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1

Relative Tsunami Hazard Maps, Humboldt County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a series of maps depicting the relative tsunami hazard of coastal Humboldt County in Northern California. Unlike inundation maps that show a single line to show the inland extent of flooding, these maps use a four-color zonation to represent relative risk. The highest hazard area has experienced tsunami or storm wave inundation in historic times. These areas include

L. A. Dengler; B. R. Ludy; J. R. Patton

2003-01-01

2

GIS based Relative Tsunami Hazard Maps for Northern California, Humboldt and Del Norte Counties  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tsunami hazard maps are generated using a geographical information systems (GIS) approach to depict the relative tsunami hazard of coastal Humboldt and Del Norte Counties in northern California. Maps are composed for the Humboldt Bay, Eel River, and Crescent City regions and available online at http:\\/\\/www.humboldt.edu\\/~geodept\\/earthquakes\\/rctwg\\/toc.html . In contrast to previous mapping efforts that utilize a single line to represent

J. R. Patton; L. A. Dengler

2004-01-01

3

Earthquake and Tsunami planning, outreach and awareness in Humboldt County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Humboldt County has the longest coastline in California and is one of the most seismically active areas of the state. It is at risk from earthquakes located on and offshore and from tsunamis generated locally from faults associated with the Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ), other regional fault systems, and from distant sources elsewhere in the Pacific. In 1995 the California Division of Mines and Geology published the first earthquake scenario to include both strong ground shaking effects and a tsunami. As a result of the scenario, the Redwood Coast Tsunami Work Group (RCTWG), an organization of representatives from government agencies, tribes, service groups, academia and the private sector from the three northern coastal California counties, was formed in 1996 to coordinate and promote earthquake and tsunami hazard awareness and mitigation. The RCTWG and its member agencies have sponsored a variety of projects including education/outreach products and programs, tsunami hazard mapping, signage and siren planning, and has sponsored an Earthquake - Tsunami Education Room at the Humboldt County fair for the past eleven years. Three editions of Living on Shaky Ground an earthquake-tsunami preparedness magazine for California's North Coast, have been published since 1993 and a fourth is due to be published in fall 2008. In 2007, Humboldt County was the first region in the country to participate in a tsunami training exercise at FEMA's Emergency Management Institute in Emmitsburg, MD and the first area in California to conduct a full-scale tsunami evacuation drill. The County has conducted numerous multi-agency, multi-discipline coordinated exercises using county-wide tsunami response plan. Two Humboldt County communities were recognized as TsunamiReady by the National Weather Service in 2007. Over 300 tsunami hazard zone signs have been posted in Humboldt County since March 2008. Six assessment surveys from 1993 to 2006 have tracked preparedness actions and personal awareness of earthquake and tsunami hazards in the county and additional surveys have tracked public awareness and tourist concerns about tsunami hazard signs. Over the thirteen year period covered by the surveys, the percent with houses secured to foundations has increased from 58 to 80 percent, respondents aware of a local tsunami hazard increased from 51 to 73 percent and knowing what the Cascadia subduction zone is from 16 to 42 percent.

Ozaki, V.; Nicolini, T.; Larkin, D.; Dengler, L.

2008-12-01

4

GIS based Relative Tsunami Hazard Maps for Northern California, Humboldt and Del Norte Counties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tsunami hazard maps are generated using a geographical information systems (GIS) approach to depict the relative tsunami hazard of coastal Humboldt and Del Norte Counties in northern California. Maps are composed for the Humboldt Bay, Eel River, and Crescent City regions and available online at http://www.humboldt.edu/~geodept/earthquakes/rctwg/toc.html . In contrast to previous mapping efforts that utilize a single line to represent inundation, hazard is displayed gradationally. A 2.5D surface is constructed to represent this hazard. Elevation, normally used for 2.5D surfaces, is substituted with hazard units. Criteria boundaries are used to separate regions of increasing hazard. Criteria boundaries are defined based on numerical modeling, paleoseismic studies, historical flooding, FEMA Q3 flood maps, and impacts of recent tsunamis elsewhere. Zones are constructed to further adjust the criteria with respect to a physically determined variable hazard (e.g. proximity to open ocean). A triangular irregular network (TIN) is constructed using hazard criteria boundaries as breaklines. Fabricated points are necessary to construct a hazard surface and are placed where criteria boundaries diverge or where hazard is nonlinear between criteria boundaries. Hazard is displayed as a continuous gradational color scale ranging from red (high hazard) through orange (medium), yellow (low) to gray (no hazard). The maps are GIS based to facilitate ready adaptation by planners and emergency managers. The maps are intended for educational purposes, to improve awareness of tsunami hazards and to encourage emergency planning efforts of local and regional organizations by illustrating the range of possible tsunami events.

Patton, J. R.; Dengler, L. A.

2004-12-01

5

Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model (DHSVM) and Sediment Discharge in a Small, Timber Production Watershed, Humboldt County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sediment impacts to streams and rivers, either as suspended sediment concentration (SSC), or as aggradation, are well documented in the Pacific Northwest. Fishery stocks, estuarine, infrastructural and wildland resources can be negatively impacted. The causes and reasons for sedimentation of river resources are varied and diverse: tectonic setting - the relative rapid uplift of the study region produces a dominant erosional process of landsliding and mass wasting; regolithic setting - the relatively recent uplift of marine sediments has produced local formations of poorly and moderately consolidated soils, and lithic melanges that are naturally susceptible to erosion; climatic/geographic setting - coastal locations are subject to seasonal delivery of a relatively high average annual precipitation serving to transport available sediment; and finally, management setting - the activities that serve to make sediment available for transport to the river channel, forest road building and harvesting activities associated with timber production, agriculture, gravel mining, and fire management. The reduction of sediment loading can be accomplished through restoration activities like forest road decommissioning or riparian area revegetation. The need to prioritize restoration efforts is confounded by a lack of hydrographic and sediment discharge data, the complex terrain, and the inability to predict the effects of these activities on a dynamic scale. The Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model (DHSVM) has been developed to model watersheds using spatially explicit geographical data coupled with physically based hydrologic equations. DHSVM simulates watershed processes across a grid on a cell-by-cell manner. The most recent development within the DHSVM includes a mass wasting / sediment production and channel routing module which allows prediction of total sediment loading in a forest basin. We are applying DHSVM to the McReady sub-basin of Freshwater Creek, Humboldt County, California, utilizing site specific precipitation, hydrographic, and sediment data. Hydrographic and sediment discharge data from 2002 to present are used to train and validate the model. A detailed sediment source inventory from both the road and stream courses further informs the model process and parameterization of sediment production and mobilization within the watershed. The availability of continuous discharge and sediment loading via turbidity threshold stations (TTS) allows validation of the model's performance on multiple levels: average annual, monthly, or weekly sediment loading, and on an event by event basis. Effective validation permits the use of the model to understand the effects of future management strategies, i.e. timber harvest, road construction or decommissioning on a site-specific basis, and to model landscape effects of wildfire and climate change scenarios on watershed functions.

Stubblefield, A.; Huggett, B.; Sullivan, K.; Dhakal, A.

2008-12-01

6

Meteorological, water-temperature, and discharge data for the Mattole River basin, Humboldt County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

To overcome a major difficulty in the testing of the validity of river-temperature models - the lack of adequate precise synoptic data for an entire river basin - synoptic meteorologic, water-temperature, and discharge data were obtained in the Mattole River Basin in northern California during the period June 10 through August 31, 1975. The variables monitored were water temperature in the main channel and major tributaries, wind velocity, wet-bulb and dry-bulb air temperature, total hemispherical incoming radiation, total incoming shortwave radiation, discharge in the main channel and major tributaries, and average velocity and axial dispersion coefficients in the main channel. This report describes the experimental design and the instrumentation and procedures followed to insure the best possible information, and it presents a detailed set of data which can be used in testing river-temperature models. (USGS)

Noble, R. D.; Jackman, Alan P.

1983-01-01

7

Educational and Demographic Profile: Humboldt County.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for Humboldt County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced…

California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

2004-01-01

8

Shoreline Changes Humboldt Bay, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The movement of littoral drift is a major concern in the design of coastal installations. This report discusses the shoreline changes in the vicinity of the Humboldt entrance from the time that it was an unimproved tidal inlet (see Frontispiece) through t...

R. M. Noble

1971-01-01

9

58. V.H.G., photographer October 27, 1948 EUREKA, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, HIGHWAY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

58. V.H.G., photographer October 27, 1948 EUREKA, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, HIGHWAY 1. HUM-1-EUR #60, LOOKING SOUTH, BROADWAY & CLARK, 10-27-48, V.H.G. Stamped office copy. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

10

57. G.M.W., photographer March 26, 1940 HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION K, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

57. G.M.W., photographer March 26, 1940 HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION K, HIGHWAY 1. HUM-1-K #93, STA. 255, 3-26-40, G.M.W. Stamped office copy. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

11

59. V.H.G., photographer October 27, 1948 EUREKA, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, HIGHWAY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

59. V.H.G., photographer October 27, 1948 EUREKA, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, HIGHWAY 1. HUM-1-EUR #59, LOOKING NORTH BROADWAY & CEDAR, 10-27-48, V.H.G. Stamped office copy. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

12

13. View to northeast. View along centerline from Humboldt County ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

13. View to northeast. View along centerline from Humboldt County side of bridge. (90mm lens) - South Fork Trinity River Bridge, State Highway 299 spanning South Fork Trinity River, Salyer, Trinity County, CA

13

Aquatic biology of the Redwood Creek and Mill Creek drainage basins, Redwood National Park, Humboldt and Del Norte counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A 2-year study of the aquatic biota in the Redwood Creek and Mill Creek drainage basins of Redwood National Park indicated that the aquatic productivity is low. Densities of coliform bacteria were low except in Prairie Creek, a tributary to Redwood Creek, where a State park, county fish hatchery, grazing land, lumber mill, and scattered residential areas are potential sources of fecal coliform bacteria. Benthic invertebrate data indicated a diverse fauna which varied considerably between streams and among stream sections. Noteworthy findings include: (1) benthic invertebrates rapidly recolonized the streambed following a major storm, and (2) man-caused disruption or sedimentation of the streambed during low flow can result in drastic reductions of the benthic invertebrate community. Seven species of fish representing species typically found in northern California coastal streams were captured during the study. Nonparametric statistical tests indicate that condition factors of steelhead trout were significantly larger at sampling stations with more insolation, regardless of drainage basin land-use history. Periphyton and phytoplankton communities were diverse, variable in numbers, and dominated by diatoms. Seston concentrations were extremely variable between stations and at each station sampled. The seston is influenced seasonally by aquatic productivity at each station and amount of allochthonous material from the terrestrial ecosystem. Time-series analysis of some seston data indicated larger and sharper peak concentrations being flushed from the logged drainage basin than from the control drainage basin. (USGS)

Iwatsubo, Rick T.; Averett, R. C.

1981-01-01

14

Digital Geologic Map of the Redding 1° x 2° Quadrangle, Shasta, Tehama, Humboldt, and Trinity Counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Redding 1° x 2 quadrangle in northwestern California transects the Franciscan Complex and southern Klamath Mountains province as well as parts of the Great Valley Complex, northern Great Valley, and southernmost Cascades volcanic province. The tectonostratigraphic terranes of the Klamath province represent slices of oceanic crust, island arcs, and overlying sediment that range largely from Paleozoic to Jurassic in age. The Eastern Klamath terrane forms the nucleus to which the other terranes were added westward, primarily during Jurassic time, and that package was probably accreted to North America during earliest Cretaceous time. The younger Franciscan Complex consists of a sequence of westward younging tectonostratigraphic terranes of late Jurassic to Miocene age that were accreted to North America from mid-Cretaceous through Miocene time, with the easternmost being the most strongly metamorphosed. The marine Great Valley sequence, of late Jurassic and Cretaceous age, was deposited unconformably across the southernmost Klamath rocks, but in turn was underthrust at its western margin by Eastern belt Franciscan rocks. Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic rocks and sediment of the Cascades province extend into the southeastern part of the quadrangle, abutting the northernmost part of the great central valley of California. This map and database represent a digital rendition of Open-File Report 87-257, 1987, by L.A. Fraticelli, J.P. Albers, W.P. Irwin, and M.C. Blake, Jr., with various improvements and additions.

Fraticelli, Luis A.; Albers, John P.; Irwin, William P.; Blake, Milton C. Jr.; Wentworth, Carl M.

2012-01-01

15

55. E.M.C., photographer July 3, 1936 HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION J, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

55. E.M.C., photographer July 3, 1936 HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION J, HIGHWAY 1. 1-HUM-I-J #80, BITUMULS PORTION OF EXPERIMENTAL SECTION, E.M.C, 7-3-36. BACK READS: C/PROCESSING STABILIZING BITUMULS WITH BLADE AFTER BEING PROCESSED WITH SPRING TOOTH HARROW. Stamped office copy. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

16

Virgin Valley opal district, Humboldt County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Virgin Valley opal district, Humboldt County, Nevada, is near the Oregon-Nevada border in the Sheldon Game Refuge. Nineteen claims owned by Jack and Toni Crane were examined, sampled, and tested radiometrically for uranium. Numerous discontinuous layers of opal are interbedded with a gently-dipping series of vitric tuff and ash which is at least 300 ft thick. The tuff and ash are capped by a dark, vesicular basalt in the eastern part of the area and by a thin layer of terrace qravels in the area along the west side of Virgin Valley. Silicification of the ash and tuff has produced a rock that ranges from partly opalized rock that resembles silicified shale to completely altered rock that is entirely translucent, and consists of massive, brown and pale-green opal. Carnotite, the only identified uranium mineral, occurs as fracture coatings or fine layers in the opal; in places, no uranium minerals are visible in the radioactive opal. The opal layers are irregular in extent and thickness. The exposed length of the layers ranges from 8 to 1, 200 ft or more, and the thickness of the layers ranges from 0. 1 to 3. 9 ft. The uranium content of each opal layer, and of different parts of the same layer, differs widely. On the east side of Virgin Valley four of the seven observed opal layers, nos. 3, 4, 5, and 7, are more radioactive than the average; and the uranium content ranges from 0. 002 to 0. 12 percent. Two samples, taken 5 ft apart across opal layer no. 7, contained 0. 003 and 0. -049 percent uranium. On the west side of the valley only four of the fifteen observed opal layers, nos; 9, , 10, 14, and 15, are more radioactive than the average; and the uranium content ranges from 0. 004 to 0. 047 percent. Material of the highest grade was found in a small discontinuous layer of pale-green opal (no. 4) on the east side of Virgin Valley. The grade of this layer ranged from 0. 027 to 0. 12 percent uranium.

Staatz, Mortimer Hay; Bauer, Herman L., Jr.

1951-01-01

17

Geology and Alteration of the Baltazor Hot Springs and Painted Hills Thermal Areas, Humboldt County, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Baltazor Hot Springs KGRA and nearby Painted Hills thermal area are situated in Humboldt County, northwestern Nevada along the northwestern margin of the Basin and Range province. The oldest rocks exposed in the Baltazor area are eugeosynclinal metase...

J. B. Hulen

1979-01-01

18

Food habits, occurrence, and population structure of the bat ray, Myliobatis californica, in Humboldt Bay, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

The bat ray, Myliobatis californica, is the most common, large predatory fish in Humboldt Bay, California. To prevent bat ray predation on cultured oyster beds, much effort has focused on reducing their population. A 13 month study was conducted in Humboldt Bay to examine the rays' use of the bay, population structure, and feeding ecology. Bat rays are seasonally found

Ann E. Gray; Timothy J. Mulligan; Robert W. Hannah

1997-01-01

19

78 FR 21964 - Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge Humboldt and Washoe Counties, NV, and Lake County, OR; Record of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...our preferred alternative, current fish, wildlife, habitat...Alternative 3, changes to current management would include removing...intensive management actions. Current public uses would continue...Lakeview, OR. [ssquf] Humboldt County Public Library,...

2013-04-12

20

LiDAR-based landslide hazard modeling using PISA-m, SHALSTAB, and SMORPH, Freshwater Creek and Ryan Slough watershed, Humboldt County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We evaluated the performance of three spatially distributed slope stability models implemented using a LiDAR digital elevation model (DEM) as part of a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) sediment source study in a steep forested watershed in northern California. The geologic setting consists primarily of deformed, deeply incised, and heavily weathered weak sedimentary rocks and highly sheared metamorphic melange (with small amounts of broken formation) covered by Quaternary surficial deposits and colluvium. Topographic input for all three models was a 1-m LiDAR DEM of the watershed that was re-sampled to 4 m to avoid computational problems with SHALSTAB and eliminate complications arising from both short wavelength features (such as fallen logs and tree stumps) and random topographic noise. We assessed the performance of each model by 1) comparison of model output with landslides identified on aerial photographs and 2) comparison of model results with each other. Each of the two sub-watersheds was analyzed separately because of different geology and inventory data sources. Both PISA-m and SHALSTAB identified 75% of the inventoried landslides. SMORPH correctly identified 99% of the inventoried landslides, but at the cost of predicting more than three times as much unstable ground as PISA-m and SHALSTAB (25% versus 8% of the watershed). The degree of overlap between unstable areas predicted by all three models ranged only from 4% to 25% of the area predicted to be unstable, reflecting differences in the mechanics and/or empirical relationships embodied by each model. PISA-m, the only one of the three models capable of doing so, was also used to simulate the effects of clear-cut logging by reducing the input root strength estimates in areas covered by mature forest.

Weppner, E.; Hoyt, J.; Haneberg, W. C.

2008-12-01

21

77 FR 67391 - Notice of Proposed Supplementary Rules on Public Land in Water Canyon, Humboldt County, NV  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Proposed Supplementary Rules on Public Land in Water Canyon, Humboldt County, NV AGENCY...and resources on public land within the Water Canyon Recreation Area. These proposed...restrictions included within the decisions of the Water Canyon Recreation Area Management...

2012-11-09

22

Buhne Point, Humboldt Bay, California, Design for the Prevention of Shoreline Erosion. Hydraulic and Numerical Model Investigations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Two numerical models and two physical models were used to investigate the effects of proposed improvement plans with respect to shoreline erosion at Buhne Point, Humboldt Bay, California. Initially, a numerical tidal circulation model was to determine the...

J. A. Earickson R. R. Bottin

1984-01-01

23

Observed and modeled tsunami current velocities in Humboldt Bay and Crescent City Harbor, northern California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A pilot project was initiated in 2009 in Humboldt Bay, about 370 kilometers (km) north of San Francisco, California, to measure the currents produced by tsunamis. Northern California is susceptible to both near- and far-field tsunamis and has a historic record of damaging events. Crescent City Harbor, located approximately 100 km north of Humboldt Bay, suffered US 20 million in damages from strong currents produced by the 2006 Kuril Islands tsunami and an additional US 20 million from the 2011 Japan tsunami. In order to better evaluate these currents in northern California, we deployed a Nortek Aquadopp 600kHz 2D Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) with a one-minute sampling interval in Humboldt Bay, near the existing National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Ocean Service (NOS) tide gauge station. The instrument recorded the tsunamis produced by the Mw 8.8 Chile earthquake on February 27, 2010 and the Mw 9.0 Japan earthquake on March 11, 2011. Currents from the 2010 tsunami persisted in Humboldt Bay for at least 30 hours with peak amplitudes of about 0.3 meters per second (m/s). The 2011 tsunami signal lasted for over 86 hours with peak amplitude of 0.95 m/s. Strongest currents corresponded to the maximum change in water level as recorded on the NOAA NOS tide gauge, and occurred 90 minutes after the initial wave arrival. No damage was observed in Humboldt Bay for either event. In Crescent City, currents for the first three and a half hours of the 2011 Japan tsunami were estimated using security camera video footage from the Harbor Master building across from the entrance to the small boat basin, approximately 70 meters away from the NOAA NOS tide gauge station. The largest amplitude tide gauge water-level oscillations and most of the damage occurred within this time window. The currents reached a velocity of approximately 4.5 m/s and six cycles exceeded 3 m/s during this period. Measured current velocities both in Humboldt Bay and in Crescent City were compared to calculated velocities from the Method of Splitting Tsunamis (MOST) numerical model. For Humboldt Bay, the 2010 model tsunami frequencies matched the actual values for the first two hours after the initial arrival however the amplitudes were underestimated by approximately 65%. MOST replicated the first four hours of the 2011 tsunami signal in Humboldt Bay quite well although the peak flood currents were underestimated by about 50%. MOST predicted attenuation of the signal after four hours but the actual signal persisted at a nearly constant level for more than 48 hours. In Crescent City, the model prediction of the 2011 frequency agreed quite well with the observed signal for the first two and a half hours after the initial arrival with a 50% underestimation of the peak amplitude. The results from this project demonstrate that ADCPs can effectively record tsunami currents for small to moderate events and can be used to calibrate and validate models (i.e. MOST) in order to better predict hazardous tsunami conditions and improve planned responses to protect lives and property, especially within harbors. An ADCP will be installed in Crescent City Harbor and four additional ADCPs are being deployed in Humboldt Bay during the fall of 2012.

Admire, A. R.; Dengler, L.; Crawford, G. B.; uslu, B. U.; Montoya, J.

2012-12-01

24

Currents Produced by the February 27, 2010 Chilean Tsunami in Humboldt Bay California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We deployed a Nortek Aquadopp 600 kHz acoustic 2D current profiler in Humboldt Bay near Eureka, California in 2008 as part of a pilot project to measure the currents produced tsunamis. Humboldt Bay is located on California’s North Coast in an area susceptible to both near- and far-field tsunamis. Since 1933, when the first tide gauge was installed in Crescent City, about 100 km north of the study site, 33 tsunamis have been recorded including four that caused damage. The instrument is installed on the Fairhaven dock about 4 km north of the entrance to Humboldt Bay and 3 km north of the NOAA’s North Spit tide gauge station. The instrument samples the navigation channel that runs parallel to the Samoa Peninsula and records tidal currents typically between 1 - 1.2 cm/second within the channel that vary in direction with ebb and flood tides. On February 27, a Mw 8.8 earthquake occurred in South Central Chile that produced a Pacific-wide tsunami. A tsunami advisory was issued along the west coast of the United States and currents sufficient to cause damage were observed at a number of locations in Southern California. The first arrivals were recorded at the North Spit tide gauge at 21:36 UTC, about 15 hours after the earthquake and persists at a nearly constant 20 mm amplitude and a 55 minute period for more than ten hours, and is detectable for more than 30 hours. The current signal begins at the same time as tide gauge signal and shows a similar period and duration as the water level, with an average amplitude in the first ten hours of about 0.2 cm/sec. There is no distinct difference in the current signal between ebb and flood tides. We use the MOST model to compare the predicted tsunami current velocities at the site with the recorded values. The Humboldt Bay tsunami current meter deployment is part of a project that will eventually deploy two similar instruments in Crescent City.

Admire, A.; Dengler, L. A.; Crawford, G. B.; Uslu, B. U.; Montoya, J.

2010-12-01

25

Documentation of model input and output values for simulation of pumping effects in Paradise Valley, a basin tributary to the Humboldt River, Humboldt County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Documentation is provided of model input and sample output used in a previous report for analysis of ground-water flow and simulated pumping scenarios in Paradise Valley, Humboldt County, Nevada.Documentation includes files containing input values and listings of sample output. The files, in American International Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) or binary format, are compressed and put on a 3-1/2-inch diskette. The decompressed files require approximately 8.4 megabytes of disk space on an International Business Machine (IBM)- compatible microcomputer using the MicroSoft Disk Operating System (MS-DOS) operating system version 5.0 or greater.

Carey, A. E.; Prudic, D. E.

1996-01-01

26

THE MISSING EARTHQUAKES OF HUMBOLDT COUNTY: RECONCILING RECURRENCE INTERVAL ESTIMATES, SOUTHERN CASCADIA SUBDUCTION ZONE  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Earthquake and tsunami hazard for northwestern California and southern Oregon is predominately based on estimates of recurrence for earthquakes on the Cascadia subduction zone and upper plate thrust faults, each with unique deformation and recurrence histories. Coastal northern California is uniquely located to enable us to distinguish these different sources of seismic hazard as the accretionary prism extends on land in this region. This region experiences ground deformation from rupture of upper plate thrust faults like the Little Salmon fault. Most of this region is thought to be above the locked zone of the megathrust, so is subject to vertical deformation during the earthquake cycle. Secondary evidence of earthquake history is found here in the form of marsh soils that coseismically subside and commonly are overlain by estuarine mud and rarely tsunami sand. It is not currently known what the source of the subsidence is for this region; it may be due to upper plate rupture, megathrust rupture, or a combination of the two. Given that many earlier investigations utilized bulk peat for 14C age determinations and that these early studies were largely reconnaissance work, these studies need to be reevaluated. Recurrence Interval estimates are inconsistent when comparing terrestrial (~500 years) and marine (~220 years) data sets. This inconsistency may be due to 1) different sources of archival bias in marine and terrestrial data sets and/or 2) different sources of deformation. Factors controlling successful archiving of paleoseismic data are considered as this relates to geologic setting and how that might change through time. We compile, evaluate, and rank existing paleoseismic data in order to prioritize future paleoseismic investigations. 14C ages are recalibrated and quality assessments are made for each age determination. We then evaluate geologic setting and prioritize important research locations and goals based on these existing data. Terrestrial core transects are located in each of eight archival domains in order to evaluate archival bias and potential deformation sources for the southern Cascadia subduction zone. These domains are located in the Eel River, Humboldt Bay, Humboldt Lagoons, and Crescent City regions. In any given domain, evidence of earthquakes can be regional, local, or both. Core transects are designed to capture archival bias due to 1) interseismic deformation in the upper plate or the megathrust, 2) rupture on upper plate thrust faults, 3) rupture on the megathrust, or 4) rupture on both. Modern biogeochemical transects are used to calibrate paleontologic estimates. Based on our assessment, we determine which sites need better age control, which sites need supplemental coring, and key new research areas that need to be investigated.

Patton, J. R.; Leroy, T. H.

2009-12-01

27

Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the northern California planning area. Final report, 1970-2020  

SciTech Connect

The report presents baseline socio-economic profiles of Del Norte, Humboldt, and Mendocino Counties in northern California. It is one of six reports prepared under the contract to develop baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in California, Oregon and Washington. The profiles cover demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and port capacity, marine traffic, and fishing. Secondary sources were used to prepare the profiles. The focus of the profiles is 1980, but 1970 to 2020 is covered to the extent possible with existing data.

Brown, G.; Kolp, P.; Wallace, B.

1987-10-01

28

Interannual variability in chlorophyll concentrations in the Humboldt and California Current Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SeaWiFS data provide the first systematic comparison of 10 years (1997-2007) of chlorophyll interannual variability over the California (CCS) and Humboldt (HCS) Current Systems. Dominant signals are adjacent to the coast in the wind-driven upwelling zone. Maximum anomalies in both systems are negative signals during the 1997-1998 El Niño that persist into 1999 at most latitudes. Thereafter, anomalies primarily appear to be associated with shifts in phenology, with those in the CCS stronger than those of the HSC. Prominent signals in the CCS are positive anomalies in 2001-2002 at latitudes >35°N and <30°N, and in 2005-2006 from ?30 to 45°N that persist at latitudes >40°N into 2007. In the HCS, latitudinally extensive positive events occur in austral summers of 2002-2003, 2003-2004. Relationships of chlorophyll anomalies to forcing are explored through correlations to local upwelling anomalies and three indices of Pacific Ocean basin-scale variability, the Multivariate El Niño Index (MEI), the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO). These show that each system has strong latitudinal regionality in linkage to forcing. At higher latitudes, correlations follow expected relationships of increased (decreased) chlorophyll with positive upwelling and NPGO (MEI and PDO). At specific latitudes, notably the Southern California Bight and off Peru, where circulation and/or chlorophyll phenology differ from canonical EBUS patterns, correlations weaken or oppose those expected. Correlations excluding the El Niño period remain similar in the CCS but substantially changed in the HCS, indicating much stronger domination of El Niño conditions on HCS anomaly relationships over this 10-year period.

Thomas, Andrew C.; Brickley, Peter; Weatherbee, Ryan

2009-12-01

29

76 FR 19515 - California Disaster # CA-00170 Declaration of Economic Injury  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Del Norte, Mendocino, San Luis Obispo, San...Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Sonoma. Contiguous Counties: California: Alameda, Glenn, Humboldt, Kern, Kings, Lake, Marin,...

2011-04-07

30

The General Plan of Glenn County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Glenn County general plan was designed to meet the minimum general plan requirements of the California planning and zoning law, and to include additional plan elements considered necessary to provide desirable long range guides for sound and orderly d...

J. M. Campbell

1970-01-01

31

COUNTIES OF CALIFORNIA - WITH FARM STATISTICS  

EPA Science Inventory

County farming statistics polygon coverage of California. The statistics were taken from the 1997 Census of Agriculture and added to a coverage extracted from TIGER county boundaries. A farm is any place from which $1,000 or more of agricultural products were sold, or normally w...

32

Standing Stock and Production of Eelgrass (Zostera Marina L.) in Humboldt Bay, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Measurements of the eelgrass standing stock in Humboldt Bay were conducted on seven occasions from June 1971 through August 1972. Values ranged from 1.4 x 10 exp 6 kg dry wt. in April 1972 to 6.9 x 10 exp 6 kg dry wt. in July 1972. South Bay eelgrass acco...

L. W. Harding J. H. Butler R. E. Heft

1975-01-01

33

Ground-water flow and simulated effects of development in Paradise Valley, a basin tributary to the Humboldt River in Humboldt County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A computer model was used to characterize ground-water flow in Paradise Valley, Nevada, and to evaluate probable long-term effects of five hypothetical development scenarios. One finding of the study is that concentrating pumping at the south end of Paradise Valley may increase underflow from the adjacent Humboldt River valley, and might affect flow in the river.

Prudic, D. E.; Herman, M. E.

1996-01-01

34

Behaviour of wintering Tundra Swans Cygnus columbianus columbianus at the Eel River delta and Humboldt Bay, California, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Tundra Swan Cygnus columbianus columbinanus phenology and behaviour at the Eel River delta and southern Humboldt Bay in northern California, USA, is described. Counts made each January from 1963 onwards peaked at 1,502 swans in 1988. Monthly counts recorded during the 2006/07 and 2008/09 winters peaked in February, at 1,033 and 772 swans respectively. Swans roosted on ephemeral ponds at the Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, on ephemeral ponds within grassland pastures in the vicinity of the Refuge, and perhaps also used the Eel River as a roost. Flights between Refuge roosts and the pastures and ponds occurred in the two hours after sunrise and before dark. In winters 2008/09 and 2009/10, the percentage of cygnets in the flocks was 10.6% and 21.4% respectively, and increased to =31% cygnets each year after most swans had departed from the area in March. Average brood size in 2009/10 was 2.1 cygnets. Daily activities consisted of foraging (44.9% of activities recorded), comfort behaviour (22.1%), locomotion (16.2%) and vigilance (15.5%). Eight neck-collared swans identified in the wintering flock were marked at four locations in different parts of Alaska, up to 1,300 km apart.

Black, Jeffrey M.; Gress, Carol; Byers, Jacob W.; Jennings, Emily; Ely, Craig

2010-01-01

35

Geophysical investigations of the Baltazor Hot Springs known geothermal resource area and the Painted Hills thermal area, Humboldt County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Geophysical investigations of the Baltazor Hot Springs geothermal resource area and the Painted Hills thermal area, Humboldt Co., Nevada are described. A gravity survey of 284 stations covering 750 sq km was conducted. Numerical modeling and interpretation of five detailed gravity profiles, numerical modeling and interpretation of 21.8 line km of dipole-dipole electrical resistivity data along four profiles, and a

R. K. Edquist

1981-01-01

36

Space Radar Image of Ventura County, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This radar image of Ventura County, California, shows the Santa Clara River valley and the surrounding mountains. The river valley is the linear feature that extends from the lower right to the upper left (east to west), where it empties into the Pacific Ocean (dark patches in upper and lower left). The cities of Ventura and Oxnard are seen along the left side of the image. Simi Valley is located in the lower center of the image, between the Santa Monica Mountains (purple area in lower left) and the Santa Susanna Mountains to the north. This area of California is known for its fruit; strawberry fields are shown in red and purple rectangular areas on the coastal plain, and citrus groves are the yellow green areas adjacent to the river. This image is centered at 34.33 degrees north latitude, 119 degrees west longitude. The area shown is approximately 53 kilometers by 35 kilometers (33 miles by 22 miles). Colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; green is L-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received; blue is C-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture (SIR-C/X-SAR) imaging radar when it flew aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 6, 1994.

1994-01-01

37

Humboldt Bay Numerical Hydrodynamics amd Sedimentation Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A study was done on the hydrodynamics and sedimentation of Humboldt Bay, California. This was done to determine the effects of channel deepening and realignment on the currents and sedimentation patterns in the area. The hydrodynamics and sedimentation we...

R. A. Evans

1994-01-01

38

Evolution of a trench-slope basin within the Cascadia subduction margin: the Neogene Humboldt Basin, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Neogene Humboldt (Eel River) Basin is located along the north-eastern margin of the Pacific Ocean within the Cascadia subduction zone. This sedimentary basin originated near the base of the accretionary prism in post-Eocene time. Subduction processes since that time have elevated strata in the south-eastern portion of the basin above sea level. High-resolution chronostratigraphic data from the onshore portion of the Humboldt Basin enable correlation of time-equivalent lithofacies across the palaeomargin, reconstruction of slope-basin evolution, and preliminary delineation of climatic and tectonic influence on lithological variation. -from Author

McCrory, P. A.

1995-01-01

39

Geophysical investigations of the Baltazor Hot Springs known geothermal resource area and the Painted Hills thermal area, Humboldt County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Geophysical investigations of the Baltazor Hot Springs KGRA and the Painted Hills thermal area, Humboldt Co., Nevada are described. The study includes a gravity survey of 284 stations covering 750 sq km, numerical modeling and interpretation of five detailed gravity profiles, numerical modeling and inerpretation of 21.8 line-km of dipole-dipole electrical resistivity data along four profiles, and a qualitative inerpretation of 38 line-km of self-potential data along eight profiles. The primary purpose of the investigation is to try to determine the nature of the geologic controls of the thermal anomalies at the two areas.

Edquist, R.K.

1981-02-01

40

CONFIRMATORY SURVEY RESULTS FOR PORTIONS OF THE MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT FROM UNITS 1 AND 2 AT THE HUMBOLDT BAY POWER PLANT, EUREKA, CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Gas & Electric Company (PG&E) operated the Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP) Unit 3 nuclear reactor near Eureka, California under Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) provisional license number DPR-7. HBPP Unit 3 achieved initial criticality in February 1963 and began commercial operations in August 1963. Unit 3 was a natural circulation boiling water reactor with a direct-cycle design. This design eliminated the need for heat transfer loops and large containment structures. Also, the pressure suppression containment design permitted below-ground construction. Stainless steel fuel claddings were used from startup until cladding failures resulted in plant system contamination—zircaloy-clad fuel was used exclusively starting in 1965 eliminating cladding-related contamination. A number of spills and gaseous releases were reported during operations resulting in a range of mitigative activities (see ESI 2008 for details).

W.C. Adams

2011-04-01

41

78 FR 43827 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Modoc and Siskiyou Counties, California, and in All Counties in Oregon...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

This proposed rule invites comments on the termination of Marketing Order No. 947 (order), which regulates the handling of Irish potatoes grown in Modoc and Siskiyou Counties, California, and in all counties in Oregon, except Malheur County, and the rules and regulations issued thereunder. The order is administered locally by the Oregon-California Potato Committee (Committee), which recommended......

2013-07-22

42

Support Services for Exceptional Students: Butte, Del Norte, Glenn, Humboldt, Lake, Lassen, Mendocino, Modoc, Plumas, Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, and Trinity Counties.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intended for use by vocational administrators responsible for mainstreaming handicapped students into vocational education classes, the resource guide lists and describes governmental and private agencies that provide vocational programs and support services for the handicapped on a local and statewide basis in the California counties of Butte,…

Hampel, Angelica; And Others

43

Meteorological, Water-Temperature, and Discharge Data for the Mattole River Basin, Humboldt County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study was made to overcome a major difficulty in the testing of the validity of river-temperature models--the lack of adequate precise synoptic data for an entire river basin. Synoptic meteorologic, water-temperature, and discharge data were obtained...

R. D. Nobel A. P. Jackman

1983-01-01

44

76 FR 39303 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control District, Kern County Air Pollution Control District, and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...

2011-07-06

45

76 FR 39357 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control District, Kern County Air Pollution Control District, and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...

2011-07-06

46

Diet and colon cancer in Los Angeles County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

The diets of 746 colon cancer cases in Los Angeles County, California (USA) were compared with those of 746 controls matched on age, sex, race, and neighborhood. In both genders, total energy intake was associated with significantly increased risk, and calcium intake was associated with significantly decreased risk. These effects were reduced only slightly after adjustment for the nondietary risk

Ruth K. Peters; Malcolm C. Pike; David Garabrant; Thomas M. Mack

1992-01-01

47

Bilingual Education Project, Santa Clara County, California. Final Report, 1972.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Spanish Dame Bilingual Education Project, located in Santa Clara County, California, served 190 children who came from homes where the primary language was Spanish and who resided within the target area schools of the Alum Rock School District. The objectives of the preschool project were (1) to demonstrate a home-teaching procedure designed…

Santa Clara County Office of Education, San Jose, CA.

48

Anza-Terwilliger hydrogeologic structures in Riverside County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This digital geospatial dataset documents the fault traces in the Anza and Terwilliger area of southwest Riverside County, California, that were modified from Moyle (1971) by Woolfenden and Bright (1988, figure 8). The fault information is used to help assess ground-water level changes in the area of Anza and Terwilliger between 2004 and 2005.

Morita, Andrew; Clark, Dennis A.; Morita, Andrew Y.; Martin, Peter

2007-01-01

49

Geology of Superior Ridge uranium deposits, Ventura County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epigenetic uranium deposits with potential commercial value have been found in the lower part of the upper Eocene to lower Miocene Sespe Formation near Ojai, in Ventura County, California. This report describes the geological and geochemical setting of these deposits and postulates a model for their origin. Several uranium deposits are located on Superior Ridge, a topographic high about 3

K. A. Dickinson; J. S. Leventhal

1988-01-01

50

Mismatch Between Interseismic Ground Deformation and Paleoseismic/Paleogeodetic Observations, Humboldt Bay, Northern California, Cascadia Subduction Zone  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Observations made by Plafker in Chile (1960) and Alaska (1964) show that vertical deformation during earthquakes is generally opposite in sense of motion compared to interseismic deformation. This elastic rebound theory drives estimates of potential coseismic deformation on the Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ). Similar to other coastal marshes along the CSZ, paleoseismic investigations around Humboldt Bay reveal evidence of coseismic subsidence for the past 4 ka. Tide gage data obtained from NOAA tide gages, as well as 'campaign' style tide gages, are used to infer interseismic ground deformation. Tide gage data from Crescent City and Humboldt Bay are compared to each other and also compared to estimates of eustatic sea-level rise to estimate rates of land-level change. Earthscope and USGS GPS permanent site data are also used to evaluate vertical interseismic deformation in this region. These rates of land-level change are then compared to paleoseismic proxies for vertical land-level change. Cores collected for master's theses research at Humboldt State University were used to compile an earthquake history for the Humboldt Bay region. Some cores in Mad River and Hookton sloughs were used to evaluate magnitudes of coseismic subsidence by comparing diatom and foraminiferid assemblages associated with lithologic contacts (paleogeodesy). Minimum estimates of paleosubsidence for earthquakes range from 0.3 to 2.6 meters. Subtracting eustatic sea-level rise (~2.3 mm/yr, 1977-2010) from Crescent City (CC) and North Spit (NS) relative sea-level rates reveals that CC is uplifting at ~3mm/yr and NS is subsiding at ~2.5 mm/yr. GPS vertical deformation reveals similar rates of ~3 mm/yr of uplift and ~2 mm/yr of subsidence in these two locations. GPS based subsidence rates show a gradient of subsidence between Trinidad (in the north) to Cape Mendocino (in the south). The spatial region of ongoing subsidence reveals the depth of locking of the CSZ fault (differently from previous studies, like Wang et al., 2003), but Humboldt Bay has regions that subsided coseismically that are also subsiding interseismically. The sense of motion mismatch is probably due to at least (1) upper plate deformation (co- or inter-seismic) and/or (2) some process that is inconsistent with existing subduction zone models. Since the interseismic deformation is found across multiple upper-plate structures it is probably not influenced by those faults. However, coseismic motion on these faults cannot be ruled out. Future geodetic measurements may further reveal the region of locking on the megathrust (and provide a measure for natural hazards), but paleoseismic records and their paleogeodetic record likely better reveal the catastrophic changes we expect in the future as they are measures of coseismic changes.

Patton, J. R.; Williams, T. B.; Leroy, T. H.; Anderson, J. K.; Weldon, R. J.; Gilkerson, W.

2011-12-01

51

Outdoor residential water use trends in Orange County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Irrigation is required to maintain outdoor landscapes in semi-arid climates, such as in Orange County, California. Landscape water use efficiency is a priority in Orange County, as nearly half the water supply is imported and the region is vulnerable to water shortages. The purpose of this research is to determine whether single family household residents adjust landscape irrigation based on climate or income in Orange County. Specifically, the goals were to (1) estimate the volume of single family residence (SFR) landscape irrigation applied (2) determine the depth (mm) of over- or under-irrigation compared to theoretical need (3) determine the climatic and socioeconomic controls on landscape irrigation. We plan to compare results from agencies with uniform vs. allocation-based rate structures. A research partnership was established between six water retail agencies in Orange County: Huntington Beach Water District, El Toro Water District, Irvine Ranch Water District, East Orange County Water District, City of San Juan Capistrano, and Laguna Beach County Water District. These agencies represent a wide range of climatic and economic conditions and contributed between 3 and 13 years of SFR water use data on a monthly/bimonthly basis. Household water use, climate, and socioeconomic factors were mapped using Arcview GIS. Air temperature (California Irrigation Management Information System), precipitation (Orange County Cooperative Observer System), landscape size, and income (US Census) were evaluated as possible controls on SFR water use. Findings indicate that landscape water use may constitute the majority of household water use. We found over-irrigation relative to plant water demand in areas of Orange County. Domestic landscape water use may depend on climate and/or income. Results suggest a high potential for residential water savings with improved landscape irrigation efficiency. This information would be useful for improving or developing water use efficiency policies and educational programs.

Bijoor, N. S.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Berg, J.; Baum-Haley, M.

2012-12-01

52

Higher melanoma incidence in coastal versus inland counties in California.  

PubMed

The incidence of melanoma is increasing and there is significant variation by geographical location between and within countries. We sought to determine the incidence of melanoma in coastal versus inland counties in California. Data on melanoma incidence were obtained for 2000-2009 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program of the National Cancer Institute. Incidences for melanoma in situ and invasive melanoma for major racial and ethnic groups for coastal and inland counties were analyzed using multivariable Poisson regression, with adjustment for socioeconomic factors (income, education), ultraviolet index, and latitude. Further analyses were carried out for the non-Hispanic white population through stratification of in-situ versus invasive melanoma, age, thickness, and anatomic distribution. The incidence of melanoma in situ is greater in coastal counties of California than inland counties (incidence rate ratio 1.23, 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.47) after adjusting for socioeconomic factors, ultraviolet index, and latitude. In non-Hispanic whites, this difference is significant for in-situ and thin (?1.00 mm) melanomas, but not for melanomas of greater thickness. In melanoma in situ and thin melanomas in non-Hispanic whites, the incidence is greater in coastal versus inland counties. Causes may include differences in exposures, differences in detection, or artifacts such as residual confounding. Our study highlights the need for further research in identifying and addressing these differences. PMID:24681542

Korgavkar, Kaveri; Lee, Kachiu C; Weinstock, Martin A

2014-06-01

53

78 FR 63934 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; El Dorado County Air Quality Management...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...California; El Dorado County Air Quality Management District; Reasonably Available...for the El Dorado County Air Quality Management District (EDAQMD) portion...1988, U.S. EPA, Air Quality Management Division, Office of Air...

2013-10-25

54

78 FR 23677 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD) portion...California including San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District...

2013-04-22

55

78 FR 12267 - Revision of Air Quality Implementation Plan; California; Placer County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Plan; California; Placer County Air Pollution Control District and Feather River...revision to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and...modification of stationary sources of air pollution within each District. EPA...

2013-02-22

56

78 FR 58460 - Revision of Air Quality Implementation Plan; California; Placer County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Plan; California; Placer County Air Pollution Control District and Feather River...revision to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and...modification of stationary sources of air pollution within each District. We...

2013-09-24

57

Data on Streamflow and Quality of Water and Bottom Sediment in and near Humboldt Wildlife Management Area, Churchill and Pershing Counties, Nevada, 1998-2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This study was initiated to expand upon previous findings that indicated concentrations of dissolved solids, arsenic, boron, mercury, molybdenum, selenium, and uranium were either above geochemical background concentrations or were approaching or exceeding ecological criteria in the lower Humboldt River system. Data were collected from May 1998 to September 2000 to further characterize streamflow and surface-water and bottom-sediment quality in the lower Humboldt River, selected agricultural drains, Upper Humboldt Lake, and Lower Humboldt Drain (ephemeral outflow from Humboldt Sink). During this study, flow in the lower Humboldt River was either at or above average. Flows in Army and Toulon Drains generally were higher than reported in previous investigations. An unnamed agricultural drain contributed a small amount to the flow measured in Army Drain. In general, measured concentrations of sodium, chloride, dissolved solids, arsenic, boron, molybdenum, and uranium were higher in water from agricultural drains than in Humboldt River water during this study. Mercury concentrations in water samples collected during the study period typically were below the laboratory reporting level. However, low-level mercury analyses showed that samples collected in August 1999 from Army Drain had higher mercury concentrations than those collected from the river or Toulon Drain or the Lower Humboldt Drain. Ecological criteria and effect concentrations for sodium, chloride, dissolved solids, arsenic, boron, mercury, and molybdenum were exceeded in some water samples collected as part of this study. Although water samples from the agricultural drains typically contained higher concentrations of sodium, chloride, dissolved solids, arsenic, boron, and uranium, greater instantaneous loads of these constituents were carried in the river near Lovelock than in agricultural drains during periods of high flow or non-irrigation. During this study, the high flows in the lower Humboldt River produced the maximum instantaneous loads of sodium, chloride, dissolved solids, arsenic, boron, molybdenum, and uranium at all river-sampling sites, except molybdenum near Imlay. Nevada Division of Environmental Protection monitoring reports on mine-dewatering discharge for permitted releases of treated effluent to the surface waters of the Humboldt River and its tributaries were reviewed for reported discharges and trace-element concentrations from June 1998 to September 1999. These data were compared with similar information for the river near Imlay. In all bottom sediments collected for this study, arsenic concentrations exceeded the Canadian Freshwater Interim Sediment-Quality Guideline for the protection of aquatic life and probable-effect level (concentration). Sediments collected near Imlay, Rye Patch Reservoir, Lovelock, and from Toulon Drain and Army Drain were found to contain cadmium and chromium concentrations that exceeded Canadian criteria. Chromium concentrations in sediments collected from these sites also exceeded the consensus-based threshold-effect concentration. The Canadian criterion for sediment copper concentration was exceeded in sediments collected from the Humboldt River near Lovelock and from Toulon, Army, and the unnamed agricultural drains. Mercury in sediments collected near Imlay and from Toulon Drain in August 1999 exceeded the U.S. Department of the Interior sediment probable-effect level. Nickel concentrations in sediments collected during this study were above the consensus-based threshold-effect concentration. All other river and drain sediments had constituent concentrations below protective criteria and toxicity thresholds. In Upper Humboldt Lake, chloride, dissolved solids, arsenic, boron, molybdenum, and uranium concentrations in surface-water samples collected near the mouth of the Humboldt River generally were higher than in samples collected near the mouth of Army Drain. Ecological criteria or effect con

Paul, Angela P.; Thodal, Carl E.

2003-01-01

58

Ground-water altitudes and well data, Nye County, Nevada, and Inyo County, California  

SciTech Connect

This report contains ground-water altitudes and well data for wells located in Nye County, Nevada, and Inyo County, California, south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Data are from wells whose coordinates are within the Beatty and Death Valley Junction, California-Nevada maps from the US Geological Survey, scale 1:100,000 (30-minute {times} 60-minute quadrangle). Compilation of these data was made to provide a reference for numerical models of ground-water flow at Yucca Mountain and its vicinity. Water-level measurements were obtained from the US Geological Survey National Water Information System (NWIS) data base, and span the period of October 1951 to May 1991; most measurements were made from 1980 to 1990.

Ciesnik, M.S.

1995-05-01

59

Combined climate- and prey-mediated range expansion of Humboldt squid (Dosidicus gigas), a large marine predator in the California Current System.  

PubMed

Climate-driven range shifts are ongoing in pelagic marine environments, and ecosystems must respond to combined effects of altered species distributions and environmental drivers. Hypoxic oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) in midwater environments are shoaling globally; this can affect distributions of species both geographically and vertically along with predator-prey dynamics. Humboldt (jumbo) squid (Dosidicus gigas) are highly migratory predators adapted to hypoxic conditions that may be deleterious to their competitors and predators. Consequently, OMZ shoaling may preferentially facilitate foraging opportunities for Humboldt squid. With two separate modeling approaches using unique, long-term data based on in situ observations of predator, prey, and environmental variables, our analyses suggest that Humboldt squid are indirectly affected by OMZ shoaling through effects on a primary food source, myctophid fishes. Our results suggest that this indirect linkage between hypoxia and foraging is an important driver of the ongoing range expansion of Humboldt squid in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. PMID:24443361

Stewart, Julia S; Hazen, Elliott L; Bograd, Steven J; Byrnes, Jarrett E K; Foley, David G; Gilly, William F; Robison, Bruce H; Field, John C

2014-06-01

60

De-confounding of Relations Between Land-Level and Sea-Level Change, Humboldt Bay, Northern California: Uncertain Predictions of Magnitude and Timing of Tectonic and Eustatic Processes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Humboldt Bay in Northern California provides a unique opportunity to investigate the effects of relative sea level change on both native flora and maritime aquiculture as influenced by both tectonic and eustatic sea-level changes. This combination of superposed influences makes quantitatively predicting relative sea-level more uncertain and consumption of the results for public planning purposes exceedingly difficult. Public digestion for practical purposes is confounded by the fact that the uncertainty for eustatic sea-level changes is a magnitude issue while the uncertainty associated with the tectonic land level changes is both a magnitude and timing problem. Secondly, the public is less well informed regarding how crustal deformation contributes to relative sea-level change. We model the superposed effects of eustatic sea-level rise and tectonically driven land-level changes on the spatial distribution of habitats suitable to native eelgrass (Zostera marina) and oyster mariculture operations in Humboldt Bay. While these intertidal organisms were chosen primarily because they have vertically restricted spatial distributions that can be successfully modeled, the public awareness of their ecologic and economic importance is also well developed. We employ easy to understand graphics depicting conceptual ideas along with maps generated from the modeling results to develop locally relevant estimates of future sea level rise over the next 100 years, a time frame consistent with local planning. We bracket these estimates based on the range of possible vertical deformation changes. These graphic displays can be used as a starting point to propose local outcomes from global and regional relative sea-level changes with respect to changes in the distribution of suitable habitat for ecologically and economically valuable species. Currently the largest sources of uncertainty for changes in relative sea-level in the Humboldt Bay area are 1) the rate and magnitude of tectonic deformation throughout the earthquake cycle and 2) the stability and reliability of the tide gauges and other benchmarks assumed to be stable in the Humboldt Bay region.

Gilkerson, W.; Leroy, T. H.; Patton, J. R.; Williams, T. B.

2010-12-01

61

Geology of Superior Ridge uranium deposits, Ventura County, California  

SciTech Connect

Epigenetic uranium deposits with potential commercial value have been found in the lower part of the upper Eocene to lower Miocene Sespe Formation near Ojai, in Ventura County, California. This report describes the geological and geochemical setting of these deposits and postulates a model for their origin. Several uranium deposits are located on Superior Ridge, a topographic high about 3 miles long located just south of White Ledge Peak and 6 to 9 miles west of Ojai (Photo 1). A single uranium deposit on Laguna Ridge is located about 3 miles south of Superior Ridge, and was included with the Superior Ridge deposits in the White Ledge Peak district. A few small deposits are known to exist in other parts of Ventura County. A preliminary model for uranium mineralization in the Sespe Formation postulated that the organic material necessary for concentrating the uranium by chemical reduction or precipitation originated as terrestrial humic acid or humate.

Dickinson, K.A.; Leventhal, J.S.

1988-03-01

62

Tar Creek study, Sargent oil field, Santa Clara County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Field work in the Tar Creek area of Sargent oil field was performed June 26 to 28, 2000. The Santa Clara County study area is located in Sections, 30, 31, and 32, Township 11 South, Range 4 East, M.D.B&M; and in Sections 25 and 36, Township 11 South, Range 3 East, M.D.B.&M., north and south of Tar Creek, west of Highway 101. The work was a cooperative effort of the California Department of Conservation's Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources (DOGGR), California Geological Survey (CGS), and the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The purpose of the project was to map the stratigraphy and geologic structure (David Wagner, CGS); sample oil for age dating (Les Magoon, USGS); and search for undocumented wells plus conduct a GPS survey of the area (Bill Fedasko, J.P. Carnahan, and Ross Brunetti, DOGGR)

Wagner, David L.; Fedasko, Bill; Carnahan, J.R.; Brunetti, Ross; Magoon, Leslie B.; Lillis, Paul G.; Lorenson, Thomas D.; Stanley, Richard G.

2002-01-01

63

Climate controls on valley fever incidence in Kern County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Coccidiodomycosis (valley fever) is a systemic infection caused by inhalation of airborne spores from Coccidioides immitis, a soil-dwelling fungus found in the southwestern United States, parts of Mexico, and Central and South America. Dust storms help disperse C. immitis so risk factors for valley fever include conditions favorable for fungal growth (moist, warm soil) and for aeolian soil erosion (dry soil and strong winds). Here, we analyze and inter-compare the seasonal and inter-annual behavior of valley fever incidence and climate risk factors for the period 1980-2002 in Kern County, California, the US county with highest reported incidence. We find weak but statistically significant links between disease incidence and antecedent climate conditions. Precipitation anomalies 8 and 20 months antecedent explain only up to 4% of monthly variability in subsequent valley fever incidence during the 23 year period tested. This is consistent with previous studies suggesting that C. immitis tolerates hot, dry periods better than competing soil organisms and, as a result, thrives during wet periods following droughts. Furthermore, the relatively small correlation with climate suggests that the causes of valley fever in Kern County could be largely anthropogenic. Seasonal climate predictors of valley fever in Kern County are similar to, but much weaker than, those in Arizona, where previous studies find precipitation explains up to 75% of incidence. Causes for this discrepancy are not yet understood. Higher resolution temporal and spatial monitoring of soil conditions could improve our understanding of climatic antecedents of severe epidemics.

Zender, Charles S.; Talamantes, Jorge

2006-01-01

64

Anza-Terwilliger study wells in Riverside County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This digital data set contains the locations, water-level altitude, and water-level differences of 70 wells selected to document water-level changes between fall 2004 and spring 2005 in the Anza-Terwilliger area of Riverside County, California. The winter of 2005 was one of the wettest periods on record. Links to the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information Systems Website (NWISWeb) have been established to interactively view recent water-level information via the internet by clicking on a specific well.

Morita, Andrew; Clark, Dennis A.; Martin, Peter

2007-01-01

65

Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in and near Humboldt Wildlife Management Area, Churchill and Pershing Counties, Nevada, 1990-91  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A reconnaissance investigation was begun in 1990 to determine whether the quality of irrigation drainage in and near the Humboldt Wildlife Management Area, Nevada, has caused or has the potential to cause harmful effects on human health, fish, and wildlife or to impair beneficial uses of water. Samples of surface and ground water, bottom sediment, and biota collected from sites upstream and downstream from the Lovelock agricultural area were analyzed for potentially toxic trace elements. Also analyzed were radioactive substances, major dissolved constitu- ents, and nutrients in water, as well as pesticide residues in bottom sediment and biota. In samples from areas affected by irrigation drainage, the following constituents equaled or exceeded baseline concentrations or recommended standards for protection of aquatic life or propagation of wildlife--in water: arsenic, boron, dissolved solids, mercury, molybdenum, selenium, sodium, and un-ionized ammonia; in bottom sediment; arsenic and uranium; and in biota; arsenic, boron, and selenium. Selenium appears to be biomagnified in the Humboldt Sink wetlands. Biological effects observed during the reconnaissance included reduced insect diversity in sites receiving irrigation drainage and acute toxicity of drain water and sediment to test organisms. The current drought and upstream consumption of water for irrigation have reduced water deliveries to the wetlands and caused habitat degradation at Humboldt Wildlife Management Area. During this investigation. Humboldt and Toulon Lakes evaporated to dryness because of the reduced water deliveries.

Seiler, R. L.; Ekechukwu, G. A.; Hallock, R. J.

1993-01-01

66

Mexican Fruit Fly Cooperative Eradication Program: Fallbrook, San Diego County, California. Environmental Assessment, November 1999.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Adult Mexican fruit flies were detected on October 12 and 28, 1999, in the Fallbrook Area of San Diego County, California close to the border of Riverside County, California. Because of the successive detections of the pest, an infestation of Mexican frui...

M. B. Stefan

1999-01-01

67

78 FR 21906 - Six Rivers National Forest, California, Trinity Summit Range Assessment Environmental Impact...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...by the Lower Trinity Ranger District in Humboldt County, California within the upper Mill...225-acre area on the western boundary of the current allotment (T. 8 N., R 6 E. Section...concerns and contentions regarding the current proposed action. Comments received...

2013-04-12

68

Service Integration in San Mateo County, California: Multiple Strategies with a Single Goal.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the past decade, the Human Services Agency (HSA) of San Mateo County, California, has implemented a series of management and staff processes designed to facilitate the delivery of services to county residents. Examples of these services are as follows: (1) regionalization (HSA offices are located throughout the county, and office staff and…

Ragan, Mark

69

76 FR 12280 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, for Imperial County, Kern County, and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...County, and Ventura County; Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District...

2011-03-07

70

76 FR 12306 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County, Kern County, and Ventura...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...County, and Ventura County; Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District...

2011-03-07

71

Natural egg mass deposition by the Humboldt squid (Dosidicus gigas) in the Gulf of California and characteristics of hatchlings and paralarvae  

Microsoft Academic Search

The jumbo or Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas, is an important fisheries resource and a significant participant in regional ecologies as both predator and prey. It is the largest species in the oceanic squid family Ommastrephidae and has the largest known potential fecundity of any cephalopod, yet little is understood about its reproductive biology. We report the first dis- covery of

B. C. S. Mexico

2008-01-01

72

Bare soil evaporation at Kesterson Reservoir, Merced County, California: Estimation by physical and chemical methods.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Soil and water contamination at Kesterson Reservoir, Merced County, California, by selenium and salts has been an environmental concern for several years. The complex speciation and transport paths of these contaminants in the soil system have been the su...

P. T. Zawislanski

1989-01-01

73

A Cultural Resource Survey and Evaluation of the Torres-Martinez Indian Reservation Riverside County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An intensive cultural resource survey was conducted of an approximately 700 acre portion of the Torres-Martinez Indian Reservation in Riverside County, California. The study was designed to locate and record cultural resources, evaluate the resources for ...

C. W. White

1981-01-01

74

Humboldt River main stem, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This data set contains the main stem of the Humboldt River as defined by Humboldt Project personnel of the U.S. Geological Survey Nevada District, 2001. The data set was digitized on screen using digital orthophoto quadrangles from 1994.

Warmath, Eric; Medina, Rose L.

2001-01-01

75

77 FR 72968 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, for Imperial County, Placer County and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Placer County and Ventura County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD)...

2012-12-07

76

77 FR 73005 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County, Placer County, and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Placer County, and Ventura County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD)...

2012-12-07

77

Suspect Tsunami Deposits Point Reyes National Seashore Marin County California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An anomalous sand layer is inter-bedded within estuary mud deposits of Point Reyes National Seashore (PORE), Marin County, California. The alternating mud and sand deposits resemble tsunami deposited sediments located along northern California, Oregon, Washington and southern British Columbia (Cascadia) coastline, and other coastal locations around the world. This study was conducted to determine if the sedimentary record indicates a significant deviation from the typical low-energy long-duration depositional environment of the PORE marshes, to a brief high-energy short- duration depositional environment, then returning to typical quiet deposition. The sand layer appears continuous along a nearly 170 m sampling traverse of the upper-most reach of the Home Bay marsh and along a 55 m sampling traverse normal to the first traverse. Generally, the sand layer appears to drape the marsh, an area measuring at least 75 m by 300 m. This estimate is based on visual inspection of tidal channel banks where the sand layer is well exposed, approximately 25 cm below the marsh surface. The sand layer ranges from one to several centimeters thick and has an abrupt, smooth to wavy lower contact with the underlying estuary mud. The upper contact of the sand layer with the overlying mud ranges from gradual to abrupt and has a smooth subsurface topography. Several samples collected during the traverses appear as sand-mud couplets and are inversely graded. Should pending laboratory analysis support the anomalous sand layer as deposited by tsunami, we can then apply these data to extend the tsunami record and ultimately, improve assessment of tsunami risk.

Hoirup, D. F.

2006-12-01

78

A Survey of Professional Library Services in California County Offices of Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A questionnaire was sent to each of California's 58 county offices of education as a means of obtaining information about the services offered by the professional education libraries to local educators. Of the 43 counties which replied, 36 offered some kind of services, but there was a great deal of variety in both their nature and extent. Most of…

Choi, Susan E.

79

Whose vision? Conspiracy theory and land-use planning in Nevada County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we examine the role of claims of global conspiracy in undermining a local environmental planning process known as Natural Heritage 2020 (NH 2020) in Nevada County, California. County officials intended NH 2020 to mitigate the environmental impacts of rapid growth in this gentrifying rural community. This program illustrates the increasing use by land-use planners of landscape-scale approaches

Patrick T Hurley; Peter A Walker

2004-01-01

80

Public Opinion in Cobb Valley Concerning Geothermal Development in Lake County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In the Spring of 1975 the Friends of Cobb, a local environmental group, polled the registered voters of the Cobb Valley precinct, Lake County, California, about their opinions regarding the development of geothermal energy in Lake County. Sixty-five perce...

L. Vollintine O. Weres

1976-01-01

81

Evaluation of Cooperative Extension Efforts at the County Level: The University of California Example.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

County-level data were gathered on California's agricultural-social conditions and the University of California's Cooperative Extension specializations, budgets, and manpower to measure the empirical relationship existing between the two. The agricultural and social data were treated as independent variables, while the Cooperative Extension…

Fiske, Emmett P.

82

75 FR 69057 - Foreign-Trade Zone 226-Merced, Madera, Fresno, and Tulare Counties, California; Site Renumbering...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Foreign-Trade Zone 226--Merced, Madera, Fresno, and Tulare Counties, California...Site 6 (87 acres)--City of Madera Airport Industrial Park/State Center Commerce Park, Falcon Drive, Madera (Madera County); Site 7 (10...

2010-11-10

83

78 FR 24309 - California High-Speed Rail Authority-Construction Exemption-in Merced, Madera and Fresno Counties...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Transportation Board [Docket No. FD 35724] California High-Speed Rail Authority--Construction Exemption--in Merced, Madera and Fresno Counties, Cal On March 27, 2013, California High-Speed Rail Authority (Authority), a noncarrier state...

2013-04-24

84

Drift Studies from the Aerial Application of DEF and Folex in Fresno and Merced Counties, California 1979.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The California Department of Food and Agriculture, Environmental Hazards Assessment Program monitored DEF and Folex drift from selected sprayed cotton fields in Fresno County, California during September and October 1979. The purpose of the study was four...

R. J. Oshima T. M. Mischke R. E. Gallavan

1980-01-01

85

A water-resources data network evaluation for Monterey County, California; Phase 1; South county  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An evaluation made of rainfall, surface water, groundwater, and water quality monitoring networks in Salinas River basin in southern Monterey County, California, proposed all long-term rain gages be continued for extending short-term records and suggested the installation of two additional recording gages. Eight new storage rain gages were suggested at midaltitudes of east and west sides of Salinas Valley where few data are available. The evaluation revealed some short-term gaging stations could be discontinued because of good regression relations between them and the long-term stations Arroyo Seco near Soledad. Of 16 stations selected for the proposed network, 4 are new recording stations, 6 are new nonrecording streamflow and water quality sampling sites, 5 are existing stations, and the last is a station operated from 1969 to 1976; also included are water quality sampling stations on Lakes Nacimiento and San Antonio. The proposed groundwater network was developed from information on geology, geohydrology, and groundwater quality, high priority objectives for groundwater network, and consideration for providing good areal coverage of levels and water quality. Of 145 sites selected, 86 are existing monitoring wells. (USGS)

Showalter, P. K.; Hord, S. H.

1986-01-01

86

Monitoring the Air for the Presence of 2,4-D in Kern County, Kings County and San Luis Obispo County: A Cooperative California Study. Spring, 1980.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Environmental Hazards Assessment Program of the California Department of Food and Agriculture conducted a study during 1980 to investigate reports of phenoxy damage to crops in Kern and Kings Counties. The herbicide 2,4-D was not detected in any of th...

S. W. Simpson L. A. Neher T. M. Mischke R. J. Oshima

1989-01-01

87

A Tale of Two Counties: Expanding Health Insurance Coverage for Children in California  

PubMed Central

During difficult economic times, many California counties have expanded health insurance coverage for low-income children. These Children's Health Initiatives (CHIs) enroll children in public programs and provide new health insurance, Healthy Kids, for those ineligible for existing programs. This article describes the policy issues in implementing the Santa Clara and San Mateo County CHIs, as well as the children's enrollment levels and utilization of services. These CHIs are among the first of the thirty California counties planning or implementing such initiatives. Their success depends on leadership from county agencies that have not traditionally worked closely together, as well as the development of a diverse public and private funding base. This effort to provide universal coverage for all children is important to national policymakers desiring similar goals.

Howell, Embry M; Hughes, Dana

2006-01-01

88

33 CFR 334.866 - Pacific Ocean at Naval Base Coronado, in the City of Coronado, San Diego County, California...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...San Diego County, California; naval danger zone. 334.866 Section 334.866...DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS...San Diego County, California; naval danger zone. (a) The area. A fan-shaped area...

2010-07-01

89

History of Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA) Issues in California Beginning in El Dorado County in 1998  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This presentation will provide a historical account when NOA emerged as a major issue in California beginning in El Dorado County (EDC) with front page news on March 29, 1998, resulting in public outcry and concern. What started in EDC resulted in major changes to rule making for all counties in California and stringent requirements for school projects. The overview includes a discussion of evolution of the rule making between 1998 and 2005 with EDC, CARB, DTSC, Department of Conservation, USGS, Cal OSHA, ATSDR, and EPA Superfund.

Beall, R.

2012-12-01

90

Addressing the social determinants of health through the Alameda County, California, place matters policy initiative.  

PubMed

In Alameda County, California, significant health inequities by race/ethnicity, income, and place persist. Many of the county's low-income residents and residents of color live in communities that have faced historical and current disinvestment through public policies. This disinvestment affects community conditions such as access to economic opportunities, well-maintained and affordable housing, high-quality schools, healthy food, safe parks, and clean water and air. These community conditions greatly affect health. At the invitation of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies' national Place Matters initiative, Alameda County Supervisor Keith Carson's Office and the Alameda County Public Health Department launched Alameda County Place Matters, an initiative that addresses community conditions through local policy change. We describe the initiative's creation, activities, policy successes, and best practices. PMID:24179279

Schaff, Katherine; Desautels, Alexandra; Flournoy, Rebecca; Carson, Keith; Drenick, Teresa; Fujii, Darlene; Lee, Anna; Luginbuhl, Jessica; Mena, Mona; Shrago, Amy; Siegel, Anita; Stahl, Robert; Watkins-Tartt, Kimi; Willow, Pam; Witt, Sandra; Woloshin, Diane; Yamashita, Brenda

2013-11-01

91

A County Superintendent's View Of The California State Testing Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purposes of this paper are to (1) consider the state testing program from the county point of view, (2) relate the testing program to other state required programs, and (3) make some suggestions for the future. (Author)

Hoffman, Glenn W.

1972-01-01

92

77 FR 66910 - Environmental Impact Statement, San Diego County, California  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Diego County, west of the San Diego-Coronado Bridge and uses the Fourth Street and Third Street couplet to the naval Station Air Station North Island (NASNI). The project proposed various alternatives to improve traffic congestion...

2012-11-07

93

McClellan Air Force Base Cross-Sectional Health Study, Sacramento, Sacramento County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

McClellan Air Force Base (McAFB) is an aircraft maintenance facility located northeast of downtown Sacramento in Sacramento County, California. In March and April 1994, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) conducted a well water su...

P. A. Jones M. A. McGeehin

1996-01-01

94

FARM WORKERS IN A SPECIALIZED SEASONAL CROP AREA, STANISLAUS COUNTY, CALIFORNIA.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

SPECIALIZATION IN THE CROPS BEST ADAPTED TO THE LOCAL AREA IS SEEN AS A HIGHLY PRODUCTIVE SYSTEM OF AGRICULTURE, BUT BY CREATING THE NEED FOR LARGE NUMBERS OF WORKERS FOR SHORT PERIODS OF TIME, IT CAUSES UNEMPLOYMENT AND MIGRATION. A SURVEY OF FRUIT AND VEGETABLE WORKERS IN STANISLAUS COUNTY, CALIFORNIA IN 1962-63 REVEALS--(1) THEIR EARNINGS ARE…

METZLER, WILLIAM H.

95

BOUNDS ON SUBSURFACE MERCURY FLUX FROM THE SULPHUR BANK MERCURY MINE, LAKE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA  

EPA Science Inventory

The Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine (SBMM) in Lake County, California has been identified as a significant source of mercury to Clear Lake. The mine was operated from the 1860s through the 1950's. Mining started with surface operations, progressed to shaft mining, and later to open p...

96

NEST BOX USE AND REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY OF THE AMERICAN KESTREL IN LASSEN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

During 1976 we implemented an American Kestrel (Falco sparverius) nest box program in the Great Basin of Lassen County, California. The primary goal was the creation of nesting habitat where no habitat existed, and the reestablishment of such habitat where it had been eliminated. Of 247 functional nest boxes examined between 1977 and 1980, 31% of these were active and

Peter H. Bloom; Stephen J. Hawks

97

Dental Screening and Education Among Cambodian, Lowland Lao, and Hmong Refugees in Fresno County, California.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ascertains the dental health needs of the following refugee groups in Fresno County, California: (1) Cambodians; (2) lowland Lao; and (3) Hmong. Discusses successful health marketing and educational strategies aimed at these groups. A Dental Screening program instructed community health specialists, provided dental health education, and performed…

Rowe, Donald R.; Jackson, Sidney

1988-01-01

98

Trends in California Teacher Demand: A County and Regional Perspective. Issues & Answers. REL 2008-No. 057  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The report highlights the differences among California counties and regions in their use of under-prepared teachers and their needs for new teachers in the coming decade as driven by projected student enrollment changes and teacher retirements. The analyses, based on expected teacher retirements and student enrollment growth, suggest that…

White, Melissa Eiler; Fong, Anthony B.

2008-01-01

99

Public Health Assessment for Frontier Fertilizer, Davis, Yolo County, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CAD071530380.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Frontier Fertilizer site is located near the eastern boundary of the City of Davis, in Yolo County, California. Two separate pesticide sales companies operated at the site from 1971 and 1987. Disposal of waste water and unused agricultural chemicals b...

1995-01-01

100

EVIDENCE FOR METAL ATTENUATION IN ACID MINE WATER BY SULFATE REDUCTION, PENN MINE, CALAVERAS COUNTY, CALIFORNIA  

EPA Science Inventory

The Penn Mine in Calaveras County, California, produced Cu from massive sulfide ores from 1861 to 1953. Mine wastes were removed to a landfill during the late 1990s, improving surface-water quality, but deep mine workings were not remediated and contain metalliferous water with p...

101

Geologic Map of Southwestern Sequoia National Park, Tulare County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This map shows the geology of 675 km2 (260 mi2) on the west slope of the Sierra Nevada, California, mainly in Sequoia National Park and Sequoia National Forest. It was produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at the request of the National Park Servi...

J. G. Moore T. W. Sisson

2013-01-01

102

California County Data Book, 2001: Factors for School Success.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count data book examines trends in the well-being of California's children, focusing on factors for school success. The statistical portrait is based on trends in 32 indicators of well-being in 4 areas: (1) education, including reading and mathematics achievement, high school dropout rates, and student-teacher ratios; (2) family…

Children Now, Oakland, CA.

103

78 FR 36823 - California High-Speed Rail Authority-Construction Exemption-in Merced, Madera and Fresno Counties...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Transportation Board [Docket No. FD 35724] California High-Speed Rail Authority--Construction Exemption--in Merced, Madera and Fresno Counties, Cal AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board, DOT. ACTION: Notice of construction...

2013-06-19

104

Concentrations of Mercury and other Metals in Black Bass (Micropterus spp.) from Whiskeytown Lake, Shasta County, California, 2005.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents the results of a reconnaissance study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to determine mercury (Hg) and other selected metal concentrations in Black bass (Micropterus spp.) from Whiskeytown Lake, Shasta County, California. ...

J. T. May L. R. Brown M. L. Bauer R. L. Hothem

2011-01-01

105

The long-term effects of Medicaid managed care on obstetrics care in three California counties.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the long-term effects of Medicaid managed care (MMC) on obstetric service use and program costs in California. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Longitudinal administrative data on Medi-Cal enrollment and claims and encounters related to pregnancy and delivery services were gathered from three counties--two long-standing MMC counties and one traditional fee-for-service Medicaid county--in California between 1987 and 1992. STUDY DESIGN: We studied Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) beneficiaries with live singleton vaginal deliveries with associated hospital stays of 14 days or less. Effects of managed care were examined with respect to prenatal visits, length of stay for delivery, maternal postpartum readmission rates, and total program expenditures. Multivariate analyses examined how the relative effect of managed care on service use and program expenditures in each MMC county evolves over time in comparison to fee-for-service. We controlled for length of Medi-Cal enrollment prior to delivery, data censoring, and individual characteristics such as race and age. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Prenatal care use is consistently lower in the MMC counties, although all three counties' prenatal care provision is well below the national standard. Drastic increases in one-day-stay deliveries were found: up to almost 50 percent of deliveries in MMC counties were one-day stays. Program cost savings associated with MMC enrollment are unambiguous. CONCLUSIONS: MMC cost savings might have come at the expense of reduced provision of prenatal care and shorter delivery length of stay. Future studies should verify any possible causal link and the effects on maternal and infant health outcomes.

Tai-Seale, M; LoSasso, A T; Freund, D A; Gerber, S E

2001-01-01

106

Ambient Air Pollution and Autism in Los Angeles County, California  

PubMed Central

Background: The prevalence of autistic disorder (AD), a serious developmental condition, has risen dramatically over the past two decades, but high-quality population-based research addressing etiology is limited. Objectives: We studied the influence of exposures to traffic-related air pollution during pregnancy on the development of autism using data from air monitoring stations and a land use regression (LUR) model to estimate exposures. Methods: Children of mothers who gave birth in Los Angeles, California, who were diagnosed with a primary AD diagnosis at 3–5 years of age during 1998–2009 were identified through the California Department of Developmental Services and linked to 1995–2006 California birth certificates. For 7,603 children with autism and 10 controls per case matched by sex, birth year, and minimum gestational age, birth addresses were mapped and linked to the nearest air monitoring station and a LUR model. We used conditional logistic regression, adjusting for maternal and perinatal characteristics including indicators of SES. Results: Per interquartile range (IQR) increase, we estimated a 12–15% relative increase in odds of autism for ozone [odds ratio (OR) = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.19; per 11.54-ppb increase] and particulate matter ? 2.5 µm (OR = 1.15; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.24; per 4.68-?g/m3 increase) when mutually adjusting for both pollutants. Furthermore, we estimated 3–9% relative increases in odds per IQR increase for LUR-based nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide exposure estimates. LUR-based associations were strongest for children of mothers with less than a high school education. Conclusion: Measured and estimated exposures from ambient pollutant monitors and LUR model suggest associations between autism and prenatal air pollution exposure, mostly related to traffic sources.

Becerra, Tracy Ann; Wilhelm, Michelle; Olsen, J?rn; Cockburn, Myles

2012-01-01

107

Sedimentation of Williams Reservoir, Santa Clara County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Fifty-two acre-feet of sediment was ·deposited in Williams Reservoir between 1913 and 1971. From calculations of the sediment yields in other nearby drainage basins in Santa Clara County, it was determined that 24 to 38 acre-feet of sediment would have been transported to Williams Reservoir between 1961 and 1971 under natural conditions. The difference (14 to 28 acre-ft) is probably a consequence of increased sediment yield due to a fire that destroyed much of the vegetation in the drainage basin in 1961.

Ritter, John R.; Brown, William M., III

1972-01-01

108

Proportional melanoma incidence and occupation among White males in Los Angeles County (California, United States)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A case-control analysis of cancer registry data was used to examine the hypothesis that occupational exposure to sunlight influences the risk of melanoma. Occupation at diagnosis was available for 3,527 cutaneous melanomas and 53,129 other cancers identified by the Los Angeles County (California, United States) Cancer Surveillance Program among non-Spanish-surnamed White males aged 20 to 65 years between 1972 and

Karen J. Goodman; Monte L. Bible; Stephanie London; Thomas M. Mack

1995-01-01

109

Geologic summary of the Owens Valley drilling project, Owens and Rose Valleys, Inyo County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Owens Valley Drilling Project consists of eight drill holes located in southwest Inyo County, California, having an aggregate depth of 19,205 feet (5853 m). Project holes penetrated the Coso Formation of upper Pliocene or early Pleistocene age and the Owens Lake sand and lakebed units of the same age. The project objective was to improve the reliability of uranium-potential-resource

Schaer

1981-01-01

110

Environmental assessmental, geothermal energy, Heber geothermal binary-cycle demonstration project: Imperial County, California  

SciTech Connect

The proposed design, construction, and operation of a commercial-scale (45 MWe net) binary-cycle geothermal demonstration power plant are described using the liquid-dominated geothermal resource at Heber, Imperial County, California. The following are included in the environmental assessment: a description of the affected environment, potential environmental consequences of the proposed action, mitigation measures and monitoring plans, possible future developmental activities at the Heber anomaly, and regulations and permit requirements. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-10-01

111

Geohydrology of the Escondido hydrologic subarea, San Diego County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The San Diego region of California is undergoing rapid growth with a corresponding increase in the demand for water. To update the basin plan developed in 1975 by the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, San Diego Region, water-level and water quality data for the 44-sq mi Escondido hydrologic subarea were collected and analyzed. Water-level measurements indicate that groundwater in most of the subarea was within 20 ft of land surface. Groundwater generally moves from the weathered crystalline rocks on hillsides into the alluvium. Groundwater moves from north to south in Reidy Canyon and from east to west in the alluvium along Escondido Creek. Water from all 20 wells sampled in 1987 had dissolved-solids concentrations greater than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recommended limit of 500 mg/L; concentrations ranged from 720 to 4,500 mg/L. Nitrate (as nitrogen) concentrations ranged from 1.1 to 86 mg/L. Water from 14 of the 20 wells had nitrate (as nitrogen) concentrations greater than the U.S. Environmental Agency recommended limit of 10 mg/L. (USGS)

Woolfenden, L. R.

1989-01-01

112

Chemical analyses for selected wells in San Joaquin County and part of Contra Costa County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The study area of this report includes the eastern valley area of Contra Costa County and all of San Joaquin County, an area of approximately 1,600 square miles in the northern part of the San Joaquin Valley, Calif. Between December 1977 and December 1978, 1,489 wells were selectively canvassed. During May and June in 1978 and 1979, water samples were collected for chemical analysis from 321 of these wells. Field determinations of alkalinity, conductance, pH, and temperature were made, and individual constituents were analyzed. This report is the fourth in a series of baseline data reports on wells in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys. (USGS)

Keeter, Gail L.

1980-01-01

113

California Library Statistics, 2009: Fiscal Year 2007-2008 from Public, Academic, Special and County Law Libraries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Each year the State Library sends annual report forms to California's public, academic, special, state agency, and county law libraries. Statistical data from those reports are tabulated in this publication, with directory listings published in the companion volume, "California Library Directory." For this fiscal year, 389 libraries of all types…

Bray, Ira, Ed.

2009-01-01

114

Health Assessment for Synertek, Inc. (Building 1) Site, Santa Clara, Santa Clara County, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CAD990832735.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Synertek Inc., (Building 1) site--a Proposed National Priorities List (NPL) site--is located in Santa Clara, Santa Clara County, California. The California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) is the lead government agency for the site. Severa...

1990-01-01

115

Geohydrology and evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa, Inyo County, California  

SciTech Connect

Franklin Lake playa is one of the principal discharge areas of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system in southern Nevada and adjacent California. Yucca Mountain, Nevada, located within this flow system, is being evaluated by the US Department of Energy to determine its suitability as a potential site for a high-level nuclear-waste repository. To assist the U.S. Department of Energy with its evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site, the US Geological Survey developed a parameter-estimation model of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system. Results from sensitivity analyses made using the parameter-estimation model indicated that simulated rates of evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa had the largest effect on the calculation of transmissivity values at Yucca Mountain of all the model-boundary conditions and, therefore, that evapotranspiration required careful definition.

Czarnecki, J.B.

1997-12-31

116

Loma Prieta earthquake, October 17, 1989, Santa Cruz County, California  

SciTech Connect

On Tuesday, October 17, 1989 at 5:04 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time, a magnitude 7.1 earthquake occurred on the San Andreas fault 10 miles northeast of Santa Cruz. This earthquake was the largest earthquake to occur in the San Francisco Bay area since 1906, and the largest anywhere in California since 1952. The earthquake was responsible for 67 deaths and about 7 billion dollars worth of damage, making it the biggest dollar loss natural disaster in United States history. This article describes the seismological features of the earthquake, and briefly outlines a number of other geologic observations made during study of the earthquake, its aftershocks, and its effects. Much of the information in this article was provided by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

McNutt, S.

1990-01-01

117

33 CFR 165.1195 - Regulated Navigation Area; Humboldt Bay Bar Channel and Humboldt Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...can be made to Station Humboldt Bay on VHF-FM Channel...to Sector/Air Station Humboldt Bay on VHF-FM Channel...day/night, and tidal currents. The final decision to close the bar rests with Humboldt Bay Sector Commander...

2009-07-01

118

33 CFR 165.1195 - Regulated Navigation Area; Humboldt Bay Bar Channel and Humboldt Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...can be made to Station Humboldt Bay on VHF-FM Channel...to Sector/Air Station Humboldt Bay on VHF-FM Channel...day/night, and tidal currents. The final decision to close the bar rests with Humboldt Bay Sector Commander...

2010-07-01

119

Wilhelm von Humboldt and the ‘Orient’: On Edward W. Said’s remarks on Humboldt’s Orientalist studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

From an epistemological perspective, Wilhelm von Humboldt’s studies on the Oriental and East Asian languages and writing systems (Egyptian hieroglyphs, Sanskrit, Chinese, Polynesian) raise the question of his position in the Orientalist discourse of his time. Said [Said, E.W., 1978. Orientalism. Western Conceptions of the Orient, fourth ed. Penguin Books, London, 1995] considers Humboldt to be part of the “official

Markus Meßling

2008-01-01

120

Neotectonics of the southern Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada and Inyo County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

A complex pattern of active faults occurs in the southern Amargosa Desert, southern Nye, County, Nevada. These faults can be grouped into three main fault systems: (1) a NE-striking zone of faults that forms the southwest extension of the left-lateral Rock Valley fault zone, in the much larger Spotted Range-Mine Mountain structural zone, (2) a N-striking fault zone coinciding with

1991-01-01

121

Suicides in California (1968-1977): absence of seasonality in Los Angeles and Sacramento counties.  

PubMed

Since the turn of the century, there have been numerous publications on the seasonality of suicide. Rarely has the duration of sunlight exposure or any other weather parameter been quantitated in studies of suicide seasonality. To explore the relationships between sunlight and suicide, we examined California weather and suicide data from 1968 to 1977. Los Angeles County and Sacramento County were well-suited to the investigation, as complete data were available for these large population centers. There was no evidence of seasonality to suicides in L.A. County or Sacramento, despite a pronounced seasonality to weather. To investigate the acute temporal effects of weather on suicides, all occurrences of 10 successive above- or below-average sunshine days were identified. Suicides of for intervals of 5 days were then compared by Mann-Whitney analyses for 25 days after the selected intervals. For L.A. County, there were no significant findings. For Sacramento County, however, there was evidence for sunlight inhibition of suicides at days 21-25 after the above-average sunshine. Suicides after 10 days of below-average sunshine were increased as much as 70% about the 10-year average. Further replication studies with larger data sets are needed for an adequate examination of the correspondences of suicide data and weather measurements. PMID:7824676

Tietjen, G H; Kripke, D F

1994-08-01

122

Recently Exposed Fumarole Fields Near Mullet Island, Imperial County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New field observations, lidar measurements, aerial imaging and preliminary laboratory measurements of mud samples are reported of three formerly submerged fumarole fields in the Salton Trough near Mullet Island in southeastern California, USA. The fumarole fields have recently been exposed as the Salton Sea level has dropped. The largest of the three fields visited in January 2011 is irregular in outline with a marked northeast elongation. It is roughly 400 meters long and 120 meters wide. The field consists of approximately one hundred warm to boiling hot (100° C) mud volcanoes (0.1 - 2 m in height), several hundred mud pots, and countless CO2 gas vents. Unusual shaped mud volcanoes in the form of vertical tubes with central vents were observed in many places. Lidar measurements were obtained in the time period Nov 9-13, 2010 using an Optech Orion 200M lidar from an elevation 800 m AGL. They reveal that the terrain immediately surrounding the two fields that are above water level reside on a low (~0.5 m high) gently sloping mound about 500 m across that shows no evidence of lineaments indicative of surface faulting. With other geothermal features, the fumaroles define a well-defined line marking the probable trace of the Calipatria fault. Although the precise locations is uncertain, it appears to define a straight line 4 km long between the Davis-Schrimpf mud volcanoes and Mullet Island. Mullet Island is one of five late Quaternary rhyolitic volcanic necks in the immediate area of the fumaroles. The Calipatria fault is subparallel to the San Andreas and Imperial faults and only one of many verified or suspected faults (including cross faults) in the complex tectonic setting of the Salton Trough. Mud from several volcanoes was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). One sample contained boussingaultite, (NH4)2Mg(SO4)2.6(H2O), a rare mineral that is known to sublime under fumarolic conditions, possibly by ammoniation of hydrated MgSO4. As the Salton Sea level continues to drop, the third fumarole field is expected to surface in the next couple of years. It is also likely that as more land emerges, many of the CO2 gas seeps currently under water will begin to for mud volcanoes and mud pots, most of them along the same NW trending axis as the others. At about the same time a land bridge will form to Mullet Island, the first in about 60 years.

Lynch, D. K.; Hudnut, K.; Adams, P.; Bernstein, L.

2011-12-01

123

Economic Cost Analysis of West Nile Virus Outbreak, Sacramento County, California, USA, 2005  

PubMed Central

In 2005, an outbreak of West Nile virus (WNV) disease occurred in Sacramento County, California; 163 human cases were reported. In response to WNV surveillance indicating increased WNV activity, the Sacramento-Yolo Mosquito and Vector Control District conducted an emergency aerial spray. We determined the economic impact of the outbreak, including the vector control event and the medical cost to treat WNV disease. WNV disease in Sacramento County cost ?$2.28 million for medical treatment and patients’ productivity loss for both West Nile fever and West Nile neuroinvasive disease. Vector control cost ?$701,790, including spray procedures and overtime hours. The total economic impact of WNV was $2.98 million. A cost-benefit analysis indicated that only 15 cases of West Nile neuroinvasive disease would need to be prevented to make the emergency spray cost-effective.

Barber, Loren M.; Schleier, Jerome J.

2010-01-01

124

Data from a solute transport experiment in the Leviathan Mine drainage, Alpine County, California, October 1982  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A twenty-four hour injection of chloride and sodium was made into Leviathan Creek, Alpine County, California to aid interpretation of the coupled interactions between physical transport processes and geochemical reactions. Leviathan Creek was chosen because it receives acid mine drainage from Leviathan Mine, an abandoned open-pit sulfur mine. Water samples were collected at 15 sites along a 4.39 kilometer reach and analyzed for chloride, sodium, sulfate and fluoride. Dissolved concentrations are presented in tabular format and time-series plots. Duplicate samples were analyzed by two laboratories: the Central Laboratory, Denver, Colorado and a research laboratory in Menlo Park, California. A tabular comparison of the analyses and plots of the differences between the two laboratories is presented. Hydrographs and instantaneous discharge measurements are included. (USGS)

Flint, M. R.; Bencala, K. E.; Zellweger, G. W.; Hammermeister, D. P.

1985-01-01

125

Geologic map of the Mound Spring quadrangle, Nye and Clark Counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Mound Spring quadrangle, the southwestern-most 7.5' quadrangle of the area of the Las Vegas 1:100,000-scale quadrangle, is entirely within the Pahrump Valley, spanning the Nevada/California State line. New geologic mapping of the predominantly Quaternary materials is combined with new studies of gravity and geochronology in this quadrangle. Eleven predominantly fine-grained units are delineated, including playa sediment, dune sand, and deposits associated with several cycles of past groundwater discharge and distal fan sedimentation. These units are intercalated with 5 predominantly coarse-grained alluvial-fan and wash gravel units mainly derived from the Spring Mountains. The gravel units are distinguished on the basis of soil development and associated surficial characteristics. Thermoluminescence and U-series geochronology constrain most of the units to the Holocene and late and middle Pleistocene. Deposits of late Pleistocene groundwater discharge in the northeast part of the quadrangle are associated with a down-to-the-southwest fault zone that is expressed by surface fault scarps and a steep gravity gradient. The gravity field also defines a northwest-trending uplift along the State line, in which the oldest sediments are poorly exposed. About 2 km to the northeast a prominent southwest-facing erosional escarpment is formed by resistant beds in middle Pleistocene fine-grained sediments that dip northeast away from the uplift. These sediments include cycles of groundwater discharge that were probably caused by upwelling of southwesterly groundwater flow that encountered the horst.

Lundstrom, Scott C.; Mahan, Shannon A.; Blakely, Richard J.; Paces, James B.; Young, Owen D.; Workman, Jeremiah B.; Dixon, Gary L.

2003-01-01

126

Humboldt State University Fisheries Biology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Fisheries Science Department of Humboldt State University offers an interdisciplinary Bachelor of Sciences degree in Aquarium Sciences. To prepare for a career as a professional aquarist or aquarium curator, training includes: husbandry, culture of aquatic organisms, ichthyology, pathology, life support, exhibit design, conservation, business management. Internships with major public aquariums are available.

2010-11-18

127

Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the southern California planning area. Final report, 1970-2020  

SciTech Connect

The report presents baseline socio-economic profiles of Los Angeles, Orange, and San Diego Counties in southern California. It is one of six reports prepared under the contract to develop baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in California, Oregon, and Washington. The profiles cover demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and port capacity, marine traffic, and fishing. Secondary sources were used to prepare the profiles. The focus of the profiles is 1980, but 1970 to 2020 is covered to the extent possible with existing data.

Brown, G.; Kolp, P.; Wallace, B.

1987-10-01

128

Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the central California planning area. Final report, 1970-2020  

SciTech Connect

The report presents baseline socio-economic profiles of Sonoma, Marin, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Cruz, and Monterey Counties in central California. It is one of six reports prepared under the contract to develop baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in California, Oregon, and Washington. The profiles cover demographics, economics, housing public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and port capacity, marine traffic, and fishing. Secondary sources were used to prepare the profiles. The focus of the profiles is 1980, but 1970 to 2020 is covered to the extent possible with existing data.

Brown, G.; Kolp, P.; Wallace, B.

1987-10-01

129

Long term compliance with California's Smoke-Free Workplace law among bars and restaurants in Los Angeles County  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To assess long term compliance with the California Smoke-Free Workplace Law in Los Angeles County freestanding bars and bar\\/restaurants. Design: Population based annual site inspection survey of a random sample of Los Angeles County freestanding bars and bar\\/restaurants was conducted from 1998 to 2002. Main outcome measures: The primary outcomes of interest were patron and employee smoking. The secondary

M D Weber; DAS Bagwell; J E Fielding

2003-01-01

130

Repeated West Nile Virus Epidemic Transmission in Kern County, California, 2004-2007  

PubMed Central

West Nile virus (WNV) has remained epidemic in Kern County, CA, since its introduction in 2004 through 2007 when the human case annual incidence increased from 6 – 8 to 17 per 100,000, respectively. The 2007 increase in human infection was associated with contradicting surveillance indicators, including severe drought, warm spring but cool summer temperature anomalies, decreased rural and urban mosquito abundance but increased early season infection in urban Culex quinquefasciatus Say, moderate avian “herd immunity,” and declines in the catch of competent (western scrub-jay and house finch) and noncompetent (California quail and mourning dove) avian species. The decline in these noncompetent avian hosts may have increased contact with competent avian hosts and perhaps humans. The marked increase in home foreclosures and associated neglected swimming pools increased urban mosquito production sites, most likely contributing to the urban mosquito population and the WNV outbreak within Bakersfield. Coalescing five surveillance indicators into a risk assessment score measured each half month provided 2- to 6-wk early warning for emergency planning and was followed consistently by the onset of human cases after reaching epidemic conditions. St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) antibody was detected rarely in wild birds but not mosquitoes or sentinel chickens, indicating that previously infected birds were detected in Kern County, but SLEV reintroduction was not successful. In contrast, western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) was detected during 3 of 5 yr in Culex tarsalis Coquillett, sentinel chickens, and wild birds, but failed to amplify to levels where tangential transmission was detected in Aedes mosquitoes or humans. A comparison of transmission patterns in Kern County to Coachella Valley in the southeastern desert of California showed the importance of mosquito phenology and spatial distribution, corvids, or other avian “super spreaders” and anthropogenic factors in WNV epidemiology.

REISEN, WILLIAM K.; CARROLL, BRIAN D.; TAKAHASHI, RICHARD; FANG, YING; GARCIA, SANDRA; MARTINEZ, VINCENT M.; QUIRING, ROB

2009-01-01

131

From the Catbird Seat. A History of Women's Studies at Humboldt State University, 1971-1996.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This 25-year history of the women's studies program at Humboldt State University (California) is based on two surveys completed by former and current program leaders (n=10), faculty members (n=18), and students (n=201), as well as on the authors' personal recollections. After an introductory chapter, individual chapters address the following…

Corbett, Kathryn L.; Preston, Kathleen

132

NAVEL BASE VENTURA COUNTY, PORT HUENEME, CALIFORNIA EPA CHARACTERIZATION TEST CELL REPORT ON ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEYS IN THE TEST CELL AREA  

EPA Science Inventory

The objective of the geophysical surveys at the EPA Characterization Test Cell (CTC) area (Site) at Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, California is to locate geophysical anomalies indicative of metallic objects within the area of the cell. The goal was to provide backgroun...

133

Recent trends in hormone therapy utilization and breast cancer incidence rates in the high incidence population of Marin County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Recent declines in invasive breast cancer have been reported in the US, with many studies linking these declines to reductions in the use of combination estrogen\\/progestin hormone therapy (EPHT). We evaluated the changing use of postmenopausal hormone therapy, mammography screening rates, and the decline in breast cancer incidence specifically for Marin County, California, a population with historically elevated breast

Rochelle R Ereman; Lee Ann Prebil; Mary Mockus; Kathy Koblick; Fern Orenstein; Christopher Benz; Christina A Clarke

2010-01-01

134

Soils and Vegetation of the French Gulch Quadrangel (24D-1,2,3,4) Trinity and Shasta Counties, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This bulletin summarizes results of a soil-vegetation survey of 145,000 acres comprising the French Gulch quadrangle in Trinity and Shasta Counties, in northern California. The data supplement maps of the area. Described are the survey area, soil-vegetati...

J. I. Mallory W. L. Colwell W. R. Powell

1973-01-01

135

Who Tills the Soil? Mexican-American Workers Replace the Small Farmer in California: An Example from Colusa County.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Documenting the impact of technological advancements upon the American farmer, this article describes a rural California county where the small farmers have had to sell or lease their land to larger enterprises who then recruit Mexican American farm workers to replace the labor once provided by the small farmer. (JC)

Moles, Jerry A.

1979-01-01

136

School-Site Administrators: A California County and Regional Perspective on Labor Market Trends. Issues & Answers. REL 2010-No. 084  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explores the differences among California's counties and regions in their needs for new school-site administrators in the coming decade, as driven by a combination of projected administrator retirements and projected student enrollment changes. The projected need for new school-site administrators, based solely on these combined…

White, Melissa Eiler; Fong, Anthony B.; Makkonen, Reino

2010-01-01

137

Environmental Changes in the Tule Lake Basin, Siskiyou and Modoc Counties, California, from 3 to 2 Million Years Before Present.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Pollen and diatom analyses of a core from the town of Tulelake, Siskiyou County, California, for the period between 3 and 2 Ma reveal a paleoclimatic and paleolimnologic sequence recording a long, warm time interval that lasted from about 2.9 to 2.6 Ma an...

D. P. Adam J. P. Bradbury H. J. Rieck A. M. Sarna-Wojcicki

1990-01-01

138

Identification of environmental issues: Hybrid wood-geothermal power plant, Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California: First phase report  

SciTech Connect

The development of a 55 MWe power plant in Lassen County, California, has been proposed. The proposed power plant is unique in that it will utilize goethermal heat and wood fuel to generate electrical power. This report identifies environmental issues and constraints which may impact the proposed hybrid wood-geothermal power plant. (ACR)

Not Available

1981-08-14

139

HYDROGEOLOGICAL AND GEOCHEMICAL FACTORS INFLUENCING MERCURY FATE AND TRANSPORT AT THE SULPHUR BANK MERCURY MINE, LAKE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA  

EPA Science Inventory

Clear Lake, located approximately 150 km north of San Francisco in Lake County, is one of the largest fresh water lakes in the California. Elevated mercury levels were first identified in fish from Clear Lake in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Although naturally occurring mercury...

140

Bat Inventory of the Multiple Species Conservation Program Area in San Diego County, California, 2002-2004.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We conducted a bat species inventory of the Multiple Species Conservation Program (MSCP) area in San Diego County, California. The study began in the early summer of 2002 and terminated in the winter of 2003. We used a variety of bat survey techniques inc...

C. S. Brehme D. C. Stokes R. N. Fisher S. A. Hathaway

2005-01-01

141

Using biomarkers to improve heavy oil reservoir management: An example from the cymric field, Kern County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

For biodegraded oil accumulations, field development can be optimized by using geochemical indicators of variations in the extent of bacterial alteration. Biodegradation typically reduces oil producibility by increasing oil viscosity. In the Cymric field (Kern County, California), sidewall core extracts reveal that the extent of oil biodegradation changes substantially over extremely short vertical distances in a shallow, low-permeability reservoir. Zones

M. A. McCaffrey; H. A. Legarre; S. J. Johnson

1996-01-01

142

76 FR 30080 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD)...

2011-05-24

143

76 FR 30025 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD)...

2011-05-24

144

Enrichment, concentration and retention processes in relation to anchovy ( Engraulis ringens) eggs and larvae distributions in the northern Humboldt upwelling ecosystem  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Lagrangian model is used to simulate and quantify in the northern Humboldt upwelling ecosystem the processes of enrichment, concentration and retention, identified by Bakun [Bakun, A., 1996. Patterns in the ocean. Ocean processes and marine population dynamics. University of California Sea Grant, California, USA, in cooperation with Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas de Noroeste, La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico,

Christophe Lett; Pierrick Penven; Patricia Ayón; Pierre Fréon

2007-01-01

145

Mass Balance Analyses of Flushing, Evaporation, Infiltration, and Biological Activity in California Park Lakes, Butte County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

California Park Lakes are retained by dams on Dead Horse Slough, an ephemeral stream network, which flows over volcanic/sedimentary rocks of the Tuscan Formation at the eastern margin of the Sacramento Valley, Butte County, California. Surface area of the lakes is approximately 0.2 km2, maximum depth is 8 m, and approximate lake volume is 700,000 m3. Flow rate and depth measurements in Dead Horse Slough indicate that discharges associated with winter storms flush the lakes repeatedly. During dry summer months no surface water discharges from the lakes and water is pumped from the underlying aquifer to maintain the water level. Average pumping rates are approximately 1250 m3/day. Surface and storm drain runoff, mainly from nearby lawn irrigation, also supply water at fluctuating rates estimated to equal a fraction (e.g., 35 percent) of well water supply. Reported pan evaporation data indicate that summer evaporation from lake surfaces is 1000 to 1500 m3/day. Thus, the estimated evaporation rate approximately equals the well water and runoff supply rate. Periodic chemical analyses of water supplies and lake water have been conducted primarily to evaluate nutrient sources. Typical nitrate and chloride concentrations are 2 to 10 mg/liter, and typical phosphate concentrations are 0.2 to 1 mg/liter. Chloride concentrations in lake water during summer 2002 increased slightly corresponding closely to mass balance calculations for evaporative concentration. Infiltration (including leakage through the terminal dam) is small relative to evaporation and difficult to measure within the uncertainty of chloride measurements and water mass balance estimates. Lake concentrations of nitrate and phosphate are generally lower than source water concentrations consistent with biological consumption. Mass balance analyses of dissolved nutrients in lakes and water sources compared to chloride provide a measure of the rate of biological activity in the lakes, which is a water quality management issue. Characterization of flushing, evaporation, and biological activity in California Park Lakes using water and chemical mass balance analyses contributes to water quality management and provides constraints on infiltration into the Tuscan Formation, which is the primary regional aquifer for domestic water supplies.

Murphy, W. M.; Sundermann, C. R.

2002-12-01

146

Occupational Behaviors and Farmworkers' Pesticide Exposure: Findings From a Study in Monterey County, California  

PubMed Central

Background We studied the relationship between behaviors promoted through the US Environmental Protection Agency Worker Protection Standard (WPS) and other programs and agricultural pesticide exposures in 73 strawberry fieldworkers employed in Monterey County, California. Methods Farmworkers’ behaviors were assessed via self-report and organophosphorus (OP) pesticide exposure was measured using dimethyl alkylphosphate (DMAP) and malathion dicarboxylic acid (MDA) urinary metabolite levels. Results Wearing WPS-recommended clothing, wearing clean work clothes, and the combination of handwashing with soap and wearing gloves were associated with decreases in DMAP and MDA metabolite levels. Despite these protective behaviors, however, participants had significantly higher levels of exposure as compared with a national reference sample. Conclusions Interventions that facilitate compliance with these behaviors may be effective in decreasing fieldworkers’ pesticide exposures. However, further efforts are needed to reduce the exposure disparities experienced by farmworkers and decrease the potential for “take home” exposures to farmworkers’ families.

Salvatore, Alicia L.; Bradman, Asa; Castorina, Rosemary; Camacho, Jose; Lopez, Jesus; Barr, Dana B.; Snyder, John; Jewell, Nicholas P.; Eskenazi, Brenda

2008-01-01

147

A critical assessment of the Burning Index in Los Angeles County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Burning Index (BI) is commonly used as a predictor of wildfire activity. An examination of data on the BI and wildfires in Los Angeles County, California, from January 1976 to December 2000 reveals that although the BI is positively associated with wildfire occurrence, its predictive value is quite limited. Wind speed alone has a higher correlation with burn area than BI, for instance, and a simple alternative point process model using wind speed, relative humidity, precipitation and temperature well outperforms the BI in terms of predictive power. The BI is generally far too high in winter and too low in fall, and may exaggerate the impact of individual variables such as wind speed or temperature during times when other variables, such as precipitation or relative humidity, render the environment ill suited for wildfires. ?? IAWF 2007.

Schoenberg, F. P.; Chang, C. -H.; Keeley, J. E.; Pompa, J.; Woods, J.; Xu, H.

2007-01-01

148

Kirschenmann Road multi-well monitoring site, Cuyama Valley, Santa Barbara County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Water Agency Division of the Santa Barbara County Department of Public Works, is evaluating the geohydrology and water availability of the Cuyama Valley, California (fig. 1). As part of this evaluation, the USGS installed the Cuyama Valley Kirschenmann Road multiple-well monitoring site (CVKR) in the South-Main subregion of the Cuyama Valley (fig. 1). The CVKR well site is designed to allow for the collection of depth-specific water-level and water-quality data. Data collected at this site provides information about the geology, hydrology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the local aquifer system, thus, enhancing the understanding of the geohydrologic framework of the Cuyama Valley. This report presents the construction information and initial geohydrologic data collected from the CVKR monitoring site, along with a brief comparison to selected supply and irrigation wells from the major subregions of the Cuyama Valley (fig. 1).

Everett, R. R.; Hanson, R. T.; Sweetkind, D. S.

2011-01-01

149

Chlorofluorocarbon dating of herbicide-containing well waters in Fresno and Tulare counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Simazine, diuron, and bromacil are the most frequently detected currently registered pesticides in California groundwater. These herbicides have been used for several decades in Fresno and Tulare counties, California; however, previous data are inadequate to determine whether the detections are a result of recent or historical applications (i.e., within the last decade, or 20-30 yr ago). Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) groundwater age-dating was used in conjunction with one-dimensional transport modeling to address this question. The estimated times between herbicide application and subsequent detection in groundwater samples from 18 domestic wells ranged from 3 to 33 yr; the aggregate data indicate that more than half of the detections are associated with applications in the last decade. The data also suggest that changes in groundwater quality arising from modified management practices will probably not be discernible for at least a decade. A secondary objective of this study was to evaluate the contribution of simazine degradates deethylsimazine (DES; 2-amino-4-chloro-6-ethylamino-s-triazine) and diaminochlorotriazine (DACT; 2,4-diamino-6-chloro-s-triazine) to total triazine concentrations (defined here as simazine + DES + DACT) in 30 domestic wells. The N-dealkylated s- chlorotriazine degradates DES and DACT substantially contribute to total triazine concentrations in Fresno and Tulare County groundwater, composing 24 to 100% of the total triazines, with a median of 82%. If s-chlorotriazines display a common mode of toxicological action, the prevalence of triazine degradates in water samples found in this and other studies indicate that drinking water standards based on total s-chlorotriazine concentrations may be most appropriate.

Spurlock, F.; Burow, K.; Dubrovsky, N.

2000-01-01

150

Study to develop statewide and county-level economic projections. Volume 1. California county economic forecasts. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Volume I provides a description of forecasts of economic growth for California and its large metropolitan areas. The California economy will continue to lag the national economy until 1996. In the longer term, California will surpass the nation in growth near the end of the decade, as the State`s comparative advantages in industry structure, natural and human resources, and geography

Kloepfer

1994-01-01

151

76 FR 64968 - Filing of Plats of Survey: California  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Humboldt Meridian, California T. 8 N., R. 3 E., dependent resurvey and subdivision accepted September 9, 2011. Mount Diablo Meridian, California T. 25 N., R. 8 W., dependent resurvey and [[Page 64969

2011-10-19

152

Late Pleistocene sediments and fossils near the mouth of Mad River, Humboldt County, California: Facies analysis, sequence development, and possible age correlation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study of late Pleistocene-age sediments near the mouth of the Mad River revealed a sequence of nearshore marine and shallow bay deposits. This sequence, bounded by unconformities, is informally named the Mouth of Mad unit. The Mouth of mad unit can be divided into four distinct depositional facies at the study site. The lowest facies are the Nearshore Sand and

1994-01-01

153

A cost-benefit analysis of a California county's back injury prevention program.  

PubMed Central

Back-related injuries have become a major health problem in the workplace, affecting as many as 35 percent of the work force and accounting for about 25 percent of all compensation claims. This study evaluates a back injury prevention program among employees in a northern California county in 1989-90. Six divisions of the county government were selected for the study because they had the highest prevalence of back pain experienced and the most back-related injuries in recent years. Four of the six divisions were randomly selected as the intervention group and the remaining two, the control group. Overall, 77 percent or 205 of the targeted employees in the intervention group participated in the study. The intervention group was given an identical health risk assessment (HRA) before and after the 1-year back injury prevention program that offered employees a combination of education, training, physical fitness activities, and ergonomic improvement. The control group was neither given the HRA nor offered the program. The back injury and cost data of both the control and intervention groups were collected before and after the 1-year intervention. The results showed a modest overall decline in back pain prevalence rates, but significant improvement in satisfaction and reduction in risky behaviors. Cost-benefit analysis showed the net benefit of introducing back injury prevention program was $161,108, and the return on investment is 179 percent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Shi, L

1993-01-01

154

Social Network Analysis of Patient Sharing Among Hospitals in Orange County, California  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We applied social network analyses to determine how hospitals within Orange County, California, are interconnected by patient sharing, a system which may have numerous public health implications. Methods. Our analyses considered 2 general patient-sharing networks: uninterrupted patient sharing (UPS; i.e., direct interhospital transfers) and total patient sharing (TPS; i.e., all interhospital patient sharing, including patients with intervening nonhospital stays). We considered these networks at 3 thresholds of patient sharing: at least 1, at least 10, and at least 100 patients shared. Results. Geographically proximate hospitals were somewhat more likely to share patients, but many hospitals shared patients with distant hospitals. Number of patient admissions and percentage of cancer patients were associated with greater connectivity across the system. The TPS network revealed numerous connections not seen in the UPS network, meaning that direct transfers only accounted for a fraction of total patient sharing. Conclusions. Our analysis demonstrated that Orange County's 32 hospitals were highly and heterogeneously interconnected by patient sharing. Different hospital populations had different levels of influence over the patient-sharing network.

McGlone, Sarah M.; Song, Yeohan; Avery, Taliser R.; Eubank, Stephen; Chang, Chung-Chou; Bailey, Rachel R.; Wagener, Diane K.; Burke, Donald S.; Platt, Richard; Huang, Susan S.

2011-01-01

155

A preliminary survey of Vietnamese nail salon workers in Alameda County, California.  

PubMed

In recent decades, the nail salon industry has been one of the fastest growing in the U.S. California has over 300,000 workers licensed to perform nail care services. Though little is known about their health, these workers routinely handle cosmetic products containing carcinogens and endocrine disruptors that may increase a woman's breast cancer risk. Additionally, an estimated 59-80% of California nail salons are run by Vietnamese women who face socio-cultural barriers that may compromise their workplace safety and health care access. In a pilot project designed to characterize Vietnamese nail salon workers in Alameda County, California in order to inform future health interventions and reduce occupational exposures, we conducted face-to-face surveys with a convenience sample of 201 Vietnamese nail salon workers at 74 salons. Of the workers surveyed, a majority reported that they are concerned about their health from exposure to workplace chemicals. Additionally, a sizeable proportion reported having experienced some health problem after they began working in the industry, particularly acute health problems that may be associated with solvent exposure (e.g. skin and eye irritation, breathing difficulties and headaches). Our findings highlight a critical need for further investigation into the breast cancer risk of nail salon workers, underscored by the workers' routine use of carcinogenic and endocrine-disrupting chemicals, their prevalent health concerns about such chemicals, and their high level of acute health problems. Moreover, the predominance of Vietnamese immigrant women in this workforce makes it an important target group for further research and health interventions. PMID:18478317

Quach, Thu; Nguyen, Kim-Dung; Doan-Billings, Phuong-An; Okahara, Linda; Fan, Cathyn; Reynolds, Peggy

2008-10-01

156

The California Geotour: Online Geologic Field Trip Guides  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

There are many great ways to learn about the geological history of California, including reading some of the works by noted writer John McPhee. Additionally, the state of California's Department of Conservation has created these very fine online geologic field trip guides. It might be more accurate to say that the site is an interactive index of web pages that contain geologic field guides containing photographs, maps, texts, and directions for local natural features from Humboldt County down to the Inland Empire. The index is organized into geographic regions collectively referred to as the "Geomorphic Provinces of California". Additionally, these geological areas are subdivided into groups like Owens Valley, Lassen Park, and Point Reyes. Overall, it's a great resource, and one that will be appreciated by just about anyone with a penchant for geology or the Golden State.

157

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Stony Gorge Reservoir Fire Management Plan Orland Project, Glenn County, California. Managing Water in the West.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Bureau of Reclamation has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) to evaluate the effects of implementing a Fire Management Plan (FMP) at Stony Gorge Reservoir, Glenn County, California. The purpose of implementing the FMP is to meet Department of t...

2007-01-01

158

78 FR 53711 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer, Santa Barbara and Ventura County...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Santa Barbara and Ventura County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD), Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD)...

2013-08-30

159

78 FR 53680 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer, Santa Barbara and Ventura County...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Santa Barbara and Ventura County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD), Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD)...

2013-08-30

160

Cooling rates and crystallization dynamics of shallow level pegmatite-aplite dikes, San Diego County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Pegmatites of the Pala and Mesa Grande Pegmatite Districts, San Diego County, California are typically thin, sheet-like composite pegmatite-aplite dikes. Aplitic portions of many dikes display pronounced mineralogical layering referred to as "line rock," characterized by fine-grained, garnet-rich bands alternating with albite- and quartz-rich bands. Thermal modeling was performed for four dikes in San Diego County including the 1 m thick Himalaya dike, the 2 m thick Mission dike, the 8 m thick George Ashley dike, and the 25 m thick Stewart dike. Calculations were based on conductive cooling equations accounting for latent heat of crystallization, a melt emplacement temperature of 650 °C into 150 °C fractured, gabbroic country rock at a depth of 5 km, and an estimated 3 wt% initial H2O content in the melt. Cooling to -5 cm/s. Crystal size distribution (CSD) studies of garnet from layered aplites suggest growth rates of about 10-6 cm/s. These results indicate that the dikes cooled and crystallized rapidly, with variable nucleation rates but high overall crystal-growth rates. Initial high nucleation rates coincident with emplacement and strong undercooling can account for the millimeter-size aplite grains. Lower nucleation rates coupled with high growth rates can explain the decimeter-size minerals in the hanging walls, cores, and miarolitic cavities of the pegmatites. The presence of tourmaline and/or lepidolite throughout these dikes suggests that although the melts were initially H2O-undersaturated, high melt concentrations of incompatible (or fluxing) components such as B, F, and Li (±H2O), aided in the development of large pegmatitic crystals that grew rapidly in the short times suggested by the conductive cooling models.

Webber, Karen L.; Simmons, William B.; Falster, Alexander U.; Foord, Eugene E.

1999-01-01

161

Fine Particulate Air Pollution and Mortality in Nine California Counties: Results from CALFINE  

PubMed Central

Many epidemiologic studies provide evidence of an association between daily counts of mortality and ambient particulate matter < 10 ?m in diameter (PM10). Relatively few studies, however, have investigated the relationship of mortality with fine particles [PM < 2.5 ?m in diameter (PM2.5)], especially in a multicity setting. We examined associations between PM2.5 and daily mortality in nine heavily populated California counties using data from 1999 through 2002. We considered daily counts of all-cause mortality and several cause-specific subcategories (respiratory, cardiovascular, ischemic heart disease, and diabetes). We also examined these associations among several subpopulations, including the elderly (> 65 years of age), males, females, non-high school graduates, whites, and Hispanics. We used Poisson multiple regression models incorporating natural or penalized splines to control for covariates that could affect daily counts of mortality, including time, seasonality, temperature, humidity, and day of the week. We used meta-analyses using random-effects models to pool the observations in all nine counties. The analysis revealed associations of PM2.5 levels with several mortality categories. Specifically, a 10-?g/m3 change in 2-day average PM2.5 concentration corresponded to a 0.6% (95% confidence interval, 0.2–1.0%) increase in all-cause mortality, with similar or greater effect estimates for several other subpopulations and mortality subcategories, including respiratory disease, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, age > 65 years, females, deaths out of the hospital, and non-high school graduates. Results were generally insensitive to model specification and the type of spline model used. This analysis adds to the growing body of evidence linking PM2.5 with daily mortality.

Ostro, Bart; Broadwin, Rachel; Green, Shelley; Feng, Wen-Ying; Lipsett, Michael

2006-01-01

162

Epidemic Salmonella enteritidis infection in Los Angeles County, California. The predominance of phage type 4.  

PubMed Central

Between April and July 1994, 501 cases of Salmonella enteritidis infection were reported in Los Angeles County, California, nearly 5 times the number reported between April and July 1993; of these, 422 (84%) were sporadic (not related to known outbreaks). A case-control study was done to determine risk factors for sporadic illness; the distribution of S enteritidis phage types was evaluated. Case-patients (n = 58) were county residents older than 1 year with culture-confirmed S enteritidis infection in August 1994. One to two acquaintance controls (n = 98) were matched to each case by age, sex, and race. Two risk factors-eating raw or undercooked eggs (matched odds ratio [MOR] = 6.6; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.9, 23.0) and eating in restaurants (MOR = 4.9; 95% CI = 1.2, 19.4) in the 3 days before the onset of illness-remained significant in the conditional logistic regression model. Of 16 randomly selected S enteritidis case-isolates, 15 (94%) were phage type 4. The reasons for the regional predominance of phage type 4, an S enteritidis subtype recently associated with large and destructive increases in salmonellosis among poultry and humans in Britain and much of Europe, are unclear. To minimize human S enteritidis infection, food service workers need frequent training in the proper handling of raw foods, eggs should be kept refrigerated during distribution and storage, and eggs should be cooked until the yolk is firm, particularly for persons at the greatest risk for serious illness: pregnant women, elderly persons, and those with compromised immune systems. Clinicians should obtain stool specimens for culture from patients who present with diarrhea and fever or bloody diarrhea or who are possibly part of an outbreak.

Passaro, D J; Reporter, R; Mascola, L; Kilman, L; Malcolm, G B; Rolka, H; Werner, S B; Vugia, D J

1996-01-01

163

Characterizing urbanization, and agricultural and conservation land-use change in Riverside County, California, USA.  

PubMed

Monitoring trends in urbanization and land use related to population growth and changing social and economic conditions is an important tool for developing in land use and habitat conservation policy. We analyzed urbanization and agricultural land-use change in Riverside County, California from 1984 to 2002, comparing maps every two years on the basis of aerial photographs. Matrix analysis combined with information theory was applied to study land type conversion. Results showed that the total area of "Urban and Built-Up Land" increased the most whereas total area of "Prime Farmland" decreased most. Land-use characterized as "Grazing Land,"Farmland of Local Importance," and "Farmland of Statewide Importance" also decreased. Mean patch size also decreased for "Grazing Land,"Water Area,"Other Land," and "Prime Farmland." The diversity of land types decreased dramatically after 1992. Urbanization patterns were different among three city groups (Riverside City, Coachella Valley, and Blythe), indicating the different times for "leapfrog" development in the three areas. Furthermore, the unpredictability and change in composition of land use increased after 1996 due to intensified urbanization. If the current driving forces continue, our model projects that in 2020 the area of "Urban and Built-Up Land" may increase between 25% and 39% in comparison with 2002. Percentages of most agricultural land types are projected to decrease, especially "Farmland of Local Importance,"Prime Farmland," and "Farmland of Statewide Importance." If the county's goal is to preserve agricultural lands and natural biodiversity, while maintaining sustainable development, current land-use policies and practices should be changed. This study demonstrates new useful methods for monitoring and detection of change of land-use processes. PMID:20586769

Chen, Xiongwen; Li, Bai-Lian; Allen, Michael F

2010-05-01

164

Demography of the San Francisco gartersnake in coastal San Mateo County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The San Francisco gartersnake Thamnophis sirtalis tetrataenia has been federally listed as endangered since 1967, but little demographic information exists for this species. We examined the demography of a San Francisco gartersnake population on approximately 213 ha of California coastal prairie in San Mateo County, California, from 2007 to 2010. The best-supported mark-recapture model indicated annual variation in daily capture probabilities and annual survival rates. Abundance increased throughout the study period, with a mean total population from 2008 to 2010 of 443 (95% CI = 313-646) individuals. Annual survival was slightly greater than that of most other gartersnakes, with an annual probability of survival of 0.78 (0.55-0.95) in 2008-2009 and 0.75 (0.49-0.93) in 2009-2010. Mean annual per capita recruitment rates were 0.73 (0.02-2.50) in 2008-2009 and 0.47 (0.02-1.42) in 2009-2010. From 2008 to 2010, the probability of an increase in abundance at this site was 0.873, with an estimated increase of 115 (-82 to 326) individuals. The estimated population growth rate in 2008-2009 was 1.52 (0.73-3.29) and in 2009-2010 was 1.21 (0.70-2.17). Although this population is probably stable or increasing in the short term, long-term studies of the status of the San Francisco gartersnake at other sites are required to estimate population trends and to elucidate mechanisms that promote the recovery of this charismatic member of our native herpetofauna.

Halstead, Brian J.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Amarello, Melissa; Smith, Jeffrey J.; Thompson, Michelle E.; Routman, Eric J.; Casazza, Michael L.

2011-01-01

165

The geology, carbonaceous materials, and origin of the epigenetic uranium deposits in the Tertiary Sespe Formation in Ventura County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Uranium deposits have been known in western Ventura County, California, since about 1959. These epigenetic uranium deposits are found in and are probably derived from the Tertiary Sespe Formation, which is of continental origin. The sandstone-filled paleochannels served as ground-water conduits that carried uranium-bearing solutions to the depositional site. The uranium mineralization took place when the humate was deposited (perhaps

K. A. Dickinson; J. S. Leventhal

1988-01-01

166

Distribution and Abundance of California Giant Salamander (Dicamptodon ensatus) and Signal Crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) in the Upper Redwood Creek Watershed, Marin County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A survey was conducted in 1997-1998 to identify the distribution of non-native signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) and larval California giant salamanders (Dicamptodon ensatus) within the upper Redwood Creek watershed (Marin County, California). The crayfish is widely distributed along the mainstem Redwood Creek. It was found in lower Fern Creek but not in any first order tributaries or above fish barriers. While present throughout the study area, larval California giant salamanders were found mainly in small headwater tributaries. Larval salamanders appear to use habitats in accordance to their availability, while signal crayfish were rarely found in shallow water habitats and appeared to prefer scour pools. Evidence of predation by signal crayfish on larval giant salamanders was found under confined conditions. Controlled laboratory and field experiments would be needed to determine whether competitive exclusion is occurring. Because of its widespread occurrence in the headwater streams surveyed in this project, California giant salamanders would be an appropriate indicator species for those interested in monitoring the health of small headwater streams. Future long-term monitoring using California giant salamanders should be based on permanent monitoring reaches with periodic basinwide habitat and animal surveys to determine if reaches are representative of basinwide conditions.

Fong, Darren; Howell, Judd A.

2006-01-01

167

78 FR 41390 - Pershing County Water Conservation District; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing with the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Commission [Project No. 14327-000] Pershing County Water Conservation District; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing...June 26, 2013. d. Applicant: Pershing County Water Conservation District. e. Name of Project: Humboldt...

2013-07-10

168

78 FR 59919 - Pershing County Water Conservation District; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing With the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Commission [Project No. 14327-000] Pershing County Water Conservation District; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing...June 26, 2013. d. Applicant: Pershing County Water Conservation District. e. Name of Project: Humboldt...

2013-09-30

169

Enhancing and Maintaining Water Service Quality for Metropolises: A Case Study of the City and County of San Francisco, California, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The City and County of San Francisco supplies treated and raw water directly or indirectly to approximately 2.4 million consumers within five California counties and at various other locations along the transmission route from its principal water source in the Sierra Nevada. From a small-scale private entity formed to meet local neighbourhood needs in 1851, the San Francisco water system

Michael D. Lee

2002-01-01

170

Limited Life Opportunities for Black and Latino Youth. Report on a Public Hearing by the Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations (Compton, California, April 26, 1990).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations held a public hearing to examine the effects of poverty on the hundreds of thousands of low income Blacks and Latinos under the age of 18 residing in Los Angeles County (California). The Commission's findings, recommendations, and concerns are presented. The following findings are presented: (1)…

Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations, CA.

171

High-Resolution Topographic, Bathymetric, and Oceanographic Data for the Pleasure Point Area, Santa Cruz County, California: 2005-2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The County of Santa Cruz Department of Public Works and the County of Santa Cruz Redevelopment Agency requested the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Western Coastal and Marine Geology Team (WCMG) to provide baseline geologic and oceanographic information on the coast and inner shelf at Pleasure Point, Santa Cruz County, California. The rationale for this proposed work is a need to better understand the environmental consequences of a proposed bluff stabilization project on the beach, the nearshore and the surf at Pleasure Point, Santa Cruz County, California. To meet these information needs, the USGS-WCMG Team collected baseline scientific information on the morphology and waves at Pleasure Point. This study provided high-resolution topography of the coastal bluffs and bathymetry of the inner shelf off East Cliff Drive between 32nd Avenue and 41st Avenue. The spatial and temporal variation in waves and their breaking patterns at the study site were documented. Although this project did not actively investigate the impacts of the proposed bluff stabilization project, these data provide the baseline information required for future studies directed toward predicting the impacts of stabilization on the sea cliffs, beach and nearshore sediment profiles, natural rock reef structures, and offshore habitats and resources. They also provide a basis for calculating potential changes to wave transformations into the shore at Pleasure Point.

Storlazzi, Curt D.; Barnard, Patrick L.; Collins, Brian D.; Finlayson, David P.; Golden, Nadine E.; Hatcher, Gerry A.; Kayen, Robert E.; Ruggiero, Peter

2007-01-01

172

L-band radar sensing of soil moisture. [Kern County, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The performance of an L-band, 25 cm wavelength imaging synthetic aperture radar was assessed for soil moisture determination, and the temporal variability of radar returns from a number of agricultural fields was studied. A series of three overflights was accomplished over an agricultural test site in Kern County, California. Soil moisture samples were collected from bare fields at nine sites at depths of 0-2, 2-5, 5-15, and 15-30 cm. These gravimetric measurements were converted to percent of field capacity for correlation to the radar return signal. The initial signal film was optically correlated and scanned to produce image data numbers. These numbers were then converted to relative return power by linear interpolation of the noise power wedge which was introduced in 5 dB steps into the original signal film before and after each data run. Results of correlations between the relative return power and percent of field capacity (FC) demonstrate that the relative return power from this imaging radar system is responsive to the amount of soil moisture in bare fields. The signal returned from dry (15% FC) and wet (130% FC) fields where furrowing is parallel to the radar beam differs by about 10 dB.

Chang, A. T. C.; Atwater, S.; Salomonson, V. V.; Estes, J. E.; Simonett, D. S.; Bryan, M. L.

1980-01-01

173

Under- and Over-Nutrition Among Refugees in San Diego County, California  

PubMed Central

Resettled refugees often arrive in their host country with little knowledge of nutrition or available food choices. We explored nutrition-related issues of recent refugee arrivals to San Diego County—the second largest California resettlement site. In-depth interviews (n = 40) were conducted with refugees, health care practitioners, and refugee service organizations. Content analysis identified nutrition-related themes. Unhealthy weight gain after arrival was the most common concern and was attributed to social pressures among adolescents, food choices and a more sedentary lifestyle. Conversely, undernutrition remained a concern due to poor diets. Factors influencing nutritional problems included continuation of past habits, acculturation, unfamiliarity with available foods and socio-economic influences. The nutritional concerns encountered by resettled refugees in San Diego are not unique to this group but are aggravated by their past experiences, and abrupt changes to food choices and behavior. Addressing contextual factors of poor food choices may prevent some of the long term health consequences of poor nutrition.

Rondinelli, Amanda J.; Morris, Meghan D.; Rodwell, Timothy C.; Moser, Kathleen S.; Paida, Paulino; Popper, Steve T.

2010-01-01

174

Evaluation of ground-water monitoring network, Santa Cruz County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Santa Cruz County Flood Control and Water Conservation District seeks to improve the existing network of observation wells to monitor water levels and ground-water quality in the Pajaro Valley subarea and the Aptos-Soquel, San Lorenzo, and Santa Cruz Coastal subbasins in California. The proposed network , consisting of 92 wells, is designed to monitor changes in storage and quality of ground water resulting from climatic changes and management-induced stresses. In the proposed network , water levels in all wells would be measured semiannually, in April and September, and monthly in a few key wells. The water-level measurements would provide data that could be used to determine changes in ground-water storage. In addition to the currently monitored characteristics--temperature, specific conductance, pH, and chloride ion concentration--inclusion of annual sampling and analysis for major ions and nutrients is proposed. The network would also include sampling and analysis for trace elements once every 4 years. More frequent analyses are proposed in areas where water-quality problems are known to exist or where potential water-quality problems are recognized. Analyses for major ions, nutrients, and trace elements are included in the proposed network to provide baseline data for monitoring long-term changes in water quality and to detect any unexpected changes in quality. (USGS)

Blankenbaker, G. G.; Farrar, Christopher D.

1981-01-01

175

Geothermal Loan Guarantee Program: Westmorland Development Project, Imperial County, California: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

The action assessed is the guaranty of a loan by DOE to finance geothermal exploration, development, and testing by Mapco Geothermal, Inc. and Republic Geothermal, Inc. in the Westmorland area of Imperial County, California. Initial drilling and flow testing of up to three production wells will occur in the exploratory phase. Exploration is proposed for either or both of two portions of the leasehold area. If exploration confirms the presence of a viable resource in the Sweetwater area, the preferred site based on limited temperature data, then up to 19 new production wells and three new injection wells may be drilled and tested there in preparation for the construction of a 55-MW double-flash electric power plant. If, however, the Sweetwater resource proves infeasible, further exploration and possible full-field development may occur instead at the Dearborn-Kalin-Landers area. At this site, up to 19 new production wells and three new injection wells may be drilled and tested, with six existing wells also used for injection. This environmental assessment chiefly addresses effects of the drilling and testing program. In summary, this paper discusses the proposed action, describes the existing environment and discusses the potential environmental impacts. 75 refs. (LSP)

Not Available

1979-04-01

176

Problems related to water quality and algal control in Lopez Reservoir, San Luis Obispo County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A study to determine the present enrichment status of Liopez Reservoir in San Luis Obispo county, California, and to evaluate copper sulfate algal treatment found that stratification in the reservoir regulates nutrient release and that algal control has been ineffective. Nuisance algal blooms, particularly from March to June, have been a problem in the warm multipurpose reservoir since it was initially filled following intense storms in 1968-69. The cyanophyte Anabaena unispora has been dominant; cospecies are the diatoms Stephanodiscus astraea and Cyclotella operculata, and the chlorophytes Pediastrum deplex and Sphaerocystis schroeteri. During an A. unispora bloom in May 1972 the total lake surface cell count was nearly 100,000 cells/ml. Thermal stratification from late spring through autumn results in oxygen deficiency in the hypolimnion and metalimnion caused by bacterial oxidation of organic detritus. The anaerobic conditions favor chemical reduction of organic matter, which constitute 10-14% of the sediment. As algae die, sink to the bottom, and decompose, nutrients are released to the hypolimnion , and with the autumn overturn are spread to the epilimnion. Algal blooms not only hamper recreation, but through depletion of dissolved oxygen in the epilimnion may have caused periodic fishkills. Copper sulfate mixed with sodium citrate and applied at 1.10-1.73 lbs/acre has not significantly reduced algal growth; a method for determining correct dosage is presented. (Lynch-Wisconsin)

Fuller, Richard H.; Averett, Robert C.; Hines, Walter G.

1975-01-01

177

Drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis in the Baja California-San Diego County border population.  

PubMed Central

A study was conducted to determine the frequency of, and risk factors for, drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) among Baja California (BC) and San Diego County (SDC) residents. Another purpose was to document the amount of contact between pulmonary TB patients and residents of the opposite side of the the border. During the period from February 1995 to May 1996, pulmonary TB patients from BC (n = 427) and SDC (n = 331) were evaluated with cultures, drug susceptibility tests, and questionnaires. Drug resistance was found in 41% of the BC Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB) isolates and 20% of the SDC isolates. Resistance to both isoniazid (INH) and rifampin (RIF) varied from 1% of isolates from SDC patients to 17% of isolates from BC patients. Patients with a history of previous treatment had increased odds of drug-resistant disease. Older BC patients were more likely to have INH- or RIF-resistant TB. Although 42% of Tijuana TB patients reported recent contact with residents from SDC, travel to Mexico and contact with residents from Mexico were not significant risk factors for drug-resistant TB among SDC residents. However, the demonstrated contact between TB patients and residents on opposite sides of the border indicates the importance of coordinating efforts internationally to control TB.

Peter, C R; Schultz, E; Moser, K; Cox, M; Freeman, R; Ramirez-Zetina, M; Lomeli, M R

1998-01-01

178

Preliminary geologic map of the Fontana 7.5' quadrangle, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Open-File Report 03-418 is a digital geologic data set that maps and describes the geology of the Fontana 7.5’ quadrangle, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, California. The Fontana quadrangle database is one of several 7.5’ quadrangle databases that are being produced by the Southern California Areal Mapping Project (SCAMP). These maps and databases are, in turn, part of the nation-wide digital geologic map coverage being developed by the National Cooperative Geologic Map Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). General Open-File Report 03-418 contains a digital geologic map database of the Fontana 7.5’ quadrangle, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, California that includes: 1. ARC/INFO (Environmental Systems Research Institute, http://www.esri.com) version 7.2.1 coverages of the various elements of the geologic map. 2. A Postscript file (fon_map.ps) to plot the geologic map on a topographic base, and containing a Correlation of Map Units diagram (CMU), a Description of Map Units (DMU), and an index map. 3. An Encapsulated PostScript (EPS) file (fon_grey.eps) created in Adobe Illustrator 10.0 to plot the geologic map on a grey topographic base, and containing a Correlation of Map Units (CMU), a Description of Map Units (DMU), and an index map. 4. Portable Document Format (.pdf) files of: a. the Readme file; includes in Appendix I, data contained in fon_met.txt b. The same graphics as plotted in 2 and 3 above.Test plots have not produced precise 1:24,000-scale map sheets. Adobe Acrobat page size setting influences map scale. The Correlation of Map Units and Description of Map Units is in the editorial format of USGS Geologic Investigations Series (I-series) maps but has not been edited to comply with I-map standards. Within the geologic map data package, map units are identified by standard geologic map criteria such as formation-name, age, and lithology. Where known, grain size is indicated on the map by a subscripted letter or letters following the unit symbols as follows: lg, large boulders; b, boulder; g, gravel; a, arenaceous; s, silt; c, clay; e.g. Qyfa is a predominantly young alluvial fan deposit that is arenaceous. Multiple letters are used for more specific identification or for mixed units, e.g., Qfysa is a silty sand. In some cases, mixed units are indicated by a compound symbol; e.g., Qyf2sc. Even though this is an Open-File Report and includes the standard USGS Open-File disclaimer, the report closely adheres to the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. Descriptions of units can be obtained by viewing or plotting the .pdf file (4b above) or plotting the postscript files (2 or 3 above).

Morton, Douglas M.; Digital preparation by Bovard, Kelly R.

2003-01-01

179

Properties of Basin-Fill Deposits, a 1971-2000 Water Budget, and Surface-Water-Groundwater Interactions in the Upper Humboldt River Basin, Northeastern Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study was done in cooperation with Elko County, Nevada in response to concerns over growing demand for water within the county and increasing external demands that are occurring statewide. The upper Humboldt River basin encompasses 4,360 square miles...

J. L. Smith R. W. Plume

2013-01-01

180

Documentation and description of the digital spatial data base for southern California Regional Aquifer-System Analysis Program, Santa Clara-Calleguas Basin, Ventura County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report documents the geographic information system map layers and data files generated for the Santa Clara-Calleguas Basin, Ventura County, as part of a Regional Aquifer- System Analysis of southern California from 1989 to 1995. Thirty-six map layers and four data files are maintained in this geographic information system data base. The map layers cover the Santa Clara-Calleguas drainage basin and are stored in a common map projection. Attributes of the map layers and data files are described and referenced. The map layers are grouped by geography, geology, and hydrology.

Predmore, Steven K.; Koczot, Kathryn M.; Paybins, Katherine S.

1997-01-01

181

Air pollution and emergency room visits for asthma in Santa Clara County, California.  

PubMed Central

During the winters of 1986-1987 through 1991-1992, rainfall throughout much of Northern California was subnormal, resulting in intermittent accumulation of air pollution, much of which was attributable to residential wood combustion (RWC). This investigation examined whether there was a relationship between ambient air pollution in Santa Clara County, California and emergency room visits for asthma during the winters of 1988-1989 through 1991-1992. Emergency room (ER) records from three acute-care hospitals were abstracted to compile daily visits for asthma and a control diagnosis (gastroenteritis) for 3-month periods during each winter. Air monitoring data included daily coefficient of haze (COH) and every-other-day particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter equal to or less than 10 microns (PM10, 24-hr average), as well as hourly nitrogen dioxide and ozone concentrations. Daily COH measurements were used to predict values for missing days of PM10 to develop a complete PM10 time series. Daily data were also obtained for temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity. In time-series analyses using Poisson regression, consistent relationships were found between ER visits for asthma and PM10. Same-day nitrogen dioxide concentrations were also associated with asthma ER visits, while ozone was not. Because there was a significant interaction between PM10 and minimum temperature in this data set, estimates of relative risks (RRs) for PM10-associated asthma ER visits were temperature-dependent. A 60 micrograms/m3 change in PM10 (2-day lag) corresponded to RRs of 1.43 (95% CI = 1.18-1.69) at 20 degrees F, representing the low end of the temperature distribution, 1.27 (95% CI = 1.13-1.42) at 30 degrees F, and 1.11 (95% CI = 1.03-1.19) at 41 degrees F, the mean of the observed minimum temperature. ER visits for gastroenteritis were not significantly associated with any pollutant variable. Several sensitivity analyses, including the use of robust regressions and of nonparametric methods for fitting time trends and temperature effects in the data, supported these findings. These results demonstrate an association between ambient wintertime PM10 and exacerbations of asthma in an area where one of the principal sources of PM10 is RWC. Images Figure 1.

Lipsett, M; Hurley, S; Ostro, B

1997-01-01

182

California GAMA Program: Sources and Transport of Nitrate in Shallow Groundwater in the Llagas Basin of Santa Clara County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program is to assess the major threats to groundwater resources that supply drinking water to Californians (Belitz et al., 2004). Nitrate is the most pervasive and intractable contaminant in California groundwater and is t...

2005-01-01

183

78 FR 21582 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Butte County Air Quality Management...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plan, Butte County Air Quality Management District and Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Butte County Air Quality Management District (BCAQMD) and...

2013-04-11

184

76 FR 26192 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Northern Sonoma County Air Pollution...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Plan, Northern Sonoma County Air Pollution Control District (NSCAPCD) and...to the Northern Sonoma County Air Pollution Control District (NSCAPCD) and...52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by...

2011-05-06

185

76 FR 28944 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District and Feather River...submitted for the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and...for new and modified sources of air pollution. If EPA finalizes the...

2011-05-19

186

75 FR 45082 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD) portion...52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Intergovernmental...

2010-08-02

187

76 FR 71886 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

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2011-11-21

188

75 FR 24406 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District, Sacramento...District, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District, and South Coast...revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District...

2010-05-05

189

75 FR 1284 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Ventura County Air Pollution Control District  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

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2010-01-11

190

76 FR 44809 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District and Feather River...submitted for the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and...modified major stationary sources of air pollution. We are approving local...

2011-07-27

191

75 FR 8008 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD) portion...SCAQMD), San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District...

2010-02-23

192

75 FR 69002 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD) portion...and San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District...

2010-11-10

193

78 FR 6736 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) portion...rules, however, provide for Air Pollution Control Officer (APCO)...

2013-01-31

194

76 FR 67366 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District and Sacramento...revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and...52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by...

2011-11-01

195

76 FR 26615 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD) AGENCY...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District portion of the...requirements and exemptions for various air pollution sources. We are approving...

2011-05-09

196

77 FR 25109 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD) portion...of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Air pollution control, Environmental...

2012-04-27

197

76 FR 7142 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD) portion...permitting requirements, for various air pollution sources. We are taking...

2011-02-09

198

78 FR 21542 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District and South Coast...revisions to the Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD) and...52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by...

2013-04-11

199

75 FR 24544 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District, Sacramento...District, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District, and South Coast...revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District...

2010-05-05

200

75 FR 56889 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plan, San Diego County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the San Diego County Air Pollution Control District (SDCAPCD) portion...52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by...

2010-09-17

201

76 FR 54993 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) portion...52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Intergovernmental...

2011-09-06

202

Sandstone matrix olistostrome deposited on intra-subduction complex serpentinite, Franciscan Complex, western Marin County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detailed field mapping in the Franciscan Complex in western Marin County, California, offers insight into the origins and development of mélanges, as well as accretionary complex architecture. From structurally high to low, the study area units comprise a structurally high sandstone matrix olistostrome, serpentinite, a structurally intermediate sandstone matrix olistostrome, Early Cretaceous Nicasio Reservoir Terrane greenstone, and coherent Cretaceous greywacke, all exhibiting prehnite-pumpellyite burial metamorphism. The structurally high sandstone matrix olistostrome includes volcanic blocks up to 700 m in diameter and chert blocks up to 100 m in diameter, whereas the structurally intermediate olistostrome unit comprises a lithic-rich sandstone matrix enclosing volcanic blocks 1-20 m in diameter. The youngest detrital zircons in the high olistostrome and the coherent greywacke have U-Pb ages of ? 20 m.y. older than the inferred depositional ages of the units themselves, suggesting that the bulk of the detritus comprising these units was derived by exposure and sedimentary recycling of significantly older, previously accreted sediments. The matrix of both olistostrome units exhibits minimal strain with weak local development of pressure solution cleavage. These findings demonstrate introduction of Franciscan exotic blocks and development of Franciscan block-in-matrix fabrics through sedimentary sliding and support sedimentary interpretations for more highly strained shale and serpentinite matrix mélanges. Additionally, these data suggest that sandstone matrix olistostromes/mélange may constitute a larger part of the Franciscan and other accretionary complexes than previously believed. The structurally high olistostrome preserves a depositional contact on serpentinite, verifying an intra-subduction complex origin for the serpentinite. The serpentinite lacks block-in-matrix structure and likely represents a tectonically emplaced unit derived from the subducting plate as a coherent nappe, rather than a sedimentary serpentinite deposit. Multi-kilometer scale west-vergent overturned folds with subhorizontal fold axes deform the nappes of the field area, and a later generation of open, northeast-trending folds overprints the earlier folds.

Prohoroff, Rachel; Wakabayashi, John; Dumitru, Trevor A.

2012-09-01

203

Geologic summary of the Owens Valley drilling project, Owens and Rose Valleys, Inyo County, California  

SciTech Connect

The Owens Valley Drilling Project consists of eight drill holes located in southwest Inyo County, California, having an aggregate depth of 19,205 feet (5853 m). Project holes penetrated the Coso Formation of upper Pliocene or early Pleistocene age and the Owens Lake sand and lakebed units of the same age. The project objective was to improve the reliability of uranium-potential-resource estimates assigned to the Coso Formation in the Owens Valley region. Uranium-potential-resource estimates for this area in $100 per pound U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ forward-cost-category material have been estimatd to be 16,954 tons (15,384 metric tons). This estimate is based partly on project drilling results. Within the Owens Valley project area, the Coso Formation was encountered only in the Rose Valley region, and for this reason Rose Valley is considered to be the only portion of the project area favorable for economically sized uranium deposits. The sequence of sediments contained in the Owens Valley basin is considered to be largely equivalent but lithologically dissimilar to the Coso Formation of Haiwee Ridge and Rose Valley. The most important factor in the concentration of significant amounts of uranium in the rock units investigated appears to be the availability of reducing agents. Significant amounts of reductants (pyrite) were found in the Coso Formation. No organic debris was noted. Many small, disconnected uranium occurrences, 100 to 500 ppM U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, were encountered in several of the holes.

Schaer, D.W. (comp.)

1981-07-01

204

Geologic map of the Fifteenmile Valley 7.5' quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Open-File Report OF 01-132 contains a digital geologic map database of the Fifteenmile Valley 7.5’ quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California that includes: 1. ARC/INFO (Environmental Systems Research Institute, http://www.esri.com) version 7.2.1 coverages of the various elements of the geologic map. 2. A PostScript file to plot the geologic map on a topographic base, and containing a Correlation of Map Units diagram, a Description of Map Units, an index map, and a regional structure map. 3. Portable Document Format (.pdf) files of: a. This Readme; includes in Appendix I, data contained in fif_met.txt b. The same graphic as plotted in 2 above. (Test plots have not produced 1:24,000-scale map sheets. Adobe Acrobat pagesize setting influences map scale.) The Correlation of Map Units (CMU) and Description of Map Units (DMU) is in the editorial format of USGS Miscellaneous Investigations Series (I-series) maps. Within the geologic map data package, map units are identified by standard geologic map criteria such as formation-name, age, and lithology. Even though this is an author-prepared report, every attempt has been made to closely adhere to the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U. S. Geological Survey. Descriptions of units can be obtained by viewing or plotting the .pdf file (3b above) or plotting the postscript file (2 above). If roads in some areas, especially forest roads that parallel topographic contours, do not show well on plots of the geologic map, we recommend use of the USGS Fifteenmile Valley 7.5’ topographic quadrangle in conjunction with the geologic map.

Miller, F. K.; Matti, J. C.

2001-01-01

205

Preliminary isostatic gravity map of the Sonoma volcanic field and vicinity, Sonoma and Napa Counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This isostatic residual gravity map is part of a three-dimensional mapping effort focused on the subsurface distribution of rocks of the Sonoma volcanic field in Napa and Sonoma counties, northern California. This map will serve as a basis for modeling the shapes of basins beneath the Santa Rosa Plain and Napa and Sonoma Valleys, and for determining the location and geometry of faults within the area. Local spatial variations in the Earth's gravity field (after accounting for variations caused by elevation, terrain, and deep crustal structure explained below) reflect the distribution of densities in the mid to upper crust. Densities often can be related to rock type, and abrupt spatial changes in density commonly mark lithologic boundaries. High-density basement rocks exposed within the northern San Francisco Bay area include those of the Mesozoic Franciscan Complex and Great Valley Sequence present in the mountainous areas of the quadrangle. Alluvial sediment and Tertiary sedimentary rocks are characterized by low densities. However, with increasing depth of burial and age, the densities of these rocks may become indistinguishable from those of basement rocks. Tertiary volcanic rocks are characterized by a wide range in densities, but, on average, are less dense than the Mesozoic basement rocks. Isostatic residual gravity values within the map area range from about -41 mGal over San Pablo Bay to about 11 mGal near Greeg Mountain 10 km east of St. Helena. Steep linear gravity gradients are coincident with the traces of several Quaternary strike-slip faults, most notably along the West Napa fault bounding the west side of Napa Valley, the projection of the Hayward fault in San Pablo Bay, the Maacama Fault, and the Rodgers Creek fault in the vicinity of Santa Rosa. These gradients result from juxtaposing dense basement rocks against thick Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks.

Langenheim, V. E.; Roberts, C. W.; McCabe, C. A.: McPhee, D. K.; Tilden, J. E.; Jachens, R. C.

2006-01-01

206

Humboldt Bay Current Surveys: December 2002-October 2004.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

At the request of the Humboldt Bay Harbor Recreation and Conservation District and the Humboldt Bay Pilots Association, the National Ocean Services Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) conducted a series of current measureme...

K. Earwalker

2005-01-01

207

Gang Activity in Orange County, California: Final Report to the National Institute of Justice.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During the past decade, however, gang activity appears to have been on the rise in the county. In 1991, the Orange County Grand Jury reported that gang problems were escalating at an alarming rate, a sentiment echoed by the 1995 Orange County Grand Jury. ...

B. J. Vila J. W. Meeker

2000-01-01

208

33 CFR 80.1150 - Arcata-Humboldt Bay, CA.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Arcata-Humboldt Bay, CA. 80.1150 Section 80.1150 Navigation and Navigable Waters...LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1150 Arcata-Humboldt Bay, CA. A line drawn from Humboldt Bay Entrance Light 4 to...

2013-07-01

209

Diatom biostratigraphy from dolomites in Monterey Formation, Rodeo Canyon to Point Pedernales, southwestern Santa Barbara County, California  

SciTech Connect

Eight-six samples were collected from three stratigraphic sections in southwestern Santa Barbara County, California: Rodeo Canyon, Lyons Head, and Point Pedernales. In this area, the Monterey Formation is exposed in prominent cliffs along the coast from Rodeo Canyon on the south, to Lyons Head and Point Pedernales on the west. Because most of the opal-A in the Monterey diatomaceous shale in this area was converted to opal-CT and/or microcrystalline quartz, the diatoms are poorly preserved or obliterated. Therefore, the age of these rocks has been in question for a long time. Twenty-five 86 samples yielded age diagnostic diatoms that range from the early Miocene, late Relizian, Annellus californicus zone, to the early Pliocene, late Delmontian, Thalassiosira oestrupii zone. These ages can be directly related to those of diatomaceous shales, mudstones, and dolomites in the California offshore.

Wornardt, W.W.

1986-04-01

210

Hybrid wood-geothermal power plant, Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California. Identification of environmental issues, second phase  

SciTech Connect

GeoProducts Corporation and the California Department of Water Resources have jointly proposed to develop a 55 MWe power plant in Lassen County, California. The proposed power plant is unique in that it will utilize geothermal heat and wood fuel to generate electrical power, the first attempt to utilize these resources together on a commercial scale. This report identifies requirements for new environmental information that must be generated for permit applications and for preparation of environmental documents required by CEOA and NEPA; presents a schedule for generating new environmental data, for preparing and submitting permit applications, and for obtaining permits; presents a budget for permitting, licensing and environmental assessments as required by applicable laws, regulations and procedures; and investigates the step needed to qualify for a Small Power Plant Exemption by the State Energy Commission.

Not Available

1981-08-14

211

Evaluation of the Mission, Santee, and Tijuana hydrologic subareas for reclaimed-water use, San Diego County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A study was made to determine the suitability of three small hydrologic subareas in San Diego County, California, for reuse of treated municipal wastewater (reclaimed water). Groundwater quality has been impacted by agricultural water use, changes in natural recharge patterns, seawater intrusion, and groundwater movement from surrounding marine sediments. Groundwater levels near land surface may limit artificial recharge of reclaimed water or may require pumping of groundwater from the aquifer prior to recharge with reclaimed water. Reclaimed water may be used for irrigated water in upland areas. (USGS)

Izbicki, J. A.

1985-01-01

212

Airborne radioactivity surveys in the Mojave Desert region, Kern, Riverside, and San Bernardino Counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Airborne radioactivity surveys in the Mojave Desert region Kern, Riverside, and Bernardino counties were made in five areas recommended as favorable for the occurrence of radioactive raw materials: (1) Rock Corral area, San Bernardino County. (2) Searles Station area, Kern county. (3) Soledad area, Kern County. (4) White Tank area, Riverside and San Bernardino counties. (5) Harvard Hills area, San Bernardino County. Anomalous radiation was detected in all but the Harvard Hills area. The radioactivity anomalies detected in the Rock Corral area are of the greatest amplitude yet recorded by the airborne equipment over natural sources. The activity is apparently attributable to the thorium-beating mineral associated with roof pendants of crystalline metamorphic rocks in a granitic intrusive. In the Searles Station, Soledad, and White Tank area, several radioactivity anomalies of medium amplitude were recorded, suggesting possible local concentrations of radioactive minerals.

Moxham, Robert M.

1952-01-01

213

Late Cenozoic geology and lacustrine history of Searles Valley, Inyo and San Bernardino Counties, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

George Smith’s career-long study of the surface geology of the Searles Valley was recently published by the USGS (Smith, 2009, online and printed). The co-authors of this abstract are the team responsible for completing the publication from the original materials. Searles Valley is an arid, closed basin lying 70 km east of the south end of the Sierra Nevada, California. During those parts of late Pliocene and Pleistocene time when precipitation and runoff from the east side of the Sierra Nevada into the Owens River were much greater than at present, a chain of as many as five large lakes was created, of which Searles Lake was third. The stratigraphic record left in Searles Valley when that lake expanded, contracted, or desiccated is fully revealed by cores taken from beneath the surface of Searles (dry) Lake and partly recorded by sediments cropping out around the edge of the valley. Although this outcrop record is discontinuous, it provides direct evidence of the lake’s water depths during each expansion, which the subsurface record does not. Maximum-depth lakes rose to the 2,280-ft (695 m) contour, the level of the spillway that led overflowing waters to Panamint Valley; that spillway is about 660 ft (200 m) above the present dry-lake surface. Most of this study concerns sediments of the newly described Searles Lake Formation, whose deposition spanned the period between about 150 ka and 2 ka. The outcrop record is documented in six geologic maps (scales: 1:50,000 and 1:10,000). The Searles Lake Formation is divided into seven main units. The depositional intervals of the units that make up the Searles Lake Formation are determined primarily by correlation with subsurface deposits that are dated by radiocarbon ages on organic carbon and U-series dates on salts. Shorelines, the most obvious geologic expressions of former lakes, are abundant around Searles Valley. Erosional shorelines have cut as much as 100 m into brecciated bedrock; depositional shorelines (beaches or tufa benches) are common, but their deposits tend to be thin. Combining the subsurface evidence of lake history with the outcrop record allows the history of lake fluctuations to be reconstructed for the period between about 150 ka and the present. Translating this record of lake fluctuations into paleohydrologic and paleoclimatic histories is complicated by uncertainties as to which of the several components of climate affected runoff volumes and lake-surface evaporation. A simplified model, however, suggests that the flow of the Owens River stayed between 2.5 and 4.5 times its present flow volume for most of the past 150 ky. Its flow exceeded this range only about 14 percent of the time, and it fell below this range only 4 percent of the time—which includes the present. In fact, the past 10 ky is clearly the driest period during the past 150 ky in the Owens River drainage. Smith, G.I., 2009, Late Cenozoic geology and lacustrine history of Searles Valley, Inyo and San Bernardino Counties, California: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1727, 115 p., 4 plates.

Nathenson, M.; Smith, G. I.; Robinson, J. E.; Stauffer, P. H.; Zigler, J. L.

2010-12-01

214

Genetic Analysis of Invasive Aedes albopictus Populations in Los Angeles County, California and Its Potential Public Health Impact  

PubMed Central

The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, is an anthropophilic aggressive daytime-biting nuisance and an efficient vector of certain arboviruses and filarial nematodes. Over the last 30 years, this species has spread rapidly through human travel and commerce from its native tropical forests of Asia to every continent except Antarctica. In 2011, a population of Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) was discovered in Los Angeles (LA) County, California. To determine the probable origin of this invasive species, the genetic structure of the population was compared against 11 populations from the United States and abroad, as well as preserved specimens from a 2001 introduction into California using the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 (CO1) gene. A total of 66 haplotypes were detected among samples and were divided into three main groups. Aedes albopictus collected in 2001 and 2011 from LA County were genetically related and similar to those from Asia but distinct from those collected in the eastern and southeastern United States. In view of the high genetic similarities between the 2001 and 2011 LA samples, it is possible that the 2011 population represents in part the descendants of the 2001 introduction. There remains an imperative need for improved surveillance and control strategies for this species.

Zhong, Daibin; Lo, Eugenia; Hu, Renjie; Metzger, Marco E.; Cummings, Robert; Bonizzoni, Mariangela; Fujioka, Kenn K.; Sorvillo, Teresa E.; Kluh, Susanne; Healy, Sean P.; Fredregill, Chris; Kramer, Vicki L.; Chen, Xiaoguang; Yan, Guiyun

2013-01-01

215

Developing the Foundation for Syndromic Surveillance and Health Information Exchange for Yolo County, California  

PubMed Central

This report delineates Yolo County Health Department’s process to ascertain its optimal methods of participation in syndromic surveillance and health information exchange. As a health department serving a county of just 200,000 residents, Yolo County Health Department needed to operate within strict financial constraints. Meaningful Use legislation enabled it to pursue both syndromic surveillance and health information exchange participation whilst complying with its budgetary restrictions. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH), a segment of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, has incentivized the ‘Meaningful Use’ of electronic health records (EHRs) by providing incentive reimbursements and non-compliance penalties. The Meaningful Use of EHRs is to take place over 3 Stages: Stage 1 has begun, Stage 2 is imminent, and Stage 3 is currently being discussed. Having been solicited by both health information exchange and syndromic surveillance options which were cost-prohibitive, Yolo County Health Department focused attention on BioSense 2.0, a Meaningul Use-ready and virtually free syndromic surveillance program developed by the Federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In collaboration with Sacramento County Department of Health and Human Services, and with support from several other area counties, Yolo County Health Department submitted a Funding Opportunity application for BioSense 2.0 regional implementation. Through this collaboration, Yolo County Health Department has begun participating in the formative stages of the Sacramento Area Center for Advanced Biosurveillance (SAC-B). Via SAC-B, Yolo County Health Department will be able to participate in syndromic surveillance in the BioSense 2.0 program, and simultaneously expand its electronic health data sharing towards a more comprehensive health information exchange. Lastly, over the course of these projects, three other methods of participating in electronic health data sharing became available to Yolo County Health Department: all three methods were the direct result of Meaningful Use legislation.

Chaudhary, Osama

2012-01-01

216

Canine heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) in Fresno and Madera Counties, California: prevalence differences between foothill and valley habitats.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of heartworm in domestic dogs in Madera and Fresno Counties, California, dependent on habitat and other host and environmental factors. Dogs were screened for presence of heartworm antigen using the PetChek(®) ELISA on blood samples (N=519) collected at seven sites during April-July 2009. Eighteen dogs were heartworm antigen positive. Pearson Chi-square analyses were conducted testing the presence of heartworm antigen against the following independent variables: elevation range, percentage of time spent outdoors during the day, percentage of time spent outdoors during the night, pet coat length, weight class, prevention status, and sex. Dogs that spent at least 50% of their time outdoors during the day were significantly more likely to have heartworm that those who spent less time outside (N=519, df=1, p=0.031). Overall prevalence (3.47%) was lower than expected, with Madera County having 3.8% positive samples and Fresno County 3.5%; this prevalence is lower than in many previous studies. The effect of time spent outdoors on heartworm prevalence was similar to previous studies. The impact of elevation on infection, though not significant, requires further investigation, as does the prevalence and viability of larval stages in mosquitoes. PMID:21051149

Miller, Laura L; Crosbie, Paul R

2011-01-10

217

Water wells in the Harper, Superior, and Cuddeback Valley areas, San Bernardino County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This bulletin is one of a series on water wells and springs in southern California desert areas. The series is prepared by the U. S. Geological Survey and published by the California Department of Water Resources. Each bulletin locates water wells and springs in a part of the southern California desert regions; describes well depth and yield, water use and level on dates observed; names the well owner; provides pumping data, including depths, rates, static water levels, drawdowns, and specific capacities; and lithologic data from drillers' well logs.

Moyle, W. R.

1971-01-01

218

Regime shifts in the Humboldt Current ecosystem  

Microsoft Academic Search

Of the four major eastern boundary currents, the Humboldt Current (HC) stands out because it is extremely productive, dominated by anchovy dynamics and subject to frequent direct environmental perturbations of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The long-term dynamics of the HC ecosystem are controlled by shifts between alternating anchovy and sardine regimes that restructure the entire ecosystem from phytoplankton

Jürgen Alheit; Miguel Niquen

2004-01-01

219

Humboldt's Legacy and the Restoration of Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines issues related to specialization in science in the context of the work of Alexander Von Humboldt, one of the first popular scientists in the 19th century and Charles Darwin's mentor. Chronicles the impacts of a science dominated by specialization and argues for increased emphasis on interdisciplinary environmental study. (LZ)

Sachs, Aaron

1995-01-01

220

77 FR 58313 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego County, Antelope Valley and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Valley and Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution Agencies AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the San Diego County Air Pollution Control District (SDCAPCD), Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution Control District (MBUAPCD)...

2012-09-20

221

Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HETA 2000-0169-2854, Riverside County Regional Medical Center, Riverside, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In March 2000, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a request from the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) local 1997 to conduct a health hazard evaluation (HHE) at Riverside County Regional Medical Center in...

C. K. Cook R. Malkin

2001-01-01

222

Survey for Bentazon in Well Water of 15 California Counties, December 1988-May 1989.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Environmental Hazards Assessment Program of the California Department of Food and Agriculture conducted a multi-phased domestic well water monitoring program to determine the geographic distribution of the herbicide bentazon (Basagran), in ground wate...

J. A. Sitts

1989-01-01

223

Biogeochemistry of a Highly Serpentinized, Chromite-Rich Ultramafic Area, Tehama County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The processes that influence Cr mobility and its uptake by plants were studied in a serpentinized, chromite-rich ultramafic area of the Coast Range, northern California. Areal element concentration trends in the stem and leaf material of Arctostaphylos vi...

L. P. Gough G. R. Meadows L. L. Jackson S. Dudka

1989-01-01

224

Negotiated Layoff Provisions in City, County and Selected Special District Agreements, California, 1977-78.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report presents the results of a study on job layoff provisions in collective bargaining agreements for California's local government employees. Some aspects examined in the report are seniority criteria, displacement (bumping) rights, alternatives to...

R. Hazlewood

1978-01-01

225

Diversity of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Residents of 26 Nursing Homes in Orange County, California  

PubMed Central

Nursing homes represent a unique and important methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) reservoir. Not only are strains imported from hospitals and the community, strains can be transported back into these settings from nursing homes. Since MRSA bacteria are prevalent in nursing homes and yet relatively poorly studied in this setting, a multicenter, regional assessment of the frequency and diversity of MRSA in the nursing home reservoir was carried out and compared to that of the MRSA from hospitals in the same region. The prospective study collected MRSA from nasal swabbing of residents of 26 nursing homes in Orange County, California, and characterized each isolate by spa typing. A total of 837 MRSA isolates were collected from the nursing homes. Estimates of admission prevalence and point prevalence of MRSA were 16% and 26%, respectively. The spa type genetic diversity was heterogeneous between nursing homes and significantly higher overall (77%) than the diversity in Orange County hospitals (72%). MRSA burden in nursing homes appears largely due to importation from hospitals. As seen in Orange County hospitals, USA300 (sequence type 8 [ST8]/t008), USA100 (ST5/t002), and a USA100 variant (ST5/t242) were the dominant MRSA clones in Orange County nursing homes, representing 83% of all isolates, although the USA100 variant was predominant in nursing homes, whereas USA300 was predominant in hospitals. Control strategies tailored to the complex problem of MRSA transmission and infection in nursing homes are needed in order to minimize the impact of this unique reservoir on the overall regional MRSA burden.

Hudson, Lyndsey O.; Reynolds, Courtney; Spratt, Brian G.; Enright, Mark C.; Quan, Victor; Kim, Diane; Hannah, Paul; Mikhail, Lydia; Alexander, Richard; Moore, Douglas F.; Godoy, Daniel; Bishop, Cynthia J.

2013-01-01

226

Diet of the San Joaquin Kit Fox, Vulpes Macrotis Mutica, on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California, 1980-1984.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A total of 1430 scats of the San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica, were collected between 1980 and 1984 on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California, and analyzed to determine frequency of occurrence of prey items. Lagomorphs (black-ta...

J. H. Scrivner T. P. O'Farrell T. T. Kato M. K. Johnson

1987-01-01

227

A Study of the Job Satisfaction of Special Education Local Plan Area (SELPA) Directors and Local School District Special Education Directors in Four Counties of Southern California  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare the perceived level of job satisfaction of SELPA directors with that of local school district special education directors in the counties of Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, and Orange of Southern California and to identify factors that contribute to their job satisfaction. Additionally, this…

Alexander, Gregory Haynes, III

2009-01-01

228

Treating Drug-Abusing Offenders: Initial Findings from a Five-County Study on the Impact of California's Proposition 36 on the Treatment System and Patient Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Five counties (Kern, Riverside, Sacramento, San Diego, San Francisco) that demonstrate both variations and similarities in their implementation of Proposition 36 (e.g., treatment approaches, urine testing) and patient mix have been selected to participate in a study assessing how California's Proposition 36 is affecting the drug treatment system…

Hser, Yih-Ing; Teruya, Cheryl; Evans, Elizabeth A.; Longshore, Douglas; Grella, Christine; Farabee, David

2003-01-01

229

Cancer incidence and community exposure to air emissions from petroleum and chemical plants in Contra Costa County, California: A critical epidemiological assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The northern part of Contra Costa County, California is heavily industrialized with a number of petroleum refineries, chemical facilities and other small industrial plants. Several epidemiological studies have been conducted in the country to assess cancer risk in relation to estimated air pollution levels. In this paper, the air monitoring data, air pollution modeling and the epidemiologic studies are critically

Otto Wong; W. J. Bailey

1993-01-01

230

Controlled Access Development for State Highway Route 20 in Colusa and Sutter Counties, in and Near Meridan, Between Sycamore Cut-Off and Drexler Road, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Improvement and relocation are proposed of State Sign Route 20 in Colusa and Sutter Counties in the near Meridian, California. Constructiion will consist of a two-lane facility designed to expressway standards and replacement of the existing bridge over t...

1973-01-01

231

The Farm Worker In A Changing Agriculture. Part I In A Series On Technological Change And Farm Labor Use, Kern County, California, 1961. Research Report No. 277.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To investigate the effect of technological change upon farm labor use, a stratified random sample of 696 farm workers from a population of 12,215 in Kern County, California, provided a basis for analysis. Some major findings were: (1) The high peak of seasonal labor use has been eliminated, (2) The need for migratory labor is decreasing, (3)…

Metzler, William H.

232

Farm Mechanization And Labor Stabilization. Part II In A Series On Technological Change And Farm Labor Use, Kern County, California, 1961. Research Report No. 280.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A stratified random sample of 69 6 workers in 361 households in Kern County, California, was selected to investigate the changes in labor use resulting from farm mechanization, and to explore the trend towards a stable labor force. Some major findings were: (1) Mechanization of the cotton harvest has erased the high peak of seasonal farm labor,…

Metzler, William H.

233

Recent trends in hormone therapy utilization and breast cancer incidence rates in the high incidence population of Marin County, California  

PubMed Central

Background Recent declines in invasive breast cancer have been reported in the US, with many studies linking these declines to reductions in the use of combination estrogen/progestin hormone therapy (EPHT). We evaluated the changing use of postmenopausal hormone therapy, mammography screening rates, and the decline in breast cancer incidence specifically for Marin County, California, a population with historically elevated breast cancer incidence rates. Methods The Marin Women's Study (MWS) is a community-based, prospective cohort study launched in 2006 to monitor changes in breast cancer, breast density, and personal and biologic risk factors among women living in Marin County. The MWS enrolled 1,833 women following routine screening mammography between October 2006 and July 2007. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire that included items regarding historical hormone therapy regimen (estrogen only, progesterone only, EPHT), age of first and last use, total years of use, and reason(s) for stopping, as well as information regarding complementary hormone use. Questionnaire items were analyzed for 1,083 non-Hispanic white participants ages 50 and over. Breast cancer incidence rates were assessed overall and by tumor histology and estrogen receptor (ER) status for the years 1990-2007 using data from the Northern California Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry. Results Prevalence of EPHT use among non-Hispanic white women ages 50 and over declined sharply from 21.2% in 1998 to 6.7% by 2006-07. Estrogen only use declined from 26.9% in 1998 to 22.4% by 2006-07. Invasive breast cancer incidence rates declined 33.4% between 2001 and 2004, with drops most pronounced for ER+ cancers. These rate reductions corresponded to declines of about 50 cases per year, consistent with population attributable fraction estimates for EPHT-related breast cancer. Self-reported screening mammography rates did not change during this period. Use of alternative or complementary agents did not differ significantly between ever and never hormone users. Of women who reported stopping EPHT in the past 5 years, 60% cited "health risks" or "news reports" as their primary reasons for quitting. Conclusion A dramatic reduction in EPHT use was followed temporally by a significant reduction in invasive and ER+ breast cancer rates among women living in Marin County, California.

2010-01-01

234

Digital geologic map of the Nevada Test Site and vicinity, Nye, Lincoln, and Clark Counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California  

SciTech Connect

This digital geologic map of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and vicinity, as well as its accompanying digital geophysical maps, are compiled at 1:100,000 scale. The map area covers two 30 {times} 60-minute quadrangles-the Pahute Mesa quadrangle to the north and the Beatty quadrangle to the south-plus a strip of 7 1/2-minute quadrangles on the east side. In addition to the NTS, the map area includes the rest of the southwest Nevada volcanic field, part of the Walker Lane, most of the Amargosa Desert, part of the Funeral and Grapevine Mountains, some of Death Valley, and the northern Spring Mountains. This geologic map improves on previous geologic mapping of the same area by providing new and updated Quaternary and bedrock geology, new geophysical interpretations of faults beneath the basins, and improved GIS coverages. This publication also includes a new isostatic gravity map and a new aeromagnetic map. The primary purpose of the three maps is to provide an updated geologic framework to aid interpretation of ground-water flow through and off the NTS. The NTS is centrally located within the area of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system of southwestern Nevada and adjacent California. During the last 40 years, DOE and its predecessor agencies have conducted about 900 nuclear tests on the NTS, of which 100 were atmospheric tests and the rest were underground tests. More than 200 of the tests were detonated at or beneath the water table, which commonly is about 500 to 600 m below the surface. Because contaminants introduced by these test may move into water supplies off the NTS, rates and directions of ground-water flow must be determined. Knowledge about the ground water also is needed to properly appraise potential future effects of the possible nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, adjacent to the NTS.

Slate, J.L.; Berry, M.E.; Rowley, P.D.; Fridrich, C.J.; Morgan, K.S.; Workman, J.B.; Young, O.D.; Dixon, G.L.; Williams, V.S.; McKee, E.H.; Ponce, D.A.; Hildenbrand, T.G.; Swadley, W.C.; Lundstrom, S.C.; Ekren, E.B.; Warren, R.G.; Cole, J.C.; Fleck, R.J.; Lanphere, M.A.; Sawyer, D.A.; Minor, S.A.; Grunwald, D.J.; Laczniak, R.J.; Menges, C.M.; Yount, J.C.; Jayko, A.S.

2000-03-08

235

77 FR 55496 - Notice of Temporary Closure of Public Lands in Eastern Lassen County, California, and Western...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Roads, (combined Lassen County Road 522), the Stage Road (Lassen County Road 504), Marr Road (Lassen County Road 526) and the BLM...the junction with Lassen County Road 526 (the Marr Road) to the junction with Nevada State Highway...

2012-09-10

236

Remote sensing research for agricultural applications. [San Joaquin County, California and Snake River Plain and Twin Falls area, Idaho  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Materials and methods used to characterize selected soil properties and agricultural crops in San Joaquin County, California are described. Results show that: (1) the location and widths of TM bands are suitable for detecting differences in selected soil properties; (2) the number of TM spectral bands allows the quantification of soil spectral curve form and magnitude; and (3) the spatial and geometric quality of TM data allows for the discrimination and quantification of within field variability of soil properties. The design of the LANDSAT based multiple crop acreage estimation experiment for the Idaho Department of Water Resources is described including the use of U.C. Berkeley's Survey Modeling Planning Model. Progress made on Peditor software development on MIDAS, and cooperative computing using local and remote systems is reported as well as development of MIDAS microcomputer systems.

Colwell, R. N. (principal investigator); Wall, S. L.; Beck, L. H.; Degloria, S. D.; Ritter, P. R.; Thomas, R. W.; Travlos, A. J.; Fakhoury, E.

1984-01-01

237

Oiled seabird rescue at the J.V. Fitzgerald Marine Reserve, San Mateo County, California, 1968-1995  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Records of oiled and injured seabirds at the J.V. Fitzgerald Marine Reserve, San Mateo County, California, were collated from the daily log at the Reserve for the period 1968-1995. These records serve to demonstrate that oil spills and chronic oiling have occurred frequently in this area, just south of San Francisco. Common Murres (Uria aalge) were the most frequently-oiled species rescued at the Reserve. Greater efforts should be made by wildlife rehabilitators to collate large volumes of past data (prior to the early 1990s) on oiled and injured seabirds for similar documentation of large or moderate oil spills (including undocumented or poorly-known spills), chronic oiling from small spills, and injuries from other sources.

Carter, H. R.

1997-01-01

238

Demographic factors associated with perceptions about water safety and tap water consumption among adults in santa clara county, california, 2011.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to examine differences in tap water consumption and perceptions of bottle versus tap water safety for Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites, as well as associations with other demographic characteristics. Data are from the Santa Clara County, California, Dietary Practices Survey (2011; N = 306). We used logistic regression to examine associations between demographic characteristics and 1) perceptions that bottled water is safer than tap and 2) primarily consuming tap water. Hispanics were less likely than non-Hispanic whites to primarily drink tap water (OR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.11-0.99), although there was no significant difference in perceptions that bottled water is safer between these groups (OR = 0.50; 95% CI, 0.11-2.27). Hispanics may be an important population for interventions promoting tap water consumption. PMID:24921901

van Erp, Brianna; Webber, Whitney L; Stoddard, Pamela; Shah, Roshni; Martin, Lori; Broderick, Bonnie; Induni, Marta

2014-01-01

239

Demographic Factors Associated With Perceptions About Water Safety and Tap Water Consumption Among Adults in Santa Clara County, California, 2011  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study was to examine differences in tap water consumption and perceptions of bottle versus tap water safety for Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites, as well as associations with other demographic characteristics. Data are from the Santa Clara County, California, Dietary Practices Survey (2011; N = 306). We used logistic regression to examine associations between demographic characteristics and 1) perceptions that bottled water is safer than tap and 2) primarily consuming tap water. Hispanics were less likely than non-Hispanic whites to primarily drink tap water (OR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.11–0.99), although there was no significant difference in perceptions that bottled water is safer between these groups (OR = 0.50; 95% CI, 0.11–2.27). Hispanics may be an important population for interventions promoting tap water consumption.

Webber, Whitney L.; Stoddard, Pamela; Shah, Roshni; Martin, Lori; Broderick, Bonnie; Induni, Marta

2014-01-01

240

Cone penetration tests and soil borings at the Mason Road site in Green Valley, Solano County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In support of a study to investigate the history of the Green Valley Fault, 13 cone penetration test soundings and 3 auger borings were made at the Mason Road site in Green Valley, Solano County, California. Three borings were made at or near two of the cone penetration test soundings. The soils are mostly clayey with a few sandy layers or lenses. Fine-grained soils range from low plasticity sandy lean clay to very plastic fat clay. Lack of stratigraphic correlation in the subsurface prevented us from determining whether any channels had been offset at this site. Because the soils are generally very clayey and few sand layers or lenses are loose, the liquefaction potential at the site is very low.

Bennett, Michael J.; Noce, Thomas E.; Lienkaemper, James J.

2011-01-01

241

Updated computations and estimates of streamflows tributary to Carson Valley, Douglas County, Nevada, and Alpine County, California, 1990-2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Rapid population growth in Carson Valley has caused concern over the continued availability of water resources to sustain future growth. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Douglas County, began a study to update estimates of water-budget components in Carson Valley for current climatic conditions. Data collected at 19 sites included 9 continuous records of tributary streamflows, 1 continuous record of outflow from the valley, and 408 measurements of 10 perennially flowing but ungaged drainages. These data were compiled and analyzed to provide updated computations and estimates of streamflows tributary to Carson Valley, 1990-2002. Mean monthly and annual flows were computed from continuous records for the period 1990-2002 for five streams, and for the period available, 1990-97, for four streams. Daily mean flow from ungaged drainages was estimated using multi-variate regressions of individual discharge measurements against measured flow at selected continuous gages. From the estimated daily mean flows, monthly and annual mean flows were calculated from 1990 to 2002. These values were used to compute estimates of mean monthly and annual flows for the ungaged perennial drainages. Using the computed and estimated mean annual flows, annual unit-area runoff was computed for the perennial drainages, which ranged from 0.30 to 2.02 feet. For the period 1990-2002, estimated inflow of perennial streams tributary to Carson Valley totaled about 25,900 acre-feet per year. Inflow computed from gaged perennial drainages totaled 10,300 acre-feet per year, and estimated inflow from ungaged perennial drainages totaled 15,600 acre-feet per year. The annual flow of perennial streams ranges from 4,210 acre-feet at Clear Creek to 450 acre-feet at Stutler Canyon Creek. Differences in unit-area runoff and in the seasonal timing of flow likely are caused by differences in geologic setting, altitude, slope, or aspect of the individual drainages. The remaining drainages are ephemeral and supply inflow to the valley floor only during spring runoff in wet years or during large precipitation events. Annual unit-area runoff for the perennial drainages was used to estimate inflow from ephemeral drainages totaling 11,700 acre-feet per year. The totaled estimate of perennial and ephemeral tributary inflows to Carson Valley is 37,600 acre-feet per year. Gaged perennial inflow is 27 percent of the total, ungaged perennial inflow is 42 percent, and ephemeral inflow is 31 percent. The estimate is from 50 to 60 percent greater than three previous estimates, one made for a larger area and similar to two other estimates made for larger areas. The combined uncertainty of the estimates totaled about 33 percent of the total inflow or about 12,000 acre-feet per year.

Maurer, Douglas K.; Watkins, Sharon A.; Burrowws, Robert L.

2004-01-01

242

Survey for least bell's vireo in riparian habitat on Vandenberg Air Force Base, Santa Barbara County, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The least bell's vireo (Vireo bellii pusillus) was listed in 1986 as an endangered species by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Because of the possibility of the species existing on Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB), this survey was conducted to determine if they exist, and if so to prepare a distribution map of the species on the base. Major riparian areas were surveyed on foot for 17 days in April, May, and July 1987. No least bell's vireo were sighted; based on past studies, it is unlikely that there is a significant population on VAFB. There are, however, at least 13 other species of special concern that inhabit VAFB riparian woodlands. Most of these species have declined along the south coast of Santa Barbara County, and many have declined in much of the southern half of California. Riparian areas on VAFB are an important environmental resource for the southern half of California; many of these areas, however, show signs of degradation.

Breininger, David R.

1988-01-01

243

Geohydrology and water chemistry in the Rialto-Colton Basin, San Bernardino County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The 40-square-mile Rialto-Colton ground- water basin is in western San Bernardino County, California, about 60 miles east of Los Angeles.This basin was chosen for storage of imported water because of the good quality of native ground water, the known capacity for additional ground-water storage in the basin, and the availability of imported water. Because the movement and mixing of imported water needed to be determined, the San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District entered into a cooperative program with the U.S.Geological Survey in 1991 to study the geohydrology and water chemistry in the Rialto- Colton basin. Ground-water flow and chemistry were investigated using existing data, borehole- geophysical and lithologic logs from newly drilled test holes, measurement of water levels, and chemical analyses of water samples. The Rialto-Colton basin is bounded on the northwest and southeast by the San Gabriel Mountains and the Badlands, respectively. The San Jacinto Fault and Barrier E form the northeastern boundary, and the Rialto-Colton Fault forms the southwestern boundary. Except in the southeastern part of the basin, the San Jacinto and Rialto-Colton Faults act as groundwater barriers that impede ground- water flow into and out of the basin.Barrier E generally does not impede ground- water flow into the basin. The ground-water system consists primarily of gravel, sand, silt, and clay. The maximum thickness is greater than 1,000 feet. The ground- water system is divided into four water-bearing units: river-channel deposits, and upper, middle, and lower water-bearing units. Relatively impermeable consolidated deposits underlie the lower water- bearing unit and form the lower boundary of the ground- water system. Ground water moves from east to west in the river-channel deposits and upper water-bearing unit in the southeastern part of the basin, and from northwest to southeast in the middle and lower water-bearing units. Two major internal faults, Barrier J and an unnamed fault, affect ground-water movement. Ground water moves across Barrier J in the unfaulted part of the ground-water system. The unnamed fault is a partial barrier to ground-water movement in the middle water- bearing unit and an effective barrier in the lower water-bearing unit.Imported water flows laterally across the unnamed fault above the saturated zone. Major sources of recharge to the ground- water system are underflow; precipitation that collects in small streams that drain the San Gabriel Mountains and the Badlands or runs off the mountain front as sheet flow, and sub-surface inflow; imported water; seepage loss from the Santa Ana River and Warm Creek; infiltration of rainfall; and irrigation return flow. The main component of discharge is pumpage. Long-term water levels in production wells reflect precipitation cycles. During a 194777 dry period, water levels in three wells declined almost continuously?as much as 100 feet in one well.Water levels in a well north of Barrier J are not affected by stresses on the groundwater system south of the barrier, indicating that these two parts of the ground-water system are not well connected. Water levels in cluster wells east of the unnamed fault north and south of the Linden Ponds artificial-recharge site rose as much as 70 feet during 1992-95. The rise in water levels in wells near the recharge ponds was observed within 2 months after the beginning of recharge. Water levels in most wells west of the unnamed fault changed very little during 1992-95. Water-chemistry data indicate that chemical characteristics vary within the groundwater system, and that dissolvedsolids concentrations are generally higher in the river-channel deposits, upper water- bearing unit, and the consolidated deposits than in the middle and lower water-bearing units. The chemical characteristics in water from the middle water-bearing unit were similar for most wells sampled west of the unnamed fault. In water from well

Woolfenden, Linda R.; Kadhim, Dina

1997-01-01

244

Geomorphic response to minor cyclic climate changes, San Diego County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Short-term episodic cycles of wet and dry patterns of climate are common in southern California. Wet intervals, like the one in 1978-83, are often characterized by more than double the average annual precipitation. The impact of these episodic climatic fluctuations on landforms and surficial processes has not been well documented for areas inland of the coast. The response to these

R. Craig Kochel; Jerry R. Miller; Dale F. Ritter

1997-01-01

245

Honey Lake Hybrid Geothermal Wood Residue Power Plant, Lassen County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The feasibility of a proposed 50 MW (gross) electric power project located near Wendel, California about 25 miles east of Susanville was studied. The project would be the first commercial power plant to combine the use of geothermal energy and wood fuel f...

1982-01-01

246

Debris Avalanche at Forest Falls, San Bernardino County, California, July 11, 1999. Version 1.0.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The community of Forest Falls, California, is frequently subject to relatively slow moving debris flows. Some 11 debris flow events that were destructive to property have been recorded between 1955 and 1998. On July 11 and 13, 1999, debris flows again occ...

D. M. Morton R. M. Hauser

2001-01-01

247

Eocene palynomorphs from the black diamond mines regional preserve, contra costa county, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Palynomorphs from Eocene coaly deposits of the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve in California are described. Thirty?two species of spores and pollen are recognized and two of them, Graminidites scabratus and Arecipites antiochus, are regarded as new. The encountered specimens are characterized by 26% spores, 32% gymnosperm pollen, 41% angiosperm pollen, and 1% foraminifers. The climate is considered to be

Abbas Kimyai

1993-01-01

248

Chemical evolution of shallow groundwater as recorded by springs, Sagehen basin; Nevada County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Springs in Sagehen basin, California, were used to document the effect of chemical weathering on the chemical evolution and composition of groundwater in a high elevation catchment. Geochemical tracer ages were determined with chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and tritium\\/3He dating techniques. The spring water ages range from less than 5 years to almost 40 years. Mass balance calculations performed by NETPATH were

Laura K. Rademacher; Jordan F. Clark; G. Bryant Hudson; Don C. Erman; Nancy A. Erman

2001-01-01

249

Bathymetric and Geophysical Surveys of Englebright Lake, Yuba-Nevada Counties, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Harry L. Englebright Lake (Englebright Lake) is a 9-mile-long (14-kilometer) reservoir located in the Sierra Nevada foothills of northern California on the Yuba River gorge known as The Narrows. The reservoir is impounded by Englebright Dam, a concrete ar...

J. R. Childs N. P. Snyder M. A. Hampton

2003-01-01

250

Effectiveness of Vegetated Buffer Strips in Reducing Dormant Season Orthophosphate Pesticide Loading to Surface Waters in Glenn County, Northern California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Riparian buffer strips are used in preventing nonpoint source contamination of agricultural runoff. The design and effectiveness of buffers varies widely under differing environmental conditions. Over the past two years, a project was implemented to evaluate the effectiveness of certain Best Management Practices in reducing organophosphate (OP) pesticide transport from almond orchards to local surface waters in Glenn County, northern California. Diazinon is a commonly-used OP pesticide applied during the dormant season in almond and stone-fruit orchards throughout the California Central Valley. Dormant season diazinon application coincides with the months of greatest rainfall and surface runoff in California. Three filter strip treatments were established: one planted with native vegetation, one with weedy resident vegetation, and the third with a bare soil surface. As a demonstration and reconnaissance project, replication of the treatments in this study was lacking (one plot of each vegetation type and two bare ground plots). Diazinon was applied in test orchard cells in January 2003. Surface runoff, shallow groundwater in the root zone, and deeper groundwater were monitored for the transport of diazinon during the three subsequent storm events. Composite surface water samples and flow volumes were obtained for each storm event using automated surface water collectors. Runoff and infiltration results indicate greater infiltration occurred in the vegetated plots as would be expected. Infiltration on bare ground plots was approximately 25%-50% less than on the vegetated plots. However, differences between the two vegetated plot treatments were less than 5%. Diazinon concentrations were reduced as surface runoff crossed the buffer strips for all three treatments. Detectable levels of diazinon were still present in runoff following the third storm, seven weeks after the pesticide application. Further replicated studies are currently being prepared for the coming dormant season and this study will continue over the next three years.

Gilbert, K. D.; Brown, D. L.; Altier, L.; Oliver, M. N.

2003-12-01

251

Cascadia Earthquake and Tsunami Scenario for California's North Coast  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 1995 the California Division of Mines and Geology (now the California Geological Survey) released a planning scenario for an earthquake on the southern portion of the Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ). This scenario was the 8th and last of the Earthquake Planning Scenarios published by CDMG. It was the largest magnitude CDMG scenario, an 8.4 earthquake rupturing the southern 200 km of the CSZ, and it was the only scenario to include tsunami impacts. This scenario event has not occurred in historic times and depicts impacts far more severe than any recent earthquake. The local tsunami hazard is new; there is no written record of significant local tsunami impact in the region. The north coast scenario received considerable attention in Humboldt and Del Norte Counties and contributed to a number of mitigation efforts. The Redwood Coast Tsunami Work Group (RCTWG), an organization of scientists, emergency managers, government agencies, and businesses from Humboldt, Mendocino, and Del Norte Counties, was formed in 1996 to assist local jurisdictions in understanding the implications of the scenario and to promote a coordinated, consistent mitigation program. The group has produced print and video materials and promoted response and evacuation planning. Since 1997 the RCTWG has sponsored an Earthquake Tsunami Education Room at county fairs featuring preparedness information, hands-on exhibits and regional tsunami hazard maps. Since the development of the TsunamiReady Program in 2001, the RCTWG facilitates community TsunamiReady certification. To assess the effectiveness of mitigation efforts, five telephone surveys between 1993 and 2001 were conducted by the Humboldt Earthquake Education Center. A sixth survey is planned for this fall. Each survey includes between 400 and 600 respondents. Over the nine year period covered by the surveys, the percent with houses secured to foundations has increased from 58 to 80 percent, respondents aware of a local tsunami hazard increased from 51 to 73 percent and knowing what the Cascadia subduction zone is from 16 to 42 percent. It is not surprising that the earlier surveys showed increases as several strong earthquakes occurred in the area between 1992 and 1995 and there was considerable media attention. But the 2001 survey, seven years after the last widely felt event, still shows significant increases in almost all preparedness indicators. The 1995 CDMG scenario was not the sole reason for the increased interest in earthquake and tsunami hazards in the area, but the scenario gave government recognition to an event that was previously only considered seriously in the scientific community and has acted as a catalyst for mitigation and planning efforts.

Dengler, L.

2006-12-01

252

Invasive range expansion by the Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas, in the eastern North Pacific.  

PubMed

A unique 16-year time series of deep video surveys in Monterey Bay reveals that the Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas, has substantially expanded its perennial geographic range in the eastern North Pacific by invading the waters off central California. This sustained range expansion coincides with changes in climate-linked oceanographic conditions and a reduction in competing top predators. It is also coincident with a decline in the abundance of Pacific hake, the most important commercial groundfish species off western North America. Recognizing the interactive effects of multiple changes in the environment is an issue of growing concern in ocean conservation and sustainability research. PMID:17646649

Zeidberg, Louis D; Robison, Bruce H

2007-07-31

253

Invasive range expansion by the Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas, in the eastern North Pacific  

PubMed Central

A unique 16-year time series of deep video surveys in Monterey Bay reveals that the Humboldt squid, Dosidicus gigas, has substantially expanded its perennial geographic range in the eastern North Pacific by invading the waters off central California. This sustained range expansion coincides with changes in climate-linked oceanographic conditions and a reduction in competing top predators. It is also coincident with a decline in the abundance of Pacific hake, the most important commercial groundfish species off western North America. Recognizing the interactive effects of multiple changes in the environment is an issue of growing concern in ocean conservation and sustainability research.

Zeidberg, Louis D.; Robison, Bruce H.

2007-01-01

254

Chemical quality of ground water in San Joaquin and part of Contra Costa Counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Chemical water-quality conditions were investigated in San Joaquin and part of Contra Costa Counties by canvassing available wells and sampling water from 324 representative wells. Chemical water types varied, with 73 percent of the wells sampled containing either calcium-magnesium bicarbonate, or calcium-sodium bicarbonate type water. Substantial areas contain ground water exceeding water-quality standards for boron, manganese, and nitrate. Trace elements, with the exception of boron and manganese, were present in negligible amounts. (USGS)

Sorenson, Stephen K.

1981-01-01

255

Ground-water-level monitoring network, Hollister and San Juan Valleys, San Benito County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The addition of 17 wells to the existing 86-well network is proposed to improve the ground-water monitoring in the Hollister and San Juan Valleys in California. The new wells were selected on the basis of well-construction data, availability, location, accessibility, use, and condition, either to replace wells that are no longer accessible or to furnish needed additional data for planning artificial recharge, preparing water-level-contour maps, and digital ground-water modeling. (USGS)

Farrar, C. D.

1981-01-01

256

Structural investigations at the Coso geothermal area using remote sensing information, Inyo County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Remote sensing studies have been made in and adjacent to the Coso geothermal field using TM FCC satellite imagery, 1:100,000 scale, US Geological Survey orthophotos, 1:24,OOO scale, and proprietary black-and-white photography by California Energy Company, Inc., at various scales including black-and-white positive film transparencies at a scale of 1:6,000. These studies have been made in an attempt to understand the

Ward H. Austin

1990-01-01

257

Water levels in observation wells in Santa Barbara County, California, in 1956  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Investigation of the ground-water resources of Santa Barbara County was continued during 1956 by the Geological Survey in cooperation with the Santa Barbara County Water Agency. Monthly water-level recorders were operated. Earlier measurements, covering the period 1941 through 1953, have been published in Geological Survey water-Supply Papers; those for 1954 and 1955 are in press and have been released locally in duplicated form. Water-Supply Paper 1068 contains tabulated descriptions of 2,246 wells in existence in 1942 in the various ground-water basins of the county. The same publication contains also many water-level measurements made prior to 1942 by the city of Santa Barbara, Santa Maria Valley Water Conservation District, San Joaquin Power Division of the Pacific Gas and Electric Co., Union Sugar Co., Union Oil Co., and other organizations and individuals. Comprehensive reports on the geology and ground-water resources of the Santa Ynez River basin (Upson and Thomasson, 1951), the south-coast basins (Upson, 1951), the Santa Maria Valley area (Worts, 1951), and the Cuyama Valley (Upson and Worts, 1951) have been published as Water-Supply Papers 1107, 1108, 1000, and 1110-B respectively. A report on stream runoff and ground-water storage capacity of the Santa Ynez River valley (Troxell and Wilson, 1952) was released to the open file in October 1952. A report appraising the ground-water resources of the Santa Ynez River valley (Wilson, 1957) was released to the open file in October 1956.

Muir, K. S.; Merritt, P. M.

1957-01-01

258

Habitat-related variation in infestation of lizards and rodents with Ixodes ticks in dense woodlands in Mendocino County, California.  

PubMed

During the spring and early summer of 2002, we examined the relative importance of Borrelia-refractory lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis, Elgaria spp.) versus potential Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.)-reservoirs (rodents) as hosts for Ixodes pacificus immatures in 14 woodland areas (six oak, five mixed oak/Douglas fir, and three redwood/tanoak areas) distributed throughout Mendocino County, California. Lizards were estimated to serve as hosts for 93-98% of all larvae and > or =99.6% of all nymphs infesting lizards or rodents in oak woodlands and oak/Douglas fir sites in the southern part of the county. In redwood/tanoak woodlands and oak/Douglas fir sites in northern Mendocino County, the contribution of rodents to larval feedings reached 36-69% but lizards still accounted for 94-100% of nymphal bloodmeals. From late April to mid-June, I. pacificus larvae were recovered from 95 to 96% of lizards and dusky-footed woodrats (Neotoma fuscipes) and from 59% of Peromyscus spp. mice. In contrast, 99% of lizards but few woodrats (15%) and none of the mice were infested by nymphs. Comparisons of tick loads for 19 lizard-Peromyscus spp. mouse pairings, where the lizard and mouse were captured within 10m of each other, revealed that the lizards harbored 36 times more larvae and >190 times more nymphs than the mice. In oak woodlands, loads of I. pacificus larvae decreased from late April/early May to late June for S. occidentalis lizards but increased for Peromyscus spp. mice. We conclude that the relative utilization of Borrelia-refractory lizards, as compared to rodents, by I. pacificus larvae was far higher in dry oak woodlands than in moister habitats such as redwood/tanoak and oak/Douglas fir woodlands in northern Mendocino County. Non-lizard-infesting potential enzootic vectors of B. burgdorferi s.l. (I. angustus and I. spinipalpis) were recorded from rodents in three of six oak woodland areas, two of five oak/Douglas fir woodland areas, and two of three redwood/tanoak woodland areas. PMID:15347025

Eisen, Rebecca J; Eisen, Lars; Lane, Robert S

2004-01-01

259

Potential for Induced Seismicity Related to the Northern California CO2 Reduction Project Pilot Test, Solano County, California  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this technical report is to analyze the potential for induced seismicity due to a proposed small-scale CO{sub 2} injection project in the Montezuma Hills. We reviewed currently available public information, including 32 years of recorded seismic events, locations of mapped faults, and estimates of the stress state of the region. We also reviewed proprietary geological information acquired by Shell, including seismic reflection imaging in the area, and found that the data and interpretations used by Shell are appropriate and satisfactory for the purpose of this report. The closest known fault to the proposed injection site is the Kirby Hills Fault. It appears to be active, and microearthquakes as large as magnitude 3.7 have been associated with the fault near the site over the past 32 years. Most of these small events occurred 9-17 miles (15-28 km) below the surface, which is deep for this part of California. However, the geographic locations of the many events in the standard seismicity catalog for the area are subject to considerable uncertainty because of the lack of nearby seismic stations; so attributing the recorded earthquakes to motion along any specific fault is also uncertain. Nonetheless, the Kirby Hills Fault is the closest to the proposed injection site and is therefore our primary consideration for evaluating the potential seismic impacts, if any, from injection. Our planned installation of seismic monitoring stations near the site will greatly improve earthquake location accuracy. Shell seismic data also indicate two unnamed faults more than 3 miles east of the project site. These faults do not reach the surface as they are truncated by an unconformity at a depth of about 2,000 feet (610 m). The unconformity is identified as occurring during the Oligocene Epoch, 33.9-23.03 million years ago, which indicates that these faults are not currently active. Farther east are the Rio Vista Fault and Midland Fault at distances of about 6 miles (10 km) and 10 miles (16 km), respectively. These faults have been identified as active during the Quaternary (last 1.6 million years), but without evidence of displacement during the Holocene (the last 11,700 years). The stress state (both magnitude and direction) in the region is an important parameter in assessing earthquake potential. Although the available information regarding the stress state is limited in the area surrounding the injection well, the azimuth of the mean maximum horizontal stress is estimated at 41{sup o} and it is consistent with strike-slip faulting on the Kirby Hills Fault, unnamed fault segments to the south, and the Rio Vista Fault. However, there are large variations (uncertainty) in stress estimates, leading to low confidence in these conclusions regarding which fault segments are optimally oriented for potential slip induced by pressure changes. Uncertainty in the stress state can be substantially reduced by measurements planned when wells are drilled at the site. Injection of CO{sub 2} at about two miles depth will result in a reservoir fluid pressure increase, which is greatest at the well and decreases with distance from the well. After the injection stops, reservoir fluid pressures will decrease rapidly. Pressure changes have been predicted quantitatively by numerical simulation models of the injection. Based on these models, the pressure increase on the Kirby Hills Fault at its closest approach to the well due to the injection of 6,000 metric tons of CO{sub 2} would be a few pounds per square inch (psi), which is a tiny fraction of the natural pressure of approximately 5,000 psi at that depth. The likelihood of such a small pressure increase triggering a slip event is very small. It is even more unlikely that events would be induced at the significantly greater depths where most of the recorded earthquakes are concentrated, because it is unlikely that such a small pressure pulse would propagate downwards any appreciable distance. Therefore, in response to the specific question of the likelihood of the CO{sub 2} injection caus

Myer, L.; Chiaramonte, L.; Daley, T.M.; Wilson, D.; Foxall, W.; Beyer, J.H.

2010-06-15

260

78 FR 21537 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara and San Diego County Air...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Santa Barbara and San Diego County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD) and San Diego County Air Pollution Control District (SDCAPCD)...

2013-04-11

261

Antibiotic Resistance Patterns of Bacterial Isolates from Blood in San Francisco County, California, 1996-1999  

PubMed Central

Countywide antibiotic resistance patterns may provide additional information from that obtained from national sampling or individual hospitals. We reviewed susceptibility patterns of selected bacterial strains isolated from blood in San Francisco County from January 1996 to March 1999. We found substantial hospital-to-hospital variability in proportional resistance to antibiotics in multiple organisms. This variability was not correlated with hospital indices such as number of intensive care unit or total beds, annual admissions, or average length of stay. We also found a significant increase in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, and proportional resistance to multiple antipseudomonal antibiotics. We describe the utility, difficulties, and limitations of countywide surveillance.

Labus, Brian J.; Samuel, Michael C.; Wan, Dairian T.; Reingold, Arthur L.

2002-01-01

262

Sedimentation in Hot Creek in vicinity of Hot Creek Fish Hatchery, Mono County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An accumulation of fine-grained sediment in Hot Creek downstream from Hot Creek Fish Hatchery, Mono County, Calif., created concern that the site may be deteriorating as a habitat for trout. The accumulation is a phenomenon that probably occurs naturally in the problem reach. Fluctuation in the weather probably is the basic cause of the deposition of fine-grained sediment that has occurred since about 1970. Man 's activities and the Hot Creek Fish Hatchery may have contributed to the problem; the significance of these factors, however, probably was magnified because of drought conditions in 1975-77. (Woodard-USGS)

Burkham, D. E.

1978-01-01

263

Classification of ground-water recharge potential in three parts of Santa Cruz County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground-water recharge potential was classified in the Santa Cruz coastal area, North-central area, and Soquel-Aptos area in Santa Cruz County, Calif., for three data elements that affect recharge; slope, soils, and geology. Separate numerical maps for each element were composited into a single numerical map using a classification system that ranked the numbers into areas of good , fair, and poor recharge potential. Most of the Santa Cruz coastal area and the Norht-central area have a poor recharge potential, and much of the Soquel-Aptos area has a good to fair recharge potential. (Kosco-USGS)

Muir, K. S.; Johnson, Michael J.

1979-01-01

264

Geology, hydrology, and water supply of Edwards Air Force Base, Kern County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Edwards Air Force Base occupies the northern part of Antelope Valley, California. As a result of large-scale and increasing agricultural pumping in the valley, the net draft has exceeded the perennial supply since about 1930 and was about 170,000 acre-feet in 1951--at least three times the estimated yield. As a result, there has been a continuing depletion of ground water stored in all the unconsolidated deposits, including the principal aquifers contained in the younger and older alluvium.

Dutcher, Lee Carlton; Warts, G. F., Jr.

1963-01-01

265

Correlation Between Aerial Insecticide Spraying to Interrupt West Nile Virus Transmission and Emergency Department Visits in Sacramento County, California  

PubMed Central

Objectives Insecticides reduce vector-borne pathogen transmission but also pose health risks. In August 2005, Sacramento County, California, underwent emergency aerial ultralow-volume (ULV) application of pyrethrin insecticide to reduce the population of West Nile virus (WNV)-infected mosquitoes and thereby interrupt enzootic and tangential transmission. We assessed the association between aerially applied pyrethrin insecticide and patterns of emergency department (ED) visit diagnoses. Methods We used geographic information systems software to determine ZIP Code-level exposure to pyrethrin. We used logistic regression models to examine the relationship between exposure status and three-digit International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes (785 in total) for all ED visits (n=253,648) within Sacramento County in 2005 and for specific diagnostic clusters (e.g., respiratory, gastrointestinal, skin, eye, and neurologic). All models were adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity (individual level), median income, ozone, and temperature (ZIP Code level). Results Exposure to aerially applied insecticide was not associated with clusters of respiratory, gastrointestinal, skin, eye, and neurologic complaints in adjusted models but was inversely associated with ICD-9-CM code 799 (“other ill-defined morbidity and mortality”), with adjusted odds ratios (AORs) ranging from 0.31 to 0.36 for 0–3 lag days (95% confidence interval 0.17, 0.68). Spraying was also directly associated with ICD-9-CM code 553 (“other abdominal hernia”), with AORs ranging from 2.34 to 2.96 for 2–3 lag days. Conclusions The observed significant ICD-9-CM code associations likely represented chance findings. Aerial ULV pyrethrin applications were not associated with ED visits for specific diagnoses or clusters of diagnoses.

Margolis, Helene G.; Kjemtrup, Anne; Reisen, William; Franks, Peter

2013-01-01

266

Fatality and Injury Severity of Older Adult Motor Vehicle Collisions in Orange County, California, 1998-2007  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Injuries and fatalities in adult drivers 18–65 years of age have decreased in recent years due to safer vehicles, enhanced medical policies, and implementation of injury prevention policies. However, adult drivers over 65 years of age are continuing to suffer from motor vehicle collision-related injuries and fatalities at a more constant rate. A number of physiological factors contribute to the deterioration in visual acuity, slower reaction speeds, and decreased awareness in older drivers. The objective of this study was to examine injury severity and fatality rates in older drivers compared to their younger counterparts in Orange County, California. Methods: This study used the Statewide Integrated Traffic Record System data for Orange County for the years 1998–2007. Drivers were categorized into 4 age groups: 25–64, 65–74, 75–84, and older than 85 years of age. Injury severity was assessed by the investigating officer. Results: Of the 197,814 drivers involved in motor vehicle collisions, 178,481 (90.2%) were in the 25–64 age group; 11,397 (5.8%) were 65–74; 6,592 (3.3%) were 75–84; and 1,344 drivers (0.7%) were over 85. Those aged 25–64 had the lowest fatality rate per 100,000 people, 2.5, whereas those 75–84 had the highest fatality rate, 4.9. The percent of crashes involving a left turn increased with age, and the percent that were stopped in the road decreases with age. Change in injury collision involvement ratio in the 3 younger age groups decreased by 26% to 32%, but decreased by 18% among drivers aged 85 years and older. Conclusion: The decrease in collision fatalities was greater in the 25–64-year-old group compared to the older adult population. This disparity highlights the need for further injury prevention efforts for older drivers.

Lotfipour, Shahram; Sayegh, Rockan; Chakravarthy, Bharath; Hoonpongsimanont, Wirachin; Anderson, Craig L.; Fox, J. Christian; Vaca, Federico E.

2013-01-01

267

Factors affecting the seasonal abundance of ground squirrel and wood rat fleas (Siphonaptera) in San Diego County, California.  

PubMed

Abiotic and biotic factors affecting the seasonal abundance of 3 species of sylvatic fleas on their hosts were examined at 7 sites in San Diego County, California. Indices for Oropsylla (Diamanus) montana (Baker) were usually highest on Spermophilus beecheyi nudipes (Huey) when < 18.4 degrees C (October-December), whereas those for Hoplopsyllus anomalus (Baker) were highest when > 18.4 degrees C (July-September). O. montana was affected most by ambient temperature (inversely for the coastal site [134 m] and directly for most mountain sites [> 1,183 m]). O. montana was affected most (directly) by relative humidity at the inland valley site, which concurs with this flea being most abundant in other areas during periods yielding higher relative humidties and moderate ambient temperatures. H. anomalus was influenced most (directly) by ambient temperature at lower sites (< 1,183 m) and by host activity at higher ones (> 1,456 m). Usually nonrandom distribution findings, when indices for each squirrel flea were higher on some hosts, indicate that flea numbers are correspondingly higher in some nests and burrows because of more favorable microconditions. Data also indicated that plague may persist at higher sites in southern California or in other areas where climatic conditions permit increased and prolonged interactions between more abundant O. montana and its host during spring through summer. Whereas, plague may have less chance of persisting at lower sites because these interactions are decreased and shortened during the warmer months. Squirrels may become infected with plague following hibernation and again when reoccupying colonial burrows. The flea Orchopeas sexdentatus was affected most (inversely) by relative humidity at a coastal site, with higher indices occurring on fewer Neotoma lepida Thomas and on more abundant Neotoma fuscipes macrotis Thomas during colder months. Such increased flea/Neotoma fuscipes Baird activity at lower sites may favor plague amplification during the winter which may involve ground squirrels and other rodents in the spring. PMID:8840686

Lang, J D

1996-09-01

268

Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Rice Fire, San Diego County, Southern California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Rice Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 1.75 inches (44.45 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

2007-01-01

269

Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Harris Fire, San Diego County, Southern California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Harris Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 1.75 inches (44.45 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

2007-01-01

270

Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Poomacha Fire, San Diego County, Southern California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Poomacha Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 2.25 inches (57.15 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

2007-01-01

271

Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Santiago Fire, Orange County, Southern California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Santiago Fire in Orange County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 1.75 inches (44.45 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

2007-01-01

272

Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Ammo Fire, San Diego County, Southern California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Ammo Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 1.75 inches (44.45 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

2007-01-01

273

Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Buckweed Fire, Los Angeles County, Southern California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Buckweed Fire in Los Angeles County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 2.25 inches (57.15 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

2007-01-01

274

Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Witch Fire, San Diego County, Southern California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Witch Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 2.25 inches (57.15 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

2007-01-01

275

Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Canyon Fire, Los Angeles County, Southern California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Canyon Fire in Los Angeles County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 2.25 inches (57.15 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

2007-01-01

276

Use of density equalizing map projections (DEMP) in the analysis of childhood cancer in four California counties  

SciTech Connect

In studying geographic disease distributions, one normally compares rates of arbitrarily defined geographic subareas (e.g. census tracts), thereby sacrificing the geographic detail of the original data. The sparser the data, the larger the subareas must be in order to calculate stable rates. This dilemma is avoided with the technique of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP). Boundaries of geographic subregions are adjusted to equalize population density over the entire study area. Case locations plotted on the transformed map should have a uniform distribution if the underlying disease rates are constant. The density equalized map portrays both individual cases and rates, and can be understood by untrained observers. Simple statistical techniques can be used to test the uniformity of the transformed map. This report describes application of the DEMP technique to a sizeable `real-world` data set: 401 childhood cancer cases occurring between 1980 and 1988 in four California counties. In an earlier analysis of the same data, the California Department of Health Services (DHS) calculated rates for 101 communities and found no significant geographic variability. The DDS 1980--88 population estimates are no longer available, so in this analysis 1980 Census data were used; geographic units were 262 census tracts. A k`th nearest neighbor analysis, corrected for boundary effects and for within-tract variability, provides strong evidence for geographic nonuniformity in tract rates ({rho} < l0{sup {minus}4}). No such effect is observed for artificial cases generated under the assumption of constant rates. Pending reanalysis with 1980-88 population estimates, no epidemiologic conclusions can be drawn at this time.

Merrill, D.W. Selvin, S.; Close, E.R.; Holmes, H.H.

1995-04-01

277

[Resident training program of coroner's office and trauma quality assurance in Los Angeles County, California, USA].  

PubMed

The author attended a practical training program at the Los Angeles County Coroner's Office for 2 weeks in June 2008. The systems of investigating the cause of death in the USA are not unified because every state has its own laws and systems, with Los Angeles County having a mixed system of Coroner and Medical Examiner. This report is presented to introduce the training course for medical residents at the Institute of LA. To begin, a tour through the office was provided. All residents then underwent a mask-fit-test in order to prevent infections. A conference to present cases for the day was held each morning, as well as lectures once or twice per week. The whole staff instructed the trainees with care, not only in the Institute but also at the death scene and the court. Additionally, the author also attended the LAC + USC Medical Center Combined Trauma Death Review Committee as an observer. This committee is very important for trauma quality assurance. The report of the coroner's autopsy is handed to the committee and the chairperson, a coroner, assesses the results of the emergency medical treatment. This greatly improves the quality of emergency medicine and reduces the number of preventable deaths. PMID:21351414

Nushida, Hideyuki

2010-12-01

278

Ground-water modeling and the installation of deep multiple-well monitoring sites in the Central and West Coast Basins, Los Angeles County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

An ongoing regional study of the geohydrology and geochemistry of the Central and West Coast Basins in Los Angeles County, California has iteratively combined the drilling of deep multiple-well monitoring sites with groundwater modeling. The monitoring sites are generally between 1,000 and 1,500 ft in depth and consist of 4-6 piezometers installed within a single borehole that provide depth-dependent geohydrologic

E. G. Reichard; T. A. Johnson; M. Land; R. R. Everett; D. J. Ponti; B. D. Edwards; S. M. Crawford; T. Kulshan

2002-01-01

279

Water-quality assessment of Cache Creek, Yolo, Lake, and Colusa counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Cache Creek and its tributaries from Clear Lake to Yolo Bypass have been the subject of quality and quantity of water studies by several governmental agencies since the early 1900's. Water-quality data from these studies showed that water in the basin is of good quality for most of the beneficial uses defined by the California State Water Resources Control Board. Concentrations of dissolved constituents are substantially higher in the water in the two largest tributaries than in Cache Creek. Seasonal variations in dissolved constituents are also greater in the tributaries than in Cache Creek. Clear Lake has a major effect on water quality, resulting in little seasonal fluctuation in water quality in Cache Creek. Excessive voron and suspended-sediment concentrations are the greatest water-quality problems, according to existing data. Both of these problems are from natural sources. Water-quality monitoring is presently being conducted monthly at four sites by the California Department of Water Resurces and at several other sites by other agencies. Modifications in current monitoring are proposed to gain further information on diel dissolved-oxygen cycles, pesticides, and biological constituents that may adversely affect beneficial uses. (USGS)

Sorenson, Stephen K.; Elliott, Ann L.

1981-01-01

280

Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Escondido Quadrangle, San Diego County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

2008-01-01

281

Bathymetric and geophysical surveys of Englebright Lake, Yuba-Nevada Counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Harry L. Englebright Lake is a 9-mile-long (14-kilometer) reservoir located in the Sierra Nevada foothills of northern California on the Yuba River gorge known as The Narrows. The reservoir is impounded by Englebright Dam (Photo 1), a concrete arch structure spanning 348 meters (1,142 feet) across and 79 meters (260 feet) high. The dam was constructed in 1941 for the primary purpose of trapping sediment derived from anticipated hydraulic mining operations in the Yuba River watershed. Hydraulic mining in the Sierra Nevada was halted in 1884 but resumed on a limited basis until the 1930's under the regulation of the California Debris Commission. Although no hydraulic mining in the upper Yuba River watershed resumed after the construction of the dam, the historical mine sites continued to contribute sediment to the river. Today, Englebright Lake is used primarily for recreation and hydropower. In 2001 and 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted bathymetric, geophysical, and geological studies of the reservoir under the auspices of the Upper Yuba River Studies Program (UYRSP), a multi-disciplinary investigation into the feasibility of introducing anadromous fish species to the Yuba River system upstream of Englebright Dam. A primary purpose of these studies was to assess the quantity and nature of the sediment that has accumulated behind the dam over the past 60 years. This report presents the results of those surveys, including a new bathymetric map of the reservoir and estimates of the total accumulated sediment volume.

Childs, Jonathan R.; Snyder, Noah P.; Hampton, Margaret A.

2003-01-01

282

Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Potrero Quadrangle, San Diego County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

2008-01-01

283

Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Poomacha Fire Perimeter, Palomar Observatory Quadrangle, San Diego County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

2008-01-01

284

Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Otay Mountain Quadrangle, San Diego County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

2008-01-01

285

Proposed Construction of the Madera County Educational Center in the State Center Community College District. A Report to the Governor and Legislature in Response to a Request from the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this report, the California Postsecondary Education Commission responds to a request by the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges to review the need for and location of a new educational center, the Madera County Educational Center, north of Fresno within the State Center Community College District. The report contains nine…

California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

286

Case-control study of intracranial meningiomas in women in Los Angeles County, California  

SciTech Connect

A case-control study was conducted among women in Los Angeles County to investigate possible causes of intracranial meningiomas. Questionnaires sought information from patients and from a neighbor of each one on characteristics and past experiences that might be associated with the development of this disease. Information was obtained on 188 matched patient-neighbor pairs. Three primary factors appeared to be associated with meningioma occurrence: 1) a history of head trauma (odds ratio = 2.0, p = 0.01), 2) consumption of certain cured meats (odds ratio = 2.8, p = less than 0.01), and 3) exposure to medical and dental diagnostic X-rays to the head. For diagnostic X-rays, the strongest association was with early exposure (less than 20 yr old) to full-mouth dental X-ray series (odds ratio = 4.0, p less than 0.01).

Preston-Martin, S.; Paganini-Hill, A.; Henderson, B.E.; Pike, M.C.; Wood, C.

1980-07-01

287

Water resources of Soledad, Poway, and Moosa basins, San Diego County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Reclaimed water is being considered as as supplemental water supply in the Soledad, Poway, and Moosa basins, San Diego County. This report describes the geology, soils, hydrology, and cultural factors in each of the basins as they relate to use of reclaimed water. Imported water is currently the major water-supply source in the basins. Groundwater supplies are used to a limited extent for both agricultural and domestic needs. Surface water flows are intermittent and, therefore, have not been developed for use in the basins. All three of the basins have the potential for use of reclaimed water, but only the Moosa basin is currently implementing a plan for such use. Concentrations of dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate in both ground and surface water commonly exceed local basin objectives. As of 1985, plans for use of reclaimed water are oriented toward improving the quality of the groundwater. (USGS)

Evenson, K. D.

1989-01-01

288

Ground-water conditions and potential for artificial recharge in Lucerne Valley, San Bernardino County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The water level in two areas of Lucerne Valley in California has declined more than 100 feet since 1917, including 60 feet from 1954 to 1976. These declines are the result of pumping for the irrigation of alfalfa. The lowering of water levels has caused many shallow domestic wells to go dry. Well yields in the valley generally are between 10 and 1,000 gallons per minute. About 240 ,000 acre-feet of ground water was withdrawn between 1950 and 1976. About 1,750,000 acre-feet remains in storage. Water of poor quality underlies the valley around Lucerne Lake. There was no definable movement of this water from 1954 to 1976, but the possibility exists for future movement toward centers of pumping. Lucerne Valley may be hydrologically suitable for artificial-recharge operations. (Woodard-USGS)

Schaefer, Donald H.

1979-01-01

289

Mathematical model of the West Bolsa Ground-water Basin, San Benito County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Simulation of the West Bolsa ground-water basin hydrology in California had provided values of basin recharge and discharge and nodally distributed values of transmissivity and storage coefficient. Average net recharge from April 1945 to March 1969 was 6.2 cubic feet per second and occurred as subsurace recharge and infiltration of rain and minor streamflow. Discharge from the basin during the same period was 8.1 cubic feet per second and occurred as pumping and leakage from confined parts of the basin. Values of transmissivity used in the model generally range from 3,300 to 20,000 feet squared per day. Values of storage coefficient used in the model range from 0.0005 to 0.10. (Woodard-USGS)

Faye, Robert E.

1976-01-01

290

Tick-borne Relapsing Fever and Borrelia hermsii, Los Angeles County, California, USA  

PubMed Central

The primary cause of tick-borne relapsing fever in western North America is Borrelia hermsii, a rodent-associated spirochete transmitted by the fast-feeding soft tick Ornithodoros hermsi. We describe a patient who had an illness consistent with relapsing fever after exposure in the mountains near Los Angeles, California, USA. The patient’s convalescent-phase serum was seropositive for B. hermsii but negative for several other vector-borne bacterial pathogens. Investigations at the exposure site showed the presence of O. hermsi ticks infected with B. hermsii and the presence of rodents that were seropositive for the spirochete. We determined that this tick-borne disease is endemic to the San Gabriel Mountains near the greater Los Angeles metropolitan area.

Raffel, Sandra J.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Webster, Larry S.; Marques, Adriana R.; Spano, Robyn; Rood, Michael; Burns, Joe; Hu, Renjie

2009-01-01

291

Map Showing Seacliff Response to Climatic and Seismic Events, Depot Hill, Santa Cruz County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

INTRODUCTION The coastal cliffs along much of the central California coast are actively retreating. Large storms and periodic earthquakes are responsible for most of the documented seacliff slope failures. Long-term average erosion rates calculated for this section of coast (Moore and others, 1999) do not provide the spatial or temporal data resolution necessary to identify the processes responsible for retreat of the seacliffs, where episodic retreat threatens homes and community infrastructure. Research suggests that more erosion occurs along the California coast over a short time scale, during periods of severe storms or seismic activity, than occurs during decades of normal weather or seismic quiescence (Griggs and Scholar, 1998; Griggs, 1994; Plant and Griggs, 1990; Griggs and Johnson, 1979 and 1983; Kuhn and Shepard, 1979). This is the first map in a series of maps documenting the processes of short-term seacliff retreat through the identification of slope failure styles, spatial variability of failures, and temporal variation in retreat amounts in an area that has been identified as an erosion hotspot (Moore and others, 1999; Griggs and Savoy, 1985). This map presents seacliff failure and retreat data from Depot Hill, California, which is located five kilometers east of Santa Cruz (fig.1) near the town of Capitola, along the northern Monterey Bay coast. The data presented in this map series provide high-resolution spatial and temporal information on the location, amount, and processes of seacliff retreat in Santa Cruz, California. These data show the response of the seacliffs to both large magnitude earthquakes and severe climatic events such as El NiOos; this information may prove useful in predicting the future response of the cliffs to events of similar magnitude. The map data can also be incorporated into Global Information System (GIS) for use by researchers and community planners. Four sets of vertical aerial photographs (Oct. 18, 1989; Jan. 27, 1998; Feb. 9, 1998; and March 6, 1998) were orthorectified and digital terrain models (DTMs) were generated and edited for this study (see Hapke and Richmond, 2000, for description of techniques). The earliest set of photography is from 1989, taken immediately following the Loma Prieta earthquake. These photographs are used to document the response of the seacliffs to seismic shaking, as well as to establish an initial cliff-edge position to measure the amount of retreat of the cliff edge over the following decade. The remaining three sets of photographs were collected using the U.S. Geological Survey Coastal Aerial Mapping System (CAMS) during the 1997-98 El NiOo (see Hapke and Richmond, 1999, 2000). The CAMS photographs were taken before, during, and after severe storms and are used to examine seacliff response to these storms. In addition to the analyses of photogrammetrically processed data, field mapping identified joints, faults, and lithologic variations along this section of seacliff.

Hapke, Cheryl J.; Richmond, Bruce M.; D'Iorio, Mimi M.

2002-01-01

292

Map Showing Seacliff Response to Climatic and Seismic Events, Seacliff State Beach, Santa Cruz County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

INTRODUCTION The coastal cliffs along much of the central California coast are actively retreating. Large storms and periodic earthquakes are responsible for most of the documented seacliff slope failures. Long-term average erosion rates calculated for this section of coast (Moore and others, 1999) do not provide the spatial or temporal data resolution necessary to identify the processes responsible for retreat of the seacliffs, where episodic retreat threatens homes and community infrastructure. Research suggests that more erosion occurs along the California coast over a short time scale, during periods of severe storms or seismic activity, than occurs during decades of normal weather or seismic quiescence (Griggs and Scholar, 1998; Griggs, 1994; Plant and Griggs, 1990; Griggs and Johnson, 1979 and 1983; Kuhn and Shepard, 1979). This is the second map in a series of maps documenting the processes of short-term seacliff retreat through the identification of slope failure styles, spatial variability of failures, and temporal variation in retreat amounts in an area that has been identified as an erosion hotspot (Moore and others, 1999; Griggs and Savoy, 1985). This map presents seacliff failure and retreat data from Seacliff State Beach, California, which is located seven kilometers east of Santa Cruz (fig. 1) along the northern Monterey Bay coast. The data presented in this map series provide high-resolution spatial and temporal information on the location, amount, and processes of seacliff retreat in Santa Cruz, California. These data show the response of the seacliffs to both large magnitude earthquakes and severe climatic events such as El Ni?os; this information may prove useful in predicting the future response of the cliffs to events of similar magnitude. The map data can also be incorporated into Global Information System (GIS) for use by researchers and community planners. Four sets of vertical aerial photographs (Oct. 18, 1989; Jan. 27, 1998; Feb. 9, 1998; and March 6, 1998) were orthorectified and digital terrain models (DTMs) were generated and edited for this study (see Hapke and Richmond, 2000, for description of techniques). The earliest set of photography is from 1989, taken immediately following the Loma Prieta earthquake. These photographs are used to document the response of the seacliffs to seismic shaking, as well as to establish a baseline cliff-edge position to measure the amount of retreat of the cliff edge over the following decade. The remaining three sets of photographs were collected using the U.S. Geological Survey Coastal Aerial Mapping System (CAMS) during the 1997-98 El Ni?o (see Hapke and Richmond, 1999; 2000). The CAMS photographs were taken before, during, and after severe storms and are used to examine seacliff response to these storms. In addition to the analyses of photogrammetrically processed data, field mapping identified joints, faults, and lithologic variations along this section of seacliff.

Hapke, Cheryl J.; Richmond, Bruce M.; D'Iorio, Mimi M.

2002-01-01

293

Fine particulate air pollution and mortality in two southern California counties  

SciTech Connect

Several epidemiologic studies have reported associations between respiratory disease and particulate matter less than 2.5 {mu}m in diameter (PM2.5) or fine particles. However, since daily fine particulate data from ambient monitors are seldom available, many studies have used estimates of PM2.5 based on visual range observed at local airports. This paper examines the impact of visibility-based estimates of PM2.5 on mortality from 1980 through 1986 in San Bernardino and Riverside Counties, located in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. Multiple regression analysis was used to isolate the effects of estimated fine particles on mortality while controlling for covariates, including season, day of week, maximum temperature, and dew point. The results are dependent on season. During the summer quarters, there was a small but statistically significant association of estimated fine particles with both total mortality (RR = 1.03, 95% CI = 1.00-1.05, evaluated at the mean PM2.5 value of 32.5 {mu}g/m{sup 3}) and respiratory-specific mortality. However, for the year taken as a whole, estimated fine particles were not associated with mortality (RR = 1.00; 95% CI = 0.99-1.02). The use of estimated fine particles introduces additional measurement error into the analysis. During the summer quarters, an effect of ozone on mortality was also detected, but this association could be due to confounding with temperature. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the fine particulate association found during the summer quarters was robust to alternative estimates deriving fine particles form visual range, alternative regression specifications, functional forms, and exposure averaging times. These findings are consistent with another recent study of mortality in Los Angeles County and add to the other findings of associations between particulate matter and various respiratory diseases outcomes. 27 refs., 4 tabs.

Ostro, B. [California Environmental Protection Agency, Berkeley, CA (United States)] [California Environmental Protection Agency, Berkeley, CA (United States)

1995-08-01

294

Intensive early season adulticide applications decrease arbovirus transmission throughout the Coachella Valley, Riverside County, California.  

PubMed

In the Coachella Valley of California the seasonal onset of St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV), western equine encephalomyelitis virus (WEEV), and West Nile virus (WNV) has been detected consistently at the shoreline of the Salton Sea near the community of North Shore. The timing and intensity of initial amplification in the Culex tarsalis Coquillett/wild bird cycle at this focus seemed closely linked to the subsequent dispersal of virus to the rest of the Coachella Valley and perhaps southern California. In 2004, an attempt was made to interrupt the amplification and dispersal of WNV using ground ultra-low volume (ULV) applications of Pyrenone 25-5. Although these localized treatments were started 1 month after the initial detection in April, surveillance indicated no dispersal from this focus at this time. However, these treatments appeared to have little effect, and WNV eventually was detected throughout the valley, with seven human cases reported in the urbanized upper valley near Palm Springs. In 2005, the initial detection of WNV at North Shore at the end of May was followed rapidly by dispersal throughout the valley precluding efforts at containment. Evaluation of ground and aerial applications at North Shore during May and June 2005, respectively, indicated variable kill of sentinel mosquitoes (overall mortality: ground, 43%; air, 34%) and limited control of the target Cx. tarsalis population. In 2006, aerial ULV applications with the same chemical were begun immediately following the first detection of virus in mid-April, resulting in an apparent reduction of Cx. tarsalis abundance and delay of WNV activity in the rural lower valley and a marked decline in transmission by Culex quinquefasciatus Say populations in the densely populated upper northwestern valley with no human cases reported. PMID:18494603

Lothrop, Hugh D; Lothrop, Branka B; Gomsi, Donald E; Reisen, William K

2008-08-01

295

78 FR 50025 - Humboldt County (CA) Resource Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...project proposals. DATES: The meetings will be held during the month of September. All meetings begin at 5:00 p.m. (PST). Exact meeting dates are as follow: 1. September 23, 2013. 2. September 25, 2013. 3. September 30, 2013. All...

2013-08-16

296

Faulting apparently related to the 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake and possible co-seismic origin of surface cracks in Potrero Canyon, Los Angeles County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Apparent southward-dipping, reverse-fault zones are imaged to depths of about 1.5 km beneath Potrero Canyon, Los Angeles County, California. Based on their orientation and projection to the surface, we suggest that the imaged fault zones are extensions of the Oak Ridge fault. Geologic mapping by others and correlations with seismicity studies suggest that the Oak Ridge fault is the causative fault of the 17 January 1994 Northridge earthquake (Northridge fault). Our seismically imaged faults may be among several faults that collectively comprise the Northridge thrust fault system. Unusually strong shaking in Potrero Canyon during the Northridge earthquake may have resulted from focusing of seismic energy or co-seismic movement along existing, related shallow-depth faults. The strong shaking produced ground-surface cracks and sand blows distributed along the length of the canyon. Seismic reflection and refraction images show that shallow-depth faults may underlie some of the observed surface cracks. The relationship between observed surface cracks and imaged faults indicates that some of the surface cracks may have developed from nontectonic alluvial movement, but others may be fault related. Immediately beneath the surface cracks, P-wave velocities are unusually low (<400 m/sec), and there are velocity anomalies consistent with a seismic reflection image of shallow faulting to depths of at least 100 m. On the basis of velocity data, we suggest that unconsolidated soils (<800 m/sec) extend to depths of about 15 to 20 m beneath our datum (<25 m below ground surface). The underlying rocks range in velocity from about 1000 to 5000 m/sec in the upper 100 m. This study illustrates the utility of high-resolution seismic imaging in assessing local and regional seismic hazards.

Catchings, R. D.; Goldman, M. R.; Lee, W. H. K.; Rymer, M. J.; Ponti, D. J.

1998-01-01

297

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Atlas Asbestos Mine, Fresno County, California (First remedial action), July 1989  

SciTech Connect

The Atlas Asbestos Mine site is in Fresno County, California, and is being remediated concurrently with the Coalinga Asbestos Mine site. The Record of Decision (ROD) does not address the mines, but rather a separate area in the city of Coalinga, where asbestos, from the Atlas-Coalinga mines, was deposited to await handling and shipment. The site consists of four distinct areas: the warehouse which was once a mining waste distribution center and which currently houses 1,600 cubic yards of mining waste; a storage yard which contains asbestos-contaminated stacked pipes; a shipping yard which was used as an asbestos distribution center by the Atlas Asbestos Company; and the U.S. Asbestos Company which currently stores piles of asbestos-contaminated mining waste. Subsequent sampling programs, conducted between 1983 and 1987, revealed that surface water and air also contained elevated levels of asbestos. As a result of these finding, EPA issued an Administrative Order to a major landowner, Southern Pacific Transportation Company (SPTC), requiring SPTC to conduct an additional remedial investigation and a feasibility study and to perform interim measures to stabilize the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and debris are metals including nickel, and other inorganics including asbestos and mining wastes. The selected remedial action for this site are included.

Not Available

1989-07-19

298

Sediment discharge in the Upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins, San Luis Obispo County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Sediment data collected in the upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins, San Luis Obispo County, California, during the 1968-73 water years were analyzed to determine total sediment discharge at four stations in the basins. Water discharge and total sediment discharge at these stations, representative of the 1943-72 period, were estimated from long-term flow data for nearby gaging stations and water-sediment discharge relations determined for the 1968-73 water years. Most of the total annual sediment discharge at each station occurs during a few days each year. The quantity of sediment transported in a single day often accounts for more than 40 percent of the total annual sediment discharge. Estimated sediment discharge for the upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins during the 1943-72 water years averaged 53,000 tons and 23,000 tons per year. Long-term sediment deposition in Lopez Reservoir, which is in the southern part of the upper Arroyo Grande basin, was estimated to be 35 acre-feet per year. (Woodard-USGS)

Knott, J. M.

1976-01-01

299

Public health assessment for Sola Optical USA, Inc. , Petaluma, Sonoma County, California, region 9. CERCLIS No. CAD981171523. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Public Health Assessment of Sola Optical USA, Inc. is based on a review of the Remedial Investigation report and the Public Health Risk Assessment. The Sola Optical USA, Inc. (Sola) site, located in Petaluma, Sonoma County, California, was placed on the National Priorities List by the EPA on June, 1988. The EPA is the lead governmental agency for the cleanup at the Sola site. Spillage associated with six underground solvent storage tanks resulted in volatile organic contaminants (VOCs) leaking into the subsurface soils and groundwater. These underground tanks and some of the surrounding contaminated soil have been excavated and removed from the site. Various VOCs have been detected in on-site groundwater at levels of human health concern; however the contaminated groundwater is not currently a source of drinking water. An on-site groundwater extraction and treatment system has been in operation since 1987. Based on information reviewed, ATSDR and CDHS have concluded that the Sola site poses no apparent public health hazard.

Not Available

1993-01-06

300

late Pleistocene and Holocene pollen record from Laguna de las Trancas, northern coastal Santa Cruz County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A 2.1-m core from Laguna de las Trancas, a marsh atop a landslide in northern Santa Cruz County, California, has yielded a pollen record for the period between about 30,000 B. P. and roughly 5000 B. P. Three pollen zones are recognized. The earliest is characterized by high frequencies of pine pollen and is correlated with a mid-Wisconsinan interstade of the mid-continent. The middle zone contains high frequencies of both pine and fir (Abies, probably A. grandis) pollen and is correlated with the last full glacial interval (upper Wisconsinan). The upper zone is dominated by redwood (Sequoia) pollen and represents latest Pleistocene to middle Holocene. The past few thousand years are not represented in the core. The pollen evidence indicates that during the full glacial period the mean annual temperature at the site was about 2°C to 3°C lower than it is today. We attribute this small difference to the stabilizing effect of marine upwelling on the temperature regime in the immediate vicinity of the coast. Precipitation may have been about 20 percent higher as a result of longer winter wet seasons.

Adam, David P.; Byrne, Roger; Luther, Edgar

1981-01-01

301

Application of advanced geophysical logging methods in the characterization of a fractured-sedimentary bedrock aquifer, Ventura County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An integrated suite of advanced geophysical logging methods was used to characterize the geology and hydrology of three boreholes completed in fractured-sedimentary bedrock in Ventura County, California. The geophysical methods included caliper, gamma, electromagnetic induction, borehole deviation, optical and acoustic televiewer, borehole radar, fluid resistivity, temperature, and electromagnetic flowmeter. The geophysical logging 1) provided insights useful for the overall geohydrologic characterization of the bedrock and 2) enhanced the value of information collected by other methods from the boreholes including core-sample analysis, multiple-level monitoring, and packer testing. The logged boreholes, which have open intervals of 100 to 200 feet, penetrate a sequence of interbedded sandstone and mudstone with bedding striking 220 to 250 degrees and dipping 15 to 40 degrees to the northwest. Fractures intersected by the boreholes include fractures parallel to bedding and fractures with variable strike that dip moderately to steeply. Two to three flow zones were detected in each borehole. The flow zones consist of bedding-parallel or steeply dipping fractures or a combination of bedding-parallel fractures and moderately to steeply dipping fractures. About 75 to more than 90 percent of the measured flow under pumped conditions was produced by only one of the flow zones in each borehole.

Williams, John H.; Lane, John W., Jr.; Singha, Kamini; Haeni, F. Peter

2002-01-01

302

Concentrations of mercury and other metals in black bass (Micropterus spp.) from Whiskeytown Lake, Shasta County, California, 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the results of a reconnaissance study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to determine mercury (Hg) and other selected metal concentrations in Black bass (Micropterus spp.) from Whiskeytown Lake, Shasta County, California. Total mercury concentrations were determined by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CVAAS) in fillets and whole bodies of each sampled fish. Selected metals scans were performed on whole bodies (less the fillets) by inductively coupled plasma–mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma–optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Mercury concentrations in fillet samples ranged from 0.06 to 0.52 micrograms per gram (?g/g) wet weight (ww). Total mercury (HgT) in the same fish whole-body samples ranged from 0.04 to 0.37 (?g/g, ww). Mercury concentrations in 17 percent of "legal catch size" (?305 millimeters in length) were above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water-quality criterion for the protection of human health of 0.30 ?g/g (ww). These data will serve as a baseline for future monitoring efforts within Whiskeytown Lake.

May, Jason T.; Hothem, Roger L.; Bauer, Marissa L.; Brown, Larry R.

2012-01-01

303

Upper Clear Creek watershed aquatic chemistry and biota surveys, 2004-5, Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, Shasta County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service and Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, performed a comprehensive aquatic biota survey of the upper Clear Creek watershed, Shasta County, California, during 2004-5. Data collected in this study can provide resource managers with information regarding aquatic resources, watershed degradation, and regional biodiversity within Whiskeytown National Recreation Area. Surveys of water chemistry, bed-sediment chemistry, algae assemblages, benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages, aquatic vertebrate assemblages, in-stream habitat characteristics, and sediment heterogeneity were conducted at 17 stream sites during both 2004 and 2005, with an additional 4 sites surveyed in 2005. A total of 67 bed-sediment samples were analyzed for major and trace inorganic element concentrations. Forty-six water samples were analyzed for trace metals and nutrients. A total of 224 taxa of invertebrates were collected during these surveys. Eleven fish species, seven of which were native, and two species of larval amphibians, were collected. A total of 24 genera of soft algae and 159 taxa of diatoms were identified. To date, this survey represents the most comprehensive inventory of aquatic resources within Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, and this information can serve as a baseline for future monitoring efforts and to inform management decisions.

Wulff, Marissa L.; May, Jason T.; Brown, Larry R.

2012-01-01

304

Use of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP) in the analysis of childhood cancer in four California counties. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

In studying geographic disease distributions, one normally compares rates among arbitrarily defined geographic subareas (e.g. census tracts), thereby sacrificing the geographic detail of the original data. The sparser the data, the larger the subareas must be in order to calculate stable rates. This dilemma is avoided with the technique of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP). Boundaries of geographic subregions are adjusted to equalize population density over the entire study area. Case locations plotted on the transformed map should have a uniform distribution if the underlying disease rates are constant. The present report describes the application of the DEMP technique to 401 childhood cancer cases occurring between 1980 and 1988 in four California counties, with the use of map files and population data for the 262 tracts of the 1980 Census. A k`th nearest neighbor analysis provides strong evidence for geographic non-uniformity in tract rates (p < 10{sup {minus}4}). No such effect is observed for artificial cases generated under the assumption of constant rates. Work is in progress to repeat the analysis with improved population estimates derived from both 1980 and 1990 Census data. Final epidemiologic conclusions will be reported when that analysis is complete.

Merrill, D.W.; Close, E.R.; Holmes, H.H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Selvin, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). School of Public Health

1995-10-01

305

Modeling the Spread of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Outbreaks throughout the Hospitals in Orange County, California  

PubMed Central

Background Since hospitals in a region often share patients, an outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in one hospital could affect other hospitals. Methods Using extensive data collected from Orange County (OC), California, we developed a detailed agent-based model to represent patient movement among all OC hospitals. Experiments simulated MRSA outbreaks in various wards, institutions, and regions. Sensitivity analysis varied lengths of stay, intraward transmission coefficients (?), MRSA loss rate, probability of patient transfer or readmission, and time to readmission. Results Each simulated outbreak eventually affected all of the hospitals in the network, with effects depending on the outbreak size and location. Increasing MRSA prevalence at a single hospital (from 5% to 15%) resulted in a 2.9% average increase in relative prevalence at all other hospitals (ranging from no effect to 46.4%). Single-hospital intensive care unit outbreaks (modeled increase from 5% to 15%) caused a 1.4% average relative increase in all other OC hospitals (ranging from no effect to 12.7%). Conclusion MRSA outbreaks may rarely be confined to a single hospital but instead may affect all of the hospitals in a region. This suggests that prevention and control strategies and policies should account for the interconnectedness of health care facilities.

Lee, Bruce Y.; McGlone, Sarah M.; Wong, Kim F.; Yilmaz, S. Levent; Avery, Taliser R.; Song, Yeohan; Christie, Richard; Eubank, Stephen; Brown, Shawn T.; Epstein, Joshua M.; Parker, Jon I.; Burke, Donald S.; Platt, Richard; Huang, Susan S.

2012-01-01

306

Fluoride, nitrate and water hardness in groundwater supplied to the rural communities of Ensenada County, Baja California, Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The hydrogeochemistry of 26 wells belonging to ten different aquifers in the county of Ensenada, Baja California, is studied. These wells are all used to supply the rural communities in the region, which comprise ~37,000 inhabitants, excluding the city of Ensenada. High total dissolved solids (TDS) concentrations (maximum 7.35 g l-1) indicate that salt is a ubiquitous contaminant in the aquifers due to seawater intrusion. The aquifers that support extensive agriculture activities (Maneadero, San Quintín, San Simón and El Rosario) are characterized by higher N-NO3 concentrations (maximum 20 mg l-1) derived from fertilizers. Fluoride concentrations exceed the 1.5 mg l-1 Mexican official limit in only four wells. The enrichments of F- in the southern aquifers are thought to be associated to water-rock interactions controlled mainly by Na-Ca equilibrium reactions with fluorite, as suggested from high dissolved Na concentrations in these waters. In the northern aquifer of Maneadero, no enrichment of Na is found and a geothermal source for F- is likely. Water is hard to moderately hard, with Ca/Mg ratios >1. Although drinking water directly from the tap is not a common practice in these localities, most sources have concentrations of major ions and TDS that exceed the Mexican official limits.

Daesslé, L. W.; Ruiz-Montoya, L.; Tobschall, H. J.; Chandrajith, R.; Camacho-Ibar, V. F.; Mendoza-Espinosa, L. G.; Quintanilla-Montoya, A. L.; Lugo-Ibarra, K. C.

2009-07-01

307

Review of samples of sediment, tailings, and waters adjacent to the Cactus Queen gold mine, Kern County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Cactus Queen Mine is located in the western Mojave Desert in Kern County, California. The Cactus Queen gold-silver (Au-Ag) deposit is similar to other Au-Ag deposits hosted in Miocene volcanic rocks that consist of silicic domes and associated flows, pyroclastic rocks, and subvolcanic intrusions. The volcanic rocks were emplaced onto a basement of Mesozoic silicic intrusive rocks. A part of the Cactus Queen Mine is located on Federal land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Staff from the BLM initially sampled the mine area and documented elevated concentrations of arsenic (As) in tailings and sediment. BLM then requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with Chapman University, measure and characterize As and other geochemical constituents in sediment, tailings, and waters on the part of the mine on Federal lands. This report is made in response to the request by the BLM, the lead agency mandated to conduct a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) - Removal Site Investigation (RSI). The RSI applies to the potential removal of As-contaminated mine waste from the Cactus Queen Mine as a means of reducing As release and exposure to humans and biota. This report summarizes data obtained from field sampling of sediments, mine tailings, and surface waters at the Cactus Queen Mine on January 27, 2008. Our results provide a preliminary assessment of the sources of As and associated chemical constituents that could potentially impact humans and biota.

Rytuba, James J.; Kim, Christopher S.; Goldstein, Daniel N.

2011-01-01

308

Hydrologic and Geologic Reconnaissance of Pinto Basin, Joshua Tree National Monument, Riverside County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Pinto basin, in the north-central part of Riverside County, Calif., is a typical desert valley formed by downfaulting along several major fault zones. The valley is filled with alluvium, and ground water in the alluvium discharges as subsurface outflow through an alluvium-filled gap at the east end of the valley. Occasionally surface water from cloudburst floods also discharges in a wash through the gap at the east end of the valley. A northeastward extension of the major fault along the south side of the valley acts as a barrier to the discharge of ground water from the valley. The average ground-water gradient is less than 1 foot per mile across the main part of the valley above this barrier, but the water level drops abruptly across the fault. The ground-water storage capacity of the uppermost 100 feet of saturated alluvium beneath the central valley area is estimated to be about 230,000 acre-feet. All this water in storage occurs at depths greater than 95 feet below the land surface and cannot be reached by plants or animals. During 1959 virtually all the water pumped in the area was withdrawn from storage. However, the quantity of water pumped is small in relation to the total quantity in storage. Except for a small decline in head, no evidence indicates that the pumping will greatly impair the yield for many years or cause the water to deteriorate in quality.

Kunkel, Fred

1963-01-01

309

A water-quality monitoring network for Vallecitos Valley, Alameda County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A water-quality monitoring network is proposed to detect the presence of and trace the movement of radioisotopes in the hydrologic system in the vicinity of the Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Alameda County, Calif. The source of the radioisotopes is treated industrial wastewater from the Vallecitos Nuclear Center that is discharged into an unnamed tributary of Vallecitos Creek. The effluent infiltrates the alluvium along the stream course, percolates downward to the water table, and mixes with the native ground water in the subsurface. The average daily discharge of effluent to the hydrologic system in 1978 was about 100,000 gallons. In Vallecitos Valley, the Livermore Gravel and the overlying alluvium constitute the groundwater reservoir. There is no subsurface inflow from adjacent groundwater basins. Groundwater flow in the Vallecitos subbasin is toward the southwest. The proposed network consists of four surface-water sampling sites and six wells to sample the groundwater system. Samples collected monthly at each site and analyzed for tritium and for alpha, beta, and gamma radiation would provide adequate data for monitoring. (USGS)

Farrar, C. D.

1980-01-01

310

Indicators assessment for habitat conservation plan of Yolo County, California, USA  

SciTech Connect

Whereas habitat conservation plans (HCPs) have been intended to provide comprehensive environmental mitigation for multiple species, they often narrow in focus to one species and either one mitigation site or unspecified sites. The authors developed an indicators framework from which to rate land units for their ecological integrity, collateral values (nonbiological qualities that can improve conservation), and restoration and conservation opportunities. The ratings of land units were guided by the tenets of conservation biology and principles of landscape and ecosystem ecology, and they were made using existing physical and floral information managed on a GIS. As an example of how the indicators approach can be used for HCPs, the 29 legally rare species targeted by the Yolo County HCP were each associated with vegetation complexes and agricultural crops, the maps of which were used for rating some of the landscape indices. The ratings were mapped so that mitigation can be directed to the places on the landscape where the legally rare species should benefit most from conservation practices. The most highly rated land units for conservation opportunity occurred along streams and sloughs, especially where they emerged from the foothills and entered the Central Valley and where the two largest creeks intersected the Sacramento River flood basin.

Smallwood, K.S. [Smallwood (K. Shawn), Davis, CA (United States)] [Smallwood (K. Shawn), Davis, CA (United States); Wilcox, B. [Inst. for Sustainable Development, San Francisco, CA (United States)] [Inst. for Sustainable Development, San Francisco, CA (United States); Leidy, R. [EIP Associates, Sacramento, CA (United States)] [EIP Associates, Sacramento, CA (United States); Yarris, K. [Yolo County Community Development Agency, Woodland, CA (United States). Planning Dept.] [Yolo County Community Development Agency, Woodland, CA (United States). Planning Dept.

1998-11-01

311

Chromium geochemistry of serpentinous sediment in the Willow core, Santa Clara County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A preliminary investigation of Cr geochemistry in serpentinous sediment completed for a multiple-aquifer ground-water monitoring well (Willow core of Santa Clara County, CA) determined sediment at depths >225 meters contains Cr concentrations ranging from 195 to 1155 mg/kg. Serpentinous sediment from this site is a potential source of non-anthropogenic Cr contamination. Chromium-bearing minerals such as Cr-spinel appear to be the main source of Cr in the sediment; however, Cr-bearing silicates and clay minerals are additional Cr sources. Aqueous Cr concentrations in the sediment are <4.6 mg/L; however, the valence of Cr was not identified in the solutions or in the sediment. Although there is no indication of Cr(VI) contamination derived from the serpentinous sediment, elevated Cr concentrations in the sediment, the observed ‘dissolution’ textures of the Cr-bearing minerals, the estimated redox environment, and water chemistry indicate the formation of Cr(VI) is potentially favorable.

Oze, Christopher J.; LaForce, Matthew J.; Wentworth, Carl M.; Hanson, Randall T.; Bird, Dennis K.; Coleman, Robert G.

2003-01-01

312

Quality of urban runoff, Tecolote Creek drainage area, San Diego County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The quality of storm runoff from a 9.2-square-mile urbanized watershed, Tecolote Creek, San Diego County, Calif., was studied during nine storms from September 1976 through May 1977. Specific conductance reached 2,100 micromhos and total residue concentrations reached 2,770 milligrams per liter. The chemical oxygen demand concentration in 95% of the samples exceeded 50 milligrams per liter, a concentration that may be sufficient to cause severe oxygen depletion in areas of the receiving water, Mission Bay. Lead concentrations in all samples exceeded concentrations thought to affect some aquatic organisms. Median total nitrogen and total orthophosphorus concentrations were far in excess of concentrations known to cause nuisance growth of algae in lakes. Fecal coliform bacteria concentrations greatly exceeded recommended levels for primary contact recreation water. Concentrations of pesticides--heptachlor, malathion, chlordane, DDT, diazinon, and dieldrin--frequently exceeded the recommended maximums for marine or freshwater aquatic systems. Total loads of selected constituents are calculated and may be used to estimate the impact of runoff on the receiving water. (USGS)

Setmire, James G.; Bradford, Wesley L.

1980-01-01

313

Typhus and typhuslike rickettsiae associated with opossums and their fleas in Los Angeles County, California.  

PubMed Central

The recent discovery of cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) infected with a typhuslike rickettsia (designated the ELB agent) raises the question of whether similar rickettsial infections exist in wild cat flea populations. We verified the presence of the ELB agent and Rickettsia typhi in urban and suburban areas of Los Angeles, Calif. Opossums trapped in close proximity to the residences of human murine typhus cases in Los Angeles county and other areas within the city of Los Angeles were tested for the presence of typhus group rickettsiae by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The presence of rickettsiae in the spleen tissues of three opossums (n = 9) and in 66 opossum fleas (n = 205) was determined by PCR and was verified by dot blot and Southern transfer hybridization. Further analysis of the amplified PCR products generated by a series of primer pairs derived from either the 17-kDa antigen gene or the citrate synthase gene revealed that both R. typhi and the ELB agent were present in the tested samples. Dual infection was not noted in the samples; however, the fleas were infected with either R. typhi or the ELB agent. The presence of the ELB agent in the cat flea population may have implications for public health. Whether this agent is responsible for the mild cases of human murine typhus in urban and suburban areas of Los Angeles or in other endemic foci remains to be determined. Images

Williams, S G; Sacci, J B; Schriefer, M E; Andersen, E M; Fujioka, K K; Sorvillo, F J; Barr, A R; Azad, A F

1992-01-01

314

Preliminary report on part of the Oat Hill quicksilver mine, Mayacmas district, Napa County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Oat Hill quicksilver mine, located in the Mayacmas district of northern California, and credited with having produced more than 160,000 flasks of quicksilver, was sampled cooperatively by the Buray of Mines and Geological Survey during 1944. 28 diamond drill holes totaling 8,120 feet were drilled by the Bureau of Mines in four of the six principal veins to sample virgin low-grade reserves and stope fill, and reserves in the other two veins were estimated from existing underground workings and by inferences from drill holes in nearby veins. The writer estimates a total of 10,220 flasks of quicksilver in indicated and inferred reserves totaling 320,000 tons. Indicated reserves minable under 1943 conditions are estimated at 1,960 flasks of quicksilver in 75,000 tons averaging 3.0 lbs Hg per ton. Inferred reserves minable under 1943 conditions are estimated at 4,640 flasks of quicksilver in 109,920 tons averaging about 3.2 lbs Hg per ton. Inferred reserves believed minable only under economic conditions much more favorable than even those of 1943 are estimated at 2,620 flasks of quicksilver in 135,080 tons averaging a little less than 1.5 lbs Hg per ton. About two-thirds of the indicated reserves are accessible in underground workings. All other reserves are estimated approximately without access underground. Several areas not sampled may possibly contain reserves.

Fix, Philip Forsyth

1955-01-01

315

Geohydrology of part of the Round Valley Indian Reservation, Mendocino County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Round Valley Indian Reservation in northern California obtains most of its water from the ground-water reservoir. The ground-water reservoir is made up of continental deposits, alluvium, and stream-channel deposits ranging in age from Pliocene to Holocene. Most of the water is pumped from the alluvium. Most ground water (about 20,000 acre-feet or 25 cubic hectometers per year) is derived from stream seepage. Natural discharge (discharge to streams, evapotranspiration, and underflow) has averaged about 21,000 acre-feet per year. Pumping and flow from artesian wells has averaged about 2,750 acre-feet per year. Ground water occurs in both confined and unconfined aquifers. The ground-water reservoir is full, and about 230,000 acre-feet of water is stored in the depth interval 10-200 feet. The water is chemically and biologically suitable for domestic or irrigation use, although hardness is high for domestic use and, locally, dissolved iron is a problem. There is potential for developing additional ground-water supplies. (Woodard-USGS)

Muir, K. S.; Webster, Dwight Albert

1977-01-01

316

Artificial recharge in the Waterman Canyon-East Twin Creek area, San Bernardino County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This is a study of the feasibility of recharging, in the Waterman Canyon-East Twin Creek area, imported water from northern California by way of the State Water Project beginning in 1972. The feasibility of recharging 30,000 acre-feet of water a year in the Waterman Canyon-East Twin Creek area will depend on the effectiveness of fault K as a barrier to ground-water movement near the land surface. The results of test drilling and an infiltration test indicate that the subsurface material at the spreading grounds is permeable enough to allow recharged water to percolate to the water table. The data indicate that fault K extends into the Waterman Canyon-East Twin Creek area and may impede the lateral movement of recharged water. Fault K has no known surface expression and therefore probably does not affect the highly permeable younger alluvium. If that is so, fault K will be less effective as a barrier to ground-water movement as the recharge mound rises. Monitoring of the observation wells near the spreading grounds as the planned recharge operation proceeds should provide data about the hydrologic effects of fault K near the land surface.

Warner, J. W.; Moreland, J. A.

1973-01-01

317

Hydrologic data, 1974-77, Stovepipe Wells Hotel area, Death Valley National Monument, Inyo County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground-water levels in most wells did not change significantly from 1974 to 1977 in the Stovepipe Wells Hotel area, California. The average water-level decline was less than 0.10 foot between August 1974 and August 1977 in 10 observation wells. Water-level contours show a depression centered on the two pumping wells, but this depression existed before the National Park Service started pumping its well. The chemical quality of the ground water is poor. Dissolved-solids concentrations in water samples ranged from 2,730 to 6,490 milligrams per liter. Analyses of water samples from two wells showed large changes in some constituents from 1976 to 1977. Streamflow in Salt Creek has been monitored since February 1974. Base flow is seasonal, being 0.10 to 0.20 cubic foot per second during the summer and as much as three times that amount during the winter. Two chemical analyses of water from Salt Creek, representing summer and winter flow conditions, show large differences for many constituents. (Woodard-USGS)

Lamb, Charles Edwin; Downing, D. J.

1979-01-01

318

Geologic map of the Lead Mountain 15’ quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Lead Mountain 15’ quadrangle in the Mojave Desert contains a record of Jurassic, Cretaceous, Tertiary, and Quaternary magmatism. Small amounts of Mesoproterozoic(?) augen gneiss and Paleozoic and Mesozoic(?) metasedimentary rocks are preserved in small patches; they are intruded by voluminous Jurassic plutons of quartz diorite to granite composition and by Late Cretaceous granite of the Cadiz Valley batholith. Jurassic intrusive rocks include part of the Bullion Mountain Intrusive Suite and also younger dikes inferred to be part of the Jurassic Independence dike swarm. A contact-metamorphosed aureole 2 km wide in the Jurassic plutonic rocks fringes the Cadiz Valley batholith. Early Miocene dacitic magmatism produced a dense swarm of dikes in the eastern Bullion Mountains and the volcanic-intrusive remnant of a volcano at Lead Mountain. Tilting of the dike swarm from inferred vertical orientations may have resulted from Miocene tectonic extension. Conglomerate of Pliocene and (or) Miocene age is also tilted. Younger volcanism is recorded by Pliocene basalt of the Deadman Lake volcanic field, basalt of Lead Mountain (approximately 0.36 Ma), and the even younger basalt of Amboy. Quaternary sedimentation built alluvial fans and filled playas in the map area. Faulting in the dextral eastern California shear zone produced several northwest-striking faults in the quadrangle, some of them active into the Pleistocene and some that may have many kilometers of right-lateral offset.

Howard, Keith A.; Jagiello, Keith J.; Fitzgibbon, Todd T.; John, Barbara E.

2013-01-01

319

Deep Springs fault, Inyo County, California: An example of the use of relative-dating techniques  

SciTech Connect

This article summarizes faulting in the Deep Springs Valley area, which was studied as part of a systematic evaluation of potentially active faults throughout California by the Division of Mines and Geology. Evaluation of surface fault-rupture hazard is authorized by the Alquist-Priolo Special Studies Zones Act of 1972. This act requires the State Geologist to delineate regulatory zones for faults that are well defined and show that displacement occurred during the last 11,000 years. Fault evaluations for the Division of Mines and Geology Fault Evaluation and Zoning Project are conducted at a detailed reconnaissance level. Evaluations are mainly based on aerial photographic interpretation in which ephemeral fault-produced landforms are identified and mapped. Young alluvial deposits and geomorphic surfaces are identified as either offset or not offset by faults. Field mapping is conducted to verify fault-related geomorphic features and to estimate ages of faulted and unfaulted deposits. The section on scarp degradation and relative dating techniques provides a brief survey of methods used in studies of the Basin and Range province. In these investigations geomorphic evidence is applied to determine the recency of faulting.

Bryant, W.A.

1989-11-01

320

Map Showing Seacliff Response to Climatic and Seismic Events, Seabright Beach, Santa Cruz County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction The coastal cliffs along much of the central California coast are actively retreating. Large storms and periodic earthquakes are responsible for most of the documented sea cliff slope failures. Long-term average erosion rates calculated for this section of coast do not provide the spatial or temporal data resolution necessary to identify the processes responsible for retreat of the sea cliffs where episodic retreat threatens homes and community infrastructure. Research suggests that more erosion occurs along the California coast over a short time scale, during periods of severe storms or seismic activity, than occurs during decades of normal weather or seismic quiescence. This is the third map in a series of maps prepared to document the processes of short-term sea cliff retreat through the identification of slope failure styles, spatial variability of failures, and temporal variation in retreat amounts in an area that has been identified as an erosion hotspot. This map presents sea cliff failure and retreat data from the Seabright Beach section, California, which is located on the east side of Santa Cruz along the northern Monterey Bay coast. The data presented in this map series provide high-resolution spatial and temporal information on the location, amount, and processes of sea cliff retreat in Santa Cruz, California. These data show the response of the sea cliffs to both large magnitude earthquakes and severe climatic events such as El Ni?os; this information may prove useful in predicting the future response of the cliffs to events of similar magnitude. The map data can also be incorporated into Global Information System (GIS) for use by researchers and community planners. During this study we developed a method for investigating short-term processes of sea cliff evolution using rectified photographic stereo models. This method allows us to document the linear extent of cliff failures, the spatial and temporal relationship between failures, and the type or style of slope failure. Seabright Beach extends 0.9 km from San Lorenzo Point on the west to the Santa Cruz Yacht Harbor on the east. The cliffs at Seabright Beach are completely protected from wave attack by a wide beach. The protective beach is a relatively recent feature that formed after the emplacement of the Santa Cruz Yacht Harbor jetty in 1963-1964. Prior to the completion of the jetty, the cliffs at Seabright Beach were subject to daily wave attack. The data in this study are post-jetty construction; therefore, the sea cliff failures and cliff retreat are the result of nonmarine processes (rainfall, groundwater and seismic shaking). The 8 to 15 m high cliffs at Seabright Beach are composed of the Miocene to Pliocene Purisima Formation, which is overlain by unconsolidated Pleistocene terrace deposits. The relative thickness of these units varies along the length of the cliff. At the west end of Seabright Beach, including San Lorenzo Point, nearly the entire cliff section is composed of Purisima Formation and is capped by less than 2 m of terrace deposits. In this exposure, the Purisima Formation is a moderately weathered, moderately indurated massive sandstone. The height of the cliffs and the thickness of the Purisima Formation decrease to the east. In the cliffs immediately adjacent to the harbor, the entire exposure is composed of terrace deposits. Toe-slope debris and wind-blown sand form a nearly continuous fan along the cliff base that obscure the lower portion of the cliff. This study documents the impacts of earthquakes and large storms to the sea cliffs in the Seabright Beach section. The first event is the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, a M7.1 earthquake that caused widespread damage to the area stretching from Santa Cruz to the San Francisco Bay. The epicenter of the earthquake was located in the Santa Cruz Mountains, approximately 9 km inland from the coast. Extensive block and debris falls, induced by the seismic shaking, occ

Hapke, Cheryl J.; Richmond, Bruce M.; D'Iorio, Mimi M.

2002-01-01

321

Comments on potential geologic and seismic hazards affecting Mare Island, Solano County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report was prepared in response to a written request from the City of Vallejo, California, to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). By letter of October 4, 2002, the City requested that the USGS "provide advice to the City’s LNG Health and Safety Committee on its review of a potential liquid natural gas project" on the southern portion of Mare Island. The City specifically requested that the USGS advise the committee on potential hazards including fault rupture, earthquake ground motion, soil failure during earthquakes, tsunami and seiche, and landslides. The City requested that the USGS: (1) comment on these hazards, (2) describe its degree of confidence in its opinions, and (3) describe the scope of additional studies that will be needed if the City enters into an agreement with project sponsors. Advice was also requested on the selection of the safe shutdown and operating basis earthquakes as specified in the NFPA 59A standard (NFPA, 2001). This review of published reports and other publicly available information indicates that all of the hazards on which the USGS was asked to comment should be considered for the proposed project on the southern portion of Mare Island. Available information differs greatly for each of these potential hazards, and adequate understanding for design will require detailed site-specific investigations.

Holzer, T. L.; Wentworth, C. M.; Bakun, W. H.; Boatwright, J.; Brocher, T. E.; Çelebi, M.; Ellsworth, W. L.; Fletcher, J. P. B.; Geist, E. L.; Graymer, R. W.; Kayen, R. E.; Keefer, D. K.; Oppenheimer, D. H.; Savage, W. U.; Schwartz, D. P.; Simpson, R. W.

2002-01-01

322

Preliminary Geologic Map of the the Little Piute Mountains, San Bernardino County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction The Little Piute Mountains in the eastern Mojave Desert expose a series of folds and thrust faults involving metamorphosed Paleozoic strata (Miller and others, 1982; Stone and others, 1983). Detailed mapping of these structures was undertaken to help elucidate regional Mesozoic structural evolution. Earlier geologic maps were prepared by Cooksley (1960a,b,c,d, generalized by Bishop, 1964) and Stone and others (1983). Deformed and metamorphosed Paleozoic and Triassic rocks form a stratal succession that was originally deposited in shallow seas on the North American craton. Based on lithologic sequence the units are correlated with unmetamorphosed equivalents 200 km to the northeast in the Grand Canyon, Arizona, and 35-50 km to the west in the Marble, Ship, and Providence Mountains, California (Stone and others, 1983). The Paleozoic sequence rests nonconformably on a heterogeneous basement of polydeformed Early Proterozoic gneiss (Miller and others, 1982; Wooden and Miller, 1990). Triassic and older rocks were deformed, metamorphosed to staurolite or andalusite grade, and intruded concordantly at their base by Late Cretaceous granodiorite (Miller and others, 1982).

Howard, Keith A.; Dennis, Michael L.; Karlstrom, Karl E.; Phelps, Geoffrey A.

1995-01-01

323

Water quality of the Lexington Reservoir, Santa Clara County, California, 1978-80  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Analysis of water samples from Lexington Reservoir and Los Gatos Creek upstream from the reservoir from June 1978 through September 1980 showed that water generally met water-quality objectives identified by California Regional Water Quality Control Board, San Francisco Bay Region. Water-temperature profiles show that Lexington Reservoir is a warm monomictic lake. During summer, dissolved-oxygen concentrations generally were not reduced below 5.0 mg/L in the hyplimnion; only once during the study did bottom waters become anoxic. Water transparency decreased with depth. The euphotic zone ranged from 1.0 to 5.4 m, depending on suspended solids and algae, and was greater in summer than in spring. Calcium and bicarbonate were dominant ions at all stations except during spring, following the rainy season, when waters were a mixed cation bicarbonate type. Nitrogen concentrations were greater in samples from reservoir stations than in those from Los Gatos Creek, with most of the nitrogen in ammonia and organic forms. The amount of dissolved nitrate appeared to be related to phytoplankton abundance. Phosphorus and trace-element concentrations were low at all stations. Estimates of net primary productivity and Carlson 's trophic-state index, based on chlorophyll-a concentrations, indicated that reservoir classification ranges from oligotrophic to mesotrophic. Blue-green algae generally were predominant in reservoir samples. (USGS)

Iwatsubo, R. T.; Sylvester, M. A.; Gloege, I. S.

1988-01-01

324

Ground-water reconnaissance of the Santa Barbara-Montecito area, Santa Barbara County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This is the third interpretive report prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Santa Barbara County Water Agency on the groundwater resources of areas along the south coast of the county. The two previous reports--one by J. E. Upson in 1951 and another by R. E. Evenson, H. D. Wilson, Jr., and K. S. Muir--were on ground-water conditions in the Goleta and Carpinteria basins. The Santa Barbara-Montecito area is between those two basins-the Goleta basin on the west and the Carpinteria basin on the east. This area of about 30 square miles extends from the Pacific Ocean on the south to the Santa Inez Mountains on the north. The city of Santa Barbara and the towns of Montecito and Summerland are within the area. The Santa Barbara-Montecito area is a low-lying flat section of the coastal plain. Farther inland are highlands of consolidated rock and terrace deposits. The highlands are areas of uplift, folding, and faulting, and the lowlands are structural depressions. Most of the urban development in the area has been in the lowlands. The unconsolidated deposits that have partly filled the structural depressions make up the ground-water reservoir of the Santa Barbara-Montecito area. They include the Santa Barbara Formation of Pliocene and Pleistocene age, the Casitas Formation of Pleistocene age, and the alluvium of late Pleistocene and Recent age. These deposits underlie an area of about 20 square miles and have a maximum thickness of about 2,000 feet. The consolidated rocks of Tertiary age that underlie and form the boundaries of the ground-water reservoir contain ground water in fractures and in sandstone beds. However, the consolidated rocks are not an important source of ground water. In 1959, a year the ground-water basins were full and ground water in storage was at a maximum, storage in the Santa Barbara area was 184,000 acre-feet, and storage in the Montecito area was 97,000 acre-feet. By 1964, in response to below-average recharge and continued withdrawal by pumping, the quantity of ground water in storage in the Santa Barbara area had decreased to 178,000 acre-feet. Because of a reduction in pumpage, there was little change in storage in the Montecito area between 1959 and 1964. Deep percolation of rain, seepage from streams, and subsurface inflow from consolidated rocks are the main sources of recharge to the ground-water reservoir in the Santa Barbara-Montecito area. The most important discharge is by pumping.The long-term perennial yield of the ground-water reservoir of the Santa Barbara area is estimated to be 1,700-2,000 acre-feet. Present data are insufficient to accurately determine the perennial yield of the reservoir in the Montecito area, but it is estimated to be about 2,500 acre-feet. Most ground water in the Santa Barbara-Montecito area is suitable for general use. However, ground water in some of the consolidated rocks and in the shallow unconsolidated deposits adjacent to the coast is too saline for most uses. Seawater intrusion has occurred in the Santa Barbara area and the western part of the Montecito area. The intrusion, however, is limited to the upper part of the nearshore shallow alluvial deposits and contaminates only wells which were constructed without a near-surface seal.

Muir, K. S.

1968-01-01

325

Residential proximity to traffic and adverse birth outcomes in Los Angeles county, California, 1994-1996.  

PubMed Central

We reported previously that increases in ambient air pollution in the Los Angeles basin increased the risk of low weight and premature birth. However, ambient concentrations measured at monitoring stations may not take into account differential exposure to pollutants found in elevated concentrations near heavy-traffic roadways. Therefore, we used an epidemiologic case-control study design to examine whether residential proximity to heavy-traffic roadways influenced the occurrence of low birth weight (LBW) and/or preterm birth in Los Angeles County between 1994 and 1996. We mapped subject home locations at birth and estimated exposure to traffic-related air pollution using a distance-weighted traffic density (DWTD) measure. This measure takes into account residential proximity to and level of traffic on roadways surrounding homes. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and risk ratios (RRs) for being LBW and/or preterm per quintile of DWTD. The clearest exposure-response pattern was observed for preterm birth, with an RR of 1.08 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-1.15] for infants in the highest DWTD quintile. Although higher risks were observed for LBW infants, exposure-response relations were less consistent. Examining the influence of season, we found elevated risks primarily for women whose third trimester fell during fall/winter months (OR(term LBW) = 1.39; 95% CI, 1.16-1.67; OR(preterm and LBW) = 1.24; 95% CI = 1.03-1.48; RR(all preterm) = 1.15; 95% CI, 1.05-1.26), and exposure-response relations were stronger for all outcomes. This result is consistent with elevated pollution in proximity to sources during more stagnant air conditions present in winter months. Our previous research and these latest results suggest exposure to traffic-related pollutants may be important.

Wilhelm, Michelle; Ritz, Beate

2003-01-01

326

Health of resettled Iraqi refugees --- San Diego County, California, October 2007-September 2009.  

PubMed

In recent years, Iraqi refugees have been resettling in the United States in large numbers, with approximately 28,000 arrivals during October 2007-September 2009 (federal fiscal years [FYs] 2008 and 2009). All refugees undergo a required medical examination before departure to the United States to prevent importation of communicable diseases, including active tuberculosis (TB), as prescribed by CDC Technical Instructions. CDC also recommends that refugees receive a more comprehensive medical assessment after arrival, which typically occurs within the first 90 days of arrival. To describe the health profile of resettled Iraqi refugees, post-arrival medical assessment data were reviewed for 5,100 Iraqi refugees who underwent full or partial assessments at the San Diego County refugee health clinic during FYs 2008 and 2009. Among 4,923 screened refugees aged >1 year, 692 (14.1%) had latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI); among 3,047 screened adult refugees aged >18 years, 751 (24.6%) were classified as obese; and among 2,704 screened adult refugees, 410 (15.2%) were hypertensive. Although infectious illness has been the traditional focus of refugee medical screening, a high prevalence of chronic, noninfectious conditions that could lead to serious morbidity was observed among Iraqi refugees. Public health agencies should be aware of the potentially diverse health profiles of resettling refugee groups. Medical assessment of arriving refugee populations, with timely collection and review of health data, enables early detection, treatment, and follow-up of conditions, and can help public health agencies develop and set priorities for population-specific health interventions and guidelines. PMID:21160458

2010-12-17

327

GLORIA Alpine Plant Monitoring in the White Mountains, Inyo County, California.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The GLORIA project (Global Observation Research Initiative in Alpine Environments: www.gloria.ac.at) is a worldwide effort coordinated by the University of Vienna Institute of Ecology and Conservation Biology, to monitor climate effects on alpine peaks around the world. In the summer of 2004 the University of California, White Mountain Research Station teamed up with the U.S. Forest Service to initiate GLORIA monitoring sites on 4 summits in the White Mountains. The lower three summits consist of granitic rock, and range from 3240m to 3975m in elevation, while the upper summit is on metavolcanic rock on the shoulder of White Mountain Peak at 4285m. For each summit we followed the rigorous GLORIA sampling design and recorded baseline data on plant species composition, cover, and frequency. Permanent monitoring plots were set up, and dataloggers installed to measure soil temperature. In addition, we are discussing ways to augment the standard GLORIA sampling protocol by setting up a White Mountain "GLORIA master site." This would involve (1) remeasurement of the GLORIA summits using alternative sampling procedures, for example random quadrat sampling, to facilitate cross-comparison with other monitoring efforts by agency and university scientists, (2) a parallel summit transect on a chemically contrasting bedrock lithology, formally known as the Reed Dolomite, which produces magnesium-rich carbonate soils, and is the principle host rock to the ancient Bristlecone forest, .and (3) expanding sampling to include animal taxa. We also plan to complete a detailed geomorphic and geologic description of each site to include in the monitoring database. project/default.htm

Jayko, A.; Powell, F. L.; Smiley, J. T.; Pritchett, D.; Dennis, A.; Millar, C. I.; Murrell, K. E.

2004-12-01

328

Characterizing sources of nitrate leaching from an irrigated dairy farm in Merced County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dairy farms comprise a complex landscape of groundwater pollution sources. The objective of our work is to develop a method to quantify nitrate leaching to shallow groundwater from different management units at dairy farms. Total nitrate loads are determined by the sequential calibration of a sub-regional scale and a farm-scale three-dimensional groundwater flow and transport model using observations at different spatial scales. These observations include local measurements of groundwater heads and nitrate concentrations in an extensive monitoring well network, providing data at a scale of a few meters and measurements of discharge rates and nitrate concentrations in a tile-drain network, providing data integrated across multiple farms. The various measurement scales are different from the spatial scales of the calibration parameters, which are the recharge and nitrogen leaching rates from individual management units. The calibration procedure offers a conceptual framework for using field measurements at different spatial scales to estimate recharge N concentrations at the management unit scale. It provides a map of spatially varying dairy farming impact on groundwater nitrogen. The method is applied to a dairy farm located in a relatively vulnerable hydrogeologic region in California. Potential sources within the dairy farm are divided into three categories, representing different manure management units: animal exercise yards and feeding areas (corrals), liquid manure holding ponds, and manure irrigated forage fields. Estimated average nitrogen leaching is 872 kg/ha/year, 807 kg/ha/year and 486 kg/ha/year for corrals, ponds and fields respectively. Results are applied to evaluate the accuracy of nitrogen mass balances often used by regulatory agencies to assess groundwater impacts. Calibrated leaching rates compare favorably to field and farm scale nitrogen mass balances. These data and interpretations provide a basis for developing improved management strategies.

van der Schans, Martin L.; Harter, Thomas; Leijnse, Anton; Mathews, Marsha C.; Meyer, Roland D.

2009-11-01

329

Surficial geologic map of the Amboy 30' x 60' quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The surficial geologic map of the Amboy 30' x 60' quadrangle presents characteristics of surficial materials for an area of approximately 5,000 km2 in the eastern Mojave Desert of southern California. This map consists of new surficial mapping conducted between 2000 and 2007, as well as compilations from previous surficial mapping. Surficial geologic units are mapped and described based on depositional process and age categories that reflect the mode of deposition, pedogenic effects following deposition, and, where appropriate, the lithologic nature of the material. Many physical properties were noted and measured during the geologic mapping. This information was used to classify surficial deposits and to understand their ecological importance. We focus on physical properties that drive hydrologic, biologic, and physical processes such as particle-size distribution (PSD) and bulk density. The database contains point data representing locations of samples for both laboratory determined physical properties and semiquantitative field-based information in the database. We include the locations of all field observations and note the type of information collected in the field to help assist in assessing the quality of the mapping. The publication is separated into three parts: documentation, spatial data, and printable map graphics of the database. Documentation includes this pamphlet, which provides a discussion of the surficial geology and units and the map. Spatial data are distributed as ArcGIS Geodatabase in Microsoft Access format and are accompanied by a readme file, which describes the database contents, and FGDC metadata for the spatial map information. Map graphics files are distributed as Postscript and Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF) files that provide a view of the spatial database at the mapped scale.

Bedford, David R.; Miller, David M.; Phelps, Geoffrey A.

2010-01-01

330

Distribution of nitrate in the unsaturated zone, Highland-East Highlands area, San Bernardino County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Nitrogen in the unsaturated soil zone in the Highland-East Highlands area of San Bernardino County, Calif., has been suspected as the source of nitrate in water from wells. Plans to recharge the local aquifers with imported surface water would raise the water table and intercept that nitrogen. This study was made to describe the distribution of inorganic nitrogen and other chemical constituents and nitrogen-using bacteria in the unsaturated zone, to relate nitrogen occurrences, in a general way, to present and historical land use, and to attempt to predict nitrogen concentrations in ground water after recharge. Some generalized correlations between nitrogen occurrence and land use were observed. In 11 of 13 test holes, the maximum nitrate-nitrogen (NO3--N) concentrations occurred within 10 feet of the surface, suggesting that the major source of nitrogen is from the surface at these sites. Test holes were ranked according to maximum NO3--N in the top 10 feet, total NO3--N in the top 10 feet, and total NO3--N in the top 40 feet. In all three rankings, the top seven test holes were the same--five in or near present or historical agricultural areas (primarily citrus groves), one in a feedlot, and one adjacent to an abandoned sewage-treatment plant. Two test holes in historically uninhabited areas ranked lowest. The control test hole in an uninhabited area ranked high in geometric mean of ammonium-nitrogen concentration (NH4+-N), suggesting that present in freshly weathered granite. The geometric means of NH4+-N concentrations in six of eight citrus-related test holes were significantly lower than in the control hole, suggesting that irrigation in citrus groves may have created conditions favoring nitrification of the primary NH4+-N. Rank correlation analyses between various measurements in test holes showed that high NO3--N concentrations tend to occur with high specific conductance and chloride concentrations in soil extracts. If recharge is carried out as planned, assuming complete mixing of the recharge water and interstitial pore water in the top 20 feet of the saturated zone, NO3--N concentrations in water at the top of the saturated zone may exceed 10 milligrams per liter in seven areas studied. Concentrations could reach as high as 66 milligrams per liter in the worst case projected. The highest concentrations may be found in three areas that are now, or were recently, citrus groves.

Klein, John M.; Bradford, Wesley L.

1980-01-01

331

A Potential Paleotsunami Shell-Hash layer from the Los Penasquitos Marsh, San Diego County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Los Penasquitos Marsh is one of a series of coastal wetlands between San Diego and Orange County that formed within stream valleys that were flooded and filled with sediment during early Holocene sea-level rise. In order to test the hypothesis that these wetlands contain a record of prehistoric tsunamis, 21 reconnaissance gouge cores between 48 and 321 cm in length were collected and described in the field. Nearly all of the cores contained a single peaty layer in the top 20-40 cm, underlain by interbedded fine-medium gray sand and mud. The stratigraphy in the cores is generally consistent with the complete infilling of a lagoon behind a baymouth bar during the mid-late Holocene. Five of the cores, ranging from 1.0-1.4 km inland from the present beach, intersect a distinctive 0.5 - 12.0 cm-thick shell-hash layer at a depth of between 233 and 280 cm beneath the modern surface. Based on this discovery, we collected a 285 cm long 5-cm diameter core using a Livingstone Piston corer. In this core the 10 cm-thick shell hash layer consists of angular fragments up to 1 cm of broken shells in a coarse sandy matrix that include the following genera: Mitrella, Venus, Spirotropis, Pecten, and Nassarius. This assemblage suggests a quiet water, marine source - from the lagoon and/or offshore. The core was also analyzed for loss on ignition (LOI) at both 550° and 950°C and magnetic susceptibility (ms). The LOI550 data are unremarkable throughout the core, and the LOI950 data show an expected spike within the shell-hash layer. The ms data show very low values for the lagoonal muds and sands, but a pronounced spike within the shell hash layer. We hypothesize that the anomalously high ms value for the shell hash layer indicates a substantial component from an offshore source, where heavier magnetic minerals may have accumulated seaward of the baymouth bar. If correct, this layer may represent a large-wave event, either a storm or tsunami. Three C-14 dates (uncorrected for the marine reservoir) on shell fragments cluster between 1720-1850 cal yrs BP.

Rhodes, B. P.; Cordova, J.; Kirby, M. E.; Leeper, R. J.; Bonuso, N.

2013-12-01

332

Neotectonic Investigation of the southern Rodgers Creek fault, Sonoma County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 60-km-long Rodgers Creek fault (RCF) between San Pablo Bay and Santa Rosa strikes approximately N35W, and is characterized by a late Holocene right-lateral slip rate of 6.4-10.4 mm/yr. Recent field studies along the southern section of the fault have resulted in: 1) new insight concerning the structural relations across the fault and the long-term slip budget on the system of faults that make up the East Bay fault system; 2) a new annotated map documenting details of the tectonic geomorphology of the fault zone; 3) and new paleoseismic data. Structural relations found west of the RCF indicate that previously mapped thrust klippen of Donnell Ranch Volcanic's (DRV)(Ar/Ar 9-10 Ma), were emplaced over the Petaluma formation (Ar/Ar 8.52 Ma) along east-vergent thrust faults, rather than along west-vergent thrusts that splay from the RCF as previously proposed. This implies that: 1) the allochthonous DRV which have been correlated to volcanic rocks in the Berkeley Hills (Ar/Ar 9-10 Ma) must have orginated from west of the Tolay fault; and 2) much of the 45 km of northward translation of the DRV from the Berkeley Hills was accomplished along the Hayward-Tolay-Petaluma Valley system of faults, and not the RCF. Long-term offset along the RCF can be more reasonably estimated by matching similar aged Sonoma volcanic rocks (Ar/Ar 3-8 Ma) across the fault which suggests only about 10-15 km of net right-lateral translation across the fault. This estimate is more consistent with independently derived offsets across the RCF using paleogeographic reconstructions of the Roblar Tuff as well as Pliocene sedimentary units (Sarna-Wojcicki, 1992; Mclaughlin, 1996) An annotated strip map compiled from 1:6000 scale aerial photos for the southern 25 km of the fault has resulted in unprecedented new details on the surficial and bedrock deposits, and tectonic geomorphology along the fault. The new maps together with GPR surveys provided the basis for a site specific paleoseimic investigation. We recently opened a 50-meter-long exploratory trench located 2 km northwest of Wildcat Mountain, in Sonoma County. The trench exposed two main traces of the fault that bound a 7-meter-wide sag pond. Stratigraphic and structural relations have provided evidence for multiple faulting events, the youngest of which may have ruptured to the ground surface. Information pertaining to the timing and chronology of events recorded in the trench exposure is pending the results of laboratory analysis of radiocarbon samples.

Randolph, C. E.; Caskey, J.

2001-12-01

333

Appraisal of ground-water resources in the San Antonio Creek Valley, Santa Barbara County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A nearly threefold increase in demand for water in the 154-square-mile San Antonio Creek valley in California during the period 1958-77 has increased the potential for overdraft on the ground-water basin. The hydrologic budget for this period showed a perennial yield of about 9,800 acre-feet per year and an annual ground-water discharge of about 11,400 acre-feet per year, comprising net pumpage of 7,100 acre-feet, phreatophyte evapotranspiration of 3,000 acre-feet, and base streamflow of 1 ,300 acre-feet. The base flow in San Antonio Creek could diminish to zero when net pumpage reaches 13,500 acre-feet per year. The environmentally sensitive marshland area of Barka Slough may then become stressed as water normally lost through evapotranspiration is captured by pumpage. The aquifer consists of alluvial valley fill that ranges in thickness from 0 to 3,500 feet. Ground water moves seaward from recharge areas along mountain fronts to a consolidated rock barrier about 5 miles east of the Pacific coast. Upwelling of ground water just east of the barrier has resulted in the 550-acre Barka Slough. Transmissivity of the aquifer ranges from 2,600 to 34,000 feet squared per day, with the lowest values occurring in the central part of the valley where the aquifer is thickest but probably finer grained. The salinity problems are increasing in the agricultural parts of the valley, which is east of the barrier. West of the barrier, stream and ground-water quality is poor, owing to seepage of saline water from the marine shale that underlies the area at shallow depths. A proposed basinwide monitoring program includes 17 water-level sites, 12 water-quality sampling sites, 3 streamflow measuring sites, and periodic infrared aerial photography of Barka Slough. A computer model of the ground-water flow system could be developed to assess the impact of various water-management alternatives. (USGS)

Hutchinson, C. B.

1980-01-01

334

50 CFR Table 6 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Southern Oregon/Northern California...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Lewiston Dam (Lewiston Reservoir). Salmon 18010210 Siskiyou (CA) Lower...

2013-10-01

335

50 CFR Table 5 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Central California Coast Coho...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Habitat for Central California Coast Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Habitat for Central California Coast Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Coyote Dam (Lake Mendocino). Gualala-Salmon 18010109 Sonoma (CA),...

2013-10-01

336

50 CFR Table 5 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Central California Coast Coho...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Habitat for Central California Coast Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Habitat for Central California Coast Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Coyote Dam (Lake Mendocino). Gualala-Salmon 18010109 Sonoma (CA),...

2010-10-01

337

50 CFR Table 6 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Southern Oregon/Northern California...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Lewiston Dam (Lewiston Reservoir). Salmon 18010210 Siskiyou (CA) Lower...

2012-10-01

338

50 CFR Table 5 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Central California Coast Coho...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Habitat for Central California Coast Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Habitat for Central California Coast Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Coyote Dam (Lake Mendocino). Gualala-Salmon 18010109 Sonoma (CA),...

2012-10-01

339

50 CFR Table 5 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Central California Coast Coho...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Habitat for Central California Coast Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Habitat for Central California Coast Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Coyote Dam (Lake Mendocino). Gualala-Salmon 18010109 Sonoma (CA),...

2011-10-01

340

50 CFR Table 6 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Southern Oregon/Northern California...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Lewiston Dam (Lewiston Reservoir). Salmon 18010210 Siskiyou (CA) Lower...

2010-10-01

341

50 CFR Table 6 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Southern Oregon/Northern California...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Oregon/Northern California Coasts Coho Salmon, Tribal Lands Within the Range of the...Lewiston Dam (Lewiston Reservoir). Salmon 18010210 Siskiyou (CA) Lower...

2011-10-01

342

Characterization of the hydrologic and transport properties of the shallow aquifer under Kesterson Reservoir, Merced County, California  

SciTech Connect

A detailed investigation of hydrologic and transport properties of the shallow aquifer underlying the selenium-contaminated Kesterson Reservoir, Merced County, California has been carried out. The aquifer is composed of a sequence of sands, silts, and clays deposited on the flood plain of the San Joaquin River. Transport properties were evaluated by two multiple well tracer experiments. A new method for interpreting observation well data from a two-well recirculating tracer test in the presence of multiple flow paths was developed and applied to these experiments. The model explicitly includes the effects of the sampling device (the well) on the shape of the tracer breakthrough curves. The model was used to interpret both non-reactive and reactive transport. Non-reactive tracer experiments were used to evaluate mesoscale heterogeneity of the aquifer. Experiments indicate that the tracer traveled from the injection well to the observation wells along discrete flow paths and within each flow path dispersion was controlled by pore-level mixing. The thickness of the individual flow paths averaged 0.28 m and dispersivity values for travel distances of 15 m averaged 0.03 m. Overall, dispersion of the tracer pulse was most strongly affected by the wide range of advection rates along the many flow paths intersecting each monitoring well. Velocities along comparable flow paths ranged over an order of magnitude within a 6.1 m-thick interval of the sandy aquifer. By repeating the same experiment with the flow field rotated 90{degree} with respect to the first experiment, it was shown that many of the layers are not continuous and/or do not have uniform hydrologic properties over lateral distances of more than 15 m. Rates of denitrification and selenium immobilization were also measured in these tracer experiments.

Benson, S.M.

1988-01-01

343

Statistical analysis and mathematical modeling of a tracer test on the Santa Clara River, Ventura County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

To better understand flow processes, solute-transport processes, and ground-water/surface-water interactions on the Santa Clara River in Ventura County, California, a 24-hour fluorescent-dye tracer study was performed under steady-state flow conditions on a 28-mile reach of the river. The study reach includes perennial (uppermost and lowermost) subreaches and ephemeral subreaches of the lower Piru Creek and the middle Santa Clara River. Dye was injected at a site on Piru Creek, and fluorescence of river water was measured continuously at four sites and intermittently at two sites. Discharge measurements were also made at the six sites. The time of travel of the dye, peak dye concentration, and time-variance of time-concentration curves were obtained at each site. The long tails of the time-concentration curves are indicative of sources/sinks within the river, such as riffles and pools, or transient bank storage. A statistical analysis of the data indicates that, in general, the transport characteristics follow Fickian theory. These data and previously collected discharge data were used to calibrate a one-dimensional flow model (DAFLOW) and a solute-transport model (BLTM). DAFLOW solves a simplified form of the diffusion-wave equation and uses empirical relations between flow rate and cross-sectional area, and flow rate and channel width. BLTM uses the velocity data from DAFLOW and solves the advection-dispersion transport equation, including first-order decay. The simulations of dye transport indicated that (1) ground-water recharge explains the loss of dye mass in the middle, ephemeral, subreaches, and (2) ground-water recharge does not explain the loss of dye mass in the uppermost and lowermost, perennial, subreaches. This loss of mass was simulated using a linear decay term. The loss of mass in the perennial subreaches may be caused by a combination of photodecay or adsorption/desorption.

Paybins, Katherine S.; Nishikawa, Tracy; Izbicki, John A.; Reichard, Eric G.

1998-01-01

344

Review of samples of tailings, soils and stream sediment adjacent to and downstream from the Ruth Mine, Inyo County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Ruth Mine and mill are located in the western Mojave Desert in Inyo County, California (fig. 1). The mill processed gold-silver (Au-Ag) ores mined from the Ruth Au-Ag deposit, which is adjacent to the mill site. The Ruth Au-Ag deposit is hosted in Mesozoic intrusive rocks and is similar to other Au-Ag deposits in the western Mojave Desert that are associated with Miocene volcanic centers that formed on a basement of Mesozoic granitic rocks (Bateman, 1907; Gardner, 1954; Rytuba, 1996). The volcanic rocks consist of silicic domes and associated flows, pyroclastic rocks, and subvolcanic intrusions (fig. 2) that were emplaced into Mesozoic silicic intrusive rocks (Troxel and Morton, 1962). The Ruth Mine is on Federal land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Tailings from the mine have been eroded and transported downstream into Homewood Canyon and then into Searles Valley (figs. 3, 4, 5, and 6). The BLM provided recreational facilities at the mine site for day-use hikers and restored and maintained the original mine buildings in collaboration with local citizen groups for use by visitors (fig. 7). The BLM requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with Chapman University, measure arsenic (As) and other geochemical constituents in soils and tailings at the mine site and in stream sediments downstream from the mine in Homewood Canyon and in Searles Valley (fig. 3). The request was made because initial sampling of the site by BLM staff indicated high concentrations of As in tailings and soils adjacent to the Ruth Mine. This report summarizes data obtained from field sampling of mine tailings and soils adjacent to the Ruth Mine and stream sediments downstream from the mine on June 7, 2009. Our results permit a preliminary assessment of the sources of As and associated chemical constituents that could potentially impact humans and biota.

Rytuba, James J.; Kim, Christopher S.; Goldstein, Daniel N.

2011-01-01

345

Preliminary report on geology and ground water of the Pajaro Valley area, Santa Cruz and Monterey counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Pajaro Valley area, California, covering about 120 square miles, extends from the southern part of Santa Cruz County to several miles south of the county line into Monterey County. It borders the Pacific Ocean on the west and the Santa Cruz Mountains on the east. The city of Watsonville is the largest center of population. Deposits that range in age from Pliocene to Holocene make up the ground-water reservoir. These include, from oldest to youngest, the Purisima Formation, Aromas Red Sands of Allen (1946), terrace deposits, alluvium, and dune sand. These deposits underlie an area of about 80 square miles and have a maximum thickness of about 4,000 feet. The alluvium yields most of the water pumped from wells in the area. Pre-Pliocene rocks underlie and form the boundaries of the ground-water reservoir. These rocks contain ground water in fractures and in sandstone beds. However, they are not an important source of ground water. There is close continuity between the geology of the Pajaro Valley area and that of the Soquel-Aptos area, which is contiguous on the north. Ground water in the Pajaro Valley area is derived from three sources: (1) Precipitation within the Pajaro Valley area that reaches the ground-water body by direct infiltration or by seepage from streams, (2) seepage from the Pajaro River as it crosses the Pajaro Valley carrying runoff which originates upstream from the valley, and (3) precipitation in the Soquel-Aptos area that infiltrates and then moves southeastward at depth into the Pajaro Valley area. Ground water in most wells in the Pajaro Valley area occurs under confined (artesian) conditions; the only exception is ground water in the upper, near-surface part of the alluvium and that in the dune sand. It moves south from the north part of the area and southwest away from the San Andreas fault toward and out under Monterey Bay. In the south part of the area, ground-water movement is almost due west. The San Andreas fault probably is the only fault that has a restrictive effect on the movement of ground water. Water levels in wells in the Pajaro Valley area in 1970 averaged about 2 feet lower than that in 1950. Ground-water pumpage averaged 46,100 acre-feet per year during the period 1963 through 1969. There are two distinct ground-water quality zones in the Pajaro Valley area: a shallow, semiperched zone of poor-quality water and a deeper, confined zone of good quality-water. Also, sea-water intrusion has occurred in limited areas near the mouth of the Pajaro River and in the vicinity of McClusky Slough. The channel of the Pajaro River near Aromas and the beds of streams that drain the area north and northeast of Watsonville have the greatest potential for artificial recharge by surface infiltration of water. The gravel at the base of the alluvium is the best zone for injection of water through wells.

Muir, K. S.

1972-01-01

346

Seismic environment of the Burro Flats site, Ventura County, California: a brief, limited literature review  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A limited review of available literature suggests that the maximum horizontal ground acceleration at the Burro Flats site from earthquakes in the region could range from less than 0.1 to 0.49 g. A magnitude 8 earthquake on the nearby San Andreas fault could produce ground acceleration in the range 0.18 to 0.31 g, and an expectable larger earthquake on that fault could produce larger accelerations. Ground motion from possible smaller but closer earthquakes ranges up to 0.49 g for an earthquake of magnitude 6.5 on the adjacent "Burro Flats fault". Estimation of these accelerations is dependent on determining the geologic environment of the site, the appropriate earthquake magnitudes to be assigned significant faults in that environment, and the attenuation of shaking between the earthquake epicenters and the site. The site lies within a tectonically active region--the historically active San Andreas fault is only 34 miles to the northeast, and lesser faults showing evidence of late Quaternary displacement are located closer to the site. Evidence for youthfulness of these lesser faults varies, and except for the active Newport-Inglewood zone and the Santa Ynez fault, they qualify as possible but as yet-unproven active faults. All known faults with appropriate length to site-distance ratios that are reasonably classed as late Quaternary faults are discussed, and are included as potential earthquake generators. Earthquakes of appropriate magnitude to be assigned to each fault are determined by assuming rupture in one event of half the map length of the fault, and applying relations (determined by several authors) between earthquake magnitude and rupture length in historic events to determine magnitudes. These magnitudes are, for the purposes of this brief review, probably reasonable estimates of the capabilities of each fault, although earthquakes of larger magnitude are possible. Accelerations are then determined by assuming earthquakes of the above determined magnitude placed at the closest point to the site on the fault trace, and applying attenuation curves of three different authors. Considerable uncertainty is inherent in the rough estimates of seismic accelerations made herein, for they are dependent on a chain of judgments, each of which, in itself, is uncertain. Present knowledge of the geology of the region is incomplete, so that geometry and structural relations of the faults are in part uncertain, and much evidence bearing on the youth of the faults has yet to be gathered and evaluated. Estimation of earthquake magnitude is also uncertain, and even assuming that approximate magnitude is known rather than estimated from fault length, estimates of maximum ground acceleration may differ greatly depending on the authority used. Further consideration of ground acceleration at the site might refine the estimates made herein and resolve the apparent contradictions between the authorities cited. Attention to frequency and duration of strong shaking would also be appropriate. This study was undertaken at the request of A. J. Pressesky, Assistant Director for Nuclear Safety, Division of Reactor-Development and Technology, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, in March, 1969. It is based on a brief review of pertinent literature to which the authors had immediate access during the few weeks (April-May, 1969) available for report preparation. Because the report is limited both in scope and thoroughness, it must be considered no more than a first estimate of the tectonic and seismic environment of the Burro Flats site, and should not be considered sufficient, in itself, as a basis for design. The report is intended, however, to indicate the breadth of inquiry that is necessary in the consideration of ground acceleration at sites in California, and to indicate the incomplete status of geologic mapping and other geologic studies in the region. The report describes the tectonic environment of the Burro Flats site, discusses 10 pertinent faults individually, and presents possible earthquake magnitudes for those faults and resultant poten

Wentworth, Carl M.; Bonilla, Manuel G.; Buchanan, Jane M.

1969-01-01

347

Evolution of regional stresses based on faulting and folding near the Pit River, Shasta County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate the evolution of the regional stress state near the Pit River, northeastern California, by analyzing faults and folds preserved in and adjacent to a diatomite mine north of the Pit River near Burney. By measuring the orientation of 250 faults and 140 kinematic indicators on fault planes, we have determined principal stress directions preserved during the past million years. We observe the best exposures of faults in the diatomite mine, a paleolake deposit with an age tightly constrained by 1045 ka volcanic rocks below and the 973 ka Pole Creek basalt above (Muffler et al, 2012). To ensure a regionally representative analysis, we also include faults from the surrounding area, which are sparse but show consistent results. If we analyze all of the high angle faults as a single heterogeneous set, we find a stress state that would produce right-lateral strike-slip faulting on a moderately dipping southeast-striking fault plane. When we break the faults into groups based on orientation and include very low angle faults, we see an evolution of the stress state through time. The maximum principal stress directions (sigma 1) for the groups cluster along a north-south axis, and the lesser principal stresses (sigma 2 and sigma 3) are distributed along an east-west axis. Because moderately-dipping faults have strikes subparallel to regional normal faults and have kinematic indicators that are both down dip and parallel to strike, we infer that normal faulting occurred first and that some normal faults have been reactivated as strike slip faults. Because low angle faults form a distinct conjugate set and cut or deform high angle faults, we infer that they are the youngest. Low angle faults cluster into two groups that dip shallowly to the northwest and southwest. Analysis of the two groups as a conjugate set is consistent with individual analysis of each, and the slip vectors for the two groups cluster around the intersection with the sigma 1-3 plane. This would be very unlikely if low angle faults were simply accommodation structures or due to landsliding or compaction. High precision survey data along marker beds in the diatomite mine show at least two generations of subtle folding, which is distinct from the pre-paleolake basement topography. On a stereonet, poles to bedding planes in the diatomite cluster neatly along two great circles that define two fold axes. Folds are roughly orthogonal and trend southeast and southwest, plunging gently 2-4 degrees. We infer that the southeast generation of folds formed with other fault-parallel folds associated with normal faults in the region, such as the nearby Five Corners monocline. Evolution at this site through time is consistent with the spatial distribution of stress states at the northwest end of Walker Lane. We observe domains of normal faulting generally to the west, strike-slip faulting to the southeast, and reverse faulting to the northwest.

Austin, L. J.; Weldon, R. J.

2013-12-01

348

Osprey distribution, abundance, and status in western North America: I. The northern California population  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An estimated 355+ 40 pairs (95 percent C.I.) of Ospreys (Pandion haliaetus carolinensis) nested in the northern California survey area in 1975. Eighty-one pairs were estimated along the extreme northern coast in Del Norte and Humboldt Counties. One hundred and forty-four pairs were estimated along California's northern coast in Mendociuo, Sonoma, and Marin Counties. The northern interior region, primarily in Siskiyou, Trinity, Shasta, Lassen, and Plumas Counties, contained an estimated 130 pairs. Forry-nine percent of the interior Osprey population is associated with reservoirs that were not present in 1900. We believe more Ospreys are present in the interior now than 75 years ago because of the increase in suitable habitat; nevertheless, populations at Shasta Lake and Clair Engle Lake are now exhibiting below-normal production rates and local declines. The long-term status of the coastal population, nesting along rivers, streams, and bays, is not clear. Recent production rates from two segments of the coastal population appear to be normal, but production at Usal Creek is below normal.

Henny, C.J.; Dunaway, D.J.; Mallette, R.D.; Koplin, J.R.

1978-01-01

349

Assessing potential effects of changes in water use with a numerical groundwater-flow model of Carson Valley, Douglas County, Nevada, and Alpine County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Rapid growth and development within Carson Valley in Douglas County, Nevada, and Alpine County, California, has caused concern over the continued availability of groundwater, and whether the increased municipal demand could either impact the availability of water or result in decreased flow in the Carson River. Annual pumpage of groundwater has increased from less than 10,000 acre feet per year (acre-ft/yr) in the 1970s to about 31,000 acre-ft/yr in 2004, with most of the water used in agriculture. Municipal use of groundwater totaled about 10,000 acre-feet in 2000. In comparison, average streamflow entering the valley from 1940 to 2006 was 344,100 acre-ft/yr, while average flow exiting the valley was 297,400 acre-ft/yr. Carson Valley is underlain by semi-consolidated Tertiary sediments that are exposed on the eastern side and dip westward. Quaternary fluvial and alluvial deposits overlie the Tertiary sediments in the center and western side of the valley. The hydrology of Carson Valley is dominated by the Carson River, which supplies irrigation water for about 39,000 acres of farmland and maintains the water table less than 5 feet (ft) beneath much of the valley floor. Perennial and ephemeral watersheds drain the Carson Range and the Pine Nut Mountains, and mountain-front recharge to the groundwater system from these watersheds is estimated to average 36,000 acre-ft/yr. Groundwater in Carson Valley flows toward the Carson River and north toward the outlet of the Carson Valley. An upward hydraulic gradient exists over much of the valley, and artesian wells flow at land surface in some areas. Water levels declined as much as 15 ft since 1980 in some areas on the eastern side of the valley. Median estimated transmissivities of Quaternary alluvial-fan and fluvial sediments, and Tertiary sediments are 316; 3,120; and 110 feet squared per day (ft2/d), respectively, with larger transmissivity values in the central part of the valley and smaller values near the valley margins. A groundwater-flow model of Quaternary and Tertiary sediments in Carson Valley was developed using MODFLOW and calibrated to simulate historical conditions from water years 1971 through 2005. The 35-year transient simulation represented quarterly changes in precipitation, streamflow, pumping and irrigation. Inflows to the groundwater system simulated in the model include mountain-front recharge from watersheds in the Carson Range and Pine Nut Mountains, valley recharge from precipitation and land application of wastewater, agricultural recharge from irrigation, and septic-tank discharge. Outflows from the groundwater system simulated in the model include evapotranspiration from the water table and groundwater withdrawals for municipal, domestic, irrigation and other water supplies. The exchange of water between groundwater, the Carson River, and the irrigation system was represented with a version of the Streamflow Routing (SFR) package that was modified to apply diversions from the irrigation network to irrigated areas as recharge. The groundwater-flow model was calibrated through nonlinear regression with UCODE to measured water levels and streamflow to estimate values of hydraulic conductivity, recharge and streambed hydraulic-conductivity that were represented by 18 optimized parameters. The aquifer system was simulated as confined to facilitate numerical convergence, and the hydraulic conductivity of the top active model layers that intersect the water table was multiplied by a factor to account for partial saturation. Storage values representative of specific yield were specified in parts of model layers where unconfined conditions are assumed to occur. The median transmissivity (T) values (11,000 and 800 ft2/d for the fluvial and alluvial-fan sediments, respectively) are both within the third quartile of T values estimated from specific-capacity data, but T values for Tertiary sediments are larger than the third quartile estimated from specific-capacity data. The estimated vertical anisotropy for the Quaternary fluvial sediments (9,000) is comparab

Yager, Richard M.; Maurer, Douglas K.; Mayers, C.J.

2012-01-01

350

From poor farm to medical center: a century of library services to the Los Angeles County/University of Southern California Medical Center.  

PubMed Central

As its centennial approaches, the history and development of library services to the patients and professional staff of the Los Angeles County/University of Southern California Medical Center is traced from the early days when the library was housed in the cafeteria of the dispensary to its present position of being first point of access to library service for one of the largest teaching hospitals in the country. Its recent affiliation with the Norris Medical Library of the University of Southern California School of Medicine is explained. The change in emphasis from patients' library to health sciences library is illustrated, and the contribution of the library to the Cumulative Index to Nursing Literature is detailed. Images

Olechno, G

1975-01-01

351

Review of mineral estate of the United States at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2, Buena Vista Hills Field, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to present this Consultant`s findings regarding the nature and extent of the mineral estate of the United States at National Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2), Buena Vista Hills Field, Kern County, California. Determination of the mineral estate is a necessary prerequisite to this Consultant`s calculation of estimated future cash flows attributable to said estate, which calculations are presented in the accompanying report entitled ``Phase II Final Report, Study of Alternatives for Future Operations of the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves, NPR-2, California.`` This Report contains a discussion of the leases in effect at NPR-2 and subsequent contracts affecting such leases. This Report also summarizes discrepancies found between the current royalty calculation procedures utilized at NPR-2 and those procedures required under applicable agreements and regulations. Recommendations for maximizing the government`s income stream at NPR-2 are discussed in the concluding section of this Report.

NONE

1996-08-09

352

Individual and County-Level Factors Associated with Use of Multiple Prescribers and Multiple Pharmacies to Obtain Opioid Prescriptions in California  

PubMed Central

Use of multiple prescribers and pharmacies is a means by which some individuals misuse opioids. Community characteristics may be important determinants of the likelihood of this phenomenon independent of individual-level factors. This was a retrospective cohort study with individual-level data derived from California's statewide prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) and county-level socioeconomic status (SES) data derived from the United States Census. Zero-truncated negative binomial (ZTNB) regression was used to model the association of individual factors (age, gender, drug schedule and drug dose type) and county SES factors (ethnicity, adult educational attainment, median household income, and physician availability) with the number of prescribers and the number of pharmacies that an individual used during a single year (2006). The incidence rates of new prescriber use and new pharmacy use for opioid prescriptions declined across increasing age groups. Males had a lower incidence rate of new prescriber use and new pharmacy use than females. The total number of licensed physicians and surgeons in a county was positively, linearly, and independently associated with the number of prescribers and pharmacies that individuals used for prescription opioids. In summary, younger age, female gender, and living in counties with more licensed physicians and surgeons were associated with use of more prescribers and/or more pharmacies for obtaining prescription opioids.

Han, Huijun; Kass, Philip H.; Wilsey, Barth L.; Li, Chin-Shang

2012-01-01

353

Debris flows triggered by the El Nino rainstorm of February 2-3, 1998, Walpert Ridge and vicinity, Alameda County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

On February 2 and 3, 1998, a rainstorm generated by the 1997-98 El Nino moved through the San Francisco Bay region of California triggering widespread slope failures. In the Walpert Ridge area of Alameda County 531 debris flows were triggered by the storm. These data depict the debris flows and landslides as polygons. The landslide polygons were mapped from 1:30,000 aerial photography using a PG2 photogrammetric plotter. The mapped debris flows and landslides were digitized manually in ArcInfo.

Coe, J. A.; Godt, J. W.

2001-01-01

354

Humboldt Bay Wetlands Review and Baylands Analysis. Volume III. Habitat Classification and Mapping and Appendices.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A principal purpose of the Humboldt Bay Wetlands Review and Baylands Analysis is to provide an objective basis for the evaluation of permit requests and development activities in wetlands and associated aquatic resources of the Humboldt Bay area. To achie...

M. Boule M. Dybdahl

1980-01-01

355

78 FR 49723 - Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forests; Ely Ranger District; Ely Westside Rangeland Project  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...production for the Humboldt National Forest...be based on the current ecological conditions...in the SETS: 1. Current Management Alternative: Continue current grazing management...Forest Supervisor, Humboldt-Toiyabe...

2013-08-15

356

78 FR 56944 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Humboldt Bay Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Humboldt Bay Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...the Humboldt Bay Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). ADDRESSES: Please...SNM-2514 that would allow for the storage of greater than Class C (GTCC)...

2013-09-16

357

Geohydrology, Geochemistry, and Ground-Water Simulation-Optimization of the Central and West Coast Basins, Los Angeles County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Historical ground-water development of the Central and West Coast Basins in Los Angeles County, California through the first half of the 20th century caused large water-level declines and induced seawater intrusion. Because of this, the basins were adjudicated and numerous ground-water management activities were implemented, including increased water spreading, construction of injection barriers, increased delivery of imported water, and increased use of reclaimed water. In order to improve the scientific basis for these water management activities, an extensive data collection program was undertaken, geohydrological and geochemical analyses were conducted, and ground-water flow simulation and optimization models were developed. In this project, extensive hydraulic, geologic, and chemical data were collected from new multiple-well monitoring sites. On the basis of these data and data compiled and collected from existing wells, the regional geohydrologic framework was characterized. For the purposes of modeling, the three-dimensional aquifer system was divided into four aquifer systems?the Recent, Lakewood, Upper San Pedro, and Lower San Pedro aquifer systems. Most pumpage in the two basins is from the Upper San Pedro aquifer system. Assessment of the three-dimensional geochemical data provides insight into the sources of recharge and the movement and age of ground water in the study area. Major-ion data indicate the chemical character of water containing less than 500 mg/L dissolved solids generally grades from calcium-bicarbonate/sulfate to sodium bicarbonate. Sodium-chloride water, high in dissolved solids, is present in wells near the coast. Stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen provide information on sources of recharge to the basin, including imported water and water originating in the San Fernando Valley, San Gabriel Valley, and the coastal plain and surrounding hills. Tritium and carbon-14 data provide information on relative ground-water ages. Water with abundant tritium (greater than 8 tritium units) is found in and downgradient from the Montebello Forebay and near the seawater barrier projects, indicating recent recharge. Water with less than measurable tritium is present in, and downgradient from, the Los Angeles Forebay and in most wells in the West Coast Basin. Water from several deep wells was analyzed for carbon-14. Uncorrected estimates of age for these samples range from 600 to more than 20,000 years before present. Chemical and isotopic data are combined to evaluate changes in chemical character along flow paths emanating from the Montebello and Los Angeles Forebays. A four-layer ground-water flow model was developed to simulate steady-state ground-water conditions representative of those in 1971 and transient conditions for the period 1971?2000. Model results indicate increases in ground-water storage in all parts of the study area over the simulated thirty-year period. The model was used to develop a three-dimensional ground-water budget and to assess impacts of two alternative future (2001?25) ground-water development scenarios?one that assumes continued pumping at average current rates and a second that assumes increasing pumping from most wells in the Central Basin. The model simulates stable or slightly increasing water levels for the first scenario and declining water levels (25 to 50 ft in the Central Basin) in the second scenario. Model sensitivity to parameter values and to the assumed Orange County boundary condition was evaluated. Particle tracking was applied to simulate advective transport of water from the spreading ponds, the coastline, and the seawater injection barriers. Particle tracking results indicate that most flow within the Upper San Pedro aquifer system occurs within about 20 percent of the total aquifer system thickness and that virtually all water injected into the seawater barrier projects has flowed inland. The simulation model was linked with optimizatio

Reichard, Eric G.; Land, Michael; Crawford, Steven M.; Johnson, Tyler; Everett, Rhett R.; Kulshan, Trayle V.; Ponti, Daniel J.; Halford, Keith L.; Johnson, Theodore A.; Paybins, Katherine S.; Nishikawa, Tracy

2003-01-01

358

Geohydrological characterization, water-chemistry, and ground-water flow simulation model of the Sonoma Valley area, Sonoma County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Sonoma Valley, located about 30 miles north of San Francisco, is one of several basins in Sonoma County that use a combination of ground water and water delivered from the Russian River for supply. Over the past 30 years, Sonoma Valley has experienced rapid population growth and land-use changes. In particular, there has been a significant increase in irrigated agriculture, predominantly vineyards. To provide a better understanding of the ground-water/surface-water system in Sonoma Valley, the U.S. Geological Survey compiled and evaluated existing data, collected and analyzed new data, and developed a ground-water flow model to better understand and manage the ground-water system. The new data collected include subsurface lithology, gravity measurements, groundwater levels, streamflow gains and losses, temperature, water chemistry, and stable isotopes. Sonoma Valley is drained by Sonoma Creek, which discharges into San Pablo Bay. The long-term average annual volume of precipitation in the watershed is estimated to be 269,000 acre-feet. Recharge to the ground-water system is primarily from direct precipitation and Sonoma Creek. Discharge from the ground-water system is predominantly outflow to Sonoma Creek, pumpage, and outflow to marshlands and to San Pablo Bay. Geologic units of most importance for groundwater supply are the Quaternary alluvial deposits, the Glen Ellen Formation, the Huichica Formation, and the Sonoma Volcanics. In this report, the ground-water system is divided into three depth-based geohydrologic units: upper (less than 200 feet below land surface), middle (between 200 and 500 feet), and lower (greater than 500 feet). Synoptic streamflow measurements were made along Sonoma Creek and indicate those reaches with statistically significant gains or losses. Changes in ground-water levels in wells were analyzed by comparing historical contour maps with the contour map for 2003. In addition, individual hydrographs were evaluated to assess temporal changes by region. In recent years, pumping depressions have developed southeast of Sonoma and southwest of El Verano. Water-chemistry data for samples collected from 75 wells during 2002-04 indicate that the ground-water quality in the study area generally is acceptable for potable use. The water from some wells, however, contains one or more constituents in excess of the recommended standards for drinking water. The chemical composition of water from creeks, springs, and wells sampled for major ions plot within three groups on a trilinear diagram: mixed-bicarbonate, sodium-mixed anion, and sodium-bicarbonate. An area of saline ground water in the southern part of the Sonoma Valley appears to have shifted since the late 1940s and early 1950s, expanding in one area, but receding in another. Sparse temperature data from wells southwest of the known occurrence of thermal water suggest that thermal water may be present beneath a larger part of the valley than previously thought. Thermal water contains higher concentrations of dissolved minerals than nonthermal waters because mineral solubilities generally increase with temperature. Geohydrologic Characterization, Water-Chemistry, and Ground-Water Flow Simulation Model of the Sonoma Valley Area, Sonoma County, California Oxygen-18 (d18 O) and deuterium (dD) values for water from most wells plot along the global meteoric water line, indicating that recharge primarily is derived from the direct infiltration of precipitation or the infiltration of seepage from creeks. Samples from shallow- and intermediate-depth wells located near Sonoma Creek and (or) in the vicinity of Shellville plot to the right of the global meteoric water line, indicating that these waters are partly evaporated. The d18 O and dD composition of water from sampled wells indicates that water from wells deeper than 200 feet is isotopically lighter (more negative) than water from wells less than 200 feet deep, possibly indicating that older ground wate

Farrar, Christopher D.; Metzger, Loren F.; Nishikawa, Tracy; Koczot, Kathryn M.; Reichard, Eric G.; Langenheim, Victoria E.

2006-01-01

359

Physical, chemical, and isotopic data for samples from the Anderson Springs area, Lake County, California, 1998-1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Anderson Springs is located about 90 miles (145 kilometers) north of San Francisco, California, in the southwestern part of Lake County. The area was first developed in the late 1800s as a health resort, which was active until the 1930s. In the rugged hills to the south of the resort were four small mercury mines of the eastern Mayacmas quicksilver district. About 1,260 flasks of mercury were produced from these mines between 1909 and 1943. In the 1970s, the high-elevation areas surrounding Anderson Springs became part of The Geysers geothermal field. Today, several electric powerplants are located on the ridges above Anderson Springs, utilizing steam produced from a 240°C vapor-dominated reservoir. The primary purpose of this report is to provide physical, chemical, and isotopic data on samples collected in the Anderson Springs area during 1998 and 1999, in response to a Freedom of Information Act request. In July 1998, drainage from the Schwartz adit of the abandoned Anderson mercury mine increased substantially over a 2-day period, transporting a slurry of water and precipitates down a tributary and into Anderson Creek. In August 1998, J.J. Rytuba and coworkers sampled the Schwartz adit drainage and water from the Anderson Springs Hot Spring for base metal and methylmercury analysis. They measured a maximum temperature (Tm) of 85°C in the Hot Spring. Published records show that the temperature of the Anderson Springs Hot Spring (main spring) was 63°C in 1889, 42–52°C from 1974 through 1991, and 77°C in March 1995. To investigate possible changes in thermal spring activity and to collect additional samples for geochemical analysis, C.J. Janik and coworkers returned to the area in September and December 1998. They determined that a cluster of springs adjacent to the main spring had Tm=98°C, and they observed that a new area of boiling vents and small fumaroles (Tm=99.3°C) had formed in an adjacent gully about 20 meters to the north of the main spring. During August–October 1999, several field trips were conducted in the vicinity of Anderson Springs to continue monitoring and sampling the thermal manifestations. The new fumarolic area had increased in temperature and in discharge intensity since 1998, and a zone of dead trees had developed on the steep bank directly west of the fumaroles. Ground temperatures and diffuse flow of CO2 flow through soils were measured in the area surrounding the main spring and new fumaroles and in the zone of tree-kill.

Janik, C. J.; Goff, F.; Sorey, M. L.; Rytuba, J. J.; Counce, D.; Colvard, E. M.; Huebner, M.; White, L. D.; Foster, A.

1999-01-01

360

Results of a shallow seismic-refraction survey in the Little Valley area near Hemet, Riverside County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Little Valley, a small locally named valley southeast of the city of Hemet in Riverside County, California, is being evaluated for development of a constructed wetland and infiltration area as part of a water-resources management program in the area. The valley is a granitic basin filled with unconsolidated material. In August 1993 and June and July 1994, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a seismic-refraction survey consisting of four lines northwest of the valley, eight lines in the valley, and six lines northeast of the valley. Two interpretations were made for the lines: a two-layer model yielded an estimate of the minimum depths to bedrock and a three-layer model yielded the most likely depths to bedrock. Results of the interpretation of the three-layer model indicate that the unsaturated unconsolidated surface layer ranges in thickness from 12 to 83 feet in the valley and 24 to 131 feet northeast of the valley. The mean compressional velocity for this layer was about 1,660 feet per second. A saturated middle layer was detected in some parts of the study area, but not in others--probably because of insufficient thickness in some places; however, in order to determine the "most likely" depths to bedrock, it was assumed that the layer was present throughout the valley. Depths to this layer were verified on three seismic lines using the water level from the only well in the valley. Data for additional verification were not available for wells near Little Valley. The bedrock slope from most of Little Valley is down toward the northeast. Bedrock profiles show that the bedrock surface is very uneven in the study area. The interpreted most likely depth to bedrock in the valley ranged from land surface (exposed) to a depth of 176 feet below land surface, and northeast of the valley it ranged from 118 to 331 feet below land surface. Bedrock depths were verified using lithologic logs from test holes drilled previously in the area. On the basis of a measured mean compressional velocity of about 12,000 feet per second, the bedrock was interpreted to be weathered granite.

Duell, L. F., Jr.

1995-01-01

361

California coastal processes study, LANDSAT 2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The authors have identified the following significant results. By using suspended sediments as tracers, objectives were met by qualitative definition of the nearshore circulation along the entire coast of California with special study sites at Humboldt Bay, the mouth of the Russian River, San Francisco Bay, Monterey Bay, and the Santa Barbara Channel. Although LANDSAT primarily imaged fines and silts in the surface waters, the distribution of sediments allowed an examination of upwelling, convergences and coastal erosion and deposition. In Monterey Bay and Humboldt Bay, these coastal phenomena were used to trace seasonal trends in surface currents.

Pirie, D. M.; Steller, D. D. (principal investigators)

1977-01-01

362

Water Budgets and Potential Effects of Land- and Water-Use Changes for Carson Valley, Douglas County, Nevada, and Alpine County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

To address concerns over continued growth in Carson Valley, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Douglas County, Nevada, began a study in February 2003 to update estimates of water-budget components in Carson Valley. Estimates of water-budget components were updated using annual evapotranspiration (ET) rates, rates of streamflow loss to infiltration and gain from ground-water seepage, and rates of recharge from precipitation determined from data collected in 2003 and 2004 for the study and reported in the literature. Overall water budgets were developed for the area of basin-fill deposits in Carson Valley for water years 1941-70 and 1990-2005. Water years 1941-70 represent conditions prior to increased population growth and ground-water pumping, and the importation of effluent. A ground-water budget was developed for the same area for water years 1990-2005. Estimates of total inflow in the overall water budget ranged from 432,000 to 450,000 acre-feet per year (acre-ft/yr) for water years 1941-70 and from 430,000 to 448,000 for water years 1990-2005. Estimates of total inflow for both periods were fairly similar because variations in streamflow and precipitation were offset by increases in imported effluent. Components of inflow included precipitation on basin-fill deposits of 38,000 acre-ft/yr for both periods, streamflow of the Carson River and tributaries to the valley floor of 372,000 acre-ft/yr for water years 1941-70 and 360,000 acre-ft/yr for water years 1990-2005, ground-water inflow ranging from 22,000 to 40,000 acre-ft/yr for both periods, and imported effluent of 9,800 acre-ft/yr for water years 1990-2005 with none imported for water years 1941-70. Estimates of ground-water inflow from the California portion of Carson Valley averaged about 6,000 acre-ft/yr and ranged from 4,000 to 8,000 acre-ft/yr. These estimates compared well with a previous estimate of ground-water inflow across the State line. Estimates of total outflow in the overall water budget were 446,000 acre-ft/yr for water years 1941-70, and 439,000 to 442,000 acre-ft/yr for water years 1990-2005. Variations in ET and outflow of the Carson River were offset by an increase in net ground-water pumping for water years 1990-2005. Components of outflow include ET of 151,000 acre-ft/yr for water years 1941-70 and 146,000 acre-ft/yr for water years 1990-2005, streamflow of the Carson River of 293,000 acre-ft/yr for water years 1941-70 and 278,000 acre-ft/yr for water years 1990-2005, and net ground-water pumping of 2,000 acre-ft/yr for water years 1941-70, and 15,000 to 18,000 acre-ft/yr for water years 1990-2005. The decreased average flows for water years 1990-2005 compared to water years 1940-71 were likely the result of dry conditions from 1987 to 1990. The large volumes of inflow and outflow of the Carson River dominate the overall water budget. Estimates of ground-water recharge for water years 1990-2005 ranged from 35,000 to 56,000 acre-ft/yr, and total sources of ground-water discharge ranged from 41,000 to 44,000 acre-ft/yr. Components of ground-water recharge included ground-water inflow from the Carson Range and Pine Nut Mountains (22,000 to 40,000 acre-ft/yr), ground-water recharge from streamflow (a minimum value of 10,000 acre-ft/yr), and secondary recharge of pumped ground water that returns to the water table (3,000 to 6,000 acre-ft/yr). Components of total ground-water discharge included ground-water ET from native phreatophytes, riparian vegetation, and non-irrigated pasture grasses (11,000 acre-ft/yr); ground-water discharge to streamflow of the Carson River (15,000 acre-ft/yr), and net ground-water pumping (15,000 to 18,000 acre-ft/yr). Changes in land use between water years 1941-70 and 1990-2005 have decreased ET by about 5,000 acre-ft/yr. Increased application of effluent for irrigation between those years has decreased the use of surface water and ground water for irrigation by about 9,500 acre-ft/yr. The total decrease, about 15,000 acre-ft/yr, was approximately equal to the net ground-water pumping of 15,000 to 18,000 a

Maurer, Douglas K.; Berger, David L.

2006-01-01

363

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF THE INCIDENCE OF CANCER AS RELATED TO INDUSTRIAL EMISSIONS IN CONTRA COSTA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA  

EPA Science Inventory

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of lung cancer incidence in Contra Costa County to ambient levels of air pollution. It was suspected that the presence of heavy industry in the county, mainly petrochemical plants and oil refineries, could be a contributin...

364

An Analysis of Aggression and Sexual Displays in the Humboldt Penguin (Spheniscus humboldti)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Humboldt penguins (Spheniscus humboldti) are a colonial species of Spheniscidae that inhabit the coastal regions of Peru and Chile, and in those regions their breeding ranges overlap both spatially and temporally with one other penguin species, the Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus). Humboldt penguins are monomorphic and monogamous breeders. Twelve captive Humboldt penguins (6 males, 5 females and 1 unsexed penguin)

Kevin Christian Welch

365

Geographical distribution patterns and habitat suitability models for presence of host-seeking ixodid ticks in dense woodlands of Mendocino County, California.  

PubMed

We used drag sampling to examine the geographical distribution patterns of ixodid ticks engaging in open (non-nidicolous) host-seeking behavior in dense woodland habitats of the climatically and ecologically diverse Mendocino County in north coastal California. The findings based on this sampling methodology reflect risk of human exposure to host-seeking ticks rather than the true distribution of the ticks. Drag sampling in 78 sites yielded 7,860 nymphal or adult Ixodes pacificus Cooley & Kohls, 220 Dermacentor occidentalis Marx, 150 Ixodes spinipalpis Hadwen & Nuttall, 15 Hemaphysalis leporispalustris (Packard), 12 Ixodes angustus Neumann, 12 Ixodes auritulus Neumann, and a single Dermacentor variabilis (Say). I. pacificus, which is the primary vector of the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi to humans in California, occurred in all 78 sites examined. D. occidentalis, another tick species commonly biting humans in California, and H. leporispalustris typically were encountered in oak-associated woodlands in the central or eastern parts of the county. In contrast, three species of Ixodes ticks (I. angustus, I. auritulus, and I. spinipalpis) most commonly were found questing openly in woodlands with redwood present in the western part of the county. I. angustus and I. spinipalpis are occasional human biters and known experimental vectors of B. burgdorferi. Our study represents the first collection of large numbers of openly host-seeking I. spinipalpis ticks. Univariate tests of associations between presence of ticks (D. occidentalis, H. leporispalustris, I. angustus, I. auritulus, or I. spinipalpis) and environmental geographical information systems-remote sensing (GIS/ RS)-based data indicated that elevation, number of growing degree-days, and tasseled cap brightness, greenness, and wetness are especially useful predictors of presence of openly hostseeking ticks. Combinations of the above-mentioned GIS/RS-based data yielded significant logistic regression models for habitat suitability of host-seeking ticks for all five above-mentioned species. The model equations were used to create spatial surfaces of predicted presence of suitable habitat for openly host-seeking ticks in Mendocino County dense woodlands. PMID:16619628

Eisen, L; Eisen, R J; Lane, R S

2006-03-01

366

Ground-water resources in the lower Milliken--Sarco--Tulucay Creeks area, southeastern Napa County, California, 2000-2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground water obtained from individual private wells is the sole source of water for about 4,800 residents living in the lower Milliken-Sarco-Tulucay Creeks area of southeastern Napa County. Increases in population and in irrigated vineyards during the past few decades have increased water demand. Estimated ground-water pumpage in 2000 was 5,350 acre-feet per year, an increase of about 80 percent since 1975. Water for agricultural irrigation is the dominant use, accounting for about 45 percent of the total. This increase in ground-water extraction has resulted in the general decline of ground-water levels. The purpose of this report is to present selected hydrologic data collected from 1975 to 2002 and to quantify changes in the ground-water system during the past 25 years. The study area lies in one of several prominent northwest-trending structural valleys in the North Coast Ranges. The area is underlain by alluvial deposits and volcanic rocks that exceed 1,000 feet in thickness in some places. Alluvial deposits and tuff beds in the volcanic sequence are the principal source of water to wells. The ground-water system is recharged by precipitation that infiltrates, in minor amounts, directly on the valley floor but mostly by infiltration in the Howell Mountains. Ground water moves laterally from the Howell Mountains into the study area. Although the area receives abundant winter precipitation in most years, nearly half of the precipitation is lost as surface runoff to the Napa River. Evapotranspiration also is high, accounting for nearly one-half of the total precipitation received. Because of the uncertainties in the estimates of precipitation, runoff, and evapotranspiration, a precise estimate of potential ground-water recharge cannot be made. Large changes in ground-water levels occurred between 1975 and 2001. In much of the western part of the area, water levels increased; but in the central and eastern parts, water levels declined by 25 to 125 feet. Ground-water extraction produced three large pumping depressions in the northern and east-central parts of the area. The general decline in ground-water levels is a result of increases in ground-water pumpage and possibly changes in infiltration capacity caused by changes in land use. Ground-water-level declines during 1960-2002 are evident in the records for 9 of 10 key monitoring wells. In five of these wells, water levels dropped by greater than 20 feet since the 1980s. The largest water-level declines have occurred since the mid 1970s, corresponding with a period of accelerated well construction and ground-water extraction. Analysis of samples from 15 wells indicates that the chemical quality of ground water in the study generally is acceptable. However, arsenic concentrations in samples from five wells exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency primary drinking-water standard of 10 micrograms per liter, and iron concentrations in samples from five wells exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the California Department of Health Services secondary drinking-water standard of 300 micrograms per liter. Water from 12 of 15 wells sampled contained concentrations of manganese that exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the California Department of Health Services secondary drinking-water standard of 50 micrograms per liter. Two wells produced water that had boron in excess of the California Department of Health Services action level of 1 milligram per liter. Stable isotope, chlorofluorocarbon, and tritium data indicate that ground water in the area is a mixture of waters that recharged the aquifer system at different times. The presence of chlorofluorocarbons and tritium in water from the study area is evidence that modern recharge (post 1950) does take place. Water-temperature logs indicate that ground-water temperatures throughout the study area exceed 30?C at depths in excess of 600 feet. Further, water at

Farrar, Christopher D.; Metzger, Loren F.

2003-01-01

367

Strontium Isotopic Composition of Paleozoic Carbonate Rocks in the Nevada Test Site Vicinity, Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties, Nevada and Inyo County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ground water moving through permeable Paleozoic carbonate rocks represents the most likely pathway for migration of radioactive contaminants from nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The strontium isotopic composition (87Sr\\/86Sr) of ground water offers a useful means of testing hydrochemical models of regional flow involving advection and reaction. However, reaction models require knowledge of 87Sr\\/86Sr

James B. Paces; Zell E. Peterman; Kiyoto Futa; Thomas A. Oliver; Brian D. Marshall

2007-01-01

368

Use of USGS earth-science products by county planning agencies in the San Francisco Bay region, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An inventory of the use of USGS products in selected planning studies, plans, ordinances, and other planning activities was made for eight counties in the San Francisco Bay region--a region of almost five million people. This inventory was designed to determine and document the use of the 87 earth-science information products prepared as a part of the San Francisco Bay Region Environment and Resources Planning Study (SFBRS). The inventory showed that: (1) all eight counties had planning staffs who were very familiar with SFBRS products and had made frequent use of such products; (2) all eight counties had prepared planning documents which cite SFBRS products; (3) the types of planning applications most often indicated were: geologic hazards studies, seismic safety and public safety plan elements, general reference, and the preparation and review of environmental impact reports and statements; (4) over 90 percent of the 87 SFBRS products were used at least once, and nine of the products were used over 30 times each for various county planning activities; and (5) at least 85 other USGS products were also used for various county planning activities. After the inventory, selected county officials, employees, and consultants were interviewed and asked--among other things--to indicate any problems in the use of the SFBRS products, to suggest improvements, and to identify any needed or desired earth-science information. The responses showed that: (1) the scales commonly used for working maps were 1:62,500 or larger and for plan implementation were 1:24,000 or larger; (2) only one county had a geologist on its planning staff, although six others had the benefit of geotechnical services from private consulting firms, county engineering staffs, or the State Division of Mines and Geology; (3) seven of the eight counties expressed some problems in using the products, primarily because of their small scale or lack of detail; (4) all eight counties expected to continue to use the products and expressed a need or desire for additional earth-science, engineering, or other information; (5) all eight counties suggested specific improvements to future products, primarily larger scale or more detail and fewer technical or more interpretive products; and (6) all eight counties received educational, advisory, and review services from USGS personnel. Seventeen selected examples of the application of SFBRS products to various county planning activities are discussed and illustrated. These examples include four planning studies, seven plans, and two ordinances. From the inventory and responses to the interviews, it is concluded that the counties in the Bay region are very familiar with, have made frequent use of, and will continue to use SFBRS products for a wide range of county planning activities. Suggestions to ensure more effective use of earth-science information in the future include: (1) monitoring emerging critical issues and analyzing new state and federal laws and regulations so as to better anticipate and respond to county earth-science information needs; (2) creating a users advisory committee to help identify critical issues and user needs; (3) providing engineering interpretations and land- and water-use capability ratings to make earth-science information more readily usable; (4) giving priority to areas impacted by development so as to husband staff resources; (5) providing earth-science information at the larger scale and greater detail commonly used and needed by counties; (6) releasing earth-science information earlier and according to a formal distribution pattern; and (7) providing educational, advisory, and review services in connection with any earth-science information designed for planners and decisionmakers.

Kockelman, William J.

1976-01-01

369

Geologic map and digital database of the Porcupine Wash 7.5 minute Quadrangle, Riverside County, southern California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This data set maps and describes the geology of the Porcupine Wash 7.5 minute quadrangle, Riverside County, southern California. The quadrangle, situated in Joshua Tree National Park in the eastern Transverse Ranges physiographic and structural province, encompasses parts of the Hexie Mountains, Cottonwood Mountains, northern Eagle Mountains, and south flank of Pinto Basin. It is underlain by a basement terrane comprising Proterozoic metamorphic rocks, Mesozoic plutonic rocks, and Mesozoic and Mesozoic or Cenozoic hypabyssal dikes. The basement terrane is capped by a widespread Tertiary erosion surface preserved in remnants in the Eagle and Cottonwood Mountains and buried beneath Cenozoic deposits in Pinto Basin. Locally, Miocene basalt overlies the erosion surface. A sequence of at least three Quaternary pediments is planed into the north piedmont of the Eagle and Hexie Mountains, each in turn overlain by successively younger residual and alluvial deposits. The Tertiary erosion surface is deformed and broken by north-northwest-trending, high-angle, dip-slip faults and an east-west trending system of high-angle dip- and left-slip faults. East-west trending faults are younger than and perhaps in part coeval with faults of the northwest-trending set. The Porcupine Wash database was created using ARCVIEW and ARC/INFO, which are geographical information system (GIS) software products of Envronmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI). The database consists of the following items: (1) a map coverage showing faults and geologic contacts and units, (2) a separate coverage showing dikes, (3) a coverage showing structural data, (4) a scanned topographic base at a scale of 1:24,000, and (5) attribute tables for geologic units (polygons and regions), contacts (arcs), and site-specific data (points). The database, accompanied by a pamphlet file and this metadata file, also includes the following graphic and text products: (1) A portable document file (.pdf) containing a navigable graphic of the geologic map on a 1:24,000 topographic base. The map is accompanied by a marginal explanation consisting of a Description of Map and Database Units (DMU), a Correlation of Map and Database Units (CMU), and a key to point-and line-symbols. (2) Separate .pdf files of the DMU and CMU, individually. (3) A PostScript graphic-file containing the geologic map on a 1:24,000 topographic base accompanied by the marginal explanation. (4) A pamphlet that describes the database and how to access it. Within the database, geologic contacts , faults, and dikes are represented as lines (arcs), geologic units as polygons and regions, and site-specific data as points. Polygon, arc, and point attribute tables (.pat, .aat, and .pat, respectively) uniquely identify each geologic datum and link it to other tables (.rel) that provide more detailed geologic information.

Powell, Robert E.

2001-01-01

370

Geologic map and digital database of the Conejo Well 7.5 minute quadrangle, Riverside County, Southern California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This data set maps and describes the geology of the Conejo Well 7.5 minute quadrangle, Riverside County, southern California. The quadrangle, situated in Joshua Tree National Park in the eastern Transverse Ranges physiographic and structural province, encompasses part of the northern Eagle Mountains and part of the south flank of Pinto Basin. It is underlain by a basement terrane comprising Proterozoic metamorphic rocks, Mesozoic plutonic rocks, and Mesozoic and Mesozoic or Cenozoic hypabyssal dikes. The basement terrane is capped by a widespread Tertiary erosion surface preserved in remnants in the Eagle Mountains and buried beneath Cenozoic deposits in Pinto Basin. Locally, Miocene basalt overlies the erosion surface. A sequence of at least three Quaternary pediments is planed into the north piedmont of the Eagle Mountains, each in turn overlain by successively younger residual and alluvial deposits. The Tertiary erosion surface is deformed and broken by north-northwest-trending, high-angle, dip-slip faults in the Eagle Mountains and an east-west trending system of high-angle dip- and left-slip faults. In and adjacent to the Conejo Well quadrangle, faults of the northwest-trending set displace Miocene sedimentary rocks and basalt deposited on the Tertiary erosion surface and Pliocene and (or) Pleistocene deposits that accumulated on the oldest pediment. Faults of this system appear to be overlain by Pleistocene deposits that accumulated on younger pediments. East-west trending faults are younger than and perhaps in part coeval with faults of the northwest-trending set. The Conejo Well database was created using ARCVIEW and ARC/INFO, which are geographical information system (GIS) software products of Envronmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI). The database consists of the following items: (1) a map coverage showing faults and geologic contacts and units, (2) a separate coverage showing dikes, (3) a coverage showing structural data, (4) a point coverage containing line ornamentation, and (5) a scanned topographic base at a scale of 1:24,000. The coverages include attribute tables for geologic units (polygons and regions), contacts (arcs), and site-specific data (points). The database, accompanied by a pamphlet file and this metadata file, also includes the following graphic and text products: (1) A portable document file (.pdf) containing a navigable graphic of the geologic map on a 1:24,000 topographic base. The map is accompanied by a marginal explanation consisting of a Description of Map and Database Units (DMU), a Correlation of Map and Database Units (CMU), and a key to point-and line-symbols. (2) Separate .pdf files of the DMU and CMU, individually. (3) A PostScript graphic-file containing the geologic map on a 1:24,000 topographic base accompanied by the marginal explanation. (4) A pamphlet that describes the database and how to access it. Within the database, geologic contacts , faults, and dikes are represented as lines (arcs), geologic units as polygons and regions, and site-specific data as points. Polygon, arc, and point attribute tables (.pat, .aat, and .pat, respectively) uniquely identify each geologic datum and link it to other tables (.rel) that provide more detailed geologic information.

Powell, Robert E.

2001-01-01

371

Analysis of methods to determine storage capacity of, and sedimentation in, Loch Lomond Reservoir, Santa Cruz County, California, 2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Santa Cruz, conducted bathymetric and topographic surveys to determine the water storage capacity of, and the loss of capacity owing to sedimentation in, Loch Lomond Reservoir in Santa Cruz County, California. The topographic survey was done as a supplement to the bathymetric survey to obtain information about temporal changes in the upper reach of the reservoir where the water is shallow or the reservoir may be dry, as well as to obtain information about shoreline changes throughout the reservoir. Results of a combined bathymetric and topographic survey using a new, state-of-the-art method with advanced instrument technology indicate that the maximum storage capacity of the reservoir at the spillway altitude of 577.5 feet (National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929) was 8,646 ±85 acre-feet in March 2009, with a confidence level of 99 percent. This new method is a combination of bathymetric scanning using multibeam-sidescan sonar, and topographic surveying using laser scanning (LiDAR), which produced a 1.64-foot-resolution grid with altitudes to 0.3-foot resolution and an estimate of total water storage capacity at a 99-percent confidence level. Because the volume of sedimentation in a reservoir is considered equal to the decrease in water-storage capacity, sedimentation in Loch Lomond Reservoir was determined by estimating the change in storage capacity by comparing the reservoir bed surface defined in the March 2009 survey with a revision of the reservoir bed surface determined in a previous investigation in November 1998. This revised reservoir-bed surface was defined by combining altitude data from the 1998 survey with new data collected during the current (2009) investigation to fill gaps in the 1998 data. Limitations that determine the accuracy of estimates of changes in the volume of sedimentation from that estimated in each of the four previous investigations (1960, 1971, 1982, and 1998) are a result of the limitations of the survey equipment and data-processing methods used. Previously used and new methods were compared to determine the recent (1998-2009) change in storage capacity and the most accurate and cost-effective means to define the reservoir bed surface so that results can be easily replicated in future surveys. Results of this investigation indicate that the advanced method used in the 2009 survey accurately captures the features of the wetted reservoir surface as well as features along the shoreline that affect the storage capacity calculations. Because the bathymetric and topographic data are referenced to a datum, the results can be easily replicated or compared with future results. Comparison of the 2009 reservoir-bed surface with the surface defined in 1998 indicates that sedimentation is occurring throughout the reservoir. About 320 acre-feet of sedimentation has occurred since 1998, as determined by comparing the revised 1998 reservoir-bed surface, with an associated maximum reservoir storage capacity of 8,965 acre-feet, to the 2009 reservoir bed surface, with an associated maximum capacity of 8,646 acre-feet. This sedimentation is more than 3 percent of the total storage capacity that was calculated on the basis of the results of the 1998 bathymetric investigation.

McPherson, Kelly R.; Freeman, Lawrence A.; Flint, Lorraine E.

2011-01-01

372

Archaeological Test Excavations at CA-LAn-105, -291, and -1269, Palos Verdes Peninsula, Los Angeles County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents the results of an archaeological survey, test and evaluation program completed at two locations near White Point, San Pedro, California. Three previously recorded cultural resource sites were (CA-LAn-105, 291, and -1269) relocated and...

T. G. Cooley J. M. Clevenger P. R. Jertberg

1986-01-01

373

Public Health Assessment for Laytonville Landfill, Laytonville, Mendocino County, California, March 22, 2005. EPA Facility ID: CAD000065532.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The California Department of Health Services (CDHS) prepared this public health assessment (PHA) under a cooperative agreement with the federal Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). PHAs provide communities with information on the spec...

2005-01-01

374

Analytical data for waters of the Harvard Open Pit, Jamestown Mine, Tuolumne County, California, March 1998-September 1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Jamestown mine is located in the Jamestown mining district in western Tuolumne County, California (see Fig. 1). This district is one of many located on or near the Melones fault zone, a major regional suture in the Sierra Nevada foothills. The districts along the Melones fault comprise the Mother Lode gold belt (Clark, 1970). The Harvard pit is the largest of several open pits mined at the Jamestown site by Sonora Mining Corporation between 1986 and 1994 (Fig. 2; Algood, 1990). It is at the site of an historical mine named the Harvard that produced about 100,000 troy ounces of gold, mainly between 1906 and 1916 (Julihn and Horton, 1940). Sonora Mining mined and processed about 17,000,000 short tons of ore, with an overall stripping ratio of about 4.5:1, yielding about 660,000 troy ounces of gold (Nelson and Leicht, 1994). Most of this material came from the Harvard pit, which attained dimensions of about 2700 ft (830 m) in length, 1500 ft (460 m) in width, and 600 ft (185 m) in depth. The bottom of the pit is at an elevation of 870 ft (265 m). Since mining operations ceased in mid-1994, the open pit has been filling with water. As of November, 2000, lake level had reached an elevation of about 1170 ft (357 m). Water quality monitoring data gathered after mine closure showed rising levels of arsenic, sulfate, and other components in the lake, with particularly notable increases accompanying a period of rapid filling in 1995 (County of Tuolumne, 1998). The largest potential source for arsenic in the vicinity of the Harvard pit is arsenian pyrite, the most abundant sulfide mineral related to gold mineralization. A previous study of weathering of arsenian pyrite in similarly mineralized rocks at the Clio mine, in the nearby Jacksonville mining district, showed that arsenic released by weathering of arsenian pyrite is effectively attenuated by adsorption on goethite or coprecipitation with jarosite, depending upon the buffering capacity of the pyrite-bearing rock (Savage and others, 2000). Although jarosite would be expected to dissolve in water having the composition of the developing pit lake, iron oxyhydroxide species (ferrihydrite and goethite) would be stable, and strong partitioning of arsenic onto suspended particles or bottom sediments containing these iron phases would be expected. Arsenic release to the lake would not be expected until stratification develops, producing a reducing, non-circulating hypolimnion in which the iron phases would be destroyed by dissolution. The fact that arsenic concentrations increased rapidly before the pit lake was deep enough to stratify shows that arsenic may not be attenuated in the ways that the earlier Clio mine area study indicated, and suggested that our understanding of release and transport of arsenic in this environment is incomplete. Therefore, in 1997 we decided to study the chemical evolution of the Harvard pit lake as part of a project on environmental impacts of gold mining in the Sierra Nevada, and in early 1998 we developed a cooperative study with several of the investigators in the Stanford University Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences who had done the Clio study. The U.S. Geological Survey portion of the project has been funded by the Mineral Resources Program. It is anticipated that a better understanding of the release and transport of arsenic into the Harvard pit lake and its accumulation there will contribute to more accurate predictions of arsenic release from weathering of sulfide-bearing rocks exposed by mining or other activities or events, and to better forecasts of pit lake evolution in this and similar environments, leading to more effective monitoring and mitigation strategies. An accurate predictive model is needed for the Harvard pit lake to forecast trends in metal concentrations, particularly arsenic, and also concentrations of major cations and anions. As the lake approaches pre-mining groundwater levels the lake water could move down the hydrologic gradient to the southeast into domestic wells, and could also affect the surface

Ashley, R. P.; Savage, K. S.

2001-01-01

375

Occurrence of Public Health and Environmental Hazards and Potential Remediation of Arsenic-Containing Soils , Sediments, Surface Water and Groundwater at the Lava Cap Mine NPL Superfund Site in Nevada County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1999 the US EPA added the Lava Cap Mine area to the National Priority List (NPL) Superfund sites. This site is a former gold and silver mine located in Nevada County, California, near Nevada City. The area is a Sierra-Nevada foothill wooded area, with low-density residential development. A risk assessment shows that there are significant potential human health and

G. Fred Lee; Anne Jones-Lee

376

Biostratigraphic and lithologic correlations of two Sonoma County Water Agency pilot wells with the type Wilson Grove Formation, Sonoma County, central California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Small mollusk faunas characteristic of the uppermost part of the Wilson Grove Formation at Wilson Grove and along River Road at Trenton (Pliocene) were encountered in Sonoma County Water Agency pilot wells at Occidental Road well field between 320-500 ft (98-152 m), depth, and in the Sebastopol Road pilot well field between 560-570 ft (171-174 m), depth. These mollusks support correlations between the two wells made on lithologic grounds. A benthic foraminifer was recovered from between 380-390 ft (116-119 m), depth, in the Sonoma County Water Agency Occidental Road pilot well. Though an isolated specimen, the presence of this well-preserved foraminifer supports the environmental interpretation of less than 100 m on the continental shelf indicated by the molluscan assemblages at this site. For this marine stratigraphic interval of the Wilson Grove Formation, we suggest a relatively narrow age range of 5.3 (Miocene-Pliocene boundary) to ~ 4.5 Ma based on the stratigraphic relations of correlative marine strata around the upland margin of Santa Rosa plain and correlative strata in the Santa Cruz area, although an age between 5.3 and ~ 2.8 Ma cannot be discounted.

Powell, Charles L., II; McLaughlin, Robert J.; Wan, Elmira

2006-01-01

377

Water-quality data for selected sites on Reversed, Rush, and Alger Creeks and Gull and Silver Lakes, Mono County, California, April 1994 to March 1995  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-quality data for selected sites on Reversed, Rush, and Alger Creeks and Gull and Silver Lakes, Mono County, California, were collected from April 1994 to March 1995. Water samples were analyzed for major ions and trace elements, nutrients, methylene blue active substances, and oil and grease. Field measurements were made for discharge, specific conductance, pH, water temperature, barometric pressure, dissolved oxygen, and alkalinity. Additional data collected include vertical water profiles of specific conductance, pH, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen collected at 3.3-foot intervals for Gull and Silver Lakes; chlorophyll-a and -b concentrations and Secchi depth for Gull and Silver Lakes; sediment interstitial- water nutrient concentrations in cores from Gull Lake; and lake surface and volume of Gull and Silver Lakes.

Wang, Bronwen; Rockwell, G. L.; Blodgett, J. C.

1995-01-01

378

Map showing recent (1997-98 El Nino) and historical landslides, Crow Creek and vicinity, Alameda and Contra Costa Counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report documents the spatial distribution of 3,800 landslides caused by 1997-98 El Ni?o winter rainfall in the vicinity of Crow Creek in Alameda and Contra Costa Counties, California. The report also documents 558 historical (pre-1997-98) landslides. Landslides were mapped from 1:12,000-scale aerial photographs and classified as either debris flows or slides. Slides include rotational and translational slides, earth flows, and complex slope movements. Debris flows and slides from the 1997-98 winter modified 1 percent of the surface of the 148.6 km2 study area. Debris flows were scattered throughout the area, regardless of the type of underlying bedrock geology. Slides, however, were concentrated in a soft sandstone, conglomerate, and clayey group of rock units. Digital map files accompany the report.

Coe, Jeffrey A.; Godt, Jonathan; Tachker, Pierre

2004-01-01

379

Joint environmental assessment for Chevron USA, Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc.: Midway Valley 3D seismic project, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

The proposed Midway Valley 3D Geophysical Exploration Project covers approximately 31,444 aces of private lands, 6,880 acres of Department of Energy (DOE) Lands within Naval Petroleum Reserve 2 (NPR2) and 3,840 acres of lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), in western Kern County, California. This environmental assessment (EA) presents an overview of the affected environment within the project area using results of a literature review of biological field surveys previously conducted within or adjacent to a proposed 3D seismic project. The purpose is to provide background information to identify potential and known locations of sensitive wildlife and special status plant species within the proposed seismic project area. Biological field surveys, following agency approved survey protocols, will be conducted during October through November 1996 to acquire current resources data to provide avoidance as the project is being implemented in the field.

NONE

1996-10-01

380

Swath Bathymetry Surveys of the Monterey Bay Area from Point Ano Nuevo to Moss Landing, San Mateo, Santa Cruz, and Monterey Counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report describes swath bathymetry and backscatter data acquired by the U.S. Geological Survey on the continental shelf within the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary between Point A?o Nuevo and Moss Landing, in San Mateo, Santa Cruz, and Monterey Counties, Calif. The survey was done for the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), in field activities S-7-09-MB and S-10-09-MB, by the Western Coastal and Marine Geology (WCMG) Team of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The data were aquired in two seperate surveys: (1) between August 13, 2009 and September 3, 2009, personnel from WCMG completed field activity S-7-09-MB, from Point A?o Nuevo south to Table Rock, as well as a block west of Soquel Canyon; (2) between October 12 and December 16, 2009, WCMG conducted field activity S-10-09-MB, surveying between Table Rock and Moss Landing.

Ritchie, Andrew C.; Finlayson, David P.; Logan, Joshua B.

2010-01-01

381

Development of a Real-Time GPS/Seismic Displacement Meter: Applications to Civilian Infrastructure in Orange and Western Riverside Counties, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We propose a three-year applications project that will develop an Integrated Real-Time GPS/Seismic System and deploy it in Orange and Western Riverside Counties, spanning three major strike-slip faults in southern California (San Andreas, San Jacinto, and Elsinore) and significant populations and civilian infrastructure. The system relying on existing GPS and seismic networks will collect and analyze GPS and seismic data for the purpose of estimating and disseminating real-time positions and total ground displacements (dynamic, as well as static) during all phases of the seismic cycle, from fractions of seconds to years. Besides its intrinsic scientific use as a real-time displacement meter (transducer), the GPS/Seismic System will be a powerful tool for local and state decision makers for risk mitigation, disaster management, and structural monitoring (dams, bridges, and buildings). Furthermore, the GPS/Seismic System will become an integral part of California's spatial referencing and positioning infrastructure, which is complicated by tectonic motion, seismic displacements, and land subsidence. Finally, the GPS/Seismic system will also be applicable to navigation in any environment (land, sea, or air) by combining precise real-time instantaneous GPS positioning with inertial navigation systems. This development will take place under the umbrella of the California Spatial Reference Center, in partnership with local (Counties, Riverside County Flood and Water Conservation District, Metropolitan Water District), state (Caltrans), and Federal agencies (NGS, NASA, USGS), the geophysics community (SCIGN/SCEC2), and the private sector (RBF Consulting). The project will leverage considerable funding, resources, and R&D from SCIGN, CSRC and two NSF-funded IT projects at UCSD and SDSU: RoadNet (Real-Time Observatories, Applications and Data Management Network) and the High Performance Wireless Research and Education Network (HPWREN). These two projects are funded to develop both the wireless networks and the integrated, seamless, and transparent information management system that will deliver seismic, geodetic, oceanographic, hydrological, ecological, and physical data to a variety of end users in real-time in the San Diego region. CSRC is interested in providing users access to real-time, accurate GPS data for a wide variety of applications including RTK surveying/GIS and positioning of moving platforms such as aircraft and emergency vehicles. SCIGN is interested in upgrading sites to high-frequency real-time operations for rapid earthquake response and GPS seismology. The successful outcome of the project will allow the implementation of similar systems elsewhere, particularly in plate boundary zones with significant populations and civilian infrastructure. CSRC would like to deploy the GPS/Seismic System in other parts of California, in particular San Diego, Los Angeles County and the San Francisco Bay Area.

Bock, Yehuda

2005-01-01

382

Water-Quality Data for Selected Stream Sites in Bridgeport Valley, Mono County, California, April 2000 to June 2003  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, Lahonton Region, carried out a water-quality data collection program of selected streams in and near Bridgeport Valley, California, during April 2000 to June 2003. These data were collected to provide information used by the California Regional Water Quality Control Board to develop total maximum daily load standards. Field measurements of streamflow, barometric pressure, dissolved oxygen, pH, specific conductance, and water temperature were made at 15 sites located on 6 streams. Water samples were analyzed for nutrients, major ions, turbidity, fecal coliform, fecal streptococci, and suspended sediment. Field data, turbidity, nutrient, major ion, and sediment concentrations and fecal coliform and fecal streptococci densities are given in tables for each site. Field blank data are also presented in a table.

Rockwell, Gerald L.; Honeywell, Paul D.

2004-01-01

383

Distribution of dissolved nitrate and fluoride in ground water, Highland-East Highlands, San Bernardino County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the Highland-East Highlands area of southern California, concentrations of nitrate in water from many wells exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 's and the California Department of Health 's recommended limit for public water supplies. The nitrate standards for public water supplies in the study area are commonly met by blending the high-nitrate water with low-nitrate water before distribution; however, some of the low-nitrate water sources have fluoride concentrations that exceed the optimum level, or in a few cases exceed the maximum level recommended by the California Department of Health. Nitrate-nitrogen concentrations in the study area are generally between 1 and 20 milligrams per liter. In general, nitrate-nitrogen concentrations exceeding 10 milligrams per liter are found in water from wells perforated at depths of less than 500 feet. (Woodard-USGS)

Eccles, Lawrence A.; Klein, John M.

1978-01-01

384

Potential Effects of a Scenario Earthquake on the Economy of Southern California: Baseline County-Level Migration Characteristics and Trends 1995-2000 and 2001-2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Multi-Hazards Demonstration Project (MHDP) is a collaboration between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and various partners from the public and private sectors and academia, meant to improve Southern California's resiliency to natural hazards. In support of the MHDP objectives, the ShakeOut Scenario was developed. It describes a magnitude 7.8 earthquake along the southernmost 300 kilometers (200 miles) of the San Andreas Fault, identified by geoscientists as a plausible event that will cause moderate to strong shaking over much of the eight-county (Imperial, Kern, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, and Ventura) Southern California region. This report uses historical, estimated, and projected population data from several Federal and State data sources to estimate baseline characteristics and trends of the region's population migration (that is, changes in a person's place of residence over time). The analysis characterizes migration by various demographic, economic, family, and household variables for the period 1995-2000. It also uses existing estimates (beginning in 2001) of the three components of population change - births, deaths, and migration - to extrapolate near-term projections of county-level migration trends through 2010. The 2010 date was chosen to provide baseline projections corresponding to a two-year recovery period following the November 2008 date that was selected for the occurrence of the ShakeOut Scenario earthquake. The baseline characteristics and projections shall assist with evaluating the effects of inflow and outflow migration trends for alternative futures in which the simulated M7.8 earthquake either does or does not occur and the impact of the event on housing and jobs, as well as community composition and regional economy changes based on dispersion of intellectual, physical, economic, and cultural capital.

Sherrouse, Benson C.; Hester, David J.

2008-01-01

385

Serologic survey for disease in endangered San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica, inhabiting the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

Serum from endangered San Joaquin kit foxes, Vulpes macrotis mutica, and sympatric wildlife inhabiting the Elk Hills Petroleum Reserve, Kern County, and Elkhorn Plain, San Luis Obispo County, California, was collected in 1981 to 1982 and 1984, and tested for antibodies against 10 infectious disease pathogens. Proportions of kit fox sera containing antibodies against diseases were: canine parvovirus, 100% in 1981 to 1982 and 67% in 1984; infectious canine hepatitis, 6% in 1981 to 1982 and 21% in 1984; canine distemper, 0 in 1981 to 1982 and 14% in 1984; tularemia, 8% in 1981 to 1982 and 31% in 1984; Brucella abortus, 8% in 1981 to 1982 and 3% in 1984; Brucella canis, 14% in 1981 to 1982 and 0 in 1984; toxoplasmosis, 6% in 1981 to 1982; coccidioidomycosis, 3% in 1981 to 1982; and plague and leptospirosis, 0 in 1981 to 1982. High population density, overlapping home ranges, ability to disperse great distances, and infestation by ectoparasites were cited as possible factors in the transmission and maintenance of these diseases in kit fox populations.

McCue, P.M.; O'Farrell, T.P.

1986-07-01

386

Biostratigraphy of the San Joaquin Formation in borrow-source area B-17, Kettleman Hills landfill, North Dome, Kettleman Hills, Kings County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The stratigraphic occurrences and interpreted biostratigraphy of invertebrate fossil taxa in the upper San Joaquin Formation and lower-most Tulare Formation encountered at the Chemical Waste Management Kettleman Hills waste disposal facility on the North Dome of the Kettleman Hills, Kings County, California are documented. Significant new findings include (1) a detailed biostratigraphy of the upper San Joaquin Formation; (2) the first fossil occurrence of Modiolus neglectus; (3) distinguishing Ostrea sequens from Myrakeena veatchii (Ostrea vespertina of authors) in the Central Valley of California; (4) differentiating two taxa previously attributed to Pteropurpura festivus; (5) finding a stratigraphic succession between Caesia coalingensis (lower in the section) and Catilon iniquus (higher in the section); and (6) recognizing Pliocene-age fossils from around Santa Barbara. In addition, the presence of the bivalves Anodonta and Gonidea in the San Joaquin Formation, both restricted to fresh water and common in the Tulare Formation, confirm periods of fresh water or very close fresh-water environments during deposition of the San Joaquin Formation.

Powell, Charles L., II; Fisk, Lanny H.; Maloney, David F.; Haasl, David M.

2010-01-01

387

Field-Trip Guide to the Southeastern Foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains in Santa Clara County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This field trip is an introduction to the geology of the southeastern foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains in southern Santa Clara County. Seven stops include four short hikes to access rock exposures and views of the foothills east of Loma Prieta Peak b...

P. W. Stoffer P. Messina

2002-01-01

388

Report on a Study of the Feasibility of Automated Circulation Systemwide for Peninsula Library System (San Mateo County, California).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This examination of the feasibility of implementing an automated circulation system within San Mateo County's Peninsula Library System (PLS) was undertaken to determine if the system should automate material circulation systemwide in order to reduce operating costs while improving circulation procedures and increasing patron access to system…

Port, Idelle; Matthews, Joseph

389

Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis of Watershed and Estuarine Processes for Conservation Planning in Elkhorn Slough, Monterey County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Elkhorn Slough watershed, located on the coast of Monterey Bay in Central California, is a significant Pacific Coast estuarine system. It has become a nexus of remote sensing research due to partnerships with multiple nearby institutions, and innovative approaches in the research area have addressed several management issues in the watershed. Historical ecological research with archival aerial photographs identified

Kristin B. Byrd

390

Usage and Recall of the Food Stamp Office Resource Kit (FSORK) by Food Stamp Applicants in 4 California Counties  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To evaluate recall and usage of the Food Stamp Office Resource Kit (FSORK), a set of nutrition education materials designed for use in food stamp offices. Design: Client intercept exit surveys, an environmental scan, and individual observations of clients in the food stamp office. Setting: Four food stamp offices in California.…

Ghirardelli, Alyssa; Linares, Amanda; Fong, Amy

2011-01-01

391

21. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, California, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

21. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, California, c. 1903) EXTERIOR, SOUTH FRONT & WEST SIDE OF MISSION IN RUINOUS STATE BEFORE RESTORATION, C. 1903 - Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma, First & Spain Streets, Sonoma, Sonoma County, CA

392

23. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, California, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

23. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, California, C. 1909) EXTERIOR, VIEW OF SOUTH FRONT OF CONVENTO IN RUINS, C. 1909 - Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma, First & Spain Streets, Sonoma, Sonoma County, CA

393

17. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, California, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

17. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, California, c. 1890) EXTERIOR, REAR VIEW OF MISSION, C. 1890 - Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma, First & Spain Streets, Sonoma, Sonoma County, CA

394

4. Historic American Buildings Survey California State Library Sacramento, California ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. Historic American Buildings Survey California State Library Sacramento, California Photo Taken: 1860 Re-photo: March 1940 EAST FRONT - CENTRAL SECTION - Custom House, Custom House Plaza, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

395

Data from the Woodland land-subsidence monitoring station, Yolo County, California, water years 1988-92  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A land-subsidence monitoring study was initiated in 1985 for the purpose of collecting data in Sacramento Valley, California, to document land-surface subsidence and to measure sediment compaction in response to ground-water pumping. Lithologic and geophysical logs obtained from the deeper of two boreholes drilled in 1987 near Woodland, California, are presented. The results of geotechnical and hydraulic laboratory tests on four sediment core samples extracted at 137, 151, 301, and 474 feet below land surface from a third borehole, drilled in 1990, are also reported. Construction of the extensometer well and the piezometer wells and equipment installed in the boreholes are described and illustrated. Data measured or recorded at the Woodland land- subsidence monitoring station from December 1987 through September 1992 are presented in tabular and graphic formats. These data include water levels from five piezometers, barometric pressure, and cumulative net sediment compaction.

Ikehara, M. E.

1995-01-01

396

An inventory of irrigated lands for selected counties within the state of California based on LANDSAT and supporting aircraft data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The author has identified the following significant results: (1) Goals of the irrigated lands project were addressed by the design and implementation of a multiphase sampling scheme that was founded on the utilization of a LANDSAT-based remote sensing system. (2) The synoptic coverage of LANDSAT and the eighteen day orbit cycle allowed the project to study agricultural test sites in a variety of environmental regions and monitor the development of crops throughout the major growing season. (3) The capability to utilize multidate imagery is crucial to the reliable estimation of irrigated acreage in California where multiple cropping is widespread and current estimation systems must rely on single data survey techniques. (4) In addition, the magnitude of agricultural acreage in California makes estimation by conventional methods impossible.

Colwell, R. N. (principal investigator)

1977-01-01

397

Identification of Culex pipiens Complex Mosquitoes in a Hybrid Zone of West Nile Virus Transmission in Fresno County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Culex pipiens sensu lato mosquitoes were collected from 24 gravid traps (mid-June to mid-October, 2005) in Fresno County, CA. Captured gravid females were allowed to oviposit before sibling species identification by Ace.2 PCR and detection of West Nile virus (WNV) RNA by RT-PCR were performed on the mother and her offspring. Of the 442 Cx. pipiens s.l. female mosquitoes collected,

Rory D. McAbee; Emily N. Green; Jodie Holeman; Julie Christiansen; Niki Frye; Katherine Dealey; F. Steve Mulligan; Aaron C. Brault; Anthony J. Cornel

2008-01-01

398

Use of Low Altitude AVIRIS Data For Identifying Salt Affected Soil Surfaces in Western Fresno County, California  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This report, by Michael L. Whiting and Susan L. Ustin of the Center for Spatial Technology and Remote Sensing (CSTARS) at the University of California, assesses low altitude Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data as a means of identifying "soil salinity and organic matter concentrations in soils." The report includes tables and color figures, in addition to the main text and partially hyperlinked references section.

Ustin, Susan L.; Whiting, Michael L.

1999-01-01

399

Evaluation of the potential for artificial ground-water recharge in eastern San Joaquin County, California; Phase 2  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In response to the increasing demand on water supplies and declining water levels in eastern San Joaquin County, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Joaquin County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, is evaluating the potential for artificially recharging the aquifer system in eastern San Joaquin County, Calif. Phase 1 of this study evaluated the geologic and hydrological conditions in the area and selected 20 drill sites in three areas of high potential for artificial recharge of the aquifer system. In phase 2, test holes were drilled. This report is on phase 2, and summarizes the data collected during the drilling and evaluates the suitability of the drilled areas for their potential for artificial recharge. Two areas seem to have a fair potential for artificial recharge of the aquifer system using the basin-spreading method: (1) The flood plain area along the Mokelumne River north of Lockeford, and (2) an area northeast of Linden along the Calaveras River. (USGS)

Ireland, R. L.

1984-01-01

400

6. Historic American Buildings Survey Courtesy of California Historical Society ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

6. Historic American Buildings Survey Courtesy of California Historical Society San Francisco, California Photo: ca. 1875 MIRROR PANELED BALLROOM - Ralston Hall, Ralston Avenue, Belmont, San Mateo County, CA

401

5. Historic American Buildings Survey Courtesy of California Historical Society ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

5. Historic American Buildings Survey Courtesy of California Historical Society San Francisco, California Photo: ca. 1885 MIRROR PANELED BALLROOM - Ralston Hall, Ralston Avenue, Belmont, San Mateo County, CA

402

2001-2002 Wet Season Branchiopod Survey Report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300, Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, California  

SciTech Connect

Condor County Consulting on behalf of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has performed wet season surveys for listed branchiopods at Site 300, located in eastern Alameda County and western San Joaquin County. LLNL is collecting information for the preparation of an EIS covering ongoing explosives testing and related activities on Site 300. Related activities include maintenance of fire roads and annual control burns of approximately 607 hectares (1500 acres). Control burns typically take place on the northern portion of the site. Because natural branchiopod habitat is sparse on Site 300, it is not surprising that listed branchiopods were not observed during this 2001-2002 wet season survey. Although the site is large, a majority of it has topography and geology that precludes the formation of static seasonal pools. Even the relatively gentle topography of the northern half of the site contains few areas where water pools for more than two weeks. The rock outcrops found on the site did not provide suitable habitat for listed branchiopods. Most of the habitat available to branchiopods on the site is puddles that form in roadbeds and dry quickly. The one persistent pool on the site, the larger of the two modified vernal pools and the only one to fill this season, is occupied by two branchiopod species that require long-lived pools to reach maturity. In short, there is little habitat available on the site for branchiopods and most of the habitat present is generally too short-lived to support the branchiopod species that do occur at Site 300.

Weber, W; Woollett, J

2004-11-16

403

Joint environmental assessment for western NPR-1 3-dimensional seismic project at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1124) to identify and evaluate the potential environmental impacts of the proposed geophysical seismic survey on and adjacent to the Naval Petroleum Reserve No.1 (NPR-1), located approximately 35 miles west of Bakersfield, California. NPR-1 is jointly owned and operated by the federal government and Chevron U.S.A. Production Company. The federal government owns about 78 percent of NPR-1, while Chevron owns the remaining 22 percent. The government`s interest is under the jurisdiction of DOE, which has contracted with Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc. (BPOI) for the operation and management of the reserve. The 3-dimensional seismic survey would take place on NPR-1 lands and on public and private lands adjacent to NPR-1. This project would involve lands owned by BLM, California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG), California Energy Commission (CEC), The Nature Conservancy, the Center for Natural Lands Management, oil companies (Chevron, Texaco, and Mobil), and several private individuals. The proposed action is designed to provide seismic data for the analysis of the subsurface geology extant in western NPR-1 with the goal of better defining the commercial limits of a currently producing reservoir (Northwest Stevens) and three prospective hydrocarbon bearing zones: the {open_quotes}A Fan{close_quotes} in Section 7R, the 19R Structure in Section 19R, and the 13Z Structure in Section 13Z. Interpreting the data is expected to provide NPR-1 owners with more accurate locations of structural highs, faults, and pinchouts to maximize the recovery of the available hydrocarbon resources in western NPR-1. Completion of this project is expected to increase NPR-1 recoverable reserves, and reduce the risks and costs associated with further exploration and development in the area.

NONE

1996-05-01

404

Geologic map and digital database of the Yucaipa 7.5' quadrangle, San Bernardino and Riverside Counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This geologic database of the Yucaipa 7.5' quadrangle was prepared by the Southern California Areal Mapping Project (SCAMP), a regional geologic-mapping project sponsored jointly by the U.S. Geological Survey and the California Geological Survey. The database was developed as a contribution to the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program's National Geologic Map Database, and is intended to provide a general geologic setting of the Yucaipa quadrangle. The database and map provide information about earth materials and geologic structures, including faults and folds that have developed in the quadrangle due to complexities in the San Andreas Fault system. The Yucaipa 7.5' quadrangle contains materials and structures that provide unique insight into the Mesozoic and Cenozoic geologic evolution of southern California. Stratigraphic and structural elements include: (1) strands of the San Andreas Fault that bound far-traveled terranes of crystalline and sedimentary rock; (2) Mesozoic crystalline rocks that form lower and upper plates of the regionwide Vincent-Orocopia Thrust system; and (3) late Tertiary and Quaternary sedimentary materials and geologic structures that formed during the last million years or so and that record complex geologic interactions within the San Andreas Fault system. These materials and the structures that deform them provide the geologic framework for investigations of geologic hazards and ground-water recharge and subsurface flow. Geologic information contained in the Yucaipa database is general-purpose data that is applicable to land-related investigations in the earth and biological sciences. The term "generalpurpose" means that all geologic-feature classes have minimal information content adequate to characterize their general geologic characteristics and to interpret their general geologic history. However, no single feature class has enough information to definitively characterize its properties and origin. For this reason the database cannot be used for site-specific geologic evaluations, although it can be used to plan and guide investigations at the site-specific level.

Matti, Jonathan C.; Morton, D.M.; Cox, B.F.; Carson, S.E.; Yetter, T.J.; Digital preparation by: Cossette, P.M.; Wright, M.C.; Kennedy, S.A.; Dawson, M.L.; Hauser, R.M.

2003-01-01

405

Population Dynamics of Blood-Fed Female Mosquitoes and Comparative Efficacy of Resting Boxes in Collecting them from the Northwestern Part of Riverside County, California  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Testing of blood-fed mosquitoes plays an integral role in arbovirus surveillance and in understanding its interaction mechanisms between host, vector and reservoir. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of two different traps (gravid and resting boxes) for collection of blood-fed mosquitoes in the northwestern part of Riverside County. Materials and Methods: Three trapping sites were selected in the Northwest Mosquito and Vector Control District of Riverside County, California. At each site resting boxes and gravid traps were set; and mosquitoes were collected on a weekly basis between July-December 2009. Mosquitoes were transported over blue ice, identified up to species level on chill table, and classified as male, female and blood-fed females. Results: During this study period, 3953 mosquitoes (826 blood-fed females) belonging to three different genera and eight species were collected; resting boxes collecting maximum number (seven) of mosquito species. Overall as well as individually in each trap kind, the most abundant mosquito species collected was Cx. quinquefasciatus. The proportion of blood-fed females of the Culex species collected in resting boxes was 28.8 times more, while of blood-fed females of Cx. quinquefasciatus was 32.2 times more than the proportion collected from gravid traps. Conclusions: Overall, the proportion of blood-fed female mosquitoes collected for each species trapped was highest in resting boxes. Additionally, resting boxes showed the advantage of extremely low running and maintenance cost; generation of no hazardous waste; quick turnaround time in terms of mosquito collection per man-hour spent; and they were less prone to vandalism or thefts.

Sandhu, Tejbir S; Williams, Gregory W; Haynes, Bryan W; Dhillon, Major S

2013-01-01

406

Niland development project geothermal loan guaranty: 49-MW (net) power plant and geothermal well field development, Imperial County, California: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

The proposed federal action addressed by this environmental assessment is the authorization of disbursements under a loan guaranteed by the US Department of Energy for the Niland Geothermal Energy Program. The disbursements will partially finance the development of a geothermal well field in the Imperial Valley of California to supply a 25-MW(e) (net) power plant. Phase I of the project is the production of 25 MW(e) (net) of power; the full rate of 49 MW (net) would be achieved during Phase II. The project is located on approximately 1600 acres (648 ha) near the city of Niland in Imperial County, California. Well field development includes the initial drilling of 8 production wells for Phase I, 8 production wells for Phase II, and the possible need for as many as 16 replacement wells over the anticipated 30-year life of the facility. Activities associated with the power plant in addition to operation are excavation and construction of the facility and associated systems (such as cooling towers). Significant environmental impacts, as defined in Council on Environmental Quality regulation 40 CFR Part 1508.27, are not expected to occur as a result of this project. Minor impacts could include the following: local degradation of ambient air quality due to particulate and/or hydrogen sulfide emissions, temporarily increased ambient noise levels due to drilling and construction activities, and increased traffic. Impacts could be significant in the event of a major spill of geothermal fluid, which could contaminate groundwater and surface waters and alter or eliminate nearby habitat. Careful land use planning and engineering design, implementation of mitigation measures for pollution control, and design and implementation of an environmental monitoring program that can provide an early indication of potential problems should ensure that impacts, except for certain accidents, will be minimized.

Not Available

1984-10-01

407

Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Ranch Fire, Ventura and Los Angeles Counties, Southern California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Ranch Fire in Ventura and Los Angeles Counties, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 2.25 inches (57.15 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

2007-01-01

408

Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Slide and Grass Valley Fires, San Bernardino County, Southern California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Slide and Grass Valley Fires in San Bernardino County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 3.50 inches (88.90 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

2007-01-01

409

Map showing geochemical summary for the Bald Rock and Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Areas, Butte and Plumas counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Bald Rock Roadless Area consists of 3,850 acres in Butte County, Calif. The Middle Rock Feather River Roadless Area consists of 29,300 acres ub Butte and Plumas Counties, Calif. Both roadless areas are in the Plumas National Forest and are on the west slope of the northern Sierra Nevada southwest of Quincy, Calif. (fig. 1). The two roadless areas are alined along the Middle Fork of the Feather River where they include the narrow canyon bottoms and precipitous sidewalls of the Middle Fork and several tributary drainages. Altitudes range from 800 ft in the canyon of the Middle Fork to approximately 6,600 ft at the northwest corner of the map area. The geology of the roadless areas has been briefly summarized by Sorenson and Pietropaoll (1982). This paper summarizes and interprets the semiquantitative emission spectrographic analyses of 106 rock sample and 165 samples of nonmagnetics heavy-mineral stream-sediment concentrates from the Blad Rock and Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Area (Sorenson and others, 1982).

Peterson, Jocelyn A.; Sorensen, Martin L.

1985-01-01

410

Map of the Carpinteria area and vicinity, Santa Barbara County, California, showing water-level contours for March 1983, and net change in water level between March 1982 and March 1983  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A water-level contour map of the Carpinteria area, California, was constructed using 34 water-level measurements made by the Carpinteria County Water District in March 1983. Also shown on the map are five hydrographs that show water-level fluctuations in each well between 1978 and 1983. In addition, a water-level net-change map for March 1982 to March 1983 is shown. (USGS)

Moyle, W. R., Jr.

1984-01-01

411

Landslides in Alameda County, California: A Digital Database Extracted from Preliminary Photointerpretation Maps of Surficial Deposits by T.H. Nilsen in USGS Open-File Report 75-277  

USGS Publications Warehouse

All or part of 25 7.5-minute quadrangles identifying 8465 landslides - largely slow-moving slides and earth flows - in Alameda County, California, have been converted to a digital-map database, compiled at 1:24,000 scale and plotted at 1:62,500 scale, that can be acquired from the U.S. Geological Survey over the Internet or on magnetic tape.

Roberts, Sebastian; Roberts, Michelle A.; Brennan, Eileen M.

2000-01-01

412

Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Ranch and Magic Fire Perimeters, Val Verde Quadrangle, Los Angeles and Ventura Counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

2008-01-01

413

Geologic map and digital database of the Apache Canyon 7.5' quadrangle, Ventura and Kern counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Apache Canyon 7.5-minute quadrangle is located in southwestern California about 55 km northeast of Santa Barbara and 65 km southwest of Bakersfield. This report presents the results of a geologic mapping investigation of the Apache Canyon quadrangle that was carried out in 1997-1999 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Southern California Areal Mapping Project. This quadrangle was chosen for study because it is in an area of complex, incompletely understood Cenozoic stratigraphy and structure of potential importance for regional tectonic interpretations, particularly those involving the San Andreas fault located just northwest of the quadrangle and the Big Pine fault about 10 km to the south. In addition, the quadrangle is notable for its well-exposed sequences of folded Neogene nonmarine strata including the Caliente Formation of Miocene age from which previous workers have collected and described several biostratigraphically significant land-mammal fossil assemblages. During the present study, these strata were mapped in detail throughout the quadrangle to provide an improved framework for possible future paleontologic investigations. The Apache Canyon quadrangle is in the eastern part of the Cuyama 30-minute by 60-minute quadrangle and is largely part of an erosionally dissected terrain known as the Cuyama badlands at the east end of Cuyama Valley. Most of the Apache Canyon quadrangle consists of public lands in the Los Padres National Forest.

Stone, Paul; Cossette, P. M.

2000-01-01

414