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Sample records for humboldt county california

  1. 5. TUNNEL TREE AT DRIVETHROUGHTREE PARK. LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. TUNNEL TREE AT DRIVE-THROUGH-TREE PARK. LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING NE. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  2. Geology of Tompkins Hill gas field, Humboldt County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.

    1988-03-01

    The Tompkins Hill gas field, located in Humboldt County, California, is the only producing field in the Eel River basin. The field is an anticlinal flexure on the north limb of the Eel River syncline in the central onshore portion of the basin. The Tompkins Hill anticline is doubly plunging and trends east-west. Stratigraphic units present in the field include the Yager, Eel River, and Rio Dell Formations and Scotia Bluffs Sandstone. The Yager occurs below a major unconformity, and forms economic basement. Strata overlying the Eel River, Rio Dell, and Scotia Bluffs represent a progradational basin-fill sequence, including submarine fan, slope, shelf, and littoral deposits. The primary productive interval in the field is within the middle of the Rio Dell and consists of interbedded fine sandstone and mudrock. Portions of the Eel River and upper Rio Dell Formations are also productive. The Tompkins Hill gas field was discovered by the Texas Company in 1937 with the drilling of Eureka 2 in Sec. 22, T3N, R1W. The play was probably based on outcrop mapping and the presence of gas seeps in the area. The primary trapping mechanism in the field is structural, although stratigraphy may have been a factor in constraining gas. To date, 39 producing wells have been drilled and 87.4 bcf of gas, consisting of 98% methane, has been produced. Very minor amounts of condensate are also produced. The source rocks for the gas are uncertain, but both the Yager Formation and strata of the lower Wildcat Group may have contributed.

  3. Humboldt County Employer Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Dave

    A project was undertaken in Humboldt County to collect information from large and small businesses in the areas of agriculture, mining, manufacturing, transportation, wholesale and retail, finance, services, and public information with respect to their employee requirements and needs. In all, 451 firms were surveyed to determine the size of the…

  4. GIS based Relative Tsunami Hazard Maps for Northern California, Humboldt and Del Norte Counties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, J. R.; Dengler, L. A.

    2004-12-01

    Tsunami hazard maps are generated using a geographical information systems (GIS) approach to depict the relative tsunami hazard of coastal Humboldt and Del Norte Counties in northern California. Maps are composed for the Humboldt Bay, Eel River, and Crescent City regions and available online at http://www.humboldt.edu/~geodept/earthquakes/rctwg/toc.html . In contrast to previous mapping efforts that utilize a single line to represent inundation, hazard is displayed gradationally. A 2.5D surface is constructed to represent this hazard. Elevation, normally used for 2.5D surfaces, is substituted with hazard units. Criteria boundaries are used to separate regions of increasing hazard. Criteria boundaries are defined based on numerical modeling, paleoseismic studies, historical flooding, FEMA Q3 flood maps, and impacts of recent tsunamis elsewhere. Zones are constructed to further adjust the criteria with respect to a physically determined variable hazard (e.g. proximity to open ocean). A triangular irregular network (TIN) is constructed using hazard criteria boundaries as breaklines. Fabricated points are necessary to construct a hazard surface and are placed where criteria boundaries diverge or where hazard is nonlinear between criteria boundaries. Hazard is displayed as a continuous gradational color scale ranging from red (high hazard) through orange (medium), yellow (low) to gray (no hazard). The maps are GIS based to facilitate ready adaptation by planners and emergency managers. The maps are intended for educational purposes, to improve awareness of tsunami hazards and to encourage emergency planning efforts of local and regional organizations by illustrating the range of possible tsunami events.

  5. 15. 'Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. 'Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, California, A.J. Logan, County Surveyor, H.J. Brunnier, Consulting Engineer, March 7, 1919,' showing general plan, plan of top chord, elevation of main girder, transverse section, plan section at deck level. - Salt River Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Dillon Road, Ferndale, Humboldt County, CA

  6. 18. "Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. "Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, California, A.J. Logan, County Surveyor, H.J. Brunnier, Consulting Engineer, March 7, 1919," showing elevation of center pier, elevation and plan of north and south abutments, sections of abutments, pier, and pier footings - Salt River Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Dillon Road, Ferndale, Humboldt County, CA

  7. 17. "Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. "Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, California, A.J. Logan, County Surveyor, H.J. Brunnier, Consulting Engineer, March 7, 1919," showing plan of bars in top flange, elevation of girder reinforcement, plan of bars in bottom flange - Salt River Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Dillon Road, Ferndale, Humboldt County, CA

  8. 51. Photographer unknown 1930 HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION A, HIGHWAY 1. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. Photographer unknown 1930 HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION A, HIGHWAY 1. 1-HUM-1-A #101, MEASURING BETWEEN TREES, 1930. Stamped office copy. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  9. 16. 'Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. 'Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, California, A.J. Logan, County Surveyor, H.J. Brunnier, Consulting Engineer, March 7, 1919,' showing detail of floor beam at central pier, half section of cantilever slab at end of bridge, floor beam end panels, slab reinforcing, plan of slab reinforcing, diagram of slab bars, typical floor girder. - Salt River Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Dillon Road, Ferndale, Humboldt County, CA

  10. 7. ABANDONED OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH OF LEGGETT. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. ABANDONED OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH OF LEGGETT. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. NOTE CANTILEVERED DECKING. SOUTH FORK OF EEL RIVER AT LEFT. LOOKING SW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  11. Orickite and coyoteite, two new sulfide minerals from Coyote Peak, Humboldt County, California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erd, Richard C.; Czamanske, G.K.

    1983-01-01

    Minute quantities of orickite and coyoteite occur with rare alkali iron sulphides in a mafic alkalic diatreme near Orick, Humboldt County. Orickite, NaxKyCu0.95Fe1.06zH2O (x,y < 0.03, z < 0.5), is hexagonal, a 3.695, c 6.16 A, D 4.212 g/cm3, Z = 4. The strongest XRD reflections are 3.08(100), 3.20(90), 2.84(60), 1.73(55), 1.583(30) A. The mineral is brass yellow, opaque, weakly pleochroic, but strongly anisotropic (greyish brown to greyish blue) in reflected light. Orickite is compositionally near to Fe-rich chalcopyrite, but it may be related to synthetic chalcogenides with a distorted wurtzite-(2H) structure. Coyoteite, NaFe3S5.2H2O, is triclinic, P1 or P1, a 7.409(8), b 9.881(6), c 6.441(3) A, alpha 100o25(3)', beta 104o37(5)', gamma 81o29(5)', D 2.879 g/cm3, Z = 2; strongest XRD reflections are 5.12(100), 7.13(90), 3.028(80), 3.080(70), 9.6(60), 5.60(60) A. Coyoteite is black, opaque, weakly pleochroic (pale brownish grey) and strongly anisotropic (grey to dull golden orange) in reflected light. It is unstable under normal atmospheric conditions. -J.A.Z.

  12. 53. Photographer unknown Date unknown VAN DUZEN BRIDGE, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. Photographer unknown Date unknown VAN DUZEN BRIDGE, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION F, HIGHWAY 1. 1. 1-HUM-1-F #24, VAN DUZEN BR. APPRAOCH/ST. 167+50. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  13. 54. Photographer unknown February 1925 HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION J, HIGHWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. Photographer unknown February 1925 HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION J, HIGHWAY 1. HUM-1-J #34, SINKS ALONG HIGH. NEAR OCEAN, 2-25. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  14. 56. Photographer unknown February 1925 HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION J, HIGHWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. Photographer unknown February 1925 HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION J, HIGHWAY 1. HUM-1-J #36, SINKS ALONG OCEAN SHORE, 2-25. Stamped office copy. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  15. Geologic map of the Redwood Creek drainage basin, Humboldt County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, Deborah Reid; Kelsey, H.M.; Morrison, S.D.; Stephens, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    A 1:62,500-scale geologic map with 14 rock stratigraphic units and an accompanying explanatory text are used to describe the geology of the Redwood Creek drainage basin of northwestern California. A large part of Redwood National Park is located in the downstream part of this actively eroding drainage basin. The bedrock consists primarily of Mesozoic sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. The structurally complex Franciscan assemblage of rocks underlies most of the basin, but rocks of the Klammath Mountain tectonic province occurs in a small eastern part of the basin. Most major boundaries between Mesozoic rock units are north-northwest trending faults parallel to the regional structural trend. Extensive areas of surficial coastal plain sediments, landslide deposits, stream terrace deposits and modern alluvium are also present; these areas help identify loci of vigorous recent erosion. (USGS)

  16. Erosional landform map of the Redwood Creek drainage basin, Humboldt County, California, 1947-74

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nolan, K.M.; Harden, D.M.; Colman, Steven M.

    1976-01-01

    Landslides and actively eroding stream channels disrupt roads, damage valuable timberland, and increase stream sediment loads in northwestern California. This 1:62,500 photointerpretative map shows the distribution of ten common types of fluvial and mass-movement erosional landforms in the drainage basin of Redwood Creek in 1947 and 1974. The mapped landforms include slides, slumps, large compound earthflows, debris avalanches, unstable streambanks and adjacent hillslopes, small mass-movement features, questionable or inactive landslides, deeply incised amphitheater shaped drainage basins, small actively eroding water courses, and actively eroding main channel stream banks. The map legend describes these landforms and the techniques used in preparing the map. The amount and diversity of erosional activity increased greatly between 1947 and 1974. This increased activity apparently reflects major floods in 1953, 1955, 1964, and 1972, as well as the start of large scale, tractor-yarded clearcut timber harvest in the basin. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. Demographic characteristics and infectious diseases of a population of American black bears in Humboldt County, California.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Nicole; Higley, J Mark; Sajecki, Jaime L; Chomel, Bruno B; Brown, Richard N; Foley, Janet E

    2015-02-01

    American black bears (Ursus americanus) are common, widely distributed, and broad-ranging omnivorous mammals in northern California forests. Bears may be susceptible to pathogens infecting both domestic animals and humans. Monitoring bear populations, particularly in changing ecosystems, is important to understanding ecological features that could affect bear population health and influence the likelihood that bears may cause adverse impacts on humans. In all, 321 bears were captured between May, 2001, and October, 2003, and blood samples were collected and tested for multiple zoonotic and vector-borne diseases. We found a PCR prevalence of 10% for Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and a seroprevalence of 28% for Toxoplasma gondii, 26% for Borrelia burgdorferi, 26% for A. phagocytophilum, 8% for Trichinella spiralis, 8% for Francisella tularensis and 1% for Yersinia pestis. In addition, we tested bears for pathogens of domestic dogs and found a seroprevalence of 15% for canine distemper virus and 0.6% for canine parvovirus. Our findings show that black bears can become infected with pathogens that are an important public health concern, as well as pathogens that can affect both domestic animals and other wildlife species. PMID:25700042

  18. Origin and evolution of the alkalic ultramafic rocks in the Coyote Peak diatreme, Humboldt County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, J.W.; Czamanske, G.K.; Gregory, Wandless A.

    1985-01-01

    Instrumental-neutron-activation analyses are reported for two uncontaminated rocks, a phlogopite-rich clot, and two contaminated rocks from the Coyote Peak diatreme, northwestern California. These data, combined with Nd, Sr, and Pb isotopic evidence, have been modeled to a multi-stage evolution for the uncontaminated rocks. Fertile mantle material (refractory elements 2.5?? chondritic abundances; Rb/Sr = 0.029 by weight) was depleted about 900 m.y. ago by congruent melting and removal of ~4% basaltic liquid; this depleted residue provided the source rock from which the Coyote Peak magma was ultimately derived. About 66 m.y. ago, the depleted mantle residue was incongruently melted in the presence of H2O and CO2 at a total pressure > 26 kb to yield ~0.5% of a Si-poor, Ca-rich melt. This melt then metasomatized depleted garnet-free harzburgite in the upper mantle at about 26 kb to produce a rock similar to phlogopite-bearing wehrlite. About 29 m.y. ago, this rock was subjected to an increase in pressure to >26 kb and incongruently melted to give ~0.5% of a second-stage melt resembling olivine melilitite in composition. Enroute to the surface, about 28% olivine and 2% titanomagnetite were lost from the highly fluid melt. Coarse-grained phlogopite-rich clots in the uncontaminated rocks apparently crystallized from a latestage liquid derived from the uncontaminated melt. Contaminated rocks appear to be the result of partial assimilation of, and dilution by, ~14% Franciscan graywacke country rock. The diatreme was emplaced near a converging plate margin where young hot oceanic mantle and crust of the Juan de Fuca plate was probably subducting obliquely beneath a thin lip of the North American plate. The unusual chemistry of the rocks may be the result of this complex tectonic setting which could also have included local strike-slip and extensional environments within the two plates pierced by the diatreme. ?? 1985.

  19. Origin and evolution of the alkalic ultramafic rocks in the Coyote Peak diatreme, Humboldt County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, John W.; Czamanske, Gerald K.; Gregory Wandless, A.

    1985-03-01

    Instrumental-neutron-activation analyses are reported for two uncontaminated rocks, a phlogopite-rich clot, and two contaminated rocks from the Coyote Peak diatreme, northwestern California. These data, combined with Nd, Sr, and Pb isotopic evidence, have been modeled to a multi-stage evolution for the uncontaminated rocks. Fertile mantle material (refractory elements 2.5× chondritic abundances; Rb/ Sr = 0.029 by weight) was depleted about 900 m.y. ago by congruent melting and removal of ~4% basaltic liquid; this depleted residue provided the source rock from which the Coyote Peak magma was ultimately derived. About 66 m.y. ago, the depleted mantle residue was incongruently melted in the presence of H 2O and CO 2 at a total pressure > 26 kb to yield ~0.5% of a Si-poor, Ca-rich melt. This melt then metasomatized depleted garnet-free harzburgite in the upper mantle at about 26 kb to produce a rock similar to phlogopite-bearing wehrlite. About 29 m.y. ago, this rock was subjected to an increase in pressure to >26 kb and incongruently melted to give ~0.5% of a second-stage melt resembling olivine melilitite in composition. Enroute to the surface, about 28% olivine and 2% titanomagnetite were lost from the highly fluid melt. Coarse-grained phlogopite-rich clots in the uncontaminated rocks apparently crystallized from a latestage liquid derived from the uncontaminated melt. Contaminated rocks appear to be the result of partial assimilation of, and dilution by, ~14% Franciscan graywacke country rock. The diatreme was emplaced near a converging plate margin where young hot oceanic mantle and crust of the Juan de Fuca plate was probably subducting obliquely beneath a thin lip of the North American plate. The unusual chemistry of the rocks may be the result of this complex tectonic setting which could also have included local strike-slip and extensional environments within the two plates pierced by the diatreme.

  20. 57. G.M.W., photographer March 26, 1940 HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION K, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. G.M.W., photographer March 26, 1940 HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION K, HIGHWAY 1. HUM-1-K #93, STA. 255, 3-26-40, G.M.W. Stamped office copy. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  1. 59. V.H.G., photographer October 27, 1948 EUREKA, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, HIGHWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    59. V.H.G., photographer October 27, 1948 EUREKA, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, HIGHWAY 1. HUM-1-EUR #59, LOOKING NORTH BROADWAY & CEDAR, 10-27-48, V.H.G. Stamped office copy. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  2. 58. V.H.G., photographer October 27, 1948 EUREKA, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, HIGHWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. V.H.G., photographer October 27, 1948 EUREKA, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, HIGHWAY 1. HUM-1-EUR #60, LOOKING SOUTH, BROADWAY & CLARK, 10-27-48, V.H.G. Stamped office copy. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  3. Aquatic biology of the Redwood Creek and Mill Creek drainage basins, Redwood National Park, Humboldt and Del Norte counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwatsubo, Rick T.; Averett, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    A 2-year study of the aquatic biota in the Redwood Creek and Mill Creek drainage basins of Redwood National Park indicated that the aquatic productivity is low. Densities of coliform bacteria were low except in Prairie Creek, a tributary to Redwood Creek, where a State park, county fish hatchery, grazing land, lumber mill, and scattered residential areas are potential sources of fecal coliform bacteria. Benthic invertebrate data indicated a diverse fauna which varied considerably between streams and among stream sections. Noteworthy findings include: (1) benthic invertebrates rapidly recolonized the streambed following a major storm, and (2) man-caused disruption or sedimentation of the streambed during low flow can result in drastic reductions of the benthic invertebrate community. Seven species of fish representing species typically found in northern California coastal streams were captured during the study. Nonparametric statistical tests indicate that condition factors of steelhead trout were significantly larger at sampling stations with more insolation, regardless of drainage basin land-use history. Periphyton and phytoplankton communities were diverse, variable in numbers, and dominated by diatoms. Seston concentrations were extremely variable between stations and at each station sampled. The seston is influenced seasonally by aquatic productivity at each station and amount of allochthonous material from the terrestrial ecosystem. Time-series analysis of some seston data indicated larger and sharper peak concentrations being flushed from the logged drainage basin than from the control drainage basin. (USGS)

  4. 55. E.M.C., photographer July 3, 1936 HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION J, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. E.M.C., photographer July 3, 1936 HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION J, HIGHWAY 1. 1-HUM-I-J #80, BITUMULS PORTION OF EXPERIMENTAL SECTION, E.M.C, 7-3-36. BACK READS: C/PROCESSING STABILIZING BITUMULS WITH BLADE AFTER BEING PROCESSED WITH SPRING TOOTH HARROW. Stamped office copy. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  5. Digital Geologic Map of the Redding 1° x 2° Quadrangle, Shasta, Tehama, Humboldt, and Trinity Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fraticelli, Luis A.; Albers, John P.; Irwin, William P.; Blake, Milton C., Jr.; Wentworth, Carl M.

    2012-01-01

    The Redding 1° x 2 quadrangle in northwestern California transects the Franciscan Complex and southern Klamath Mountains province as well as parts of the Great Valley Complex, northern Great Valley, and southernmost Cascades volcanic province. The tectonostratigraphic terranes of the Klamath province represent slices of oceanic crust, island arcs, and overlying sediment that range largely from Paleozoic to Jurassic in age. The Eastern Klamath terrane forms the nucleus to which the other terranes were added westward, primarily during Jurassic time, and that package was probably accreted to North America during earliest Cretaceous time. The younger Franciscan Complex consists of a sequence of westward younging tectonostratigraphic terranes of late Jurassic to Miocene age that were accreted to North America from mid-Cretaceous through Miocene time, with the easternmost being the most strongly metamorphosed. The marine Great Valley sequence, of late Jurassic and Cretaceous age, was deposited unconformably across the southernmost Klamath rocks, but in turn was underthrust at its western margin by Eastern belt Franciscan rocks. Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic rocks and sediment of the Cascades province extend into the southeastern part of the quadrangle, abutting the northernmost part of the great central valley of California. This map and database represent a digital rendition of Open-File Report 87-257, 1987, by L.A. Fraticelli, J.P. Albers, W.P. Irwin, and M.C. Blake, Jr., with various improvements and additions.

  6. Mass movement and storms in the drainage basin of Redwood Creek, Humboldt County, California: a progress report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, Deborah Reid; Janda, Richard J.; Nolan, K. Michael

    1978-01-01

    Numerous active landslides are clearly significant contributors to high sediment loads in the Redwood Creek basin. Field and aerial-photograph inspections indicate that large mass-movement features, such as earthflows and massive streamside debris slides, occur primarily in terrain underlain by unmetamorphosed or slightly metamorphosed sedimentary rocks. These features cannot account for stream sediment derived from schist. Observed lithologic heterogeneity of stream sediment therefore suggests that large-scale mass movement is only one part of a complex suite of processes supplying sediment to streams in this basin. Other significant sediment contributors include various forms of fluvial erosion and small-scale discrete mass failures, particularly on oversteepened hillslopes adjacent to perennial streams. Photo-interpretive studies of landslide and timber-harvest history adjacent to Redwood Creek, together with analysis of regional precipitation and runoff records for six flood-producing storms between 1953 and 1975, indicate that loci and times of significant streamside landsliding are influenced by both local storm intensity and streamside logging. Analysis of rainfall records and historic accounts indicates that the individual storms comprising a late-19th-century series of storms in northwestern California were similar in magnitude and spacing to those of the past 25 years. The recent storms apparently initiated more streamside landslides than comparable earlier storms, which occurred prior to extensive road construction and timber harvest. Field observations and repeated surveys of stake arrays at 10 sites in the basin indicate that earthflows are especially active during prolonged periods of moderate rainfall; but that during brief intense storms, fluvial processes are the dominant erosion mechanism. Stake movement occurs mostly during wet winter months. Spring and summer movement was detected at some moist streamside sites. Surveys of stake arrays in two recently logged areas did not indicate exceptionally rapid rates of movement in three years following timber harvest.

  7. Virgin Valley opal district, Humboldt County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staatz, Mortimer Hay; Bauer, Herman L., Jr.

    1951-01-01

    The Virgin Valley opal district, Humboldt County, Nevada, is near the Oregon-Nevada border in the Sheldon Game Refuge. Nineteen claims owned by Jack and Toni Crane were examined, sampled, and tested radiometrically for uranium. Numerous discontinuous layers of opal are interbedded with a gently-dipping series of vitric tuff and ash which is at least 300 ft thick. The tuff and ash are capped by a dark, vesicular basalt in the eastern part of the area and by a thin layer of terrace qravels in the area along the west side of Virgin Valley. Silicification of the ash and tuff has produced a rock that ranges from partly opalized rock that resembles silicified shale to completely altered rock that is entirely translucent, and consists of massive, brown and pale-green opal. Carnotite, the only identified uranium mineral, occurs as fracture coatings or fine layers in the opal; in places, no uranium minerals are visible in the radioactive opal. The opal layers are irregular in extent and thickness. The exposed length of the layers ranges from 8 to 1, 200 ft or more, and the thickness of the layers ranges from 0. 1 to 3. 9 ft. The uranium content of each opal layer, and of different parts of the same layer, differs widely. On the east side of Virgin Valley four of the seven observed opal layers, nos. 3, 4, 5, and 7, are more radioactive than the average; and the uranium content ranges from 0. 002 to 0. 12 percent. Two samples, taken 5 ft apart across opal layer no. 7, contained 0. 003 and 0. -049 percent uranium. On the west side of the valley only four of the fifteen observed opal layers, nos; 9, , 10, 14, and 15, are more radioactive than the average; and the uranium content ranges from 0. 004 to 0. 047 percent. Material of the highest grade was found in a small discontinuous layer of pale-green opal (no. 4) on the east side of Virgin Valley. The grade of this layer ranged from 0. 027 to 0. 12 percent uranium.

  8. North Coast Journal | Humboldt County, California Marketplace

    E-print Network

    Withers, Paul

    chilly February morning in 1600, the freethinking Dominican monk Giordano Bruno is still creating eyes, the moon throbbed like a wounded snake." Crater Giordano Bruno lies at the center of pristine) meteor or asteroid, resulting in the formation of the Giordano Bruno lunar crater. Molten dust from

  9. Permian and Triassic rocks near Quinn River Crossing, Humboldt County, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketner, Keith B.; Wardlaw, Bruce R.

    1981-03-01

    Permian and Triassic rocks near Quinn River Crossing, Humboldt County, Nevada, consist of four structural blocks: (1) a Lower Permian volcanic block; (2) a Permian(?) chert-arenite block; (3) a Lower Permian limestone block; and (4) a Permian and Triassic block. The contacts between the Permian volcanic block and the others are interpreted as thrust faults or glide surfaces. None of these rocks are metamorphosed, in contrast to those of the surrounding mountain ranges. Each of the blocks is lithically similar in some respects to rocks of the Osgood Mountains area 80 km to the southeast. The fusulinid and brachiopod faunas of two of the blocks display affinities to those of the McCloud Limestone of northern California and the Coyote Butte Limestone of central Oregon, and the fauna of another block has elements in common with autochthonous rocks of eastern Nevada and Utah. All four blocks probably are allochthonous with respect to the rocks exposed in the surrounding mountain ranges, but their points of origin remain obscure. The rocks at Quinn River Crossing provide a link among the Permian rocks of north-central Nevada, northern California, and central Oregon and a possible key to their original relations, but more comparative data are needed.

  10. Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010

    DOE Data Explorer

    Michael Lane

    2010-01-01

    Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010. ArcGIS map package containing topographic base map, Township and Range layer, Oski BLM and private leases at time of survey, and locations, with selected shot points, of the five seismic lines.

  11. 33 CFR 165.1195 - Regulated Navigation Area; Humboldt Bay Bar Channel and Humboldt Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. 165.1195 Section 165.1195...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. (a) Location. The Regulated...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. (b) Definitions. As used in...

  12. 33 CFR 165.1195 - Regulated Navigation Area; Humboldt Bay Bar Channel and Humboldt Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. 165.1195 Section 165.1195...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. (a) Location. The Regulated...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. (b) Definitions. As used in...

  13. 33 CFR 165.1195 - Regulated Navigation Area; Humboldt Bay Bar Channel and Humboldt Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. 165.1195 Section 165.1195...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. (a) Location. The Regulated...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. (b) Definitions. As used in...

  14. 33 CFR 165.1195 - Regulated Navigation Area; Humboldt Bay Bar Channel and Humboldt Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. 165.1195 Section 165.1195...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. (a) Location. The Regulated...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. (b) Definitions. As used in...

  15. 77 FR 67391 - Notice of Proposed Supplementary Rules on Public Land in Water Canyon, Humboldt County, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ...Proposed Supplementary Rules on Public Land in Water Canyon, Humboldt County, NV AGENCY...and resources on public land within the Water Canyon Recreation Area. These proposed...restrictions included within the decisions of the Water Canyon Recreation Area Management...

  16. Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada, U.S.A

    SciTech Connect

    Ted Fitzpatrick, Brian D. Fairbank

    2005-04-01

    The report documents the drilling of well Deep Blue No.2, the second deep geothermal test hole at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Humboldt County, Nevada. The well was drilled by Noramex Corp, a Nevada company, with funding support from the US Department of Energy, under the DOE’s GRED II Program. Deep Blue No.2 was drilled as a ‘step-out’ hole from Deep Blue No.1, to further evaluate the commercial potential of the geothermal resource. Deep Blue No.2 was designed as a vertical, slim observation test hole to a nominal target depth of 1000 meters (nominal 3400 feet). The well tests an area of projected high temperatures at depth, from temperature gradients measured in a group of shallow drill holes located approximately one kilometer to the northeast of observation hole Deep Blue No.1. The well is not intended for, or designed as, a commercial well or a production well. Deep Blue No.2 was spudded on March 25, 2004 and completed to a total depth of 1127.76m (3700 ft) on April 28, 2004. The well was drilled using conventional rotary drilling techniques to a depth of 201.17 m (660 ft), and continuously cored from 201.17m (660 ft) to 1127.76m (3700 ft). A brief rig-on flow-test was conducted at completion to determine basic reservoir parameters and obtain fluid samples. A permeable fracture zone with measured temperatures of 150 to 167°C (302 to 333°F) occurs between 500 to 750m (1640 to 2461ft). The well was left un-lined in anticipation of the Phase III - Flow and Injection Testing. A further Kuster temperature survey was attempted after the well had been shut in for almost 3 weeks. The well appears to have bridged off at 439m (1440ft) as the Kuster tool was unable to descend past this point. Several attempts to dislodge the obstruction using tube jars were unsuccessful. Deep Blue No.2 encountered variably fractured and veined, fine-grained rocks of the Singas Formation, and intruded by minor strongly altered fine-grained felsic dikes, and less altered fineto medium-grained felsic to intermediate dikes. Widespread open fractures and extensive of quartz veining in many intervals of the core indicate a high degree of fracturing and flow of silica-bearing fluids, almost certainly hotter than 200°C (392°F), at some time, but these fractures are now partially sealed. Intervals of soft shaly mudstone, common clay gouge, and rocks with generally low permeability (few veins and fractures) may also form a seal or ‘cap’ above the main high temperature reservoir at Blue Mountain. The encouraging results from Deep Blue No.2 support further drilling at Blue Mountain. Higher temperature fluids can be expected where fractures providing channels for the circulation of hot water from depth have not been sealed extensively by silica deposition.

  17. Interannual variability in chlorophyll concentrations in the Humboldt and California Current Systems

    E-print Network

    Thomas, Andrew

    Interannual variability in chlorophyll concentrations in the Humboldt and California CurrentWiFS data provide the first systematic comparison of 10 years (1997­2007) of chlorophyll interannual occur in austral summers of 2002­2003, 2003­2004. Relationships of chlorophyll anomalies to forcing

  18. 33 CFR 165.1195 - Regulated Navigation Area; Humboldt Bay Bar Channel and Humboldt Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area; Humboldt Bay Bar Channel and Humboldt Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. 165.1195 Section 165.1195 Navigation and Navigable Waters...

  19. Documentation of model input and output values for simulation of pumping effects in Paradise Valley, a basin tributary to the Humboldt River, Humboldt County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carey, A.E.; Prudic, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    Documentation is provided of model input and sample output used in a previous report for analysis of ground-water flow and simulated pumping scenarios in Paradise Valley, Humboldt County, Nevada.Documentation includes files containing input values and listings of sample output. The files, in American International Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) or binary format, are compressed and put on a 3-1/2-inch diskette. The decompressed files require approximately 8.4 megabytes of disk space on an International Business Machine (IBM)- compatible microcomputer using the MicroSoft Disk Operating System (MS-DOS) operating system version 5.0 or greater.

  20. 77 FR 71396 - Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest; Nevada and California Greater Sage Grouse Bi-State Distinct...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... Forest Service Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest; Nevada and California Greater Sage Grouse Bi-State.... These management units include areas identified as habitat for the Greater Sage Grouse Bi- State...'' Endangered Species Act (ESA) listing petition decision for the Greater Sage grouse Bi-State...

  1. Truancy in Yolo County, California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Barbara; Tyburczy, Jason

    The problem of truancy in the elementary and junior high schools of California's Yolo County was investigated during the 1980-81 academic year by means of questionnaires completed by 16 school principals and interviews with 30 people representing schools, school district offices, law enforcement agencies, the Department of Social Services, and the…

  2. Uranium occurrences at the Moonlight Mine and Granite Point claims, Humboldt County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Allen O.; Powers, James Farl

    1955-01-01

    The Moonlight mine and Granite Foint claims are on the western flank of the Double H Mountains between the Kings River and Quinn, River valleys in northern Humboldt County, Nev. Uranium minerals at the Moonlight mine occur in a vein in intensely altered Tertiary volcanic rocks. The knovm uranium mineralization is spotty and erratic, but ore-grade material is present in the vein. Samples of the vein taken along its outcrop and in the mine shaft contain from less than 0.02 percent to 0.40 percent U308. The uranium minerals change from autunite at the surface to torbernite, 'gummite(?)' and pitchblende below the 90-foot level of the shaft. The Granite Point claims are two miles north of the Moonlight mine at the base of a rhyolite cliff. Radioactivity traverses made along the base and slope of the rhyolite cliff indicate that a large part of the rhyolite is abnormally radioactive. Radioactivity ranges from 0.013 to 0.3 mr/hr and averaged 0.10 mr/hr. in the vicinity of the claims. A sample taken at the base of the rhyolite cliff, at the point of highest radioactivity c6ntains 0.02 percent U3O8.

  3. Trees and herbs killed by an earthquake ˜300 yr ago at Humboldt Bay, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacoby, Gordon; Carver, Gary; Wagner, Wendy

    1995-01-01

    Evidence of rapid seismic-induced subsidence at Humboldt Bay, California, is produced by analyses of annual growth rings of relict Sitka spruce [Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.] roots and entombed herbaceous plants. These results add to previously reported evidence that an earthquake caused subsidence ˜300 yr ago at Mad River slough, California. Both types of remains are rooted in buried soils that stood at or above the high-tide level until the area subsided at least 0.5 m into the intertidal zone. Burial by intertidal muds took place quickly enough to preserve the herbs in the growth position. Analysis of the annual growth rings of the tree roots shows that all died within four growing seasons, but the time of root death varies even among roots of the same tree. With no central nervous system, tree cells do not die simultaneously throughout the organism. The 0.5 to 1.5 m of subsidence, as evidenced by stratigraphy and sedimentology, was not enough to kill all the trees even in one season. Although such gradual death could be due to rapid aseismic subsidence, the tree deaths and preserved herbs are much better explained by sudden coseismic subsidence.

  4. CONFIRMATORY SURVEY OF THE FUEL OIL TANK AREA HUMBOLDT BAY POWER PLANT EUREKA, CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect

    WADE C. ADAMS

    2012-04-09

    During the period of February 14 to 15, 2012, ORISE performed radiological confirmatory survey activities for the former Fuel Oil Tank Area (FOTA) and additional radiological surveys of portions of the Humboldt Bay Power Plant site in Eureka, California. The radiological survey results demonstrate that residual surface soil contamination was not present significantly above background levels within the FOTA. Therefore, it is ORISE’s opinion that the radiological conditions for the FOTA surveyed by ORISE are commensurate with the site release criteria for final status surveys as specified in PG&E’s Characterization Survey Planning Worksheet. In addition, the confirmatory results indicated that the ORISE FOTA survey unit Cs-137 mean concentrations results compared favorably with the PG&E FOTA Cs-137 mean concentration results, as determined by ORISE from the PG&E characterization data. The interlaboratory comparison analyses of the three soil samples analyzed by PG&E’s onsite laboratory and the ORISE laboratory indicated good agreement for the sample results and provided confidence in the PG&E analytical procedures and final status survey soil sample data reporting.

  5. 78 FR 43827 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Modoc and Siskiyou Counties, California, and in All Counties in Oregon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in All Counties in Oregon, Except Malheur County...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in all counties in Oregon, except Malheur County...at: http://www.regulations.gov. All comments submitted in response to this...

  6. COUNTIES OF CALIFORNIA - WITH FARM STATISTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    County farming statistics polygon coverage of California. The statistics were taken from the 1997 Census of Agriculture and added to a coverage extracted from TIGER county boundaries. A farm is any place from which $1,000 or more of agricultural products were sold, or normally w...

  7. State of California County of Los Angeles

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Exhibit F #12;State of California County of Los Angeles West Basin Municipal Water District IN SUPPORT OF THE EXPANSION OF THE HARBOR/SOUTH BAY WATER RECYCLING PROJECT WHEREAS, California is now facing one of the most severe droughts on record, and is currently under a declared State of Emergency

  8. 78 FR 68135 - Environmental Impact Statement: Los Angeles County, California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ...Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Los Angeles County, California AGENCY: Federal...prepared for a proposed highway project in Los Angeles County, California. DATES: Public...Transportation (Caltrans), 100 S. Main Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012, telephone (213)...

  9. GENERAL SITE PLAN, HAMILTON AIR FORCE BASE, MARIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL SITE PLAN, HAMILTON AIR FORCE BASE, MARIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. Pencil on paper, dated December 4, 1952. Also marked "PWC 103474." By J.Y. Long Company, Engineers, Oakland, California - Hamilton Field, East of Nave Drive, Novato, Marin County, CA

  10. Behaviour of wintering Tundra Swans Cygnus columbianus columbianus at the Eel River delta and Humboldt Bay, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Black, Jeffrey M.; Gress, Carol; Byers, Jacob W.; Jennings, Emily; Ely, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Tundra Swan Cygnus columbianus columbinanus phenology and behaviour at the Eel River delta and southern Humboldt Bay in northern California, USA, is described. Counts made each January from 1963 onwards peaked at 1,502 swans in 1988. Monthly counts recorded during the 2006/07 and 2008/09 winters peaked in February, at 1,033 and 772 swans respectively. Swans roosted on ephemeral ponds at the Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, on ephemeral ponds within grassland pastures in the vicinity of the Refuge, and perhaps also used the Eel River as a roost. Flights between Refuge roosts and the pastures and ponds occurred in the two hours after sunrise and before dark. In winters 2008/09 and 2009/10, the percentage of cygnets in the flocks was 10.6% and 21.4% respectively, and increased to =31% cygnets each year after most swans had departed from the area in March. Average brood size in 2009/10 was 2.1 cygnets. Daily activities consisted of foraging (44.9% of activities recorded), comfort behaviour (22.1%), locomotion (16.2%) and vigilance (15.5%). Eight neck-collared swans identified in the wintering flock were marked at four locations in different parts of Alaska, up to 1,300 km apart.

  11. El Niño and similar perturbation effects on the benthos of the Humboldt, California, and Benguela Current upwelling ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arntz, W. E.; Gallardo, V. A.; Gutiérrez, D.; Isla, E.; Levin, L. A.; Mendo, J.; Neira, C.; Rowe, G. T.; Tarazona, J.; Wolff, M.

    2006-03-01

    To a certain degree, Eastern Boundary Current (EBC) ecosystems are similar: Cold bottom water from moderate depths, rich in nutrients, is transported to the euphotic zone by a combination of trade winds, Coriolis force and Ekman transport. The resultant high primary production fuels a rich secondary production in the upper pelagic and nearshore zones, but where O2 exchange is restricted, it creates oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) at shelf and upper slope (Humboldt and Benguela Current) or slope depths (California Current). These hypoxic zones host a specifically adapted, small macro- and meiofauna together with giant sulphur bacteria that use nitrate to oxydise H2S. In all EBC, small polychaetes, large nematodes and other opportunistic benthic species have adapted to the hypoxic conditions and co-exist with sulphur bacteria, which seem to be particularly dominant off Peru and Chile. However, a massive reduction of macrobenthos occurs in the core of the OMZ. In the Humboldt Current area the OMZ ranges between <100 and about 600 m, with decreasing thickness in a poleward direction. The OMZ merges into better oxygenated zones towards the deep sea, where large cold-water mega- and macrofauna occupy a dominant role as in the nearshore strip. The Benguela Current OMZ has a similar upper limit but remains shallower. It also hosts giant sulphur bacteria but little is known about the benthic fauna. However, sulphur eruptions and intense hypoxia might preclude the coexistence of significant mega- und macrobenthos. Conversely, off North America the upper limit of the OMZ is considerably deeper (e.g., 500-600 m off California and Oregon), and the lower boundary may exceed 1000m. The properties described are valid for very cold and cold (La Niña and "normal") ENSO conditions with effective upwelling of nutrient-rich bottom water. During warm (El Niño) episodes, warm water masses of low oxygen concentration from oceanic and equatorial regions enter the upwelling zones, bringing a variety of (sub)tropical immigrants. The autochthonous benthic fauna emigrates to deeper water or poleward, or suffers mortality. However, some local macrofaunal species experience important population proliferations, presumably due to improved oxygenation (in the southern hemisphere), higher temperature tolerance, reduced competition or the capability to use different food. Both these negative and positive effects of El Niño influence local artisanal fisheries and the livelihood of coastal populations. In the Humboldt Current system the hypoxic seafloor at outer shelf depths receives important flushing from the equatorial zone, causing havoc on the sulphur bacteria mats and immediate recolonisation of the sediments by mega- and macrofauna. Conversely, off California, the intruding equatorial water masses appear to have lower oxygen than ambient waters, and may cause oxygen deficiency at upper slope depths. Effects of this change have not been studied in detail, although shrimp and other taxa appear to alter their distribution on the continental margin. Other properties and reactions of the two Pacific EBC benthic ecosystems to El Niño seem to differ, too, as does the overall impact of major episodes (e.g., 1982/1983(1984) vs. 1997/1998). The relation of the "Benguela Niño" to ENSO seems unclear although many Pacific-Atlantic ocean and atmosphere teleconnections have been described. Warm, low-oxygen equatorial water seems to be transported into the upwelling area by similar mechanisms as in the Pacific, but most major impacts on the eukaryotic biota obviously come from other, independent perturbations such as an extreme eutrophication of the sediments ensuing in sulphidic eruptions and toxic algal blooms. Similarities and differences of the Humboldt and California Current benthic ecosystems are discussed with particular reference to ENSO impacts since 1972/73. Where there are data available, the authors include the Benguela Current ecosystem as another important, non-Pacific EBC, which also suffers from the effects of hypoxia.

  12. A MULTIFACETED APPROACH TO PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN IMPERIAL COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    E-print Network

    Tuba, Imre

    A MULTIFACETED APPROACH TO PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN IMPERIAL COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Jeffrey Burt San operates in one of the poorest and most educationally challenged parts of California. We take development project. Imperial County is in the southeastern corner of the state of California along the U

  13. 78 FR 68135 - Environmental Impact Statement: Los Angeles County, California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Los Angeles County, California AGENCY... Environmental Impact Statement will be prepared for a proposed highway project in Los Angeles County, California... (Caltrans) assumed, environmental responsibilities fOr this project pursuant to 23 U.S.C. 327. Caltrans...

  14. The application of LANDSAT remote sensing technology to natural resources management. Section 1: Introduction to VICAR - Image classification module. Section 2: Forest resource assessment of Humboldt County.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, L., III (principal investigator); Mayer, K. E.

    1980-01-01

    A teaching module on image classification procedures using the VICAR computer software package was developed to optimize the training benefits for users of the VICAR programs. The field test of the module is discussed. An intensive forest land inventory strategy was developed for Humboldt County. The results indicate that LANDSAT data can be computer classified to yield site specific forest resource information with high accuracy (82%). The "Douglas-fir 80%" category was found to cover approximately 21% of the county and "Mixed Conifer 80%" covering about 13%. The "Redwood 80%" resource category, which represented dense old growth trees as well as large second growth, comprised 4.0% of the total vegetation mosaic. Furthermore, the "Brush" and "Brush-Regeneration" categories were found to be a significant part of the vegetative community, with area estimates of 9.4 and 10.0%.

  15. 76 FR 71935 - Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, Carson Ranger District, Nevada and California, Bordertown to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ..., Bordertown to California 120 kV Transmission Line AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to... determine and analyze the effects of the proposed Bordertown 120 kilovolt (kV) Transmission Line project on... 10 miles of new 120 kV overhead transmission line between NV Energy's existing Bordertown...

  16. Evolution of a trench-slope basin within the Cascadia subduction margin: the Neogene Humboldt Basin, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Neogene Humboldt (Eel River) Basin is located along the north-eastern margin of the Pacific Ocean within the Cascadia subduction zone. This sedimentary basin originated near the base of the accretionary prism in post-Eocene time. Subduction processes since that time have elevated strata in the south-eastern portion of the basin above sea level. High-resolution chronostratigraphic data from the onshore portion of the Humboldt Basin enable correlation of time-equivalent lithofacies across the palaeomargin, reconstruction of slope-basin evolution, and preliminary delineation of climatic and tectonic influence on lithological variation. -from Author

  17. Space Radar Image of Ventura County, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image of Ventura County, California, shows the Santa Clara River valley and the surrounding mountains. The river valley is the linear feature that extends from the lower right to the upper left (east to west), where it empties into the Pacific Ocean (dark patches in upper and lower left). The cities of Ventura and Oxnard are seen along the left side of the image. Simi Valley is located in the lower center of the image, between the Santa Monica Mountains (purple area in lower left) and the Santa Susanna Mountains to the north. This area of California is known for its fruit; strawberry fields are shown in red and purple rectangular areas on the coastal plain, and citrus groves are the yellow green areas adjacent to the river. This image is centered at 34.33 degrees north latitude, 119 degrees west longitude. The area shown is approximately 53 kilometers by 35 kilometers (33 miles by 22 miles). Colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; green is L-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received; blue is C-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture (SIR-C/X-SAR) imaging radar when it flew aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 6, 1994.

  18. Travertine Hot Springs, Mono County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Chesterman, C.W.; Kleinhampl, F.J.

    1991-08-01

    This article is an abridgement of Special Report 172, Travertine Hot Springs at Bridgeport, Mono County, California, in preparation at the California Division of Mines and Geology. The Travertine Hot Springs area is on the northern edge of what many consider to be one of the most tectonically active areas in the United States. There is abundant geothermal and seismic activity. The landscape is dotted with volcanic features- cones, craters, domes, flows, fumaroles and hot springs-indicators of unrest in the present as well as reminders of activity in the past. Travertine, also known as calcareous sinter, is limestone formed by chemical precipitation of calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) from ground or surface waters. It forms stalactites and stalagmites in caves, fills some veins and spring conduits and can also be found at the mouths of springs, especially hot springs. The less compact variety is called tufa and the dense, banded variety is known as Mexican onyx, or onyx marble. True onyx, however, is a banded silicate.

  19. Marine terrace deformation, san diego county, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, P.A.; Lajoie, K.R.

    1979-01-01

    The NW-SE trending southern California coastline between the Palos Verdes Peninsula and San Diego roughly parallels the southern part and off-shore extension of the dominantly right-lateral, strike-slip, Newport-Inglewood fault zone. Emergent marine terraces between Newport Bay and San Diego record general uplift and gentle warping on the northeast side of the fault zone throughout Pleistocene time. Marine terraces on Soledad Mt. and Point Loma record local differential uplift (maximum 0.17 m/ka) during middle to late Pleistocene time on the southwest side of the fault (Rose Canyon fault) near San Diego. The broad Linda Vista Mesa (elev. 70-120 m) in the central part of coastal San Diego County, previously thought to be a single, relatively undeformed marine terrace of Plio-Pleistocene age, is a series of marine terraces and associated beach ridges most likely formed during sea-level highstands throughout Pleistocene time. The elevations of the terraces in this sequence gradually increase northwestward to the vicinity of San Onofre, indicating minor differential uplift along the central and northern San Diego coast during Pleistocene time. The highest, oldest terraces in the sequence are obliterated by erosional dissection to the northwest where uplift is greatest. Broad, closely spaced (vertically) terraces with extensive beach ridges were the dominant Pleistocene coastal landforms in central San Diego County where the coastal slope is less than 1% and uplift is lowest. The beach ridges die out to the northwest as the broad low terraces grade laterally into narrower, higher, and more widely spaced (vertically) terraces on the high bluffs above San Onofre where the coastal slope is 20-30% and uplift is greatest. At San Onofre the terraces slope progressively more steeply toward the ocean with increasing elevation, indicating continuous southwest tilt accompanying uplift from middle to late Pleistocene time. This southwest tilt is also recorded in the asymmetrical valleys of major local streams where strath terraces occur only on the northeast side of NW-SE-trending valley segments. The deformational pattern (progressively greater uplift to the northwest with slight southwest tilt) recorded in the marine and strath terraces of central and northern coastal San Diego County conforms well with the historic pattern derived by others from geodetic data. It is not known how much of the Santa Ana structural block (between the Newport-Inglewood and the Elsinore fault zones) is affected by this deformational pattern. ?? 1979.

  20. CONFIRMATORY SURVEY RESULTS FOR PORTIONS OF THE MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT FROM UNITS 1 AND 2 AT THE HUMBOLDT BAY POWER PLANT, EUREKA, CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect

    W.C. Adams

    2011-04-01

    The Pacific Gas & Electric Company (PG&E) operated the Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP) Unit 3 nuclear reactor near Eureka, California under Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) provisional license number DPR-7. HBPP Unit 3 achieved initial criticality in February 1963 and began commercial operations in August 1963. Unit 3 was a natural circulation boiling water reactor with a direct-cycle design. This design eliminated the need for heat transfer loops and large containment structures. Also, the pressure suppression containment design permitted below-ground construction. Stainless steel fuel claddings were used from startup until cladding failures resulted in plant system contamination—zircaloy-clad fuel was used exclusively starting in 1965 eliminating cladding-related contamination. A number of spills and gaseous releases were reported during operations resulting in a range of mitigative activities (see ESI 2008 for details).

  1. 33 CFR 334.1127 - Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, California; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, California; restricted area. 334.1127 Section 334.1127 Navigation... § 334.1127 Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, California; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within...

  2. 33 CFR 334.1127 - Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, California; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, California; restricted area. 334.1127 Section 334.1127 Navigation... § 334.1127 Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, California; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within...

  3. 33 CFR 334.1127 - Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, California; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, California; restricted area. 334.1127 Section 334.1127 Navigation... § 334.1127 Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, California; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within...

  4. 33 CFR 334.1127 - Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, California; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, California; restricted area. 334.1127 Section 334.1127 Navigation... § 334.1127 Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, California; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within...

  5. 33 CFR 334.1127 - Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, California; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, California; restricted area. 334.1127 Section 334.1127 Navigation... § 334.1127 Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, California; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within...

  6. Taeniolite, an uncommon lithium-mica from Coyote Peak, Humboldt County, California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erd, Richard C.; Czamanske, G.K.; Meyer, C.E.

    1983-01-01

    Taeniolite has been found in a late pegmatitic clot in a mafic alkalic diatreme at Coyote Peak; associated species are natrolite, pectolite, aegirine, barytolamprophyllite, rasvumite and sphalerite. The taeniolite is green-brown with sp. gr. (meas.) 2.85(1) and H. 31/2. Optically it is biaxial (-) with alpha 1.541(2), beta = gamma 1.570(2), 2V approx 0o and moderate pleochroism with gamma = beta reddish-brown, alpha pale greenish brown. Single-crystal precession photographs show it to be of the 1M type, with a 5.254(2), b 9.110(4), c 10.187(2) A, beta 99.85(4)o and V = 480.4(1) A3. Combined microprobe and ion probe analyses gave SiO2 53.5, Al2O3 3.00, TiO2 1.06, FeO 3.35, MnO 0.21, MgO 18.3, Li2O 2.4, K2O 11.3, Na2O 0.27, F 6.3 = 99.69; SrO and BaO are both <0.04 wt.%; B, Be, Ca and Cl were not detected. Assuming (F + OH) = 2 and assigning 1.30 wt.% H2O gives 409(K1.01Na0.04)(Al0.01Ti0.06Fe2+0.20Mn0.01Mg1.92Li0.68)(Si3.76Al0.24)O10- (F1.40OH0.60).-G.W.R.

  7. 76 FR 39357 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ...Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control District, Kern County Air Pollution Control District, and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...

  8. 76 FR 39303 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ...Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control District, Kern County Air Pollution Control District, and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...

  9. Seafloor off Pleasure Point, Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Golden, Nadine E.; Gibbons, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The seafloor off Pleasure Point, Santa Cruz County, California, is extremely varied, with sandy flats, boulder fields, faults, and complex bedrock ridges. These ridges support rich marine ecosystems; some of them form the "reefs" that produce world-class surf breaks. Colors indicate seafloor depth, from red-orange (about 2 meters or 7 feet) to magenta (25 meters or 82 feet)

  10. 77 FR 66910 - Environmental Impact Statement, San Diego County, California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... San Diego County, California (Federal Register Vol. 72, No 10; FR Doc E7-491) will be withdrawn. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Manuel E. Sanchez, Senior Transportation Engineer/Border Engineer, Federal... Hours: 6:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Telephone: (619) 699-7336, Email: manuel.sanchez@dot.gov , or Bruce...

  11. Initial exploration results: COSO Geothermal Field Inyo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.L.; Austin, C.

    1983-09-01

    The Coso geothermal area in Inyo County, California is described. Extensive geological, geophysical, and geochemical studies of the area have been conducted making it one of the most thoroughly studied geothermal prospects in the US. The Coso geothermal system, its reservoir rocks and fractures, magmatic heat source, groundwater flow patterns, caprock or seals, and the Coso Navy Exploratory Well 75-7 are described.

  12. 33 CFR 334.1125 - Pacific Ocean Naval Air Weapons Station, Point Mugu, Small Arms Range, Ventura County, California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Small Arms Range, Ventura County, California; danger zone. 334.1125 Section...Small Arms Range, Ventura County, California; danger zone. (a) The area...point on the beach north of Point Mugu, California, as follows: Station...

  13. 33 CFR 334.1125 - Pacific Ocean Naval Air Weapons Station, Point Mugu, Small Arms Range, Ventura County, California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Small Arms Range, Ventura County, California; danger zone. 334.1125 Section...Small Arms Range, Ventura County, California; danger zone. (a) The area...point on the beach north of Point Mugu, California, as follows: Station...

  14. 33 CFR 334.1125 - Pacific Ocean Naval Air Weapons Station, Point Mugu, Small Arms Range, Ventura County, California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Small Arms Range, Ventura County, California; danger zone. 334.1125 Section...Small Arms Range, Ventura County, California; danger zone. (a) The area...point on the beach north of Point Mugu, California, as follows: Station...

  15. 33 CFR 334.1125 - Pacific Ocean Naval Air Weapons Station, Point Mugu, Small Arms Range, Ventura County, California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Small Arms Range, Ventura County, California; danger zone. 334.1125 Section...Small Arms Range, Ventura County, California; danger zone. (a) The area...point on the beach north of Point Mugu, California, as follows: Station...

  16. 33 CFR 334.1125 - Pacific Ocean Naval Air Weapons Station, Point Mugu, Small Arms Range, Ventura County, California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Small Arms Range, Ventura County, California; danger zone. 334.1125 Section...Small Arms Range, Ventura County, California; danger zone. (a) The area...point on the beach north of Point Mugu, California, as follows: Station...

  17. Outdoor residential water use trends in Orange County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijoor, N. S.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Berg, J.; Baum-Haley, M.

    2012-12-01

    Irrigation is required to maintain outdoor landscapes in semi-arid climates, such as in Orange County, California. Landscape water use efficiency is a priority in Orange County, as nearly half the water supply is imported and the region is vulnerable to water shortages. The purpose of this research is to determine whether single family household residents adjust landscape irrigation based on climate or income in Orange County. Specifically, the goals were to (1) estimate the volume of single family residence (SFR) landscape irrigation applied (2) determine the depth (mm) of over- or under-irrigation compared to theoretical need (3) determine the climatic and socioeconomic controls on landscape irrigation. We plan to compare results from agencies with uniform vs. allocation-based rate structures. A research partnership was established between six water retail agencies in Orange County: Huntington Beach Water District, El Toro Water District, Irvine Ranch Water District, East Orange County Water District, City of San Juan Capistrano, and Laguna Beach County Water District. These agencies represent a wide range of climatic and economic conditions and contributed between 3 and 13 years of SFR water use data on a monthly/bimonthly basis. Household water use, climate, and socioeconomic factors were mapped using Arcview GIS. Air temperature (California Irrigation Management Information System), precipitation (Orange County Cooperative Observer System), landscape size, and income (US Census) were evaluated as possible controls on SFR water use. Findings indicate that landscape water use may constitute the majority of household water use. We found over-irrigation relative to plant water demand in areas of Orange County. Domestic landscape water use may depend on climate and/or income. Results suggest a high potential for residential water savings with improved landscape irrigation efficiency. This information would be useful for improving or developing water use efficiency policies and educational programs.

  18. California Society of Professional Engineers and UCI Host Orange County MATHCOUNTS

    E-print Network

    Russo, Bernard

    California Society of Professional Engineers and UCI Host Orange County MATHCOUNTS Competition, February 19th to participate in the Orange County Chapter MATHCOUNTS Competition. This is the twenty was conducted by the Orange County Chapter of the California Society of Professional Engineers (CSPE

  19. 33 CFR 334.1126 - Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, California; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, California; restricted area. 334.1126 Section 334.1126 Navigation... § 334.1126 Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, California; restricted area. (a) The area. The restricted area at Naval Base Ventura County...

  20. 33 CFR 334.1126 - Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, California; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, California; restricted area. 334.1126 Section 334.1126 Navigation... § 334.1126 Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, California; restricted area. (a) The area. The restricted area at Naval Base Ventura County...

  1. 33 CFR 334.1126 - Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, California; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, California; restricted area. 334.1126 Section 334.1126 Navigation... § 334.1126 Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, California; restricted area. (a) The area. The restricted area at Naval Base Ventura County...

  2. 33 CFR 334.1126 - Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, California; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, California; restricted area. 334.1126 Section 334.1126 Navigation... § 334.1126 Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, California; restricted area. (a) The area. The restricted area at Naval Base Ventura County...

  3. 33 CFR 334.1126 - Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, California; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, California; restricted area. 334.1126 Section 334.1126 Navigation... § 334.1126 Naval Base Ventura County, Point Mugu, California; restricted area. (a) The area. The restricted area at Naval Base Ventura County...

  4. Estimation of the Fire Interval Distribution for Los Angeles County, California

    E-print Network

    Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

    Estimation of the Fire Interval Distribution for Los Angeles County, California Roger D. Peng Frederic Paik Schoenberg Department of Statistics, University of California, Los Angeles Short Title to ascertain the overall relationship between fuel age and burning. In Los Angeles County, California, detailed

  5. Pet ownership in rural Northern California (El Dorado County).

    PubMed

    Franti, C E; Kraus, J F; Borhani, N O; Johnson, S L; Tucker, S D

    1980-01-15

    Demographic and economic aspects of pet ownership were studied in 488 households in El Dorado County, California, from May to July 1971. About 60% of households owned dogs or cats, and pet ownership was most prevalent (75%) in two small residential communities in the western end of the county. Among dogs, Poodle and German Shepherd Dog were the most popular breeds; about 36% of the females in the sample were spayed, but only 6% of the males were castrated. Approximately one third of all cats had been neutered. Reported use of veterinary services was higher for dogs (79%) than for cats (53%). The results of the survey indicated pet ownership is most likely to be found in households with children, where the head of household is employed, generally confirming findings from earlier surveys in Yolo, Alameda, and Contra Costa Counties (all in northern California) and later surveys in Champaign County, Illinois, and Garland, Tex. Some community health findings were included for El Dorado County and nearby Yolo County. In these two counties, cancer was reported more frequently by adults without pets (3.9% of those greater than or equal to 65 years old) than by pet owners (1.8% of those greater than or equal to 65 years old). Among children less than 5 years old, "frequent diarrhea" was reported more commonly in homes without pets (9.5% vs 2.6%; P less than 0.01). On the other hand, pet-owning adults, 16 to 64 years of age, living in rural areas or areas with generally lower than average incomes reported "frequent headaches" (21%) more frequently than did adults without pets (17%; P less than 0.025%) who resided in the same areas. PMID:7353990

  6. Data on Streamflow and Quality of Water and Bottom Sediment in and near Humboldt Wildlife Management Area, Churchill and Pershing Counties, Nevada, 1998-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paul, Angela P.; Thodal, Carl E.

    2003-01-01

    This study was initiated to expand upon previous findings that indicated concentrations of dissolved solids, arsenic, boron, mercury, molybdenum, selenium, and uranium were either above geochemical background concentrations or were approaching or exceeding ecological criteria in the lower Humboldt River system. Data were collected from May 1998 to September 2000 to further characterize streamflow and surface-water and bottom-sediment quality in the lower Humboldt River, selected agricultural drains, Upper Humboldt Lake, and Lower Humboldt Drain (ephemeral outflow from Humboldt Sink). During this study, flow in the lower Humboldt River was either at or above average. Flows in Army and Toulon Drains generally were higher than reported in previous investigations. An unnamed agricultural drain contributed a small amount to the flow measured in Army Drain. In general, measured concentrations of sodium, chloride, dissolved solids, arsenic, boron, molybdenum, and uranium were higher in water from agricultural drains than in Humboldt River water during this study. Mercury concentrations in water samples collected during the study period typically were below the laboratory reporting level. However, low-level mercury analyses showed that samples collected in August 1999 from Army Drain had higher mercury concentrations than those collected from the river or Toulon Drain or the Lower Humboldt Drain. Ecological criteria and effect concentrations for sodium, chloride, dissolved solids, arsenic, boron, mercury, and molybdenum were exceeded in some water samples collected as part of this study. Although water samples from the agricultural drains typically contained higher concentrations of sodium, chloride, dissolved solids, arsenic, boron, and uranium, greater instantaneous loads of these constituents were carried in the river near Lovelock than in agricultural drains during periods of high flow or non-irrigation. During this study, the high flows in the lower Humboldt River produced the maximum instantaneous loads of sodium, chloride, dissolved solids, arsenic, boron, molybdenum, and uranium at all river-sampling sites, except molybdenum near Imlay. Nevada Division of Environmental Protection monitoring reports on mine-dewatering discharge for permitted releases of treated effluent to the surface waters of the Humboldt River and its tributaries were reviewed for reported discharges and trace-element concentrations from June 1998 to September 1999. These data were compared with similar information for the river near Imlay. In all bottom sediments collected for this study, arsenic concentrations exceeded the Canadian Freshwater Interim Sediment-Quality Guideline for the protection of aquatic life and probable-effect level (concentration). Sediments collected near Imlay, Rye Patch Reservoir, Lovelock, and from Toulon Drain and Army Drain were found to contain cadmium and chromium concentrations that exceeded Canadian criteria. Chromium concentrations in sediments collected from these sites also exceeded the consensus-based threshold-effect concentration. The Canadian criterion for sediment copper concentration was exceeded in sediments collected from the Humboldt River near Lovelock and from Toulon, Army, and the unnamed agricultural drains. Mercury in sediments collected near Imlay and from Toulon Drain in August 1999 exceeded the U.S. Department of the Interior sediment probable-effect level. Nickel concentrations in sediments collected during this study were above the consensus-based threshold-effect concentration. All other river and drain sediments had constituent concentrations below protective criteria and toxicity thresholds. In Upper Humboldt Lake, chloride, dissolved solids, arsenic, boron, molybdenum, and uranium concentrations in surface-water samples collected near the mouth of the Humboldt River generally were higher than in samples collected near the mouth of Army Drain. Ecological criteria or effect con

  7. Graphite deposits in Siskiyou County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rynearson, Garn A.

    1945-01-01

    The graphite deposits examined are in sec. 7, T. 47 N., R. 11 W., Siskiyou County, Calif., on the summit of the Siskiyou Mts. between Elk Meadow and the northeast end of "mill 6220" (see map of the Seias quadrangle). Four claims, designated as the Black Jack Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4 claims, and a five-acre mill site have been located by W. H. Gassaway, W. B. Stewart, and E. R. Stewart. Development consists of four small cuts and several shallow trenches.

  8. 78 FR 58460 - Revision of Air Quality Implementation Plan; California; Placer County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ...Plan; California; Placer County Air Pollution Control District and Feather River...revision to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and...modification of stationary sources of air pollution within each District. We...

  9. 78 FR 12267 - Revision of Air Quality Implementation Plan; California; Placer County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ...Plan; California; Placer County Air Pollution Control District and Feather River...revision to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and...modification of stationary sources of air pollution within each District. EPA...

  10. 78 FR 23677 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ...Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD) portion...California including San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District...

  11. 78 FR 63934 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; El Dorado County Air Quality Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ...California; El Dorado County Air Quality Management District; Reasonably Available...for the El Dorado County Air Quality Management District (EDAQMD) portion...1988, U.S. EPA, Air Quality Management Division, Office of Air...

  12. 76 FR 30025 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and Ventura County Air Pollution...

  13. Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in and near Humboldt Wildlife Management Area, Churchill and Pershing Counties, Nevada, 1990-91

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seiler, R.L.; Ekechukwu, G.A.; Hallock, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    A reconnaissance investigation was begun in 1990 to determine whether the quality of irrigation drainage in and near the Humboldt Wildlife Management Area, Nevada, has caused or has the potential to cause harmful effects on human health, fish, and wildlife or to impair beneficial uses of water. Samples of surface and ground water, bottom sediment, and biota collected from sites upstream and downstream from the Lovelock agricultural area were analyzed for potentially toxic trace elements. Also analyzed were radioactive substances, major dissolved constitu- ents, and nutrients in water, as well as pesticide residues in bottom sediment and biota. In samples from areas affected by irrigation drainage, the following constituents equaled or exceeded baseline concentrations or recommended standards for protection of aquatic life or propagation of wildlife--in water: arsenic, boron, dissolved solids, mercury, molybdenum, selenium, sodium, and un-ionized ammonia; in bottom sediment; arsenic and uranium; and in biota; arsenic, boron, and selenium. Selenium appears to be biomagnified in the Humboldt Sink wetlands. Biological effects observed during the reconnaissance included reduced insect diversity in sites receiving irrigation drainage and acute toxicity of drain water and sediment to test organisms. The current drought and upstream consumption of water for irrigation have reduced water deliveries to the wetlands and caused habitat degradation at Humboldt Wildlife Management Area. During this investigation. Humboldt and Toulon Lakes evaporated to dryness because of the reduced water deliveries.

  14. Geothermal resource development in Alturas, Modoc County, northeastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Bohm, B.

    1995-06-01

    The small rural town of Alturas, California is located in Modoc County in the northeastern part of the state. Due to a diminishing of the traditional economic base of ranching, mining, and timber harvesting, other possible economic opportunities were investigated. In 1986, Modoc County and the Modoc Joint Unified School District received state funds under the geothermal loan program to study the geothermal resource potential of the Alturas area. As a result of this and further study in the area, a major part of the Modoc High School building has been heated using geothermal energy since 1990. Present efforts are being made to geothermally heat other public buildings as well. This paper summarizes the highlights of geothermal resource development in the Alturas area.

  15. Mineral resources and land use in Stanislaus County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.T.; Dupras, D.L.; Chapman, R.H.; Churchill, R.K. . Div. of Mines and Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Stanislaus County covers portions of 3 geologic provinces: Coast Ranges, Great Valley, and Sierra Nevada. Each has been exploited for a distinct set of mineral resources, which include sand and gravel, ball and fire clay, placer gold, manganese, chromite, magnesite, mercury, diatomite, building stone, and mineral pigment. Of these, sand and gravel, clay, and diatomite have been the most important commodities produced recently. Sand and gravel, particularly that along the Tuolumne River, is and will continue to be the county's main mineral product; other potentially important areas include alluvial fans along the west side of the Great Valley. Clay and diatomite could resume importance in the future. There is also potential for quartz-rich specialty sands. Although the county is largely rural, it is undergoing one of the highest growth rates in California. Several new residential communities are being proposed in the county, which would have two major effects on mineral resources: (1) large sources of aggregate will be required for construction, and (2) development of residential areas may preclude mining of resources in those areas. Maps of mineral resources produced by this study, will assist decisions on such potential conflicts in land use.

  16. 76 FR 67396 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution... proposing to approve revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and Sacramento Metro Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD) portions of the California State Implementation Plan...

  17. Development of An Integrated Hydrologic Model in Yolo County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; Taghavi, A.; Stevenson, M.; Najmus, S.

    2006-12-01

    To more efficiently use the Cache Creek flows and the groundwater basin as the sources of water supply and to restore the riparian ecosystem along the Cache Creek, Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (YCFCWCD) in Woodland, California plans to conduct the Cache Creek Groundwater Recharge and Recovery Program (CCGRRP). The concept of this program is to operate the groundwater basin to induce greater amounts of groundwater recharge from Cache Creek directly along the creek and to increase the recharge even further by diverting rainy season water at the District's Capay Diversion Dam into the West Adams Canal to a few recharge basins outside the active channel of Cache Creek. Besides the CCGRRP, cities of Woodland and Davis are in the process of conducting groundwater management plans, and the stakeholders in Yolo County developing a long-term integrated regional water management plan (IRWMP) for the entire county. To effectively evaluate the benefits and impacts of CCGRRP, local groundwater management plans, and the Yolo County IRWMP, the Integrated Groundwater and Surface water Model (IGSM) was applied to the Yolo groundwater basin. The IGSM is a comprehensive integrated hydrologic model that simulates both surface water and groundwater flow systems, including rainfall-runoff, soil moisture accounting and unsaturated flow, crop consumptive module, stream-aquifer interaction, and groundwater flow. The finite element code was originally developed in 1990 for the California Department of Water Resources and the State Water Resources Control Board. The IGSM code has subsequently been applied to more than 25 groundwater basins in California and other states. The model code has been peer reviewed and upgraded throughout its application to various projects, with the latest upgrade in 2004, as part of the application to the Stony Creek Fan area of Sacramento Valley. The Yolo County IGSM (YCIGSM) was calibrated against the historical (1970-2000) groundwater level records at 105 monitoring wells, and three streamflow gages along Cache Creek. Calibration results show that the YCIGSM is able to reasonably simulate the long-term groundwater level trends and short-term seasonal fluctuations. The YCIGSM will be used to develop operational guidelines to manage the groundwater basin, to determine the optimum yield of water projects, to identify benefits and impacts of projects on existing groundwater users, and to assess the environmental benefits and impacts during the development of projects, as well as during the environmental permitting process.

  18. California County Data Book 1997 [and] Report Card 1997. Challenges Ahead: Can Counties Make the Grade? A Children Now Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Amy

    This Kids Count data book and report card examines statewide and county level trends in the well-being of California's children, with an additional focus on indicators of the new economic realities encountered by families as counties take on greater responsibility for local welfare programs. The statistical portrait is based on indicators in the…

  19. Service Integration in San Mateo County, California: Multiple Strategies with a Single Goal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragan, Mark

    Over the past decade, the Human Services Agency (HSA) of San Mateo County, California, has implemented a series of management and staff processes designed to facilitate the delivery of services to county residents. Examples of these services are as follows: (1) regionalization (HSA offices are located throughout the county, and office staff and…

  20. 76 FR 30080 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District (VCAPCD) portion...

  1. 76 FR 12306 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County, Kern County, and Ventura...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ...County, and Ventura County; Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District...

  2. 76 FR 12280 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, for Imperial County, Kern County, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ...County, and Ventura County; Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District...

  3. Humboldt digital library and interconnectedness

    E-print Network

    Doherr, Detlev; Baron, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The Humboldt digital library (HDL) represents an innovative system to access the works and legacy of Alexander von Humboldt in a digital form on the Internet (www.avhumboldt.net). It contributes to the key question about how to present...

  4. Humboldt River main stem, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warmath, Eric; Medina, Rose L.

    2001-01-01

    This data set contains the main stem of the Humboldt River as defined by Humboldt Project personnel of the U.S. Geological Survey Nevada District, 2001. The data set was digitized on screen using digital orthophoto quadrangles from 1994.

  5. Residential Mobility and Breast Cancer in Marin County, California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Jacquez, Geoffrey M.; Barlow, Janice; Rommel, Robert; Kaufmann, Andy; Rienti, Michael; AvRuskin, Gillian; Rasul, Jawaid

    2013-01-01

    Marin County (California, USA) has among the highest incidences of breast cancer in the U.S. A previously conducted case-control study found eight significant risk factors in participants enrolled from 1997–1999. These included being premenopausal, never using birth control pills, lower highest lifetime body mass index, having four or more mammograms from 1990–1994, beginning drinking alcohol after age 21, drinking an average two or more alcoholic drinks per day, being in the highest quartile of pack-years of cigarette smoking, and being raised in an organized religion. Previously conducted surveys provided residential histories; while ? statistic accounted for participants’ residential mobility, and assessed clustering of breast cancer cases relative to controls based on the known risk factors. These identified specific cases, places, and times of excess breast cancer risk. Analysis found significant global clustering of cases localized to specific residential histories and times. Much of the observed clustering occurred among participants who immigrated to Marin County. However, persistent case-clustering of greater than fifteen years duration was also detected. Significant case-clustering among long-term residents may indicate geographically localized risk factors not accounted for in the study design, as well as uncertainty and incompleteness in the acquired addresses. Other plausible explanations include environmental risk factors and cases tending to settle in specific areas. A biologically plausible exposure or risk factor has yet to be identified. PMID:24366047

  6. 78 FR 66058 - Habitat Conservation Plan for South Sacramento County, California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ...County, California AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior...SUMMARY: We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service...governmental agencies, the scientific community, Tribes, industry, or any...comments to Nina Bicknese, Senior Fish and Wildlife Biologist,...

  7. 33 CFR 334.866 - Pacific Ocean at Naval Base Coronado, in the City of Coronado, San Diego County, California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...City of Coronado, San Diego County, California; naval danger zone. 334.866 ...City of Coronado, San Diego County, California; naval danger zone. (a) The area...of Naval Base Coronado, Coronado, California beginning at latitude 32°41?13? N, longitude...

  8. 33 CFR 334.866 - Pacific Ocean at Naval Base Coronado, in the City of Coronado, San Diego County, California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...City of Coronado, San Diego County, California; naval danger zone. 334.866 ...City of Coronado, San Diego County, California; naval danger zone. (a) The area...of Naval Base Coronado, Coronado, California beginning at latitude 32°41?13? N, longitude...

  9. 33 CFR 334.866 - Pacific Ocean at Naval Base Coronado, in the City of Coronado, San Diego County, California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...City of Coronado, San Diego County, California; naval danger zone. 334.866 ...City of Coronado, San Diego County, California; naval danger zone. (a) The area...of Naval Base Coronado, Coronado, California beginning at latitude 32°41?13? N, longitude...

  10. 33 CFR 334.866 - Pacific Ocean at Naval Base Coronado, in the City of Coronado, San Diego County, California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...City of Coronado, San Diego County, California; naval danger zone. 334.866 ...City of Coronado, San Diego County, California; naval danger zone. (a) The area...of Naval Base Coronado, Coronado, California beginning at latitude 32°41?13? N, longitude...

  11. 33 CFR 334.866 - Pacific Ocean at Naval Base Coronado, in the City of Coronado, San Diego County, California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...City of Coronado, San Diego County, California; naval danger zone. 334.866 ...City of Coronado, San Diego County, California; naval danger zone. (a) The area...of Naval Base Coronado, Coronado, California beginning at latitude 32°41?13? N, longitude...

  12. 77 FR 72968 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, for Imperial County, Placer County and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ...Placer County and Ventura County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD)...

  13. 77 FR 73005 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County, Placer County, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ...Placer County, and Ventura County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD)...

  14. County Clustering for the California 4-H Youth Development Program: Impacts and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subramaniam, Aarti; Dasher, Harry Steve; Young, Jane Chin

    2012-01-01

    In response to budgetary constraints, a new staffing structure, the Pilot Leadership Plan, was proposed for California's 4-H Youth Development Program. County clusters were formed, each led by a coordinator. The plan was piloted for 2 years to provide insight into how county clustering could support Extension staff to increase and enhance…

  15. Oak Management by County Jurisdictions in the Central Sierra Nevada, California1

    E-print Network

    Oak Management by County Jurisdictions in the Central Sierra Nevada, California1 Richard R. Harris2 protection is provided to oak woodlands during the land development process. We selected three Sierra Nevada components: 1) analysis of county plans, policies, guidelines, and ordinances to determine if oak woodland

  16. 78 FR 75293 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of California; 2012 Los Angeles County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ...EPA is proposing to approve a State implementation plan revision submitted by the State of California to provide for attainment of the 2008 lead national ambient air quality standard in the Los Angeles County nonattainment area. The submitted SIP revision is the Final 2012 Lead State Implementation Plan--Los Angeles County. Specifically, EPA is proposing to approve the emissions inventory,......

  17. 77 FR 73391 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; Eastern Kern, Imperial County, Placer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ...EPA is proposing approval of revisions to the California State Implementation Plan (SIP) under the Clean Air Act (CAA or Act). EPA is proposing approval of four permitting rules submitted for the Eastern Kern Air Pollution Control District (EKAPCD), Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD), and Yolo-Solano Air Quality......

  18. 78 FR 21581 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District and South Coast Air Quality Management District AGENCY: Environmental Protection... County Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD) and South Coast Air Quality Management District...

  19. 78 FR 6736 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution... taking direct final action to approve revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District... earlier version of Rule 102 into the SIP on June 29, 1999 (64 FR 34558). PCAPCD adopted revisions to...

  20. 76 FR 54993 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ... the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990''; 57 FR ] 13498 (April 16, 1992); 57 FR 18070 (April 28, 1992... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution... proposing a limited approval and limited disapproval of ] revisions to the Placer County Air...

  1. 77 FR 67322 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ... FR 2643). III. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews Under the Clean Air Act, the Administrator is... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution... proposing to approve revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) portion of...

  2. 76 FR 75795 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution... taking direct final action to approve revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District... earlier version of PCAPCD Rule 218 into the SIP on July 18, 1996 (61 FR 37390). The PCAPCD...

  3. 75 FR 1284 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Ventura County Air Pollution Control District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Ventura County Air Pollution... finalizing approval of revisions to the Ventura County Air Pollution Control District (VCAPCD) portion of the.... Proposed Action On November 19, 2008 (73 FR 69593), EPA proposed to approve the following rules into...

  4. 78 FR 53249 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution... finalizing approval of revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) portion of the... Action On November 9, 2012 (77 FR 67322), EPA proposed to approve the following rule into the...

  5. 78 FR 6784 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution... proposing to approve revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) portion of the... approve local rules to regulate this emission source under the Clean Air Act (CAA or the Act). DATES:...

  6. 76 FR 75857 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution... proposing to approve revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) portion of the... local rules to regulate these emission sources under the Clean Air Act as amended in 1990 (CAA or...

  7. 77 FR 2643 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution... finalizing a limited approval and limited disapproval of revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control... FR 54993), EPA proposed a limited approval and limited disapproval of the following rule that...

  8. 78 FR 66058 - Habitat Conservation Plan for South Sacramento County, California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ..., 2008 (73 FR 32729). The draft EIS/ EIR will evaluate the impacts of several alternatives related to the... Fish and Wildlife Service ; Habitat Conservation Plan for South Sacramento County, California AGENCY... Policy Act and the California Environmental Quality Act for the proposed South Sacramento...

  9. SPECIAL PROBLEM REPORT, IMPROVING EXTENSION PROGRAM PLANNING PROCEDURES IN SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CANNON, DALE CARTER

    A SURVEY WAS CONDUCTED BY MAIL QUESTIONNAIRE TO GATHER DATA ON THE FARM POPULATION OF SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, TO GET NAMES OF COMMUNITY LEADERS, AND PROVIDE MOTIVATION FOR EXTENSION PROGRAM PLANNING. THE MEAN AGE OF RESPONDENTS WAS 50, THE LARGE MAJORITY WITH CHILDREN AT HOME, THREE-FOURTHS NATIVE TO CALIFORNIA, ONE-HALF BEING BORN IN…

  10. Metasomatism, titanian acmite, and alkali amphiboles in lithic- wacke inclusions within the Coyote Peak diatreme, Humboldt County, California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czamanske, S.A.; Atkin, G.K.

    1985-01-01

    Lithic-wacke inclusions within the alkali-ultramafic diatreme at Coyote Peak record a history of pronounced metasomatism and crystal growth. The dominant metasomatic changes were loss of Si from the inclusions and mass influx of K, due to an unusually high K activity in the ultramafic host. The reaction with K converted much of the clay, quartz and lithic fraction of the lithic wacke into microcline, and exchanged Na from abundant clastic albite. Probe analyses are tabulated for cores and rims of titanian acmites, augites and alkali amphiboles. -J.A.Z.

  11. 76 FR 14372 - Glenn/Colusa County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ...Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet in Willows, California. Agenda items covered include...District Office, 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988. Individuals who wish to speak...Olmedo, DFO, 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988 or Laurie Pearson,...

  12. 75 FR 63436 - Glenn/Colusa County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ...Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet in Willows, California. Agenda items covered include...District Office, 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988. Individuals who wish to speak...Olmedo, DFO, 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988 or Laurie Trombley,...

  13. 75 FR 27287 - Glenn/Colusa County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ...Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet in Willows, California. Agenda items covered include...District Office, 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988. Individuals who wish to speak...Olmedo, DFO, 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988 or Laurie Trombley,...

  14. Geologic map of southwestern Sequoia National Park, Tulare County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, Thomas W.; Moore, James G.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the geology of 675 km2 (260 mi2) on the west slope of the Sierra Nevada, California, mainly in Sequoia National Park and Sequoia National Forest. It was produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at the request of the National Park Service to complete the geologic map coverage of Kings Canyon and Sequoia National Parks. The area includes the Mineral King 15’ topographic quadrangle (sheet 1) and strips along the east and northeast edges of the Kaweah 15’ topographic quadrangle (sheet 2), both in Tulare County. Mapping was performed mainly on the 1:24,000-scale Mineral King, Silver City, Quinn Peak, Moses Mountain, Case Mountain, and Dennison Peak 7.5’ topographic quadrangle bases. Rocks within the study area are chiefly Cretaceous granites and granodiorites of the Sierra Nevada batholith that intruded coherent masses of Mesozoic metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks. Quaternary till and talus are the principal surficial deposits, with the exception of a large bouldery alluvial apron near the southwest corner of the map area. The study area includes the headwaters of the Kaweah River (East and South Forks), Tule River (North Fork and North Fork of the Middle Fork), and the Little Kern River. Relief is considerable, with elevations spanning from 1,500 feet along the Middle Fork Kaweah River to 12,432 feet at the summit of Florence Peak along the crest of the Great Western Divide.

  15. Silverthread oil field, Ventura County, California: a hydrodynamic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, R.N.; Hester, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    Silverthread oil field is located in west-central Ventura County, California. An unusual combination of Miocene turbidite sand deposition, tight folding, faulting, and hydrodynamics have created an accumulation of over 6 million bbl of oil from 33 wells. This field is also unique in that it lies beneath the convergence of several opposing major thrust faults which effectively hide any surface indication of structure at depth. Though previously and often explored by majors and other operators, the remarkable deduction and perseverance by Harry Browne and Argo Petroleum Corporation geologists led to the main area discovery in 1971. Of exceptional interest is the interaction of classic hydrodynamic flow on the distribution of fluids within the reservoir. Thirteen contour maps and numerous structure and stratigraphic sections were required to unravel the sand sequence, faulting, structure, and hydrodynamics. Because of high surface relief, most wells were directionally drilled from islands, and subsequent electric logs had to be unstretched using the Dental Dam technique to facilitate their correlation. A large, lighted, three-dimensional model consisting of thirty-six 2 x 5-ft transparent plexiglas plates was constructed to show a simple resolution of the complexities of this area and will be part of the poster session. This display, they believe, will generate considerable interest in their presentation.

  16. Assessment of ambient ozone air quality and evidence of transport effects in eastern Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Beutelman, H.P.; Hallman, P.K.; Franz, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    Edwards AFB is located in the Mojave desert of southern California. The bulk of the base is located in the eastern part of Kern County, and is classified as serious non-attainment for ozone. However, geographically the eastern part of Kern County is separated form the western part of the county by some of the tallest mountains in the continental US. It has long been suspected, but not well quantified, that the air quality in eastern Kern County is impacted by transport of ozone from the San Joaquin area (as well as possible transport from the Los Angeles Basin area). Because of the significance of the ozone non-attainment designation with regards to the Department of Defense Base Realignment and Closure process, improved assessment of ambient ozone air quality and possible routes of transport in eastern Kern County was required. This was accomplished by; installing and operating an ambient air quality monitoring station at Edwards AFB; and comparing at least one year of data (ozone, NO{sub x} and meteorological) from the Edwards AFB station with similar data from the California Air Resources Board operated stations in the upwind locations (along possible transport routes) of Edison (western Kern County), Mojave (eastern Kern County) and Lancaster (northern Los Angeles County). Empirical analysis of this and other data indicate that; (1) compared to western Kern County, eastern Kern County is in a significantly different and isolated air basin; (2) the peak ambient ozone levels in eastern Kern County are substantially lower than in western Kern County; (3) peak ambient ozone levels in eastern Kern County occur late afternoon/early evening and are indicative of transport of ozone and (4) direct transport of ozone from the San Joaquin and/or South Coast area does occur (given proper conditions). This paper will address the elements of this study and its conclusions.

  17. A water-resources data network evaluation for Monterey County, California; Phase 1; South county

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Showalter, P.K.; Hord, S.H.

    1986-01-01

    An evaluation made of rainfall, surface water, groundwater, and water quality monitoring networks in Salinas River basin in southern Monterey County, California, proposed all long-term rain gages be continued for extending short-term records and suggested the installation of two additional recording gages. Eight new storage rain gages were suggested at midaltitudes of east and west sides of Salinas Valley where few data are available. The evaluation revealed some short-term gaging stations could be discontinued because of good regression relations between them and the long-term stations Arroyo Seco near Soledad. Of 16 stations selected for the proposed network, 4 are new recording stations, 6 are new nonrecording streamflow and water quality sampling sites, 5 are existing stations, and the last is a station operated from 1969 to 1976; also included are water quality sampling stations on Lakes Nacimiento and San Antonio. The proposed groundwater network was developed from information on geology, geohydrology, and groundwater quality, high priority objectives for groundwater network, and consideration for providing good areal coverage of levels and water quality. Of 145 sites selected, 86 are existing monitoring wells. (USGS)

  18. County-level analysis of the impact of temperature and population increases on California wildfire data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baltar, M.; Keeley, Jon E.; Schoenberg, F.P.

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which the apparent increase in wildfire incidence and burn area in California from 1990 to 2006 is affected by population and temperature increases is examined. Using generalized linear models with random effects, we focus on the estimated impacts of increases in mean daily temperatures and populations in different counties on wildfire in those counties, after essentially controlling for the overall differences between counties in their overall mean temperatures and populations. We find that temperature increase appears to have a significant positive impact on both total burn area and number of observed wildfires. Population growth appears to have a much less pronounced impact on total burn area than do annual temperature increases, and population growth appears to be negatively correlated with the total number of observed wildfires. These effects are especially pronounced in the winter season and in Southern California counties.

  19. 78 FR 33047 - Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, Carson Ranger District Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe-Atoma Area...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-03

    ...SUMMARY: The Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest (HTNF), Carson Ranger District, will prepare...area. The project is located on both private and National Forest System (NFS) land within Washoe County, Nevada....

  20. Addressing the Social Determinants of Health through the Alameda County, California, Place Matters Policy Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Schaff, Katherine; Flournoy, Rebecca; Carson, Keith; Drenick, Teresa; Fujii, Darlene; Lee, Anna; Luginbuhl, Jessica; Mena, Mona; Shrago, Amy; Siegel, Anita; Stahl, Robert; Watkins-Tartt, Kimi; Willow, Pam; Witt, Sandra; Woloshin, Diane; Yamashita, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    In Alameda County, California, significant health inequities by race/ethnicity, income, and place persist. Many of the county's low-income residents and residents of color live in communities that have faced historical and current disinvestment through public policies. This disinvestment affects community conditions such as access to economic opportunities, well-maintained and affordable housing, high-quality schools, healthy food, safe parks, and clean water and air. These community conditions greatly affect health. At the invitation of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies' national Place Matters initiative, Alameda County Supervisor Keith Carson's Office and the Alameda County Public Health Department launched Alameda County Place Matters, an initiative that addresses community conditions through local policy change. We describe the initiative's creation, activities, policy successes, and best practices. PMID:24179279

  1. 76 FR 67366 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ...EPA is taking direct final action to approve revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and Sacramento Metro Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD) portions of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP). These revisions concern oxides of nitrogen (NOX) emissions from industrial, institutional and commercial boilers, stationary internal combustion......

  2. FARM WORKERS IN A SPECIALIZED SEASONAL CROP AREA, STANISLAUS COUNTY, CALIFORNIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    METZLER, WILLIAM H.

    SPECIALIZATION IN THE CROPS BEST ADAPTED TO THE LOCAL AREA IS SEEN AS A HIGHLY PRODUCTIVE SYSTEM OF AGRICULTURE, BUT BY CREATING THE NEED FOR LARGE NUMBERS OF WORKERS FOR SHORT PERIODS OF TIME, IT CAUSES UNEMPLOYMENT AND MIGRATION. A SURVEY OF FRUIT AND VEGETABLE WORKERS IN STANISLAUS COUNTY, CALIFORNIA IN 1962-63 REVEALS--(1) THEIR EARNINGS ARE…

  3. Trends in California Teacher Demand: A County and Regional Perspective. Issues & Answers. REL 2008-No. 057

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Melissa Eiler; Fong, Anthony B.

    2008-01-01

    The report highlights the differences among California counties and regions in their use of under-prepared teachers and their needs for new teachers in the coming decade as driven by projected student enrollment changes and teacher retirements. The analyses, based on expected teacher retirements and student enrollment growth, suggest that…

  4. EVIDENCE FOR METAL ATTENUATION IN ACID MINE WATER BY SULFATE REDUCTION, PENN MINE, CALAVERAS COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Penn Mine in Calaveras County, California, produced Cu from massive sulfide ores from 1861 to 1953. Mine wastes were removed to a landfill during the late 1990s, improving surface-water quality, but deep mine workings were not remediated and contain metalliferous water with p...

  5. Spatially explicit West Nile virus risk modeling in Santa Clara County, California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A previously created Geographic Information Systems model designed to identify regions of West Nile virus (WNV) transmission risk is tested and calibrated in Santa Clara County, California. American Crows that died from WNV infection in 2005 provide the spatial and temporal ground truth. Model param...

  6. BOUNDS ON SUBSURFACE MERCURY FLUX FROM THE SULPHUR BANK MERCURY MINE, LAKE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine (SBMM) in Lake County, California has been identified as a significant source of mercury to Clear Lake. The mine was operated from the 1860s through the 1950's. Mining started with surface operations, progressed to shaft mining, and later to open p...

  7. 76 FR 26615 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    .... SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing approval of revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District... various air pollution sources. We are approving local rules that regulate these emission sources under the... February 9, 2011 (76 FR 7142), EPA proposed to approve the following rules into the California SIP....

  8. 75 FR 56942 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Diego Air Pollution Control District...

  9. Organism interactions and their environmental significance, as exemplified by the Pliocene-Pleistocene fauna of the Kettleman Hills and Humboldt Basin, California 

    E-print Network

    Harris, William Maurice

    2013-09-27

    completed a modified version of the California Child Q-set (CCQ) (Block & Block, 1980) as a measure of these children's regulatory control abilities. African American parents' ratings of their family's rules and routines were higher than those of Hispanic...

  10. Geothermal direct-heat study: Imperial County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-05-01

    Potential applications of geothermal energy which would be compatible with the agricultural activities in the county were identified and a plan to attract potential users to the area was developed. The intent of the first effort was to identify general classifications of industries which could utilize geothermal heat in production processes. Two levels of analyses were utilized for this effort. Initially, activities relying on previously developed engineering and industrial concepts were investigated to determine capital costs, employment, and potential energy savings. Second, innovative concepts not yet fully developed were investigated to determine their potential applicability to the agricultural base of the county. These investigations indicated that the major potential applications of geothermal heat would involve industries related to food processing or other direct agriculture-related uses of raw materials produced or imported to the county. An implementation plan which can be utilized by the county to market direct heat applications was developed. A socioeconomics analysis examined the potential effects on the county from development of direct heat projects. The county's planning and permitting requirements for dirct heat projects were also examined.

  11. Beginnings of geothermal impact on county population and leadership, Imperial County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Pick, J.B.; Butler, E.W.

    1980-09-01

    A major geothermal energy development scenario is about to begin in Imperial County. Initial energy-socioeconomic interactions in the areas of population and county leadership structure are discussed. These include immigration of energy company workers, a sewage plant dispute, conflict over union affiliation of geothermal laborers, and a transmission corridor routing dispute.

  12. The Changing Epidemiology of Coccidioidomycosis in Los Angeles (LA) County, California, 1973–2011

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis, also known as Valley Fever, is often thought of as an endemic disease of central California exclusive of Los Angeles County. The fungus that causes Valley Fever, Coccidioides spp., grows in previously undisturbed soil of semi-arid and arid environments of certain areas of the Americas. LA County has a few large areas with such environments, particularly the Antelope Valley which has been having substantial land development. Coccidioidomycosis that is both clinically- and laboratory-confirmed is a mandated reportable disease in LA County. Population surveillance data for 1973–2011 reveals an annual rate increase from 0.87 to 3.2 cases per 100,000 population (n = 61 to 306 annual cases). In 2004, case frequency started substantially increasing with notable epidemiologic changes such as a rising 2.1 to 5.7 male-to-female case ratio stabilizing to 1.4–2.2. Additionally, new building construction in Antelope Valley greatly rose in 2003 and displayed a strong correlation (R = 0.92, Pearson p<0.0001) with overall LA County incidence rates for 1996–2007. Of the 24 LA County health districts, 19 had a 100%-1500% increase in cases when comparing 2000–2003 to 2008–2011. Case residents of endemic areas had stronger odds of local exposures, but cases from areas not known to be endemic had greater mortality (14% versus 9%) with notably more deaths during 2008–2011. Compared to the 57 other California counties during 2001–2011, LA County had the third highest average annual number of cases and Antelope Valley had a higher incidence rate than all but six counties. With the large number of reported coccidioidomycosis cases, multi-agency and community partnering is recommended to develop effective education and prevention strategies to protect residents and travelers. PMID:26313151

  13. 50 CFR Table 5 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Central California Coast Coho...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Central California Coast Coho Salmon...Representing the Upstream Extent of Critical Habitat 5 Table 5 to Part 226 Wildlife and... MARINE MAMMALS DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT Pt. 226, Table 5 Table 5 to...

  14. 50 CFR Table 5 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Central California Coast Coho...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Central California Coast Coho Salmon...Representing the Upstream Extent of Critical Habitat 5 Table 5 to Part 226 Wildlife and... MARINE MAMMALS DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT Pt. 226, Table 5 Table 5 to...

  15. 50 CFR Table 5 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Central California Coast Coho...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Central California Coast Coho Salmon...Representing the Upstream Extent of Critical Habitat 5 Table 5 to Part 226 Wildlife and... MARINE MAMMALS DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT Pt. 226, Table 5 Table 5 to...

  16. 50 CFR Table 6 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Southern Oregon/Northern California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Southern Oregon/Northern California...Representing the Upstream Extent of Critical Habitat 6 Table 6 to Part 226 Wildlife and... MARINE MAMMALS DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT Pt. 226, Table 6 Table 6 to...

  17. 50 CFR Table 6 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Southern Oregon/Northern California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Southern Oregon/Northern California...Representing the Upstream Extent of Critical Habitat 6 Table 6 to Part 226 Wildlife and... MARINE MAMMALS DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT Pt. 226, Table 6 Table 6 to...

  18. 50 CFR Table 6 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Southern Oregon/Northern California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Southern Oregon/Northern California...Representing the Upstream Extent of Critical Habitat 6 Table 6 to Part 226 Wildlife and... MARINE MAMMALS DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT Pt. 226, Table 6 Table 6 to...

  19. 50 CFR Table 6 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Southern Oregon/Northern California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Southern Oregon/Northern California...Representing the Upstream Extent of Critical Habitat 6 Table 6 to Part 226 Wildlife and... MARINE MAMMALS DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT Pt. 226, Table 6 Table 6 to...

  20. 50 CFR Table 6 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Southern Oregon/Northern California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Southern Oregon/Northern California...Representing the Upstream Extent of Critical Habitat 6 Table 6 to Part 226 Wildlife and... MARINE MAMMALS DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT Pt. 226, Table 6 Table 6 to...

  1. 50 CFR Table 5 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Central California Coast Coho...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Central California Coast Coho Salmon...Representing the Upstream Extent of Critical Habitat 5 Table 5 to Part 226 Wildlife and... MARINE MAMMALS DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT Pt. 226, Table 5 Table 5 to...

  2. 50 CFR Table 5 to Part 226 - Hydrologic Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Central California Coast Coho...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Units and Counties Containing Critical Habitat for Central California Coast Coho Salmon...Representing the Upstream Extent of Critical Habitat 5 Table 5 to Part 226 Wildlife and... MARINE MAMMALS DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITAT Pt. 226, Table 5 Table 5 to...

  3. Fire Prevention in California's Riverside County Headstart Project: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folkman, William S.; Taylor, Jean

    Results of evaluation are reported for a safety program devised by Head Start teachers and California Division of Forestry personnel to teach fire prevention education to Head Start children. Chapters describe the place of fire prevention in Head Start and causes of fire starting behavior in children. The Head Start Fire Prevention Kit is also…

  4. Mineral resources of the North Algodones Dunes Wilderness Study Area (CDCA-360), Imperial County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.S.U.; Yeend, W.; Dohrenwend, J.C.; Gese, D.D.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents the results of a mineral survey of the North Algodones Dunes Wilderness Study Area (CDCA-360), California Desert Conservation Area, Imperial County, California. The potential for undiscovered base and precious metals, and sand and gravel within the North Algodones Dunes Wilderness Study Area is low. The study area has a moderate potential for geothermal energy. One small sand-free area between the Coachella Canal and the west edge of the dune field would probably be the only feasible exploration site for geothermal energy. The study area has a moderate to high potential for the occurrence of undiscovered gas/condensate within the underlying rocks. 21 refs.

  5. Implementing a mental health and primary care partnership program in Placer County, California.

    PubMed

    Nover, Cynthia Helen

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with serious mental illness are at an increased risk for developing co-morbid chronic physical illnesses, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This article is a descriptive piece about an intervention to decrease physical health risks in this population through a partnership effort between a primary care clinic and mental health agency in rural Placer County, California. The project was conducted as a part of the CalMEND Pilot Collaborative to Integrate Primary Care and Mental Health Services, which took place in five California counties in 2010-2011. A description of the program elements, conceptual models, key measures, and the process of program implementation is provided. Benefits were observed in areas of quality assurance, intra- and inter-agency teamwork, and access to adequate primary care for this population. PMID:24483334

  6. Environmental assessmental, geothermal energy, Heber geothermal binary-cycle demonstration project: Imperial County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    The proposed design, construction, and operation of a commercial-scale (45 MWe net) binary-cycle geothermal demonstration power plant are described using the liquid-dominated geothermal resource at Heber, Imperial County, California. The following are included in the environmental assessment: a description of the affected environment, potential environmental consequences of the proposed action, mitigation measures and monitoring plans, possible future developmental activities at the Heber anomaly, and regulations and permit requirements. (MHR)

  7. Geology and nickel mineralization of the Julian-Cuyamaca area, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Creasey, S.C.

    1946-01-01

    The Julian-Cuyamaca area is in the San Diego Mountains, one of the Peninsular Ranges of southern California. It lies in San Diego County, about 3 miles south of Julian, and approximately 60 miles northeast of San Diego. The area was mapped, and its nickel mineralization studied, from March to June, 1944; the work was part of the U. S. Geological Survey's program of strategic mineral investigations.

  8. 78 FR 24309 - California High-Speed Rail Authority-Construction Exemption-in Merced, Madera and Fresno Counties...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... Surface Transportation Board California High-Speed Rail Authority--Construction Exemption--in Merced, Madera and Fresno Counties, Cal On March 27, 2013, California High-Speed Rail Authority (Authority), a... approval requirements of 49 U.S.C. 10901 to construct an approximately 65-mile dedicated...

  9. Reconnaissance of geothermal resources of Los Angeles County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.T.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal waters produced from large oil fields are currently the most important geothermal resources in Los Angeles County. Otherwise, the County does not appear to have any large, near-surface geothermal resources. The oil fields produce thermal water because of both the moderate depths of production and normal to above-normal geothermal gradients. Gradients are about 3.0-3.5/sup 0/C/100 meters in the Ventura Basin and range from that up to about 5.5-6.0/sup 0/C/100 meters in the Los Angeles Basin. The hottest fields in the County are west of the Newport-Inglewood Structural Zone. The Los Angeles Basin has substantially more potential for uses of heat from oil fields than does the Ventura Basin because of its large fields and dense urban development. Produced fluid temperatures there range from ambient air to boiling, but most are in the 100-150/sup 0/F range. Daily water production ranges from only a few barrels at some fields to over a million barrels at Wilmington Oil Field; nearly all fields produce less than 50,000 barrels/day. Water salinity generally ranges from about 15,000-35,000 mg/liter NaCl. Fields with the most promise as sources of heat for outside applications are Wilmington, Torrance, Venice Beach, and Lawndale. The centralized treatment facilities are the most favorable sites for extraction of heat within the oil fields. Because of the poor water quality heat exchangers will likely be required rather than direct circulation of the field water to users. The best sites for applications are commercial-industrial areas and possibly institutional structures occupied by large numbers of people.

  10. Chemical analyses for selected wells in San Joaquin County and part of Contra Costa County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeter, Gail L.

    1980-01-01

    The study area of this report includes the eastern valley area of Contra Costa County and all of San Joaquin County, an area of approximately 1,600 square miles in the northern part of the San Joaquin Valley, Calif. Between December 1977 and December 1978, 1,489 wells were selectively canvassed. During May and June in 1978 and 1979, water samples were collected for chemical analysis from 321 of these wells. Field determinations of alkalinity, conductance, pH, and temperature were made, and individual constituents were analyzed. This report is the fourth in a series of baseline data reports on wells in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys. (USGS)

  11. Ambient Air Pollution and Autism in Los Angeles County, California

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Tracy Ann; Wilhelm, Michelle; Olsen, Jørn; Cockburn, Myles

    2012-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of autistic disorder (AD), a serious developmental condition, has risen dramatically over the past two decades, but high-quality population-based research addressing etiology is limited. Objectives: We studied the influence of exposures to traffic-related air pollution during pregnancy on the development of autism using data from air monitoring stations and a land use regression (LUR) model to estimate exposures. Methods: Children of mothers who gave birth in Los Angeles, California, who were diagnosed with a primary AD diagnosis at 3–5 years of age during 1998–2009 were identified through the California Department of Developmental Services and linked to 1995–2006 California birth certificates. For 7,603 children with autism and 10 controls per case matched by sex, birth year, and minimum gestational age, birth addresses were mapped and linked to the nearest air monitoring station and a LUR model. We used conditional logistic regression, adjusting for maternal and perinatal characteristics including indicators of SES. Results: Per interquartile range (IQR) increase, we estimated a 12–15% relative increase in odds of autism for ozone [odds ratio (OR) = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.19; per 11.54-ppb increase] and particulate matter ? 2.5 µm (OR = 1.15; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.24; per 4.68-?g/m3 increase) when mutually adjusting for both pollutants. Furthermore, we estimated 3–9% relative increases in odds per IQR increase for LUR-based nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide exposure estimates. LUR-based associations were strongest for children of mothers with less than a high school education. Conclusion: Measured and estimated exposures from ambient pollutant monitors and LUR model suggest associations between autism and prenatal air pollution exposure, mostly related to traffic sources. PMID:23249813

  12. California Child Care Workforce Study: Family Child Care Providers and Assistants in Alameda County, Kern County, Monterey County, San Benito County, San Francisco County, San Mateo County, Santa Cruz County, and Santa Clara County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitebook, Marcy; Almaraz, Mirella; Jo-Yung, Joon; Sakai, Laura; Boots, Shelley Waters; Voisin, Irene; Young, Marci; Burton, Alice; Duff, Brian; Laverty, Kassin; Bellm, Dan; Jay, E. Deborah; Krishnaswamy, Nandini; Kipnis, Fran

    An important first step toward more effectively addressing the complexities of child care as a service for families and as an employment setting for workers in California is to develop a detailed picture of the child care workforce. On this premise, a study examined licensed family child care provider demographics, professional preparation, length…

  13. Two-garnet rodingite from Amador County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, W.A.; Beeson, M.H.

    1973-01-01

    Two distinct phases of garnet have been discovered in rodingite from Amador County, Calif. The two garnets are hydrogrossular and (hydro?) grossular-andradite. Only one, generally hydrogrossular, has been reported in rodingitcs studied by other workers. The rodingite of this study formed from a mafic dike with abundant euhedral plagioclase laths. The hydrogrossular is concentrated within the areas of these laths and is volumetrically about as abundant. The (hydro?) grossular-andradite is concentrated in the groundmass and as incursions into the plagioclase laths. The garnets apparently grew during one general episode of metasomatism, and their spatial distribution and compositions were controlled principally by the unequal distribution of iron and aluminum caused by the presence of plagioclase laths (and mafic minerals?) in the original unaltered dike.

  14. Space Radar Image of Orange County, California (annotated version)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This spaceborne radar image of Orange County, Calif., shows the massive urbanization of this rapidly growing region located just south of Los Angeles. Orange County, sandwiched between rugged mountains and the Pacific Ocean, includes the communities of Anaheim, Santa Ana and Huntington Beach. Anaheim Stadium can be seen in the upper center of the image, as a small white ring to the right of a major freeway intersection. The large dark blue rectangular area in the upper left is the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station and adjacent wildlife refuge. Runways of the El Toro Marine Air Station appear as a black 'x' near the center of the image. The large purple area to the left of the the Air Station and extending to the coast is the scar left by the Laguna wildfire of October 1993. The sparse vegetation left in the wake of the fire provides a weak source of radar echoes, making the burn areas distinctively dark in the image. Another large burn area, from the Ortega fire of 1993, is seen in the mountains in the lower right of the image. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 3, 1994. The image is centered at 33.7 degrees north latitude and 117.7 degrees west longitude. North is toward the upper right. The image shows an area 66.2 kilometers by 44.2 kilometers (41.0 miles by 27.4 miles). The colors are assigned todifferent frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; green is L-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received; blue is C-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program.

  15. Rickettsia felis in cat fleas, Ctenocephalides felis parasitizing opossums, San Bernardino County, California.

    PubMed

    Abramowicz, K F; Wekesa, J W; Nwadike, C N; Zambrano, M L; Karpathy, S E; Cecil, D; Burns, J; Hu, R; Eremeeva, M E

    2012-12-01

    Los Angeles and Orange Counties are known endemic areas for murine typhus in California; however, no recent reports of flea-borne rickettsioses are known from adjacent San Bernardino County. Sixty-five opossums (Didelphis virginiana) were trapped in the suburban residential and industrial zones of the southwestern part of San Bernardino County in 2007. Sixty out of 65 opossums were infested with fleas, primarily cat fleas, Ctenocephalides felis (Bouché, 1835). The flea minimum infection rate with Rickettsia felis was 13.3% in pooled samples and the prevalence was 23.7% in single fleas, with two gltA genotypes detected. In spite of historic records of murine typhus in this area, no evidence for circulation of R. typhi in fleas was found during the present study. Factors contributing to the absence of R. typhi in these cat fleas in contrast to its presence in cat fleas from Orange and Los Angeles Counties are unknown and need to be investigated further in San Bernardino County. PMID:22712460

  16. Geohydrology and evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa, Inyo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnecki, J.B.

    1997-12-31

    Franklin Lake playa is one of the principal discharge areas of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system in southern Nevada and adjacent California. Yucca Mountain, Nevada, located within this flow system, is being evaluated by the US Department of Energy to determine its suitability as a potential site for a high-level nuclear-waste repository. To assist the U.S. Department of Energy with its evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site, the US Geological Survey developed a parameter-estimation model of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system. Results from sensitivity analyses made using the parameter-estimation model indicated that simulated rates of evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa had the largest effect on the calculation of transmissivity values at Yucca Mountain of all the model-boundary conditions and, therefore, that evapotranspiration required careful definition.

  17. Magma energy exploratory well Long Valley caldera, Mono County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Bender-Lamb, S.

    1991-04-01

    Intensive study of Long Valley over the past 15 years indicates evidence for magma at depths accessible to drilling. The Department of Energy's Magma Energy Extraction Program is currently drilling a 20,000 foot exploratory well into the Long Valley caldera. The purpose of this program is to determine the feasibility of producing electrical power from magma. If the magma energy experiment is successful, the Long Valley caldera could hypothetically supply the electrical power needs of California for 100 years at present power consumption rates. The paper describes calderas, the potential of geothermal energy, Long Valley geology, the Long Valley magma energy exploratory well, the four phases of the exploratory well drilling program, and Phase 1 results.

  18. Geohydrology and evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake Playa, Inyo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-01

    Franklin Lake playa is one of the principal discharge areas of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system in southern Nevada and adjacent California. Yucca Mountain, Nevada, located within this flow system, is being evaluated by the US Department of Energy to determine its suitability as a potential site for a high-level nuclear-waste repository. To assist the US Department of Energy with its evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site, the US Geological Survey developed a parameter-estimation model of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system. Results from sensitivity analyses made using the parameter-estimation model indicated that simulated rates of evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa had the largest effect on the calculation of transmissivity values at Yucca Mountain of all the model-boundary conditions and, therefore, that evapotranspiration required careful definition. 72 refs., 59 figs., 26 tab.

  19. Yuma District Resource Management Plan, Yuma, La Paz, and Mohave Counties, Arizona and San Bernardino, Riverside and Imperial Counties, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    Implementation of a resource management plan is proposed for 1.2 million acres within the 2.7-million-acre Yuma District, located in Yuma, La Paz, and Mohave counties, Arizona and San Bernardino, Riverside, and Imperial counties, California. Under the preferred alternative, wildlife habitat would be a priority consideration on approximately 247,740 acre, and nine special management areas would be designated. A portion of the Cactus Plain and the Chemehuevi/Needles wilderness study areas would be recommended for wilderness designation. Two areas totaling 31,360 acres would be designated as special management areas, and another six areas totaling 155,705 acres would be managed to protect their natural values. Livestock grazing would be authorized at 3998 animal unit months on four allotments. Approximately 55,490 acres of federal lands would be available for disposal and 31,220 acres would be acquired. Nine utility corridors and nine communication sites would be designated. Existing recreational facilities would be maintained, with additional facilities provided when warranted. Along Parker Strip, only floodproofed day-use facilities would be allowed within the 100-year flood plain. Off-road vehicle (ORV) use designations would be made on 640 acres and ORV use in the remainder of the district would be limited to existing roads and trails. Continuous occupancy of mobile home sites would be restricted to one five-month period in a single year. Permanent residential use would be phased out.

  20. Digital Geologic Map of the Nevada Test Site and Vicinity, Nye, Lincoln, and Clark Counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slate, Janet L.; Berry, Margaret E.; Rowley, Peter D.; Fridrich, Christopher J.; Morgan, Karen S.; Workman, Jeremiah B.; Young, Owen D.; Dixon, Gary L.; Williams, Van S.; McKee, Edwin H.; Ponce, David A.; Hildenbrand, Thomas G.; Swadley, W.C.; Lundstrom, Scott C.; Ekren, E. Bartlett; Warren, Richard G.; Cole, James C.; Fleck, Robert J.; Lanphere, Marvin A.; Sawyer, David A.; Minor, Scott A.; Grunwald, Daniel J.; Laczniak, Randell J.; Menges, Christopher M.; Yount, James C.; Jayko, Angela S.

    1999-01-01

    This digital geologic map of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and vicinity, as well as its accompanying digital geophysical maps, are compiled at 1:100,000 scale. The map compilation presents new polygon (geologic map unit contacts), line (fault, fold axis, metamorphic isograd, dike, and caldera wall) and point (structural attitude) vector data for the NTS and vicinity, Nye, Lincoln, and Clark Counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California. The map area covers two 30 x 60-minute quadrangles-the Pahute Mesa quadrangle to the north and the Beatty quadrangle to the south-plus a strip of 7.5-minute quadrangles on the east side-72 quadrangles in all. In addition to the NTS, the map area includes the rest of the southwest Nevada volcanic field, part of the Walker Lane, most of the Amargosa Desert, part of the Funeral and Grapevine Mountains, some of Death Valley, and the northern Spring Mountains. This geologic map improves on previous geologic mapping of the same area (Wahl and others, 1997) by providing new and updated Quaternary and bedrock geology, new geophysical interpretations of faults beneath the basins, and improved GIS coverages. Concurrent publications to this one include a new isostatic gravity map (Ponce and others, 1999) and a new aeromagnetic map (Ponce, 1999).

  1. 76 FR 21329 - Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest; Nevada; Environmental Impact Statement for Geothermal Leasing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    The Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest (HTNF) will prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) to evaluate certain National Forest System (NFS) lands for geothermal leasing availability. The project area includes NFS lands on the HTNF in Douglas, Lyon, Mineral, Lander, Nye and White Pine County,...

  2. 76 FR 21329 - Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest; Nevada; Environmental Impact Statement for Geothermal Leasing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ...The Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest (HTNF) will prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) to evaluate certain National Forest System (NFS) lands for geothermal leasing availability. The project area includes NFS lands on the HTNF in Douglas, Lyon, Mineral, Lander, Nye and White Pine County,...

  3. Clay mineralogy of Pleistocene Lake Tecopa, Inyo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Starkey, Harry C.; Blackmon, Paul D.

    1979-01-01

    Pleistocene Lake Tecopa in southeastern Inyo County, Calif., was formed when the Amargosa River was blocked at the southern end of its valley. The lake acted as a settling basin for detrital material being transported by the river. This detritus consisted of clays, quartz, feldspars, and micas which became mudstones and siltstones. These mudstones and siltstones, much eroded and dissected after the draining of the lake, extend over the entire basin and are interbedded with tuffs formed by the intermittent deposition of volcanic ashfalls in the former lake waters. These lightcolored mudstones and siltstones are tough and well indurated and break with a conchoidal fracture. The predominant clay mineral in these detrital beds is a lithiumbearing saponite, which is found not only in the lake beds but also in the area beyond the boundaries of the lake, especially in fluvial deposits in the drainage basin of the Amargosa River to the north. This saponite does not contain enough lithium to be classified as a hectorite, and we have observed no indications that this clay consists of a mixture of two phases, such as hectorite and a diluent. Some authigenic dioctahedral montmorillonite, found only in small quantities close to the tuffs, was formed by alteration of the volcanic glass of the tuffs and was then admixed with the overlying or underlying detrital clays. The only authigenic clay-type mineral found in any significant quantity is sepiolite, found near the edges of the lake basin and stratigraphically located mainly within a meter of the two uppermost tuffs. This sepiolite probably was precipitated when silica became available to the magnesium-bearing lake water through dissolution of the volcanic ash. Precipitation of sepiolite probably did not occur within the tuffs owing to the presence of alumina in solution. Zeolites were produced there and sepiolite formed outside the margins of the tuffs. Also formed by the high-pH lake waters were water-soluble minerals, which were found widely dispersed in crusts or streaks on the clays. Much of the calcite was likely precipitated from the lake waters, especially near the north end of the lake where calciumbearing fresh water came into contact with the C02-rich lake waters. Magadiite, a sodium silicate mineral reported only twice previously in the United States, was found in small quantities in the southern end of the basin. This mineral is indicative of a minimum pH of 8.5. The authigenic minerals formed in the lake reflect the presence of silica-rich tuffs and the high-pH, alkaline character of the lake waters.

  4. Digital database of microfossil localities in Alameda and Contra Costa Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDougall, Kristin; Block, Debra

    2014-01-01

    The eastern San Francisco Bay region (Contra Costa and Alameda Counties, California) is a geologically complex area divided by faults into a suite of tectonic blocks. Each block contains a unique stratigraphic sequence of Tertiary sediments that in most blocks unconformably overlie Mesozoic sediments. Age and environmental interpretations based on analysis of microfossil assemblages are key factors in interpreting geologic history, structure, and correlation of each block. Much of this data, however, is distributed in unpublished internal reports and memos, and is generally unavailable to the geologic community. In this report the U.S. Geological Survey microfossil data from the Tertiary sediments of Alameda and Contra Costa counties are analyzed and presented in a digital database, which provides a user-friendly summary of the micropaleontologic data, locality information, and biostratigraphic and ecologic interpretations.

  5. Economic cost analysis of West Nile virus outbreak, Sacramento County, California, USA, 2005.

    PubMed

    Barber, Loren M; Schleier, Jerome J; Peterson, Robert K D

    2010-03-01

    In 2005, an outbreak of West Nile virus (WNV) disease occurred in Sacramento County, California; 163 human cases were reported. In response to WNV surveillance indicating increased WNV activity, the Sacramento-Yolo Mosquito and Vector Control District conducted an emergency aerial spray. We determined the economic impact of the outbreak, including the vector control event and the medical cost to treat WNV disease. WNV disease in Sacramento County cost approximately $2.28 million for medical treatment and patients' productivity loss for both West Nile fever and West Nile neuroinvasive disease. Vector control cost approximately $701,790, including spray procedures and overtime hours. The total economic impact of WNV was $2.98 million. A cost-benefit analysis indicated that only 15 cases of West Nile neuroinvasive disease would need to be prevented to make the emergency spray cost-effective. PMID:20202424

  6. Recently Exposed Fumarole Fields Near Mullet Island, Imperial County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, D. K.; Hudnut, K.; Adams, P.; Bernstein, L.

    2011-12-01

    New field observations, lidar measurements, aerial imaging and preliminary laboratory measurements of mud samples are reported of three formerly submerged fumarole fields in the Salton Trough near Mullet Island in southeastern California, USA. The fumarole fields have recently been exposed as the Salton Sea level has dropped. The largest of the three fields visited in January 2011 is irregular in outline with a marked northeast elongation. It is roughly 400 meters long and 120 meters wide. The field consists of approximately one hundred warm to boiling hot (100° C) mud volcanoes (0.1 - 2 m in height), several hundred mud pots, and countless CO2 gas vents. Unusual shaped mud volcanoes in the form of vertical tubes with central vents were observed in many places. Lidar measurements were obtained in the time period Nov 9-13, 2010 using an Optech Orion 200M lidar from an elevation 800 m AGL. They reveal that the terrain immediately surrounding the two fields that are above water level reside on a low (~0.5 m high) gently sloping mound about 500 m across that shows no evidence of lineaments indicative of surface faulting. With other geothermal features, the fumaroles define a well-defined line marking the probable trace of the Calipatria fault. Although the precise locations is uncertain, it appears to define a straight line 4 km long between the Davis-Schrimpf mud volcanoes and Mullet Island. Mullet Island is one of five late Quaternary rhyolitic volcanic necks in the immediate area of the fumaroles. The Calipatria fault is subparallel to the San Andreas and Imperial faults and only one of many verified or suspected faults (including cross faults) in the complex tectonic setting of the Salton Trough. Mud from several volcanoes was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). One sample contained boussingaultite, (NH4)2Mg(SO4)2.6(H2O), a rare mineral that is known to sublime under fumarolic conditions, possibly by ammoniation of hydrated MgSO4. As the Salton Sea level continues to drop, the third fumarole field is expected to surface in the next couple of years. It is also likely that as more land emerges, many of the CO2 gas seeps currently under water will begin to for mud volcanoes and mud pots, most of them along the same NW trending axis as the others. At about the same time a land bridge will form to Mullet Island, the first in about 60 years.

  7. Data from a solute transport experiment in the Leviathan Mine drainage, Alpine County, California, October 1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, M.R.; Bencala, K.E.; Zellweger, G.W.; Hammermeister, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    A twenty-four hour injection of chloride and sodium was made into Leviathan Creek, Alpine County, California to aid interpretation of the coupled interactions between physical transport processes and geochemical reactions. Leviathan Creek was chosen because it receives acid mine drainage from Leviathan Mine, an abandoned open-pit sulfur mine. Water samples were collected at 15 sites along a 4.39 kilometer reach and analyzed for chloride, sodium, sulfate and fluoride. Dissolved concentrations are presented in tabular format and time-series plots. Duplicate samples were analyzed by two laboratories: the Central Laboratory, Denver, Colorado and a research laboratory in Menlo Park, California. A tabular comparison of the analyses and plots of the differences between the two laboratories is presented. Hydrographs and instantaneous discharge measurements are included. (USGS)

  8. Capacity and sedimentation of Loch Lomond Reservoir Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fogelman, R.P.; Johnson, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    A sedimentation study of Loch Lomond Reservoir in Santa Cruz County, California, was begun in 1982 to determine reservoir storage capacity and to establish permanent ranges for future studies. Results of a reservoir survey indicated a total storage capacity of 8,824 acre-ft in 1982. Comparison of thalweg profiles from this survey and a survey done prior to dam construction in 1960 shows that deposition has occurred in the lower reach of the reservoir due to landsliding and in the upper reach due to sediment inflow from Newell Creek. (Author 's abstract)

  9. Neotectonics of the southern Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada and Inyo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, D.E.

    1991-05-01

    A complex pattern of active faults occurs in the southern Amargosa Desert, southern Nye, County, Nevada. These faults can be grouped into three main fault systems: (1) a NE-striking zone of faults that forms the southwest extension of the left-lateral Rock Valley fault zone, in the much larger Spotted Range-Mine Mountain structural zone, (2) a N-striking fault zone coinciding with a NNW-trending alignment of springs that is either a northward continuation of a fault along the west side of the Resting Spring Range or a N-striking branch fault of the Pahrump fault system, and (3) a NW-striking fault zone which is parallel to the Pahrump fault system, but is offset approximately 5 km with a left step in southern Ash Meadows. These three fault zones suggest extension is occurring in an E-W direction, which is compatible with the {approximately}N10W structural grain prevalent in the Death Valley extensional region to the west.

  10. Ground-water resources of Honey Lake valley, Lassen County, California, and Washoe County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Handman, E.H.; Londquist, C.J.; Maurer, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    Honey Lake Valley is a 2,200 sq-mi, topographically closed basin about 35 miles northwest of Reno, Nevada. Unconsolidated basin-fill deposits on the valley floor and fractured volcanic rocks in northern and eastern uplands are the principal aquifers. In the study area, about 130,000 acre- ft of water recharges the aquifer system annually, about 40% by direct infiltration of precipitation and about 60% by infiltration of streamflow and irrigation water. Balancing this is an equal amount of groundwater discharge, of which about 65% evaporates from the water table or is transpired by phreatophytes, about 30 % is withdrawn from wells, and about 5% leaves the basin as subsurface outflow to the east. Results of a groundwater flow model of the eastern part of the basin, where withdrawals for public supply have been proposed, indicate that if 15,000 acre-ft of water were withdrawn annually, a new equilibrium would eventually be established by a reduction of about 60% in both evapotranspiration and subsurface outflow to the east. Hydrologic effects would be minimal at the western boundary of the flow-model area. Within the modeled area, the increased withdrawals cause an increase in the simulated net flow of groundwater eastward across the California-Nevada State line from about 670 acre-ft/yr to about 2,300 acre-ft/yr. (USGS)

  11. Geologic map of the Mound Spring quadrangle, Nye and Clark Counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lundstrom, Scott C.; Mahan, Shannon; Blakely, Richard J.; Paces, James B.; Young, Owen D.; Workman, Jeremiah B.; Dixon, Gary L.

    2003-01-01

    The Mound Spring quadrangle, the southwestern-most 7.5' quadrangle of the area of the Las Vegas 1:100,000-scale quadrangle, is entirely within the Pahrump Valley, spanning the Nevada/California State line. New geologic mapping of the predominantly Quaternary materials is combined with new studies of gravity and geochronology in this quadrangle. Eleven predominantly fine-grained units are delineated, including playa sediment, dune sand, and deposits associated with several cycles of past groundwater discharge and distal fan sedimentation. These units are intercalated with 5 predominantly coarse-grained alluvial-fan and wash gravel units mainly derived from the Spring Mountains. The gravel units are distinguished on the basis of soil development and associated surficial characteristics. Thermoluminescence and U-series geochronology constrain most of the units to the Holocene and late and middle Pleistocene. Deposits of late Pleistocene groundwater discharge in the northeast part of the quadrangle are associated with a down-to-the-southwest fault zone that is expressed by surface fault scarps and a steep gravity gradient. The gravity field also defines a northwest-trending uplift along the State line, in which the oldest sediments are poorly exposed. About 2 km to the northeast a prominent southwest-facing erosional escarpment is formed by resistant beds in middle Pleistocene fine-grained sediments that dip northeast away from the uplift. These sediments include cycles of groundwater discharge that were probably caused by upwelling of southwesterly groundwater flow that encountered the horst.

  12. Resource assessment of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal waters in Calistoga, Napa County, California. Report of the second year, 1979-1980

    SciTech Connect

    Youngs, L.G.; Bacon, C.F.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.; Higgins, C.T.; Majmundar, H.H.; Taylor, G.C.

    1980-11-10

    Phase I studies included updating and completing the USGS GEOTHERM file for California and compiling all data needed for a California Geothermal Resources Map. Phase II studies included a program to assess the geothermal resource at Calistoga, Napa County, California. The Calistoga effort was comprised of a series of studies involving different disciplines, including geologic, hydrologic, geochemical and geophysical studies.

  13. Quaternary geology of Alameda County, and parts of Contra Costa, Santa Clara, San Mateo, San Francisco, Stanislaus, and San Joaquin counties, California: a digital database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helley, E.J.; Graymer, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Alameda County is located at the northern end of the Diablo Range of Central California. It is bounded on the north by the south flank of Mount Diablo, one of the highest peaks in the Bay Area, reaching an elevation of 1173 meters (3,849 ft). San Francisco Bay forms the western boundary, the San Joaquin Valley borders it on the east and an arbitrary line from the Bay into the Diablo Range forms the southern boundary. Alameda is one of the nine Bay Area counties tributary to San Francisco Bay. Most of the country is mountainous with steep rugged topography. Alameda County is covered by twenty-eight 7.5' topographic Quadrangles which are shown on the index map. The Quaternary deposits in Alameda County comprise three distinct depositional environments. One, forming a transgressive sequence of alluvial fan and fan-delta facies, is mapped in the western one-third of the county. The second, forming only alluvial fan facies, is mapped in the Livermore Valley and San Joaquin Valley in the eastern part of the county. The third, forming a combination of Eolian dune and estuarine facies, is restricted to the Alameda Island area in the northwestern corner of the county.

  14. Repeated West Nile Virus Epidemic Transmission in Kern County, California, 2004–2007

    PubMed Central

    REISEN, WILLIAM K.; CARROLL, BRIAN D.; TAKAHASHI, RICHARD; FANG, YING; GARCIA, SANDRA; MARTINEZ, VINCENT M.; QUIRING, ROB

    2009-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) has remained epidemic in Kern County, CA, since its introduction in 2004 through 2007 when the human case annual incidence increased from 6 – 8 to 17 per 100,000, respectively. The 2007 increase in human infection was associated with contradicting surveillance indicators, including severe drought, warm spring but cool summer temperature anomalies, decreased rural and urban mosquito abundance but increased early season infection in urban Culex quinquefasciatus Say, moderate avian “herd immunity,” and declines in the catch of competent (western scrub-jay and house finch) and noncompetent (California quail and mourning dove) avian species. The decline in these noncompetent avian hosts may have increased contact with competent avian hosts and perhaps humans. The marked increase in home foreclosures and associated neglected swimming pools increased urban mosquito production sites, most likely contributing to the urban mosquito population and the WNV outbreak within Bakersfield. Coalescing five surveillance indicators into a risk assessment score measured each half month provided 2- to 6-wk early warning for emergency planning and was followed consistently by the onset of human cases after reaching epidemic conditions. St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) antibody was detected rarely in wild birds but not mosquitoes or sentinel chickens, indicating that previously infected birds were detected in Kern County, but SLEV reintroduction was not successful. In contrast, western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) was detected during 3 of 5 yr in Culex tarsalis Coquillett, sentinel chickens, and wild birds, but failed to amplify to levels where tangential transmission was detected in Aedes mosquitoes or humans. A comparison of transmission patterns in Kern County to Coachella Valley in the southeastern desert of California showed the importance of mosquito phenology and spatial distribution, corvids, or other avian “super spreaders” and anthropogenic factors in WNV epidemiology. PMID:19198528

  15. Mitigation action plan sale of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills) Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1, also called {open_quotes}Elk Hills{close_quotes}), a Federally-owned oil and gas production field in Kern County, California, was created by an Executive Order issued by President Taft on September 2, 1912. He signed another Executive Order on December 13, 1912, to establish Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2), located immediately south of NPR-1 and containing portions of the town of Taft, California. NPR-1 was not developed until the 1973-74 oil embargo demonstrated the nation`s vulnerability to oil supply interruptions. Following the embargo, Congress passed the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 which directed that the reserve be explored and developed to its fall economic potential at the {open_quotes}maximum efficient rate{close_quotes} (MER) of production. Since Elk Hills began full production in 1976, it has functioned as a commercial operation, with total revenues to the Federal government through FY 1996 of $16.4 billion, compared to total exploration, development and production costs of $3.1 billion. In February 1996, Title 34 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1996 (P.L. 104-106), referred to as the Elk Hills Sales Statute, directed the Secretary of Energy to sell NPR-1 by February 10, 1998.The Secretary was also directed to study options for enhancing the value of the other Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserve properties such as NPR-2, located adjacent to NPR-1 in Kern County- Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) located in Natrona County, Wyoming; Naval Oil Shale Reserves No. 1 and No. 3 (NOSR-1 and NOSR-3) located in Garfield County, Colorado; and Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 2 (NOSR-2) located in Uintah and Carbon Counties, Utah. The purpose of these actions was to remove the Federal government from the inherently non-Federal function of operating commercial oil fields while making sure that the public would obtain the maximum value from the reserves.

  16. Mapping Episodic Stream Activity for the Ridgecrest Solar Power Project, Kern County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibodeaux-Yost, S. N.; Brady, R. H., III; Vyverberg, K.; Weinman, B.

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale renewable energy projects are being developed in the California desert region on large tracts of predominantly undeveloped land (total area of developed land for individual project sites vary from 327 acres to 8,230 acres). The absence of a standard method of identifying and accounting for episodic streams in arid and semi-arid (dryland) regions is an area of conflict between project developers and the government agencies responsible for protecting natural resources and permitting renewable energy projects. There is a need for an accurate dryland stream delineation protocol that is consistent, efficient, accessible, and accurately reflects the extent and distribution of streams on a site. Dryland stream delineation protocol based on a scientific, geomorphic and ecological understanding of dryland stream processes will help ensure dryland streams are accurately identified for the purposes of environmental impact assessments and project permitting. Such a method is currently being developed by the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW). This thesis work critically evaluates the stream delineation and stream impact assessment previously completed by the developer for the proposed renewable energy project in El Paso Fan, El Paso Mountains, Ridgecrest, Kern County, California. This evaluation is then compared and contrasted with the results achieved in the field using the MESA (Mapping Episodic Stream Activity) stream delineation methods and protocols and mobile GIS mapping technology.

  17. Blood-feeding patterns of the Culex pipiens complex in Sacramento and Yolo Counties, California.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Matthew J; Thiemann, Tara; Macedo, Paula; Brown, David A; Scott, Thomas W

    2011-03-01

    Mosquitoes in the Culex pipiens complex are competent vectors of West Nile virus (WNV; family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus) in the laboratory, and field-collected mosquitoes have tested positive for the virus in California and elsewhere. A better understanding of Cx. pipiens complex blood-feeding patterns will help define the threat that these mosquitoes pose to human health and their role in WNV amplification in northern California. We collected blood-engorged Cx. pipiens complex mosquitoes from resting sites near and away from human habitation in Sacramento and Yolo Counties. Cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene sequences were used to identify the vertebrate species from which blood meals were taken. Of 330 engorged mosquitoes collected at 28 sites from June through August 2007 and May through August 2008, >99% fed on an avian host. Three mosquitoes contained bovine blood and none had fed on a human. American Robins (Turdus migratorius) were bitten most often, and the proportion of American Robin blood meals increased significantly over the summer. Other important avian hosts included House Finches (Carpodacus mexicanus), Barn Swallows (Hirundo rustica), Western Meadowlarks (Sturnella neglecta), and Mourning Doves (Zenaida macroura). In rural areas, Barn Swallows, Brewer's Blackbirds (Euphagus cyanocephalus), and House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) were frequent hosts. In settings near human habitation, Mourning Doves and Western Meadowlarks were common hosts. Our data indicate that in north central California mosquitoes in the Cx. pipiens complex may be more important as epiornitic than epidemic vectors of WNV. PMID:21485380

  18. 77 FR 55496 - Notice of Temporary Closure of Public Lands in Eastern Lassen County, California, and Western...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ...public lands in the area affected by the Rush Fire in eastern Lassen County, California...access because of dangers posed by the Rush Fire. Exempted from this closure are personnel...comply with the provisions of this closure order may be subject to the penalties...

  19. Effects of a Wildfire and Salvage Logging on Site Conditions and Hillslope Sediment Production: Placer County, California

    E-print Network

    MacDonald, Lee

    THESIS Effects of a Wildfire and Salvage Logging on Site Conditions and Hillslope Sediment OF A WILDFIRE AND SALVAGE LOGGING ON HILLSLOPE SEDIMENT PRODUCTION: PLACER COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Post-fire sediment production rates have been measured in many areas, but there are few published data on how salvage logging

  20. IDENTIFYING THE CAUSE OF HIGH CONCENTRATIONS OF TBA IN GROUNDWATER AT GASOLINE SPIILL SITES IN ORANGE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitoring at gasoline spills in Orange County, California has revealed that TBA (tertiary butyl alcohol) is often present at high concentrations in ground water. To manage the hazard associated with the presence of TBA, staff of the UST Local Oversight Program (LOP) of the Oran...

  1. 33 CFR 334.866 - Pacific Ocean at Naval Base Coronado, in the City of Coronado, San Diego County, California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Naval Base Coronado, in the City of Coronado, San Diego County, California; naval danger zone. 334.866 Section 334.866... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.866 Pacific Ocean at Naval Base Coronado, in the City...

  2. School-Site Administrators: A California County and Regional Perspective on Labor Market Trends. Issues & Answers. REL 2010-No. 084

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Melissa Eiler; Fong, Anthony B.; Makkonen, Reino

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the differences among California's counties and regions in their needs for new school-site administrators in the coming decade, as driven by a combination of projected administrator retirements and projected student enrollment changes. The projected need for new school-site administrators, based solely on these combined…

  3. ANAEROBIC DEGRADATION OF MTBE TO TBA IN GROUND WATER AT GASOLINE SPILL SITES IN ORANGE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although tert-Butyl Alcohol (TBA) has not been used as a fuel oxygenate in Orange County, California, the concentrations of TBA in ground water at gasoline spill sites are high compared to the concentrations of the conventional fuel oxygenate Methyl tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE). In t...

  4. Identification of environmental issues: Hybrid wood-geothermal power plant, Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California: First phase report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-14

    The development of a 55 MWe power plant in Lassen County, California, has been proposed. The proposed power plant is unique in that it will utilize goethermal heat and wood fuel to generate electrical power. This report identifies environmental issues and constraints which may impact the proposed hybrid wood-geothermal power plant. (ACR)

  5. HYDROGEOLOGICAL AND GEOCHEMICAL FACTORS INFLUENCING MERCURY FATE AND TRANSPORT AT THE SULPHUR BANK MERCURY MINE, LAKE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Clear Lake, located approximately 150 km north of San Francisco in Lake County, is one of the largest fresh water lakes in the California. Elevated mercury levels were first identified in fish from Clear Lake in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Although naturally occurring mercury...

  6. 33 CFR 334.866 - Pacific Ocean at Naval Base Coronado, in the City of Coronado, San Diego County, California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Naval Base Coronado, in the City of Coronado, San Diego County, California; naval danger zone. 334.866 Section 334.866 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS §...

  7. 33 CFR 334.866 - Pacific Ocean at Naval Base Coronado, in the City of Coronado, San Diego County, California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pacific Ocean at Naval Base Coronado, in the City of Coronado, San Diego County, California; naval danger zone. 334.866 Section 334.866 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS §...

  8. NAVEL BASE VENTURA COUNTY, PORT HUENEME, CALIFORNIA EPA CHARACTERIZATION TEST CELL REPORT ON ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEYS IN THE TEST CELL AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the geophysical surveys at the EPA Characterization Test Cell (CTC) area (Site) at Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, California is to locate geophysical anomalies indicative of metallic objects within the area of the cell. The goal was to provide backgroun...

  9. Preliminary report on water storage capacity of unconsolidated deposits beneath the Lompoc Plain, Santa Barbara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Upson, Joseph E.

    1943-01-01

    The Lompoc Plain is the central lowland of a topographic and structural basin that forms the western and lower part of the Santa Ynes Valley in Santa Barbara County, California. It extends inland about 11 miles from the coast and is 1 mile fto about 3 miles wide.

  10. 76 FR 30025 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ...Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD)...

  11. 76 FR 30080 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ...Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD)...

  12. 33 CFR 80.1150 - Arcata-Humboldt Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arcata-Humboldt Bay, CA. 80.1150 Section 80.1150 Navigation...Pacific Coast § 80.1150 Arcata-Humboldt Bay, CA. A line drawn from Humboldt Bay Entrance Light 4 to Humboldt Bay Entrance...

  13. Late Pleistocene sediments and fossils near the mouth of Mad River, Humboldt County, California: Facies analysis, sequence development, and possible age correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, E.W. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1994-04-01

    Study of late Pleistocene-age sediments near the mouth of the Mad River revealed a sequence of nearshore marine and shallow bay deposits. This sequence, bounded by unconformities, is informally named the Mouth of Mad unit. The Mouth of mad unit can be divided into four distinct depositional facies at the study site. The lowest facies are the Nearshore Sand and Estuarine Mud, which lie unconformably on a paleosol. The sand facies grades upward into a high-energy, interbedded Nearshore Sand and Gravel facies containing storm and rip-channel deposits. Above the sand and gravel is a Strand-Plain Sand facies. This sand is overlain by a laterally variable sequence of shell-rich Bay facies. The bay deposits can be further divided into five subfacies: (1) a Bioturbated Sand; (2) a Lower Tidal Flat Mud; (3) a Mixed Sand and Mud; (4) an oyster-rich Bay Mud; and (5) an Upper Tidal Flat Mud. The bay sequence is overlain unconformably by younger late Pleistocene-age marine terrace deposits. The depositional environments represented by these facies progress from a shoreline estuary to nearshore deposits, above storm wave base, and slowly back to shoreline and finally shallow bay conditions. The Mouth of Mad unit represents a transgressive-regressive sequence, involving the development of a protective spit. The uppermost mud within the Mouth of Mad unit has been dated, using thermoluminescence age estimation, at 176 [+-] 33 ka, placing it in the late Pleistocene. The Mouth of Mad unit appears to be younger than the fossiliferous deposits at Elk Head, Crannell Junction, Trinidad Head, Moonstone Beach, and the Falor Formation near Maple Creek, and possibly time equivalent with gravel deposits exposed at the western end of School Road in McKinleyville.

  14. A critical assessment of the Burning Index in Los Angeles County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoenberg, F.P.; Chang, H.-C.; Keeley, J.E.; Pompa, J.; Woods, J.; Xu, H.

    2007-01-01

    The Burning Index (BI) is commonly used as a predictor of wildfire activity. An examination of data on the BI and wildfires in Los Angeles County, California, from January 1976 to December 2000 reveals that although the BI is positively associated with wildfire occurrence, its predictive value is quite limited. Wind speed alone has a higher correlation with burn area than BI, for instance, and a simple alternative point process model using wind speed, relative humidity, precipitation and temperature well outperforms the BI in terms of predictive power. The BI is generally far too high in winter and too low in fall, and may exaggerate the impact of individual variables such as wind speed or temperature during times when other variables, such as precipitation or relative humidity, render the environment ill suited for wildfires. ?? IAWF 2007.

  15. Chlorofluorocarbon dating of herbicide-containing well waters in Fresno and Tulare counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spurlock, F.; Burow, K.; Dubrovsky, N.

    2000-01-01

    Simazine, diuron, and bromacil are the most frequently detected currently registered pesticides in California groundwater. These herbicides have been used for several decades in Fresno and Tulare counties, California; however, previous data are inadequate to determine whether the detections are a result of recent or historical applications (i.e., within the last decade, or 20-30 yr ago). Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) groundwater age-dating was used in conjunction with one-dimensional transport modeling to address this question. The estimated times between herbicide application and subsequent detection in groundwater samples from 18 domestic wells ranged from 3 to 33 yr; the aggregate data indicate that more than half of the detections are associated with applications in the last decade. The data also suggest that changes in groundwater quality arising from modified management practices will probably not be discernible for at least a decade. A secondary objective of this study was to evaluate the contribution of simazine degradates deethylsimazine (DES; 2-amino-4-chloro-6-ethylamino-s-triazine) and diaminochlorotriazine (DACT; 2,4-diamino-6-chloro-s-triazine) to total triazine concentrations (defined here as simazine + DES + DACT) in 30 domestic wells. The N-dealkylated s- chlorotriazine degradates DES and DACT substantially contribute to total triazine concentrations in Fresno and Tulare County groundwater, composing 24 to 100% of the total triazines, with a median of 82%. If s-chlorotriazines display a common mode of toxicological action, the prevalence of triazine degradates in water samples found in this and other studies indicate that drinking water standards based on total s-chlorotriazine concentrations may be most appropriate.

  16. Devitoite, A New Heterophyllosilcate Mineral with Astrophyllite-Like Layers from Eastern Fresno County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kampf, Anthony R.; Rossman, George R.; Steele, Ian M.; Pluth, Joseph J.; Dunning, Gail E.; Walstrom, Robert E.

    2010-03-30

    Devitoite, [Ba{sub 6}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}(CO{sub 3})] [Fe{sup 2+}{sub 7}Fe{sup 3+}{sub 2}(Si{sub 4}O{sup 12}){sub 2}O{sub 2}(OH){sub 4}], is a new mineral species from the Esquire No.8 claim along Big Creek in eastern Fresno County, California, U.S.A. It is also found at the nearby Esquire No.7 claim and at Trumbull Peak in Mariposa County. The mineral is named for Alfred (Fred) DeVito (1937-2004). Devitoite crystallized very late in a sequence of minerals resulting from fluids interacting with a quartz-sanbornite vein along its margin with the country rock. The mineral occurs in subparallel intergrowths of very thin brown blades, flattened on {l_brace}001{r_brace} and elongate and striated parallel to [100]. The mineral has a cream to pale brown streak, a silky luster, a Mohs hardness of approximately 4, and two cleavages: {l_brace}001{r_brace} perfect and {l_brace}010{r_brace} good.

  17. 78 FR 41390 - Pershing County Water Conservation District; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing with the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    ...Commission [Project No. 14327-000] Pershing County Water Conservation District; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing...June 26, 2013. d. Applicant: Pershing County Water Conservation District. e. Name of Project: Humboldt...

  18. Evidence of Mercurial Contamination and Denundation Downstream of New Idria Mercury Mine, San Benito County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letsinger, H. E.; Sharma, R. K.; Weinman, B.

    2014-12-01

    California's Central Valley water quality and soils are essential to the survival of the valley's communities and agriculture. Therefore, detection of possible contaminants within the valley streams and soils are paramount to the protection of this land and the people that depend upon it. Here we explore the impact of the contaminated stream beds near the New Idria Mercury Mine site, San Benito County, California. Previous work by Ganguli et al. (2000) has been done in this area to determine the mercury levels associated with the water that flows near the ghost town of New Idria. We performed geochemical analyses on the finer bed sediments from channels draining the area, as well as the coarser sediments taken from along the channel banks, to determine mercury transport downriver from the source. Using a novel application of tau, a mass transfer coefficient typically used in critical zone studies or soil production and weathering rates, we determine downstream weathering, accumulation, and transport of mercury. Our initial geochemical data showed higher tau values upstream as well as within the banks of the contaminated streambed and a greater accumulation of mercury near the pollution source (i.e., mine tailings, (? ~ 103)). Tau results also show elevated mercurial levels existing downstream, with accumulations in mid- (? ~ 102) and down-stream (? ~ 10) reaches. Combining tau results with more traditional indices of chemical weathering (CIA) support consistent overall Hg-weathering processes with low levels of chemical weathering and higher dominance of coupled physical-anthropogenic weathering.

  19. Schweickert, R. A.; and Merguerian, Charles, 1980, Augen gneiss in the Shoo Fly Complex, Tuolumne County, California -a pre-Middle Jurassic plutonic episode.

    E-print Network

    Merguerian, Charles

    Schweickert, R. A.; and Merguerian, Charles, 1980, Augen gneiss in the Shoo Fly Complex, Tuolumne.; and Merguerian, Charles, 1980, Augen gneiss in the Shoo Fly Complex, Tuolumne County, California - a pre

  20. 76 FR 39376 - Glenn/Colusa County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ...Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet in Willows, California. The committee is authorized...Supervisor's Office, 825 North Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA. Written comments may be submitted...comments received at 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988. Please call ahead to...

  1. 77 FR 48125 - Glenn/Colusa County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ...Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet in Willows, California. The committee is authorized...Conference Room, 825 North Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA. Written comments may be submitted...comments received at 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988. Please call ahead to...

  2. 77 FR 56606 - Glenn/Colusa County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-13

    ...Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet in Willows, California. The committee is authorized...Conference Room, 825 North Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA. Written comments may be submitted...comments received at 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988. Please call ahead to...

  3. 76 FR 53880 - Glenn/Colusa County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ...Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet in Willows, California. The committee is authorized...Supervisor's Office, 825 North Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA. Written comments may be submitted...comments received at 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988. Please call ahead to...

  4. 76 FR 45771 - Glenn/Colusa County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ...Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet in Willows, California. The committee is authorized...Supervisor's Office, 825 North Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA. Written comments may be submitted...comments received at 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988. Please call ahead to...

  5. 76 FR 53880 - Glenn/Colusa County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... Willows, California. The committee is authorized under the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self... Supervisor's Office, 825 North Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA. Written comments may be submitted as described... received at 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988. Please call ahead to (530) 934-1269 to...

  6. 76 FR 45771 - Glenn/Colusa County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... Willows, California. The committee is authorized under the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self... Supervisor's Office, 825 North Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA. Written comments may be submitted as described... received at 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988. Please call ahead to (530) 934-1269 to...

  7. 76 FR 39376 - Glenn/Colusa County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... Willows, California. The committee is authorized under the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self... monitoring trip beginning at the Mendocino NF Supervisor's Office, 825 North Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA... copying. The public may inspect comments received at 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988. Please...

  8. 77 FR 48125 - Glenn/Colusa County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... Willows, California. The committee is authorized under the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self... Conference Room, 825 North Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA. Written comments may be submitted as described under.... Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988. Please call ahead to (530) 934-3316 to facilitate entry into the...

  9. 75 FR 27287 - Glenn/Colusa County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... Willows, California. Agenda items covered include: (1) Introductions, (2) Approve Minutes, (3) RAC Admin... District Office, 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988. Individuals who wish to speak or propose agenda items send their names and proposals to Eduardo Olmedo, DFO, 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988...

  10. 77 FR 56606 - Glenn/Colusa County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-13

    ... (RAC) will meet in Willows, California. The committee is authorized under the Secure Rural Schools and... Supervisor's Office, Snow Mountain Conference Room, 825 North Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA. Written comments... public may inspect comments received at 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988. Please call ahead...

  11. 76 FR 39303 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... Pollution Control District, Kern County Air Pollution Control District, and Ventura County Air Pollution... taking direct final action to approve revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District (KCAPCD), and Ventura County Air Pollution...

  12. 76 FR 39357 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... Pollution Control District, Kern County Air Pollution Control District, and Ventura County Air Pollution... proposing to approve revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Kern County Air Pollution Control District (KCAPCD), and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District...

  13. 78 FR 53711 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer, Santa Barbara and Ventura County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ...Santa Barbara and Ventura County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD), Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD)...

  14. 78 FR 53680 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer, Santa Barbara and Ventura County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ...Santa Barbara and Ventura County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD), Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD)...

  15. 76 FR 26224 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Northern Sonoma County Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ...and Mendocino County Air Quality Management District (MCAQMD) AGENCY...and Mendocino County Air Quality Management District (MCAQMD) portions...Definitions and Mendocino County Air Quality Management District (MCAQMD) Rule...

  16. Limited Life Opportunities for Black and Latino Youth. Report on a Public Hearing by the Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations (Compton, California, April 26, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations, CA.

    The Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations held a public hearing to examine the effects of poverty on the hundreds of thousands of low income Blacks and Latinos under the age of 18 residing in Los Angeles County (California). The Commission's findings, recommendations, and concerns are presented. The following findings are presented: (1)…

  17. The Role of Women in Farming: An Exploratory Study of the Relative Impact Women Have on the Farm Enterprise in Yolo County, California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gwynn, Douglas; And Others

    The purpose of this pilot study was to describe the participation of farm women in farm work in one California country. Women from 228 farms, approximately 55 percent of the farms in Yolo County, California, were interviewed by telephone concerning their efforts and roles on the family farm. The study found that the main criterion of whether or…

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL AUDITING: Indicators Assessment for Habitat Conservation Plan of Yolo County, California, USA.

    PubMed

    SMALLWOOD; WILCOX; LEIDY; YARRIS

    1998-11-01

    / Whereas habitat conservation plans (HCPs) have been intended to provide comprehensive environmental mitigation for multiple species, they often narrow in focus to one species and either one mitigation site or unspecified sites. We developed an indicators framework from which to rate land units for their ecological integrity, collateral values (nonbiological qualities that can improve conservation), and restoration and conservation opportunities. The ratings of land units were guided by the tenets of conservation biology and principles of landscape and ecosystem ecology, and they were made using existing physical and floral information managed on a GIS. As an example of how the indicators approach can be used for HCPs, the 29 legally rare species targeted by the Yolo County HCP were each associated with vegetation complexes and agricultural crops, the maps of which were used for rating some of the landscape indices. The ratings were mapped so that mitigation can be directed to the places on the landscape where the legally rare species should benefit most from conservation practices. The most highly rated land units for conservation opportunity occurred along streams and sloughs, especially where they emerged from the foothills and entered the Central Valley and where the two largest creeks intersected the Sacramento River flood basin. We recommend that priority be given to mitigation or conservation at the most highly rated land units. The indices were easy to measure and can be used with other tools to monitor the mitigation success. The indicators framework can be applied to other large-area planning efforts with some modifications.KEY WORDS: Ecosystem; Indicators; Landscape; Mitigation; Planning; Yolo County; California PMID:9732523

  19. Cooling rates and crystallization dynamics of shallow level pegmatite-aplite dikes, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webber, Karen L.; Simmons, William B.; Falster, Alexander U.; Foord, Eugene E.

    1999-01-01

    Pegmatites of the Pala and Mesa Grande Pegmatite Districts, San Diego County, California are typically thin, sheet-like composite pegmatite-aplite dikes. Aplitic portions of many dikes display pronounced mineralogical layering referred to as "line rock," characterized by fine-grained, garnet-rich bands alternating with albite- and quartz-rich bands. Thermal modeling was performed for four dikes in San Diego County including the 1 m thick Himalaya dike, the 2 m thick Mission dike, the 8 m thick George Ashley dike, and the 25 m thick Stewart dike. Calculations were based on conductive cooling equations accounting for latent heat of crystallization, a melt emplacement temperature of 650 °C into 150 °C fractured, gabbroic country rock at a depth of 5 km, and an estimated 3 wt% initial H2O content in the melt. Cooling to -5 cm/s. Crystal size distribution (CSD) studies of garnet from layered aplites suggest growth rates of about 10-6 cm/s. These results indicate that the dikes cooled and crystallized rapidly, with variable nucleation rates but high overall crystal-growth rates. Initial high nucleation rates coincident with emplacement and strong undercooling can account for the millimeter-size aplite grains. Lower nucleation rates coupled with high growth rates can explain the decimeter-size minerals in the hanging walls, cores, and miarolitic cavities of the pegmatites. The presence of tourmaline and/or lepidolite throughout these dikes suggests that although the melts were initially H2O-undersaturated, high melt concentrations of incompatible (or fluxing) components such as B, F, and Li (±H2O), aided in the development of large pegmatitic crystals that grew rapidly in the short times suggested by the conductive cooling models.

  20. Geologic map database of the El Mirage Lake area, San Bernardino and Los Angeles Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David M.; Bedford, David R.

    2000-01-01

    This geologic map database for the El Mirage Lake area describes geologic materials for the dry lake, parts of the adjacent Shadow Mountains and Adobe Mountain, and much of the piedmont extending south from the lake upward toward the San Gabriel Mountains. This area lies within the western Mojave Desert of San Bernardino and Los Angeles Counties, southeastern California. The area is traversed by a few paved highways that service the community of El Mirage, and by numerous dirt roads that lead to outlying properties. An off-highway vehicle area established by the Bureau of Land Management encompasses the dry lake and much of the land north and east of the lake. The physiography of the area consists of the dry lake, flanking mud and sand flats and alluvial piedmonts, and a few sharp craggy mountains. This digital geologic map database, intended for use at 1:24,000-scale, describes and portrays the rock units and surficial deposits of the El Mirage Lake area. The map database was prepared to aid in a water-resource assessment of the area by providing surface geologic information with which deepergroundwater-bearing units may be understood. The area mapped covers the Shadow Mountains SE and parts of the Shadow Mountains, Adobe Mountain, and El Mirage 7.5-minute quadrangles. The map includes detailed geology of surface and bedrock deposits, which represent a significant update from previous bedrock geologic maps by Dibblee (1960) and Troxel and Gunderson (1970), and the surficial geologic map of Ponti and Burke (1980); it incorporates a fringe of the detailed bedrock mapping in the Shadow Mountains by Martin (1992). The map data were assembled as a digital database using ARC/INFO to enable wider applications than traditional paper-product geologic maps and to provide for efficient meshing with other digital data bases prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey's Southern California Areal Mapping Project.

  1. High-resolution topographic, bathymetric, and oceanographic data for the Pleasure Point Area, Santa Cruz County, California: 2005-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Barnard, Patrick L.; Collins, Brian D.; Finlayson, David P.; Golden, Nadine E.; Hatcher, Gerry A.; Kayen, Robert E.; Ruggiero, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The County of Santa Cruz Department of Public Works and the County of Santa Cruz Redevelopment Agency requested the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Western Coastal and Marine Geology Team (WCMG) to provide baseline geologic and oceanographic information on the coast and inner shelf at Pleasure Point, Santa Cruz County, California. The rationale for this proposed work is a need to better understand the environmental consequences of a proposed bluff stabilization project on the beach, the nearshore and the surf at Pleasure Point, Santa Cruz County, California. To meet these information needs, the USGS-WCMG Team collected baseline scientific information on the morphology and waves at Pleasure Point. This study provided high-resolution topography of the coastal bluffs and bathymetry of the inner shelf off East Cliff Drive between 32nd Avenue and 41st Avenue. The spatial and temporal variation in waves and their breaking patterns at the study site were documented. Although this project did not actively investigate the impacts of the proposed bluff stabilization project, these data provide the baseline information required for future studies directed toward predicting the impacts of stabilization on the sea cliffs, beach and nearshore sediment profiles, natural rock reef structures, and offshore habitats and resources. They also provide a basis for calculating potential changes to wave transformations into the shore at Pleasure Point.

  2. Environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact: Biorecycling Technologies, Inc., Noble Biogas and Fertilizer Plant, Fresno County, California

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is considering a proposal from the California Energy Commission for partial funding up to $1,500,000 of the construction of the biorecycling Technologies, Inc., (BTI) Noble Biogas and Fertilizer Plant in Fresno County, California. BTI along with its contractors and business partners would develop the plant, which would use manure and green waste to produce biogas and a variety of organic fertilizer products. The California Energy Commission has requested funding from the DOE Commercialization Ventures program to assist in the construction of the plant, which would produce up to one megawatt of electricity by burning biogas in a cogeneration unit. The purpose of this environmental assessment (EA) is to provide DOE and the public with information on potential environmental impacts associated with funding development of the proposed project.

  3. A Digital Map of Susceptibility to Large Landslides in Santa Clara County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, R. J.; Sobieszczyk, S.

    2002-12-01

    Hillsides bordering the Santa Clara ("Silicon") Valley are prone to earthquake- and rainfall-triggered landslides. To narrow the uncertainty surrounding the location of future slope movement, we estimate the relative likelihood of landsliding at 30-m resolution from regional data sets. While small areas are evaluated accurately from detailed observations on material properties, topography, and hydrology, resource limitations force a regional, statistical, approach to mapping large areas. This is the first county-size susceptibility map prepared from the Arc/Info GIS model developed by Pike and others (2001) in the Oakland, CA, area (USGS MF-2385). Their index of susceptibility is the spatial frequency of prior slope failure for each one-degree slope interval in each geologic-map unit, obtained by combining a geologic map (a proxy for rock or soil strength) with a landslide-inventory map and a map of slope gradient. Areas in existing landslides are multiplied by an observationally derived constant, 1.33, to reflect their higher susceptibility. Santa Clara County's 170 geologic units occupy about 3,440,000 30-m grid cells. The geology is from three digital USGS maps (OF 97-710, 98-348, 98-795). The thousands of existing landslides were digitized from 13 inventories--six by the California Geological Survey, five by USGS, two by private consultants. These source maps vary in scale (mostly 1:24,000 or 1:12,000), date (1970-98), attribution of failures (most are large rock and debris slides, rock slumps, and earth flows; few are debris flows), completeness, and detail. The map of slope gradient (OF 98-766) was computed from a 30-m digital elevation model (OF 98-625). Severity of prior landsliding throughout the county strongly reflects geology--from a mean spatial frequency of zero, e.g. flat-lying Pleistocene alluvial fan and fluvial deposits, to 100%, e.g. a mudstone member of the Oligocene-Eocene San Lorenzo Formation. Values of the susceptibility index, ranging from zero (1,000,000 cells largely on the valley floor) to 1.33 (4200 cells in the most hazardous terrain), are not randomly distributed. Among large areas of highest susceptibility (>0.60) are the hills flanking Santa Clara Valley just E of the cities of San Jose, Milpitas, and Morgan Hill, as well as some terrain in the Santa Cruz Mountains.

  4. Interactions of solutes and streambed sediment. 1. An experimental analysis of cation and anion transport in a mountain stream ( California).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bencala, K.E.; Kennedy, V.C.; Zellweger, G.W.; Jackman, A.P.; Avanzino, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental injection was performed to study the transport of stream water solutes under conditions of significant interaction with streambed sediments in a mountain pool-and-riffle stream. Experiments were conducted in Little Lost Man Creek, Humboldt County, California, in a period of low flow during which only a part of the bank-full channel held active surface flow. The injection of chloride and several trace cations lasted 20 days. In this report we discuss the results of the first 24 hours of the injection and survey the results of the first 10 days. -from Authors

  5. Alexander von Humboldt and the Origins of Landscape Archaeology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathewson, Kent

    1986-01-01

    Reviews the life, theories, and influence of Alexander von Humboldt, the early nineteenth century founder of modern geography. Maintains that Humboldt's novel approaches to the study of landscape antiquities have value for contemporary students in cultural and historical geography. (JDH)

  6. Gene Flow Patterns of the Mayfly Fallceon quilleri in San Diego County, California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zickovich, J.; Bohonak, A. J.

    2005-05-01

    Management decisions and conservation strategies for freshwater invertebrates critically depend on an understanding of gene flow and genetic structure. We collected the mayfly Fallceon quilleri (Ephemeroptera: Baetidae) from 15 streams across three geographically distinct watersheds in San Diego County, California (San Dieguito, Santa Margarita, and Tijuana) and one site in Anza-Borrego desert. We sequenced a 667 base pair region of the mitochondrial DNA (COI) to assess genetic structure and gene flow. We found eight haplotypes across all populations. San Dieguito and Santa Margarita each contained six haplotypes. Tijuana and Anza Borrego each contained four haplotypes. The expected heterozygosity for San Dieguito, Santa Margarita, Tijuana, and Anza Borrego was 0.81, 0.83, 0.75, and 1.0, respectively. A hierarchical AMOVA analysis indicated restricted gene flow and a pairwise comparison indicated that Tijuana watershed differs significantly from San Dieguito and Anza Borrego. A haplotype cladogram revealed two internal ancestral haplotypes and six derived tip haplotypes that are unique to particular watersheds. These results suggest that Tijuana (the southernmost and the most impacted watershed) is more genetically distinct and isolated than the other watersheds sampled.

  7. Mineral resource potential map of the John Muir Wilderness, Fresno, Inyo, Madera, and Mono counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Du Bray, E.A.; Dellinger, D.A.; Diggles, M.F.; Oliver, H.W.; Johnson, F.L.; Thurber, H.K.; Morris, R.W.; Perers, T.J.; Lindsey, D.S.

    1982-01-01

    Under the provisions of the Wilderness Act (Public Law 88-577, September 3, 1964) and the Joint Conference Report on Senate Bill 4, 88th Congress, the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Bureau of Mines have been conducting mineral surveys of wilderness and primitive areas. Areas officially designated as "wilderness," "wild," or "canoe" when the act was passed were incorporated into the National Wilderness Preservation System, and some of them are presently being studied. The act provided that areas under consideration for wilderness designation should be studied for suitability for incorporation into the Wilderness System. The mineral surveys constitute one aspect of the suitability studies. The act directs that the results of such surveys are to be made available to the public and be submitted to the President and the Congress. This report discusses the results of a mineral survey of the John Muir Wilderness, Inyo and Sierra National Forests, Fresno, lnyo, Madera, and Mono Counties, California. The area was established as a wilderness by Public Law 88-577, September 3, 1964.

  8. Problems related to water quality and algal control in Lopez Reservoir, San Luis Obispo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, Richard H.; Averett, Robert C.; Hines, Walter G.

    1975-01-01

    A study to determine the present enrichment status of Liopez Reservoir in San Luis Obispo county, California, and to evaluate copper sulfate algal treatment found that stratification in the reservoir regulates nutrient release and that algal control has been ineffective. Nuisance algal blooms, particularly from March to June, have been a problem in the warm multipurpose reservoir since it was initially filled following intense storms in 1968-69. The cyanophyte Anabaena unispora has been dominant; cospecies are the diatoms Stephanodiscus astraea and Cyclotella operculata, and the chlorophytes Pediastrum deplex and Sphaerocystis schroeteri. During an A. unispora bloom in May 1972 the total lake surface cell count was nearly 100,000 cells/ml. Thermal stratification from late spring through autumn results in oxygen deficiency in the hypolimnion and metalimnion caused by bacterial oxidation of organic detritus. The anaerobic conditions favor chemical reduction of organic matter, which constitute 10-14% of the sediment. As algae die, sink to the bottom, and decompose, nutrients are released to the hypolimnion , and with the autumn overturn are spread to the epilimnion. Algal blooms not only hamper recreation, but through depletion of dissolved oxygen in the epilimnion may have caused periodic fishkills. Copper sulfate mixed with sodium citrate and applied at 1.10-1.73 lbs/acre has not significantly reduced algal growth; a method for determining correct dosage is presented. (Lynch-Wisconsin)

  9. Acid mine drainage on public and private lands, the Walker Mine experience, Plumas County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Croyle, W.A.; Rosenbaum, S.E.

    1996-11-01

    A widespread environmental problem associated with abandoned mines and their tailings is acid mine drainage (AMD). AMID typically has low pH and elevated metal concentrations that are toxic to aquatic life. In Northern California, Iron Mountain and other mines in the Shasta mining districts are the largest sources of AMD. Additional sources lie to the south along a discontinuous belt of copper and zinc mineralization in the western Sierra foothills. Between these areas lies a remote group of copper mines in northeastern Plumas County including the Walker, Engels and Superior mines. Of this group, AMD from Walker Mine has caused the most severe water quality impairment. This paper describes the history and environmental setting of Walker Mine and the approaches used by the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board, a state regulatory agency, to improve water quality at the site. Both the mine and its tailings contribute pollutants to the watershed. The mine has a portal discharge with depressed pH and high copper concentrations. The tailings add fine grained sediment to the creek and generate low but significant concentrations of dissolved copper. The mine is on private property and the tailings are on land managed by the U. S. Forest Service. Because of these differences in pollution problems and ownership, the methods employed by the Regional Board to improve conditions at the mine and tailings have been on different, but parallel tracks. Monitoring shows these efforts have significantly improved water quality in the watershed over the last 10 years.

  10. A geophysical study of the hydrogeology of the Carrizo plain area, San Luis Obispo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.W. )

    1991-02-01

    This investigation was conducted to attempt to locate structural geologic features and variations in aquifer characteristics in an area within the Carrizo plain, San Luis Obispo County, California. The investigation included a review of the established geologic knowledge for the region, followed by field studies. The field studies included surface magnetometer surveys, thermal borehole logging, and a piezometric level survey. Existing borehole electric logs were obtained. The conclusions of the investigation were then derived from a collective interpretation. The investigation concluded that a fault appears to extend beneath the valley fill in the northwestern part of the area, and that a subsurface basaltic dike is apparently located in the southeastern part of the area. Evaluations indicate that the valley has a deep aquifer overlain by a confining clay-rich layer in the central part of the area. Areal and depth-related variations in water quality are probably influenced by the presence of evaporites near Soda Lake and in the region near the San Andreas fault.

  11. Seastacks buried beneath newly reported Lower Miocene sandstone, northern Santa Barbara County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Fritsche, A.E.; Hanna, F.M.

    1985-04-01

    Three large, isolated exposures of a light-gray, coarse-grained, thick-bedded sandstone unit occur in the northern San Rafael Mountains of Santa Barbara County, California. These rocks are moderately fossiliferous and contain Vertipecten bowersi, Amussiopecten vanvlecki, Aequipecten andersoni, Otrea howelli, shark teeth, whale bones, and regular echinoid spines. The fossils indicate that the sandstone unit, although previously reported as upper(.) Miocene, correlates best with the lower Miocene Vaqueros Formation. This unit was deposited in angular unconformity on a Cretaceous, greenish-gray turbidite sequence of interbedded sandstone and shale, and onlaps the unconformity erosion surface from west to east, the unit being thicker in the west and older at its base. The underlying Cretaceous sandstone beds are well indurated, and during the eastward transgression of the early Miocene sea, they resisted wave erosion and stood as seastacks offshore of the advancing coastline, thus creating a very irregular topographic surface upon which the Vaqueros Formation was deposited. Some seastacks were as much as 4 m tall, as indicated by inliers of Cretaceous rock surrounded by 4-m thick sections of the Vaqueros Formation.

  12. Adverse pregnancy outcomes in relation to water contamination, Santa Clara County, California, 1980-1981

    SciTech Connect

    Deane, M.; Swan, S.H.; Harris, J.A.; Epstein, D.M.; Neutra, R.R.

    1989-05-01

    An epidemiologic study was conducted to investigate a suspected cluster of adverse outcomes of pregnancies conceived in 1980-1981 among women who resided in a census tract in Santa Clara County, California that was thought to be exposed to drinking water from a well contaminated by an organic solvent, trichloroethane. A comparison census tract that received water from a different source was selected on the basis of demographic comparability. The cluster was confirmed; the odds ratio for spontaneous abortion was 2.3 (95% confidence interval (Cl) 1.3-4.2) after adjustment by multiple logistic regression for maternal risk factors, including maternal age, alcohol consumption, smoking, and prior fetal loss. The relative risk for congenital malformations was 3.1 (95% Cl 1.1-10.4). Because of the lack of precise information on the timing and extent of contamination, the pattern of spontaneous abortion rates throughout the study period cannot be used to either support or refute a causal inference.

  13. Streamflow, sediment discharge, and streambank erosion in Cache Creek, Yolo County, California, 1953-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harmon, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    This report defines cross-section geometry, slope, sinuosity, bed and bank material size, and sediment discharge for Cache Creek, Capay Valley, Yolo County, California; it also relates streambank erosion to daily volumes of flow greater than 6,000 acre-ft. Mean bed elevations at six cross sections during 1983-86 and at two cross sections over several years indicate general stability of elevations in the gravel-bed channel. Water-surface slope ranged from 0.13% to 0.51% in four reaches during two flood peaks. Aerial photographs indicate that the Cache Creek channel is sinuous. About 67% of bed material at 45 cross sections is gravel, and 23% is coarser than gravel. Bank material at 27 cross sections contain sands, silt, and clay, except at one cross section where cobbles and gravel form the left bank. The sediment-discharge rate was lower during 1984-86 than in 1960-63. Streambank erosion was measured by comparing aerial photographs taken over several years. Eroded areas total about 13.2 million sq ft (300 acres) from 1953 to 1984. Net migration is toward the right bank. (USGS)

  14. Biological survey of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (Buena Vista), Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Sauls, M.L.

    1987-06-01

    A field survey of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2, Kern County, California, was conducted to determine the distribution and relative abundance of endangered species and other wildlife. Of the 343 San Joaquin kit fox dens found in 40 sections, 33 were observed by surveyors in transit and 310 were found along transects. Of the latter, 264 were typical subterranean dens and 46 were atypical dens in man-made structures. Estimated density of dens was 28.8 +- 4.4 per square mile; relative density was 9.2/1000 acres. The number of typical dens observed per section was inversely correlated with the number of petroleum wells per section (intensity of development). Atypical dens were usually found to be in pipes or pipe culverts and were positively correlated with density of wells. Relative densities of black-tailed jackrabbits (41.9/1000 acres) and desert cottontails (17.1/1000 acres), preferred prey for foxes, were high compared with densities reported on other public lands. Most (81%) of the 19 blunt-nosed leopard lizards were observed in six adjacent sections located in the gentle foothills near Buena Vista Lake playa. Most (86%) of the 275 giant kangaroo rat burrow systems were observed in ten sections containing flat, relatively undeveloped terrain in and around upper Buena Vista Valley. San Joaquin antelope ground squirrels were the second most commonly observed diurnal vertebrate: 761 observations in 45 sections. A total of 6740 observations of 61 species of wildlife were made.

  15. Comments on potential geologic and seismic hazards affecting coastal Ventura County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, Stephanie L.; Boore, David M.; Fisher, Michael A.; Frankel, Arthur D.; Geist, Eric L.; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; Kayen, Robert E.; Lee, Homa J.; Normark, William R.; Wong, Florence L.

    2004-01-01

    This report examines the regional seismic and geologic hazards that could affect proposed liquefied natural gas (LNG) facilities in coastal Ventura County, California. Faults throughout this area are thought to be capable of producing earthquakes of magnitude 6.5 to 7.5, which could produce surface fault offsets of as much as 15 feet. Many of these faults are sufficiently well understood to be included in the current generation of the National Seismic Hazard Maps; others may become candidates for inclusion in future revisions as research proceeds. Strong shaking is the primary hazard that causes damage from earthquakes and this area is zoned with a high level of shaking hazard. The estimated probability of a magnitude 6.5 or larger earthquake (comparable in size to the 2003 San Simeon quake) occurring in the next 30 years within 30 miles of Platform Grace is 50-60%; for Cabrillo Port, the estimate is a 35% likelihood. Combining these probabilities of earthquake occurrence with relationships that give expected ground motions yields the estimated seismic-shaking hazard. In parts of the project area, the estimated shaking hazard is as high as along the San Andreas Fault. The combination of long-period basin waves and LNG installations with large long-period resonances potentially increases this hazard.

  16. L-band radar sensing of soil moisture. [Kern County, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Atwater, S.; Salomonson, V. V.; Estes, J. E.; Simonett, D. S.; Bryan, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    The performance of an L-band, 25 cm wavelength imaging synthetic aperture radar was assessed for soil moisture determination, and the temporal variability of radar returns from a number of agricultural fields was studied. A series of three overflights was accomplished over an agricultural test site in Kern County, California. Soil moisture samples were collected from bare fields at nine sites at depths of 0-2, 2-5, 5-15, and 15-30 cm. These gravimetric measurements were converted to percent of field capacity for correlation to the radar return signal. The initial signal film was optically correlated and scanned to produce image data numbers. These numbers were then converted to relative return power by linear interpolation of the noise power wedge which was introduced in 5 dB steps into the original signal film before and after each data run. Results of correlations between the relative return power and percent of field capacity (FC) demonstrate that the relative return power from this imaging radar system is responsive to the amount of soil moisture in bare fields. The signal returned from dry (15% FC) and wet (130% FC) fields where furrowing is parallel to the radar beam differs by about 10 dB.

  17. California GAMA Program: Sources and transport of nitrate in shallow groundwater in the Llagas Basin of Santa Clara County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J E; McNab, W; Esser, B; Hudson, G; Carle, S; Beller, H; Kane, S; Tompson, A B; Letain, T; Moore, K; Eaton, G; Leif, R; Moody-Bartel, C; Singleton, M

    2005-06-29

    A critical component of the State Water Resource Control Board's Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program is to assess the major threats to groundwater resources that supply drinking water to Californians (Belitz et al., 2004). Nitrate is the most pervasive and intractable contaminant in California groundwater and is the focus of special studies under the GAMA program. This report presents results of a study of nitrate contamination in the aquifer beneath the cities of Morgan Hill and Gilroy, CA, in the Llagas Subbasin of Santa Clara County, where high nitrate levels affect several hundred private domestic wells. The main objectives of the study are: (1) to identify the main source(s) of nitrate that issue a flux to the shallow regional aquifer (2) to determine whether denitrification plays a role in the fate of nitrate in the subbasin and (3) to assess the impact that a nitrate management plan implemented by the local water agency has had on the flux of nitrate to the regional aquifer. Analyses of 56 well water samples for major anions and cations, nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate, dissolved excess nitrogen, tritium and groundwater age, and trace organic compounds, show that synthetic fertilizer is the most likely source of nitrate in highly contaminated wells, and that denitrification is not a significant process in the fate of nitrate in the subbasin except in the area of recycled water application. In addition to identifying contaminant sources, these methods offer a deeper understanding of how the severity and extent of contamination are affected by hydrogeology and groundwater management practices. In the Llagas subbasin, the nitrate problem is amplified in the shallow aquifer because it is highly vulnerable with high vertical recharge rates and rapid lateral transport, but the deeper aquifers are relatively more protected by laterally extensive aquitards. Artificial recharge delivers low-nitrate water and provides a means of long-term remediation. Examination of nitrate concentration in relation to groundwater age indicates that the nitrate management plan has not yet resulted in a decrease in the flux of nitrate to the shallow aquifer in the areas tested.

  18. Preliminary geologic map of the Fontana 7.5' quadrangle, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Douglas M.; Digital preparation by Bovard, Kelly R.

    2003-01-01

    Open-File Report 03-418 is a digital geologic data set that maps and describes the geology of the Fontana 7.5’ quadrangle, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, California. The Fontana quadrangle database is one of several 7.5’ quadrangle databases that are being produced by the Southern California Areal Mapping Project (SCAMP). These maps and databases are, in turn, part of the nation-wide digital geologic map coverage being developed by the National Cooperative Geologic Map Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). General Open-File Report 03-418 contains a digital geologic map database of the Fontana 7.5’ quadrangle, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, California that includes: 1. ARC/INFO (Environmental Systems Research Institute, http://www.esri.com) version 7.2.1 coverages of the various elements of the geologic map. 2. A Postscript file (fon_map.ps) to plot the geologic map on a topographic base, and containing a Correlation of Map Units diagram (CMU), a Description of Map Units (DMU), and an index map. 3. An Encapsulated PostScript (EPS) file (fon_grey.eps) created in Adobe Illustrator 10.0 to plot the geologic map on a grey topographic base, and containing a Correlation of Map Units (CMU), a Description of Map Units (DMU), and an index map. 4. Portable Document Format (.pdf) files of: a. the Readme file; includes in Appendix I, data contained in fon_met.txt b. The same graphics as plotted in 2 and 3 above.Test plots have not produced precise 1:24,000-scale map sheets. Adobe Acrobat page size setting influences map scale. The Correlation of Map Units and Description of Map Units is in the editorial format of USGS Geologic Investigations Series (I-series) maps but has not been edited to comply with I-map standards. Within the geologic map data package, map units are identified by standard geologic map criteria such as formation-name, age, and lithology. Where known, grain size is indicated on the map by a subscripted letter or letters following the unit symbols as follows: lg, large boulders; b, boulder; g, gravel; a, arenaceous; s, silt; c, clay; e.g. Qyfa is a predominantly young alluvial fan deposit that is arenaceous. Multiple letters are used for more specific identification or for mixed units, e.g., Qfysa is a silty sand. In some cases, mixed units are indicated by a compound symbol; e.g., Qyf2sc. Even though this is an Open-File Report and includes the standard USGS Open-File disclaimer, the report closely adheres to the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. Descriptions of units can be obtained by viewing or plotting the .pdf file (4b above) or plotting the postscript files (2 or 3 above).

  19. Documentation and description of the digital spatial data base for southern California Regional Aquifer-System Analysis Program, Santa Clara-Calleguas Basin, Ventura County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Predmore, Steven K.; Koczot, Kathryn M.; Paybins, Katherine S.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the geographic information system map layers and data files generated for the Santa Clara-Calleguas Basin, Ventura County, as part of a Regional Aquifer- System Analysis of southern California from 1989 to 1995. Thirty-six map layers and four data files are maintained in this geographic information system data base. The map layers cover the Santa Clara-Calleguas drainage basin and are stored in a common map projection. Attributes of the map layers and data files are described and referenced. The map layers are grouped by geography, geology, and hydrology.

  20. From Alexander von Humboldt to Frederic Edwin Church: Voyages of Scientific Exploration and Creativity

    E-print Network

    Baron, Frank

    2005-01-01

    From Alexander von Humboldt to Frederic Edwin Church: Voyages of Scientific Exploration and Creativity Sondernummer The Humboldt Digital Library „From Humboldt to F. E. Church“ (F. Baron) 1HiN VI, 10 (2005) Humboldt im Netz Herausgeber: Prof. Dr... .......................................................................................................13 „From Humboldt to F. E. Church“ (F. Baron) 2HiN VI, 10 (2005) Humboldt im Netz From Alexander von Humboldt to Frederic Edwin Church: Voyages of Scientific Exploration and Creativity Frank Baron Abstract Stephen Jay Gould wrote recently that „when...

  1. 75 FR 24544 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ...Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District, Sacramento...District, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District, and South Coast...revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District...

  2. 76 FR 44809 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ...Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District and Feather River...submitted for the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and...modified major stationary sources of air pollution. We are approving local...

  3. 76 FR 67366 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ...Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District and Sacramento...revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and...52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by...

  4. 76 FR 54993 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ...Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) portion...52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Intergovernmental...

  5. 75 FR 1284 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Ventura County Air Pollution Control District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ...Implementation Plan, Ventura County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Ventura County Air Pollution Control District (VCAPCD) portion...52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by...

  6. 76 FR 7142 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ...Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD) portion...permitting requirements, for various air pollution sources. We are taking...

  7. 77 FR 25109 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ...Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD) portion...of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Air pollution control, Environmental...

  8. 76 FR 26192 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Northern Sonoma County Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ...Plan, Northern Sonoma County Air Pollution Control District (NSCAPCD) and...to the Northern Sonoma County Air Pollution Control District (NSCAPCD) and...52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by...

  9. 75 FR 24406 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ...Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District, Sacramento...District, San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District, and South Coast...revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District...

  10. 75 FR 45082 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ...Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD) portion...52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Intergovernmental...

  11. 78 FR 6736 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ...Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) portion...rules, however, provide for Air Pollution Control Officer (APCO)...

  12. 75 FR 56889 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ...Implementation Plan, San Diego County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the San Diego County Air Pollution Control District (SDCAPCD) portion...52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by...

  13. 75 FR 8008 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ...Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD) portion...SCAQMD), San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District...

  14. 76 FR 71886 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ...Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District and Sacramento...revisions to the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and...52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by...

  15. 76 FR 26615 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    ...Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD) AGENCY...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District portion of the...requirements and exemptions for various air pollution sources. We are approving...

  16. 78 FR 21542 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ...Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District and South Coast...revisions to the Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD) and...52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by...

  17. 76 FR 28944 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ...Implementation Plan, Placer County Air Pollution Control District and Feather River...submitted for the Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and...for new and modified sources of air pollution. If EPA finalizes the...

  18. 75 FR 69002 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ...Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD) portion...and San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District...

  19. 78 FR 21540 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Butte County Air Quality Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ...Implementation Plan, Butte County Air Quality Management District and Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Butte County Air Quality Management District (BCAQMD) and...

  20. Humboldt Bay Cooperative Eelgrass Project

    E-print Network

    Schlosser, Susan

    2007-01-01

    for other aquatic invasive species programs. Our projectprograms that ensure early detection of new aquatic invasive speciesprograms throughout California that are sampling coastal and marine habitats to train them in identification of aquatic invasive species

  1. Evaluating Channel Head Conditions for Environmental Impact Assessment in Northwestern Sonoma County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, M. N.; O'Connor, M.; Pennington, R.

    2007-12-01

    Erosion and sedimentation have been identified as processes significantly affecting water quality in northern California Coast Range watersheds. These watersheds, including the Gualala River watershed in northwestern Sonoma County, have been designated as having water quality impaired by sediment under provisions of the Clean Water Act Section 303(d). A study was performed to estimate potential increases in erosion rates resulting from proposed vineyard development of ridge top forestland in the Gualala River watershed. The study area has an extensive history of logging, with substantial ground disturbance from tractors. The study area is characterized by flat ridge tops with steeply incised drainages shaped by debris slides, rock slides and earth flows. Jurassic age sedimentary and meta-sedimentary rocks of the coastal and central belt Franciscan formation comprise the underlying bedrock. Channel head development and advancement has long been understood to play a key role in sediment delivery and is possibly the most sensitive to changes in the external factors such as changes in climate or land use (Dietrich and Dunne 1993). Quantifying the amount of sediment contributed by potential channel head incision and/or initiation is an objective of environmental analysis for the project. Field surveys were performed during the field seasons of 2005 and 2006 to acquire measurements of channel head locations and slope, channel dimensions and substrate associated with the proposed development sites. Analysis of this field data, including the use of ArcGIS, allowed us to examine the local relationships between variables that influence channel initiation. Variables considered include drainage area, slope, soil type, geology and vegetation. An initial analysis of a selection of area-slope data failed to produce an inverse area-slope relationship as has been found in previous studies by Montgomery and Dietrich (1988). A more complete evaluation of the entire data set is presented here.

  2. Geologic map of the Fifteenmile Valley 7.5' quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, F.K.; Matti, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Open-File Report OF 01-132 contains a digital geologic map database of the Fifteenmile Valley 7.5’ quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California that includes: 1. ARC/INFO (Environmental Systems Research Institute, http://www.esri.com) version 7.2.1 coverages of the various elements of the geologic map. 2. A PostScript file to plot the geologic map on a topographic base, and containing a Correlation of Map Units diagram, a Description of Map Units, an index map, and a regional structure map. 3. Portable Document Format (.pdf) files of: a. This Readme; includes in Appendix I, data contained in fif_met.txt b. The same graphic as plotted in 2 above. (Test plots have not produced 1:24,000-scale map sheets. Adobe Acrobat pagesize setting influences map scale.) The Correlation of Map Units (CMU) and Description of Map Units (DMU) is in the editorial format of USGS Miscellaneous Investigations Series (I-series) maps. Within the geologic map data package, map units are identified by standard geologic map criteria such as formation-name, age, and lithology. Even though this is an author-prepared report, every attempt has been made to closely adhere to the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U. S. Geological Survey. Descriptions of units can be obtained by viewing or plotting the .pdf file (3b above) or plotting the postscript file (2 above). If roads in some areas, especially forest roads that parallel topographic contours, do not show well on plots of the geologic map, we recommend use of the USGS Fifteenmile Valley 7.5’ topographic quadrangle in conjunction with the geologic map.

  3. Habitat restoration plan for Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1985-10-01

    In 1976 Congress directed that production on the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) in Kern County, California, be increased to the maximum efficient rate to fulfill some United States needs for domestic oil and gas. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) issued a Biological Opinion, required under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, that proposed construction activities on NPR-1 would jeopardize the continued existence of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica) and blunt-nosed leopard lizard (Gambelia silus) and damage their critical habitats. One of the reasonable and prudent alternatives that the FWS required if the project were to proceed was that DOE prepare this plan to restore disturbed habitats. The plan was based on published information and the results of habitat restoration studies conducted on NPR-1 between 1981 and 1983. Preconstruction surveys will be used to insure that new disturbances are the minimum size necessary, topsoil is salvaged, and engineering practices are implemented to control soil erosion and enhance revegetation. Existing disturbances will be located, inventoried, classified, and restored using existing guidelines. Native and naturalized plant seeds will be harvested and cultivated; shrub seedlings will be grown in containers suitable for transplantation. An inventory of disturbances, results of preconstruction activities, inventory of topsoil reserves, changes in habitat quality, uses of herbicides and toxic substances, and program costs will be monitored and used to document progress and evaluate the success of the program. Results of the program will be documented in an annual report, at technical information meetings and published in DOE topical reports and scientific journals. 46 refs., 1 fig. 4 tabs.

  4. Report of endangered species studies on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Warrick, G.D.; Mathews, N.E.; Kato, T.T.

    1987-09-01

    Between 1983 and 1986 the size of the population of San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica) on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2), Kern County, California, was estimated semiannually using capture-recapture techniques. Although summer population estimates varied between 222 in 1983 and 121 in 1986, and winter estimates varies between 258 in 1984 and 91 in 1983, the population appeared to remain relatively stable at an apparent norm of 165. Kit foxes were abundant even in the intensely developed areas, and numbers and densities (1.12 to 2.49/sq mile) were consistently higher on NPR-2 than on neighboring NPR-1. The percentage of adult vixens that successfully raised pups was 55%, average litter size was 4.0 +- 0.0, and the sex ratio (M:F) of 25 pups was 1:1.5. Most (45.2%) foxes were killed by coyotes (Canis latrans), vehicles killed 6.4%, and 6.5% died of other causes. A cause could not be determined for 41.9% of the deaths. There was a general increase in coyote visitation rates at scent stations, but kit fox visitation rates generally decreased. Kit fox indices were consistently higher on NPR-2 than on NPR-1. Approximately 15% of the kit foxes on NPR-2 dispersed an average of 2.2 +- 0.2 miles. Average dispersal distance did not differ between the sexes. The longest dispersal was 6.9 miles. Proportionately more male than female pups dispersed. Remains of lagomorphs (jackrabbits and cottontails) and kangaroo rats had the highest frequency of occurrence in scats. Frequency of occurrence of lagomorph remains was greater in developed than in undeveloped habitats. Proportions of lagomorph remains increased and kangaroo rat remains decreased between 1983 and 1984. 62 refs., 9 figs., 24 tabs.

  5. Wildlife management plan, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Scrivner, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Under the Naval Petroleum Act of 1976, Congress directed the Secretary of the Navy and subsequently the Secretary of Energy, to produce petroleum products from Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) in Kern County, California, at the maximum efficient rate consistent with sound engineering practices. Because of the presence of two endangered species and the quality, quantity, and contiguous nature of habitat on NPR-1, the area is unique and management of its resources deserves special attention. The purpose of this wildlife management plan is to: (1) draw together specific information on NPR-1 wildlife resources; (2) suggest management goals that could be implemented, which if achieved, would result in diverse, healthy wildlife populations; and (3) reinitiate cooperative agreements between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other conservation organizations regarding the management of wildlife on NPR-1. NPR-1 supports an abundant and diverse vertebrate fauna. Twenty-five mammalian, 92 avian, eight reptilian, and two amphibian species have been observed on Elk Hills. Of these, three are endangered (San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica; giant kangaroo rat, Dipodomys ingens; blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Gambelia silus). Nine vertebrates, six invertebrates, and four plant species known to occur or suspected of occurring on Elk Hills are potential candidates for listing. A major objective of this management plan is to minimize the impact of petroleum development activities on the San Joaquin kit fox, giant kangaroo rat, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, and their essential habitats. This will mainly be achieved by monitoring the status of these species and their habitat and by restoring disturbed habitats. In general, management policies designed to benefit the above three species and other species of concern will also benefit other wildlife inhabiting NPR-1.

  6. A vapor-dominated reservoir exceeding 600{degrees}F at the Geysers, Sonoma County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, M.A.; Sternfeld, J.N.; Haizlip, J.R.; Drenick, A.F.; Combs, Jim

    1988-01-01

    A high-temperature vapor-dominated reservoir underlies a portion of the Northwest Geysers area, Sonoma County, California. The high-temperature reservoir (HTR) is defined by flowing fluid temperatures exceeding 500º F, rock temperatures apparently exceeding 600º F and steam enthalpies of about 1320 BTU/lb. Steam from existing wells drilled in the Northwest Geysers is produced from both a “typical” Geysers reservoir and the HTR. In all cases, the HTR is in the lower portion of the wells and is overlain by a “typical” Geysers reservoir. Depth to the high-temperature reservoir is relatively uniform at about -5900 ft subsea. There are no identified lithologic or mineralogic conditions that separate the HTR from the “typical” reservoir, although the two reservoirs are vertically distinct and can be located in most wells to within about 200 ft by the use of downhole temperature-depth measurements. Gas concentrations in steam from the HTR are higher (6 to 9 wt %) than from the “typical” Geysers reservoir (0.85 to 2.6 wt %). Steam from the HTR is enriched in chloride and the heavy isotopes of water relative to the “typical” reservoir. Available static and dynamic measurements show pressures are subhydrostatic in both reservoirs with no anomalous differences between the two: the HTR pressure being near 520 psia at sea level datum. The small observed differences in pressure between the reservoirs appear to vary along a steam density gradient. It is postulated that the Northwest Geysers area evolved more slowly toward vapor-dominated conditions than other parts of The Geysers field because of its poor connection with the surface. In this paper, a model is presented in which the boundary between the HTR and “typical” reservoir is a thermodynamic feature only, resulting from recent deep venting of a liquid-dominated system in which conduction is still an important component of heat transfer.

  7. Deciphering the origin of the Humboldt Slide using Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwehr, K.; Driscoll, N.; Tauxe, L.

    2003-04-01

    The origin of the "so-called" Humboldt Slide has raised much controversy.Some researchers argue that it is a slide deposit, while others interpret thedeposit as a depositional feature mantling an old slide scar formed bydown-slope gravity flows. We recently adapted the standard paleomagnetic toolof Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) in order to detect minorpost-depositional deformation (i.e., "crypto-slumps") in sedimentarysuccessions and applied it to the Humboldt Slide controversy. Crypto-slumps are slumps that are not easily observed in outcrop or coresamples. Undeformed sediments show a typical oblate fabric while even slightlydeformed sediments develop a triaxial fabric. In the winter of 2001, weacquired 5 large diameter piston cores from the Humboldt Slide, NorthernCalifornia based on a previous chirp seismic survey collected as part of theSTRATAFORM project. The cores were acquired in two groups with the first beinglocated in the center of the Humboldt Slide covering the upslope and downslopelimb of one of the structures with one core located between the twostructures. The second group of cores is located upslope near the top of theso-called Humboldt complex. Both groups are located in the extensional regimeif this deposit is indeed a slump in an area morphologically described as theridges and swales by Gardner et al. (1999). We measured the AMS on a total of293 samples down-core and from these analyses we found that fabric wasdominantly oblate except in regions that had experienced flow-in from thepiston coring process. Based on these results, we conclude that the HumboldtSlide is not a slide. The ridges and swales appear to have grown as sedimentwaves on an old slide scar. We have corroborated this model with furtheranalysis of our chirp seismics which show thickening on the upslope side ofthese structures and continuous reflectors across regions where others havemapped normal faults. Gardner, J.V., Prior, D.B., Field, M.E., 1999, Humboldt Slide - a largeshear-dominated retrogressive slope failure, Marine Geology, v. 154, 323-338.

  8. 75 FR 17397 - Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Project, Kern County, CA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-06

    ...DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Hydrogen Energy California's Integrated Gasification...and operation of a project proposed by Hydrogen Energy California LLC (HECA). DOE...be processed and purified to produce a hydrogen-rich fuel. The hydrogen would be...

  9. Morphology, hydrology, and water quality of two vernal pools in Madera County, California

    E-print Network

    Renz, Wendy; Higgins, Tanya

    2006-01-01

    received 10.89 in of rain during this water year thus far,rain gauge stations listed on the California Data Exchange Center website (http://cdec.water.ca.gov), managed by the California Department of Water

  10. 33 CFR 165.1195 - Regulated Navigation Area; Humboldt Bay Bar Channel and Humboldt Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... substances listed in 46 CFR 153.40. Humboldt Bay Area means the area described in the location section of... requirements listed in title 33 CFR, part 160, Ports and Waterways Safety—General, subpart C—Notifications of... transit and must be stationed so as to provide immediate assistance in response to the loss of power...

  11. 33 CFR 165.1195 - Regulated Navigation Area; Humboldt Bay Bar Channel and Humboldt Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... substances listed in 46 CFR 153.40. Humboldt Bay Area means the area described in the location section of... requirements listed in title 33 CFR, part 160, Ports and Waterways Safety—General, subpart C—Notifications of... transit and must be stationed so as to provide immediate assistance in response to the loss of power...

  12. 33 CFR 165.1195 - Regulated Navigation Area; Humboldt Bay Bar Channel and Humboldt Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... substances listed in 46 CFR 153.40. Humboldt Bay Area means the area described in the location section of... requirements listed in title 33 CFR, part 160, Ports and Waterways Safety—General, subpart C—Notifications of... transit and must be stationed so as to provide immediate assistance in response to the loss of power...

  13. 33 CFR 165.1195 - Regulated Navigation Area; Humboldt Bay Bar Channel and Humboldt Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... substances listed in 46 CFR 153.40. Humboldt Bay Area means the area described in the location section of... requirements listed in title 33 CFR, part 160, Ports and Waterways Safety—General, subpart C—Notifications of... and type of vessel or tow, wave period, time of day/night, and tidal currents. The final decision...

  14. 33 CFR 165.1195 - Regulated Navigation Area; Humboldt Bay Bar Channel and Humboldt Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... substances listed in 46 CFR 153.40. Humboldt Bay Area means the area described in the location section of... requirements listed in title 33 CFR, part 160, Ports and Waterways Safety—General, subpart C—Notifications of... and type of vessel or tow, wave period, time of day/night, and tidal currents. The final decision...

  15. Hybrid wood-geothermal power plant, Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California. Identification of environmental issues, second phase

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-14

    GeoProducts Corporation and the California Department of Water Resources have jointly proposed to develop a 55 MWe power plant in Lassen County, California. The proposed power plant is unique in that it will utilize geothermal heat and wood fuel to generate electrical power, the first attempt to utilize these resources together on a commercial scale. This report identifies requirements for new environmental information that must be generated for permit applications and for preparation of environmental documents required by CEOA and NEPA; presents a schedule for generating new environmental data, for preparing and submitting permit applications, and for obtaining permits; presents a budget for permitting, licensing and environmental assessments as required by applicable laws, regulations and procedures; and investigates the step needed to qualify for a Small Power Plant Exemption by the State Energy Commission.

  16. Evaluation of the Mission, Santee, and Tijuana hydrologic subareas for reclaimed-water use, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made to determine the suitability of three small hydrologic subareas in San Diego County, California, for reuse of treated municipal wastewater (reclaimed water). Groundwater quality has been impacted by agricultural water use, changes in natural recharge patterns, seawater intrusion, and groundwater movement from surrounding marine sediments. Groundwater levels near land surface may limit artificial recharge of reclaimed water or may require pumping of groundwater from the aquifer prior to recharge with reclaimed water. Reclaimed water may be used for irrigated water in upland areas. (USGS)

  17. Inventory of San Joaquin kit fox on land proposed as Phase II, Kesterson Reservoir, Merced County, California

    SciTech Connect

    McCue, P.; Kato, T.; Sauls, M.L.; O'Farrell, T.P.

    1981-04-01

    A survey of potential San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica, habitat was conducted for the US Department of the Interior Water and Power Resource Service between 23 and 25 March 1981 on lands proposed as Phase II, Kesterson Reservoir, Merced County, California. Results of ground transects covering approximately 3000 acres revealed no sign (dens, tracks, or scats) of kit fox. No kit fox were observed during four night spotlight surveys. Neither completion of Phase II nor subsequent operation and maintenance activities will have any known negative impact on the endangered San Joaquin kit fox.

  18. Summary and evaluation of the coyote control program, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Scrivner, J.H.; Harris, C.E.

    1986-11-01

    For the second consecutive year (1986) the US Department of Energy funded a coyote (Canis latrans) control program in an attempt to reduce predation of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica) on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in Kern County, California. A total of 46 adult and 18 pups were taken. Trapping was the most productive control method. Data were gathered on standard measurements, weights, ages, and reproductive condition of the coyotes. No kit foxes were trapped. Recommendations were made to begin the 1986/1987 control program in December 1986, and to use helicopters for aerial gunning and to locate coyote dens.

  19. Humboldt's Legacy and the Restoration of Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachs, Aaron

    1995-01-01

    Examines issues related to specialization in science in the context of the work of Alexander Von Humboldt, one of the first popular scientists in the 19th century and Charles Darwin's mentor. Chronicles the impacts of a science dominated by specialization and argues for increased emphasis on interdisciplinary environmental study. (LZ)

  20. Airborne radioactivity surveys in the Mojave Desert region, Kern, Riverside, and San Bernardino Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moxham, Robert M.

    1952-01-01

    Airborne radioactivity surveys in the Mojave Desert region Kern, Riverside, and Bernardino counties were made in five areas recommended as favorable for the occurrence of radioactive raw materials: (1) Rock Corral area, San Bernardino County. (2) Searles Station area, Kern county. (3) Soledad area, Kern County. (4) White Tank area, Riverside and San Bernardino counties. (5) Harvard Hills area, San Bernardino County. Anomalous radiation was detected in all but the Harvard Hills area. The radioactivity anomalies detected in the Rock Corral area are of the greatest amplitude yet recorded by the airborne equipment over natural sources. The activity is apparently attributable to the thorium-beating mineral associated with roof pendants of crystalline metamorphic rocks in a granitic intrusive. In the Searles Station, Soledad, and White Tank area, several radioactivity anomalies of medium amplitude were recorded, suggesting possible local concentrations of radioactive minerals.

  1. Location of odor sources and the affected population in Imperial County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, J.L.

    1981-08-01

    This report is divided into four sections. The first two sections contain general background information on Imperial County. The third section is a general discussion of odor sources in Imperial County, and the fourth maps the specific odor sources, the expected areas of perception, and the affected populations. this mapping is done for the Imperial Valley and each of the four Imperial County KGRA's (Known Geothermal Resource Areas) where odor from the development of the geothermal energy may affect population.

  2. Geology, water resources and usable ground-water storage capacity of part of Solano County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomasson, H.G., Jr.; Olmsted, F.H.; LeRoux, E.F.

    1960-01-01

    The area described is confined largely to the valley-floor and foothill lands of Solano County, which lies directly between Sacramento, the State capital, and San Francisco. The area is considered in two subareas: The Putah area, which extends from Putah Creek southward to the Montezuma Hills and from the foothills of the Coast Ranges eastward to the west edge of the Yolo Bypass; and the Suisun-Fairfield area, which is to the southwest in the notch in the Coast Ranges through which the waters of the Great Central Valley of California reach San Francisco Bay. There are no known hydrologic interconnections between the two subareas, through either surface streams or underground aquifers. The climate of the area is characterized by warm, rainless summers and by cool winters in which temperatures seldom drop much below freezing. The rainfall ranges from about 17 inches per year along the east side to perhaps 24 inches in the foothills to the west, and irrigation is necessary for all crops except dry-farmed grains, pastures, and some orchards. PUTAH AREA The Putah area occupies the southwestern corner of the Sacramento Valley, a topographic and structural basin underlain by a thick accumulation of sediments eroded from the surrounding hills and mountains by the Sacramento River and its tributaries. The eastern Coast Ranges and foothills lying west of the Sacramento Valley are a generally northward-trending belt of eastward-dipping sedimentary rocks that range in age from Cretaceous to Pleistocene. Successively younger strata are exposed eastward, and the essentially undeformed deposits of late Pleistocene and Recent age that immediately underlie the valley lap onto the tilted sediments of the foothills. Most of the streams of the Putah area rise east of the high ridge of Cretaceous rocks marking the western boundaries of Solano and Yolo Counties, but Putah Creek, the largest stream in the area, rises far west of that ridge and flows across it in a deep, narrow canyon. Putah Creek and the smaller streams have constructed an alluvial plain, herein designated the Putah plain, which slopes eastward and southeastward from the foothills toward the Sacramento River. A large part of the Putah plain is traversed by a branching set of distributary channel ridges or natural levees formed at times of overflow of Putah Creek. The rocks in the Putah area range in age from Cretaceous to Recent. For the purposes of this investigation they are divided into eight geologic or stratigraphic units, from youngest to oldest: (1) Stream-channel deposits, (2) younger alluvium, (3) older alluvium, (4) Tehama formation and related continental sediments, (5) volcanic sedimentary rocks, (6) basalt, (7) undifferentiated sedimentary rocks of Paleocene(?) and Eocene age, and (8) undifferentiated rocks of Cretaceous age. The stream-channel deposits are predominantly loose sand and gravel along the channel of Putah Creek. In part they are actively moving downstream and shifting. The younger alluvium, of Recent age, consists of flood-plain deposits underlying the Putah plain, Vaca Valley, Pleasants Valley, and the small valleys in the foothills north of Putah Creek and in the English Hills. Exposures of younger alluvium are characterized by soils lacking significant profile development and in many places by channel-ridge topography. The older alluvium occupies the stratigraphic interval between the younger alluvium and the Tehama formation and related continental sediments and is probably of late Pleistocene age. Its contact with the underlying Tehama formation and related continental sediments is unconformable near the foothills, but it may be gradational beneath much of the Putah plain. The base of the older alluvium is not well defined at many places but is inferred to be at the bottom of an irregular and ill-defined zone of coarse deposits, which ranges from about 50 feet to more than 150 feet below the land surface. Exposures of the older

  3. Final Scientific / Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration Program, Truckhaven Area, Imperial County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Layman Energy Associates, Inc.

    2006-08-15

    With financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Layman Energy Associates, Inc. (LEA) has completed a program of geothermal exploration at the Truckhaven area in Imperial County, California. The exploratory work conducted by LEA included the following activities: compilation of public domain resource data (wells, seismic data, geologic maps); detailed field geologic mapping at the project site; acquisition and interpretation of remote sensing imagery such as aerial and satellite photographs; acquisition, quality control and interpretation of gravity data; and acquisition, quality control and interpretation of resistivity data using state of the art magnetotelluric (MT) methods. The results of this exploratory program have allowed LEA to develop a structural and hydrologic interpretation of the Truckhaven geothermal resource which can be used to guide subsequent exploratory drilling and resource development. Of primary significance, is the identification of an 8 kilometer-long, WNW-trending zone of low resistivity associated with geothermal activity in nearby wells. The long axis of this low resistivity zone is inferred to mark a zone of faulting which likely provides the primary control on the distribution of geothermal resources in the Truckhaven area. Abundant cross-faults cutting the main WNW-trending zone in its western half may indicate elevated fracture permeability in this region, possibly associated with thermal upwelling and higher resource temperatures. Regional groundwater flow is inferred to push thermal fluids from west to east along the trend of the main low resistivity zone, with resource temperatures likely declining from west to east away from the inferred upwelling zone. Resistivity mapping and well data have also shown that within the WNW-trending low resistivity zone, the thickness of the Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary section above granite basement ranges from 1,900–2,600 meters. Well data indicates the lower part of this sedimentary section is sand-rich, suggesting good potential for a sediment-hosted geothermal reservoir in porous sands, similar to other fields in the region such as Heber and East Mesa. Sand porosity may remain higher in the eastern portion of the low resistivity zone. This is based on its location hydrologically downstream of the probable area of thermal upwelling, intense fracture development, and associated pore-filling hydrothermal mineral deposition to the west.

  4. Preliminary geologic map of the Big Bear City 7.5' Quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Fred K.; digital preparation by Cossette, Pamela M.

    2004-01-01

    This data set maps and describes the geology of the Big Bear City 7.5' quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California. Created using Environmental Systems Research Institute's ARC/INFO software, the data base consists of the following items: (1) a rock-unit coverage and attribute tables (polygon and arc) containing geologic contacts, units and rock-unit labels as annotation which are also included in a separate annotation coverage, bbc_anno (2) a point coverage containing structural point data and (3) a coverage containing fold axes. In addition, the data set includes the following graphic and text products: (1) A PostScript graphic plot-file containing the geologic map, topography, cultural data, a Correlation of Map Units (CMU) diagram, a Description of Map Units (DMU), an index map, a regional geologic and structure map, and an explanation for point and line symbols; (2) PDF files of the Readme (including the metadata file as an appendix), and a screen graphic of the plot produced by the PostScript plot file. The geologic map describes a geologically complex area on the north side of the San Bernardino Mountains. Bedrock units in the Big Bear City quadrangle are dominated by (1) large Cretaceous granitic bodies ranging in composition from monzogranite to gabbro, (2) metamorphosed sedimentary rocks ranging in age from late Paleozoic to late Proterozoic, and (3) Middle Proterozoic gneiss. These rocks are complexly deformed by normal, reverse, and thrust faults, and in places are tightly folded. The geologic map database contains original U.S. Geological Survey data generated by detailed field observation and by interpretation of aerial photographs. The map data was compiled on base-stable cronoflex copies of the Big Bear City 7.5' topographic map, transferred to a scribe-guide and subsequently digitized. Lines, points, and polygons were edited at the USGS using standard ARC/INFO commands. Digitizing and editing artifacts significant enough to display at a scale of 1:24,000 were corrected. Within the database, geologic contacts are represented as lines (arcs), geologic units as polygons, and site-specific data as points. Polygon, arc, and point attribute tables (.pat, .aat, and .pat, respectively) uniquely identify each geologic datum.

  5. Preliminary geologic map of the Elsinore 7.5' Quadrangle, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Douglas M.; Weber, F. Harold, Jr.; Digital preparation: Alvarez, Rachel M.; Burns, Diane

    2003-01-01

    Open-File Report 03-281 contains a digital geologic map database of the Elsinore 7.5’ quadrangle, Riverside County, California that includes: 1. ARC/INFO (Environmental Systems Research Institute, http://www.esri.com) version 7.2.1 coverages of the various elements of the geologic map. 2. A Postscript file to plot the geologic map on a topographic base, and containing a Correlation of Map Units diagram (CMU), a Description of Map Units (DMU), and an index map. 3. Portable Document Format (.pdf) files of: a. This Readme; includes in Appendix I, data contained in els_met.txt b. The same graphic as plotted in 2 above. Test plots have not produced precise 1:24,000-scale map sheets. Adobe Acrobat page size setting influences map scale. The Correlation of Map Units and Description of Map Units is in the editorial format of USGS Geologic Investigations Series (I-series) maps but has not been edited to comply with I-map standards. Within the geologic map data package, map units are identified by standard geologic map criteria such as formation-name, age, and lithology. Where known, grain size is indicated on the map by a subscripted letter or letters following the unit symbols as follows: lg, large boulders; b, boulder; g, gravel; a, arenaceous; s, silt; c, clay; e.g. Qyfa is a predominantly young alluvial fan deposit that is arenaceous. Multiple letters are used for more specific identification or for mixed units, e.g., Qfysa is a silty sand. In some cases, mixed units are indicated by a compound symbol; e.g., Qyf2sc. Even though this is an Open-File Report and includes the standard USGS Open-File disclaimer, the report closely adheres to the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. Descriptions of units can be obtained by viewing or plotting the .pdf file (3b above) or plotting the postscript file (2 above).

  6. Data from a thick unsaturated zone in Joshua Tree, San Bernardino County, California, 2007--09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burgess, Matthew; Izbicki, John; Teague, Nicholas; O'Leary, David R.; Clark, Dennis; Land, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Data were collected on the physical properties of unsaturated alluvial deposits, the chemical composition of leachate extracted from unsaturated alluvial deposits, the chemical and isotopic composition of groundwater and unsaturated-zone water, and the chemical composition of unsaturated-zone gas at four monitoring sites in the southwestern part of the Mojave Desert in the town of Joshua Tree, San Bernardino County, California. The presence of denitrifying and nitrate-reducing bacteria from unsaturated alluvial deposits was evaluated for two of these monitoring sites that underlie unsewered residential development. Four unsaturated-zone monitoring sites were installed in the Joshua Tree area—two in an unsewered residential development and two adjacent to a proposed artificial-recharge site in an undeveloped area. The two boreholes in residential development areas were installed by using the ODEX air-hammer method. One borehole was drilled through the unsaturated zone to a depth of 541 ft (feet) below land surface; a well screened across the water table was installed. Groundwater was sampled from this well. The second borehole was drilled to a depth of 81 ft below land surface. Drilling procedures, lithologic and geophysical data, construction details, and instrumentation placed in these boreholes are described. Core material was analyzed for water content, bulk density, matric potential, particle size, and water retention. The leachate from over 500 subsamples of cores and cuttings was analyzed for soluble anions, including fluoride, sulfate, bromide, chloride, nitrate, nitrite, and orthophosphate. Groundwater was analyzed for major ions, inorganic compounds, select trace elements, and isotopic composition. Unsaturated-zone water from suction-cup lysimeters was analyzed for major ions, inorganic compounds, select trace elements, and isotopic composition. Unsaturated-zone gas samples were analyzed for argon, oxygen, nitrogen, methane, carbon dioxide, ethane, nitrous oxide, and carbon monoxide. Drill cuttings were analyzed for denitrifying and nitrate-reducing bacteria. One of the boreholes installed adjacent to the Joshua Basin Water District proposed groundwater-recharge facility was installed by using the ODEX air-hammer method and the other was installed by using a 7.875-inch hollow-stem auger. Drilling procedures, lithologic and geophysical data, construction details, and instrumentation placed in these boreholes are described; however, geochemical data were not available at the time of publication.

  7. 78 FR 56944 - Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Humboldt Bay Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ...Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Humboldt Bay Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation...2010, as supplemented, for the Humboldt Bay Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation...C (GTCC) process waste at the Humboldt Bay ISFSI. PG&E submitted its license...

  8. 78 FR 46676 - Environmental Impact Statement; Los Angeles and San Bernardino Counties, California; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ...based upon traffic projections. This alternative generally follows Avenue P-8 in Los Angeles County and runs just south of El Mirage Road in San Bernardino County and then extends to Air Expressway Road near I-15 and curves south terminating at Bear...

  9. Evaluation of the Life Skills Training Program, Los Angeles County, California: Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Mark E.; Zinn, Andrew; Zielewski, Erica H.; Bess, Roseana J.; Malm, Karin E.; Stagner, Matthew; Pergamit, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This report presents findings from a rigorous evaluation of the Life Skills Training Program (LST) in Los Angeles County. LST provides 30 hours of life skills training over five weeks to foster youths ages 16 and older. The classes are held on community college campuses throughout Los Angeles County. The program is staffed by workers tasked with…

  10. 75 FR 39365 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... Order Reviews I. Summary of Proposed Action On February 23, 2010 (75 FR 8008), EPA proposed a limited... section E.6 for recreational use of public lands in Imperial County. \\6\\ 75 FR 8008, 8010-8011 and our... Imperial County as serious nonattainment for PM 10. 69 FR 48835. Since 2008 has passed, BACM is...

  11. 75 FR 27975 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan; Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-19

    ...: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD... previous version of Rule 420 (see 68 FR 8839). CARB has made no subsequent submittals of the rule. C. What..., Imperial County was reclassified as a serious PM nonattainment area (see 69 FR 48792 and 40 CFR part...

  12. Diversity of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Strains Isolated from Inpatients of 30 Hospitals in Orange County, California

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Lyndsey O.; Murphy, Courtney R.; Spratt, Brian G.; Enright, Mark C.; Elkins, Kristen; Nguyen, Christopher; Terpstra, Leah; Gombosev, Adrijana; Kim, Diane; Hannah, Paul; Mikhail, Lydia; Alexander, Richard; Moore, Douglas F.; Huang, Susan S.

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for a regional assessment of the frequency and diversity of MRSA to determine major circulating clones and the extent to which community and healthcare MRSA reservoirs have mixed. We conducted a prospective cohort study of inpatients in Orange County, California, systematically collecting clinical MRSA isolates from 30 hospitals, to assess MRSA diversity and distribution. All isolates were characterized by spa typing, with selective PFGE and MLST to relate spa types with major MRSA clones. We collected 2,246 MRSA isolates from hospital inpatients. This translated to 91/10,000 inpatients with MRSA and an Orange County population estimate of MRSA inpatient clinical cultures of 86/100,000 people. spa type genetic diversity was heterogeneous between hospitals, and relatively high overall (72%). USA300 (t008/ST8), USA100 (t002/ST5) and a previously reported USA100 variant (t242/ST5) were the dominant clones across all Orange County hospitals, representing 83% of isolates. Fifteen hospitals isolated more t008 (USA300) isolates than t002/242 (USA100) isolates, and 12 hospitals isolated more t242 isolates than t002 isolates. The majority of isolates were imported into hospitals. Community-based infection control strategies may still be helpful in stemming the influx of traditionally community-associated strains, particularly USA300, into the healthcare setting. PMID:23637976

  13. A case study simulation of DBCP groundwater contamination in Fresno County, California 2. Transport in the saturated subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loague, Keith; Abrams, Robert H.; Davis, Stanley N.; Nguyen, Anh; Stewart, Iris T.

    1998-01-01

    This paper is the second installment of a multipaper series concerned with simulating regional-scale groundwater contamination in Fresno County, CA as the result of long-term nonpoint source applications of 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP). In the first part of this study [Loague, K., Lloyd, D., Nguyen, A., Davis, S.N., Abrams, R.H., 1997. A case study simulation of DBCP groundwater contamination in Fresno County, California: 1. Leaching through the unsaturated subsurface. J. Contamin. Hydrol. (this issue)], our focus was on the unsaturated zone and DBCP leaching to the water table. Our focus in this paper is the assessment of DBCP transport in the saturated subsurface. Here, the groundwater flow code MODFLOW is coupled to the solute transport code MT3D to simulate the potential fate and transport of DBCP below the water table in the Fresno County study area for a 35-yr period. The results presented here illustrate the long-term regional-scale evolution of the DBCP plume in the study area. The simulated DBCP concentrations are limited to the relatively shallow younger sediments and are generally well below the maximum contaminant level set for the chemical. The simulations presented here suggest that nonpoint source applications of DBCP are not responsible for the observed hot spots in the study area. At the end of this paper we discuss the implications and extensions of the Fresno case study which has been reported here and in the companion paper mentioned above (Loague et al., 1997).

  14. Developing the foundation for syndromic surveillance and health information exchange for yolo county, california.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Osama

    2012-01-01

    This report delineates Yolo County Health Department's process to ascertain its optimal methods of participation in syndromic surveillance and health information exchange. As a health department serving a county of just 200,000 residents, Yolo County Health Department needed to operate within strict financial constraints. Meaningful Use legislation enabled it to pursue both syndromic surveillance and health information exchange participation whilst complying with its budgetary restrictions. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH), a segment of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, has incentivized the 'Meaningful Use' of electronic health records (EHRs) by providing incentive reimbursements and non-compliance penalties. The Meaningful Use of EHRs is to take place over 3 Stages: Stage 1 has begun, Stage 2 is imminent, and Stage 3 is currently being discussed. Having been solicited by both health information exchange and syndromic surveillance options which were cost-prohibitive, Yolo County Health Department focused attention on BioSense 2.0, a Meaningul Use-ready and virtually free syndromic surveillance program developed by the Federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In collaboration with Sacramento County Department of Health and Human Services, and with support from several other area counties, Yolo County Health Department submitted a Funding Opportunity application for BioSense 2.0 regional implementation. Through this collaboration, Yolo County Health Department has begun participating in the formative stages of the Sacramento Area Center for Advanced Biosurveillance (SAC-B). Via SAC-B, Yolo County Health Department will be able to participate in syndromic surveillance in the BioSense 2.0 program, and simultaneously expand its electronic health data sharing towards a more comprehensive health information exchange. LASTLY, OVER THE COURSE OF THESE PROJECTS, THREE OTHER METHODS OF PARTICIPATING IN ELECTRONIC HEALTH DATA SHARING BECAME AVAILABLE TO YOLO COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT: all three methods were the direct result of Meaningful Use legislation. PMID:23569635

  15. Developing the Foundation for Syndromic Surveillance and Health Information Exchange for Yolo County, California

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Osama

    2012-01-01

    This report delineates Yolo County Health Department’s process to ascertain its optimal methods of participation in syndromic surveillance and health information exchange. As a health department serving a county of just 200,000 residents, Yolo County Health Department needed to operate within strict financial constraints. Meaningful Use legislation enabled it to pursue both syndromic surveillance and health information exchange participation whilst complying with its budgetary restrictions. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH), a segment of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, has incentivized the ‘Meaningful Use’ of electronic health records (EHRs) by providing incentive reimbursements and non-compliance penalties. The Meaningful Use of EHRs is to take place over 3 Stages: Stage 1 has begun, Stage 2 is imminent, and Stage 3 is currently being discussed. Having been solicited by both health information exchange and syndromic surveillance options which were cost-prohibitive, Yolo County Health Department focused attention on BioSense 2.0, a Meaningul Use-ready and virtually free syndromic surveillance program developed by the Federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In collaboration with Sacramento County Department of Health and Human Services, and with support from several other area counties, Yolo County Health Department submitted a Funding Opportunity application for BioSense 2.0 regional implementation. Through this collaboration, Yolo County Health Department has begun participating in the formative stages of the Sacramento Area Center for Advanced Biosurveillance (SAC-B). Via SAC-B, Yolo County Health Department will be able to participate in syndromic surveillance in the BioSense 2.0 program, and simultaneously expand its electronic health data sharing towards a more comprehensive health information exchange. Lastly, over the course of these projects, three other methods of participating in electronic health data sharing became available to Yolo County Health Department: all three methods were the direct result of Meaningful Use legislation. PMID:23569635

  16. Digital Compilation of "Preliminary Map of Landslide Deposits in Santa Cruz County, California, By Cooper-Clark and Associates, 1975": A Digital Map Database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Report by Roberts, Sebastian; Barron, Andrew D.; Preface by Brabb, Earl E.; Pike, Richard J.

    1998-01-01

    A 1:62,500-scale black-and-white map identifying some 2,000 landslides of various types in Santa Cruz County, California, has been converted to a digital-map database that can be acquired from the U.S. Geological Survey over the Internet or on magnetic tape.

  17. Treating Drug-Abusing Offenders: Initial Findings from a Five-County Study on the Impact of California's Proposition 36 on the Treatment System and Patient Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Teruya, Cheryl; Evans, Elizabeth A.; Longshore, Douglas; Grella, Christine; Farabee, David

    2003-01-01

    Five counties (Kern, Riverside, Sacramento, San Diego, San Francisco) that demonstrate both variations and similarities in their implementation of Proposition 36 (e.g., treatment approaches, urine testing) and patient mix have been selected to participate in a study assessing how California's Proposition 36 is affecting the drug treatment system…

  18. Documentation of model input and output values for the geohydrology and mathematical simulation of the Pajaro Valley aquifer system, Santa Cruz and Monterey counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitten, H.T.; Londquist, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    This report contains listings of the model input and sample output for simulation of the Pajaro Valley aquifer system, Santa Cruz and Monterey Counties, California. The files are contained on a 5 1/4-inch diskette. The decompressed files require approximately 5.3 megabytes of disk space on an IBM-compatible microcomputer. (USGS)

  19. Characterization and seroepidemiology of a type 5 astrovirus associated with an outbreak of gastroenteritis in Marin County, California.

    PubMed Central

    Midthun, K; Greenberg, H B; Kurtz, J B; Gary, G W; Lin, F Y; Kapikian, A Z

    1993-01-01

    The Marin County strain of type 5 astrovirus was associated with two separate outbreaks of nonbacterial gastroenteritis in California in 1978. A safety-tested, bacterium-free filtrate prepared from a stool specimen of an individual who was ill during the original outbreak was given orally to 19 adult volunteers. One volunteer developed a gastrointestinal illness, and nine had serologic responses. Several diarrheal stool specimens from the ill volunteer contained a large number of 27-nm particles. By using immune electron microscopy with acute- and convalescent-phase sera from the original outbreak, these 27-nm particles were shown to be identical to the viral inoculum. The Marin County virus, purified from the stool of the ill volunteer, was shown by immunoprecipitation and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to contain a single structural protein with a molecular weight of 30,000. The buoyant density of the virion was 1.39 g/cm3 in cesium chloride. By electron microscopy, approximately 5% of the particles had the characteristic stellate configuration of astrovirus, and serologic studies by immunofluorescence technique confirmed previous classification of the Marin County virus as a type 5 astrovirus. Radioimmunoassay and biotin-avidin immunoassay were used to detect antibody to the Marin County virus in paired acute- and convalescent-phase sera from 32 outbreaks of nonbacterial gastroenteritis, but none of these outbreaks could be attributed to this virus. Prevalence of antibody to this strain of astrovirus was approximately 13% in children 6 months to 3 years of age and increased to 41% in older children and young adults. Images PMID:8385155

  20. 77 FR 58313 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego County, Antelope Valley and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ...Valley and Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution Agencies AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the San Diego County Air Pollution Control District (SDCAPCD), Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution Control District (MBUAPCD)...

  1. 78 FR 21542 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ... Pollution Control District and South Coast Air Quality Management District AGENCY: Environmental Protection... to the Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD) and South Coast Air Quality... Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by reference,...

  2. 75 FR 56942 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ...San Diego County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY...revisions to the San Diego Air Pollution Control District (SDCAPCD...revision concerns the definition of volatile organic compounds...sources under the Clean Air Act as amended in...

  3. 78 FR 75293 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of California; 2012 Los Angeles County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ...Coast Air Quality Management District, 21865 E. Copley Drive, Diamond Bar, California 91765. The SIP materials are also electronically...cardiovascular function, kidneys, immune system, and red blood cells. Children are particularly vulnerable to lead...

  4. BENEFITS OF VEGETATED AGRICULTURAL DRAINAGE DITCHES (VADD) AS A BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICE IN YOLO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Widespread contamination of California water bodies by the orthophosphate insecticides diazinon and chlorpyrifos is well documented. While their usage has decreased over the last few years, a concomitant increase in pyrethroid usage (replacement insecticides) has occurred. Researchers have also do...

  5. BENEFITS OF VEGETATED AGRICULTURAL DRAINAGE DITCHES (VADD) AS A BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICE IN YOLO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Widespread contamination of California water bodies by the orthophosphate insecticides diazinon and chlorpyrifos is well documented. While their usage has decreased over the last few years, a concomitant increase in pyrethroid usage (replacement insecticides) has occurred. Researchers have also docu...

  6. Habitat requirements of the endangered California freshwater shrimp (Syncaris pacifica) in lagunitas and olema creeks, Marin County, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, B.A.; Saiki, M.K.; Fong, D.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to better understand the habitat requirements and environmental limiting factors of Syncaris pacifica, the California freshwater shrimp. This federally listed endangered species is native to perennial lowland streams in a few watersheds in northern California. Field sampling occurred in Lagunitas and Olema creeks at seasonal intervals from February 2003 to November 2004. Ten glides, five pools, and five riffles served as fixed sampling reaches, with eight glides, four pools, and four riffles located in Lagunitas Creek and the remainder in Olema Creek. A total of 1773 S. pacifica was counted during this study, all of which were captured along vegetated banks in Lagunitas Creek. Syncaris pacifica was most numerous in glides (64), then in pools (31), and lastly in riffles (5). According to logistic regression analysis, S. pacifica was mostly associated with submerged portions of streambank vegetation (especially overhanging vegetation such as ferns and blackberries, emergent vegetation such as sedge and brooklime, and fine roots associated with water hemlock, willow, sedge, and blackberries) along with low water current velocity and a sandy substrate. These seemingly favorable habitat conditions for S. pacifica were present in glides and pools in Lagunitas Creek, but not in Olema Creek. ?? 2009 The Crustacean Society.

  7. Demographic factors associated with perceptions about water safety and tap water consumption among adults in Santa Clara County, California, 2011.

    PubMed

    van Erp, Brianna; Webber, Whitney L; Stoddard, Pamela; Shah, Roshni; Martin, Lori; Broderick, Bonnie; Induni, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine differences in tap water consumption and perceptions of bottle versus tap water safety for Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites, as well as associations with other demographic characteristics. Data are from the Santa Clara County, California, Dietary Practices Survey (2011; N = 306). We used logistic regression to examine associations between demographic characteristics and 1) perceptions that bottled water is safer than tap and 2) primarily consuming tap water. Hispanics were less likely than non-Hispanic whites to primarily drink tap water (OR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.11-0.99), although there was no significant difference in perceptions that bottled water is safer between these groups (OR = 0.50; 95% CI, 0.11-2.27). Hispanics may be an important population for interventions promoting tap water consumption. PMID:24921901

  8. Determination of channel capacity of the Sacramento River between Ordbend and Glenn, Butte and Glenn counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    The adequacy of an 8.5-mi reach of the Sacramento River to carry flood flows is evaluated. The reach studied is in Butte and Glenn Counties, California, and extends northward from the present east-bank Sacramento River Flood Control Project levee near Glenn upstream to the Ord Ferry gaging station near Ordbend. There is a west-bank levee throughout the study reach. Flows analyzed range from 11,500 to 265,000 cfs. Computed water-surface elevations are based on topography obtained during September through November 1974. The present Sacramento River Flood Control Project levees at the downstream end of the study reach near Glenn are designed to contain flows up to 150,000 cfs. Water-surface elevations computed for flows of this magnitude are about 6 to 8 ft below the top of the existing west-bank levee throughout the study reach. (Woodard-USGS)

  9. Cone penetration tests and soil borings at the Mason Road site in Green Valley, Solano County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, Michael J.; Noce, Thomas E.; Lienkaemper, James J.

    2011-01-01

    In support of a study to investigate the history of the Green Valley Fault, 13 cone penetration test soundings and 3 auger borings were made at the Mason Road site in Green Valley, Solano County, California. Three borings were made at or near two of the cone penetration test soundings. The soils are mostly clayey with a few sandy layers or lenses. Fine-grained soils range from low plasticity sandy lean clay to very plastic fat clay. Lack of stratigraphic correlation in the subsurface prevented us from determining whether any channels had been offset at this site. Because the soils are generally very clayey and few sand layers or lenses are loose, the liquefaction potential at the site is very low.

  10. Health Care–Associated Infection Outbreak Investigations in Outpatient Settings, Los Angeles County, California, USA, 2000?2012

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Laura; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Terashita, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Health care services are increasingly delivered in outpatient settings. However, infection control oversight in outpatient settings to ensure patient safety has not improved and literature quantifying reported health care–associated infection outbreaks in outpatient settings is scarce. The objective of this analysis was to characterize investigations of suspected and confirmed outbreaks in outpatient settings in Los Angeles County, California, USA, reported during 2000–2012, by using internal logs; publications; records; and correspondence of outbreak investigations by characteristics of the setting, number, and type of infection control breaches found during investigations, outcomes of cases, and public health responses. Twenty-eight investigations met the inclusion criteria. Investigations occurred frequently, in diverse settings, and required substantial public health resources. Most outpatient settings investigated had >1 infection control breach. Lapses in infection control were suspected to be the outbreak source for 16 of the reviewed investigations. PMID:26196293

  11. Remote sensing research for agricultural applications. [San Joaquin County, California and Snake River Plain and Twin Falls area, Idaho

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, R. N. (principal investigator); Wall, S. L.; Beck, L. H.; Degloria, S. D.; Ritter, P. R.; Thomas, R. W.; Travlos, A. J.; Fakhoury, E.

    1984-01-01

    Materials and methods used to characterize selected soil properties and agricultural crops in San Joaquin County, California are described. Results show that: (1) the location and widths of TM bands are suitable for detecting differences in selected soil properties; (2) the number of TM spectral bands allows the quantification of soil spectral curve form and magnitude; and (3) the spatial and geometric quality of TM data allows for the discrimination and quantification of within field variability of soil properties. The design of the LANDSAT based multiple crop acreage estimation experiment for the Idaho Department of Water Resources is described including the use of U.C. Berkeley's Survey Modeling Planning Model. Progress made on Peditor software development on MIDAS, and cooperative computing using local and remote systems is reported as well as development of MIDAS microcomputer systems.

  12. West Nile virus cluster analysis and vertical transmission in Culex pipiens complex mosquitoes in Sacramento and Yolo Counties, California, 2011.

    PubMed

    Fechter-Leggett, Ethan; Nelms, Brittany M; Barker, Christopher M; Reisen, William K

    2012-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is now endemic in California, with annual transmission documented by the statewide surveillance system. Although much is known about the horizontal avian-mosquito transmission cycle, less is known about vertical transmission under field conditions, which may supplement virus amplification during summer and provide a mechanism to infect overwintering female mosquitoes during fall. The current study identified clusters of WNV-infected mosquitoes in Sacramento and Yolo Counties, CA, during late summer 2011 and tested field-captured ovipositing female mosquitoes and their progeny for WNV RNA to estimate the frequency of vertical transmission. Space-time clustering of WNV-positive Culex pipiens complex pools was detected in the northern Elk Grove area of Sacramento County between July 18 and September 18, 2011 (5.22 km radius; p<0.001 and RR=7.80). Vertical transmission by WNV-infected females to egg rafts was 50% and to larvae was 40%. The estimated minimal filial infection rate from WNV-positive, ovipositing females was 2.0 infected females/1,000. The potential contribution of vertical transmission to WNV maintenance and amplification are discussed. PMID:23181869

  13. Summary and evaluation of the coyote control program on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Scrivner, J.H.

    1987-09-01

    For the third consecutive year (1987) the US Department of Energy (DOE) funded a coyote (Canis latrans) control program in an attempt to reduce coyote predation on the endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica) on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1, Elk Hills) in Kern County, California. During approximately 8 weeks of control activities, personnel from the US Department of Agriculture, Division of Animal Damage Control (ADC), removed 16 adult coyotes: 14 were trapped, 2 were shot. Data were gathered on standard measurements, weights, ages, and reproductive condition. No kit foxes were accidently trapped. Based on the results of canid scent-station surveys, the coyote population on NPR-1 declined and the kit fox population was relatively stable. Recommendations were made to conduct the 1987/1988 coyote control program between December 1987 and February 1988, use helicopters for aerial gunning and locating coyote dens, and develop a cooperative agreement between DOE, ADC, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, and the California Department of Fish and Game to conduct the coyote control program on lands surrounding NPR-1 owned by DOE and others. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Survey for least bell's vireo in riparian habitat on Vandenberg Air Force Base, Santa Barbara County, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breininger, David R.

    1988-01-01

    The least bell's vireo (Vireo bellii pusillus) was listed in 1986 as an endangered species by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Because of the possibility of the species existing on Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB), this survey was conducted to determine if they exist, and if so to prepare a distribution map of the species on the base. Major riparian areas were surveyed on foot for 17 days in April, May, and July 1987. No least bell's vireo were sighted; based on past studies, it is unlikely that there is a significant population on VAFB. There are, however, at least 13 other species of special concern that inhabit VAFB riparian woodlands. Most of these species have declined along the south coast of Santa Barbara County, and many have declined in much of the southern half of California. Riparian areas on VAFB are an important environmental resource for the southern half of California; many of these areas, however, show signs of degradation.

  15. Effectiveness of Vegetated Buffer Strips in Reducing Dormant Season Orthophosphate Pesticide Loading to Surface Waters in Glenn County, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, K. D.; Brown, D. L.; Altier, L.; Oliver, M. N.

    2003-12-01

    Riparian buffer strips are used in preventing nonpoint source contamination of agricultural runoff. The design and effectiveness of buffers varies widely under differing environmental conditions. Over the past two years, a project was implemented to evaluate the effectiveness of certain Best Management Practices in reducing organophosphate (OP) pesticide transport from almond orchards to local surface waters in Glenn County, northern California. Diazinon is a commonly-used OP pesticide applied during the dormant season in almond and stone-fruit orchards throughout the California Central Valley. Dormant season diazinon application coincides with the months of greatest rainfall and surface runoff in California. Three filter strip treatments were established: one planted with native vegetation, one with weedy resident vegetation, and the third with a bare soil surface. As a demonstration and reconnaissance project, replication of the treatments in this study was lacking (one plot of each vegetation type and two bare ground plots). Diazinon was applied in test orchard cells in January 2003. Surface runoff, shallow groundwater in the root zone, and deeper groundwater were monitored for the transport of diazinon during the three subsequent storm events. Composite surface water samples and flow volumes were obtained for each storm event using automated surface water collectors. Runoff and infiltration results indicate greater infiltration occurred in the vegetated plots as would be expected. Infiltration on bare ground plots was approximately 25%-50% less than on the vegetated plots. However, differences between the two vegetated plot treatments were less than 5%. Diazinon concentrations were reduced as surface runoff crossed the buffer strips for all three treatments. Detectable levels of diazinon were still present in runoff following the third storm, seven weeks after the pesticide application. Further replicated studies are currently being prepared for the coming dormant season and this study will continue over the next three years.

  16. Wilhelm von Humboldt and the "Orient": On Edward W. Said's Remarks on Humboldt's Orientalist Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messling, Markus

    2008-01-01

    From an epistemological perspective, Wilhelm von Humboldt's studies on the Oriental and East Asian languages and writing systems (Egyptian hieroglyphs, Sanskrit, Chinese, Polynesian) raise the question of his position in the Orientalist discourse of his time. Said [Said, E.W., 1978. "Orientalism. Western Conceptions of the Orient, fourth ed."…

  17. Sediment transport and deposition, Walnut and Pacheco Creeks, Contra Costa County, California, August 1965-April 1970

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porterfield, George

    1972-01-01

    Average annual sediment discharge in Pacheco Creek basin, Contra Costa County, Calif., was larger during August 1965-April 1970 than the historical annual sediment discharge (1909-62) by a factor of about 1.3. This increas in sediment discharge is attributed primarily to an increased frequency of peak streamflows and to a larger average annual streamflow during the 1965-70 period.

  18. 75 FR 39365 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... minimis level. Id. at 42011. \\19\\ 75 FR 8008, 8010, and proposal TSD, pp. 5-7. Open areas: --Windblown... Order Reviews I. Summary of Proposed Action On February 23, 2010 (75 FR 8008), EPA proposed a limited... section E.6 for recreational use of public lands in Imperial County. \\6\\ 75 FR 8008, 8010-8011 and...

  19. 78 FR 922 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ...sources of fugitive dust such as unpaved roads and disturbed soils in open and agricultural areas in Imperial County. We are...owners to prevent vehicular trespass and stabilize disturbed soil on open areas larger than 0.5 acres in urban areas,...

  20. 78 FR 922 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ... for the Implementation of Title I of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990,'' 57 FR 13498 (April 16... Preamble for the Implementation of Title I of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990,'' 59 FR 41998 (August...: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District...

  1. 78 FR 23677 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... is finalizing approval of revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD... III. EPA Action IV. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews I. Proposed Action On January 7, 2013 (78 FR... not acting on Rule 802 at this time. \\2\\ See, e.g., 75 FR 8010 (February 23, 2010). Comment...

  2. 75 FR 56889 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ...: EPA is taking direct final action to approve revisions to the San Diego County Air Pollution Control... earlier version of Rule 2 into the SIP on February 3, 2000 (65 FR 5262). C. What is the purpose of the... Federalism (64 FR 43255, August 10, 1999) revokes and replaces Executive Orders 12612 (Federalism) and...

  3. 77 FR 25109 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... Implementation of Title I of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990,'' 59 FR 41998 (August 16, 1994). 5. ``PM-10...: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD...-2008 monitoring period (74 FR 63309). This determination suspended some of the planning...

  4. 76 FR 7142 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ...: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD... versions of these rules? We approved an earlier version of Rule 201 into the SIP on January 3, 2007 (72 FR... permit exemptions. Rule 103 was approved into the SIP on May 31, 1972 (37 FR 10842). The...

  5. 78 FR 896 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ... is finalizing approval of revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD... IV. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews I. Proposed Action On April 27, 2012 (77 FR 25109), EPA... and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993); does not impose an...

  6. 75 FR 45082 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... Preamble for the Implementation of Title I of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990'', 57 FR 13498, April 16... Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP... proposed a limited approval and a limited disapproval (60 FR 6049) but did not finalize the action....

  7. Ectoparasites of Microtus californicus and Possible Emergence of an Exotic Ixodes Species Tick in California.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Amanda; Conroy, Chris; Foley, Patrick; Ott-Conn, Caitlin; Roy, Austin; Brown, Richard; Foley, Janet

    2015-09-01

    California voles (Microtus californicus Peale) harbor fleas and ticks, may be infected with vector-borne pathogens, and could themselves suffer from disease and serve as a source of infection for people and other animals. Here we summarize publications, museum archives, and recent records of ticks and fleas from California voles. There have been 18 flea species reported on California voles with geographic locations reported for 13. During recent statewide surveys, we found six flea species, with the highest species richness in Humboldt County. We found three of five previously reported tick species as well as a tick resembling the eastern North American tick Ixodes minor Neumann (which we here designate Ixodes "Mojave morphotype") on isolated Amargosa voles and Owens Valley voles (Microtus californicus vallicola Bailey) in Inyo County in 2012 and 2014. Additional incidental observations of this Mojave morphotype tick were on a western harvest mouse (Reithrodontomys megalotis Baird) at the Mojave site and a montane vole (Microtus montanus Peale) in the Owens Valley, both in March, 2014. We cannot rule out that this tick species has been present in remote areas of California but gone unrecognized, but these data are consistent with recent introduction of this tick, possibly from migrating birds. Changes in the ectoparasite fauna suggest changing ecologies of vectors and vector-borne pathogens that could influence animals and people as well. PMID:26336217

  8. Humboldt slide - A large shear-dominated retrogressive slope failure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, J.V.; Prior, D.B.; Field, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Humboldt Slide is a large, complex slide zone located on the northern California continental margin. Its three-dimensional architecture has been imaged by a combination of multibeam bathymetry, Huntec Deep-Tow seismic profiling, and sidescan sonar. The slide is interpreted to be Late Pleistocene to early Holocene in age and was caused by a combination of factors. The area of the slide is a local depocenter with high accumulation rates of organic-rich sediment; there has been local steepening of slopes by tectonic uplifts; and the entire area is one of high seismicity. Overall, the failure occurred by retrogressive, shear-dominated, minimum movement apparently as a sequence of events. Failure initially occurred by subsidence extension at the middle of the feature, followed by upslope retrogressive failure and downslope compression, and finally by translational sliding at the top of the slide. Degassing, as evidenced by abundant pockmarks, may have inhibited downslope translation. The slide may still be active, as suggested by offsets in Holocene hemipelagic sediment draped over some of the shear surfaces. Crown cracks occur above the present head of the failure and may represent the next generation of failure.

  9. Chemical quality of ground water in San Joaquin and part of Contra Costa Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorenson, Stephen K.

    1981-01-01

    Chemical water-quality conditions were investigated in San Joaquin and part of Contra Costa Counties by canvassing available wells and sampling water from 324 representative wells. Chemical water types varied, with 73 percent of the wells sampled containing either calcium-magnesium bicarbonate, or calcium-sodium bicarbonate type water. Substantial areas contain ground water exceeding water-quality standards for boron, manganese, and nitrate. Trace elements, with the exception of boron and manganese, were present in negligible amounts. (USGS)

  10. 78 FR 21580 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara and San Diego County Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ...Santa Barbara and San Diego County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD) and San Diego County Air Pollution Control District (SDCAPCD)...

  11. 78 FR 21537 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara and San Diego County Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ...Santa Barbara and San Diego County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD) and San Diego County Air Pollution Control District (SDCAPCD)...

  12. Final record of decision/remedial action plan, nine sites, Sierra Army Depot, Lassen County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Arroyo, S.L.; Larson, A.M.; Parent, M.M.; Silvers, J.M.; Weaverling, P.H.

    1996-10-01

    This ROD/RAP presents the selected response actions for nine sites at SIAD. The response actions were selected by the US Department of the Army (Army) in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA)(collectively referred to as CERCLA), the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP), and Section 6.8 of the California Health and Safety Code. This ROD/RAP includes the factual and legal basis for selecting the response action at each of the nine sites listed above. The data used to support the selected response action are contained in the Administrative Record for each site. The State of California as represented by the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), and the Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) concur with the selected response action at each site.

  13. Mineral resources of the Santa Rose Mountains Wilderness Study Area, Riverside County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Calzia, J.P.; Madden-McGuire, D.J.; Oliver, H.W.; Schreiner, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Santa Rosa Mountains Wilderness Study Area covers 68,051 acres in the Santa Rose Mountains, California. An appraisal of the mineral resources (known) and an assessment of mineral resource potential (undiscovered) of this wilderness study area were made at the request of the US Bureau of Land Management. Geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral surveys indicate that the study area has high potential for tungsten and marble resources, moderate potential for gold, and no potential for oil, natural gas, and geothermal resources.

  14. Preliminary maps of Quaternary deposits and liquefaction susceptibility, nine-county San Francisco Bay region, California: a digital database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knudsen, Keith L.; Sowers, Janet M.; Witter, Robert C.; Wentworth, Carl M.; Helley, Edward J.; Nicholson, Robert S.; Wright, Heather M.; Brown, Katherine H.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary map and database of Quaternary deposits and liquefaction susceptibility for the nine-county San Francisco Bay region, together with a digital compendium of ground effects associated with past earthquakes in the region. The report consists of (1) a spatial database of fivedata layers (Quaternary deposits, quadrangle index, and three ground effects layers) and two text layers (a labels and leaders layer for Quaternary deposits and for ground effects), (2) two small-scale colored maps (Quaternary deposits and liquefaction susceptibility), (3) a text describing the Quaternary map, liquefaction interpretation, and the ground effects compendium, and (4) the databse description pamphlet. The nine counties surrounding San Francisco Bay straddle the San Andreas fault system, which exposes the region to serious earthquake hazard (Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities, 1999). Much of the land adjacent to the Bay and the major rivers and streams is underlain by unconsolidated deposits that are particularly vulnerable to earthquake shaking and liquefaction of water-saturated granular sediment. This new map provides a modern and regionally consistent treatment of Quaternary surficial deposits that builds on the pioneering mapping of Helley and Lajoie (Helley and others, 1979) and such intervening work as Atwater (1982), Helley and others (1994), and Helley and Graymer (1997a and b). Like these earlier studies, the current mapping uses geomorphic expression, pedogenic soils, and inferred depositional environments to define and distinguish the map units. In contrast to the twelve map units of Helley and Lajoie, however, this new map uses a complex stratigraphy of some forty units, which permits a more realistic portrayal of the Quaternary depositional system. The two colored maps provide a regional summary of the new mapping at a scale of 1:275,000, a scale that is sufficient to show the general distribution and relationships of the map units but cannot distinguish the more detailed elements that are present in the database. The report is the product of years of cooperative work by the USGS National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) and National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program, William Lettis and & Associates, Inc. (WLA) and, more recently, by the California Division of Mines and Geology as well. An earlier version was submitted to the Geological Survey by WLA as a final report for a NEHRP grant (Knudsen and others, 2000). The mapping has been carried out by WLA geologists under contract to the NEHRP Earthquake Program (Grants #14-08-0001-G2129, 1434-94-G-2499, 1434-HQ-97-GR-03121, and 99-HQ-GR-0095) and with other limited support from the County of Napa, and recently also by the California Division of Mines and Geology. The current map consists of this new mapping and revisions of previous USGS mapping.

  15. Arc-rift transition volcanism in the Volcanic Hills, Jacumba and Coyote Mountains, San Diego and Imperial Counties, california

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisch, Gregory Zane

    Neogene volcanism associated with the subduction of the Farallon-Pacific spreading center and the transition from a subduction zone to a rift zone has been studied extensively in Baja, California, Mexico. One of the main goals of these studies was to find a geochemical correlation with slab windows that may have formed during that complicated transition. While workers have been able to find distinct geochemical signatures in samples from Baja California, none have shown statistically significant correlation with samples from southern California that are thought to be related to the same arc-rift transition events. All of the basaltic samples from this study of southern California rocks have prominent Nb depletions typical of island-arc subduction-related volcanism, in contrast to the chemistry of Baja California volcanics that have trace element patterns typical of synrift related volcanism. The work done by previous investigators has been additionally complicated due to each investigator's choice of important ratios or patterns, which bears little, if any, correlation with work done by others working in the same area. For example, Martin-Barajas et al. (1995) use K/Rb ratios in their study of the Puertocitos Volcanic Province, while Castillo (2008) argues that Sr/Y vs. Y is a better indicator of petrogenetic processes. Little petrologic work has been done on Neogene volcanic rocks in the Imperial Valley and eastern San Diego County region of Southern California. This thesis combines new research with that of previous workers and attempts to establish a better understanding of the processes involved with the transition volcanism. Prior work documents significant differences in the geochemistry between some of these areas, especially those in close proximity to each other (e.g. the Volcanic Hills and Coyote Mountains). These differences were thought to be largely the result different magmatic sources. The potential of finding two differing magma types in close proximity could possibly reflect the opening of a slab window produced by the collision of the spreading center and continued subduction of the Farallon plate beneath the North American continent. However, evidence presented here suggests that crustal contamination and metasomatic processes in the Coyote Mountains are the primary source of the geochemical variations. Trace-element signatures are similar in samples from all of the study regions, with pronounced Nb depletion typical of island-arc volcanism. The distinguishing features of samples from the Coyote Mountains are the high amount of alteration and their high levels of K2O (4-5 wt%). This study will examine the possibility that these characteristics result from the interaction of the basalt with a highly alkaline body of water and/or sediments. Supporting data for such a model include pillow structures and spiracle formations within the basalt flows exposed in the Fossil Canyon and Butaca Canyon regions of the Coyote Mountains. Future studies of the olivine-basalt samples within the central region of the Coyote Mountains, away from the altered exposures, would provide a more complete understanding of their genesis. While the geochemical data were initially analyzed using standard geochemical techniques, the data are also analyzed statistically using a relatively new multivariate analysis technique known as Compositional Data Analysis (CoDA). Using the CoDA techniques, a clearer insight into the actual changes of the chemical composition can be seen. It also provides statistically valid correlation between the various regions in the study area. The CoDA processes, CLR BiPlots in particular, show which elements vary from one region to the next. It also differentiates elemental groups that correlate with typical rock-forming processes (e.g., fractional crystallization) from those that result from contamination from other sources or processes. Two examples illustrate the application: 1) In the Volcanic Hills, a pronounced negative correlation between MgO and K2O is clearly observed. However, in the Table Mountai

  16. Fatality and Injury Severity of Older Adult Motor Vehicle Collisions in Orange County, California, 1998–2007

    PubMed Central

    Lotfipour, Shahram; Sayegh, Rockan; Chakravarthy, Bharath; Hoonpongsimanont, Wirachin; Anderson, Craig L.; Fox, J. Christian; Vaca, Federico E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Injuries and fatalities in adult drivers 18–65 years of age have decreased in recent years due to safer vehicles, enhanced medical policies, and implementation of injury prevention policies. However, adult drivers over 65 years of age are continuing to suffer from motor vehicle collision-related injuries and fatalities at a more constant rate. A number of physiological factors contribute to the deterioration in visual acuity, slower reaction speeds, and decreased awareness in older drivers. The objective of this study was to examine injury severity and fatality rates in older drivers compared to their younger counterparts in Orange County, California. Methods: This study used the Statewide Integrated Traffic Record System data for Orange County for the years 1998–2007. Drivers were categorized into 4 age groups: 25–64, 65–74, 75–84, and older than 85 years of age. Injury severity was assessed by the investigating officer. Results: Of the 197,814 drivers involved in motor vehicle collisions, 178,481 (90.2%) were in the 25–64 age group; 11,397 (5.8%) were 65–74; 6,592 (3.3%) were 75–84; and 1,344 drivers (0.7%) were over 85. Those aged 25–64 had the lowest fatality rate per 100,000 people, 2.5, whereas those 75–84 had the highest fatality rate, 4.9. The percent of crashes involving a left turn increased with age, and the percent that were stopped in the road decreases with age. Change in injury collision involvement ratio in the 3 younger age groups decreased by 26% to 32%, but decreased by 18% among drivers aged 85 years and older. Conclusion: The decrease in collision fatalities was greater in the 25–64-year-old group compared to the older adult population. This disparity highlights the need for further injury prevention efforts for older drivers. PMID:23451291

  17. Correlation Between Aerial Insecticide Spraying to Interrupt West Nile Virus Transmission and Emergency Department Visits in Sacramento County, California

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Helene G.; Kjemtrup, Anne; Reisen, William; Franks, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Insecticides reduce vector-borne pathogen transmission but also pose health risks. In August 2005, Sacramento County, California, underwent emergency aerial ultralow-volume (ULV) application of pyrethrin insecticide to reduce the population of West Nile virus (WNV)-infected mosquitoes and thereby interrupt enzootic and tangential transmission. We assessed the association between aerially applied pyrethrin insecticide and patterns of emergency department (ED) visit diagnoses. Methods We used geographic information systems software to determine ZIP Code-level exposure to pyrethrin. We used logistic regression models to examine the relationship between exposure status and three-digit International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes (785 in total) for all ED visits (n=253,648) within Sacramento County in 2005 and for specific diagnostic clusters (e.g., respiratory, gastrointestinal, skin, eye, and neurologic). All models were adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity (individual level), median income, ozone, and temperature (ZIP Code level). Results Exposure to aerially applied insecticide was not associated with clusters of respiratory, gastrointestinal, skin, eye, and neurologic complaints in adjusted models but was inversely associated with ICD-9-CM code 799 (“other ill-defined morbidity and mortality”), with adjusted odds ratios (AORs) ranging from 0.31 to 0.36 for 0–3 lag days (95% confidence interval 0.17, 0.68). Spraying was also directly associated with ICD-9-CM code 553 (“other abdominal hernia”), with AORs ranging from 2.34 to 2.96 for 2–3 lag days. Conclusions The observed significant ICD-9-CM code associations likely represented chance findings. Aerial ULV pyrethrin applications were not associated with ED visits for specific diagnoses or clusters of diagnoses. PMID:23633737

  18. Use of density equalizing map projections (DEMP) in the analysis of childhood cancer in four California counties

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, D.W. Selvin, S.; Close, E.R.; Holmes, H.H.

    1995-04-01

    In studying geographic disease distributions, one normally compares rates of arbitrarily defined geographic subareas (e.g. census tracts), thereby sacrificing the geographic detail of the original data. The sparser the data, the larger the subareas must be in order to calculate stable rates. This dilemma is avoided with the technique of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP). Boundaries of geographic subregions are adjusted to equalize population density over the entire study area. Case locations plotted on the transformed map should have a uniform distribution if the underlying disease rates are constant. The density equalized map portrays both individual cases and rates, and can be understood by untrained observers. Simple statistical techniques can be used to test the uniformity of the transformed map. This report describes application of the DEMP technique to a sizeable `real-world` data set: 401 childhood cancer cases occurring between 1980 and 1988 in four California counties. In an earlier analysis of the same data, the California Department of Health Services (DHS) calculated rates for 101 communities and found no significant geographic variability. The DDS 1980--88 population estimates are no longer available, so in this analysis 1980 Census data were used; geographic units were 262 census tracts. A k`th nearest neighbor analysis, corrected for boundary effects and for within-tract variability, provides strong evidence for geographic nonuniformity in tract rates ({rho} < l0{sup {minus}4}). No such effect is observed for artificial cases generated under the assumption of constant rates. Pending reanalysis with 1980-88 population estimates, no epidemiologic conclusions can be drawn at this time.

  19. Reservoir analysis study, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: Phase 2 report, Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    The Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills) is located in Kern County, California, and is jointly owned by the US Department of Energy and Chevron USA Inc. The Elk Hills Field is presently producing oil and gas from five geologic zones. These zones contain a number of separate and geologically complex reservoirs. Considerable field development and production of oil and gas have occurred since initial estimates of reserves were made. Total cumulative field production through December 1987 is 850 MMBbls of oil, 1.2 Tcf of gas and 648.2 MMBbls of water. In December 1987, field producing rates expressed on a calendar day basis amounted to 110,364 BOPD, 350,946 Mcfd and 230,179 BWPD from 1157 producers. In addition, a total of two reservoirs have gas injection in progress and four reservoirs have water injection in progress and four reservoirs have water injection in progress. Cumulative gas and water injection amounted to 586 Bcf of gas and 330 MMB of water. December 1987 gas and water injection rates amounted to 174 MMcfd and 234 MBWPD, into 129 injectors. In addition, a steamflood pilot program is currently active in the Eastern Shallow Oil Zone. Jerry R. Bergeson and Associates, Inc. (Bergeson) has completed Phase II of the Reservoir Analysis, Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 1, Elk Hills Oilfield, California. The objectives for this phase of the study included the establishment of revised estimates of the original oil and gas-in-place for each of the zones/reservoirs, estimation of the remaining proved developed, proved undeveloped, probable and possible reserves, and assessment of the effects of historical development and production operations and practices on recoverable reserves. 28 figs., 37 tabs.

  20. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Santiago Fire, Orange County, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Santiago Fire in Orange County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 1.75 inches (44.45 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  1. Internal architecture of the proto-Kern Canyon Fault at Engineer's Point, Lake Isabella Dam site, Kern County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martindale, Z. S.; Andrews, G. D.; Brown, S. R.; Krugh, W. C.

    2014-12-01

    The core of the Cretaceous (?) proto-Kern Canyon Fault (KCF) is exposed continuously for 1.25 km along Engineer's Point at Lake Isabella, Kern County, California. The proto-KCF is notable for (1) its long and complex history within, and perhaps preceding the Sierra Nevada batholith, and (2) hosting the Quaternary Kern Canyon Fault, an active fault that threatens the integrity of the Lake Isabella auxiliary dam and surrounding communities. We are investigating the internal architecture of the proto-KCF to explore its control on the likely behavior of the modern KCF. The proto-KCF is developed in the Alta Sierra biotite-granodiorite pluton. A traverse across Engineer's Point, perpendicular to the proto-KCF trace, reveals gradational increases in fracture density, fracture length, bulk alteration, and decreases in fracture spacing and grain size toward the fault core. Mapping of the fault core reveals two prominent and laterally extensive zones: (1) continuous foliated blastomylonitic granodiorite with steeply-dipping, anastomosing shear bands and minor mylonite planes, and (2) foliated orange and green fault breccia with intergranular gouge, strong C/S fabric, and a central gouge plane. The fault breccia zone is intruded by a lensoidal, post-deformation dacite dike, probably ca. 105 - 102 Ma (Nadin & Saleeby, 2008) and is weakly overprinted by a set of cross-cutting spaced, short, brittle fractures, often coated in calcite, which we infer to be genetically related to the modern KCF. We present our structural and lithological data that will be supported by mineralogical and geochemical analyses. E. Nadin & J. Saleeby (2008) Disruption of regional primary structure of the Sierra Nevada batholith by the Kern Canyon fault system, California: Geological Society of America Special Paper 438, p. 429-454.

  2. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Harris Fire, San Diego County, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Harris Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 1.75 inches (44.45 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  3. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Witch Fire, San Diego County, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Witch Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 2.25 inches (57.15 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  4. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Rice Fire, San Diego County, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Rice Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 1.75 inches (44.45 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  5. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Canyon Fire, Los Angeles County, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Canyon Fire in Los Angeles County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 2.25 inches (57.15 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  6. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Poomacha Fire, San Diego County, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Poomacha Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 2.25 inches (57.15 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  7. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Ammo Fire, San Diego County, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Ammo Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 1.75 inches (44.45 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  8. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Buckweed Fire, Los Angeles County, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Buckweed Fire in Los Angeles County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 2.25 inches (57.15 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  9. Classification of ground-water recharge potential in three parts of Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muir, K.S.; Johnson, Michael J.

    1979-01-01

    Ground-water recharge potential was classified in the Santa Cruz coastal area, North-central area, and Soquel-Aptos area in Santa Cruz County, Calif., for three data elements that affect recharge; slope, soils, and geology. Separate numerical maps for each element were composited into a single numerical map using a classification system that ranked the numbers into areas of good , fair, and poor recharge potential. Most of the Santa Cruz coastal area and the Norht-central area have a poor recharge potential, and much of the Soquel-Aptos area has a good to fair recharge potential. (Kosco-USGS)

  10. Potential for Induced Seismicity Related to the Northern California CO2 Reduction Project Pilot Test, Solano County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Myer, L.; Chiaramonte, L.; Daley, T.M.; Wilson, D.; Foxall, W.; Beyer, J.H.

    2010-06-15

    The objective of this technical report is to analyze the potential for induced seismicity due to a proposed small-scale CO{sub 2} injection project in the Montezuma Hills. We reviewed currently available public information, including 32 years of recorded seismic events, locations of mapped faults, and estimates of the stress state of the region. We also reviewed proprietary geological information acquired by Shell, including seismic reflection imaging in the area, and found that the data and interpretations used by Shell are appropriate and satisfactory for the purpose of this report. The closest known fault to the proposed injection site is the Kirby Hills Fault. It appears to be active, and microearthquakes as large as magnitude 3.7 have been associated with the fault near the site over the past 32 years. Most of these small events occurred 9-17 miles (15-28 km) below the surface, which is deep for this part of California. However, the geographic locations of the many events in the standard seismicity catalog for the area are subject to considerable uncertainty because of the lack of nearby seismic stations; so attributing the recorded earthquakes to motion along any specific fault is also uncertain. Nonetheless, the Kirby Hills Fault is the closest to the proposed injection site and is therefore our primary consideration for evaluating the potential seismic impacts, if any, from injection. Our planned installation of seismic monitoring stations near the site will greatly improve earthquake location accuracy. Shell seismic data also indicate two unnamed faults more than 3 miles east of the project site. These faults do not reach the surface as they are truncated by an unconformity at a depth of about 2,000 feet (610 m). The unconformity is identified as occurring during the Oligocene Epoch, 33.9-23.03 million years ago, which indicates that these faults are not currently active. Farther east are the Rio Vista Fault and Midland Fault at distances of about 6 miles (10 km) and 10 miles (16 km), respectively. These faults have been identified as active during the Quaternary (last 1.6 million years), but without evidence of displacement during the Holocene (the last 11,700 years). The stress state (both magnitude and direction) in the region is an important parameter in assessing earthquake potential. Although the available information regarding the stress state is limited in the area surrounding the injection well, the azimuth of the mean maximum horizontal stress is estimated at 41{sup o} and it is consistent with strike-slip faulting on the Kirby Hills Fault, unnamed fault segments to the south, and the Rio Vista Fault. However, there are large variations (uncertainty) in stress estimates, leading to low confidence in these conclusions regarding which fault segments are optimally oriented for potential slip induced by pressure changes. Uncertainty in the stress state can be substantially reduced by measurements planned when wells are drilled at the site. Injection of CO{sub 2} at about two miles depth will result in a reservoir fluid pressure increase, which is greatest at the well and decreases with distance from the well. After the injection stops, reservoir fluid pressures will decrease rapidly. Pressure changes have been predicted quantitatively by numerical simulation models of the injection. Based on these models, the pressure increase on the Kirby Hills Fault at its closest approach to the well due to the injection of 6,000 metric tons of CO{sub 2} would be a few pounds per square inch (psi), which is a tiny fraction of the natural pressure of approximately 5,000 psi at that depth. The likelihood of such a small pressure increase triggering a slip event is very small. It is even more unlikely that events would be induced at the significantly greater depths where most of the recorded earthquakes are concentrated, because it is unlikely that such a small pressure pulse would propagate downwards any appreciable distance. Therefore, in response to the specific question of the likelihood of the CO{sub 2} injection caus

  11. AB 327 A Look At Renewable Energy in Los Angeles County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schevker, Marla

    AB 327 was passed in the California State Assembly in October of 2013. This affected not only the way that investor-owned utility companies but also consumers who are interested in or have already invested in solar or other electricity efficiency efforts. This project looks at the way that AB 327 affects consumers and power companies, who supported it and who is against it and what consumers are doing to make their homes more environmentally friendly. Please note this project is intended to be viewed on the web and can be seen at: http://marla.schevker.com/marla/USC_Thesis/index.html.

  12. Mineral resources of the Tunnison Mountain Wilderness Study Area, Lassen County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.A.; Frisken, J.G.; Plouff, D.; Goeldner, C.A.; Munts, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    The part of the Tunnison Mountain Wilderness Study Area requested for mineral surveys encompasses 8,445 acres in northeastern California. The area contains Tertiary pyroclastic rocks, basaltic andesite flows, and basalt flows. There are no identified resources and it is unlikely that metallic minerals or oil and gas are present. Geothermal areas south and southwest of the study area suggest that the area may have potential for geothermal energy resources. Therefore, it has been assigned low potential for such resources; however, the mountainous geologic terrane differs from the sediment-filled valleys where the known resources are located.

  13. Mineral resources of the Tunnison Mountains Wilderness Study Area, Lassen County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.A.; Friskin, J.G.; Plouff, D.; Goeldner, C.A. ); Munts, S.R. )

    1988-01-01

    The part of the Tunnison Mountain Wilderness Study Area requested for mineral surveys encompasses 8,445 acres in northeastern California. The area contains Tertiary pyroclastic rocks, basaltic andesite flows, and basalt flows. There are no identified resources and it is unlikely that metallic minerals or oil and gas are present. Geothermal areas south and southwest of the study area suggest that the area may have potential for geothermal energy sources. Therefore, it has been assigned low potential for such resources; however, the mountainous geologic terrane differs from the sediment-filled valleys where the known resources are located.

  14. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Valley Center Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  15. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Warners Ranch Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  16. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Buckweed Fire Perimeter, Sleepy Valley Quadrangle, Los Angeles County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  17. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Otay Mesa Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  18. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Poomacha Fire Perimeter, Pala Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  19. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Santiago Fire Perimeter, Lake Forest Quadrangle, Orange County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  20. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Dulzura Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  1. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Slide Fire Perimeter, Harrison Mountain Quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  2. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Poomacha Fire Perimeter, Palomar Observatory Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  3. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Potrero Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  4. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Ranch Fire Perimeter, Fillmore Quadrangle, Ventura County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  5. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Barrett Lake Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  6. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Ramona Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  7. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Escondido Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  8. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, San Pasqual Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  9. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Slide Fire Perimeter, Butler Peak Quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  10. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Otay Mountain Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  11. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Jamul Mountains Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  12. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Cajon Fire Perimeter, Devore Quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  13. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Santiago Fire Perimeter, Tustin Quadrangle, Orange County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  14. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Slide Fire Perimeter, Keller Peak Quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  15. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Santa Ysabel Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  16. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Rice Fire Perimeter, Bonsall Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  17. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Ammo Fire Perimeter, Margarita Peak Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  18. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Santiago Fire Perimeter, Orange Quadrangle, Orange County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  19. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Buckweed Fire Perimeter, Agua Dulce Quadrangle, Los Angeles County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  20. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Poomacha Fire Perimeter, Boucher Hill Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  1. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Ranch Fire Perimeter, Piru Quadrangle, Ventura County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  2. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Tecate Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  3. Bathymetric and geophysical surveys of Englebright Lake, Yuba-Nevada Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childs, Jonathan R.; Snyder, Noah P.; Hampton, Margaret A.

    2003-01-01

    Harry L. Englebright Lake is a 9-mile-long (14-kilometer) reservoir located in the Sierra Nevada foothills of northern California on the Yuba River gorge known as The Narrows. The reservoir is impounded by Englebright Dam (Photo 1), a concrete arch structure spanning 348 meters (1,142 feet) across and 79 meters (260 feet) high. The dam was constructed in 1941 for the primary purpose of trapping sediment derived from anticipated hydraulic mining operations in the Yuba River watershed. Hydraulic mining in the Sierra Nevada was halted in 1884 but resumed on a limited basis until the 1930's under the regulation of the California Debris Commission. Although no hydraulic mining in the upper Yuba River watershed resumed after the construction of the dam, the historical mine sites continued to contribute sediment to the river. Today, Englebright Lake is used primarily for recreation and hydropower. In 2001 and 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted bathymetric, geophysical, and geological studies of the reservoir under the auspices of the Upper Yuba River Studies Program (UYRSP), a multi-disciplinary investigation into the feasibility of introducing anadromous fish species to the Yuba River system upstream of Englebright Dam. A primary purpose of these studies was to assess the quantity and nature of the sediment that has accumulated behind the dam over the past 60 years. This report presents the results of those surveys, including a new bathymetric map of the reservoir and estimates of the total accumulated sediment volume.

  4. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Canyon Fire Perimeter, Malibu Beach Quadrangle, Los Angeles County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  5. Water-quality assessment of Cache Creek, Yolo, Lake, and Colusa counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorenson, Stephen K.; Elliott, Ann L.

    1981-01-01

    Cache Creek and its tributaries from Clear Lake to Yolo Bypass have been the subject of quality and quantity of water studies by several governmental agencies since the early 1900's. Water-quality data from these studies showed that water in the basin is of good quality for most of the beneficial uses defined by the California State Water Resources Control Board. Concentrations of dissolved constituents are substantially higher in the water in the two largest tributaries than in Cache Creek. Seasonal variations in dissolved constituents are also greater in the tributaries than in Cache Creek. Clear Lake has a major effect on water quality, resulting in little seasonal fluctuation in water quality in Cache Creek. Excessive voron and suspended-sediment concentrations are the greatest water-quality problems, according to existing data. Both of these problems are from natural sources. Water-quality monitoring is presently being conducted monthly at four sites by the California Department of Water Resurces and at several other sites by other agencies. Modifications in current monitoring are proposed to gain further information on diel dissolved-oxygen cycles, pesticides, and biological constituents that may adversely affect beneficial uses. (USGS)

  6. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Buckweed Fire Perimeter, Green Valley Quadrangle, Los Angeles County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  7. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Morena Reservoir Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  8. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Poway Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  9. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Buckweed Fire Perimeter, Mint Canyon Quadrangle, Los Angeles County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  10. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Tule Springs Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  11. Use of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP) in the analysis of childhood cancer in four California counties. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, D.W.; Close, E.R.; Holmes, H.H.; Selvin, S. |

    1995-10-01

    In studying geographic disease distributions, one normally compares rates among arbitrarily defined geographic subareas (e.g. census tracts), thereby sacrificing the geographic detail of the original data. The sparser the data, the larger the subareas must be in order to calculate stable rates. This dilemma is avoided with the technique of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP). Boundaries of geographic subregions are adjusted to equalize population density over the entire study area. Case locations plotted on the transformed map should have a uniform distribution if the underlying disease rates are constant. The present report describes the application of the DEMP technique to 401 childhood cancer cases occurring between 1980 and 1988 in four California counties, with the use of map files and population data for the 262 tracts of the 1980 Census. A k`th nearest neighbor analysis provides strong evidence for geographic non-uniformity in tract rates (p < 10{sup {minus}4}). No such effect is observed for artificial cases generated under the assumption of constant rates. Work is in progress to repeat the analysis with improved population estimates derived from both 1980 and 1990 Census data. Final epidemiologic conclusions will be reported when that analysis is complete.

  12. Concentrations of mercury and other metals in black bass (Micropterus spp.) from Whiskeytown Lake, Shasta County, California, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Jason T.; Hothem, Roger L.; Bauer, Marissa L.; Brown, Larry R.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents the results of a reconnaissance study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to determine mercury (Hg) and other selected metal concentrations in Black bass (Micropterus spp.) from Whiskeytown Lake, Shasta County, California. Total mercury concentrations were determined by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CVAAS) in fillets and whole bodies of each sampled fish. Selected metals scans were performed on whole bodies (less the fillets) by inductively coupled plasma–mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma–optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Mercury concentrations in fillet samples ranged from 0.06 to 0.52 micrograms per gram (?g/g) wet weight (ww). Total mercury (HgT) in the same fish whole-body samples ranged from 0.04 to 0.37 (?g/g, ww). Mercury concentrations in 17 percent of "legal catch size" (?305 millimeters in length) were above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water-quality criterion for the protection of human health of 0.30 ?g/g (ww). These data will serve as a baseline for future monitoring efforts within Whiskeytown Lake.

  13. Review of samples of sediment, tailings, and waters adjacent to the Cactus Queen gold mine, Kern County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rytuba, James J.; Kim, Christopher S.; Goldstein, Daniel N.

    2011-01-01

    The Cactus Queen Mine is located in the western Mojave Desert in Kern County, California. The Cactus Queen gold-silver (Au-Ag) deposit is similar to other Au-Ag deposits hosted in Miocene volcanic rocks that consist of silicic domes and associated flows, pyroclastic rocks, and subvolcanic intrusions. The volcanic rocks were emplaced onto a basement of Mesozoic silicic intrusive rocks. A part of the Cactus Queen Mine is located on Federal land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Staff from the BLM initially sampled the mine area and documented elevated concentrations of arsenic (As) in tailings and sediment. BLM then requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with Chapman University, measure and characterize As and other geochemical constituents in sediment, tailings, and waters on the part of the mine on Federal lands. This report is made in response to the request by the BLM, the lead agency mandated to conduct a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) - Removal Site Investigation (RSI). The RSI applies to the potential removal of As-contaminated mine waste from the Cactus Queen Mine as a means of reducing As release and exposure to humans and biota. This report summarizes data obtained from field sampling of sediments, mine tailings, and surface waters at the Cactus Queen Mine on January 27, 2008. Our results provide a preliminary assessment of the sources of As and associated chemical constituents that could potentially impact humans and biota.

  14. The effect of selenium on reproduction of black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) in Shasta County California

    SciTech Connect

    Flueck, W.T.

    1989-01-01

    This study was to determine if nutritional inadequacy of selenium may be responsible for a declining reproductive rate of a migratory herd of black-tailed deer. Selenium is an essential trace mineral for mammalian herbivores. Deficiency affects primarily neonates resulting in increased mortality rates. Shasta County, California is indigenously low in selenium due to soil characteristics. Local livestock enterprises have experienced reproductive problems, which were responsive to selenium treatment. The low recruitment rate in the deer herd suggested a physiological link between low selenium status and reproductive problems, and an experimental trial was initiated. Free ranging adult females were supplemented with selenium rumen pellets and marked with radio transmitters. From 1985 to 1987, the selenium dose was doubled as compared to 1984. It was established that evaluation of selenium status by determining whole blood selenium levels adequately describes the major bioactive form of selenium, glutathione peroxidase. To evaluate the experimental trial, the pre-weaning survival rate of progeny of supplemented females was compared with the rate in the untreated herd.

  15. Health assessment for Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine, Clearlake, Lake County, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CAD980893275. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-04

    The Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine Site is located on the eastern shore of the Oaks Arm of Clearlake, in the City of Clearlake, Lake County, California. The site is on the Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List (NPL). This site was mined for sulphur beginning in 1865, and later for mercury. The most extensive surface mining occurred between 1922-1947 and 1955-1957; during these two periods mining waste containing mercury was dumped directly into Clearlake and along the shoreline. The Clearlake surface waters are an important area resource for recreational purposes such as fishing and boating. The human exposure pathway of greatest concern is the consumption of contaminated fish. The state has issued a health advisory regarding consumption of fish from Clearlake. Potential on-site exposure routes include ingestion, inhalation, and dermal contact with contaminated soil and surface water. Potential off-site exposure routes include ingestion and dermal contact with surface water and groundwater; most of the mercury in the lake is contained in bottom sediment and along the shore of Oaks Arm. Based on available information reviewed, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry has concluded that this site is a public health hazard.

  16. Application of advanced geophysical logging methods in the characterization of a fractured-sedimentary bedrock aquifer, Ventura County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, John H.; Lane, John W.; Singha, Kamini; Haeni, F. Peter

    2002-01-01

    An integrated suite of advanced geophysical logging methods was used to characterize the geology and hydrology of three boreholes completed in fractured-sedimentary bedrock in Ventura County, California. The geophysical methods included caliper, gamma, electromagnetic induction, borehole deviation, optical and acoustic televiewer, borehole radar, fluid resistivity, temperature, and electromagnetic flowmeter. The geophysical logging 1) provided insights useful for the overall geohydrologic characterization of the bedrock and 2) enhanced the value of information collected by other methods from the boreholes including core-sample analysis, multiple-level monitoring, and packer testing. The logged boreholes, which have open intervals of 100 to 200 feet, penetrate a sequence of interbedded sandstone and mudstone with bedding striking 220 to 250 degrees and dipping 15 to 40 degrees to the northwest. Fractures intersected by the boreholes include fractures parallel to bedding and fractures with variable strike that dip moderately to steeply. Two to three flow zones were detected in each borehole. The flow zones consist of bedding-parallel or steeply dipping fractures or a combination of bedding-parallel fractures and moderately to steeply dipping fractures. About 75 to more than 90 percent of the measured flow under pumped conditions was produced by only one of the flow zones in each borehole.

  17. Upper Clear Creek watershed aquatic chemistry and biota surveys, 2004-5, Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, Shasta County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wulff, Marissa L.; May, Jason T.; Brown, Larry R.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service and Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, performed a comprehensive aquatic biota survey of the upper Clear Creek watershed, Shasta County, California, during 2004-5. Data collected in this study can provide resource managers with information regarding aquatic resources, watershed degradation, and regional biodiversity within Whiskeytown National Recreation Area. Surveys of water chemistry, bed-sediment chemistry, algae assemblages, benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages, aquatic vertebrate assemblages, in-stream habitat characteristics, and sediment heterogeneity were conducted at 17 stream sites during both 2004 and 2005, with an additional 4 sites surveyed in 2005. A total of 67 bed-sediment samples were analyzed for major and trace inorganic element concentrations. Forty-six water samples were analyzed for trace metals and nutrients. A total of 224 taxa of invertebrates were collected during these surveys. Eleven fish species, seven of which were native, and two species of larval amphibians, were collected. A total of 24 genera of soft algae and 159 taxa of diatoms were identified. To date, this survey represents the most comprehensive inventory of aquatic resources within Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, and this information can serve as a baseline for future monitoring efforts and to inform management decisions.

  18. Case study of the Wendel-Amedee Exploration Drilling Project, Lassen County, California, User Coupled Confirmation Drilling Program

    SciTech Connect

    Zeisloft, J.; Sibbett, B.S.; Adams, M.C.

    1984-09-01

    The Wendel-Amedee KGRA is located in Honey Lake basin in Lassen County, California, on the boundary between the Modoc Plateau and the Basin and Range geologic provinces. A variety of geophysical surveys was performed over the project property. Geophysical data helped in establishing the regional structural framework, however, none of the geophysical data is sufficiently refined to be considered suitable for the purpose of siting an exploration drill hole. Drilling of reservoir confirmation well WEN-1 took place from August 1 to September 22, 1981. Pulse and long-term flow testing subjected the reservoir to a maximum flow of 680 gpm for 75 hours. At that rate, the well exhibited a productivity index of 21.6 gpm/psi; the reservoir transmissivity was 3.5 x 10/sup 6/ md-ft/cp. The maximum bottom-hole temperature recorded during testing was 251/sup 0/F. The conceptual model of the geothermal resource at Wendel Hot Springs calls on ground water, originating in the neighboring volcanic highlands, descending through jointed and otherwise permeable rocks into the granitic basement. Once in the basement, the fluid is heated as it continues its descent, and lateral movement as dictated by the hydrologic gradient. It then rises to the discharge point along transmissive faults. 45 refs., 28 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Property description and fact-finding report for NPR-2, Buena Vista Hills Field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The US Department of Energy has asked Gustavson Associates, Inc. to serve as an Independent Petroleum Consultant under contract DE-AC01-96FE64202. This authorizes a study and recommendations regarding future development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2) in Kern County, California. The report that follows is the Phase 1 fact-finding and property description for that study. The United States of America owns 100 percent of the mineral rights and 96.1 percent of surface rights in 10,447 acres of the 30,182 acres contained within NPR-2. This property comprises the Buena Vista Hills Oil Field. Oil and gas companies have leased out 9,227 acres in 17 separate leases. Discovered in 1909, this field has approximately 435 active wells producing 2,819 gross barrels of oil and 8.6 million cubic feet of gas per day. Net production to the Government royalty interests include 200 barrels of oil per day and 750 thousand cubic feet of gas per day. Royalty revenues are about $1.7 million per year. Remaining recoverable reserves are approximately 407 thousand barrels of oil and 1.8 billion cubic feet of gas. Significant plugging and abandonment (P&A) and environmental liabilities are present, but these should be the responsibility of the lessees. Ultimate liability still rests with the United States and may increase as the leases are sold to smaller and smaller operators.

  20. Movements and home range of San Joaquin kit foxes on the Naval Petroleum Reserves, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Zoellick, B.W.; O'Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.

    1987-09-01

    Movements and home range use of San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica) were studied on and adjacent to the Naval Petroleum Reserves (NPR-1 and NPR-2), Kern County, California, between June 1984 and September 1985. Foxes were studied in an undeveloped area of Buena Vista Valley centered on the border between the Reserves, and in an area of intensive petroleum development in NPR-2 adjacent to the city of Taft. Distances moved nightly did not differ between sexes or between level of petroleum development. Nightly movements averaged 9.4 miles in length during the breeding season, and were significantly longer than the average nightly movements for the pup-rearing (6.4 miles) and pup-dispersal (6.5 miles) seasons. Convex polygon home ranges averaged 1144 acres in size and did not differ between sexes or level of petroleum development. Home ranges of paired males and females overlapped an average of 78%. Home ranges of nonpaired males and females, adjacent males, and adjacent females overlapped an average of 31 to 48%. Although kit foxes were not strongly territorial, home range overlap of paired males and females was significantly greater than that of either nonpaired males and females and males with adjacent home ranges. Home range overlap did not differ between foxes inhabiting developed and undeveloped areas. 42 refs., 10 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Evaluation of lactation support in the workplace or school environment on 6-month breastfeeding outcomes in Yolo County, California.

    PubMed

    Dabritz, Haydee A; Hinton, Bette G; Babb, Jan

    2009-05-01

    Six-month breastfeeding outcomes (almost exclusive breastfeeding, partial breastfeeding, and not breastfeeding) were analyzed for 201 infants born to Yolo County, California, mothers who returned to work or school. Twenty-two percent of workplaces and 17% of schools did not provide a lactation room. Although part- or full-time status, knowledge of breastfeeding rules, and support from colleagues were independently associated with the outcome, they were not significant in the multivariate analysis. In the selected model, maternal age (odds ratio [OR] = 2.3; 1.3-3.9 for a 10-year difference), college or above versus

  2. late Pleistocene and Holocene pollen record from Laguna de las Trancas, northern coastal Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adam, David P.; Byrne, Roger; Luther, Edgar

    1981-01-01

    A 2.1-m core from Laguna de las Trancas, a marsh atop a landslide in northern Santa Cruz County, California, has yielded a pollen record for the period between about 30,000 B. P. and roughly 5000 B. P. Three pollen zones are recognized. The earliest is characterized by high frequencies of pine pollen and is correlated with a mid-Wisconsinan interstade of the mid-continent. The middle zone contains high frequencies of both pine and fir (Abies, probably A. grandis) pollen and is correlated with the last full glacial interval (upper Wisconsinan). The upper zone is dominated by redwood (Sequoia) pollen and represents latest Pleistocene to middle Holocene. The past few thousand years are not represented in the core. The pollen evidence indicates that during the full glacial period the mean annual temperature at the site was about 2°C to 3°C lower than it is today. We attribute this small difference to the stabilizing effect of marine upwelling on the temperature regime in the immediate vicinity of the coast. Precipitation may have been about 20 percent higher as a result of longer winter wet seasons.

  3. Faulting apparently related to the 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake and possible co-seismic origin of surface cracks in Potrero Canyon, Los Angeles County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Goldman, M.R.; Lee, W.H.K.; Rymer, M.J.; Ponti, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    Apparent southward-dipping, reverse-fault zones are imaged to depths of about 1.5 km beneath Potrero Canyon, Los Angeles County, California. Based on their orientation and projection to the surface, we suggest that the imaged fault zones are extensions of the Oak Ridge fault. Geologic mapping by others and correlations with seismicity studies suggest that the Oak Ridge fault is the causative fault of the 17 January 1994 Northridge earthquake (Northridge fault). Our seismically imaged faults may be among several faults that collectively comprise the Northridge thrust fault system. Unusually strong shaking in Potrero Canyon during the Northridge earthquake may have resulted from focusing of seismic energy or co-seismic movement along existing, related shallow-depth faults. The strong shaking produced ground-surface cracks and sand blows distributed along the length of the canyon. Seismic reflection and refraction images show that shallow-depth faults may underlie some of the observed surface cracks. The relationship between observed surface cracks and imaged faults indicates that some of the surface cracks may have developed from nontectonic alluvial movement, but others may be fault related. Immediately beneath the surface cracks, P-wave velocities are unusually low (<400 m/sec), and there are velocity anomalies consistent with a seismic reflection image of shallow faulting to depths of at least 100 m. On the basis of velocity data, we suggest that unconsolidated soils (<800 m/sec) extend to depths of about 15 to 20 m beneath our datum (<25 m below ground surface). The underlying rocks range in velocity from about 1000 to 5000 m/sec in the upper 100 m. This study illustrates the utility of high-resolution seismic imaging in assessing local and regional seismic hazards.

  4. Case-control study of intracranial meningiomas in women in Los Angeles County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Preston-Martin, S.; Paganini-Hill, A.; Henderson, B.E.; Pike, M.C.; Wood, C.

    1980-07-01

    A case-control study was conducted among women in Los Angeles County to investigate possible causes of intracranial meningiomas. Questionnaires sought information from patients and from a neighbor of each one on characteristics and past experiences that might be associated with the development of this disease. Information was obtained on 188 matched patient-neighbor pairs. Three primary factors appeared to be associated with meningioma occurrence: 1) a history of head trauma (odds ratio = 2.0, p = 0.01), 2) consumption of certain cured meats (odds ratio = 2.8, p = less than 0.01), and 3) exposure to medical and dental diagnostic X-rays to the head. For diagnostic X-rays, the strongest association was with early exposure (less than 20 yr old) to full-mouth dental X-ray series (odds ratio = 4.0, p less than 0.01).

  5. Water resources and geology of the Los Coyotes Indian Reservation and vicinity, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ballog, A.P., Jr.; Moyle, W.R., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The water resources of the Los Coyotes Indian Reservation, San Diego County, Calif., are sufficient to supply the limited domestic and stock-water needs of the present residents of the reservation. Surface-water runoff is derived from direct precipitation on the area and from intermittent spring flow. Groundwater occurs in the alluvial deposits and in the consolidated rocks where they are highly fractured or deeply weathered. The best potential for groundwater development on the reservation is in the small alluvial basins in the San Ysidro and San Ignacio areas. Most water on the reservation is good to excellent in chemical quality for domestic, stock, and irrigation use. Water from two wells (and one spring), however, exceeds the primary drinking-water standard for nitrate plus nitrate. (USGS)

  6. Birth of a fault: Connecting the Kern County and Walker Pass, California, earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bawden, G.W.; Michael, A.J.; Kellogg, L.H.

    1999-01-01

    A band of seismicity transects the southern Sierra Nevada range between the northeastern end of the site of the 1952 MW (moment magnitude) 7.3 Kern County earthquake and the site of the 1946 MW 6.1 Walker Pass earthquake. Relocated earthquakes in this band, which lacks a surface expression, better delineate the northeast-trending seismic lineament and resolve complex structure near the Walker Pass mainshock. Left-lateral earthquake focal planes are rotated counterclockwise from the strike of the seismic lineament, consistent with slip on shear fractures such as those observed in the early stages of fault development in laboratory experiments. We interpret this seismic lineament as a previously unrecognized, incipient, currently blind, strike-slip fault, a unique example of a newly forming structure.

  7. Chemical quality of ground water in Yolo and Solano counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evenson, K.D.

    1985-01-01

    Ground-water-quality conditions were investigated in Yolo and Solano Counties during the summers of 1980 and 1981 by sampling 188 representative wells. Chemical analyses of the water samples show that the ground water is suitable for domestic and most agricultural purposes. Water samples from wells near the Sacramento River generally contained lower concentrations of dissolved solids and higher concentrations of trace elements than the rest of the study area. Ninety percent of the water sampled had a dissolved-solids concentration of less than 850 milligrams per liter. Chemical water types varied, with 72 percent of the wells sampled containing either sodium bicarbonate, magnesium bicarbonate, sodium-magnesium bicarbonate , or magnesium-sodium bicarbonate type water. A large part of the study area contains ground water with boron concentrations that exceed tolerance levels for many crops. Other toxic trace elements were present in negligible amounts. (USGS)

  8. Geohydrology and artificial-recharge potential of the Irvine area, Orange County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, John A.

    1973-01-01

    The Irvine area is in hydraulic continuity with the rest of the coastal plain in Orange County. Factors that distinguish the aquifer section of the Irvine area from that in other parts of the coastal plain are a low permeability, a high clay and silt content, and a thin alluvial sequence. Rapid facies change and the large percentage of silt and clay in the section locally result in confining conditions. The aquifer, most of which is included in the Fernando Formation, is as much as 1,300 feet thick beneath parts of the plain. The alluvium overlying the Fernando Formation averages about 200-250 feet in thickness and also contains significant amounts of silt and clay. Transmissivities range from 25,000 to 100,000 gallons per day per foot in the Irvine area, values which are much lower than those in the rest of the coastal plain in Orange County. Water levels have recovered as much as 60 feet from the low levels of the early 1950's. Water-level maps indicate that in the winter non-pumping season water tends to move toward upper Newport Bay and the rest of the coastal plain. During the summer pumping season a cone of depression develops, reversing the winter gradient. The average dissolved-solids content of the ground water is about 800 milligrams per liter. The most prevalent cations are sodium and calcium; the most prevalent anions are bicarbonate and sulfate. No long-term degradation of water quality has occurred, with the exception of a slight increase in dissolved solids. No areas in the Irvine area are suitable for the large-scale spreading of water for artificial recharge. Clay and silt predominate in the section beneath the Tustin plain, and in the foothill areas either bedrock is close to the surface or the alluvium is fine grained.

  9. Geochemistry of Birch Creek, Inyo County, California a travertine depositing creek in an arid climate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, I.

    1965-01-01

    A small stream in eastern California was studied in detail to determine the causes of travertine deposition from the stream. Although the ground water feeding the stream is slightly supersaturated to just saturated with calcite, the ground water is supersaturated with CO2 with respect to the overlying air. The water becomes increasingly supersaturated with calcite in a downstream direction as CO2 loss to the air and by photosynthesis exceeds the rate of precipitation of calcite. Water loss by evaporation was below detection and does not play an important role in calcite deposition in this case. The water loss is by seepage through the stream bed. Observations showed variations in HCO-3, pH, discharge, Ca+2, relative humidity, water and air temperatures, and dissolved CO2. Comparisons of observed and equilibrium states are given for five sampling stations along the stream. ?? 1965.

  10. Mathematical model of the West Bolsa Ground-water Basin, San Benito County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faye, Robert E.

    1976-01-01

    Simulation of the West Bolsa ground-water basin hydrology in California had provided values of basin recharge and discharge and nodally distributed values of transmissivity and storage coefficient. Average net recharge from April 1945 to March 1969 was 6.2 cubic feet per second and occurred as subsurace recharge and infiltration of rain and minor streamflow. Discharge from the basin during the same period was 8.1 cubic feet per second and occurred as pumping and leakage from confined parts of the basin. Values of transmissivity used in the model generally range from 3,300 to 20,000 feet squared per day. Values of storage coefficient used in the model range from 0.0005 to 0.10. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. Intensive early season adulticide applications decrease arbovirus transmission throughout the Coachella Valley, Riverside County, California.

    PubMed

    Lothrop, Hugh D; Lothrop, Branka B; Gomsi, Donald E; Reisen, William K

    2008-08-01

    In the Coachella Valley of California the seasonal onset of St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV), western equine encephalomyelitis virus (WEEV), and West Nile virus (WNV) has been detected consistently at the shoreline of the Salton Sea near the community of North Shore. The timing and intensity of initial amplification in the Culex tarsalis Coquillett/wild bird cycle at this focus seemed closely linked to the subsequent dispersal of virus to the rest of the Coachella Valley and perhaps southern California. In 2004, an attempt was made to interrupt the amplification and dispersal of WNV using ground ultra-low volume (ULV) applications of Pyrenone 25-5. Although these localized treatments were started 1 month after the initial detection in April, surveillance indicated no dispersal from this focus at this time. However, these treatments appeared to have little effect, and WNV eventually was detected throughout the valley, with seven human cases reported in the urbanized upper valley near Palm Springs. In 2005, the initial detection of WNV at North Shore at the end of May was followed rapidly by dispersal throughout the valley precluding efforts at containment. Evaluation of ground and aerial applications at North Shore during May and June 2005, respectively, indicated variable kill of sentinel mosquitoes (overall mortality: ground, 43%; air, 34%) and limited control of the target Cx. tarsalis population. In 2006, aerial ULV applications with the same chemical were begun immediately following the first detection of virus in mid-April, resulting in an apparent reduction of Cx. tarsalis abundance and delay of WNV activity in the rural lower valley and a marked decline in transmission by Culex quinquefasciatus Say populations in the densely populated upper northwestern valley with no human cases reported. PMID:18494603

  12. The Complexity of the California Recall Election

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, R. Michael

    2003-11-06

    The October 7, 2003 California Recall Election strained California’s direct democracy. In recent California politics there has not been a statewide election conducted on such short notice; county election officials were ...

  13. A data viewer for stream-sediment and surface-water chemistry, geology, and geography of the Humboldt River basin, northern Nevada. Chapter F.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Douglas B.; Folger, Helen W.; Stillings, Lisa L.

    2006-01-01

    The data and software utilized in this product permit the user to view and analyze the geographic relationships among chemistry of stream sediments and surface waters, geology, and various cartographic base information such as but not limited to cities, county boundaries, and land ownership. Data for this product were compiled and or produced as part of a mineral and environmental assessment of the Humboldt River basin conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey between 1995 - 2000.

  14. Scenic drive landslide of January-March 1998, La Honda, San Mateo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jayko, Angela S.; Rymer, Michael J.; Prentice, Carol S.; Wilson, Ray C.; Wells, Ray E.

    1998-01-01

    The small rural town of La Honda, Calif., is an unincorporated region of San Mateo County situated in the Santa Cruz Mountains in the western part of the San Francisco peninsula. Much of the town is underlain by a previously recognized ancient landslide complex. The ancient slide complex covers about 1.0 to 1.25 km2, parts of which have been historically active. This report describes a recent landslide involving part of Scenic Drive, La Honda, that became active in January 1998. This report does not describe other currently active landslides in La Honda, such as the January 1998 slide on lower Recreation Drive, or the history of sliding in the area. This report concerns the principal morphological features we observed and mapped between 11 February and 21 March 1998 on an enlargement of a 1:7500-scale air photo acquired 6 March 1998 and prior to that on a town property-line map, and by laser survey carried out between 26 February and 8 March. The principal objective of this report is to make available the detailed photographic and topographic base maps and associated description of surface morphological features.

  15. Indicators assessment for habitat conservation plan of Yolo County, California, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, K.S.; Wilcox, B.; Leidy, R.; Yarris, K.

    1998-11-01

    Whereas habitat conservation plans (HCPs) have been intended to provide comprehensive environmental mitigation for multiple species, they often narrow in focus to one species and either one mitigation site or unspecified sites. The authors developed an indicators framework from which to rate land units for their ecological integrity, collateral values (nonbiological qualities that can improve conservation), and restoration and conservation opportunities. The ratings of land units were guided by the tenets of conservation biology and principles of landscape and ecosystem ecology, and they were made using existing physical and floral information managed on a GIS. As an example of how the indicators approach can be used for HCPs, the 29 legally rare species targeted by the Yolo County HCP were each associated with vegetation complexes and agricultural crops, the maps of which were used for rating some of the landscape indices. The ratings were mapped so that mitigation can be directed to the places on the landscape where the legally rare species should benefit most from conservation practices. The most highly rated land units for conservation opportunity occurred along streams and sloughs, especially where they emerged from the foothills and entered the Central Valley and where the two largest creeks intersected the Sacramento River flood basin.

  16. Chromium geochemistry of serpentinous sediment in the Willow core, Santa Clara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oze, Christopher J.; LaForce, Matthew J.; Wentworth, Carl M.; Hanson, Randall T.; Bird, Dennis K.; Coleman, Robert G.

    2003-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of Cr geochemistry in serpentinous sediment completed for a multiple-aquifer ground-water monitoring well (Willow core of Santa Clara County, CA) determined sediment at depths >225 meters contains Cr concentrations ranging from 195 to 1155 mg/kg. Serpentinous sediment from this site is a potential source of non-anthropogenic Cr contamination. Chromium-bearing minerals such as Cr-spinel appear to be the main source of Cr in the sediment; however, Cr-bearing silicates and clay minerals are additional Cr sources. Aqueous Cr concentrations in the sediment are <4.6 mg/L; however, the valence of Cr was not identified in the solutions or in the sediment. Although there is no indication of Cr(VI) contamination derived from the serpentinous sediment, elevated Cr concentrations in the sediment, the observed ‘dissolution’ textures of the Cr-bearing minerals, the estimated redox environment, and water chemistry indicate the formation of Cr(VI) is potentially favorable.

  17. Nature and chlorine reactivity of organic constituents from reclaimed water in groundwater, Los Angeles County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Rostad, C.E.; Barber, L.B.; Schroeder, R.A.; Anders, R.; Davisson, M.L.

    2001-01-01

    The nature and chlorine reactivity of organic constituents in reclaimed water (tertiary-treated municipal wastewater) before, during, and after recharge into groundwater at the Montebello Forebay in Los Angeles County, CA, was the focus of this study. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in reclaimed water from this site is primarily a mixture of aromatic sulfonates from anionic surfactant degradation, N-acetyl amino sugars and proteins from bacterial activity, and natural fulvic acid, whereas DOM from native groundwaters in the aquifer to which reclaimed water was recharged consists of natural fulvic acids. The hydrophilic neutral N-acetyl amino sugars that constitute 40% of the DOM in reclaimed water are removed during the first 3 m of vertical infiltration in the recharge basin. Groundwater age dating with 3H and 3He isotopes, and determinations of organic and inorganic C isotopes, enabled clear differentiation of recent recharged water from older native groundwater. Phenol structures in natural fulvic acids in DOM isolated from groundwater produced significant trihalomethanes (THM) and total organic halogen (TOX) yields upon chlorination, and these structures also were responsible for the enhanced SUVA and specific fluorescence characteristics relative to DOM in reclaimed water. Aromatic sulfonates and fulvic acids in reclaimed water DOM produced minimal THM and TOX yields.

  18. A water-quality monitoring network for Vallecitos Valley, Alameda County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrar, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    A water-quality monitoring network is proposed to detect the presence of and trace the movement of radioisotopes in the hydrologic system in the vicinity of the Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Alameda County, Calif. The source of the radioisotopes is treated industrial wastewater from the Vallecitos Nuclear Center that is discharged into an unnamed tributary of Vallecitos Creek. The effluent infiltrates the alluvium along the stream course, percolates downward to the water table, and mixes with the native ground water in the subsurface. The average daily discharge of effluent to the hydrologic system in 1978 was about 100,000 gallons. In Vallecitos Valley, the Livermore Gravel and the overlying alluvium constitute the groundwater reservoir. There is no subsurface inflow from adjacent groundwater basins. Groundwater flow in the Vallecitos subbasin is toward the southwest. The proposed network consists of four surface-water sampling sites and six wells to sample the groundwater system. Samples collected monthly at each site and analyzed for tritium and for alpha, beta, and gamma radiation would provide adequate data for monitoring. (USGS)

  19. Controlled Landfill Project in Yolo County, California for Environmental Benefits of Waste Stabilization and Minimization of Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, R.; Augenstein, D.; Kieffer, J.; Cohen, K.

    2003-12-01

    The Department of Public Works of Yolo County, California, USA has been testing an advanced approach to landfill bioreactors, controlled (or "enhanced") landfilling, at its Yolo County Central Landfill site near Davis, CA, since 1994. Overall objectives have been the management of waste landfilling for: (1) rapid completion of total gas generation; (2) maximum, high-efficiency gas capture; (3) waste volume reduction; and (4) maximum greenhouse gas and carbon sequestration benefits. Methane generation is controlled and enhanced through carefully managed moisture additions, and by taking advantage of landfill temperature elevation. The generated landfill methane, an important greenhouse gas, is recovered with high efficiency through extraction from a porous recovery layer beneath a surface geomembrane cover. Instrumentation included a total of 56 moisture and 15 temperature sensors in the two cells, gas flow monitoring by positive displacement gas meters, and accurate quantification of liquid inputs and outputs. Gas composition, waste volume reduction, base hydrostatic head, and a range of environmental compliance parameters has been monitored since 1995. Partitioning gas tracer tests using the injection of two gases at dilute concentrations in the landfill have also been initiated to compute the fraction of pore space occupied by water between the points of tracer injection and tracer measurement. There has been rapid waste volume reduction in the enhanced cell that corresponds to the solids' reduction to gas. Monitoring is planned for the next several years, until stabilization parameters are determined complete. Encouraging performance is indicated by: (1) sensor data; (2) gas generation results; (3) data from landfill cores; and (4) decomposition-related indicators including rapid volume reduction. When data are synthesized, project results have attractive implications for new approaches to landfill management. Over seven-years, methane recoveries have averaged over fivefold the "typical" values for comparable landfill waste. In terms of "greenhouse benefit," fractional VOC and methane energy recovery are estimated to exceed 90%, with corresponding methane and VOC emission reductions. Analyses done for the greenhouse gas mitigation program of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory indicate favorable economics justified on landfill life extension, as well as environmental benefits. The "controlled landfill" project findings suggest potential for low-cost mitigation of waste greenhouse methane emissions, maximum landfill carbon sequestration, and maximization of beneficial energy capture from landfills. Details and results obtained since 1994 will be presented.

  20. A debris avalanche at Forest Falls, San Bernardino County, California, July 11, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Douglas M.; Hauser, Rachel M.

    2001-01-01

    The community of Forest Falls, California, is frequently subject to relatively slow moving debris flows. Some 11 debris flow events that were destructive to property have been recorded between 1955 and 1998. On July 11 and 13, 1999, debris flows again occurred, produced by high-intensity, short-duration monsoon rains. Unlike previous debris flow events, the July 11 rainfall generated a high-velocity debris avalanche in Snow Creek, one of the several creeks crossing the composite, debris flow dominated, alluvial fan on which Forest Falls is located. This debris avalanche overshot the bank of the active debris flow channel of Snow Creek, destroying property in the near vicinity and taking a life. The minimum velocity of this avalanche is calculated to have been in the range of 40 to 55 miles per hour. Impact from high-velocity boulders removed trees where the avalanche overshot the channel bank. Further down the fan, the rapidly moving debris fragmented the outer parts of the upslope side of large pine trees and embedded rock fragments into the tree trunks. Unlike the characteristic deposits formed by debris flows, the avalanche spread out down-slope and left no deposit suggestive of a debris avalanche. This summer monsoon-generated debris avalanche is apparently the first recorded for Forest Falls. The best indications of past debris avalanches may be the degree of permanent scars produced by extensive abrasion and splintering of the outer parts of pine trees that were in the path of an avalanche.

  1. Preliminary report on part of the Oat Hill quicksilver mine, Mayacmas district, Napa County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fix, Philip Forsyth

    1955-01-01

    Oat Hill quicksilver mine, located in the Mayacmas district of northern California, and credited with having produced more than 160,000 flasks of quicksilver, was sampled cooperatively by the Buray of Mines and Geological Survey during 1944. 28 diamond drill holes totaling 8,120 feet were drilled by the Bureau of Mines in four of the six principal veins to sample virgin low-grade reserves and stope fill, and reserves in the other two veins were estimated from existing underground workings and by inferences from drill holes in nearby veins. The writer estimates a total of 10,220 flasks of quicksilver in indicated and inferred reserves totaling 320,000 tons. Indicated reserves minable under 1943 conditions are estimated at 1,960 flasks of quicksilver in 75,000 tons averaging 3.0 lbs Hg per ton. Inferred reserves minable under 1943 conditions are estimated at 4,640 flasks of quicksilver in 109,920 tons averaging about 3.2 lbs Hg per ton. Inferred reserves believed minable only under economic conditions much more favorable than even those of 1943 are estimated at 2,620 flasks of quicksilver in 135,080 tons averaging a little less than 1.5 lbs Hg per ton. About two-thirds of the indicated reserves are accessible in underground workings. All other reserves are estimated approximately without access underground. Several areas not sampled may possibly contain reserves.

  2. Comments on potential geologic and seismic hazards affecting Mare Island, Solano County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, T.L.; Wentworth, C.M.; Bakun, W.H.; Boatwright, J.; Brocher, T.E.; Çelebi, M.; Ellsworth, W.L.; Fletcher, J.P.B.; Geist, E.L.; Graymer, R.W.; Kayen, R.E.; Keefer, D.K.; Oppenheimer, D.H.; Savage, W.U.; Schwartz, D.P.; Simpson, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    This report was prepared in response to a written request from the City of Vallejo, California, to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). By letter of October 4, 2002, the City requested that the USGS "provide advice to the City’s LNG Health and Safety Committee on its review of a potential liquid natural gas project" on the southern portion of Mare Island. The City specifically requested that the USGS advise the committee on potential hazards including fault rupture, earthquake ground motion, soil failure during earthquakes, tsunami and seiche, and landslides. The City requested that the USGS: (1) comment on these hazards, (2) describe its degree of confidence in its opinions, and (3) describe the scope of additional studies that will be needed if the City enters into an agreement with project sponsors. Advice was also requested on the selection of the safe shutdown and operating basis earthquakes as specified in the NFPA 59A standard (NFPA, 2001). This review of published reports and other publicly available information indicates that all of the hazards on which the USGS was asked to comment should be considered for the proposed project on the southern portion of Mare Island. Available information differs greatly for each of these potential hazards, and adequate understanding for design will require detailed site-specific investigations.

  3. Final Report: Natural State Models of The Geysers Geothermal System, Sonoma County, California

    SciTech Connect

    T. H. Brikowski; D. L. Norton; D. D. Blackwell

    2001-12-31

    Final project report of natural state modeling effort for The Geysers geothermal field, California. Initial models examined the liquid-dominated state of the system, based on geologic constraints and calibrated to match observed whole rock delta-O18 isotope alteration. These models demonstrated that the early system was of generally low permeability (around 10{sup -12} m{sup 2}), with good hydraulic connectivity at depth (along the intrusive contact) and an intact caprock. Later effort in the project was directed at development of a two-phase, supercritical flow simulation package (EOS1sc) to accompany the Tough2 flow simulator. Geysers models made using this package show that ''simmering'', or the transient migration of vapor bubbles through the hydrothermal system, is the dominant transition state as the system progresses to vapor-dominated. Such a system is highly variable in space and time, making the rock record more difficult to interpret, since pressure-temperature indicators likely reflect only local, short duration conditions.

  4. Artificial recharge in the Waterman Canyon-East Twin Creek area, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, J.W.; Moreland, J.A.

    1973-01-01

    This is a study of the feasibility of recharging, in the Waterman Canyon-East Twin Creek area, imported water from northern California by way of the State Water Project beginning in 1972. The feasibility of recharging 30,000 acre-feet of water a year in the Waterman Canyon-East Twin Creek area will depend on the effectiveness of fault K as a barrier to ground-water movement near the land surface. The results of test drilling and an infiltration test indicate that the subsurface material at the spreading grounds is permeable enough to allow recharged water to percolate to the water table. The data indicate that fault K extends into the Waterman Canyon-East Twin Creek area and may impede the lateral movement of recharged water. Fault K has no known surface expression and therefore probably does not affect the highly permeable younger alluvium. If that is so, fault K will be less effective as a barrier to ground-water movement as the recharge mound rises. Monitoring of the observation wells near the spreading grounds as the planned recharge operation proceeds should provide data about the hydrologic effects of fault K near the land surface.

  5. Swath bathymetric survey of Englebright Lake, Yuba-Nevada Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childs, Jonathan R.; Stevenson, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    In March, 2004, the USGS conducted a swath bathymetric survey of Englebright Lake, a 9-mile long reservoir located in the Sierra Nevada foothills of northern California on the Yuba River. This survey was follow-on to an earlier bathymetric survey and sediment thickness analysis done by the USGS in 2001 (Childs and others, 2003). The primary purpose of these studies is to assess the quantity and nature of the sediment that has accumulated since the dam was completed in 1940. The specific purpose of the swath bathymetry was to map in high detail the prograding delta that is being formed as the lake fills in with sediment. In the event of another large flood such as occurred on January 1, 1997, the survey could be repeated to determine the effect of such an event on the sediment volume and distribution. This study was conducted under the auspices of the Upper Yuba River Studies Program (UYRSP) . The UYRSP is funded by the CALFED Bay-Delta Program, whose mission is to "develop and implement a long-term comprehensive plan that will restore ecological health and improve water management for beneficial uses of the San Francisco Bay-Delta System".

  6. Geohydrology and mathematical simulation of the Pajaro Valley aquifer system, Santa Cruz and Monterey counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, M.J.; Londquist, C.J.; Laudon, Julie; Mitten, H.T.

    1988-01-01

    Groundwater development has resulted in lowered water levels and seawater intrusion in the Pajaro Valley, California. An investigation was undertaken to describe the geohydrology of the groundwater flow system and to evaluate the response of the system to pumping stresses by using a mathematical model. The aquifer system consists of three aquifers. The lower aquifer is in fluvial sequences of Quaternary Aromas Sand below interbedded clay layers. The middle aquifer is in upper fluvial and lower eolian sequence of Aromas Sand, and in overlying basal gravels in terrace deposits and alluvium. Weathered soil zones in the Aromas Sand, and clay layers in the terrace deposits and alluvium overlie the middle aquifer. The upper aquifer is actually many discontinuous water bearing zones in the Aromas Sand, terrace deposits, alluvium, and dune sand. The three aquifers are represented in the mathematical model by three model layers separated by two confining layers. Model-generated water budgets for the 11-year simulation period show that storage decreased by 23,000 acre-ft, mostly during the 1976-77 drought. The calibrated model can simulate, with acceptable accuracy, both semiannual and long-term trends of potentiometric heads in parts of the lower and middle layers. (USGS)

  7. Honey Lake hybrid geothermal wood residue power plant, Lassen County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    The feasibility of a proposed 50 MW (gross) electric power project located near Wendel, California about 25 miles east of Susanville was studied. The project would be the first commercial power plant to combine the use of geothermal energy and wood fuel for power production. Wood fuel consisting primarily of various forms of forest management residues would be processed and partially dehydrated with geothermal energy prior to combustion. Geothermal energy would also be used for boiler feedwater heating and combustion air preheating. The study defines the range of site-specific benefits and economics of using wood fuel and moderate temperature geothermal energy, both of which are abundant and often located in proximity at many locations in the western United States. The study results document conclusively that overall project economics can be very favorable and that in addition to providing an important source of electric power, many benefits to forest land managers, local communities, project developers and the state of the environment can be derived from the combined use of moderate temperature geothermal energy and wood fuel.

  8. Water quality of the Lexington Reservoir, Santa Clara County, California, 1978-80

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwatsubo, R.T.; Sylvester, M.A.; Gloege, I.S.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of water samples from Lexington Reservoir and Los Gatos Creek upstream from the reservoir from June 1978 through September 1980 showed that water generally met water-quality objectives identified by California Regional Water Quality Control Board, San Francisco Bay Region. Water-temperature profiles show that Lexington Reservoir is a warm monomictic lake. During summer, dissolved-oxygen concentrations generally were not reduced below 5.0 mg/L in the hyplimnion; only once during the study did bottom waters become anoxic. Water transparency decreased with depth. The euphotic zone ranged from 1.0 to 5.4 m, depending on suspended solids and algae, and was greater in summer than in spring. Calcium and bicarbonate were dominant ions at all stations except during spring, following the rainy season, when waters were a mixed cation bicarbonate type. Nitrogen concentrations were greater in samples from reservoir stations than in those from Los Gatos Creek, with most of the nitrogen in ammonia and organic forms. The amount of dissolved nitrate appeared to be related to phytoplankton abundance. Phosphorus and trace-element concentrations were low at all stations. Estimates of net primary productivity and Carlson 's trophic-state index, based on chlorophyll-a concentrations, indicated that reservoir classification ranges from oligotrophic to mesotrophic. Blue-green algae generally were predominant in reservoir samples. (USGS)

  9. Preliminary results of hydrogeologic investigations Humboldt River Valley, Winnemucca, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, Philip M.

    1964-01-01

    Most of the ground water of economic importance and nearly all the ground water closely associated with the flow o# the Humboldt River in the. 40-mile reach near Winnemucca, Nev., are in unconsolidated sedimentary deposits. These deposits range in age from Pliocene to Recent and range in character from coarse poorly sorted fanglomerate to lacustrine strata of clay, silt, sand, and gravel. The most permeable deposit consists of sand and gravel of Lake Lahontan age--the so-called medial gravel unit--which is underlain and overlain by fairly impermeable silt and clay also of Lake Lahontan age. The ultimate source of nearly all the water in the study area is precpitation within the drainage basin of the Humboldt River. Much of this water reaches the study, area as flow or underflow of the Humboldt River and as underflow from other valleys tributary to the study area. Little if any flow from the tributary streams in the study area usually reaches the Humboldt River. Most of the tributary streamflow within the study area evaporates or is transpired by vegetation, but a part percolates downward through unconsolidated deposits of the alluvial fans flanking the mountains and move downgradient as ground-water underflow toward the Humboldt River. Areas that contribute significant amounts of ground-water underflow to. the valley of the Humboldt River within the study area are (1) the valley of the Humboldt River upstream from the study area, (2) the Pole Creek-Rock Creek area, (3) Paradise Valley, and (4) Grass Valley and the northwestern slope of the Sonoma Range. The total average underflow from these areas in the period 1949-61 was about 14,000-19,000 acre-feet per year. Much of this underflow discharged into the Humboldt River within the study area and constituted a large part of the base flow of the river. Streamflow in the Humboldt River increases substantially in the early spring, principally because of runoff to the river in the reaches upstream from the study area. The resulting increase of the stage of the river causes the river to lose large amounts of water by infiltration to the ground-water reservoir in the study area. In addition, there is much recharge to the ground-water reservoir in the spring and early summer as a result of seepage losses from irrigation ditches and the downward percolation of some of the excess water applied for irrigation. The average net increase of ground water in storage in the deposits beneath and adjacent to the flood plain of the Humboldt River during the spring and early summer is about 10,000 acre-feet.

  10. Health of resettled Iraqi refugees --- San Diego County, California, October 2007-September 2009.

    PubMed

    2010-12-17

    In recent years, Iraqi refugees have been resettling in the United States in large numbers, with approximately 28,000 arrivals during October 2007-September 2009 (federal fiscal years [FYs] 2008 and 2009). All refugees undergo a required medical examination before departure to the United States to prevent importation of communicable diseases, including active tuberculosis (TB), as prescribed by CDC Technical Instructions. CDC also recommends that refugees receive a more comprehensive medical assessment after arrival, which typically occurs within the first 90 days of arrival. To describe the health profile of resettled Iraqi refugees, post-arrival medical assessment data were reviewed for 5,100 Iraqi refugees who underwent full or partial assessments at the San Diego County refugee health clinic during FYs 2008 and 2009. Among 4,923 screened refugees aged >1 year, 692 (14.1%) had latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI); among 3,047 screened adult refugees aged >18 years, 751 (24.6%) were classified as obese; and among 2,704 screened adult refugees, 410 (15.2%) were hypertensive. Although infectious illness has been the traditional focus of refugee medical screening, a high prevalence of chronic, noninfectious conditions that could lead to serious morbidity was observed among Iraqi refugees. Public health agencies should be aware of the potentially diverse health profiles of resettling refugee groups. Medical assessment of arriving refugee populations, with timely collection and review of health data, enables early detection, treatment, and follow-up of conditions, and can help public health agencies develop and set priorities for population-specific health interventions and guidelines. PMID:21160458

  11. l'cole Polytechnique Seminaire du Prix Gay-Lussac / Humboldt

    E-print Network

    Botti, Silvana

    à l'École Polytechnique Seminaire du Prix Gay-Lussac / Humboldt À l'occasion de la visite du Prof. Friedhelm Bechstedt au Laboratoire des Solides Irradiés, dans le cadre de son prix Gay Lussac/Humboldt 2008

  12. Geologic Map of the southern Inyo Mountains and vicinity, Inyo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Paul; Swanson, Brian J.; Stevens, Calvin H.; Dunne, George C.; Priest, Susan S.

    2009-01-01

    The Inyo Mountains are located in east-central California between Owens Valley on the west and Saline Valley on the east. This map encompasses the southernmost part of the Inyo Mountains and vicinity, which is centered on the high plateau of Conglomerate Mesa and extends from Owens Valley on the west to the Santa Rosa Hills, Lee Flat, and the Nelson Range on the east. The area includes parts of the Cerro Gordo Peak, Nelson Range, Keeler, and Santa Rosa Flat 7.5' quadrangles. Sedimentary and volcanic rocks, unconformities, and structural features exposed in the southern Inyo Mountains region provide information critical for reconstructing the complex Paleozoic and Mesozoic tectonic evolution of the southwestern United States. Ordovician to Cretaceous rocks in the map area record a long geologic history during which the continental margin of the western United States gradually changed from a passive tectonic setting in the early and middle Paleozoic to an active tectonic setting in the Jurassic and Cretaceous. A major highlight of the map area is the unusually complete record of late Paleozoic to earliest Mesozoic (Pennsylvanian to Triassic) deformation and sedimentation that marked the transition between the passive and active margin settings. The area also provides an excellent record of Jurassic to Cretaceous deformation and igneous activity that characterized the middle to late Mesozoic active margin. This map provides a detailed depiction of all the Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks and structural features known in the area. The area also contains important exposures of upper Cenozoic rocks related to the evolution of the Basin and Range province, although detailed mapping of these rocks was beyond the scope of this study.

  13. Significant results of deep drilling at Elk Hills, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Fishburn, M.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Naval Petroleum Reserve 1 (Elk Hills) is located in the southwestern San Joaquin basin one of the most prolific oil-producing areas in the US. Although the basin is in a mature development stage, the presence of favorable structures and high-quality source rocks continue to make the deeper parts of the basin, specifically Elk Hills, an inviting exploration target. Of the three deep tests drilled by the US Department of Energy since 1976, significant geologic results were achieved in two wells. Well 987-25R reached low-grade metamorphic rock at 18,761 ft after penetrating over 800 ft of salt below the Eocene Point of Rocks Sandstone. In well 934-29R, the deepest well in California, Cretaceous sedimentary rocks were encountered at a total depth of 24,426 ft. In well 934-29R several major sand units were penetrated most of which encountered significant gas shows. Minor amounts of gas with no water were produced below 22,000 ft. In addition, production tests at 17,000 ft produced 46{degree} API gravity oil. Geochemical analysis of cores and cuttings indicated that the potential for hydrocarbon generation exists throughout the well and is significant because the possibility of hydrocarbon production exists at a greater depth than previously expected. A vertical seismic profile in the well indicated that basement at this location is at approximately 25,500 ft. Successful drilling of well 934-29R was attributed to the use of an oil-based mud system. The well took 917 days to drill, including 9,560 rotating hr with 134 bits. Bottom-hole temperature was 431{degree}F and pressures were approximately 18,000 psi. The high overburden pressure at 24,000 ft created drilling problems that ultimately led to the termination of drilling at 24,426 ft.

  14. Review of Vedder pool development, Kern River field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Condon, M.W.

    1986-07-01

    The Kern River field is located on the east side of the San Joaquin Valley, just north of Bakersfield, California. Since its discovery in 1899, the field has produced over 1 billion bbl of heavy oil from the Kern River Formation. It was not until 1981 that light oil was discovered from a deeper zone, the Vedder formation. The discovery well, Getty Oil Company WD-1 Apollo, encountered 40 ft of net oil sand within the third Vedder sand and was completed on pump for an initial production of 100 bbl of 40.5/sup 0/ API oil and 200 MCDGD. As suggested by its name, WD-1 Apollo was drilled as a water-water injection wells. However, a detailed subsurface study of the field suggested the possibility of a trap within the Vedder formation. The originally proposed location of WD-1 Apollo was then moved to test the proposal. The trap is a series of intersecting, up-to-the-basin normal faults trending west and northwest. These faults have dropped impermeable silty zones within the Vedder formation against the productive Vedder sands. Since the completion of WD-1 Apollo, nine other wells have been drilled within this pool, extending production over 1 mi to the southeast. One of the first of the extension wells, Getty Oil Company 73X Central Point, located approximately 600 ft southeast of WD-1 Apollo, established production from the second Vedder sand. This well was completed flowing 300 b/d of 32/sup 0/ API oil and 1000 MCFGD through a 16/64-in. choke. Through December 1985, Texaco (Getty Oil) produced more than 250,000 bbl of oil and 350,000 mcf of gas combined from the second and third Vedder sands from 2.5 net wells. Although attempts to find other such Vedder pools have met with limited success, there is still the potential for many to exist, given proper structural closure, as seen in the Apollo pool.

  15. Evaluation of the potential for artificial ground-water recharge in eastern San Joaquin County, California; Phase 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamlin, S.N.

    1987-01-01

    Infiltration tests were used to evaluate the potential of basin spreading surface water as a means of artificially recharging the aquifer system in eastern San Joaquin County, California. Two infiltration sites near Lockeford and Linden were selected on the basis of information collected during the first two phases of the study. Data from the infiltration tests indicate that the two sites are acceptable for recharge by the basin-spreading method. Infiltration rates ranged between 6.7 and 10.5 ft/day near Lockeford and between 2.6 and 11.2 ft/day near Linden. Interpretation of these data is limited by lack of information on the response of the saturated zone during testing and by the inherent difficulty in extrapolating the results of small-scale tests to larger long-term operations. Lithology is a major factor that controls infiltration rates at the test sites. The unsaturated zone is characterized by heterogeneous layers of coarse- and fine- grained materials. Clay layers of low hydraulic conductivity commonly form discontinuous lenses that may cause a transient perched water table to develop during recharge. Water level measurements from wells screened in the unsaturated zone indicate that the perched water table could reach the land surface after 2 and 5 months of recharge near Lockeford and Linden, respectively. These figures probably represent the minimum time necessary for saturation of the land. Another major factor that affects infiltration rates is the quality of the recharge water, particularly the suspended sediment content. The clogging action of suspended sediment may be minimized by: (1) pretreatment of recharge water in a settling pond, (2) adherence to a routine program of monitoring and maintenance, and (3) proper design of the recharge facility. Other factors that affect infiltration rates include basin excavation technique, basin shape, and maintenance procedures. Efficient operation of the recharge facility requires careful attention to the relation between subsurface water levels and infiltration rates. (Author 's abstract)

  16. Review of samples of tailings, soils and stream sediment adjacent to and downstream from the Ruth Mine, Inyo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rytuba, James J.; Kim, Christopher S.; Goldstein, Daniel N.

    2011-01-01

    The Ruth Mine and mill are located in the western Mojave Desert in Inyo County, California (fig. 1). The mill processed gold-silver (Au-Ag) ores mined from the Ruth Au-Ag deposit, which is adjacent to the mill site. The Ruth Au-Ag deposit is hosted in Mesozoic intrusive rocks and is similar to other Au-Ag deposits in the western Mojave Desert that are associated with Miocene volcanic centers that formed on a basement of Mesozoic granitic rocks (Bateman, 1907; Gardner, 1954; Rytuba, 1996). The volcanic rocks consist of silicic domes and associated flows, pyroclastic rocks, and subvolcanic intrusions (fig. 2) that were emplaced into Mesozoic silicic intrusive rocks (Troxel and Morton, 1962). The Ruth Mine is on Federal land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Tailings from the mine have been eroded and transported downstream into Homewood Canyon and then into Searles Valley (figs. 3, 4, 5, and 6). The BLM provided recreational facilities at the mine site for day-use hikers and restored and maintained the original mine buildings in collaboration with local citizen groups for use by visitors (fig. 7). The BLM requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with Chapman University, measure arsenic (As) and other geochemical constituents in soils and tailings at the mine site and in stream sediments downstream from the mine in Homewood Canyon and in Searles Valley (fig. 3). The request was made because initial sampling of the site by BLM staff indicated high concentrations of As in tailings and soils adjacent to the Ruth Mine. This report summarizes data obtained from field sampling of mine tailings and soils adjacent to the Ruth Mine and stream sediments downstream from the mine on June 7, 2009. Our results permit a preliminary assessment of the sources of As and associated chemical constituents that could potentially impact humans and biota.

  17. Sediment accumulation in San Leandro Bay, Alameda County, California, during the 20th century : a preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nolan, K.M.; Fuller, C.C.

    1986-01-01

    Major changes made in the configuration of San Leandro Bay, Alameda County, California, during the 20th century have caused rapid sedimentation within parts of the Bay. Opening of the Oakland tidal channel and removal of 97% of the marshlands formerly surrounding the Bay have decreased tidal velocities and volumes. Marshland removal has decreased the tidal prism by about 25%. Comparison of bathymetric surveys indicates that sedimentation in the vicinity of the San Leandro Bay channel averaged 0.7 cm/annum between 1856 and 1984. Lead-210 data collected at four shallow water sites east of the San Leandro Bay channel indicated that sedimentation rates have averaged between 0.06 and 0.28 cm/annum. Because bioturbation of bottom sediments cannot be discounted, better definition of this range in sedimentation rates would required measuring the activity of lead-210 on incoming sediments. In addition to sediment deposited in the vicinity of the San Leandro Bay channel and open, shallow areas to the east, 850,740 cu m of sediment was deposited between 1948 and 1983 in an area dredged at the mouth of San Leandro Creek. All available data indicate that between 1 ,213,000 and 1,364,000 cu m of sediment was deposited in San Leandro Bay between 1948 and 1983. Sediment yield data from an adjacent drainage basin, when combined with inventories of lead-210 and cesium-137, indicate that most of the sediment deposited in San Leandro Bay is coming from resuspension of bottom sediments or from erosion of marshes or shorelines of San Leandro or San Francisco Bay. (Author 's abstract)

  18. Distribution of the endangered giant kangaroo rat, Dipodomys ingens, on the Naval Petroleum Reserves, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Mathews, N.E.; Kato, T.T.; McCue, P.M.; McManus, J.S.; Sauls, M.L.

    1987-07-01

    Field surveys were conducted to determine the distribution and relative abundance of burrow systems of the endangered giant kangaroo rat, Dipodomys ingens, on the US Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum Reserves (NPR-1, NPR-2) in Kern County, California. A total of 1080 burrow systems were observed on 30 sections of NPR-1, 22 sections of NPR-2, and six adjoining sections. Most burrow systems were found in clusters on deep sandy loams in Buena Vista Valley, but isolated burrows were found in similar soils on the upper slopes or crests of ridges in 30 other sections of the reserves. Burrow systems had an average of 3.3 horizontal entrances measuring 2.7 in. high and 3.4 in. wide, and an average of 1.4 vertical entrances 2.0 in. in diameter. In the valleys burrows occurred in a density of 28.2 per acre; had an average slope angle of 4.3/sup 0/; were within 3.3 yd of a perennial shrub, usually a cheese-bush, Hymenoclea salsola; had a predominantly southern aspect; and were grazed by sheep, but were remote from petroleum production activities. In the uplands burrows occurred in a density of 0.1 per acre; had an average slope angle of 6.4/sup 0/; were within 5.1 yd of a perennial shrub, usually a desert saltbush, Atriplex polycarpa; had no particular aspect; and were not grazed by sheep, but were close to petroleum production activities. Since 1980, preconstruction surveys have helped conserve giant kangaroo rat burrows that may have been inadvertently threatened by construction projects on the reserves.

  19. Arsenic speciation in pyrite and secondary weathering phases, Mother Lode gold district, Tuolumne County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, K.S.; Tingle, Tracy N.; O'Day, Peggy A.; Waychunas, Glenn A.; Bird, Dennis K.

    2004-10-27

    Arsenian pyrite, formed during Cretaceous gold mineralization, is the primary source of As along the Melones fault zone in the southern Mother Lode Gold District of California. Mine tailings and associated weathering products from partially submerged inactive gold mines at Don Pedro Reservoir, on the Tuolumne River, contain approx. 20-1300 ppm As. The highest concentrations are in weathering crusts from the Clio mine and nearby outcrops which contain goethite or jarosite. As is concentrated up to 2150 ppm in the fine-grained (<63 mu-m) fraction of these Fe-rich weathering products. Individual pyrite grains in albite-chlorite schists of the Clio mine tailings contain an average of 1.2 wt. percent As. Pyrite grains are coarsely zoned, with local As concentrations ranging from approx. 0 to 5 wt. percent. Electron microprobe, transmission electron microscope, and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) analyses indicate that As substitutes for S in pyrite and is not present as inclusions of arsenopyrite or other As-bearing phases. Comparison with simulated EXAFS spectra demonstrates that As atoms are locally clustered in the pyrite lattice and that the unit cell of arsenian pyrite is expanded by approx. 2.6 percent relative to pure pyrite. During weathering, clustered substitution of As into pyrite may be responsible for accelerating oxidation, hydrolysis, and dissolution of arsenian pyrite relative to pure pyrite in weathered tailings. Arsenic K-edge EXAFS analysis of the fine-grained Fe-rich weathering products are consistent with corner-sharing between As(V) tetrahedra and Fe(III)-octahedra. Determinations of nearest-neighbor distances and atomic identities, generated from least-squares fitting algorithms to spectral data, indicate that arsenate tetrahedra are sorbed on goethite mineral surfaces but substitute for SO4 in jarosite. Erosional transport of As-bearing goethite and jarosite to Don Pedro Reservoir increases the potential for As mobility and bioavailability by desorption or dissolution. Both the substrate minerals and dissolved As species are expected to respond to seasonal changes in lake chemistry caused by thermal stratification and turnover within the monomictic Don Pedro Reservoir. Arsenic is predicted to be most bioavailable and toxic in the reservoir's summer hypolimnion.

  20. Arsenic speciation in pyrite and secondary weathering phases, Mother Lode gold district, Tuolumne County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, K.S.; Tingle, Tracy N.; O'Day, Peggy A.; Waychunas, Glenn A.; Bird, Dennis K.

    2004-10-27

    Arsenian pyrite, formed during Cretaceous gold mineralization, is the primary source of As along the Melones fault zone in the southern Mother Lode Gold District of California. Mine tailings and associated weathering products from partially submerged inactive gold mines at Don Pedro Reservoir, on the Tuolumne River, contain approx. 20-1300 ppm As. The highest concentrations are in weathering crusts from the Clio mine and nearby outcrops which contain goethite or jarosite. As is concentrated up to 2150 ppm in the fine-grained (<63 mu-m) fraction of these Fe-rich weathering products. Individual pyrite grains in albite-chlorite schists of the Clio mine tailings contain an average of 1.2 wt. percent As. Pyrite grains are coarsely zoned, with local As concentrations ranging from approx. 0 to 5 wt. percent. Electron microprobe, transmission electron microscope, and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) analyses indicate that As substitutes for S in pyrite and is not p resent as inclusions of arsenopyrite or other As-bearing phases. Comparison with simulated EXAFS spectra demonstrates that As atoms are locally clustered in the pyrite lattice and that the unit cell of arsenian pyrite is expanded by approx. 2.6 percent relative to pure pyrite. During weathering, clustered substitution of As into pyrite may be responsible for accelerating oxidation, hydrolysis, and dissolution of arsenian pyrite relative to pure pyrite in weathered tailings. Arsenic K-edge EXAFS analysis of the fine-grained Fe-rich weathering products are consistent with corner-sharing between As(V) tetrahedra and Fe(III)-octahedra. Determinations of nearest-neighbor distances and atomic identities, generated from least-squares fitting algorithms to spectral data, indicate that arsenate tetrahedra are sorbed on goethite mineral surfaces but substitute for SO4 in jarosite. Erosional transport of As-bearing goethite and jarosite to Don Pedro Reservoir increases the potential for As mobility and bioavailability by desorption or dissolution. Both the substrate minerals and dissolved As species are expected to respond to seasonal changes in lake chemistry caused by thermal stratification and turnover within the monomictic Don Pedro Reservoir. Arsenic is predicted to be most bioavailable and toxic in the reservoir's summer hypolimnion.

  1. Environmental assessment of water, sediment, and biota collected from the Bear Creek watershed, Colusa County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rytuba, James J.; Hothem, Roger L.; Brussee, Brianne E.; Goldstein, Daniel; May, Jason T.

    2015-01-01

    The Cache Creek watershed lies within California's North Coast Range, an area with abundant geologic sources of mercury (Hg) and a long history of Hg contamination (Rytuba, 2000). Bear Creek, Cache Creek, and the North Fork of Cache Creek are the major streams of the Cache Creek watershed, encompassing 2978 km2. The Cache Creek watershed contains soils naturally enriched in Hg as well as natural springs (both hot and cold) with varying levels of aqueous Hg (Domagalski and others, 2004, Suchanek and others, 2004, Holloway and others 2009). All three tributaries are known to be significant sources of anthropogenically derived Hg from historic mines, both Hg and gold (Au), and associated ore storage/processing sites and facilities (Slotton and others, 1995, 2004; CVRWQCB, 2003; Schwarzbach and others, 2001; Gassel and others, 2005; Suchanek and others., 2004, 2008a, 2009). Historically, two of the primary sources of mercury contamination in the upper part of Bear Creek have been the Rathburn and Petray Hg Mines. The Rathburn Hg mine was discovered and initially mined in the early 1890s. The Rathburn and the more recently developed Petray open pit mines are localized along fault zones in serpentinite that has been altered and cut by quartz and chalcedony veins. Cold saline-carbonate springs are located perepheral to the Hg deposits and effluent from the springs locally has high concentrations of Hg (Slowey and Rytuba, 2008). Several ephemeral tributaries to Bear Creek drain the mine area which is located on federal land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (USBLM). The USBLM requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) measure and characterize Hg and other geochemical constituents in sediment, water, and biota to establish baseline information prior to remediation of the Rathburn and Petray mines. Samples sites were established in Bear Creek upstream and downstream from the mine area. This report is made in response to the USBLM request, the lead agency mandated to conduct a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) - Removal Site Investigation (RSI). The RSI applies to the possible removal of Hg-contaminated mine waste from Bear Creek. This report summarizes data obtained from field sampling of water, sediment, and biota in Bear Creek, above input from the mine area and downstream from the Rathburn-Petray mine area to the confluence with Cache Creek. Our results permit a preliminary assessment of the chemical constituents that could elevate levels of monomethyl Hg (MMeHg) in Bear Creek and its uptake by biota and provide baseline information for comparison to conditions after mine remediation is completed.

  2. 78 FR 22031 - California High-Speed Rail Authority-Construction Exemption-In Merced, Madera and Fresno Counties...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ... Surface Transportation Board California High-Speed Rail Authority--Construction Exemption--In Merced... Administration (FRA) and California High-Speed Rail Authority (Authority). This Final EIS is titled ``California High-Speed Train: Merced to Fresno Section, Final Project Environmental Impact...

  3. 78 FR 36823 - California High-Speed Rail Authority-Construction Exemption-in Merced, Madera and Fresno Counties...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... Surface Transportation Board California High-Speed Rail Authority--Construction Exemption--in Merced... requirements of 49 U.S.C. 10901 for the California High-Speed Rail Authority (Authority) to construct an approximately 65- mile high-speed passenger rail line between Merced and Fresno, California (the Project)....

  4. Review of mineral estate of the United States at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2, Buena Vista Hills Field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-09

    The purpose of this report is to present this Consultant`s findings regarding the nature and extent of the mineral estate of the United States at National Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2), Buena Vista Hills Field, Kern County, California. Determination of the mineral estate is a necessary prerequisite to this Consultant`s calculation of estimated future cash flows attributable to said estate, which calculations are presented in the accompanying report entitled ``Phase II Final Report, Study of Alternatives for Future Operations of the Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves, NPR-2, California.`` This Report contains a discussion of the leases in effect at NPR-2 and subsequent contracts affecting such leases. This Report also summarizes discrepancies found between the current royalty calculation procedures utilized at NPR-2 and those procedures required under applicable agreements and regulations. Recommendations for maximizing the government`s income stream at NPR-2 are discussed in the concluding section of this Report.

  5. UONPR No. 1, Elk Hills, 26R Reservoir, Elk Hills oil and gas field, Kern County, California: Management Review: Surface operations and measurements of production and injection volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    Evans, Carey and Crozier was given the task to conduct a Management Review of the Surface Operations of the 26R Reservoir in UONPR No. 1, Elk Hills field, Kern County, California. The MER strategy for this reservoir is to maintain pressure, and toward this end, gas injection volumes are scheduled to amount to 110% of calculated withdrawals. In spite of this, however, reservoir pressure continues to decline. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to determine if, and to what extent, field operating practices and accounting procedures may be contributing to this dilemma and to make appropriate recommendations pertaining to correcting any deficiencies which may have been found.

  6. Debris flows triggered by the El Nino rainstorm of February 2-3, 1998, Walpert Ridge and vicinity, Alameda County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coe, J.A.; Godt, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    On February 2 and 3, 1998, a rainstorm generated by the 1997-98 El Nino moved through the San Francisco Bay region of California triggering widespread slope failures. In the Walpert Ridge area of Alameda County 531 debris flows were triggered by the storm. These data depict the debris flows and landslides as polygons. The landslide polygons were mapped from 1:30,000 aerial photography using a PG2 photogrammetric plotter. The mapped debris flows and landslides were digitized manually in ArcInfo.

  7. Edoylerite, Hg32+Cr6+O4S2 a new mineral from the Clear Creek claim, San Benito County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erd, Richard C.; Roberts, Andrew C.; Bonardi, M.; Criddle, A.J.; Le, Page Y.; Gabe, E.J.

    1993-01-01

    Edoylerite is a rare constituent of a small prospect near the long-abandoned Clear Creek mercury mine, New Idria district, San Benito County, California. It is most closely associated with cinnabar, from which it is a primary alteration product, in a host rock composed predominantly of quartz, chalcedony and ferroan magnesite. Edoylerite typically occurs as acicular to stellate crystal groups on and around corroded masses of cinnabar. The mineral is canary yellow to orangish yellow, and possesses a yellow streak and an adamantine luster. The crystallographic, physical and optical properties of edoylerite are described. -after Authors

  8. Institut fr Physik der Humboldt-Universitt Willkommen zum Studium am

    E-print Network

    Röder, Beate

    Physik der Humboldt-Universität Head of Physikalisches Institut Hermann von Helmholtz 1871 -88 August Universität by Wilhelm von Humboldt 1828 ­ 1945 ,,Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität" Heinrich Wilhelm Dove first in Berlin Heinrich Hertz, Diss., Assistent, 1880-83 H. v. Helmholtz #12;Institut für Physik der Humboldt

  9. Geologic Map of the Santa Barbara Coastal Plain Area, Santa Barbara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minor, Scott A.; Kellogg, Karl S.; Stanley, Richard G.; Gurrola, Larry D.; Keller, Edward A.; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents a newly revised and expanded digital geologic map of the Santa Barbara coastal plain area at a compilation scale of 1:24,000 (one inch on the map to 2,000 feet on the ground)1 and with a horizontal positional accuracy of at least 20 m. The map depicts the distribution of bedrock units and surficial deposits and associated deformation underlying and adjacent to the coastal plain within the contiguous Dos Pueblos Canyon, Goleta, Santa Barbara, and Carpinteria 7.5' quadrangles. The new map supersedes an earlier preliminary geologic map of the central part of the coastal plain (Minor and others, 2002; revised 2006) that provided coastal coverage only within the Goleta and Santa Barbara quadrangles. In addition to new mapping to the west and east, geologic mapping in parts of the central map area has been significantly revised from the preliminary map compilation - especially north of downtown Santa Barbara in the Mission Ridge area - based on new structural interpretations supplemented by new biostratigraphic data. All surficial and bedrock map units, including several new units recognized in the areas of expanded mapping, are described in detail in the accompanying pamphlet. Abundant new biostratigraphic and biochronologic data based on microfossil identifications are presented in expanded unit descriptions of the marine Neogene Monterey and Sisquoc Formations. Site-specific fault kinematic observations embedded in the digital map database are more complete owing to the addition of slip-sense determinations. Finally, the pamphlet accompanying the present report includes an expanded and refined summary of stratigraphic and structural observations and interpretations that are based on the composite geologic data contained in the new map compilation. The Santa Barbara coastal plain is located in the western Transverse Ranges physiographic province along an east-west-trending segment of the southern California coastline about 100 km (62 mi) northwest of Los Angeles. The coastal plain surface includes several mesas and hills that are geomorphic expressions of potentially active folds and partly buried oblique and reverse faults of the Santa Barbara fold and fault belt (SBFFB) that transects the coastal plain. Strong earthquakes have occurred offshore within 10 km of the Santa Barbara coastal plain in 1925 (6.3 magnitude), 1941 (5.5 magnitude), and 1978 (5.1 magnitude). These and numerous smaller seismic events located beneath and offshore of the coastal plain, likely occurred on reverse-oblique-slip faults that are similar to, or continuous with, Quaternary reverse faults crossing the coastal plain. Thus, faults of the SBFFB pose a significant earthquake hazard to the approximately 200,000 people living within the major coastal population centers of Santa Barbara, Goleta, and Carpinteria. In addition, numerous Quaternary landslide deposits along the steep southern flank of the Santa Ynez Mountains indicate the potential for continued slope failures and mass movements in developed areas. Folded, faulted, and fractured sedimentary rocks in the subsurface of the coastal plain and adjacent Santa Barbara Channel are sources and form reservoirs for economic deposits of oil and gas, some of which are currently being extracted offshore. Shallow, localized sedimentary aquifers underlying the coastal plain provide limited amounts of water for the urban areas, but the quality of some of this groundwater is compromised by coastal salt-water contamination. The present map compilation provides a set of uniform geologic digital coverages that can be used for analysis and interpretation of these and other geologic hazards and resources in the coastal plain region.

  10. Assessing potential effects of changes in water use with a numerical groundwater-flow model of Carson Valley, Douglas County, Nevada, and Alpine County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Richard M.; Maurer, Douglas K.; Mayers, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid growth and development within Carson Valley in Douglas County, Nevada, and Alpine County, California, has caused concern over the continued availability of groundwater, and whether the increased municipal demand could either impact the availability of water or result in decreased flow in the Carson River. Annual pumpage of groundwater has increased from less than 10,000 acre feet per year (acre-ft/yr) in the 1970s to about 31,000 acre-ft/yr in 2004, with most of the water used in agriculture. Municipal use of groundwater totaled about 10,000 acre-feet in 2000. In comparison, average streamflow entering the valley from 1940 to 2006 was 344,100 acre-ft/yr, while average flow exiting the valley was 297,400 acre-ft/yr. Carson Valley is underlain by semi-consolidated Tertiary sediments that are exposed on the eastern side and dip westward. Quaternary fluvial and alluvial deposits overlie the Tertiary sediments in the center and western side of the valley. The hydrology of Carson Valley is dominated by the Carson River, which supplies irrigation water for about 39,000 acres of farmland and maintains the water table less than 5 feet (ft) beneath much of the valley floor. Perennial and ephemeral watersheds drain the Carson Range and the Pine Nut Mountains, and mountain-front recharge to the groundwater system from these watersheds is estimated to average 36,000 acre-ft/yr. Groundwater in Carson Valley flows toward the Carson River and north toward the outlet of the Carson Valley. An upward hydraulic gradient exists over much of the valley, and artesian wells flow at land surface in some areas. Water levels declined as much as 15 ft since 1980 in some areas on the eastern side of the valley. Median estimated transmissivities of Quaternary alluvial-fan and fluvial sediments, and Tertiary sediments are 316; 3,120; and 110 feet squared per day (ft2/d), respectively, with larger transmissivity values in the central part of the valley and smaller values near the valley margins. A groundwater-flow model of Quaternary and Tertiary sediments in Carson Valley was developed using MODFLOW and calibrated to simulate historical conditions from water years 1971 through 2005. The 35-year transient simulation represented quarterly changes in precipitation, streamflow, pumping and irrigation. Inflows to the groundwater system simulated in the model include mountain-front recharge from watersheds in the Carson Range and Pine Nut Mountains, valley recharge from precipitation and land application of wastewater, agricultural recharge from irrigation, and septic-tank discharge. Outflows from the groundwater system simulated in the model include evapotranspiration from the water table and groundwater withdrawals for municipal, domestic, irrigation and other water supplies. The exchange of water between groundwater, the Carson River, and the irrigation system was represented with a version of the Streamflow Routing (SFR) package that was modified to apply diversions from the irrigation network to irrigated areas as recharge. The groundwater-flow model was calibrated through nonlinear regression with UCODE to measured water levels and streamflow to estimate values of hydraulic conductivity, recharge and streambed hydraulic-conductivity that were represented by 18 optimized parameters. The aquifer system was simulated as confined to facilitate numerical convergence, and the hydraulic conductivity of the top active model layers that intersect the water table was multiplied by a factor to account for partial saturation. Storage values representative of specific yield were specified in parts of model layers where unconfined conditions are assumed to occur. The median transmissivity (T) values (11,000 and 800 ft2/d for the fluvial and alluvial-fan sediments, respectively) are both within the third quartile of T values estimated from specific-capacity data, but T values for Tertiary sediments are larger than the third quartile estimated from specific-capacity data. The estimated vertical anisotropy for the Quaternary fluvial sediments (9,000) is comparab

  11. Geohydrology of deep-aquifer system monitoring-well site at Marina, Monterey County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, Randall T.; Everett, Rhett; Newhouse, Mark W.; Crawford, Steven M.; Pimentel, M. Isabel; Smith, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    In 2000, a deep-aquifer system monitoring-well site (DMW1) was completed at Marina, California to provide basic geologic and hydrologic information about the deep-aquifer system in the coastal region of the Salinas Valley. The monitoring-well site contains four wells in a single borehole; one completed from 930 to 950 feet below land surface (bls) in the Paso Robles Formation (DMW1-4); one 1,040 to 1,060 feet below land surface in the upper Purisima Formation (DMW1-3); one from 1,410 to 1,430 feet below land surface in the middle Purisima Formation (DMW1-2); and one from 1,820 to 1,860 feet below land surface in the lower Purisima Formation (DMW1-1). The monitoring site is installed between the coast and several deep-aquifer system supply wells in the Marina Coast Water District, and the completion depths are within the zones screened in those supply wells. Sediments below a depth of 955 feet at DMW1 are Pliocene age, whereas the sediments encountered at the water-supply wells are Pleistocene age at an equivalent depth. Water levels are below sea level in DMW1 and the Marina Water District deep-aquifer system supply wells, which indicate that the potential for seawater intrusion exists in the deep-aquifer system. If the aquifers at DMW1 are hydraulically connected with the submarine outcrops in Monterey Bay, then the water levels at the DMW1 site are 8 to 27 feet below the level necessary to prevent seawater intrusion. Numerous thick fine-grained interbeds and confining units in the aquifer systems retard the vertical movement of fresh and saline ground water between aquifers and restrict the movement of seawater to narrow water-bearing zones in the upper-aquifer system.Hydraulic testing of the DMW1 and the Marina Water District supply wells indicates that the tested zones within the deep-aquifer system are transmissive water-bearing units with hydraulic conductivities ranging from 2 to 14.5 feet per day. The hydraulic properties of the supply wells and monitoring wells are similar, even though the wells are completed in different geologic formations.Geophysical logs collected at the DMW1 site indicate saline water in most water-bearing zones shallower than 720 feet below land surface and from about 1,025 to 1,130 feet below land surface, and indicate fresher water from about 910 to 950 feet below land surface (DMW1-4), 1,130 to 1,550 feet below land surface, and below 1,650 feet below land surface. Temporal differences between electromagnetic induction logs indicate possible seasonal seawater intrusion in five water-bearing zones from 350 to 675 feet below land surface in the upper-aquifer system.The water-chemistry analyses from the deep-aquifer system monitoring and supply wells indicate that these deep aquifers in the Marina area contain potable water with the exception of the saline water in well DMW1-3. The saline water from well DMW1-3 has a chloride concentration of 10,800 milligrams per liter and dissolved solids concentration of 23,800 milligrams per liter. The source of this water was determined not to be recent seawater based on geochemical indicators and the age of the ground water. The high salinity of this ground water may be related to the dissolution of salts from the saline marine clays that surround the water-bearing zone screened by DMW1-3. The major ion water chemistry of the monitoring wells and the nearby MCWD water-supply wells are similar, which may indicate they are in hydraulic connection, even though the stratigraphic layers differ below 955 feet below land surface.No tritium was detected in samples from the deep monitoring wells. The lack of tritium suggest that there is no recent recharge water (less than 50 years old) in the deep-aquifer system at the DMW1 site. The carbon-14 analyses of these samples indicate ground water from the monitoring site was recharged thousands of years ago.

  12. California coastal processes study, LANDSAT 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirie, D. M.; Steller, D. D. (principal investigators)

    1977-01-01

    The authors have identified the following significant results. By using suspended sediments as tracers, objectives were met by qualitative definition of the nearshore circulation along the entire coast of California with special study sites at Humboldt Bay, the mouth of the Russian River, San Francisco Bay, Monterey Bay, and the Santa Barbara Channel. Although LANDSAT primarily imaged fines and silts in the surface waters, the distribution of sediments allowed an examination of upwelling, convergences and coastal erosion and deposition. In Monterey Bay and Humboldt Bay, these coastal phenomena were used to trace seasonal trends in surface currents.

  13. Map showing locations of damaging landslides in Alameda County, California, resulting from 1997-98 El Nino rainstorms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coe, J.A.; Godt, J.W.; Brian, Dianne; Houdre, Nicolas

    1999-01-01

    Heavy rainfall associated with a strong El Nino caused over $150 million in landslide damage in the 10-county San Francisco Bay region during the winter and spring of 1998. A team of USGS scientists collected information on landslide locations and damage costs. In Alameda County more than $20 million in damages were assessed. Debris flows occurred in rural portions of the county, but were only responsible for $400 thousand in damages.

  14. Map showing locations of damaging landslides in San Mateo County, California, resulting from 1997-98 El Nino rainstorms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jayko, Angela S.; De Mouthe, Jean; Lajoie, Kenneth R.; Ramsey, David W.; Godt, Jonathan W.

    1999-01-01

    Heavy rainfall associated with a strong El Nino caused over $150 million in landslide damage in the 10-county San Francisco Bay region during the winter and spring of 1998. A team of USGS scientists collected information on landslide locations and damage costs. About $55 million in damages were assessed in San Mateo County. The only fatality attributed to landsliding in the region during the period occurred in San Mateo County near Loma Mar.

  15. Map showing locations of damaging landslides in Napa County, California, resulting from 1997-98 El Nino rainstorms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godt, Jonathan W.; Savage, William Z.; Wilson, Raymond C.

    1999-01-01

    Heavy rainfall associated with a strong El Nino caused over $150 million in landslide damage in the 10-county San Francisco Bay region during the winter and spring of 1998. A team of USGS scientists collected information on landslide locations and damage costs. Napa County was relatively unaffected in comparison to other counties in the region with approximately $1.1 million in damages assessed.

  16. Geohydrology, Geochemistry, and Ground-Water Simulation-Optimization of the Central and West Coast Basins, Los Angeles County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichard, Eric G.; Land, Michael; Crawford, Steven M.; Johnson, Tyler D.; Everett, Rhett; Kulshan, Trayle V.; Ponti, Daniel J.; Halford, Keith L.; Johnson, Theodore A.; Paybins, Katherine S.; Nishikawa, Tracy

    2003-01-01

    Historical ground-water development of the Central and West Coast Basins in Los Angeles County, California through the first half of the 20th century caused large water-level declines and induced seawater intrusion. Because of this, the basins were adjudicated and numerous ground-water management activities were implemented, including increased water spreading, construction of injection barriers, increased delivery of imported water, and increased use of reclaimed water. In order to improve the scientific basis for these water management activities, an extensive data collection program was undertaken, geohydrological and geochemical analyses were conducted, and ground-water flow simulation and optimization models were developed. In this project, extensive hydraulic, geologic, and chemical data were collected from new multiple-well monitoring sites. On the basis of these data and data compiled and collected from existing wells, the regional geohydrologic framework was characterized. For the purposes of modeling, the three-dimensional aquifer system was divided into four aquifer systems?the Recent, Lakewood, Upper San Pedro, and Lower San Pedro aquifer systems. Most pumpage in the two basins is from the Upper San Pedro aquifer system. Assessment of the three-dimensional geochemical data provides insight into the sources of recharge and the movement and age of ground water in the study area. Major-ion data indicate the chemical character of water containing less than 500 mg/L dissolved solids generally grades from calcium-bicarbonate/sulfate to sodium bicarbonate. Sodium-chloride water, high in dissolved solids, is present in wells near the coast. Stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen provide information on sources of recharge to the basin, including imported water and water originating in the San Fernando Valley, San Gabriel Valley, and the coastal plain and surrounding hills. Tritium and carbon-14 data provide information on relative ground-water ages. Water with abundant tritium (greater than 8 tritium units) is found in and downgradient from the Montebello Forebay and near the seawater barrier projects, indicating recent recharge. Water with less than measurable tritium is present in, and downgradient from, the Los Angeles Forebay and in most wells in the West Coast Basin. Water from several deep wells was analyzed for carbon-14. Uncorrected estimates of age for these samples range from 600 to more than 20,000 years before present. Chemical and isotopic data are combined to evaluate changes in chemical character along flow paths emanating from the Montebello and Los Angeles Forebays. A four-layer ground-water flow model was developed to simulate steady-state ground-water conditions representative of those in 1971 and transient conditions for the period 1971?2000. Model results indicate increases in ground-water storage in all parts of the study area over the simulated thirty-year period. The model was used to develop a three-dimensional ground-water budget and to assess impacts of two alternative future (2001?25) ground-water development scenarios?one that assumes continued pumping at average current rates and a second that assumes increasing pumping from most wells in the Central Basin. The model simulates stable or slightly increasing water levels for the first scenario and declining water levels (25 to 50 ft in the Central Basin) in the second scenario. Model sensitivity to parameter values and to the assumed Orange County boundary condition was evaluated. Particle tracking was applied to simulate advective transport of water from the spreading ponds, the coastline, and the seawater injection barriers. Particle tracking results indicate that most flow within the Upper San Pedro aquifer system occurs within about 20 percent of the total aquifer system thickness and that virtually all water injected into the seawater barrier projects has flowed inland. The simulation model was linked with optimizatio

  17. Users' guide to system dynamics model describing Coho salmon survival in Olema Creek, Point Reyes National Seashore, Marin County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodward, Andrea; Torregrosa, Alicia; Madej, Mary Ann; Reichmuth, Michael; Fong, Darren

    2014-01-01

    The system dynamics model described in this report is the result of a collaboration between U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists and National Park Service (NPS) San Francisco Bay Area Network (SFAN) staff, whose goal was to develop a methodology to integrate inventory and monitoring data to better understand ecosystem dynamics and trends using salmon in Olema Creek, Marin County, California, as an example case. The SFAN began monitoring multiple life stages of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in Olema Creek during 2003 (Carlisle and others, 2013), building on previous monitoring of spawning fish and redds. They initiated water-quality and habitat monitoring, and had access to flow and weather data from other sources. This system dynamics model of the freshwater portion of the coho salmon life cycle in Olema Creek integrated 8 years of existing monitoring data, literature values, and expert opinion to investigate potential factors limiting survival and production, identify data gaps, and improve monitoring and restoration prescriptions. A system dynamics model is particularly effective when (1) data are insufficient in time series length and/or measured parameters for a statistical or mechanistic model, and (2) the model must be easily accessible by users who are not modelers. These characteristics helped us meet the following overarching goals for this model: Summarize and synthesize NPS monitoring data with data and information from other sources to describe factors and processes affecting freshwater survival of coho salmon in Olema Creek. Provide a model that can be easily manipulated to experiment with alternative values of model parameters and novel scenarios of environmental drivers. Although the model describes the ecological dynamics of Olema Creek, these dynamics are structurally similar to numerous other coastal streams along the California coast that also contain anadromous fish populations. The model developed for Olema can be used, at least as a starting point, for other watersheds. This report describes each of the model elements with sufficient detail to guide the primary target audience, the NPS resource specialist, to run the model, interpret the results, change the input data to explore hypotheses, and ultimately modify and improve the model. Running the model and interpreting the results does not require modeling expertise on the part of the user. Additional companion publications will highlight other aspects of the model, such as its development, the rationale behind the methodological approach, scenario testing, and discussions of its use. System dynamics models consist of three basic elements: stocks, flows, and converters. Stocks are measurable quantities that can change over time, such as animal populations. Flows are any processes or conditions that change the quantity in a stock over time (Ford, 1999), are expressed in the model as a rate of change, and are diagrammed as arrows to or from stocks. Converters are processes or conditions that change the rate of flows. A converter is connected to a flow with an arrow indicating that it alters the rate of change. Anything that influences the rate of change (such as different environmental conditions, other external factors, or feedbacks from other stocks or flows) is modeled as a converter. For example, the number of fish in a population is appropriately modeled as a stock. Mortality is modeled as a flow because it is a rate of change over time used to determine the number of fish in the population. The density-dependent effect on mortality is modeled as a converter because it influences the rate of morality. Together, the flow and converter change the number, or stock, of juvenile coho. The instructions embedded in the stocks, flows, converters, and the sequence in which they are linked are processed by the simulation software with each completed sequence composing a model run. At each modeled time step within the model run, the stock counts will go up, down, or stay the same based on the modeled flows and the influence of converters on those f

  18. Effects of Residential Indoor Air Quality and Household Ventilation on Preterm Birth and Term Low Birth Weight in Los Angeles County, California

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Michelle; Ritz, Beate

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The purpose of our study was to examine the effects of indoor residential air quality on preterm birth and term low birth weight (LBW). Methods. We evaluated 1761 nonsmoking women from a case-control survey of mothers who delivered a baby in 2003 in Los Angeles County, California. In multinomial logistic regression models adjusted for maternal age, education, race/ethnicity, parity and birthplace, we evaluated the effects of living with smokers or using personal or household products that may contain volatile organic compounds and examined the influence of household ventilation. Results. Compared with unexposed mothers, women exposed to secondhand smoke (SHS) at home had increased odds of term LBW (adjusted odds ratio [OR]?=?1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI]?=? 0.85, 2.18) and preterm birth (adjusted OR?=?1.27; 95% CI?=?0.95, 1.70), although 95% CIs included the null. No increase in risk was observed for SHS-exposed mothers reporting moderate or high window ventilation. Associations were also observed for product usage, but only for women reporting low or no window ventilation. Conclusions. Residential window ventilation may mitigate the effects of indoor air pollution among pregnant women in Los Angeles County, California. PMID:23409879

  19. Studies on avian malaria in vectors and hosts of encephalitis in Kern County, California. I. Infections in avian hosts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Reeves, W.C.; McClure, H.E.; French, E.M.; Hammon, W.M.

    1954-01-01

    An epizoological study of Plasmodium infections in wild birds of Kern County, California, in the years 1946 through 1951 greatly extended knowledge of the occurrence of these parasites and their behavior in nature. Examination of 10,459 blood smears from 8,674 birds representing 73 species resulted in the observation of Plasmodium spp. in 1,094 smears representing 888 individual birds of 27 species. Seven species of Plasmodium were found: relictum, elongatum, hexamerium, nucleophilum, polare, rouxi and vaughani. Plasmodium relictum was by far the most frequently observed species, occurring in at least 79 per cent of the infected birds. Twelve new host species are recorded for this parasite. Sufficient morphological variation was observed to indicate that two strains of this species probably exist in nature. Numerous new host records were made of plasmodia with elongate gametocytes. The finding of parasites believed to be P. rouxi in two new host species represents the first record of the occurrence of this Plasmodium outside of Algeria. Multiple smears were obtained from a number of individual birds over varying time periods. Evidence of prolonged parasitemia was unusual, but some individuals had parasitemia on consecutive months and even for three successive years. In most individuals, parasitemias were of short duration. The inoculation of blood from wild birds into canaries led to the demonstration of many infections not observed on blood smear examination of donors. Use of these two complementary techniques led to more complete host records and a truer picture of the prevalence of infection. Three age classes of birds were studied--nestling, immature (less than 1 year of age) and adult. Parasites were observed in all three groups but infections in the younger individuals were most susceptible to interpretation. As to time of onset, numerous records were obtained of infection in nestling birds. Prevalence rates in immature birds after a single season's exposure ranged from 64 to 100 per cent in the house finch and 17 to 68 per cent in the English sparrow in different areas and years. Marked differences were found in the prevalence rates in different summer months, years and areas. It is believed these differences reflect variation in a number of environmental factors. This study indicates the extensive distribution of Plasmodium infection in a wide range of wild avian hosts. The observations are of possible importance in epidemiological studies of other arthropod-borne diseases such as the viral encephalitides for which these birds serve as hosts.

  20. Determination of channel capacity of the Mokelumne River downstream from Camanche Dam, San Joaquin and Sacramento Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, R.G.

    1972-01-01

    This study evaluates the adequacy of a 39-mile reach of the Mokelumne River in San Joaquin and Sacramento Counties, California, to carry planned flood releases between Camanche Reservoir and the Bensons Ferry Bridge near Thornton. The flood releases from Camanche Reservoir are to be restricted, insofar as possible, so that the flows in the Mokelumne River will not exceed 5,000 cfs (cubic feet per second) as measured at the gaging station below Camanche Dam. Areas of inundation and computed floodwater profiles are based on channel conditions in late 1970 and on observed water-surface profiles during flood releases of about 5,000 cfs in January 1969 and January 1970. The inundated area shown on the maps (appendix A) and the water-surface elevations indicated on the cross sections (appendix G) are for the flood releases of those dates. The following conclusions are contingent on there being no levee failures during periods of high flow and no significant channel changes since the flood release of January 1970. 1. High tides in San Francisco Bay and, to a greater degree, flood stages on the Cosumnes River, cause backwater in the study reach. Severe backwater conditions occurring simultaneously with a flow of 5,000 cfs in the Mokelumne River can increase the flood stage 4 to 6 feet at Bensons Ferry Bridge (cross section 1). Backwater effects decrease in an upstream direction and are less than 0.5 foot at cross section 35, a river distance of 8.6 miles upstream from cross section 1, and 1.5 miles downstream from the Peltier Road bridge. 2. In the reach between cross sections 1 and 35, a 5,000 cfs release from Camanche Reservoir with maximum backwater effect (measured at cross section 1 at the mouth of the Cosumnes River) is confined within the natural or leveed banks except on the right bank flood plain between cross sections 12 and 19. 3. Upstream from cross section 35, there is overbank flooding at a flow of 5,000 cfs between cross sections 48 and 51, and 62 and 67.5. An increase in flow from 5,000 to 6,000 cfs will cause flooding between cross sections 43 and 47, 52 and 56, and 73 and 85. 4. A discharge of 5,000 cfs will pass through all bridge openings in the study reach except that of the Western Pacific Railroad Co. bridge at cross section 4. If large amounts of debris lodge on the railroad bridge when backwater from the Cosumnes River occurs, the debris could cause higher stages and flooding along the right bank between cross sections 5 and 12.

  1. A Larger Volcanic Field About Yucca Mountain: New Geochemical Data From the Death Valley Volcanic Field, Inyo County California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbetts, A. K.; Smith, E. I.

    2008-12-01

    Volcanism is an important issue for the characterization of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Due to recent legal decisions that now require DOE to evaluate hazards over both 10,000 year and 1,000,000 year compliance periods, the definition of the area of interest for calculation of disruption probability and a knowledge of the volcanic process have become more important. New geochemical data for the Death Valley volcanic field in the Greenwater Range in Inyo County, California indicate that the Death Valley field and the volcanoes about Yucca Mountain are parts of the same volcanic field. The Death Valley field is just 35 km south of Yucca Mountain and only 20 km south of buried volcanoes in the Amargosa Valley. Trace elements for both areas show a negative Nb anomaly, but differ in that Death Valley basalt has lower La (70 vs. 130 ppm). Isotopic ratios are remarkably similar and strongly support a link between the Death Valley and Yucca Mountain areas. The isotope ranges for Death Valley are -11.88 to -3.26, 0.706322 to 0.707600, 17.725 to 18.509, 15.512 to 15.587, and 38.237 to 38.854 for epsilon Nd, 87Sr/86Sr, 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb respectively. Crater Flat isotope ranges are -13.17 to -5.48, 0.706221 to 0.707851, 18.066 to 18.706, 15.488 to 15.564, and 38.143 to 38.709 for epsilon Nd, 87Sr/86Sr, 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb respectively. Depth of melting calculated using the Fe-Na geobarometer indicates that basalt magma was generated at depths of 135-138 km beneath Death Valley and 115-133 km for Crater Flat indicating asthenospheric melting for both areas. Combining the Death Valley and Yucca Mountain areas into a single volcanic field increases the area of interest for probability calculations by over 1/3 and increases the number of volcanic events by 23. The increased size of the volcanic field and number of volcanoes may result in an increase in the probability of disruption of the repository by an igneous event by as much as two orders of magnitude.

  2. Physical, chemical, and isotopic data for samples from the Anderson Springs area, Lake County, California, 1998-1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Janik, C.J.; Goff, F.; Sorey, M.L.; Rytuba, J.J.; Counce, D.; Colvard, E.M.; Huebner, M.; White, L.D.; Foster, A.

    1999-01-01

    Anderson Springs is located about 90 miles (145 kilometers) north of San Francisco, California, in the southwestern part of Lake County. The area was first developed in the late 1800s as a health resort, which was active until the 1930s. In the rugged hills to the south of the resort were four small mercury mines of the eastern Mayacmas quicksilver district. About 1,260 flasks of mercury were produced from these mines between 1909 and 1943. In the 1970s, the high-elevation areas surrounding Anderson Springs became part of The Geysers geothermal field. Today, several electric powerplants are located on the ridges above Anderson Springs, utilizing steam produced from a 240°C vapor-dominated reservoir. The primary purpose of this report is to provide physical, chemical, and isotopic data on samples collected in the Anderson Springs area during 1998 and 1999, in response to a Freedom of Information Act request. In July 1998, drainage from the Schwartz adit of the abandoned Anderson mercury mine increased substantially over a 2-day period, transporting a slurry of water and precipitates down a tributary and into Anderson Creek. In August 1998, J.J. Rytuba and coworkers sampled the Schwartz adit drainage and water from the Anderson Springs Hot Spring for base metal and methylmercury analysis. They measured a maximum temperature (Tm) of 85°C in the Hot Spring. Published records show that the temperature of the Anderson Springs Hot Spring (main spring) was 63°C in 1889, 42–52°C from 1974 through 1991, and 77°C in March 1995. To investigate possible changes in thermal spring activity and to collect additional samples for geochemical analysis, C.J. Janik and coworkers returned to the area in September and December 1998. They determined that a cluster of springs adjacent to the main spring had Tm=98°C, and they observed that a new area of boiling vents and small fumaroles (Tm=99.3°C) had formed in an adjacent gully about 20 meters to the north of the main spring. During August–October 1999, several field trips were conducted in the vicinity of Anderson Springs to continue monitoring and sampling the thermal manifestations. The new fumarolic area had increased in temperature and in discharge intensity since 1998, and a zone of dead trees had developed on the steep bank directly west of the fumaroles. Ground temperatures and diffuse flow of CO2 flow through soils were measured in the area surrounding the main spring and new fumaroles and in the zone of tree-kill.

  3. Five-year resurvey for endangered species on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, (Elk Hills), Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Otten, M.R.M.; O`Farrell, T.P.; Briden, L.E.

    1992-06-01

    A transect survey of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1), Kern County, California, was conducted between July 3 and August 5, 1989 to determine the distribution and relative density of endangered species and other wildlife. Results were compared with other reported results, particularly the 1979 and 1984 surveys of NPR-1. A total of 589.8 miles of transects were walked through approximately 47,235 acres in all or parts of 81 sections. Of the 516 San Joaquin kit fox dens observed, 496 were typical subterranean dens and 20 were atypical dens in man-made structures. Estimated den density was 36.7 {plus_minus} 4.1 per square mile; and relative den density was 10.5/1,000 acres for all of NPR-1. Characteristics of typical kit fox dens were comparable to characteristics reported for other studies, except mean number of entrances per den, which was lower. Observers counted a total of 300 dens previously marked with an identification sign, 191 of which contained at least one complete entrance and would have been observed without a sign. Relative densities of preferred kit fox prey, black-toiled jackrabbits (40.1/1,000 acres) and desert cottontails (14.1/1,000 acres), were lower than previously recorded. Five blunt-nosed leopard lizards were observed along the southwest and northeast perimeter of the Reserve. Most of the 59 giant kangaroo rat burrow systems were observed in the flat terrain along the northeast and south perimeters of the Reserve. San Joaquin antelope squirrels were observed in the central and western parts of NPR- 1. A total of 73 antelope squirrels were observed, and the relative density was 1.511,000 acres. A total.of 30 possible environmental hazards were observed during transect surveys. Most of these were oil and water leaks of small size and appeared to pose little risk to endangered species. Results of this survey indicate that NPR-1 is supporting less wildlife than it did during either the 1979 or 1984 surveys.

  4. Five-year resurvey for endangered species on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, (Elk Hills), Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Otten, M.R.M.; O'Farrell, T.P.; Briden, L.E.

    1992-06-01

    A transect survey of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1), Kern County, California, was conducted between July 3 and August 5, 1989 to determine the distribution and relative density of endangered species and other wildlife. Results were compared with other reported results, particularly the 1979 and 1984 surveys of NPR-1. A total of 589.8 miles of transects were walked through approximately 47,235 acres in all or parts of 81 sections. Of the 516 San Joaquin kit fox dens observed, 496 were typical subterranean dens and 20 were atypical dens in man-made structures. Estimated den density was 36.7 [plus minus] 4.1 per square mile; and relative den density was 10.5/1,000 acres for all of NPR-1. Characteristics of typical kit fox dens were comparable to characteristics reported for other studies, except mean number of entrances per den, which was lower. Observers counted a total of 300 dens previously marked with an identification sign, 191 of which contained at least one complete entrance and would have been observed without a sign. Relative densities of preferred kit fox prey, black-toiled jackrabbits (40.1/1,000 acres) and desert cottontails (14.1/1,000 acres), were lower than previously recorded. Five blunt-nosed leopard lizards were observed along the southwest and northeast perimeter of the Reserve. Most of the 59 giant kangaroo rat burrow systems were observed in the flat terrain along the northeast and south perimeters of the Reserve. San Joaquin antelope squirrels were observed in the central and western parts of NPR- 1. A total of 73 antelope squirrels were observed, and the relative density was 1.511,000 acres. A total.of 30 possible environmental hazards were observed during transect surveys. Most of these were oil and water leaks of small size and appeared to pose little risk to endangered species. Results of this survey indicate that NPR-1 is supporting less wildlife than it did during either the 1979 or 1984 surveys.

  5. Reconnaissance of beryl-bearing pegmatites in the Ruby Mountains, other areas in Nevada, and northwestern Mohave County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Jerry Chipman; Hinrichs, E. Neal

    1957-01-01

    The scheelite-beryl deposits at Oreana and in Humboldt Canyon, Pershing County., are rich in beryllium.  Twelve samples from the Humboldt Canyon (Lakeview) deposit range from 0.018 to 0.11 percent BeO, but underground crosscuts have failed to intersect similar rock at depth. Beryl locally constitutes as much as 10 percent of the pegmati tic ore at Oreana. &nbs

  6. Strong upslope shifts in Chimborazo's vegetation over two centuries since Humboldt

    PubMed Central

    Morueta-Holme, Naia; Engemann, Kristine; Sandoval-Acuña, Pablo; Jonas, Jeremy D.; Segnitz, R. Max; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change is driving species poleward and upward in high-latitude regions, but the extent to which the biodiverse tropics are similarly affected is poorly known due to a scarcity of historical records. In 1802, Alexander von Humboldt ascended the Chimborazo volcano in Ecuador. He recorded the distribution of plant species and vegetation zones along its slopes and in surrounding parts of the Andes. We revisited Chimborazo in 2012, precisely 210 y after Humboldt’s expedition. We documented upward shifts in the distribution of vegetation zones as well as increases in maximum elevation limits of individual plant taxa of >500 m on average. These range shifts are consistent with increased temperatures and glacier retreat on Chimborazo since Humboldt’s study. Our findings provide evidence that global warming is strongly reshaping tropical plant distributions, consistent with Humboldt’s proposal that climate is the primary control on the altitudinal distribution of vegetation. PMID:26371298

  7. Map showing locations of damaging landslides in Marin County, California, resulting from 1997-98 El Nino rainstorms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrissey, Meghan M.; Wieczorek, Gerald F.; Godt, Jonathan W.

    1999-01-01

    Heavy rainfall associated with a strong El Nino caused over $150 million in landslide damage in the 10-county San Francisco Bay region during the winter and spring of 1998. A team of USGS scientists collected information on landslide locations and damage costs. About $2.5 million in damages were assessed in Marin County.

  8. Map showing locations of damaging landslides in Sonoma County, California, resulting from 1997-98 El Nino rainstorms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, David W.; Godt, Jonathan W.

    1999-01-01

    Heavy rainfall associated with a strong El Nino caused over $150 million in landslide damage in the 10-county San Francisco Bay region during the winter and spring of 1998. A team of USGS scientists collected information on landslide locations and damage costs. About $21 million in damages were assessed in Sonoma County.

  9. Map showing locations of damaging landslides in Santa Cruz County, California, resulting from 1997-98 El Nino rainstorms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baum, Rex L.; Schuster, Robert L.; Godt, Jonathan W.

    1999-01-01

    Heavy rainfall associated with a strong El Nino caused over $150 million in landslide damage in the 10-county San Francisco Bay region during the winter and spring of 1998. A team of USGS scientists collected information on landslide locations and damage costs. About $14.5 million in damages were assessed in Santa Cruz County.

  10. Map showing locations of damaging landslides in Santa Clara County, California, resulting from 1997-98 El Nino rainstorms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, William L.; Harp, Edwin L.; Arnal, Caroline H.; Godt, Jonathan W.

    1999-01-01

    Heavy rainfall associated with a strong El Nino caused over $150 million in landslide damage in the 10-county San Francisco Bay region during the winter and spring of 1998. A team of USGS scientists collected information on landslide locations and damage costs. About $7.6 million in damages were assessed in Santa Clara County.

  11. Map showing locations of damaging landslides in Contra Costa County, California, resulting from 1997-98 El Nino rainstorms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graymer, Russell W.; Godt, Jonathan W.

    1999-01-01

    Heavy rainfall associated with a strong El Nino caused over $150 million in landslide damage in the 10-county San Francisco Bay region during the winter and spring of 1998. A team of USGS scientists collected information on landslide locations and damage costs. About $27 million in damages were assessed in Contra Costa County.

  12. Map showing locations of damaging landslides in Solano County, California, resulting from 1997-98 El Nino rainstorms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howell, David G.; Godt, Jonathan W.

    1999-01-01

    Heavy rainfall associated with a strong El Nino caused over $150 million in landslide damage in the 10-county San Francisco Bay region during the winter and spring of 1998. A team of USGS scientists collected information on landslide locations and damage costs. About $13.5 million in damages were assessed in Solano County.

  13. Wilhelm von Humboldt's Idea of "Bildung" and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Elsina

    The importance of Wilhelm von Humboldt's work in educational philosophy is little known outside of Germany and even there he is more often criticized than praised. This is unfortunate because his contributions to education and other areas had an important impact on other philosophers of his period and are well worth considering today. In his main…

  14. Molecular Modeling and Computational Chemistry at Humboldt State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paselk, Richard A.; Zoellner, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a molecular modeling and computational chemistry (MM&CC) facility for undergraduate instruction and research at Humboldt State University. This facility complex allows the introduction of MM&CC throughout the chemistry curriculum with tailored experiments in general, organic, and inorganic courses as well as a new molecular modeling…

  15. Use of USGS earth-science products by county planning agencies in the San Francisco Bay region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kockelman, William J.

    1976-01-01

    An inventory of the use of USGS products in selected planning studies, plans, ordinances, and other planning activities was made for eight counties in the San Francisco Bay region--a region of almost five million people. This inventory was designed to determine and document the use of the 87 earth-science information products prepared as a part of the San Francisco Bay Region Environment and Resources Planning Study (SFBRS). The inventory showed that: (1) all eight counties had planning staffs who were very familiar with SFBRS products and had made frequent use of such products; (2) all eight counties had prepared planning documents which cite SFBRS products; (3) the types of planning applications most often indicated were: geologic hazards studies, seismic safety and public safety plan elements, general reference, and the preparation and review of environmental impact reports and statements; (4) over 90 percent of the 87 SFBRS products were used at least once, and nine of the products were used over 30 times each for various county planning activities; and (5) at least 85 other USGS products were also used for various county planning activities. After the inventory, selected county officials, employees, and consultants were interviewed and asked--among other things--to indicate any problems in the use of the SFBRS products, to suggest improvements, and to identify any needed or desired earth-science information. The responses showed that: (1) the scales commonly used for working maps were 1:62,500 or larger and for plan implementation were 1:24,000 or larger; (2) only one county had a geologist on its planning staff, although six others had the benefit of geotechnical services from private consulting firms, county engineering staffs, or the State Division of Mines and Geology; (3) seven of the eight counties expressed some problems in using the products, primarily because of their small scale or lack of detail; (4) all eight counties expected to continue to use the products and expressed a need or desire for additional earth-science, engineering, or other information; (5) all eight counties suggested specific improvements to future products, primarily larger scale or more detail and fewer technical or more interpretive products; and (6) all eight counties received educational, advisory, and review services from USGS personnel. Seventeen selected examples of the application of SFBRS products to various county planning activities are discussed and illustrated. These examples include four planning studies, seven plans, and two ordinances. From the inventory and responses to the interviews, it is concluded that the counties in the Bay region are very familiar with, have made frequent use of, and will continue to use SFBRS products for a wide range of county planning activities. Suggestions to ensure more effective use of earth-science information in the future include: (1) monitoring emerging critical issues and analyzing new state and federal laws and regulations so as to better anticipate and respond to county earth-science information needs; (2) creating a users advisory committee to help identify critical issues and user needs; (3) providing engineering interpretations and land- and water-use capability ratings to make earth-science information more readily usable; (4) giving priority to areas impacted by development so as to husband staff resources; (5) providing earth-science information at the larger scale and greater detail commonly used and needed by counties; (6) releasing earth-science information earlier and according to a formal distribution pattern; and (7) providing educational, advisory, and review services in connection with any earth-science information designed for planners and decisionmakers.

  16. VARIABLES INFLUENCING PREDATION OF ARTIFICIAL DUCK NESTS IN NORTHWEST COASTAL CALIFORNIA

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Matthew

    11 VARIABLES INFLUENCING PREDATION OF ARTIFICIAL DUCK NESTS IN NORTHWEST COASTAL CALIFORNIA MATTHEW Abstract: Nest predation can greatly affect reproductive success of waterfowl. We studied factors influencing duck-nest predation near Humboldt Bay in northern California by testing the prediction

  17. 76 FR 13017 - Environmental Impact Statement: Los Angeles County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Los Angeles County, CA AGENCY: Federal... Environmental Impact Statement will be prepared for a proposed highway project in Los Angeles County, California... District Director, California Department of Transportation, District 7, Division of Environmental...

  18. Analysis of methods to determine storage capacity of, and sedimentation in, Loch Lomond Reservoir, Santa Cruz County, California, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPherson, Kelly R.; Freeman, Lawrence A.; Flint, Lorraine E.

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Santa Cruz, conducted bathymetric and topographic surveys to determine the water storage capacity of, and the loss of capacity owing to sedimentation in, Loch Lomond Reservoir in Santa Cruz County, California. The topographic survey was done as a supplement to the bathymetric survey to obtain information about temporal changes in the upper reach of the reservoir where the water is shallow or the reservoir may be dry, as well as to obtain information about shoreline changes throughout the reservoir. Results of a combined bathymetric and topographic survey using a new, state-of-the-art method with advanced instrument technology indicate that the maximum storage capacity of the reservoir at the spillway altitude of 577.5 feet (National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929) was 8,646 ±85 acre-feet in March 2009, with a confidence level of 99 percent. This new method is a combination of bathymetric scanning using multibeam-sidescan sonar, and topographic surveying using laser scanning (LiDAR), which produced a 1.64-foot-resolution grid with altitudes to 0.3-foot resolution and an estimate of total water storage capacity at a 99-percent confidence level. Because the volume of sedimentation in a reservoir is considered equal to the decrease in water-storage capacity, sedimentation in Loch Lomond Reservoir was determined by estimating the change in storage capacity by comparing the reservoir bed surface defined in the March 2009 survey with a revision of the reservoir bed surface determined in a previous investigation in November 1998. This revised reservoir-bed surface was defined by combining altitude data from the 1998 survey with new data collected during the current (2009) investigation to fill gaps in the 1998 data. Limitations that determine the accuracy of estimates of changes in the volume of sedimentation from that estimated in each of the four previous investigations (1960, 1971, 1982, and 1998) are a result of the limitations of the survey equipment and data-processing methods used. Previously used and new methods were compared to determine the recent (1998-2009) change in storage capacity and the most accurate and cost-effective means to define the reservoir bed surface so that results can be easily replicated in future surveys. Results of this investigation indicate that the advanced method used in the 2009 survey accurately captures the features of the wetted reservoir surface as well as features along the shoreline that affect the storage capacity calculations. Because the bathymetric and topographic data are referenced to a datum, the results can be easily replicated or compared with future results. Comparison of the 2009 reservoir-bed surface with the surface defined in 1998 indicates that sedimentation is occurring throughout the reservoir. About 320 acre-feet of sedimentation has occurred since 1998, as determined by comparing the revised 1998 reservoir-bed surface, with an associated maximum reservoir storage capacity of 8,965 acre-feet, to the 2009 reservoir bed surface, with an associated maximum capacity of 8,646 acre-feet. This sedimentation is more than 3 percent of the total storage capacity that was calculated on the basis of the results of the 1998 bathymetric investigation.

  19. Geologic map and digital database of the Porcupine Wash 7.5 minute Quadrangle, Riverside County, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    This data set maps and describes the geology of the Porcupine Wash 7.5 minute quadrangle, Riverside County, southern California. The quadrangle, situated in Joshua Tree National Park in the eastern Transverse Ranges physiographic and structural province, encompasses parts of the Hexie Mountains, Cottonwood Mountains, northern Eagle Mountains, and south flank of Pinto Basin. It is underlain by a basement terrane comprising Proterozoic metamorphic rocks, Mesozoic plutonic rocks, and Mesozoic and Mesozoic or Cenozoic hypabyssal dikes. The basement terrane is capped by a widespread Tertiary erosion surface preserved in remnants in the Eagle and Cottonwood Mountains and buried beneath Cenozoic deposits in Pinto Basin. Locally, Miocene basalt overlies the erosion surface. A sequence of at least three Quaternary pediments is planed into the north piedmont of the Eagle and Hexie Mountains, each in turn overlain by successively younger residual and alluvial deposits. The Tertiary erosion surface is deformed and broken by north-northwest-trending, high-angle, dip-slip faults and an east-west trending system of high-angle dip- and left-slip faults. East-west trending faults are younger than and perhaps in part coeval with faults of the northwest-trending set. The Porcupine Wash database was created using ARCVIEW and ARC/INFO, which are geographical information system (GIS) software products of Envronmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI). The database consists of the following items: (1) a map coverage showing faults and geologic contacts and units, (2) a separate coverage showing dikes, (3) a coverage showing structural data, (4) a scanned topographic base at a scale of 1:24,000, and (5) attribute tables for geologic units (polygons and regions), contacts (arcs), and site-specific data (points). The database, accompanied by a pamphlet file and this metadata file, also includes the following graphic and text products: (1) A portable document file (.pdf) containing a navigable graphic of the geologic map on a 1:24,000 topographic base. The map is accompanied by a marginal explanation consisting of a Description of Map and Database Units (DMU), a Correlation of Map and Database Units (CMU), and a key to point-and line-symbols. (2) Separate .pdf files of the DMU and CMU, individually. (3) A PostScript graphic-file containing the geologic map on a 1:24,000 topographic base accompanied by the marginal explanation. (4) A pamphlet that describes the database and how to access it. Within the database, geologic contacts , faults, and dikes are represented as lines (arcs), geologic units as polygons and regions, and site-specific data as points. Polygon, arc, and point attribute tables (.pat, .aat, and .pat, respectively) uniquely identify each geologic datum and link it to other tables (.rel) that provide more detailed geologic information.

  20. Analytical data for waters of the Harvard Open Pit, Jamestown Mine, Tuolumne County, California, March 1998-September 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ashley, R.P.; Savage, K.S.

    2001-01-01

    The Jamestown mine is located in the Jamestown mining district in western Tuolumne County, California (see Fig. 1). This district is one of many located on or near the Melones fault zone, a major regional suture in the Sierra Nevada foothills. The districts along the Melones fault comprise the Mother Lode gold belt (Clark, 1970). The Harvard pit is the largest of several open pits mined at the Jamestown site by Sonora Mining Corporation between 1986 and 1994 (Fig. 2; Algood, 1990). It is at the site of an historical mine named the Harvard that produced about 100,000 troy ounces of gold, mainly between 1906 and 1916 (Julihn and Horton, 1940). Sonora Mining mined and processed about 17,000,000 short tons of ore, with an overall stripping ratio of about 4.5:1, yielding about 660,000 troy ounces of gold (Nelson and Leicht, 1994). Most of this material came from the Harvard pit, which attained dimensions of about 2700 ft (830 m) in length, 1500 ft (460 m) in width, and 600 ft (185 m) in depth. The bottom of the pit is at an elevation of 870 ft (265 m). Since mining operations ceased in mid-1994, the open pit has been filling with water. As of November, 2000, lake level had reached an elevation of about 1170 ft (357 m). Water quality monitoring data gathered after mine closure showed rising levels of arsenic, sulfate, and other components in the lake, with particularly notable increases accompanying a period of rapid filling in 1995 (County of Tuolumne, 1998). The largest potential source for arsenic in the vicinity of the Harvard pit is arsenian pyrite, the most abundant sulfide mineral related to gold mineralization. A previous study of weathering of arsenian pyrite in similarly mineralized rocks at the Clio mine, in the nearby Jacksonville mining district, showed that arsenic released by weathering of arsenian pyrite is effectively attenuated by adsorption on goethite or coprecipitation with jarosite, depending upon the buffering capacity of the pyrite-bearing rock (Savage and others, 2000). Although jarosite would be expected to dissolve in water having the composition of the developing pit lake, iron oxyhydroxide species (ferrihydrite and goethite) would be stable, and strong partitioning of arsenic onto suspended particles or bottom sediments containing these iron phases would be expected. Arsenic release to the lake would not be expected until stratification develops, producing a reducing, non-circulating hypolimnion in which the iron phases would be destroyed by dissolution. The fact that arsenic concentrations increased rapidly before the pit lake was deep enough to stratify shows that arsenic may not be attenuated in the ways that the earlier Clio mine area study indicated, and suggested that our understanding of release and transport of arsenic in this environment is incomplete. Therefore, in 1997 we decided to study the chemical evolution of the Harvard pit lake as part of a project on environmental impacts of gold mining in the Sierra Nevada, and in early 1998 we developed a cooperative study with several of the investigators in the Stanford University Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences who had done the Clio study. The U.S. Geological Survey portion of the project has been funded by the Mineral Resources Program. It is anticipated that a better understanding of the release and transport of arsenic into the Harvard pit lake and its accumulation there will contribute to more accurate predictions of arsenic release from weathering of sulfide-bearing rocks exposed by mining or other activities or events, and to better forecasts of pit lake evolution in this and similar environments, leading to more effective monitoring and mitigation strategies. An accurate predictive model is needed for the Harvard pit lake to forecast trends in metal concentrations, particularly arsenic, and also concentrations of major cations and anions. As the lake approaches pre-mining groundwater levels the lake water could move down the hydrologic gradient to the southeast into domestic wells, and could also affect the surface