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1

Relative Tsunami Hazard Maps, Humboldt County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a series of maps depicting the relative tsunami hazard of coastal Humboldt County in Northern California. Unlike inundation maps that show a single line to show the inland extent of flooding, these maps use a four-color zonation to represent relative risk. The highest hazard area has experienced tsunami or storm wave inundation in historic times. These areas include

L. A. Dengler; B. R. Ludy; J. R. Patton

2003-01-01

2

Relative Tsunami Hazard Maps, Humboldt County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a series of maps depicting the relative tsunami hazard of coastal Humboldt County in Northern California. Unlike inundation maps that show a single line to show the inland extent of flooding, these maps use a four-color zonation to represent relative risk. The highest hazard area has experienced tsunami or storm wave inundation in historic times. These areas include beaches and low coastal bluffs on the open coast and low areas adjacent to Humboldt Bay and major river deltas. The high hazard zones are also mapped as zone A (100 year flooding) or zone V (100 year flood with wave action) on FEMA Flood Insurance Rate Maps. Moderate hazard zones are areas likely to be flooded by a major tsunami generated by the Cascadia subduction zone based on published paleotsunami studies, numerical modeling (Bernard and others, 1994) and observations of recent tsunamis elsewhere. Current estimates of major Cascadia earthquake recurrence averages about 500 years. Low hazard zones show no evidence of flooding in the paleotsunami record and are likely to provide refuge in all but the most extreme event. No hazard areas are too high in elevation and/or too far inland to be at risk. A continuous gradational color scale ranging from red (high hazard) through orange (medium), yellow (low) to gray (no hazard) depicts the zones. The blurred boundaries help convey the continuum of possible events and the uncertainty in delineating distinct inundation lines. The maps are GIS based to facilitate ready adaptation by planners and emergency managers. The maps are intended for educational purposes, to improve awareness of tsunami hazards and to encourage emergency planning efforts of local and regional organizations by illustrating the range of possible tsunami events.

Dengler, L. A.; Ludy, B. R.; Patton, J. R.

2003-12-01

3

GIS based Relative Tsunami Hazard Maps for Northern California, Humboldt and Del Norte Counties  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tsunami hazard maps are generated using a geographical information systems (GIS) approach to depict the relative tsunami hazard of coastal Humboldt and Del Norte Counties in northern California. Maps are composed for the Humboldt Bay, Eel River, and Crescent City regions and available online at http:\\/\\/www.humboldt.edu\\/~geodept\\/earthquakes\\/rctwg\\/toc.html . In contrast to previous mapping efforts that utilize a single line to represent

J. R. Patton; L. A. Dengler

2004-01-01

4

A Cultural Resource Survey and Evaluation of Five Trust Indian Allotments in Humboldt and Shasta Counties, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A cultural resource survey and evaluation was conducted on three parcels of trust Indian allotment land in Humboldt County and two in Shasta County, California. The three in Humboldt County were Moreck Dodge Parcel, 10 acres; Moreck Jerry Parcel, 10 acres...

R. A. Stradford

1979-01-01

5

18. "Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

18. "Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, California, A.J. Logan, County Surveyor, H.J. Brunnier, Consulting Engineer, March 7, 1919," showing elevation of center pier, elevation and plan of north and south abutments, sections of abutments, pier, and pier footings - Salt River Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Dillon Road, Ferndale, Humboldt County, CA

6

17. "Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

17. "Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, California, A.J. Logan, County Surveyor, H.J. Brunnier, Consulting Engineer, March 7, 1919," showing plan of bars in top flange, elevation of girder reinforcement, plan of bars in bottom flange - Salt River Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Dillon Road, Ferndale, Humboldt County, CA

7

51. Photographer unknown 1930 HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION A, HIGHWAY 1. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

51. Photographer unknown 1930 HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION A, HIGHWAY 1. 1-HUM-1-A #101, MEASURING BETWEEN TREES, 1930. Stamped office copy. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

8

16. 'Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

16. 'Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, California, A.J. Logan, County Surveyor, H.J. Brunnier, Consulting Engineer, March 7, 1919,' showing detail of floor beam at central pier, half section of cantilever slab at end of bridge, floor beam end panels, slab reinforcing, plan of slab reinforcing, diagram of slab bars, typical floor girder. - Salt River Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Dillon Road, Ferndale, Humboldt County, CA

9

6. ABANDONED OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH OF LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

6. ABANDONED OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH OF LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. NOTE CANTILEVERED DECKING. NEW HIGHWAY 101 AND BRIDGE SEEN AT CENTER REAR. LOOKING N. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

10

7. ABANDONED OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH OF LEGGETT. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. ABANDONED OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH OF LEGGETT. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. NOTE CANTILEVERED DECKING. SOUTH FORK OF EEL RIVER AT LEFT. LOOKING SW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

11

Orickite and coyoteite, two new sulfide minerals from Coyote Peak, Humboldt County, California.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Minute quantities of orickite and coyoteite occur with rare alkali iron sulphides in a mafic alkalic diatreme near Orick, Humboldt County. Orickite, NaxKyCu0.95Fe1.06zH2O (x,y < 0.03, z < 0.5), is hexagonal, a 3.695, c 6.16 A, D 4.212 g/cm3, Z = 4. The strongest XRD reflections are 3.08(100), 3.20(90), 2.84(60), 1.73(55), 1.583(30) A. The mineral is brass yellow, opaque, weakly pleochroic, but strongly anisotropic (greyish brown to greyish blue) in reflected light. Orickite is compositionally near to Fe-rich chalcopyrite, but it may be related to synthetic chalcogenides with a distorted wurtzite-(2H) structure. Coyoteite, NaFe3S5.2H2O, is triclinic, P1 or P1, a 7.409(8), b 9.881(6), c 6.441(3) A, alpha 100o25(3)', beta 104o37(5)', gamma 81o29(5)', D 2.879 g/cm3, Z = 2; strongest XRD reflections are 5.12(100), 7.13(90), 3.028(80), 3.080(70), 9.6(60), 5.60(60) A. Coyoteite is black, opaque, weakly pleochroic (pale brownish grey) and strongly anisotropic (grey to dull golden orange) in reflected light. It is unstable under normal atmospheric conditions. -J.A.Z.

Erd, R. C.; Czamanske, G. K.

1983-01-01

12

Origin and evolution of the alkalic ultramafic rocks in the Coyote Peak diatreme, Humboldt County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Instrumental-neutron-activation analyses are reported for two uncontaminated rocks, a phlogopite-rich clot, and two contaminated rocks from the Coyote Peak diatreme, northwestern California. These data, combined with Nd, Sr, and Pb isotopic evidence, have been modeled to a multi-stage evolution for the uncontaminated rocks. Fertile mantle material (refractory elements 2.5× chondritic abundances; Rb \\/ Sr = 0.029 by weight) was depleted

John W. Morgan; Gerald K. Czamanske; A. Gregory Wandless

1985-01-01

13

Origin and evolution of the alkalic ultramafic rocks in the Coyote Peak diatreme, Humboldt County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Instrumental-neutron-activation analyses are reported for two uncontaminated rocks, a phlogopite-rich clot, and two contaminated rocks from the Coyote Peak diatreme, northwestern California. These data, combined with Nd, Sr, and Pb isotopic evidence, have been modeled to a multi-stage evolution for the uncontaminated rocks. Fertile mantle material (refractory elements 2.5?? chondritic abundances; Rb/Sr = 0.029 by weight) was depleted about 900 m.y. ago by congruent melting and removal of ~4% basaltic liquid; this depleted residue provided the source rock from which the Coyote Peak magma was ultimately derived. About 66 m.y. ago, the depleted mantle residue was incongruently melted in the presence of H2O and CO2 at a total pressure > 26 kb to yield ~0.5% of a Si-poor, Ca-rich melt. This melt then metasomatized depleted garnet-free harzburgite in the upper mantle at about 26 kb to produce a rock similar to phlogopite-bearing wehrlite. About 29 m.y. ago, this rock was subjected to an increase in pressure to >26 kb and incongruently melted to give ~0.5% of a second-stage melt resembling olivine melilitite in composition. Enroute to the surface, about 28% olivine and 2% titanomagnetite were lost from the highly fluid melt. Coarse-grained phlogopite-rich clots in the uncontaminated rocks apparently crystallized from a latestage liquid derived from the uncontaminated melt. Contaminated rocks appear to be the result of partial assimilation of, and dilution by, ~14% Franciscan graywacke country rock. The diatreme was emplaced near a converging plate margin where young hot oceanic mantle and crust of the Juan de Fuca plate was probably subducting obliquely beneath a thin lip of the North American plate. The unusual chemistry of the rocks may be the result of this complex tectonic setting which could also have included local strike-slip and extensional environments within the two plates pierced by the diatreme. ?? 1985.

Morgan, J. W.; Czamanske, G. K.; Gregory, Wandless, A.

1985-01-01

14

Aquatic biology of the Redwood Creek and Mill Creek drainage basins, Redwood National Park, Humboldt and Del Norte counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A 2-year study of the aquatic biota in the Redwood Creek and Mill Creek drainage basins of Redwood National Park indicated that the aquatic productivity is low. Densities of coliform bacteria were low except in Prairie Creek, a tributary to Redwood Creek, where a State park, county fish hatchery, grazing land, lumber mill, and scattered residential areas are potential sources of fecal coliform bacteria. Benthic invertebrate data indicated a diverse fauna which varied considerably between streams and among stream sections. Noteworthy findings include: (1) benthic invertebrates rapidly recolonized the streambed following a major storm, and (2) man-caused disruption or sedimentation of the streambed during low flow can result in drastic reductions of the benthic invertebrate community. Seven species of fish representing species typically found in northern California coastal streams were captured during the study. Nonparametric statistical tests indicate that condition factors of steelhead trout were significantly larger at sampling stations with more insolation, regardless of drainage basin land-use history. Periphyton and phytoplankton communities were diverse, variable in numbers, and dominated by diatoms. Seston concentrations were extremely variable between stations and at each station sampled. The seston is influenced seasonally by aquatic productivity at each station and amount of allochthonous material from the terrestrial ecosystem. Time-series analysis of some seston data indicated larger and sharper peak concentrations being flushed from the logged drainage basin than from the control drainage basin. (USGS)

Iwatsubo, Rick T.; Averett, R. C.

1981-01-01

15

Archaeological Reconnaissance on South Fork Mountain, Millerade and Sulphur-Blake Compartments, Trinity and Humboldt Counties, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is based on an approximately 8000 acre archaeological survey on South Fork Mountain in Northwestern California. The survey resulted in the location of 27 new archaeological sites and the rerecording of 16 others. Thirty-six of these sites were...

S. Baker

1982-01-01

16

Digital Geologic Map of the Redding 1° x 2° Quadrangle, Shasta, Tehama, Humboldt, and Trinity Counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Redding 1° x 2 quadrangle in northwestern California transects the Franciscan Complex and southern Klamath Mountains province as well as parts of the Great Valley Complex, northern Great Valley, and southernmost Cascades volcanic province. The tectonostratigraphic terranes of the Klamath province represent slices of oceanic crust, island arcs, and overlying sediment that range largely from Paleozoic to Jurassic in age. The Eastern Klamath terrane forms the nucleus to which the other terranes were added westward, primarily during Jurassic time, and that package was probably accreted to North America during earliest Cretaceous time. The younger Franciscan Complex consists of a sequence of westward younging tectonostratigraphic terranes of late Jurassic to Miocene age that were accreted to North America from mid-Cretaceous through Miocene time, with the easternmost being the most strongly metamorphosed. The marine Great Valley sequence, of late Jurassic and Cretaceous age, was deposited unconformably across the southernmost Klamath rocks, but in turn was underthrust at its western margin by Eastern belt Franciscan rocks. Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic rocks and sediment of the Cascades province extend into the southeastern part of the quadrangle, abutting the northernmost part of the great central valley of California. This map and database represent a digital rendition of Open-File Report 87-257, 1987, by L.A. Fraticelli, J.P. Albers, W.P. Irwin, and M.C. Blake, Jr., with various improvements and additions.

Fraticelli, Luis A.; Albers, John P.; Irwin, William P.; Blake, Milton C. Jr.; Wentworth, Carl M.

2012-01-01

17

LiDAR-based landslide hazard modeling using PISA-m, SHALSTAB, and SMORPH, Freshwater Creek and Ryan Slough watershed, Humboldt County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We evaluated the performance of three spatially distributed slope stability models implemented using a LiDAR digital elevation model (DEM) as part of a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) sediment source study in a steep forested watershed in northern California. The geologic setting consists primarily of deformed, deeply incised, and heavily weathered weak sedimentary rocks and highly sheared metamorphic melange (with small amounts of broken formation) covered by Quaternary surficial deposits and colluvium. Topographic input for all three models was a 1-m LiDAR DEM of the watershed that was re-sampled to 4 m to avoid computational problems with SHALSTAB and eliminate complications arising from both short wavelength features (such as fallen logs and tree stumps) and random topographic noise. We assessed the performance of each model by 1) comparison of model output with landslides identified on aerial photographs and 2) comparison of model results with each other. Each of the two sub-watersheds was analyzed separately because of different geology and inventory data sources. Both PISA-m and SHALSTAB identified 75% of the inventoried landslides. SMORPH correctly identified 99% of the inventoried landslides, but at the cost of predicting more than three times as much unstable ground as PISA-m and SHALSTAB (25% versus 8% of the watershed). The degree of overlap between unstable areas predicted by all three models ranged only from 4% to 25% of the area predicted to be unstable, reflecting differences in the mechanics and/or empirical relationships embodied by each model. PISA-m, the only one of the three models capable of doing so, was also used to simulate the effects of clear-cut logging by reducing the input root strength estimates in areas covered by mature forest.

Weppner, E.; Hoyt, J.; Haneberg, W. C.

2008-12-01

18

Permian and Triassic rocks near Quinn River Crossing, Humboldt County, Nevada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Permian and Triassic rocks near Quinn River Crossing, Humboldt County, Nevada, consist of four structural blocks: (1) a Lower Permian volcanic block; (2) a Permian(?) chert-arenite block; (3) a Lower Permian limestone block; and (4) a Permian and Triassic block. The contacts between the Permian volcanic block and the others are interpreted as thrust faults or glide surfaces. None of these rocks are metamorphosed, in contrast to those of the surrounding mountain ranges. Each of the blocks is lithically similar in some respects to rocks of the Osgood Mountains area 80 km to the southeast. The fusulinid and brachiopod faunas of two of the blocks display affinities to those of the McCloud Limestone of northern California and the Coyote Butte Limestone of central Oregon, and the fauna of another block has elements in common with autochthonous rocks of eastern Nevada and Utah. All four blocks probably are allochthonous with respect to the rocks exposed in the surrounding mountain ranges, but their points of origin remain obscure. The rocks at Quinn River Crossing provide a link among the Permian rocks of north-central Nevada, northern California, and central Oregon and a possible key to their original relations, but more comparative data are needed.

Ketner, Keith B.; Wardlaw, Bruce R.

1981-03-01

19

33 CFR 165.1195 - Regulated Navigation Area; Humboldt Bay Bar Channel and Humboldt Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. 165.1195 Section 165.1195...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. (a) Location. The Regulated...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. (b) Definitions. As used in...

2013-07-01

20

Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada, U.S.A  

SciTech Connect

The report documents the drilling of well Deep Blue No.2, the second deep geothermal test hole at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Humboldt County, Nevada. The well was drilled by Noramex Corp, a Nevada company, with funding support from the US Department of Energy, under the DOE’s GRED II Program. Deep Blue No.2 was drilled as a ‘step-out’ hole from Deep Blue No.1, to further evaluate the commercial potential of the geothermal resource. Deep Blue No.2 was designed as a vertical, slim observation test hole to a nominal target depth of 1000 meters (nominal 3400 feet). The well tests an area of projected high temperatures at depth, from temperature gradients measured in a group of shallow drill holes located approximately one kilometer to the northeast of observation hole Deep Blue No.1. The well is not intended for, or designed as, a commercial well or a production well. Deep Blue No.2 was spudded on March 25, 2004 and completed to a total depth of 1127.76m (3700 ft) on April 28, 2004. The well was drilled using conventional rotary drilling techniques to a depth of 201.17 m (660 ft), and continuously cored from 201.17m (660 ft) to 1127.76m (3700 ft). A brief rig-on flow-test was conducted at completion to determine basic reservoir parameters and obtain fluid samples. A permeable fracture zone with measured temperatures of 150 to 167°C (302 to 333°F) occurs between 500 to 750m (1640 to 2461ft). The well was left un-lined in anticipation of the Phase III - Flow and Injection Testing. A further Kuster temperature survey was attempted after the well had been shut in for almost 3 weeks. The well appears to have bridged off at 439m (1440ft) as the Kuster tool was unable to descend past this point. Several attempts to dislodge the obstruction using tube jars were unsuccessful. Deep Blue No.2 encountered variably fractured and veined, fine-grained rocks of the Singas Formation, and intruded by minor strongly altered fine-grained felsic dikes, and less altered fineto medium-grained felsic to intermediate dikes. Widespread open fractures and extensive of quartz veining in many intervals of the core indicate a high degree of fracturing and flow of silica-bearing fluids, almost certainly hotter than 200°C (392°F), at some time, but these fractures are now partially sealed. Intervals of soft shaly mudstone, common clay gouge, and rocks with generally low permeability (few veins and fractures) may also form a seal or ‘cap’ above the main high temperature reservoir at Blue Mountain. The encouraging results from Deep Blue No.2 support further drilling at Blue Mountain. Higher temperature fluids can be expected where fractures providing channels for the circulation of hot water from depth have not been sealed extensively by silica deposition.

Ted Fitzpatrick, Brian D. Fairbank

2005-04-01

21

Role of a child death review team in a small rural county in California.  

PubMed

Humboldt County is one of California's most rural counties. Located in far Northern California, it is 6-7 h by car from the nearest major urban areas of San Francisco and Sacramento. In landmass it is one of the largest of the California counties, about the size of Rhode Island. In 1991, the Humboldt County Public Health Branch began a Fetal Infant Mortality Review programme. Because of the county's small size, the Fetal Infant Mortality Review process was combined with the review of child deaths through age 17. Responding to a high proportion of cases of child deaths due to unintentional injury, the team developed a workgroup to explore injury prevention strategies. Funding was identified to hire a coordinator who formed a Childhood Injury Prevention Program and developed a strategic plan. The plan prioritised both motor vehicle/traffic safety related injuries and general childhood injury. Funding was obtained for child passenger safety and youth safe driving programmes. The Childhood Injury Prevention Program also collaboratively addressed other injury prevention areas, including water safety. As a small, rural county in California, committed safety advocates from multiple agencies were able to utilise the child death review process to guide injury prevention efforts. Case reviews provided the motivation and quantitative and qualitative data to design programmes and implement interventions that addressed specific unintentional injuries causing child deaths and injuries in Humboldt County. PMID:21278092

Keleher, Nancy; Arledge, Dawn N

2011-02-01

22

Fault Trace: Marin County, California  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This photograph shows the trace of a fault (in trench phase) as it passes beneath a barn. The trace developed during the April 18, 1906 San Francisco Earthquake. The location is the Skinner Ranch, near Olema, Marin County, California.

23

76 FR 19515 - California Disaster # CA-00170 Declaration of Economic Injury  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Contiguous Counties: California: Alameda, Glenn, Humboldt, Kern, Kings, Lake, Marin, Merced, Monterey, Napa, San Benito, San Francisco, Santa Barbara, Siskiyou, Solano, Stanislaus, Tehama, Trinity. Oregon: Curry, Josephine. The...

2011-04-07

24

Uranium occurrences at the Moonlight Mine and Granite Point claims, Humboldt County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Moonlight mine and Granite Foint claims are on the western flank of the Double H Mountains between the Kings River and Quinn, River valleys in northern Humboldt County, Nev. Uranium minerals at the Moonlight mine occur in a vein in intensely altered Tertiary volcanic rocks. The knovm uranium mineralization is spotty and erratic, but ore-grade material is present in the vein. Samples of the vein taken along its outcrop and in the mine shaft contain from less than 0.02 percent to 0.40 percent U308. The uranium minerals change from autunite at the surface to torbernite, 'gummite(?)' and pitchblende below the 90-foot level of the shaft. The Granite Point claims are two miles north of the Moonlight mine at the base of a rhyolite cliff. Radioactivity traverses made along the base and slope of the rhyolite cliff indicate that a large part of the rhyolite is abnormally radioactive. Radioactivity ranges from 0.013 to 0.3 mr/hr and averaged 0.10 mr/hr. in the vicinity of the claims. A sample taken at the base of the rhyolite cliff, at the point of highest radioactivity c6ntains 0.02 percent U3O8.

Taylor, Allen O.; Powers, James Farl

1955-01-01

25

Trees and herbs killed by an earthquake ˜300 yr ago at Humboldt Bay, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evidence of rapid seismic-induced subsidence at Humboldt Bay, California, is produced by analyses of annual growth rings of relict Sitka spruce [Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.] roots and entombed herbaceous plants. These results add to previously reported evidence that an earthquake caused subsidence ˜300 yr ago at Mad River slough, California. Both types of remains are rooted in buried soils that stood at or above the high-tide level until the area subsided at least 0.5 m into the intertidal zone. Burial by intertidal muds took place quickly enough to preserve the herbs in the growth position. Analysis of the annual growth rings of the tree roots shows that all died within four growing seasons, but the time of root death varies even among roots of the same tree. With no central nervous system, tree cells do not die simultaneously throughout the organism. The 0.5 to 1.5 m of subsidence, as evidenced by stratigraphy and sedimentology, was not enough to kill all the trees even in one season. Although such gradual death could be due to rapid aseismic subsidence, the tree deaths and preserved herbs are much better explained by sudden coseismic subsidence.

Jacoby, Gordon; Carver, Gary; Wagner, Wendy

1995-01-01

26

Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the northern California planning area. Final report, 1970-2020  

SciTech Connect

The report presents baseline socio-economic profiles of Del Norte, Humboldt, and Mendocino Counties in northern California. It is one of six reports prepared under the contract to develop baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in California, Oregon and Washington. The profiles cover demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and port capacity, marine traffic, and fishing. Secondary sources were used to prepare the profiles. The focus of the profiles is 1980, but 1970 to 2020 is covered to the extent possible with existing data.

Brown, G.; Kolp, P.; Wallace, B.

1987-10-01

27

CONFIRMATORY SURVEY OF THE FUEL OIL TANK AREA HUMBOLDT BAY POWER PLANT EUREKA, CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect

During the period of February 14 to 15, 2012, ORISE performed radiological confirmatory survey activities for the former Fuel Oil Tank Area (FOTA) and additional radiological surveys of portions of the Humboldt Bay Power Plant site in Eureka, California. The radiological survey results demonstrate that residual surface soil contamination was not present significantly above background levels within the FOTA. Therefore, it is ORISE’s opinion that the radiological conditions for the FOTA surveyed by ORISE are commensurate with the site release criteria for final status surveys as specified in PG&E’s Characterization Survey Planning Worksheet. In addition, the confirmatory results indicated that the ORISE FOTA survey unit Cs-137 mean concentrations results compared favorably with the PG&E FOTA Cs-137 mean concentration results, as determined by ORISE from the PG&E characterization data. The interlaboratory comparison analyses of the three soil samples analyzed by PG&E’s onsite laboratory and the ORISE laboratory indicated good agreement for the sample results and provided confidence in the PG&E analytical procedures and final status survey soil sample data reporting.

WADE C. ADAMS

2012-04-09

28

Kern River-California Aqueduct Intertie, Kern County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Authorization is recommended by the Chief of Engineers of a small flood control project consisting of a concrete chute, gate structure and sedimentation basin in Kern County, California. Environmental impacts are to provide additional flood protection to ...

1973-01-01

29

COUNTIES OF CALIFORNIA - WITH FARM STATISTICS  

EPA Science Inventory

County farming statistics polygon coverage of California. The statistics were taken from the 1997 Census of Agriculture and added to a coverage extracted from TIGER county boundaries. A farm is any place from which $1,000 or more of agricultural products were sold, or normally w...

30

NEW HAZARD MAPS FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Riverside County, California is a complex area of differing geologic and hydrologic conditions representing many differing hazards. Hazard iden- tification defines the magnitude and associated probabilities of natural haz- ards that may pose threats to human interests in specific areas. Utilizing geographical information systems (GIS), the following maps of the Temecula area of Riverside County were developed: raster image, digital

W. Richard Laton; Rene Perez; Doug Bausch

31

62 FR 27169 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Modoc and Siskiyou Counties, California, and in all Counties in Oregon...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in all Counties in Oregon, Except Malheur County...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in all counties in Oregon, except Malheur County...rate as issued herein will be applicable to all assessable potatoes beginning July 1,...

1997-05-19

32

78 FR 43827 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Modoc and Siskiyou Counties, California, and in All Counties in Oregon...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in All Counties in Oregon, Except Malheur County...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in all counties in Oregon, except Malheur County...at: http://www.regulations.gov. All comments submitted in response to this...

2013-07-22

33

Shear band formation and poromechanical properties; application to unlithified sand, Humboldt County, CA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In response to shear strain, porous granular media may fail in tabular zones of grain deformation, commonly referred to as shear bands. Previous researchers have argued that shear bands form via cataclasis and strain hardening, and that once formed they do not accommodate additional shear-strain. If correct, this hypothesis requires that shear bands are stronger than their parent material, and that parent material strengthens in response to shear-driven cataclasis, each of which may alter the effective permeability. We report on laboratory experiments designed to resolve the frictional strength and permeability of shear bands formed in well-sorted nearshore marine sand and their unlithified parent material, and to elucidate the strength and deformation properties of parent material under conditions of shear-band formation. Experiments were conducted on in situ shear bands and parent material from late Quaternary nearshore marine sand in the footwall of the active McKinleyville thrust fault, Humboldt County, CA. Shear bands are exposed in positive relief, a consequence of reduced grain size and cementation, which result in decreased permeability. Permeability was measured under hydrostatic stress conditions at effective confining pressures from 0.2 MPa - 5.0 MPa . Shear bands have permeabilities of 8.2*10 -15 - 1.3*10 -17 m 2 , which represents roughly a 1 to 3 order of magnitude decrease relative to that of the parent material (7.0*10 -14 - 2.0*10 -14 m 2 ). We sheared parent material and in situ shear bands in the single-direct shear geometry over a range of probable in situ normal stresses (0.5-1.8 MPa). Shear bands have greater strength than parent material, with the coefficient of internal friction being ? i = 0.623 and ? i = 0.525, respectively. We sheared parent material in the double-direct shear geometry under conditions approximating shear band formation (sliding velocity = 10 ?m/s-10 mm/s, ? n = 0.75-1.75 MPa, saturated/dry, shear strain = 0.5-20). We find that parent material strengthens as a function of shear strain throughout individual experiments; frictional yield strength increases by 1 to 9% over a range of shear strain from 0 to 10. We attribute the increase in strength to increased grain angularity and abundance of small particles, both of which are a consequence of pervasive cataclasis. Our results support the hypothesis that shear bands are stronger than their parent material and that parent material exhibits strengthening as a function of shear-driven cataclasis. Further, cataclasis may be responsible for the observed permeability contrast of in situ shear bands and parent material. Ongoing work will analyze the role of cataclasis on parent material permeability as a function of shear strain.

Kaproth, B. M.; Perez, E.; Cashman, S. M.; Saffer, D. M.; Marone, C.

2009-12-01

34

GENERAL SITE PLAN, HAMILTON AIR FORCE BASE, MARIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

GENERAL SITE PLAN, HAMILTON AIR FORCE BASE, MARIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. Pencil on paper, dated December 4, 1952. Also marked "PWC 103474." By J.Y. Long Company, Engineers, Oakland, California - Hamilton Field, East of Nave Drive, Novato, Marin County, CA

35

65 FR 66489 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Modoc and Siskiyou Counties, California, and in all Counties in Oregon...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in all Counties in Oregon, Except Malheur County...marketing order. This rule also suspends all reporting and assessment collection requirements...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in all Counties in Oregon, except Malheur...

2000-11-06

36

65 FR 42275 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Modoc and Siskiyou Counties, California, and in all Counties in Oregon...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in all Counties in Oregon, except Malheur County...potato marketing order. It also suspends all reporting and assessment collection requirements...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in all Counties in Oregon, except Malheur...

2000-07-10

37

Ground-water flow and simulated effects of development in Paradise Valley, a basin tributary to the Humboldt River in Humboldt County, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A computer model was used to characterize ground-water flow in Paradise Valley, Nevada, and to evaluate probable long-term effects of five hypothetical development scenarios. One finding of the study is that concentrating pumping at the south end of Paradise Valley may increase underflow from the adjacent Humboldt River valley, and might affect flow in the river.

Prudic, D. E.; Herman, M. E.

1996-01-01

38

Ridgecrest Wash Channel, Kern County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Ridgecrest Wash Channel project is located in Kern County, California, approximately 1/2 mile westerly and northerly of the city of Ridgecrest. The proposed project is to provide protection against damage caused by flood from Ridgecrest Wash in El Pas...

1971-01-01

39

California County Data Book 1995.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This data book examines statewide trends in the well-being of California's children. The report begins with highlights of findings and focuses on teens in the areas of teen births and gun violence. The report then lists summary tables for the state for 17 indicators of child well being in the areas of: (1) family economics; (2) education; (3)…

Children Now, Oakland, CA.

40

Lithology and Well-LOG Study of Campbell E-2, Geothermal Test Well, Humboldt House Geothermal Prospect, Pershing County, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In light of the cuttings and geophysical logs from the Campbell E-2 hole, it seems unlikely that a geothermal reservoir exists in the horst block of the Humboldt House area. All known sinter deposits occur in the graben block in the valley, northwest and ...

B. S. Sibbett W. E. Glenn

1981-01-01

41

Lithology and well-log study of Campbell E-2, geothermal test well, Humboldt House geothermal prospect, Pershing County, Nevada  

Microsoft Academic Search

In light of the cuttings and geophysical logs from the Campbell E-2 hole, it seems unlikely that a geothermal reservoir exists in the horst block of the Humboldt House area. All known sinter deposits occur in the graben block in the valley, northwest and southwest of Campbell E-2. The range front fault, which may serve as a conduit for deeply

B. S. Sibbett; W. E. Glenn

1981-01-01

42

77 FR 73005 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County, Placer County, and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) portions of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). Under authority of the Clean Air Act as amended in 1990 (CAA or the Act), we are proposing to approve local rules that......

2012-12-07

43

76 FR 12280 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, for Imperial County, Kern County, and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is taking direct final action to approve revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District (KCAPCD), and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District (VCAPCD) portions of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). Under authority of the Clean Air Act as amended in 1990 (CAA or the Act), we are approving local rules that......

2011-03-07

44

76 FR 12306 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County, Kern County, and Ventura...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District (KCAPCD), and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District (VCAPCD) portions of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). We are proposing to approve revisions to local rules that define terms used in other air pollution regulations in these areas......

2011-03-07

45

California 2008-2030 County-Level Economic Forecast.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Economic forecasts for the 2008 to 2030 period have been prepared for each county of California. A forecast for the entire state has also been developed and included. The forecasts utilize the most recent historical information through calendar 2007, avai...

M. Schniepp

2008-01-01

46

Public opinion concerning geothermal development in Lake County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

A random sample of 2500 of the registered voters of Lake County, California, were polled about their opinions regarding the prospect of the development of geothermal energy in Lake County. The results of a secondary analysis of their responses are presented. The main conclusions are: (1) A large majority of the respondents are in favor of geothermal development provided that

L. Vollintine; O. Weres

1976-01-01

47

California 2011-2040 County-Level Economic Forecast.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 2011 county-level long term forecast for all 58 counties of California is presented in this edition of the CalTrans Economic Forecast. The forecast was conducted from June 2011 through August 2011. Actual information for the state, the nation and the ...

M. Schniepp

2011-01-01

48

California 2010-2035 County-Level Economic Forecast.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 2010 county-level long term forecast for all 58 counties of California is presented in this edition of the Caltrans Economic Forecast. The forecast was conducted from November 2009 through February 2010. Actual information for the state, the nation an...

M. Schniepp

2010-01-01

49

California 2012-2040 County-Level Economic Forecast.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 2012 county-level long term forecast for all 58 counties of California is presented in this edition of the CalTrans Economic Forecast. The forecast was conducted from June 2012 through September 2012. Actual information for the state, the nation and t...

M. Schniepp

2012-01-01

50

Geophysical investigations of the Baltazor Hot Springs known geothermal resource area and the Painted Hills thermal area, Humboldt County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Geophysical investigations of the Baltazor Hot Springs KGRA and the Painted Hills thermal area, Humboldt Co., Nevada are described. The study includes a gravity survey of 284 stations covering 750 sq km, numerical modeling and interpretation of five detailed gravity profiles, numerical modeling and inerpretation of 21.8 line-km of dipole-dipole electrical resistivity data along four profiles, and a qualitative inerpretation of 38 line-km of self-potential data along eight profiles. The primary purpose of the investigation is to try to determine the nature of the geologic controls of the thermal anomalies at the two areas.

Edquist, R.K.

1981-02-01

51

CONFIRMATORY SURVEY RESULTS FOR PORTIONS OF THE MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT FROM UNITS 1 AND 2 AT THE HUMBOLDT BAY POWER PLANT, EUREKA, CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Gas & Electric Company (PG&E) operated the Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP) Unit 3 nuclear reactor near Eureka, California under Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) provisional license number DPR-7. HBPP Unit 3 achieved initial criticality in February 1963 and began commercial operations in August 1963. Unit 3 was a natural circulation boiling water reactor with a direct-cycle design. This design eliminated the need for heat transfer loops and large containment structures. Also, the pressure suppression containment design permitted below-ground construction. Stainless steel fuel claddings were used from startup until cladding failures resulted in plant system contamination—zircaloy-clad fuel was used exclusively starting in 1965 eliminating cladding-related contamination. A number of spills and gaseous releases were reported during operations resulting in a range of mitigative activities (see ESI 2008 for details).

W.C. Adams

2011-04-01

52

Cultural Resources Study of the California Forest Highway 105 Project, Yuba County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The results of a cultural resources investigation, undertaken in 1991 along an approximately 2.5 mile long section of California Forest Highway 105 (near Dobbins, Yuba County), are presented. The Federal Highway Administration plans to widen and upgrade t...

S. Baker L. H. Shoup M. L. Brack

1992-01-01

53

Groundwater quality in the Kern County Subbasin, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California's drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State's groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The Kern County Subbasin constitutes one of the study units being evaluated.

Burton, Carmen A.; Belitz, Kenneth

2012-01-01

54

Support Services for Exceptional Students: Butte, Del Norte, Glenn, Humboldt, Lake, Lassen, Mendocino, Modoc, Plumas, Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, and Trinity Counties.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Intended for use by vocational administrators responsible for mainstreaming handicapped students into vocational education classes, the resource guide lists and describes governmental and private agencies that provide vocational programs and support services for the handicapped on a local and statewide basis in the California counties of Butte,…

Hampel, Angelica; And Others

55

Ground-Water Conditions in the Eureka Area, Humboldt County, California, 1975.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Ground-water conditions in the Eureka area were evaluated during 1975 to determine whether significant changes had occurred since 1952, when an earlier reconnaissance was made. No major changes in water levels or water quality were noted at 1975 pumping r...

M. J. Johnson

1978-01-01

56

Diet and colon cancer in Los Angeles County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

The diets of 746 colon cancer cases in Los Angeles County, California (USA) were compared with those of 746 controls matched on age, sex, race, and neighborhood. In both genders, total energy intake was associated with significantly increased risk, and calcium intake was associated with significantly decreased risk. These effects were reduced only slightly after adjustment for the nondietary risk

Ruth K. Peters; Malcolm C. Pike; David Garabrant; Thomas M. Mack

1992-01-01

57

Development of An Integrated Hydrologic Model in Yolo County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

To more efficiently use the Cache Creek flows and the groundwater basin as the sources of water supply and to restore the riparian ecosystem along the Cache Creek, Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (YCFCWCD) in Woodland, California plans to conduct the Cache Creek Groundwater Recharge and Recovery Program (CCGRRP). The concept of this program is to operate

Y. Liang; A. Taghavi; M. Stevenson; S. Najmus

2006-01-01

58

Paleontologic Salvage, Southern California Edison Company Ten Megawatt Solar Generating Pilot Plant, Daggett, San Bernardino County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Paleontologic monitoring and salvage operations were performed by the San Bernardino County Museum Association during the construction phase of the Ten Megawatt Solar Generating Pilot Plant at Daggett, San Bernardino County, California. A large and varied...

R. E. Reynolds

1980-01-01

59

33 CFR 334.1125 - Pacific Ocean Naval Air Weapons Station, Point Mugu, Small Arms Range, Ventura County, California...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Small Arms Range, Ventura County, California; danger zone. 334.1125 Section...Small Arms Range, Ventura County, California; danger zone. (a) The area...point on the beach north of Point Mugu, California, as follows: Station...

2013-07-01

60

Courtright intrusive zone: Sierra National Forest, Fresno County, California.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This is a field guide to a well-exposed area of plutonic and metamorphic rocks in the Sierra National Forest, Fresno County, California. The plutonic rocks, of which three major bodies are recognized, besides aplite and pegmatite dykes, range 103 to approx 90 m.y. in age. Points emphasized include cataclastic features within the plutonic rocks, schlieren and mafic inclusions. (M.A. 83M/0035).-A.P.

Bateman, P. C.; Kistler, R. W.; Degraff, J. V.

1984-01-01

61

HIV Services Utilization in Los Angeles County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recipients of HIV\\/AIDS prevention services in Los Angeles County California were surveyed in 2004 by 220 HIV prevention service\\u000a provider staff from 51 agencies funded by the Office of AIDS Programs and Policy. This resulted in 2,102 usable surveys for\\u000a cluster analysis purposes. This Countywide Risk Assessment Survey assessed demographics, sexual history, substance use, perceptions\\u000a regarding HIV\\/AIDS, and use of

Dennis G. Fisher; David Wishart; Grace L. Reynolds; Jordan W. Edwards; Lee M. Kochems; Michael A. Janson

2010-01-01

62

33 CFR 334.1126 - Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, California; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, California; restricted area. 334.1126 Section 334.1126 Navigation... § 334.1126 Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, California; restricted area. (a) The area. The restricted area at Naval Base Ventura County...

2013-07-01

63

Ground-water altitudes and well data, Nye County, Nevada, and Inyo County, California  

SciTech Connect

This report contains ground-water altitudes and well data for wells located in Nye County, Nevada, and Inyo County, California, south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Data are from wells whose coordinates are within the Beatty and Death Valley Junction, California-Nevada maps from the US Geological Survey, scale 1:100,000 (30-minute {times} 60-minute quadrangle). Compilation of these data was made to provide a reference for numerical models of ground-water flow at Yucca Mountain and its vicinity. Water-level measurements were obtained from the US Geological Survey National Water Information System (NWIS) data base, and span the period of October 1951 to May 1991; most measurements were made from 1980 to 1990.

Ciesnik, M.S.

1995-05-01

64

De-confounding of Relations Between Land-Level and Sea-Level Change, Humboldt Bay, Northern California: Uncertain Predictions of Magnitude and Timing of Tectonic and Eustatic Processes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Humboldt Bay in Northern California provides a unique opportunity to investigate the effects of relative sea level change on both native flora and maritime aquiculture as influenced by both tectonic and eustatic sea-level changes. This combination of superposed influences makes quantitatively predicting relative sea-level more uncertain and consumption of the results for public planning purposes exceedingly difficult. Public digestion for practical purposes is confounded by the fact that the uncertainty for eustatic sea-level changes is a magnitude issue while the uncertainty associated with the tectonic land level changes is both a magnitude and timing problem. Secondly, the public is less well informed regarding how crustal deformation contributes to relative sea-level change. We model the superposed effects of eustatic sea-level rise and tectonically driven land-level changes on the spatial distribution of habitats suitable to native eelgrass (Zostera marina) and oyster mariculture operations in Humboldt Bay. While these intertidal organisms were chosen primarily because they have vertically restricted spatial distributions that can be successfully modeled, the public awareness of their ecologic and economic importance is also well developed. We employ easy to understand graphics depicting conceptual ideas along with maps generated from the modeling results to develop locally relevant estimates of future sea level rise over the next 100 years, a time frame consistent with local planning. We bracket these estimates based on the range of possible vertical deformation changes. These graphic displays can be used as a starting point to propose local outcomes from global and regional relative sea-level changes with respect to changes in the distribution of suitable habitat for ecologically and economically valuable species. Currently the largest sources of uncertainty for changes in relative sea-level in the Humboldt Bay area are 1) the rate and magnitude of tectonic deformation throughout the earthquake cycle and 2) the stability and reliability of the tide gauges and other benchmarks assumed to be stable in the Humboldt Bay region.

Gilkerson, W.; Leroy, T. H.; Patton, J. R.; Williams, T. B.

2010-12-01

65

Care system assessment findings in Orange County, California.  

PubMed

This article describes how the Care System Assessment Demonstration (CSAD) was applied to the Ryan White Care System in Orange County, California. Data were collected for the project using the Rapid Assessment, Response and Evaluation (RARE) assessment methods plus document reviews. The RARE methods were used to gather data from people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH), cultural experts and service providers. Information from the contextual assessment and the system assessment were combined and presented to a group of community stakeholders representing PLWH and their families and service providers. Three recommendations were forwarded to the HIV Planning Council for implementation. PMID:17938471

Watson, Mary M

2007-08-01

66

Climate controls on valley fever incidence in Kern County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Coccidiodomycosis (valley fever) is a systemic infection caused by inhalation of airborne spores from Coccidioides immitis, a soil-dwelling fungus found in the southwestern United States, parts of Mexico, and Central and South America. Dust storms help disperse C. immitis so risk factors for valley fever include conditions favorable for fungal growth (moist, warm soil) and for aeolian soil erosion (dry soil and strong winds). Here, we analyze and inter-compare the seasonal and inter-annual behavior of valley fever incidence and climate risk factors for the period 1980-2002 in Kern County, California, the US county with highest reported incidence. We find weak but statistically significant links between disease incidence and antecedent climate conditions. Precipitation anomalies 8 and 20 months antecedent explain only up to 4% of monthly variability in subsequent valley fever incidence during the 23 year period tested. This is consistent with previous studies suggesting that C. immitis tolerates hot, dry periods better than competing soil organisms and, as a result, thrives during wet periods following droughts. Furthermore, the relatively small correlation with climate suggests that the causes of valley fever in Kern County could be largely anthropogenic. Seasonal climate predictors of valley fever in Kern County are similar to, but much weaker than, those in Arizona, where previous studies find precipitation explains up to 75% of incidence. Causes for this discrepancy are not yet understood. Higher resolution temporal and spatial monitoring of soil conditions could improve our understanding of climatic antecedents of severe epidemics.

Zender, Charles S.; Talamantes, Jorge

2006-01-01

67

Mineral resources and land use in Stanislaus County, California  

SciTech Connect

Stanislaus County covers portions of 3 geologic provinces: Coast Ranges, Great Valley, and Sierra Nevada. Each has been exploited for a distinct set of mineral resources, which include sand and gravel, ball and fire clay, placer gold, manganese, chromite, magnesite, mercury, diatomite, building stone, and mineral pigment. Of these, sand and gravel, clay, and diatomite have been the most important commodities produced recently. Sand and gravel, particularly that along the Tuolumne River, is and will continue to be the county's main mineral product; other potentially important areas include alluvial fans along the west side of the Great Valley. Clay and diatomite could resume importance in the future. There is also potential for quartz-rich specialty sands. Although the county is largely rural, it is undergoing one of the highest growth rates in California. Several new residential communities are being proposed in the county, which would have two major effects on mineral resources: (1) large sources of aggregate will be required for construction, and (2) development of residential areas may preclude mining of resources in those areas. Maps of mineral resources produced by this study, will assist decisions on such potential conflicts in land use.

Higgins, C.T.; Dupras, D.L.; Chapman, R.H.; Churchill, R.K. (California Dept. of Conservation, Sacramento, CA (United States). Div. of Mines and Geology)

1993-04-01

68

Development of An Integrated Hydrologic Model in Yolo County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To more efficiently use the Cache Creek flows and the groundwater basin as the sources of water supply and to restore the riparian ecosystem along the Cache Creek, Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (YCFCWCD) in Woodland, California plans to conduct the Cache Creek Groundwater Recharge and Recovery Program (CCGRRP). The concept of this program is to operate the groundwater basin to induce greater amounts of groundwater recharge from Cache Creek directly along the creek and to increase the recharge even further by diverting rainy season water at the District's Capay Diversion Dam into the West Adams Canal to a few recharge basins outside the active channel of Cache Creek. Besides the CCGRRP, cities of Woodland and Davis are in the process of conducting groundwater management plans, and the stakeholders in Yolo County developing a long-term integrated regional water management plan (IRWMP) for the entire county. To effectively evaluate the benefits and impacts of CCGRRP, local groundwater management plans, and the Yolo County IRWMP, the Integrated Groundwater and Surface water Model (IGSM) was applied to the Yolo groundwater basin. The IGSM is a comprehensive integrated hydrologic model that simulates both surface water and groundwater flow systems, including rainfall-runoff, soil moisture accounting and unsaturated flow, crop consumptive module, stream-aquifer interaction, and groundwater flow. The finite element code was originally developed in 1990 for the California Department of Water Resources and the State Water Resources Control Board. The IGSM code has subsequently been applied to more than 25 groundwater basins in California and other states. The model code has been peer reviewed and upgraded throughout its application to various projects, with the latest upgrade in 2004, as part of the application to the Stony Creek Fan area of Sacramento Valley. The Yolo County IGSM (YCIGSM) was calibrated against the historical (1970-2000) groundwater level records at 105 monitoring wells, and three streamflow gages along Cache Creek. Calibration results show that the YCIGSM is able to reasonably simulate the long-term groundwater level trends and short-term seasonal fluctuations. The YCIGSM will be used to develop operational guidelines to manage the groundwater basin, to determine the optimum yield of water projects, to identify benefits and impacts of projects on existing groundwater users, and to assess the environmental benefits and impacts during the development of projects, as well as during the environmental permitting process.

Liang, Y.; Taghavi, A.; Stevenson, M.; Najmus, S.

2006-12-01

69

Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in and near Humboldt Wildlife Management Area, Churchill and Pershing Counties, Nevada, 1990-91  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A reconnaissance investigation was begun in 1990 to determine whether the quality of irrigation drainage in and near the Humboldt Wildlife Management Area, Nevada, has caused or has the potential to cause harmful effects on human health, fish, and wildlife or to impair beneficial uses of water. Samples of surface and ground water, bottom sediment, and biota collected from sites upstream and downstream from the Lovelock agricultural area were analyzed for potentially toxic trace elements. Also analyzed were radioactive substances, major dissolved constitu- ents, and nutrients in water, as well as pesticide residues in bottom sediment and biota. In samples from areas affected by irrigation drainage, the following constituents equaled or exceeded baseline concentrations or recommended standards for protection of aquatic life or propagation of wildlife--in water: arsenic, boron, dissolved solids, mercury, molybdenum, selenium, sodium, and un-ionized ammonia; in bottom sediment; arsenic and uranium; and in biota; arsenic, boron, and selenium. Selenium appears to be biomagnified in the Humboldt Sink wetlands. Biological effects observed during the reconnaissance included reduced insect diversity in sites receiving irrigation drainage and acute toxicity of drain water and sediment to test organisms. The current drought and upstream consumption of water for irrigation have reduced water deliveries to the wetlands and caused habitat degradation at Humboldt Wildlife Management Area. During this investigation. Humboldt and Toulon Lakes evaporated to dryness because of the reduced water deliveries.

Seiler, R. L.; Ekechukwu, G. A.; Hallock, R. J.

1993-01-01

70

33 CFR 334.1127 - Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, California; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, California; restricted area. 334.1127 Section 334.1127 Navigation... § 334.1127 Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, California; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within...

2013-07-01

71

Correlation Analysis of Pesticide Use Data and Cancer Incidence Rates in California Counties  

Microsoft Academic Search

California, the leading agricultural state in the United States, has maintained a population-based cancer registry since 1988, and it also maintains a comprehensive, statewide pesticide reporting system. Data on cancer incidence and pesticide use reporting are available, by county, for all 58 counties in California. Average annual age-adjusted cancer incidence rates (1988–1992), on a county-, sex-, and race\\/ethnicity-specific basis, were

Paul K. Mills

1998-01-01

72

78 FR 53680 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer, Santa Barbara and Ventura County...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is taking direct final action to approve revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD), Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD) and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District (VCAPCD) portions of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions concern volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from adhesives and sealants. We are......

2013-08-30

73

Statistical modeling of valley fever data in Kern County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Coccidioidomycosis (valley fever) is a fungal infection found in the southwestern US, northern Mexico, and some places in Central and South America. The fungus that causes it ( Coccidioides immitis) is normally soil-dwelling but, if disturbed, becomes air-borne and infects the host when its spores are inhaled. It is thus natural to surmise that weather conditions that foster the growth and dispersal of the fungus must have an effect on the number of cases in the endemic areas. We present here an attempt at the modeling of valley fever incidence in Kern County, California, by the implementation of a generalized auto regressive moving average (GARMA) model. We show that the number of valley fever cases can be predicted mainly by considering only the previous history of incidence rates in the county. The inclusion of weather-related time sequences improves the model only to a relatively minor extent. This suggests that fluctuations of incidence rates (about a seasonally varying background value) are related to biological and/or anthropogenic reasons, and not so much to weather anomalies.

Talamantes, Jorge; Behseta, Sam; Zender, Charles S.

2007-03-01

74

Humboldt River main stem, Nevada  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This data set contains the main stem of the Humboldt River as defined by Humboldt Project personnel of the U.S. Geological Survey Nevada District, 2001. The data set was digitized on screen using digital orthophoto quadrangles from 1994.

Warmath, Eric; Medina, Rose L.

2001-01-01

75

Environmental Assessmental, Geothermal Energy, Heber Geothermal Binary-Cycle Demonstration Project: Imperial County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The proposed design, construction, and operation of a commercial-scale (45 MWe net) binary-cycle geothermal demonstration power plant are described using the liquid-dominated geothermal resource at Heber, Imperial County, California. The following are inc...

1980-01-01

76

Cottonwood Creek Project Shasta and Tehama Counties, California: Dutch Gulch Lake Intersive Cultural Resources Survey.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Archeological, ethnographic and historical research undertaken in 1981-1982 in the Dutch Gulch Lake portion of the proposed Cottonwood Creek Project, Shasta and Tehama counties, California. An intensive archeological survey of approximately 24,000 acres i...

J. J. Johnson D. J. Theodoratus

1984-01-01

77

Draft Environmental Statement/Environmental Impact Report. North Bay Aqueduct (Phase II Facilities) Solano County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project would divert Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta water from one of three locations in eastern Solano County overland by pipeline and aqueduct to tie into Phase I aqueduct facilities near Cordelia, California. Environmental impacts include possi...

1981-01-01

78

Baseline Socioeconomic Profiles of Coastal Counties in the Central California Planning Area.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report presents baseline socioeconomic profiles of Sonoma, Marin, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Cruz, and Monterey Counties in central California. It is one of six reports prepared under the contract to develop baseline socioeconomic profiles of coa...

G. Brown P. Kolp B. Wallace

1987-01-01

79

33 CFR 334.866 - Pacific Ocean at Naval Base Coronado, in the City of Coronado, San Diego County, California...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...City of Coronado, San Diego County, California; naval danger zone. 334.866 ...City of Coronado, San Diego County, California; naval danger zone. (a) The area...of Naval Base Coronado, Coronado, California beginning at latitude 32°41â²13â³ N, longitude...

2013-07-01

80

78 FR 58460 - Revision of Air Quality Implementation Plan; California; Placer County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is finalizing a limited approval and limited disapproval of two permitting rules submitted by California as a revision to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and Feather River Air Quality Management District (FRAQMD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions were proposed in the Federal Register on February 22, 2013 and concern......

2013-09-24

81

SPECIAL PROBLEM REPORT, IMPROVING EXTENSION PROGRAM PLANNING PROCEDURES IN SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A SURVEY WAS CONDUCTED BY MAIL QUESTIONNAIRE TO GATHER DATA ON THE FARM POPULATION OF SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, TO GET NAMES OF COMMUNITY LEADERS, AND PROVIDE MOTIVATION FOR EXTENSION PROGRAM PLANNING. THE MEAN AGE OF RESPONDENTS WAS 50, THE LARGE MAJORITY WITH CHILDREN AT HOME, THREE-FOURTHS NATIVE TO CALIFORNIA, ONE-HALF BEING BORN IN…

CANNON, DALE CARTER

82

78 FR 63934 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; El Dorado County Air Quality Management...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is proposing to approve a State Implementation Plan (SIP) revision submitted by California for the El Dorado County Air Quality Management District (EDAQMD) portion of the California SIP. The submitted SIP revision contains the District's demonstrations regarding Reasonably Available Control Technology (RACT) requirements for the 1997 8-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards......

2013-10-25

83

Public opinion in Cobb Valley concerning geothermal development in Lake County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the Spring of 1975 the Friends of Cobb, a local environmental group, polled the registered voters of the Cobb Valley precinct, Lake County, California, about their opinions regarding the development of geothermal energy in Lake County. Sixty-five percent of those polled responded, and an analysis of their responses indicates the following: (1) The people of the Cobb Valley (which

L. Vollintine; O. Weres

1976-01-01

84

77 FR 73391 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; Eastern Kern, Imperial County, Placer...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is proposing approval of revisions to the California State Implementation Plan (SIP) under the Clean Air Act (CAA or Act). EPA is proposing approval of four permitting rules submitted for the Eastern Kern Air Pollution Control District (EKAPCD), Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD), and Yolo-Solano Air Quality......

2012-12-10

85

Whose vision? Conspiracy theory and land-use planning in Nevada County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we examine the role of claims of global conspiracy in undermining a local environmental planning process known as Natural Heritage 2020 (NH 2020) in Nevada County, California. County officials intended NH 2020 to mitigate the environmental impacts of rapid growth in this gentrifying rural community. This program illustrates the increasing use by land-use planners of landscape-scale approaches

Patrick T Hurley; Peter A Walker

2004-01-01

86

76 FR 30080 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District (VCAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions concern volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from surface coatings of metal parts and products. We are proposing to approve local rules to regulate these......

2011-05-24

87

76 FR 26224 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Northern Sonoma County Air Pollution...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Northern Sonoma County Air Pollution Control District (NSCAPCD) and Mendocino County Air Quality Management District (MCAQMD) portions of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). Both districts are required under Part C of title I of the Clean Air Act (CAA) to adopt and implement SIP- approved Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) permit......

2011-05-06

88

76 FR 26192 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Northern Sonoma County Air Pollution...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is taking direct final action to approve revisions to the Northern Sonoma County Air Pollution Control District (NSCAPCD) and Mendocino County Air Quality Management District (MCAQMD) portions of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). Both districts are required under Part C of title I of the Clean Air Act (CAA) to adopt and implement SIP-approved Prevention of Significant......

2011-05-06

89

Silverthread oil field, Ventura County, California: a hydrodynamic trap  

SciTech Connect

Silverthread oil field is located in west-central Ventura County, California. An unusual combination of Miocene turbidite sand deposition, tight folding, faulting, and hydrodynamics have created an accumulation of over 6 million bbl of oil from 33 wells. This field is also unique in that it lies beneath the convergence of several opposing major thrust faults which effectively hide any surface indication of structure at depth. Though previously and often explored by majors and other operators, the remarkable deduction and perseverance by Harry Browne and Argo Petroleum Corporation geologists led to the main area discovery in 1971. Of exceptional interest is the interaction of classic hydrodynamic flow on the distribution of fluids within the reservoir. Thirteen contour maps and numerous structure and stratigraphic sections were required to unravel the sand sequence, faulting, structure, and hydrodynamics. Because of high surface relief, most wells were directionally drilled from islands, and subsequent electric logs had to be unstretched using the Dental Dam technique to facilitate their correlation. A large, lighted, three-dimensional model consisting of thirty-six 2 x 5-ft transparent plexiglas plates was constructed to show a simple resolution of the complexities of this area and will be part of the poster session. This display, they believe, will generate considerable interest in their presentation.

Hacker, R.N.; Hester, R.L.

1987-05-01

90

Monitoring the Pesticide Treatments of the Japanese Beetle Project, Sacramento County, California, 1983-1986. Volume 1: Carbaryl.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Japanese beetle has the potential of being a serious agricultural pest if it becomes established in California. Therefore, the Sacramento County Agriculture Department and the California Department of Food and Agriculture conducted a program to eradic...

R. T. Segawa

1988-01-01

91

Monitoring the Pesticide Treatments of the Japanese Beetle Project, Sacramento County, California, 1983-1986. Volume 3. Diazinon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Japanese beetle has the potential of being a serious agricultural pest if it becomes established in California. The Sacramento County Agriculture Department and the California Department of Food and Agriculture conducted a program to eradicate an infe...

R. T. Segawa S. J. Powell

1989-01-01

92

Monitoring the Pesticide Treatments of the Japanese Beetle Project, Sacramento County, California, 1983-1986. Volume 2. Isofenphos.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In the summer of 1983, the Sacramento County Agriculture Department and the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) initiated a program to eradicate an infestation of the Japanese beetle in Orangevale, California. Part of the eradication prog...

R. T. Segawa S. J. Powell

1989-01-01

93

Study to Develop Statewide and County-Level Economic Projections. Volume 1. California County Economic Forecasts.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Volume I provides a description of forecasts of economic growth for California and its large metropolitan areas. The California economy will continue to lag the national economy until 1996. In the longer term, California will surpass the nation in growth ...

J. Kloepfer

1994-01-01

94

A Tale of Two Counties: Expanding Health Insurance Coverage for Children in California  

PubMed Central

During difficult economic times, many California counties have expanded health insurance coverage for low-income children. These Children's Health Initiatives (CHIs) enroll children in public programs and provide new health insurance, Healthy Kids, for those ineligible for existing programs. This article describes the policy issues in implementing the Santa Clara and San Mateo County CHIs, as well as the children's enrollment levels and utilization of services. These CHIs are among the first of the thirty California counties planning or implementing such initiatives. Their success depends on leadership from county agencies that have not traditionally worked closely together, as well as the development of a diverse public and private funding base. This effort to provide universal coverage for all children is important to national policymakers desiring similar goals.

Howell, Embry M; Hughes, Dana

2006-01-01

95

An Examination of Wetland Diversity in Ventura County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the importance of documenting wetlands for legislative and conservation purposes, little work has been done to provide a regional inventory of wetlands in southern California. In this paper, we begin the process of documenting the diversity and distribution of wetlands in southern California and provide an analysis of the spatial distribution of wetlands relative to potential human impact. Using

Shawna Dark; Regan Maas; Jason D. Mejia; Namrata Belliappa

2006-01-01

96

Dental Screening and Education Among Cambodian, Lowland Lao, and Hmong Refugees in Fresno County, California.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ascertains the dental health needs of the following refugee groups in Fresno County, California: (1) Cambodians; (2) lowland Lao; and (3) Hmong. Discusses successful health marketing and educational strategies aimed at these groups. A Dental Screening program instructed community health specialists, provided dental health education, and performed…

Rowe, Donald R.; Jackson, Sidney

1988-01-01

97

Evaluation of the Early Start to Emancipation Preparation Tutoring Program Los Angeles County, California: Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The subject of this report is the Early Start to Emancipation Preparation (ESTEP)-Tutoring program of Los Angeles County, California. ESTEP-Tutoring offers a service (i.e., tutoring) that is provided in numerous locations throughout the United States. Whi...

A. Zinn E. H. Zielewski K. E. Malm M. E. Courtney R. J. Bess

2008-01-01

98

Habitat restoration plan for Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1976 Congress directed that production on the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) in Kern County, California, be increased to the maximum efficient rate to fulfill some United States needs for domestic oil and gas. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) issued a Biological Opinion, required under the Endangered Species Act of 1973,

T. P. OFarrell; D. L. Mitchell

1985-01-01

99

Habitat Restoration Plan for Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 1976 Congress directed that production on the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) in Kern County, California, be increased to the maximum efficient rate to fulfill some United States needs for domestic oil and gas. The...

T. P. O'Farrell D. L. Mitchell

1985-01-01

100

Evaluation of the Independent Living - Employment Services Program, Kern County, California: Final Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This evaluation explores the impacts of the employment services offered to youths in Kern County, California, aged 16 and older in the child welfare system. The main source of data for identifying program impacts is interviews with foster youths. To asses...

A. Zinn M. E. Courtney R. Koralek R. J. Bess

2011-01-01

101

Evaluation of Factors Associated with Variation in DUI Conviction Rates Among California Counties.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Although California's statewide driving-under-the-influence of alcohol and/or drugs (DUI) conviction rate has improved over time from 64% in 1989 to 79% in 2006, the DUI conviction rates vary considerably among counties. The purpose of this study was to i...

H. N. Tashima S. V. Masten

2011-01-01

102

Public Health Assessment for Leviathan Mine Markleeville, Alpine County, California. EPA Facility ID: CAD980673685.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Leviathan Mine Site is located on the eastern slope of the Sierra Nevada in Alpine County, California, at approximately 7,000 feet above sea level. The site was originally mined for copper sulfate in 1863. In the 1950s and 1960s, the site was mined fo...

2003-01-01

103

Temporal Variation in Vertebrate Archaeofaunas from Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base, San Diego County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent archaeological investigations on and near Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base, San Diego County, California, have yielded vertebrate skeletal remains including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Camp Pendleton vertebrate faunal assemblages from 23 sites are discussed and placed in a broader regional perspective. Research questions addressed through the analysis of these data sets, include subsistence and settlement shifts through

Thomas Wake

104

FARM WORKERS IN A SPECIALIZED SEASONAL CROP AREA, STANISLAUS COUNTY, CALIFORNIA.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|SPECIALIZATION IN THE CROPS BEST ADAPTED TO THE LOCAL AREA IS SEEN AS A HIGHLY PRODUCTIVE SYSTEM OF AGRICULTURE, BUT BY CREATING THE NEED FOR LARGE NUMBERS OF WORKERS FOR SHORT PERIODS OF TIME, IT CAUSES UNEMPLOYMENT AND MIGRATION. A SURVEY OF FRUIT AND VEGETABLE WORKERS IN STANISLAUS COUNTY, CALIFORNIA IN 1962-63 REVEALS--(1) THEIR EARNINGS ARE…

METZLER, WILLIAM H.

105

Paleoseismic features as indicators of earthquake hazards in North Coastal, San Diego County, California, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

New road cut and mass-grading excavations in the north coastal area of San Diego County, California expose heretofore generally unrecognized, probable late Holocene tsunami deposits and paleoseismically deformed sediments. Remnant tsunami deposits occur up to 100+ m in elevation around the margins of modern coastal lagoons and estuaries and, combined with local mima mounds of possible sand blow origin, provide

Gerald G. Kuhn

2005-01-01

106

BOUNDS ON SUBSURFACE MERCURY FLUX FROM THE SULPHUR BANK MERCURY MINE, LAKE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA  

EPA Science Inventory

The Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine (SBMM) in Lake County, California has been identified as a significant source of mercury to Clear Lake. The mine was operated from the 1860s through the 1950's. Mining started with surface operations, progressed to shaft mining, and later to open p...

107

Acculturation and functional impairment among older Chinese and Vietnamese in San Diego County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Level of acculturation and the relationship to functional impairment was examined among a group of Chinese (n = 50) and Vietnamese (n = 50) 45 years and older in San Diego County, California. Prevalence of functional impairment and level of acculturation, one-way analysis of variance and Pearson correlations were utilized to examine differences between ethnicity, gender and age groups, as

Deborah J. Morton; E. Percil Stanford; Catherine J. Happersett; Craig A. Molgaard

1992-01-01

108

Bat Inventory of the Descanso District of the Cleveland National Forest, San Diego County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The US Geological Survey conducted a bat species inventory of the Descanso District of the Cleveland National Forest in San Diego County, California. The study began in the early summer of 2002 and terminated in the fall of 2003. A variety of bat survey t...

D. C. Stokes R. N. Fisher

2004-01-01

109

HANTAVIRUS(BUNYAVIRIDAE) INFECTIONS IN RODENTS FROM ORANGE AND SAN DIEGO COUNTIES, CALIFORNIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

During a screening program to determine the extent of hantavirus activity in Orange and San Diego Counties, California, serum samples from 2,365 rodents representing nine genera and 15 species were tested for hantavirus antibodies. A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction on selected seropositive rodents was used to identify the specific hantavirus. Rodents positive for Sin Nombre virus (SNV) antibodies by Western

STEPHEN G. BENNETT; JAMES P. WEBB; MINOO B. MADON; JAMES E. CHILDS; THOMAS G. KSIAZEK; NORAH TORREZ-MARTINEZ; BRIAN HJELLE

110

NEST BOX USE AND REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY OF THE AMERICAN KESTREL IN LASSEN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

During 1976 we implemented an American Kestrel (Falco sparverius) nest box program in the Great Basin of Lassen County, California. The primary goal was the creation of nesting habitat where no habitat existed, and the reestablishment of such habitat where it had been eliminated. Of 247 functional nest boxes examined between 1977 and 1980, 31% of these were active and

Peter H. Bloom; Stephen J. Hawks

111

77 FR 67322 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions concern oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions from biomass boilers. We are approving a local rule that regulates these emission sources under the Clean Air Act (CAA or the Act). We are taking comments on this proposal and plan......

2012-11-09

112

76 FR 28944 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is proposing a limited approval and limited disapproval of permitting rules submitted for the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and Feather River Air Quality Management District (FRAQMD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). The districts are required under Part D of title I of the Clean Air Act (CAA) to adopt and implement a SIP-approved New Source......

2011-05-19

113

78 FR 896 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). This action was proposed in the Federal Register on April 27, 2012 and concerns oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions from certain boilers, process heaters and steam generators. We are approving a local rule that regulates these......

2013-01-07

114

78 FR 21581 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD) and South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) portions of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions concern volatile organic compound (VOC) and oxides of nitrogen (NOX) emissions from gas-fired fan-type central furnaces, small water heaters, and......

2013-04-11

115

76 FR 54993 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is proposing a limited approval and limited disapproval of revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions concern oxides of nitrogen (NOX) emissions from biomass fuel-fired boilers. We are proposing action on a local rule that regulates these emission sources under the Clean Air Act......

2011-09-06

116

76 FR 26615 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions were proposed in the Federal Register on February 9, 2011 and concern New Source Review (NSR) permitting requirements and exemptions for various air pollution sources. We are approving local rules that regulate these emission......

2011-05-09

117

76 FR 71886 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is taking direct final action to approve revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD) portions of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions concern volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from coatings and strippers used on wood products, wood paneling, and miscellaneous......

2011-11-21

118

76 FR 75857 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions concern volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from architectural coatings and automotive refinishing operations. We are proposing to approve two local rules to regulate these emission sources under the Clean Air Act as......

2011-12-05

119

75 FR 27975 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan; Imperial County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions concern particulate matter (PM) emissions from beef feedlots. We are approving a local rule that regulates these emission sources under the Clean Air Act as amended in 1990 (CAA or the Act). We are taking comments on this......

2010-05-19

120

75 FR 24544 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD), Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD), San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD), and South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) portions of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions concern volatile organic......

2010-05-05

121

75 FR 24406 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is taking direct final action to approve revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD), Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD), San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD), and South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) portions of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions concern......

2010-05-05

122

78 FR 21542 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is taking direct final action to approve revisions to the Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD) and South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) portions of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions concern volatile organic compound (VOC) and oxides of nitrogen (NOX) emissions from gas-fired fan-type central furnaces, small......

2013-04-11

123

76 FR 7142 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions clarify permitting requirements, and update and revise exemptions from New Source Review (NSR) permitting requirements, for various air pollution sources. We are taking comments on this proposal and plan to follow with a......

2011-02-09

124

76 FR 75795 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is taking direct final action to approve revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions concern volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from architectural coatings and automotive refinishing operations. We are approving local rules that regulate these emission sources under the Clean Air Act......

2011-12-05

125

78 FR 23677 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). This action was proposed in the Federal Register on January 7, 2013 and concerns local rules that regulate inhalable particulate matter (PM) emissions from sources of fugitive dust such as unpaved roads and disturbed soils in open and......

2013-04-22

126

77 FR 25109 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions concern oxides of nitrogen (NOX) emissions from certain boilers, process heaters and steam generators. We are approving a local rule that regulates these emission sources under the Clean Air Act as amended in......

2012-04-27

127

Dental Screening and Education Among Cambodian, Lowland Lao, and Hmong Refugees in Fresno County, California.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Ascertains the dental health needs of the following refugee groups in Fresno County, California: (1) Cambodians; (2) lowland Lao; and (3) Hmong. Discusses successful health marketing and educational strategies aimed at these groups. A Dental Screening program instructed community health specialists, provided dental health education, and performed…

Rowe, Donald R.; Jackson, Sidney

1988-01-01

128

Gene Flow Patterns of the Mayfly Fallceon quilleri in San Diego County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Management decisions and conservation strategies for freshwater invertebrates critically depend on an understanding of gene flow and genetic structure. We collected the mayfly Fallceon quilleri (Ephemeroptera: Baetidae) from 15 streams across three geographically distinct watersheds in San Diego County, California (San Dieguito, Santa Margarita, and Tijuana) and one site in Anza-Borrego desert. We sequenced a 667 base pair region of

J. Zickovich; A. J. Bohonak

2005-01-01

129

Effects of County Land Use Policies and Management Practices on Anadromous Salmonids and Their Habitats: Sonoma, Marin, San Mateo, Santa Cruz and Monterey Counties, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The FishNet 4C program is a county-based, regional salmonid protection and restoration program, created under a Memorandum of Agreement between the six Central California Coastal Counties of Mendocino, Sonoma, Marin, San Mateo, Santa Cruz and Monterey. A ...

R. R. Haris S. D. Kocher K. M. Kull

2001-01-01

130

Beginnings of geothermal impact on county population and leadership, Imperial County, California  

SciTech Connect

A major geothermal energy development scenario is about to begin in Imperial County. Initial energy-socioeconomic interactions in the areas of population and county leadership structure are discussed. These include immigration of energy company workers, a sewage plant dispute, conflict over union affiliation of geothermal laborers, and a transmission corridor routing dispute.

Pick, J.B.; Butler, E.W.

1980-09-01

131

California County Data Book, 2001: Factors for School Success.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count data book examines trends in the well-being of California's children, focusing on factors for school success. The statistical portrait is based on trends in 32 indicators of well-being in 4 areas: (1) education, including reading and mathematics achievement, high school dropout rates, and student-teacher ratios; (2) family…

Children Now, Oakland, CA.

132

The January 1977 avian cholera epornitic in northwest California.  

PubMed

A total of 844 birds were observed dead at three sites in Humboldt County and an estimated 6750 birds died at three sites in Del Norte County, California. Coots were the primary species affected. The isolation of Pasteurella multocida from a snowy egret (Egretta thula) is the first reported case of avian cholera in this bird. There was evidence for a distinct sequence in the bird species dying at one site; American coots (Fulica americana) appeared to be the first species to die. PMID:691123

Oddo, A F; Pagan, R D; Worden, L; Botzler, R G

1978-07-01

133

Status and Ecology of Sensitive Aquatic Vertebrates in Lower San Simeon and Pico Creeks, San Luis Obispo County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report includes visual surveys during 1992 in San Simeon and Pico Creeks in coastal San Luis Obispo County, California. The authors objectives were to determine the status, habitats and relative abundance of five sensitive, aquatic species: the tidewa...

G. B. Rathbun M. R. Jennings N. R. Siepel T. G. Murphey

1993-01-01

134

Capture-Recapture Estimation of San Joaquin Kit Fox Population Size on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica) population size was estimated semiannually on the US Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California, between December 1980 and August 1986 using capture-recapture data. Estimates ...

C. E. Harris T. P. O'Farrell P. M. McCue T. T. Kato

1987-01-01

135

Ambient Air Pollution and Autism in Los Angeles County, California  

PubMed Central

Background: The prevalence of autistic disorder (AD), a serious developmental condition, has risen dramatically over the past two decades, but high-quality population-based research addressing etiology is limited. Objectives: We studied the influence of exposures to traffic-related air pollution during pregnancy on the development of autism using data from air monitoring stations and a land use regression (LUR) model to estimate exposures. Methods: Children of mothers who gave birth in Los Angeles, California, who were diagnosed with a primary AD diagnosis at 3–5 years of age during 1998–2009 were identified through the California Department of Developmental Services and linked to 1995–2006 California birth certificates. For 7,603 children with autism and 10 controls per case matched by sex, birth year, and minimum gestational age, birth addresses were mapped and linked to the nearest air monitoring station and a LUR model. We used conditional logistic regression, adjusting for maternal and perinatal characteristics including indicators of SES. Results: Per interquartile range (IQR) increase, we estimated a 12–15% relative increase in odds of autism for ozone [odds ratio (OR) = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.19; per 11.54-ppb increase] and particulate matter ? 2.5 µm (OR = 1.15; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.24; per 4.68-?g/m3 increase) when mutually adjusting for both pollutants. Furthermore, we estimated 3–9% relative increases in odds per IQR increase for LUR-based nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide exposure estimates. LUR-based associations were strongest for children of mothers with less than a high school education. Conclusion: Measured and estimated exposures from ambient pollutant monitors and LUR model suggest associations between autism and prenatal air pollution exposure, mostly related to traffic sources.

Becerra, Tracy Ann; Wilhelm, Michelle; Olsen, J?rn; Cockburn, Myles

2012-01-01

136

Reconnaissance of geothermal resources of Los Angeles County, California  

SciTech Connect

Thermal waters produced from large oil fields are currently the most important geothermal resources in Los Angeles County. Otherwise, the County does not appear to have any large, near-surface geothermal resources. The oil fields produce thermal water because of both the moderate depths of production and normal to above-normal geothermal gradients. Gradients are about 3.0-3.5/sup 0/C/100 meters in the Ventura Basin and range from that up to about 5.5-6.0/sup 0/C/100 meters in the Los Angeles Basin. The hottest fields in the County are west of the Newport-Inglewood Structural Zone. The Los Angeles Basin has substantially more potential for uses of heat from oil fields than does the Ventura Basin because of its large fields and dense urban development. Produced fluid temperatures there range from ambient air to boiling, but most are in the 100-150/sup 0/F range. Daily water production ranges from only a few barrels at some fields to over a million barrels at Wilmington Oil Field; nearly all fields produce less than 50,000 barrels/day. Water salinity generally ranges from about 15,000-35,000 mg/liter NaCl. Fields with the most promise as sources of heat for outside applications are Wilmington, Torrance, Venice Beach, and Lawndale. The centralized treatment facilities are the most favorable sites for extraction of heat within the oil fields. Because of the poor water quality heat exchangers will likely be required rather than direct circulation of the field water to users. The best sites for applications are commercial-industrial areas and possibly institutional structures occupied by large numbers of people.

Higgins, C.T.

1981-01-01

137

Environmental assessmental, geothermal energy, Heber geothermal binary-cycle demonstration project: Imperial County, California  

SciTech Connect

The proposed design, construction, and operation of a commercial-scale (45 MWe net) binary-cycle geothermal demonstration power plant are described using the liquid-dominated geothermal resource at Heber, Imperial County, California. The following are included in the environmental assessment: a description of the affected environment, potential environmental consequences of the proposed action, mitigation measures and monitoring plans, possible future developmental activities at the Heber anomaly, and regulations and permit requirements. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-10-01

138

Variations in a regional fire regime related to vegetation type in San Diego County, California (USA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study considers variations in a regional fire regime that are related to vegetation structure. Using a Geographic Information\\u000a System, the vegetation of San Diego County, Southern coastal California USA is divided into six generalized classes based\\u000a on dominant plant form and include: herbaceous, sage scrub, chaparral, hardwood forest, conifer forest and desert. Mapped\\u000a fire occurrences for the 20th century

Michael L. Wells; John F. O’Leary; Janet Franklin; Joel Michaelsen; David E. McKinsey

2004-01-01

139

TEMPORAL VARIATION OF SEISMICITY AND SPECTRUM OF SMALL EARTHQUAKES PRECEDING THE 1952 KERN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, EARTHQUAKE  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spatio-temporal variation of seismicity in the epicentral area of the 1952 Kern County California, earthquake (Ms -- 7.7, 34°58.6'N; 119°02'W) was examined for the period prior to the main shock. Most of the events that occurred in the epicentral area were relocated by using the main shock as a master event. A large part of the fault plane of

MIZUHO ISHIDA; HIROO KANAMORI

1980-01-01

140

78 FR 21537 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara and San Diego County Air...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is taking direct final action to approve revisions to the Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD) and San Diego County Air Pollution Control District (SDCAPCD) portions of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions concern volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from surface coating of aerospace vehicles and components and from wood products......

2013-04-11

141

78 FR 21580 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara and San Diego County Air...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD) and San Diego County Air Pollution Control District (SDCAPCD) portions of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions concern volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from surface coating of aerospace vehicles and components and from wood products coating operations. We......

2013-04-11

142

Geohydrology and evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake Playa, Inyo County, California  

SciTech Connect

Franklin Lake playa is one of the principal discharge areas of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system in southern Nevada and adjacent California. Yucca Mountain, Nevada, located within this flow system, is being evaluated by the US Department of Energy to determine its suitability as a potential site for a high-level nuclear-waste repository. To assist the US Department of Energy with its evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site, the US Geological Survey developed a parameter-estimation model of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system. Results from sensitivity analyses made using the parameter-estimation model indicated that simulated rates of evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa had the largest effect on the calculation of transmissivity values at Yucca Mountain of all the model-boundary conditions and, therefore, that evapotranspiration required careful definition. 72 refs., 59 figs., 26 tab.

NONE

1990-12-01

143

Geohydrology and evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa, Inyo County, California  

SciTech Connect

Franklin Lake playa is one of the principal discharge areas of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system in southern Nevada and adjacent California. Yucca Mountain, Nevada, located within this flow system, is being evaluated by the US Department of Energy to determine its suitability as a potential site for a high-level nuclear-waste repository. To assist the U.S. Department of Energy with its evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site, the US Geological Survey developed a parameter-estimation model of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system. Results from sensitivity analyses made using the parameter-estimation model indicated that simulated rates of evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa had the largest effect on the calculation of transmissivity values at Yucca Mountain of all the model-boundary conditions and, therefore, that evapotranspiration required careful definition.

Czarnecki, J.B.

1997-12-31

144

Congenital cardiac anomalies in relation to water contamination, Santa Clara County, California, 1981-1983.  

PubMed

In November 1981, a leak of solvents from an underground storage tank was detected at an electronics manufacturing plant in Santa Clara County, California. Solvents (predominantly 1,1,1-trichloroethene, or methyl chloroform) were found in a nearby well which supplied drinking water to the surrounding community. Residents were concerned about a possible relation between adverse reproductive outcomes and consumption of contaminated water. To address this concern, the California Department of Health Services conducted two epidemiologic studies: one of these, reported here, is a county-wide study of cardiac anomalies. This study, which looked at major cardiac anomalies among births throughout Santa Clara County in 1981-1983, found an increased prevalence in the service area of the water company which operated the contaminated well. During the potentially exposed time period (January 1981 through August 1982), 12 babies with major cardiac anomalies were born to residents of this area. This represents an excess of six cases over the number expected based on the prevalence in the remainder of the county (relative risk = 2.2, 95 per cent confidence interval 1.2-4.0). No excess was observed in the unexposed time period (September 1982 through December 1983). However, the temporal distribution of major cardiac cases born during the exposed time period suggests that the solvent leak is an unlikely explanation for this excess. PMID:2784935

Swan, S H; Shaw, G; Harris, J A; Neutra, R R

1989-05-01

145

Wilhelm von Humboldt and the ‘Orient’: On Edward W. Said’s remarks on Humboldt’s Orientalist studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

From an epistemological perspective, Wilhelm von Humboldt’s studies on the Oriental and East Asian languages and writing systems (Egyptian hieroglyphs, Sanskrit, Chinese, Polynesian) raise the question of his position in the Orientalist discourse of his time. Said [Said, E.W., 1978. Orientalism. Western Conceptions of the Orient, fourth ed. Penguin Books, London, 1995] considers Humboldt to be part of the “official

Markus Meßling

2008-01-01

146

Resource Assessment of Low- and Moderate-Temperature Geothermal Waters in Calistoga, Napa County, California. Report of the Second Year, 1979-1980.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Phase I studies included updating and completing the USGS GEOTHERM file for California and compiling all data needed for a California Geothermal Resources Map. Phase II studies included a program to assess the geothermal resource at Calistoga, Napa County...

L. G. Youngs C. F. Bacon R. H. Chapman G. W. Chase C. T. Higgins

1980-01-01

147

Suicides in California (1968-1977): absence of seasonality in Los Angeles and Sacramento counties.  

PubMed

Since the turn of the century, there have been numerous publications on the seasonality of suicide. Rarely has the duration of sunlight exposure or any other weather parameter been quantitated in studies of suicide seasonality. To explore the relationships between sunlight and suicide, we examined California weather and suicide data from 1968 to 1977. Los Angeles County and Sacramento County were well-suited to the investigation, as complete data were available for these large population centers. There was no evidence of seasonality to suicides in L.A. County or Sacramento, despite a pronounced seasonality to weather. To investigate the acute temporal effects of weather on suicides, all occurrences of 10 successive above- or below-average sunshine days were identified. Suicides of for intervals of 5 days were then compared by Mann-Whitney analyses for 25 days after the selected intervals. For L.A. County, there were no significant findings. For Sacramento County, however, there was evidence for sunlight inhibition of suicides at days 21-25 after the above-average sunshine. Suicides after 10 days of below-average sunshine were increased as much as 70% about the 10-year average. Further replication studies with larger data sets are needed for an adequate examination of the correspondences of suicide data and weather measurements. PMID:7824676

Tietjen, G H; Kripke, D F

1994-08-01

148

Rickettsia felis in cat fleas, Ctenocephalides felis parasitizing opossums, San Bernardino County, California.  

PubMed

Los Angeles and Orange Counties are known endemic areas for murine typhus in California; however, no recent reports of flea-borne rickettsioses are known from adjacent San Bernardino County. Sixty-five opossums (Didelphis virginiana) were trapped in the suburban residential and industrial zones of the southwestern part of San Bernardino County in 2007. Sixty out of 65 opossums were infested with fleas, primarily cat fleas, Ctenocephalides felis (Bouché, 1835). The flea minimum infection rate with Rickettsia felis was 13.3% in pooled samples and the prevalence was 23.7% in single fleas, with two gltA genotypes detected. In spite of historic records of murine typhus in this area, no evidence for circulation of R. typhi in fleas was found during the present study. Factors contributing to the absence of R. typhi in these cat fleas in contrast to its presence in cat fleas from Orange and Los Angeles Counties are unknown and need to be investigated further in San Bernardino County. PMID:22712460

Abramowicz, K F; Wekesa, J W; Nwadike, C N; Zambrano, M L; Karpathy, S E; Cecil, D; Burns, J; Hu, R; Eremeeva, M E

2012-06-20

149

Yuma District Resource Management Plan, Yuma, La Paz, and Mohave Counties, Arizona and San Bernardino, Riverside and Imperial Counties, California  

SciTech Connect

Implementation of a resource management plan is proposed for 1.2 million acres within the 2.7-million-acre Yuma District, located in Yuma, La Paz, and Mohave counties, Arizona and San Bernardino, Riverside, and Imperial counties, California. Under the preferred alternative, wildlife habitat would be a priority consideration on approximately 247,740 acre, and nine special management areas would be designated. A portion of the Cactus Plain and the Chemehuevi/Needles wilderness study areas would be recommended for wilderness designation. Two areas totaling 31,360 acres would be designated as special management areas, and another six areas totaling 155,705 acres would be managed to protect their natural values. Livestock grazing would be authorized at 3998 animal unit months on four allotments. Approximately 55,490 acres of federal lands would be available for disposal and 31,220 acres would be acquired. Nine utility corridors and nine communication sites would be designated. Existing recreational facilities would be maintained, with additional facilities provided when warranted. Along Parker Strip, only floodproofed day-use facilities would be allowed within the 100-year flood plain. Off-road vehicle (ORV) use designations would be made on 640 acres and ORV use in the remainder of the district would be limited to existing roads and trails. Continuous occupancy of mobile home sites would be restricted to one five-month period in a single year. Permanent residential use would be phased out.

Not Available

1985-08-01

150

Breast cancer incidence and mortality trends in an affluent population: Marin County, California, USA, 1990-1999  

PubMed Central

Background Elevated rates of breast cancer in affluent Marin County, California, were first reported in the early 1990s. These rates have since been related to higher regional prevalence of known breast cancer risk factors, including low parity, education, and income. Close surveillance of Marin County breast cancer trends has nevertheless continued, in part because distinctive breast cancer patterns in well-defined populations may inform understanding of breast cancer etiology. Methods Using the most recent incidence and mortality data available from the California Cancer Registry, we examined rates and trends for 1990–1999 for invasive breast cancer among non-Hispanic, white women in Marin County, in other San Francisco Bay Area counties, and in other urban California counties. Rates were age adjusted to the 2000 US standard, and temporal changes were evaluated with weighted linear regression. Results Marin County breast cancer incidence rates between 1990 and 1999 increased 3.6% per year (95% confidence interval, 1.8–5.5), six times more rapidly than in comparison areas. The increase was limited to women aged 45–64 years, in whom rates increased at 6.7% per year (95% confidence interval, 3.8–9.6). Mortality rates did not change significantly in Marin County despite 3–5% yearly declines elsewhere. Conclusion Patterns of breast cancer incidence and mortality in Marin County are unlike those in other California counties, and they are probably explained by Marin County's unique sociodemographic characteristics. Similar trends may have occurred in other affluent populations for which available data do not permit annual monitoring of cancer occurrence.

Clarke, Christina A; Glaser, Sally L; West, Dee W; Ereman, Rochelle R; Erdmann, Christine A; Barlow, Janice M; Wrensch, Margaret R

2002-01-01

151

Hospital Utilization for Injection Drug Use-Related Soft Tissue Infections in Urban versus Rural Counties in California  

PubMed Central

Drug related-soft tissue infections (DR-STIs) are a significant source of hospital utilization in inner-city urban areas where injection drug use is common but the magnitude of hospital utilization for DR-STIs outside of inner-city urban areas is not known. We described the magnitude and characteristics of hospital utilization for DR-STIs in urban versus rural counties in California. All discharges from all nonfederal hospitals in California in 2000 with ICD-9 codes for a soft tissue infection and for drug dependence/abuse were abstracted from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development discharge database. There were 4,152 DR-STI discharges in 2000 from hospitals in 49 of California's 58 counties. Residents of 12 large metropolitan counties accounted for 3,598 discharges (87% of total). The majority of DR-STI discharges were from urban safety net hospitals with county indigent programs and Medicaid as the expected payment source and opiate related discharge diagnoses. Hospital utilization for DR-STIs in California is highest in large urban metropolitan counties, although DR-STI discharges are widespread. Increased access to harm reduction services and drug treatment may reduce government health care expenditures by preventing unnecessary hospital utilization for DR-STIs.

Etzioni, David A.; Hurley, Brian; Holtom, Paul; Bluthenthal, Ricky N.; Asch, Steven M.

2006-01-01

152

Swath Bathymetric Survey of Englebright Lake, Yuba-Nevada Counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Swath bathymetric data of upper Englebright Lake, Yuba-Nevada Counties, California are presented. These data consist of registered 1-meter cells and a water depth for the cell. Precision and accuracy of the depth values is 0.1 m (4 in). Water depth is referenced to an elevation of 160.6 m (527.0 ft) foot, the spillway elevation of the dam. Data coverage is of the upper reach of the reservoir, over the prograding sediment delta. Coverage does not extend to the deeper downstream reach of the reservoir approaching the dam.

Childs Jonathan R.; Stevenson, Andrew J.

2006-01-01

153

Humboldt State University Fisheries Biology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Fisheries Science Department of Humboldt State University offers an interdisciplinary Bachelor of Sciences degree in Aquarium Sciences. To prepare for a career as a professional aquarist or aquarium curator, training includes: husbandry, culture of aquatic organisms, ichthyology, pathology, life support, exhibit design, conservation, business management. Internships with major public aquariums are available.

2010-11-18

154

Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the central California planning area. Final report, 1970-2020  

SciTech Connect

The report presents baseline socio-economic profiles of Sonoma, Marin, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Cruz, and Monterey Counties in central California. It is one of six reports prepared under the contract to develop baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in California, Oregon, and Washington. The profiles cover demographics, economics, housing public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and port capacity, marine traffic, and fishing. Secondary sources were used to prepare the profiles. The focus of the profiles is 1980, but 1970 to 2020 is covered to the extent possible with existing data.

Brown, G.; Kolp, P.; Wallace, B.

1987-10-01

155

Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the southern California planning area. Final report, 1970-2020  

SciTech Connect

The report presents baseline socio-economic profiles of Los Angeles, Orange, and San Diego Counties in southern California. It is one of six reports prepared under the contract to develop baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in California, Oregon, and Washington. The profiles cover demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and port capacity, marine traffic, and fishing. Secondary sources were used to prepare the profiles. The focus of the profiles is 1980, but 1970 to 2020 is covered to the extent possible with existing data.

Brown, G.; Kolp, P.; Wallace, B.

1987-10-01

156

Differences in reproductive risk factors for breast cancer in middle-aged women in Marin County, California and a sociodemographically similar area of Northern California  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The Northern California county of Marin (MC) has historically had high breast cancer incidence rates. Because of MC's high socioeconomic status (SES) and racial homogeneity (non-Hispanic White), it has been difficult to assess whether these elevated rates result from a combination of established risk factors or other behavioral or environmental factors. This survey was designed to compare potential breast

C Suzanne Lea; Nancy P Gordon; Lee Ann Prebil; Rochelle Ereman; Connie S Uratsu; Mark Powell

2009-01-01

157

Detection of Coccidioides immitis in Kern County, California, by multiplex PCR.  

PubMed

Coccidioides immitis is a fungal human pathogen endemic to semiarid soils in southern California and Baja California (Mexico). Results of culture-dependent detection of C. immitis in the past indicated a spotty distribution and unreliable prediction of C. immitis growth sites and accumulation sites. In this project we investigated bulk soil samples for the presence of the pathogen in nonagricultural loamy soils at nine different locations around Bakersfield, Kern County, California, for almost 2 y (2008-2009). To detect the pathogen we used a multiplex PCR method with optimized soil handling and storage, DNA extraction procedure and PCR protocol. With this method we were able to detect C. immitis in 8.42% of our samples in 2008 (n = 285), mostly from early spring to early summer. In 2009 however the percentage of samples positive for C. immitis from the same sites declined to 2.68% (n = 261). We also were able to distinguish C. immitis growth sites from accumulation sites. One site close to a recreation area (Lake Webb, Buena Vista Lake Basin), not previously known to support the growth of C. immitis, was identified as a strong growth site of the fungus. The cultivation-independent method in this study together with soil parameters can be used to predict and confirm C. immitis growth sites and might be a valuable tool for public health institutions. PMID:21933931

Lauer, Antje; Baal, Joe Darryl Hugo; Baal, Jed Cyril Hugo; Verma, Mona; Chen, Jeffrey M

2011-09-20

158

Using Bayesian influence diagrams to assess organizational performance in 4 California county health departments, April-July 2009.  

PubMed

A Bayesian influence diagram is used to analyze interactions among operational units of county health departments. This diagram, developed using Bayesian network analysis, represents a novel method of analyzing the internal performance of county health departments that were operating under the simultaneous constraints of budget cuts and increased demand for services during the H1N1 threat in California, April-July 2009. This analysis reveals the interactions among internal organizational units that degrade performance under stress or, conversely, enable a county health department to manage heavy demands effectively. PMID:23514661

Comfort, Louise K; Scheinert, Steve; Yeo, Jungwon; Schuh, Russell; Duran, Luis; Potter, Margaret A

159

Resource assessment of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal waters in Calistoga, Napa County, California. Report of the second year, 1979-1980  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phase I studies included updating and completing the USGS GEOTHERM file for California and compiling all data needed for a California Geothermal Resources Map. Phase II studies included a program to assess the geothermal resource at Calistoga, Napa County, California. The Calistoga effort was comprised of a series of studies involving different disciplines, including geologic, hydrologic, geochemical and geophysical studies.

L. G. Youngs; C. F. Bacon; R. H. Chapman; G. W. Chase; C. T. Higgins; H. H. Majmundar; G. C. Taylor

1980-01-01

160

Resource assessment of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal waters in Calistoga, Napa County, California. Report of the second year, 1979-1980  

SciTech Connect

Phase I studies included updating and completing the USGS GEOTHERM file for California and compiling all data needed for a California Geothermal Resources Map. Phase II studies included a program to assess the geothermal resource at Calistoga, Napa County, California. The Calistoga effort was comprised of a series of studies involving different disciplines, including geologic, hydrologic, geochemical and geophysical studies.

Youngs, L.G.; Bacon, C.F.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.; Higgins, C.T.; Majmundar, H.H.; Taylor, G.C.

1980-11-10

161

Resource assessment of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal waters in Calistoga, Napa County, California. Report of the second year, 1979 to 1980 of the US Department of Energy-California State-Coupled Program for reservoir assessment and confirmation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Statewide assessment studies included updating and completing the USGS GEOTHERM File for California and compiling all data needed for a California Geothermal Resources Map. Site specific assessment studies included a program to assess the geothermal resource at Calistoga, Napa County, California. The Calistoga effort was comprised of a series of studies involving different disciplines, including geologic, hydrologic, geochemical and geophysical

L. G. Youngs; C. F. Bacon; R. H. Chapman; G. W. Chase; C. T. Higgins; H. H. Majmundar; G. C. Taylor

1980-01-01

162

Resource assessment of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal waters in Calistoga, Napa County, California. Report of the second year, 1979 to 1980 of the US Department of Energy-California State-Coupled Program for reservoir assessment and confirmation  

SciTech Connect

Statewide assessment studies included updating and completing the USGS GEOTHERM File for California and compiling all data needed for a California Geothermal Resources Map. Site specific assessment studies included a program to assess the geothermal resource at Calistoga, Napa County, California. The Calistoga effort was comprised of a series of studies involving different disciplines, including geologic, hydrologic, geochemical and geophysical studies.

Youngs, L.G.; Bacon, C.F.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.; Higgins, C.T.; Majmundar, H.H.; Taylor, G.C.

1980-11-10

163

SUMMARY OF AQUATIC LIFE TOXICITY STUDIES IN UPPER NEWPORT BAY TRIBUTARIES, ORANGE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA DURING 1996\\/981  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the fall of 1996, the Evaluation Monitoring Demonstration Project (Lee and Taylor, 1997a; Silverado, 1997a) found that stormwater runoff in San Diego Creek at Campus Drive as it enters Upper Newport Bay Orange County, California was toxic to Ceriodaphnia. The stormwater runoff contained sufficient concentrations of diazinon and chlorpyrifos (organophosphate pesticides - OP pesticides), as well as some unidentified

Scott Taylor; Deborah Neiter

164

Using biomarkers to improve heavy oil reservoir management: An example from the cymric field, Kern County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

For biodegraded oil accumulations, field development can be optimized by using geochemical indicators of variations in the extent of bacterial alteration. Biodegradation typically reduces oil producibility by increasing oil viscosity. In the Cymric field (Kern County, California), sidewall core extracts reveal that the extent of oil biodegradation changes substantially over extremely short vertical distances in a shallow, low-permeability reservoir. Zones

M. A. McCaffrey; H. A. Legarre; S. J. Johnson

1996-01-01

165

Bat Inventory of the Multiple Species Conservation Program Area in San Diego County, California, 2002-2004.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We conducted a bat species inventory of the Multiple Species Conservation Program (MSCP) area in San Diego County, California. The study began in the early summer of 2002 and terminated in the winter of 2003. We used a variety of bat survey techniques inc...

C. S. Brehme D. C. Stokes R. N. Fisher S. A. Hathaway

2005-01-01

166

ANAEROBIC DEGRADATION OF MTBE TO TBA IN GROUND WATER AT GASOLINE SPILL SITES IN ORANGE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA  

EPA Science Inventory

Although tert-Butyl Alcohol (TBA) has not been used as a fuel oxygenate in Orange County, California, the concentrations of TBA in ground water at gasoline spill sites are high compared to the concentrations of the conventional fuel oxygenate Methyl tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE). In t...

167

Distribution of the endangered giant kangaroo rat, Dipodomys ingens, on the Naval Petroleum Reserves, Kern County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Field surveys were conducted to determine the distribution and relative abundance of burrow systems of the endangered giant kangaroo rat, Dipodomys ingens, on the US Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum Reserves (NPR-1, NPR-2) in Kern County, California. A total of 1080 burrow systems were observed on 30 sections of NPR-1, 22 sections of NPR-2, and six adjoining sections. Most burrow

T. P. OFarrell; N. E. Mathews; T. T. Kato; P. M. McCue; J. S. McManus; M. L. Sauls

1987-01-01

168

Diatom biostratigraphy from dolomites in Monterey Formation, Rodeo Canyon to Point Pedernales, southwestern Santa Barbara County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eight-six samples were collected from three stratigraphic sections in southwestern Santa Barbara County, California: Rodeo Canyon, Lyons Head, and Point Pedernales. In this area, the Monterey Formation is exposed in prominent cliffs along the coast from Rodeo Canyon on the south, to Lyons Head and Point Pedernales on the west. Because most of the opal-A in the Monterey diatomaceous shale

W. W. Wornardt

1986-01-01

169

Alexander von Humboldt: a revolutionary explorer.  

PubMed

After he returned from his five-year expedition to the New World, Alexander von Humboldt promoted himself as a Romantic explorer. Although this image pervades British perceptions, political movements have fashioned different heroic versions of Humboldt in Germany and South America. PMID:18276009

Fara, Patricia

2008-02-13

170

Use of a density equalizing map projection in analysing childhood cancer in four California counties.  

PubMed

In this study, 401 cases of childhood cancer in four California counties in 1980-1988 were analysed with the innovative methodology of density equalizing map projections. The data were originally collected and analysed by the California State Department of Health Services (DHS). In addition to the new analytic technique, the present analysis used population data more detailed and more accurate than those in the DHS analysis. The geographic boundaries of the 259 census tracts in the study area were adjusted according to population at risk so as to make population density everywhere constant; then the 401 case locations were plotted on the density equalized map. If risk is everywhere equal, the resulting distribution of cases should be uniform except for statistical variation. The metric used was a measure of the variability of the density of cases on the density equalized map. The same metric was calculated for independent samples of artificial cases, generated under the null hypothesis of equal risk. The slight geographic non-uniformity observed among the real cases is well within the limits of variation observed in the samples of artificial cases. In agreement with results published by DHS, we conclude that there is no evidence for geographic variation of risk among the cases studied. Subsets of the data, selected by age, sex, race, time period and cancer site, yielded similar negative results. PMID:11343370

Merrill, D W

171

A cost-benefit analysis of a California county's back injury prevention program.  

PubMed Central

Back-related injuries have become a major health problem in the workplace, affecting as many as 35 percent of the work force and accounting for about 25 percent of all compensation claims. This study evaluates a back injury prevention program among employees in a northern California county in 1989-90. Six divisions of the county government were selected for the study because they had the highest prevalence of back pain experienced and the most back-related injuries in recent years. Four of the six divisions were randomly selected as the intervention group and the remaining two, the control group. Overall, 77 percent or 205 of the targeted employees in the intervention group participated in the study. The intervention group was given an identical health risk assessment (HRA) before and after the 1-year back injury prevention program that offered employees a combination of education, training, physical fitness activities, and ergonomic improvement. The control group was neither given the HRA nor offered the program. The back injury and cost data of both the control and intervention groups were collected before and after the 1-year intervention. The results showed a modest overall decline in back pain prevalence rates, but significant improvement in satisfaction and reduction in risky behaviors. Cost-benefit analysis showed the net benefit of introducing back injury prevention program was $161,108, and the return on investment is 179 percent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Shi, L

1993-01-01

172

Experimental Infection with Western Equine Encephalomyelitis Virus in Wild Rodents Indigenous to Kern County, California  

PubMed Central

Six species of rodents from Kern County, California, were inoculated subcutaneously with western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE) virus to determine their susceptibility to infection and their potential as natural hosts. Ammospermophilus nelsoni, Citellus beecheyi, Dipodomys heermanni, Dipodomys nitratoides, Peromyscus maniculatus, and Sciurus griseus were readily infected. Infection was usually fatal in Dipodomys species, C. beecheyi, and S. griseus, but was clinically inapparent in other species. Viremic responses varied greatly in magnitude and duration in different species and with different viral strains. Viremic animals that survived developed high titers of hemagglutination-inhibiting antibody. Hemagglutination-inhibiting and neutralizing antibodies persisted at high titers for at least 8 to 58 weeks after infection, except in P. maniculatus. If animals died during or shortly after the viremic phase of infection, the virus usually was recoverable from numerous organs. Long-term survival of virus could not be demonstrated in A. nelsoni and Dipodomys species. It is concluded that A. nelsoni and P. maniculatus are not important natural hosts of WEE virus; they are susceptible to infection and develop antibodies, but serological surveys of the same species rarely reveal evidence of infection. S. griseus, D. heermanni, D. nitratoides, and possibly C. beecheyi are aberrant hosts of WEE virus since most of them died when infected. Two species of ticks that are ectoparasitic on rodents in Kern County were evaluated as vectors of WEE virus. Dermacentor parumapertus failed to become infected after feeding on viremic hosts, and Ornithodorus parkeri became infected but failed to transmit virus.

Hardy, J. L.; Reeves, W. C.; Rush, W. A.; Nir, Y. D.

1974-01-01

173

Water-Quality Data for the Lower Russian River Basin, Sonoma County, California, 2003-2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Sonoma County Water Agency, began a study to determine the chemical, microbiological, and isotopic composition of the surface water and ground water in selected areas of the Lower Russian River Basin, Sonoma County, California. This report is a compilation of the hydrologic and water-quality data collected from 10 Russian River sites, 1 gravel-terrace pit site, 12 ground-water sites, 11 tributary sites including Mark West Creek, and 2 estuary sites between the city of Healdsburg and the Pacific Ocean, for the period August 2003 to September 2004. Field measurements made included streamflow, barometric pressure, dissolved oxygen, pH, specific conductance, and turbidity. Water samples were analyzed for nutrients, major ions, total and dissolved organic carbon, trace elements, mercury, wastewater compounds, total coliform, Escherichia coli, Enterococci, Clostridium perfringens, and the stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen. Discharge measurements and sampling techniques were modified to accommodate the very low summer flows at most of the tributaries, and discharge measurements were made with an acoustic Doppler velocity meter at the estuary river site to overcome the complexities associated with tidal influences.

Anders, Robert; Davidek, Karl; Koczot, Kathryn M.

2006-01-01

174

Maternal hospital experiences associated with breastfeeding at 6 months in a northern California county.  

PubMed

A retrospective cohort study of infant-feeding practices at 6 months of age was conducted for 382 breastfed infants in a semirural northern California county. The authors hypothesized that almost exclusive breastfeeding at 6 months would be related to maternal experiences in the hospital. Multiple logistic regression analysis, controlling for maternal age and education, found that almost exclusive breastfeeding at 6 months was positively associated with receiving a telephone number for breastfeeding help from the hospital (odds ratio, 6.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-33.9), use of a breast pump in the first 6 months (odds ratio, 2.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-4.76), and gestational age (odds ratio, 2.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-4.71 for a 4-week age difference), whereas formula supplementation at the hospital had a negative association (odds ratio, 0.27; 95% confidence interval, 0.13-0.56). Making postpartum breastfeeding support easily accessible and offering breast pumps at low or no cost may help to increase exclusive breastfeeding rates in this county. PMID:20484659

Dabritz, Haydee A; Hinton, Bette G; Babb, Jan

2010-05-19

175

Devitoite, A New Heterophyllosilcate Mineral with Astrophyllite-Like Layers from Eastern Fresno County, California  

SciTech Connect

Devitoite, [Ba{sub 6}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}(CO{sub 3})] [Fe{sup 2+}{sub 7}Fe{sup 3+}{sub 2}(Si{sub 4}O{sup 12}){sub 2}O{sub 2}(OH){sub 4}], is a new mineral species from the Esquire No.8 claim along Big Creek in eastern Fresno County, California, U.S.A. It is also found at the nearby Esquire No.7 claim and at Trumbull Peak in Mariposa County. The mineral is named for Alfred (Fred) DeVito (1937-2004). Devitoite crystallized very late in a sequence of minerals resulting from fluids interacting with a quartz-sanbornite vein along its margin with the country rock. The mineral occurs in subparallel intergrowths of very thin brown blades, flattened on {l_brace}001{r_brace} and elongate and striated parallel to [100]. The mineral has a cream to pale brown streak, a silky luster, a Mohs hardness of approximately 4, and two cleavages: {l_brace}001{r_brace} perfect and {l_brace}010{r_brace} good.

Kampf, Anthony R.; Rossman, George R.; Steele, Ian M.; Pluth, Joseph J.; Dunning, Gail E.; Walstrom, Robert E. (CIT); (NHM-LA); (UC)

2010-03-30

176

A preliminary survey of Vietnamese nail salon workers in Alameda County, California.  

PubMed

In recent decades, the nail salon industry has been one of the fastest growing in the U.S. California has over 300,000 workers licensed to perform nail care services. Though little is known about their health, these workers routinely handle cosmetic products containing carcinogens and endocrine disruptors that may increase a woman's breast cancer risk. Additionally, an estimated 59-80% of California nail salons are run by Vietnamese women who face socio-cultural barriers that may compromise their workplace safety and health care access. In a pilot project designed to characterize Vietnamese nail salon workers in Alameda County, California in order to inform future health interventions and reduce occupational exposures, we conducted face-to-face surveys with a convenience sample of 201 Vietnamese nail salon workers at 74 salons. Of the workers surveyed, a majority reported that they are concerned about their health from exposure to workplace chemicals. Additionally, a sizeable proportion reported having experienced some health problem after they began working in the industry, particularly acute health problems that may be associated with solvent exposure (e.g. skin and eye irritation, breathing difficulties and headaches). Our findings highlight a critical need for further investigation into the breast cancer risk of nail salon workers, underscored by the workers' routine use of carcinogenic and endocrine-disrupting chemicals, their prevalent health concerns about such chemicals, and their high level of acute health problems. Moreover, the predominance of Vietnamese immigrant women in this workforce makes it an important target group for further research and health interventions. PMID:18478317

Quach, Thu; Nguyen, Kim-Dung; Doan-Billings, Phuong-An; Okahara, Linda; Fan, Cathyn; Reynolds, Peggy

2008-10-01

177

The California Geotour: Online Geologic Field Trip Guides  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

There are many great ways to learn about the geological history of California, including reading some of the works by noted writer John McPhee. Additionally, the state of California's Department of Conservation has created these very fine online geologic field trip guides. It might be more accurate to say that the site is an interactive index of web pages that contain geologic field guides containing photographs, maps, texts, and directions for local natural features from Humboldt County down to the Inland Empire. The index is organized into geographic regions collectively referred to as the "Geomorphic Provinces of California". Additionally, these geological areas are subdivided into groups like Owens Valley, Lassen Park, and Point Reyes. Overall, it's a great resource, and one that will be appreciated by just about anyone with a penchant for geology or the Golden State.

178

Post-Remedial-Action Survey Report for Kinetic Experiment Water Boiler Reactor Facility, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Rockwell International's Santa Susana Laboratories in Ventura County, California, have been the site of numerous federally-funded contracted projects involving the use of radioactive materials. Among these was the Kinetics Experiment Water Boiler (KEWB) R...

R. A. Wynveen W. H. Smith C. M. Sholeen K. F. Flynn A. L. Justus

1981-01-01

179

Ontogenetic Changes in the Foraging Behavior, Habitat Use and Food Habits of the Western Aquatic Garter Snake, 'Thamnophis couchii', at Hurdygurdy Creek, Del Norte County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The author studied the foraging behaviors, stream habitat use, and food habits of a marked population of western aquatic garter snakes, Thamnophis couchii, at Hurdygurdy Creek (Del Norte County, California) during the spring and summer of 1987 and 1988. D...

A. J. Lind

1990-01-01

180

Planning Level Delineation and Geospatial Characterization of Aquatic Resources for San Jacinto and Portions of Santa Margarita Watersheds, Riverside County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A planning level delineation of aquatic resources was performed within the San Jacinto River and portions of Santa Margarita River Watersheds in Riverside County, California. This was the identification of areas that meet both the jurisdictional requireme...

R. Lichvar G. Gustina M. Ericsson

2003-01-01

181

Geologic Map and Map Database of Eastern Sonoma and Western Napa Counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction This report contains a new 1:100,000-scale geologic map, derived from a set of geologic map databases (Arc-Info coverages) containing information at 1:62,500-scale resolution, and a new description of the geologic map units and structural relations in the map area. Prepared as part of the San Francisco Bay Region Mapping Project, the study area includes the north-central part of the San Francisco Bay region, and forms the final piece of the effort to generate new, digital geologic maps and map databases for an area which includes Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Solano, and Sonoma Counties. Geologic mapping in Lake County in the north-central part of the map extent was not within the scope of the Project. The map and map database integrates both previously published reports and new geologic mapping and field checking by the authors (see Sources of Data index map on the map sheet or the Arc-Info coverage eswn-so and the textfile eswn-so.txt). This report contains new ideas about the geologic structures in the map area, including the active San Andreas Fault system, as well as the geologic units and their relations. Together, the map (or map database) and the unit descriptions in this report describe the composition, distribution, and orientation of geologic materials and structures within the study area at regional scale. Regional geologic information is important for analysis of earthquake shaking, liquifaction susceptibility, landslide susceptibility, engineering materials properties, mineral resources and hazards, as well as groundwater resources and hazards. These data also assist in answering questions about the geologic history and development of the California Coast Ranges.

Graymer, R. W.; Brabb, E. E.; Jones, D. L.; Barnes, J.; Nicholson, R. S.; Stamski, R. E.

2007-01-01

182

Evaluation of Lactation Support in the Workplace or School Environment on 6Month Breastfeeding Outcomes in Yolo County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Six-month breastfeeding outcomes (almost exclusive breastfeeding, partial breastfeeding, and not breastfeeding) were analyzed for 201 infants born to Yolo County, California, mothers who returned to work or school. Twenty-two percent of workplaces and 17% of schools did not provide a lactation room. Although part- or full-time status, knowledge of breastfeeding rules, and support from colleagues were independently associated with the

Haydee A. Dabritz; Bette G. Hinton; Jan Babb

2009-01-01

183

Habitat-related variation in infestation of lizards and rodents with Ixodes ticks in dense woodlands in Mendocino County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the spring and early summer of 2002, we examined the relative importance of Borrelia-refractory lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis, Elgaria spp.) versus potential Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.)-reservoirs (rodents) as hosts for Ixodes pacificus immatures in 14 woodland areas (six oak, five mixed oak\\/Douglas fir, and three redwood\\/tanoak areas) distributed throughout Mendocino County, California. Lizards were estimated to serve as hosts

Rebecca J. Eisen; Lars Eisen

2004-01-01

184

Distribution and Abundance of California Giant Salamander (Dicamptodon ensatus) and Signal Crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) in the Upper Redwood Creek Watershed, Marin County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A survey was conducted in 1997-1998 to identify the distribution of non-native signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) and larval California giant salamanders (Dicamptodon ensatus) within the upper Redwood Creek watershed (Marin County, California). The crayfish is widely distributed along the mainstem Redwood Creek. It was found in lower Fern Creek but not in any first order tributaries or above fish barriers. While present throughout the study area, larval California giant salamanders were found mainly in small headwater tributaries. Larval salamanders appear to use habitats in accordance to their availability, while signal crayfish were rarely found in shallow water habitats and appeared to prefer scour pools. Evidence of predation by signal crayfish on larval giant salamanders was found under confined conditions. Controlled laboratory and field experiments would be needed to determine whether competitive exclusion is occurring. Because of its widespread occurrence in the headwater streams surveyed in this project, California giant salamanders would be an appropriate indicator species for those interested in monitoring the health of small headwater streams. Future long-term monitoring using California giant salamanders should be based on permanent monitoring reaches with periodic basinwide habitat and animal surveys to determine if reaches are representative of basinwide conditions.

Fong, Darren; Howell, Judd A.

2006-01-01

185

Limited Life Opportunities for Black and Latino Youth. Report on a Public Hearing by the Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations (Compton, California, April 26, 1990).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations held a public hearing to examine the effects of poverty on the hundreds of thousands of low income Blacks and Latinos under the age of 18 residing in Los Angeles County (California). The Commission's findings, recommendations, and concerns are presented. The following findings are presented: (1)…

Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations, CA.

186

Limited Life Opportunities for Black and Latino Youth. Report on a Public Hearing by the Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations (Compton, California, April 26, 1990).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations held a public hearing to examine the effects of poverty on the hundreds of thousands of low income Blacks and Latinos under the age of 18 residing in Los Angeles County (California). The Commission's findings, recommendations, and concerns are presented. The following findings are presented:…

Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations, CA.

187

Environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact: Biorecycling Technologies, Inc., Noble Biogas and Fertilizer Plant, Fresno County, California  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is considering a proposal from the California Energy Commission for partial funding up to $1,500,000 of the construction of the biorecycling Technologies, Inc., (BTI) Noble Biogas and Fertilizer Plant in Fresno County, California. BTI along with its contractors and business partners would develop the plant, which would use manure and green waste to produce biogas and a variety of organic fertilizer products. The California Energy Commission has requested funding from the DOE Commercialization Ventures program to assist in the construction of the plant, which would produce up to one megawatt of electricity by burning biogas in a cogeneration unit. The purpose of this environmental assessment (EA) is to provide DOE and the public with information on potential environmental impacts associated with funding development of the proposed project.

NONE

1997-09-01

188

California GAMA Program: Sources and transport of nitrate in shallow groundwater in the Llagas Basin of Santa Clara County, California  

SciTech Connect

A critical component of the State Water Resource Control Board's Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program is to assess the major threats to groundwater resources that supply drinking water to Californians (Belitz et al., 2004). Nitrate is the most pervasive and intractable contaminant in California groundwater and is the focus of special studies under the GAMA program. This report presents results of a study of nitrate contamination in the aquifer beneath the cities of Morgan Hill and Gilroy, CA, in the Llagas Subbasin of Santa Clara County, where high nitrate levels affect several hundred private domestic wells. The main objectives of the study are: (1) to identify the main source(s) of nitrate that issue a flux to the shallow regional aquifer (2) to determine whether denitrification plays a role in the fate of nitrate in the subbasin and (3) to assess the impact that a nitrate management plan implemented by the local water agency has had on the flux of nitrate to the regional aquifer. Analyses of 56 well water samples for major anions and cations, nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate, dissolved excess nitrogen, tritium and groundwater age, and trace organic compounds, show that synthetic fertilizer is the most likely source of nitrate in highly contaminated wells, and that denitrification is not a significant process in the fate of nitrate in the subbasin except in the area of recycled water application. In addition to identifying contaminant sources, these methods offer a deeper understanding of how the severity and extent of contamination are affected by hydrogeology and groundwater management practices. In the Llagas subbasin, the nitrate problem is amplified in the shallow aquifer because it is highly vulnerable with high vertical recharge rates and rapid lateral transport, but the deeper aquifers are relatively more protected by laterally extensive aquitards. Artificial recharge delivers low-nitrate water and provides a means of long-term remediation. Examination of nitrate concentration in relation to groundwater age indicates that the nitrate management plan has not yet resulted in a decrease in the flux of nitrate to the shallow aquifer in the areas tested.

Moran, J E; McNab, W; Esser, B; Hudson, G; Carle, S; Beller, H; Kane, S; Tompson, A B; Letain, T; Moore, K; Eaton, G; Leif, R; Moody-Bartel, C; Singleton, M

2005-06-29

189

Evaluation of ground-water monitoring network, Santa Cruz County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Santa Cruz County Flood Control and Water Conservation District seeks to improve the existing network of observation wells to monitor water levels and ground-water quality in the Pajaro Valley subarea and the Aptos-Soquel, San Lorenzo, and Santa Cruz Coastal subbasins in California. The proposed network , consisting of 92 wells, is designed to monitor changes in storage and quality of ground water resulting from climatic changes and management-induced stresses. In the proposed network , water levels in all wells would be measured semiannually, in April and September, and monthly in a few key wells. The water-level measurements would provide data that could be used to determine changes in ground-water storage. In addition to the currently monitored characteristics--temperature, specific conductance, pH, and chloride ion concentration--inclusion of annual sampling and analysis for major ions and nutrients is proposed. The network would also include sampling and analysis for trace elements once every 4 years. More frequent analyses are proposed in areas where water-quality problems are known to exist or where potential water-quality problems are recognized. Analyses for major ions, nutrients, and trace elements are included in the proposed network to provide baseline data for monitoring long-term changes in water quality and to detect any unexpected changes in quality. (USGS)

Blankenbaker, G. G.; Farrar, Christopher D.

1981-01-01

190

Adverse pregnancy outcomes in relation to water contamination, Santa Clara County, California, 1980-1981  

SciTech Connect

An epidemiologic study was conducted to investigate a suspected cluster of adverse outcomes of pregnancies conceived in 1980-1981 among women who resided in a census tract in Santa Clara County, California that was thought to be exposed to drinking water from a well contaminated by an organic solvent, trichloroethane. A comparison census tract that received water from a different source was selected on the basis of demographic comparability. The cluster was confirmed; the odds ratio for spontaneous abortion was 2.3 (95% confidence interval (Cl) 1.3-4.2) after adjustment by multiple logistic regression for maternal risk factors, including maternal age, alcohol consumption, smoking, and prior fetal loss. The relative risk for congenital malformations was 3.1 (95% Cl 1.1-10.4). Because of the lack of precise information on the timing and extent of contamination, the pattern of spontaneous abortion rates throughout the study period cannot be used to either support or refute a causal inference.

Deane, M.; Swan, S.H.; Harris, J.A.; Epstein, D.M.; Neutra, R.R.

1989-05-01

191

Inequalities in cumulative environmental burdens among three urbanized counties in California.  

PubMed

Low-income communities and communities of color often suffer from multiple environmental hazards that pose risks to their health. Here we extended a cumulative environmental hazard inequality index (CEHII) - developed to assess inequalities in air pollution hazards - to compare the inequality among three urban counties in California: Alameda, San Diego, and Los Angeles. We included a metric for heat stress to the analysis because exposure to excessively hot weather is increasingly recognized as a threat to human health and well-being. We determined if inequalities from heat stress differed between the three regions and if this added factor modified the metric for inequality from cumulative exposure to air pollution. This analysis indicated that of the three air pollutants considered, diesel particulate matter had the greatest inequality, followed by nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) and fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)). As measured by our index, the inequalities from cumulative exposure to air pollution were greater than those of single pollutants. Inequalities were significantly different among single air pollutant hazards within each region and between regions; however, inequalities from the cumulative burdens did not differ significantly between any two regions. Modeled absolute and relative heat stress inequalities were small except for relative heat stress in San Diego which had the second highest inequality. Our analysis, techniques, and results provide useful insights for policy makers to assess inequalities between regions and address factors that contribute to overall environmental inequality within each region. PMID:22280931

Su, Jason G; Jerrett, Michael; Morello-Frosch, Rachel; Jesdale, Bill M; Kyle, Amy D

2012-01-03

192

Under- and over-nutrition among refugees in San Diego County, California.  

PubMed

Resettled refugees often arrive in their host country with little knowledge of nutrition or available food choices. We explored nutrition-related issues of recent refugee arrivals to San Diego County-the second largest California resettlement site. In-depth interviews (n = 40) were conducted with refugees, health care practitioners, and refugee service organizations. Content analysis identified nutrition-related themes. Unhealthy weight gain after arrival was the most common concern and was attributed to social pressures among adolescents, food choices and a more sedentary lifestyle. Conversely, undernutrition remained a concern due to poor diets. Factors influencing nutritional problems included continuation of past habits, acculturation, unfamiliarity with available foods and socio-economic influences. The nutritional concerns encountered by resettled refugees in San Diego are not unique to this group but are aggravated by their past experiences, and abrupt changes to food choices and behavior. Addressing contextual factors of poor food choices may prevent some of the long term health consequences of poor nutrition. PMID:20505992

Rondinelli, Amanda J; Morris, Meghan D; Rodwell, Timothy C; Moser, Kathleen S; Paida, Paulino; Popper, Steve T; Brouwer, Kimberly C

2011-02-01

193

Biological survey of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (Buena Vista), Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

A field survey of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2, Kern County, California, was conducted to determine the distribution and relative abundance of endangered species and other wildlife. Of the 343 San Joaquin kit fox dens found in 40 sections, 33 were observed by surveyors in transit and 310 were found along transects. Of the latter, 264 were typical subterranean dens and 46 were atypical dens in man-made structures. Estimated density of dens was 28.8 +- 4.4 per square mile; relative density was 9.2/1000 acres. The number of typical dens observed per section was inversely correlated with the number of petroleum wells per section (intensity of development). Atypical dens were usually found to be in pipes or pipe culverts and were positively correlated with density of wells. Relative densities of black-tailed jackrabbits (41.9/1000 acres) and desert cottontails (17.1/1000 acres), preferred prey for foxes, were high compared with densities reported on other public lands. Most (81%) of the 19 blunt-nosed leopard lizards were observed in six adjacent sections located in the gentle foothills near Buena Vista Lake playa. Most (86%) of the 275 giant kangaroo rat burrow systems were observed in ten sections containing flat, relatively undeveloped terrain in and around upper Buena Vista Valley. San Joaquin antelope ground squirrels were the second most commonly observed diurnal vertebrate: 761 observations in 45 sections. A total of 6740 observations of 61 species of wildlife were made.

O'Farrell, T.P.; Sauls, M.L.

1987-06-01

194

Under- and Over-Nutrition Among Refugees in San Diego County, California  

PubMed Central

Resettled refugees often arrive in their host country with little knowledge of nutrition or available food choices. We explored nutrition-related issues of recent refugee arrivals to San Diego County—the second largest California resettlement site. In-depth interviews (n = 40) were conducted with refugees, health care practitioners, and refugee service organizations. Content analysis identified nutrition-related themes. Unhealthy weight gain after arrival was the most common concern and was attributed to social pressures among adolescents, food choices and a more sedentary lifestyle. Conversely, undernutrition remained a concern due to poor diets. Factors influencing nutritional problems included continuation of past habits, acculturation, unfamiliarity with available foods and socio-economic influences. The nutritional concerns encountered by resettled refugees in San Diego are not unique to this group but are aggravated by their past experiences, and abrupt changes to food choices and behavior. Addressing contextual factors of poor food choices may prevent some of the long term health consequences of poor nutrition.

Rondinelli, Amanda J.; Morris, Meghan D.; Rodwell, Timothy C.; Moser, Kathleen S.; Paida, Paulino; Popper, Steve T.

2010-01-01

195

Seastacks buried beneath newly reported Lower Miocene sandstone, northern Santa Barbara County, California  

SciTech Connect

Three large, isolated exposures of a light-gray, coarse-grained, thick-bedded sandstone unit occur in the northern San Rafael Mountains of Santa Barbara County, California. These rocks are moderately fossiliferous and contain Vertipecten bowersi, Amussiopecten vanvlecki, Aequipecten andersoni, Otrea howelli, shark teeth, whale bones, and regular echinoid spines. The fossils indicate that the sandstone unit, although previously reported as upper(.) Miocene, correlates best with the lower Miocene Vaqueros Formation. This unit was deposited in angular unconformity on a Cretaceous, greenish-gray turbidite sequence of interbedded sandstone and shale, and onlaps the unconformity erosion surface from west to east, the unit being thicker in the west and older at its base. The underlying Cretaceous sandstone beds are well indurated, and during the eastward transgression of the early Miocene sea, they resisted wave erosion and stood as seastacks offshore of the advancing coastline, thus creating a very irregular topographic surface upon which the Vaqueros Formation was deposited. Some seastacks were as much as 4 m tall, as indicated by inliers of Cretaceous rock surrounded by 4-m thick sections of the Vaqueros Formation.

Fritsche, A.E.; Hanna, F.M.

1985-04-01

196

Gene Flow Patterns of the Mayfly Fallceon quilleri in San Diego County, California.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Management decisions and conservation strategies for freshwater invertebrates critically depend on an understanding of gene flow and genetic structure. We collected the mayfly Fallceon quilleri (Ephemeroptera: Baetidae) from 15 streams across three geographically distinct watersheds in San Diego County, California (San Dieguito, Santa Margarita, and Tijuana) and one site in Anza-Borrego desert. We sequenced a 667 base pair region of the mitochondrial DNA (COI) to assess genetic structure and gene flow. We found eight haplotypes across all populations. San Dieguito and Santa Margarita each contained six haplotypes. Tijuana and Anza Borrego each contained four haplotypes. The expected heterozygosity for San Dieguito, Santa Margarita, Tijuana, and Anza Borrego was 0.81, 0.83, 0.75, and 1.0, respectively. A hierarchical AMOVA analysis indicated restricted gene flow and a pairwise comparison indicated that Tijuana watershed differs significantly from San Dieguito and Anza Borrego. A haplotype cladogram revealed two internal ancestral haplotypes and six derived tip haplotypes that are unique to particular watersheds. These results suggest that Tijuana (the southernmost and the most impacted watershed) is more genetically distinct and isolated than the other watersheds sampled.

Zickovich, J.; Bohonak, A. J.

2005-05-01

197

Improving planting stock quality: The humboldt experience. Forest Service general technical report (Final)  

SciTech Connect

A seedling testing program was developed to improve the survival and growth potential of planting stock produced in the USDA Forest Service Humboldt Nursery, situated on the Pacific Coast in northern California. Coastal and inland seed sources of Douglas-fir and eight other conifers in the Pacific Slope forests of western Oregon and northern California were assessed in both nursery and field studies. Seedling top and root growth capacities were evaluated just after lifting and after cold storage, and stored seedlings were tested for suvival and growth on cleared planting sites in the seed zones of origin. Safe lifting and cold storage schedules were defined, and seedling cultural regimes were formulated to produce successful 1-0, 1-1, and 2-0 stock types. Testing deomonstrated the critical elements of reforestation and proved that rapid establishment is attainable on diverse sites. Accomplishments of the Humboldt program recommended similar programs for other forest nurseries and their service regions.

Jenkinson, J.L.; Nelson, J.A.; Huddleston, M.E.

1993-05-01

198

76 FR 42112 - Humboldt (NV) Resource Advisory Committee  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Forest Service Humboldt (NV) Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY...SUMMARY: The Humboldt (NV) Resource Advisory Committee will meet...implementaion and recommend funding allocations for selected projects. DATES...recommend and decide on funding allocations for proposed projects,...

2011-07-18

199

California GAMA Program: Sources and Transport of Nitrate in Shallow Groundwater in the Llagas Basin of Santa Clara County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program is to assess the major threats to groundwater resources that supply drinking water to Californians (Belitz et al., 2004). Nitrate is the most pervasive and intractable contaminant in California groundwater and is t...

2005-01-01

200

Geologic map database of the El Mirage Lake area, San Bernardino and Los Angeles counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This geologic map database for the El Mirage Lake area describes geologic materials for the dry lake, parts of the adjacent Shadow Mountains and Adobe Mountain, and much of the piedmont extending south from the lake upward toward the San Gabriel Mountains. This area lies within the western Mojave Desert of San Bernardino and Los Angeles Counties, southern California. The area is traversed by a few paved highways that service the community of El Mirage, and by numerous dirt roads that lead to outlying properties. An off-highway vehicle area established by the Bureau of Land Management encompasses the dry lake and much of the land north and east of the lake. The physiography of the area consists of the dry lake, flanking mud and sand flats and alluvial piedmonts, and a few sharp craggy mountains. This digital geologic map database, intended for use at 1:24,000-scale, describes and portrays the rock units and surficial deposits of the El Mirage Lake area. It was prepared as part of a water-resource assessments of the area, describing and interpreting surface geology that provides information to help understand distribution and extent of deeper groundwater-bearing units. The area mapped covers the Shadow Mountains SE and parts of the Shadow Mountains, Adobe Mountain, and El Mirage 7.5-minute quadrangles. The map database includes detailed geology of surface and bedrock deposits, which represent a significant update from previous bedrock geologic maps by Dibblee (1960) and Troxel and Gunderson (1970), and the surficial geologic map of Ponti and Burke (1980); it incorporates a fringe of the detailed bedrock mapping in the Shadow Mountains by Martin (1992).

Miller, D. M.; Bedford, D. R.

2000-01-01

201

Strike-slip offset along the McKittrick fault, western Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

Reconstructions of offset Miocene strata in McKittrick and northern Midway-Sunset fields, western Kern County, California, show about 7 mi (11 km) of post-Miocene right-lateral offset along the McKittrick fault. Detailed correlations of facies within the Potter sand, an informal member of the late Miocene Reef Ridge formation, in these fields show consistent stratigraphic character when the offset of the McKittrick fault is removed. Achieving this correlation allows the further correlation of Stevens sands, an informal member of the underlying Monterey Formation, between Midway-Sunset and McKittrick fields, including the feeder channels of these turbidite deposits. Facies are more continuous in a dip direction than they are along strike, facilitating their use as piercing points along the fault. The McKittrick fault parallels a feature long mapped as a right-lateral structure, the Bacon Hills fault, along the southwestern edge of the Cymric field. The McKittrick fault has always been considered to have vertical separation only. However, strike-slip motion as now proposed for it clarifies a structural problem that has been unexplained: the resemblance of the multiple thrust slices along the McKittrick fault in northern Midway-Sunset field and southeast McKittrick to the palm structures of Sylvester and Smith, but for which the requisite strike-slip displacement was not proved. Further evidence for this structural interpretation is provided by the presence of northeast-southwest-trending strike-slip faults in McKittrick Valley, which are explained by this model as differential slip taking up rotation between the McKittrick and Bacon Hills faults.

Bowersox, J.R.; Olson, D.M.

1987-05-01

202

Report of endangered species studies on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

Between 1983 and 1986 the size of the population of San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica) on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2), Kern County, California, was estimated semiannually using capture-recapture techniques. Although summer population estimates varied between 222 in 1983 and 121 in 1986, and winter estimates varies between 258 in 1984 and 91 in 1983, the population appeared to remain relatively stable at an apparent norm of 165. Kit foxes were abundant even in the intensely developed areas, and numbers and densities (1.12 to 2.49/sq mile) were consistently higher on NPR-2 than on neighboring NPR-1. The percentage of adult vixens that successfully raised pups was 55%, average litter size was 4.0 +- 0.0, and the sex ratio (M:F) of 25 pups was 1:1.5. Most (45.2%) foxes were killed by coyotes (Canis latrans), vehicles killed 6.4%, and 6.5% died of other causes. A cause could not be determined for 41.9% of the deaths. There was a general increase in coyote visitation rates at scent stations, but kit fox visitation rates generally decreased. Kit fox indices were consistently higher on NPR-2 than on NPR-1. Approximately 15% of the kit foxes on NPR-2 dispersed an average of 2.2 +- 0.2 miles. Average dispersal distance did not differ between the sexes. The longest dispersal was 6.9 miles. Proportionately more male than female pups dispersed. Remains of lagomorphs (jackrabbits and cottontails) and kangaroo rats had the highest frequency of occurrence in scats. Frequency of occurrence of lagomorph remains was greater in developed than in undeveloped habitats. Proportions of lagomorph remains increased and kangaroo rat remains decreased between 1983 and 1984. 62 refs., 9 figs., 24 tabs.

O'Farrell, T.P.; Warrick, G.D.; Mathews, N.E.; Kato, T.T.

1987-09-01

203

Wildlife management plan, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

Under the Naval Petroleum Act of 1976, Congress directed the Secretary of the Navy and subsequently the Secretary of Energy, to produce petroleum products from Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) in Kern County, California, at the maximum efficient rate consistent with sound engineering practices. Because of the presence of two endangered species and the quality, quantity, and contiguous nature of habitat on NPR-1, the area is unique and management of its resources deserves special attention. The purpose of this wildlife management plan is to: (1) draw together specific information on NPR-1 wildlife resources; (2) suggest management goals that could be implemented, which if achieved, would result in diverse, healthy wildlife populations; and (3) reinitiate cooperative agreements between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other conservation organizations regarding the management of wildlife on NPR-1. NPR-1 supports an abundant and diverse vertebrate fauna. Twenty-five mammalian, 92 avian, eight reptilian, and two amphibian species have been observed on Elk Hills. Of these, three are endangered (San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica; giant kangaroo rat, Dipodomys ingens; blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Gambelia silus). Nine vertebrates, six invertebrates, and four plant species known to occur or suspected of occurring on Elk Hills are potential candidates for listing. A major objective of this management plan is to minimize the impact of petroleum development activities on the San Joaquin kit fox, giant kangaroo rat, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, and their essential habitats. This will mainly be achieved by monitoring the status of these species and their habitat and by restoring disturbed habitats. In general, management policies designed to benefit the above three species and other species of concern will also benefit other wildlife inhabiting NPR-1.

O'Farrell, T.P.; Scrivner, J.H.

1987-01-01

204

Habitat restoration plan for Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

In 1976 Congress directed that production on the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) in Kern County, California, be increased to the maximum efficient rate to fulfill some United States needs for domestic oil and gas. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) issued a Biological Opinion, required under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, that proposed construction activities on NPR-1 would jeopardize the continued existence of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica) and blunt-nosed leopard lizard (Gambelia silus) and damage their critical habitats. One of the reasonable and prudent alternatives that the FWS required if the project were to proceed was that DOE prepare this plan to restore disturbed habitats. The plan was based on published information and the results of habitat restoration studies conducted on NPR-1 between 1981 and 1983. Preconstruction surveys will be used to insure that new disturbances are the minimum size necessary, topsoil is salvaged, and engineering practices are implemented to control soil erosion and enhance revegetation. Existing disturbances will be located, inventoried, classified, and restored using existing guidelines. Native and naturalized plant seeds will be harvested and cultivated; shrub seedlings will be grown in containers suitable for transplantation. An inventory of disturbances, results of preconstruction activities, inventory of topsoil reserves, changes in habitat quality, uses of herbicides and toxic substances, and program costs will be monitored and used to document progress and evaluate the success of the program. Results of the program will be documented in an annual report, at technical information meetings and published in DOE topical reports and scientific journals. 46 refs., 1 fig. 4 tabs.

O'Farrell, T.P.; Mitchell, D.L.

1985-10-01

205

Social and institutional factors that affect breastfeeding duration among WIC participants in Los Angeles County, California.  

PubMed

Hospital practices and early maternal return to work are associated with breastfeeding duration; however, research has not documented the long-term effects of many hospital policies or the effect of early return to work on breastfeeding outcomes of WIC participants. This study investigated the impact of in-hospital breastfeeding, receipt of a formula discharge pack, and maternal return to work on the long-term breastfeeding outcomes of 4,725 WIC participants in Los Angeles County, California. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess determinants of exclusive breastfeeding at 6 months and breastfeeding at 6, 12, and 24 months. In-hospital initiation of breastfeeding, exclusive breastfeeding in the hospital, receipt of a formula discharge pack, and maternal return to work before 3 months were all significantly associated with breastfeeding outcomes after controlling for known confounders. Mothers who exclusively breastfed in the hospital were eight times as likely as mothers who did not breastfeed in the hospital to reach the AAP recommendation of breastfeeding for 12 months or longer (P < .01). Only 6.9% of the sample reported exclusively breastfeeding for 6 months or more, and just one-third reported any breastfeeding at 12 months. Nine in ten respondents received a formula discharge pack in the hospital. Mothers who received a discharge pack were half as likely to exclusively breastfeed at 6 months as those who did not receive one (P < .01). Medical providers should educate, encourage, and support WIC mothers to breastfeed in the hospital and refrain from giving formula discharge packs. PMID:22205423

Langellier, Brent A; Pia Chaparro, M; Whaley, Shannon E

2012-12-01

206

A vapor-dominated reservoir exceeding 600{degrees}F at the Geysers, Sonoma County, California  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature vapor-dominated reservoir underlies a portion of the Northwest Geysers area, Sonoma County, California. The high-temperature reservoir (HTR) is defined by flowing fluid temperatures exceeding 500º F, rock temperatures apparently exceeding 600º F and steam enthalpies of about 1320 BTU/lb. Steam from existing wells drilled in the Northwest Geysers is produced from both a “typical” Geysers reservoir and the HTR. In all cases, the HTR is in the lower portion of the wells and is overlain by a “typical” Geysers reservoir. Depth to the high-temperature reservoir is relatively uniform at about -5900 ft subsea. There are no identified lithologic or mineralogic conditions that separate the HTR from the “typical” reservoir, although the two reservoirs are vertically distinct and can be located in most wells to within about 200 ft by the use of downhole temperature-depth measurements. Gas concentrations in steam from the HTR are higher (6 to 9 wt %) than from the “typical” Geysers reservoir (0.85 to 2.6 wt %). Steam from the HTR is enriched in chloride and the heavy isotopes of water relative to the “typical” reservoir. Available static and dynamic measurements show pressures are subhydrostatic in both reservoirs with no anomalous differences between the two: the HTR pressure being near 520 psia at sea level datum. The small observed differences in pressure between the reservoirs appear to vary along a steam density gradient. It is postulated that the Northwest Geysers area evolved more slowly toward vapor-dominated conditions than other parts of The Geysers field because of its poor connection with the surface. In this paper, a model is presented in which the boundary between the HTR and “typical” reservoir is a thermodynamic feature only, resulting from recent deep venting of a liquid-dominated system in which conduction is still an important component of heat transfer.

Walters, M.A.; Sternfeld, J.N.; Haizlip, J.R.; Drenick, A.F.; Combs, Jim

1988-01-01

207

Preliminary isostatic gravity map of the Sonoma volcanic field and vicinity, Sonoma and Napa Counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This isostatic residual gravity map is part of a three-dimensional mapping effort focused on the subsurface distribution of rocks of the Sonoma volcanic field in Napa and Sonoma counties, northern California. This map will serve as a basis for modeling the shapes of basins beneath the Santa Rosa Plain and Napa and Sonoma Valleys, and for determining the location and geometry of faults within the area. Local spatial variations in the Earth's gravity field (after accounting for variations caused by elevation, terrain, and deep crustal structure explained below) reflect the distribution of densities in the mid to upper crust. Densities often can be related to rock type, and abrupt spatial changes in density commonly mark lithologic boundaries. High-density basement rocks exposed within the northern San Francisco Bay area include those of the Mesozoic Franciscan Complex and Great Valley Sequence present in the mountainous areas of the quadrangle. Alluvial sediment and Tertiary sedimentary rocks are characterized by low densities. However, with increasing depth of burial and age, the densities of these rocks may become indistinguishable from those of basement rocks. Tertiary volcanic rocks are characterized by a wide range in densities, but, on average, are less dense than the Mesozoic basement rocks. Isostatic residual gravity values within the map area range from about -41 mGal over San Pablo Bay to about 11 mGal near Greeg Mountain 10 km east of St. Helena. Steep linear gravity gradients are coincident with the traces of several Quaternary strike-slip faults, most notably along the West Napa fault bounding the west side of Napa Valley, the projection of the Hayward fault in San Pablo Bay, the Maacama Fault, and the Rodgers Creek fault in the vicinity of Santa Rosa. These gradients result from juxtaposing dense basement rocks against thick Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks.

Langenheim, V. E.; Roberts, C. W.; McCabe, C. A.: McPhee, D. K.; Tilden, J. E.; Jachens, R. C.

2006-01-01

208

Interpretation of total wave field data over Lost Hills Field, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

During May 1987, approximately 5 mi of total wave field data were acquired over the southeastern edge of Lost Hills Field, Kerny County, California. Data were acquired to assess the capabilities of multicomponent data to provide information about lithologic variation and fracturing within the Miocene Monterey Formation. Quality of the shear-wave sections was extraordinarily good, better than any P-wave sections reviewed from the area. The addition of a multicomponent VSP provided crucial tie information between P- and S-wave data. VP/VS ratios were computed that ranged from 2.79 to 1.63, with low VP/VS ratios in the interval (lower Reef Ridge Shale to McDonald Shale) corresponding to production. Evidence for azimuthal anisotropy was found, so the SV and SH data sets were rotated into principal component axes. The fast shear wave (S1) and slow shear wave (S2) have orientations of N45/sup 0/E and N45/sup 0/W, respectively. After rotation, these data show clear evidence of shear-wave splitting. Delay ratios, used as a measure of fracture intensity, range from a maximum of 7.31% to a minimum of 0.09% across the structure. Delay ratios in the zone of interest are anomalously high (2.83-7.31%) in the vicinity of production. Additionally, a comparison of slope vs. percent of interval delay indicates a larger degree of fracturing on the flanks as opposed to the crest of the structure. Use of a total wave field data set and associated analyses have provided significant structural and stratigraphic information on the Miocene Monterey Formation over the Lost Hills field, highlighting the productive interval.

Squires, S.G.; Kim, D.Y.

1988-03-01

209

Deformation near the Coyote Creek fault, Imperial County, California: Tectonic or groundwater-related?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) measurements show a consistent, 40-km2 wedge-shaped area of deformation partially bounded by a branch of the Coyote Creek fault (a southern extension of the San Jacinto fault) in Imperial County, California, west of the Salton Sea. The deformation is centered at 33.1 N latitude, 116.0 W longitude. 18 ERS-1 and ERS-2 (descending) interferograms falling within 1992 to 2000 are analyzed. An average line-of-sight range change over the area of 6 ± 3 mm per year away from the satellite is observed with peak values up to 12 ± 3 mm per year. The southwestern edge of the deformation is partially bounded by a fault segment that ruptured in the 1968 Mw 6.5 Borrego Mountain earthquake and which also showed triggered slip after the 1987 Superstition Hills earthquakes. The southeastern edge of the deformation also coincides with a mapped fault. The deformation is centered on a farming area that has pumped approximately 5.8 × 10-6 m3 per year of groundwater from 5 wells on the property and which shows declining water levels of 1.4 m per year. The area of highest change appears to be centered on location of the wells and away from the faults. The aquifer is at a depth of roughly 100 to 200 m and consists of sands with interbedded clays. It appears that the most likely explanation is subsidence due to groundwater withdrawal in a fault-bounded aquifer rather than tectonic slip.

Mellors, Robert J.; Boisvert, Alex

2003-02-01

210

Long term compliance with California's Smoke-Free Workplace Law among bars and restaurants in Los Angeles County  

PubMed Central

Objective: To assess long term compliance with the California Smoke-Free Workplace Law in Los Angeles County freestanding bars and bar/restaurants. Design: Population based annual site inspection survey of a random sample of Los Angeles County freestanding bars and bar/restaurants was conducted from 1998 to 2002. Main outcome measures: The primary outcomes of interest were patron and employee smoking. The secondary outcomes of interest were the presence of ashtrays and designated outdoor smoking areas. Results: Significant increases in patron non-smoking compliance were found for freestanding bars (45.7% to 75.8%, p < 0.0001) and bar/restaurants (92.2% to 98.5%, p < 0.0001) between 1998 and 2002. Increases in employee non-smoking compliance were found for freestanding bars (86.2% to 94.7%, p < 0.0003) and bar/restaurants (96.5% to 99.2%, p < 0.005). Conclusions: This study provides clear evidence that the California Smoke-Free Workplace Law has been effective at reducing patron and employee smoking in Los Angeles County bars and restaurants. Recommendations include educational campaigns targeted to freestanding bar owners and staff to counter perceptions of lost revenue, more rigorous enforcement, and more severe penalties for repeat violators such as alcohol licence revocation. Policymakers can enact smoke-free restaurant and bar policies to protect employees and patrons from secondhand smoke, confident that these laws can be successfully implemented.

Weber, M; Bagwell, D; Fielding, J; Glantz, S

2003-01-01

211

Infrared survey of the Pisgah Crater area, San Bernardino County, California - a geologic interpretation  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The infrared survey of the Pisgah Crater Area, San Bernardino County, California was primarily undertaken to establish parameters by which rock types, structures, and textures peculiar to this locale could be recognized or differentiated. A secondary purpose was to provide an adequate evaluation and calibration of airborne and ground-based instruments used in the survey. Pisgah Crater and its vicinity was chosen as one of the fundamental test sites for the NASA remote sensing program because of its relatively fresh basaltic flows and pyroclastics. Its typical exposure of basalt also made it a possible lunar analogue. A fundamental test site for the purpose of the program is defined as a readily accessible area for which the topography, geology, hydrology, soils, vegetation and other features are relatively well known. All remote sensor instrument teams, i.e. infrared, radar, microwave, and photography, were obligated to use the fundamental test sites for instrument evaluation and to establish terrain identification procedures. Pisgah Crater, nearby Sunshine Cone, and their associated lava flows are in the southern Mojave Desert about 40 miles east-southeast of Barstow, California. (See fig. 1.) U. S. Highway 66 skirts .the northern part of the area and provides access via asphalt-paved and dirt roads to the Crater and to the perimeters of the flows. Pisgah Crater, which is a pumiceous cone, is owned and occasionally quarried by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. The remaining part of the area to the south is within the boundary of the Marine Corps Base, Twentynine Palms, California and is currently being used as a gunnery, and bombing range. The proximate area to east, west, and north of Pisgah Crater is public domain. Originally, an area totaling 10 square miles was outlined for detailed study. (See plate 1.) This included an 8 mile long strip extending south- east from and including Pisgah Crater to Lavic Dry Lake, and a 2 mile strip aligned to include a portion of the Sunshine lava flow and the dry lake. Additional aerial infrared imagery of the Sunshine and Pisgah flows along the Pisgah fault proved so interesting and informative that this area is included in the discussion. Infrared surveys were flown February ii through 13, 1965 and August 5 and 9, 1966. The initial survey was flown by the NASA personnel aboard the NASA 926 Convair 240 aircraft. Because of technical problems with the infrared scanners (4.5-5.5 and 8-14 micron bands) and with certain ground instruments, most of the imagery and ground temperature data obtained during the initial survey period was of little value. However, excellent infrared imagery in the 8-14 micron (?) region of the spectrum was acquired by the Geological Survey during the August 1966 survey. The scanner was mounted in a Beech D-18 aircraft provided by the Survey's Water Resources Division. Likewise, more reliable ground data was obtained at this time owing to improved instrumentation and technique. Ground data were taken by Geological Survey personnel including W. A. Fischer, J. D. Friedman, W. R. Hemphill, D. L. Daniels, G. R. Boynton, Po W. Philbin and the author. C. R. Fross operated the infrared scanner during the August, 1966 survey and R. M. Turner was-responsible for photo processing of the infrared imagery. Their assistance is gratefully acknowledged.

Gawarecki, Stephen J.

1968-01-01

212

Hybrid wood-geothermal power plant, Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California. Identification of environmental issues, second phase  

SciTech Connect

GeoProducts Corporation and the California Department of Water Resources have jointly proposed to develop a 55 MWe power plant in Lassen County, California. The proposed power plant is unique in that it will utilize geothermal heat and wood fuel to generate electrical power, the first attempt to utilize these resources together on a commercial scale. This report identifies requirements for new environmental information that must be generated for permit applications and for preparation of environmental documents required by CEOA and NEPA; presents a schedule for generating new environmental data, for preparing and submitting permit applications, and for obtaining permits; presents a budget for permitting, licensing and environmental assessments as required by applicable laws, regulations and procedures; and investigates the step needed to qualify for a Small Power Plant Exemption by the State Energy Commission.

Not Available

1981-08-14

213

Diatom biostratigraphy from dolomites in Monterey Formation, Rodeo Canyon to Point Pedernales, southwestern Santa Barbara County, California  

SciTech Connect

Eight-six samples were collected from three stratigraphic sections in southwestern Santa Barbara County, California: Rodeo Canyon, Lyons Head, and Point Pedernales. In this area, the Monterey Formation is exposed in prominent cliffs along the coast from Rodeo Canyon on the south, to Lyons Head and Point Pedernales on the west. Because most of the opal-A in the Monterey diatomaceous shale in this area was converted to opal-CT and/or microcrystalline quartz, the diatoms are poorly preserved or obliterated. Therefore, the age of these rocks has been in question for a long time. Twenty-five 86 samples yielded age diagnostic diatoms that range from the early Miocene, late Relizian, Annellus californicus zone, to the early Pliocene, late Delmontian, Thalassiosira oestrupii zone. These ages can be directly related to those of diatomaceous shales, mudstones, and dolomites in the California offshore.

Wornardt, W.W.

1986-04-01

214

Using contextual issues among African Americans and Latinos in Orange County, California to inform a community response.  

PubMed

This is one of two papers in this volume to report on the result of the Care System Assessment Demonstration (CSAD) Project conducted in Orange County, California. Latino and African American residents of Orange County who were aware of being HIV positive but who were not in care were targeted for this assessment. The basic questions were: Why are these people not in care? and What can we do to get them into care? The project used selected Rapid Assessment, Response, and Evaluation (RARE) methods (described in chapter 5) to retrieve information from HIV-positive Latinos and African Americans both in and out of care, cultural experts, service providers, and administrators to find the answers. Latinos and African Americans who were out of care responded in the most similar ways, of all the groups of respondents. PMID:17938470

Watson, Mary M

2007-08-01

215

Summary and evaluation of the coyote control program, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California, 1986  

SciTech Connect

For the second consecutive year (1986) the US Department of Energy funded a coyote (Canis latrans) control program in an attempt to reduce predation of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica) on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in Kern County, California. A total of 46 adult and 18 pups were taken. Trapping was the most productive control method. Data were gathered on standard measurements, weights, ages, and reproductive condition of the coyotes. No kit foxes were trapped. Recommendations were made to begin the 1986/1987 control program in December 1986, and to use helicopters for aerial gunning and to locate coyote dens.

Scrivner, J.H.; Harris, C.E.

1986-11-01

216

Inventory of San Joaquin kit fox on land proposed as Phase II, Kesterson Reservoir, Merced County, California  

SciTech Connect

A survey of potential San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica, habitat was conducted for the US Department of the Interior Water and Power Resource Service between 23 and 25 March 1981 on lands proposed as Phase II, Kesterson Reservoir, Merced County, California. Results of ground transects covering approximately 3000 acres revealed no sign (dens, tracks, or scats) of kit fox. No kit fox were observed during four night spotlight surveys. Neither completion of Phase II nor subsequent operation and maintenance activities will have any known negative impact on the endangered San Joaquin kit fox.

McCue, P.; Kato, T.; Sauls, M.L.; O'Farrell, T.P.

1981-04-01

217

Location of odor sources and the affected population in Imperial County, California  

SciTech Connect

This report is divided into four sections. The first two sections contain general background information on Imperial County. The third section is a general discussion of odor sources in Imperial County, and the fourth maps the specific odor sources, the expected areas of perception, and the affected populations. this mapping is done for the Imperial Valley and each of the four Imperial County KGRA's (Known Geothermal Resource Areas) where odor from the development of the geothermal energy may affect population.

Hahn, J.L.

1981-08-01

218

Late Cenozoic geology and lacustrine history of Searles Valley, Inyo and San Bernardino Counties, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

George Smith’s career-long study of the surface geology of the Searles Valley was recently published by the USGS (Smith, 2009, online and printed). The co-authors of this abstract are the team responsible for completing the publication from the original materials. Searles Valley is an arid, closed basin lying 70 km east of the south end of the Sierra Nevada, California. During those parts of late Pliocene and Pleistocene time when precipitation and runoff from the east side of the Sierra Nevada into the Owens River were much greater than at present, a chain of as many as five large lakes was created, of which Searles Lake was third. The stratigraphic record left in Searles Valley when that lake expanded, contracted, or desiccated is fully revealed by cores taken from beneath the surface of Searles (dry) Lake and partly recorded by sediments cropping out around the edge of the valley. Although this outcrop record is discontinuous, it provides direct evidence of the lake’s water depths during each expansion, which the subsurface record does not. Maximum-depth lakes rose to the 2,280-ft (695 m) contour, the level of the spillway that led overflowing waters to Panamint Valley; that spillway is about 660 ft (200 m) above the present dry-lake surface. Most of this study concerns sediments of the newly described Searles Lake Formation, whose deposition spanned the period between about 150 ka and 2 ka. The outcrop record is documented in six geologic maps (scales: 1:50,000 and 1:10,000). The Searles Lake Formation is divided into seven main units. The depositional intervals of the units that make up the Searles Lake Formation are determined primarily by correlation with subsurface deposits that are dated by radiocarbon ages on organic carbon and U-series dates on salts. Shorelines, the most obvious geologic expressions of former lakes, are abundant around Searles Valley. Erosional shorelines have cut as much as 100 m into brecciated bedrock; depositional shorelines (beaches or tufa benches) are common, but their deposits tend to be thin. Combining the subsurface evidence of lake history with the outcrop record allows the history of lake fluctuations to be reconstructed for the period between about 150 ka and the present. Translating this record of lake fluctuations into paleohydrologic and paleoclimatic histories is complicated by uncertainties as to which of the several components of climate affected runoff volumes and lake-surface evaporation. A simplified model, however, suggests that the flow of the Owens River stayed between 2.5 and 4.5 times its present flow volume for most of the past 150 ky. Its flow exceeded this range only about 14 percent of the time, and it fell below this range only 4 percent of the time—which includes the present. In fact, the past 10 ky is clearly the driest period during the past 150 ky in the Owens River drainage. Smith, G.I., 2009, Late Cenozoic geology and lacustrine history of Searles Valley, Inyo and San Bernardino Counties, California: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1727, 115 p., 4 plates.

Nathenson, M.; Smith, G. I.; Robinson, J. E.; Stauffer, P. H.; Zigler, J. L.

2010-12-01

219

Geology, water resources and usable ground-water storage capacity of part of Solano County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The area described is confined largely to the valley-floor and foothill lands of Solano County, which lies directly between Sacramento, the State capital, and San Francisco. The area is considered in two subareas: The Putah area, which extends from Putah Creek southward to the Montezuma Hills and from the foothills of the Coast Ranges eastward to the west edge of the Yolo Bypass; and the Suisun-Fairfield area, which is to the southwest in the notch in the Coast Ranges through which the waters of the Great Central Valley of California reach San Francisco Bay. There are no known hydrologic interconnections between the two subareas, through either surface streams or underground aquifers. The climate of the area is characterized by warm, rainless summers and by cool winters in which temperatures seldom drop much below freezing. The rainfall ranges from about 17 inches per year along the east side to perhaps 24 inches in the foothills to the west, and irrigation is necessary for all crops except dry-farmed grains, pastures, and some orchards. PUTAH AREA The Putah area occupies the southwestern corner of the Sacramento Valley, a topographic and structural basin underlain by a thick accumulation of sediments eroded from the surrounding hills and mountains by the Sacramento River and its tributaries. The eastern Coast Ranges and foothills lying west of the Sacramento Valley are a generally northward-trending belt of eastward-dipping sedimentary rocks that range in age from Cretaceous to Pleistocene. Successively younger strata are exposed eastward, and the essentially undeformed deposits of late Pleistocene and Recent age that immediately underlie the valley lap onto the tilted sediments of the foothills. Most of the streams of the Putah area rise east of the high ridge of Cretaceous rocks marking the western boundaries of Solano and Yolo Counties, but Putah Creek, the largest stream in the area, rises far west of that ridge and flows across it in a deep, narrow canyon. Putah Creek and the smaller streams have constructed an alluvial plain, herein designated the Putah plain, which slopes eastward and southeastward from the foothills toward the Sacramento River. A large part of the Putah plain is traversed by a branching set of distributary channel ridges or natural levees formed at times of overflow of Putah Creek. The rocks in the Putah area range in age from Cretaceous to Recent. For the purposes of this investigation they are divided into eight geologic or stratigraphic units, from youngest to oldest: (1) Stream-channel deposits, (2) younger alluvium, (3) older alluvium, (4) Tehama formation and related continental sediments, (5) volcanic sedimentary rocks, (6) basalt, (7) undifferentiated sedimentary rocks of Paleocene(?) and Eocene age, and (8) undifferentiated rocks of Cretaceous age. The stream-channel deposits are predominantly loose sand and gravel along the channel of Putah Creek. In part they are actively moving downstream and shifting. The younger alluvium, of Recent age, consists of flood-plain deposits underlying the Putah plain, Vaca Valley, Pleasants Valley, and the small valleys in the foothills north of Putah Creek and in the English Hills. Exposures of younger alluvium are characterized by soils lacking significant profile development and in many places by channel-ridge topography. The older alluvium occupies the stratigraphic interval between the younger alluvium and the Tehama formation and related continental sediments and is probably of late Pleistocene age. Its contact with the underlying Tehama formation and related continental sediments is unconformable near the foothills, but it may be gradational beneath much of the Putah plain. The base of the older alluvium is not well defined at many places but is inferred to be at the bottom of an irregular and ill-defined zone of coarse deposits, which ranges from about 50 feet to more than 150 feet below the land surface. Exposures of the older

Thomasson, H. G., Jr.; Olmsted, F. H.; LeRoux, E. F.

1960-01-01

220

Rainfall and Seasonal Movement of the Weeks Creek Landslide, San Mateo County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction Many different types of landslide occur in the Santa Cruz Mountains of San Mateo County, Calif. (Brabb and Pampeyan, 1972); most slope movement is triggered by strong earthquakes, heavy rainfall, or shoreline erosion. In this area, shallow landslides of loose soil and rock, which may transform into debris flows, commonly occur during individual storms when rainfall exceeds a threshold of intensity and duration (Cannon and Ellen, 1985; Wieczorek and Sarmiento, 1988; Wilson and Wieczorek, 1995). In contrast, deeper rotational and translational slides (Varnes, 1978) typically begin to move only after days to weeks or months of heavy rain. Once started, they can continue to move for months during and after a heavy rainfall season, for example, the Scenic Drive landslide at La Honda, Calif. (Jayko and others, 1998; Wells and others, 2005, 2006). Although the rainfall characteristics triggering rapid, shallow landslides have been documented (Wieczorek, 1987; Cannon and Ellen, 1988), the rainfall conditions leading to repeated deeper-seated slope movements are less well known. The Weeks Creek landslide (Adam, 1975), near the western crest of the Santa Cruz Mountains north of La Honda in San Mateo County (fig. 1), consists of a large prehistoric section containing a historically active section; both sections have earthflow morphologies. The entire landslide mass, which extends about 1,000 m westward from an elevation of 220 m down to an elevation of 120 m, is about 300 to 370 m wide (Cole and others, 1994); The prehistoric section of the landslide is about 30 m deep and approximately 10 million m3 in volume (Cole and others, 1994). The smaller, historically active portion of the Weeks Creek landslide (fig. 1) is only approximately 500 m long, 200 m wide, and 13 m deep (Cole and others, 1994). Near the landslide, the Santa Cruz Mountains consist of tightly folded, Tertiary sedimentary bedrock materials of the Butano sandstone and San Lorenzo Formations (Eocene through Lower Oligocene). These sedimentary bedrock materials are locally intruded by Oligocene diabase and capped by Oligocene through Miocene basalt of the Mindego Formation (Brabb, 1980; Cole and others, 1994). Within the active landslide, as documented from multiple borings by Cole and others (1994), deeply weathered mudstone and sandstone of the San Lorenzo Formation extends to a depth of about 10 to 13 m, where the active shear zone is located. Beneath this, within the deeper prehistoric landslide, mudstone extends to a depth of about 24 to 32 m and is underlain by strong diabase bedrock. The basal rupture surface of the prehistoric landslide is located near the mudstone/diabase contact (Cole and others, 1994). The historically active section of the Weeks Creek landslide, which is crossed by the La Honda road (California Highway 84, fig. 1), was first noticed to partially move during the great 1906 San Francisco earthquake (Lawson, 1908). It has moved repeatedly over the ensuing years but generally only during wet rainy seasons. For some of these active years, ground cracks and lateral displacements were recorded by local residents Walter Jodicke and Chris Pearson, as well as by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel. In spring 2006, fresh ground cracks were noted in parts of the prehistoric, previously inactive section of the landslide. In this report, we present daily rainfall measurements from 1973 through 2006 obtained at the landslide site and summarize available observations of slope movement over that period. In addition, we present more detailed observations of rainfall, ground-water pressure, and slope movement for three water years spanning the period 1981-1984. We conclude with some preliminary observations about rainfall and slope movement at this site.

Wieczorek, Gerald F.; Reid, Mark E.; Jodicke, Walter; Pearson, Chris; Wilcox, Grant

2007-01-01

221

Sequential Sediment Budgets in an Ungauged Watershed: Redwood Creek, Marin County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sediment budgets provide an organizing framework in fluvial geomorphology and have enormous potential in environmental management. A sediment budget approach assisted in developing strategies for restoring Big Lagoon, the wetland ecosystem at the terminus of the 22.7 km2 Redwood Creek watershed in Marin County, California. Persistence of a restored lagoon largely depends on the current sediment yield relative to the reference yield prior to European settlement. Process-based, distributed sediment budgets were constructed for several historical time periods to account for accelerated sediment production from contemporary land management practices and legacy factors stemming from past resource exploitation. Sediment production, storage, and transfer were investigated using digital terrain modeling, field reconnaissance to ascertain and validate hillslope processes, mainstem channel surveys and dendrochronology to assess trends in alluvial sediment storage, application of published process rate estimates, use of short-term and prorated stream gauging records, and sediment transport modeling to validate sediment yields into Big Lagoon. Evidence suggests that the Redwood Creek valley bottom aggraded from at least 3,500 B.P., with floodplain wetlands acting as sediment sinks (average annual sediment yield of 34 t km2 yr-1). Channel incision rapidly followed European settlement and intensive hillslope disturbances beginning around 1840 (peak yield 1921-1982 of 324 t km2 yr-1). Mainstem and large tributary valley bottoms became major sediment sources during this time and remain sources despite progressive retirement of most agricultural land use (yield 1981-2000 of 198 t km2 yr-1). Numerous issues related to data availability and resolution limited quantification of some sediment sources and resulted in potential uncertainties in estimates of yield to Big Lagoon. Historical sediment budgets, however, require more than adequate data sources, they require accurate conceptual models of geomorphic processes operating over historical time periods as the basis for correctly interpreting results, while the applicability of sediment budgets over decadal timescales may depend on climate factors influencing the frequency and magnitude of large storm events during the period. Further, legacy factors affecting sediment storage and transfer are critical yet difficult to resolve and often overlooked in sediment budgeting. `Rapid' sediment budgets are desirable components of historically-informed environmental management but are subject to uncertainties relating to data availability, accuracy, resolution, interpretation, and applicability. Future work is focusing on data acquisition necessary for a transparent realization of this potential.

Downs, P. W.; Stallman, J.

2005-12-01

222

Final Scientific / Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration Program, Truckhaven Area, Imperial County, California  

SciTech Connect

With financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Layman Energy Associates, Inc. (LEA) has completed a program of geothermal exploration at the Truckhaven area in Imperial County, California. The exploratory work conducted by LEA included the following activities: compilation of public domain resource data (wells, seismic data, geologic maps); detailed field geologic mapping at the project site; acquisition and interpretation of remote sensing imagery such as aerial and satellite photographs; acquisition, quality control and interpretation of gravity data; and acquisition, quality control and interpretation of resistivity data using state of the art magnetotelluric (MT) methods. The results of this exploratory program have allowed LEA to develop a structural and hydrologic interpretation of the Truckhaven geothermal resource which can be used to guide subsequent exploratory drilling and resource development. Of primary significance, is the identification of an 8 kilometer-long, WNW-trending zone of low resistivity associated with geothermal activity in nearby wells. The long axis of this low resistivity zone is inferred to mark a zone of faulting which likely provides the primary control on the distribution of geothermal resources in the Truckhaven area. Abundant cross-faults cutting the main WNW-trending zone in its western half may indicate elevated fracture permeability in this region, possibly associated with thermal upwelling and higher resource temperatures. Regional groundwater flow is inferred to push thermal fluids from west to east along the trend of the main low resistivity zone, with resource temperatures likely declining from west to east away from the inferred upwelling zone. Resistivity mapping and well data have also shown that within the WNW-trending low resistivity zone, the thickness of the Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary section above granite basement ranges from 1,900–2,600 meters. Well data indicates the lower part of this sedimentary section is sand-rich, suggesting good potential for a sediment-hosted geothermal reservoir in porous sands, similar to other fields in the region such as Heber and East Mesa. Sand porosity may remain higher in the eastern portion of the low resistivity zone. This is based on its location hydrologically downstream of the probable area of thermal upwelling, intense fracture development, and associated pore-filling hydrothermal mineral deposition to the west.

Layman Energy Associates, Inc.

2006-08-15

223

Differences in reproductive risk factors for breast cancer in middle-aged women in Marin County, California and a sociodemographically similar area of Northern California  

PubMed Central

Background The Northern California county of Marin (MC) has historically had high breast cancer incidence rates. Because of MC's high socioeconomic status (SES) and racial homogeneity (non-Hispanic White), it has been difficult to assess whether these elevated rates result from a combination of established risk factors or other behavioral or environmental factors. This survey was designed to compare potential breast cancer risks and incidence rates for a sample of middle-aged MC women with those of a demographically similar population. Methods A random sample of 1500 middle-aged female members of a large Northern California health plan, half from Marin County (MC) and half from a comparison area in East/Central Contra Costa County (ECCC), were mailed a survey covering family history, reproductive history, use of oral contraceptives (OC) and hormone replacement therapy (HRT), behavioral health risks, recency of breast screening, and demographic characteristics. Weighted data were used to compare prevalence of individual breast cancer risk factors and Gail scores. Age-adjusted cumulative breast cancer incidence rates (2000–2004) were also calculated for female health plan members aged 40–64 residing in the two geographic areas. Results Survey response was 57.1% (n = 427) and 47.9% (n = 359) for MC and ECCC samples, respectively. Women in the two areas were similar in SES, race, obesity, exercise frequency, current smoking, ever use of OCs and HRT, age at onset of menarche, high mammography rates, family history of breast cancer, and Gail scores. However, MC women were significantly more likely than ECCC women to be former smokers (43.6% vs. 31.2%), have Ashkenazi Jewish heritage (12.8% vs. 7.1%), have no live births before age 30 (52.7% vs. 40.8%), and be nulliparous (29.2% vs. 15.4%), and less likely to never or rarely consume alcohol (34.4% vs. 41.9%). MC and ECCC women had comparable 2000–2004 invasive breast cancer incidence rates. Conclusion The effects of reproductive risks factors, Ashkenazi Jewish heritage, smoking history, and alcohol consumption with regard to breast cancer risk in Marin County should be further evaluated. When possible, future comparisons of breast cancer incidence rates between regions should adjust for differences in income and education in addition to age and race/ethnicity, preferably by using a sociodemographically similar comparison group.

2009-01-01

224

Drilling Addendum to Resource Assessment of Low- and Moderate-Temperature Geothermal Waters in Calistoga, Napa County, California  

SciTech Connect

This addendum report presents the results of the California Division of Mines and Geology (CDMG) drilling program at Calistoga, California, which was the final geothermal-resource assessment investigation performed under terms of the second year contract (1979-80) between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the CDMG under the State Coupled Program. This report is intended to supplement information presented in CDMG's technical report for the project year, ''Resource Assessment of Low- and Moderate-Temperature Geothermal Waters in Calistoga, Napa County, California''. During the investigative phase of the CDMG's Geothermal Project, over 200 well-driller's reports were obtained from the Department of Water Resources (DWR). It was hoped that the interpretation and correlation of these logs would reveal the subsurface geology of the Upper Napa Valley and also provide a check for the various geophysical surveys that were performed in the course of the study. However, these DWR driller logs proved to be inadequate due to the brief, non-technical, and erroneous descriptions contained on the logs. As a result of the lack of useable drill-hole data, and because information was desired from,deeper horizons, it became evident that drilling some exploratory holes would be necessary in order to obtain physical evidence of the stratigraphy and aquifers in the immediate Calistoga area. Pursuant to this objective, a total of twelve sites were selected--four under jurisdiction of Napa County and eight under jurisdiction of the City of Calistoga. A moratorium is currently in existence within Napa County on most geothermal drilling, and environmental and time constraints precluded CDMG from obtaining the necessary site permits within the county. However, a variance was applied for and obtained from the City of Calistoga to allow CDMG to drill within the city limits. With this areal constraint and also funding limits in mind, six drilling sites were selected on the basis of (1) proximity to areas where geophysical surveys had been performed, (2) accessibility of the site for drill rig setup, and (3) favorability for obtaining the maximum information possible concerning the geology and the resources. Necessary landowner permission and permits were secured for these sites, and actual drilling began on December 17, 1980. Drilling was terminated on February 4, 1981, with the completion of three holes that ranged in depth from 205 to 885 feet. Use of a relatively new drilling technique called the Dual Tube Method enabled the collection of precise subsurface data of a level of detail never before obtained in the Calistoga area. As a result, a totally new and unexpected picture of the geothermal reservoir conditions there has been obtained, and is outlined in this addendum report.

Taylor, Gary C.; Bacon, C. Forrest; Chapman, Rodger H.; Chase, Gordon W.; Majmundar, Hasmukhrai H.

1981-05-01

225

Report of the Preliminary Archaeological Reconnaissance of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Site 300, San Joaquin County, California  

SciTech Connect

The area subject to this investigation is the existing Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Site 300, located in the region north of Corral Hollow; approximately eight and one half miles southwest of Tracy, San Joaquin County, California. Cartographic location can be determined from the Tracy and Midway USGS 7.5 minute topographic quadrangles, the appropriate portions of which are herein reproduced as Maps 1 and 2. The majority of the approximate 7000 acres of the location lies within San Joaquin County. This includes all of the area arbitrarily designated the 'Eastern Portion' on Map 2 and the majority of the area designated the 'Western Portion' on Map 1. The remaining acreage, along the western boundary of the location, lies within Alameda County. The area is located in the region of open rolling hills immediately north of Corral Hollow, and ranges in elevation from approximately 600 feet, on the flood plain of Corral Hollow Creek, to approximately 1700 feet in the northwest portion of the project location. Proposed for the area under investigation are various, unspecified improvements or modifications to the existing Site 300 facilities. Present facilities consist of scattered buildings, bunkers and magazines, utilized for testing and research purposes, including the necessary water, power, and transportation improvements to support them. The vast majority of the 7000 acres location is presently open space, utilized as buffer zones between test locations and as firing ranges.

Busby, C

2009-11-24

226

Humboldt's Legacy and the Restoration of Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Examines issues related to specialization in science in the context of the work of Alexander Von Humboldt, one of the first popular scientists in the 19th century and Charles Darwin's mentor. Chronicles the impacts of a science dominated by specialization and argues for increased emphasis on interdisciplinary environmental study. (LZ)|

Sachs, Aaron

1995-01-01

227

Public Health Assessment for Alark Hard Chrome Riverside, Riverside County, California. EPA Facility ID: CAD098229214.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Environmental Health Investigations Branch (EHIB) of the California Department of Health Services, under cooperative agreement with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), is conducting a PHA for the Alark Hard Chrome (AHC) facil...

2003-01-01

228

Feasibility Analysis for the Center for Performing Arts, Orange County, California. Volume II. Appendices.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Volume II of the study shows in table form: analysis of traffic, parking and utilities; construction cost estimates; survey of selected performing arts facilities and sports facilities in the Southern California Basin and selected interviews conducted reg...

1977-01-01

229

Cultural Resources Inventory of the Axford Timber Compartment, Plumas County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is based on an approximately 5071 acre archaeological inventory of the Axford Timber Compartment, Plumas National Forest, located near Bucks Lake, California. The survey resulted in the recordation of six aboriginal and nine historic sites, tw...

S. Baker L. H. Shoup

1983-01-01

230

Geohydrology of a Deep-Aquifer System Monitoring-Well Site at Marina, Monterey County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In the Salinas Valley, located in the central coastal area of California, extensive agriculture and subsequent urbanization has resulted in extensive ground-water development and seawater intrusion within the upper-aquifer system. As a result, local water...

R. T. Hanson R. S. Everett M. W. Newhouse S. M. Crawford M. I. Pimentel

2002-01-01

231

BENEFITS OF VEGETATED AGRICULTURAL DRAINAGE DITCHES (VADD) AS A BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICE IN YOLO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Widespread contamination of California water bodies by the orthophosphate insecticides diazinon and chlorpyrifos is well documented. While their usage has decreased over the last few years, a concomitant increase in pyrethroid usage (replacement insecticides) has occurred. Researchers have also docu...

232

Rare Plant Survey of Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, San Joaquin County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Site 300 supports a diverse array of grassland communities typical of lowland central California. This report describes the results of a rare plant inventory of Site 300 and relates findings to potential environmental impacts of operating and possibly exp...

D. W. Taylor W. Davilla

1986-01-01

233

Economic Study of Low Temperature Geothermal Energy in Lassen and Modoc Counties, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report investigates the feasibility of using low cost, low temperature geothermal energy in job-producing industries to increase employment and encourage economic development. The study, encompassing all of Lassen and Modoc Counties, is site-specific...

1977-01-01

234

Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HETA 2000-0169-2854, Riverside County Regional Medical Center, Riverside, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In March 2000, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a request from the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) local 1997 to conduct a health hazard evaluation (HHE) at Riverside County Regional Medical Center in...

C. K. Cook R. Malkin

2001-01-01

235

33 CFR 3.55-25 - Sector Humboldt Bay Search and Rescue Mission Coordinator Zone.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Sector Humboldt Bay Search and Rescue Mission Coordinator Zone... § 3.55-25 Sector Humboldt Bay Search and Rescue Mission Coordinator Zone...The boundaries of Sector Humboldt Bay's Search and Rescue Mission Coordinator...

2013-07-01

236

Diversity of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Residents of 26 Nursing Homes in Orange County, California.  

PubMed

Nursing homes represent a unique and important methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) reservoir. Not only are strains imported from hospitals and the community, strains can be transported back into these settings from nursing homes. Since MRSA bacteria are prevalent in nursing homes and yet relatively poorly studied in this setting, a multicenter, regional assessment of the frequency and diversity of MRSA in the nursing home reservoir was carried out and compared to that of the MRSA from hospitals in the same region. The prospective study collected MRSA from nasal swabbing of residents of 26 nursing homes in Orange County, California, and characterized each isolate by spa typing. A total of 837 MRSA isolates were collected from the nursing homes. Estimates of admission prevalence and point prevalence of MRSA were 16% and 26%, respectively. The spa type genetic diversity was heterogeneous between nursing homes and significantly higher overall (77%) than the diversity in Orange County hospitals (72%). MRSA burden in nursing homes appears largely due to importation from hospitals. As seen in Orange County hospitals, USA300 (sequence type 8 [ST8]/t008), USA100 (ST5/t002), and a USA100 variant (ST5/t242) were the dominant MRSA clones in Orange County nursing homes, representing 83% of all isolates, although the USA100 variant was predominant in nursing homes, whereas USA300 was predominant in hospitals. Control strategies tailored to the complex problem of MRSA transmission and infection in nursing homes are needed in order to minimize the impact of this unique reservoir on the overall regional MRSA burden. PMID:24025901

Hudson, Lyndsey O; Reynolds, Courtney; Spratt, Brian G; Enright, Mark C; Quan, Victor; Kim, Diane; Hannah, Paul; Mikhail, Lydia; Alexander, Richard; Moore, Douglas F; Godoy, Daniel; Bishop, Cynthia J; Huang, Susan S

2013-09-11

237

A Study of the Job Satisfaction of Special Education Local Plan Area (SELPA) Directors and Local School District Special Education Directors in Four Counties of Southern California  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare the perceived level of job satisfaction of SELPA directors with that of local school district special education directors in the counties of Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, and Orange of Southern California and to identify factors that contribute to their job satisfaction. Additionally, this…

Alexander, Gregory Haynes, III

2009-01-01

238

Treating Drug-Abusing Offenders: Initial Findings from a Five-County Study on the Impact of California's Proposition 36 on the Treatment System and Patient Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Five counties (Kern, Riverside, Sacramento, San Diego, San Francisco) that demonstrate both variations and similarities in their implementation of Proposition 36 (e.g., treatment approaches, urine testing) and patient mix have been selected to participate in a study assessing how California's Proposition 36 is affecting the drug treatment system…

Hser, Yih-Ing; Teruya, Cheryl; Evans, Elizabeth A.; Longshore, Douglas; Grella, Christine; Farabee, David

2003-01-01

239

An epidemiological study of public and animal health consequences of pet ownership in a disaster: The January 1997 flood of Yuba County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study characterized the risk factors for household evacuation failure, pet evacuation failure and pet rescue attempts during a natural disaster. A random digit dial telephone survey was conducted of 397 households in Yuba County, California, where residents were under an evacuation notice due to flooding. Risk factors were identified using multivariate logistic regression. Case households were defined as those

Sebastian Eugen Heath

1999-01-01

240

Compilation and interpretation of water-quality and discharge data for acidic mine waters at Iron Mountain, Shasta County, California, 1940-1991. Water resources investigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The report contains a compilation and interpretation of the historical records of water quality and discharge for the period 1940-91 from the two most significant discharge points for acid mine drainage at Iron Mountain, Shasta County, California--the Richmond and Lawson portals. The primary objectives are (1) to clarify whether or not there is a hydrologic connection between the Richmond and

C. N. Alpers; D. K. Nordstrom; J. M. Burchard

1992-01-01

241

A Study of the Job Satisfaction of Special Education Local Plan Area (SELPA) Directors and Local School District Special Education Directors in Four Counties of Southern California  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare the perceived level of job satisfaction of SELPA directors with that of local school district special education directors in the counties of Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, and Orange of Southern California and to identify factors that contribute to their job satisfaction. Additionally, this…

Alexander, Gregory Haynes, III

2009-01-01

242

Stratigraphy and depositional environment of unnamed (lower Miocene) submarine-fan sandstone unit in Sierra Madre and San Rafael Mountains, northeastern Santa Barbara County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

A relatively thick and extensive, previously unnamed, lower Miocene sandstone unit occurs in the central Sierra Madre and in the Hurricane Deck area of the San Rafael Mountains of northeastern Santa Barbara County, California. It is underlain conformably and interfingers with a dark mudstone that correlates with the Soda Lake Shale Member of the Vaqueros Formation; it is overlain conformably

G. D. Thomas; A. E. Fritsche; M. W. Condon

1988-01-01

243

Treating Drug-Abusing Offenders: Initial Findings from a Five-County Study on the Impact of California's Proposition 36 on the Treatment System and Patient Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Five counties (Kern, Riverside, Sacramento, San Diego, San Francisco) that demonstrate both variations and similarities in their implementation of Proposition 36 (e.g., treatment approaches, urine testing) and patient mix have been selected to participate in a study assessing how California's Proposition 36 is affecting the drug treatment system…

Hser, Yih-Ing; Teruya, Cheryl; Evans, Elizabeth A.; Longshore, Douglas; Grella, Christine; Farabee, David

2003-01-01

244

Documentation of model input and output values for the geohydrology and mathematical simulation of the Pajaro Valley aquifer system, Santa Cruz and Monterey counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report contains listings of the model input and sample output for simulation of the Pajaro Valley aquifer system, Santa Cruz and Monterey Counties, California. The files are contained on a 5 1/4-inch diskette. The decompressed files require approximately 5.3 megabytes of disk space on an IBM-compatible microcomputer. (USGS)

Mitten, H. T.; Londquist, C. J.

1990-01-01

245

Digital Compilation of "Preliminary Map of Landslide Deposits in Santa Cruz County, California, By Cooper-Clark and Associates, 1975": A Digital Map Database  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A 1:62,500-scale black-and-white map identifying some 2,000 landslides of various types in Santa Cruz County, California, has been converted to a digital-map database that can be acquired from the U.S. Geological Survey over the Internet or on magnetic tape.

Report by Roberts, Sebastian; Barron, Andrew D.; Preface by Brabb, Earl E.; Pike, Richard J.

1998-01-01

246

Recent trends in hormone therapy utilization and breast cancer incidence rates in the high incidence population of Marin County, California  

PubMed Central

Background Recent declines in invasive breast cancer have been reported in the US, with many studies linking these declines to reductions in the use of combination estrogen/progestin hormone therapy (EPHT). We evaluated the changing use of postmenopausal hormone therapy, mammography screening rates, and the decline in breast cancer incidence specifically for Marin County, California, a population with historically elevated breast cancer incidence rates. Methods The Marin Women's Study (MWS) is a community-based, prospective cohort study launched in 2006 to monitor changes in breast cancer, breast density, and personal and biologic risk factors among women living in Marin County. The MWS enrolled 1,833 women following routine screening mammography between October 2006 and July 2007. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire that included items regarding historical hormone therapy regimen (estrogen only, progesterone only, EPHT), age of first and last use, total years of use, and reason(s) for stopping, as well as information regarding complementary hormone use. Questionnaire items were analyzed for 1,083 non-Hispanic white participants ages 50 and over. Breast cancer incidence rates were assessed overall and by tumor histology and estrogen receptor (ER) status for the years 1990-2007 using data from the Northern California Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry. Results Prevalence of EPHT use among non-Hispanic white women ages 50 and over declined sharply from 21.2% in 1998 to 6.7% by 2006-07. Estrogen only use declined from 26.9% in 1998 to 22.4% by 2006-07. Invasive breast cancer incidence rates declined 33.4% between 2001 and 2004, with drops most pronounced for ER+ cancers. These rate reductions corresponded to declines of about 50 cases per year, consistent with population attributable fraction estimates for EPHT-related breast cancer. Self-reported screening mammography rates did not change during this period. Use of alternative or complementary agents did not differ significantly between ever and never hormone users. Of women who reported stopping EPHT in the past 5 years, 60% cited "health risks" or "news reports" as their primary reasons for quitting. Conclusion A dramatic reduction in EPHT use was followed temporally by a significant reduction in invasive and ER+ breast cancer rates among women living in Marin County, California.

2010-01-01

247

Determination of channel capacity of the Sacramento River between Ordbend and Glenn, Butte and Glenn counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The adequacy of an 8.5-mi reach of the Sacramento River to carry flood flows is evaluated. The reach studied is in Butte and Glenn Counties, California, and extends northward from the present east-bank Sacramento River Flood Control Project levee near Glenn upstream to the Ord Ferry gaging station near Ordbend. There is a west-bank levee throughout the study reach. Flows analyzed range from 11,500 to 265,000 cfs. Computed water-surface elevations are based on topography obtained during September through November 1974. The present Sacramento River Flood Control Project levees at the downstream end of the study reach near Glenn are designed to contain flows up to 150,000 cfs. Water-surface elevations computed for flows of this magnitude are about 6 to 8 ft below the top of the existing west-bank levee throughout the study reach. (Woodard-USGS)

Simpson, R. G.

1976-01-01

248

Five-year resurvey for endangered species on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

A transect survey of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1), Kern County, California, was conducted in 1984 to determine the distribution and relative abundance of endangered species and other wildlife. A total of 589.8 miles of transects were walked through approximately 47,235 acres in all or parts of 81 sections. A total of 16,401 observations of 58 species of wildlife were made which demonstrated the richness and abundance of wildlife on NPR-1 in spite of the intensity of recent petroleum developments. Although most construction activities associated with increased petroleum production took place between the first transect survey in 1979 and this resurvey, no adverse changes in relative densities of kit fox dens, prey base, or other wildlife were observed. NPR-1 should be resurveyed again in 1989. 33 refs., 5 figs., 13 tabs.

O'Farrell, T.P.; Mathews, N.E.

1987-09-01

249

Summary and evaluation of the coyote control program on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California, 1987  

SciTech Connect

For the third consecutive year (1987) the US Department of Energy (DOE) funded a coyote (Canis latrans) control program in an attempt to reduce coyote predation on the endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica) on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1, Elk Hills) in Kern County, California. During approximately 8 weeks of control activities, personnel from the US Department of Agriculture, Division of Animal Damage Control (ADC), removed 16 adult coyotes: 14 were trapped, 2 were shot. Data were gathered on standard measurements, weights, ages, and reproductive condition. No kit foxes were accidently trapped. Based on the results of canid scent-station surveys, the coyote population on NPR-1 declined and the kit fox population was relatively stable. Recommendations were made to conduct the 1987/1988 coyote control program between December 1987 and February 1988, use helicopters for aerial gunning and locating coyote dens, and develop a cooperative agreement between DOE, ADC, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, and the California Department of Fish and Game to conduct the coyote control program on lands surrounding NPR-1 owned by DOE and others. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Scrivner, J.H.

1987-09-01

250

Mineral resources and mineral resource potential of the South Providence Mountains Wilderness Study Area, San Bernardino County, California  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a mineral survey of the South Providence Mountains Wilderness Study Area (CDCA-262), California Desert Conservation Area, San Bernardino County, California. Geologic, geochemical, and geophysical evidence, together with a review of historical and recent mining and prospecting activities, suggests that much of the South Providence Mountains Wilderness Study Area has a wide range of potential for the occurrence of several types of undiscovered mineral resources. Eight mines and prospects in the study area have potential for gold, silver, lead, or copper resources. A high potential for epithermal volcanogenic gold resources is indicated for one small area of altered metavolcanic, plutonic, and hypabyssal rocks, and a moderate potential for epithermal gold resources is indicated for three other small areas. A low potential for placer gold resources is indicated for all alluvium in the area with particularly strong support for two small areas. Radioactive-mineral resources are possible in one area of granite, which is ascribed a low resource potential. A low potential for hydrocarbon resources is indicated for basinal sediments in a small part of the study area. Mines in and immediately adjacent to the study area contain an estimated 200,000 tons of indicated and inferred marginal gold reserves and an additional 11,000 tons of marginally economic gold-bearing dump reserves. Thirteen mines have potential for additional resources. 30 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs. (ACR)

Miller, D.M.; Glick, L.L.; Goldfarb, R.; Simpson, R.W.; Hoover, D.B.; Detra, D.A.; Dohrenwend, J.C.; Munts, S.R.

1984-01-01

251

Mineral Resources of the South Warner Contiguous Wilderness Study Area, Modoc County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The South Warner Contiguous Wilderness Study Area (CA-020-708) is located along the east flank of the South Warner Mountains in northwestern California. At the request of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, 4,330 acres of the South Warner Contiguous Wilde...

M. G. Sawlan J. G. Frisken M. S. Miller

1989-01-01

252

Spatial mismatch outside of large urban areas: an analysis of welfare recipients in Fresno County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerous scholars assert that welfare recipients face a mismatch between their residential locations in inner-city or rural areas where they live far from employment opportunities located in the suburbs. However, the findings of this study bring into question the wholesale application of the spatial mismatch hypothesis to all welfare recipients. Welfare recipients in mid-sized cities such as Fresno, California, do

Evelyn Blumenberg; Kimiko Shiki

2003-01-01

253

Spatial mismatch outside of large urban areas: an analysis of welfare recipients in Fresno County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerous scholars assert that welfare recipients face a mismatch between their residential locations in inner-city or rural areas and employment opportunities located in the suburbs far from where they live. However, the authors' findings bring into question the wholesale application of the spatial mismatch hypothesis to all welfare recipients. Welfare recipients in mid-sized cities such as Fresno, California, do not

Evelyn Blumenberg; Kimiko Shiki

2004-01-01

254

Bathymetric and Geophysical Surveys of Englebright Lake, Yuba-Nevada Counties, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Harry L. Englebright Lake (Englebright Lake) is a 9-mile-long (14-kilometer) reservoir located in the Sierra Nevada foothills of northern California on the Yuba River gorge known as The Narrows. The reservoir is impounded by Englebright Dam, a concrete ar...

J. R. Childs N. P. Snyder M. A. Hampton

2003-01-01

255

GIS-BASED RISK ASSESSMENT OF PESTICIDE DRIFT CASE STUDY: FRESNO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA  

EPA Science Inventory

The report describes the potential risk of herbicide drift and accidentally damaging neighboring crops or surrounding native vegetation. This study is the first to use the California Pesticide Use Reporting database within a mapping framework (known as a Geographic Information S...

256

Public Health Assessment for Sherwin Williams, Emeryville, Alameda County, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CAD03934601.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Sherwin-Williams facility is located on Sherwin Avenue in Emeryville, California. Emeryville is located on the eastern side of the San Francisco Bay between Berkely to the north, and Oakland to the east and south. Several site investigations have dete...

1999-01-01

257

75 FR 56942 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Diego Air Pollution Control District (SDCAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). This revision concerns the definition of volatile organic compounds (VOC). We are proposing to approve a local rule to regulate these emission sources under the Clean Air Act as amended in 1990 (CAA or the...

2010-09-17

258

A rare plant survey of Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, San Joaquin County, California  

SciTech Connect

Site 300 supports a diverse array of grassland communities typical of lowland central California. This report describes the results of a rare plant inventory of Site 300 and relates findings to potential environmental impacts of operating and possibly expanding on-site facilities.

Taylor, D.W.; Davilla, W.

1986-11-01

259

Latino Youth in the Juvenile Drug Court of Orange County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the factors associated with successful completion of the Orange County Juvenile Drug Court (OCJDC) for 232 (164 male and 68 female) adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 years. No significant associations were found between graduation status and participants’ age, most serious prior offense, entry offense, primary drug of choice, or secondary drug of choice. While

Henry F. Fradella; Ryan G. Fischer; Christine Hagan Kleinpeter; Jeffrey J. Koob

2009-01-01

260

Model Programs: Reading. Yuba County Reading-Learning Center, Marysville, California.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Almost 900 children in grades 1 through 8, with reading difficulties, are given special individualized instruction at the Yuba County Reading-Learning Center each year. Operating on a twelve-months basis, the Center seeks to improve the children's reading and verbal skills and bring about more positive attitudes toward school and education. The…

American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, CA.

261

Public Health Assessment for Stoker Company, Imperial, Imperial County, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CAD066635442.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Stoker Company is a pesticide dealer and crop dusting loading facility located in the County of Imperial, approximately 25 miles from the Mexican border. The 26-acre site is barren with no vegetation. Operations at the facility, beginning in 1966, have ca...

1994-01-01

262

78 FR 922 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...sources of fugitive dust such as unpaved roads and disturbed soils in open and agricultural areas in Imperial County. We are...owners to prevent vehicular trespass and stabilize disturbed soil on open areas larger than 0.5 acres in urban areas,...

2013-01-07

263

Effectiveness of Vegetated Buffer Strips in Reducing Dormant Season Orthophosphate Pesticide Loading to Surface Waters in Glenn County, Northern California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Riparian buffer strips are used in preventing nonpoint source contamination of agricultural runoff. The design and effectiveness of buffers varies widely under differing environmental conditions. Over the past two years, a project was implemented to evaluate the effectiveness of certain Best Management Practices in reducing organophosphate (OP) pesticide transport from almond orchards to local surface waters in Glenn County, northern California. Diazinon is a commonly-used OP pesticide applied during the dormant season in almond and stone-fruit orchards throughout the California Central Valley. Dormant season diazinon application coincides with the months of greatest rainfall and surface runoff in California. Three filter strip treatments were established: one planted with native vegetation, one with weedy resident vegetation, and the third with a bare soil surface. As a demonstration and reconnaissance project, replication of the treatments in this study was lacking (one plot of each vegetation type and two bare ground plots). Diazinon was applied in test orchard cells in January 2003. Surface runoff, shallow groundwater in the root zone, and deeper groundwater were monitored for the transport of diazinon during the three subsequent storm events. Composite surface water samples and flow volumes were obtained for each storm event using automated surface water collectors. Runoff and infiltration results indicate greater infiltration occurred in the vegetated plots as would be expected. Infiltration on bare ground plots was approximately 25%-50% less than on the vegetated plots. However, differences between the two vegetated plot treatments were less than 5%. Diazinon concentrations were reduced as surface runoff crossed the buffer strips for all three treatments. Detectable levels of diazinon were still present in runoff following the third storm, seven weeks after the pesticide application. Further replicated studies are currently being prepared for the coming dormant season and this study will continue over the next three years.

Gilbert, K. D.; Brown, D. L.; Altier, L.; Oliver, M. N.

2003-12-01

264

Cascadia Earthquake and Tsunami Scenario for California's North Coast  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 1995 the California Division of Mines and Geology (now the California Geological Survey) released a planning scenario for an earthquake on the southern portion of the Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ). This scenario was the 8th and last of the Earthquake Planning Scenarios published by CDMG. It was the largest magnitude CDMG scenario, an 8.4 earthquake rupturing the southern 200 km of the CSZ, and it was the only scenario to include tsunami impacts. This scenario event has not occurred in historic times and depicts impacts far more severe than any recent earthquake. The local tsunami hazard is new; there is no written record of significant local tsunami impact in the region. The north coast scenario received considerable attention in Humboldt and Del Norte Counties and contributed to a number of mitigation efforts. The Redwood Coast Tsunami Work Group (RCTWG), an organization of scientists, emergency managers, government agencies, and businesses from Humboldt, Mendocino, and Del Norte Counties, was formed in 1996 to assist local jurisdictions in understanding the implications of the scenario and to promote a coordinated, consistent mitigation program. The group has produced print and video materials and promoted response and evacuation planning. Since 1997 the RCTWG has sponsored an Earthquake Tsunami Education Room at county fairs featuring preparedness information, hands-on exhibits and regional tsunami hazard maps. Since the development of the TsunamiReady Program in 2001, the RCTWG facilitates community TsunamiReady certification. To assess the effectiveness of mitigation efforts, five telephone surveys between 1993 and 2001 were conducted by the Humboldt Earthquake Education Center. A sixth survey is planned for this fall. Each survey includes between 400 and 600 respondents. Over the nine year period covered by the surveys, the percent with houses secured to foundations has increased from 58 to 80 percent, respondents aware of a local tsunami hazard increased from 51 to 73 percent and knowing what the Cascadia subduction zone is from 16 to 42 percent. It is not surprising that the earlier surveys showed increases as several strong earthquakes occurred in the area between 1992 and 1995 and there was considerable media attention. But the 2001 survey, seven years after the last widely felt event, still shows significant increases in almost all preparedness indicators. The 1995 CDMG scenario was not the sole reason for the increased interest in earthquake and tsunami hazards in the area, but the scenario gave government recognition to an event that was previously only considered seriously in the scientific community and has acted as a catalyst for mitigation and planning efforts.

Dengler, L.

2006-12-01

265

Ground-Water Quality Data in the Kern County Subbasin Study Unit, 2006 - Results from the California GAMA Program  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground-water quality in the approximately 3,000 square-mile Kern County Subbasin study unit (KERN) was investigated from January to March, 2006, as part of the Priority Basin Assessment Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The GAMA Priority Basin Assessment project was developed in response to the Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001, and is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Kern County Subbasin study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw (untreated) ground-water quality within KERN, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 50 wells within the San Joaquin Valley portion of Kern County. Forty-seven of the wells were selected using a randomized grid-based method to provide a statistical representation of the ground-water resources within the study unit. Three additional wells were sampled to aid in the evaluation of changes in water chemistry along regional ground-water flow paths. The ground-water samples were analyzed for a large number of man-made organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides, and pesticide degradates), constituents of special interest (perchlorate, N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA], and 1,2,3-trichloropropane [1,2,3-TCP]), naturally occurring inorganic constituents (nutrients, major and minor ions, and trace elements), radioactive constituents, and microbial indicators. Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, carbon-14, and stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon) and dissolved noble gases also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled ground water. Quality-control samples (blanks, replicates, and laboratory matrix spikes) were collected and analyzed at approximately 10 percent of the wells, and the results for these samples were used to evaluate the quality of the data from the ground-water samples. Assessment of the quality-control information resulted in censoring of less than 0.4 percent of the data collected for ground-water samples. This study did not attempt to evaluate the quality of water delivered to consumers; after withdrawal from the ground, raw ground water typically is treated, disinfected, or blended with other waters to maintain acceptable water quality. Regulatory thresholds apply, not to the raw ground water, but to treated water that is served to the consumer. However, to provide some context for the results, concentrations of constituents measured in the raw ground water were compared with health-based thresholds established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), and as well as with thresholds established for aesthetic concerns (secondary maximum contaminant levels, SMCL-CA) by CDPH. VOCs and pesticides each were detected in approximately 60 percent of the grid wells, and detections of all compounds but one were below health-based thresholds. The fumigant, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP), was detected above the USEPA maximum contaminant level (MCL-US) in one sample. Detections of most inorganic constituents were also below health-based thresholds. Constituents detected above health-based thresholds include: nitrate, (MCL-US, 2 samples), arsenic (MCL-US, 2 samples), and vanadium (California notification level, NL-CA, 1 sample). All detections of radioactive constituents were below health-based thresholds, although nine samples had activities of radon-222 above the lower proposed MCL-US. Most of the samples from KERN wells had concentrations of major elements, total dissolved solids, and trace elements below the non-enforceable thresholds set for aesthetic concerns.

Shelton, Jennifer L.; Pimentel, Isabel; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

2008-01-01

266

Final record of decision/remedial action plan, nine sites, Sierra Army Depot, Lassen County, California  

SciTech Connect

This ROD/RAP presents the selected response actions for nine sites at SIAD. The response actions were selected by the US Department of the Army (Army) in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA)(collectively referred to as CERCLA), the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP), and Section 6.8 of the California Health and Safety Code. This ROD/RAP includes the factual and legal basis for selecting the response action at each of the nine sites listed above. The data used to support the selected response action are contained in the Administrative Record for each site. The State of California as represented by the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), and the Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) concur with the selected response action at each site.

Arroyo, S.L.; Larson, A.M.; Parent, M.M.; Silvers, J.M.; Weaverling, P.H.

1996-10-01

267

Ground-water-level monitoring network, Hollister and San Juan Valleys, San Benito County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The addition of 17 wells to the existing 86-well network is proposed to improve the ground-water monitoring in the Hollister and San Juan Valleys in California. The new wells were selected on the basis of well-construction data, availability, location, accessibility, use, and condition, either to replace wells that are no longer accessible or to furnish needed additional data for planning artificial recharge, preparing water-level-contour maps, and digital ground-water modeling. (USGS)

Farrar, C. D.

1981-01-01

268

Electrical methods of detecting contaminated groundwater at the stringfellow waste disposal site, riverside county, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

At the Stringfellow Class I waste-disposal site near Riverside, California, the influence of variations in groundwater chemistry and saturation on electrical measurements made from the surface was tested Spontaneous potential, D C electrical sounding, dipole-dipole resistivity profiles, and mise-a-la-masse measurements were employed to investigate the sub-surface migration of the acidic fluids deposited in this site between 1956 and 1972 Mise-a-la-masse

Donald J. Stierman

1984-01-01

269

Tick-borne Relapsing Fever and Borrelia hermsii, Los Angeles County, California, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary cause of tick-borne relapsing fever in west- ern North America is Borrelia hermsii, a rodent-associated spi- rochete transmitted by the fast-feeding soft tick Ornithodoros hermsii. We describe a patient who had an illness consistent with relapsing fever after exposure in the mountains near Los Angeles, California, USA. The patient's convalescent-phase serum was seropositive for B. hermsii but negative

Tom G. Schwan; Sandra J. Raffel; Merry E. Schrumpf; Larry S. Webster; Adriana R. Marques; Robyn Spano; Michael Rood; Joe Burns; Renjie Hu

2009-01-01

270

Vegetation of Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, San Joaquin County, California  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) administers and operates an approximately 28 km/sup 2/ (10.9 mi/sup 2/, 7000 acre) test site known as Site 300. This expanse of rolling hills and canyons supports a diverse array of grassland communities typical of lowland central California. The report quantitatively describes the variation of vegetation within Site 300, and relates vegetation to potential environmental impacts associated with present operation and possible expansion of on-site facilities.

Taylor, D.W.; Davilla, W.

1986-11-01

271

Correlates of Tanning Facility Prevalence within San Diego County, California Census Tracts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adolescents frequenting indoor tanning facilities may have an increased risk of skin cancer. The high level of indoor tanning\\u000a by this age group may be due, in part, to the large number of tanning facilities in US cities. This study examined how facilities\\u000a are distributed throughout one large county. Based on ecological models, it was predicted that tanning facilities are

Minal R. Patel; Joni A. Mayer; Donald J. Slymen; Ami L. Hurd

2007-01-01

272

Effect of urban growth on streamflow regimen of Permanente Creek, Santa Clara County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents the results of an investigation of the effect of urban growth on the streamflow regimen of Permanente Creek in Mountain View, Santa Clara County, Calif. The data available did not permit a complete study of all hydrologic aspects, but there is conclusive evidence that the volume of storm runoff produced by rainfall on the valley floor has increased substantially as a result of urbanization. In 1945, storm runoff from the 5.12-square mile project area was insufficient to balance channel losses, and the streamflow entering the project area in the Permanente Creek channel was greater than that leaving the area. If, however, total outflow from the project area is considered to be the sum of the streamflow leaving the area plus channel seepage in the area, the ratio of total outflow to inflow was 1:18. By 1958, storm runoff from the project area was far in excess of channel losses and the ratio of total outflow to inflow was 1:70. This increase in outflow is attributed to the fact that urban development during the period 1945 to 1958 increased the extent of impervious surface in the project area from about 4 percent to 19 percent. The effect of urban growth in other basins in Santa Clara County should be investigated before any attempt is made to project the quantitative results of this study to other areas in the county.

Harris, E. E.; Rantz, S. E.

1964-01-01

273

Alexander von Humboldt: The explorer and the scientist  

Microsoft Academic Search

On June 5, 1799 Alexander von Humboldt, explorer and scientist, left La Coruña in Spain to go to Cumaná, Venezuela. On August 3, 1804 he arrived again in Bordeaux, France. The paper deals with five aspects of this famous journey: The itinerary of the American journey; Scientific aims: Humboldt's journeys and scientific activities were two sides of the same coin;

Eberhard Knobloch

2006-01-01

274

Preliminary maps of Quaternary deposits and liquefaction susceptibility, nine-county San Francisco Bay region, California: a digital database  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report presents a preliminary map and database of Quaternary deposits and liquefaction susceptibility for the nine-county San Francisco Bay region, together with a digital compendium of ground effects associated with past earthquakes in the region. The report consists of (1) a spatial database of fivedata layers (Quaternary deposits, quadrangle index, and three ground effects layers) and two text layers (a labels and leaders layer for Quaternary deposits and for ground effects), (2) two small-scale colored maps (Quaternary deposits and liquefaction susceptibility), (3) a text describing the Quaternary map, liquefaction interpretation, and the ground effects compendium, and (4) the databse description pamphlet. The nine counties surrounding San Francisco Bay straddle the San Andreas fault system, which exposes the region to serious earthquake hazard (Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities, 1999). Much of the land adjacent to the Bay and the major rivers and streams is underlain by unconsolidated deposits that are particularly vulnerable to earthquake shaking and liquefaction of water-saturated granular sediment. This new map provides a modern and regionally consistent treatment of Quaternary surficial deposits that builds on the pioneering mapping of Helley and Lajoie (Helley and others, 1979) and such intervening work as Atwater (1982), Helley and others (1994), and Helley and Graymer (1997a and b). Like these earlier studies, the current mapping uses geomorphic expression, pedogenic soils, and inferred depositional environments to define and distinguish the map units. In contrast to the twelve map units of Helley and Lajoie, however, this new map uses a complex stratigraphy of some forty units, which permits a more realistic portrayal of the Quaternary depositional system. The two colored maps provide a regional summary of the new mapping at a scale of 1:275,000, a scale that is sufficient to show the general distribution and relationships of the map units but cannot distinguish the more detailed elements that are present in the database. The report is the product of years of cooperative work by the USGS National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) and National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program, William Lettis and & Associates, Inc. (WLA) and, more recently, by the California Division of Mines and Geology as well. An earlier version was submitted to the Geological Survey by WLA as a final report for a NEHRP grant (Knudsen and others, 2000). The mapping has been carried out by WLA geologists under contract to the NEHRP Earthquake Program (Grants #14-08-0001-G2129, 1434-94-G-2499, 1434-HQ-97-GR-03121, and 99-HQ-GR-0095) and with other limited support from the County of Napa, and recently also by the California Division of Mines and Geology. The current map consists of this new mapping and revisions of previous USGS mapping.

Knudsen, Keith L.; Sowers, Janet M.; Witter, Robert C.; Wentworth, Carl M.; Helley, Edward J.; Nicholson, Robert S.; Wright, Heather M.; Brown, Katherine H.

2000-01-01

275

Potential for Induced Seismicity Related to the Northern California CO2 Reduction Project Pilot Test, Solano County, California  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this technical report is to analyze the potential for induced seismicity due to a proposed small-scale CO{sub 2} injection project in the Montezuma Hills. We reviewed currently available public information, including 32 years of recorded seismic events, locations of mapped faults, and estimates of the stress state of the region. We also reviewed proprietary geological information acquired by Shell, including seismic reflection imaging in the area, and found that the data and interpretations used by Shell are appropriate and satisfactory for the purpose of this report. The closest known fault to the proposed injection site is the Kirby Hills Fault. It appears to be active, and microearthquakes as large as magnitude 3.7 have been associated with the fault near the site over the past 32 years. Most of these small events occurred 9-17 miles (15-28 km) below the surface, which is deep for this part of California. However, the geographic locations of the many events in the standard seismicity catalog for the area are subject to considerable uncertainty because of the lack of nearby seismic stations; so attributing the recorded earthquakes to motion along any specific fault is also uncertain. Nonetheless, the Kirby Hills Fault is the closest to the proposed injection site and is therefore our primary consideration for evaluating the potential seismic impacts, if any, from injection. Our planned installation of seismic monitoring stations near the site will greatly improve earthquake location accuracy. Shell seismic data also indicate two unnamed faults more than 3 miles east of the project site. These faults do not reach the surface as they are truncated by an unconformity at a depth of about 2,000 feet (610 m). The unconformity is identified as occurring during the Oligocene Epoch, 33.9-23.03 million years ago, which indicates that these faults are not currently active. Farther east are the Rio Vista Fault and Midland Fault at distances of about 6 miles (10 km) and 10 miles (16 km), respectively. These faults have been identified as active during the Quaternary (last 1.6 million years), but without evidence of displacement during the Holocene (the last 11,700 years). The stress state (both magnitude and direction) in the region is an important parameter in assessing earthquake potential. Although the available information regarding the stress state is limited in the area surrounding the injection well, the azimuth of the mean maximum horizontal stress is estimated at 41{sup o} and it is consistent with strike-slip faulting on the Kirby Hills Fault, unnamed fault segments to the south, and the Rio Vista Fault. However, there are large variations (uncertainty) in stress estimates, leading to low confidence in these conclusions regarding which fault segments are optimally oriented for potential slip induced by pressure changes. Uncertainty in the stress state can be substantially reduced by measurements planned when wells are drilled at the site. Injection of CO{sub 2} at about two miles depth will result in a reservoir fluid pressure increase, which is greatest at the well and decreases with distance from the well. After the injection stops, reservoir fluid pressures will decrease rapidly. Pressure changes have been predicted quantitatively by numerical simulation models of the injection. Based on these models, the pressure increase on the Kirby Hills Fault at its closest approach to the well due to the injection of 6,000 metric tons of CO{sub 2} would be a few pounds per square inch (psi), which is a tiny fraction of the natural pressure of approximately 5,000 psi at that depth. The likelihood of such a small pressure increase triggering a slip event is very small. It is even more unlikely that events would be induced at the significantly greater depths where most of the recorded earthquakes are concentrated, because it is unlikely that such a small pressure pulse would propagate downwards any appreciable distance. Therefore, in response to the specific question of the likelihood of the CO{sub 2} injection caus

Myer, L.; Chiaramonte, L.; Daley, T.M.; Wilson, D.; Foxall, W.; Beyer, J.H.

2010-06-15

276

Geology, hydrology, and water supply of Edwards Air Force Base, Kern County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Edwards Air Force Base occupies the northern part of Antelope Valley, California. As a result of large-scale and increasing agricultural pumping in the valley, the net draft has exceeded the perennial supply since about 1930 and was about 170,000 acre-feet in 1951--at least three times the estimated yield. As a result, there has been a continuing depletion of ground water stored in all the unconsolidated deposits, including the principal aquifers contained in the younger and older alluvium.

Dutcher, Lee Carlton; Warts, G. F., Jr.

1963-01-01

277

Electrical methods of detecting contaminated groundwater at the stringfellow waste disposal site, riverside county, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

At the Stringfellow Class I waste-disposal site near Riverside, California, the influence of variations in groundwater chemistry\\u000a and saturation on electrical measurements made from the surface was tested Spontaneous potential, D C electrical sounding,\\u000a dipole-dipole resistivity profiles, and mise-a-la-masse measurements were employed to investigate the sub-surface migration\\u000a of the acidic fluids deposited in this site between 1956 and 1972 Mise-a-la-masse

Donald J. Stierman

1984-01-01

278

Chemical quality of ground water in Sacramento and Western Placer counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Chemical quality of groundwater was investigated in Sacramento and western Placer Counties during the summer of 1982. Chemical analyses of water samples from 209 wells indicate that the groundwater is suitable for domestic and most agricultural uses. Water from wells near the Sacramento River and a few wells near Lincoln had high concentrations of dissolved solids and some trace elements. Although chemical water types varied, 53% of the wells had a combination of calcium magnesium bicarbonate water. More than 90% of the wells sampled had water with a low to medium sodium-salinity hazard when used for irrigation. (Author 's abstract)

Johnson, K. L.

1985-01-01

279

Classification of ground-water recharge potential in three parts of Santa Cruz County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground-water recharge potential was classified in the Santa Cruz coastal area, North-central area, and Soquel-Aptos area in Santa Cruz County, Calif., for three data elements that affect recharge; slope, soils, and geology. Separate numerical maps for each element were composited into a single numerical map using a classification system that ranked the numbers into areas of good , fair, and poor recharge potential. Most of the Santa Cruz coastal area and the Norht-central area have a poor recharge potential, and much of the Soquel-Aptos area has a good to fair recharge potential. (Kosco-USGS)

Muir, K. S.; Johnson, Michael J.

1979-01-01

280

Ground-water conditions and well yields in fractured rocks, southwestern Nevada County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report describes the availability of ground water in the southwestern part of Nevada County, and suggests general guidelines for selecting sites for future ground-water development in the study area. Ground water in this area occurs chiefly in fractures in hard pre-Tertiary metavolcanic and plutonic rocks generally above a depth of 215 feet. Some ground water is found at the contact between alluvium or decomposed granite and the underlying hard rock; little is found in alluvium or colluvium. Mean yield is less than 18 gallons per minute. (USGS)

Page, R. W.; Anttila, P. W.; Johnson, K. L.; Pierce, M. J.

1984-01-01

281

Wilhelm von Humboldt and the "Orient": On Edward W. Said's Remarks on Humboldt's Orientalist Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|From an epistemological perspective, Wilhelm von Humboldt's studies on the Oriental and East Asian languages and writing systems (Egyptian hieroglyphs, Sanskrit, Chinese, Polynesian) raise the question of his position in the Orientalist discourse of his time. Said [Said, E.W., 1978. "Orientalism. Western Conceptions of the Orient, fourth ed."…

Messling, Markus

2008-01-01

282

Use of density equalizing map projections (DEMP) in the analysis of childhood cancer in four California counties  

SciTech Connect

In studying geographic disease distributions, one normally compares rates of arbitrarily defined geographic subareas (e.g. census tracts), thereby sacrificing the geographic detail of the original data. The sparser the data, the larger the subareas must be in order to calculate stable rates. This dilemma is avoided with the technique of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP). Boundaries of geographic subregions are adjusted to equalize population density over the entire study area. Case locations plotted on the transformed map should have a uniform distribution if the underlying disease rates are constant. The density equalized map portrays both individual cases and rates, and can be understood by untrained observers. Simple statistical techniques can be used to test the uniformity of the transformed map. This report describes application of the DEMP technique to a sizeable `real-world` data set: 401 childhood cancer cases occurring between 1980 and 1988 in four California counties. In an earlier analysis of the same data, the California Department of Health Services (DHS) calculated rates for 101 communities and found no significant geographic variability. The DDS 1980--88 population estimates are no longer available, so in this analysis 1980 Census data were used; geographic units were 262 census tracts. A k`th nearest neighbor analysis, corrected for boundary effects and for within-tract variability, provides strong evidence for geographic nonuniformity in tract rates ({rho} < l0{sup {minus}4}). No such effect is observed for artificial cases generated under the assumption of constant rates. Pending reanalysis with 1980-88 population estimates, no epidemiologic conclusions can be drawn at this time.

Merrill, D.W. Selvin, S.; Close, E.R.; Holmes, H.H.

1995-04-01

283

Factors affecting the seasonal abundance of ground squirrel and wood rat fleas (Siphonaptera) in San Diego County, California.  

PubMed

Abiotic and biotic factors affecting the seasonal abundance of 3 species of sylvatic fleas on their hosts were examined at 7 sites in San Diego County, California. Indices for Oropsylla (Diamanus) montana (Baker) were usually highest on Spermophilus beecheyi nudipes (Huey) when < 18.4 degrees C (October-December), whereas those for Hoplopsyllus anomalus (Baker) were highest when > 18.4 degrees C (July-September). O. montana was affected most by ambient temperature (inversely for the coastal site [134 m] and directly for most mountain sites [> 1,183 m]). O. montana was affected most (directly) by relative humidity at the inland valley site, which concurs with this flea being most abundant in other areas during periods yielding higher relative humidties and moderate ambient temperatures. H. anomalus was influenced most (directly) by ambient temperature at lower sites (< 1,183 m) and by host activity at higher ones (> 1,456 m). Usually nonrandom distribution findings, when indices for each squirrel flea were higher on some hosts, indicate that flea numbers are correspondingly higher in some nests and burrows because of more favorable microconditions. Data also indicated that plague may persist at higher sites in southern California or in other areas where climatic conditions permit increased and prolonged interactions between more abundant O. montana and its host during spring through summer. Whereas, plague may have less chance of persisting at lower sites because these interactions are decreased and shortened during the warmer months. Squirrels may become infected with plague following hibernation and again when reoccupying colonial burrows. The flea Orchopeas sexdentatus was affected most (inversely) by relative humidity at a coastal site, with higher indices occurring on fewer Neotoma lepida Thomas and on more abundant Neotoma fuscipes macrotis Thomas during colder months. Such increased flea/Neotoma fuscipes Baird activity at lower sites may favor plague amplification during the winter which may involve ground squirrels and other rodents in the spring. PMID:8840686

Lang, J D

1996-09-01

284

Fatality and injury severity of older adult motor vehicle collisions in orange county, california, 1998-2007.  

PubMed

Introduction: Injuries and fatalities in adult drivers 18-65 years of age have decreased in recent years due to safer vehicles, enhanced medical policies, and implementation of injury prevention policies. However, adult drivers over 65 years of age are continuing to suffer from motor vehicle collision-related injuries and fatalities at a more constant rate. A number of physiological factors contribute to the deterioration in visual acuity, slower reaction speeds, and decreased awareness in older drivers. The objective of this study was to examine injury severity and fatality rates in older drivers compared to their younger counterparts in Orange County, California.Methods: This study used the Statewide Integrated Traffic Record System data for Orange County for the years 1998-2007. Drivers were categorized into 4 age groups: 25-64, 65-74, 75-84, and older than 85 years of age. Injury severity was assessed by the investigating officer.Results: Of the 197,814 drivers involved in motor vehicle collisions, 178,481 (90.2%) were in the 25-64 age group; 11,397 (5.8%) were 65-74; 6,592 (3.3%) were 75-84; and 1,344 drivers (0.7%) were over 85. Those aged 25-64 had the lowest fatality rate per 100,000 people, 2.5, whereas those 75-84 had the highest fatality rate, 4.9. The percent of crashes involving a left turn increased with age, and the percent that were stopped in the road decreases with age. Change in injury collision involvement ratio in the 3 younger age groups decreased by 26% to 32%, but decreased by 18% among drivers aged 85 years and older.Conclusion: The decrease in collision fatalities was greater in the 25-64-year-old group compared to the older adult population. This disparity highlights the need for further injury prevention efforts for older drivers. PMID:23451291

Lotfipour, Shahram; Sayegh, Rockan; Chakravarthy, Bharath; Hoonpongsimanont, Wirachin; Anderson, Craig L; Fox, J Christian; Vaca, Federico E

2013-02-01

285

Using Environmental Tracers to Determine Long-Term Effects of Recharging Recycled Water in the Central Ground Water Basin, Los Angeles County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), tritium-helium, chloride, boron, dissolved gases, and nitrogen isotopes were evaluated to determine some long-term effects of augmenting aquifer recharge using recycled water (secondary- and tertiary-treated wastewater). The USGS collected water and gas samples from four multiple-well monitoring sites located in Los Angeles County, California, along a flowpath extending from the Montebello Forebay in the north, where water is

R. Anders; R. A. Schroeder

2001-01-01

286

The Twentieth Campus. An Analysis of the California State University's Proposal To Establish a Full-Service Campus in the City of San Marcos in Northern San Diego County. Commission Report 89-2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The California State University's (CSU) proposal to convert its North County Center in San Marcos from a permanent upper division and off-campus graduate center to the 20th full-service campus of the system is analyzed. The evolution of the CSU plan for serving the residents of northern San Diego County is described, including development of this…

California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

287

Drilling, logging and preliminary well testing of geothermal well Susan 1, Susanville, Lassen County, California  

SciTech Connect

Susan 1, a hot water production well, was drilled late in 1980 for the City of Susanville, California, as part of its geothermal space-heating project. A history of drilling, logging, completion and pump testing of this well is presented. Susan 1 was drilled to 930 feet using local river water with a 17-1/2-inch bit from 50 to 540 feet and a 12-1/2-inch bit from 540 to 927 feet. A 12-3/4-inch solid casing was set from surface to 350 feet, a slotted casing from 350 to 538 feet, and a 8-5/8-inch slotted casing from 520 to 925 feet. Interpretations of the following logs and test data from this well are presented: drilling logs (penetration rate, water loss and gain, return temperatures); formation logs (description of well cuttings, caliper, spontaneous potential, electrical resistivity, gamma ray, neutron); production logs (temperature, spinner); and pump test data.

McNitt, J.R.; Petersen, C.A.; Sanyal, S.K.

1981-03-01

288

Water-resources data, 1970-75, for Perris Valley and vicinity, Riverside County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 1969 the U.S. Geological Survey began in Perris Valley, Calif., to determine changes in the hydrologic regime as a rural area becomes urbanized. The investigations spanned several years when precipitation was below normal in most of southern California. Surface-water records were collected for a 6-year period at 21 sites, and continuous precipitation records were obtained at four sites. Ground-water levels were tabulated from historical data at selected wells for 1941, 1968, and 1970. Water quality was monitored at several wells in the valley, and sediment data were collected at three surface-water gages. There was little increase in urbanization during the investigation. (Kosco-USGS)

Lang, David J.

1979-01-01

289

Map Showing Seacliff Response to Climatic and Seismic Events, Depot Hill, Santa Cruz County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

INTRODUCTION The coastal cliffs along much of the central California coast are actively retreating. Large storms and periodic earthquakes are responsible for most of the documented seacliff slope failures. Long-term average erosion rates calculated for this section of coast (Moore and others, 1999) do not provide the spatial or temporal data resolution necessary to identify the processes responsible for retreat of the seacliffs, where episodic retreat threatens homes and community infrastructure. Research suggests that more erosion occurs along the California coast over a short time scale, during periods of severe storms or seismic activity, than occurs during decades of normal weather or seismic quiescence (Griggs and Scholar, 1998; Griggs, 1994; Plant and Griggs, 1990; Griggs and Johnson, 1979 and 1983; Kuhn and Shepard, 1979). This is the first map in a series of maps documenting the processes of short-term seacliff retreat through the identification of slope failure styles, spatial variability of failures, and temporal variation in retreat amounts in an area that has been identified as an erosion hotspot (Moore and others, 1999; Griggs and Savoy, 1985). This map presents seacliff failure and retreat data from Depot Hill, California, which is located five kilometers east of Santa Cruz (fig.1) near the town of Capitola, along the northern Monterey Bay coast. The data presented in this map series provide high-resolution spatial and temporal information on the location, amount, and processes of seacliff retreat in Santa Cruz, California. These data show the response of the seacliffs to both large magnitude earthquakes and severe climatic events such as El NiOos; this information may prove useful in predicting the future response of the cliffs to events of similar magnitude. The map data can also be incorporated into Global Information System (GIS) for use by researchers and community planners. Four sets of vertical aerial photographs (Oct. 18, 1989; Jan. 27, 1998; Feb. 9, 1998; and March 6, 1998) were orthorectified and digital terrain models (DTMs) were generated and edited for this study (see Hapke and Richmond, 2000, for description of techniques). The earliest set of photography is from 1989, taken immediately following the Loma Prieta earthquake. These photographs are used to document the response of the seacliffs to seismic shaking, as well as to establish an initial cliff-edge position to measure the amount of retreat of the cliff edge over the following decade. The remaining three sets of photographs were collected using the U.S. Geological Survey Coastal Aerial Mapping System (CAMS) during the 1997-98 El NiOo (see Hapke and Richmond, 1999, 2000). The CAMS photographs were taken before, during, and after severe storms and are used to examine seacliff response to these storms. In addition to the analyses of photogrammetrically processed data, field mapping identified joints, faults, and lithologic variations along this section of seacliff.

Hapke, Cheryl J.; Richmond, Bruce M.; D'Iorio, Mimi M.

2002-01-01

290

Map Showing Seacliff Response to Climatic and Seismic Events, Seacliff State Beach, Santa Cruz County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

INTRODUCTION The coastal cliffs along much of the central California coast are actively retreating. Large storms and periodic earthquakes are responsible for most of the documented seacliff slope failures. Long-term average erosion rates calculated for this section of coast (Moore and others, 1999) do not provide the spatial or temporal data resolution necessary to identify the processes responsible for retreat of the seacliffs, where episodic retreat threatens homes and community infrastructure. Research suggests that more erosion occurs along the California coast over a short time scale, during periods of severe storms or seismic activity, than occurs during decades of normal weather or seismic quiescence (Griggs and Scholar, 1998; Griggs, 1994; Plant and Griggs, 1990; Griggs and Johnson, 1979 and 1983; Kuhn and Shepard, 1979). This is the second map in a series of maps documenting the processes of short-term seacliff retreat through the identification of slope failure styles, spatial variability of failures, and temporal variation in retreat amounts in an area that has been identified as an erosion hotspot (Moore and others, 1999; Griggs and Savoy, 1985). This map presents seacliff failure and retreat data from Seacliff State Beach, California, which is located seven kilometers east of Santa Cruz (fig. 1) along the northern Monterey Bay coast. The data presented in this map series provide high-resolution spatial and temporal information on the location, amount, and processes of seacliff retreat in Santa Cruz, California. These data show the response of the seacliffs to both large magnitude earthquakes and severe climatic events such as El Ni?os; this information may prove useful in predicting the future response of the cliffs to events of similar magnitude. The map data can also be incorporated into Global Information System (GIS) for use by researchers and community planners. Four sets of vertical aerial photographs (Oct. 18, 1989; Jan. 27, 1998; Feb. 9, 1998; and March 6, 1998) were orthorectified and digital terrain models (DTMs) were generated and edited for this study (see Hapke and Richmond, 2000, for description of techniques). The earliest set of photography is from 1989, taken immediately following the Loma Prieta earthquake. These photographs are used to document the response of the seacliffs to seismic shaking, as well as to establish a baseline cliff-edge position to measure the amount of retreat of the cliff edge over the following decade. The remaining three sets of photographs were collected using the U.S. Geological Survey Coastal Aerial Mapping System (CAMS) during the 1997-98 El Ni?o (see Hapke and Richmond, 1999; 2000). The CAMS photographs were taken before, during, and after severe storms and are used to examine seacliff response to these storms. In addition to the analyses of photogrammetrically processed data, field mapping identified joints, faults, and lithologic variations along this section of seacliff.

Hapke, Cheryl J.; Richmond, Bruce M.; D'Iorio, Mimi M.

2002-01-01

291

Ground-water conditions and potential for artificial recharge in Lucerne Valley, San Bernardino County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The water level in two areas of Lucerne Valley in California has declined more than 100 feet since 1917, including 60 feet from 1954 to 1976. These declines are the result of pumping for the irrigation of alfalfa. The lowering of water levels has caused many shallow domestic wells to go dry. Well yields in the valley generally are between 10 and 1,000 gallons per minute. About 240 ,000 acre-feet of ground water was withdrawn between 1950 and 1976. About 1,750,000 acre-feet remains in storage. Water of poor quality underlies the valley around Lucerne Lake. There was no definable movement of this water from 1954 to 1976, but the possibility exists for future movement toward centers of pumping. Lucerne Valley may be hydrologically suitable for artificial-recharge operations. (Woodard-USGS)

Schaefer, Donald H.

1979-01-01

292

Mathematical model of the West Bolsa Ground-water Basin, San Benito County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Simulation of the West Bolsa ground-water basin hydrology in California had provided values of basin recharge and discharge and nodally distributed values of transmissivity and storage coefficient. Average net recharge from April 1945 to March 1969 was 6.2 cubic feet per second and occurred as subsurace recharge and infiltration of rain and minor streamflow. Discharge from the basin during the same period was 8.1 cubic feet per second and occurred as pumping and leakage from confined parts of the basin. Values of transmissivity used in the model generally range from 3,300 to 20,000 feet squared per day. Values of storage coefficient used in the model range from 0.0005 to 0.10. (Woodard-USGS)

Faye, Robert E.

1976-01-01

293

Birth of a fault: Connecting the Kern County and Walker Pass, California, earthquakes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A band of seismicity transects the southern Sierra Nevada range between the northeastern end of the site of the 1952 MW (moment magnitude) 7.3 Kern County earthquake and the site of the 1946 MW 6.1 Walker Pass earthquake. Relocated earthquakes in this band, which lacks a surface expression, better delineate the northeast-trending seismic lineament and resolve complex structure near the Walker Pass mainshock. Left-lateral earthquake focal planes are rotated counterclockwise from the strike of the seismic lineament, consistent with slip on shear fractures such as those observed in the early stages of fault development in laboratory experiments. We interpret this seismic lineament as a previously unrecognized, incipient, currently blind, strike-slip fault, a unique example of a newly forming structure.

Bawden, G. W.; Michael, A. J.; Kellogg, L. H.

1999-01-01

294

Water resources and geology of the Los Coyotes Indian Reservation and vicinity, San Diego County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The water resources of the Los Coyotes Indian Reservation, San Diego County, Calif., are sufficient to supply the limited domestic and stock-water needs of the present residents of the reservation. Surface-water runoff is derived from direct precipitation on the area and from intermittent spring flow. Groundwater occurs in the alluvial deposits and in the consolidated rocks where they are highly fractured or deeply weathered. The best potential for groundwater development on the reservation is in the small alluvial basins in the San Ysidro and San Ignacio areas. Most water on the reservation is good to excellent in chemical quality for domestic, stock, and irrigation use. Water from two wells (and one spring), however, exceeds the primary drinking-water standard for nitrate plus nitrate. (USGS)

Ballog, A. P., Jr.; Moyle, W. R., Jr.

1980-01-01

295

Sediment discharge in the Upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins, San Luis Obispo County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Sediment data collected in the upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins, San Luis Obispo County, California, during the 1968-73 water years were analyzed to determine total sediment discharge at four stations in the basins. Water discharge and total sediment discharge at these stations, representative of the 1943-72 period, were estimated from long-term flow data for nearby gaging stations and water-sediment discharge relations determined for the 1968-73 water years. Most of the total annual sediment discharge at each station occurs during a few days each year. The quantity of sediment transported in a single day often accounts for more than 40 percent of the total annual sediment discharge. Estimated sediment discharge for the upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins during the 1943-72 water years averaged 53,000 tons and 23,000 tons per year. Long-term sediment deposition in Lopez Reservoir, which is in the southern part of the upper Arroyo Grande basin, was estimated to be 35 acre-feet per year. (Woodard-USGS)

Knott, J. M.

1976-01-01

296

Evaluation of lactation support in the workplace or school environment on 6-month breastfeeding outcomes in Yolo County, California.  

PubMed

Six-month breastfeeding outcomes (almost exclusive breastfeeding, partial breastfeeding, and not breastfeeding) were analyzed for 201 infants born to Yolo County, California, mothers who returned to work or school. Twenty-two percent of workplaces and 17% of schools did not provide a lactation room. Although part- or full-time status, knowledge of breastfeeding rules, and support from colleagues were independently associated with the outcome, they were not significant in the multivariate analysis. In the selected model, maternal age (odds ratio [OR] = 2.3; 1.3-3.9 for a 10-year difference), college or above versus

Dabritz, Haydee A; Hinton, Bette G; Babb, Jan

2008-12-16

297

Using biomarkers to improve heavy oil reservoir management: An example from the cymric field, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

For biodegraded oil accumulations, field development can be optimized by using geochemical indicators of variations in the extent of bacterial alteration. Biodegradation typically reduces oil producibility by increasing oil viscosity. In the Cymric field (Kern County, California), sidewall core extracts reveal that the extent of oil biodegradation changes substantially over extremely short vertical distances in a shallow, low-permeability reservoir. Zones of more degraded oil can extend laterally for more than a mile. The relationships between oil viscosity and biomarker biodegradation parameters in this field were calibrated from analyses of produced oils, and these relationships were used to convert sidewall core biomarker analyses into quantitative predictions of lateral and vertical changes in oil viscosity and gravity. Compositional variations were also used to allocate production to discrete zones. Viscosity prediction and production allocation can be used to optimize (1) the placement of new wells, (2) the placement of completion intervals, (3) the thickness of steam injection intervals, and (4) the spacing between injection intervals in the same well.

McCaffrey, M.A. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States); Legarre, H.A.; Johnson, S.J. [Chevron U.S.A. Production Co., Bakersfield, CA (United States)

1996-06-01

298

Property description and fact-finding report for NPR-2, Buena Vista Hills Field, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy has asked Gustavson Associates, Inc. to serve as an Independent Petroleum Consultant under contract DE-AC01-96FE64202. This authorizes a study and recommendations regarding future development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2) in Kern County, California. The report that follows is the Phase 1 fact-finding and property description for that study. The United States of America owns 100 percent of the mineral rights and 96.1 percent of surface rights in 10,447 acres of the 30,182 acres contained within NPR-2. This property comprises the Buena Vista Hills Oil Field. Oil and gas companies have leased out 9,227 acres in 17 separate leases. Discovered in 1909, this field has approximately 435 active wells producing 2,819 gross barrels of oil and 8.6 million cubic feet of gas per day. Net production to the Government royalty interests include 200 barrels of oil per day and 750 thousand cubic feet of gas per day. Royalty revenues are about $1.7 million per year. Remaining recoverable reserves are approximately 407 thousand barrels of oil and 1.8 billion cubic feet of gas. Significant plugging and abandonment (P&A) and environmental liabilities are present, but these should be the responsibility of the lessees. Ultimate liability still rests with the United States and may increase as the leases are sold to smaller and smaller operators.

NONE

1996-06-01

299

Movements and home range of San Joaquin kit foxes on the Naval Petroleum Reserves, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

Movements and home range use of San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica) were studied on and adjacent to the Naval Petroleum Reserves (NPR-1 and NPR-2), Kern County, California, between June 1984 and September 1985. Foxes were studied in an undeveloped area of Buena Vista Valley centered on the border between the Reserves, and in an area of intensive petroleum development in NPR-2 adjacent to the city of Taft. Distances moved nightly did not differ between sexes or between level of petroleum development. Nightly movements averaged 9.4 miles in length during the breeding season, and were significantly longer than the average nightly movements for the pup-rearing (6.4 miles) and pup-dispersal (6.5 miles) seasons. Convex polygon home ranges averaged 1144 acres in size and did not differ between sexes or level of petroleum development. Home ranges of paired males and females overlapped an average of 78%. Home ranges of nonpaired males and females, adjacent males, and adjacent females overlapped an average of 31 to 48%. Although kit foxes were not strongly territorial, home range overlap of paired males and females was significantly greater than that of either nonpaired males and females and males with adjacent home ranges. Home range overlap did not differ between foxes inhabiting developed and undeveloped areas. 42 refs., 10 figs., 9 tabs.

Zoellick, B.W.; O'Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.

1987-09-01

300

Use of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP) in the analysis of childhood cancer in four California counties. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

In studying geographic disease distributions, one normally compares rates among arbitrarily defined geographic subareas (e.g. census tracts), thereby sacrificing the geographic detail of the original data. The sparser the data, the larger the subareas must be in order to calculate stable rates. This dilemma is avoided with the technique of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP). Boundaries of geographic subregions are adjusted to equalize population density over the entire study area. Case locations plotted on the transformed map should have a uniform distribution if the underlying disease rates are constant. The present report describes the application of the DEMP technique to 401 childhood cancer cases occurring between 1980 and 1988 in four California counties, with the use of map files and population data for the 262 tracts of the 1980 Census. A k`th nearest neighbor analysis provides strong evidence for geographic non-uniformity in tract rates (p < 10{sup {minus}4}). No such effect is observed for artificial cases generated under the assumption of constant rates. Work is in progress to repeat the analysis with improved population estimates derived from both 1980 and 1990 Census data. Final epidemiologic conclusions will be reported when that analysis is complete.

Merrill, D.W.; Close, E.R.; Holmes, H.H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Selvin, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). School of Public Health

1995-10-01

301

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Coalinga Asbestos Mine, Fresno County, California (First remedial action), July 1989. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Coalinga Asbestos Mine site is in Fresno County, California, and is being remediated concurrently with the Atlas Asbestos Mine site. The Record of Decision (ROD) does not address the mines, but rather a separate area in the city of Coalinga, where asbestos, from the Atlas-Coalinga mines, was deposited to await handling and shipment. The site consists of four distinct areas: (1) the warehouse which was once a mining waste distribution center and which currently houses 1,600 cubic yards of mining waste; (2) a storage yard which contains asbestos-contaminated stacked pipes; (3) a shipping yard which was used as an asbestos distribution center by the Coalinga Asbestos Company; and (4) the U.S. Coalinga Company which currently stores piles of asbestos-contaminated mining waste. Subsequent sampling programs, conducted between 1983 and 1987, revealed that surface water and air also contained elevated levels of asbestos. As a result of these findings, EPA issued an Administrative Order to a major landowner, Southern Pacific Transportation Company (SPTC), requiring SPTC to conduct an additional remedial investigation and a feasibility study and to perform interim measures to stabilize the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and debris are metals including nickel, and other inorganics including asbestos and mining wastes. The selected remedial action for this site are included.

Not Available

1989-07-19

302

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Atlas Asbestos Mine, Fresno County, California (First remedial action), July 1989  

SciTech Connect

The Atlas Asbestos Mine site is in Fresno County, California, and is being remediated concurrently with the Coalinga Asbestos Mine site. The Record of Decision (ROD) does not address the mines, but rather a separate area in the city of Coalinga, where asbestos, from the Atlas-Coalinga mines, was deposited to await handling and shipment. The site consists of four distinct areas: the warehouse which was once a mining waste distribution center and which currently houses 1,600 cubic yards of mining waste; a storage yard which contains asbestos-contaminated stacked pipes; a shipping yard which was used as an asbestos distribution center by the Atlas Asbestos Company; and the U.S. Asbestos Company which currently stores piles of asbestos-contaminated mining waste. Subsequent sampling programs, conducted between 1983 and 1987, revealed that surface water and air also contained elevated levels of asbestos. As a result of these finding, EPA issued an Administrative Order to a major landowner, Southern Pacific Transportation Company (SPTC), requiring SPTC to conduct an additional remedial investigation and a feasibility study and to perform interim measures to stabilize the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and debris are metals including nickel, and other inorganics including asbestos and mining wastes. The selected remedial action for this site are included.

Not Available

1989-07-19

303

Upper Clear Creek watershed aquatic chemistry and biota surveys, 2004-5, Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, Shasta County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service and Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, performed a comprehensive aquatic biota survey of the upper Clear Creek watershed, Shasta County, California, during 2004-5. Data collected in this study can provide resource managers with information regarding aquatic resources, watershed degradation, and regional biodiversity within Whiskeytown National Recreation Area. Surveys of water chemistry, bed-sediment chemistry, algae assemblages, benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages, aquatic vertebrate assemblages, in-stream habitat characteristics, and sediment heterogeneity were conducted at 17 stream sites during both 2004 and 2005, with an additional 4 sites surveyed in 2005. A total of 67 bed-sediment samples were analyzed for major and trace inorganic element concentrations. Forty-six water samples were analyzed for trace metals and nutrients. A total of 224 taxa of invertebrates were collected during these surveys. Eleven fish species, seven of which were native, and two species of larval amphibians, were collected. A total of 24 genera of soft algae and 159 taxa of diatoms were identified. To date, this survey represents the most comprehensive inventory of aquatic resources within Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, and this information can serve as a baseline for future monitoring efforts and to inform management decisions.

Wulff, Marissa L.; May, Jason T.; Brown, Larry R.

2012-01-01

304

Reservoir description is key to steamflood planning and implementation, Webster Reservoir, Midway-Sunset Field, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

The Webster reservoir at Midway-Sunset field, Kern County, California, is an unconsolidated sand reservoir of Miocene age (''Stevens equivalent,'' Monterey Formation). The Webster was discovered in 1910 but, due to poor heavy oil (14/sup 0/ API) economics, development for primary production and subsequent enhanced recovery were sporadic. Currently, the reservoir produces by cyclic steam stimulation in approximately 35 wells. Cumulative oil production for the Webster since 1910 is about 13 million bbl. The Webster is subdivided into two reservoirs - the Webster Intermediate and Webster Main. The Webster Intermediate directly overlies the Webster Main in one area but it is separated by up to 300 ft of shale elsewhere. The combined thickness of both Webster reservoirs averages 250 ft and is located at a drilling depth of 1,100-1,800 ft. From evaluation of modern core data and sand distribution maps, the Webster sands are interpreted to have been deposited by turbidity currents that flowed from southwest to northeast in this area. Oil is trapped in the Webster reservoir where these turbidites were subsequently folded on a northwest-southeast-trending anticline. Detailed recorrelation on wireline logs, stratigraphic zonation, detailed reservoir description by zone, and sedimentary facies identification in modern cores has led to development of a geologic model for the Webster. This model indicates that the Webster Intermediate was deposited predominately by strongly channelized turbidity currents, resulting in channel-fill sands, and that the Webster Main was deposited by less restricted flows, resulting in more lobate deposits.

Hall, B.R.; Link, M.H.

1988-01-01

305

Modeling the Spread of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Outbreaks throughout the Hospitals in Orange County, California  

PubMed Central

Background Since hospitals in a region often share patients, an outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in one hospital could affect other hospitals. Methods Using extensive data collected from Orange County (OC), California, we developed a detailed agent-based model to represent patient movement among all OC hospitals. Experiments simulated MRSA outbreaks in various wards, institutions, and regions. Sensitivity analysis varied lengths of stay, intraward transmission coefficients (?), MRSA loss rate, probability of patient transfer or readmission, and time to readmission. Results Each simulated outbreak eventually affected all of the hospitals in the network, with effects depending on the outbreak size and location. Increasing MRSA prevalence at a single hospital (from 5% to 15%) resulted in a 2.9% average increase in relative prevalence at all other hospitals (ranging from no effect to 46.4%). Single-hospital intensive care unit outbreaks (modeled increase from 5% to 15%) caused a 1.4% average relative increase in all other OC hospitals (ranging from no effect to 12.7%). Conclusion MRSA outbreaks may rarely be confined to a single hospital but instead may affect all of the hospitals in a region. This suggests that prevention and control strategies and policies should account for the interconnectedness of health care facilities.

Lee, Bruce Y.; McGlone, Sarah M.; Wong, Kim F.; Yilmaz, S. Levent; Avery, Taliser R.; Song, Yeohan; Christie, Richard; Eubank, Stephen; Brown, Shawn T.; Epstein, Joshua M.; Parker, Jon I.; Burke, Donald S.; Platt, Richard; Huang, Susan S.

2012-01-01

306

Application of advanced geophysical logging methods in the characterization of a fractured-sedimentary bedrock aquifer, Ventura County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An integrated suite of advanced geophysical logging methods was used to characterize the geology and hydrology of three boreholes completed in fractured-sedimentary bedrock in Ventura County, California. The geophysical methods included caliper, gamma, electromagnetic induction, borehole deviation, optical and acoustic televiewer, borehole radar, fluid resistivity, temperature, and electromagnetic flowmeter. The geophysical logging 1) provided insights useful for the overall geohydrologic characterization of the bedrock and 2) enhanced the value of information collected by other methods from the boreholes including core-sample analysis, multiple-level monitoring, and packer testing. The logged boreholes, which have open intervals of 100 to 200 feet, penetrate a sequence of interbedded sandstone and mudstone with bedding striking 220 to 250 degrees and dipping 15 to 40 degrees to the northwest. Fractures intersected by the boreholes include fractures parallel to bedding and fractures with variable strike that dip moderately to steeply. Two to three flow zones were detected in each borehole. The flow zones consist of bedding-parallel or steeply dipping fractures or a combination of bedding-parallel fractures and moderately to steeply dipping fractures. About 75 to more than 90 percent of the measured flow under pumped conditions was produced by only one of the flow zones in each borehole.

Williams, John H.; Lane, John W., Jr.; Singha, Kamini; Haeni, F. Peter

2002-01-01

307

Faulting apparently related to the 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake and possible co-seismic origin of surface cracks in Potrero Canyon, Los Angeles County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Apparent southward-dipping, reverse-fault zones are imaged to depths of about 1.5 km beneath Potrero Canyon, Los Angeles County, California. Based on their orientation and projection to the surface, we suggest that the imaged fault zones are extensions of the Oak Ridge fault. Geologic mapping by others and correlations with seismicity studies suggest that the Oak Ridge fault is the causative fault of the 17 January 1994 Northridge earthquake (Northridge fault). Our seismically imaged faults may be among several faults that collectively comprise the Northridge thrust fault system. Unusually strong shaking in Potrero Canyon during the Northridge earthquake may have resulted from focusing of seismic energy or co-seismic movement along existing, related shallow-depth faults. The strong shaking produced ground-surface cracks and sand blows distributed along the length of the canyon. Seismic reflection and refraction images show that shallow-depth faults may underlie some of the observed surface cracks. The relationship between observed surface cracks and imaged faults indicates that some of the surface cracks may have developed from nontectonic alluvial movement, but others may be fault related. Immediately beneath the surface cracks, P-wave velocities are unusually low (<400 m/sec), and there are velocity anomalies consistent with a seismic reflection image of shallow faulting to depths of at least 100 m. On the basis of velocity data, we suggest that unconsolidated soils (<800 m/sec) extend to depths of about 15 to 20 m beneath our datum (<25 m below ground surface). The underlying rocks range in velocity from about 1000 to 5000 m/sec in the upper 100 m. This study illustrates the utility of high-resolution seismic imaging in assessing local and regional seismic hazards.

Catchings, R. D.; Goldman, M. R.; Lee, W. H. K.; Rymer, M. J.; Ponti, D. J.

1998-01-01

308

Management by assertion: beavers and songbirds at Lake Skinner (Riverside County, California).  

PubMed

Management of ecological reserve lands should rely on the best available science to achieve the goal of biodiversity conservation. "Adaptive Resource Management" is the current template to ensure that management decisions are reasoned and that decisions increase understanding of the system being managed. In systems with little human disturbance, certain management decisions are clear; steps to protect native species usually include the removal of invasive species. In highly modified systems, however, appropriate management steps to conserve biodiversity are not as readily evident. Managers must, more than ever, rely upon the development and testing of hypotheses to make rational management decisions. We present a case study of modern reserve management wherein beavers (Castor canadensis) were suspected of destroying habitat for endangered songbirds (least Bell's vireo, Vireo bellii pusillus, and southwestern willow flycatcher, Empidonax traillii extimus) and for promoting the invasion of an exotic plant (tamarisk, Tamarix spp.) at an artificial reservoir in southern California. This case study documents the consequences of failing to follow the process of Adaptive Resource Management. Managers made decisions that were unsupported by the scientific literature, and actions taken were likely counterproductive. The opportunity to increase knowledge of the ecosystem was lost. Uninformed management decisions, essentially "management by assertion," undermine the long-term prospects for biodiversity conservation. PMID:17318698

Longcore, Travis; Rich, Catherine; Müller-Schwarze, Dietland

2007-02-01

309

Final Report: Natural State Models of The Geysers Geothermal System, Sonoma County, California  

SciTech Connect

Final project report of natural state modeling effort for The Geysers geothermal field, California. Initial models examined the liquid-dominated state of the system, based on geologic constraints and calibrated to match observed whole rock delta-O18 isotope alteration. These models demonstrated that the early system was of generally low permeability (around 10{sup -12} m{sup 2}), with good hydraulic connectivity at depth (along the intrusive contact) and an intact caprock. Later effort in the project was directed at development of a two-phase, supercritical flow simulation package (EOS1sc) to accompany the Tough2 flow simulator. Geysers models made using this package show that ''simmering'', or the transient migration of vapor bubbles through the hydrothermal system, is the dominant transition state as the system progresses to vapor-dominated. Such a system is highly variable in space and time, making the rock record more difficult to interpret, since pressure-temperature indicators likely reflect only local, short duration conditions.

T. H. Brikowski; D. L. Norton; D. D. Blackwell

2001-12-31

310

A debris avalanche at Forest Falls, San Bernardino County, California, July 11, 1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The community of Forest Falls, California, is frequently subject to relatively slow moving debris flows. Some 11 debris flow events that were destructive to property have been recorded between 1955 and 1998. On July 11 and 13, 1999, debris flows again occurred, produced by high-intensity, short-duration monsoon rains. Unlike previous debris flow events, the July 11 rainfall generated a high-velocity debris avalanche in Snow Creek, one of the several creeks crossing the composite, debris flow dominated, alluvial fan on which Forest Falls is located. This debris avalanche overshot the bank of the active debris flow channel of Snow Creek, destroying property in the near vicinity and taking a life. The minimum velocity of this avalanche is calculated to have been in the range of 40 to 55 miles per hour. Impact from high-velocity boulders removed trees where the avalanche overshot the channel bank. Further down the fan, the rapidly moving debris fragmented the outer parts of the upslope side of large pine trees and embedded rock fragments into the tree trunks. Unlike the characteristic deposits formed by debris flows, the avalanche spread out down-slope and left no deposit suggestive of a debris avalanche. This summer monsoon-generated debris avalanche is apparently the first recorded for Forest Falls. The best indications of past debris avalanches may be the degree of permanent scars produced by extensive abrasion and splintering of the outer parts of pine trees that were in the path of an avalanche.

Morton, Douglas M.; Hauser, Rachel M.

2001-01-01

311

Map Showing Seacliff Response to Climatic and Seismic Events, Seabright Beach, Santa Cruz County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction The coastal cliffs along much of the central California coast are actively retreating. Large storms and periodic earthquakes are responsible for most of the documented sea cliff slope failures. Long-term average erosion rates calculated for this section of coast do not provide the spatial or temporal data resolution necessary to identify the processes responsible for retreat of the sea cliffs where episodic retreat threatens homes and community infrastructure. Research suggests that more erosion occurs along the California coast over a short time scale, during periods of severe storms or seismic activity, than occurs during decades of normal weather or seismic quiescence. This is the third map in a series of maps prepared to document the processes of short-term sea cliff retreat through the identification of slope failure styles, spatial variability of failures, and temporal variation in retreat amounts in an area that has been identified as an erosion hotspot. This map presents sea cliff failure and retreat data from the Seabright Beach section, California, which is located on the east side of Santa Cruz along the northern Monterey Bay coast. The data presented in this map series provide high-resolution spatial and temporal information on the location, amount, and processes of sea cliff retreat in Santa Cruz, California. These data show the response of the sea cliffs to both large magnitude earthquakes and severe climatic events such as El Ni?os; this information may prove useful in predicting the future response of the cliffs to events of similar magnitude. The map data can also be incorporated into Global Information System (GIS) for use by researchers and community planners. During this study we developed a method for investigating short-term processes of sea cliff evolution using rectified photographic stereo models. This method allows us to document the linear extent of cliff failures, the spatial and temporal relationship between failures, and the type or style of slope failure. Seabright Beach extends 0.9 km from San Lorenzo Point on the west to the Santa Cruz Yacht Harbor on the east. The cliffs at Seabright Beach are completely protected from wave attack by a wide beach. The protective beach is a relatively recent feature that formed after the emplacement of the Santa Cruz Yacht Harbor jetty in 1963-1964. Prior to the completion of the jetty, the cliffs at Seabright Beach were subject to daily wave attack. The data in this study are post-jetty construction; therefore, the sea cliff failures and cliff retreat are the result of nonmarine processes (rainfall, groundwater and seismic shaking). The 8 to 15 m high cliffs at Seabright Beach are composed of the Miocene to Pliocene Purisima Formation, which is overlain by unconsolidated Pleistocene terrace deposits. The relative thickness of these units varies along the length of the cliff. At the west end of Seabright Beach, including San Lorenzo Point, nearly the entire cliff section is composed of Purisima Formation and is capped by less than 2 m of terrace deposits. In this exposure, the Purisima Formation is a moderately weathered, moderately indurated massive sandstone. The height of the cliffs and the thickness of the Purisima Formation decrease to the east. In the cliffs immediately adjacent to the harbor, the entire exposure is composed of terrace deposits. Toe-slope debris and wind-blown sand form a nearly continuous fan along the cliff base that obscure the lower portion of the cliff. This study documents the impacts of earthquakes and large storms to the sea cliffs in the Seabright Beach section. The first event is the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, a M7.1 earthquake that caused widespread damage to the area stretching from Santa Cruz to the San Francisco Bay. The epicenter of the earthquake was located in the Santa Cruz Mountains, approximately 9 km inland from the coast. Extensive block and debris falls, induced by the seismic shaking, occ

Hapke, Cheryl J.; Richmond, Bruce M.; D'Iorio, Mimi M.

2002-01-01

312

Deep Springs fault, Inyo County, California: An example of the use of relative-dating techniques  

SciTech Connect

This article summarizes faulting in the Deep Springs Valley area, which was studied as part of a systematic evaluation of potentially active faults throughout California by the Division of Mines and Geology. Evaluation of surface fault-rupture hazard is authorized by the Alquist-Priolo Special Studies Zones Act of 1972. This act requires the State Geologist to delineate regulatory zones for faults that are well defined and show that displacement occurred during the last 11,000 years. Fault evaluations for the Division of Mines and Geology Fault Evaluation and Zoning Project are conducted at a detailed reconnaissance level. Evaluations are mainly based on aerial photographic interpretation in which ephemeral fault-produced landforms are identified and mapped. Young alluvial deposits and geomorphic surfaces are identified as either offset or not offset by faults. Field mapping is conducted to verify fault-related geomorphic features and to estimate ages of faulted and unfaulted deposits. The section on scarp degradation and relative dating techniques provides a brief survey of methods used in studies of the Basin and Range province. In these investigations geomorphic evidence is applied to determine the recency of faulting.

Bryant, W.A.

1989-11-01

313

Ground-water quality in the Lompoc Plain, Santa Barbara County, California, 1983  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Groundwater is the main source of water in the Lompoc plain, California. The lower member of the younger alluvium is the main water-bearing zone. Long-term groundwater levels in most of the plain have not changed significantly since the 1940's. Groundwater quality in the plain in 1983 tended to deteriorate from east to west. Dissolved-solids concentrations throughout the plain exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency secondary maximum contaminant level of 500 mg/L for drinking water. In samples from some wells, concentrations of one or more of the following constituents--sodium, chloride, nitrate, and iron-exceeded primary and secondary maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Concentration of constituents in some samples also exceeded recommended levels for irrigation water. The predominant ions generally were calcium, magnesium, sulfate, and bicarbonate--except in the western part, where sodium and chloride were the predominant dissolved ions. From 1972 to 1983, dissolved-solids concentrations in the main water-bearing zone generally decreased in the central part of the plain but increased throughout most of the study area. The largest increases, greater than 1,000 mg/L, were in the extreme western part of the plain. (USGS)

Berenbrock, Charles

1988-01-01

314

Honey Lake hybrid geothermal wood residue power plant, Lassen County, California  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of a proposed 50 MW (gross) electric power project located near Wendel, California about 25 miles east of Susanville was studied. The project would be the first commercial power plant to combine the use of geothermal energy and wood fuel for power production. Wood fuel consisting primarily of various forms of forest management residues would be processed and partially dehydrated with geothermal energy prior to combustion. Geothermal energy would also be used for boiler feedwater heating and combustion air preheating. The study defines the range of site-specific benefits and economics of using wood fuel and moderate temperature geothermal energy, both of which are abundant and often located in proximity at many locations in the western United States. The study results document conclusively that overall project economics can be very favorable and that in addition to providing an important source of electric power, many benefits to forest land managers, local communities, project developers and the state of the environment can be derived from the combined use of moderate temperature geothermal energy and wood fuel.

Not Available

1982-06-01

315

Geohydrology and mathematical simulation of the Pajaro Valley aquifer system, Santa Cruz and Monterey counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Groundwater development has resulted in lowered water levels and seawater intrusion in the Pajaro Valley, California. An investigation was undertaken to describe the geohydrology of the groundwater flow system and to evaluate the response of the system to pumping stresses by using a mathematical model. The aquifer system consists of three aquifers. The lower aquifer is in fluvial sequences of Quaternary Aromas Sand below interbedded clay layers. The middle aquifer is in upper fluvial and lower eolian sequence of Aromas Sand, and in overlying basal gravels in terrace deposits and alluvium. Weathered soil zones in the Aromas Sand, and clay layers in the terrace deposits and alluvium overlie the middle aquifer. The upper aquifer is actually many discontinuous water bearing zones in the Aromas Sand, terrace deposits, alluvium, and dune sand. The three aquifers are represented in the mathematical model by three model layers separated by two confining layers. Model-generated water budgets for the 11-year simulation period show that storage decreased by 23,000 acre-ft, mostly during the 1976-77 drought. The calibrated model can simulate, with acceptable accuracy, both semiannual and long-term trends of potentiometric heads in parts of the lower and middle layers. (USGS)

Johnson, M. J.; Londquist, C. J.; Laudon, Julie; Mitten, H. T.

1988-01-01

316

Active AIDS surveillance: hospital-based case finding in a metropolitan California county.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES. Health departments that use passive surveillance alone cannot be sure of the level of complete and accurate reporting of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) cases. We sought to develop a model of active AIDS case reporting using limited county resources. METHODS. A validation study of AIDS case reporting using discharge diagnosis codes was undertaken to assess underreporting. Hospital-specific protocols for active surveillance were developed. RESULTS. The validation study revealed that 24% of AIDS cases in all hospitals were not reported through passive surveillance in 1990. In the first 3 months of 1991, active surveillance identified nine unreported cases (69% of the total cases reported) in one hospital. These underreporting estimates far exceed the 15% national underreporting rate estimated by the Centers for Disease Control. CONCLUSIONS. A method of hospital-based case finding was developed and serves as the model for implementing an ongoing program of active surveillance needed to ensure complete, accurate, and timely reporting of diagnosed AIDS cases. Application of this model may be helpful in attempts to minimize underreporting.

Elcock, M; Simon, T; Gilbert, B P; Copello, A G; Kelzer, P J

1993-01-01

317

A water-quality monitoring network for Vallecitos Valley, Alameda County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A water-quality monitoring network is proposed to detect the presence of and trace the movement of radioisotopes in the hydrologic system in the vicinity of the Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Alameda County, Calif. The source of the radioisotopes is treated industrial wastewater from the Vallecitos Nuclear Center that is discharged into an unnamed tributary of Vallecitos Creek. The effluent infiltrates the alluvium along the stream course, percolates downward to the water table, and mixes with the native ground water in the subsurface. The average daily discharge of effluent to the hydrologic system in 1978 was about 100,000 gallons. In Vallecitos Valley, the Livermore Gravel and the overlying alluvium constitute the groundwater reservoir. There is no subsurface inflow from adjacent groundwater basins. Groundwater flow in the Vallecitos subbasin is toward the southwest. The proposed network consists of four surface-water sampling sites and six wells to sample the groundwater system. Samples collected monthly at each site and analyzed for tritium and for alpha, beta, and gamma radiation would provide adequate data for monitoring. (USGS)

Farrar, C. D.

1980-01-01

318

Scenic drive landslide of January-March 1998, La Honda, San Mateo County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The small rural town of La Honda, Calif., is an unincorporated region of San Mateo County situated in the Santa Cruz Mountains in the western part of the San Francisco peninsula. Much of the town is underlain by a previously recognized ancient landslide complex. The ancient slide complex covers about 1.0 to 1.25 km2, parts of which have been historically active. This report describes a recent landslide involving part of Scenic Drive, La Honda, that became active in January 1998. This report does not describe other currently active landslides in La Honda, such as the January 1998 slide on lower Recreation Drive, or the history of sliding in the area. This report concerns the principal morphological features we observed and mapped between 11 February and 21 March 1998 on an enlargement of a 1:7500-scale air photo acquired 6 March 1998 and prior to that on a town property-line map, and by laser survey carried out between 26 February and 8 March. The principal objective of this report is to make available the detailed photographic and topographic base maps and associated description of surface morphological features.

Jayko, Angela S.; Rymer, Michael J.; Prentice, Carol S.; Wilson, Ray C.; Wells, Ray E.

1998-01-01

319

Isolation of Salmonella from muscoid flies at commercial animal establishments in San Bernardino County, California.  

PubMed

Adult muscoid flies collected from three dairies and eight commercial poultry ranches in San Bernardino County were tested for Salmonella enteritidis. Of the total 2,686 flies tested, 92.3% were Musca domestica, 5.5% Fannia canicularis, 1.9% Ophyra leucostoma, 0.2% Phaenicia sericata, and <0.1% Muscina stabulans. Whereas flies at the dairies belonged exclusively to M. domestica, faunal composition at the poultry ranches was more diverse, including all five species. Among the five fly species, only M. domestica tested positive for serotypes of S. enteritidis. The six isolates from fly pools (25-50 flies per pool) collected from dairies included five S. enteritidis serotype Kentucky and one S. enteritidis ser. Muenster. Isolates from flies collected at poultry ranches were three S. enteritidis ser. Braenderup, S. enteritidis ser. Kottbus, and S. enteritidis ser. Montevideo. The male to female ratio in M. domestica testing positive for S. enteritidis serotypes, was 3 to 8 pools, showing more female than male flies carrying the organism. PMID:12125877

Mian, Lal S; Maag, Holly; Tacal, Jose V

2002-06-01

320

Ground-water reconnaissance of the Santa Barbara-Montecito area, Santa Barbara County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This is the third interpretive report prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Santa Barbara County Water Agency on the groundwater resources of areas along the south coast of the county. The two previous reports--one by J. E. Upson in 1951 and another by R. E. Evenson, H. D. Wilson, Jr., and K. S. Muir--were on ground-water conditions in the Goleta and Carpinteria basins. The Santa Barbara-Montecito area is between those two basins-the Goleta basin on the west and the Carpinteria basin on the east. This area of about 30 square miles extends from the Pacific Ocean on the south to the Santa Inez Mountains on the north. The city of Santa Barbara and the towns of Montecito and Summerland are within the area. The Santa Barbara-Montecito area is a low-lying flat section of the coastal plain. Farther inland are highlands of consolidated rock and terrace deposits. The highlands are areas of uplift, folding, and faulting, and the lowlands are structural depressions. Most of the urban development in the area has been in the lowlands. The unconsolidated deposits that have partly filled the structural depressions make up the ground-water reservoir of the Santa Barbara-Montecito area. They include the Santa Barbara Formation of Pliocene and Pleistocene age, the Casitas Formation of Pleistocene age, and the alluvium of late Pleistocene and Recent age. These deposits underlie an area of about 20 square miles and have a maximum thickness of about 2,000 feet. The consolidated rocks of Tertiary age that underlie and form the boundaries of the ground-water reservoir contain ground water in fractures and in sandstone beds. However, the consolidated rocks are not an important source of ground water. In 1959, a year the ground-water basins were full and ground water in storage was at a maximum, storage in the Santa Barbara area was 184,000 acre-feet, and storage in the Montecito area was 97,000 acre-feet. By 1964, in response to below-average recharge and continued withdrawal by pumping, the quantity of ground water in storage in the Santa Barbara area had decreased to 178,000 acre-feet. Because of a reduction in pumpage, there was little change in storage in the Montecito area between 1959 and 1964. Deep percolation of rain, seepage from streams, and subsurface inflow from consolidated rocks are the main sources of recharge to the ground-water reservoir in the Santa Barbara-Montecito area. The most important discharge is by pumping.The long-term perennial yield of the ground-water reservoir of the Santa Barbara area is estimated to be 1,700-2,000 acre-feet. Present data are insufficient to accurately determine the perennial yield of the reservoir in the Montecito area, but it is estimated to be about 2,500 acre-feet. Most ground water in the Santa Barbara-Montecito area is suitable for general use. However, ground water in some of the consolidated rocks and in the shallow unconsolidated deposits adjacent to the coast is too saline for most uses. Seawater intrusion has occurred in the Santa Barbara area and the western part of the Montecito area. The intrusion, however, is limited to the upper part of the nearshore shallow alluvial deposits and contaminates only wells which were constructed without a near-surface seal.

Muir, K. S.

1968-01-01

321

Traffic-Related Air Toxics and Term Low Birth Weight in Los Angeles County, California  

PubMed Central

Background: Numerous studies have linked criteria air pollutants with adverse birth outcomes, but there is less information on the importance of specific emission sources, such as traffic, and air toxics. Objectives: We used three exposure data sources to examine odds of term low birth weight (LBW) in Los Angeles, California, women when exposed to high levels of traffic-related air pollutants during pregnancy. Methods: We identified term births during 1 June 2004 to 30 March 2006 to women residing within 5 miles of a South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Multiple Air Toxics Exposure Study (MATES III) monitoring station. Pregnancy period average exposures were estimated for air toxics, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), source-specific particulate matter < 2.5 ?m in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) based on a chemical mass balance model, criteria air pollutants from government monitoring data, and land use regression (LUR) model estimates of nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Associations between these metrics and odds of term LBW (< 2,500 g) were examined using logistic regression. Results: Odds of term LBW increased approximately 5% per interquartile range increase in entire pregnancy exposures to several correlated traffic pollutants: LUR measures of NO, NO2, and NOx, elemental carbon, and PM2.5 from diesel and gasoline combustion and paved road dust (geological PM2.5). Conclusions: These analyses provide additional evidence of the potential impact of traffic-related air pollution on fetal growth. Particles from traffic sources should be a focus of future studies.

Ghosh, Jo Kay; Su, Jason; Cockburn, Myles; Jerrett, Michael; Ritz, Beate

2011-01-01

322

Characterizing sources of nitrate leaching from an irrigated dairy farm in Merced County, California.  

PubMed

Dairy farms comprise a complex landscape of groundwater pollution sources. The objective of our work is to develop a method to quantify nitrate leaching to shallow groundwater from different management units at dairy farms. Total nitrate loads are determined by the sequential calibration of a sub-regional scale and a farm-scale three-dimensional groundwater flow and transport model using observations at different spatial scales. These observations include local measurements of groundwater heads and nitrate concentrations in an extensive monitoring well network, providing data at a scale of a few meters and measurements of discharge rates and nitrate concentrations in a tile-drain network, providing data integrated across multiple farms. The various measurement scales are different from the spatial scales of the calibration parameters, which are the recharge and nitrogen leaching rates from individual management units. The calibration procedure offers a conceptual framework for using field measurements at different spatial scales to estimate recharge N concentrations at the management unit scale. It provides a map of spatially varying dairy farming impact on groundwater nitrogen. The method is applied to a dairy farm located in a relatively vulnerable hydrogeologic region in California. Potential sources within the dairy farm are divided into three categories, representing different manure management units: animal exercise yards and feeding areas (corrals), liquid manure holding ponds, and manure irrigated forage fields. Estimated average nitrogen leaching is 872 kg/ha/year, 807 kg/ha/year and 486 kg/ha/year for corrals, ponds and fields respectively. Results are applied to evaluate the accuracy of nitrogen mass balances often used by regulatory agencies to assess groundwater impacts. Calibrated leaching rates compare favorably to field and farm scale nitrogen mass balances. These data and interpretations provide a basis for developing improved management strategies. PMID:19767124

van der Schans, Martin L; Harter, Thomas; Leijnse, Anton; Mathews, Marsha C; Meyer, Roland D

2009-06-30

323

Structural investigations at the Coso geothermal area using remote sensing information, Inyo County, California  

SciTech Connect

Remote sensing studies have been made in and adjacent to the Coso geothermal field using TM FCC satellite imagery, 1:100,000 scale, US Geological Survey orthophotos, 1:24,OOO scale, and proprietary black-and-white photography by California Energy Company, Inc., at various scales including black-and-white positive film transparencies at a scale of 1:6,000. These studies have been made in an attempt to understand the complex geology seen on the surface and to try to improve the method of locating geothermal wells. The tectonic history indicated by remote sensing, gravity, magnetic, refraction and reflection seismic studies indicates structure caused by a period of thrusting and folding followed by local and regional slumping and collapse, which is continuing today. During Sevier/Laramide orogeny, the Sierra Nevada Mountains were thrust eastward over Rose Valley/lndian Wells Valley. Relatively thin granitic/metamorphic plates were folded to form the Coso Range and thrust eastward over Coso Wash. In turn, the Argus Range to the east was thrust eastward over Panamint Valley. As soon as topographic relief, developed by the thrusting, was high enough, the entire area started to collapse, in some cases using the original thrust planes for slumping. The granitic/metamorphic rocks forming the surface of the Coso Range anticline slumped eastward into Coso Wash and westward toward Rose Valley. The Sierra front slumped eastward into Rose Valley/Indian Wells Valley, and the entire range may have had westward on the original thrust faults. The thin basalts on the east side of Coso Wash slumped westward into Coso Wash. Several basaltic eruptions of 3-4 million years ago used the zone between slump blocks as eruption sites. Regional slumping for the entire area toward the southeast is indicated on satellite imagery.

Austin, W.H. (Austin Enterprises, Santa Rose, CA (USA))

1990-05-01

324

Geologic and Geophysical Framework of the Santa Rosa 7.5' Quadrangle, Sonoma County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The geologic and geophysical maps of Santa Rosa 7.5? quadrangle and accompanying structure sections portray the sedimentary and volcanic stratigraphy and crustal structure of the Santa Rosa 7.5? quadrangle and provide a context for interpreting the evolution of volcanism and active faulting in this region. The quadrangle is located in the California Coast Ranges north of San Francisco Bay and is traversed by the active Rodgers Creek, Healdsburg and Maacama Fault Zones. The geologic and geophysical data presented in this report, are substantial improvements over previous geologic and geophysical maps of the Santa Rosa area, allowing us to address important geologic issues. First, the geologic mapping is integrated with gravity and magnetic data, allowing us to depict the thicknesses of Cenozoic deposits, the depth and configuration of the Mesozoic basement surface, and the geometry of fault structures beneath this region to depths of several kilometers. This information has important implications for constraining the geometries of major active faults and for understanding and predicting the distribution and intensity of damage from ground shaking during earthquakes. Secondly, the geologic map and the accompanying description of the area describe in detail the distribution, geometry and complexity of faulting associated with the Rodgers Creek, Healdsburg and Bennett Valley Fault Zones and associated faults in the Santa Rosa quadrangle. The timing of fault movements is constrained by new 40Ar/39Ar ages and tephrochronologic correlations. These new data provide a better understanding of the stratigraphy of the extensive sedimentary and volcanic cover in the area and, in particular, clarify the formational affinities of Pliocene and Pleistocene nonmarine sedimentary units in the map area. Thirdly, the geophysics, particularly gravity data, indicate the locations of thick sections of sedimentary and volcanic fill within ground water basins of the Santa Rosa plain and Rincon, Bennett, and northwestern Sonoma Valleys, providing geohydrologists a more realistic framework for groundwater flow models.

McLaughlin, R. J.; Langenheim, V. E.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Fleck, R. J.; McPhee, D. K.; Roberts, C. W.; McCabe, C. A.; Wan, Elmira

2008-01-01

325

GLORIA Alpine Plant Monitoring in the White Mountains, Inyo County, California.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The GLORIA project (Global Observation Research Initiative in Alpine Environments: www.gloria.ac.at) is a worldwide effort coordinated by the University of Vienna Institute of Ecology and Conservation Biology, to monitor climate effects on alpine peaks around the world. In the summer of 2004 the University of California, White Mountain Research Station teamed up with the U.S. Forest Service to initiate GLORIA monitoring sites on 4 summits in the White Mountains. The lower three summits consist of granitic rock, and range from 3240m to 3975m in elevation, while the upper summit is on metavolcanic rock on the shoulder of White Mountain Peak at 4285m. For each summit we followed the rigorous GLORIA sampling design and recorded baseline data on plant species composition, cover, and frequency. Permanent monitoring plots were set up, and dataloggers installed to measure soil temperature. In addition, we are discussing ways to augment the standard GLORIA sampling protocol by setting up a White Mountain "GLORIA master site." This would involve (1) remeasurement of the GLORIA summits using alternative sampling procedures, for example random quadrat sampling, to facilitate cross-comparison with other monitoring efforts by agency and university scientists, (2) a parallel summit transect on a chemically contrasting bedrock lithology, formally known as the Reed Dolomite, which produces magnesium-rich carbonate soils, and is the principle host rock to the ancient Bristlecone forest, .and (3) expanding sampling to include animal taxa. We also plan to complete a detailed geomorphic and geologic description of each site to include in the monitoring database. project/default.htm

Jayko, A.; Powell, F. L.; Smiley, J. T.; Pritchett, D.; Dennis, A.; Millar, C. I.; Murrell, K. E.

2004-12-01

326

Evaluation of strength degradation in seismic loading of Holocene bay mud from Marin County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cyclic simple shear tests performed on Holocene bay mud at the University of California at Berkeley following the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, suggested that the response of silty clay to cyclic loading might be more severe than earlier research had indicated. A program of laboratory testing was therefore carried out to investigate the potential strength degradation of Holocene bay mud subjected to a range of conditions representative of those expected in a major earthquake. The results show that the volumetric cyclic threshold shear strain is between 0.02% and 0.04%. The reduction of shear modulus with increasing strain amplitude is generally consistent with data presented in an earlier study on Holocene bay mud from another location. The damping ratios for the first cycle of loading are consistent with the limits suggested for cohesive soils from earlier studies. The shear stress in the first cycle of loading exhibits approximately a 13--16% increase per order of magnitude increase in strain rate, which is on the higher end of the range of values presented in studies on other cohesive soils. The post-cyclic monotonic strengths are within +/-10% of the monotonic strengths of specimens that had not undergone cyclic loading. There were no clear effects of varying the strain amplitude, frequency of loading, or strain rate, but dissipation of pore pressures between the' end of cyclic loading and the beginning of monotonic shear increases the strength by an average of 8%. One-dimensional site response analysis was performed to estimate the amplitude and number of cycles of shear strain in moderate to large earthquakes, and it showed that up to five cycles or more of shear strain amplitudes exceeding I% could be expected. Therefore, the strength degradation that was observed in the cyclic testing is within the range of interest for geotechnical earthquake engineering. A comparison between the cyclic response of the specimens from Hamilton Air Force Base and specimens tested in the earlier study from the Marina District in San Francisco proved of particular interest. The Marina District specimens exhibited a significantly more severe degradation both during and after cyclic loading, especially for cyclic strains exceeding 1%. Finally, available geotechnical literature and data were reviewed to provide an understanding of the variation of physical properties of Holocene bay mud across the bay area. The engineering characteristics of Holocene bay mud vary considerably across the region; the plasticity index reported for bay mud ranges from 14 to 64. An important conclusion of this study is that the cyclic response of Holocene bay mud should be considered in the context of the engineering index characteristics at a particular location and depth. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

Rau, Gretchen Anne

327

75 FR 69154 - Environmental Impact Statement: Kern County, CA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Kern County, CA AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration...proposed 24th Street Improvement Project in Kern County, California, is being rescinded...the 24th Street Improvement Project in Kern County, California. The proposed...

2010-11-10

328

Sediment accumulation in San Leandro Bay, Alameda County, California, during the 20th century : a preliminary report  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Major changes made in the configuration of San Leandro Bay, Alameda County, California, during the 20th century have caused rapid sedimentation within parts of the Bay. Opening of the Oakland tidal channel and removal of 97% of the marshlands formerly surrounding the Bay have decreased tidal velocities and volumes. Marshland removal has decreased the tidal prism by about 25%. Comparison of bathymetric surveys indicates that sedimentation in the vicinity of the San Leandro Bay channel averaged 0.7 cm/annum between 1856 and 1984. Lead-210 data collected at four shallow water sites east of the San Leandro Bay channel indicated that sedimentation rates have averaged between 0.06 and 0.28 cm/annum. Because bioturbation of bottom sediments cannot be discounted, better definition of this range in sedimentation rates would required measuring the activity of lead-210 on incoming sediments. In addition to sediment deposited in the vicinity of the San Leandro Bay channel and open, shallow areas to the east, 850,740 cu m of sediment was deposited between 1948 and 1983 in an area dredged at the mouth of San Leandro Creek. All available data indicate that between 1 ,213,000 and 1,364,000 cu m of sediment was deposited in San Leandro Bay between 1948 and 1983. Sediment yield data from an adjacent drainage basin, when combined with inventories of lead-210 and cesium-137, indicate that most of the sediment deposited in San Leandro Bay is coming from resuspension of bottom sediments or from erosion of marshes or shorelines of San Leandro or San Francisco Bay. (Author 's abstract)

Nolan, K. M.; Fuller, C. C.

1986-01-01

329

Characterization of the hydrologic and transport properties of the shallow aquifer under Kesterson Reservoir, Merced County, California  

SciTech Connect

A detailed investigation of hydrologic and transport properties of the shallow aquifer underlying the selenium-contaminated Kesterson Reservoir, Merced County, California has been carried out. The aquifer is composed of a sequence of sands, silts, and clays deposited on the flood plain of the San Joaquin River. Transport properties were evaluated by two multiple well tracer experiments. A new method for interpreting observation well data from a two-well recirculating tracer test in the presence of multiple flow paths was developed and applied to these experiments. The model explicitly includes the effects of the sampling device (the well) on the shape of the tracer breakthrough curves. The model was used to interpret both non-reactive and reactive transport. Non-reactive tracer experiments were used to evaluate mesoscale heterogeneity of the aquifer. Experiments indicate that the tracer traveled from the injection well to the observation wells along discrete flow paths and within each flow path dispersion was controlled by pore-level mixing. The thickness of the individual flow paths averaged 0.28 m and dispersivity values for travel distances of 15 m averaged 0.03 m. Overall, dispersion of the tracer pulse was most strongly affected by the wide range of advection rates along the many flow paths intersecting each monitoring well. Velocities along comparable flow paths ranged over an order of magnitude within a 6.1 m-thick interval of the sandy aquifer. By repeating the same experiment with the flow field rotated 90{degree} with respect to the first experiment, it was shown that many of the layers are not continuous and/or do not have uniform hydrologic properties over lateral distances of more than 15 m. Rates of denitrification and selenium immobilization were also measured in these tracer experiments.

Benson, S.M.

1988-01-01

330

The US Clean Water Act and habitat replacement: evaluation of mitigation sites in Orange County, California, USA.  

PubMed

Both permit requirements and ecological assessments have been used to evaluate mitigation success. This analysis combines these two approaches to evaluate mitigation required under Section 404 of the United States Clean Water Act (CWA) and Section 10 of the Rivers and Harbors Act, which allow developers to provide compensatory mitigation for unavoidable impacts to wetlands. This study reviewed permit files and conducted field assessments of mitigation sites to evaluate the effectiveness of mitigation required by the US Army Corps of Engineers for all permits issued in Orange County, California from 1979 through 1993. The 535 permit actions approved during this period allowed 157 ha of impacts. Mitigation was required on 70 of these actions, with 152 ha of enhanced, restored, and created habitat required for 136 ha of impacts. In 15 permit actions, no mitigation project was constructed, but in only two cases was the originally permitted project built; the two cases resulted in an unmitigated loss of 1.6 ha. Of the remaining 55 sites, 55% were successful at meeting the permit conditions while 11% failed to do so. Based on a qualitative assessment of habitat quality, only 16% of the sites could be considered successful and 26% were considered failures. Thus, of the 126 ha of habitat lost due to the 55 projects, only 26 ha of mitigation was considered successful. The low success rate was not due to poor enforcement, although nearly half of the projects did not comply with all permit conditions. Mitigation success could best be improved by requiring mitigation plans to have performance standards based on habitat functions. PMID:12375092

Sudol, Mark F; Ambrose, Richard F

2002-11-01

331

Depositional environments of Painted Rock sandstone member of Miocene Vaqueros Formation in eastern Caliente Range, San Luis Obispo County, California  

SciTech Connect

The Painted Rock Sandstone Member of the Miocene Vaqueros Formation in the southeastern Caliente Range, San Luis Obispo County, California, crops out in a narrow band along the anticlinal Caliente Range. The study area is on the eastern flanks of the northwest-trending range. The Painted Rock Sandstone Member is conformably underlain by the Soda Lake Shale Member of the Vaqueros. In the eastern part of the study area, the member is conformably overlain or interfingers with the Oligocene-Miocene Caliente Formation. In the western study area, Painted Rock is conformably overlain by the Miocene Monterey Formation. The Painted Rock Member thickens rapidly to the west with measured thickness ranging from 130 m in the easternmost section to 1800 m in the westernmost and type section. The member generally coarsens upward from interbedded mudstone and fossiliferous, laminated, fine-grained sandstones to cyclical couplets of fossiliferous, medium-grained, cross-bedded sandstones underlying laminated, medium-grained sandstones and local conglomerates. Interspersed within the member is a medium to coarse-grained, structureless sandstone. The Painted Rock generally coarsens to the east, except for almost completely conglomeratic outcrops in a central section. The Painted Rock sequence represents a gradual shoaling from lower-shoreface environments (fine sands and mudstones), to shoreface and foreshore deposits (sandy couplets). The structureless sandstone may fit in this sequence or it may record a subaqueous part of the nearby Caliente delta. The conglomerate section represents a basin-feeding channel. The anomalously thick type section coupled with the conformably overlying deep-marine Monterey Formation records rapid basin subsidence in the western study area.

Oldershaw, M.W.

1988-03-01

332

Statistical analysis and mathematical modeling of a tracer test on the Santa Clara River, Ventura County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

To better understand flow processes, solute-transport processes, and ground-water/surface-water interactions on the Santa Clara River in Ventura County, California, a 24-hour fluorescent-dye tracer study was performed under steady-state flow conditions on a 28-mile reach of the river. The study reach includes perennial (uppermost and lowermost) subreaches and ephemeral subreaches of the lower Piru Creek and the middle Santa Clara River. Dye was injected at a site on Piru Creek, and fluorescence of river water was measured continuously at four sites and intermittently at two sites. Discharge measurements were also made at the six sites. The time of travel of the dye, peak dye concentration, and time-variance of time-concentration curves were obtained at each site. The long tails of the time-concentration curves are indicative of sources/sinks within the river, such as riffles and pools, or transient bank storage. A statistical analysis of the data indicates that, in general, the transport characteristics follow Fickian theory. These data and previously collected discharge data were used to calibrate a one-dimensional flow model (DAFLOW) and a solute-transport model (BLTM). DAFLOW solves a simplified form of the diffusion-wave equation and uses empirical relations between flow rate and cross-sectional area, and flow rate and channel width. BLTM uses the velocity data from DAFLOW and solves the advection-dispersion transport equation, including first-order decay. The simulations of dye transport indicated that (1) ground-water recharge explains the loss of dye mass in the middle, ephemeral, subreaches, and (2) ground-water recharge does not explain the loss of dye mass in the uppermost and lowermost, perennial, subreaches. This loss of mass was simulated using a linear decay term. The loss of mass in the perennial subreaches may be caused by a combination of photodecay or adsorption/desorption.

Paybins, Katherine S.; Nishikawa, Tracy; Izbicki, John A.; Reichard, Eric G.

1998-01-01

333

Review of samples of tailings, soils and stream sediment adjacent to and downstream from the Ruth Mine, Inyo County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Ruth Mine and mill are located in the western Mojave Desert in Inyo County, California (fig. 1). The mill processed gold-silver (Au-Ag) ores mined from the Ruth Au-Ag deposit, which is adjacent to the mill site. The Ruth Au-Ag deposit is hosted in Mesozoic intrusive rocks and is similar to other Au-Ag deposits in the western Mojave Desert that are associated with Miocene volcanic centers that formed on a basement of Mesozoic granitic rocks (Bateman, 1907; Gardner, 1954; Rytuba, 1996). The volcanic rocks consist of silicic domes and associated flows, pyroclastic rocks, and subvolcanic intrusions (fig. 2) that were emplaced into Mesozoic silicic intrusive rocks (Troxel and Morton, 1962). The Ruth Mine is on Federal land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Tailings from the mine have been eroded and transported downstream into Homewood Canyon and then into Searles Valley (figs. 3, 4, 5, and 6). The BLM provided recreational facilities at the mine site for day-use hikers and restored and maintained the original mine buildings in collaboration with local citizen groups for use by visitors (fig. 7). The BLM requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with Chapman University, measure arsenic (As) and other geochemical constituents in soils and tailings at the mine site and in stream sediments downstream from the mine in Homewood Canyon and in Searles Valley (fig. 3). The request was made because initial sampling of the site by BLM staff indicated high concentrations of As in tailings and soils adjacent to the Ruth Mine. This report summarizes data obtained from field sampling of mine tailings and soils adjacent to the Ruth Mine and stream sediments downstream from the mine on June 7, 2009. Our results permit a preliminary assessment of the sources of As and associated chemical constituents that could potentially impact humans and biota.

Rytuba, James J.; Kim, Christopher S.; Goldstein, Daniel N.

2011-01-01

334

Satellite tracking of Humboldt penguins ( Spheniscus humboldti ) in northern Chile  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the El Nio of 1982\\/1983, the Humboldt penguin population diminished dramatically in the whole distributional area\\u000a of the species. Recovery of the population was slow since 1983 and it has been suggested that large numbers of Humboldt penguins\\u000a die at sea, entangled in nets, or starve to death, even during non-“El Nio” years. We were able to determine for

B. M. Culik; G. Luna-Jorquera

1997-01-01

335

Preliminary report on geology and ground water of the Pajaro Valley area, Santa Cruz and Monterey counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Pajaro Valley area, California, covering about 120 square miles, extends from the southern part of Santa Cruz County to several miles south of the county line into Monterey County. It borders the Pacific Ocean on the west and the Santa Cruz Mountains on the east. The city of Watsonville is the largest center of population. Deposits that range in age from Pliocene to Holocene make up the ground-water reservoir. These include, from oldest to youngest, the Purisima Formation, Aromas Red Sands of Allen (1946), terrace deposits, alluvium, and dune sand. These deposits underlie an area of about 80 square miles and have a maximum thickness of about 4,000 feet. The alluvium yields most of the water pumped from wells in the area. Pre-Pliocene rocks underlie and form the boundaries of the ground-water reservoir. These rocks contain ground water in fractures and in sandstone beds. However, they are not an important source of ground water. There is close continuity between the geology of the Pajaro Valley area and that of the Soquel-Aptos area, which is contiguous on the north. Ground water in the Pajaro Valley area is derived from three sources: (1) Precipitation within the Pajaro Valley area that reaches the ground-water body by direct infiltration or by seepage from streams, (2) seepage from the Pajaro River as it crosses the Pajaro Valley carrying runoff which originates upstream from the valley, and (3) precipitation in the Soquel-Aptos area that infiltrates and then moves southeastward at depth into the Pajaro Valley area. Ground water in most wells in the Pajaro Valley area occurs under confined (artesian) conditions; the only exception is ground water in the upper, near-surface part of the alluvium and that in the dune sand. It moves south from the north part of the area and southwest away from the San Andreas fault toward and out under Monterey Bay. In the south part of the area, ground-water movement is almost due west. The San Andreas fault probably is the only fault that has a restrictive effect on the movement of ground water. Water levels in wells in the Pajaro Valley area in 1970 averaged about 2 feet lower than that in 1950. Ground-water pumpage averaged 46,100 acre-feet per year during the period 1963 through 1969. There are two distinct ground-water quality zones in the Pajaro Valley area: a shallow, semiperched zone of poor-quality water and a deeper, confined zone of good quality-water. Also, sea-water intrusion has occurred in limited areas near the mouth of the Pajaro River and in the vicinity of McClusky Slough. The channel of the Pajaro River near Aromas and the beds of streams that drain the area north and northeast of Watsonville have the greatest potential for artificial recharge by surface infiltration of water. The gravel at the base of the alluvium is the best zone for injection of water through wells.

Muir, K. S.

1972-01-01

336

Osprey distribution, abundance, and status in western North America: I. The northern California population  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An estimated 355+ 40 pairs (95 percent C.I.) of Ospreys (Pandion haliaetus carolinensis) nested in the northern California survey area in 1975. Eighty-one pairs were estimated along the extreme northern coast in Del Norte and Humboldt Counties. One hundred and forty-four pairs were estimated along California's northern coast in Mendociuo, Sonoma, and Marin Counties. The northern interior region, primarily in Siskiyou, Trinity, Shasta, Lassen, and Plumas Counties, contained an estimated 130 pairs. Forry-nine percent of the interior Osprey population is associated with reservoirs that were not present in 1900. We believe more Ospreys are present in the interior now than 75 years ago because of the increase in suitable habitat; nevertheless, populations at Shasta Lake and Clair Engle Lake are now exhibiting below-normal production rates and local declines. The long-term status of the coastal population, nesting along rivers, streams, and bays, is not clear. Recent production rates from two segments of the coastal population appear to be normal, but production at Usal Creek is below normal.

Henny, C.J.; Dunaway, D.J.; Mallette, R.D.; Koplin, J.R.

1978-01-01

337

Late Cenozoic Geology and Lacustrine History of Searles Valley, Inyo and San Bernardino Counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Searles Valley is an arid, closed basin lying 70 km east of the south end of the Sierra Nevada, California. It is bounded on the east and northeast by the Slate Range, on the west by the Argus Range and Spangler Hills, and on the south by the Lava Mountains; Searles (dry) Lake occupies the north-central part of the valley. During those parts of late Pliocene and Pleistocene time when precipitation and runoff from the east side of the Sierra Nevada into the Owens River were much greater than at present, a chain of as many as five large lakes was created, of which Searles Lake was third. The stratigraphic record left in Searles Valley when that lake expanded, contracted, or desiccated, is fully revealed by cores from beneath the surface of Searles (dry) Lake and partly recorded by sediments cropping out around the edge of the valley. The subsurface record is described elsewhere. This volume includes six geologic maps (scales: 1:50,000 and 1:10,000) and a text that describes the outcrop record, most of which represents sedimentation since 150 ka. Although this outcrop record is discontinuous, it provides evidence indicating the lake's water depths during each expansion, which the subsurface record does not. Maximum-depth lakes rose to the 2,280-ft (695 m) contour, the level of the spillway that led overflowing waters to Panamint Valley; that spillway is about 660 ft (200 m) above the present dry-lake surface. Several rock units of Tertiary and early Quaternary ages crop out in Searles Valley. Siltstone and sandstone of Tertiary age, mostly lacustrine in nature and locally deformed to near-vertical dips, are exposed in the southern part of the valley, as is the younger(?) upper Miocene Bedrock Spring Formation. Unnamed, mostly mafic volcanic rocks of probable Miocene or Pliocene age are exposed along the north and south edges of the basin. Slightly deformed lacustrine sandstones are mapped in the central-southwestern and southern parts of the study area. The Christmas Canyon Formation and deposits mapped as older gravel and older tufa are extensively exposed over much of the basin floor. The older gravel unit and the gravel facies of the Christmas Canyon Formation are boulder alluvial gravels; parts of these units are probably correlative. The lacustrine facies of the Christmas Canyon Formation includes the Lava Creek ash, which is dated at 0.64 Ma; the older tufa deposits may be equivalent in age to those sediments. Most of this study concerns sediments of the newly described Searles Lake Formation, whose deposition spanned the period between about 150 ka and 2 ka. Most of this formation is lacustrine in origin, but it includes interbedded alluvium. To extract as much geologic detail as possible, criteria were developed that permitted (1) intrabasin correlation of some thin outcrop units representative of only a few thousand years (or less), (2) identification of unconformities produced by subaerial erosion, (3) identification of unconformities produced by sublacustrine erosion, and (4) correlation of outcrop units with subsurface units. The Searles Lake Formation is divided into seven main units, many of which are subdivided on the five larger scale geologic maps. Units A (oldest), B, C, and D are dominantly lacustrine in origin. The Pleistocene-Holocene boundary is placed at the top of unit C. In areas that were a kilometer or more from shore at the time of deposition, deposits of units A,B, and C consist of fine, highly calcareous sand, silt, or clay; nearer to shore they consist of well-sorted coarse sand and gravel. Unit A has been locally subdivided into as many as four subunits, unit B into six subunits, and unit C into six subunits. The finer facies of units A, B, and C contain such high percentages of Caco3 that they are best described as marl. Sediments of unit C, and to a lesser extent those of unit B, are laminated with light- to white-colored layers of aragonite, calcite, or dolomite(?) that may repre

Smith, George I.

2009-01-01

338

Assessing potential effects of changes in water use with a numerical groundwater-flow model of Carson Valley, Douglas County, Nevada, and Alpine County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Rapid growth and development within Carson Valley in Douglas County, Nevada, and Alpine County, California, has caused concern over the continued availability of groundwater, and whether the increased municipal demand could either impact the availability of water or result in decreased flow in the Carson River. Annual pumpage of groundwater has increased from less than 10,000 acre feet per year (acre-ft/yr) in the 1970s to about 31,000 acre-ft/yr in 2004, with most of the water used in agriculture. Municipal use of groundwater totaled about 10,000 acre-feet in 2000. In comparison, average streamflow entering the valley from 1940 to 2006 was 344,100 acre-ft/yr, while average flow exiting the valley was 297,400 acre-ft/yr. Carson Valley is underlain by semi-consolidated Tertiary sediments that are exposed on the eastern side and dip westward. Quaternary fluvial and alluvial deposits overlie the Tertiary sediments in the center and western side of the valley. The hydrology of Carson Valley is dominated by the Carson River, which supplies irrigation water for about 39,000 acres of farmland and maintains the water table less than 5 feet (ft) beneath much of the valley floor. Perennial and ephemeral watersheds drain the Carson Range and the Pine Nut Mountains, and mountain-front recharge to the groundwater system from these watersheds is estimated to average 36,000 acre-ft/yr. Groundwater in Carson Valley flows toward the Carson River and north toward the outlet of the Carson Valley. An upward hydraulic gradient exists over much of the valley, and artesian wells flow at land surface in some areas. Water levels declined as much as 15 ft since 1980 in some areas on the eastern side of the valley. Median estimated transmissivities of Quaternary alluvial-fan and fluvial sediments, and Tertiary sediments are 316; 3,120; and 110 feet squared per day (ft2/d), respectively, with larger transmissivity values in the central part of the valley and smaller values near the valley margins. A groundwater-flow model of Quaternary and Tertiary sediments in Carson Valley was developed using MODFLOW and calibrated to simulate historical conditions from water years 1971 through 2005. The 35-year transient simulation represented quarterly changes in precipitation, streamflow, pumping and irrigation. Inflows to the groundwater system simulated in the model include mountain-front recharge from watersheds in the Carson Range and Pine Nut Mountains, valley recharge from precipitation and land application of wastewater, agricultural recharge from irrigation, and septic-tank discharge. Outflows from the groundwater system simulated in the model include evapotranspiration from the water table and groundwater withdrawals for municipal, domestic, irrigation and other water supplies. The exchange of water between groundwater, the Carson River, and the irrigation system was represented with a version of the Streamflow Routing (SFR) package that was modified to apply diversions from the irrigation network to irrigated areas as recharge. The groundwater-flow model was calibrated through nonlinear regression with UCODE to measured water levels and streamflow to estimate values of hydraulic conductivity, recharge and streambed hydraulic-conductivity that were represented by 18 optimized parameters. The aquifer system was simulated as confined to facilitate numerical convergence, and the hydraulic conductivity of the top active model layers that intersect the water table was multiplied by a factor to account for partial saturation. Storage values representative of specific yield were specified in parts of model layers where unconfined conditions are assumed to occur. The median transmissivity (T) values (11,000 and 800 ft2/d for the fluvial and alluvial-fan sediments, respectively) are both within the third quartile of T values estimated from specific-capacity data, but T values for Tertiary sediments are larger than the third quartile estimated from specific-capacity data. The estimated vertical anisotropy for the Quaternary fluvial sediments (9,000) is comparab

Yager, Richard M.; Maurer, Douglas K.; Mayers, C.J.

2012-01-01

339

Review of mineral estate of the United States at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2, Buena Vista Hills Field, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to present this Consultant`s findings regarding the nature and extent of the mineral estate of the United States at National Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2), Buena Vista Hills Field, Kern County, California. Determination of the mineral estate is a necessary prerequisite to this Consultant`s calculation of estimated future cash flows attributable to said estate, which calculations are presented in the accompanying report entitled ``Phase II Final Report, Study of Alternatives for Future Operations of the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves, NPR-2, California.`` This Report contains a discussion of the leases in effect at NPR-2 and subsequent contracts affecting such leases. This Report also summarizes discrepancies found between the current royalty calculation procedures utilized at NPR-2 and those procedures required under applicable agreements and regulations. Recommendations for maximizing the government`s income stream at NPR-2 are discussed in the concluding section of this Report.

NONE

1996-08-09

340

From poor farm to medical center: a century of library services to the Los Angeles County/University of Southern California Medical Center.  

PubMed Central

As its centennial approaches, the history and development of library services to the patients and professional staff of the Los Angeles County/University of Southern California Medical Center is traced from the early days when the library was housed in the cafeteria of the dispensary to its present position of being first point of access to library service for one of the largest teaching hospitals in the country. Its recent affiliation with the Norris Medical Library of the University of Southern California School of Medicine is explained. The change in emphasis from patients' library to health sciences library is illustrated, and the contribution of the library to the Cumulative Index to Nursing Literature is detailed. Images

Olechno, G

1975-01-01

341

Individual and county-level factors associated with use of multiple prescribers and multiple pharmacies to obtain opioid prescriptions in California.  

PubMed

Use of multiple prescribers and pharmacies is a means by which some individuals misuse opioids. Community characteristics may be important determinants of the likelihood of this phenomenon independent of individual-level factors. This was a retrospective cohort study with individual-level data derived from California's statewide prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) and county-level socioeconomic status (SES) data derived from the United States Census. Zero-truncated negative binomial (ZTNB) regression was used to model the association of individual factors (age, gender, drug schedule and drug dose type) and county SES factors (ethnicity, adult educational attainment, median household income, and physician availability) with the number of prescribers and the number of pharmacies that an individual used during a single year (2006). The incidence rates of new prescriber use and new pharmacy use for opioid prescriptions declined across increasing age groups. Males had a lower incidence rate of new prescriber use and new pharmacy use than females. The total number of licensed physicians and surgeons in a county was positively, linearly, and independently associated with the number of prescribers and pharmacies that individuals used for prescription opioids. In summary, younger age, female gender, and living in counties with more licensed physicians and surgeons were associated with use of more prescribers and/or more pharmacies for obtaining prescription opioids. PMID:23049992

Han, Huijun; Kass, Philip H; Wilsey, Barth L; Li, Chin-Shang

2012-09-25

342

78 FR 59073 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Humboldt Bay Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Humboldt Bay Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation; Amendment to Materials...Humboldt Bay (HB) independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI). ADDRESSES: Please...receipt, possession, transfer, and storage of spent fuel and associated...

2013-09-25

343

78 FR 56944 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Humboldt Bay Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Humboldt Bay Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory...the Humboldt Bay Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). ADDRESSES: Please...SNM-2514 that would allow for the storage of greater than Class C (GTCC)...

2013-09-16

344

Map showing locations of damaging landslides in San Mateo County, California, resulting from 1997-98 El Nino rainstorms  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Heavy rainfall associated with a strong El Nino caused over $150 million in landslide damage in the 10-county San Francisco Bay region during the winter and spring of 1998. A team of USGS scientists collected information on landslide locations and damage costs. About $55 million in damages were assessed in San Mateo County. The only fatality attributed to landsliding in the region during the period occurred in San Mateo County near Loma Mar.

Jayko, Angela S.; De Mouthe, Jean; Lajoie, Kenneth R.; Ramsey, David W.; Godt, Jonathan W.

1999-01-01

345

Geohydrological characterization, water-chemistry, and ground-water flow simulation model of the Sonoma Valley area, Sonoma County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Sonoma Valley, located about 30 miles north of San Francisco, is one of several basins in Sonoma County that use a combination of ground water and water delivered from the Russian River for supply. Over the past 30 years, Sonoma Valley has experienced rapid population growth and land-use changes. In particular, there has been a significant increase in irrigated agriculture, predominantly vineyards. To provide a better understanding of the ground-water/surface-water system in Sonoma Valley, the U.S. Geological Survey compiled and evaluated existing data, collected and analyzed new data, and developed a ground-water flow model to better understand and manage the ground-water system. The new data collected include subsurface lithology, gravity measurements, groundwater levels, streamflow gains and losses, temperature, water chemistry, and stable isotopes. Sonoma Valley is drained by Sonoma Creek, which discharges into San Pablo Bay. The long-term average annual volume of precipitation in the watershed is estimated to be 269,000 acre-feet. Recharge to the ground-water system is primarily from direct precipitation and Sonoma Creek. Discharge from the ground-water system is predominantly outflow to Sonoma Creek, pumpage, and outflow to marshlands and to San Pablo Bay. Geologic units of most importance for groundwater supply are the Quaternary alluvial deposits, the Glen Ellen Formation, the Huichica Formation, and the Sonoma Volcanics. In this report, the ground-water system is divided into three depth-based geohydrologic units: upper (less than 200 feet below land surface), middle (between 200 and 500 feet), and lower (greater than 500 feet). Synoptic streamflow measurements were made along Sonoma Creek and indicate those reaches with statistically significant gains or losses. Changes in ground-water levels in wells were analyzed by comparing historical contour maps with the contour map for 2003. In addition, individual hydrographs were evaluated to assess temporal changes by region. In recent years, pumping depressions have developed southeast of Sonoma and southwest of El Verano. Water-chemistry data for samples collected from 75 wells during 2002-04 indicate that the ground-water quality in the study area generally is acceptable for potable use. The water from some wells, however, contains one or more constituents in excess of the recommended standards for drinking water. The chemical composition of water from creeks, springs, and wells sampled for major ions plot within three groups on a trilinear diagram: mixed-bicarbonate, sodium-mixed anion, and sodium-bicarbonate. An area of saline ground water in the southern part of the Sonoma Valley appears to have shifted since the late 1940s and early 1950s, expanding in one area, but receding in another. Sparse temperature data from wells southwest of the known occurrence of thermal water suggest that thermal water may be present beneath a larger part of the valley than previously thought. Thermal water contains higher concentrations of dissolved minerals than nonthermal waters because mineral solubilities generally increase with temperature. Geohydrologic Characterization, Water-Chemistry, and Ground-Water Flow Simulation Model of the Sonoma Valley Area, Sonoma County, California Oxygen-18 (d18 O) and deuterium (dD) values for water from most wells plot along the global meteoric water line, indicating that recharge primarily is derived from the direct infiltration of precipitation or the infiltration of seepage from creeks. Samples from shallow- and intermediate-depth wells located near Sonoma Creek and (or) in the vicinity of Shellville plot to the right of the global meteoric water line, indicating that these waters are partly evaporated. The d18 O and dD composition of water from sampled wells indicates that water from wells deeper than 200 feet is isotopically lighter (more negative) than water from wells less than 200 feet deep, possibly indicating that older ground wate

Farrar, Christopher D.; Metzger, Loren F.; Nishikawa, Tracy; Koczot, Kathryn M.; Reichard, Eric G.; Langenheim, Victoria E.

2006-01-01

346

Geologic map and digital database of the Cougar Buttes 7.5' quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This data set maps and describes the geology of the Cougar Buttes 7.5' quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California. Created using Environmental Systems Research Institute's ARC/INFO software, the data base consists of the following items: (1) a map coverage showing geologic contacts and units, (2) a separate coverage layer showing structural data, (3) a scanned topographic base at a scale of 1:24,000, and (4) attribute tables for geologic units (polygons), contacts (arcs), and site-specific data (points). The data base is accompanied by a readme file and this metadata file. In addition, the data set includes the following graphic and text products: (1) A portable document file (.pdf) containing a browse-graphic of the geologic map on a 1:24,000 topographic base. The map is accompanied by a marginal explanation consisting of a Description of Map Units (DMU), a Correlation of Map Units (CMU), and a key to point and line symbols. (2) Separate .pdf files of the DMU and CMU, individually. (3) A PostScript graphic plot-file containing the geologic map on a 1:24,000 topographic base accompanied by the marginal explanation. (4) A pamphlet that summarizes the late Cenozoic geology of the Cougar Buttes quadrangle. The geologic map data base contains original U.S. Geological Survey data generated by detailed field observation and by interpretation of aerial photographs, including low-altitude color and black-and-white photographs and high-altitude infrared photographs. The map was created by transferring lines from the aerial photographs to a 1:24,000 topographic base via a mylar orthophoto-quadrangle or by using a PG-2 plotter. The map was then scribed, scanned, and imported into ARC/INFO, where the database was built. Within the database, geologic contacts are represented as lines (arcs), geologic units as polygons, and site-specific data as points. Polygon, arc, and point attribute tables (.pat, .aat, and .pat, respectively) uniquely identify each geologic datum and link it to other tables (.rel) that provide more detailed geologic information.

Powell, R. E.; Matti, J. C.; Cossette, P. M.

2000-01-01

347

Determination of channel capacity of the Mokelumne River downstream from Camanche Dam, San Joaquin and Sacramento Counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This study evaluates the adequacy of a 39-mile reach of the Mokelumne River in San Joaquin and Sacramento Counties, California, to carry planned flood releases between Camanche Reservoir and the Bensons Ferry Bridge near Thornton. The flood releases from Camanche Reservoir are to be restricted, insofar as possible, so that the flows in the Mokelumne River will not exceed 5,000 cfs (cubic feet per second) as measured at the gaging station below Camanche Dam. Areas of inundation and computed floodwater profiles are based on channel conditions in late 1970 and on observed water-surface profiles during flood releases of about 5,000 cfs in January 1969 and January 1970. The inundated area shown on the maps (appendix A) and the water-surface elevations indicated on the cross sections (appendix G) are for the flood releases of those dates. The following conclusions are contingent on there being no levee failures during periods of high flow and no significant channel changes since the flood release of January 1970. 1. High tides in San Francisco Bay and, to a greater degree, flood stages on the Cosumnes River, cause backwater in the study reach. Severe backwater conditions occurring simultaneously with a flow of 5,000 cfs in the Mokelumne River can increase the flood stage 4 to 6 feet at Bensons Ferry Bridge (cross section 1). Backwater effects decrease in an upstream direction and are less than 0.5 foot at cross section 35, a river distance of 8.6 miles upstream from cross section 1, and 1.5 miles downstream from the Peltier Road bridge. 2. In the reach between cross sections 1 and 35, a 5,000 cfs release from Camanche Reservoir with maximum backwater effect (measured at cross section 1 at the mouth of the Cosumnes River) is confined within the natural or leveed banks except on the right bank flood plain between cross sections 12 and 19. 3. Upstream from cross section 35, there is overbank flooding at a flow of 5,000 cfs between cross sections 48 and 51, and 62 and 67.5. An increase in flow from 5,000 to 6,000 cfs will cause flooding between cross sections 43 and 47, 52 and 56, and 73 and 85. 4. A discharge of 5,000 cfs will pass through all bridge openings in the study reach except that of the Western Pacific Railroad Co. bridge at cross section 4. If large amounts of debris lodge on the railroad bridge when backwater from the Cosumnes River occurs, the debris could cause higher stages and flooding along the right bank between cross sections 5 and 12.

Simpson, R. G.

1972-01-01

348

Five-year resurvey for endangered species on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, (Elk Hills), Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

A transect survey of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1), Kern County, California, was conducted between July 3 and August 5, 1989 to determine the distribution and relative density of endangered species and other wildlife. Results were compared with other reported results, particularly the 1979 and 1984 surveys of NPR-1. A total of 589.8 miles of transects were walked through approximately 47,235 acres in all or parts of 81 sections. Of the 516 San Joaquin kit fox dens observed, 496 were typical subterranean dens and 20 were atypical dens in man-made structures. Estimated den density was 36.7 [plus minus] 4.1 per square mile; and relative den density was 10.5/1,000 acres for all of NPR-1. Characteristics of typical kit fox dens were comparable to characteristics reported for other studies, except mean number of entrances per den, which was lower. Observers counted a total of 300 dens previously marked with an identification sign, 191 of which contained at least one complete entrance and would have been observed without a sign. Relative densities of preferred kit fox prey, black-toiled jackrabbits (40.1/1,000 acres) and desert cottontails (14.1/1,000 acres), were lower than previously recorded. Five blunt-nosed leopard lizards were observed along the southwest and northeast perimeter of the Reserve. Most of the 59 giant kangaroo rat burrow systems were observed in the flat terrain along the northeast and south perimeters of the Reserve. San Joaquin antelope squirrels were observed in the central and western parts of NPR- 1. A total of 73 antelope squirrels were observed, and the relative density was 1.511,000 acres. A total.of 30 possible environmental hazards were observed during transect surveys. Most of these were oil and water leaks of small size and appeared to pose little risk to endangered species. Results of this survey indicate that NPR-1 is supporting less wildlife than it did during either the 1979 or 1984 surveys.

Otten, M.R.M.; O'Farrell, T.P.; Briden, L.E.

1992-06-01

349

A Larger Volcanic Field About Yucca Mountain: New Geochemical Data From the Death Valley Volcanic Field, Inyo County California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volcanism is an important issue for the characterization of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Due to recent legal decisions that now require DOE to evaluate hazards over both 10,000 year and 1,000,000 year compliance periods, the definition of the area of interest for calculation of disruption probability and a knowledge of the volcanic process have become more important. New geochemical data for the Death Valley volcanic field in the Greenwater Range in Inyo County, California indicate that the Death Valley field and the volcanoes about Yucca Mountain are parts of the same volcanic field. The Death Valley field is just 35 km south of Yucca Mountain and only 20 km south of buried volcanoes in the Amargosa Valley. Trace elements for both areas show a negative Nb anomaly, but differ in that Death Valley basalt has lower La (70 vs. 130 ppm). Isotopic ratios are remarkably similar and strongly support a link between the Death Valley and Yucca Mountain areas. The isotope ranges for Death Valley are -11.88 to -3.26, 0.706322 to 0.707600, 17.725 to 18.509, 15.512 to 15.587, and 38.237 to 38.854 for epsilon Nd, 87Sr/86Sr, 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb respectively. Crater Flat isotope ranges are -13.17 to -5.48, 0.706221 to 0.707851, 18.066 to 18.706, 15.488 to 15.564, and 38.143 to 38.709 for epsilon Nd, 87Sr/86Sr, 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb respectively. Depth of melting calculated using the Fe-Na geobarometer indicates that basalt magma was generated at depths of 135-138 km beneath Death Valley and 115-133 km for Crater Flat indicating asthenospheric melting for both areas. Combining the Death Valley and Yucca Mountain areas into a single volcanic field increases the area of interest for probability calculations by over 1/3 and increases the number of volcanic events by 23. The increased size of the volcanic field and number of volcanoes may result in an increase in the probability of disruption of the repository by an igneous event by as much as two orders of magnitude.

Tibbetts, A. K.; Smith, E. I.

2008-12-01

350

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF THE INCIDENCE OF CANCER AS RELATED TO INDUSTRIAL EMISSIONS IN CONTRA COSTA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA  

EPA Science Inventory

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of lung cancer incidence in Contra Costa County to ambient levels of air pollution. It was suspected that the presence of heavy industry in the county, mainly petrochemical plants and oil refineries, could be a contributin...

351

Map showing locations of damaging landslides in Santa Cruz County, California, resulting from 1997-98 El Nino rainstorms  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Heavy rainfall associated with a strong El Nino caused over $150 million in landslide damage in the 10-county San Francisco Bay region during the winter and spring of 1998. A team of USGS scientists collected information on landslide locations and damage costs. About $14.5 million in damages were assessed in Santa Cruz County.

Baum, Rex L.; Schuster, Robert L.; Godt, Jonathan W.

1999-01-01

352

Geology of the Colado Geothermal Area, Pershing County, Nevada.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Colado geothermal area in south-central Pershing County, Nevada is defined by hot water wells in alluvium just west of the West Humboldt Range. Geothermal gradient holes have encountered temperatures up to 113.5 exp 0 C at a depth of 76 m (250 ft) wit...

B. S. Sibbett M. J. Bullett

1980-01-01

353

Public Health Assessment for Laytonville Landfill, Laytonville, Mendocino County, California, March 22, 2005. EPA Facility ID: CAD000065532.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The California Department of Health Services (CDHS) prepared this public health assessment (PHA) under a cooperative agreement with the federal Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). PHAs provide communities with information on the spec...

2005-01-01

354

Report on a Study of the Feasibility of Automated Circulation Systemwide for Peninsula Library System San Mateo County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This examination of the feasibility of implementing an automated circulation system within San Mateo County's Peninsula Library System (PLS) was undertaken to determine if the system should automate material circulation systemwide in order to reduce opera...

I. Port J. Matthews

1980-01-01

355

Violence and Intimidation: Rising Bigotry toward Arabs and Muslims. Report on a Public Hearing by the Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations (Los Angeles, California, March 14, 1991).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Responding to a rise in hate crimes directed toward persons of Arab descent and Muslims before and during the Gulf War, the Los Angeles County (California) Commission on Human Relations held a hearing. The commission heard presentations by representatives of the Arab and Muslim communities, law enforcement, schools, and social science, and…

Chan, Carole

356

Joint environmental assessment for Chevron USA, Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc.: Midway Valley 3D seismic project, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

The proposed Midway Valley 3D Geophysical Exploration Project covers approximately 31,444 aces of private lands, 6,880 acres of Department of Energy (DOE) Lands within Naval Petroleum Reserve 2 (NPR2) and 3,840 acres of lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), in western Kern County, California. This environmental assessment (EA) presents an overview of the affected environment within the project area using results of a literature review of biological field surveys previously conducted within or adjacent to a proposed 3D seismic project. The purpose is to provide background information to identify potential and known locations of sensitive wildlife and special status plant species within the proposed seismic project area. Biological field surveys, following agency approved survey protocols, will be conducted during October through November 1996 to acquire current resources data to provide avoidance as the project is being implemented in the field.

NONE

1996-10-01

357

Survey of potential habitat for the endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica) in the Carrizo Plain, San Luis Obispo County, California. [Vulpes macrotis mutica  

SciTech Connect

A field study was conducted for the US Fish and Wildlife Service to determine the presence and distribution of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica), and to map land use patterns on the Carrizo Plain, eastern San Luis Obispo County, California. The survey was conducted in July 1985 and covered approximately 8140 acres in 20 sections of land. A total of 41 kit fox dens were found. The highest number of kit fox dens observed per 1000 acres was 12; the lowest was 1.5. Approximately 29,720 acres (49%) were grazed by cattle and sheep, 25,600 acres (42%) were cultivated for dry-land farming, but land use was not determined for 5560 acres (9%).

Kato, T.T.

1986-10-01

358

Distribution of dens used by radiocollared San Joaquin kit fox on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California, 1980-1987  

SciTech Connect

Locations of 945 dens used by radiocollared San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica) on or adjacent to the US Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) in western Kern County, California between 1980-1987 were recorded on maps and stored within a computer-compatible data base. Most (516 of 887) typical subterranean dens of this endangered species were found in undeveloped portions of 65 sections, but most (41 of 58) atypical dens (dens in man-made structures) were found in developed portions of 26 sections. Program managers can plan construction, maintenance, and operational activities on NPR-1 in ways that avoid potential conflicts with the conservation of kit fox dens by using the section maps provided in this report or by accessing the computerized data base through the Endangered Species Contractor, EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. 20 refs., 3 figs, 1 tab.

O'Farrell, T.P.; Tabor, S.P.; Kato, T.T.

1987-09-01

359

Map showing recent (1997-98 El Nino) and historical landslides, Crow Creek and vicinity, Alameda and Contra Costa Counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report documents the spatial distribution of 3,800 landslides caused by 1997-98 El Ni?o winter rainfall in the vicinity of Crow Creek in Alameda and Contra Costa Counties, California. The report also documents 558 historical (pre-1997-98) landslides. Landslides were mapped from 1:12,000-scale aerial photographs and classified as either debris flows or slides. Slides include rotational and translational slides, earth flows, and complex slope movements. Debris flows and slides from the 1997-98 winter modified 1 percent of the surface of the 148.6 km2 study area. Debris flows were scattered throughout the area, regardless of the type of underlying bedrock geology. Slides, however, were concentrated in a soft sandstone, conglomerate, and clayey group of rock units. Digital map files accompany the report.

Coe, Jeffrey A.; Godt, Jonathan; Tachker, Pierre

2004-01-01

360

Cancer incidence and community exposure to air emissions from petroleum and chemical plants in Contra Costa County, California: A critical epidemiological assessment  

SciTech Connect

The northern part of Contra Costa County, California is heavily industrialized with a number of petroleum refineries, chemical facilities and other small industrial plants. Several epidemiological studies have been conducted in the country to assess cancer risk in relation to estimated air pollution levels. In this paper, the air monitoring data, air pollution modeling and the epidemiologic studies are critically reviewed. The association between cancer risk and estimated emissions is critically evaluated. The role of occupational and lifestyle (such as cigarette smoking and diet) confounding exposures is also assessed. The importance of validating exposure data generated by air pollution models in epidemiologic studies is emphasized. Pollutants of major concern are sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and hydrocarbons.

Otto Wong (Applied Health Sciences, San Mateo, CA (United States)); Bailey, W.J.

1993-12-01

361

Distribution of dissolved nitrate and fluoride in ground water, Highland-East Highlands, San Bernardino County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the Highland-East Highlands area of southern California, concentrations of nitrate in water from many wells exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 's and the California Department of Health 's recommended limit for public water supplies. The nitrate standards for public water supplies in the study area are commonly met by blending the high-nitrate water with low-nitrate water before distribution; however, some of the low-nitrate water sources have fluoride concentrations that exceed the optimum level, or in a few cases exceed the maximum level recommended by the California Department of Health. Nitrate-nitrogen concentrations in the study area are generally between 1 and 20 milligrams per liter. In general, nitrate-nitrogen concentrations exceeding 10 milligrams per liter are found in water from wells perforated at depths of less than 500 feet. (Woodard-USGS)

Eccles, Lawrence A.; Klein, John M.

1978-01-01

362

Usage and Recall of the Food Stamp Office Resource Kit (FSORK) by Food Stamp Applicants in 4 California Counties  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To evaluate recall and usage of the Food Stamp Office Resource Kit (FSORK), a set of nutrition education materials designed for use in food stamp offices. Design: Client intercept exit surveys, an environmental scan, and individual observations of clients in the food stamp office. Setting: Four food stamp offices in California.…

Ghirardelli, Alyssa; Linares, Amanda; Fong, Amy

2011-01-01

363

Remote Sensing and Spatial Analysis of Watershed and Estuarine Processes for Conservation Planning in Elkhorn Slough, Monterey County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Elkhorn Slough watershed, located on the coast of Monterey Bay in Central California, is a significant Pacific Coast estuarine system. It has become a nexus of remote sensing research due to partnerships with multiple nearby institutions, and innovative approaches in the research area have addressed several management issues in the watershed. Historical ecological research with archival aerial photographs identified

Kristin B. Byrd

364

A New Model for Inservice Training: A Report of a Survey of Thirteen Counties in Northern California.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study was to evolve a new model for inservice training of teachers and administrators in rural and urban areas of California. Initially, 1,600 individuals were surveyed regarding their inservice activities. The data were then evaluated using "Filep's intersect theory of assessment" which employs an analysis of consensus as well as…

Filep, Robert T.; And Others

365

Summary and evaluation of the kit fox relocation program, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 1988, the U. S. Department of Energy began investigating the relocation of foxes to Naval Petroleum Reserve (number sign)1 (NPR-1) in California. The objective of the study was to develop techniques to reintroduce kit foxes onto NPR-1. Soft reintroduct...

J. H. Scrivner T. P. O'Farrell K. L. Hammer

1993-01-01

366

GIS-BASED HAZARD MAPPING AND LOSS ESTIMATION IN THE SAFETY ELEMENT OF THE GENERAL PLAN FOR RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have compiled a GIS database of faults, earthquakes, engineering geology, slope instability, liquefaction, ground water, dam failure inundation, stream flooding, fire, wind, and subsidence for the County of Riverside. The hazard mapping provides overlays on which to conduct loss estimations related to existing infrastructure while attempting to minimize risk to new infrastructure. Eight scenario loss estimations associated with segments

D. Bausch; E. Gath; T. Gonzalez; R. Laton

367

Population-Based Analysis of the Effect of the Northridge Earthquake on Cardiac Death in Los Angeles County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. We sought to determine whether a natural disaster affected total cardiovascular mortality and coronary mortality in an entire population.Background. The effect of the January 17, 1994 Northridge Earthquake (NEQ) on all deaths and causes of deaths within the entire population of Los Angeles County is unknown. The purposes of our study were to analyze all deaths in this entire

Robert A Kloner; Jonathan Leor; W. Kenneth Poole; Rebecca Perritt

1997-01-01

368

Field assessment of soil quality as affected by compost and fertilizer application in a broccoli field (San Benito County, California)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Selected in-field physical, chemical and biological indicators were measured for the rapid assessment of soil quality changes in a Sorrento silty clay loam as a result of compost and ammonium nitrate application to a broccoli field (San Benito County, CA). Plots were laid out in a randomized complete block design with four replications of 0, 22 and 44Mgha?1 compost treatments

S Stamatiadis; M Werner; M Buchanan

1999-01-01

369

67. WILLITS SIGN. GATEWAY TO THE REDWOODS. WILLITS, MENDOCINO COUNTY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

67. WILLITS SIGN. GATEWAY TO THE REDWOODS. WILLITS, MENDOCINO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING NW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

370

2. WILLITS SIGN. GATEWAY TO THE REDWOODS. WILLITS, MENDOCINO COUNTY, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. WILLITS SIGN. GATEWAY TO THE REDWOODS. WILLITS, MENDOCINO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING NW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

371

77 FR 56797 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; California; Determinations of Attainment for...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...is proposing to determine that six 8-hour ozone nonattainment areas in California (Amador and Calaveras Counties, Chico, Kern County, Mariposa and Tuolumne Counties, Nevada County, and Sutter County) (``six CA areas'') attained the 1997...

2012-09-14

372

2. Historic American Buildings Survey California State Library Collection California ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

2. Historic American Buildings Survey California State Library Collection California Section Photo of Thompson & West Engraving of 1880 COMBINED FRONTAGE OF THE THREE BUILDINGS - Big Four Building, 220-226 K Street, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

373

21. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, California, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

21. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, California, c. 1903) EXTERIOR, SOUTH FRONT & WEST SIDE OF MISSION IN RUINOUS STATE BEFORE RESTORATION, C. 1903 - Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma, First & Spain Streets, Sonoma, Sonoma County, CA

374

23. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, California, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

23. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, California, C. 1909) EXTERIOR, VIEW OF SOUTH FRONT OF CONVENTO IN RUINS, C. 1909 - Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma, First & Spain Streets, Sonoma, Sonoma County, CA

375

17. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, California, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

17. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, California, c. 1890) EXTERIOR, REAR VIEW OF MISSION, C. 1890 - Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma, First & Spain Streets, Sonoma, Sonoma County, CA

376

4. Historic American Buildings Survey California State Library Sacramento, California ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. Historic American Buildings Survey California State Library Sacramento, California Photo Taken: 1860 Re-photo: March 1940 EAST FRONT - CENTRAL SECTION - Custom House, Custom House Plaza, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

377

Using a GIS to Model Tsunami Evacuation Times for the Community of Fairhaven, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The community of Fairhaven (pop. 200) is located at the southern end of the Samoa Peninsula in Humboldt County, California. Fairhaven experienced minor flooding from the 1964 Alaska teletsunami and lies within the inundation zone of numerical models for tsunamis generated by the Cascadia s¬ubduction zone. The highest elevations in the community are about 8 meters which potentially exposes the community to high velocity waves and tsunami inundation. This study modeled the evacuation times to reach the nearest designated evacuation area in the adjacent community of Samoa by foot, to determine if this time frame is realistic in the event of a tsunami evacuation. We used a GIS to generate a Cost Weighted Surface that takes into account distance, physical objects such as buildings, lakes, rivers and other obstructions, and elevation. The Spatial Analyst extension in ArcGIS along with 1 meter resolution NAIP imagery was used to construct a land-use polygon shapefile for the Samoa Peninsula. Slope values were imported into the Cost Weighted Surface with 5 meter resolution DEM's of the Humboldt Bay area. Land-use and slope were reclassified to contain speed values based on the type of surface or slope a pedestrian would walk over. Land-use was reclassified based on walking speed values attained in the field while slope values were reclassified based on Laghi and Cavalletti's criteria. Land-use and slope were then combined to create the final Cost Weighted Surface. Two evacuation time maps were created: one modeled pedestrian evacuation time to Samoa's official evacuation site and the other to a proposed evacuation site located within Fairhaven. The generated evacuation time maps show that evacuation times generally increase radially as the distance from the evacuation sites increases. However, this is untrue where slope and land use characteristics have more of an influence on evacuation time than distance. Maximum pedestrian evacuation times decreased from nearly two hours to reach the Samoa evacuation site to less than 17 minutes for the proposed Fairhaven site. This study is being used to promote a pilot project with Humboldt County and the Army Corps of Engineers to study the feasibility of an elevated tsunami evacuation berm at the proposed evacuation site.

Graehl, N.; Dengler, L.

2008-12-01

378

Clay and framework mineralogy, cation exchange capacity, matrix density, and porosity from geochemical well logging in Kern County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Elemental concentrations of several inorganic elements were determined in a continuous basis with depth using the Schlumberger gamma-ray spectrometry (GST) and natural gamma-ray spectrometry (NGS) logs in a Santa Fe Energy Company well in the Kern Front field in Bakersfield, California. Logs of Al, Si, Ca, K, Fe, Ti, and non-pore H were processed by a matrix multiplication procedure, used

M. M. Herron; J. A. Grau

1987-01-01

379

Chemical quality of water at 14 sites near Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge, Fresno and Merced Counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Data were collected to determine concentrations of major ions, nutrients, and selected trace elements in collector drains tributary to the San Luis Drain; the San Luis Drain near Kesterson Reservoir; Kesterson Reservoir; and selected drains, canals, and sloughs near but not tributary to Kesterson Reservoir, California. Results from 14 samples collected during January 24-26, 1984, are summarized in tables, and the sample locations are shown on maps. (USGS)

Izbicki, J. A.

1984-01-01

380

Sediment magnetic, paleomagnetic, and geochemical data from Quaternary lacustrine sediment in a core from Grass Lake, Siskiyou County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Sediment magnetic and geochemical results have been obtained from the top 60 meters of lacustrine sediments recovered in two cores from Tule Lake in northern California. The sediment magnetic and geochemical data, presented here in tabular form, complement studies of diatoms and pollen in the cores that are the bases for published paleoclimatic interpretations. This report also documents the methods used to obtain the magnetic properties and geochemical data.

Best, Patti J.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Rosenbaum, Joseph G.; Drexler, John W.; Adam, David P.

1996-01-01

381

Sediment magnetic and geochemical data from Quaternary lacustine sediment in two cores from Tule Lake, Siskiyou County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Sediment magnetic and geochemical results have been obtained from the top 60 meters of lacustrine sediments recovered in two cores from Tule Lake in northern California. The sediment magnetic and geochemical data, presented here in tabular form, complement studies of diatoms and pollen in the cores that are the bases for published paleoclimatic interpretations. This report also documents the methods used to obtain the magnetic properties and geochemical data.

Best, Patti J.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Rosenbaum, Joseph G.; Dean, Walter E.; Honey, Jeannine; Drexler, John W.; Adam, David P.

1996-01-01

382

Identification of Culex pipiens Complex Mosquitoes in a Hybrid Zone of West Nile Virus Transmission in Fresno County, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Culex pipiens sensu lato mosquitoes were collected from 24 gravid traps (mid-June to mid-October, 2005) in Fresno County, CA. Captured gravid females were allowed to oviposit before sibling species identification by Ace.2 PCR and detection of West Nile virus (WNV) RNA by RT-PCR were performed on the mother and her offspring. Of the 442 Cx. pipiens s.l. female mosquitoes collected,

Rory D. McAbee; Emily N. Green; Jodie Holeman; Julie Christiansen; Niki Frye; Katherine Dealey; F. Steve Mulligan; Aaron C. Brault; Anthony J. Cornel

2008-01-01

383

Evaluation of the potential for artificial ground-water recharge in eastern San Joaquin County, California; Phase 2  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In response to the increasing demand on water supplies and declining water levels in eastern San Joaquin County, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the San Joaquin County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, is evaluating the potential for artificially recharging the aquifer system in eastern San Joaquin County, Calif. Phase 1 of this study evaluated the geologic and hydrological conditions in the area and selected 20 drill sites in three areas of high potential for artificial recharge of the aquifer system. In phase 2, test holes were drilled. This report is on phase 2, and summarizes the data collected during the drilling and evaluates the suitability of the drilled areas for their potential for artificial recharge. Two areas seem to have a fair potential for artificial recharge of the aquifer system using the basin-spreading method: (1) The flood plain area along the Mokelumne River north of Lockeford, and (2) an area northeast of Linden along the Calaveras River. (USGS)

Ireland, R. L.

1984-01-01

384

Strontium Isotopic Composition of Paleozoic Carbonate Rocks in the Nevada Test Site Vicinity, Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties, Nevada and Inyo County, California.  

SciTech Connect

Ground water moving through permeable Paleozoic carbonate rocks represents the most likely pathway for migration of radioactive contaminants from nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The strontium isotopic composition (87Sr/86Sr) of ground water offers a useful means of testing hydrochemical models of regional flow involving advection and reaction. However, reaction models require knowledge of 87Sr/86Sr data for carbonate rock in the Nevada Test Site vicinity, which is scarce. To fill this data gap, samples of core or cuttings were selected from 22 boreholes at depth intervals from which water samples had been obtained previously around the Nevada Test Site at Yucca Flat, Frenchman Flat, Rainier Mesa, and Mercury Valley. Dilute acid leachates of these samples were analyzed for a suite of major- and trace-element concentrations (MgO, CaO, SiO2, Al2O3, MnO, Rb, Sr, Th, and U) as well as for 87Sr/86Sr. Also presented are unpublished analyses of 114 Paleozoic carbonate samples from outcrops, road cuts, or underground sites in the Funeral Mountains, Bare Mountain, Striped Hills, Specter Range, Spring Mountains, and ranges east of the Nevada Test Site measured in the early 1990's. These data originally were collected to evaluate the potential for economic mineral deposition at the potential high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain and adjacent areas (Peterman and others, 1994). Samples were analyzed for a suite of trace elements (Rb, Sr, Zr, Ba, La, and Ce) in bulk-rock powders, and 87Sr/86Sr in partial digestions of carbonate rock using dilute acid or total digestions of silicate-rich rocks. Pre-Tertiary core samples from two boreholes in the central or western part of the Nevada Test Site also were analyzed. Data are presented in tables and summarized in graphs; however, no attempt is made to interpret results with respect to ground-water flow paths in this report. Present-day 87Sr/86Sr values are compared to values for Paleozoic seawater present at the time of deposition. Many of the samples have 87Sr/86Sr compositions that remain relatively unmodified from expected seawater values. However, rocks underlying the northern Nevada Test Site as well as rocks exposed at Bare Mountain commonly have elevated 87Sr/86Sr values derived from post-depositional addition of radiogenic Sr most likely from fluids circulating through rubidium-rich Paleozoic strata or Precambrian basement rocks.

James B. Paces; Zell E. Peterman; Kiyoto Futa; Thomas A. Oliver; and Brian D. Marshall.

2007-08-07

385

Strontium Isotopic Composition of Paleozoic Carbonate Rocks in the Nevada Test Site Vicinity, Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground water moving through permeable Paleozoic carbonate rocks represents the most likely pathway for migration of radioactive contaminants from nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The strontium isotopic composition (87Sr/86Sr) of ground water offers a useful means of testing hydrochemical models of regional flow involving advection and reaction. However, reaction models require knowledge of 87Sr/86Sr data for carbonate rock in the Nevada Test Site vicinity, which is scarce. To fill this data gap, samples of core or cuttings were selected from 22 boreholes at depth intervals from which water samples had been obtained previously around the Nevada Test Site at Yucca Flat, Frenchman Flat, Rainier Mesa, and Mercury Valley. Dilute acid leachates of these samples were analyzed for a suite of major- and trace-element concentrations (MgO, CaO, SiO2, Al2O3, MnO, Rb, Sr, Th, and U) as well as for 87Sr/86Sr. Also presented are unpublished analyses of 114 Paleozoic carbonate samples from outcrops, road cuts, or underground sites in the Funeral Mountains, Bare Mountain, Striped Hills, Specter Range, Spring Mountains, and ranges east of the Nevada Test Site measured in the early 1990's. These data originally were collected to evaluate the potential for economic mineral deposition at the potential high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain and adjacent areas (Peterman and others, 1994). Samples were analyzed for a suite of trace elements (Rb, Sr, Zr, Ba, La, and Ce) in bulk-rock powders, and 87Sr/86Sr in partial digestions of carbonate rock using dilute acid or total digestions of silicate-rich rocks. Pre-Tertiary core samples from two boreholes in the central or western part of the Nevada Test Site also were analyzed. Data are presented in tables and summarized in graphs; however, no attempt is made to interpret results with respect to ground-water flow paths in this report. Present-day 87Sr/86Sr values are compared to values for Paleozoic seawater present at the time of deposition. Many of the samples have 87Sr/86Sr compositions that remain relatively unmodified from expected seawater values. However, rocks underlying the northern Nevada Test Site as well as rocks exposed at Bare Mountain commonly have elevated 87Sr/86Sr values derived from post-depositional addition of radiogenic Sr most likely from fluids circulating through rubidium-rich Paleozoic strata or Precambrian basement rocks.

Paces, James B.; Peterman, Zell E.; Futo, Kiyoto; Oliver, Thomas A.; Marshall, Brian D.

2007-01-01

386

Population Dynamics of Blood-Fed Female Mosquitoes and Comparative Efficacy of Resting Boxes in Collecting them from the Northwestern Part of Riverside County, California  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Testing of blood-fed mosquitoes plays an integral role in arbovirus surveillance and in understanding its interaction mechanisms between host, vector and reservoir. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of two different traps (gravid and resting boxes) for collection of blood-fed mosquitoes in the northwestern part of Riverside County. Materials and Methods: Three trapping sites were selected in the Northwest Mosquito and Vector Control District of Riverside County, California. At each site resting boxes and gravid traps were set; and mosquitoes were collected on a weekly basis between July-December 2009. Mosquitoes were transported over blue ice, identified up to species level on chill table, and classified as male, female and blood-fed females. Results: During this study period, 3953 mosquitoes (826 blood-fed females) belonging to three different genera and eight species were collected; resting boxes collecting maximum number (seven) of mosquito species. Overall as well as individually in each trap kind, the most abundant mosquito species collected was Cx. quinquefasciatus. The proportion of blood-fed females of the Culex species collected in resting boxes was 28.8 times more, while of blood-fed females of Cx. quinquefasciatus was 32.2 times more than the proportion collected from gravid traps. Conclusions: Overall, the proportion of blood-fed female mosquitoes collected for each species trapped was highest in resting boxes. Additionally, resting boxes showed the advantage of extremely low running and maintenance cost; generation of no hazardous waste; quick turnaround time in terms of mosquito collection per man-hour spent; and they were less prone to vandalism or thefts.

Sandhu, Tejbir S; Williams, Gregory W; Haynes, Bryan W; Dhillon, Major S

2013-01-01

387

Transverse drainage development along a tectonically active transform plate boundary (San Lorenzo River and Pancho Rico Creek, Monterey County, California)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Transverse drainage is often assumed to form as a result of either antecedence or superposition. Drainage-basin geomorphology in the Diablo Range of central California suggests that Pancho Rico Creek established transverse drainage as result of headward erosion, and drainage diversion caused by a landslide. Stream piracy may have also played a significant role. Mesoscale stream catchments within the Diablo Range of central California are elongate parallel to the NW trending San Andreas Fault zone (SAFZ). Principal streams draining these catchments ultimately flow to the west and form transverse drainages across the western ridges of the Diablo Range. Examples include the San Lorenzo River (SLR), which flows into the Salinas Valley at King City, and Pancho Rico Creek (PRC), which flows into the Salinas Valley at San Ardo. Incision patterns, fluvial stratigraphy, wind gaps, and beheaded, SW-flowing piedmont streams suggest that southeastward expansion of the SLR catchment occurred via headward erosion parallel to the SAFZ. Expansion occurred at the expense of SW-flowing piedmont streams, which were separated from the upland parts of their catchment by headward expansion of the SLR catchment. Preliminary results suggest that the upper PRC catchment was captured by the SLR after Qf2 time, but before Qt3 time. PRC recaptured its upper catchment when a Quaternary landslide (Qls) diverted both PRC and the SLR, an event that probably occurred after Qt3 time. Upper PRC drainage basin morphology also suggests recent stream capture. Thus, since Qls time, PRC has been a southeastward expanding transverse drainage.

Garcia, A. F.; Stokes, M.

2003-12-01

388

Identification of Culex pipiens complex mosquitoes in a hybrid zone of West Nile virus transmission in Fresno County, California.  

PubMed

Culex pipiens sensu lato mosquitoes were collected from 24 gravid traps (mid-June to mid-October, 2005) in Fresno County, CA. Captured gravid females were allowed to oviposit before sibling species identification by Ace.2 PCR and detection of West Nile virus (WNV) RNA by RT-PCR were performed on the mother and her offspring. Of the 442 Cx. pipiens s.l. female mosquitoes collected, 88 were positive for WNV viral RNA (peaked in August) with no significant differences among complex members or habitat. Vertical transmission was detected in 4 out of 20 families originating from WNV-positive mothers, however, in only a small number of offspring from each family. Out of 101 families that had PCR-based maternal and offspring identifications, the offspring from 15 families produced inexplicable amplicon patterns, suggesting ambiguities in the PCR assay identifications. Male genitalia (DV/D ratio) and Ace.2 PCR identifications revealed numerous discrepancies in our ability to accurately determine the identity of Cx. pipiens complex members in the hybrid zone of Fresno County. PMID:18256434

McAbee, Rory D; Green, Emily N; Holeman, Jodie; Christiansen, Julie; Frye, Niki; Dealey, Katherine; Mulligan, F Steve; Brault, Aaron C; Cornel, Anthony J

2008-02-01

389

Landslides in Alameda County, California: A Digital Database Extracted from Preliminary Photointerpretation Maps of Surficial Deposits by T.H. Nilsen in USGS Open-File Report 75-277  

USGS Publications Warehouse

All or part of 25 7.5-minute quadrangles identifying 8465 landslides - largely slow-moving slides and earth flows - in Alameda County, California, have been converted to a digital-map database, compiled at 1:24,000 scale and plotted at 1:62,500 scale, that can be acquired from the U.S. Geological Survey over the Internet or on magnetic tape.

Roberts, Sebastian; Roberts, Michelle A.; Brennan, Eileen M.

2000-01-01

390

Enrichment, concentration and retention processes in relation to anchovy (Engraulis ringens) eggs and larvae distributions in the northern Humboldt upwelling ecosystem  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A Lagrangian model is used to simulate and quantify in the northern Humboldt upwelling ecosystem the processes of enrichment, concentration and retention, identified by Bakun [Bakun, A., 1996. Patterns in the ocean. Ocean processes and marine population dynamics. University of California Sea Grant, California, USA, in cooperation with Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas de Noroeste, La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico, 323 pp.] as being important for the survival and recruitment of early life stages of pelagic fish. The method relies on tracking the positions of particles within water velocity fields generated by a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. Simple criteria for considering particles as participating to enrichment, concentration or retention are used to derive indices of the three processes. We analyse the spatial distribution of and seasonal variability in these indices. The results are discussed in relation to anchovy (Engraulis ringens) eggs and larvae distributions off Peru, and to a comparable study conducted in the southern Benguela upwelling ecosystem.

Lett, Christophe; Penven, Pierrick; Ayón, Patricia; Fréon, Pierre

2007-01-01

391

Availability of substance abuse treatment services in Spanish: A GIS analysis of Latino communities in Los Angeles County, California  

PubMed Central

Background The percentage of Latino clients entering outpatient substance abuse treatment (OSAT) in the United States has increased significantly in the past 10 years. Evidence suggests that a lack of services in Spanish is a significant barrier to treatment access among Latinos. Methods Using a geographic information system (GIS) approach, data from the U.S. Census Bureau and the National Survey of Substance Abuse Treatment Services (N-SSATS) were analyzed to determine the geographic distance between OSAT facilities with services in Spanish and Latino communities throughout Los Angeles County, CA. Data from N-SSATS were also analyzed using logistic regression models to examine organizational characteristics and their association with offering services in Spanish. Our GIS methods are tested in their ability to provide baseline measures to inform future analysis comparing changes in demography and service infrastructure. Results GIS analysis revealed cold spots representing high-density Latino communities with extensive travel distance to facilities offering services in Spanish. The average linear distance between Latino communities and facilities offering Spanish-language services ranged from 2 to 6 miles, while the location of the cold spots pointed to a need for services in Spanish in a particular subregion of the county. Further, secondary data analysis revealed that, on average, being privately owned (OR = .23, 95% CI = 0.06-0.90) was associated with a lower likelihood of providing services in Spanish compared to public facilities. Additionally, a facility with a state license (OR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.12-3.88) or a higher number of Medicaid recipients (OR = 2.98, 95% CI = 1.76-5.05) was twice as likely to offer services in Spanish. Conclusion Despite the significant presence of Latinos in L.A. County in 2000, low capacity was found in discrete Latino communities in terms of offering OSAT services in Spanish. Funding and regulation play a significant role in facilities' capacity to offer these services. Future studies should build from our multi-method approach to compare changes in population demography and system infrastructure and inform health care policy that seeks to improve providers' capacity to provide linguistically competent care.

2011-01-01

392

8. EEL RIVER SOUTH FORK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

8. EEL RIVER SOUTH FORK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH OF LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING N. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

393

3. CEDAR CREEK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. SOUTH OF LEGGETT, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. CEDAR CREEK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. SOUTH OF LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING NW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

394

4. BIG DAN CREEK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. SOUTH OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. BIG DAN CREEK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. SOUTH OF LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING NE. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

395

9. EEL RIVER SOUTH FORK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

9. EEL RIVER SOUTH FORK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH OF LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING W. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

396

68. AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD HIGHWAY 101, ROAD VIEW ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

68. AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD HIGHWAY 101, ROAD VIEW .5 MILE NORTH OF MIRANDA. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING NW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

397

20. AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD HIGHWAY 101, ROAD VIEW ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

20. AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD HIGHWAY 101, ROAD VIEW .5 MILE NORTH OF MIRANDA. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING NW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

398

26. BOLLING MEMORIAL GROVE PLAQUE, AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

26. BOLLING MEMORIAL GROVE PLAQUE, AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD HIGHWAY 101. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING E. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

399

27. AVENUE OF THE GIANTS SIGN AT NORTH END OF ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

27. AVENUE OF THE GIANTS SIGN AT NORTH END OF ROAD. PEPPERWOOD, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING S. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

400

21. AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD HIGHWAY 101, ROAD VIEW ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

21. AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD HIGHWAY 101, ROAD VIEW 1.5 MILES NORTH OF MIRANDA. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING N. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

401

69. AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD HIGHWAY 101, ROAD VIEW ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

69. AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD HIGHWAY 101, ROAD VIEW 1.5 MILES NORTH OF MIRANDA. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING N. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

402

22. BRIDGE CREEK BRIDGE, AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD HIGHWAY ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

22. BRIDGE CREEK BRIDGE, AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD HIGHWAY 101. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING E. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

403

Summary of water resources for the Campo, Cuyapaipe, La Posta, and Manzanita Indian Reservations and vicinity, San Diego County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Since 1945, precipitation and runoff in California on the Campo, Cuyapaipe, La Posta, and Manzanita Indian Reservations and surrounding areas generally have been below normal, and ground-water levels are declining. Most of the water is of excellent quality. The analysis of water from one well on the Campo Reservation indicates a concentration of nitrate that exceeds the recommended limit established in 1972 by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Most wells and springs in the study area yield water for domestic purposes. The yields range from less than 1 gallon per minute to 210 gallons per minute. Most of the water is produced from shallow aluvial-filled channels or from consolidated rocks that are deeply weathered locally or highly fractured. The well data show that insufficient water is available on the four reservations for large-scale irrigation. (Woodard-USGS)

Moyle, W. R.; Downing, D. J.

1978-01-01

404

An evaluation of problems arising from acid mine drainage in the vicinity of Shasta Lake, Shasta County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Streams draining the mined areas of massive sulfide ore deposits in the Shasta Mining Districts of northern California are generally acidic and contain large concentrations of dissolved metals, including iron, copper, and zinc. The streams, including Flat, Little Backbone, Spring, West Squaw, Horse, and Zinc Creeks, discharge into Shasta Reservoir and the Sacramento River and have caused numerous fish kills. The sources of pollution are discharge from underground mines, streams that flow into open pits, and streams that flow through pyritic mine dumps where the oxidation of pyrite and other sulfide minerals results in the production of acid and the mobilization of metals. Suggested methods of treatment include the use of air and hydraulic seals in the mines, lime neutralization of mine effluent, channeling of runoff and mine effluent away from mine and tailing areas, and the grading and sealing of mine dumps. A comprehensive preabatement and postabatement program is recommended to evaluate the effects of any treatment method used. (Woodard-USGS)

Fuller, Richard H.; Shay, J. M.; Ferreira, R. F.; Hoffman, R. J.

1978-01-01

405

Reservoir analysis study, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: Phase 2 report, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

Jerry R. Bergeso and Associates, Inc. (Bergeson) has completed Phase II of the Reservoir Analysis, Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 1, Elk Hills Oilfield, California. The objectives for this phase of the study included the establishment of revised estimates of the original oil and gas-in-place for each of the zones/reservoirs, estimation of the remaining proved developed, proved undeveloped, probable and possible reserves, and assessment of the effects of historical development and production operations and practices on recoverable reserves. Volume one contains the following: summary; introduction; and reservoir studies for tulare, dry gas zone, eastern shallow oil zone, western shallow oil zone, and Stevens --MBB/W31S, 31S NA/D.

Not Available

1988-06-01

406

Digital-model evaluation of the ground-water resources in Ocotillo-Coyote Wells Basin, Imperial County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A flow model using finite-element techniques has been constructed for an alluvial aquifer in the Ocotillo-Coyote Wells Basin, Imperial County, Calif. Natural recharge is about 2,600 acre-feet per year, and estimated ground water in storage is 640 ,000 acre-feet. Pumpage totaled 880 acre-feet in 1975. The computed decline from steady-state conditions in 1925 to December 1975 was 15 feet in Ocotillo. The projected decline from 1976 to 1995 with annual pumpage of 1,000 acre-feet is 6 feet and with annual pumpage of 2,000 acre-feet is 17 feet in Ocotillo. In the latter projection, continued pumping after 1995 may cause saline water to flow toward the potable ground water in and around Ocotillo. (Woodard-USGS)

Skrivan, James A.

1977-01-01

407

[open quotes]2-Step[close quotes] log analysis of the Spellacy reservoir in the giant Midway-Sunset Field, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

A technique is presented for simple, effective log analysis of (Miocene) [open quotes]Spellacy[close quotes] sands and conglomerates of the Santa Margarita Formation at Midway-Sunset Field in Kern County, California. Results are shown graphically on the log display and are quantified for mapping. Requirements are digital wireline data -- in this simple case, just resistivity and porosities - and flexible log analysis software such as QLA2[trademark]. The first step of this technique discriminates between reservoir-quality and non-reservoir-quality intervals yielding three color-coded categories. A narrow color-filled column is added to the well log display to graphically communicate the vertical distribution of reservoir-quality and barrier intervals. The second step performs a fluid analysis on the reservoir-quality category (intervals) yielding three more color-coded categories. The results of the fluid analysis are graphically displayed in a second narrow color-filled column on the well log. Analysis results are captured from a tabular report for mapping. Quantifiable products include (1) thicknesses: original net pay, current net pay, reservoir quality, total sand, total porosity, phi-H, etc.; (2) averages: original net pay porosity; current net pay porosity, current net pay saturation, current net pay bulk volume oil, etc.; and (3) ratios: thickness of reservoir quality to total sand and thickness of current net pay to total interval.

Sturm, D.H. (Santa Fe Energy Resources, Bakersfield, CA (United States))

1996-01-01

408

Water-quality and sediment-chemistry data of drain water and evaporation ponds from Tulare Lake Drainage District, Kings County, California, March 1985 to March 1986  

SciTech Connect

Trace element and major ion concentrations were measured in water samples collected monthly between March 1985 and March 1986 at the MD-1 pumping station at the Tulare Lake Drainage District evaporation ponds, Kings County, California. Samples were analyzed for selected pesticides several times during the year. Salinity, as measured by specific conductance, ranged from 11,500 to 37,600 microsiemens/centimeter; total recoverable boron ranged from 4,000 to 16,000 micrg/L; and total recoverable molybdenum ranged from 630 to 2,600 microg/L. Median concentrations of total arsenic and total selenium were 97 and 2 microg/L. Atrazine, prometone, propazine, and simazine were the only pesticides detected in water samples collected at the MD-1 pumping station. Major ions, trace elements, and selected pesticides also were analyzed in water and bottom-sediment samples from five of the southern evaporation ponds at Tulare Lake Drainage District. The water samples increased in specific conductance and concentrations of total arsenic, total recoverable boron and total recoverable molybdenum going from pond 1 to pond 10, respectively. Median concentrations of total arsenic and total selenium in the bottom sediments were 4.0 and 0.9 microg/g, respectively. 6 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

Fujii, R.

1988-01-01

409

Well-construction, water-quality, and water-level data, and pond-infiltration estimates, for three ground-water subbasins, Riverside County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Reclaimed water in the Eastern Municipal Water District of Riverside County,California, is used within the service area for agricultural irrigation.Owing to the seasonal demand for reclaimed water, storage/infiltration ponds were constructed in the Winchester, Menifee, and south Perris subbasins.Reclaimed water infiltrates from these ponds and enters the groundwater system. Little is known of the effects of the reclaimed water on groundwater quality. In cooperation with the Eastern MunicipalWater District, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study in 1995 to determine the quantity and fate of reclaimed water percolating from these storage ponds. Data compiled during the first phase of this study are presented in this report. Field reconnaissance of the Winchester, Menifee, and south Perris subbasins indicated the existence of many wells. Wellconstruction data for 115 of these wells were tabulated. Available historical waterquality and waterlevel data for 178 wells in the subbasins also were tabulated. In addition, water levels in 86 wells were measured during the spring and autumn of 1995. On the basis of these data, waterlevel contour lines were drawn and the direction of groundwater flow was determined.Three lithologic sections through the subbasins were constructed from drillers' logs of 26 wells.

Burton, C. A.; Kaehler, C. A.; Christensen, A. H.

1996-01-01

410

Improved reservoir management of heavy oil assets using biomarker variability in sidewall cores and produced oils: An example from the Cymric Field, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

Development of biodegraded oil accumulations can be optimized by using geochemical indicators of variations in the extent of biodegradation. Biodegradation typically reduces oil producibility by increasing oil viscosity. Using the Cymric Field (Kern County, California), we show that the extent of oil biodegradation can change substantially over extremely short vertical distances (feet) in shallow, low-permeability reservoirs. These variations can be mapped laterally for more than a mile using reservoir sidewall core extract compositions. The relationship between oil viscosity and biomarker biodegradation parameters can be calibrated from analyses of produced oils. These relationships can then be used to convert sidewall core biomarker parameters into quantitative predictions of lateral and vertical changes in oil viscosity and gravity. These compositional variations can be used to optimize the placement of new wells and well completion intervals, as well as to assess the relative production from discrete zones. We discuss how this new technique can be used to optimize field development, including parameters such as (1) the placement of completion intervals, (2) the thickness of steam injection intervals, and (3) the spacing between injection intervals in the same well.

Legarre, H.A.; Johnson, S.J. (Chevron Production Co., Bakersfield, CA (United States)); McCaffrey, M.A. (Chevron Petroleum Technology, Co., La Habra, CA (United States))

1996-01-01

411

Geophysical Surveys of the San Andreas and Crystal Springs Reservoir System Including Seismic-Reflection Profiles and Swath Bathymetry, San Mateo County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report describes geophysical data acquired by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in San Andreas Reservoir and Upper and Lower Crystal Springs Reservoirs, San Mateo County, California, as part of an effort to refine knowledge of the location of traces of the San Andreas Fault within the reservoir system and to provide improved reservoir bathymetry for estimates of reservoir water volume. The surveys were conducted by the Western Coastal and Marine Geology (WCMG) Team of the USGS for the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC). The data were acquired in three separate surveys: (1) in June 2007, personnel from WCMG completed a three-day survey of San Andreas Reservoir, collecting approximately 50 km of high-resolution Chirp subbottom seismic-reflection data; (2) in November 2007, WCMG conducted a swath-bathymetry survey of San Andreas reservoir; and finally (3) in April 2008, WCMG conducted a swath-bathymetry survey of both the upper and lower Crystal Springs Reservoir system. Top of PageFor more information, contact David Finlayson.

Finlayson, David P.; Triezenberg, Peter J.; Hart, Patrick E.

2010-01-01

412

Characteristics of dens used by radiocollared San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

A total of 946 dens used by radiocollared San Joaquin kit foxes, Vulpes macrotis mutica, were observed on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 and surrounding lands in Kern County, California. Of these, 887 were typical subterranean dens located in 65 sections, and 59 were atypical dens in man-made structures located in 24 sections and in two pipe storage yards. Although the number of entrances to dens ranged between 1 and 17, most (90%) had six or fewer entrances and the average, which did not differ between developed and undeveloped habitats, was 3.4. Entrances were significantly higher than wide, and 53% had ramp-shaped dirt berms. Dens had an average slope angle of 16.1/sup 0/ and more were found on slopes than in flats. Fewer dens faced the northwest quadrant and more faced the southern quadrant than expected. Evidence of kit foxes (tracks, scats, or prey remains) was observed at 80% of the dens, but 11% were not associated with kit fox sign (matted vegetation or trails) even though they were occupied. Human disturbances, most frequently roads, were observed in the immediate vicinity of 78% of the dens. Most (93%) atypical dens were in metal pipes, three were in buried wooden culverts, and one was under a concrete slab. 27 refs., 7 figs., 10 tabs.

Berry, W.H.; O'Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.; McCue, P.M.

1987-08-01

413

Diet of the San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica, on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California, 1980-1984  

SciTech Connect

A total of 1430 scats of the San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica, were collected between 1980 and 1984 on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California, and analyzed to determine frequency of occurrence of prey items. Lagomorphs (black-tailed jackrabbits and desert cotton-tails) were the primary prey species (frequency of occurrence = 73%); while kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spp.) were the next most common (13%). The proportions of lagomorphs and kangaroo rats in the diet did not differ between sexes of foxes, periods of the year, or topography. Intensity of petroleum developments had no observable influence on food habits. There were annual differences in diet: proportions of lagomorphs declined, and proportions of kangaroo rats increased between 1980-1984. Changes in the frequency of occurrence of lagomorphs were significantly correlated with changes in their relative abundance in undeveloped-flat habitat. The frequency of occurrence of kangaroo rats was not significantly correlated with their relative abundance. San Joaquin kit fox on NPR-1 fed primarily on lagomorphs, and had the ability to sustain themselves on kangaroo rats and other secondary prey when their primary prey declined.

Scrivner, J.H.; O'Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.; Johnson, M.K.

1987-06-01

414

Capture-recapture estimation of San Joaquin kit fox population size on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California. [Vulpes macrotis mutica  

SciTech Connect

San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica) population size was estimated semiannually on the US Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California, between December 1980 and August 1986 using capture-recapture data. Estimates were derived using a calendar graph (minimum population size) and appropriate models that allowed for unequal probability of capture. A total of 469 foxes were captured 930 times. There was a significant decline between the peak population estimates (164, minimum population size; 262, closed population model estimate) obtained in winter 1981 and the estimates for winter 1985 (41, minimum population size; 56, closed population model estimate). Population trends for the portion of the study area affected by petroleum development activities did not differ from those observed in undeveloped habitats. Closed population model tests provided evidence of behavioral response and heterogeneity of capture probability in the kit fox. The proportion of animals known to be alive but untrapped each session ranged between 14% and 77% which also indicated variable trap response. Closed population models provided reliable estimates of population size and its variance when the number of individual foxes captured was at least 40 to 50. Use of the Jolly-Seber open population model with this data set was rejected by the goodness-of-fit test because of the small number of marked foxes that were captured each trapping period and the small number of marked foxes from each release that were eventually recaptured.

Harris, C.E.; O'Farrell, T.P.; McCue, P.M.; Kato, T.T.

1987-01-01

415

Results of preconstruction surveys used as a management technique for conserving endangered species and their habitats on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

In 1976 an intensive program of petroleum production at maximum efficient rate was initiated on the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills) in western Kern County, California. In a Biological Opinion required by the Endangered Species Act, the US Fish and Wildlife Service concluded that proposed construction and production activities may jeopardize the continued existence of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica, and the blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Gambelia silus, inhabiting the Reserve. DOE committed itself to carrying out a compensation/mitigation plan to offset impacts of program activities on endangered species and their habitats. One compensation/mitigation strategy was to develop and implement preconstruction surveys to assess potential conflicts between proposed construction activities, and endangered species and their critical habitats, and to propose reasonable and prudent alternatives to avoid conflicts. Between 1980 and 1984, preconstruction surveys were completed for 296 of a total of 387 major construction projects encompassing 3590 acres. Fewer than 22% of the projects potentially conflicted with conservation of endangered species, and most conflicts were easily resolved by identifying sensitive areas that required protection. Only 8% of the projects received minor modification in their design or locations to satisfy conservation needs, and only three projects had to be completely relocated. No projects were cancelled or delayed because of conflicts with endangered species, and costs to conduct preconstruction surveys were minimal. 27 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Kato, T.T.; O'Farrell, T.P.; Johnson, J.W.

1985-08-01

416

Petroleum production at Maximum Efficient Rate Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California. Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

This document provides an analysis of the potential impacts associated with the proposed action, which is continued operation of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. I (NPR-1) at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER) as authorized by Public law 94-258, the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 (Act). The document also provides a similar analysis of alternatives to the proposed action, which also involve continued operations, but under lower development scenarios and lower rates of production. NPR-1 is a large oil and gas field jointly owned and operated by the federal government and Chevron U.SA Inc. (CUSA) pursuant to a Unit Plan Contract that became effective in 1944; the government`s interest is approximately 78% and CUSA`s interest is approximately 22%. The government`s interest is under the jurisdiction of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The facility is approximately 17,409 acres (74 square miles), and it is located in Kern County, California, about 25 miles southwest of Bakersfield and 100 miles north of Los Angeles in the south central portion of the state. The environmental analysis presented herein is a supplement to the NPR-1 Final Environmental Impact Statement of that was issued by DOE in 1979 (1979 EIS). As such, this document is a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS).

Not Available

1993-07-01

417

Wilhelm von Humboldt and the representative assemblies of the Basque Country  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article Joseba Agirreazkuenaga gives an account of Wilhelm von Humboldt's writings on the political culture of the Basque people. Humboldt had made two visits to the Basque country in 1799 and 1801, and after leaving public life published his observations about them in 1821. He saw the Basques as having developed a distinctive political culture, which was based

JOSEBA AGIRREAZKUENAGA

1999-01-01

418

Location and age of foraminifer samples examined by Chevron Petroleum Company paleontologists from more than 2,500 oil test wells in California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Chevron Petroleum Company in 2001 donated an estimated 50,000 foraminifer slides, 5,000 well logs, geologic and surface locality maps, and paleontologic reports to the California Academy of Sciences and Stanford University for safekeeping, because they stopped or cut back exploration for petroleum deposits in California. The material was loaned to Earl Brabb temporarily so that information useful to the U.S. Geological Survey could be extracted. Among the estimated 5,000 well logs, more than 2,500 were printed on fragile Ozalid paper that had deteriorated by turning brown and hardening so that they could be easily damaged. These 2,516 well logs were scanned to provide a digital copy of the information. The 2,516 wells extend over an area from Eureka in Humboldt County south to the Imperial Valley and from the Pacific Ocean east to the eastern side of the Great Valley and the Los Angeles Basin. The wells are located in 410 7.5-minute quadrangle maps in 42 counties. The digital information herein preserves the data, makes the logs easily distributed to others interested in subsurface geology, and makes previously proprietary information widely available to the public for the first time.

Brabb, Earl E.

2011-01-01

419

Energy, the Environment, and the California - Baja California Border Region  

SciTech Connect

The continued development of Baja California as an electricity and natural gas supply source for California is not in the best public interest of the citizens of Baja California or California. Siting power plants in the badly contaminated Imperial County - Mexicali air basin to serve Southern California load center raises serious environmental justice issues on both sides of the border that are not adequately addressed by existing environmental protection regulations.

Powers, Bill

2005-07-01

420

Geologic Map and Map Database of the Oakland Metropolitan Area, Alameda, Contra Costa, and San Francisco Counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction This report contains a new geologic map at 1:50,000 scale, derived from a set of geologic map databases containing information at a resolution associated with 1:24,000 scale, and a new description of geologic map units and structural relationships in the mapped area. The map database represents the integration of previously published reports and new geologic mapping and field checking by the author (see Sources of Data index map on the map sheet or the Arc-Info coverage pi-so and the textfile pi-so.txt). The descriptive text (below) contains new ideas about the Hayward fault and other faults in the East Bay fault system, as well as new ideas about the geologic units and their relations. These new data are released in digital form in conjunction with the Federal Emergency Management Agency Project Impact in Oakland. The goal of Project Impact is to use geologic information in land-use and emergency services planning to reduce the losses occurring during earthquakes, landslides, and other hazardous geologic events. The USGS, California Division of Mines and Geology, FEMA, California Office of Emergency Services, and City of Oakland participated in the cooperative project. The geologic data in this report were provided in pre-release form to other Project Impact scientists, and served as one of the basic data layers for the analysis of hazard related to earthquake shaking, liquifaction, earthquake induced landsliding, and rainfall induced landsliding. The publication of these data provides an opportunity for regional planners, local, state, and federal agencies, teachers, consultants, and others outside Project Impact who are interested in geologic data to have the new data long before a traditional paper map could be published. Because the database contains information about both the bedrock and surficial deposits, it has practical applications in the study of groundwater and engineering of hillside materials, as well as the study of geologic hazards and the academic research on the geologic history and development of the region.

Graymer, R. W.

2000-01-01

421

Preliminary surficial geologic map of a Calico Mountains piedmont and part of Coyote Lake, Mojave desert, San Bernardino County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This 1:24,000 scale detailed surficial geologic map and digital database of a Calico Mountains piedmont and part of Coyote Lake in south-central California depicts surficial deposits and generalized bedrock units. The mapping is part of a USGS project to investigate the spatial distribution of deposits linked to changes in climate, to provide framework geology for land use management (http://deserts.wr.usgs.gov), to understand the Quaternary tectonic history of the Mojave Desert, and to provide additional information on the history of Lake Manix, of which Coyote Lake is a sub-basin. Mapping is displayed on parts of four USGS 7.5 minute series topographic maps. The map area lies in the central Mojave Desert of California, northeast of Barstow, Calif. and south of Fort Irwin, Calif. and covers 258 sq.km. (99.5 sq.mi.). Geologic deposits in the area consist of Paleozoic metamorphic rocks, Mesozoic plutonic rocks, Miocene volcanic rocks, Pliocene-Pleistocene basin fill, and Quaternary surficial deposits. McCulloh (1960, 1965) conducted bedrock mapping and a generalized version of his maps are compiled into this map. McCulloh's maps contain many bedrock structures within the Calico Mountains that are not shown on the present map. This study resulted in several new findings, including the discovery of previously unrecognized faults, one of which is the Tin Can Alley fault. The north-striking Tin Can Alley fault is part of the Paradise fault zone (Miller and others, 2005), a potentially important feature for studying neo-tectonic strain in the Mojave Desert. Additionally, many Anodonta shells were collected in Coyote Lake lacustrine sediments for radiocarbon dating. Preliminary results support some of Meek's (1999) conclusions on the timing of Mojave River inflow into the Coyote Basin. The database includes information on geologic deposits, samples, and geochronology. The database is distributed in three parts: spatial map-based data, documentation, and printable map graphics of the database. Spatial data are distributed as an ArcInfo personal geodatabase, or as tabular data in the form of Microsoft Access Database (MDB) or dBase Format (DBF) file formats. Documentation includes this file, which provides a discussion of the surficial geology and describes the format and content of the map data, and Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata for the spatial map information. Map graphics files are distributed as Postscript and Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format (PDF) files, and are appropriate for representing a view of the spatial database at the mapped scale.

Dudash, Stephanie L.

2006-01-01

422

Public health assessment for Sherwin Williams, Emeryville, Alameda County, California, Region 9: CERCLIS number CAD03934601. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Sherwin-Williams facility is located on Sherwin Avenue in Emeryville, California. Emeryville is located on the eastern side of the San Francisco Bay between Berkeley to the north, and Oakland to the east and south. Several site investigations have determined that the primary contaminants on the site include volatile organic chemicals, semi-volatile organic chemicals, petroleum hydrocarbons, and metals (primarily arsenic and lead). Currently, the areas with contaminated soils have been covered with an asphalt cap, and the area with the most heavily contaminated groundwater has been enclosed with a slurry wall to reduce or prevent the migration of contaminated groundwater. A groundwater extraction and treatment system is operating with the goal of creating an inward hydraulic gradient across the slurry wall, thereby preventing arsenic and lead contaminated groundwater from migrating off site. CDHS has concluded, assuming a worst-case scenario of daily exposure to the most contaminated soils for a period of greater than one year, that past levels of arsenic and lead and near the Artists' cooperative property posed a public health hazard for both non-cancer and cancer health effects. However, with the cleanup of the Garden Area on the Coop property and the flower beds along Horton Street adjacent to the 45th Street building and the Coop Annex/Horton Street Lofts, there is no longer a public health threat due to exposure to contaminants from these areas.

Not Available

1999-06-17

423

Transformation of dilative and contractive landslide debris into debris flows-An example from marin County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The severe rainstorm of January 3, 4 and 5, 1982, in the San Francisco Bay area, California, produced numerous landslides, many of which transformed into damaging debris flows. The process of transformation was studied in detail at one site where only part of a landslide mobilized into several episodes of debris flow. The focus of our investigation was to learn whether the landslide debris dilated or contracted during the transformation from slide to flow. The landslide debris consisted of sandy colluvium that was separable into three soil horizons that occupied the axis of a small topographic swale. Failure involved the entire thickness of colluvium; however, over parts of the landslide, the soil A-horizon failed separately from the remainder of the colluvium. Undisturbed samples were taken for density measurements from outside the landslide, from the failure zone and overlying material from the part of the landslide that did not mobilize into debris flows, and from the debris-flow deposits. The soil A-horizon was contractive and mobilized to flows in a process analogous to liquefaction of loose, granular soils during earthquakes. The soil B- and C-horizons were dilative and underwent 2 to 5% volumetric expansion during landslide movement that permitted mobilization of debris-flow episodes. Several criteria can be used in the field to differentiate between contractive and dilative behavior including lag time between landsliding and mobilization of flow, episodic mobilization of flows, and partial or complete transformation of the landslide. ?? 1989.

Fleming, R. W.; Ellen, S. D.; Algus, M. A.

1989-01-01

424

Unintended Consequences of Smoke-Free Bar Policies for Low-SES Women in Three California Counties  

PubMed Central

Background To amplify earlier studies of unintended consequences of public policies, this article illustrates both negative and positive unanticipated consequences of smoke-free workplace policies in California bars for women of low SES. Methods The article relies on thematic analysis in 2008 of qualitative data gathered between 2001 and 2007 from three mixed-method studies of tobacco use in and around bars where indoor smoking is prohibited. Results Unanticipated consequences primarily occurred when bars did comply with the law and smokers went outside the bar to smoke, particularly when smokers stood on the street outside the bar. Key negative consequences for women who smoked outside of bars included threats to their physical safety and their public image. For women living near bars, increased smoking on the street may have increased their exposure to secondhand smoke and disruptive noise. For some women, however, unanticipated negative consequences were identified with noncompliant bars. Smokers were conjectured to congregate in the smaller number of bars where smoking was still allowed, resulting in increased exposure to secondhand smoke for low-SES women working in these bars. A common positive unintended consequence of the tobacco control ordinance was increased social circulation and solidarity, as smokers gathered outside bars to smoke. Conclusions Smoke-free workplace laws in bars can have both negative and positive consequences for workers and smokers, and low-income women in particular.

Moore, Roland S.; Annechino, Rachelle M.; Lee, Juliet P.

2009-01-01

425

Primary surface rupture associated with the Mw 7.1 16 October 1999 Hector Mine earthquake, San Bernardino County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Mw 7.1 Hector Mine earthquake occurred within the Mojave Desert portion of the eastern California shear zone and was accompanied by 48 km of dextral surface rupture. Complex northward rupture began on two branches of the Lavic Lake fault in the northern Bullion Mountains and also propagated southward onto the Bullion fault. Lesser amounts of rupture occurred across two right steps to the south. Surface rupture was mapped using postearthquake, 1:10,000-scale aerial photography. Field mapping provided additional detail and more than 400 fault-rupture observations; of these, approximately 300 measurements were used to characterize the slip distribution. En echelon surface rupture predominated in areas of thick alluvium, whereas in the bedrock areas, rupture was more continuous and focused within a narrower zone. Measured dextral offsets were relatively symmetrical about the epicentral region, with a maximum displacement of 5.25 ?? 0.85 m. Vertical slip was a secondary component and was variable, with minor west-side-down displacements predominat.ing in the Bullion Mountains. Field and aerial photographic evidence indicates that most of the faults that ruptured in 1999 had had prior late-Quaternary displacement, although only limited sections of the rupture show evidence for prior Holocene displacement.

Treiman, J. A.; Kendrick, K. J.; Bryant, W. A.; Rockwell, T. K.; McGill, S. F.

2002-01-01

426

Ground-water data, 1974-76, Indian Wells Valley, Kern, Inyo, and San Bernardino Counties, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-level measurements were made annually in 115 wells in Indian Wells Valley, Kern, Inyo, and San Bernardino Counties, Calif., in 1974-76. In the Inyokern area the average water-level decline was 2.0 ft for two wells between October 1973 and November 1976. In the intermediate area the average decline was 6.2 ft for five wells between October 1973 and December 1976. In the Ridgecrest area the average decline was 4.5 ft for four wells between October 1973 and December 1976 but was 10.3 ft for one well during the same period. Reported metered ground-water pumpage from Indian Wells Valley totaled 14,400 acre-ft in 1974, 14,500 acre-ft in 1975, and 14,100 acre-ft in 1976. These figures may not completely reflect the total pumpage from the basin due to changing patterns of land use and new pumping sources. Chemical analyses were made of 102 water samples collected from 42 wells during 1974-76. The analyses show large variance of quality of ground water in Indian Wells Valley. (Woodard-USGS)

Lamb, C. E.; Downing, D. J.

1978-01-01

427

Public health assessment for Stoker Company, Imperial, Imperial County, California, Region 9. Cerclis No. CAD066635442. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

Stoker Company is a pesticide dealer and crop dusting loading facility located in the County of Imperial, approximately 25 miles from the Mexican border. The 26-acre site is barren with no vegetation. Operations at the facility, beginning in 1966, have caused the surface soil over much of the site to be contaminated with pesticides. Some of the contaminated surface soil has blown off-site and impacted nearby surface soil and surface water. This preliminary public health assessment evaluated the potential for adverse health effects to occur in five populations identified as being impacted by contaminants. The impacted populations include: (1) on-site workers; (2) the family formerly living on the neighboring D K property; (3) the D K Duck Hunting Club members; (4) individuals using untreated surface water for drinking and/or other domestic purposes; and (5) individuals living or working near crop dusting operations. Based on this assessment, Stoker Company is considered to pose a public health hazard because long-term exposure to site-related contaminants may cause adverse health effects.

Not Available

1994-01-06

428

The Obsidian Creep Project: Seismic Imaging in the Brawley Seismic Zone and Salton Sea Geothermal Field, Imperial County, California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In March 2010, we acquired medium- and high-resolution P- and S-wave seismic reflection and refraction data across faults in the Brawley seismic zone (BSZ) and across part of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF), Imperial Valley, California. Our objectives were to determine the dip, possible structural complexities, and seismic velocities associated with the BSZ and SSGF. We acquired multiple seismic data sets along a north-south profile and a high-resolution P-wave profile along an east-west profile. The north-south profile included: 1) a 6.4-km-long P-wave (main) profile that was recorded on 320 Texan seismographs spaced at 20-m intervals, 2) a 1.2-km-long cabled, high-resolution profile along the northern end of the main profile, and 3) an approximately 1.2-km-long S-wave profile along the cabled profile. P-wave sources along the main profile were generated by 0.15- to 0.45-kg buried explosions spaced every 40 m, and P-wave sources along the cabled profile were generated by Betsy-Seisgun ‘shots’ spaced every 10 m. S-waves sources were generated by hammer impacts on the ends of an aluminum block. The east-west profile consisted of a 3.4-km-long high-resolution P-wave seismic profile with shots (Betsy-Seisgun) and geophones spaced every 10 m. Preliminary interpretation of shot gathers from blasts in the north-south profile suggests that the BSZ and SSGF are structurally complex, with abundant faults extending to or near the ground surface. Also, we observe relatively high-velocity material, apparent velocities of about 4.0 km/s in one direction and about 2.8 km/s in another relative to about 1.6 km/s for shallower material, that shallows beneath the SSGF. This may be due to high temperatures and resultant metamorphism of buried materials in the SSGF. From preliminary interpretation of shot gathers along the east-west profile we interpret a prominent fault that extends to the ground surface. This fault is on projection of the Kalin fault, from about 40 m to the south, which broke the surface during a local swarm of earthquakes in 2005 and which also slipped at the surface in association with the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in Baja California. The faults imaged in our profiles will be compared to high-precision earthquake relocations for the 2005 earthquake swarm and more recent events recorded by the Cal Energy borehole seismic network, and will be used as input into a reanalysis of geodetic observations spanning the 2005 earthquake swarm. The combined Obsidian Creep data set provides the most detailed, publicly available subsurface images of fault structures in the BSZ and SSGF.

Catchings, R. D.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M.; Lohman, R. B.; McGuire, J. J.

2010-12-01

429

Summary and evaluation of the kit fox relocation program, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

In 1988, the U. S. Department of Energy began investigating the relocation of foxes to Naval Petroleum Reserve {number_sign}1 (NPR-1) in California. The objective of the study was to develop techniques to reintroduce kit foxes onto NPR-1. Soft reintroduction was proposed, which is not immediately releasing relocated parent animals. The method involved holding relocated foxes in pens during fall and winter and then releasing foxes in spring and summer. Twelve foxes were relocated to NPR-1 and kept in captivity for 131 days before their release in 1989. Twenty-eight foxes were similarly relocated to NPR-1 in 1990. The distance between the release site and the location of death averaged 6.1 miles for adult foxes released in 1989 and 2.7 miles for adult foxes released in 1990. Distance moved was not influenced by sex or age. In 1990, the distance from the release site and the location of death averaged 1.9 miles for foxes released from pens in hilly terrain and 3.5 miles for foxes released from pens in level terrain. Annual survivorship of relocated foxes was 0.03, which was smaller than survivorship of free-ranging foxes. During the year after release, the number of days foxes survived after release averaged 31.9 and was not influenced by sex, age, or the terrain in which foxes were released. By April 30, 1992, only one released fox was still alive; radio contact with three foxes was lost. One pup reared in captivity in 1989 was found dead 17 days after its released. The ten pups reared in captivity in 1990 were found dead within 17 days after their release. Predation was the main known cause of death of all relocated foxes. Six relocated foxes survived through one breeding season and three relocated foxes survived through two breeding seasons; four of the six foxes were known to have reproduced with free-ranging foxes.

Scrivner, J.H.; O`Farrell, T.P.; Hammer, K.L.

1993-01-01

430

Summary and evaluation of the kit fox relocation program, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

In 1988, the U. S. Department of Energy began investigating the relocation of foxes to Naval Petroleum Reserve [number sign]1 (NPR-1) in California. The objective of the study was to develop techniques to reintroduce kit foxes onto NPR-1. Soft reintroduction was proposed, which is not immediately releasing relocated parent animals. The method involved holding relocated foxes in pens during fall and winter and then releasing foxes in spring and summer. Twelve foxes were relocated to NPR-1 and kept in captivity for 131 days before their release in 1989. Twenty-eight foxes were similarly relocated to NPR-1 in 1990. The distance between the release site and the location of death averaged 6.1 miles for adult foxes released in 1989 and 2.7 miles for adult foxes released in 1990. Distance moved was not influenced by sex or age. In 1990, the distance from the release site and the location of death averaged 1.9 miles for foxes released from pens in hilly terrain and 3.5 miles for foxes released from pens in level terrain. Annual survivorship of relocated foxes was 0.03, which was smaller than survivorship of free-ranging foxes. During the year after release, the number of days foxes survived after release averaged 31.9 and was not influenced by sex, age, or the terrain in which foxes were released. By April 30, 1992, only one released fox was still alive; radio contact with three foxes was lost. One pup reared in captivity in 1989 was found dead 17 days after its released. The ten pups reared in captivity in 1990 were found dead within 17 days after their release. Predation was the main known cause of death of all relocated foxes. Six relocated foxes survived through one breeding season and three relocated foxes survived through two breeding seasons; four of the six foxes were known to have reproduced with free-ranging foxes.

Scrivner, J.H.; O'Farrell, T.P.; Hammer, K.L.

1993-01-01

431

Logs and data from trenches across the Hayward Fault at Tyson's Lagoon (Tule Pond), Fremont, Alameda County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

INTRODUCTION The purpose of this publication is to make available detailed trench logs (sheets 1, 2), radiocarbon dates (table 1) and pollen data (fig. 1) obtained as a result of an intensive subsurface investigation of the Hayward Fault at Tyson's Lagoon (Tule Pond) from August to November 2000 (figs. 1, 2 on sheet 1). The Hayward Fault is recognized to be among the most hazardous in the United States (Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities, 1999). This document makes available geologic evidence for historical and prehistoric surfacerupturing earthquakes that were recorded at the site. Prehistoric earthquakes deduced from geologic evidence are called paleoearthquakes. Establishing a chronology of paleoearthquakes is of immediate use in resolving the level of hazard posed by the Hayward Fault for producing large earthquakes in the future. Preliminary findings of this investigation have been presented in Lienkaemper and others (2001). A formal report on our conclusions based on these data is in preparation. The investigation at Tyson's Lagoon is ongoing, so these products should not be considered final. Lienkaemper, Dawson, and Personius interpreted the geology and logged the trenches. Seitz and Reidy performed analyses on radiocarbon and pollen samples, respectively. Schwartz led the critical-review field team. Previous trenching work was done at Tyson's Lagoon (figs. 2, 3 on sheet 1). Lienkaemper (1992) references the location of most of those trenches. The earlier trenching was generally for the evaluation of local faultrupture hazard, except for the study of Williams (1993), which was a paleoearthquake investigation. An unpublished study by J.N. Alt in 1998 (shown on our site map as trenches 98A and 98B, fig. 3, on sheet 1), also sought evidence of paleoearthquakes. Alt's study and one by Woodward-Clyde and Associates (1970; trenches 70A to 70G, fig. 3) were located south of Walnut Avenue in one of the few areas that still remain undisturbed and were, thus, useful in planning our work in 2000.

Linenkaemper, James J.; Dawson, Timothy E.; Personius, Stephen F.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Reidy, Liam M.; Schwartz, David P.

2002-01-01

432

Barriers and unmet need for supportive services for HIV patients in care in Los Angeles County, California.  

PubMed

Abstract HIV-infected patients frequently experience depression, drug use, and unstable housing but are often unable to access supportive services to manage these challenges. Data on barriers to needed supportive services are critical to improving patient access. Data from the Medical Monitoring Project (MMP), a national supplemental surveillance system for HIV-infected persons in care, was used to examine barriers to support service use and factors associated with need and unmet need for services. Interview data for 333 patients in care in 2007 and 2008 in Los Angeles County (LAC) showed that 71% (n=236) reported needing at least one supportive service and of these, 35% (n=83) reported at least one unmet need for services (46% Latino; 25% white; 83% male; 92% 30+; 77% gay/bisexual; 40% response rate). The main reasons that supportive services were not accessed included lack of information (47%; do not know where to go or who to call); an agency barrier (33%; system too confusing, wait list too long); or a financial/practical barrier (18%; too expensive, transportation problems). In a logistic regression that included all participants (n=333), African Americans (OR=3.1, 95% CI: 1.1-8.7) and those with incomes less than $10,000 were more likely to have service needs (odds ratio [OR]=3.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.3-9.3). Among those with at least one service need (n=236), those who were gay or bisexual were more likely to report at least one unmet service need (OR=2.8; 95% CI: 1.3-6.1). Disparities were found for need and unmet need for supportive services by race/ethnicity; income and sexual orientation. The reported reasons that services were not obtained suggest needed improvements in information dissemination on availability and location of HIV support services and more streamlined delivery of services. PMID:21774689

Wohl, Amy Rock; Carlos, Juli-Ann; Tejero, Judith; Dierst-Davies, Rhodri; Daar, Eric S; Khanlou, Homayoon; Cadden, Joseph; Towner, William; Frye, Douglas

2011-07-20

433