others previously described, six distinct antigenic determinants were identified and mapped. Three of these determinants are conformational in nature and dependent in part on Env oligomeric structure. MAbs to two of these determinants were broadly cross-reactive with Env proteins derived from primary virus strains. The prevalence of antibodies in HIV-1-positive human sera to the antigenic determinants was determined by the ability of such sera to block binding of MAbs to Env protein. Strong blocking activity that correlated with cross-reactivity was found. PMID:9060620

  2. A new phosphoglycerolipid, 'phosphatidylglucose', found in human cord red cells by multi-reactive monoclonal anti-i cold agglutinin, mAb GL-1/GL-2.

    PubMed

    Nagatsuka, Y; Kasama, T; Ohashi, Y; Uzawa, J; Ono, Y; Shimizu, K; Hirabayashi, Y

    2001-05-25

    Cord red cell membranes express many differentiation-related molecules. To study such molecules, we have established human cell lines, termed GL-1 and GL-2, by the Epstein-Barr virus transformation method, both of which produce monoclonal anti-i cold agglutinin [Y. Nagatsuka et al., Immunol. Lett. 46 (1995) 93-100]. Thin layer chromatography immunoblotting analysis revealed that these antibodies had broad specificities reacting with a variety of glycolipid antigens. Of the immunoreactive lipid antigens, a new phosphoglycerolipid containing glucose from human cord red cells was found. The isolated lipid was unstable to alkaline hydrolysis and contained glucose as a sole sugar. Secondary ion mass spectrum-collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometric analysis of this lipid gave the main molecular ion peak at m/z 885 corresponding to phosphatidylhexose. This antigen was susceptible to phospholipases A2, C and D but resistant to phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy confirmed that glucose is linked to the sn-glycerol 3-phosphate residue with a beta-anomeric configuration. Based upon these combined results, we identified this lipid as phosphatidyl-beta-D-glucose. This is the first report showing the presence of the glucosylated glycerophospholipid in mammalian sources. PMID:11377429

  3. A non-VH1-69 heterosubtypic neutralizing human monoclonal antibody protects mice against H1N1 and H5N1 viruses.

    PubMed

    De Marco, Donata; Clementi, Nicola; Mancini, Nicasio; Solforosi, Laura; Moreno, Guisella J; Sun, Xiangjie; Tumpey, Terrence M; Gubareva, Larisa V; Mishin, Vasiliy; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Influenza viruses are among the most important human pathogens and are responsible for annual epidemics and sporadic, potentially devastating pandemics. The humoral immune response plays an important role in the defense against these viruses, providing protection mainly by producing antibodies directed against the hemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein. However, their high genetic variability allows the virus to evade the host immune response and the potential protection offered by seasonal vaccines. The emergence of resistance to antiviral drugs in recent years further limits the options available for the control of influenza. The development of alternative strategies for influenza prophylaxis and therapy is therefore urgently needed. In this study, we describe a human monoclonal antibody (PN-SIA49) that recognizes a highly conserved epitope located on the stem region of the HA and able to neutralize a broad spectrum of influenza viruses belonging to different subtypes (H1, H2 and H5). Furthermore, we describe its protective activity in mice after lethal challenge with H1N1 and H5N1 viruses suggesting a potential application in the treatment of influenza virus infections. PMID:22496802

  4. Cytochrome P-450 epitope typing in animals and humans with monoclonal antibodies to ethanol induced rat liver microsomal cytochrome P-450 (P-450et)

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.S.; Ko, I.Y.; Yang, C.; Guengerich, F.G.; Schenkman, J.B.; Coon, M.J.; Gelboin, H.V.

    1986-05-01

    Hybridomas were prepared from mouse myeloma cells and spleen cells derived from BALB/c female mice that had been immunized with P-450et. The monoclonal antibody (MAb)-producing hybridomas were screened by RIA. Thirty one independent hybrid clones were isolated with each producing an MAb of a single immunoglobulin subclass. All of these MAbs had high affinities for P-450et but only one MAb had a strong inhibitory effect on aniline rho-hydroxylase and N-nitrosodimethylamine demethylase. Western blots and RIAs based on ten MAbs (C1-C10) were used to determine the epitope homology of purified cytochromes P-450 from rats, rabbits, and humans. All ten MAbs had high affinity for both P-450et and a rat P-450 which is induced by acetone (P-450ac). Classes of these MAbs were identified which crossreacted toward different forms of rat P-450. In addition, several MAbs (C3, C6, C9) recognized a P-450 form of human liver, while other MAbs (C7, C9) recognized P-450/sub LM2/ of rabbits. Three MAbs (C4, C5, C8) were specific for only P-450et and P-450ac. These results demonstrate the different degrees of epitope relatedness among the multiple forms of cytochrome P-450.

  5. FYWHCLDE-based affinity chromatography of IgG: effect of ligand density and purifications of human IgG and monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-Wei; Shi, Qing-Hong; Sun, Yan

    2014-08-15

    This work reports the development of an octapeptide-based affinity adsorbent for the purification of human IgG (hIgG) and monoclonal antibody (mAb). The octapeptide was FYWHCLDE selected earlier by the biomimetic design of affinity peptide ligands for hIgG. The ligand was coupled to Sepharose gel at four densities from 10.4 to 31.0μmol/mL, and the effect of peptide density on the adsorption of hIgG and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was first investigated. The binding capacity of hIgG increased from 104.2 to 176.4mg/mL within the ligand density range, and the binding affinity (dissociation constant) kept at 2.4-3.7μM. Batch adsorption revealed that the selectivity of FYWHCLDE-Sepharose for IgG was 30-40 times over BSA. The effective pore diffusivity of IgG decreased somewhat with increasing ligand density, but the dynamic binding capacity at 10% breakthrough, measured by using 10-fold diluted human serum as feedstock, doubled with increasing ligand density from 10.4 to 31.0μmol/mL due to the remarkable increase of static binding capacity. By using the affinity column with a ligand density of 23.9μmol/mL, hIgG and humanized mAb purifications from human serum and cell culture supernatant, respectively, were achieved at high purities and recovery yields. Finally, the robustness of the peptide gel was demonstrated by recycled use of the affinity column in 20 breakthrough cycles. PMID:24947889

  6. Generation and characterization of rendomab-B1, a monoclonal antibody displaying potent and specific antagonism of the human endothelin B receptor

    PubMed Central

    Allard, Bertrand; Wijkhuisen, Anne; Borrull, Aurélie; Deshayes, Frédérique; Priam, Fabienne; Lamourette, Patricia; Ducancel, Frédéric; Boquet, Didier; Couraud, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Endothelin B receptor (ETBR) is a G protein-coupled receptor able to bind equally to the three identified human endothelin peptides. It is expressed primarily on vascular endothelial cells and involved in various physiological processes including vascular tone homeostasis, enteric nervous system development, melanogenesis and angiogenesis. Furthermore, overactivation or overexpression of ETBR have been associated with the development of various diseases such as cardiovascular disorders and cancers. Therefore, ETBR appears to be relevant target for the therapy or diagnosis of highly prevalent human diseases. In this study, we report the in vitro characterization of rendomab-B1, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) obtained by genetic immunization, which selectively recognizes the native form of human ETBR (hETBR). Rendomab-B1 is the first-reported mAb that behaves as a potent antagonist of hETBR. It recognizes an original extracellular conformational epitope on the receptor, distinct from the endothelin-1 (ET-1) binding site. Rendomab-B1 not only blocks ET-1-induced calcium signaling pathway and triggers rapid receptor internalization on recombinant hETBR-expressing cells, but also exerts pharmacological activities on human vascular endothelial cells, reducing both cell viability and ET-1-induced hETBR synthesis. In addition, binding experiments using rendomab-B1 on different melanoma cell lines reveal the structural and functional heterogeneity of hETBR expressed at the surface of these cancer cells, strongly suggesting the existence of tumor-specific receptors. Collectively, our results underscore the value of rendomab-B1 for research, therapeutic and diagnostic applications dealing with hETBR. PMID:23221682

  7. Genetic engineering, expression, and activity of a chimeric monoclonal antibody-avidin fusion protein for receptor-mediated delivery of biotinylated drugs in humans.

    PubMed

    Boado, Ruben J; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhang, Yun; Xia, Chun-fang; Wang, Yuntao; Pardridge, William M

    2008-03-01

    The genetic engineering, expression, and validation of a fusion protein of avidin (AV) and a chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) to the human insulin receptor (HIR) is described. The 15 kDa avidin monomer was fused to the carboxyl terminus of the heavy chain of the HIRMAb. The fusion protein heavy chain reacted with antibodies specific for human IgG and avidin, and had the same affinity for binding to the HIR extracellular domain as the original chimeric HIRMAb. The fusion protein qualitatively bound biotinylated ligands, but was secreted fully saturated with biotin by COS cells, owing to the high level of biotin in tissue culture medium. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were permanently transfected with a tandem vector expressing the fusion protein genes, and high expressing cell lines were isolated by methotrexate amplification and dilutional cloning. The product expressed by CHO cells had high binding to the HIR, and migrated as a homogeneous species in size exclusion HPLC and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The CHO cells were adapted to a 4 week culture in biotin depleted medium, and the HIRMAb-AV fusion protein expressed under these conditions had 1 unoccupied biotin binding site per molecule, based on a [3H]-biotin ultrafiltration assay. The HIRMAb-AV increased biotin uptake by human cells >15-fold, and mediated the endocytosis of fluorescein-biotin, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy. In summary, the HIRMAb-AV fusion protein is a new drug targeting system for humans that can be adapted to monobiotinylated drugs or nucleic acids. PMID:18278853

  8. Anti-alphav integrin monoclonal antibody intetumumab enhances the efficacy of radiation therapy and reduces metastasis of human cancer xenografts in nude rats.

    PubMed

    Ning, Shoucheng; Tian, Junqiang; Marshall, Deborah J; Knox, Susan J

    2010-10-01

    We previously reported that intetumumab (CNTO 95), a fully human anti-αv integrin monoclonal antibody, is a radiosensitizer in mice with xenograft tumors. Because intetumumab does not cross-react with mouse integrins, but has cross-reactivity with rat integrins, we next studied the potential combined use of radiation therapy and intetumumab in human cancer xenograft models in nude rats to assess effects on both tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment. Nude rats bearing human head and neck cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) xenografts were treated with intetumumab and fractionated local tumor radiotherapy. Effects on tumor growth and metastasis, blood perfusion, oxygenation, and gastrointestinal toxicity were studied. Intetumumab alone had a moderate effect on tumor growth. When combined with fractionated radiation therapy, intetumumab significantly inhibited tumor growth and produced a tumor response rate that was significantly better than with radiation therapy alone. Treatment with intetumumab also significantly reduced lung metastasis in the A549 NSCLC xenograft model. The oxygenation and blood perfusion in xenograft tumors measured by microbubble-enhanced ultrasound imaging were substantially increased after treatment with intetumumab. The combined use of intetumumab and radiation therapy reduced the microvessel density and increased apoptosis in tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment. Toxicity studies showed that treatment with intetumumab did not cause the histopathologic changes in the lungs and did not sensitize the sensitive gastrointestinal epithelium to the effect of radiation therapy. Intetumumab can potentiate the efficacy of fractionated radiation therapy in human cancer xenograft tumors in nude rats without increased toxicity. PMID:20841470

  9. Immunospecific saturable clearance mechanisms for indium-111-labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibody 96. 5 in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.L.; Lamki, L.M.; Shanken, L.J.; Blake, M.E.; Plager, C.E.; Benjamin, R.S.; Schweighardt, S.; Unger, M.W.; Rosenblum, M.G.

    1988-08-01

    Liver uptake of 111In-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) remains a significant problem in radioimaging studies to date. To determine if the observed liver uptake of an 111In-labeled anti-melanoma antibody 96.5 (111In-96.5) was dependent on the presence of hepatic antigen or on recognition of circulating murine antibody, escalating doses of an unlabeled nonimmunoreactive MoAb (NIR-MoAb) were administered to 18 patients with metastatic malignant melanoma either 1 or 24 h prior to an infusion of 1 mg of 111In-96.5. The number of metastases imaged, pharmacokinetics, and the ratio of radioactivity (expressed as average counts/pixel) in liver (L), spleen (S), bone (B), and kidney (K) compared to blood pool (heart = H) were examined. Results were prospectively compared with data from six patients who received immunoreactive unlabeled 96.5 prior to 111In-96.5. Increasing dose or changes in the preinfusion time of NIR-MoAb had no significant effect on the biodistribution of 111In-96.5. In contrast, patients who received unlabeled, immunoreactive 96.5 prior to 111In-96.5 infusion demonstrated a significant drop (P less than 0.001) in the liver/heart ratio of radioactivity (2.81 +/- 0.35 (SEM)) compared to patients receiving the identical dose of NIR-MoAb (10.35 +/- 1.33). Significant decreases in spleen/heart and bone/heart ratios were also observed. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that the volume of distribution (Vd) and the plasma t1/2 both decreased when 96.5 was administered compared to NIR-MoAb. In addition, a 4-fold increase in concentration X time was obtained after 96.5 antibody was administered compared to NIR-MoAb. More metastases were imaged in patients receiving preinfusions of 96.5 (23 of 28) than in patients receiving NIR-MoAb (10 of 18; P less than 0.05).

  10. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  11. A First-in-Human Phase I Study of MORAb-004, a Monoclonal Antibody to Endosialin in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Luis A.; Coughlin, Christina M.; C.Weil, Susan; Fishel, Jean; Gounder, Mrinal M.; Lawrence, Susan; Azad, Nilofer; O'Shannessy, Daniel J.; Grasso, Luigi; Wustner, Jason; Ebel, Wolfgang; Carvajal, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Endosialin (TEM-1, CD248) is a protein expressed on the surface of activated mesenchymal cells, including certain subsets of tumors. Preclinical models suppressing endosialin function have shown antitumor activity. A humanized monoclonal antibody, MORAb-004, was engineered to target endosialin and is the first agent in clinical development for this mesenchymal cell target. Experimental Design This first-in-human, open-label, phase I study recruited patients with treatment-refractory solid tumors. MORAb-004 was administered intravenously once weekly in 4-week cycles. Objectives included determination of the safety of multiple infusions of MORAb-004, identification of the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), pharmacokinetic modeling, detection of any anti-human antibody response, and assessment of objective radiographic response to therapy. Results Thirty-six patients were treated at 10 dose levels of MORAb-004, ranging from 0.0625 to 16 mg/kg. Drug-related adverse events were primarily grade 1–2 infusion toxicities. Dose-limiting toxicity of grade 3 vomiting was observed at 16 mg/kg. Eighteen of 32 evaluable patients across all doses achieved disease stability, with minor radiographic responses observed in 4 patients (pancreatic neuroendocrine, hepatocellular, and sarcoma tumor types). Pharmacokinetics showed MORAb-004 accumulation beginning at 4 mg/kg and saturable elimination beginning at 0.25 mg/kg. Exposure increased in a greater-than-dose-proportional manner with terminal half-life increasing proportionally with dose. The MTD was identified as 12 mg/kg. Conclusions Preliminary antitumor activity was observed. Safety profile, pharmacokinetics, and early antitumor activity suggest that MORAb-004 is safe at doses up to 12 mg/kg and should be studied further for efficacy. PMID:25398449

  12. Identifying the emerging human pathogen Scedosporium prolificans by using a species-specific monoclonal antibody that binds to the melanin biosynthetic enzyme tetrahydroxynaphthalene reductase.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Christopher R; Ryder, Lauren S; Le Cocq, Kate; Soanes, Darren M

    2015-04-01

    The dematiaceous (melanized) fungus Scedosporium prolificans is an emerging and frequently fatal pathogen of immunocompromised humans and which, along with the closely related fungi Pseudallescheria boydii, Scedosporium apiospermum and S. aurantiacum in the Pseudallescheria-Scedosporium complex, is a contributing aetiology to tsunami lung and central nervous system infections in near-drowning victims who have aspirated water laden with spores. At present, the natural habitat of the fungus is largely unknown, and accurate detection methods are needed to identify environmental reservoirs of infectious propagules. In this study, we report the development of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (CA4) specific to S. prolificans, which does not cross-react with closely related fungi in the Pseudallescheria-Scedosporium complex or with a wide range of mould and yeast species pathogenic to humans. Using genome sequencing of a soil isolate and targeted gene disruption of the CA4 antigen-encoding gene, we show that mAb CA4 binds to the melanin-biosynthetic enzyme tetrahydroxynaphthalene reductase. Enzyme-deficient mutants produce orange-brown or green-brown spore suspensions compared with the black spore suspension of the wild-type strain. Using mAb CA4 and a mAb (HG12) specific to the related fungi P. boydii, P. apiosperma, S. apiospermum and S. aurantiacum, we demonstrate how the mAbs can be used in combination with a semiselective isolation procedure to track these opportunistic pathogens in environmental samples containing mixed populations of human pathogenic fungi. Specificity of mAb CA4 was confirmed by sequencing of the internally transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1)-5.8S-ITS2 rRNA-encoding regions of fungi isolated from estuarine muds. PMID:24684242

  13. Accelerating Influenza Research: Vaccines, Antivirals, Immunomodulators and Monoclonal Antibodies. The Manufacture of a New Wild-Type H3N2 Virus for the Human Viral Challenge Model

    PubMed Central

    Fullen, Daniel J.; Noulin, Nicolas; Catchpole, Andrew; Fathi, Hosnieh; Murray, Edward J.; Mann, Alex; Eze, Kingsley; Balaratnam, Ganesh; Borley, Daryl W.; Gilbert, Anthony; Lambkin-Williams, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Background Influenza and its associated diseases are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The United States Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends influenza vaccination for everyone over 6 months of age. The failure of the flu vaccine in 2014–2015 demonstrates the need for a model that allows the rapid development of novel antivirals, universal/intra-seasonal vaccines, immunomodulators, monoclonal antibodies and other novel treatments. To this end we manufactured a new H3N2 influenza virus in compliance with Good Manufacturing Practice for use in the Human Viral Challenge Model. Methods and Strain Selection We chose an H3N2 influenza subtype, rather than H1N1, given that this strain has the most substantial impact in terms of morbidity or mortality annually as described by the Centre for Disease Control. We first subjected the virus batch to rigorous adventitious agent testing, confirmed the virus to be wild-type by Sanger sequencing and determined the virus titres appropriate for human use via the established ferret model. We built on our previous experience with other H3N2 and H1N1 viruses to develop this unique model. Human Challenge and Conclusions We conducted an initial safety and characterisation study in healthy adult volunteers, utilising our unique clinical quarantine facility in London, UK. In this study we demonstrated this new influenza (H3N2) challenge virus to be both safe and pathogenic with an appropriate level of disease in volunteers. Furthermore, by inoculating volunteers with a range of different inoculum titres, we established the minimum infectious titre required to achieve reproducible disease whilst ensuring a sensitive model that can be translated to design of subsequent field based studies. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02525055 PMID:26761707

  14. Glycemic control and chronic dosing of rhesus monkeys with a fusion protein of iduronidase and a monoclonal antibody against the human insulin receptor.

    PubMed

    Boado, Ruben J; Hui, Eric Ka-Wai; Lu, Jeff Zhiqiang; Pardridge, William M

    2012-10-01

    Hurler's syndrome, or mucopolysaccharidosis type I, is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the lysosomal enzyme iduronidase (IDUA). The disease affects both peripheral tissues and the central nervous system (CNS). Recombinant IDUA treatment does not affect the CNS, because IDUA does not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). To enable BBB penetration, human IDUA was re-engineered as an IgG-IDUA fusion protein, where the IgG domain is a genetically engineered monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the human insulin receptor (HIR). The HIRMAb penetrates the brain from the blood via transport on the endogenous BBB insulin receptor and acts as a molecular Trojan horse to deliver the fused IDUA to the brain. Before human testing, the HIRMAb-IDUA fusion protein was evaluated in a 6-month weekly dosing toxicology study at doses of 0, 3, 9, and 30 mg/kg/week of the fusion protein administered to 40 rhesus monkeys. The focus of the present study is the effect of chronic high dose administration of this fusion protein on plasma glucose and long-term glycemic control. The results show that the HIRMAb has weak insulin agonist activity and causes hypoglycemia at the high dose, 30 mg/kg, after intravenous infusion in normal saline. When dextrose is added to the saline infusion solution, no hypoglycemia is observed at any dose. An intravenous glucose tolerance test performed at the end of the 6 months of chronic treatment showed no change in glucose tolerance at any dose of the HIRMAb-IDUA fusion protein. PMID:22822036

  15. Five birds, one stone: neutralization of α-hemolysin and 4 bi-component leukocidins of Staphylococcus aureus with a single human monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Rouha, Harald; Badarau, Adriana; Visram, Zehra C; Battles, Michael B; Prinz, Bianka; Magyarics, Zoltán; Nagy, Gábor; Mirkina, Irina; Stulik, Lukas; Zerbs, Manuel; Jägerhofer, Michaela; Maierhofer, Barbara; Teubenbacher, Astrid; Dolezilkova, Ivana; Gross, Karin; Banerjee, Srijib; Zauner, Gerhild; Malafa, Stefan; Zmajkovic, Jakub; Maier, Sabine; Mabry, Robert; Krauland, Eric; Wittrup, K Dane; Gerngross, Tillman U; Nagy, Eszter

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen associated with high mortality. The emergence of antibiotic resistance and the inability of antibiotics to counteract bacterial cytotoxins involved in the pathogenesis of S. aureus call for novel therapeutic approaches, such as passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The complexity of staphylococcal pathogenesis and past failures with single mAb products represent considerable barriers for antibody-based therapeutics. Over the past few years, efforts have focused on neutralizing α-hemolysin. Recent findings suggest that the concerted actions of several cytotoxins, including the bi-component leukocidins play important roles in staphylococcal pathogenesis. Therefore, we aimed to isolate mAbs that bind to multiple cytolysins by employing high diversity human IgG1 libraries presented on the surface of yeast cells. Here we describe cross-reactive antibodies with picomolar affinity for α-hemolysin and 4 different bi-component leukocidins that share only ∼26% overall amino acid sequence identity. The molecular basis of cross-reactivity is the recognition of a conformational epitope shared by α-hemolysin and F-components of gamma-hemolysin (HlgAB and HlgCB), LukED and LukSF (Panton-Valentine Leukocidin). The amino acids predicted to form the epitope are conserved and known to be important for cytotoxic activity. We found that a single cross-reactive antibody prevented lysis of human phagocytes, epithelial and red blood cells induced by α-hemolysin and leukocidins in vitro, and therefore had superior effectiveness compared to α-hemolysin specific antibodies to protect from the combined cytolytic effect of secreted S. aureus toxins. Such mAb afforded high levels of protection in murine models of pneumonia and sepsis. PMID:25523282

  16. Glycemic Control and Chronic Dosing of Rhesus Monkeys with a Fusion Protein of Iduronidase and a Monoclonal Antibody Against the Human Insulin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Boado, Ruben J.; Hui, Eric Ka-Wai; Lu, Jeff Zhiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Hurler's syndrome, or mucopolysaccharidosis type I, is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the lysosomal enzyme iduronidase (IDUA). The disease affects both peripheral tissues and the central nervous system (CNS). Recombinant IDUA treatment does not affect the CNS, because IDUA does not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). To enable BBB penetration, human IDUA was re-engineered as an IgG-IDUA fusion protein, where the IgG domain is a genetically engineered monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the human insulin receptor (HIR). The HIRMAb penetrates the brain from the blood via transport on the endogenous BBB insulin receptor and acts as a molecular Trojan horse to deliver the fused IDUA to the brain. Before human testing, the HIRMAb-IDUA fusion protein was evaluated in a 6-month weekly dosing toxicology study at doses of 0, 3, 9, and 30 mg/kg/week of the fusion protein administered to 40 rhesus monkeys. The focus of the present study is the effect of chronic high dose administration of this fusion protein on plasma glucose and long-term glycemic control. The results show that the HIRMAb has weak insulin agonist activity and causes hypoglycemia at the high dose, 30 mg/kg, after intravenous infusion in normal saline. When dextrose is added to the saline infusion solution, no hypoglycemia is observed at any dose. An intravenous glucose tolerance test performed at the end of the 6 months of chronic treatment showed no change in glucose tolerance at any dose of the HIRMAb-IDUA fusion protein. PMID:22822036

  17. A new monoclonal antibody DAG-6F4 against human alpha-dystroglycan reveals reduced core protein in some, but not all, dystroglycanopathy patients.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Emma L; Lacey, Erica; Le, Lam T; Feng, Lucy; Sciandra, Francesca; Morris, Charlotte R; Hewitt, Jane E; Holt, Ian; Brancaccio, Andrea; Barresi, Rita; Sewry, Caroline A; Brown, Susan C; Morris, Glenn E

    2015-01-01

    We generated a novel monoclonal antibody, DAG-6F4, against alpha-dystroglycan which immunolabels the sarcolemma in human muscle biopsies. Its seven amino-acid epitope, PNQRPEL, was identified using phage-displayed peptides and is located immediately after the highly-glycosylated mucin domain of alpha-dystroglycan. On Western blots of recombinant alpha-dystroglycan, epitope accessibility was reduced, but not entirely prevented, by glycosylation. DAG-6F4 immunolabelling was markedly reduced in muscle biopsies from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients consistent with disruption of the dystroglycan complex. In a range of dystroglycanopathy patients with reduced/altered glycosylation, staining by DAG-6F4 was often less reduced than staining by IIH6 (antibody against the glycan epitope added by LARGE and commonly used to identify glycosylated alpha-dystroglycan). Whereas IIH6 was reduced in all patients, DAG-6F4 was hardly changed in a LARGE patient, less reduced than IIH6 in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I, but as reduced as IIH6 in some congenital muscular dystrophy patients. Although absence of the LARGE-dependent laminin-binding site appears not to affect alpha-dystroglycan stability at the sarcolemma, the results suggest that further reduction in aDG glycosylation may reduce its stability. These studies suggest that DAG-6F4 may be a useful addition to the antibody repertoire for evaluating the dystroglycan complex in neuromuscular disorders. PMID:25387694

  18. A monoclonal antibody to a carbohydrate epitope expressed on glycolipid and on alpha3beta1 integrin on human esophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jamasbi, Roudabeh J; Stoner, Gary D; Foote, Linda J; Lankford, Trish K; Davern, Sandra; Kennel, Stephen J

    2003-12-01

    A mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb-9) produced by immunization with a human esophageal carcinoma cell line, TE-2 (derived from undifferentiated squamous cell carcinoma) reacted specifically with about 30% of esophageal carcinoma cell lines and tissue sections from clinical samples. MAb-9 showed minimal reactivity with normal esophageal tissue. (125)I, fluorescent or gold particle labeled MAb-9 bound to TE-2 cell surfaces. (125)I-radiolabeled MAb-9 was used to detect reactive material from cell extracts in Western blot. Treatment of TE-2 membrane proteins with neuraminidase, N-glycanase or O-glycanase reduced antigen detection. Treatment of cells with periodic acid destroyed antibody binding in ELISA. Lipid extracts from cell membranes, containing glycolipids, also reacted with MAb-9. MAb-9 was used to purify target antigen from detergent solubilized membrane proteins and the prominent bands from subsequent gel electrophoresis were trypsin digested and analyzed by mass spectrometry. Peptides from alpha(3) and beta(1) integrin chains were identified. These data indicate that alpha3beta1integrin is prominently expressed on certain esophageal carcinomas and that a specific carbohydrate unit is selectively displayed on the alpha(3) integrin subunit as well as on glycolipid on the cell surface. The alpha3beta1 integrin expressed on A-431 carcinoma cells does not display this carbohydrate epitope and is not detected by MAb-9. Thus, expression of the carbohydrate epitope is the basis for the tumor selective reaction of MAb-9 with a subset of esophageal carcinomas. PMID:14683596

  19. Frequent Use of the IgA Isotype in Human B Cells Encoding Potent Norovirus-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies That Block HBGA Binding.

    PubMed

    Sapparapu, Gopal; Czakó, Rita; Alvarado, Gabriela; Shanker, Sreejesh; Prasad, B V Venkataram; Atmar, Robert L; Estes, Mary K; Crowe, James E

    2016-06-01

    Noroviruses (NoV) are the most common cause of non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis and cause local outbreaks of illness, especially in confined situations. Despite being identified four decades ago, the correlates of protection against norovirus gastroenteritis are still being elucidated. Recent studies have shown an association of protection with NoV-specific serum histo-blood group antigen-blocking antibody and with serum IgA in patients vaccinated with NoV VLPs. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of human monoclonal IgG and IgA antibodies against a GI.I NoV, Norwalk virus (NV). A higher proportion of the IgA antibodies blocked NV VLP binding to glycans than did IgG antibodies. We generated isotype-switched variants of IgG and IgA antibodies to study the effects of the constant domain on blocking and binding activities. The IgA form of antibodies appears to be more potent than the IgG form in blocking norovirus binding to histo-blood group antigens. These studies suggest a unique role for IgA antibodies in protection from NoV infections by blocking attachment to cell receptors. PMID:27355511

  20. Stability, characterization, and kinetics of /sup 111/In-labeled monoclonal antitumor antibodies in normal animals and nude mouse-human tumor models

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, S.E.; Hagan, P.L.; Garver, P.R.; Koziol, J.A.; Chen, A.W.; Frincke, J.M.; Bartholomew, R.M.; David, G.S.; Adams, T.H.

    1983-11-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against carcinoembryonic antigen were successfully radiolabeled with /sup 111/In, and the radiopharmaceutical was characterized in vitro and in normal and tumor-bearing mice. The /sup 111/In-MoAb proved to be stable in vitro and in vivo under normal conditions, although instability could be induced in vitro with large quantities of iron-free transferrin. Animal distribution studies with /sup 111/In-MoAb demonstrated tumor localization superior to /sup 67/Ga and pharmacokinetics that were highly similar to those of endogenously labeled /sup 75/Se-MoAb. The /sup 111/In-MoAb followed first-order kinetics and fit a two-compartmental model when studied in nude mice bearing human colon tumors known to express carcinoembryonic antigen. Significant quantities of radiolabel appeared in tissues other than tumor, with liver and skin having the highest concentrations. Sufficient tumor/background ratios were formed for scanning purposes. The data indicate that /sup 111/In-MoAb may prove to be effective as a radiopharmaceutical for tumor imaging.

  1. Generation of specific monoclonal antibodies against the extracellular loops of human claudin-3 by immunizing mice with target-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Ando, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Masayo; Kato-Nakano, Mariko; Kawamoto, Shinobu; Misaka, Hirofumi; Kimoto, Naoya; Furuya, Akiko; Nakamura, Kazuyasu

    2015-01-01

    Human claudin-3 (CLDN3) is a tetraspanin transmembrane protein of tight junction structures and is known to be over-expressed in some malignant tumors. Although a specific monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the extracellular domains of CLDN3 would be a valuable tool, generation of such MAbs has been regarded as difficult using traditional hybridoma techniques, because of the conserved sequence homology of CLDN3s among various species. In addition, high sequence similarity is shared among claudin family members, and potential cross-reactivity of MAb should be evaluated carefully. To overcome these difficulties, we generated CLDN3-expressing Chinese hamster ovary and Sf9 cells to use an immunogens and performed cell-based screening to eliminate cross-reactive antibodies. As a result, we generated MAbs that recognized the extracellular loops of CLDN3 but not those of CLDN4, 5, 6, or 9. Further in vitro studies suggested that the isolated MAbs possessed the desired binding properties for the detection or targeting of CLDN3. PMID:25744656

  2. Immunogenic and antigenic epitopes of immunoglobulins binding of human monoclonal anti-D antibodies to FcRI on the monocyte-like U937 cell line.

    PubMed

    Walker, M R; Kumpel, B M; Thompson, K; Woof, J M; Burton, D R; Jefferis, R

    1988-01-01

    Seventeen human monoclonal IgG1- or IgG3 anti-D-secreting clones have been examined for their ability to sensitise O+ red cells for Fc-receptor-mediated rosette formation with U937 cells. IgG3 but not IgG1 anti-D antibodies were able to mediate stable rosette formation with unstimulated U937 cells via interaction with the FcRI receptor. Decreasing FcRI density by incubating U937 cells with di-butyryl cAMP almost completely abolished rosette formation, whilst increasing FcRI density by incubating U937 cells with interferon-gamma increased the percentage of cells forming rosettes with IgG3- and IgG1-sensitised red cells. These data suggest that rosette formation between IgG anti-D-sensitised red cells and FcRI-expressing cells is dependent upon the density of IgG3 on the red cell surface, the density of FcRI on the effector cell, multiple FcRI/IgG interactions are required for stable rosette formation and that more FcRI/IgG1 than FcRI/IgG3 interactions are required. PMID:2464239

  3. Differential effects of CD45 CD45R and CD45R0 monoclonal antibodies in modulating human B cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Deane, D L; Harvey, E; Steel, C M

    1991-01-01

    We have examined the effect of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to different epitopes of the leucocyte common antigen (LCA), CD45, on anti-human immunoglobulin-primed B cell activation. Binding of MoAbs to restricted epitopes present on CD45 glycoproteins of 180 kD and 220 kD (designated CD45R0 and CD45R, respectively) was found to promote B cell proliferation in the presence of T cells. CD45 MoAbs reactive with 'public' determinants on all four constituent members of the LCA family (180, 190, 205, and 220 kD) had either little effect or inhibited the basal B cell response to anti-immunoglobulin priming. Simultaneous immunofluorescent analysis of 5-bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and the expression of CD19 (B cell specific) or CD2 (T cell specific) identified the majority of responder cells as B lymphocytes. CD45R MoAbs significantly enhanced the B cell response to sub-optimal concentrations of interleukin-2. CD45 and CD45R0 MoAbs failed to elicit a similar response. Antibody to the interleukin-2 receptor (anti-Tac) partially blocked the CD45R-driven, T cell-dependent B cell proliferation. PMID:1703055

  4. Monoclonal antibody-based dipstick assay: a reliable field applicable technique for diagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni infection using human serum and urine samples.

    PubMed

    Demerdash, Zeinab; Mohamed, Salwa; Hendawy, Mohamed; Rabia, Ibrahim; Attia, Mohy; Shaker, Zeinab; Diab, Tarek M

    2013-02-01

    A field applicable diagnostic technique, the dipstick assay, was evaluated for its sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing human Schistosoma mansoni infection. A monoclonal antibody (mAb) against S. mansoni adult worm tegumental antigen (AWTA) was employed in dipstick and sandwich ELISA for detection of circulating schistosome antigen (CSA) in both serum and urine samples. Based on clinical and parasitological examinations, 60 S. mansoni-infected patients, 30 patients infected with parasites other than schistosomiasis, and 30 uninfected healthy individuals were selected. The sensitivity and specificity of dipstick assay in urine samples were 86.7% and 90.0%, respectively, compared to 90.0% sensitivity and 91.7% specificity of sandwich ELISA. In serum samples, the sensitivity and specificity were 88.3% and 91.7% for dipstick assay vs. 91.7% and 95.0% for sandwich ELISA, respectively. The diagnostic efficacy of dipstick assay in urine and serum samples was 88.3% and 90.0%, while it was 90.8% and 93.3% for sandwich ELISA, respectively. The diagnostic indices of dipstick assay and ELISA either in serum or in urine were statistically comparable (P>0.05). In conclusion, the dipstick assay offers an alternative simple, rapid, non-invasive technique in detecting CSA or complement to stool examinations especially in field studies. PMID:23467705

  5. Binding Affinity, Specificity and Comparative Biodistribution of the Parental Murine Monoclonal Antibody MX35 (Anti-NaPi2b) and Its Humanized Version Rebmab200.

    PubMed

    Lindegren, Sture; Andrade, Luciana N S; Bäck, Tom; Machado, Camila Maria L; Horta, Bruno Brasil; Buchpiguel, Carlos; Moro, Ana Maria; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith; Jacobsson, Lars; Cederkrantz, Elin; Washiyama, Kohshin; Aneheim, Emma; Palm, Stig; Jensen, Holger; Tuma, Maria Carolina B; Chammas, Roger; Hultborn, Ragnar; Albertsson, Per

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this preclinical study was to evaluate the characteristics of the monoclonal antibody Rebmab200, which is a humanized version of the ovarian-specific murine antibody MX35. This investigation contributes to the foundation for future clinical α-radioimmunotherapy of minimal residual ovarian cancer with 211At-Rebmab200. Here, the biodistribution of 211At-Rebmab200 was evaluated, as was the utility of 99mTc-Rebmab200 for bioimaging. Rebmab200 was directly compared with its murine counterpart MX35 in terms of its in-vitro capacity for binding the immobilized NaPi2B epitope and live cells; we also assessed its biodistribution in nude mice carrying subcutaneous OVCAR-3 tumors. Tumor antigen and cell binding were similar between Rebmab200 and murine MX35, as was biodistribution, including normal tissue uptake and in-vivo tumor binding. We also demonstrated that 99mTc-Rebmab200 can be used for single-photon emission computed tomography of subcutaneous ovarian carcinomas in tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, our data support the further development of Rebmab200 for radioimmunotherapy and diagnostics. PMID:25970341

  6. Binding Affinity, Specificity and Comparative Biodistribution of the Parental Murine Monoclonal Antibody MX35 (Anti-NaPi2b) and Its Humanized Version Rebmab200

    PubMed Central

    Lindegren, Sture; Andrade, Luciana N. S.; Bäck, Tom; Machado, Camila Maria L.; Horta, Bruno Brasil; Buchpiguel, Carlos; Moro, Ana Maria; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith; Jacobsson, Lars; Cederkrantz, Elin; Washiyama, Kohshin; Aneheim, Emma; Palm, Stig; Jensen, Holger; Tuma, Maria Carolina B.; Chammas, Roger; Hultborn, Ragnar; Albertsson, Per

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this preclinical study was to evaluate the characteristics of the monoclonal antibody Rebmab200, which is a humanized version of the ovarian-specific murine antibody MX35. This investigation contributes to the foundation for future clinical α-radioimmunotherapy of minimal residual ovarian cancer with 211At-Rebmab200. Here, the biodistribution of 211At-Rebmab200 was evaluated, as was the utility of 99mTc-Rebmab200 for bioimaging. Rebmab200 was directly compared with its murine counterpart MX35 in terms of its in-vitro capacity for binding the immobilized NaPi2B epitope and live cells; we also assessed its biodistribution in nude mice carrying subcutaneous OVCAR-3 tumors. Tumor antigen and cell binding were similar between Rebmab200 and murine MX35, as was biodistribution, including normal tissue uptake and in-vivo tumor binding. We also demonstrated that 99mTc-Rebmab200 can be used for single-photon emission computed tomography of subcutaneous ovarian carcinomas in tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, our data support the further development of Rebmab200 for radioimmunotherapy and diagnostics. PMID:25970341

  7. Frequent Use of the IgA Isotype in Human B Cells Encoding Potent Norovirus-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies That Block HBGA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Shanker, Sreejesh; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; Atmar, Robert L.; Estes, Mary K.; Crowe, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoV) are the most common cause of non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis and cause local outbreaks of illness, especially in confined situations. Despite being identified four decades ago, the correlates of protection against norovirus gastroenteritis are still being elucidated. Recent studies have shown an association of protection with NoV-specific serum histo-blood group antigen-blocking antibody and with serum IgA in patients vaccinated with NoV VLPs. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of human monoclonal IgG and IgA antibodies against a GI.I NoV, Norwalk virus (NV). A higher proportion of the IgA antibodies blocked NV VLP binding to glycans than did IgG antibodies. We generated isotype-switched variants of IgG and IgA antibodies to study the effects of the constant domain on blocking and binding activities. The IgA form of antibodies appears to be more potent than the IgG form in blocking norovirus binding to histo-blood group antigens. These studies suggest a unique role for IgA antibodies in protection from NoV infections by blocking attachment to cell receptors. PMID:27355511

  8. A human monoclonal antibody derived from a vaccinated volunteer recognizes heterosubtypically a novel epitope on the hemagglutinin globular head of H1 and H9 influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Panthong, Sumolrat; Koksunan, Sarawut; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Phuygun, Siripaporn; Waicharoen, Sunthareeya; Prachasupap, Apichai; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Yasugi, Mayo; Ono, Ken-Ichiro; Arai, Yasuha; Kurosu, Takeshi; Sawanpanyalert, Pathom; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Watanabe, Yohei

    2014-09-26

    Most neutralizing antibodies elicited during influenza virus infection or by vaccination have a narrow spectrum because they usually target variable epitopes in the globular head region of hemagglutinin (HA). In this study, we describe a human monoclonal antibody (HuMAb), 5D7, that was prepared from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of a vaccinated volunteer using the fusion method. The HuMAb heterosubtypically neutralizes group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H9N2, with a strong hemagglutinin inhibition activity. Selection of an escape mutant showed that the HuMAb targets a novel conformational epitope that is located in the HA head region but is distinct from the receptor binding site. Furthermore, Phe114Ile substitution in the epitope made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAb. Amino acid residues in the predicted epitope region are also highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1 and H9N2. The HuMAb reported here may be a potential candidate for the development of therapeutic/prophylactic antibodies against H1 and H9 influenza viruses. PMID:25204499

  9. Safety, Pharmacokinetic, and Functional Effects of the Nogo-A Monoclonal Antibody in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Randomized, First-In-Human Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Meininger, Vincent; Pradat, Pierre-François; Corse, Andrea; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Rix Brooks, Benjamin; Caress, James B.; Cudkowicz, Merit; Kolb, Stephen J.; Lange, Dale; Leigh, P. Nigel; Meyer, Thomas; Milleri, Stefano; Morrison, Karen E.; Orrell, Richard W.; Peters, Gary; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.; Shefner, Jeremy; Lavrov, Arseniy; Williams, Nicola; Overend, Phil; Price, Jeffrey; Bates, Stewart; Bullman, Jonathan; Krull, David; Berges, Alienor; Abila, Bams; Meno-Tetang, Guy; Wurthner, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The neurite outgrowth inhibitor, Nogo-A, has been shown to be overexpressed in skeletal muscle in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); it is both a potential biomarker and therapeutic target. We performed a double-blind, two-part, dose-escalation study, in subjects with ALS, assessing safety, pharmacokinetics (PK) and functional effects of ozanezumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against Nogo-A. In Part 1, 40 subjects were randomized (3∶1) to receive single dose intravenous ozanezumab (0.01, 0.1, 1, 5, or 15 mg/kg) or placebo. In Part 2, 36 subjects were randomized (3∶1) to receive two repeat doses of intravenous ozanezumab (0.5, 2.5, or 15 mg/kg) or placebo, approximately 4 weeks apart. The primary endpoints were safety and tolerability (adverse events [AEs], vital signs, electrocardiogram (ECG), and clinical laboratory tests). Secondary endpoints included PK, immunogenicity, functional endpoints (clinical and electrophysiological), and biomarker parameters. Overall, ozanezumab treatment (0.01–15 mg/kg) was well tolerated. The overall incidence of AEs in the repeat dose 2.5 mg/kg and 15 mg/kg ozanezumab groups was higher than in the repeat dose placebo group and repeat dose 0.5 mg/kg ozanezumab group. The majority were considered not related to study drug by the investigators. Six serious AEs were reported in three subjects receiving ozanezumab; none were considered related to study drug. No study drug-related patterns were identified for ECG, laboratory, or vital signs parameters. One subject (repeat dose 15 mg/kg ozanezumab) showed a weak, positive anti-ozanezumab-antibody result. PK results were generally consistent with monoclonal antibody treatments. No apparent treatment effects were observed for functional endpoints or muscle biomarkers. Immunohistochemical staining showed dose-dependent co-localization of ozanezumab with Nogo-A in skeletal muscle. In conclusion, single and repeat dose ozanezumab treatment was well tolerated and demonstrated co

  10. Monoclonal antibodies to a rat nestin fusion protein recognize a 220-kDa polypeptide in subsets of fetal and adult human central nervous system neurons and in primitive neuroectodermal tumor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tohyama, T.; Lee, V. M.; Rorke, L. B.; Marvin, M.; McKay, R. D.; Trojanowski, J. Q.

    1993-01-01

    Nestin is the major intermediate filament protein of embryonic central nervous system (CNS) progenitor cells. To identify proteins involved in early stages of lineage commitment in the developing human CNS we generated monoclonal antibodies to a TrpE-rat nestin fusion protein. This resulted in a monoclonal antibody (designated NST11) that did not recognize authentic human nestin, but did recognize a novel neuron-specific human polypeptide expressed in a subset of embryonic and adult CNS neurons as well as in medulloblastomas. NST11 immunoreactivity was abundant in developing spinal cord motor neurons, but was extinguished in these neurons by 17 weeks gestation. NST11 also labeled Purkinje cells at 17 weeks gestation, but Purkinje cells continued to express the NST11 antigen throughout gestation as well as in the adult cerebellum, and NST11 immunoreactivity was more abundant in Purkinje cells than in any other human CNS neurons. No NST11 immunoreactivity was detected in cells of the adult human peripheral nervous system or in a variety of adult non-neural human tissues. Further, NST11 almost exclusively stained cerebellar medulloblastomas. In Western blots of immature and mature human cerebral and cerebellar extracts, NST11 did not bind human nestin, but did detect an immunoband with a molecular weight of 220 kd. A similar immunoband was detected in medulloblastoma-derived cell lines with a neuron-like phenotype. These findings suggest that the NST11 monoclonal antibody recognizes a novel protein expressed by a subpopulation of immature and mature human CNS neurons, medulloblastomas, and medulloblastoma-derived cell lines. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7686344

  11. Human monoclonal IgM with autoantibody activity against two gangliosides (GM1 and GD1b) in a patient with motor neuron syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Jauberteau, M O; Gualde, N; Preud'Homme, J L; Rigaud, M; Gil, R; Vallat, J M; Baumann, N

    1990-01-01

    Small amounts of oligoclonal immunoglobulins were detected by Western blotting in the serum from a patient with motor neuron syndrome. The prominent one, a monoclonal IgM lambda, reacted strongly with the gangliosides GM1 and GD1b and more weakly with asialo GM1, as shown by immunoenzymatic staining of thin-layer chromatograms of gangliosides, ELISA on purified glycolipid coats and immunoadsorption with purified GM1. Affinity-chromatography with purified GM1 resulted in the purification of monoclonal IgM lambda. This purified IgM and its Fab fragments showed the same pattern of reactivity with gangliosides as that observed with whole serum. Such monoclonal IgM could be responsible for motor neuron diseases in some patients with overt or barely detectable monoclonal gammopathies. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:2357844

  12. Differentiation between Human Coronaviruses NL63 and 229E Using a Novel Double-Antibody Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Based on Specific Monoclonal Antibodies ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sastre, Patricia; Dijkman, Ronald; Camuñas, Ana; Ruiz, Tamara; Jebbink, Maarten F.; van der Hoek, Lia; Vela, Carmen; Rueda, Paloma

    2011-01-01

    Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) are responsible for respiratory tract infections ranging from common colds to severe acute respiratory syndrome. HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-229E are two of the four HCoVs that circulate worldwide and are close phylogenetic relatives. HCoV infections can lead to hospitalization of children, elderly individuals, and immunocompromised patients. Globally, approximately 5% of all upper and lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized children are caused by HCoV-229E and HCoV-NL63. The latter virus has recently been associated with the childhood disease croup. Thus, differentiation between the two viruses is relevant for epidemiology studies. The aim of this study was to develop a double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA) as a potential tool for identification and differentiation between HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-229E. The nucleocapsid (N) proteins of HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-229E were expressed in an Escherichia coli system and used to immunize mice in order to obtain monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for each virus. Three specific MAbs to HCoV-NL63, one MAb specific to HCoV-229E, and four MAbs that recognized both viruses were obtained. After their characterization, three MAbs were selected in order to develop a differential DAS-ELISA. The described assay could detect up to 3 ng/ml of N protein and 50 50% tissue culture infective doses/ml of virus stock. No cross-reactivity with other human coronaviruses or closely related animal coronaviruses was found. The newly developed DAS-ELISA was species specific, and therefore, it could be considered a potential tool for detection and differentiation of HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-229E infections. PMID:21084464

  13. Imaging of human leukemic T-cell xenografts in nude mice by radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Vacca, A.; Buchegger, F.; Carrel, S.; Mach, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) that react with the T-lymphocyte markers called cluster of differentiation CD5 and CD2 were labeled with iodine 131 (/sup 131/I) and were injected intravenously in nude mice bearing solid subcutaneous xenografts derived from the human T-cell leukemia line Ichikawa. Both MoAb anti-CD5 and anti-CD2 yielded favorable mean tumor to whole-body ratios of 3.8 and 5.1, respectively. These ratios were further increased up to 10.0 for MoAb anti-CD5 and 15.5 for MoAb anti-CD2 by using their F(ab')2 fragments. The tumors could be imaged clearly by external scanning after injection of F(ab')2 fragments from both MoAb. F(ab')2 fragments from MoAb anti-CD2 and of a third MoAb recognizing the clonotypic determinant (Ti) of the antigen receptor expressed by the human T-cell line Jurkat were injected in mice bearing intrasplenic Jurkat xenografts. A selective localization of both fragments in tumor tissue was demonstrated with mean tumor to whole-body ratios of 7.5 and 4.1 for MoAb anti-CD2 and anti-Ti, respectively. These in vivo experimental results may provide useful information for the potential use of radiolabeled MoAb and fragments in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with T-cell lymphoma and different other forms of T-cell malignancies.

  14. Overexpression of EpCAM in uterine serous papillary carcinoma: implications for EpCAM-specific immunotherapy with human monoclonal antibody adecatumumab (MT201).

    PubMed

    El-Sahwi, Karim; Bellone, Stefania; Cocco, Emiliano; Casagrande, Francesca; Bellone, Marta; Abu-Khalaf, Maysa; Buza, Natalia; Tavassoli, Fattaneh A; Hui, Pei; Rüttinger, Dominik; Silasi, Dan-Arin; Azodi, Masoud; Schwartz, Peter E; Rutherford, Thomas J; Pecorelli, Sergio; Santin, Alessandro D

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) and the potential of MT201 (adecatumumab), a human monoclonal antibody against EpCAM, in uterine serous papillary carcinoma (USPC). EpCAM expression was evaluated by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry in a total of 56 USPC fresh-frozen biopsies and paraffin-embedded tissues. EpCAM surface expression was also evaluated by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry in six USPC cell lines. Sensitivity to MT201 antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity was tested against a panel of primary USPC cell lines expressing different levels of EpCAM in standard 5-h (51)Cr release assays. EpCAM transcript was significantly overexpressed in fresh-frozen USPC when compared with normal endometrial cells (NEC). Median (minimum-maximum) copy number was 943.8 (31.5-1568.3) in tumor samples versus 12.9 (1.0-37.0) in NEC (P < 0.001). By immunohistochemistry, EpCAM expression was found in 96% (26 out of 27) of USPC samples with significantly higher expression compared with NECs (P < 0.001). High surface expression of EpCAM was found in 83% (five out of six) of the USPC cell lines tested by flow cytometry. EpCAM-positive cell lines were found highly sensitive to MT201-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in vitro, whereas primary USPC cell lines were resistant to natural killer cell-dependent cytotoxicity. Human plasma IgG did not significantly inhibit MT201-mediated cytotoxicity against USPC. EpCAM is highly expressed in uterine serous carcinoma at mRNA and protein levels, and primary USPC are highly sensitivity to MT201-mediated cytotoxicity. MT201 might represent a novel therapeutic strategy in patients harboring advanced/recurrent or metastatic USPC refractory to standard treatment modalities. PMID:20053761

  15. Immunoscintigraphic detection of venous thrombosis of the lower extremities by means of human antifibrin monoclonal antibodies labeled with sup 111 In

    SciTech Connect

    Lusiani, L.; Zanco, P.; Visona, A.; Breggion, G.; Pagnan, A.; Ferlin, G. )

    1989-07-01

    A new monoclonal antibody specific for the beta-chain of human fibrin (C22A) and labeled with 111In has been obtained and successfully used in rabbits and dogs for the in vivo detection of venous thrombosis. Studies in humans are currently ongoing. In order to assess the diagnostic value of 111In-antifibrin for the detection of venous thrombosis of the lower extremities, the authors investigated 25 consecutive patients. Ten patients had clinical and instrumental (contrast phlebography and duplex scanning) evidence of acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT), 3 had a long-standing DVT with relapsing episodes of swelling and pain, 5 had superficial venous thrombosis, and the remaining 7 had no signs of thrombosis at all. Twenty patients were being treated with heparin. All patients received