Sample records for humboldt county california

  1. 11. ROAD VIEW. SOUTH OF PIERCY, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. OLD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. ROAD VIEW. SOUTH OF PIERCY, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. OLD HIGHWAY ON LEFT. NEW HIGHWAY ON RIGHT. LOOKING SW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  2. 25. ROAD VIEW ON NEWTON DRURY PARKWAY. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. ROAD VIEW ON NEWTON DRURY PARKWAY. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING NW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  3. 17. BENBOW INN. SOUTH OF GARBERVILLE, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. BENBOW INN. SOUTH OF GARBERVILLE, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING NW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  4. 10. ROAD VIEW. SOUTH OF PIERCY, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. OLD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. ROAD VIEW. SOUTH OF PIERCY, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. OLD HIGHWAY ON LEFT. NEW HIGHWAY ON RIGHT. LOOKING W. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  5. 5. TUNNEL TREE AT DRIVETHROUGHTREE PARK. LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. TUNNEL TREE AT DRIVE-THROUGH-TREE PARK. LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING NE. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  6. Geology of Tompkins Hill gas field, Humboldt County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.

    1988-03-01

    The Tompkins Hill gas field, located in Humboldt County, California, is the only producing field in the Eel River basin. The field is an anticlinal flexure on the north limb of the Eel River syncline in the central onshore portion of the basin. The Tompkins Hill anticline is doubly plunging and trends east-west. Stratigraphic units present in the field include the Yager, Eel River, and Rio Dell Formations and Scotia Bluffs Sandstone. The Yager occurs below a major unconformity, and forms economic basement. Strata overlying the Eel River, Rio Dell, and Scotia Bluffs represent a progradational basin-fill sequence, including submarine fan, slope, shelf, and littoral deposits. The primary productive interval in the field is within the middle of the Rio Dell and consists of interbedded fine sandstone and mudrock. Portions of the Eel River and upper Rio Dell Formations are also productive. The Tompkins Hill gas field was discovered by the Texas Company in 1937 with the drilling of Eureka 2 in Sec. 22, T3N, R1W. The play was probably based on outcrop mapping and the presence of gas seeps in the area. The primary trapping mechanism in the field is structural, although stratigraphy may have been a factor in constraining gas. To date, 39 producing wells have been drilled and 87.4 bcf of gas, consisting of 98% methane, has been produced. Very minor amounts of condensate are also produced. The source rocks for the gas are uncertain, but both the Yager Formation and strata of the lower Wildcat Group may have contributed.

  7. Earthquake and Tsunami planning, outreach and awareness in Humboldt County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, V.; Nicolini, T.; Larkin, D.; Dengler, L.

    2008-12-01

    Humboldt County has the longest coastline in California and is one of the most seismically active areas of the state. It is at risk from earthquakes located on and offshore and from tsunamis generated locally from faults associated with the Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ), other regional fault systems, and from distant sources elsewhere in the Pacific. In 1995 the California Division of Mines and Geology published the first earthquake scenario to include both strong ground shaking effects and a tsunami. As a result of the scenario, the Redwood Coast Tsunami Work Group (RCTWG), an organization of representatives from government agencies, tribes, service groups, academia and the private sector from the three northern coastal California counties, was formed in 1996 to coordinate and promote earthquake and tsunami hazard awareness and mitigation. The RCTWG and its member agencies have sponsored a variety of projects including education/outreach products and programs, tsunami hazard mapping, signage and siren planning, and has sponsored an Earthquake - Tsunami Education Room at the Humboldt County fair for the past eleven years. Three editions of Living on Shaky Ground an earthquake-tsunami preparedness magazine for California's North Coast, have been published since 1993 and a fourth is due to be published in fall 2008. In 2007, Humboldt County was the first region in the country to participate in a tsunami training exercise at FEMA's Emergency Management Institute in Emmitsburg, MD and the first area in California to conduct a full-scale tsunami evacuation drill. The County has conducted numerous multi-agency, multi-discipline coordinated exercises using county-wide tsunami response plan. Two Humboldt County communities were recognized as TsunamiReady by the National Weather Service in 2007. Over 300 tsunami hazard zone signs have been posted in Humboldt County since March 2008. Six assessment surveys from 1993 to 2006 have tracked preparedness actions and personal awareness of earthquake and tsunami hazards in the county and additional surveys have tracked public awareness and tourist concerns about tsunami hazard signs. Over the thirteen year period covered by the surveys, the percent with houses secured to foundations has increased from 58 to 80 percent, respondents aware of a local tsunami hazard increased from 51 to 73 percent and knowing what the Cascadia subduction zone is from 16 to 42 percent.

  8. 15. HIGHWAY 101 BRIDGE IN RICHARDSON STATE PARK. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. HIGHWAY 101 BRIDGE IN RICHARDSON STATE PARK. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING N. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  9. 24. ROAD VIEW AT PRAIRE CREEK STATE PARK. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. ROAD VIEW AT PRAIRE CREEK STATE PARK. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING N. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  10. 19. OLD HIGHWAY 101 AND ROAD VIEW. MIRANDA, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. OLD HIGHWAY 101 AND ROAD VIEW. MIRANDA, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING NW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  11. 6. ABANDONED OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH OF LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. ABANDONED OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH OF LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. NOTE CANTILEVERED DECKING. NEW HIGHWAY 101 AND BRIDGE SEEN AT CENTER REAR. LOOKING N. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  12. 7. ABANDONED OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH OF LEGGETT. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. ABANDONED OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH OF LEGGETT. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. NOTE CANTILEVERED DECKING. SOUTH FORK OF EEL RIVER AT LEFT. LOOKING SW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  13. 54. Photographer unknown February 1925 HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION J, HIGHWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. Photographer unknown February 1925 HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION J, HIGHWAY 1. HUM-1-J #34, SINKS ALONG HIGH. NEAR OCEAN, 2-25. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  14. 56. Photographer unknown February 1925 HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION J, HIGHWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. Photographer unknown February 1925 HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION J, HIGHWAY 1. HUM-1-J #36, SINKS ALONG OCEAN SHORE, 2-25. Stamped office copy. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  15. 53. Photographer unknown Date unknown VAN DUZEN BRIDGE, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. Photographer unknown Date unknown VAN DUZEN BRIDGE, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION F, HIGHWAY 1. 1. 1-HUM-1-F #24, VAN DUZEN BR. APPRAOCH/ST. 167+50. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  16. Geologic map of the Redwood Creek drainage basin, Humboldt County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, Deborah Reid; Kelsey, H.M.; Morrison, S.D.; Stephens, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    A 1:62,500-scale geologic map with 14 rock stratigraphic units and an accompanying explanatory text are used to describe the geology of the Redwood Creek drainage basin of northwestern California. A large part of Redwood National Park is located in the downstream part of this actively eroding drainage basin. The bedrock consists primarily of Mesozoic sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. The structurally complex Franciscan assemblage of rocks underlies most of the basin, but rocks of the Klammath Mountain tectonic province occurs in a small eastern part of the basin. Most major boundaries between Mesozoic rock units are north-northwest trending faults parallel to the regional structural trend. Extensive areas of surficial coastal plain sediments, landslide deposits, stream terrace deposits and modern alluvium are also present; these areas help identify loci of vigorous recent erosion. (USGS)

  17. Demographic characteristics and infectious diseases of a population of American black bears in Humboldt County, California.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Nicole; Higley, J Mark; Sajecki, Jaime L; Chomel, Bruno B; Brown, Richard N; Foley, Janet E

    2015-02-01

    American black bears (Ursus americanus) are common, widely distributed, and broad-ranging omnivorous mammals in northern California forests. Bears may be susceptible to pathogens infecting both domestic animals and humans. Monitoring bear populations, particularly in changing ecosystems, is important to understanding ecological features that could affect bear population health and influence the likelihood that bears may cause adverse impacts on humans. In all, 321 bears were captured between May, 2001, and October, 2003, and blood samples were collected and tested for multiple zoonotic and vector-borne diseases. We found a PCR prevalence of 10% for Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and a seroprevalence of 28% for Toxoplasma gondii, 26% for Borrelia burgdorferi, 26% for A. phagocytophilum, 8% for Trichinella spiralis, 8% for Francisella tularensis and 1% for Yersinia pestis. In addition, we tested bears for pathogens of domestic dogs and found a seroprevalence of 15% for canine distemper virus and 0.6% for canine parvovirus. Our findings show that black bears can become infected with pathogens that are an important public health concern, as well as pathogens that can affect both domestic animals and other wildlife species. PMID:25700042

  18. Origin and evolution of the alkalic ultramafic rocks in the Coyote Peak diatreme, Humboldt County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, John W.; Czamanske, Gerald K.; Gregory Wandless, A.

    1985-03-01

    Instrumental-neutron-activation analyses are reported for two uncontaminated rocks, a phlogopite-rich clot, and two contaminated rocks from the Coyote Peak diatreme, northwestern California. These data, combined with Nd, Sr, and Pb isotopic evidence, have been modeled to a multi-stage evolution for the uncontaminated rocks. Fertile mantle material (refractory elements 2.5× chondritic abundances; Rb/ Sr = 0.029 by weight) was depleted about 900 m.y. ago by congruent melting and removal of ~4% basaltic liquid; this depleted residue provided the source rock from which the Coyote Peak magma was ultimately derived. About 66 m.y. ago, the depleted mantle residue was incongruently melted in the presence of H 2O and CO 2 at a total pressure > 26 kb to yield ~0.5% of a Si-poor, Ca-rich melt. This melt then metasomatized depleted garnet-free harzburgite in the upper mantle at about 26 kb to produce a rock similar to phlogopite-bearing wehrlite. About 29 m.y. ago, this rock was subjected to an increase in pressure to >26 kb and incongruently melted to give ~0.5% of a second-stage melt resembling olivine melilitite in composition. Enroute to the surface, about 28% olivine and 2% titanomagnetite were lost from the highly fluid melt. Coarse-grained phlogopite-rich clots in the uncontaminated rocks apparently crystallized from a latestage liquid derived from the uncontaminated melt. Contaminated rocks appear to be the result of partial assimilation of, and dilution by, ~14% Franciscan graywacke country rock. The diatreme was emplaced near a converging plate margin where young hot oceanic mantle and crust of the Juan de Fuca plate was probably subducting obliquely beneath a thin lip of the North American plate. The unusual chemistry of the rocks may be the result of this complex tectonic setting which could also have included local strike-slip and extensional environments within the two plates pierced by the diatreme.

  19. 59. V.H.G., photographer October 27, 1948 EUREKA, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, HIGHWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    59. V.H.G., photographer October 27, 1948 EUREKA, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, HIGHWAY 1. HUM-1-EUR #59, LOOKING NORTH BROADWAY & CEDAR, 10-27-48, V.H.G. Stamped office copy. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  20. 58. V.H.G., photographer October 27, 1948 EUREKA, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, HIGHWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. V.H.G., photographer October 27, 1948 EUREKA, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, HIGHWAY 1. HUM-1-EUR #60, LOOKING SOUTH, BROADWAY & CLARK, 10-27-48, V.H.G. Stamped office copy. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  1. Aquatic biology of the Redwood Creek and Mill Creek drainage basins, Redwood National Park, Humboldt and Del Norte counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwatsubo, Rick T.; Averett, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    A 2-year study of the aquatic biota in the Redwood Creek and Mill Creek drainage basins of Redwood National Park indicated that the aquatic productivity is low. Densities of coliform bacteria were low except in Prairie Creek, a tributary to Redwood Creek, where a State park, county fish hatchery, grazing land, lumber mill, and scattered residential areas are potential sources of fecal coliform bacteria. Benthic invertebrate data indicated a diverse fauna which varied considerably between streams and among stream sections. Noteworthy findings include: (1) benthic invertebrates rapidly recolonized the streambed following a major storm, and (2) man-caused disruption or sedimentation of the streambed during low flow can result in drastic reductions of the benthic invertebrate community. Seven species of fish representing species typically found in northern California coastal streams were captured during the study. Nonparametric statistical tests indicate that condition factors of steelhead trout were significantly larger at sampling stations with more insolation, regardless of drainage basin land-use history. Periphyton and phytoplankton communities were diverse, variable in numbers, and dominated by diatoms. Seston concentrations were extremely variable between stations and at each station sampled. The seston is influenced seasonally by aquatic productivity at each station and amount of allochthonous material from the terrestrial ecosystem. Time-series analysis of some seston data indicated larger and sharper peak concentrations being flushed from the logged drainage basin than from the control drainage basin. (USGS)

  2. 23. MADISON GRANT TABLET AT PRAIRIE CREEK STATE PARK. HUMBOLDT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. MADISON GRANT TABLET AT PRAIRIE CREEK STATE PARK. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING W. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  3. Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010

    DOE Data Explorer

    Michael Lane

    Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010. ArcGIS map package containing topographic base map, Township and Range layer, Oski BLM and private leases at time of survey, and locations, with selected shot points, of the five seismic lines.

  4. 77 FR 67391 - Notice of Proposed Supplementary Rules on Public Land in Water Canyon, Humboldt County, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ...Proposed Supplementary Rules on Public Land in Water Canyon, Humboldt County, NV AGENCY...and resources on public land within the Water Canyon Recreation Area. These proposed...restrictions included within the decisions of the Water Canyon Recreation Area Management...

  5. Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada, U.S.A

    SciTech Connect

    Ted Fitzpatrick, Brian D. Fairbank

    2005-04-01

    The report documents the drilling of well Deep Blue No.2, the second deep geothermal test hole at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Humboldt County, Nevada. The well was drilled by Noramex Corp, a Nevada company, with funding support from the US Department of Energy, under the DOE’s GRED II Program. Deep Blue No.2 was drilled as a ‘step-out’ hole from Deep Blue No.1, to further evaluate the commercial potential of the geothermal resource. Deep Blue No.2 was designed as a vertical, slim observation test hole to a nominal target depth of 1000 meters (nominal 3400 feet). The well tests an area of projected high temperatures at depth, from temperature gradients measured in a group of shallow drill holes located approximately one kilometer to the northeast of observation hole Deep Blue No.1. The well is not intended for, or designed as, a commercial well or a production well. Deep Blue No.2 was spudded on March 25, 2004 and completed to a total depth of 1127.76m (3700 ft) on April 28, 2004. The well was drilled using conventional rotary drilling techniques to a depth of 201.17 m (660 ft), and continuously cored from 201.17m (660 ft) to 1127.76m (3700 ft). A brief rig-on flow-test was conducted at completion to determine basic reservoir parameters and obtain fluid samples. A permeable fracture zone with measured temperatures of 150 to 167°C (302 to 333°F) occurs between 500 to 750m (1640 to 2461ft). The well was left un-lined in anticipation of the Phase III - Flow and Injection Testing. A further Kuster temperature survey was attempted after the well had been shut in for almost 3 weeks. The well appears to have bridged off at 439m (1440ft) as the Kuster tool was unable to descend past this point. Several attempts to dislodge the obstruction using tube jars were unsuccessful. Deep Blue No.2 encountered variably fractured and veined, fine-grained rocks of the Singas Formation, and intruded by minor strongly altered fine-grained felsic dikes, and less altered fineto medium-grained felsic to intermediate dikes. Widespread open fractures and extensive of quartz veining in many intervals of the core indicate a high degree of fracturing and flow of silica-bearing fluids, almost certainly hotter than 200°C (392°F), at some time, but these fractures are now partially sealed. Intervals of soft shaly mudstone, common clay gouge, and rocks with generally low permeability (few veins and fractures) may also form a seal or ‘cap’ above the main high temperature reservoir at Blue Mountain. The encouraging results from Deep Blue No.2 support further drilling at Blue Mountain. Higher temperature fluids can be expected where fractures providing channels for the circulation of hot water from depth have not been sealed extensively by silica deposition.

  6. Radiological dose to man through the marine pathway from reactor operations at Humboldt Bay, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. E. Noshkin; W. L. Robison; F. L. Harrison

    1976-01-01

    Source-strength measurements and environmental samples taken at the Humboldt Bay Nuclear Reactor site near Eureka, California, since mid-1971 were used to evaluate the potential dose to man resulting from an aquatic release of radioactivity from the reactor. In this report, we provide an evaluation of individual and population dose through the marine pathways during 1972 and 1973 computed by the

  7. Mapping salt marsh vegetation using aerial hyperspectral imagery and linear unmixing in Humboldt Bay, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chaeli Judd; Steven Steinberg; Frank Shaughnessy; Greg Crawford

    2007-01-01

    Composition of salt marsh vegetation is important to wetland ecosystem health, and monitoring invasive species is critical.\\u000a The purpose of this study was to examine the utility of airborne hyperspectral imagery in mapping salt marsh vegetation in\\u000a Humboldt Bay, California, USA. An unmixing algorithm was applied to spatial and spectral image subsets. Overall accuracy among\\u000a Spartina densiflora, Salicornia virginica, and

  8. Documentation of model input and output values for simulation of pumping effects in Paradise Valley, a basin tributary to the Humboldt River, Humboldt County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carey, A.E.; Prudic, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    Documentation is provided of model input and sample output used in a previous report for analysis of ground-water flow and simulated pumping scenarios in Paradise Valley, Humboldt County, Nevada.Documentation includes files containing input values and listings of sample output. The files, in American International Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) or binary format, are compressed and put on a 3-1/2-inch diskette. The decompressed files require approximately 8.4 megabytes of disk space on an International Business Machine (IBM)- compatible microcomputer using the MicroSoft Disk Operating System (MS-DOS) operating system version 5.0 or greater.

  9. Material properties of Pacific hake, Humboldt squid, and two species of myctophids in the California Current.

    PubMed

    Becker, Kaylyn N; Warren, Joseph D

    2015-05-01

    Material properties of the flesh from three fish species (Merluccius productus, Symbolophorus californiensis, and Diaphus theta), and several body parts of the Humboldt squid (Dosidicus gigas) collected from the California Current ecosystem were measured. The density contrast relative to seawater varied within and among taxa for fish flesh (0.9919-1.036), squid soft body parts (mantle, arms, tentacle, braincase, eyes; 1.009-1.057), and squid hard body parts (beak and pen; 1.085-1.459). Effects of animal length and environmental conditions on nekton density contrast were investigated. The sound speed contrast relative to seawater varied within and among taxa for fish flesh (0.986-1.027) and Humboldt squid mantle and braincase (0.937-1.028). Material properties in this study are similar to values from previous studies on species with similar life histories. In general, the sound speed and density of soft body parts of fish and squid were 1%-3% and 1%-6%, respectively, greater than the surrounding seawater. Hard parts of the squid were significantly more dense (6%-46%) than seawater. The material properties reported here can be used to improve target strength estimates from acoustic scattering models, which could increase the accuracy of biomass estimates from acoustic surveys for these nekton. PMID:25994685

  10. Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the northern California planning area. Final report, 1970-2020

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.; Kolp, P.; Wallace, B.

    1987-10-01

    The report presents baseline socio-economic profiles of Del Norte, Humboldt, and Mendocino Counties in northern California. It is one of six reports prepared under the contract to develop baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in California, Oregon and Washington. The profiles cover demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and port capacity, marine traffic, and fishing. Secondary sources were used to prepare the profiles. The focus of the profiles is 1980, but 1970 to 2020 is covered to the extent possible with existing data.

  11. 78 FR 43827 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Modoc and Siskiyou Counties, California, and in All Counties in Oregon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in All Counties in Oregon, Except Malheur County...Siskiyou Counties, California, and in all counties in Oregon, except Malheur County...at: http://www.regulations.gov. All comments submitted in response to this...

  12. NAME: Humboldt Estuarine Complex Intertidal Habitat Restoration and Climate Change LOCATION: Humboldt Bay and Eel River Estuary, Humboldt County, California

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    project will eradicate more than 50 acres of invasive eelgrass through multiple traditional and innovative of dwarf eelgrass, Zostera japonica. Open mudflats support large numbers of resident and migrating) and the native eelgrass, Zostera marina. STATUS: Planning and Design #12;

  13. CONFIRMATORY SURVEY OF THE FUEL OIL TANK AREA HUMBOLDT BAY POWER PLANT EUREKA, CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect

    WADE C. ADAMS

    2012-04-09

    During the period of February 14 to 15, 2012, ORISE performed radiological confirmatory survey activities for the former Fuel Oil Tank Area (FOTA) and additional radiological surveys of portions of the Humboldt Bay Power Plant site in Eureka, California. The radiological survey results demonstrate that residual surface soil contamination was not present significantly above background levels within the FOTA. Therefore, it is ORISE’s opinion that the radiological conditions for the FOTA surveyed by ORISE are commensurate with the site release criteria for final status surveys as specified in PG&E’s Characterization Survey Planning Worksheet. In addition, the confirmatory results indicated that the ORISE FOTA survey unit Cs-137 mean concentrations results compared favorably with the PG&E FOTA Cs-137 mean concentration results, as determined by ORISE from the PG&E characterization data. The interlaboratory comparison analyses of the three soil samples analyzed by PG&E’s onsite laboratory and the ORISE laboratory indicated good agreement for the sample results and provided confidence in the PG&E analytical procedures and final status survey soil sample data reporting.

  14. Mechanisms of expansion for an introduced species of cordgrass, Spartina densiflora , in Humboldt Bay, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pamela M. Kittelson; Milton J. Boyd

    1997-01-01

    The dominant plant in Humboldt Bay salt marshes in Spartina densiflora, a species of cordgrass apparently introduced from South America. At several salt marshes and restoration sites around Humboldt\\u000a Bay, distribution of this plant has increased significantly. We investigated the relative contributions of vegetative tiller\\u000a production and seed germination to the establishment and expansion of S. densiflora. Lateral spread of

  15. Shear band formation and poromechanical properties; application to unlithified sand, Humboldt County, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaproth, B. M.; Perez, E.; Cashman, S. M.; Saffer, D. M.; Marone, C.

    2009-12-01

    In response to shear strain, porous granular media may fail in tabular zones of grain deformation, commonly referred to as shear bands. Previous researchers have argued that shear bands form via cataclasis and strain hardening, and that once formed they do not accommodate additional shear-strain. If correct, this hypothesis requires that shear bands are stronger than their parent material, and that parent material strengthens in response to shear-driven cataclasis, each of which may alter the effective permeability. We report on laboratory experiments designed to resolve the frictional strength and permeability of shear bands formed in well-sorted nearshore marine sand and their unlithified parent material, and to elucidate the strength and deformation properties of parent material under conditions of shear-band formation. Experiments were conducted on in situ shear bands and parent material from late Quaternary nearshore marine sand in the footwall of the active McKinleyville thrust fault, Humboldt County, CA. Shear bands are exposed in positive relief, a consequence of reduced grain size and cementation, which result in decreased permeability. Permeability was measured under hydrostatic stress conditions at effective confining pressures from 0.2 MPa - 5.0 MPa . Shear bands have permeabilities of 8.2*10 -15 - 1.3*10 -17 m 2 , which represents roughly a 1 to 3 order of magnitude decrease relative to that of the parent material (7.0*10 -14 - 2.0*10 -14 m 2 ). We sheared parent material and in situ shear bands in the single-direct shear geometry over a range of probable in situ normal stresses (0.5-1.8 MPa). Shear bands have greater strength than parent material, with the coefficient of internal friction being ? i = 0.623 and ? i = 0.525, respectively. We sheared parent material in the double-direct shear geometry under conditions approximating shear band formation (sliding velocity = 10 ?m/s-10 mm/s, ? n = 0.75-1.75 MPa, saturated/dry, shear strain = 0.5-20). We find that parent material strengthens as a function of shear strain throughout individual experiments; frictional yield strength increases by 1 to 9% over a range of shear strain from 0 to 10. We attribute the increase in strength to increased grain angularity and abundance of small particles, both of which are a consequence of pervasive cataclasis. Our results support the hypothesis that shear bands are stronger than their parent material and that parent material exhibits strengthening as a function of shear-driven cataclasis. Further, cataclasis may be responsible for the observed permeability contrast of in situ shear bands and parent material. Ongoing work will analyze the role of cataclasis on parent material permeability as a function of shear strain.

  16. Ground-water flow and simulated effects of development in Paradise Valley, a basin tributary to the Humboldt River in Humboldt County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prudic, D.E.; Herman, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    A computer model was used to characterize ground-water flow in Paradise Valley, Nevada, and to evaluate probable long-term effects of five hypothetical development scenarios. One finding of the study is that concentrating pumping at the south end of Paradise Valley may increase underflow from the adjacent Humboldt River valley, and might affect flow in the river.

  17. Behaviour of wintering Tundra Swans Cygnus columbianus columbianus at the Eel River delta and Humboldt Bay, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Black, Jeffrey M.; Gress, Carol; Byers, Jacob W.; Jennings, Emily; Ely, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Tundra Swan Cygnus columbianus columbinanus phenology and behaviour at the Eel River delta and southern Humboldt Bay in northern California, USA, is described. Counts made each January from 1963 onwards peaked at 1,502 swans in 1988. Monthly counts recorded during the 2006/07 and 2008/09 winters peaked in February, at 1,033 and 772 swans respectively. Swans roosted on ephemeral ponds at the Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, on ephemeral ponds within grassland pastures in the vicinity of the Refuge, and perhaps also used the Eel River as a roost. Flights between Refuge roosts and the pastures and ponds occurred in the two hours after sunrise and before dark. In winters 2008/09 and 2009/10, the percentage of cygnets in the flocks was 10.6% and 21.4% respectively, and increased to =31% cygnets each year after most swans had departed from the area in March. Average brood size in 2009/10 was 2.1 cygnets. Daily activities consisted of foraging (44.9% of activities recorded), comfort behaviour (22.1%), locomotion (16.2%) and vigilance (15.5%). Eight neck-collared swans identified in the wintering flock were marked at four locations in different parts of Alaska, up to 1,300 km apart.

  18. El Niño and similar perturbation effects on the benthos of the Humboldt, California, and Benguela Current upwelling ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arntz, W. E.; Gallardo, V. A.; Gutiérrez, D.; Isla, E.; Levin, L. A.; Mendo, J.; Neira, C.; Rowe, G. T.; Tarazona, J.; Wolff, M.

    2006-03-01

    To a certain degree, Eastern Boundary Current (EBC) ecosystems are similar: Cold bottom water from moderate depths, rich in nutrients, is transported to the euphotic zone by a combination of trade winds, Coriolis force and Ekman transport. The resultant high primary production fuels a rich secondary production in the upper pelagic and nearshore zones, but where O2 exchange is restricted, it creates oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) at shelf and upper slope (Humboldt and Benguela Current) or slope depths (California Current). These hypoxic zones host a specifically adapted, small macro- and meiofauna together with giant sulphur bacteria that use nitrate to oxydise H2S. In all EBC, small polychaetes, large nematodes and other opportunistic benthic species have adapted to the hypoxic conditions and co-exist with sulphur bacteria, which seem to be particularly dominant off Peru and Chile. However, a massive reduction of macrobenthos occurs in the core of the OMZ. In the Humboldt Current area the OMZ ranges between <100 and about 600 m, with decreasing thickness in a poleward direction. The OMZ merges into better oxygenated zones towards the deep sea, where large cold-water mega- and macrofauna occupy a dominant role as in the nearshore strip. The Benguela Current OMZ has a similar upper limit but remains shallower. It also hosts giant sulphur bacteria but little is known about the benthic fauna. However, sulphur eruptions and intense hypoxia might preclude the coexistence of significant mega- und macrobenthos. Conversely, off North America the upper limit of the OMZ is considerably deeper (e.g., 500-600 m off California and Oregon), and the lower boundary may exceed 1000m. The properties described are valid for very cold and cold (La Niña and "normal") ENSO conditions with effective upwelling of nutrient-rich bottom water. During warm (El Niño) episodes, warm water masses of low oxygen concentration from oceanic and equatorial regions enter the upwelling zones, bringing a variety of (sub)tropical immigrants. The autochthonous benthic fauna emigrates to deeper water or poleward, or suffers mortality. However, some local macrofaunal species experience important population proliferations, presumably due to improved oxygenation (in the southern hemisphere), higher temperature tolerance, reduced competition or the capability to use different food. Both these negative and positive effects of El Niño influence local artisanal fisheries and the livelihood of coastal populations. In the Humboldt Current system the hypoxic seafloor at outer shelf depths receives important flushing from the equatorial zone, causing havoc on the sulphur bacteria mats and immediate recolonisation of the sediments by mega- and macrofauna. Conversely, off California, the intruding equatorial water masses appear to have lower oxygen than ambient waters, and may cause oxygen deficiency at upper slope depths. Effects of this change have not been studied in detail, although shrimp and other taxa appear to alter their distribution on the continental margin. Other properties and reactions of the two Pacific EBC benthic ecosystems to El Niño seem to differ, too, as does the overall impact of major episodes (e.g., 1982/1983(1984) vs. 1997/1998). The relation of the "Benguela Niño" to ENSO seems unclear although many Pacific-Atlantic ocean and atmosphere teleconnections have been described. Warm, low-oxygen equatorial water seems to be transported into the upwelling area by similar mechanisms as in the Pacific, but most major impacts on the eukaryotic biota obviously come from other, independent perturbations such as an extreme eutrophication of the sediments ensuing in sulphidic eruptions and toxic algal blooms. Similarities and differences of the Humboldt and California Current benthic ecosystems are discussed with particular reference to ENSO impacts since 1972/73. Where there are data available, the authors include the Benguela Current ecosystem as another important, non-Pacific EBC, which also suffers from the effects of hypoxia.

  19. RIVER OTTER MONITORING BY CITIZEN SCIENCE VOLUNTEERS IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA: SOCIAL GROUPS AND LITTER SIZE

    E-print Network

    Black, Jeff

    @humboldt.edu ABSTRACT--Opportunistic observations of Nearctic River Otter (Lontra canadensis) were collected, Humboldt County, litters, Lontra canadensis, Nearctic River Otter, northern California, pups, social group This paper reports on the establishment of a long-term demographic study of Nearctic River Otters (Lontra

  20. The application of LANDSAT remote sensing technology to natural resources management. Section 1: Introduction to VICAR - Image classification module. Section 2: Forest resource assessment of Humboldt County.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, L., III (principal investigator); Mayer, K. E.

    1980-01-01

    A teaching module on image classification procedures using the VICAR computer software package was developed to optimize the training benefits for users of the VICAR programs. The field test of the module is discussed. An intensive forest land inventory strategy was developed for Humboldt County. The results indicate that LANDSAT data can be computer classified to yield site specific forest resource information with high accuracy (82%). The "Douglas-fir 80%" category was found to cover approximately 21% of the county and "Mixed Conifer 80%" covering about 13%. The "Redwood 80%" resource category, which represented dense old growth trees as well as large second growth, comprised 4.0% of the total vegetation mosaic. Furthermore, the "Brush" and "Brush-Regeneration" categories were found to be a significant part of the vegetative community, with area estimates of 9.4 and 10.0%.

  1. Geophysical investigations of the Baltazor Hot Springs known geothermal resource area and the Painted Hills thermal area, Humboldt County, Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. K. Edquist

    1981-01-01

    Geophysical investigations of the Baltazor Hot Springs geothermal resource area and the Painted Hills thermal area, Humboldt Co., Nevada are described. A gravity survey of 284 stations covering 750 sq km was conducted. Numerical modeling and interpretation of five detailed gravity profiles, numerical modeling and interpretation of 21.8 line km of dipole-dipole electrical resistivity data along four profiles, and a

  2. 76 FR 71935 - Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, Carson Ranger District, Nevada and California, Bordertown to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ...California 120 kV Transmission Line'' in the subject line. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...the west side, has created bulk electrical transmission problems. Almost...power through a network of 120 kV lines to the west side. During...

  3. California City and County Transient Occupancy Taxes Exemption

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    California City and County Transient Occupancy Taxes Exemption According to G-28, Section VIII business are granted an exemption from the payment of occupancy taxes imposed by these cities or counties from the tax when checking in. The traveler may be required to complete an exemption certificate

  4. CONFIRMATORY SURVEY RESULTS FOR PORTIONS OF THE MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT FROM UNITS 1 AND 2 AT THE HUMBOLDT BAY POWER PLANT, EUREKA, CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect

    W.C. Adams

    2011-04-01

    The Pacific Gas & Electric Company (PG&E) operated the Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP) Unit 3 nuclear reactor near Eureka, California under Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) provisional license number DPR-7. HBPP Unit 3 achieved initial criticality in February 1963 and began commercial operations in August 1963. Unit 3 was a natural circulation boiling water reactor with a direct-cycle design. This design eliminated the need for heat transfer loops and large containment structures. Also, the pressure suppression containment design permitted below-ground construction. Stainless steel fuel claddings were used from startup until cladding failures resulted in plant system contamination—zircaloy-clad fuel was used exclusively starting in 1965 eliminating cladding-related contamination. A number of spills and gaseous releases were reported during operations resulting in a range of mitigative activities (see ESI 2008 for details).

  5. America's Job Center of California Formerly "California One-Stop Career Centers" Sorted by County and City

    E-print Network

    America's Job Center of California Formerly "California One-Stop Career Centers" Sorted by County and City As of July 1, 2014, this listing of the America's Job Center of California (AJCC) will no longer be available. To locate an AJCC office near you, use the EDD Office Locator. #12;Alameda County America's Job

  6. Bilingual Education Project, Santa Clara County, California. Final Report, 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Clara County Office of Education, San Jose, CA.

    The Spanish Dame Bilingual Education Project, located in Santa Clara County, California, served 190 children who came from homes where the primary language was Spanish and who resided within the target area schools of the Alum Rock School District. The objectives of the preschool project were (1) to demonstrate a home-teaching procedure designed…

  7. Silverthread oil field, Ventura County, California: a hydrodynamic trap

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. N. Hacker; R. L. Hester

    1987-01-01

    Silverthread oil field is located in west-central Ventura County, California. An unusual combination of Miocene turbidite sand deposition, tight folding, faulting, and hydrodynamics have created an accumulation of over 6 million bbl of oil from 33 wells. This field is also unique in that it lies beneath the convergence of several opposing major thrust faults which effectively hide any surface

  8. Seafloor off Pleasure Point, Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Golden, Nadine E.; Gibbons, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The seafloor off Pleasure Point, Santa Cruz County, California, is extremely varied, with sandy flats, boulder fields, faults, and complex bedrock ridges. These ridges support rich marine ecosystems; some of them form the "reefs" that produce world-class surf breaks. Colors indicate seafloor depth, from red-orange (about 2 meters or 7 feet) to magenta (25 meters or 82 feet)

  9. Ground-water conditions in the Eureka area, Humboldt County, California, 1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Michael J.

    1978-01-01

    Ground-water conditions in the Eureka area, Calif., were evaluated during 1975 to determine whether significant changes had occurred since 1952, when an earlier reconnaissance was made. No major changes in water levels or water quality were noted at 1975 pumping rates. Recharge to the ground-water system compensates for both artificial and natural discharge. The position of the freshwater-saltwater transition zone underlying the alluvial flood plains in the summer of 1975 were unchanged from those in 1952. Ground water continues to be used principally for irrigation on the alluvial flood plains of the Eel and Mad Rivers. In 1975, about 425 irrigation wells supplied an estimated 24,000 acre-feet of ground water to the Eureka area; half of those wells were located on the Eel River flood plain. The estimated total ground-water pumpage for irrigation, industry, public supply, domestic use, and livestock was 27,500 acre-feet. During the irrigation season, there is a higher rate of recharge from the rivers which helps to maintain ground-water storage and stabilize the freshwater-seawater transition zone. (Woodard-USGS)

  10. The California Child Care Portfolio, 2001: A Compilation of Data about Child Care in California, County by County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Child Care Resource and Referral Network, San Francisco.

    This report compiles standardized data on child care supply and requests for care in California. The report provides county and statewide information based on responses from about 42,000 child care providers and more than 55,000 parents over a 3-month period and on data from state and federal government agencies, including: (1) demographic…

  11. Structural Controls of the MacFarlane Geothermal System, Humboldt County, Nevada: New Insights Based on Detailed Geologic Mapping, Shallow Temperature Surveys, and Magnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraushaar, Sabina M.

    Detailed geologic mapping, structural analysis, magnetic and two-meter temperature data, integrated with previous datasets, constrain the structural controls of the MacFarlane geothermal system. MacFarlane hot springs and the travertine fissure ridges lie within a relay ramp. The relay ramp is formed between two overlapping, north-northeast-striking, west-dipping Holocene normal faults exposed in Lake Lahontan sediments. Other mapped faults near the hot spring include a north-striking, west-dipping Tertiary fault east of MacFarlane hot springs. The highest temperature gradient is found at the projected intersection between the Tertiary and north-northeast-striking Quaternary fault, ˜2.5 km northeast of the hot spring (Sibbett et al., 1982; Swanberg and Bowers, 1982). Our new data suggest other controls involving the relay ramp geometry of the Holocene faults. The anomalous orientation of the travertine fissure ridge motivated this study of the structural controls of the geothermal system. MacFarlane hot spring is located on the eastern margin of the Black Rock Desert, ˜85 km west of Winnemucca, in Humboldt County, Nevada. The active hot spring emerges from the west end of an east-trending travertine fissure ridge, which is ˜180 m long. The travertine fissure ridge is up to ˜2 m tall and ˜5 m wide, and has a central fissure along its long axis. The orientation of the travertine fissure ridge indicates local north-south extension, which is inconsistent with the regional west-northwest extension of the northwestern Basin and Range province. The anomalous travertine orientation is due to fractures that occurred during formation of a relay ramp between two overlapping fault segments.

  12. Graphite deposits in Siskiyou County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rynearson, Garn A.

    1945-01-01

    The graphite deposits examined are in sec. 7, T. 47 N., R. 11 W., Siskiyou County, Calif., on the summit of the Siskiyou Mts. between Elk Meadow and the northeast end of "mill 6220" (see map of the Seias quadrangle). Four claims, designated as the Black Jack Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4 claims, and a five-acre mill site have been located by W. H. Gassaway, W. B. Stewart, and E. R. Stewart. Development consists of four small cuts and several shallow trenches.

  13. California Division of Mines and Geology: geothermal studies in Los Angeles County and in Calistoga, Napa County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

    1981-05-01

    Geothermal assessments conducted by the California Division of Mines and Geology, as part of the US Department of Energy's State Coupled Program, include studies of the Calistoga area completed in the 1979-80 project year and of the Los Angeles County area, in progress in the 1980-81 project year. Brief summaries and comments on the findings in each of the two areas are presented.

  14. Data on Streamflow and Quality of Water and Bottom Sediment in and near Humboldt Wildlife Management Area, Churchill and Pershing Counties, Nevada, 1998-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paul, Angela P.; Thodal, Carl E.

    2003-01-01

    This study was initiated to expand upon previous findings that indicated concentrations of dissolved solids, arsenic, boron, mercury, molybdenum, selenium, and uranium were either above geochemical background concentrations or were approaching or exceeding ecological criteria in the lower Humboldt River system. Data were collected from May 1998 to September 2000 to further characterize streamflow and surface-water and bottom-sediment quality in the lower Humboldt River, selected agricultural drains, Upper Humboldt Lake, and Lower Humboldt Drain (ephemeral outflow from Humboldt Sink). During this study, flow in the lower Humboldt River was either at or above average. Flows in Army and Toulon Drains generally were higher than reported in previous investigations. An unnamed agricultural drain contributed a small amount to the flow measured in Army Drain. In general, measured concentrations of sodium, chloride, dissolved solids, arsenic, boron, molybdenum, and uranium were higher in water from agricultural drains than in Humboldt River water during this study. Mercury concentrations in water samples collected during the study period typically were below the laboratory reporting level. However, low-level mercury analyses showed that samples collected in August 1999 from Army Drain had higher mercury concentrations than those collected from the river or Toulon Drain or the Lower Humboldt Drain. Ecological criteria and effect concentrations for sodium, chloride, dissolved solids, arsenic, boron, mercury, and molybdenum were exceeded in some water samples collected as part of this study. Although water samples from the agricultural drains typically contained higher concentrations of sodium, chloride, dissolved solids, arsenic, boron, and uranium, greater instantaneous loads of these constituents were carried in the river near Lovelock than in agricultural drains during periods of high flow or non-irrigation. During this study, the high flows in the lower Humboldt River produced the maximum instantaneous loads of sodium, chloride, dissolved solids, arsenic, boron, molybdenum, and uranium at all river-sampling sites, except molybdenum near Imlay. Nevada Division of Environmental Protection monitoring reports on mine-dewatering discharge for permitted releases of treated effluent to the surface waters of the Humboldt River and its tributaries were reviewed for reported discharges and trace-element concentrations from June 1998 to September 1999. These data were compared with similar information for the river near Imlay. In all bottom sediments collected for this study, arsenic concentrations exceeded the Canadian Freshwater Interim Sediment-Quality Guideline for the protection of aquatic life and probable-effect level (concentration). Sediments collected near Imlay, Rye Patch Reservoir, Lovelock, and from Toulon Drain and Army Drain were found to contain cadmium and chromium concentrations that exceeded Canadian criteria. Chromium concentrations in sediments collected from these sites also exceeded the consensus-based threshold-effect concentration. The Canadian criterion for sediment copper concentration was exceeded in sediments collected from the Humboldt River near Lovelock and from Toulon, Army, and the unnamed agricultural drains. Mercury in sediments collected near Imlay and from Toulon Drain in August 1999 exceeded the U.S. Department of the Interior sediment probable-effect level. Nickel concentrations in sediments collected during this study were above the consensus-based threshold-effect concentration. All other river and drain sediments had constituent concentrations below protective criteria and toxicity thresholds. In Upper Humboldt Lake, chloride, dissolved solids, arsenic, boron, molybdenum, and uranium concentrations in surface-water samples collected near the mouth of the Humboldt River generally were higher than in samples collected near the mouth of Army Drain. Ecological criteria or effect con

  15. Mineral resources and land use in Stanislaus County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.T.; Dupras, D.L.; Chapman, R.H.; Churchill, R.K. (California Dept. of Conservation, Sacramento, CA (United States). Div. of Mines and Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Stanislaus County covers portions of 3 geologic provinces: Coast Ranges, Great Valley, and Sierra Nevada. Each has been exploited for a distinct set of mineral resources, which include sand and gravel, ball and fire clay, placer gold, manganese, chromite, magnesite, mercury, diatomite, building stone, and mineral pigment. Of these, sand and gravel, clay, and diatomite have been the most important commodities produced recently. Sand and gravel, particularly that along the Tuolumne River, is and will continue to be the county's main mineral product; other potentially important areas include alluvial fans along the west side of the Great Valley. Clay and diatomite could resume importance in the future. There is also potential for quartz-rich specialty sands. Although the county is largely rural, it is undergoing one of the highest growth rates in California. Several new residential communities are being proposed in the county, which would have two major effects on mineral resources: (1) large sources of aggregate will be required for construction, and (2) development of residential areas may preclude mining of resources in those areas. Maps of mineral resources produced by this study, will assist decisions on such potential conflicts in land use.

  16. Climate controls on valley fever incidence in Kern County, California.

    PubMed

    Zender, Charles S; Talamantes, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    Coccidiodomycosis (valley fever) is a systemic infection caused by inhalation of airborne spores from Coccidioides immitis, a soil-dwelling fungus found in the southwestern United States, parts of Mexico, and Central and South America. Dust storms help disperse C. immitis so risk factors for valley fever include conditions favorable for fungal growth (moist, warm soil) and for aeolian soil erosion (dry soil and strong winds). Here, we analyze and inter-compare the seasonal and inter-annual behavior of valley fever incidence and climate risk factors for the period 1980-2002 in Kern County, California, the US county with highest reported incidence. We find weak but statistically significant links between disease incidence and antecedent climate conditions. Precipitation anomalies 8 and 20 months antecedent explain only up to 4% of monthly variability in subsequent valley fever incidence during the 23 year period tested. This is consistent with previous studies suggesting that C. immitis tolerates hot, dry periods better than competing soil organisms and, as a result, thrives during wet periods following droughts. Furthermore, the relatively small correlation with climate suggests that the causes of valley fever in Kern County could be largely anthropogenic. Seasonal climate predictors of valley fever in Kern County are similar to, but much weaker than, those in Arizona, where previous studies find precipitation explains up to 75% of incidence. Causes for this discrepancy are not yet understood. Higher resolution temporal and spatial monitoring of soil conditions could improve our understanding of climatic antecedents of severe epidemics. PMID:16249922

  17. Climate controls on valley fever incidence in Kern County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zender, Charles S.; Talamantes, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    Coccidiodomycosis (valley fever) is a systemic infection caused by inhalation of airborne spores from Coccidioides immitis, a soil-dwelling fungus found in the southwestern United States, parts of Mexico, and Central and South America. Dust storms help disperse C. immitis so risk factors for valley fever include conditions favorable for fungal growth (moist, warm soil) and for aeolian soil erosion (dry soil and strong winds). Here, we analyze and inter-compare the seasonal and inter-annual behavior of valley fever incidence and climate risk factors for the period 1980-2002 in Kern County, California, the US county with highest reported incidence. We find weak but statistically significant links between disease incidence and antecedent climate conditions. Precipitation anomalies 8 and 20 months antecedent explain only up to 4% of monthly variability in subsequent valley fever incidence during the 23 year period tested. This is consistent with previous studies suggesting that C. immitis tolerates hot, dry periods better than competing soil organisms and, as a result, thrives during wet periods following droughts. Furthermore, the relatively small correlation with climate suggests that the causes of valley fever in Kern County could be largely anthropogenic. Seasonal climate predictors of valley fever in Kern County are similar to, but much weaker than, those in Arizona, where previous studies find precipitation explains up to 75% of incidence. Causes for this discrepancy are not yet understood. Higher resolution temporal and spatial monitoring of soil conditions could improve our understanding of climatic antecedents of severe epidemics.

  18. Tar Creek study, Sargent oil field, Santa Clara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, David L.; Fedasko, Bill; Carnahan, J.R.; Brunetti, Ross; Magoon, Leslie B.; Lillis, Paul G.; Lorenson, Thomas D.; Stanley, Richard G.

    2002-01-01

    Field work in the Tar Creek area of Sargent oil field was performed June 26 to 28, 2000. The Santa Clara County study area is located in Sections, 30, 31, and 32, Township 11 South, Range 4 East, M.D.B&M; and in Sections 25 and 36, Township 11 South, Range 3 East, M.D.B.&M., north and south of Tar Creek, west of Highway 101. The work was a cooperative effort of the California Department of Conservation's Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources (DOGGR), California Geological Survey (CGS), and the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The purpose of the project was to map the stratigraphy and geologic structure (David Wagner, CGS); sample oil for age dating (Les Magoon, USGS); and search for undocumented wells plus conduct a GPS survey of the area (Bill Fedasko, J.P. Carnahan, and Ross Brunetti, DOGGR)

  19. Development of An Integrated Hydrologic Model in Yolo County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; Taghavi, A.; Stevenson, M.; Najmus, S.

    2006-12-01

    To more efficiently use the Cache Creek flows and the groundwater basin as the sources of water supply and to restore the riparian ecosystem along the Cache Creek, Yolo County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (YCFCWCD) in Woodland, California plans to conduct the Cache Creek Groundwater Recharge and Recovery Program (CCGRRP). The concept of this program is to operate the groundwater basin to induce greater amounts of groundwater recharge from Cache Creek directly along the creek and to increase the recharge even further by diverting rainy season water at the District's Capay Diversion Dam into the West Adams Canal to a few recharge basins outside the active channel of Cache Creek. Besides the CCGRRP, cities of Woodland and Davis are in the process of conducting groundwater management plans, and the stakeholders in Yolo County developing a long-term integrated regional water management plan (IRWMP) for the entire county. To effectively evaluate the benefits and impacts of CCGRRP, local groundwater management plans, and the Yolo County IRWMP, the Integrated Groundwater and Surface water Model (IGSM) was applied to the Yolo groundwater basin. The IGSM is a comprehensive integrated hydrologic model that simulates both surface water and groundwater flow systems, including rainfall-runoff, soil moisture accounting and unsaturated flow, crop consumptive module, stream-aquifer interaction, and groundwater flow. The finite element code was originally developed in 1990 for the California Department of Water Resources and the State Water Resources Control Board. The IGSM code has subsequently been applied to more than 25 groundwater basins in California and other states. The model code has been peer reviewed and upgraded throughout its application to various projects, with the latest upgrade in 2004, as part of the application to the Stony Creek Fan area of Sacramento Valley. The Yolo County IGSM (YCIGSM) was calibrated against the historical (1970-2000) groundwater level records at 105 monitoring wells, and three streamflow gages along Cache Creek. Calibration results show that the YCIGSM is able to reasonably simulate the long-term groundwater level trends and short-term seasonal fluctuations. The YCIGSM will be used to develop operational guidelines to manage the groundwater basin, to determine the optimum yield of water projects, to identify benefits and impacts of projects on existing groundwater users, and to assess the environmental benefits and impacts during the development of projects, as well as during the environmental permitting process.

  20. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends

    E-print Network

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01

    North Coast between 2005 and 2007 – 143,000 in the ‘Redwoodand Redwood (which covers Humboldt and Del Norte counties) – together characterize North CoastCoast trips occur in Humboldt and Del Norte counties (Redwood

  1. Risk-Limiting Audits California AB 2023 Orange County, 2011 Audits: The After-Math of Elections

    E-print Network

    Stark, Philip B.

    Risk-Limiting Audits California AB 2023 Orange County, 2011 Audits: The After-Math of Elections Verification Network Conference Chicago, IL #12;Risk-Limiting Audits California AB 2023 Orange County, 2011 Outline Risk-Limiting Audits California AB 2023 Orange County, 2011 Matching ballots to CVRs Statutory

  2. Using a GIS to Model Tsunami Evacuation Times for the Community of Fairhaven, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Graehl; L. Dengler

    2008-01-01

    The community of Fairhaven (pop. 200) is located at the southern end of the Samoa Peninsula in Humboldt County, California. Fairhaven experienced minor flooding from the 1964 Alaska teletsunami and lies within the inundation zone of numerical models for tsunamis generated by the Cascadia s¬ubduction zone. The highest elevations in the community are about 8 meters which potentially exposes the

  3. EPIZOOTIOLOGICAL FEATURES OF AVIAN CHOLERA ON THE NORTH COAST OF CALIFORNIA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JGregory Mensik; Richard G. Botzler

    An avian cholera (Pasteurella multocida) epizootic was observed among wildfowl at the Centerville Gun Club, Humboldt County, California (USA) in January 1978. Compared to their live populations and use of the area, coots (Fulica americana) died in proportionately greater numbers than any other species. Coots collected by gunshot were evaluated for sex and age composition, and morphometry from November 1977

  4. Economic Impact of Low Income Health Program Spending on Select California Counties by Laurel Lucia

    E-print Network

    Militzer, Burkhard

    1 Economic Impact of Low Income Health Program Spending on Select California Counties by Laurel comprehensive benefits to low-income adults who are currently ineligible for Medi-Cal coverage. County spending. County health spending supports economic output and jobs in hospitals, clinics and other health care

  5. De-confounding of Relations Between Land-Level and Sea-Level Change, Humboldt Bay, Northern California: Uncertain Predictions of Magnitude and Timing of Tectonic and Eustatic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilkerson, W.; Leroy, T. H.; Patton, J. R.; Williams, T. B.

    2010-12-01

    Humboldt Bay in Northern California provides a unique opportunity to investigate the effects of relative sea level change on both native flora and maritime aquiculture as influenced by both tectonic and eustatic sea-level changes. This combination of superposed influences makes quantitatively predicting relative sea-level more uncertain and consumption of the results for public planning purposes exceedingly difficult. Public digestion for practical purposes is confounded by the fact that the uncertainty for eustatic sea-level changes is a magnitude issue while the uncertainty associated with the tectonic land level changes is both a magnitude and timing problem. Secondly, the public is less well informed regarding how crustal deformation contributes to relative sea-level change. We model the superposed effects of eustatic sea-level rise and tectonically driven land-level changes on the spatial distribution of habitats suitable to native eelgrass (Zostera marina) and oyster mariculture operations in Humboldt Bay. While these intertidal organisms were chosen primarily because they have vertically restricted spatial distributions that can be successfully modeled, the public awareness of their ecologic and economic importance is also well developed. We employ easy to understand graphics depicting conceptual ideas along with maps generated from the modeling results to develop locally relevant estimates of future sea level rise over the next 100 years, a time frame consistent with local planning. We bracket these estimates based on the range of possible vertical deformation changes. These graphic displays can be used as a starting point to propose local outcomes from global and regional relative sea-level changes with respect to changes in the distribution of suitable habitat for ecologically and economically valuable species. Currently the largest sources of uncertainty for changes in relative sea-level in the Humboldt Bay area are 1) the rate and magnitude of tectonic deformation throughout the earthquake cycle and 2) the stability and reliability of the tide gauges and other benchmarks assumed to be stable in the Humboldt Bay region.

  6. Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in and near Humboldt Wildlife Management Area, Churchill and Pershing Counties, Nevada, 1990-91

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seiler, R.L.; Ekechukwu, G.A.; Hallock, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    A reconnaissance investigation was begun in 1990 to determine whether the quality of irrigation drainage in and near the Humboldt Wildlife Management Area, Nevada, has caused or has the potential to cause harmful effects on human health, fish, and wildlife or to impair beneficial uses of water. Samples of surface and ground water, bottom sediment, and biota collected from sites upstream and downstream from the Lovelock agricultural area were analyzed for potentially toxic trace elements. Also analyzed were radioactive substances, major dissolved constitu- ents, and nutrients in water, as well as pesticide residues in bottom sediment and biota. In samples from areas affected by irrigation drainage, the following constituents equaled or exceeded baseline concentrations or recommended standards for protection of aquatic life or propagation of wildlife--in water: arsenic, boron, dissolved solids, mercury, molybdenum, selenium, sodium, and un-ionized ammonia; in bottom sediment; arsenic and uranium; and in biota; arsenic, boron, and selenium. Selenium appears to be biomagnified in the Humboldt Sink wetlands. Biological effects observed during the reconnaissance included reduced insect diversity in sites receiving irrigation drainage and acute toxicity of drain water and sediment to test organisms. The current drought and upstream consumption of water for irrigation have reduced water deliveries to the wetlands and caused habitat degradation at Humboldt Wildlife Management Area. During this investigation. Humboldt and Toulon Lakes evaporated to dryness because of the reduced water deliveries.

  7. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Regional Profile

    E-print Network

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01

    and Redwood (which covers Humboldt and Del Norte counties) – together characterize North CoastCoast trips occur in Humboldt and Del Norte counties (RedwoodRedwood (Humboldt, Del Norte counties) Manmade Beach/bank CPFV Private/rental Total Total North Coast

  8. Statistical modeling of valley fever data in Kern County, California.

    PubMed

    Talamantes, Jorge; Behseta, Sam; Zender, Charles S

    2007-03-01

    Coccidioidomycosis (valley fever) is a fungal infection found in the southwestern US, northern Mexico, and some places in Central and South America. The fungus that causes it (Coccidioides immitis) is normally soil-dwelling but, if disturbed, becomes air-borne and infects the host when its spores are inhaled. It is thus natural to surmise that weather conditions that foster the growth and dispersal of the fungus must have an effect on the number of cases in the endemic areas. We present here an attempt at the modeling of valley fever incidence in Kern County, California, by the implementation of a generalized auto regressive moving average (GARMA) model. We show that the number of valley fever cases can be predicted mainly by considering only the previous history of incidence rates in the county. The inclusion of weather-related time sequences improves the model only to a relatively minor extent. This suggests that fluctuations of incidence rates (about a seasonally varying background value) are related to biological and/or anthropogenic reasons, and not so much to weather anomalies. PMID:17120065

  9. Statistical modeling of valley fever data in Kern County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talamantes, Jorge; Behseta, Sam; Zender, Charles S.

    2007-03-01

    Coccidioidomycosis (valley fever) is a fungal infection found in the southwestern US, northern Mexico, and some places in Central and South America. The fungus that causes it ( Coccidioides immitis) is normally soil-dwelling but, if disturbed, becomes air-borne and infects the host when its spores are inhaled. It is thus natural to surmise that weather conditions that foster the growth and dispersal of the fungus must have an effect on the number of cases in the endemic areas. We present here an attempt at the modeling of valley fever incidence in Kern County, California, by the implementation of a generalized auto regressive moving average (GARMA) model. We show that the number of valley fever cases can be predicted mainly by considering only the previous history of incidence rates in the county. The inclusion of weather-related time sequences improves the model only to a relatively minor extent. This suggests that fluctuations of incidence rates (about a seasonally varying background value) are related to biological and/or anthropogenic reasons, and not so much to weather anomalies.

  10. 75 FR 39581 - Yosemite Valley Plan; Yosemite National Park; Mariposa, Madera, and Tuolumne Counties, California...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-09

    ...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Yosemite Valley Plan; Yosemite National Park; Mariposa, Madera, and Tuolumne Counties, California; Notice of Revised Record of Decision SUMMARY: On December 29, 2000, the National...

  11. Characterization of a sandstone reservoir using seismic methods: Yowlumne Field, Kern County, California 

    E-print Network

    Proust, Rodrigo Diez

    1988-01-01

    CHARACTERIZATION OF A SANDSTONE RESERVOIR USING SEISMIC METHODS: YOWLUMNE FIELD, KERN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA A Thesis by RODRIGO DIEZ PROUST Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject: Geophysics CHARACTERIZATION OF A SANDSTONE RESERVOIR USING SEISMIC METHODS: YOWLUMNE FIELD KERN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA A Thesis by RODRIGO DIEZ PROUST Approved as to style s. nd content by: Anth...

  12. AT ale of Two Counties: Expanding Health Insurance Coverage for Children in California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    EMBRY M. H OWELL

    During difficult economic times, many California counties have expanded health insurance coverage for low-income children. These Children's Health Initiatives (CHIs) enroll children in public programs and provide new health insurance, Healthy Kids, for those ineligible for existing programs. This arti- cle describes the policy issues in implementing the Santa Clara and San Mateo County CHIs, as well as the children's

  13. County Clustering for the California 4-H Youth Development Program: Impacts and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subramaniam, Aarti; Dasher, Harry Steve; Young, Jane Chin

    2012-01-01

    In response to budgetary constraints, a new staffing structure, the Pilot Leadership Plan, was proposed for California's 4-H Youth Development Program. County clusters were formed, each led by a coordinator. The plan was piloted for 2 years to provide insight into how county clustering could support Extension staff to increase and enhance…

  14. Micro-Scale Distribution of Trace Elements in a High Boron Soil from Kern County, California

    E-print Network

    AND METHODS Soil samples from a Lethent series soil located in Kern County, CA were taken from various soil aggregate structure. The resin was hardened by heating samples at 60º C for 48 hours. The hardenedMicro-Scale Distribution of Trace Elements in a High Boron Soil from Kern County, California P. Fox

  15. SPECIAL PROBLEM REPORT, IMPROVING EXTENSION PROGRAM PLANNING PROCEDURES IN SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CANNON, DALE CARTER

    A SURVEY WAS CONDUCTED BY MAIL QUESTIONNAIRE TO GATHER DATA ON THE FARM POPULATION OF SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, TO GET NAMES OF COMMUNITY LEADERS, AND PROVIDE MOTIVATION FOR EXTENSION PROGRAM PLANNING. THE MEAN AGE OF RESPONDENTS WAS 50, THE LARGE MAJORITY WITH CHILDREN AT HOME, THREE-FOURTHS NATIVE TO CALIFORNIA, ONE-HALF BEING BORN IN…

  16. Using PeMS Data to Empirically Diagnose Freeway Bottleneck Locations in Orange County, California

    E-print Network

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Using PeMS Data to Empirically Diagnose Freeway Bottleneck Locations in Orange County, California analysis of the same site using more recent data now that ramp counts are available in the PeMS database, the study takes advantage of the rich resource in the California Freeway Performance Measurement System (PeMS

  17. 75 FR 69057 - Foreign-Trade Zone 226-Merced, Madera, Fresno, and Tulare Counties, California; Site Renumbering...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ...Foreign-Trade Zone 226--Merced, Madera, Fresno, and Tulare Counties, California...Site 6 (87 acres)--City of Madera Airport Industrial Park/State Center Commerce Park, Falcon Drive, Madera (Madera County); Site 7 (10...

  18. Humboldt River main stem, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warmath, Eric; Medina, Rose L.

    2001-01-01

    This data set contains the main stem of the Humboldt River as defined by Humboldt Project personnel of the U.S. Geological Survey Nevada District, 2001. The data set was digitized on screen using digital orthophoto quadrangles from 1994.

  19. Humboldt digital library and interconnectedness

    E-print Network

    Doherr, Detlev; Baron, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The Humboldt digital library (HDL) represents an innovative system to access the works and legacy of Alexander von Humboldt in a digital form on the Internet (www.avhumboldt.net). It contributes to the key question about how to present...

  20. 78 FR 24309 - California High-Speed Rail Authority-Construction Exemption-in Merced, Madera and Fresno Counties...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ...Transportation Board [Docket No. FD 35724] California High-Speed Rail Authority--Construction Exemption--in Merced, Madera and Fresno Counties, Cal On March 27, 2013, California High-Speed Rail Authority (Authority), a noncarrier state...

  1. Silverthread oil field, Ventura County, California: a hydrodynamic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, R.N.; Hester, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    Silverthread oil field is located in west-central Ventura County, California. An unusual combination of Miocene turbidite sand deposition, tight folding, faulting, and hydrodynamics have created an accumulation of over 6 million bbl of oil from 33 wells. This field is also unique in that it lies beneath the convergence of several opposing major thrust faults which effectively hide any surface indication of structure at depth. Though previously and often explored by majors and other operators, the remarkable deduction and perseverance by Harry Browne and Argo Petroleum Corporation geologists led to the main area discovery in 1971. Of exceptional interest is the interaction of classic hydrodynamic flow on the distribution of fluids within the reservoir. Thirteen contour maps and numerous structure and stratigraphic sections were required to unravel the sand sequence, faulting, structure, and hydrodynamics. Because of high surface relief, most wells were directionally drilled from islands, and subsequent electric logs had to be unstretched using the Dental Dam technique to facilitate their correlation. A large, lighted, three-dimensional model consisting of thirty-six 2 x 5-ft transparent plexiglas plates was constructed to show a simple resolution of the complexities of this area and will be part of the poster session. This display, they believe, will generate considerable interest in their presentation.

  2. Geologic map of southwestern Sequoia National Park, Tulare County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, Thomas W.; Moore, James G.

    2013-01-01

    This map shows the geology of 675 km2 (260 mi2) on the west slope of the Sierra Nevada, California, mainly in Sequoia National Park and Sequoia National Forest. It was produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at the request of the National Park Service to complete the geologic map coverage of Kings Canyon and Sequoia National Parks. The area includes the Mineral King 15’ topographic quadrangle (sheet 1) and strips along the east and northeast edges of the Kaweah 15’ topographic quadrangle (sheet 2), both in Tulare County. Mapping was performed mainly on the 1:24,000-scale Mineral King, Silver City, Quinn Peak, Moses Mountain, Case Mountain, and Dennison Peak 7.5’ topographic quadrangle bases. Rocks within the study area are chiefly Cretaceous granites and granodiorites of the Sierra Nevada batholith that intruded coherent masses of Mesozoic metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks. Quaternary till and talus are the principal surficial deposits, with the exception of a large bouldery alluvial apron near the southwest corner of the map area. The study area includes the headwaters of the Kaweah River (East and South Forks), Tule River (North Fork and North Fork of the Middle Fork), and the Little Kern River. Relief is considerable, with elevations spanning from 1,500 feet along the Middle Fork Kaweah River to 12,432 feet at the summit of Florence Peak along the crest of the Great Western Divide.

  3. History of Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA) Issues in California Beginning in El Dorado County in 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beall, R.

    2012-12-01

    This presentation will provide a historical account when NOA emerged as a major issue in California beginning in El Dorado County (EDC) with front page news on March 29, 1998, resulting in public outcry and concern. What started in EDC resulted in major changes to rule making for all counties in California and stringent requirements for school projects. The overview includes a discussion of evolution of the rule making between 1998 and 2005 with EDC, CARB, DTSC, Department of Conservation, USGS, Cal OSHA, ATSDR, and EPA Superfund.

  4. Combustion - a primary recovery process, Moco Zone reservoir - Midway Sunset field, Kern County, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. F. Gates; I. Sklar

    1970-01-01

    The Moco Zone reservoir is located in the Midway Sunset field, Kern County, California. It was discovered in 1957 and partially developed, but was essentially shut-in until late 1959. In situ combustion operations were initiated in Jan. 1960 at the top of the structure to fully utilize gravitation in the recovery of the highly mobile hot crude affected by the

  5. Solar radiation, lip protection, and lip cancer risk in Los Angeles County women (California, United States)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janice M. Pogoda; Susan Preston-Martin

    1996-01-01

    A population-based case-control study of 74 women with lip cancer diagnosed from 1978 to 1985 in Los Angeles County (California, United States) and frequency matched to 105 controls investigated the risk of solar radiation and protection from lip sunscreening agents to explore the hypothesis that excess incidence of lip cancer seen in men is due partly to lower rates in

  6. EVIDENCE FOR METAL ATTENUATION IN ACID MINE WATER BY SULFATE REDUCTION, PENN MINE, CALAVERAS COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Penn Mine in Calaveras County, California, produced Cu from massive sulfide ores from 1861 to 1953. Mine wastes were removed to a landfill during the late 1990s, improving surface-water quality, but deep mine workings were not remediated and contain metalliferous water with p...

  7. 78 FR 24983 - Domestic Dates Produced or Packed in Riverside County, California; Decreased Assessment Rate

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-29

    ...AMS-FV-12-0035; FV12-987-1 FIR] Domestic Dates Produced or Packed in Riverside County...assessment rate established for the California Date Administrative Committee (Committee...1.00 to $0.90 per hundredweight of dates handled. The Committee locally...

  8. AVIFAUNA AND RIPARIAN VEGETATION IN CARMEL VALLEY, MONTEREY COUNTY, CALIFORNIA1

    E-print Network

    Standiford, Richard B.

    AVIFAUNA AND RIPARIAN VEGETATION IN CARMEL VALLEY, MONTEREY COUNTY, CALIFORNIA1 Molly Williams not effect the number of birds observed in mature riparian forest. In spring 1983, the avifauna of the Carmel. This study examined the avifauna of five sites on the floodplain of the Carmel River. The study sites

  9. Gene Flow Patterns of the Mayfly Fallceon quilleri in San Diego County, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Zickovich; A. J. Bohonak

    2005-01-01

    Management decisions and conservation strategies for freshwater invertebrates critically depend on an understanding of gene flow and genetic structure. We collected the mayfly Fallceon quilleri (Ephemeroptera: Baetidae) from 15 streams across three geographically distinct watersheds in San Diego County, California (San Dieguito, Santa Margarita, and Tijuana) and one site in Anza-Borrego desert. We sequenced a 667 base pair region of

  10. Reconnaissance of geothermal resources of Los Angeles County, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Higgins

    1981-01-01

    Thermal waters produced from large oil fields are currently the most important geothermal resources in Los Angeles County. Otherwise, the County does not appear to have any large, near-surface geothermal resources. The oil fields produce thermal water because of both the moderate depths of production and normal to above-normal geothermal gradients. Gradients are about 3.0-3.5°C\\/100 meters in the Ventura Basin

  11. Beginnings of geothermal impact on county population and leadership, Imperial County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Pick, J.B.; Butler, E.W.

    1980-09-01

    A major geothermal energy development scenario is about to begin in Imperial County. Initial energy-socioeconomic interactions in the areas of population and county leadership structure are discussed. These include immigration of energy company workers, a sewage plant dispute, conflict over union affiliation of geothermal laborers, and a transmission corridor routing dispute.

  12. Sources of emergency water supplies in Santa Clara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Akers, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    Water distribution systems in Santa Clara County, Calif., may be damaged and rendered inoperable by a large earthquake or other disaster. In such an event, individual agencies may have to implement emergency measures to supply water for drinking, firefighting, decontamination, or other purposes. In Santa Clara County, 128 wells have been identified as potential water-supply sources in emergencies. The criteria used to select the wells are: yield of at least 3 liters per second (50 gallons per minute), good water quality, ready accessibility, and available emergency power. Purification methods of small water supplies are described. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. The January 1977 avian cholera epornitic in northwest California.

    PubMed

    Oddo, A F; Pagan, R D; Worden, L; Botzler, R G

    1978-07-01

    A total of 844 birds were observed dead at three sites in Humboldt County and an estimated 6750 birds died at three sites in Del Norte County, California. Coots were the primary species affected. The isolation of Pasteurella multocida from a snowy egret (Egretta thula) is the first reported case of avian cholera in this bird. There was evidence for a distinct sequence in the bird species dying at one site; American coots (Fulica americana) appeared to be the first species to die. PMID:691123

  14. Redwood National Park studies; data release number 2, Redwood Creek, Humboldt County, and Mill Creek, Del Norte County, California, April 11, 1974-September 30, 1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwatsubo, Rick T.; Nolan, K.M.; Harden, D.R.; Glysson, G.D.

    1976-01-01

    An interdisciplinary study has been undertaken in Redwood National Park, Calif., to describe parts of the ecosystems and recent changes in the intensity of erosion and sedimentation, define processes that may alter the natural ecosystems, and assess the impact of recent road construction and timber harvest. This report is the second of a series that will present data collected in this study. Stream-discharge and water-quality data were collected at 53 sampling stations in the Redwood Creek and Mill Creek drainage basins. Measurements included the following variables: Stream stage and discharge; turbidity; sediment; onsite water-quality determinations of temperature, pH , total alkalinity, specific conductance, and dissolved-oxxygen concentration; chemical analyses of water samples for major dissolved solids, selected trace elements, nitrogen, phosphorus, and organic carbon; chemical analyses of bottom sediment for organic carbon and pesticides; bacteria; benthic invertebrates; fish; periphyton; phytoplankton; and seston. Additional data include changes in geometry at 10 stream-channel cross sections along Mill Creek and the distribution of erosional landforms in the Mill Creek drainage basin; quantity and chemical composition of rainwater; and the intragravel-streambed condition at selected stations in the Redwood Creek drainage basin. (Woodard-USGS)

  15. URANIUM OCCURRENCES IN THE MOJAVE MINING DISTRICT, KERN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1957-01-01

    The Mojave minlng district is located about 12 miles southwest of ; Mojave, California. Several areas of anoma lous radioactivity were discovered ; here by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and published on an anomaly map ; in the spring of 1954. Two of these anomalies were exposed by surface excavation. ; Anomaly No. 2, the Dono-Han prospect, was

  16. AB 9: California bill would end county mandate for last-resort care, including communicable diseases.

    PubMed

    1996-02-16

    The California Assembly passed a bill to end the current requirement that counties provide general assistance and medical care as last resort care to persons who do not have access to Medi-Cal or private insurance. There is concern that all counties will close the facilities and reduce or eliminate last resort care, leaving people with no access to treatment when they become ill. The bill is now in the California State Senate. AIDS organizations are urging Californians to call their state senator and urge them to oppose the bill. More information is available by contacting AIDS Project Los Angeles, Life AIDS Lobby (916)444-0424, or ACT UP/Golden Gate. PMID:11363189

  17. Evaluation of animal control measures on pet demographics in Santa Clara County, California, 1993–2006

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Karen L.; Weng, Hsin-Yi

    2013-01-01

    The measurable benefits of animal control programs are unknown and the aim of this study was to determine the impact of these programs on pet population changes. A prospective cross-sectional study of 1000 households was implemented in 2005 to evaluate characteristics of the owned and unowned population of dogs and cats in Santa Clara County, California. The same population was previously studied 12 years earlier. During this time period, the county instituted in 1994 and then subsequently disestablished a municipal spay/neuter voucher program for cats. Dog intakes declined from 1992–2005, as they similarly did for an adjacent county (San Mateo). However, cat intakes declined significantly more in Santa Clara County than San Mateo, with an average annual decline of approximately 700 cats for the 12 year period. Time series analysis showed a greater than expected decline in the number of cats surrendered to shelters in Santa Clara County during the years the voucher program was in effect (1994–2005). The net savings to the county by reducing the number of cat shelter intakes was estimated at approximately $1.5 million. The measurable benefits of animal control programs are unknown and the aim of this study was to determine the impact of these programs on pet population changes. PMID:23638352

  18. Environmental assessmental, geothermal energy, Heber geothermal binary-cycle demonstration project: Imperial County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    The proposed design, construction, and operation of a commercial-scale (45 MWe net) binary-cycle geothermal demonstration power plant are described using the liquid-dominated geothermal resource at Heber, Imperial County, California. The following are included in the environmental assessment: a description of the affected environment, potential environmental consequences of the proposed action, mitigation measures and monitoring plans, possible future developmental activities at the Heber anomaly, and regulations and permit requirements. (MHR)

  19. Geology and nickel mineralization of the Julian-Cuyamaca area, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Creasey, S.C.

    1946-01-01

    The Julian-Cuyamaca area is in the San Diego Mountains, one of the Peninsular Ranges of southern California. It lies in San Diego County, about 3 miles south of Julian, and approximately 60 miles northeast of San Diego. The area was mapped, and its nickel mineralization studied, from March to June, 1944; the work was part of the U. S. Geological Survey's program of strategic mineral investigations.

  20. California State Library Statistics, 2004: Fiscal Year 2002-2003. From Public, Academic, Special and County Law Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Ira, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    Each year the State Library sends annual report forms to California's academic, public, special, state agency, and county law libraries. Statistical data from those reports are tabulated in this publication, with directory listings published in the companion volume, California Library Directory. For this fiscal year four hundred and thirty seven…

  1. California Library Statistics, 2005: Fiscal Year 2003-2004 from Public, Academic, Special and County Law Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Ira, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    Each year the State Library sends annual report forms to California's academic, public, special, state agency, and county law libraries. Statistical data from those reports are tabulated in this publication, with directory listings published in the companion volume, California Library Directory. For this fiscal year four hundred and eight…

  2. California Library Statistics, 2009: Fiscal Year 2007-2008 from Public, Academic, Special and County Law Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Ira, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Each year the State Library sends annual report forms to California's public, academic, special, state agency, and county law libraries. Statistical data from those reports are tabulated in this publication, with directory listings published in the companion volume, "California Library Directory." For this fiscal year, 389 libraries of all types…

  3. Humboldt Bay Cooperative Eelgrass Project

    E-print Network

    Schlosser, Susan

    2007-01-01

    of eelgrass meadows in the Pacific Northwest: a communityeelgrass (Zostera japonica Ascher. & Graeb. ) in a Pacific NorthwestPacific Northwest of North America populations achieve their highest biomass and reproductive effort in the fall Humboldt Bay Cooperative Eelgrass

  4. Hydrological Controls on Nutrient Concentrations and Fluxes in California Park Lakes, Butte County, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. R. Sundermann; W. M. Murphy

    2003-01-01

    Storm drains, groundwater wells, and an ephemeral stream network, Dead Horse Slough, supply nutrients to California Park Lakes, three interconnected reservoirs east of Chico, California. The 11 km2 watershed above the lakes traverses the Tuscan Formation, which consists of volcanic\\/sedimentary rocks with thin soil and suburban housing developments. The relatively impermeable Tuscan Formation strata and developed surfaces are consistent with

  5. Ambient Air Pollution and Autism in Los Angeles County, California

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Tracy Ann; Wilhelm, Michelle; Olsen, Jørn; Cockburn, Myles

    2012-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of autistic disorder (AD), a serious developmental condition, has risen dramatically over the past two decades, but high-quality population-based research addressing etiology is limited. Objectives: We studied the influence of exposures to traffic-related air pollution during pregnancy on the development of autism using data from air monitoring stations and a land use regression (LUR) model to estimate exposures. Methods: Children of mothers who gave birth in Los Angeles, California, who were diagnosed with a primary AD diagnosis at 3–5 years of age during 1998–2009 were identified through the California Department of Developmental Services and linked to 1995–2006 California birth certificates. For 7,603 children with autism and 10 controls per case matched by sex, birth year, and minimum gestational age, birth addresses were mapped and linked to the nearest air monitoring station and a LUR model. We used conditional logistic regression, adjusting for maternal and perinatal characteristics including indicators of SES. Results: Per interquartile range (IQR) increase, we estimated a 12–15% relative increase in odds of autism for ozone [odds ratio (OR) = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.19; per 11.54-ppb increase] and particulate matter ? 2.5 µm (OR = 1.15; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.24; per 4.68-?g/m3 increase) when mutually adjusting for both pollutants. Furthermore, we estimated 3–9% relative increases in odds per IQR increase for LUR-based nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide exposure estimates. LUR-based associations were strongest for children of mothers with less than a high school education. Conclusion: Measured and estimated exposures from ambient pollutant monitors and LUR model suggest associations between autism and prenatal air pollution exposure, mostly related to traffic sources. PMID:23249813

  6. Sources of emergency water supplies in San Mateo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, P.R.

    1975-01-01

    San Mateo County has several densely populated urban areas that get most of their water supplies from surface-water sources that could by damaged by a major earthquake or other general disaster. In the event of such a disaster, limited supplies of potable water may be obtained from selected wells, springs, and perennial streams. This report outlines the principal sources of existing water supplies, gives information on the need for emergency water-supply procedures, presents general criteria needed for selecting emergency water-supply wells, summarizes information for 60 selected water wells, numerous springs, and perennial streams that can be used as sources of water, and describes emergency water-purification procedures that can be used by individuals or small groups of people.

  7. Geohydrology and evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake Playa, Inyo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1990-12-01

    Franklin Lake playa is one of the principal discharge areas of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system in southern Nevada and adjacent California. Yucca Mountain, Nevada, located within this flow system, is being evaluated by the US Department of Energy to determine its suitability as a potential site for a high-level nuclear-waste repository. To assist the US Department of Energy with its evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site, the US Geological Survey developed a parameter-estimation model of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system. Results from sensitivity analyses made using the parameter-estimation model indicated that simulated rates of evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa had the largest effect on the calculation of transmissivity values at Yucca Mountain of all the model-boundary conditions and, therefore, that evapotranspiration required careful definition. 72 refs., 59 figs., 26 tab.

  8. Geohydrology and evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa, Inyo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnecki, J.B.

    1997-12-31

    Franklin Lake playa is one of the principal discharge areas of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system in southern Nevada and adjacent California. Yucca Mountain, Nevada, located within this flow system, is being evaluated by the US Department of Energy to determine its suitability as a potential site for a high-level nuclear-waste repository. To assist the U.S. Department of Energy with its evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site, the US Geological Survey developed a parameter-estimation model of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system. Results from sensitivity analyses made using the parameter-estimation model indicated that simulated rates of evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa had the largest effect on the calculation of transmissivity values at Yucca Mountain of all the model-boundary conditions and, therefore, that evapotranspiration required careful definition.

  9. Magma energy exploratory well Long Valley caldera, Mono County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Bender-Lamb, S.

    1991-04-01

    Intensive study of Long Valley over the past 15 years indicates evidence for magma at depths accessible to drilling. The Department of Energy's Magma Energy Extraction Program is currently drilling a 20,000 foot exploratory well into the Long Valley caldera. The purpose of this program is to determine the feasibility of producing electrical power from magma. If the magma energy experiment is successful, the Long Valley caldera could hypothetically supply the electrical power needs of California for 100 years at present power consumption rates. The paper describes calderas, the potential of geothermal energy, Long Valley geology, the Long Valley magma energy exploratory well, the four phases of the exploratory well drilling program, and Phase 1 results.

  10. Occurrence of Pacific Fisher (Martes pennanti pacifica) in the Redwood Zone of Northern California and the Habitat Attributes Associated with their Detections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard R. Klug

    1997-01-01

    ABSTRACT I conducted sooted track plate surveys in Humboldt and Del Node Counties, California , not detect fishers. Detection ratios were compared between the 3 vegetation types that occur on the study area., Predominantly Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) stands had detection ratios of 0.24. 0.38, and 0.46 in 1994, 1995, and for both years combined, respe&vely. Douglas-fir and redwood (Sequoia

  11. Breast cancer incidence and mortality trends in an affluent population: Marin County, California, USA, 1990–1999

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Christina A; Glaser, Sally L; West, Dee W; Ereman, Rochelle R; Erdmann, Christine A; Barlow, Janice M; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2002-01-01

    Background Elevated rates of breast cancer in affluent Marin County, California, were first reported in the early 1990s. These rates have since been related to higher regional prevalence of known breast cancer risk factors, including low parity, education, and income. Close surveillance of Marin County breast cancer trends has nevertheless continued, in part because distinctive breast cancer patterns in well-defined populations may inform understanding of breast cancer etiology. Methods Using the most recent incidence and mortality data available from the California Cancer Registry, we examined rates and trends for 1990–1999 for invasive breast cancer among non-Hispanic, white women in Marin County, in other San Francisco Bay Area counties, and in other urban California counties. Rates were age adjusted to the 2000 US standard, and temporal changes were evaluated with weighted linear regression. Results Marin County breast cancer incidence rates between 1990 and 1999 increased 3.6% per year (95% confidence interval, 1.8–5.5), six times more rapidly than in comparison areas. The increase was limited to women aged 45–64 years, in whom rates increased at 6.7% per year (95% confidence interval, 3.8–9.6). Mortality rates did not change significantly in Marin County despite 3–5% yearly declines elsewhere. Conclusion Patterns of breast cancer incidence and mortality in Marin County are unlike those in other California counties, and they are probably explained by Marin County's unique sociodemographic characteristics. Similar trends may have occurred in other affluent populations for which available data do not permit annual monitoring of cancer occurrence. PMID:12473174

  12. Digital database of microfossil localities in Alameda and Contra Costa Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDougall, Kristin; Block, Debra

    2014-01-01

    The eastern San Francisco Bay region (Contra Costa and Alameda Counties, California) is a geologically complex area divided by faults into a suite of tectonic blocks. Each block contains a unique stratigraphic sequence of Tertiary sediments that in most blocks unconformably overlie Mesozoic sediments. Age and environmental interpretations based on analysis of microfossil assemblages are key factors in interpreting geologic history, structure, and correlation of each block. Much of this data, however, is distributed in unpublished internal reports and memos, and is generally unavailable to the geologic community. In this report the U.S. Geological Survey microfossil data from the Tertiary sediments of Alameda and Contra Costa counties are analyzed and presented in a digital database, which provides a user-friendly summary of the micropaleontologic data, locality information, and biostratigraphic and ecologic interpretations.

  13. Statistical Modeling of Valley Fever Data in Kern County, California Jorge Talamantes (1), Sam Behseta (2), and Charles S. Zender (3)

    E-print Network

    Zender, Charles

    Statistical Modeling of Valley Fever Data in Kern County, California Jorge Talamantes (1), Sam, Irvine, USA Abstract. Coccidioidomycosis (valley fever) is a fungal infection found in the southwestern an attempt at the modeling of valley fever incidence in Kern County, California by the implementation

  14. Capacity and sedimentation of Loch Lomond Reservoir Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fogelman, R.P.; Johnson, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    A sedimentation study of Loch Lomond Reservoir in Santa Cruz County, California, was begun in 1982 to determine reservoir storage capacity and to establish permanent ranges for future studies. Results of a reservoir survey indicated a total storage capacity of 8,824 acre-ft in 1982. Comparison of thalweg profiles from this survey and a survey done prior to dam construction in 1960 shows that deposition has occurred in the lower reach of the reservoir due to landsliding and in the upper reach due to sediment inflow from Newell Creek. (Author 's abstract)

  15. Data from a solute transport experiment in the Leviathan Mine drainage, Alpine County, California, October 1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, M.R.; Bencala, K.E.; Zellweger, G.W.; Hammermeister, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    A twenty-four hour injection of chloride and sodium was made into Leviathan Creek, Alpine County, California to aid interpretation of the coupled interactions between physical transport processes and geochemical reactions. Leviathan Creek was chosen because it receives acid mine drainage from Leviathan Mine, an abandoned open-pit sulfur mine. Water samples were collected at 15 sites along a 4.39 kilometer reach and analyzed for chloride, sodium, sulfate and fluoride. Dissolved concentrations are presented in tabular format and time-series plots. Duplicate samples were analyzed by two laboratories: the Central Laboratory, Denver, Colorado and a research laboratory in Menlo Park, California. A tabular comparison of the analyses and plots of the differences between the two laboratories is presented. Hydrographs and instantaneous discharge measurements are included. (USGS)

  16. Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the central California planning area. Final report, 1970-2020

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.; Kolp, P.; Wallace, B.

    1987-10-01

    The report presents baseline socio-economic profiles of Sonoma, Marin, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Cruz, and Monterey Counties in central California. It is one of six reports prepared under the contract to develop baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in California, Oregon, and Washington. The profiles cover demographics, economics, housing public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and port capacity, marine traffic, and fishing. Secondary sources were used to prepare the profiles. The focus of the profiles is 1980, but 1970 to 2020 is covered to the extent possible with existing data.

  17. Baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in the southern California planning area. Final report, 1970-2020

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.; Kolp, P.; Wallace, B.

    1987-10-01

    The report presents baseline socio-economic profiles of Los Angeles, Orange, and San Diego Counties in southern California. It is one of six reports prepared under the contract to develop baseline socio-economic profiles of coastal counties in California, Oregon, and Washington. The profiles cover demographics, economics, housing, public services and facilities, public finance, energy consumption, land use, and port capacity, marine traffic, and fishing. Secondary sources were used to prepare the profiles. The focus of the profiles is 1980, but 1970 to 2020 is covered to the extent possible with existing data.

  18. Neotectonics of the southern Amargosa Desert, Nye County, Nevada and Inyo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, D.E. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States)

    1991-05-01

    A complex pattern of active faults occurs in the southern Amargosa Desert, southern Nye, County, Nevada. These faults can be grouped into three main fault systems: (1) a NE-striking zone of faults that forms the southwest extension of the left-lateral Rock Valley fault zone, in the much larger Spotted Range-Mine Mountain structural zone, (2) a N-striking fault zone coinciding with a NNW-trending alignment of springs that is either a northward continuation of a fault along the west side of the Resting Spring Range or a N-striking branch fault of the Pahrump fault system, and (3) a NW-striking fault zone which is parallel to the Pahrump fault system, but is offset approximately 5 km with a left step in southern Ash Meadows. These three fault zones suggest extension is occurring in an E-W direction, which is compatible with the {approximately}N10W structural grain prevalent in the Death Valley extensional region to the west.

  19. Differences in reproductive risk factors for breast cancer in middle-aged women in Marin County, California and a sociodemographically similar area of Northern California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C Suzanne Lea; Nancy P Gordon; Lee Ann Prebil; Rochelle Ereman; Connie S Uratsu; Mark Powell

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Northern California county of Marin (MC) has historically had high breast cancer incidence rates. Because of MC's high socioeconomic status (SES) and racial homogeneity (non-Hispanic White), it has been difficult to assess whether these elevated rates result from a combination of established risk factors or other behavioral or environmental factors. This survey was designed to compare potential breast

  20. Climate controls on Valley Fever incidence in Kern County, California, USA Charlie Zender , Department of Earth System Science, University of California at Irvine

    E-print Network

    Zender, Charles

    Climate controls on Valley Fever incidence in Kern County, California, USA Charlie Zender (Valley Fever) is a systemic infection caused by inhalation of airborne spores from Coccidioides immitis America. Figure 1: Areas endemic to Valley fever, after Kirkland and Fierer [1996]: Objectives: · Identify

  1. Ground-water resources of Honey Lake valley, Lassen County, California, and Washoe County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Handman, E.H.; Londquist, C.J.; Maurer, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    Honey Lake Valley is a 2,200 sq-mi, topographically closed basin about 35 miles northwest of Reno, Nevada. Unconsolidated basin-fill deposits on the valley floor and fractured volcanic rocks in northern and eastern uplands are the principal aquifers. In the study area, about 130,000 acre- ft of water recharges the aquifer system annually, about 40% by direct infiltration of precipitation and about 60% by infiltration of streamflow and irrigation water. Balancing this is an equal amount of groundwater discharge, of which about 65% evaporates from the water table or is transpired by phreatophytes, about 30 % is withdrawn from wells, and about 5% leaves the basin as subsurface outflow to the east. Results of a groundwater flow model of the eastern part of the basin, where withdrawals for public supply have been proposed, indicate that if 15,000 acre-ft of water were withdrawn annually, a new equilibrium would eventually be established by a reduction of about 60% in both evapotranspiration and subsurface outflow to the east. Hydrologic effects would be minimal at the western boundary of the flow-model area. Within the modeled area, the increased withdrawals cause an increase in the simulated net flow of groundwater eastward across the California-Nevada State line from about 670 acre-ft/yr to about 2,300 acre-ft/yr. (USGS)

  2. Geologic map of the Mound Spring quadrangle, Nye and Clark Counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lundstrom, Scott C.; Mahan, Shannon A.; Blakely, Richard J.; Paces, James B.; Young, Owen D.; Workman, Jeremiah B.; Dixon, Gary L.

    2003-01-01

    The Mound Spring quadrangle, the southwestern-most 7.5' quadrangle of the area of the Las Vegas 1:100,000-scale quadrangle, is entirely within the Pahrump Valley, spanning the Nevada/California State line. New geologic mapping of the predominantly Quaternary materials is combined with new studies of gravity and geochronology in this quadrangle. Eleven predominantly fine-grained units are delineated, including playa sediment, dune sand, and deposits associated with several cycles of past groundwater discharge and distal fan sedimentation. These units are intercalated with 5 predominantly coarse-grained alluvial-fan and wash gravel units mainly derived from the Spring Mountains. The gravel units are distinguished on the basis of soil development and associated surficial characteristics. Thermoluminescence and U-series geochronology constrain most of the units to the Holocene and late and middle Pleistocene. Deposits of late Pleistocene groundwater discharge in the northeast part of the quadrangle are associated with a down-to-the-southwest fault zone that is expressed by surface fault scarps and a steep gravity gradient. The gravity field also defines a northwest-trending uplift along the State line, in which the oldest sediments are poorly exposed. About 2 km to the northeast a prominent southwest-facing erosional escarpment is formed by resistant beds in middle Pleistocene fine-grained sediments that dip northeast away from the uplift. These sediments include cycles of groundwater discharge that were probably caused by upwelling of southwesterly groundwater flow that encountered the horst.

  3. 76 FR 21329 - Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest; Nevada; Environmental Impact Statement for Geothermal Leasing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    The Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest (HTNF) will prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) to evaluate certain National Forest System (NFS) lands for geothermal leasing availability. The project area includes NFS lands on the HTNF in Douglas, Lyon, Mineral, Lander, Nye and White Pine County,...

  4. Repeated West Nile virus epidemic transmission in Kern County, California, 2004-2007.

    PubMed

    Reisen, William K; Carroll, Brian D; Takahashi, Richard; Fang, Ying; Garcia, Sandra; Martinez, Vincent M; Quiring, Rob

    2009-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) has remained epidemic in Kern County, CA, since its introduction in 2004 through 2007 when the human case annual incidence increased from 6-8 to 17 per 100,000, respectively. The 2007 increase in human infection was associated with contradicting surveillance indicators, including severe drought, warm spring but cool summer temperature anomalies, decreased rural and urban mosquito abundance but increased early season infection in urban Culex quinquefasciatus Say, moderate avian "herd immunity," and declines in the catch of competent (western scrub-jay and house finch) and noncompetent (California quail and mourning dove) avian species. The decline in these noncompetent avian hosts may have increased contact with competent avian hosts and perhaps humans. The marked increase in home foreclosures and associated neglected swimming pools increased urban mosquito production sites, most likely contributing to the urban mosquito population and the WNV outbreak within Bakersfield. Coalescing five surveillance indicators into a risk assessment score measured each half month provided 2- to 6-wk early warning for emergency planning and was followed consistently by the onset of human cases after reaching epidemic conditions. St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) antibody was detected rarely in wild birds but not mosquitoes or sentinel chickens, indicating that previously infected birds were detected in Kern County, but SLEV reintroduction was not successful. In contrast, western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) was detected during 3 of 5 yr in Culex tarsalis Coquillett, sentinel chickens, and wild birds, but failed to amplify to levels where tangential transmission was detected in Aedes mosquitoes or humans. A comparison of transmission patterns in Kern County to Coachella Valley in the southeastern desert of California showed the importance of mosquito phenology and spatial distribution, corvids, or other avian "super spreaders" and anthropogenic factors in WNV epidemiology. PMID:19198528

  5. Mitigation action plan sale of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills) Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1, also called {open_quotes}Elk Hills{close_quotes}), a Federally-owned oil and gas production field in Kern County, California, was created by an Executive Order issued by President Taft on September 2, 1912. He signed another Executive Order on December 13, 1912, to establish Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2), located immediately south of NPR-1 and containing portions of the town of Taft, California. NPR-1 was not developed until the 1973-74 oil embargo demonstrated the nation`s vulnerability to oil supply interruptions. Following the embargo, Congress passed the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 which directed that the reserve be explored and developed to its fall economic potential at the {open_quotes}maximum efficient rate{close_quotes} (MER) of production. Since Elk Hills began full production in 1976, it has functioned as a commercial operation, with total revenues to the Federal government through FY 1996 of $16.4 billion, compared to total exploration, development and production costs of $3.1 billion. In February 1996, Title 34 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1996 (P.L. 104-106), referred to as the Elk Hills Sales Statute, directed the Secretary of Energy to sell NPR-1 by February 10, 1998.The Secretary was also directed to study options for enhancing the value of the other Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserve properties such as NPR-2, located adjacent to NPR-1 in Kern County- Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) located in Natrona County, Wyoming; Naval Oil Shale Reserves No. 1 and No. 3 (NOSR-1 and NOSR-3) located in Garfield County, Colorado; and Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 2 (NOSR-2) located in Uintah and Carbon Counties, Utah. The purpose of these actions was to remove the Federal government from the inherently non-Federal function of operating commercial oil fields while making sure that the public would obtain the maximum value from the reserves.

  6. Blood-feeding patterns of the Culex pipiens complex in Sacramento and Yolo Counties, California.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Matthew J; Thiemann, Tara; Macedo, Paula; Brown, David A; Scott, Thomas W

    2011-03-01

    Mosquitoes in the Culex pipiens complex are competent vectors of West Nile virus (WNV; family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus) in the laboratory, and field-collected mosquitoes have tested positive for the virus in California and elsewhere. A better understanding of Cx. pipiens complex blood-feeding patterns will help define the threat that these mosquitoes pose to human health and their role in WNV amplification in northern California. We collected blood-engorged Cx. pipiens complex mosquitoes from resting sites near and away from human habitation in Sacramento and Yolo Counties. Cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene sequences were used to identify the vertebrate species from which blood meals were taken. Of 330 engorged mosquitoes collected at 28 sites from June through August 2007 and May through August 2008, >99% fed on an avian host. Three mosquitoes contained bovine blood and none had fed on a human. American Robins (Turdus migratorius) were bitten most often, and the proportion of American Robin blood meals increased significantly over the summer. Other important avian hosts included House Finches (Carpodacus mexicanus), Barn Swallows (Hirundo rustica), Western Meadowlarks (Sturnella neglecta), and Mourning Doves (Zenaida macroura). In rural areas, Barn Swallows, Brewer's Blackbirds (Euphagus cyanocephalus), and House Sparrows (Passer domesticus) were frequent hosts. In settings near human habitation, Mourning Doves and Western Meadowlarks were common hosts. Our data indicate that in north central California mosquitoes in the Cx. pipiens complex may be more important as epiornitic than epidemic vectors of WNV. PMID:21485380

  7. Mapping Episodic Stream Activity for the Ridgecrest Solar Power Project, Kern County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibodeaux-Yost, S. N.; Brady, R. H., III; Vyverberg, K.; Weinman, B.

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale renewable energy projects are being developed in the California desert region on large tracts of predominantly undeveloped land (total area of developed land for individual project sites vary from 327 acres to 8,230 acres). The absence of a standard method of identifying and accounting for episodic streams in arid and semi-arid (dryland) regions is an area of conflict between project developers and the government agencies responsible for protecting natural resources and permitting renewable energy projects. There is a need for an accurate dryland stream delineation protocol that is consistent, efficient, accessible, and accurately reflects the extent and distribution of streams on a site. Dryland stream delineation protocol based on a scientific, geomorphic and ecological understanding of dryland stream processes will help ensure dryland streams are accurately identified for the purposes of environmental impact assessments and project permitting. Such a method is currently being developed by the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW). This thesis work critically evaluates the stream delineation and stream impact assessment previously completed by the developer for the proposed renewable energy project in El Paso Fan, El Paso Mountains, Ridgecrest, Kern County, California. This evaluation is then compared and contrasted with the results achieved in the field using the MESA (Mapping Episodic Stream Activity) stream delineation methods and protocols and mobile GIS mapping technology.

  8. Reservoir description is key to steamflood planning and implementation, Webster Reservoir, Midway-Sunset Field, Kern County, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. R. Hall; M. H. Link

    1988-01-01

    The Webster reservoir at Midway-Sunset field, Kern County, California, is an unconsolidated sand reservoir of Miocene age (''Stevens equivalent,'' Monterey Formation). The Webster was discovered in 1910 but, due to poor heavy oil (14° API) economics, development for primary production and subsequent enhanced recovery were sporadic. Currently, the reservoir produces by cyclic steam stimulation in approximately 35 wells. Cumulative oil

  9. Preliminary report on water storage capacity of unconsolidated deposits beneath the Lompoc Plain, Santa Barbara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Upson, Joseph E.

    1943-01-01

    The Lompoc Plain is the central lowland of a topographic and structural basin that forms the western and lower part of the Santa Ynes Valley in Santa Barbara County, California. It extends inland about 11 miles from the coast and is 1 mile fto about 3 miles wide.

  10. Identification of environmental issues: Hybrid wood-geothermal power plant, Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California: First phase report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-14

    The development of a 55 MWe power plant in Lassen County, California, has been proposed. The proposed power plant is unique in that it will utilize goethermal heat and wood fuel to generate electrical power. This report identifies environmental issues and constraints which may impact the proposed hybrid wood-geothermal power plant. (ACR)

  11. Merguerian, Charles, 1985c, Tectonic significance of mylonitic Paleozoic gneissic granitoids in the Shoo Fly Complex, Tuolumne County, California.

    E-print Network

    Merguerian, Charles

    Merguerian, Charles, 1985c, Tectonic significance of mylonitic Paleozoic gneissic granitoids in the Shoo Fly Complex, Tuolumne County, California. Paleozoic gneissic granitoids are an important mark the remnants of a Paleozoic plutonic belt as their protoliths conssisted of I- type, rather than S

  12. Case study of the Wendel-Amedee Exploration Drilling Project, Lassen County, California, User Coupled Confirmation Drilling Program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Zeisloft; B. S. Sibbett; M. C. Adams

    1984-01-01

    The Wendel-Amedee KGRA is located in Honey Lake basin in Lassen County, California, on the boundary between the Modoc Plateau and the Basin and Range geologic provinces. A variety of geophysical surveys was performed over the project property. Geophysical data helped in establishing the regional structural framework, however, none of the geophysical data is sufficiently refined to be considered suitable

  13. IDENTIFYING THE CAUSE OF HIGH CONCENTRATIONS OF TBA IN GROUNDWATER AT GASOLINE SPIILL SITES IN ORANGE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitoring at gasoline spills in Orange County, California has revealed that TBA (tertiary butyl alcohol) is often present at high concentrations in ground water. To manage the hazard associated with the presence of TBA, staff of the UST Local Oversight Program (LOP) of the Oran...

  14. SUMMARY OF AQUATIC LIFE TOXICITY STUDIES IN UPPER NEWPORT BAY TRIBUTARIES, ORANGE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA DURING 1996\\/981

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott Taylor; Deborah Neiter

    During the fall of 1996, the Evaluation Monitoring Demonstration Project (Lee and Taylor, 1997a; Silverado, 1997a) found that stormwater runoff in San Diego Creek at Campus Drive as it enters Upper Newport Bay Orange County, California was toxic to Ceriodaphnia. The stormwater runoff contained sufficient concentrations of diazinon and chlorpyrifos (organophosphate pesticides - OP pesticides), as well as some unidentified

  15. Map of the Carpinteria area and vicinity, Santa Barbara County, California, showing water-level contours for March 1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maltby, Dorothy

    1984-01-01

    A water-level contour map of the Carpinteria area, California, has been completed by the U.S. Geological Survey using 34 water-level measurements made by the Carpinteria County Water District in March 1982. Also shown are 5 hydrographs that show water-level fluctuations in each well between 1977 and 1982. (USGS)

  16. Who Tills the Soil? Mexican-American Workers Replace the Small Farmer in California: An Example from Colusa County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moles, Jerry A.

    1979-01-01

    Documenting the impact of technological advancements upon the American farmer, this article describes a rural California county where the small farmers have had to sell or lease their land to larger enterprises who then recruit Mexican American farm workers to replace the labor once provided by the small farmer. (JC)

  17. The effect of selenium on reproduction of black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) in Shasta County California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Flueck

    1989-01-01

    This study was to determine if nutritional inadequacy of selenium may be responsible for a declining reproductive rate of a migratory herd of black-tailed deer. Selenium is an essential trace mineral for mammalian herbivores. Deficiency affects primarily neonates resulting in increased mortality rates. Shasta County, California is indigenously low in selenium due to soil characteristics. Local livestock enterprises have experienced

  18. ANAEROBIC DEGRADATION OF MTBE TO TBA IN GROUND WATER AT GASOLINE SPILL SITES IN ORANGE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although tert-Butyl Alcohol (TBA) has not been used as a fuel oxygenate in Orange County, California, the concentrations of TBA in ground water at gasoline spill sites are high compared to the concentrations of the conventional fuel oxygenate Methyl tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE). In t...

  19. Impact of intercensal population projections and error of closure on breast cancer surveillance: examples from 10 California counties

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Amanda I; Clarke, Christina A; Ereman, Rochelle R

    2005-01-01

    Introduction In 2001, data from the California Cancer Registry suggested that breast cancer incidence rates among non-Hispanic white (nHW) women in Marin County, California, had increased almost 60% between 1991 and 1999. This analysis examines the extent to which these and other breast cancer incidence trends could have been impacted by bias in intercensal population projections. Method We obtained population projections for the year 2000 projected from the 1990 census from the California Department of Finance (DOF) and population counts from the 2000 US Census for nHW women living in 10 California counties and quantified age-specific differences in counts. We also computed age-adjusted incidence rates of invasive breast cancer in order to examine and quantify the impact of differences between the population data sources. Results Differences between year 2000 DOF projections and year 2000 census counts varied by county and age and ranged from underestimates of 60% to overestimates of 64%. For Marin County, the DOF underestimated the number of nHW women aged 45 to 64 years by 32% compared to the 2000 US census. This difference produced a significant 22% discrepancy between breast cancer incidence rates calculated using the two population data sources. In Los Angeles and Santa Clara counties, DOF-based incidence rates were significantly lower than rates based on census data. Rates did not differ significantly by population data source in the remaining seven counties examined. Conclusion Although year 2000 population estimates from the DOF did not differ markedly from census counts at the state or county levels, greater discrepancies were observed for race-stratified, age-specific groups within counties. Because breast cancer incidence rates must be calculated with age-specific data, differences between population data sources at the age-race level may lead to mis-estimation of breast cancer incidence rates in county populations affected by these differences, as was observed in Marin County. Although intercensal rates based on population projections are important for timely breast cancer surveillance, these rates are prone to bias due to the error of closure between population projections and decennial census population counts. Intercensal rates should be interpreted with this potential bias in mind. PMID:16168110

  20. Occupational Behaviors and Farmworkers’ Pesticide Exposure: Findings From a Study in Monterey County, California

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Alicia L.; Bradman, Asa; Castorina, Rosemary; Camacho, José; López, Jesús; Barr, Dana B.; Snyder, John; Jewell, Nicholas P.; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2008-01-01

    Background We studied the relationship between behaviors promoted through the US Environmental Protection Agency Worker Protection Standard (WPS) and other programs and agricultural pesticide exposures in 73 strawberry fieldworkers employed in Monterey County, California. Methods Farmworkers’ behaviors were assessed via self-report and organophosphorus (OP) pesticide exposure was measured using dimethyl alkylphosphate (DMAP) and malathion dicarboxylic acid (MDA) urinary metabolite levels. Results Wearing WPS-recommended clothing, wearing clean work clothes, and the combination of handwashing with soap and wearing gloves were associated with decreases in DMAP and MDA metabolite levels. Despite these protective behaviors, however, participants had significantly higher levels of exposure as compared with a national reference sample. Conclusions Interventions that facilitate compliance with these behaviors may be effective in decreasing fieldworkers’ pesticide exposures. However, further efforts are needed to reduce the exposure disparities experienced by farmworkers and decrease the potential for “take home” exposures to farmworkers’ families. PMID:18702096

  1. Racial/Ethnic Composition, Social Disorganization, and Offsite Alcohol Availability in San Diego County, California*

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Amie L.; Hill, Terrence D.; French, Michael T.; Hernandez, Monique N.

    2009-01-01

    We draw upon social disorganization theory to examine the effects of community characteristics on the distribution of offsite alcohol outlets in San Diego County, California. Of particular interest is whether alcohol availability varies according to neighborhood racial/ethnic composition once measures of social disorganization (socioeconomic disadvantage, residential instability, and racial/ethnic heterogeneity) are controlled. Using data from the 1990 Census and 1993 alcohol license reports, we estimate a series of negative binomial regression models with corrections for spatial autocorrelation. The results show that percent Asian is associated with lower offsite alcohol outlet density. Once socioeconomic disadvantage is controlled, percent Latino is related to lower alcohol availability. Although similar suppressor patterns are observed, percent Black is generally unrelated to outlet density. Consistent with social disorganization theory, socioeconomic disadvantage and residential instability predict increased alcohol availability. Neighborhood racial/ethnic composition is either unrelated or inversely related to outlet density once social disorganization and other neighborhood characteristics are taken into account. PMID:20161391

  2. Fluctuations in climate and incidence of coccidioidomycosis in Kern County, California: a review.

    PubMed

    Talamantes, Jorge; Behseta, Sam; Zender, Charles S

    2007-09-01

    Coccidioidomycosis (Valley Fever) is a fungal infection found in the southwestern United States, northern Mexico, and some places in Central and South America. The fungi that cause it (Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii) are normally soil dwelling, but, if disturbed, become airborne and infect the host when their spores are inhaled. It is thus natural to surmise that weather conditions, which foster the growth and dispersal of Coccidioides, must have an effect on the number of cases in the endemic areas. This article reviews our attempts to date at quantifying this relationship in Kern County, California (where C. immitis is endemic). We have examined the effect on incidence resulting from precipitation, surface temperature, and wind speed. We have performed our studies by means of a simple linear correlation analysis, and by a generalized autoregressive moving average model. Our first analysis suggests that linear correlations between climatic parameters and incidence are weak; our second analysis indicates that incidence can be predicted largely by considering only the previous history of incidence in the county-the inclusion of climate- or weather-related time sequences improves the model only to a relatively minor extent. Our work therefore suggests that incidence fluctuations (about a seasonally varying background value) are related to biological and/or anthropogenic reasons, and not so much to weather or climate anomalies. PMID:17347336

  3. Persistence of mosquito-borne viruses in Kern County, California, 1983-1988.

    PubMed

    Reisen, W K; Hardy, J L; Reeves, W C; Presser, S B; Milby, M M; Meyer, R P

    1990-10-01

    The persistence of arboviruses was studied from 1983 to 1988 in mixed agriculture, marsh, riparian, and foothill habitats in Kern County, CA. Western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE) virus was isolated frequently during 1983 from Culex tarsalis and Aedes melanimon and was detected by the seroconversion of sentinel chickens. WEE virus then disappeared, even though vector competence studies during 1984-1986 showed that Cx. tarsalis was able to transmit WEE virus. St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) virus was detected sporadically in 3 of the 6 years of the study by isolation from Cx. tarsalis and/or by sentinel chicken seroconversion. When mosquito pools were screened for virus in suckling mice, Turlock (TUR) and Hart Park (HP) viruses were isolated from Cx. tarsalis during each summer. Vertical transmission of HP was indicated by the isolation of virus from a pool of male Cx. tarsalis. California encephalitis (CE) virus was isolated repeatedly from host-seeking Ae. melanimon females, males, and adults reared from field-collected immatures, verifying vertical transmission in nature. Horizontal transmission of CE virus among both jackrabbits (Lepus californicus) and desert cottontails (Sylvilagus auduboni) appeared to amplify Ae. melanimon infection rates during the summer of 1985, but elevated herd immunity depressed infection rates during 1986. Thus, CE, HP, and TUR viruses persisted in Kern County, while WEE virus appeared to become extinct and required reintroduction. The sporadic occurrence of SLE virus activity remains unexplained, but its persistence may require both vertical transmission and reintroduction. PMID:2240370

  4. Neisseria gonorrhoeae with reduced susceptibility to azithromycin--San Diego County, California, 2009.

    PubMed

    2011-05-13

    A single 2 g dose of azithromycin effectively treats genitourinary infections caused by susceptible Neisseria gonorrhoeae and has been used to treat uncomplicated gonorrhea in persons with cephalosporin allergy. However, azithromycin is not recommended as monotherapy because of concern over the emergence of resistance. Instead, a 1 g dose of azithromycin is recommended as a component of dual therapy for gonorrhea, in conjunction with a cephalosporin (i.e., 250 mg of ceftriaxone or 400 mg of cefixime, if ceftriaxone is not an option). During January 1992--July 2009, of 87,566 N. gonorrhoeae isolates tested for azithromycin susceptibility by CDC's national Gonoccoccal Isolate Surveillance Project (GISP), only 39 (0.04%) had minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ?8 µg/mL (including 25 with 8 µg/mL and 14 with 16 µg/mL), indicating reduced susceptibility; none of the isolates were collected in San Diego County, California (CDC, unpublished data, 2011). During August--October 2009, five of 55 (9.1%) N. gonorrhoeae isolates obtained from men with symptomatic urethritis tested at San Diego County's main municipal sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic had high azithromycin MICs: three with 8µg/mL and two with 16 µg/mL. This report summarizes the laboratory and epidemiologic findings associated with this reduced susceptibility to azithromycin. In San Diego County, clinicians treating cephalosporin-allergic patients with a 2 g dose of azithromycin for uncomplicated gonorrhea are advised to obtain tests of cure 3 weeks after treatment and to recommend sexual abstinence until a negative test result for gonorrhea is achieved. Continued surveillance for antibiotic resistance and effective control efforts are critical for gonorrhea prevention. PMID:21566558

  5. An analysis of asthma hospitalizations, air pollution, and weather conditions in Los Angeles County, California

    PubMed Central

    Delamater, Paul L.; Finley, Andrew O.; Banerjee, Sudipto

    2012-01-01

    There is now a large body of literature supporting a linkage between exposure to air pollutants and asthma morbidity. However, the extent and significance of this relationship varies considerably between pollutants, location, scale of analysis, and analysis methods. Our primary goal is to evaluate the relationship between asthma hospitalizations, levels of ambient air pollution, and weather conditions in Los Angeles (LA) County, California, an area with a historical record of heavy air pollution. County-wide measures of Carbon Monoxide (CO), Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2), Ozone (O3), Particulate Matter < 10 ? m (PM10), Particulate Matter < 2.5 ? m (PM2.5), maximum temperature, and relative humidity were collected for all months from 2001 to 2008. We then related these variables to monthly asthma hospitalization rates using Bayesian regression models with temporal random effects. We evaluated model performance using a goodness of fit criterion and predictive ability. Asthma hospitalization rates in LA County decreased between 2001 and 2008. Traffic-related pollutants, CO and NO2, were significant and positively correlated with asthma hospitalizations. PM2.5 also had a positive, significant association with asthma hospitalizations. PM10, relative humidity, and maximum temperature produced mixed results, whereas O3 was non-significant in all models. Inclusion of temporal random effects satisfies statistical model assumptions, improves model fit, and yields increased predictive accuracy and precision compared to their non-temporal counterparts. Generally, pollution levels and asthma hospitalizations decreased during the 9 year study period. Our findings also indicate that after accounting for seasonality in the data, asthma hospitalization rate has a significant positive relationship with ambient levels of CO, NO2, and PM2.5. PMID:22475217

  6. 78 FR 41390 - Pershing County Water Conservation District; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing with the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    ...Commission [Project No. 14327-000] Pershing County Water Conservation District; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing...June 26, 2013. d. Applicant: Pershing County Water Conservation District. e. Name of Project: Humboldt...

  7. 78 FR 59919 - Pershing County Water Conservation District; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing With the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ...Commission [Project No. 14327-000] Pershing County Water Conservation District; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing...June 26, 2013. d. Applicant: Pershing County Water Conservation District. e. Name of Project: Humboldt...

  8. Late Pleistocene sediments and fossils near the mouth of Mad River, Humboldt County, California: Facies analysis, sequence development, and possible age correlation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1994-01-01

    Study of late Pleistocene-age sediments near the mouth of the Mad River revealed a sequence of nearshore marine and shallow bay deposits. This sequence, bounded by unconformities, is informally named the Mouth of Mad unit. The Mouth of mad unit can be divided into four distinct depositional facies at the study site. The lowest facies are the Nearshore Sand and

  9. Late Pleistocene sediments and fossils near the mouth of Mad River, Humboldt County, California: Facies analysis, sequence development, and possible age correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, E.W. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1994-04-01

    Study of late Pleistocene-age sediments near the mouth of the Mad River revealed a sequence of nearshore marine and shallow bay deposits. This sequence, bounded by unconformities, is informally named the Mouth of Mad unit. The Mouth of mad unit can be divided into four distinct depositional facies at the study site. The lowest facies are the Nearshore Sand and Estuarine Mud, which lie unconformably on a paleosol. The sand facies grades upward into a high-energy, interbedded Nearshore Sand and Gravel facies containing storm and rip-channel deposits. Above the sand and gravel is a Strand-Plain Sand facies. This sand is overlain by a laterally variable sequence of shell-rich Bay facies. The bay deposits can be further divided into five subfacies: (1) a Bioturbated Sand; (2) a Lower Tidal Flat Mud; (3) a Mixed Sand and Mud; (4) an oyster-rich Bay Mud; and (5) an Upper Tidal Flat Mud. The bay sequence is overlain unconformably by younger late Pleistocene-age marine terrace deposits. The depositional environments represented by these facies progress from a shoreline estuary to nearshore deposits, above storm wave base, and slowly back to shoreline and finally shallow bay conditions. The Mouth of Mad unit represents a transgressive-regressive sequence, involving the development of a protective spit. The uppermost mud within the Mouth of Mad unit has been dated, using thermoluminescence age estimation, at 176 [+-] 33 ka, placing it in the late Pleistocene. The Mouth of Mad unit appears to be younger than the fossiliferous deposits at Elk Head, Crannell Junction, Trinidad Head, Moonstone Beach, and the Falor Formation near Maple Creek, and possibly time equivalent with gravel deposits exposed at the western end of School Road in McKinleyville.

  10. 76 FR 26224 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Northern Sonoma County Air Pollution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ...Northern Sonoma County Air Pollution Control District (NSCAPCD...Northern Sonoma County Air Pollution Control District (NSCAPCD...and implement SIP- approved Prevention of Significant Deterioration...Northern Sonoma County Air Pollution Control District...

  11. Vegetation and Small Vertebrates of Oak Woodlands at Low and High Risk for Sudden Oak Death in San Luis Obispo County, California1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Douglas J. Tempel; William D. Tietje; Donald E. Winslow

    San Luis Obispo County contains oak woodlands at varying levels of risk of sudden oak death (SOD), caused by a fungal pathogen (Phytophthora ramorum) that in the past decade has killed thousands of oak (Quercus spp.) and tanoak (Lithocarpus densiflorus) trees in California. SOD was most recently detected 16 km north of the San Luis Obispo County line. Low-risk woodlands

  12. Limited Life Opportunities for Black and Latino Youth. Report on a Public Hearing by the Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations (Compton, California, April 26, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations, CA.

    The Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations held a public hearing to examine the effects of poverty on the hundreds of thousands of low income Blacks and Latinos under the age of 18 residing in Los Angeles County (California). The Commission's findings, recommendations, and concerns are presented. The following findings are presented: (1)…

  13. Habitat-related variation in infestation of lizards and rodents with Ixodes ticks in dense woodlands in Mendocino County, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rebecca J. Eisen; Lars Eisen

    2004-01-01

    During the spring and early summer of 2002, we examined the relative importance of Borrelia-refractory lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis, Elgaria spp.) versus potential Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.)-reservoirs (rodents) as hosts for Ixodes pacificus immatures in 14 woodland areas (six oak, five mixed oak\\/Douglas fir, and three redwood\\/tanoak areas) distributed throughout Mendocino County, California. Lizards were estimated to serve as hosts

  14. The Role of Women in Farming: An Exploratory Study of the Relative Impact Women Have on the Farm Enterprise in Yolo County, California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gwynn, Douglas; And Others

    The purpose of this pilot study was to describe the participation of farm women in farm work in one California country. Women from 228 farms, approximately 55 percent of the farms in Yolo County, California, were interviewed by telephone concerning their efforts and roles on the family farm. The study found that the main criterion of whether or…

  15. Rice burning and asthma hospitalizations, Butte County, California, 1983-1992.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, J; Kreutzer, R; Smith, D

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the association between rice burning and daily asthma hospitalizations in Butte County, California, from 1983 to 1992. Eighty-two percent of planted rice was burned, with a mean of 555 acres burned on days when burning was permitted. For 60% of the days during this period, no rice burning occurred. Peak burning occurred in fall and spring but was not correlated with criteria pollutants. Asthma admissions averaged 0.65/day and peaked in March. In the basic Poisson model with daily asthma hospitalizations as the outcome of interest, burn acreage showed a small but statistically significant elevation of risk for hospitalization per acre of rice burned [relative risk (RR) = 1.0001; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1. 00004-1.0002], after adjusting for maximum daily temperature, seasonal factors, and yearly population. In this model, burn acreage showed a dose-response effect as acreage burned increased. Days with the greatest acreage burned (>499 acres) had the largest risk of hospitalization (RR = 1.23; CI, 1.09-1.39), and days with moderate burning (between 100 and 499 acres) had a slightly lower risk of admission (RR = 1.2; CI, 1.05-1.37). Elevations of air pollutants were not associated with days of increased rice burning; however, rice burn acreage was shown to have a small but statistically significant effect on asthma morbidity in Butte County. This evidence suggests that further limitations on the daily amount of rice straw permitted to be burned should be considered to reduce pulmonary morbidity related to asthma. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:9300924

  16. Study of the influential leaders, power structure, community decisions, and geothermal energy development in Imperial County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, E.W.; Hall, C.H.; Pick, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    The economy of Imperial County, California, is now dominated by agriculture, but economic studies indicate that the emerging geothermal sector could grow to a size comparable to that of agriculture. The purpose of this study is to discover the kind of power structure operating in Imperial County, the influential leaders, the source of their power, their probable reactions to geothermal development, and the possible effects geothermal development will have on the power structure. Several social science research methods are used to identify the influential leaders and to describe the power structure in Imperial County. An analysis of the opinions of leadership and the public shows the likely response to geothermal development. The power structure analysis, combined with forecasts of the economic effects of geothermal development, indicates the ways in which the power structure itself may change.

  17. Numerical model of a tracer test on the Santa Clara River, Ventura County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nishikawa, T.; Paybins, K.S.; Izbicki, J.A.; Reichard, E.G.

    1999-01-01

    To better understand the flow processes, solute-transport processes, and ground-water/surface-water interactions on the Santa Clara River in Ventura County, California, a 24-hour fluorescent-dye tracer study was performed under steady-state flow conditions on a 45-km reach of the river. The study reach includes perennial (uppermost and lowermost) subreaches and ephemeral subreaches of the lower Piru Creek and the middle Santa Clara River. The tracer-test data were used to calibrate a one-dimensional flow model (DAFLOW) and a solute-transport model (BLTM). The dye-arrival times at each sample location were simulated by calibrating the velocity parameters in DAFLOW. The simulations of dye transport indicated that (1) ground-water recharge explains the loss of mass in the ephemeral middle subreaches, and (2) groundwater recharge does not explain the loss of mass in the perennial uppermost and lowermost subreaches. The observed tracer curves in the perennial subreaches were indicative of sorptive dye losses, transient storage, and (or) photodecay - these phenomena were simulated using a linear decay term. However, analysis of the linear decay terms indicated that photodecay was not a dominant source of dye loss.To better understand the flow processes, solute-transport processes, and ground-water/surface-water interactions on the Santa Clara River in Ventura County, California, a 24-hour fluorescent-dye tracer study was performed under steady-state flow conditions on a 45-km reach of the river. The study reach includes perennial (uppermost and lowermost) subreaches and ephemeral subreaches of the lower Piru Creek and the middle Santa Clara River. The tracer-test data were used to calibrate a one-dimension-al flow model (DAFLOW) and a solute-transport model (BLTM). The dye-arrival times at each sample location were simulated by calibrating the velocity parameters in DAFLOW. The simulations of dye transport indicated that (1) ground-water recharge explains the loss of mass in the ephemeral middle subreaches, and (2) ground-water recharge does not explain the loss of mass in the perennial uppermost and lowermost subreaches. The observed tracer curves in the perennial subreaches were indicative of sorptive dye losses, transient storage, and (or) photodecay - these phenomena were simulated using a linear decay term. However, analysis of the linear decay terms indicated that photodecay was not a dominant source of dye loss.

  18. Study to develop statewide and county-level economic projections. Volume 1. California county economic forecasts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kloepfer, J.

    1994-08-01

    Volume I provides a description of forecasts of economic growth for California and its large metropolitan areas. The California economy will continue to lag the national economy until 1996. In the longer term, California will surpass the nation in growth near the end of the decade, as the State`s comparative advantages in industry structure, natural and human resources, and geography will enable it to prosper. Real output will grow faster than employment as continued competitive pressures from across the nation and around the world will drive productivity gains in California`s manufacturing industries. Inland areas in the state are expected to experience stronger growth than the coastal areas at the same competitive pressures.

  19. Distribution and Abundance of California Giant Salamander (Dicamptodon ensatus) and Signal Crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) in the Upper Redwood Creek Watershed, Marin County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fong, Darren; Howell, Judd A.

    2006-01-01

    A survey was conducted in 1997-1998 to identify the distribution of non-native signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) and larval California giant salamanders (Dicamptodon ensatus) within the upper Redwood Creek watershed (Marin County, California). The crayfish is widely distributed along the mainstem Redwood Creek. It was found in lower Fern Creek but not in any first order tributaries or above fish barriers. While present throughout the study area, larval California giant salamanders were found mainly in small headwater tributaries. Larval salamanders appear to use habitats in accordance to their availability, while signal crayfish were rarely found in shallow water habitats and appeared to prefer scour pools. Evidence of predation by signal crayfish on larval giant salamanders was found under confined conditions. Controlled laboratory and field experiments would be needed to determine whether competitive exclusion is occurring. Because of its widespread occurrence in the headwater streams surveyed in this project, California giant salamanders would be an appropriate indicator species for those interested in monitoring the health of small headwater streams. Future long-term monitoring using California giant salamanders should be based on permanent monitoring reaches with periodic basinwide habitat and animal surveys to determine if reaches are representative of basinwide conditions.

  20. Humboldt National Forest East Mormon

    E-print Network

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Range Nevada Test Site ASH MEADOWS NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE DESERT NATIONAL WILDLIFE RANGE PAHRANAGAT Sunrise ManorLas Vegas North Las Vegas Nevada Test Site Lake Mohave Lake Mead Esmeralda County Nye County

  1. Evaluation of ground-water monitoring network, Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blankenbaker, G.G.; Farrar, Christopher D.

    1981-01-01

    The Santa Cruz County Flood Control and Water Conservation District seeks to improve the existing network of observation wells to monitor water levels and ground-water quality in the Pajaro Valley subarea and the Aptos-Soquel, San Lorenzo, and Santa Cruz Coastal subbasins in California. The proposed network , consisting of 92 wells, is designed to monitor changes in storage and quality of ground water resulting from climatic changes and management-induced stresses. In the proposed network , water levels in all wells would be measured semiannually, in April and September, and monthly in a few key wells. The water-level measurements would provide data that could be used to determine changes in ground-water storage. In addition to the currently monitored characteristics--temperature, specific conductance, pH, and chloride ion concentration--inclusion of annual sampling and analysis for major ions and nutrients is proposed. The network would also include sampling and analysis for trace elements once every 4 years. More frequent analyses are proposed in areas where water-quality problems are known to exist or where potential water-quality problems are recognized. Analyses for major ions, nutrients, and trace elements are included in the proposed network to provide baseline data for monitoring long-term changes in water quality and to detect any unexpected changes in quality. (USGS)

  2. Biological survey of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (Buena Vista), Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Sauls, M.L.

    1987-06-01

    A field survey of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2, Kern County, California, was conducted to determine the distribution and relative abundance of endangered species and other wildlife. Of the 343 San Joaquin kit fox dens found in 40 sections, 33 were observed by surveyors in transit and 310 were found along transects. Of the latter, 264 were typical subterranean dens and 46 were atypical dens in man-made structures. Estimated density of dens was 28.8 +- 4.4 per square mile; relative density was 9.2/1000 acres. The number of typical dens observed per section was inversely correlated with the number of petroleum wells per section (intensity of development). Atypical dens were usually found to be in pipes or pipe culverts and were positively correlated with density of wells. Relative densities of black-tailed jackrabbits (41.9/1000 acres) and desert cottontails (17.1/1000 acres), preferred prey for foxes, were high compared with densities reported on other public lands. Most (81%) of the 19 blunt-nosed leopard lizards were observed in six adjacent sections located in the gentle foothills near Buena Vista Lake playa. Most (86%) of the 275 giant kangaroo rat burrow systems were observed in ten sections containing flat, relatively undeveloped terrain in and around upper Buena Vista Valley. San Joaquin antelope ground squirrels were the second most commonly observed diurnal vertebrate: 761 observations in 45 sections. A total of 6740 observations of 61 species of wildlife were made.

  3. Comments on potential geologic and seismic hazards affecting coastal Ventura County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, Stephanie L.; Boore, David M.; Fisher, Michael A.; Frankel, Arthur D.; Geist, Eric L.; Hudnut, Kenneth W.; Kayen, Robert E.; Lee, Homa J.; Normark, William R.; Wong, Florence L.

    2004-01-01

    This report examines the regional seismic and geologic hazards that could affect proposed liquefied natural gas (LNG) facilities in coastal Ventura County, California. Faults throughout this area are thought to be capable of producing earthquakes of magnitude 6.5 to 7.5, which could produce surface fault offsets of as much as 15 feet. Many of these faults are sufficiently well understood to be included in the current generation of the National Seismic Hazard Maps; others may become candidates for inclusion in future revisions as research proceeds. Strong shaking is the primary hazard that causes damage from earthquakes and this area is zoned with a high level of shaking hazard. The estimated probability of a magnitude 6.5 or larger earthquake (comparable in size to the 2003 San Simeon quake) occurring in the next 30 years within 30 miles of Platform Grace is 50-60%; for Cabrillo Port, the estimate is a 35% likelihood. Combining these probabilities of earthquake occurrence with relationships that give expected ground motions yields the estimated seismic-shaking hazard. In parts of the project area, the estimated shaking hazard is as high as along the San Andreas Fault. The combination of long-period basin waves and LNG installations with large long-period resonances potentially increases this hazard.

  4. Sexual behavior and AIDS-related knowledge among community college students in Orange County, California.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, J; Radecki, S; Charchian, A S; Josephson, V

    1999-02-01

    Whereas college students are not identified as a high-risk group for acquiring the HIV infection, they exhibit high-risk behaviors consistent with their age group, including multiple sexual partners and high rates of unprotected intercourse. This study was conducted to determine levels of HIV-related sexual behavior, along with knowledge and attitudes among students attending community colleges in a relatively affluent multiethnic community. This study used a random sample survey (N = 319) of students attending selected classes at four community colleges in Orange County, California, to assess HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitudes, and patterns of past and present sexual behavior. The level of student knowledge concerning HIV disease was found to be relatively high, and pronounced differences in knowledge and sexual permissiveness were identified as a function of ethnicity and religion, with Asians showing lower knowledge and lower concern about HIV, and religion/religiosity related to these variables and also to levels of sexual permissiveness. Respondents' comfort in asking a partner about his/her sexual history was positively associated with their level of self-esteem, and negatively related to peer pressure in this population. As in previous studies of college populations, HIV knowledge per se does not confer a protective effect against high-risk behavior. However, knowledge was found to be an enabling factor with regard to students' comfort levels in asking about their partner's sexual histories, and in requesting that partners take an AIDS test. PMID:10036646

  5. Seastacks buried beneath newly reported Lower Miocene sandstone, northern Santa Barbara County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Fritsche, A.E.; Hanna, F.M.

    1985-04-01

    Three large, isolated exposures of a light-gray, coarse-grained, thick-bedded sandstone unit occur in the northern San Rafael Mountains of Santa Barbara County, California. These rocks are moderately fossiliferous and contain Vertipecten bowersi, Amussiopecten vanvlecki, Aequipecten andersoni, Otrea howelli, shark teeth, whale bones, and regular echinoid spines. The fossils indicate that the sandstone unit, although previously reported as upper(.) Miocene, correlates best with the lower Miocene Vaqueros Formation. This unit was deposited in angular unconformity on a Cretaceous, greenish-gray turbidite sequence of interbedded sandstone and shale, and onlaps the unconformity erosion surface from west to east, the unit being thicker in the west and older at its base. The underlying Cretaceous sandstone beds are well indurated, and during the eastward transgression of the early Miocene sea, they resisted wave erosion and stood as seastacks offshore of the advancing coastline, thus creating a very irregular topographic surface upon which the Vaqueros Formation was deposited. Some seastacks were as much as 4 m tall, as indicated by inliers of Cretaceous rock surrounded by 4-m thick sections of the Vaqueros Formation.

  6. Under- and Over-Nutrition Among Refugees in San Diego County, California

    PubMed Central

    Rondinelli, Amanda J.; Morris, Meghan D.; Rodwell, Timothy C.; Moser, Kathleen S.; Paida, Paulino; Popper, Steve T.

    2010-01-01

    Resettled refugees often arrive in their host country with little knowledge of nutrition or available food choices. We explored nutrition-related issues of recent refugee arrivals to San Diego County—the second largest California resettlement site. In-depth interviews (n = 40) were conducted with refugees, health care practitioners, and refugee service organizations. Content analysis identified nutrition-related themes. Unhealthy weight gain after arrival was the most common concern and was attributed to social pressures among adolescents, food choices and a more sedentary lifestyle. Conversely, undernutrition remained a concern due to poor diets. Factors influencing nutritional problems included continuation of past habits, acculturation, unfamiliarity with available foods and socio-economic influences. The nutritional concerns encountered by resettled refugees in San Diego are not unique to this group but are aggravated by their past experiences, and abrupt changes to food choices and behavior. Addressing contextual factors of poor food choices may prevent some of the long term health consequences of poor nutrition. PMID:20505992

  7. Streamflow, sediment discharge, and streambank erosion in Cache Creek, Yolo County, California, 1953-86

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harmon, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    This report defines cross-section geometry, slope, sinuosity, bed and bank material size, and sediment discharge for Cache Creek, Capay Valley, Yolo County, California; it also relates streambank erosion to daily volumes of flow greater than 6,000 acre-ft. Mean bed elevations at six cross sections during 1983-86 and at two cross sections over several years indicate general stability of elevations in the gravel-bed channel. Water-surface slope ranged from 0.13% to 0.51% in four reaches during two flood peaks. Aerial photographs indicate that the Cache Creek channel is sinuous. About 67% of bed material at 45 cross sections is gravel, and 23% is coarser than gravel. Bank material at 27 cross sections contain sands, silt, and clay, except at one cross section where cobbles and gravel form the left bank. The sediment-discharge rate was lower during 1984-86 than in 1960-63. Streambank erosion was measured by comparing aerial photographs taken over several years. Eroded areas total about 13.2 million sq ft (300 acres) from 1953 to 1984. Net migration is toward the right bank. (USGS)

  8. Problems related to water quality and algal control in Lopez Reservoir, San Luis Obispo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, Richard H.; Averett, Robert C.; Hines, Walter G.

    1975-01-01

    A study to determine the present enrichment status of Liopez Reservoir in San Luis Obispo county, California, and to evaluate copper sulfate algal treatment found that stratification in the reservoir regulates nutrient release and that algal control has been ineffective. Nuisance algal blooms, particularly from March to June, have been a problem in the warm multipurpose reservoir since it was initially filled following intense storms in 1968-69. The cyanophyte Anabaena unispora has been dominant; cospecies are the diatoms Stephanodiscus astraea and Cyclotella operculata, and the chlorophytes Pediastrum deplex and Sphaerocystis schroeteri. During an A. unispora bloom in May 1972 the total lake surface cell count was nearly 100,000 cells/ml. Thermal stratification from late spring through autumn results in oxygen deficiency in the hypolimnion and metalimnion caused by bacterial oxidation of organic detritus. The anaerobic conditions favor chemical reduction of organic matter, which constitute 10-14% of the sediment. As algae die, sink to the bottom, and decompose, nutrients are released to the hypolimnion , and with the autumn overturn are spread to the epilimnion. Algal blooms not only hamper recreation, but through depletion of dissolved oxygen in the epilimnion may have caused periodic fishkills. Copper sulfate mixed with sodium citrate and applied at 1.10-1.73 lbs/acre has not significantly reduced algal growth; a method for determining correct dosage is presented. (Lynch-Wisconsin)

  9. Gene Flow Patterns of the Mayfly Fallceon quilleri in San Diego County, California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zickovich, J.; Bohonak, A. J.

    2005-05-01

    Management decisions and conservation strategies for freshwater invertebrates critically depend on an understanding of gene flow and genetic structure. We collected the mayfly Fallceon quilleri (Ephemeroptera: Baetidae) from 15 streams across three geographically distinct watersheds in San Diego County, California (San Dieguito, Santa Margarita, and Tijuana) and one site in Anza-Borrego desert. We sequenced a 667 base pair region of the mitochondrial DNA (COI) to assess genetic structure and gene flow. We found eight haplotypes across all populations. San Dieguito and Santa Margarita each contained six haplotypes. Tijuana and Anza Borrego each contained four haplotypes. The expected heterozygosity for San Dieguito, Santa Margarita, Tijuana, and Anza Borrego was 0.81, 0.83, 0.75, and 1.0, respectively. A hierarchical AMOVA analysis indicated restricted gene flow and a pairwise comparison indicated that Tijuana watershed differs significantly from San Dieguito and Anza Borrego. A haplotype cladogram revealed two internal ancestral haplotypes and six derived tip haplotypes that are unique to particular watersheds. These results suggest that Tijuana (the southernmost and the most impacted watershed) is more genetically distinct and isolated than the other watersheds sampled.

  10. California GAMA Program: Sources and transport of nitrate in shallow groundwater in the Llagas Basin of Santa Clara County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J E; McNab, W; Esser, B; Hudson, G; Carle, S; Beller, H; Kane, S; Tompson, A B; Letain, T; Moore, K; Eaton, G; Leif, R; Moody-Bartel, C; Singleton, M

    2005-06-29

    A critical component of the State Water Resource Control Board's Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program is to assess the major threats to groundwater resources that supply drinking water to Californians (Belitz et al., 2004). Nitrate is the most pervasive and intractable contaminant in California groundwater and is the focus of special studies under the GAMA program. This report presents results of a study of nitrate contamination in the aquifer beneath the cities of Morgan Hill and Gilroy, CA, in the Llagas Subbasin of Santa Clara County, where high nitrate levels affect several hundred private domestic wells. The main objectives of the study are: (1) to identify the main source(s) of nitrate that issue a flux to the shallow regional aquifer (2) to determine whether denitrification plays a role in the fate of nitrate in the subbasin and (3) to assess the impact that a nitrate management plan implemented by the local water agency has had on the flux of nitrate to the regional aquifer. Analyses of 56 well water samples for major anions and cations, nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate, dissolved excess nitrogen, tritium and groundwater age, and trace organic compounds, show that synthetic fertilizer is the most likely source of nitrate in highly contaminated wells, and that denitrification is not a significant process in the fate of nitrate in the subbasin except in the area of recycled water application. In addition to identifying contaminant sources, these methods offer a deeper understanding of how the severity and extent of contamination are affected by hydrogeology and groundwater management practices. In the Llagas subbasin, the nitrate problem is amplified in the shallow aquifer because it is highly vulnerable with high vertical recharge rates and rapid lateral transport, but the deeper aquifers are relatively more protected by laterally extensive aquitards. Artificial recharge delivers low-nitrate water and provides a means of long-term remediation. Examination of nitrate concentration in relation to groundwater age indicates that the nitrate management plan has not yet resulted in a decrease in the flux of nitrate to the shallow aquifer in the areas tested.

  11. 78 FR 21582 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Butte County Air Quality Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ...Implementation Plan, Butte County Air Quality Management District and Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Butte County Air Quality Management District (BCAQMD) and...

  12. Air pollution and emergency room visits for asthma in Santa Clara County, California.

    PubMed Central

    Lipsett, M; Hurley, S; Ostro, B

    1997-01-01

    During the winters of 1986-1987 through 1991-1992, rainfall throughout much of Northern California was subnormal, resulting in intermittent accumulation of air pollution, much of which was attributable to residential wood combustion (RWC). This investigation examined whether there was a relationship between ambient air pollution in Santa Clara County, California and emergency room visits for asthma during the winters of 1988-1989 through 1991-1992. Emergency room (ER) records from three acute-care hospitals were abstracted to compile daily visits for asthma and a control diagnosis (gastroenteritis) for 3-month periods during each winter. Air monitoring data included daily coefficient of haze (COH) and every-other-day particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter equal to or less than 10 microns (PM10, 24-hr average), as well as hourly nitrogen dioxide and ozone concentrations. Daily COH measurements were used to predict values for missing days of PM10 to develop a complete PM10 time series. Daily data were also obtained for temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity. In time-series analyses using Poisson regression, consistent relationships were found between ER visits for asthma and PM10. Same-day nitrogen dioxide concentrations were also associated with asthma ER visits, while ozone was not. Because there was a significant interaction between PM10 and minimum temperature in this data set, estimates of relative risks (RRs) for PM10-associated asthma ER visits were temperature-dependent. A 60 micrograms/m3 change in PM10 (2-day lag) corresponded to RRs of 1.43 (95% CI = 1.18-1.69) at 20 degrees F, representing the low end of the temperature distribution, 1.27 (95% CI = 1.13-1.42) at 30 degrees F, and 1.11 (95% CI = 1.03-1.19) at 41 degrees F, the mean of the observed minimum temperature. ER visits for gastroenteritis were not significantly associated with any pollutant variable. Several sensitivity analyses, including the use of robust regressions and of nonparametric methods for fitting time trends and temperature effects in the data, supported these findings. These results demonstrate an association between ambient wintertime PM10 and exacerbations of asthma in an area where one of the principal sources of PM10 is RWC. Images Figure 1. PMID:9105797

  13. Strike-slip offset along the McKittrick fault, western Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Bowersox, J.R.; Olson, D.M.

    1987-05-01

    Reconstructions of offset Miocene strata in McKittrick and northern Midway-Sunset fields, western Kern County, California, show about 7 mi (11 km) of post-Miocene right-lateral offset along the McKittrick fault. Detailed correlations of facies within the Potter sand, an informal member of the late Miocene Reef Ridge formation, in these fields show consistent stratigraphic character when the offset of the McKittrick fault is removed. Achieving this correlation allows the further correlation of Stevens sands, an informal member of the underlying Monterey Formation, between Midway-Sunset and McKittrick fields, including the feeder channels of these turbidite deposits. Facies are more continuous in a dip direction than they are along strike, facilitating their use as piercing points along the fault. The McKittrick fault parallels a feature long mapped as a right-lateral structure, the Bacon Hills fault, along the southwestern edge of the Cymric field. The McKittrick fault has always been considered to have vertical separation only. However, strike-slip motion as now proposed for it clarifies a structural problem that has been unexplained: the resemblance of the multiple thrust slices along the McKittrick fault in northern Midway-Sunset field and southeast McKittrick to the palm structures of Sylvester and Smith, but for which the requisite strike-slip displacement was not proved. Further evidence for this structural interpretation is provided by the presence of northeast-southwest-trending strike-slip faults in McKittrick Valley, which are explained by this model as differential slip taking up rotation between the McKittrick and Bacon Hills faults.

  14. Wildlife management plan, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Scrivner, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Under the Naval Petroleum Act of 1976, Congress directed the Secretary of the Navy and subsequently the Secretary of Energy, to produce petroleum products from Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) in Kern County, California, at the maximum efficient rate consistent with sound engineering practices. Because of the presence of two endangered species and the quality, quantity, and contiguous nature of habitat on NPR-1, the area is unique and management of its resources deserves special attention. The purpose of this wildlife management plan is to: (1) draw together specific information on NPR-1 wildlife resources; (2) suggest management goals that could be implemented, which if achieved, would result in diverse, healthy wildlife populations; and (3) reinitiate cooperative agreements between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other conservation organizations regarding the management of wildlife on NPR-1. NPR-1 supports an abundant and diverse vertebrate fauna. Twenty-five mammalian, 92 avian, eight reptilian, and two amphibian species have been observed on Elk Hills. Of these, three are endangered (San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica; giant kangaroo rat, Dipodomys ingens; blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Gambelia silus). Nine vertebrates, six invertebrates, and four plant species known to occur or suspected of occurring on Elk Hills are potential candidates for listing. A major objective of this management plan is to minimize the impact of petroleum development activities on the San Joaquin kit fox, giant kangaroo rat, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, and their essential habitats. This will mainly be achieved by monitoring the status of these species and their habitat and by restoring disturbed habitats. In general, management policies designed to benefit the above three species and other species of concern will also benefit other wildlife inhabiting NPR-1.

  15. A vapor-dominated reservoir exceeding 600{degrees}F at the Geysers, Sonoma County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, M.A.; Sternfeld, J.N.; Haizlip, J.R.; Drenick, A.F.; Combs, Jim

    1988-01-01

    A high-temperature vapor-dominated reservoir underlies a portion of the Northwest Geysers area, Sonoma County, California. The high-temperature reservoir (HTR) is defined by flowing fluid temperatures exceeding 500º F, rock temperatures apparently exceeding 600º F and steam enthalpies of about 1320 BTU/lb. Steam from existing wells drilled in the Northwest Geysers is produced from both a “typical” Geysers reservoir and the HTR. In all cases, the HTR is in the lower portion of the wells and is overlain by a “typical” Geysers reservoir. Depth to the high-temperature reservoir is relatively uniform at about -5900 ft subsea. There are no identified lithologic or mineralogic conditions that separate the HTR from the “typical” reservoir, although the two reservoirs are vertically distinct and can be located in most wells to within about 200 ft by the use of downhole temperature-depth measurements. Gas concentrations in steam from the HTR are higher (6 to 9 wt %) than from the “typical” Geysers reservoir (0.85 to 2.6 wt %). Steam from the HTR is enriched in chloride and the heavy isotopes of water relative to the “typical” reservoir. Available static and dynamic measurements show pressures are subhydrostatic in both reservoirs with no anomalous differences between the two: the HTR pressure being near 520 psia at sea level datum. The small observed differences in pressure between the reservoirs appear to vary along a steam density gradient. It is postulated that the Northwest Geysers area evolved more slowly toward vapor-dominated conditions than other parts of The Geysers field because of its poor connection with the surface. In this paper, a model is presented in which the boundary between the HTR and “typical” reservoir is a thermodynamic feature only, resulting from recent deep venting of a liquid-dominated system in which conduction is still an important component of heat transfer.

  16. Preliminary geologic map of the Perris 7.5' quadrangle, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Douglas M.; Digital preparation by Bovard, Kelly R.; Alvarez, Rachel M.

    2003-01-01

    Open-File Report 03-270 contains a digital geologic map database of the Perris 7.5’ quadrangle, Riverside County, California that includes: 1. ARC/INFO (Environmental Systems Research Institute, http://www.esri.com) version 7.2.1 coverages of the various elements of the geologic map. 2. A Postscript file to plot the geologic map on a topographic base, and containing a Correlation of Map Units diagram (CMU), a Description of Map Units (DMU), and an index map. 3. Portable Document Format (.pdf) files of: a. A Readme file b. The same graphic as described in 2 above. Test plots have not produced precise 1:24,000- scale map sheets. Adobe Acrobat page size setting influences map scale. The Correlation of Map Units and Description of Map Units is in the editorial format of USGS Geologic Investigations Series (I-series) maps but has not been edited to comply with I-map standards. Within the geologic map data package, map units are identified by standard geologic map criteria such as formationname, age, and lithology. Where known, grain size is indicated on the map by a subscripted letter or letters following the unit symbols as follows: lg, large boulders; b, boulder; g, gravel; a, arenaceous; s, silt; c, clay; e.g. Qyfa is a predominantly young alluvial fan deposit that is arenaceous. Multiple letters are used for more specific identification or for mixed units, e.g., Qfysa is a silty sand. In some cases, mixed units are indicated by a compound symbol; e.g., Qyf2sc.

  17. Health assessment for Kaiser Steel Corporation Fontana, San Nernadino County, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CAD008274938. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-25

    The Kaiser Steel Corporation (KSC) site was included in the Update 7, proposed National Priorities List (NPL). The site was subsequently dropped from the proposed NPL on October 4, 1989. The site is located near Fontana, California, in San Bernardino County, approximately 45 miles east of Los Angeles. The on-site environmental contamination in groundwater and soil consisted of volatile organic compounds, organic acids, aluminum, barium, iron, lead, manganese, cadmium, and chromium compounds. The site is of potential health concern because of the risk to human health resulting from possible exposure to hazardous substances at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects.

  18. Water-quality data for the Santa Clara-Calleguas hydrologic unit, Ventura County, California, October 1989 through December 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, J.A.; Martin, P.M.; Densmore, J.N.; Clark, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    More than 700 water samples were collected from 232 wells and 34 surface-water sites in the Santa Clara-Calleguas Hydrologic Unit, Ventura County, California, from October 1989 through December 1993 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Southern California Regional Aquifer-System Analysis study. Most samples were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, selected trace elements, oxygen-18, and deuterium. Selected samples were analyzed for one or more of the following isotopes: carbon-13/12, carbon-14, strontium-87/86, sulfur-34/32, and tritium. Other samples were analyzed for one or more of the following dissolved gases: hydrogen, methane, oxygen, and freon-11. Location of sampling sites is shown on maps and the results are presented in tables.

  19. Hybrid wood-geothermal power plant, Wendel-Amedee KGRA, Lassen County, California. Identification of environmental issues, second phase

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-14

    GeoProducts Corporation and the California Department of Water Resources have jointly proposed to develop a 55 MWe power plant in Lassen County, California. The proposed power plant is unique in that it will utilize geothermal heat and wood fuel to generate electrical power, the first attempt to utilize these resources together on a commercial scale. This report identifies requirements for new environmental information that must be generated for permit applications and for preparation of environmental documents required by CEOA and NEPA; presents a schedule for generating new environmental data, for preparing and submitting permit applications, and for obtaining permits; presents a budget for permitting, licensing and environmental assessments as required by applicable laws, regulations and procedures; and investigates the step needed to qualify for a Small Power Plant Exemption by the State Energy Commission.

  20. Alexander von Humboldt and the Origins of Landscape Archaeology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathewson, Kent

    1986-01-01

    Reviews the life, theories, and influence of Alexander von Humboldt, the early nineteenth century founder of modern geography. Maintains that Humboldt's novel approaches to the study of landscape antiquities have value for contemporary students in cultural and historical geography. (JDH)

  1. 33 CFR 80.1150 - Arcata-Humboldt Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arcata-Humboldt Bay, CA. 80.1150 Section 80.1150 Navigation and Navigable Waters...LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1150 Arcata-Humboldt Bay, CA. A line drawn from Humboldt Bay Entrance Light 4 to...

  2. 33 CFR 80.1150 - Arcata-Humboldt Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Arcata-Humboldt Bay, CA. 80.1150 Section 80.1150 Navigation and Navigable Waters...LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1150 Arcata-Humboldt Bay, CA. A line drawn from Humboldt Bay Entrance Light 4 to...

  3. Geology, water resources and usable ground-water storage capacity of part of Solano County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomasson, H.G., Jr.; Olmsted, F.H.; LeRoux, E.F.

    1960-01-01

    The area described is confined largely to the valley-floor and foothill lands of Solano County, which lies directly between Sacramento, the State capital, and San Francisco. The area is considered in two subareas: The Putah area, which extends from Putah Creek southward to the Montezuma Hills and from the foothills of the Coast Ranges eastward to the west edge of the Yolo Bypass; and the Suisun-Fairfield area, which is to the southwest in the notch in the Coast Ranges through which the waters of the Great Central Valley of California reach San Francisco Bay. There are no known hydrologic interconnections between the two subareas, through either surface streams or underground aquifers. The climate of the area is characterized by warm, rainless summers and by cool winters in which temperatures seldom drop much below freezing. The rainfall ranges from about 17 inches per year along the east side to perhaps 24 inches in the foothills to the west, and irrigation is necessary for all crops except dry-farmed grains, pastures, and some orchards. PUTAH AREA The Putah area occupies the southwestern corner of the Sacramento Valley, a topographic and structural basin underlain by a thick accumulation of sediments eroded from the surrounding hills and mountains by the Sacramento River and its tributaries. The eastern Coast Ranges and foothills lying west of the Sacramento Valley are a generally northward-trending belt of eastward-dipping sedimentary rocks that range in age from Cretaceous to Pleistocene. Successively younger strata are exposed eastward, and the essentially undeformed deposits of late Pleistocene and Recent age that immediately underlie the valley lap onto the tilted sediments of the foothills. Most of the streams of the Putah area rise east of the high ridge of Cretaceous rocks marking the western boundaries of Solano and Yolo Counties, but Putah Creek, the largest stream in the area, rises far west of that ridge and flows across it in a deep, narrow canyon. Putah Creek and the smaller streams have constructed an alluvial plain, herein designated the Putah plain, which slopes eastward and southeastward from the foothills toward the Sacramento River. A large part of the Putah plain is traversed by a branching set of distributary channel ridges or natural levees formed at times of overflow of Putah Creek. The rocks in the Putah area range in age from Cretaceous to Recent. For the purposes of this investigation they are divided into eight geologic or stratigraphic units, from youngest to oldest: (1) Stream-channel deposits, (2) younger alluvium, (3) older alluvium, (4) Tehama formation and related continental sediments, (5) volcanic sedimentary rocks, (6) basalt, (7) undifferentiated sedimentary rocks of Paleocene(?) and Eocene age, and (8) undifferentiated rocks of Cretaceous age. The stream-channel deposits are predominantly loose sand and gravel along the channel of Putah Creek. In part they are actively moving downstream and shifting. The younger alluvium, of Recent age, consists of flood-plain deposits underlying the Putah plain, Vaca Valley, Pleasants Valley, and the small valleys in the foothills north of Putah Creek and in the English Hills. Exposures of younger alluvium are characterized by soils lacking significant profile development and in many places by channel-ridge topography. The older alluvium occupies the stratigraphic interval between the younger alluvium and the Tehama formation and related continental sediments and is probably of late Pleistocene age. Its contact with the underlying Tehama formation and related continental sediments is unconformable near the foothills, but it may be gradational beneath much of the Putah plain. The base of the older alluvium is not well defined at many places but is inferred to be at the bottom of an irregular and ill-defined zone of coarse deposits, which ranges from about 50 feet to more than 150 feet below the land surface. Exposures of the older

  4. Final Scientific / Technical Report, Geothermal Resource Exploration Program, Truckhaven Area, Imperial County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Layman Energy Associates, Inc.

    2006-08-15

    With financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Layman Energy Associates, Inc. (LEA) has completed a program of geothermal exploration at the Truckhaven area in Imperial County, California. The exploratory work conducted by LEA included the following activities: compilation of public domain resource data (wells, seismic data, geologic maps); detailed field geologic mapping at the project site; acquisition and interpretation of remote sensing imagery such as aerial and satellite photographs; acquisition, quality control and interpretation of gravity data; and acquisition, quality control and interpretation of resistivity data using state of the art magnetotelluric (MT) methods. The results of this exploratory program have allowed LEA to develop a structural and hydrologic interpretation of the Truckhaven geothermal resource which can be used to guide subsequent exploratory drilling and resource development. Of primary significance, is the identification of an 8 kilometer-long, WNW-trending zone of low resistivity associated with geothermal activity in nearby wells. The long axis of this low resistivity zone is inferred to mark a zone of faulting which likely provides the primary control on the distribution of geothermal resources in the Truckhaven area. Abundant cross-faults cutting the main WNW-trending zone in its western half may indicate elevated fracture permeability in this region, possibly associated with thermal upwelling and higher resource temperatures. Regional groundwater flow is inferred to push thermal fluids from west to east along the trend of the main low resistivity zone, with resource temperatures likely declining from west to east away from the inferred upwelling zone. Resistivity mapping and well data have also shown that within the WNW-trending low resistivity zone, the thickness of the Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary section above granite basement ranges from 1,900–2,600 meters. Well data indicates the lower part of this sedimentary section is sand-rich, suggesting good potential for a sediment-hosted geothermal reservoir in porous sands, similar to other fields in the region such as Heber and East Mesa. Sand porosity may remain higher in the eastern portion of the low resistivity zone. This is based on its location hydrologically downstream of the probable area of thermal upwelling, intense fracture development, and associated pore-filling hydrothermal mineral deposition to the west.

  5. Preliminary geologic map of the Elsinore 7.5' Quadrangle, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Douglas M.; Weber, F. Harold, Jr.; Digital preparation: Alvarez, Rachel M.; Burns, Diane

    2003-01-01

    Open-File Report 03-281 contains a digital geologic map database of the Elsinore 7.5’ quadrangle, Riverside County, California that includes: 1. ARC/INFO (Environmental Systems Research Institute, http://www.esri.com) version 7.2.1 coverages of the various elements of the geologic map. 2. A Postscript file to plot the geologic map on a topographic base, and containing a Correlation of Map Units diagram (CMU), a Description of Map Units (DMU), and an index map. 3. Portable Document Format (.pdf) files of: a. This Readme; includes in Appendix I, data contained in els_met.txt b. The same graphic as plotted in 2 above. Test plots have not produced precise 1:24,000-scale map sheets. Adobe Acrobat page size setting influences map scale. The Correlation of Map Units and Description of Map Units is in the editorial format of USGS Geologic Investigations Series (I-series) maps but has not been edited to comply with I-map standards. Within the geologic map data package, map units are identified by standard geologic map criteria such as formation-name, age, and lithology. Where known, grain size is indicated on the map by a subscripted letter or letters following the unit symbols as follows: lg, large boulders; b, boulder; g, gravel; a, arenaceous; s, silt; c, clay; e.g. Qyfa is a predominantly young alluvial fan deposit that is arenaceous. Multiple letters are used for more specific identification or for mixed units, e.g., Qfysa is a silty sand. In some cases, mixed units are indicated by a compound symbol; e.g., Qyf2sc. Even though this is an Open-File Report and includes the standard USGS Open-File disclaimer, the report closely adheres to the stratigraphic nomenclature of the U.S. Geological Survey. Descriptions of units can be obtained by viewing or plotting the .pdf file (3b above) or plotting the postscript file (2 above).

  6. Data from a thick unsaturated zone in Joshua Tree, San Bernardino County, California, 2007--09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burgess, Matthew; Izbicki, John; Teague, Nicholas; O'Leary, David R.; Clark, Dennis; Land, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Data were collected on the physical properties of unsaturated alluvial deposits, the chemical composition of leachate extracted from unsaturated alluvial deposits, the chemical and isotopic composition of groundwater and unsaturated-zone water, and the chemical composition of unsaturated-zone gas at four monitoring sites in the southwestern part of the Mojave Desert in the town of Joshua Tree, San Bernardino County, California. The presence of denitrifying and nitrate-reducing bacteria from unsaturated alluvial deposits was evaluated for two of these monitoring sites that underlie unsewered residential development. Four unsaturated-zone monitoring sites were installed in the Joshua Tree area—two in an unsewered residential development and two adjacent to a proposed artificial-recharge site in an undeveloped area. The two boreholes in residential development areas were installed by using the ODEX air-hammer method. One borehole was drilled through the unsaturated zone to a depth of 541 ft (feet) below land surface; a well screened across the water table was installed. Groundwater was sampled from this well. The second borehole was drilled to a depth of 81 ft below land surface. Drilling procedures, lithologic and geophysical data, construction details, and instrumentation placed in these boreholes are described. Core material was analyzed for water content, bulk density, matric potential, particle size, and water retention. The leachate from over 500 subsamples of cores and cuttings was analyzed for soluble anions, including fluoride, sulfate, bromide, chloride, nitrate, nitrite, and orthophosphate. Groundwater was analyzed for major ions, inorganic compounds, select trace elements, and isotopic composition. Unsaturated-zone water from suction-cup lysimeters was analyzed for major ions, inorganic compounds, select trace elements, and isotopic composition. Unsaturated-zone gas samples were analyzed for argon, oxygen, nitrogen, methane, carbon dioxide, ethane, nitrous oxide, and carbon monoxide. Drill cuttings were analyzed for denitrifying and nitrate-reducing bacteria. One of the boreholes installed adjacent to the Joshua Basin Water District proposed groundwater-recharge facility was installed by using the ODEX air-hammer method and the other was installed by using a 7.875-inch hollow-stem auger. Drilling procedures, lithologic and geophysical data, construction details, and instrumentation placed in these boreholes are described; however, geochemical data were not available at the time of publication.

  7. Drilling Addendum to Resource Assessment of Low- and Moderate-Temperature Geothermal Waters in Calistoga, Napa County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Gary C.; Bacon, C. Forrest; Chapman, Rodger H.; Chase, Gordon W.; Majmundar, Hasmukhrai H.

    1981-05-01

    This addendum report presents the results of the California Division of Mines and Geology (CDMG) drilling program at Calistoga, California, which was the final geothermal-resource assessment investigation performed under terms of the second year contract (1979-80) between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the CDMG under the State Coupled Program. This report is intended to supplement information presented in CDMG's technical report for the project year, ''Resource Assessment of Low- and Moderate-Temperature Geothermal Waters in Calistoga, Napa County, California''. During the investigative phase of the CDMG's Geothermal Project, over 200 well-driller's reports were obtained from the Department of Water Resources (DWR). It was hoped that the interpretation and correlation of these logs would reveal the subsurface geology of the Upper Napa Valley and also provide a check for the various geophysical surveys that were performed in the course of the study. However, these DWR driller logs proved to be inadequate due to the brief, non-technical, and erroneous descriptions contained on the logs. As a result of the lack of useable drill-hole data, and because information was desired from,deeper horizons, it became evident that drilling some exploratory holes would be necessary in order to obtain physical evidence of the stratigraphy and aquifers in the immediate Calistoga area. Pursuant to this objective, a total of twelve sites were selected--four under jurisdiction of Napa County and eight under jurisdiction of the City of Calistoga. A moratorium is currently in existence within Napa County on most geothermal drilling, and environmental and time constraints precluded CDMG from obtaining the necessary site permits within the county. However, a variance was applied for and obtained from the City of Calistoga to allow CDMG to drill within the city limits. With this areal constraint and also funding limits in mind, six drilling sites were selected on the basis of (1) proximity to areas where geophysical surveys had been performed, (2) accessibility of the site for drill rig setup, and (3) favorability for obtaining the maximum information possible concerning the geology and the resources. Necessary landowner permission and permits were secured for these sites, and actual drilling began on December 17, 1980. Drilling was terminated on February 4, 1981, with the completion of three holes that ranged in depth from 205 to 885 feet. Use of a relatively new drilling technique called the Dual Tube Method enabled the collection of precise subsurface data of a level of detail never before obtained in the Calistoga area. As a result, a totally new and unexpected picture of the geothermal reservoir conditions there has been obtained, and is outlined in this addendum report.

  8. Canine heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) in Fresno and Madera Counties, California: prevalence differences between foothill and valley habitats.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laura L; Crosbie, Paul R

    2011-01-10

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of heartworm in domestic dogs in Madera and Fresno Counties, California, dependent on habitat and other host and environmental factors. Dogs were screened for presence of heartworm antigen using the PetChek(®) ELISA on blood samples (N=519) collected at seven sites during April-July 2009. Eighteen dogs were heartworm antigen positive. Pearson Chi-square analyses were conducted testing the presence of heartworm antigen against the following independent variables: elevation range, percentage of time spent outdoors during the day, percentage of time spent outdoors during the night, pet coat length, weight class, prevention status, and sex. Dogs that spent at least 50% of their time outdoors during the day were significantly more likely to have heartworm that those who spent less time outside (N=519, df=1, p=0.031). Overall prevalence (3.47%) was lower than expected, with Madera County having 3.8% positive samples and Fresno County 3.5%; this prevalence is lower than in many previous studies. The effect of time spent outdoors on heartworm prevalence was similar to previous studies. The impact of elevation on infection, though not significant, requires further investigation, as does the prevalence and viability of larval stages in mosquitoes. PMID:21051149

  9. [open quotes]2Step[close quotes] log analysis of the Spellacy reservoir in the giant Midway-Sunset Field, Kern County, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sturm

    1996-01-01

    A technique is presented for simple, effective log analysis of (Miocene) [open quotes]Spellacy[close quotes] sands and conglomerates of the Santa Margarita Formation at Midway-Sunset Field in Kern County, California. Results are shown graphically on the log display and are quantified for mapping. Requirements are digital wireline data -- in this simple case, just resistivity and porosities - and flexible log

  10. Farm Mechanization And Labor Stabilization. Part II In A Series On Technological Change And Farm Labor Use, Kern County, California, 1961. Research Report No. 280.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzler, William H.

    A stratified random sample of 69 6 workers in 361 households in Kern County, California, was selected to investigate the changes in labor use resulting from farm mechanization, and to explore the trend towards a stable labor force. Some major findings were: (1) Mechanization of the cotton harvest has erased the high peak of seasonal farm labor,…

  11. The Farm Worker In A Changing Agriculture. Part I In A Series On Technological Change And Farm Labor Use, Kern County, California, 1961. Research Report No. 277.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzler, William H.

    To investigate the effect of technological change upon farm labor use, a stratified random sample of 696 farm workers from a population of 12,215 in Kern County, California, provided a basis for analysis. Some major findings were: (1) The high peak of seasonal labor use has been eliminated, (2) The need for migratory labor is decreasing, (3)…

  12. Documentation of model input and output values for the geohydrology and mathematical simulation of the Pajaro Valley aquifer system, Santa Cruz and Monterey counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitten, H.T.; Londquist, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    This report contains listings of the model input and sample output for simulation of the Pajaro Valley aquifer system, Santa Cruz and Monterey Counties, California. The files are contained on a 5 1/4-inch diskette. The decompressed files require approximately 5.3 megabytes of disk space on an IBM-compatible microcomputer. (USGS)

  13. 78 FR 32274 - Scorpion Pier Replacement Project, Channel Islands National Park, Santa Barbara County, California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ...Scorpion Pier Replacement Project, Channel Islands National Park, Santa Barbara County...the existing Scorpion Pier at Santa Cruz Island's eastern waterfront. The NPS is the...comments by mail to Superintendent, Channel Islands National Park, Attn: Scorpion Pier...

  14. Evaluation of two low-flow releases from Big Tujunga Reservoir, Los Angeles County, California, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendez, Gregory O.

    2005-01-01

    Since 1973, the Santa Ana Sucker (Catostomus santaanae) has been listed as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. The Lower Big Tujunga Creek, in Los Angeles County, is one of the areas in southern California where the Santa Ana Sucker is still present. This study was designed to assess two flow releases from Big Tujunga Dam that may contribute to favorable habitat conditions for the Santa Ana Sucker. It is important for the Santa Ana Sucker's survival that pools in the lower reach of the study area are replenished periodically. The focus of the study area was on the Lower Big Tujunga Creek within a reach extending approximately 6 miles downstream from the Big Tujunga Reservoir. Six sites were established from the Big Tujunga Dam to Delta Flats day-use area for data collection. This report describes the study design, discharge measurements, and the flow data collected from the two releases. Two scheduled flows (phases 1 and 2) were released from the Big Tujunga Reservoir in August and September 2003. During the first phase, which lasted 50 hours, travel times from the dam to four sites downstream were determined. Arrival times at the four sites were determined on the basis of temperature data. Travel time from the dam to site 6 (the furthest downstream site) was about 51.5 hours. Travel times for subreaches were 3 hours from site 1 to site 2, 6.5 hours from site 2 to site 3, almost 18 hours from site 3 to site 4, and 24 hours from site 4 to site 6. The temperature probe at site 5 was destroyed, and thus the arrival time could not be estimated. A probe that measures stage was placed in one of the many pools downstream from site 4 to evaluate a typical pool response to a low-flow release. Also, discharge measurements were taken at four sites along the study reach. In phase 2, which lasted 5 days (121 hours), flow losses along the 6-mile reach were analyzed. Losses were estimated by measuring difference in flow from the dam to sites 3, 4, 5, and 6, when flow was most stable at each site or when the last measurement made before flow decreased due to flow from dam being shut off. Losses in the plunge pool, directly below the dam were assumed to be negligible for this study. Overall creek loss between the dam and site 6 (the last site) was estimated to be between 4.0 and 4.2 ft3/s (cubic feet per second). Estimated losses between the dam and intermediate sites were about 1.5 ft3/s to site 3; 2.5 ft3/s to site 4; and between 3.7 and 4.1 ft3/s to site 5.

  15. BENEFITS OF VEGETATED AGRICULTURAL DRAINAGE DITCHES (VADD) AS A BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICE IN YOLO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Widespread contamination of California water bodies by the orthophosphate insecticides diazinon and chlorpyrifos is well documented. While their usage has decreased over the last few years, a concomitant increase in pyrethroid usage (replacement insecticides) has occurred. Researchers have also docu...

  16. Successful sand oil fracturing in the Sespe field, Ventura County, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1970-01-01

    Sand-oil fracturing has been used since 1948 mainly in the Mid-Continent-Rocky Mt. areas. This method of well stimulation has increased the rate of flow and increased the producible reserves many-fold over other methods of stimulation. Due to the nature of most California producing formations, the fracturing process has had limited application in California. The Sespe field has demonstrated it can

  17. Demographic factors associated with perceptions about water safety and tap water consumption among adults in Santa Clara County, California, 2011.

    PubMed

    van Erp, Brianna; Webber, Whitney L; Stoddard, Pamela; Shah, Roshni; Martin, Lori; Broderick, Bonnie; Induni, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine differences in tap water consumption and perceptions of bottle versus tap water safety for Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites, as well as associations with other demographic characteristics. Data are from the Santa Clara County, California, Dietary Practices Survey (2011; N = 306). We used logistic regression to examine associations between demographic characteristics and 1) perceptions that bottled water is safer than tap and 2) primarily consuming tap water. Hispanics were less likely than non-Hispanic whites to primarily drink tap water (OR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.11-0.99), although there was no significant difference in perceptions that bottled water is safer between these groups (OR = 0.50; 95% CI, 0.11-2.27). Hispanics may be an important population for interventions promoting tap water consumption. PMID:24921901

  18. Oiled seabird rescue at the J.V. Fitzgerald Marine Reserve, San Mateo County, California, 1968-1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, H.R.

    1997-01-01

    Records of oiled and injured seabirds at the J.V. Fitzgerald Marine Reserve, San Mateo County, California, were collated from the daily log at the Reserve for the period 1968-1995. These records serve to demonstrate that oil spills and chronic oiling have occurred frequently in this area, just south of San Francisco. Common Murres (Uria aalge) were the most frequently-oiled species rescued at the Reserve. Greater efforts should be made by wildlife rehabilitators to collate large volumes of past data (prior to the early 1990s) on oiled and injured seabirds for similar documentation of large or moderate oil spills (including undocumented or poorly-known spills), chronic oiling from small spills, and injuries from other sources.

  19. Digital geologic map of the Nevada Test Site and vicinity, Nye, Lincoln, and Clark Counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Slate, J.L.; Berry, M.E.; Rowley, P.D.; Fridrich, C.J.; Morgan, K.S.; Workman, J.B.; Young, O.D.; Dixon, G.L.; Williams, V.S.; McKee, E.H.; Ponce, D.A.; Hildenbrand, T.G.; Swadley, W.C.; Lundstrom, S.C.; Ekren, E.B.; Warren, R.G.; Cole, J.C.; Fleck, R.J.; Lanphere, M.A.; Sawyer, D.A.; Minor, S.A.; Grunwald, D.J.; Laczniak, R.J.; Menges, C.M.; Yount, J.C.; Jayko, A.S.

    2000-03-08

    This digital geologic map of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and vicinity, as well as its accompanying digital geophysical maps, are compiled at 1:100,000 scale. The map area covers two 30 {times} 60-minute quadrangles-the Pahute Mesa quadrangle to the north and the Beatty quadrangle to the south-plus a strip of 7 1/2-minute quadrangles on the east side. In addition to the NTS, the map area includes the rest of the southwest Nevada volcanic field, part of the Walker Lane, most of the Amargosa Desert, part of the Funeral and Grapevine Mountains, some of Death Valley, and the northern Spring Mountains. This geologic map improves on previous geologic mapping of the same area by providing new and updated Quaternary and bedrock geology, new geophysical interpretations of faults beneath the basins, and improved GIS coverages. This publication also includes a new isostatic gravity map and a new aeromagnetic map. The primary purpose of the three maps is to provide an updated geologic framework to aid interpretation of ground-water flow through and off the NTS. The NTS is centrally located within the area of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system of southwestern Nevada and adjacent California. During the last 40 years, DOE and its predecessor agencies have conducted about 900 nuclear tests on the NTS, of which 100 were atmospheric tests and the rest were underground tests. More than 200 of the tests were detonated at or beneath the water table, which commonly is about 500 to 600 m below the surface. Because contaminants introduced by these test may move into water supplies off the NTS, rates and directions of ground-water flow must be determined. Knowledge about the ground water also is needed to properly appraise potential future effects of the possible nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, adjacent to the NTS.

  20. 33 CFR 3.55-25 - Sector Humboldt Bay Search and Rescue Mission Coordinator Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Sector Humboldt Bay Search and Rescue Mission Coordinator Zone... § 3.55-25 Sector Humboldt Bay Search and Rescue Mission Coordinator Zone...The boundaries of Sector Humboldt Bay's Search and Rescue Mission Coordinator...

  1. 33 CFR 3.55-25 - Sector Humboldt Bay Search and Rescue Mission Coordinator Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Sector Humboldt Bay Search and Rescue Mission Coordinator Zone... § 3.55-25 Sector Humboldt Bay Search and Rescue Mission Coordinator Zone...The boundaries of Sector Humboldt Bay's Search and Rescue Mission Coordinator...

  2. Health assessment for Del Norte County Pesticide Storage Area, Cresent City, Del Norte County, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CAD000626176. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-18

    The Del Norte County Pesticide Storage Area is located northwest of Cresent City, California. The site soils and ground water were contaminated with a myriad of pesticides and herbicides. The data also indicated an elevated concentration of chromium was present on-site and off-site; however, it does not appear to be related to the activities involving the use of the site as a pesticide storage area. The site was included on the National Priorities List in 1983. The storage area operated from 1970 until 1981, accepting containers from local agricultural and forestry-related industries. The intended use of the site was as an interim or emergency storage area for pesticide containers which had been triple rinsed and punctured prior to coming to the site. There were 9 private wells monitored within 0.50 miles of the site and the results indicated these wells were not contaminated by site contaminants. This site is of public health concern because of the potential for exposure to pesticides, herbicides, and chromium at concentrations of health concern.

  3. Survey for least bell's vireo in riparian habitat on Vandenberg Air Force Base, Santa Barbara County, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breininger, David R.

    1988-01-01

    The least bell's vireo (Vireo bellii pusillus) was listed in 1986 as an endangered species by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Because of the possibility of the species existing on Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB), this survey was conducted to determine if they exist, and if so to prepare a distribution map of the species on the base. Major riparian areas were surveyed on foot for 17 days in April, May, and July 1987. No least bell's vireo were sighted; based on past studies, it is unlikely that there is a significant population on VAFB. There are, however, at least 13 other species of special concern that inhabit VAFB riparian woodlands. Most of these species have declined along the south coast of Santa Barbara County, and many have declined in much of the southern half of California. Riparian areas on VAFB are an important environmental resource for the southern half of California; many of these areas, however, show signs of degradation.

  4. Effectiveness of Vegetated Buffer Strips in Reducing Dormant Season Orthophosphate Pesticide Loading to Surface Waters in Glenn County, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, K. D.; Brown, D. L.; Altier, L.; Oliver, M. N.

    2003-12-01

    Riparian buffer strips are used in preventing nonpoint source contamination of agricultural runoff. The design and effectiveness of buffers varies widely under differing environmental conditions. Over the past two years, a project was implemented to evaluate the effectiveness of certain Best Management Practices in reducing organophosphate (OP) pesticide transport from almond orchards to local surface waters in Glenn County, northern California. Diazinon is a commonly-used OP pesticide applied during the dormant season in almond and stone-fruit orchards throughout the California Central Valley. Dormant season diazinon application coincides with the months of greatest rainfall and surface runoff in California. Three filter strip treatments were established: one planted with native vegetation, one with weedy resident vegetation, and the third with a bare soil surface. As a demonstration and reconnaissance project, replication of the treatments in this study was lacking (one plot of each vegetation type and two bare ground plots). Diazinon was applied in test orchard cells in January 2003. Surface runoff, shallow groundwater in the root zone, and deeper groundwater were monitored for the transport of diazinon during the three subsequent storm events. Composite surface water samples and flow volumes were obtained for each storm event using automated surface water collectors. Runoff and infiltration results indicate greater infiltration occurred in the vegetated plots as would be expected. Infiltration on bare ground plots was approximately 25%-50% less than on the vegetated plots. However, differences between the two vegetated plot treatments were less than 5%. Diazinon concentrations were reduced as surface runoff crossed the buffer strips for all three treatments. Detectable levels of diazinon were still present in runoff following the third storm, seven weeks after the pesticide application. Further replicated studies are currently being prepared for the coming dormant season and this study will continue over the next three years.

  5. Unintended, InexorableThe Production of Environmental Inequalities in Santa Clara County, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew Szasz; Michael Meuser

    2000-01-01

    Instead of demonstrating the existence of environmental race and class inequalities at one point in time, social scientists must now do historical studies that explain how such inequali ties are generated over time. The authors use 1990 census and 1989 Environmental Protec tion Agency Toxics Release Inventory data to document environmental race and class inequal ities in Santa Clara County,

  6. Cascadia Earthquake and Tsunami Scenario for California's North Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dengler, L.

    2006-12-01

    In 1995 the California Division of Mines and Geology (now the California Geological Survey) released a planning scenario for an earthquake on the southern portion of the Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ). This scenario was the 8th and last of the Earthquake Planning Scenarios published by CDMG. It was the largest magnitude CDMG scenario, an 8.4 earthquake rupturing the southern 200 km of the CSZ, and it was the only scenario to include tsunami impacts. This scenario event has not occurred in historic times and depicts impacts far more severe than any recent earthquake. The local tsunami hazard is new; there is no written record of significant local tsunami impact in the region. The north coast scenario received considerable attention in Humboldt and Del Norte Counties and contributed to a number of mitigation efforts. The Redwood Coast Tsunami Work Group (RCTWG), an organization of scientists, emergency managers, government agencies, and businesses from Humboldt, Mendocino, and Del Norte Counties, was formed in 1996 to assist local jurisdictions in understanding the implications of the scenario and to promote a coordinated, consistent mitigation program. The group has produced print and video materials and promoted response and evacuation planning. Since 1997 the RCTWG has sponsored an Earthquake Tsunami Education Room at county fairs featuring preparedness information, hands-on exhibits and regional tsunami hazard maps. Since the development of the TsunamiReady Program in 2001, the RCTWG facilitates community TsunamiReady certification. To assess the effectiveness of mitigation efforts, five telephone surveys between 1993 and 2001 were conducted by the Humboldt Earthquake Education Center. A sixth survey is planned for this fall. Each survey includes between 400 and 600 respondents. Over the nine year period covered by the surveys, the percent with houses secured to foundations has increased from 58 to 80 percent, respondents aware of a local tsunami hazard increased from 51 to 73 percent and knowing what the Cascadia subduction zone is from 16 to 42 percent. It is not surprising that the earlier surveys showed increases as several strong earthquakes occurred in the area between 1992 and 1995 and there was considerable media attention. But the 2001 survey, seven years after the last widely felt event, still shows significant increases in almost all preparedness indicators. The 1995 CDMG scenario was not the sole reason for the increased interest in earthquake and tsunami hazards in the area, but the scenario gave government recognition to an event that was previously only considered seriously in the scientific community and has acted as a catalyst for mitigation and planning efforts.

  7. [The journal of A.V. Humboldt in Spain].

    PubMed

    Leitner, Ulrike

    2011-01-01

    The Spanish diary can surprisingly not be found in his bounded diaries from his American travels, but in a separate folder of his legacy in Berlin, where Humboldt collected material which he wanted to use for his publication about Spain. So it remained undiscovered until recently. Humboldt's notes contain geognostic descriptions as well as his observations about climate, vegetation, electricity of the atmosphere, etc. The comparison with Humboldt's publication of 1825 facilitates to gain insight into his scientific methods. PMID:22375303

  8. California County Data Book, 1999: How Our Youngest Children Are Faring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children Now, Oakland, CA.

    This Kids Count Data Book examines trends in the well-being of California's children, focusing on factors influencing young children. This statistical portrait is based on trends in 19 indicators of child well-being in four areas: (1) family economics, including child poverty rate, children receiving TANF, children receiving WIC, fair market rent,…

  9. Reproductive Success of Oak Woodland Birds in Sonoma and Napa Counties, California1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Reynolds; Thomas Gardali; Matt Merrifield; Robin Hirsch-Jacobsen; Amon Armstrong; David Wood; Julia Smith; Emily Heaton; Gretchen LeBuhn

    Birds are often used as environmental indicators because they are conspicuous, they have a very broad constituency, respond to change at multiple spatial scales, and are sampled by standard protocols. However simple counts of birds may provide an incomplete picture of the response of bird populations to environmental change in rapidly changing landscapes like California's oak woodlands. Demographic data such

  10. Habitat-related variation in infestation of lizards and rodents with Ixodes ticks in dense woodlands in Mendocino County, California.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Rebecca J; Eisen, Lars; Lane, Robert S

    2004-01-01

    During the spring and early summer of 2002, we examined the relative importance of Borrelia-refractory lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis, Elgaria spp.) versus potential Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.)-reservoirs (rodents) as hosts for Ixodes pacificus immatures in 14 woodland areas (six oak, five mixed oak/Douglas fir, and three redwood/tanoak areas) distributed throughout Mendocino County, California. Lizards were estimated to serve as hosts for 93-98% of all larvae and > or =99.6% of all nymphs infesting lizards or rodents in oak woodlands and oak/Douglas fir sites in the southern part of the county. In redwood/tanoak woodlands and oak/Douglas fir sites in northern Mendocino County, the contribution of rodents to larval feedings reached 36-69% but lizards still accounted for 94-100% of nymphal bloodmeals. From late April to mid-June, I. pacificus larvae were recovered from 95 to 96% of lizards and dusky-footed woodrats (Neotoma fuscipes) and from 59% of Peromyscus spp. mice. In contrast, 99% of lizards but few woodrats (15%) and none of the mice were infested by nymphs. Comparisons of tick loads for 19 lizard-Peromyscus spp. mouse pairings, where the lizard and mouse were captured within 10m of each other, revealed that the lizards harbored 36 times more larvae and >190 times more nymphs than the mice. In oak woodlands, loads of I. pacificus larvae decreased from late April/early May to late June for S. occidentalis lizards but increased for Peromyscus spp. mice. We conclude that the relative utilization of Borrelia-refractory lizards, as compared to rodents, by I. pacificus larvae was far higher in dry oak woodlands than in moister habitats such as redwood/tanoak and oak/Douglas fir woodlands in northern Mendocino County. Non-lizard-infesting potential enzootic vectors of B. burgdorferi s.l. (I. angustus and I. spinipalpis) were recorded from rodents in three of six oak woodland areas, two of five oak/Douglas fir woodland areas, and two of three redwood/tanoak woodland areas. PMID:15347025

  11. Effect of urban growth on streamflow regimen of Permanente Creek, Santa Clara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, E.E.; Rantz, S.E.

    1964-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of the effect of urban growth on the streamflow regimen of Permanente Creek in Mountain View, Santa Clara County, Calif. The data available did not permit a complete study of all hydrologic aspects, but there is conclusive evidence that the volume of storm runoff produced by rainfall on the valley floor has increased substantially as a result of urbanization. In 1945, storm runoff from the 5.12-square mile project area was insufficient to balance channel losses, and the streamflow entering the project area in the Permanente Creek channel was greater than that leaving the area. If, however, total outflow from the project area is considered to be the sum of the streamflow leaving the area plus channel seepage in the area, the ratio of total outflow to inflow was 1:18. By 1958, storm runoff from the project area was far in excess of channel losses and the ratio of total outflow to inflow was 1:70. This increase in outflow is attributed to the fact that urban development during the period 1945 to 1958 increased the extent of impervious surface in the project area from about 4 percent to 19 percent. The effect of urban growth in other basins in Santa Clara County should be investigated before any attempt is made to project the quantitative results of this study to other areas in the county.

  12. Ground-water-level monitoring network, Hollister and San Juan Valleys, San Benito County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrar, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    The addition of 17 wells to the existing 86-well network is proposed to improve the ground-water monitoring in the Hollister and San Juan Valleys in California. The new wells were selected on the basis of well-construction data, availability, location, accessibility, use, and condition, either to replace wells that are no longer accessible or to furnish needed additional data for planning artificial recharge, preparing water-level-contour maps, and digital ground-water modeling. (USGS)

  13. Mineral resources of the Santa Rose Mountains Wilderness Study Area, Riverside County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Calzia, J.P.; Madden-McGuire, D.J.; Oliver, H.W.; Schreiner, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Santa Rosa Mountains Wilderness Study Area covers 68,051 acres in the Santa Rose Mountains, California. An appraisal of the mineral resources (known) and an assessment of mineral resource potential (undiscovered) of this wilderness study area were made at the request of the US Bureau of Land Management. Geologic, geochemical, geophysical, and mineral surveys indicate that the study area has high potential for tungsten and marble resources, moderate potential for gold, and no potential for oil, natural gas, and geothermal resources.

  14. Syntectonic hydrocarbon migration and accumulation in Miley Reservoir, Rincon field, Ventura County, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. E. Nelson; R. A. Harrison

    1987-01-01

    The Miley reservoir of the Rincon field is located in the Central Transverse Ranges of southern California on a structural high that borders the Santa Barbara Channel. The east-west-trending Rincon and Ventura anticlines are part of a major oil-productive trend containing the Rincon, San Miguelito, and Ventura Avenue fields, which have estimated ultimate recovery of 1.7 billion BOE. Hydrocarbon accumulations

  15. Proposed Construction of the Madera County Educational Center in the State Center Community College District. A Report to the Governor and Legislature in Response to a Request from the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

    In this report, the California Postsecondary Education Commission responds to a request by the Chancellor of the California Community Colleges to review the need for and location of a new educational center, the Madera County Educational Center, north of Fresno within the State Center Community College District. The report contains nine…

  16. Fatality and Injury Severity of Older Adult Motor Vehicle Collisions in Orange County, California, 1998–2007

    PubMed Central

    Lotfipour, Shahram; Sayegh, Rockan; Chakravarthy, Bharath; Hoonpongsimanont, Wirachin; Anderson, Craig L.; Fox, J. Christian; Vaca, Federico E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Injuries and fatalities in adult drivers 18–65 years of age have decreased in recent years due to safer vehicles, enhanced medical policies, and implementation of injury prevention policies. However, adult drivers over 65 years of age are continuing to suffer from motor vehicle collision-related injuries and fatalities at a more constant rate. A number of physiological factors contribute to the deterioration in visual acuity, slower reaction speeds, and decreased awareness in older drivers. The objective of this study was to examine injury severity and fatality rates in older drivers compared to their younger counterparts in Orange County, California. Methods: This study used the Statewide Integrated Traffic Record System data for Orange County for the years 1998–2007. Drivers were categorized into 4 age groups: 25–64, 65–74, 75–84, and older than 85 years of age. Injury severity was assessed by the investigating officer. Results: Of the 197,814 drivers involved in motor vehicle collisions, 178,481 (90.2%) were in the 25–64 age group; 11,397 (5.8%) were 65–74; 6,592 (3.3%) were 75–84; and 1,344 drivers (0.7%) were over 85. Those aged 25–64 had the lowest fatality rate per 100,000 people, 2.5, whereas those 75–84 had the highest fatality rate, 4.9. The percent of crashes involving a left turn increased with age, and the percent that were stopped in the road decreases with age. Change in injury collision involvement ratio in the 3 younger age groups decreased by 26% to 32%, but decreased by 18% among drivers aged 85 years and older. Conclusion: The decrease in collision fatalities was greater in the 25–64-year-old group compared to the older adult population. This disparity highlights the need for further injury prevention efforts for older drivers. PMID:23451291

  17. Use of density equalizing map projections (DEMP) in the analysis of childhood cancer in four California counties

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, D.W. Selvin, S.; Close, E.R.; Holmes, H.H.

    1995-04-01

    In studying geographic disease distributions, one normally compares rates of arbitrarily defined geographic subareas (e.g. census tracts), thereby sacrificing the geographic detail of the original data. The sparser the data, the larger the subareas must be in order to calculate stable rates. This dilemma is avoided with the technique of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP). Boundaries of geographic subregions are adjusted to equalize population density over the entire study area. Case locations plotted on the transformed map should have a uniform distribution if the underlying disease rates are constant. The density equalized map portrays both individual cases and rates, and can be understood by untrained observers. Simple statistical techniques can be used to test the uniformity of the transformed map. This report describes application of the DEMP technique to a sizeable `real-world` data set: 401 childhood cancer cases occurring between 1980 and 1988 in four California counties. In an earlier analysis of the same data, the California Department of Health Services (DHS) calculated rates for 101 communities and found no significant geographic variability. The DDS 1980--88 population estimates are no longer available, so in this analysis 1980 Census data were used; geographic units were 262 census tracts. A k`th nearest neighbor analysis, corrected for boundary effects and for within-tract variability, provides strong evidence for geographic nonuniformity in tract rates ({rho} < l0{sup {minus}4}). No such effect is observed for artificial cases generated under the assumption of constant rates. Pending reanalysis with 1980-88 population estimates, no epidemiologic conclusions can be drawn at this time.

  18. Internal architecture of the proto-Kern Canyon Fault at Engineer's Point, Lake Isabella Dam site, Kern County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martindale, Z. S.; Andrews, G. D.; Brown, S. R.; Krugh, W. C.

    2014-12-01

    The core of the Cretaceous (?) proto-Kern Canyon Fault (KCF) is exposed continuously for 1.25 km along Engineer's Point at Lake Isabella, Kern County, California. The proto-KCF is notable for (1) its long and complex history within, and perhaps preceding the Sierra Nevada batholith, and (2) hosting the Quaternary Kern Canyon Fault, an active fault that threatens the integrity of the Lake Isabella auxiliary dam and surrounding communities. We are investigating the internal architecture of the proto-KCF to explore its control on the likely behavior of the modern KCF. The proto-KCF is developed in the Alta Sierra biotite-granodiorite pluton. A traverse across Engineer's Point, perpendicular to the proto-KCF trace, reveals gradational increases in fracture density, fracture length, bulk alteration, and decreases in fracture spacing and grain size toward the fault core. Mapping of the fault core reveals two prominent and laterally extensive zones: (1) continuous foliated blastomylonitic granodiorite with steeply-dipping, anastomosing shear bands and minor mylonite planes, and (2) foliated orange and green fault breccia with intergranular gouge, strong C/S fabric, and a central gouge plane. The fault breccia zone is intruded by a lensoidal, post-deformation dacite dike, probably ca. 105 - 102 Ma (Nadin & Saleeby, 2008) and is weakly overprinted by a set of cross-cutting spaced, short, brittle fractures, often coated in calcite, which we infer to be genetically related to the modern KCF. We present our structural and lithological data that will be supported by mineralogical and geochemical analyses. E. Nadin & J. Saleeby (2008) Disruption of regional primary structure of the Sierra Nevada batholith by the Kern Canyon fault system, California: Geological Society of America Special Paper 438, p. 429-454.

  19. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Witch Fire, San Diego County, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Witch Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 2.25 inches (57.15 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  20. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Rice Fire, San Diego County, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Rice Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 1.75 inches (44.45 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  1. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Ammo Fire, San Diego County, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Ammo Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 1.75 inches (44.45 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  2. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Canyon Fire, Los Angeles County, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Canyon Fire in Los Angeles County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 2.25 inches (57.15 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  3. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Santiago Fire, Orange County, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Santiago Fire in Orange County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 1.75 inches (44.45 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  4. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Buckweed Fire, Los Angeles County, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Buckweed Fire in Los Angeles County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 2.25 inches (57.15 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  5. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Poomacha Fire, San Diego County, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Poomacha Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 2.25 inches (57.15 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  6. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Harris Fire, San Diego County, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Harris Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 1.75 inches (44.45 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  7. Humboldt-Preis fr Zum zweiten Mal wrdigt die HU

    E-print Network

    Röder, Beate

    WASKOMMT Humboldt-Preis für gute Lehre Zum zweiten Mal würdigt die HU Lehrende für ihr Engagement Preisträger für Lehrzwecke einsetzen kann. Bis zum 15. August können Angehörige der HU Vorschläge machen, wer hauptamtlich an der HU tätig sind. Der erste ,,Humboldt-Preis für gute Lehre" wurde im ver- gangenen Jahr

  8. Potential for Induced Seismicity Related to the Northern California CO2 Reduction Project Pilot Test, Solano County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Myer, L.; Chiaramonte, L.; Daley, T.M.; Wilson, D.; Foxall, W.; Beyer, J.H.

    2010-06-15

    The objective of this technical report is to analyze the potential for induced seismicity due to a proposed small-scale CO{sub 2} injection project in the Montezuma Hills. We reviewed currently available public information, including 32 years of recorded seismic events, locations of mapped faults, and estimates of the stress state of the region. We also reviewed proprietary geological information acquired by Shell, including seismic reflection imaging in the area, and found that the data and interpretations used by Shell are appropriate and satisfactory for the purpose of this report. The closest known fault to the proposed injection site is the Kirby Hills Fault. It appears to be active, and microearthquakes as large as magnitude 3.7 have been associated with the fault near the site over the past 32 years. Most of these small events occurred 9-17 miles (15-28 km) below the surface, which is deep for this part of California. However, the geographic locations of the many events in the standard seismicity catalog for the area are subject to considerable uncertainty because of the lack of nearby seismic stations; so attributing the recorded earthquakes to motion along any specific fault is also uncertain. Nonetheless, the Kirby Hills Fault is the closest to the proposed injection site and is therefore our primary consideration for evaluating the potential seismic impacts, if any, from injection. Our planned installation of seismic monitoring stations near the site will greatly improve earthquake location accuracy. Shell seismic data also indicate two unnamed faults more than 3 miles east of the project site. These faults do not reach the surface as they are truncated by an unconformity at a depth of about 2,000 feet (610 m). The unconformity is identified as occurring during the Oligocene Epoch, 33.9-23.03 million years ago, which indicates that these faults are not currently active. Farther east are the Rio Vista Fault and Midland Fault at distances of about 6 miles (10 km) and 10 miles (16 km), respectively. These faults have been identified as active during the Quaternary (last 1.6 million years), but without evidence of displacement during the Holocene (the last 11,700 years). The stress state (both magnitude and direction) in the region is an important parameter in assessing earthquake potential. Although the available information regarding the stress state is limited in the area surrounding the injection well, the azimuth of the mean maximum horizontal stress is estimated at 41{sup o} and it is consistent with strike-slip faulting on the Kirby Hills Fault, unnamed fault segments to the south, and the Rio Vista Fault. However, there are large variations (uncertainty) in stress estimates, leading to low confidence in these conclusions regarding which fault segments are optimally oriented for potential slip induced by pressure changes. Uncertainty in the stress state can be substantially reduced by measurements planned when wells are drilled at the site. Injection of CO{sub 2} at about two miles depth will result in a reservoir fluid pressure increase, which is greatest at the well and decreases with distance from the well. After the injection stops, reservoir fluid pressures will decrease rapidly. Pressure changes have been predicted quantitatively by numerical simulation models of the injection. Based on these models, the pressure increase on the Kirby Hills Fault at its closest approach to the well due to the injection of 6,000 metric tons of CO{sub 2} would be a few pounds per square inch (psi), which is a tiny fraction of the natural pressure of approximately 5,000 psi at that depth. The likelihood of such a small pressure increase triggering a slip event is very small. It is even more unlikely that events would be induced at the significantly greater depths where most of the recorded earthquakes are concentrated, because it is unlikely that such a small pressure pulse would propagate downwards any appreciable distance. Therefore, in response to the specific question of the likelihood of the CO{sub 2} injection caus

  9. Wilhelm von Humboldt and the "Orient": On Edward W. Said's Remarks on Humboldt's Orientalist Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messling, Markus

    2008-01-01

    From an epistemological perspective, Wilhelm von Humboldt's studies on the Oriental and East Asian languages and writing systems (Egyptian hieroglyphs, Sanskrit, Chinese, Polynesian) raise the question of his position in the Orientalist discourse of his time. Said [Said, E.W., 1978. "Orientalism. Western Conceptions of the Orient, fourth ed."…

  10. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Otay Mesa Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  11. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Santiago Fire Perimeter, Tustin Quadrangle, Orange County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  12. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Ranch Fire Perimeter, Fillmore Quadrangle, Ventura County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  13. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Valley Center Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  14. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Poomacha Fire Perimeter, Palomar Observatory Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  15. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Cajon Fire Perimeter, Devore Quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  16. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Ranch Fire Perimeter, Piru Quadrangle, Ventura County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  17. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Potrero Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  18. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Morena Reservoir Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  19. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Slide Fire Perimeter, Keller Peak Quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  20. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, San Pasqual Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  1. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Santiago Fire Perimeter, Lake Forest Quadrangle, Orange County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  2. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Slide Fire Perimeter, Butler Peak Quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  3. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Dulzura Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  4. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Ramona Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  5. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Escondido Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  6. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Jamul Mountains Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  7. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Slide Fire Perimeter, Harrison Mountain Quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  8. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Rice Fire Perimeter, Bonsall Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  9. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Tecate Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  10. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Otay Mountain Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  11. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Barrett Lake Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  12. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Poomacha Fire Perimeter, Pala Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  13. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Poomacha Fire Perimeter, Boucher Hill Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  14. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Tule Springs Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  15. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Santa Ysabel Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  16. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Poway Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  17. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Santiago Fire Perimeter, Orange Quadrangle, Orange County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  18. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Warners Ranch Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  19. Water-quality assessment of Cache Creek, Yolo, Lake, and Colusa counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorenson, Stephen K.; Elliott, Ann L.

    1981-01-01

    Cache Creek and its tributaries from Clear Lake to Yolo Bypass have been the subject of quality and quantity of water studies by several governmental agencies since the early 1900's. Water-quality data from these studies showed that water in the basin is of good quality for most of the beneficial uses defined by the California State Water Resources Control Board. Concentrations of dissolved constituents are substantially higher in the water in the two largest tributaries than in Cache Creek. Seasonal variations in dissolved constituents are also greater in the tributaries than in Cache Creek. Clear Lake has a major effect on water quality, resulting in little seasonal fluctuation in water quality in Cache Creek. Excessive voron and suspended-sediment concentrations are the greatest water-quality problems, according to existing data. Both of these problems are from natural sources. Water-quality monitoring is presently being conducted monthly at four sites by the California Department of Water Resurces and at several other sites by other agencies. Modifications in current monitoring are proposed to gain further information on diel dissolved-oxygen cycles, pesticides, and biological constituents that may adversely affect beneficial uses. (USGS)

  20. Bathymetric and geophysical surveys of Englebright Lake, Yuba-Nevada Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childs, Jonathan R.; Snyder, Noah P.; Hampton, Margaret A.

    2003-01-01

    Harry L. Englebright Lake is a 9-mile-long (14-kilometer) reservoir located in the Sierra Nevada foothills of northern California on the Yuba River gorge known as The Narrows. The reservoir is impounded by Englebright Dam (Photo 1), a concrete arch structure spanning 348 meters (1,142 feet) across and 79 meters (260 feet) high. The dam was constructed in 1941 for the primary purpose of trapping sediment derived from anticipated hydraulic mining operations in the Yuba River watershed. Hydraulic mining in the Sierra Nevada was halted in 1884 but resumed on a limited basis until the 1930's under the regulation of the California Debris Commission. Although no hydraulic mining in the upper Yuba River watershed resumed after the construction of the dam, the historical mine sites continued to contribute sediment to the river. Today, Englebright Lake is used primarily for recreation and hydropower. In 2001 and 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted bathymetric, geophysical, and geological studies of the reservoir under the auspices of the Upper Yuba River Studies Program (UYRSP), a multi-disciplinary investigation into the feasibility of introducing anadromous fish species to the Yuba River system upstream of Englebright Dam. A primary purpose of these studies was to assess the quantity and nature of the sediment that has accumulated behind the dam over the past 60 years. This report presents the results of those surveys, including a new bathymetric map of the reservoir and estimates of the total accumulated sediment volume.

  1. Case study of the Wendel-Amedee Exploration Drilling Project, Lassen County, California, User Coupled Confirmation Drilling Program

    SciTech Connect

    Zeisloft, J.; Sibbett, B.S.; Adams, M.C.

    1984-09-01

    The Wendel-Amedee KGRA is located in Honey Lake basin in Lassen County, California, on the boundary between the Modoc Plateau and the Basin and Range geologic provinces. A variety of geophysical surveys was performed over the project property. Geophysical data helped in establishing the regional structural framework, however, none of the geophysical data is sufficiently refined to be considered suitable for the purpose of siting an exploration drill hole. Drilling of reservoir confirmation well WEN-1 took place from August 1 to September 22, 1981. Pulse and long-term flow testing subjected the reservoir to a maximum flow of 680 gpm for 75 hours. At that rate, the well exhibited a productivity index of 21.6 gpm/psi; the reservoir transmissivity was 3.5 x 10/sup 6/ md-ft/cp. The maximum bottom-hole temperature recorded during testing was 251/sup 0/F. The conceptual model of the geothermal resource at Wendel Hot Springs calls on ground water, originating in the neighboring volcanic highlands, descending through jointed and otherwise permeable rocks into the granitic basement. Once in the basement, the fluid is heated as it continues its descent, and lateral movement as dictated by the hydrologic gradient. It then rises to the discharge point along transmissive faults. 45 refs., 28 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Reservoir description is key to steamflood planning and implementation, Webster Reservoir, Midway-Sunset Field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, B.R.; Link, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    The Webster reservoir at Midway-Sunset field, Kern County, California, is an unconsolidated sand reservoir of Miocene age (''Stevens equivalent,'' Monterey Formation). The Webster was discovered in 1910 but, due to poor heavy oil (14/sup 0/ API) economics, development for primary production and subsequent enhanced recovery were sporadic. Currently, the reservoir produces by cyclic steam stimulation in approximately 35 wells. Cumulative oil production for the Webster since 1910 is about 13 million bbl. The Webster is subdivided into two reservoirs - the Webster Intermediate and Webster Main. The Webster Intermediate directly overlies the Webster Main in one area but it is separated by up to 300 ft of shale elsewhere. The combined thickness of both Webster reservoirs averages 250 ft and is located at a drilling depth of 1,100-1,800 ft. From evaluation of modern core data and sand distribution maps, the Webster sands are interpreted to have been deposited by turbidity currents that flowed from southwest to northeast in this area. Oil is trapped in the Webster reservoir where these turbidites were subsequently folded on a northwest-southeast-trending anticline. Detailed recorrelation on wireline logs, stratigraphic zonation, detailed reservoir description by zone, and sedimentary facies identification in modern cores has led to development of a geologic model for the Webster. This model indicates that the Webster Intermediate was deposited predominately by strongly channelized turbidity currents, resulting in channel-fill sands, and that the Webster Main was deposited by less restricted flows, resulting in more lobate deposits.

  3. Rapid large-scale deployment of tuberculosis testing in a high school - riverside county, california, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Cameron; Cole, Barbara; Saruwatari, Kimberly; Leon, Ramon

    2015-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), can spread from person to person through the air, which can make contact investigations particularly complex in heavily populated settings such as schools. In November 2013, a student (the index patient) at a southern California high school with approximately 2,000 students and staff members was diagnosed with active pulmonary TB. Because of an unexpectedly high number of positive tuberculin skin test results in the initial contact investigation, testing was extended to the entire school population, which had to be completed before the end of the school term. A total of 1,806 persons were tested in 24 hours. The rapid testing of the entire population of a high school is unusual and led to widespread media attention and community concern, requiring close coordination among branches of the County of Riverside Department of Public Health, local governments, and the school district. The testing resulted in identification of two additional cases of TB; in addition, 72 persons underwent treatment for latent TB infection (LTBI). This incident demonstrates the importance of a coordinated emergency response in a large-scale deployment of rapid testing, including efficiently focused resources, organized testing operations, and effective media relations. PMID:26042648

  4. Use of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP) in the analysis of childhood cancer in four California counties. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, D.W.; Close, E.R.; Holmes, H.H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Selvin, S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). School of Public Health

    1995-10-01

    In studying geographic disease distributions, one normally compares rates among arbitrarily defined geographic subareas (e.g. census tracts), thereby sacrificing the geographic detail of the original data. The sparser the data, the larger the subareas must be in order to calculate stable rates. This dilemma is avoided with the technique of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP). Boundaries of geographic subregions are adjusted to equalize population density over the entire study area. Case locations plotted on the transformed map should have a uniform distribution if the underlying disease rates are constant. The present report describes the application of the DEMP technique to 401 childhood cancer cases occurring between 1980 and 1988 in four California counties, with the use of map files and population data for the 262 tracts of the 1980 Census. A k`th nearest neighbor analysis provides strong evidence for geographic non-uniformity in tract rates (p < 10{sup {minus}4}). No such effect is observed for artificial cases generated under the assumption of constant rates. Work is in progress to repeat the analysis with improved population estimates derived from both 1980 and 1990 Census data. Final epidemiologic conclusions will be reported when that analysis is complete.

  5. The effect of selenium on reproduction of black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) in Shasta County California

    SciTech Connect

    Flueck, W.T.

    1989-01-01

    This study was to determine if nutritional inadequacy of selenium may be responsible for a declining reproductive rate of a migratory herd of black-tailed deer. Selenium is an essential trace mineral for mammalian herbivores. Deficiency affects primarily neonates resulting in increased mortality rates. Shasta County, California is indigenously low in selenium due to soil characteristics. Local livestock enterprises have experienced reproductive problems, which were responsive to selenium treatment. The low recruitment rate in the deer herd suggested a physiological link between low selenium status and reproductive problems, and an experimental trial was initiated. Free ranging adult females were supplemented with selenium rumen pellets and marked with radio transmitters. From 1985 to 1987, the selenium dose was doubled as compared to 1984. It was established that evaluation of selenium status by determining whole blood selenium levels adequately describes the major bioactive form of selenium, glutathione peroxidase. To evaluate the experimental trial, the pre-weaning survival rate of progeny of supplemented females was compared with the rate in the untreated herd.

  6. Using biomarkers to improve heavy oil reservoir management: An example from the cymric field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    McCaffrey, M.A. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States); Legarre, H.A.; Johnson, S.J. [Chevron U.S.A. Production Co., Bakersfield, CA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    For biodegraded oil accumulations, field development can be optimized by using geochemical indicators of variations in the extent of bacterial alteration. Biodegradation typically reduces oil producibility by increasing oil viscosity. In the Cymric field (Kern County, California), sidewall core extracts reveal that the extent of oil biodegradation changes substantially over extremely short vertical distances in a shallow, low-permeability reservoir. Zones of more degraded oil can extend laterally for more than a mile. The relationships between oil viscosity and biomarker biodegradation parameters in this field were calibrated from analyses of produced oils, and these relationships were used to convert sidewall core biomarker analyses into quantitative predictions of lateral and vertical changes in oil viscosity and gravity. Compositional variations were also used to allocate production to discrete zones. Viscosity prediction and production allocation can be used to optimize (1) the placement of new wells, (2) the placement of completion intervals, (3) the thickness of steam injection intervals, and (4) the spacing between injection intervals in the same well.

  7. Ox Mountain sanitary landfill: Apanolio Canyon expansion site, San Mateo County, California. Volume 2. Appendix. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    Further studies include: plants Observed in Apanolio Canyon; Animals Expected or Observed in Apanolio Canyon; Marbled Murrelet Survey; Review of Available Scientific Information on Six Candidate Insects; Update on Status of Candidate Insects; Apanolio Canyon Sensitive Plant Investigation; Fisheries Resources of Upper Apanolio, Benthic Invertebrate Survey of Apanolio, Corinda Los Trancos, and Pilarcitos Creeks, San Mateo County, California; Streamflows and Velocity of Flows at the Bongard diversion Dam in Apanolio Canyon; A Spring Survey to Determine the Presence or Absence of the San Francisco Garter Snake (Thamnophis sirtalis tetrataenis) in Two Tributaries of Pilarcitos Creek, Half Moon Bay, CA; Wildlife and Fisheries Mitigation Plan, Ox Mountain Sanitary Landfill, Apanolio Canyon Expansion Site; Correspondence Site Selection Criteria Information; Draft Contingency Remedial Action Plan; Leachate Collection and Removal System (LCRS) and Leachate/Contaminated Groundwater Treatment Systems; Apanolio Creek Streamflow Augmentation Plan; Apanolio Canyon Lower Aquifer Recharge Plan; Application for Exemptions - Technical Informations; Geotechnical Study and Specifications, Subgrade Barrier and Clay Liner System; Apanolio Canyon Boring Logs; Potentiometric Surface Maps, Apanolio Canyon; Geologic Cross Sections - Apanolio Canyon; Interim Report on Leachate Exposure Test Program, Apanolio Canyon Landfill Expansion.

  8. Concentrations of mercury and other metals in black bass (Micropterus spp.) from Whiskeytown Lake, Shasta County, California, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Jason T.; Hothem, Roger L.; Bauer, Marissa L.; Brown, Larry R.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents the results of a reconnaissance study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to determine mercury (Hg) and other selected metal concentrations in Black bass (Micropterus spp.) from Whiskeytown Lake, Shasta County, California. Total mercury concentrations were determined by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CVAAS) in fillets and whole bodies of each sampled fish. Selected metals scans were performed on whole bodies (less the fillets) by inductively coupled plasma–mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and inductively coupled plasma–optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Mercury concentrations in fillet samples ranged from 0.06 to 0.52 micrograms per gram (?g/g) wet weight (ww). Total mercury (HgT) in the same fish whole-body samples ranged from 0.04 to 0.37 (?g/g, ww). Mercury concentrations in 17 percent of "legal catch size" (?305 millimeters in length) were above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water-quality criterion for the protection of human health of 0.30 ?g/g (ww). These data will serve as a baseline for future monitoring efforts within Whiskeytown Lake.

  9. Emergency assessment of post-fire debris-flow hazards for the 2013 Springs Fire, Ventura County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Staley, Dennis M.

    2014-01-01

    Wildfire can significantly alter the hydrologic response of a watershed to the extent that even modest rainstorms can produce dangerous flash floods and debris flows. In this report, empirical models are used to predict the probability and magnitude of debris-flow occurrence in response to a 10-year rainstorm for the 2013 Springs fire in Ventura County, California. Overall, the models predict a relatively high probability (60–80 percent) of debris flow for 9 of the 99 drainage basins in the burn area in response to a 10-year recurrence interval design storm. Predictions of debris-flow volume suggest that debris flows may entrain a significant volume of material, with 28 of the 99 basins identified as having potential debris-flow volumes greater than 10,000 cubic meters. These results of the relative combined hazard analysis suggest there is a moderate likelihood of significant debris-flow hazard within and downstream of the burn area for nearby populations, infrastructure, wildlife, and water resources. Given these findings, we recommend that residents, emergency managers, and public works departments pay close attention to weather forecasts and National Weather Service-issued Debris Flow and Flash Flood Outlooks, Watches, and Warnings, and that residents adhere to any evacuation orders.

  10. Tick-borne Relapsing Fever and Borrelia hermsii, Los Angeles County, California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Raffel, Sandra J.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Webster, Larry S.; Marques, Adriana R.; Spano, Robyn; Rood, Michael; Burns, Joe; Hu, Renjie

    2009-01-01

    The primary cause of tick-borne relapsing fever in western North America is Borrelia hermsii, a rodent-associated spirochete transmitted by the fast-feeding soft tick Ornithodoros hermsi. We describe a patient who had an illness consistent with relapsing fever after exposure in the mountains near Los Angeles, California, USA. The patient’s convalescent-phase serum was seropositive for B. hermsii but negative for several other vector-borne bacterial pathogens. Investigations at the exposure site showed the presence of O. hermsi ticks infected with B. hermsii and the presence of rodents that were seropositive for the spirochete. We determined that this tick-borne disease is endemic to the San Gabriel Mountains near the greater Los Angeles metropolitan area. PMID:19624916

  11. Map Showing Seacliff Response to Climatic and Seismic Events, Depot Hill, Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Richmond, Bruce M.; D'Iorio, Mimi M.

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The coastal cliffs along much of the central California coast are actively retreating. Large storms and periodic earthquakes are responsible for most of the documented seacliff slope failures. Long-term average erosion rates calculated for this section of coast (Moore and others, 1999) do not provide the spatial or temporal data resolution necessary to identify the processes responsible for retreat of the seacliffs, where episodic retreat threatens homes and community infrastructure. Research suggests that more erosion occurs along the California coast over a short time scale, during periods of severe storms or seismic activity, than occurs during decades of normal weather or seismic quiescence (Griggs and Scholar, 1998; Griggs, 1994; Plant and Griggs, 1990; Griggs and Johnson, 1979 and 1983; Kuhn and Shepard, 1979). This is the first map in a series of maps documenting the processes of short-term seacliff retreat through the identification of slope failure styles, spatial variability of failures, and temporal variation in retreat amounts in an area that has been identified as an erosion hotspot (Moore and others, 1999; Griggs and Savoy, 1985). This map presents seacliff failure and retreat data from Depot Hill, California, which is located five kilometers east of Santa Cruz (fig.1) near the town of Capitola, along the northern Monterey Bay coast. The data presented in this map series provide high-resolution spatial and temporal information on the location, amount, and processes of seacliff retreat in Santa Cruz, California. These data show the response of the seacliffs to both large magnitude earthquakes and severe climatic events such as El NiOos; this information may prove useful in predicting the future response of the cliffs to events of similar magnitude. The map data can also be incorporated into Global Information System (GIS) for use by researchers and community planners. Four sets of vertical aerial photographs (Oct. 18, 1989; Jan. 27, 1998; Feb. 9, 1998; and March 6, 1998) were orthorectified and digital terrain models (DTMs) were generated and edited for this study (see Hapke and Richmond, 2000, for description of techniques). The earliest set of photography is from 1989, taken immediately following the Loma Prieta earthquake. These photographs are used to document the response of the seacliffs to seismic shaking, as well as to establish an initial cliff-edge position to measure the amount of retreat of the cliff edge over the following decade. The remaining three sets of photographs were collected using the U.S. Geological Survey Coastal Aerial Mapping System (CAMS) during the 1997-98 El NiOo (see Hapke and Richmond, 1999, 2000). The CAMS photographs were taken before, during, and after severe storms and are used to examine seacliff response to these storms. In addition to the analyses of photogrammetrically processed data, field mapping identified joints, faults, and lithologic variations along this section of seacliff.

  12. Map Showing Seacliff Response to Climatic and Seismic Events, Seacliff State Beach, Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Richmond, Bruce M.; D'Iorio, Mimi M.

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The coastal cliffs along much of the central California coast are actively retreating. Large storms and periodic earthquakes are responsible for most of the documented seacliff slope failures. Long-term average erosion rates calculated for this section of coast (Moore and others, 1999) do not provide the spatial or temporal data resolution necessary to identify the processes responsible for retreat of the seacliffs, where episodic retreat threatens homes and community infrastructure. Research suggests that more erosion occurs along the California coast over a short time scale, during periods of severe storms or seismic activity, than occurs during decades of normal weather or seismic quiescence (Griggs and Scholar, 1998; Griggs, 1994; Plant and Griggs, 1990; Griggs and Johnson, 1979 and 1983; Kuhn and Shepard, 1979). This is the second map in a series of maps documenting the processes of short-term seacliff retreat through the identification of slope failure styles, spatial variability of failures, and temporal variation in retreat amounts in an area that has been identified as an erosion hotspot (Moore and others, 1999; Griggs and Savoy, 1985). This map presents seacliff failure and retreat data from Seacliff State Beach, California, which is located seven kilometers east of Santa Cruz (fig. 1) along the northern Monterey Bay coast. The data presented in this map series provide high-resolution spatial and temporal information on the location, amount, and processes of seacliff retreat in Santa Cruz, California. These data show the response of the seacliffs to both large magnitude earthquakes and severe climatic events such as El Ni?os; this information may prove useful in predicting the future response of the cliffs to events of similar magnitude. The map data can also be incorporated into Global Information System (GIS) for use by researchers and community planners. Four sets of vertical aerial photographs (Oct. 18, 1989; Jan. 27, 1998; Feb. 9, 1998; and March 6, 1998) were orthorectified and digital terrain models (DTMs) were generated and edited for this study (see Hapke and Richmond, 2000, for description of techniques). The earliest set of photography is from 1989, taken immediately following the Loma Prieta earthquake. These photographs are used to document the response of the seacliffs to seismic shaking, as well as to establish a baseline cliff-edge position to measure the amount of retreat of the cliff edge over the following decade. The remaining three sets of photographs were collected using the U.S. Geological Survey Coastal Aerial Mapping System (CAMS) during the 1997-98 El Ni?o (see Hapke and Richmond, 1999; 2000). The CAMS photographs were taken before, during, and after severe storms and are used to examine seacliff response to these storms. In addition to the analyses of photogrammetrically processed data, field mapping identified joints, faults, and lithologic variations along this section of seacliff.

  13. Flood-hazard study: 100-year flood stage for Lucerne Lake, San Bernadino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busby, Mark William

    1977-01-01

    A study of the flood hydrology of Lucerne Valley, Calif., was made to develop the 100-year stage for Lucerne Lake. Synthetic-hydrologic techniques were used; and the 100-year flood stage was estimated to be at an elevation of 2,849.3 feet above mean sea level. Channel dimensions were measured at 59 sites in Lucerne Valley. Dranage area-discharge relations developed from channel-geometry data for sites nearby were used to estimate the discharge at 12 additional sites where channel geometry could not be measured. In order to compute the total volume discharge into the playa, the peak discharges were converted to volumes. From the Apple Valley report (Busby, 1975) the equation formulated from the relation between peak discharge and flood volume for the deserts of California was used to compute the flood volumes for routing into Lucerne Lake. (Woodard-USGS)

  14. An analysis of stimulation treatments of the Randolph Sand in the Semitropic field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M.D.; Chamberlain, C.R.

    1983-03-01

    The Semitropic field is located approximately ten miles west of Wasco in the San Joaquin Valley of California. The original productive zones in the field were the Mya and the Mulinia gas sands occuring at depths of 2,200' to 4,400'. In the last six years, the Randolph Oil Sand at 7,800' has been actively developed and is now the major productive interval. Recently, several of the Randolph wells have been stimulated with hydraulic fracturing treatments. A majority of these wells have shown productive increases of varying degrees depending upon field location, job volume and proppant size. This paper discusses the geologic production history of the Randolph Zone, completion techniques, reservoir characteristics and stimulation design and treatments.

  15. Properties of basin-fill deposits, a 1971–2000 water budget, and surface-water-groundwater interactions in the upper Humboldt River basin, northeastern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plume, Russell W.; Smith, J.L.

    2013-01-01

    This study was done in cooperation with Elko County, Nevada in response to concerns over growing demand for water within the county and increasing external demands that are occurring statewide. The upper Humboldt River basin encompasses 4,360 square miles in northeastern Nevada and includes the headwaters area of the Humboldt River. Nearly all of the mean annual flow of the Humboldt River originates in this area. Basin-fill deposits function as the principal aquifers in the upper Humboldt River basin. Over much of the basin lowlands, the upper 200 feet of basin fill consists of clay, silt, sand, and gravel deposited in a lake of middle to late Pliocene age. Fine-grained lacustrine sediments compose from 30 to more than 70 percent of the deposits. Mean values of transmissivity are less than 1,000 feet squared per day. Total inflow to the upper Humboldt River basin, about 3,330,000 acre-feet per year, is entirely from annual precipitation. Total outflow from the basin, about 3,330,000 acre-feet per year, occurs as evapotranspiration, streamflow, subsurface flow, and pumpage. The uncertainty of these values of inflow and outflow is estimated to be 25 percent. Baseflow of the Humboldt River is minimal upstream of the Elko Hills and in downstream reaches almost all baseflow comes from tributary inflow of the North Fork and South Fork Humboldt Rivers. However, the baseflow of these two tributaries comes from groundwater discharge to their respective channels in canyons incised in volcanic rocks along the North Fork and in carbonate rocks along the South Fork. Water levels in the shallow water-table aquifer along the Humboldt River flood plain fluctuate with changes in stage of the river. During high rising river stage in spring and early summer, streamflow enters the aquifer as bank storage. As stage begins to decline in early to mid-summer groundwater in bank storage begins discharging back into the river channel and this continues through late summer. In years of below average flow some reaches of the river are dry in late summer. Flood plain deposits are more permeable than adjacent and underlying fine-grained sediments of the Pliocene lake and the two aquifers are poorly connected.

  16. Surficial geology and stratigraphy of Pleistocene Lake Manix, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reheis, Marith C.; Redwine, Joanna R.; Wan, Elmira; McGeehin, John P.; VanSistine, D. Paco

    2014-01-01

    Pluvial Lake Manix and its surrounding drainage basin, in the central Mojave Desert of California, has been a focus of paleoclimate, surficial processes, and neotectonic studies by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) since about 2004. The USGS initiated studies of Lake Manix deposits to improve understanding of the paleoclimatic record and the shifts in atmospheric circulation that controlled precipitation in the Mojave Desert. Until approximately 25,000 years ago, Lake Manix was the terminus of the Mojave River, which drains northeasterly from the San Bernardino Mountains; the river currently terminates in the Soda Lake and Silver Lake playas. Pleistocene Lake Manix occupied several subbasins at its maximum extent. This map focuses on the extensive exposures created by incision of the Mojave River and its tributaries into the interbedded lacustrine and alluvial deposits within the central (Cady) and northeastern (Afton) subbasins of Lake Manix, and extends from the head of Afton Canyon to Manix Wash. The map illuminates the geomorphic development and depositional history of the lake and alluvial fans within the active tectonic setting of the eastern California shear zone, especially interactions with the left-lateral Manix fault. Lake Manix left an extraordinarily detailed but complex record of numerous transgressive-regressive sequences separated by desiccation and deposition of fan, eolian, and fluvial deposits, and punctuated by tectonic movements and a catastrophic flood that reconfigured the lake basin. Through careful observation of the intercalated lacustrine and fan sequences and by determining the precise elevations of unit contacts, this record was decoded to understand the response of the lake and river system to the interplay of climatic, geomorphic, and tectonic forces. These deposits are exposed in steep badland topography. Mapping was carried out mostly at scales of 1:12,000, although the map is presented at 1:24,000 scale, and employs custom unit nomenclature, with multiple subdivided lacustrine and alluvial fan units. In addition, many important units are very thin and cannot be mapped separately, or are covered by thin eolian sand, so these are commonly portrayed as stacks of units or combined units. These details are more accurately portrayed in the measured sections that accompany the map. Altitudes of many contacts were obtained using differentially corrected Global Positioning System (GPS) or, in some cases, lidar (light detection and ranging) data.

  17. Controlled Landfill Project in Yolo County, California for Environmental Benefits of Waste Stabilization and Minimization of Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, R.; Augenstein, D.; Kieffer, J.; Cohen, K.

    2003-12-01

    The Department of Public Works of Yolo County, California, USA has been testing an advanced approach to landfill bioreactors, controlled (or "enhanced") landfilling, at its Yolo County Central Landfill site near Davis, CA, since 1994. Overall objectives have been the management of waste landfilling for: (1) rapid completion of total gas generation; (2) maximum, high-efficiency gas capture; (3) waste volume reduction; and (4) maximum greenhouse gas and carbon sequestration benefits. Methane generation is controlled and enhanced through carefully managed moisture additions, and by taking advantage of landfill temperature elevation. The generated landfill methane, an important greenhouse gas, is recovered with high efficiency through extraction from a porous recovery layer beneath a surface geomembrane cover. Instrumentation included a total of 56 moisture and 15 temperature sensors in the two cells, gas flow monitoring by positive displacement gas meters, and accurate quantification of liquid inputs and outputs. Gas composition, waste volume reduction, base hydrostatic head, and a range of environmental compliance parameters has been monitored since 1995. Partitioning gas tracer tests using the injection of two gases at dilute concentrations in the landfill have also been initiated to compute the fraction of pore space occupied by water between the points of tracer injection and tracer measurement. There has been rapid waste volume reduction in the enhanced cell that corresponds to the solids' reduction to gas. Monitoring is planned for the next several years, until stabilization parameters are determined complete. Encouraging performance is indicated by: (1) sensor data; (2) gas generation results; (3) data from landfill cores; and (4) decomposition-related indicators including rapid volume reduction. When data are synthesized, project results have attractive implications for new approaches to landfill management. Over seven-years, methane recoveries have averaged over fivefold the "typical" values for comparable landfill waste. In terms of "greenhouse benefit," fractional VOC and methane energy recovery are estimated to exceed 90%, with corresponding methane and VOC emission reductions. Analyses done for the greenhouse gas mitigation program of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory indicate favorable economics justified on landfill life extension, as well as environmental benefits. The "controlled landfill" project findings suggest potential for low-cost mitigation of waste greenhouse methane emissions, maximum landfill carbon sequestration, and maximization of beneficial energy capture from landfills. Details and results obtained since 1994 will be presented.

  18. Honey Lake hybrid geothermal wood residue power plant, Lassen County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    The feasibility of a proposed 50 MW (gross) electric power project located near Wendel, California about 25 miles east of Susanville was studied. The project would be the first commercial power plant to combine the use of geothermal energy and wood fuel for power production. Wood fuel consisting primarily of various forms of forest management residues would be processed and partially dehydrated with geothermal energy prior to combustion. Geothermal energy would also be used for boiler feedwater heating and combustion air preheating. The study defines the range of site-specific benefits and economics of using wood fuel and moderate temperature geothermal energy, both of which are abundant and often located in proximity at many locations in the western United States. The study results document conclusively that overall project economics can be very favorable and that in addition to providing an important source of electric power, many benefits to forest land managers, local communities, project developers and the state of the environment can be derived from the combined use of moderate temperature geothermal energy and wood fuel.

  19. Hydrologic data, 1974-77, Stovepipe Wells Hotel area, Death Valley National Monument, Inyo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamb, Charles Edwin; Downing, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    Ground-water levels in most wells did not change significantly from 1974 to 1977 in the Stovepipe Wells Hotel area, California. The average water-level decline was less than 0.10 foot between August 1974 and August 1977 in 10 observation wells. Water-level contours show a depression centered on the two pumping wells, but this depression existed before the National Park Service started pumping its well. The chemical quality of the ground water is poor. Dissolved-solids concentrations in water samples ranged from 2,730 to 6,490 milligrams per liter. Analyses of water samples from two wells showed large changes in some constituents from 1976 to 1977. Streamflow in Salt Creek has been monitored since February 1974. Base flow is seasonal, being 0.10 to 0.20 cubic foot per second during the summer and as much as three times that amount during the winter. Two chemical analyses of water from Salt Creek, representing summer and winter flow conditions, show large differences for many constituents. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. Geologic map of the Lead Mountain 15’ quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, Keith A.; Jagiello, Keith J.; Fitzgibbon, Todd T.; John, Barbara E.

    2013-01-01

    The Lead Mountain 15’ quadrangle in the Mojave Desert contains a record of Jurassic, Cretaceous, Tertiary, and Quaternary magmatism. Small amounts of Mesoproterozoic(?) augen gneiss and Paleozoic and Mesozoic(?) metasedimentary rocks are preserved in small patches; they are intruded by voluminous Jurassic plutons of quartz diorite to granite composition and by Late Cretaceous granite of the Cadiz Valley batholith. Jurassic intrusive rocks include part of the Bullion Mountain Intrusive Suite and also younger dikes inferred to be part of the Jurassic Independence dike swarm. A contact-metamorphosed aureole 2 km wide in the Jurassic plutonic rocks fringes the Cadiz Valley batholith. Early Miocene dacitic magmatism produced a dense swarm of dikes in the eastern Bullion Mountains and the volcanic-intrusive remnant of a volcano at Lead Mountain. Tilting of the dike swarm from inferred vertical orientations may have resulted from Miocene tectonic extension. Conglomerate of Pliocene and (or) Miocene age is also tilted. Younger volcanism is recorded by Pliocene basalt of the Deadman Lake volcanic field, basalt of Lead Mountain (approximately 0.36 Ma), and the even younger basalt of Amboy. Quaternary sedimentation built alluvial fans and filled playas in the map area. Faulting in the dextral eastern California shear zone produced several northwest-striking faults in the quadrangle, some of them active into the Pleistocene and some that may have many kilometers of right-lateral offset.

  1. Final Report: Natural State Models of The Geysers Geothermal System, Sonoma County, California

    SciTech Connect

    T. H. Brikowski; D. L. Norton; D. D. Blackwell

    2001-12-31

    Final project report of natural state modeling effort for The Geysers geothermal field, California. Initial models examined the liquid-dominated state of the system, based on geologic constraints and calibrated to match observed whole rock delta-O18 isotope alteration. These models demonstrated that the early system was of generally low permeability (around 10{sup -12} m{sup 2}), with good hydraulic connectivity at depth (along the intrusive contact) and an intact caprock. Later effort in the project was directed at development of a two-phase, supercritical flow simulation package (EOS1sc) to accompany the Tough2 flow simulator. Geysers models made using this package show that ''simmering'', or the transient migration of vapor bubbles through the hydrothermal system, is the dominant transition state as the system progresses to vapor-dominated. Such a system is highly variable in space and time, making the rock record more difficult to interpret, since pressure-temperature indicators likely reflect only local, short duration conditions.

  2. A debris avalanche at Forest Falls, San Bernardino County, California, July 11, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Douglas M.; Hauser, Rachel M.

    2001-01-01

    The community of Forest Falls, California, is frequently subject to relatively slow moving debris flows. Some 11 debris flow events that were destructive to property have been recorded between 1955 and 1998. On July 11 and 13, 1999, debris flows again occurred, produced by high-intensity, short-duration monsoon rains. Unlike previous debris flow events, the July 11 rainfall generated a high-velocity debris avalanche in Snow Creek, one of the several creeks crossing the composite, debris flow dominated, alluvial fan on which Forest Falls is located. This debris avalanche overshot the bank of the active debris flow channel of Snow Creek, destroying property in the near vicinity and taking a life. The minimum velocity of this avalanche is calculated to have been in the range of 40 to 55 miles per hour. Impact from high-velocity boulders removed trees where the avalanche overshot the channel bank. Further down the fan, the rapidly moving debris fragmented the outer parts of the upslope side of large pine trees and embedded rock fragments into the tree trunks. Unlike the characteristic deposits formed by debris flows, the avalanche spread out down-slope and left no deposit suggestive of a debris avalanche. This summer monsoon-generated debris avalanche is apparently the first recorded for Forest Falls. The best indications of past debris avalanches may be the degree of permanent scars produced by extensive abrasion and splintering of the outer parts of pine trees that were in the path of an avalanche.

  3. Map Showing Seacliff Response to Climatic and Seismic Events, Seabright Beach, Santa Cruz County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Richmond, Bruce M.; D'Iorio, Mimi M.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction The coastal cliffs along much of the central California coast are actively retreating. Large storms and periodic earthquakes are responsible for most of the documented sea cliff slope failures. Long-term average erosion rates calculated for this section of coast do not provide the spatial or temporal data resolution necessary to identify the processes responsible for retreat of the sea cliffs where episodic retreat threatens homes and community infrastructure. Research suggests that more erosion occurs along the California coast over a short time scale, during periods of severe storms or seismic activity, than occurs during decades of normal weather or seismic quiescence. This is the third map in a series of maps prepared to document the processes of short-term sea cliff retreat through the identification of slope failure styles, spatial variability of failures, and temporal variation in retreat amounts in an area that has been identified as an erosion hotspot. This map presents sea cliff failure and retreat data from the Seabright Beach section, California, which is located on the east side of Santa Cruz along the northern Monterey Bay coast. The data presented in this map series provide high-resolution spatial and temporal information on the location, amount, and processes of sea cliff retreat in Santa Cruz, California. These data show the response of the sea cliffs to both large magnitude earthquakes and severe climatic events such as El Ni?os; this information may prove useful in predicting the future response of the cliffs to events of similar magnitude. The map data can also be incorporated into Global Information System (GIS) for use by researchers and community planners. During this study we developed a method for investigating short-term processes of sea cliff evolution using rectified photographic stereo models. This method allows us to document the linear extent of cliff failures, the spatial and temporal relationship between failures, and the type or style of slope failure. Seabright Beach extends 0.9 km from San Lorenzo Point on the west to the Santa Cruz Yacht Harbor on the east. The cliffs at Seabright Beach are completely protected from wave attack by a wide beach. The protective beach is a relatively recent feature that formed after the emplacement of the Santa Cruz Yacht Harbor jetty in 1963-1964. Prior to the completion of the jetty, the cliffs at Seabright Beach were subject to daily wave attack. The data in this study are post-jetty construction; therefore, the sea cliff failures and cliff retreat are the result of nonmarine processes (rainfall, groundwater and seismic shaking). The 8 to 15 m high cliffs at Seabright Beach are composed of the Miocene to Pliocene Purisima Formation, which is overlain by unconsolidated Pleistocene terrace deposits. The relative thickness of these units varies along the length of the cliff. At the west end of Seabright Beach, including San Lorenzo Point, nearly the entire cliff section is composed of Purisima Formation and is capped by less than 2 m of terrace deposits. In this exposure, the Purisima Formation is a moderately weathered, moderately indurated massive sandstone. The height of the cliffs and the thickness of the Purisima Formation decrease to the east. In the cliffs immediately adjacent to the harbor, the entire exposure is composed of terrace deposits. Toe-slope debris and wind-blown sand form a nearly continuous fan along the cliff base that obscure the lower portion of the cliff. This study documents the impacts of earthquakes and large storms to the sea cliffs in the Seabright Beach section. The first event is the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, a M7.1 earthquake that caused widespread damage to the area stretching from Santa Cruz to the San Francisco Bay. The epicenter of the earthquake was located in the Santa Cruz Mountains, approximately 9 km inland from the coast. Extensive block and debris falls, induced by the seismic shaking, occ

  4. Water quality of the Lexington Reservoir, Santa Clara County, California, 1978-80

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwatsubo, R.T.; Sylvester, M.A.; Gloege, I.S.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of water samples from Lexington Reservoir and Los Gatos Creek upstream from the reservoir from June 1978 through September 1980 showed that water generally met water-quality objectives identified by California Regional Water Quality Control Board, San Francisco Bay Region. Water-temperature profiles show that Lexington Reservoir is a warm monomictic lake. During summer, dissolved-oxygen concentrations generally were not reduced below 5.0 mg/L in the hyplimnion; only once during the study did bottom waters become anoxic. Water transparency decreased with depth. The euphotic zone ranged from 1.0 to 5.4 m, depending on suspended solids and algae, and was greater in summer than in spring. Calcium and bicarbonate were dominant ions at all stations except during spring, following the rainy season, when waters were a mixed cation bicarbonate type. Nitrogen concentrations were greater in samples from reservoir stations than in those from Los Gatos Creek, with most of the nitrogen in ammonia and organic forms. The amount of dissolved nitrate appeared to be related to phytoplankton abundance. Phosphorus and trace-element concentrations were low at all stations. Estimates of net primary productivity and Carlson 's trophic-state index, based on chlorophyll-a concentrations, indicated that reservoir classification ranges from oligotrophic to mesotrophic. Blue-green algae generally were predominant in reservoir samples. (USGS)

  5. Hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in Long Valley Caldera, Mono County, California, 1982-1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrar, C.D.; Sorey, M.L.; Rojstaczer, S.; Janik, C.J.; Mariner, R.H.; Winnett, T.L.; Clark, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    The Long Valley caldera is a potentially active volcanic area on the eastern side of the Sierra Nevada in east-central California. Hydrologic and geochemical monitoring of surface and subsurface features began in July 1982 to determine if changes were occurring in response to processes causing earthquakes and crustal deformation. Differences since 1982 in fluid chemistry of springs has been minor except at Casa Diablo, where rapid fluctuations in chemistry result from near surface boiling and mixing. Ratios of 3-He/4-He and 13-C/12-C in hot springs and fumaroles are consistent with a magnetic source for some of the carbon and helium discharged in thermal areas, and observed changes in 3-He/4-He between 1978 and 1984 suggest changes in the magmatic component. Significant fluctuations in hot spring discharge recorded at several sites since 1982 closely followed earthquake activity. Water levels in wells have been used as strain meters to detect rock deformation associated with magmatic and tectonic activity and to construct a water table contour map. Coseismic water level fluctuations of as much as 0.6 ft have been observed but no clear evidence of deformation caused by magmatic intrusions can be seen in the well records through 1984. Temperature profiles in wells, which can be used to delineate regionally continuous zones of lateral flow of hot water across parts of the caldera, have remained constant at all but two sites. (Author 's abstract)

  6. Ground-water quality in the Lompoc Plain, Santa Barbara County, California, 1983

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berenbrock, Charles

    1988-01-01

    Groundwater is the main source of water in the Lompoc plain, California. The lower member of the younger alluvium is the main water-bearing zone. Long-term groundwater levels in most of the plain have not changed significantly since the 1940's. Groundwater quality in the plain in 1983 tended to deteriorate from east to west. Dissolved-solids concentrations throughout the plain exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency secondary maximum contaminant level of 500 mg/L for drinking water. In samples from some wells, concentrations of one or more of the following constituents--sodium, chloride, nitrate, and iron-exceeded primary and secondary maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Concentration of constituents in some samples also exceeded recommended levels for irrigation water. The predominant ions generally were calcium, magnesium, sulfate, and bicarbonate--except in the western part, where sodium and chloride were the predominant dissolved ions. From 1972 to 1983, dissolved-solids concentrations in the main water-bearing zone generally decreased in the central part of the plain but increased throughout most of the study area. The largest increases, greater than 1,000 mg/L, were in the extreme western part of the plain. (USGS)

  7. Influence of early Miocene tectonism on Miocene deposystems, Tejon area, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, B.M.

    1986-04-01

    The Tejor area, located in the southeastern end of the San Joaquin Valley of California, provides an excellent opportunity to study earliest Miocene tectonics and their subsequent control on Miocene deposystems in the east slope setting. Abundant outcrop and subsurface control, correlative time markers (including volcanic units and micropaleontologic reports), and a relatively mild overprinting by recent structuring facilitated this 3-year study. Late Zemorrian through early Saucesian (22 Ma) volcanic flows and eruptives covered the area while coincident tensional faulting caused the Zemorrian-age Vedder shelf-slope system to collapse. A horst-and-graben basin system resulted, with a narrow serrated shelf along the eastern margin. Onset of Saucesian deposition was dominated by conglomeratic turbidites spilling into silled basin depocenters. The clastic load included typical Sierran-derived material and volcanic detritus from the prior flows. Rugged sea floor relief controlled channel courses and sediment thickness. Turbidite deposition continued through the earliest Mohnian. The early Saucesian sea flow topography exerted progressively less effect on channel courses, while influence from previous channel buildups increased. Clastic sorting improved with time as the shelf matured and the slope gradient decreased, and clean reservoir channel sands were deposited in meanderlike patterns. This sequence of events is critical to working the structural and stratigraphic hydrocarbon potential of the Tejon area. Zemorrian Vedder and Eocene-age production is associated with paleohorst blocks (e.g., Tejon North oil field and Tunis Creek pool of the Tejon Hills oil field).

  8. Comments on potential geologic and seismic hazards affecting Mare Island, Solano County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, T.L.; Wentworth, C.M.; Bakun, W.H.; Boatwright, J.; Brocher, T.E.; Çelebi, M.; Ellsworth, W.L.; Fletcher, J.P.B.; Geist, E.L.; Graymer, R.W.; Kayen, R.E.; Keefer, D.K.; Oppenheimer, D.H.; Savage, W.U.; Schwartz, D.P.; Simpson, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    This report was prepared in response to a written request from the City of Vallejo, California, to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). By letter of October 4, 2002, the City requested that the USGS "provide advice to the City’s LNG Health and Safety Committee on its review of a potential liquid natural gas project" on the southern portion of Mare Island. The City specifically requested that the USGS advise the committee on potential hazards including fault rupture, earthquake ground motion, soil failure during earthquakes, tsunami and seiche, and landslides. The City requested that the USGS: (1) comment on these hazards, (2) describe its degree of confidence in its opinions, and (3) describe the scope of additional studies that will be needed if the City enters into an agreement with project sponsors. Advice was also requested on the selection of the safe shutdown and operating basis earthquakes as specified in the NFPA 59A standard (NFPA, 2001). This review of published reports and other publicly available information indicates that all of the hazards on which the USGS was asked to comment should be considered for the proposed project on the southern portion of Mare Island. Available information differs greatly for each of these potential hazards, and adequate understanding for design will require detailed site-specific investigations.

  9. Swath bathymetric survey of Englebright Lake, Yuba-Nevada Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childs, Jonathan R.; Stevenson, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    In March, 2004, the USGS conducted a swath bathymetric survey of Englebright Lake, a 9-mile long reservoir located in the Sierra Nevada foothills of northern California on the Yuba River. This survey was follow-on to an earlier bathymetric survey and sediment thickness analysis done by the USGS in 2001 (Childs and others, 2003). The primary purpose of these studies is to assess the quantity and nature of the sediment that has accumulated since the dam was completed in 1940. The specific purpose of the swath bathymetry was to map in high detail the prograding delta that is being formed as the lake fills in with sediment. In the event of another large flood such as occurred on January 1, 1997, the survey could be repeated to determine the effect of such an event on the sediment volume and distribution. This study was conducted under the auspices of the Upper Yuba River Studies Program (UYRSP) . The UYRSP is funded by the CALFED Bay-Delta Program, whose mission is to "develop and implement a long-term comprehensive plan that will restore ecological health and improve water management for beneficial uses of the San Francisco Bay-Delta System".

  10. Preliminary report on part of the Oat Hill quicksilver mine, Mayacmas district, Napa County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fix, Philip Forsyth

    1955-01-01

    Oat Hill quicksilver mine, located in the Mayacmas district of northern California, and credited with having produced more than 160,000 flasks of quicksilver, was sampled cooperatively by the Buray of Mines and Geological Survey during 1944. 28 diamond drill holes totaling 8,120 feet were drilled by the Bureau of Mines in four of the six principal veins to sample virgin low-grade reserves and stope fill, and reserves in the other two veins were estimated from existing underground workings and by inferences from drill holes in nearby veins. The writer estimates a total of 10,220 flasks of quicksilver in indicated and inferred reserves totaling 320,000 tons. Indicated reserves minable under 1943 conditions are estimated at 1,960 flasks of quicksilver in 75,000 tons averaging 3.0 lbs Hg per ton. Inferred reserves minable under 1943 conditions are estimated at 4,640 flasks of quicksilver in 109,920 tons averaging about 3.2 lbs Hg per ton. Inferred reserves believed minable only under economic conditions much more favorable than even those of 1943 are estimated at 2,620 flasks of quicksilver in 135,080 tons averaging a little less than 1.5 lbs Hg per ton. About two-thirds of the indicated reserves are accessible in underground workings. All other reserves are estimated approximately without access underground. Several areas not sampled may possibly contain reserves.

  11. Syntectonic hydrocarbon migration and accumulation in Miley Reservoir, Rincon field, Ventura County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.E.; Harrison, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    The Miley reservoir of the Rincon field is located in the Central Transverse Ranges of southern California on a structural high that borders the Santa Barbara Channel. The east-west-trending Rincon and Ventura anticlines are part of a major oil-productive trend containing the Rincon, San Miguelito, and Ventura Avenue fields, which have estimated ultimate recovery of 1.7 billion BOE. Hydrocarbon accumulations in the multiple and stacked reservoirs within these three fields are controlled by the complex interplay of late Pleistocene folding and reverse fault development. The detailed interpretation reported here combines reservoir performance data with subsurface structural geology and sequential tectonic development to provide a new understanding of the relationship of migration barriers to oil accumulation and production. The Miley reservoir is an axial- and fault-controlled accumulation on the eastern terminus of the Rincon anticline. It is located in a structural saddle formed by the doubly plunging Rincon and Ventura anticlinal trend. Three operative trapping mechanisms confine oil pools: (1) axial accumulations associated with reverse fault closures; (2) traps on the hanging wall of dip-slip reverse faults; and (3) a permeability barrier developed in response to flexural slip folding. Oil trapped within the Rincon-Miley reservoir was primarily generated beneath the Santa Barbara Channel and migrated up the south flank of the anticlinal trend. Four stages of structural development and hydrocarbon migration, encompassing the last 700,000 years, have implications for the enhanced development of reservoirs on this anticlinal trend.

  12. Management by assertion: beavers and songbirds at Lake Skinner (Riverside County, California).

    PubMed

    Longcore, Travis; Rich, Catherine; Müller-Schwarze, Dietland

    2007-04-01

    Management of ecological reserve lands should rely on the best available science to achieve the goal of biodiversity conservation. "Adaptive Resource Management" is the current template to ensure that management decisions are reasoned and that decisions increase understanding of the system being managed. In systems with little human disturbance, certain management decisions are clear; steps to protect native species usually include the removal of invasive species. In highly modified systems, however, appropriate management steps to conserve biodiversity are not as readily evident. Managers must, more than ever, rely upon the development and testing of hypotheses to make rational management decisions. We present a case study of modern reserve management wherein beavers (Castor canadensis) were suspected of destroying habitat for endangered songbirds (least Bell's vireo, Vireo bellii pusillus, and southwestern willow flycatcher, Empidonax traillii extimus) and for promoting the invasion of an exotic plant (tamarisk, Tamarix spp.) at an artificial reservoir in southern California. This case study documents the consequences of failing to follow the process of Adaptive Resource Management. Managers made decisions that were unsupported by the scientific literature, and actions taken were likely counterproductive. The opportunity to increase knowledge of the ecosystem was lost. Uninformed management decisions, essentially "management by assertion," undermine the long-term prospects for biodiversity conservation. PMID:17318698

  13. The Complexity of the California Recall Election

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, R. Michael

    2003-11-06

    The October 7, 2003 California Recall Election strained California’s direct democracy. In recent California politics there has not been a statewide election conducted on such short notice; county election officials were ...

  14. Ground-water reconnaissance of the Santa Barbara-Montecito area, Santa Barbara County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muir, K.S.

    1968-01-01

    This is the third interpretive report prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Santa Barbara County Water Agency on the groundwater resources of areas along the south coast of the county. The two previous reports--one by J. E. Upson in 1951 and another by R. E. Evenson, H. D. Wilson, Jr., and K. S. Muir--were on ground-water conditions in the Goleta and Carpinteria basins. The Santa Barbara-Montecito area is between those two basins-the Goleta basin on the west and the Carpinteria basin on the east. This area of about 30 square miles extends from the Pacific Ocean on the south to the Santa Inez Mountains on the north. The city of Santa Barbara and the towns of Montecito and Summerland are within the area. The Santa Barbara-Montecito area is a low-lying flat section of the coastal plain. Farther inland are highlands of consolidated rock and terrace deposits. The highlands are areas of uplift, folding, and faulting, and the lowlands are structural depressions. Most of the urban development in the area has been in the lowlands. The unconsolidated deposits that have partly filled the structural depressions make up the ground-water reservoir of the Santa Barbara-Montecito area. They include the Santa Barbara Formation of Pliocene and Pleistocene age, the Casitas Formation of Pleistocene age, and the alluvium of late Pleistocene and Recent age. These deposits underlie an area of about 20 square miles and have a maximum thickness of about 2,000 feet. The consolidated rocks of Tertiary age that underlie and form the boundaries of the ground-water reservoir contain ground water in fractures and in sandstone beds. However, the consolidated rocks are not an important source of ground water. In 1959, a year the ground-water basins were full and ground water in storage was at a maximum, storage in the Santa Barbara area was 184,000 acre-feet, and storage in the Montecito area was 97,000 acre-feet. By 1964, in response to below-average recharge and continued withdrawal by pumping, the quantity of ground water in storage in the Santa Barbara area had decreased to 178,000 acre-feet. Because of a reduction in pumpage, there was little change in storage in the Montecito area between 1959 and 1964. Deep percolation of rain, seepage from streams, and subsurface inflow from consolidated rocks are the main sources of recharge to the ground-water reservoir in the Santa Barbara-Montecito area. The most important discharge is by pumping.The long-term perennial yield of the ground-water reservoir of the Santa Barbara area is estimated to be 1,700-2,000 acre-feet. Present data are insufficient to accurately determine the perennial yield of the reservoir in the Montecito area, but it is estimated to be about 2,500 acre-feet. Most ground water in the Santa Barbara-Montecito area is suitable for general use. However, ground water in some of the consolidated rocks and in the shallow unconsolidated deposits adjacent to the coast is too saline for most uses. Seawater intrusion has occurred in the Santa Barbara area and the western part of the Montecito area. The intrusion, however, is limited to the upper part of the nearshore shallow alluvial deposits and contaminates only wells which were constructed without a near-surface seal.

  15. Surficial geologic map of the Cuddeback Lake 30' x 60' quadrangle, San Bernardino and Kern counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amoroso, Lee; Miller, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The 1:100,000-scale Cuddeback Lake quadrangle is located in the western Mojave Desert north-northeast of Los Angeles, between the southern Sierra Nevada and San Bernardino Mountains, in Kern and San Bernardino Counties, California. Geomorphic features include high-relief mountains, small hills, volcanic domes, pediments, broad alluvial valleys, and dry lakes. It is one in a series of surficial geologic maps created to investigate landscape development and tectonic evolution of the northern Mojave Desert. The mapped area includes pre-Tertiary plutonic, metavolcanic, metasedimentary, and igneous rocks; Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic rocks; and Quaternary sediments and basalts. The map area includes the El Paso, Lockhart, Blackwater, and Muroc Faults, as well as the central segment of the Garlock Fault Zone. The tectonically active western Mojave Desert and the variety of surficial materials have resulted in distinctive geomorphic features and terrains. Geologic mapping shows that active faults are widespread and have diverted drainage patterns. The tectonically active area near the Garlock Fault Zone and the nearby El Paso Fault influenced development of drainage networks; base level is controlled by fault offset. Evidence of a late Tertiary drainage network is preserved in remnants of alluvial fans and paleodrainage deposits north of the El Paso Mountains, west of the Lava Mountains, and south and west of the Rand Mountains. Holocene fault activity for the Cantil Valley, Lockhart, Garlock, and Rand Mountain Faults is indicated by displaced stream channels, playa-filled depressions, scarps, and shutter ridges. Previously unmapped Holocene and Late Pleistocene fault strands identified near the Rand Mountains may represent a splay at the northwest termination of the Lockhart Fault. The Grass Valley Fault, northwest of Black Mountain, is a right-lateral, strike-slip fault that may be a splay of the Blackwater Fault. Holocene activity on the Grass Valley Fault is indicated by one displaced early Holocene stream terrace. Mapped faults in Fremont Valley are tentatively identified as surficial expressions of the buried Cantil Valley Fault.

  16. Surficial Geologic Map and Geodatabase of the Cuddeback Lake 30' x 60' Quadrangle, San Bernardino and Kern Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amoroso, Lee; Miller, David M.

    2006-01-01

    A USGS surficial geologic mapping project, focused on the arid Southwest USA, conducted mapping and process studies to investigate landscape development and tectonic evolution. This project included the Cuddeback Lake 1:100,000-scale quadrangle located in the western Mojave Desert north-northeast of Los Angeles, between the southern Sierra Nevada and San Bernardino Mountains, in Kern and San Bernardino Counties, California. Geomorphic features include high-relief mountains, small hills, volcanic domes, pediments, broad alluvial valleys, and dry lakes. The mapped area includes pre-Tertiary plutonic, metavolcanic, metasedimentary, and other metamorphic rocks; Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic rocks; and Quaternary sediments and basalts. Included in the area are the El Paso, Lockhart, Blackwater, and Muroc faults as well as the central segment of the Garlock fault zone. The tectonically active western Mojave Desert and the variety of surficial materials have resulted in distinctive geomorphic features and terrains. Mapping has shown that the tectonically active area near the Garlock fault zone and El Paso Fault influenced development of drainage networks; base level is controlled by fault offset. There is evidence of a late Tertiary drainage network preserved in remnants of alluvial fans and paleo-drainage deposits north of the El Paso Mountains, west of the Lava Mountains, and south and west of the Rand Mountains. Faults identified as being active in the Holocene based on displaced stream channels, scarps, and shutter ridges include the Cantil Valley, Lockhart, Garlock, and Rand Mountain faults. Previously unmapped Holocene and late Pleistocene fault strands identified near the Rand Mountains may represent a splay at the northwest termination of the Lockhart Fault. The informally named Grass Valley fault, NW of Black Mountain, is a right-lateral strike-slip fault that may be a splay of the Blackwater Fault. Holocene activity on the Grass Valley fault is indicated by one displaced early Holocene stream terrace. Mapped faults in Fremont Valley are tentatively identified as surficial expressions of the buried Cantil Valley fault.

  17. Distribution of the endangered giant kangaroo rat, Dipodomys ingens, on the Naval Petroleum Reserves, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Mathews, N.E.; Kato, T.T.; McCue, P.M.; McManus, J.S.; Sauls, M.L.

    1987-07-01

    Field surveys were conducted to determine the distribution and relative abundance of burrow systems of the endangered giant kangaroo rat, Dipodomys ingens, on the US Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum Reserves (NPR-1, NPR-2) in Kern County, California. A total of 1080 burrow systems were observed on 30 sections of NPR-1, 22 sections of NPR-2, and six adjoining sections. Most burrow systems were found in clusters on deep sandy loams in Buena Vista Valley, but isolated burrows were found in similar soils on the upper slopes or crests of ridges in 30 other sections of the reserves. Burrow systems had an average of 3.3 horizontal entrances measuring 2.7 in. high and 3.4 in. wide, and an average of 1.4 vertical entrances 2.0 in. in diameter. In the valleys burrows occurred in a density of 28.2 per acre; had an average slope angle of 4.3/sup 0/; were within 3.3 yd of a perennial shrub, usually a cheese-bush, Hymenoclea salsola; had a predominantly southern aspect; and were grazed by sheep, but were remote from petroleum production activities. In the uplands burrows occurred in a density of 0.1 per acre; had an average slope angle of 6.4/sup 0/; were within 5.1 yd of a perennial shrub, usually a desert saltbush, Atriplex polycarpa; had no particular aspect; and were not grazed by sheep, but were close to petroleum production activities. Since 1980, preconstruction surveys have helped conserve giant kangaroo rat burrows that may have been inadvertently threatened by construction projects on the reserves.

  18. Statistical analysis and mathematical modeling of a tracer test on the Santa Clara River, Ventura County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paybins, Katherine S.; Nishikawa, Tracy; Izbicki, John A.; Reichard, Eric G.

    1998-01-01

    To better understand flow processes, solute-transport processes, and ground-water/surface-water interactions on the Santa Clara River in Ventura County, California, a 24-hour fluorescent-dye tracer study was performed under steady-state flow conditions on a 28-mile reach of the river. The study reach includes perennial (uppermost and lowermost) subreaches and ephemeral subreaches of the lower Piru Creek and the middle Santa Clara River. Dye was injected at a site on Piru Creek, and fluorescence of river water was measured continuously at four sites and intermittently at two sites. Discharge measurements were also made at the six sites. The time of travel of the dye, peak dye concentration, and time-variance of time-concentration curves were obtained at each site. The long tails of the time-concentration curves are indicative of sources/sinks within the river, such as riffles and pools, or transient bank storage. A statistical analysis of the data indicates that, in general, the transport characteristics follow Fickian theory. These data and previously collected discharge data were used to calibrate a one-dimensional flow model (DAFLOW) and a solute-transport model (BLTM). DAFLOW solves a simplified form of the diffusion-wave equation and uses empirical relations between flow rate and cross-sectional area, and flow rate and channel width. BLTM uses the velocity data from DAFLOW and solves the advection-dispersion transport equation, including first-order decay. The simulations of dye transport indicated that (1) ground-water recharge explains the loss of dye mass in the middle, ephemeral, subreaches, and (2) ground-water recharge does not explain the loss of dye mass in the uppermost and lowermost, perennial, subreaches. This loss of mass was simulated using a linear decay term. The loss of mass in the perennial subreaches may be caused by a combination of photodecay or adsorption/desorption.

  19. Sediment accumulation in San Leandro Bay, Alameda County, California, during the 20th century : a preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nolan, K.M.; Fuller, C.C.

    1986-01-01

    Major changes made in the configuration of San Leandro Bay, Alameda County, California, during the 20th century have caused rapid sedimentation within parts of the Bay. Opening of the Oakland tidal channel and removal of 97% of the marshlands formerly surrounding the Bay have decreased tidal velocities and volumes. Marshland removal has decreased the tidal prism by about 25%. Comparison of bathymetric surveys indicates that sedimentation in the vicinity of the San Leandro Bay channel averaged 0.7 cm/annum between 1856 and 1984. Lead-210 data collected at four shallow water sites east of the San Leandro Bay channel indicated that sedimentation rates have averaged between 0.06 and 0.28 cm/annum. Because bioturbation of bottom sediments cannot be discounted, better definition of this range in sedimentation rates would required measuring the activity of lead-210 on incoming sediments. In addition to sediment deposited in the vicinity of the San Leandro Bay channel and open, shallow areas to the east, 850,740 cu m of sediment was deposited between 1948 and 1983 in an area dredged at the mouth of San Leandro Creek. All available data indicate that between 1 ,213,000 and 1,364,000 cu m of sediment was deposited in San Leandro Bay between 1948 and 1983. Sediment yield data from an adjacent drainage basin, when combined with inventories of lead-210 and cesium-137, indicate that most of the sediment deposited in San Leandro Bay is coming from resuspension of bottom sediments or from erosion of marshes or shorelines of San Leandro or San Francisco Bay. (Author 's abstract)

  20. GLORIA Alpine Plant Monitoring in the White Mountains, Inyo County, California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayko, A.; Powell, F. L.; Smiley, J. T.; Pritchett, D.; Dennis, A.; Millar, C. I.; Murrell, K. E.

    2004-12-01

    The GLORIA project (Global Observation Research Initiative in Alpine Environments: www.gloria.ac.at) is a worldwide effort coordinated by the University of Vienna Institute of Ecology and Conservation Biology, to monitor climate effects on alpine peaks around the world. In the summer of 2004 the University of California, White Mountain Research Station teamed up with the U.S. Forest Service to initiate GLORIA monitoring sites on 4 summits in the White Mountains. The lower three summits consist of granitic rock, and range from 3240m to 3975m in elevation, while the upper summit is on metavolcanic rock on the shoulder of White Mountain Peak at 4285m. For each summit we followed the rigorous GLORIA sampling design and recorded baseline data on plant species composition, cover, and frequency. Permanent monitoring plots were set up, and dataloggers installed to measure soil temperature. In addition, we are discussing ways to augment the standard GLORIA sampling protocol by setting up a White Mountain "GLORIA master site." This would involve (1) remeasurement of the GLORIA summits using alternative sampling procedures, for example random quadrat sampling, to facilitate cross-comparison with other monitoring efforts by agency and university scientists, (2) a parallel summit transect on a chemically contrasting bedrock lithology, formally known as the Reed Dolomite, which produces magnesium-rich carbonate soils, and is the principle host rock to the ancient Bristlecone forest, .and (3) expanding sampling to include animal taxa. We also plan to complete a detailed geomorphic and geologic description of each site to include in the monitoring database. project/default.htm

  1. Review of Vedder pool development, Kern River field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Condon, M.W.

    1986-07-01

    The Kern River field is located on the east side of the San Joaquin Valley, just north of Bakersfield, California. Since its discovery in 1899, the field has produced over 1 billion bbl of heavy oil from the Kern River Formation. It was not until 1981 that light oil was discovered from a deeper zone, the Vedder formation. The discovery well, Getty Oil Company WD-1 Apollo, encountered 40 ft of net oil sand within the third Vedder sand and was completed on pump for an initial production of 100 bbl of 40.5/sup 0/ API oil and 200 MCDGD. As suggested by its name, WD-1 Apollo was drilled as a water-water injection wells. However, a detailed subsurface study of the field suggested the possibility of a trap within the Vedder formation. The originally proposed location of WD-1 Apollo was then moved to test the proposal. The trap is a series of intersecting, up-to-the-basin normal faults trending west and northwest. These faults have dropped impermeable silty zones within the Vedder formation against the productive Vedder sands. Since the completion of WD-1 Apollo, nine other wells have been drilled within this pool, extending production over 1 mi to the southeast. One of the first of the extension wells, Getty Oil Company 73X Central Point, located approximately 600 ft southeast of WD-1 Apollo, established production from the second Vedder sand. This well was completed flowing 300 b/d of 32/sup 0/ API oil and 1000 MCFGD through a 16/64-in. choke. Through December 1985, Texaco (Getty Oil) produced more than 250,000 bbl of oil and 350,000 mcf of gas combined from the second and third Vedder sands from 2.5 net wells. Although attempts to find other such Vedder pools have met with limited success, there is still the potential for many to exist, given proper structural closure, as seen in the Apollo pool.

  2. Tectonically-beheaded drainages (wind gaps), Palmdale area, Los Angeles, County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Lachapelle, W.A. (GeoSoils, Inc., Van Nuys, CA (United States)); Shlemon, R.J.

    1993-04-01

    Five discrete wind gaps, informally designated 1 (west) through 5 (east), occur along a 6.5 km distance between the Anaverde water gap on the west and the Old Harold Road drainage on the east at Palmdale, California. Aerial photographic and geomorphic interpretations combined with boring and trench logs indicate that the windgaps were once courses of low-order, northward-flowing drainages now beheaded by the San Andreas Fault (SAF). Wind gaps 2 through 5 now contain only intermittent underfit streams, but are bordered by remnants of high-level fluvial terrace gravels attesting to long periods of flow across the SAF before cutoff by tectonic displacement. Representative wind gap 5 contains approximately 6-m of fining-upward sands and silts, and yields an approximately 10,000-yr radiocarbon date from near the base of the section. Based mainly on wind gap morphology and on an average right-lateral slip rate of about 35 mm/yr for this segment of the SAF, the authors suggest three possible hypotheses to account for the origin of the Palmdale area wind gaps: (1) they were beheaded by continual lateral movement of the SAF; (2) they maintained flow across the SAF during much of Pleistocene time, but were eventually defeated by an increasing rate of slip in latest Pleistocene time or (3) they continued flow across the SAF until latest Pleistocene time, particularly during pluvial epochs, but were eventually cut off owing to the onset of more aridic climatic and sedimentation regimes in early Holocene time.

  3. Geologic Map of the southern Inyo Mountains and vicinity, Inyo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Paul; Swanson, Brian J.; Stevens, Calvin H.; Dunne, George C.; Priest, Susan S.

    2009-01-01

    The Inyo Mountains are located in east-central California between Owens Valley on the west and Saline Valley on the east. This map encompasses the southernmost part of the Inyo Mountains and vicinity, which is centered on the high plateau of Conglomerate Mesa and extends from Owens Valley on the west to the Santa Rosa Hills, Lee Flat, and the Nelson Range on the east. The area includes parts of the Cerro Gordo Peak, Nelson Range, Keeler, and Santa Rosa Flat 7.5' quadrangles. Sedimentary and volcanic rocks, unconformities, and structural features exposed in the southern Inyo Mountains region provide information critical for reconstructing the complex Paleozoic and Mesozoic tectonic evolution of the southwestern United States. Ordovician to Cretaceous rocks in the map area record a long geologic history during which the continental margin of the western United States gradually changed from a passive tectonic setting in the early and middle Paleozoic to an active tectonic setting in the Jurassic and Cretaceous. A major highlight of the map area is the unusually complete record of late Paleozoic to earliest Mesozoic (Pennsylvanian to Triassic) deformation and sedimentation that marked the transition between the passive and active margin settings. The area also provides an excellent record of Jurassic to Cretaceous deformation and igneous activity that characterized the middle to late Mesozoic active margin. This map provides a detailed depiction of all the Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks and structural features known in the area. The area also contains important exposures of upper Cenozoic rocks related to the evolution of the Basin and Range province, although detailed mapping of these rocks was beyond the scope of this study.

  4. Epizootiological features of avian cholera on the north coast of California.

    PubMed

    Mensik, J G; Botzler, R G

    1989-04-01

    An avian cholera (Pasteurella multocida) epizootic was observed among wildfowl at the Centerville Gun Club, Humboldt County, California (USA) in January 1978. Compared to their live populations and use of the area, coots (Fulica americana) died in proportionately greater numbers than any other species. Coots collected by gunshot were evaluated for sex and age composition, and morphometry from November 1977 through mid-January 1978 at this site. There was no substantial difference in the sex, age or morphometry between birds dying of avian cholera and from those dying from gunshot. Assuming coots dying of gunshot are representative of the general population, it appears there was little selection among coots by P. multocida. There was evidence for a sequential mortality similar to that reported previously at this site: coots were the first birds to die, followed by American wigeon (Anas americana) and northern pintails (A. acuta acuta); northern shovelers (A. clypeata) and mallards (A. platyrhynchos) died late in the epizootic. PMID:2716104

  5. A Potential Paleotsunami Shell-Hash layer from the Los Penasquitos Marsh, San Diego County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, B. P.; Cordova, J.; Kirby, M. E.; Leeper, R. J.; Bonuso, N.

    2013-12-01

    The Los Penasquitos Marsh is one of a series of coastal wetlands between San Diego and Orange County that formed within stream valleys that were flooded and filled with sediment during early Holocene sea-level rise. In order to test the hypothesis that these wetlands contain a record of prehistoric tsunamis, 21 reconnaissance gouge cores between 48 and 321 cm in length were collected and described in the field. Nearly all of the cores contained a single peaty layer in the top 20-40 cm, underlain by interbedded fine-medium gray sand and mud. The stratigraphy in the cores is generally consistent with the complete infilling of a lagoon behind a baymouth bar during the mid-late Holocene. Five of the cores, ranging from 1.0-1.4 km inland from the present beach, intersect a distinctive 0.5 - 12.0 cm-thick shell-hash layer at a depth of between 233 and 280 cm beneath the modern surface. Based on this discovery, we collected a 285 cm long 5-cm diameter core using a Livingstone Piston corer. In this core the 10 cm-thick shell hash layer consists of angular fragments up to 1 cm of broken shells in a coarse sandy matrix that include the following genera: Mitrella, Venus, Spirotropis, Pecten, and Nassarius. This assemblage suggests a quiet water, marine source - from the lagoon and/or offshore. The core was also analyzed for loss on ignition (LOI) at both 550° and 950°C and magnetic susceptibility (ms). The LOI550 data are unremarkable throughout the core, and the LOI950 data show an expected spike within the shell-hash layer. The ms data show very low values for the lagoonal muds and sands, but a pronounced spike within the shell hash layer. We hypothesize that the anomalously high ms value for the shell hash layer indicates a substantial component from an offshore source, where heavier magnetic minerals may have accumulated seaward of the baymouth bar. If correct, this layer may represent a large-wave event, either a storm or tsunami. Three C-14 dates (uncorrected for the marine reservoir) on shell fragments cluster between 1720-1850 cal yrs BP.

  6. Distribution of nitrate in the unsaturated zone, Highland-East Highlands area, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, John M.; Bradford, Wesley L.

    1980-01-01

    Nitrogen in the unsaturated soil zone in the Highland-East Highlands area of San Bernardino County, Calif., has been suspected as the source of nitrate in water from wells. Plans to recharge the local aquifers with imported surface water would raise the water table and intercept that nitrogen. This study was made to describe the distribution of inorganic nitrogen and other chemical constituents and nitrogen-using bacteria in the unsaturated zone, to relate nitrogen occurrences, in a general way, to present and historical land use, and to attempt to predict nitrogen concentrations in ground water after recharge. Some generalized correlations between nitrogen occurrence and land use were observed. In 11 of 13 test holes, the maximum nitrate-nitrogen (NO3--N) concentrations occurred within 10 feet of the surface, suggesting that the major source of nitrogen is from the surface at these sites. Test holes were ranked according to maximum NO3--N in the top 10 feet, total NO3--N in the top 10 feet, and total NO3--N in the top 40 feet. In all three rankings, the top seven test holes were the same--five in or near present or historical agricultural areas (primarily citrus groves), one in a feedlot, and one adjacent to an abandoned sewage-treatment plant. Two test holes in historically uninhabited areas ranked lowest. The control test hole in an uninhabited area ranked high in geometric mean of ammonium-nitrogen concentration (NH4+-N), suggesting that present in freshly weathered granite. The geometric means of NH4+-N concentrations in six of eight citrus-related test holes were significantly lower than in the control hole, suggesting that irrigation in citrus groves may have created conditions favoring nitrification of the primary NH4+-N. Rank correlation analyses between various measurements in test holes showed that high NO3--N concentrations tend to occur with high specific conductance and chloride concentrations in soil extracts. If recharge is carried out as planned, assuming complete mixing of the recharge water and interstitial pore water in the top 20 feet of the saturated zone, NO3--N concentrations in water at the top of the saturated zone may exceed 10 milligrams per liter in seven areas studied. Concentrations could reach as high as 66 milligrams per liter in the worst case projected. The highest concentrations may be found in three areas that are now, or were recently, citrus groves.

  7. Reservoir compaction of the Belridge Diatomite and surface subsidence, south Belridge field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Bowersox, J.R.; Shore, R.A. (Mission Resources, Inc., Bakersfield, CA (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Surface subsidence due to reservoir compaction during production has been observed in many large oil fields. Subsidence is most obvious in coastal and offshore fields where inundation by the sea occurs. Well-known examples are Wilmington field in California and Ekofisk field in the North Sea. In South Belridge field, the Belridge Diatomite member of the late Miocene Reef Ridge Shale has proven prone to compaction during production. The reservoir, a high-porosity, low-permeability, highly compressive rock composed largely of diatomite and mudstone, is about 1,000 ft thick and lies at an average depth of 1,600 ft. Within the Belridge Diatomite, reservoir compaction due to withdrawal of oil and water in Sec. 12, T28S, R20E, MDB and M, was noticed after casing failures in producing wells began occurring and tension cracks, enlarged by hydrocompaction after a heavy rainstorm were observed. Surface subsidence in Sec. 12 has been monitored since April 1987, through the surveying of benchmark monuments. The average annualized subsidence rate during 1987 was {minus}1.86 ft/yr, {minus}0.92 ft/yr during 1988, and {minus}0.65 ft/yr during 1989; the estimated peak subsidence rate reached {minus}7.50 ft/yr in July 1985, after 1.5 yrs of production from the Belridge Diatomite reservoir. Since production from the Belridge Diatomite reservoir commenced in February 1984, the surface of the 160-ac producing area has subsided about 12.5 ft. This equates to an estimated reservoir compaction of 30 ft in the Belridge Diatomite and an average loss of reservoir porosity of 2.4% from 55.2 to 52.8%. Injection of water for reservoir pressure maintenance in the Belridge diatomite began in June 1987, and has been effective in mitigating subsidence to current rates and repressurizing the reservoir to near-initial pressure. An added benefit of water injection has been improved recovery of oil from the Belridge Diatomite by waterflood.

  8. Environmental assessment of water, sediment, and biota collected from the Bear Creek watershed, Colusa County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rytuba, James J.; Hothem, Roger L.; Brussee, Brianne E.; Goldstein, Daniel; May, Jason T.

    2015-01-01

    The Cache Creek watershed lies within California's North Coast Range, an area with abundant geologic sources of mercury (Hg) and a long history of Hg contamination (Rytuba, 2000). Bear Creek, Cache Creek, and the North Fork of Cache Creek are the major streams of the Cache Creek watershed, encompassing 2978 km2. The Cache Creek watershed contains soils naturally enriched in Hg as well as natural springs (both hot and cold) with varying levels of aqueous Hg (Domagalski and others, 2004, Suchanek and others, 2004, Holloway and others 2009). All three tributaries are known to be significant sources of anthropogenically derived Hg from historic mines, both Hg and gold (Au), and associated ore storage/processing sites and facilities (Slotton and others, 1995, 2004; CVRWQCB, 2003; Schwarzbach and others, 2001; Gassel and others, 2005; Suchanek and others., 2004, 2008a, 2009). Historically, two of the primary sources of mercury contamination in the upper part of Bear Creek have been the Rathburn and Petray Hg Mines. The Rathburn Hg mine was discovered and initially mined in the early 1890s. The Rathburn and the more recently developed Petray open pit mines are localized along fault zones in serpentinite that has been altered and cut by quartz and chalcedony veins. Cold saline-carbonate springs are located perepheral to the Hg deposits and effluent from the springs locally has high concentrations of Hg (Slowey and Rytuba, 2008). Several ephemeral tributaries to Bear Creek drain the mine area which is located on federal land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (USBLM). The USBLM requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) measure and characterize Hg and other geochemical constituents in sediment, water, and biota to establish baseline information prior to remediation of the Rathburn and Petray mines. Samples sites were established in Bear Creek upstream and downstream from the mine area. This report is made in response to the USBLM request, the lead agency mandated to conduct a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) - Removal Site Investigation (RSI). The RSI applies to the possible removal of Hg-contaminated mine waste from Bear Creek. This report summarizes data obtained from field sampling of water, sediment, and biota in Bear Creek, above input from the mine area and downstream from the Rathburn-Petray mine area to the confluence with Cache Creek. Our results permit a preliminary assessment of the chemical constituents that could elevate levels of monomethyl Hg (MMeHg) in Bear Creek and its uptake by biota and provide baseline information for comparison to conditions after mine remediation is completed.

  9. Rate of Drying Out of Vernal Pools on the Table Mountain Latite, Tuolumne County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, Y.; Barrera, A. Y.; Ferriz, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Miocene Table Mountain latite lava flow originated in what is now the east side of the Sierra Nevada, and extends west from The Dardanelles (2709 m amsl) to Knights Ferry (336 m amsl) in the Central Valley of California. The lava flow filled the paleo-canyon of the Stanislaus River 10.4 Ma ago, but now forms a prominent table mountain as an outstanding example of inverted topography. The flat surface of the lava flow is host to numerous ephemeral vernal pools that vary in diameter between 2 and 10 m, but because of prominent development of cooling joints the vernal pools dry out rapidly from the end of the rainy season (January) to early summer (May). Although the area of any individual vernal pool is too small to monitor, we used a time analysis of EarthExplorer, Google Earth, and Landsat 7 images (80 m pixel resolution) to determine the rate of drying out of vernal pools at three different elevations (122, 305, and 549 m amsl). Large clusters of vernal pools have a distinctive spectral signature in bands 6, 5, and 4 of the images. We used supervised and unsupervised classification to separate the pixels dominated by vernal pools from 'dry pixels. Because the lava flow has an irregular outline, we found it easier to tally 'wet' and 'dry' pixels by inspection of the highly magnified image than attempt to implement an edge-recognition algorithm. Therefore, ISODATA clustering was used to distinguish the temporal vegetation. At the 305 m amsl elevation, the rate of drying out of the vernal pools was approximately 300 m^2/month per 1,000 m^2 of lava flow surface. Equivalent values of 500 m^2/month and 150 m^2/month were determined for the 122 and 549 m amsl elevations, respectively. The high rate documented at the mid elevations is unexpected, and we believe it is due to an increase in the rate of columnar jointing (and hence drainage) in this portion of the lava flow. Google Earth Regional Map of Study Area. Using MultiSpec to interpret satellite image of the three elevations for the month of May 2008.

  10. Edoylerite, Hg32+Cr6+O4S2 a new mineral from the Clear Creek claim, San Benito County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erd, Richard C.; Roberts, Andrew C.; Bonardi, M.; Criddle, A.J.; Le, Page Y.; Gabe, E.J.

    1993-01-01

    Edoylerite is a rare constituent of a small prospect near the long-abandoned Clear Creek mercury mine, New Idria district, San Benito County, California. It is most closely associated with cinnabar, from which it is a primary alteration product, in a host rock composed predominantly of quartz, chalcedony and ferroan magnesite. Edoylerite typically occurs as acicular to stellate crystal groups on and around corroded masses of cinnabar. The mineral is canary yellow to orangish yellow, and possesses a yellow streak and an adamantine luster. The crystallographic, physical and optical properties of edoylerite are described. -after Authors

  11. Debris flows triggered by the El Nino rainstorm of February 2-3, 1998, Walpert Ridge and vicinity, Alameda County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coe, J.A.; Godt, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    On February 2 and 3, 1998, a rainstorm generated by the 1997-98 El Nino moved through the San Francisco Bay region of California triggering widespread slope failures. In the Walpert Ridge area of Alameda County 531 debris flows were triggered by the storm. These data depict the debris flows and landslides as polygons. The landslide polygons were mapped from 1:30,000 aerial photography using a PG2 photogrammetric plotter. The mapped debris flows and landslides were digitized manually in ArcInfo.

  12. Assessing potential effects of changes in water use with a numerical groundwater-flow model of Carson Valley, Douglas County, Nevada, and Alpine County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Richard M.; Maurer, Douglas K.; Mayers, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid growth and development within Carson Valley in Douglas County, Nevada, and Alpine County, California, has caused concern over the continued availability of groundwater, and whether the increased municipal demand could either impact the availability of water or result in decreased flow in the Carson River. Annual pumpage of groundwater has increased from less than 10,000 acre feet per year (acre-ft/yr) in the 1970s to about 31,000 acre-ft/yr in 2004, with most of the water used in agriculture. Municipal use of groundwater totaled about 10,000 acre-feet in 2000. In comparison, average streamflow entering the valley from 1940 to 2006 was 344,100 acre-ft/yr, while average flow exiting the valley was 297,400 acre-ft/yr. Carson Valley is underlain by semi-consolidated Tertiary sediments that are exposed on the eastern side and dip westward. Quaternary fluvial and alluvial deposits overlie the Tertiary sediments in the center and western side of the valley. The hydrology of Carson Valley is dominated by the Carson River, which supplies irrigation water for about 39,000 acres of farmland and maintains the water table less than 5 feet (ft) beneath much of the valley floor. Perennial and ephemeral watersheds drain the Carson Range and the Pine Nut Mountains, and mountain-front recharge to the groundwater system from these watersheds is estimated to average 36,000 acre-ft/yr. Groundwater in Carson Valley flows toward the Carson River and north toward the outlet of the Carson Valley. An upward hydraulic gradient exists over much of the valley, and artesian wells flow at land surface in some areas. Water levels declined as much as 15 ft since 1980 in some areas on the eastern side of the valley. Median estimated transmissivities of Quaternary alluvial-fan and fluvial sediments, and Tertiary sediments are 316; 3,120; and 110 feet squared per day (ft2/d), respectively, with larger transmissivity values in the central part of the valley and smaller values near the valley margins. A groundwater-flow model of Quaternary and Tertiary sediments in Carson Valley was developed using MODFLOW and calibrated to simulate historical conditions from water years 1971 through 2005. The 35-year transient simulation represented quarterly changes in precipitation, streamflow, pumping and irrigation. Inflows to the groundwater system simulated in the model include mountain-front recharge from watersheds in the Carson Range and Pine Nut Mountains, valley recharge from precipitation and land application of wastewater, agricultural recharge from irrigation, and septic-tank discharge. Outflows from the groundwater system simulated in the model include evapotranspiration from the water table and groundwater withdrawals for municipal, domestic, irrigation and other water supplies. The exchange of water between groundwater, the Carson River, and the irrigation system was represented with a version of the Streamflow Routing (SFR) package that was modified to apply diversions from the irrigation network to irrigated areas as recharge. The groundwater-flow model was calibrated through nonlinear regression with UCODE to measured water levels and streamflow to estimate values of hydraulic conductivity, recharge and streambed hydraulic-conductivity that were represented by 18 optimized parameters. The aquifer system was simulated as confined to facilitate numerical convergence, and the hydraulic conductivity of the top active model layers that intersect the water table was multiplied by a factor to account for partial saturation. Storage values representative of specific yield were specified in parts of model layers where unconfined conditions are assumed to occur. The median transmissivity (T) values (11,000 and 800 ft2/d for the fluvial and alluvial-fan sediments, respectively) are both within the third quartile of T values estimated from specific-capacity data, but T values for Tertiary sediments are larger than the third quartile estimated from specific-capacity data. The estimated vertical anisotropy for the Quaternary fluvial sediments (9,000) is comparab

  13. Evolution of regional stresses based on faulting and folding near the Pit River, Shasta County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, L. J.; Weldon, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the evolution of the regional stress state near the Pit River, northeastern California, by analyzing faults and folds preserved in and adjacent to a diatomite mine north of the Pit River near Burney. By measuring the orientation of 250 faults and 140 kinematic indicators on fault planes, we have determined principal stress directions preserved during the past million years. We observe the best exposures of faults in the diatomite mine, a paleolake deposit with an age tightly constrained by 1045 ka volcanic rocks below and the 973 ka Pole Creek basalt above (Muffler et al, 2012). To ensure a regionally representative analysis, we also include faults from the surrounding area, which are sparse but show consistent results. If we analyze all of the high angle faults as a single heterogeneous set, we find a stress state that would produce right-lateral strike-slip faulting on a moderately dipping southeast-striking fault plane. When we break the faults into groups based on orientation and include very low angle faults, we see an evolution of the stress state through time. The maximum principal stress directions (sigma 1) for the groups cluster along a north-south axis, and the lesser principal stresses (sigma 2 and sigma 3) are distributed along an east-west axis. Because moderately-dipping faults have strikes subparallel to regional normal faults and have kinematic indicators that are both down dip and parallel to strike, we infer that normal faulting occurred first and that some normal faults have been reactivated as strike slip faults. Because low angle faults form a distinct conjugate set and cut or deform high angle faults, we infer that they are the youngest. Low angle faults cluster into two groups that dip shallowly to the northwest and southwest. Analysis of the two groups as a conjugate set is consistent with individual analysis of each, and the slip vectors for the two groups cluster around the intersection with the sigma 1-3 plane. This would be very unlikely if low angle faults were simply accommodation structures or due to landsliding or compaction. High precision survey data along marker beds in the diatomite mine show at least two generations of subtle folding, which is distinct from the pre-paleolake basement topography. On a stereonet, poles to bedding planes in the diatomite cluster neatly along two great circles that define two fold axes. Folds are roughly orthogonal and trend southeast and southwest, plunging gently 2-4 degrees. We infer that the southeast generation of folds formed with other fault-parallel folds associated with normal faults in the region, such as the nearby Five Corners monocline. Evolution at this site through time is consistent with the spatial distribution of stress states at the northwest end of Walker Lane. We observe domains of normal faulting generally to the west, strike-slip faulting to the southeast, and reverse faulting to the northwest.

  14. Seismic environment of the Burro Flats site, Ventura County, California: a brief, limited literature review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wentworth, Carl M.; Bonilla, Manuel G.; Buchanan, Jane M.

    1969-01-01

    A limited review of available literature suggests that the maximum horizontal ground acceleration at the Burro Flats site from earthquakes in the region could range from less than 0.1 to 0.49 g. A magnitude 8 earthquake on the nearby San Andreas fault could produce ground acceleration in the range 0.18 to 0.31 g, and an expectable larger earthquake on that fault could produce larger accelerations. Ground motion from possible smaller but closer earthquakes ranges up to 0.49 g for an earthquake of magnitude 6.5 on the adjacent "Burro Flats fault". Estimation of these accelerations is dependent on determining the geologic environment of the site, the appropriate earthquake magnitudes to be assigned significant faults in that environment, and the attenuation of shaking between the earthquake epicenters and the site. The site lies within a tectonically active region--the historically active San Andreas fault is only 34 miles to the northeast, and lesser faults showing evidence of late Quaternary displacement are located closer to the site. Evidence for youthfulness of these lesser faults varies, and except for the active Newport-Inglewood zone and the Santa Ynez fault, they qualify as possible but as yet-unproven active faults. All known faults with appropriate length to site-distance ratios that are reasonably classed as late Quaternary faults are discussed, and are included as potential earthquake generators. Earthquakes of appropriate magnitude to be assigned to each fault are determined by assuming rupture in one event of half the map length of the fault, and applying relations (determined by several authors) between earthquake magnitude and rupture length in historic events to determine magnitudes. These magnitudes are, for the purposes of this brief review, probably reasonable estimates of the capabilities of each fault, although earthquakes of larger magnitude are possible. Accelerations are then determined by assuming earthquakes of the above determined magnitude placed at the closest point to the site on the fault trace, and applying attenuation curves of three different authors. Considerable uncertainty is inherent in the rough estimates of seismic accelerations made herein, for they are dependent on a chain of judgments, each of which, in itself, is uncertain. Present knowledge of the geology of the region is incomplete, so that geometry and structural relations of the faults are in part uncertain, and much evidence bearing on the youth of the faults has yet to be gathered and evaluated. Estimation of earthquake magnitude is also uncertain, and even assuming that approximate magnitude is known rather than estimated from fault length, estimates of maximum ground acceleration may differ greatly depending on the authority used. Further consideration of ground acceleration at the site might refine the estimates made herein and resolve the apparent contradictions between the authorities cited. Attention to frequency and duration of strong shaking would also be appropriate. This study was undertaken at the request of A. J. Pressesky, Assistant Director for Nuclear Safety, Division of Reactor-Development and Technology, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, in March, 1969. It is based on a brief review of pertinent literature to which the authors had immediate access during the few weeks (April-May, 1969) available for report preparation. Because the report is limited both in scope and thoroughness, it must be considered no more than a first estimate of the tectonic and seismic environment of the Burro Flats site, and should not be considered sufficient, in itself, as a basis for design. The report is intended, however, to indicate the breadth of inquiry that is necessary in the consideration of ground acceleration at sites in California, and to indicate the incomplete status of geologic mapping and other geologic studies in the region. The report describes the tectonic environment of the Burro Flats site, discusses 10 pertinent faults individually, and presents possible earthquake magnitudes for those faults and resultant poten

  15. Optimal pumping policy and groundwater balance for the Blue Lake aquifer, California, involving nonlinear groundwater hydraulics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, A. K.

    The Blue Lake aquifer is an unconfined sloping aquifer in Northern California traversed by the Mad River which is regulated by Ruth Reservoir. High pumpage from the existing six wells operated by Humboldt Bay Municipal Water District (HBMWD) of the order of a few million gallons per day (MGD) causes appreciable drawdown compared to the saturated thickness of the aquifer. Additionally, HBMWD also proposed another set of ten wells for meeting an anticipated daily demand of 23 MG of the Humboldt County. Therefore reduction of the governing nonlinear groundwater flow equation into a linear equation was not considered appropriate. An existing explicit scheme coded by previous workers for this project was found most suitable for the solution of inherent nonlinear equations. However, many modifications in the existing algorithm were required before a groundwater balance was obtained for the Blue Lake Aquifer. HBMWD wanted to minimise pumping cost for lifting the proposed 23 MGD from the ten wells. This required the simulation of a groundwater management model of the aquifer involving the principles of nonlinear optimisation. A recent Modified Embedded Approach was used to solve the problem incorporating the appropriate constraints based upon the real system and on the optimisation requirements. It was estimated that HBMWD could have an annual saving of $20,000 by implementing the annual optimal pumping policy (involving monthly planning periods as listed in the Appendix) compared to nonoptimised policy (equal pumping of 2.3 MGD from ten wells).

  16. Satellite tracking of Humboldt penguins ( Spheniscus humboldti ) in northern Chile

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. M. Culik; G. Luna-Jorquera

    1997-01-01

    During the El Nio of 1982\\/1983, the Humboldt penguin population diminished dramatically in the whole distributional area\\u000a of the species. Recovery of the population was slow since 1983 and it has been suggested that large numbers of Humboldt penguins\\u000a die at sea, entangled in nets, or starve to death, even during non-“El Nio” years. We were able to determine for

  17. Map showing locations of damaging landslides in Alameda County, California, resulting from 1997-98 El Nino rainstorms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coe, J.A.; Godt, J.W.; Brian, Dianne; Houdre, Nicolas

    1999-01-01

    Heavy rainfall associated with a strong El Nino caused over $150 million in landslide damage in the 10-county San Francisco Bay region during the winter and spring of 1998. A team of USGS scientists collected information on landslide locations and damage costs. In Alameda County more than $20 million in damages were assessed. Debris flows occurred in rural portions of the county, but were only responsible for $400 thousand in damages.

  18. Map showing locations of damaging landslides in Napa County, California, resulting from 1997-98 El Nino rainstorms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godt, Jonathan W.; Savage, William Z.; Wilson, Raymond C.

    1999-01-01

    Heavy rainfall associated with a strong El Nino caused over $150 million in landslide damage in the 10-county San Francisco Bay region during the winter and spring of 1998. A team of USGS scientists collected information on landslide locations and damage costs. Napa County was relatively unaffected in comparison to other counties in the region with approximately $1.1 million in damages assessed.

  19. Geohydrology of deep-aquifer system monitoring-well site at Marina, Monterey County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, Randall T.; Everett, Rhett; Newhouse, Mark W.; Crawford, Steven M.; Pimentel, M. Isabel; Smith, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    In 2000, a deep-aquifer system monitoring-well site (DMW1) was completed at Marina, California to provide basic geologic and hydrologic information about the deep-aquifer system in the coastal region of the Salinas Valley. The monitoring-well site contains four wells in a single borehole; one completed from 930 to 950 feet below land surface (bls) in the Paso Robles Formation (DMW1-4); one 1,040 to 1,060 feet below land surface in the upper Purisima Formation (DMW1-3); one from 1,410 to 1,430 feet below land surface in the middle Purisima Formation (DMW1-2); and one from 1,820 to 1,860 feet below land surface in the lower Purisima Formation (DMW1-1). The monitoring site is installed between the coast and several deep-aquifer system supply wells in the Marina Coast Water District, and the completion depths are within the zones screened in those supply wells. Sediments below a depth of 955 feet at DMW1 are Pliocene age, whereas the sediments encountered at the water-supply wells are Pleistocene age at an equivalent depth. Water levels are below sea level in DMW1 and the Marina Water District deep-aquifer system supply wells, which indicate that the potential for seawater intrusion exists in the deep-aquifer system. If the aquifers at DMW1 are hydraulically connected with the submarine outcrops in Monterey Bay, then the water levels at the DMW1 site are 8 to 27 feet below the level necessary to prevent seawater intrusion. Numerous thick fine-grained interbeds and confining units in the aquifer systems retard the vertical movement of fresh and saline ground water between aquifers and restrict the movement of seawater to narrow water-bearing zones in the upper-aquifer system.Hydraulic testing of the DMW1 and the Marina Water District supply wells indicates that the tested zones within the deep-aquifer system are transmissive water-bearing units with hydraulic conductivities ranging from 2 to 14.5 feet per day. The hydraulic properties of the supply wells and monitoring wells are similar, even though the wells are completed in different geologic formations.Geophysical logs collected at the DMW1 site indicate saline water in most water-bearing zones shallower than 720 feet below land surface and from about 1,025 to 1,130 feet below land surface, and indicate fresher water from about 910 to 950 feet below land surface (DMW1-4), 1,130 to 1,550 feet below land surface, and below 1,650 feet below land surface. Temporal differences between electromagnetic induction logs indicate possible seasonal seawater intrusion in five water-bearing zones from 350 to 675 feet below land surface in the upper-aquifer system.The water-chemistry analyses from the deep-aquifer system monitoring and supply wells indicate that these deep aquifers in the Marina area contain potable water with the exception of the saline water in well DMW1-3. The saline water from well DMW1-3 has a chloride concentration of 10,800 milligrams per liter and dissolved solids concentration of 23,800 milligrams per liter. The source of this water was determined not to be recent seawater based on geochemical indicators and the age of the ground water. The high salinity of this ground water may be related to the dissolution of salts from the saline marine clays that surround the water-bearing zone screened by DMW1-3. The major ion water chemistry of the monitoring wells and the nearby MCWD water-supply wells are similar, which may indicate they are in hydraulic connection, even though the stratigraphic layers differ below 955 feet below land surface.No tritium was detected in samples from the deep monitoring wells. The lack of tritium suggest that there is no recent recharge water (less than 50 years old) in the deep-aquifer system at the DMW1 site. The carbon-14 analyses of these samples indicate ground water from the monitoring site was recharged thousands of years ago.

  20. Geohydrology, Geochemistry, and Ground-Water Simulation-Optimization of the Central and West Coast Basins, Los Angeles County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichard, Eric G.; Land, Michael; Crawford, Steven M.; Johnson, Tyler; Everett, Rhett R.; Kulshan, Trayle V.; Ponti, Daniel J.; Halford, Keith L.; Johnson, Theodore A.; Paybins, Katherine S.; Nishikawa, Tracy

    2003-01-01

    Historical ground-water development of the Central and West Coast Basins in Los Angeles County, California through the first half of the 20th century caused large water-level declines and induced seawater intrusion. Because of this, the basins were adjudicated and numerous ground-water management activities were implemented, including increased water spreading, construction of injection barriers, increased delivery of imported water, and increased use of reclaimed water. In order to improve the scientific basis for these water management activities, an extensive data collection program was undertaken, geohydrological and geochemical analyses were conducted, and ground-water flow simulation and optimization models were developed. In this project, extensive hydraulic, geologic, and chemical data were collected from new multiple-well monitoring sites. On the basis of these data and data compiled and collected from existing wells, the regional geohydrologic framework was characterized. For the purposes of modeling, the three-dimensional aquifer system was divided into four aquifer systems?the Recent, Lakewood, Upper San Pedro, and Lower San Pedro aquifer systems. Most pumpage in the two basins is from the Upper San Pedro aquifer system. Assessment of the three-dimensional geochemical data provides insight into the sources of recharge and the movement and age of ground water in the study area. Major-ion data indicate the chemical character of water containing less than 500 mg/L dissolved solids generally grades from calcium-bicarbonate/sulfate to sodium bicarbonate. Sodium-chloride water, high in dissolved solids, is present in wells near the coast. Stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen provide information on sources of recharge to the basin, including imported water and water originating in the San Fernando Valley, San Gabriel Valley, and the coastal plain and surrounding hills. Tritium and carbon-14 data provide information on relative ground-water ages. Water with abundant tritium (greater than 8 tritium units) is found in and downgradient from the Montebello Forebay and near the seawater barrier projects, indicating recent recharge. Water with less than measurable tritium is present in, and downgradient from, the Los Angeles Forebay and in most wells in the West Coast Basin. Water from several deep wells was analyzed for carbon-14. Uncorrected estimates of age for these samples range from 600 to more than 20,000 years before present. Chemical and isotopic data are combined to evaluate changes in chemical character along flow paths emanating from the Montebello and Los Angeles Forebays. A four-layer ground-water flow model was developed to simulate steady-state ground-water conditions representative of those in 1971 and transient conditions for the period 1971?2000. Model results indicate increases in ground-water storage in all parts of the study area over the simulated thirty-year period. The model was used to develop a three-dimensional ground-water budget and to assess impacts of two alternative future (2001?25) ground-water development scenarios?one that assumes continued pumping at average current rates and a second that assumes increasing pumping from most wells in the Central Basin. The model simulates stable or slightly increasing water levels for the first scenario and declining water levels (25 to 50 ft in the Central Basin) in the second scenario. Model sensitivity to parameter values and to the assumed Orange County boundary condition was evaluated. Particle tracking was applied to simulate advective transport of water from the spreading ponds, the coastline, and the seawater injection barriers. Particle tracking results indicate that most flow within the Upper San Pedro aquifer system occurs within about 20 percent of the total aquifer system thickness and that virtually all water injected into the seawater barrier projects has flowed inland. The simulation model was linked with optimizatio

  1. Geohydrological characterization, water-chemistry, and ground-water flow simulation model of the Sonoma Valley area, Sonoma County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrar, Christopher D.; Metzger, Loren F.; Nishikawa, Tracy; Koczot, Kathryn M.; Reichard, Eric G.; Langenheim, Victoria E.

    2006-01-01

    The Sonoma Valley, located about 30 miles north of San Francisco, is one of several basins in Sonoma County that use a combination of ground water and water delivered from the Russian River for supply. Over the past 30 years, Sonoma Valley has experienced rapid population growth and land-use changes. In particular, there has been a significant increase in irrigated agriculture, predominantly vineyards. To provide a better understanding of the ground-water/surface-water system in Sonoma Valley, the U.S. Geological Survey compiled and evaluated existing data, collected and analyzed new data, and developed a ground-water flow model to better understand and manage the ground-water system. The new data collected include subsurface lithology, gravity measurements, groundwater levels, streamflow gains and losses, temperature, water chemistry, and stable isotopes. Sonoma Valley is drained by Sonoma Creek, which discharges into San Pablo Bay. The long-term average annual volume of precipitation in the watershed is estimated to be 269,000 acre-feet. Recharge to the ground-water system is primarily from direct precipitation and Sonoma Creek. Discharge from the ground-water system is predominantly outflow to Sonoma Creek, pumpage, and outflow to marshlands and to San Pablo Bay. Geologic units of most importance for groundwater supply are the Quaternary alluvial deposits, the Glen Ellen Formation, the Huichica Formation, and the Sonoma Volcanics. In this report, the ground-water system is divided into three depth-based geohydrologic units: upper (less than 200 feet below land surface), middle (between 200 and 500 feet), and lower (greater than 500 feet). Synoptic streamflow measurements were made along Sonoma Creek and indicate those reaches with statistically significant gains or losses. Changes in ground-water levels in wells were analyzed by comparing historical contour maps with the contour map for 2003. In addition, individual hydrographs were evaluated to assess temporal changes by region. In recent years, pumping depressions have developed southeast of Sonoma and southwest of El Verano. Water-chemistry data for samples collected from 75 wells during 2002-04 indicate that the ground-water quality in the study area generally is acceptable for potable use. The water from some wells, however, contains one or more constituents in excess of the recommended standards for drinking water. The chemical composition of water from creeks, springs, and wells sampled for major ions plot within three groups on a trilinear diagram: mixed-bicarbonate, sodium-mixed anion, and sodium-bicarbonate. An area of saline ground water in the southern part of the Sonoma Valley appears to have shifted since the late 1940s and early 1950s, expanding in one area, but receding in another. Sparse temperature data from wells southwest of the known occurrence of thermal water suggest that thermal water may be present beneath a larger part of the valley than previously thought. Thermal water contains higher concentrations of dissolved minerals than nonthermal waters because mineral solubilities generally increase with temperature. Geohydrologic Characterization, Water-Chemistry, and Ground-Water Flow Simulation Model of the Sonoma Valley Area, Sonoma County, California Oxygen-18 (d18 O) and deuterium (dD) values for water from most wells plot along the global meteoric water line, indicating that recharge primarily is derived from the direct infiltration of precipitation or the infiltration of seepage from creeks. Samples from shallow- and intermediate-depth wells located near Sonoma Creek and (or) in the vicinity of Shellville plot to the right of the global meteoric water line, indicating that these waters are partly evaporated. The d18 O and dD composition of water from sampled wells indicates that water from wells deeper than 200 feet is isotopically lighter (more negative) than water from wells less than 200 feet deep, possibly indicating that older ground wate

  2. Ground-water modeling and the installation of deep multiple-well monitoring sites in the Central and West Coast Basins, Los Angeles County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichard, E. G.; Johnson, T. A.; Land, M.; Everett, R. R.; Ponti, D. J.; Edwards, B. D.; Crawford, S. M.; Kulshan, T.

    2002-12-01

    An ongoing regional study of the geohydrology and geochemistry of the Central and West Coast Basins in Los Angeles County, California has iteratively combined the drilling of deep multiple-well monitoring sites with groundwater modeling. The monitoring sites are generally between 1,000 and 1,500 ft in depth and consist of 4-6 piezometers installed within a single borehole that provide depth-dependent geohydrologic data. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Water Replenishment District of Southern California (WRDSC) drilled four monitoring sites at the beginning of the cooperative study. The data from these sites, along with data compiled from existing wells, formed the basis for developing a preliminary multi-aquifer ground-water simulation model. Initial model simulations were then used to help prioritize new drilling locations where additional geohydrologic data were needed to more accurately simulate the complex system. Additional drilling, updating the regional simulation model, and new modeling-including development of particle tracking, simulation-optimization, and solute transport models-have proceeded iteratively. As of September, 2002, 34 multiple-well monitoring sites (162 piezometers) have been constructed. The new modeling, which focuses on seawater intrusion, has identified the need for more detailed data on sequence stratigraphy, geometries of confining beds and high permeability zones, and pore-water chemistry. In response to this need, continuous coring has been conducted cooperatively by the USGS, WRDSC, and Los Angeles County Department of Public Works at six of the monitoring sites completed thus far.

  3. Studies on avian malaria in vectors and hosts of encephalitis in Kern County, California. I. Infections in avian hosts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Reeves, W.C.; McClure, H.E.; French, E.M.; Hammon, W.M.

    1954-01-01

    An epizoological study of Plasmodium infections in wild birds of Kern County, California, in the years 1946 through 1951 greatly extended knowledge of the occurrence of these parasites and their behavior in nature. Examination of 10,459 blood smears from 8,674 birds representing 73 species resulted in the observation of Plasmodium spp. in 1,094 smears representing 888 individual birds of 27 species. Seven species of Plasmodium were found: relictum, elongatum, hexamerium, nucleophilum, polare, rouxi and vaughani. Plasmodium relictum was by far the most frequently observed species, occurring in at least 79 per cent of the infected birds. Twelve new host species are recorded for this parasite. Sufficient morphological variation was observed to indicate that two strains of this species probably exist in nature. Numerous new host records were made of plasmodia with elongate gametocytes. The finding of parasites believed to be P. rouxi in two new host species represents the first record of the occurrence of this Plasmodium outside of Algeria. Multiple smears were obtained from a number of individual birds over varying time periods. Evidence of prolonged parasitemia was unusual, but some individuals had parasitemia on consecutive months and even for three successive years. In most individuals, parasitemias were of short duration. The inoculation of blood from wild birds into canaries led to the demonstration of many infections not observed on blood smear examination of donors. Use of these two complementary techniques led to more complete host records and a truer picture of the prevalence of infection. Three age classes of birds were studied--nestling, immature (less than 1 year of age) and adult. Parasites were observed in all three groups but infections in the younger individuals were most susceptible to interpretation. As to time of onset, numerous records were obtained of infection in nestling birds. Prevalence rates in immature birds after a single season's exposure ranged from 64 to 100 per cent in the house finch and 17 to 68 per cent in the English sparrow in different areas and years. Marked differences were found in the prevalence rates in different summer months, years and areas. It is believed these differences reflect variation in a number of environmental factors. This study indicates the extensive distribution of Plasmodium infection in a wide range of wild avian hosts. The observations are of possible importance in epidemiological studies of other arthropod-borne diseases such as the viral encephalitides for which these birds serve as hosts.

  4. Five-year resurvey for endangered species on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, (Elk Hills), Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Otten, M.R.M.; O`Farrell, T.P.; Briden, L.E.

    1992-06-01

    A transect survey of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1), Kern County, California, was conducted between July 3 and August 5, 1989 to determine the distribution and relative density of endangered species and other wildlife. Results were compared with other reported results, particularly the 1979 and 1984 surveys of NPR-1. A total of 589.8 miles of transects were walked through approximately 47,235 acres in all or parts of 81 sections. Of the 516 San Joaquin kit fox dens observed, 496 were typical subterranean dens and 20 were atypical dens in man-made structures. Estimated den density was 36.7 {plus_minus} 4.1 per square mile; and relative den density was 10.5/1,000 acres for all of NPR-1. Characteristics of typical kit fox dens were comparable to characteristics reported for other studies, except mean number of entrances per den, which was lower. Observers counted a total of 300 dens previously marked with an identification sign, 191 of which contained at least one complete entrance and would have been observed without a sign. Relative densities of preferred kit fox prey, black-toiled jackrabbits (40.1/1,000 acres) and desert cottontails (14.1/1,000 acres), were lower than previously recorded. Five blunt-nosed leopard lizards were observed along the southwest and northeast perimeter of the Reserve. Most of the 59 giant kangaroo rat burrow systems were observed in the flat terrain along the northeast and south perimeters of the Reserve. San Joaquin antelope squirrels were observed in the central and western parts of NPR- 1. A total of 73 antelope squirrels were observed, and the relative density was 1.511,000 acres. A total.of 30 possible environmental hazards were observed during transect surveys. Most of these were oil and water leaks of small size and appeared to pose little risk to endangered species. Results of this survey indicate that NPR-1 is supporting less wildlife than it did during either the 1979 or 1984 surveys.

  5. Five-year resurvey for endangered species on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, (Elk Hills), Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Otten, M.R.M.; O'Farrell, T.P.; Briden, L.E.

    1992-06-01

    A transect survey of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1), Kern County, California, was conducted between July 3 and August 5, 1989 to determine the distribution and relative density of endangered species and other wildlife. Results were compared with other reported results, particularly the 1979 and 1984 surveys of NPR-1. A total of 589.8 miles of transects were walked through approximately 47,235 acres in all or parts of 81 sections. Of the 516 San Joaquin kit fox dens observed, 496 were typical subterranean dens and 20 were atypical dens in man-made structures. Estimated den density was 36.7 [plus minus] 4.1 per square mile; and relative den density was 10.5/1,000 acres for all of NPR-1. Characteristics of typical kit fox dens were comparable to characteristics reported for other studies, except mean number of entrances per den, which was lower. Observers counted a total of 300 dens previously marked with an identification sign, 191 of which contained at least one complete entrance and would have been observed without a sign. Relative densities of preferred kit fox prey, black-toiled jackrabbits (40.1/1,000 acres) and desert cottontails (14.1/1,000 acres), were lower than previously recorded. Five blunt-nosed leopard lizards were observed along the southwest and northeast perimeter of the Reserve. Most of the 59 giant kangaroo rat burrow systems were observed in the flat terrain along the northeast and south perimeters of the Reserve. San Joaquin antelope squirrels were observed in the central and western parts of NPR- 1. A total of 73 antelope squirrels were observed, and the relative density was 1.511,000 acres. A total.of 30 possible environmental hazards were observed during transect surveys. Most of these were oil and water leaks of small size and appeared to pose little risk to endangered species. Results of this survey indicate that NPR-1 is supporting less wildlife than it did during either the 1979 or 1984 surveys.

  6. Users' guide to system dynamics model describing Coho salmon survival in Olema Creek, Point Reyes National Seashore, Marin County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodward, Andrea; Torregrosa, Alicia; Madej, Mary Ann; Reichmuth, Michael; Fong, Darren

    2014-01-01

    The system dynamics model described in this report is the result of a collaboration between U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists and National Park Service (NPS) San Francisco Bay Area Network (SFAN) staff, whose goal was to develop a methodology to integrate inventory and monitoring data to better understand ecosystem dynamics and trends using salmon in Olema Creek, Marin County, California, as an example case. The SFAN began monitoring multiple life stages of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in Olema Creek during 2003 (Carlisle and others, 2013), building on previous monitoring of spawning fish and redds. They initiated water-quality and habitat monitoring, and had access to flow and weather data from other sources. This system dynamics model of the freshwater portion of the coho salmon life cycle in Olema Creek integrated 8 years of existing monitoring data, literature values, and expert opinion to investigate potential factors limiting survival and production, identify data gaps, and improve monitoring and restoration prescriptions. A system dynamics model is particularly effective when (1) data are insufficient in time series length and/or measured parameters for a statistical or mechanistic model, and (2) the model must be easily accessible by users who are not modelers. These characteristics helped us meet the following overarching goals for this model: Summarize and synthesize NPS monitoring data with data and information from other sources to describe factors and processes affecting freshwater survival of coho salmon in Olema Creek. Provide a model that can be easily manipulated to experiment with alternative values of model parameters and novel scenarios of environmental drivers. Although the model describes the ecological dynamics of Olema Creek, these dynamics are structurally similar to numerous other coastal streams along the California coast that also contain anadromous fish populations. The model developed for Olema can be used, at least as a starting point, for other watersheds. This report describes each of the model elements with sufficient detail to guide the primary target audience, the NPS resource specialist, to run the model, interpret the results, change the input data to explore hypotheses, and ultimately modify and improve the model. Running the model and interpreting the results does not require modeling expertise on the part of the user. Additional companion publications will highlight other aspects of the model, such as its development, the rationale behind the methodological approach, scenario testing, and discussions of its use. System dynamics models consist of three basic elements: stocks, flows, and converters. Stocks are measurable quantities that can change over time, such as animal populations. Flows are any processes or conditions that change the quantity in a stock over time (Ford, 1999), are expressed in the model as a rate of change, and are diagrammed as arrows to or from stocks. Converters are processes or conditions that change the rate of flows. A converter is connected to a flow with an arrow indicating that it alters the rate of change. Anything that influences the rate of change (such as different environmental conditions, other external factors, or feedbacks from other stocks or flows) is modeled as a converter. For example, the number of fish in a population is appropriately modeled as a stock. Mortality is modeled as a flow because it is a rate of change over time used to determine the number of fish in the population. The density-dependent effect on mortality is modeled as a converter because it influences the rate of morality. Together, the flow and converter change the number, or stock, of juvenile coho. The instructions embedded in the stocks, flows, converters, and the sequence in which they are linked are processed by the simulation software with each completed sequence composing a model run. At each modeled time step within the model run, the stock counts will go up, down, or stay the same based on the modeled flows and the influence of converters on those f

  7. Trace fossils and environments of deposition, Humboldt Basin, California 

    E-print Network

    Jennings, Robert Harold

    1983-01-01

    of in- terbedded sandstone and mudstone in Lower and Middle Rio Dell Memb rs of the Centerville Coastal section. 12 Typical turbiditic sandstone with associated trace fossils in lower Eel River Formation at Centerville Beach . 60 13 Turbiditic... are at the Centerville Coastal section, the Rio Dell/Scotia section, and the Holmes/Shively section (fig. 2). The best exposures of sediments and ichnofauna are in the sea cliffs of the Centerville Coastal section. The section at Centerville Beach commences...

  8. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF THE INCIDENCE OF CANCER AS RELATED TO INDUSTRIAL EMISSIONS IN CONTRA COSTA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of lung cancer incidence in Contra Costa County to ambient levels of air pollution. It was suspected that the presence of heavy industry in the county, mainly petrochemical plants and oil refineries, could be a contributin...

  9. Map showing locations of damaging landslides in Santa Clara County, California, resulting from 1997-98 El Nino rainstorms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, William L.; Harp, Edwin L.; Arnal, Caroline H.; Godt, Jonathan W.

    1999-01-01

    Heavy rainfall associated with a strong El Nino caused over $150 million in landslide damage in the 10-county San Francisco Bay region during the winter and spring of 1998. A team of USGS scientists collected information on landslide locations and damage costs. About $7.6 million in damages were assessed in Santa Clara County.

  10. l'cole Polytechnique Seminaire du Prix Gay-Lussac / Humboldt

    E-print Network

    Botti, Silvana

    à l'École Polytechnique Seminaire du Prix Gay-Lussac / Humboldt À l'occasion de la visite du Prof. Friedhelm Bechstedt au Laboratoire des Solides Irradiés, dans le cadre de son prix Gay Lussac/Humboldt 2008

  11. 67. WILLITS SIGN. GATEWAY TO THE REDWOODS. WILLITS, MENDOCINO COUNTY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    67. WILLITS SIGN. GATEWAY TO THE REDWOODS. WILLITS, MENDOCINO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING NW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  12. 2. WILLITS SIGN. GATEWAY TO THE REDWOODS. WILLITS, MENDOCINO COUNTY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. WILLITS SIGN. GATEWAY TO THE REDWOODS. WILLITS, MENDOCINO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING NW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  13. Violence and Intimidation: Rising Bigotry toward Arabs and Muslims. Report on a Public Hearing by the Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations (Los Angeles, California, March 14, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Carole

    Responding to a rise in hate crimes directed toward persons of Arab descent and Muslims before and during the Gulf War, the Los Angeles County (California) Commission on Human Relations held a hearing. The commission heard presentations by representatives of the Arab and Muslim communities, law enforcement, schools, and social science, and…

  14. Appel candidatures pour le Prix scientifique franco-allemand Gay-Lussac Humboldt

    E-print Network

    Canet, Léonie

    Appel à candidatures pour le Prix scientifique franco-allemand Gay-Lussac Humboldt année 2014 Le Prix Gay-Lussac Humboldt, créé en 1981, est attribué par le ministère de l'Enseignement supérieur et de-allemand Gay-Lussac Humboldt Année 2014 Dossier de candidature à retourner le 30 juin 2014 au plus tard sous

  15. Use of USGS earth-science products by county planning agencies in the San Francisco Bay region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kockelman, William J.

    1976-01-01

    An inventory of the use of USGS products in selected planning studies, plans, ordinances, and other planning activities was made for eight counties in the San Francisco Bay region--a region of almost five million people. This inventory was designed to determine and document the use of the 87 earth-science information products prepared as a part of the San Francisco Bay Region Environment and Resources Planning Study (SFBRS). The inventory showed that: (1) all eight counties had planning staffs who were very familiar with SFBRS products and had made frequent use of such products; (2) all eight counties had prepared planning documents which cite SFBRS products; (3) the types of planning applications most often indicated were: geologic hazards studies, seismic safety and public safety plan elements, general reference, and the preparation and review of environmental impact reports and statements; (4) over 90 percent of the 87 SFBRS products were used at least once, and nine of the products were used over 30 times each for various county planning activities; and (5) at least 85 other USGS products were also used for various county planning activities. After the inventory, selected county officials, employees, and consultants were interviewed and asked--among other things--to indicate any problems in the use of the SFBRS products, to suggest improvements, and to identify any needed or desired earth-science information. The responses showed that: (1) the scales commonly used for working maps were 1:62,500 or larger and for plan implementation were 1:24,000 or larger; (2) only one county had a geologist on its planning staff, although six others had the benefit of geotechnical services from private consulting firms, county engineering staffs, or the State Division of Mines and Geology; (3) seven of the eight counties expressed some problems in using the products, primarily because of their small scale or lack of detail; (4) all eight counties expected to continue to use the products and expressed a need or desire for additional earth-science, engineering, or other information; (5) all eight counties suggested specific improvements to future products, primarily larger scale or more detail and fewer technical or more interpretive products; and (6) all eight counties received educational, advisory, and review services from USGS personnel. Seventeen selected examples of the application of SFBRS products to various county planning activities are discussed and illustrated. These examples include four planning studies, seven plans, and two ordinances. From the inventory and responses to the interviews, it is concluded that the counties in the Bay region are very familiar with, have made frequent use of, and will continue to use SFBRS products for a wide range of county planning activities. Suggestions to ensure more effective use of earth-science information in the future include: (1) monitoring emerging critical issues and analyzing new state and federal laws and regulations so as to better anticipate and respond to county earth-science information needs; (2) creating a users advisory committee to help identify critical issues and user needs; (3) providing engineering interpretations and land- and water-use capability ratings to make earth-science information more readily usable; (4) giving priority to areas impacted by development so as to husband staff resources; (5) providing earth-science information at the larger scale and greater detail commonly used and needed by counties; (6) releasing earth-science information earlier and according to a formal distribution pattern; and (7) providing educational, advisory, and review services in connection with any earth-science information designed for planners and decisionmakers.

  16. 78 FR 22031 - California High-Speed Rail Authority-Construction Exemption-In Merced, Madera and Fresno Counties...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ...High-Speed Rail Authority--Construction Exemption--In Merced, Madera and Fresno Counties, CA AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board...communities: Atwater, Chowchilla, Fresno, Le Grand, Los Banos, Madera, and Merced. OEA has mailed this notification to the...

  17. A case study simulation of DBCP groundwater contamination in Fresno County, California 2. Transport in the saturated subsurface

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keith Loague; Robert H. Abrams; Stanley N. Davis; Anh Nguyen; Iris T. Stewart

    1998-01-01

    This paper is the second installment of a multipaper series concerned with simulating regional-scale groundwater contamination in Fresno County, CA as the result of long-term nonpoint source applications of 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP). In the first part of this study [Loague, K., Lloyd, D., Nguyen, A., Davis, S.N., Abrams, R.H., 1997. A case study simulation of DBCP groundwater contamination in Fresno County,

  18. Geologic map and digital database of the Porcupine Wash 7.5 minute Quadrangle, Riverside County, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    This data set maps and describes the geology of the Porcupine Wash 7.5 minute quadrangle, Riverside County, southern California. The quadrangle, situated in Joshua Tree National Park in the eastern Transverse Ranges physiographic and structural province, encompasses parts of the Hexie Mountains, Cottonwood Mountains, northern Eagle Mountains, and south flank of Pinto Basin. It is underlain by a basement terrane comprising Proterozoic metamorphic rocks, Mesozoic plutonic rocks, and Mesozoic and Mesozoic or Cenozoic hypabyssal dikes. The basement terrane is capped by a widespread Tertiary erosion surface preserved in remnants in the Eagle and Cottonwood Mountains and buried beneath Cenozoic deposits in Pinto Basin. Locally, Miocene basalt overlies the erosion surface. A sequence of at least three Quaternary pediments is planed into the north piedmont of the Eagle and Hexie Mountains, each in turn overlain by successively younger residual and alluvial deposits. The Tertiary erosion surface is deformed and broken by north-northwest-trending, high-angle, dip-slip faults and an east-west trending system of high-angle dip- and left-slip faults. East-west trending faults are younger than and perhaps in part coeval with faults of the northwest-trending set. The Porcupine Wash database was created using ARCVIEW and ARC/INFO, which are geographical information system (GIS) software products of Envronmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI). The database consists of the following items: (1) a map coverage showing faults and geologic contacts and units, (2) a separate coverage showing dikes, (3) a coverage showing structural data, (4) a scanned topographic base at a scale of 1:24,000, and (5) attribute tables for geologic units (polygons and regions), contacts (arcs), and site-specific data (points). The database, accompanied by a pamphlet file and this metadata file, also includes the following graphic and text products: (1) A portable document file (.pdf) containing a navigable graphic of the geologic map on a 1:24,000 topographic base. The map is accompanied by a marginal explanation consisting of a Description of Map and Database Units (DMU), a Correlation of Map and Database Units (CMU), and a key to point-and line-symbols. (2) Separate .pdf files of the DMU and CMU, individually. (3) A PostScript graphic-file containing the geologic map on a 1:24,000 topographic base accompanied by the marginal explanation. (4) A pamphlet that describes the database and how to access it. Within the database, geologic contacts , faults, and dikes are represented as lines (arcs), geologic units as polygons and regions, and site-specific data as points. Polygon, arc, and point attribute tables (.pat, .aat, and .pat, respectively) uniquely identify each geologic datum and link it to other tables (.rel) that provide more detailed geologic information.

  19. Analysis of methods to determine storage capacity of, and sedimentation in, Loch Lomond Reservoir, Santa Cruz County, California, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPherson, Kelly R.; Freeman, Lawrence A.; Flint, Lorraine E.

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Santa Cruz, conducted bathymetric and topographic surveys to determine the water storage capacity of, and the loss of capacity owing to sedimentation in, Loch Lomond Reservoir in Santa Cruz County, California. The topographic survey was done as a supplement to the bathymetric survey to obtain information about temporal changes in the upper reach of the reservoir where the water is shallow or the reservoir may be dry, as well as to obtain information about shoreline changes throughout the reservoir. Results of a combined bathymetric and topographic survey using a new, state-of-the-art method with advanced instrument technology indicate that the maximum storage capacity of the reservoir at the spillway altitude of 577.5 feet (National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929) was 8,646 ±85 acre-feet in March 2009, with a confidence level of 99 percent. This new method is a combination of bathymetric scanning using multibeam-sidescan sonar, and topographic surveying using laser scanning (LiDAR), which produced a 1.64-foot-resolution grid with altitudes to 0.3-foot resolution and an estimate of total water storage capacity at a 99-percent confidence level. Because the volume of sedimentation in a reservoir is considered equal to the decrease in water-storage capacity, sedimentation in Loch Lomond Reservoir was determined by estimating the change in storage capacity by comparing the reservoir bed surface defined in the March 2009 survey with a revision of the reservoir bed surface determined in a previous investigation in November 1998. This revised reservoir-bed surface was defined by combining altitude data from the 1998 survey with new data collected during the current (2009) investigation to fill gaps in the 1998 data. Limitations that determine the accuracy of estimates of changes in the volume of sedimentation from that estimated in each of the four previous investigations (1960, 1971, 1982, and 1998) are a result of the limitations of the survey equipment and data-processing methods used. Previously used and new methods were compared to determine the recent (1998-2009) change in storage capacity and the most accurate and cost-effective means to define the reservoir bed surface so that results can be easily replicated in future surveys. Results of this investigation indicate that the advanced method used in the 2009 survey accurately captures the features of the wetted reservoir surface as well as features along the shoreline that affect the storage capacity calculations. Because the bathymetric and topographic data are referenced to a datum, the results can be easily replicated or compared with future results. Comparison of the 2009 reservoir-bed surface with the surface defined in 1998 indicates that sedimentation is occurring throughout the reservoir. About 320 acre-feet of sedimentation has occurred since 1998, as determined by comparing the revised 1998 reservoir-bed surface, with an associated maximum reservoir storage capacity of 8,965 acre-feet, to the 2009 reservoir bed surface, with an associated maximum capacity of 8,646 acre-feet. This sedimentation is more than 3 percent of the total storage capacity that was calculated on the basis of the results of the 1998 bathymetric investigation.

  20. Swath Bathymetry Surveys of the Monterey Bay Area from Point Ano Nuevo to Moss Landing, San Mateo, Santa Cruz, and Monterey Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ritchie, Andrew C.; Finlayson, David P.; Logan, Joshua B.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes swath bathymetry and backscatter data acquired by the U.S. Geological Survey on the continental shelf within the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary between Point A?o Nuevo and Moss Landing, in San Mateo, Santa Cruz, and Monterey Counties, Calif. The survey was done for the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), in field activities S-7-09-MB and S-10-09-MB, by the Western Coastal and Marine Geology (WCMG) Team of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The data were aquired in two seperate surveys: (1) between August 13, 2009 and September 3, 2009, personnel from WCMG completed field activity S-7-09-MB, from Point A?o Nuevo south to Table Rock, as well as a block west of Soquel Canyon; (2) between October 12 and December 16, 2009, WCMG conducted field activity S-10-09-MB, surveying between Table Rock and Moss Landing.

  1. Joint environmental assessment for Chevron USA, Inc. and Santa Fe Energy Resources, Inc.: Midway Valley 3D seismic project, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The proposed Midway Valley 3D Geophysical Exploration Project covers approximately 31,444 aces of private lands, 6,880 acres of Department of Energy (DOE) Lands within Naval Petroleum Reserve 2 (NPR2) and 3,840 acres of lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), in western Kern County, California. This environmental assessment (EA) presents an overview of the affected environment within the project area using results of a literature review of biological field surveys previously conducted within or adjacent to a proposed 3D seismic project. The purpose is to provide background information to identify potential and known locations of sensitive wildlife and special status plant species within the proposed seismic project area. Biological field surveys, following agency approved survey protocols, will be conducted during October through November 1996 to acquire current resources data to provide avoidance as the project is being implemented in the field.

  2. An examination of cesarean and vaginal birth histories among Hispanic women entering prenatal care in two California counties with large immigrant populations.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Mendez, Enrique; Gonzales-Mendez, Enrique; Gonzalez-Maddux, Catherine; Hall, Celeste; Maddux-Gonzalez, Mary; Handley, Margaret A

    2012-04-01

    Repeat cesarean delivery (CD) rates among US Hispanic women are the highest of all racial/ethnic groups (90%). Vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC) is an alternative delivery method, but requires medical records documentation of a non-vertical incision and favorable conditions in the current pregnancy. VBAC rates for Hispanic women are extremely low. This study explores the birth histories and medical records access among Hispanic women in California, taking into account the potential role of immigration on access to VBAC. Study aims are to describe for a sample of Hispanic women: (1) CD and VBAC histories as well as history of vaginal delivery preceding CD; and (2) medical records access, among women who had previous births in Mexico. Chart review was conducted for prenatal patients from three safety net clinics in two California counties with large Mexican migrant populations between August, 2003 and February 2004--during which VBAC was widely available in these two counties to determine: obstetric histories, CD details, birthplace and whether or not medical records had been requested/obtained for CD. 355 multiparous Hispanic women were included. Thirty-three percent had a previous CD, almost two-thirds (64%) had only one CD. Over half of the women (55%) with 2+ births and CD history also reported a vaginal birth history. Medical records for CD were infrequently requested (29%). Of those requested, records were received for 77% of women with a US CD, compared with 13% of women with Mexican CD histories. Policies to address: (1) VBAC opportunities for low risk women, such as those with prior vaginal births and one CD, and (2) overcoming limited medical records access, could mitigate against unnecessary CD and associated medical expenditures and risks for future complications. PMID:21298482

  3. Promising practices for delivery of court-supervised substance abuse treatment: Perspectives from six high-performing California counties operating Proposition 36

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Elizabeth; Anglin, M. Douglas; Urada, Darren; Yang, Joy

    2010-01-01

    Operative for nearly a decade, California's voter-initiated Proposition 36 program offers many offenders community-based substance abuse treatment in lieu of likely incarceration. Research has documented program successes and plans for replication have proliferated, yet very little is known about how the Proposition 36 program works or practices for achieving optimal program outcomes. In this article, we identify policies and practices that key stakeholders perceive to be most responsible for the successful delivery of court-supervised substance abuse treatment to offenders under Proposition 36. Data was collected via focus groups conducted with 59 county stakeholders in six high-performing counties during 2009. Discussion was informed by seven empirical indicators of program performance and outcomes and was focused on identifying and describing elements contributing to success. Program success was primarily attributed to four strategies, those that: (1) fostered program engagement, monitored participant progress, and sustained cooperation among participants; (2) cultivated buy-in among key stakeholders; (3) capitalized on the role of the court and the judge; and (4) created a setting which promoted a high-quality treatment system, utilization of existing resources, and broad financial and political support for the program. Goals and practices for implementing each strategy are discussed. Findings provide a “promising practices” resource for Proposition 36 program evaluation and improvement and inform the design and study of other similar types of collaborative justice treatment efforts. PMID:20965568

  4. Residential magnetic field exposure and breast cancer risk: a nested case-control study from a multiethnic cohort in Los Angeles County, California.

    PubMed

    London, Stephanie J; Pogoda, Janice M; Hwang, Katherine Liao; Langholz, Bryan; Monroe, Kristine R; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kaune, William T; Peters, John M; Henderson, Brian E

    2003-11-15

    Some experimental and epidemiologic evidence suggests that residential exposure to power-frequency magnetic fields can increase breast cancer risk. This association was investigated in a nested case-control study of female breast cancer within a cohort of African Americans, Latinas, and Caucasians in Los Angeles County, California. Incident breast cancer was ascertained from 1993 to 1999 by linkage to county and state tumor registries. Controls were selected from a random sample of cohort members without breast cancer at baseline. Exposure was assessed in 1995-2001 by means of wiring configuration coding (an indirect measure of magnetic field exposure that has been associated with increased risk of childhood leukemia in Los Angeles and elsewhere in North America) in all homes occupied over the previous 10 years for 743 cases and 699 controls and by measurement of magnetic fields in the bedroom over a 7-day period for 347 cases and 286 controls. The estimated risk of breast cancer was not higher among women with wiring configuration codes associated with the highest magnetic fields (for a very high current configuration relative to very low, the adjusted odds ratio was 0.76 (95% confidence interval: 0.49, 1.18)). Stronger measured fields were not significantly associated with increased risk. These data suggest that residential magnetic field exposures commonly experienced by US women do not influence risk of breast cancer. PMID:14607805

  5. Combining Forces - The Use of Landsat TM Satellite Imagery, Soil Parameter Information, and Multiplex PCR to Detect Coccidioides immitis Growth Sites in Kern County, California

    PubMed Central

    Lauer, Antje; Talamantes, Jorge; Castañón Olivares, Laura Rosío; Medina, Luis Jaime; Baal, Joe Daryl Hugo; Casimiro, Kayla; Shroff, Natasha; Emery, Kirt W.

    2014-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is a fungal disease acquired through the inhalation of spores of Coccidioides spp., which afflicts primarily humans and other mammals. It is endemic to areas in the southwestern United States, including the San Joaquin Valley portion of Kern County, California, our region of interest (ROI). Recently, incidence of coccidioidomycosis, also known as valley fever, has increased significantly, and several factors including climate change have been suggested as possible drivers for this observation. Up to date details about the ecological niche of C. immitis have escaped full characterization. In our project, we chose a three-step approach to investigate this niche: 1) We examined Landsat-5-Thematic-Mapper multispectral images of our ROI by using training pixels at a 750 m×750 m section of Sharktooth Hill, a site confirmed to be a C. immitis growth site, to implement a Maximum Likelihood Classification scheme to map out the locations that could be suitable to support the growth of the pathogen; 2) We used the websoilsurvey database of the US Department of Agriculture to obtain soil parameter data; and 3) We investigated soil samples from 23 sites around Bakersfield, California using a multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) based method to detect the pathogen. Our results indicated that a combination of satellite imagery, soil type information, and multiplex PCR are powerful tools to predict and identify growth sites of C. immitis. This approach can be used as a basis for systematic sampling and investigation of soils to detect Coccidioides spp. PMID:25380290

  6. Natural and experimental arboviral infections in a population of blacktail jackrabbits along the sacramento river in butte county, california (1971-1974).

    PubMed

    Hardy, J L; Milby, M M; Wright, M E; Beck, A J; Presser, S B; Bruen, J P

    1977-10-01

    A serologic survey of the blacktail jackrabbit ( Lepus californicus ) for infections with 10 arboviruses was conducted from 1971 through 1974 along the Sacramento River in Butte County, California. Of 325 animals captured and bled a total of 493 times, 40% were found positive for hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) antibody to California encephalitis (CE) virus, 34% to western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE) virus, 20% to Buttonwillow virus, 15% to St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) virus and 12% to Main Drain virus. Only 5 and 2% of the animals had HI antibodies to Lokern and Turlock (TUR) viruses, respectively. There was no serologic evidence for infection of animals with Powassan, Modoc and Rio Bravo viruses. Differenles in monthly and yearly activities of some viruses were found by analyses of lata on antibody prevalence rates and immunologic conversions in recaptured animals. Experimental studies revealed that subadult jackrabbits were highly susceptible by subcutaneous inoculation to infection with CE, WEE and SLE viruses but were refractory to infection with TUR virus. All animals infected with CE and WEE viruses developed viremia that persisted for 2 or 3 days after inoculation and then developed antibodies that were detectable from 7 through at least 56 days after infection. In contrast, only 2 of 7 animals that developed HI antibodies to SLE virus had viremia, and at barely detectable levels; and HI antibodies were undetectable in 3 of the 7 animals at 56 days after infection. PMID:24228958

  7. Distribution of dissolved nitrate and fluoride in ground water, Highland-East Highlands, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eccles, Lawrence A.; Klein, John M.

    1978-01-01

    In the Highland-East Highlands area of southern California, concentrations of nitrate in water from many wells exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 's and the California Department of Health 's recommended limit for public water supplies. The nitrate standards for public water supplies in the study area are commonly met by blending the high-nitrate water with low-nitrate water before distribution; however, some of the low-nitrate water sources have fluoride concentrations that exceed the optimum level, or in a few cases exceed the maximum level recommended by the California Department of Health. Nitrate-nitrogen concentrations in the study area are generally between 1 and 20 milligrams per liter. In general, nitrate-nitrogen concentrations exceeding 10 milligrams per liter are found in water from wells perforated at depths of less than 500 feet. (Woodard-USGS)

  8. 21. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, California, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, California, c. 1903) EXTERIOR, SOUTH FRONT & WEST SIDE OF MISSION IN RUINOUS STATE BEFORE RESTORATION, C. 1903 - Mission San Francisco Solano de Sonoma, First & Spain Streets, Sonoma, Sonoma County, CA

  9. Diversity of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from residents of 26 nursing homes in orange county, california

    E-print Network

    2013-01-01

    MRSA clones in Orange County nursing homes, representing 83%most common clone isolated from the nares of nursing homehomes, we found that t002/t242 (USA100) and t008 (USA300) isolates dominated this setting, with ST5/t242 the most prevalent clone.

  10. ALDER ESTABLISHMENT AND CHANNEL DYNAMICS IN A TRIBUTARY OF THE SOUTH FORK EEL RIVER, MENDOCINO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA1

    E-print Network

    Standiford, Richard B.

    ALDER ESTABLISHMENT AND CHANNEL DYNAMICS IN A TRIBUTARY OF THE SOUTH FORK EEL RIVER, MENDOCINO, a tributary of the upper South Fork Eel River, are bounded by two frequencies of periodic flooding. The upper, Williams 1978). On the tributaries of the upper South Fork Eel River, in Mendocino County, Cal- ifornia

  11. Effectiveness of Vegetated Buffer Strips in Reducing Dormant Season Orthophosphate Pesticide Loading to Surface Waters in Glenn County, Northern California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. D. Gilbert; D. L. Brown; L. Altier; M. N. Oliver

    2003-01-01

    Riparian buffer strips are used in preventing nonpoint source contamination of agricultural runoff. The design and effectiveness of buffers varies widely under differing environmental conditions. Over the past two years, a project was implemented to evaluate the effectiveness of certain Best Management Practices in reducing organophosphate (OP) pesticide transport from almond orchards to local surface waters in Glenn County, northern

  12. 77 FR 55496 - Notice of Temporary Closure of Public Lands in Eastern Lassen County, California, and Western...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ...is hereby given that BLM-managed public lands in the area affected by the...Washoe County, Nevada, are closed to public access because of dangers posed by the Rush...This closure is necessary to protect public health and safety. DATES: The...

  13. Field assessment of soil quality as affected by compost and fertilizer application in a broccoli field (San Benito County, California)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S Stamatiadis; M Werner; M Buchanan

    1999-01-01

    Selected in-field physical, chemical and biological indicators were measured for the rapid assessment of soil quality changes in a Sorrento silty clay loam as a result of compost and ammonium nitrate application to a broccoli field (San Benito County, CA). Plots were laid out in a randomized complete block design with four replications of 0, 22 and 44Mgha?1 compost treatments

  14. Hinter Humboldts Tren Studierende der HU bieten drei-

    E-print Network

    Röder, Beate

    WAS KOMMT Hinter Humboldts Türen blicken Studierende der HU bieten drei- mal täglich Führungen anderen Nobelpreisträgern der HU. Die Führungen beginnen Montag bis Samstag jeweils um 11, 14 und 17 Uhr Anmeldung ist noch möglich bis zum 12. September per E-Mail unter bpi@rz.hu-berlin.de. www2.hu

  15. Molecular Modeling and Computational Chemistry at Humboldt State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paselk, Richard A.; Zoellner, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a molecular modeling and computational chemistry (MM&CC) facility for undergraduate instruction and research at Humboldt State University. This facility complex allows the introduction of MM&CC throughout the chemistry curriculum with tailored experiments in general, organic, and inorganic courses as well as a new molecular modeling…

  16. Prospects for young academics -postdoctoral work at Humboldt-Universitt

    E-print Network

    Peters, Achim

    Prospects for young academics - postdoctoral work at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin Content Introduction After the doctorate - the prospects of postdoctoral work Career planning versus family planning. 2 #12;After the doctorate - the prospects of postdoctoral work While working on their doctorate

  17. Transverse drainage development along a tectonically active transform plate boundary (San Lorenzo River and Pancho Rico Creek, Monterey County, California)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. F. Garcia; M. Stokes

    2003-01-01

    Transverse drainage is often assumed to form as a result of either antecedence or superposition. Drainage-basin geomorphology in the Diablo Range of central California suggests that Pancho Rico Creek established transverse drainage as result of headward erosion, and drainage diversion caused by a landslide. Stream piracy may have also played a significant role. Mesoscale stream catchments within the Diablo Range

  18. Rice Straw Compost as a Soil Amendment for the Reduction of Surface Runoff in Almond Orchards in Glenn County, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Coelho; M. McKinney; D. Brown; M. Johns

    2004-01-01

    Almond production in the Northern Sacramento Valley is dependant on dormant season pesticide application and fertilizers. However, over the past 10 years there has been increased demand from public and regulatory agencies for farmers to reduce the movement of agricultural chemicals into local water sources. Many pesticides of concern have been detected in California watersheds particularly after runoff producing storm

  19. Concentrations of metals and trace elements in aquatic biota associated with abandoned mine lands in the Whiskeytown National Recreation Area and nearby Clear Creek watershed, Shasta County, northwestern California, 2002-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hothem, Roger L.; May, Jason T.; Gibson, Jennifer K.; Brussee, Brianne E.

    2015-01-01

    Compared with other recently evaluated mine-impacted watersheds in northern California, invertebrates, amphibians, and fish from sites within the Upper Clear Creek watershed tended to have significantly lower concentrations of Hg than at most other sites. For other metals and trace elements, Upper Clear Creek sites were only compared with the Deer Creek watershed, Nevada County, California. Copper from both Willow Creek sites (WLCC and WLTH) in the Clear Creek watershed was the only metal with concentrations in biota that were significantly higher than biota from Deer Creek

  20. Identification of Culex pipiens Complex Mosquitoes in a Hybrid Zone of West Nile Virus Transmission in Fresno County, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rory D. McAbee; Emily N. Green; Jodie Holeman; Julie Christiansen; Niki Frye; Katherine Dealey; F. Steve Mulligan; Aaron C. Brault; Anthony J. Cornel

    2008-01-01

    Culex pipiens sensu lato mosquitoes were collected from 24 gravid traps (mid-June to mid-October, 2005) in Fresno County, CA. Captured gravid females were allowed to oviposit before sibling species identification by Ace.2 PCR and detection of West Nile virus (WNV) RNA by RT-PCR were performed on the mother and her offspring. Of the 442 Cx. pipiens s.l. female mosquitoes collected,

  1. Landslides in Alameda County, California: A Digital Database Extracted from Preliminary Photointerpretation Maps of Surficial Deposits by T.H. Nilsen in USGS Open-File Report 75-277

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, Sebastian; Roberts, Michelle A.; Brennan, Eileen M.

    2000-01-01

    All or part of 25 7.5-minute quadrangles identifying 8465 landslides - largely slow-moving slides and earth flows - in Alameda County, California, have been converted to a digital-map database, compiled at 1:24,000 scale and plotted at 1:62,500 scale, that can be acquired from the U.S. Geological Survey over the Internet or on magnetic tape.

  2. Map of the Carpinteria area and vicinity, Santa Barbara County, California, showing water-level contours for March 1983, and net change in water level between March 1982 and March 1983

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyle, W.R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A water-level contour map of the Carpinteria area, California, was constructed using 34 water-level measurements made by the Carpinteria County Water District in March 1983. Also shown on the map are five hydrographs that show water-level fluctuations in each well between 1978 and 1983. In addition, a water-level net-change map for March 1982 to March 1983 is shown. (USGS)

  3. Chemical quality of water at 14 sites near Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge, Fresno and Merced Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Data were collected to determine concentrations of major ions, nutrients, and selected trace elements in collector drains tributary to the San Luis Drain; the San Luis Drain near Kesterson Reservoir; Kesterson Reservoir; and selected drains, canals, and sloughs near but not tributary to Kesterson Reservoir, California. Results from 14 samples collected during January 24-26, 1984, are summarized in tables, and the sample locations are shown on maps. (USGS)

  4. 3. CEDAR CREEK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. SOUTH OF LEGGETT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. CEDAR CREEK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. SOUTH OF LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING NW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  5. 26. BOLLING MEMORIAL GROVE PLAQUE, AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. BOLLING MEMORIAL GROVE PLAQUE, AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD HIGHWAY 101. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING E. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  6. 68. AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD HIGHWAY 101, ROAD VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD HIGHWAY 101, ROAD VIEW .5 MILE NORTH OF MIRANDA. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING NW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  7. 18. STONE ARCH BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101, AT BENBOW INN. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. STONE ARCH BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101, AT BENBOW INN. SOUTH OF GARBERVILLE, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING W. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  8. 27. AVENUE OF THE GIANTS SIGN AT NORTH END OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. AVENUE OF THE GIANTS SIGN AT NORTH END OF ROAD. PEPPERWOOD, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING S. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  9. 14. TURNOUT AND MASONRY GUARD WALL 1.5 MILES NORTH OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. TURNOUT AND MASONRY GUARD WALL 1.5 MILES NORTH OF TREE HOUSE SOUTH OF PIERCY, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING SW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  10. 12. WORLD'S FAMOUS TREE HOUSE AND ROAD VIEW. SOUTH OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. WORLD'S FAMOUS TREE HOUSE AND ROAD VIEW. SOUTH OF PIERCY, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING SW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  11. 22. BRIDGE CREEK BRIDGE, AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD HIGHWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. BRIDGE CREEK BRIDGE, AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD HIGHWAY 101. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING E. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  12. 21. AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD HIGHWAY 101, ROAD VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD HIGHWAY 101, ROAD VIEW 1.5 MILES NORTH OF MIRANDA. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING N. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  13. 20. AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD HIGHWAY 101, ROAD VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD HIGHWAY 101, ROAD VIEW .5 MILE NORTH OF MIRANDA. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING NW. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  14. 4. BIG DAN CREEK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. SOUTH OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. BIG DAN CREEK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. SOUTH OF LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING NE. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  15. 69. AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD HIGHWAY 101, ROAD VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. AVENUE OF THE GIANTS, OLD HIGHWAY 101, ROAD VIEW 1.5 MILES NORTH OF MIRANDA. HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING N. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  16. 9. EEL RIVER SOUTH FORK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. EEL RIVER SOUTH FORK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH OF LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING W. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  17. 8. EEL RIVER SOUTH FORK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. EEL RIVER SOUTH FORK BRIDGE, OLD HIGHWAY 101. NORTH OF LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING N. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  18. Strontium Isotopic Composition of Paleozoic Carbonate Rocks in the Nevada Test Site Vicinity, Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties, Nevada, and Inyo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paces, James B.; Peterman, Zell E.; Futo, Kiyoto; Oliver, Thomas A.; Marshall, Brian D.

    2007-01-01

    Ground water moving through permeable Paleozoic carbonate rocks represents the most likely pathway for migration of radioactive contaminants from nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The strontium isotopic composition (87Sr/86Sr) of ground water offers a useful means of testing hydrochemical models of regional flow involving advection and reaction. However, reaction models require knowledge of 87Sr/86Sr data for carbonate rock in the Nevada Test Site vicinity, which is scarce. To fill this data gap, samples of core or cuttings were selected from 22 boreholes at depth intervals from which water samples had been obtained previously around the Nevada Test Site at Yucca Flat, Frenchman Flat, Rainier Mesa, and Mercury Valley. Dilute acid leachates of these samples were analyzed for a suite of major- and trace-element concentrations (MgO, CaO, SiO2, Al2O3, MnO, Rb, Sr, Th, and U) as well as for 87Sr/86Sr. Also presented are unpublished analyses of 114 Paleozoic carbonate samples from outcrops, road cuts, or underground sites in the Funeral Mountains, Bare Mountain, Striped Hills, Specter Range, Spring Mountains, and ranges east of the Nevada Test Site measured in the early 1990's. These data originally were collected to evaluate the potential for economic mineral deposition at the potential high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain and adjacent areas (Peterman and others, 1994). Samples were analyzed for a suite of trace elements (Rb, Sr, Zr, Ba, La, and Ce) in bulk-rock powders, and 87Sr/86Sr in partial digestions of carbonate rock using dilute acid or total digestions of silicate-rich rocks. Pre-Tertiary core samples from two boreholes in the central or western part of the Nevada Test Site also were analyzed. Data are presented in tables and summarized in graphs; however, no attempt is made to interpret results with respect to ground-water flow paths in this report. Present-day 87Sr/86Sr values are compared to values for Paleozoic seawater present at the time of deposition. Many of the samples have 87Sr/86Sr compositions that remain relatively unmodified from expected seawater values. However, rocks underlying the northern Nevada Test Site as well as rocks exposed at Bare Mountain commonly have elevated 87Sr/86Sr values derived from post-depositional addition of radiogenic Sr most likely from fluids circulating through rubidium-rich Paleozoic strata or Precambrian basement rocks.

  19. Strontium Isotopic Composition of Paleozoic Carbonate Rocks in the Nevada Test Site Vicinity, Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties, Nevada and Inyo County, California.

    SciTech Connect

    James B. Paces; Zell E. Peterman; Kiyoto Futa; Thomas A. Oliver; and Brian D. Marshall.

    2007-08-07

    Ground water moving through permeable Paleozoic carbonate rocks represents the most likely pathway for migration of radioactive contaminants from nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The strontium isotopic composition (87Sr/86Sr) of ground water offers a useful means of testing hydrochemical models of regional flow involving advection and reaction. However, reaction models require knowledge of 87Sr/86Sr data for carbonate rock in the Nevada Test Site vicinity, which is scarce. To fill this data gap, samples of core or cuttings were selected from 22 boreholes at depth intervals from which water samples had been obtained previously around the Nevada Test Site at Yucca Flat, Frenchman Flat, Rainier Mesa, and Mercury Valley. Dilute acid leachates of these samples were analyzed for a suite of major- and trace-element concentrations (MgO, CaO, SiO2, Al2O3, MnO, Rb, Sr, Th, and U) as well as for 87Sr/86Sr. Also presented are unpublished analyses of 114 Paleozoic carbonate samples from outcrops, road cuts, or underground sites in the Funeral Mountains, Bare Mountain, Striped Hills, Specter Range, Spring Mountains, and ranges east of the Nevada Test Site measured in the early 1990's. These data originally were collected to evaluate the potential for economic mineral deposition at the potential high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain and adjacent areas (Peterman and others, 1994). Samples were analyzed for a suite of trace elements (Rb, Sr, Zr, Ba, La, and Ce) in bulk-rock powders, and 87Sr/86Sr in partial digestions of carbonate rock using dilute acid or total digestions of silicate-rich rocks. Pre-Tertiary core samples from two boreholes in the central or western part of the Nevada Test Site also were analyzed. Data are presented in tables and summarized in graphs; however, no attempt is made to interpret results with respect to ground-water flow paths in this report. Present-day 87Sr/86Sr values are compared to values for Paleozoic seawater present at the time of deposition. Many of the samples have 87Sr/86Sr compositions that remain relatively unmodified from expected seawater values. However, rocks underlying the northern Nevada Test Site as well as rocks exposed at Bare Mountain commonly have elevated 87Sr/86Sr values derived from post-depositional addition of radiogenic Sr most likely from fluids circulating through rubidium-rich Paleozoic strata or Precambrian basement rocks.

  20. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Slide and Grass Valley Fires, San Bernardino County, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Slide and Grass Valley Fires in San Bernardino County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 3.50 inches (88.90 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  1. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Ranch Fire, Ventura and Los Angeles Counties, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Ranch Fire in Ventura and Los Angeles Counties, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 2.25 inches (57.15 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  2. Map showing geochemical summary for the Bald Rock and Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Areas, Butte and Plumas counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Jocelyn A.; Sorensen, Martin L.

    1985-01-01

    The Bald Rock Roadless Area consists of 3,850 acres in Butte County, Calif. The Middle Rock Feather River Roadless Area consists of 29,300 acres ub Butte and Plumas Counties, Calif. Both roadless areas are in the Plumas National Forest and are on the west slope of the northern Sierra Nevada southwest of Quincy, Calif. (fig. 1). The two roadless areas are alined along the Middle Fork of the Feather River where they include the narrow canyon bottoms and precipitous sidewalls of the Middle Fork and several tributary drainages. Altitudes range from 800 ft in the canyon of the Middle Fork to approximately 6,600 ft at the northwest corner of the map area. The geology of the roadless areas has been briefly summarized by Sorenson and Pietropaoll (1982). This paper summarizes and interprets the semiquantitative emission spectrographic analyses of 106 rock sample and 165 samples of nonmagnetics heavy-mineral stream-sediment concentrates from the Blad Rock and Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Area (Sorenson and others, 1982).

  3. Rates of evapotranspiration, recharge from precipitation beneath selected areas of native vegetation, and streamflow gain and loss in Carson Valley, Douglas County, Nevada, and Alpine County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maurer, Douglas K.; Berger, David L.; Tumbusch, Mary L.; Johnson, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Rapid growth and development in Carson Valley is causing concern over the continued availability of water resources to sustain such growth into the future. A study to address concerns over water resources and to update estimates of water-budget components in Carson Valley was begun in 2003 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Douglas County, Nevada. This report summarizes micrometeorologic, soil-chloride, and streambed-temperature data collected in Carson Valley from April 2003 through November 2004. Using these data, estimates of rates of discharge by evapotranspiration (ET), rates of recharge from precipitation in areas of native vegetation on the eastern and northern sides of the valley, and rates of recharge and discharge from streamflow infiltration and seepage on the valley floor were calculated. These rates can be used to develop updated water budgets for Carson Valley and to evaluate potential effects of land- and water-use changes on the valley's water budget. Data from eight ET stations provided estimates of annual ET during water year 2004, the sixth consecutive year of a drought with average or below average precipitation since 1999. Estimated annual ET from flood-irrigated alfalfa where the water table was from 3 to 6 feet below land surface was 3.1 feet. A similar amount of ET, 3.0 feet, was estimated from flood-irrigated alfalfa where the water table was about 40 feet below land surface. Estimated annual ET from flood-irrigated pasture ranged from 2.8 to 3.2 feet where the water table ranged from 2 to 5 feet below land surface, and was 4.4 feet where the water table was within 2 feet from land surface. Annual ET estimated from nonirrigated pasture was 1.7 feet. Annual ET estimated from native vegetation was 1.9 feet from stands of rabbitbrush and greasewood near the northern end of the valley, and 1.5 feet from stands of native bitterbrush and sagebrush covering alluvial fans along the western side of the valley. Uncertainty in most ET estimates is about 12 percent, but ranged from +30 and +50 percent to -20 and -40 percent for nonirrigated pasture and native bitterbrush and sagebrush. Estimated rates for water year 2004 likely are less than those during years of average, or above average precipitation when the water table would be closer to land surface. Test holes drilled in areas of native vegetation on the northern and eastern sides of Carson Valley had high concentrations of soil chloride at depths ranging from 4 to 18 feet below land surface at six locations on the eastern side of the valley. The high chloride concentrations indicate that modern-day precipitation at the six locations does not percolate deeper than the root zone of native vegetation. Estimates of the time required to accumulate the measured amount of chloride to depths of about 30 feet below land surface at the six test holes ranged from about 3,000 to 12,000 years. Low concentrations of soil chloride in two test holes on the northern end of Carson Valley and in a test hole on the eastern side of Fish Spring Flat indicate that a small amount of recharge from modern-day precipitation is taking place. Estimated annual recharge from precipitation at the two locations was 0.03 and 0.04 foot on the northern end of the valley and 0.02 foot on the eastern side of Fish Spring Flat. Uncertainty in the estimated recharge rates was about ?0.01 foot. Estimates of the time required to accumulate the measured amount of chloride to depths of about 30 feet below land surface at the three test holes ranged from about 100 to 700 years. The two test holes near the northern end of the valley are in gravel and eolian sand deposits and recharge from precipitation may be taking place at similar rates in other areas with gravel and eolian sand deposits. Based on results from other test holes, recharge at the rate estimated for the test hole on the eastern side of Fish Spring Flat is not likely applicable to a large area. Data from 37 site

  4. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Santiago Fire Perimeter, Santiago Peak Quadrangle, Orange and Riverside Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  5. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Poomacha Fire Perimeter, Vail Lake Quadrangle, Riverside and San Diego Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  6. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Poomacha Fire Perimeter, Pechanga Quadrangle, Riverside and San Diego Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  7. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Magic and Buckweed Fire Perimeters, Newhall Quadrangle, Los Angeles County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  8. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch and Poomacha Fire Perimeters, Mesa Grande Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  9. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch and Poomacha Fire Perimeters, Rodriguez Mountain Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  10. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Grass Valley Fire Perimeter, Lake Arrowhead Quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  11. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Ranch Fire Perimeter, Whitaker Peak Quadrangle, Los Angeles and Ventura Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  12. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Rancho Santa Fe Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  13. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, El Cajon Mountain Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  14. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Ranch Fire Perimeter, Cobblestone Mountain Quadrangle, Los Angeles and Ventura Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  15. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Poomacha Fire Perimeter, Temecula Quadrangle, Riverside and San Diego Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  16. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Cajon Fire Perimeter, San Bernardino North Quadrangle, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  17. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Buckweed Fire Perimeter, Warm Springs Mountain Quadrangle, Los Angeles County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  18. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Ranch and Magic Fire Perimeters, Val Verde Quadrangle, Los Angeles and Ventura Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  19. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, San Vicente Reservoir Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  20. Transverse drainage development along a tectonically active transform plate boundary (San Lorenzo River and Pancho Rico Creek, Monterey County, California)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, A. F.; Stokes, M.

    2003-12-01

    Transverse drainage is often assumed to form as a result of either antecedence or superposition. Drainage-basin geomorphology in the Diablo Range of central California suggests that Pancho Rico Creek established transverse drainage as result of headward erosion, and drainage diversion caused by a landslide. Stream piracy may have also played a significant role. Mesoscale stream catchments within the Diablo Range of central California are elongate parallel to the NW trending San Andreas Fault zone (SAFZ). Principal streams draining these catchments ultimately flow to the west and form transverse drainages across the western ridges of the Diablo Range. Examples include the San Lorenzo River (SLR), which flows into the Salinas Valley at King City, and Pancho Rico Creek (PRC), which flows into the Salinas Valley at San Ardo. Incision patterns, fluvial stratigraphy, wind gaps, and beheaded, SW-flowing piedmont streams suggest that southeastward expansion of the SLR catchment occurred via headward erosion parallel to the SAFZ. Expansion occurred at the expense of SW-flowing piedmont streams, which were separated from the upland parts of their catchment by headward expansion of the SLR catchment. Preliminary results suggest that the upper PRC catchment was captured by the SLR after Qf2 time, but before Qt3 time. PRC recaptured its upper catchment when a Quaternary landslide (Qls) diverted both PRC and the SLR, an event that probably occurred after Qt3 time. Upper PRC drainage basin morphology also suggests recent stream capture. Thus, since Qls time, PRC has been a southeastward expanding transverse drainage.

  1. Electronic Publishing at Humboldt University Berlin - Concepts, Tools and Services

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Uwe Müller; Manuel Klatt; Susanne Dobratz; Sven Bahnik

    2006-01-01

    Originally established to merely publish electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) as well as postdoctoral theses, the edoc server at Humboldt University Berlin (http:\\/\\/edoc.hu-berlin.de\\/) has become the service platform for scholarly publications of all types. It is an integral part of the university's information infrastructure which also contains a teaching management system, a virtual library portal, and a media portal. During

  2. {open_quotes}2-Step{close_quotes} log analysis of the Spellacy reservoir in the giant Midway-Sunset Field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, D.H. [Santa Fe Energy Resources, Bakersfield, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    A technique is presented for simple, effective log analysis of (Miocene) {open_quotes}Spellacy{close_quotes} sands and conglomerates of the Santa Margarita Formation at Midway-Sunset Field in Kern County, California. Results are shown graphically on the log display and are quantified for mapping. Requirements are digital wireline data -- in this simple case, just resistivity and porosities - and flexible log analysis software such as QLA2{trademark}. The first step of this technique discriminates between reservoir-quality and non-reservoir-quality intervals yielding three color-coded categories. A narrow color-filled column is added to the well log display to graphically communicate the vertical distribution of reservoir-quality and barrier intervals. The second step performs a fluid analysis on the reservoir-quality category (intervals) yielding three more color-coded categories. The results of the fluid analysis are graphically displayed in a second narrow color-filled column on the well log. Analysis results are captured from a tabular report for mapping. Quantifiable products include (1) thicknesses: original net pay, current net pay, reservoir quality, total sand, total porosity, phi-H, etc.; (2) averages: original net pay porosity; current net pay porosity, current net pay saturation, current net pay bulk volume oil, etc.; and (3) ratios: thickness of reservoir quality to total sand and thickness of current net pay to total interval.

  3. [open quotes]2-Step[close quotes] log analysis of the Spellacy reservoir in the giant Midway-Sunset Field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, D.H. (Santa Fe Energy Resources, Bakersfield, CA (United States))

    1996-01-01

    A technique is presented for simple, effective log analysis of (Miocene) [open quotes]Spellacy[close quotes] sands and conglomerates of the Santa Margarita Formation at Midway-Sunset Field in Kern County, California. Results are shown graphically on the log display and are quantified for mapping. Requirements are digital wireline data -- in this simple case, just resistivity and porosities - and flexible log analysis software such as QLA2[trademark]. The first step of this technique discriminates between reservoir-quality and non-reservoir-quality intervals yielding three color-coded categories. A narrow color-filled column is added to the well log display to graphically communicate the vertical distribution of reservoir-quality and barrier intervals. The second step performs a fluid analysis on the reservoir-quality category (intervals) yielding three more color-coded categories. The results of the fluid analysis are graphically displayed in a second narrow color-filled column on the well log. Analysis results are captured from a tabular report for mapping. Quantifiable products include (1) thicknesses: original net pay, current net pay, reservoir quality, total sand, total porosity, phi-H, etc.; (2) averages: original net pay porosity; current net pay porosity, current net pay saturation, current net pay bulk volume oil, etc.; and (3) ratios: thickness of reservoir quality to total sand and thickness of current net pay to total interval.

  4. Petroleum production at Maximum Efficient Rate Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California. Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This document provides an analysis of the potential impacts associated with the proposed action, which is continued operation of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. I (NPR-1) at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER) as authorized by Public law 94-258, the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 (Act). The document also provides a similar analysis of alternatives to the proposed action, which also involve continued operations, but under lower development scenarios and lower rates of production. NPR-1 is a large oil and gas field jointly owned and operated by the federal government and Chevron U.SA Inc. (CUSA) pursuant to a Unit Plan Contract that became effective in 1944; the government`s interest is approximately 78% and CUSA`s interest is approximately 22%. The government`s interest is under the jurisdiction of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The facility is approximately 17,409 acres (74 square miles), and it is located in Kern County, California, about 25 miles southwest of Bakersfield and 100 miles north of Los Angeles in the south central portion of the state. The environmental analysis presented herein is a supplement to the NPR-1 Final Environmental Impact Statement of that was issued by DOE in 1979 (1979 EIS). As such, this document is a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS).

  5. Diet of the San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica, on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California, 1980-1984

    SciTech Connect

    Scrivner, J.H.; O'Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.T.; Johnson, M.K.

    1987-06-01

    A total of 1430 scats of the San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica, were collected between 1980 and 1984 on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California, and analyzed to determine frequency of occurrence of prey items. Lagomorphs (black-tailed jackrabbits and desert cotton-tails) were the primary prey species (frequency of occurrence = 73%); while kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spp.) were the next most common (13%). The proportions of lagomorphs and kangaroo rats in the diet did not differ between sexes of foxes, periods of the year, or topography. Intensity of petroleum developments had no observable influence on food habits. There were annual differences in diet: proportions of lagomorphs declined, and proportions of kangaroo rats increased between 1980-1984. Changes in the frequency of occurrence of lagomorphs were significantly correlated with changes in their relative abundance in undeveloped-flat habitat. The frequency of occurrence of kangaroo rats was not significantly correlated with their relative abundance. San Joaquin kit fox on NPR-1 fed primarily on lagomorphs, and had the ability to sustain themselves on kangaroo rats and other secondary prey when their primary prey declined.

  6. Geophysical Surveys of the San Andreas and Crystal Springs Reservoir System Including Seismic-Reflection Profiles and Swath Bathymetry, San Mateo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finlayson, David P.; Triezenberg, Peter J.; Hart, Patrick E.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes geophysical data acquired by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in San Andreas Reservoir and Upper and Lower Crystal Springs Reservoirs, San Mateo County, California, as part of an effort to refine knowledge of the location of traces of the San Andreas Fault within the reservoir system and to provide improved reservoir bathymetry for estimates of reservoir water volume. The surveys were conducted by the Western Coastal and Marine Geology (WCMG) Team of the USGS for the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC). The data were acquired in three separate surveys: (1) in June 2007, personnel from WCMG completed a three-day survey of San Andreas Reservoir, collecting approximately 50 km of high-resolution Chirp subbottom seismic-reflection data; (2) in November 2007, WCMG conducted a swath-bathymetry survey of San Andreas reservoir; and finally (3) in April 2008, WCMG conducted a swath-bathymetry survey of both the upper and lower Crystal Springs Reservoir system. Top of PageFor more information, contact David Finlayson.

  7. Improved reservoir management of heavy oil assets using biomarker variability in sidewall cores and produced oils: An example from the Cymric Field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Legarre, H.A.; Johnson, S.J. (Chevron Production Co., Bakersfield, CA (United States)); McCaffrey, M.A. (Chevron Petroleum Technology, Co., La Habra, CA (United States))

    1996-01-01

    Development of biodegraded oil accumulations can be optimized by using geochemical indicators of variations in the extent of biodegradation. Biodegradation typically reduces oil producibility by increasing oil viscosity. Using the Cymric Field (Kern County, California), we show that the extent of oil biodegradation can change substantially over extremely short vertical distances (feet) in shallow, low-permeability reservoirs. These variations can be mapped laterally for more than a mile using reservoir sidewall core extract compositions. The relationship between oil viscosity and biomarker biodegradation parameters can be calibrated from analyses of produced oils. These relationships can then be used to convert sidewall core biomarker parameters into quantitative predictions of lateral and vertical changes in oil viscosity and gravity. These compositional variations can be used to optimize the placement of new wells and well completion intervals, as well as to assess the relative production from discrete zones. We discuss how this new technique can be used to optimize field development, including parameters such as (1) the placement of completion intervals, (2) the thickness of steam injection intervals, and (3) the spacing between injection intervals in the same well.

  8. Improved reservoir management of heavy oil assets using biomarker variability in sidewall cores and produced oils: An example from the Cymric Field, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Legarre, H.A.; Johnson, S.J. [Chevron Production Co., Bakersfield, CA (United States); McCaffrey, M.A. [Chevron Petroleum Technology, Co., La Habra, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Development of biodegraded oil accumulations can be optimized by using geochemical indicators of variations in the extent of biodegradation. Biodegradation typically reduces oil producibility by increasing oil viscosity. Using the Cymric Field (Kern County, California), we show that the extent of oil biodegradation can change substantially over extremely short vertical distances (feet) in shallow, low-permeability reservoirs. These variations can be mapped laterally for more than a mile using reservoir sidewall core extract compositions. The relationship between oil viscosity and biomarker biodegradation parameters can be calibrated from analyses of produced oils. These relationships can then be used to convert sidewall core biomarker parameters into quantitative predictions of lateral and vertical changes in oil viscosity and gravity. These compositional variations can be used to optimize the placement of new wells and well completion intervals, as well as to assess the relative production from discrete zones. We discuss how this new technique can be used to optimize field development, including parameters such as (1) the placement of completion intervals, (2) the thickness of steam injection intervals, and (3) the spacing between injection intervals in the same well.

  9. 75 FR 20598 - Public Buildings Service; Prospect Island, Sacramento Delta, Solano County, CA; Transfer of Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ...9-I-CA-1674] Public Buildings Service; Prospect Island, Sacramento Delta, Solano County, CA; Transfer of Property Pursuant to section...1253 acres of land identified as Prospect Island, Sacramento Delta, Solano County, California to the State of California,...

  10. Evaluation of host preferences by helminths and ectoparasites among black-tailed jackrabbits in northern California.

    PubMed

    Clemons, C; Rickard, L G; Keirans, J E; Botzler, R G

    2000-07-01

    Fifty-four black-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus californicus) (five juvenile males, 22 adult males, five juvenile females, and 22 adult females) from Humboldt County, California (USA) were evaluated for sex and age-specific differences in parasite prevalences and intensities, 26 February through 30 October 1996. Nematodes found included Biogastranema leporis in 42 hares (78% prevalence), Rauschia triangularis in 26 hares (48%), Trichostrongylus calcaratus in 14 hares (26%), and Trichuris sylvilagi in two hares (4%). Cestodes found included Taenia sp. cysticerci in five hares (9%) and Taenia sp. coenurus found in one hare (2%). Ectoparasites found included the ticks Dermacentor variabilis on 10 hares (19%) and Ixodes spinipalpis (= Ixodes neotomae) on nine hares (17%), as well as the anoplurid louse Haemodipsus setoni on 12 hares (22%). No significant differences in the parasite prevalences or intensities were found between male and female jackrabbits; this was for all males and females collectively, juvenile males and females only, as well as adult males and females only. Combining male and female hosts, adult jackrabbits had a significantly higher prevalence of B. leporis and R. triangularis compared to juveniles. This is the first known report of Trichostrongylus calcaratus, Rauschia triangularis, Trichuris sylvilagi, and Dermacentor variabilis among black-tailed jackrabbits and the first known report of T. calcaratus and T. sylvilagi in the western USA. This is the first published report of I. spinipalpis, the vector for Lyme disease in California, on black-tailed jackrabbits. PMID:10941744

  11. Evolution of regional stress state based on faulting and folding near the pit river, Shasta county, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Lauren Jean

    We investigate the evolution of the regional stress state near the Pit River, northern California, in order to understand the faulting style in a tectonic transition zone and to inform the hazard analysis of Fault 3432 near the Pit 3 Dam. By analyzing faults and folds preserved in and adjacent to a diatomite mine north of the Pit River, we have determined principal stress directions preserved during the past million years. We find that the stress state has evolved from predominantly normal to strike slip and most recently to reverse, which is consistent with regional structures such as the extensional Hat Creek Fault to the south and the compressional folding of Mushroom Rock to the north. South of the Pit River, we still observe normal and strike slip faults, suggesting that changes in stress state are moving from north to south through time.

  12. An evaluation of problems arising from acid mine drainage in the vicinity of Shasta Lake, Shasta County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, Richard H.; Shay, J.M.; Ferreira, R.F.; Hoffman, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    Streams draining the mined areas of massive sulfide ore deposits in the Shasta Mining Districts of northern California are generally acidic and contain large concentrations of dissolved metals, including iron, copper, and zinc. The streams, including Flat, Little Backbone, Spring, West Squaw, Horse, and Zinc Creeks, discharge into Shasta Reservoir and the Sacramento River and have caused numerous fish kills. The sources of pollution are discharge from underground mines, streams that flow into open pits, and streams that flow through pyritic mine dumps where the oxidation of pyrite and other sulfide minerals results in the production of acid and the mobilization of metals. Suggested methods of treatment include the use of air and hydraulic seals in the mines, lime neutralization of mine effluent, channeling of runoff and mine effluent away from mine and tailing areas, and the grading and sealing of mine dumps. A comprehensive preabatement and postabatement program is recommended to evaluate the effects of any treatment method used. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy

    E-print Network

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy Kurt R. Richter University of California Agricultural Issues Center October 2009 #12;Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy II University of California Agricultural Issues Center #12;Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy III Making

  14. Logs and Scarp Data from a Paloseismic Investigation of the Surprise Valley Fault Zone, Modoc County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Personius, Stephen F.; Crone, Anthony J.; Machette, Michael N.; Lidke, David J.; Bradley, Lee-Ann; Mahan, Shannon A.

    2007-01-01

    This report contains field and laboratory data from a paleoseismic study of the Surprise Valley fault zone near Cedarville, California. The 85-km-long Surprise Valley fault zone forms the western active margin of the Basin and Range province in northeastern California. The down-to-the-east normal fault is marked by Holocene fault scarps along most of its length, from Fort Bidwell on the north to near the southern end of Surprise Valley. We studied the central section of the fault to determine ages of paleoearthquakes and to better constrain late Quaternary slip rates, which we hope to compare to deformation rates derived from a recently established geodetic network in the region (Hammond and Thatcher, 2005; 2007). We excavated a trench in June 2005 across a prominent fault scarp on pluvial Lake Surprise deltaic sediments near the mouth of Cooks Canyon, 4 km north of Cedarville. This site was chosen because of the presence of a well-preserved fault scarp and its development on lacustrine deposits thought to be suitable for luminescence dating. We also logged a natural exposure of the fault in similar deltaic sediments near the mouth of Steamboat Canyon, 11 km south of Cedarville, to better understand the along-strike extent of surface ruptures. The purpose of this report is to present photomosaics, trench, drill hole, and stream exposure logs; scarp profiles; and fault slip, tephrochronologic, radiocarbon, luminescence, and unit description data obtained during this investigation. We do not attempt to use the data presented herein to construct a paleoseismic history of this part of the Surprise Valley fault zone; that history will be the subject of a future report.

  15. Public health assessment for Stoker Company, Imperial, Imperial County, California, Region 9. Cerclis No. CAD066635442. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-06

    Stoker Company is a pesticide dealer and crop dusting loading facility located in the County of Imperial, approximately 25 miles from the Mexican border. The 26-acre site is barren with no vegetation. Operations at the facility, beginning in 1966, have caused the surface soil over much of the site to be contaminated with pesticides. Some of the contaminated surface soil has blown off-site and impacted nearby surface soil and surface water. This preliminary public health assessment evaluated the potential for adverse health effects to occur in five populations identified as being impacted by contaminants. The impacted populations include: (1) on-site workers; (2) the family formerly living on the neighboring D K property; (3) the D K Duck Hunting Club members; (4) individuals using untreated surface water for drinking and/or other domestic purposes; and (5) individuals living or working near crop dusting operations. Based on this assessment, Stoker Company is considered to pose a public health hazard because long-term exposure to site-related contaminants may cause adverse health effects.

  16. Transformation of dilative and contractive landslide debris into debris flows-An example from marin County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, R.W.; Ellen, S.D.; Algus, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    The severe rainstorm of January 3, 4 and 5, 1982, in the San Francisco Bay area, California, produced numerous landslides, many of which transformed into damaging debris flows. The process of transformation was studied in detail at one site where only part of a landslide mobilized into several episodes of debris flow. The focus of our investigation was to learn whether the landslide debris dilated or contracted during the transformation from slide to flow. The landslide debris consisted of sandy colluvium that was separable into three soil horizons that occupied the axis of a small topographic swale. Failure involved the entire thickness of colluvium; however, over parts of the landslide, the soil A-horizon failed separately from the remainder of the colluvium. Undisturbed samples were taken for density measurements from outside the landslide, from the failure zone and overlying material from the part of the landslide that did not mobilize into debris flows, and from the debris-flow deposits. The soil A-horizon was contractive and mobilized to flows in a process analogous to liquefaction of loose, granular soils during earthquakes. The soil B- and C-horizons were dilative and underwent 2 to 5% volumetric expansion during landslide movement that permitted mobilization of debris-flow episodes. Several criteria can be used in the field to differentiate between contractive and dilative behavior including lag time between landsliding and mobilization of flow, episodic mobilization of flows, and partial or complete transformation of the landslide. ?? 1989.

  17. Water-resources monitoring in the Cottonwood Creek area, Shasta and Tehama counties, California, 1982-83

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fogelman, R.P.; Evenson, K.D.

    1985-01-01

    The Cottonwood Creek study area in the Redding basin, California , contains a network of wells established to provide baseline information on ground-water levels and quality prior to the completion of two proposed dams, one on Cottonwood Creek and one on South Fork Cottonwood Creek. Analysis of monthly ground-water levels from September 1982 through September 1983 shows lowest water levels in autumn and highest in spring. The ground-water surface slopes east and has a mound at Anderson-Cottonwood Irrigation District Canal near the town of Cottonwood. Future studies here could provide additional information needed for subsequent modeling studies. Data are insufficient upstream from the damsites, specifically in areas of future impoundment where the monitoring network could be expanded. Comparison of ground-water quality samples collected from periods of lowest and highest water levels showed little chemical variation. Ground water is good to excellent with respect to recommended drinking-water standards. Ground-water types north of Cottonwood Creek are sodium magnesium or magnesium sodium bicarbonate and south of Cottonwood Creek are calcium magnesium or magnesium calcium bicarbonate. Surface-water samples from Cottonwood and South Fork Cottonwood Creeks indicate water chemically similar to ground water south of Cottonwood Creek. (USGS)

  18. Rice Straw Compost as a Soil Amendment for the Reduction of Surface Runoff in Almond Orchards in Glenn County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, C.; McKinney, M.; Brown, D.; Johns, M.

    2004-12-01

    Almond production in the Northern Sacramento Valley is dependant on dormant season pesticide application and fertilizers. However, over the past 10 years there has been increased demand from public and regulatory agencies for farmers to reduce the movement of agricultural chemicals into local water sources. Many pesticides of concern have been detected in California watersheds particularly after runoff producing storm events. Two methods of reducing surface runoff into local waterways are to increase orchard soil infiltration rates, and to use riparian buffers to reduce surface flow velocity or runoff that does occur. Organic rice straw compost was applied in an orchard to examine its effect on soil infiltration and runoff. A rainfall simulator was developed capable of producing a 2.54 cm per hour storm and covering an area roughly 3 meter diameter. Runoff and infiltration are being tested from three orchard cells with the compost addition and three orchard cells without. Infiltration and runoff are also being monitored at three plots in a nearby riparian buffer strip. Runoff samples are being analyzed for nutrients, pH, EC and aqueous carbon content.

  19. Health assessment for Western Pacific Railroad, Oroville Yard, Oroville, Butte County, California, Region 9. CERCLIS No. CAD980894679. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-06

    The Western Pacific Railroad's (WPR) Oroville yard, near Oroville, California, has been proposed for inclusion on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Priorities List (NPL). WPR operated the 90-acre railyard for almost 60 years until the railyard was purchased by Union Pacific Railroad (UPR) in 1983. The servicing and repair of railcars on the site generated petroleum product wastes, chlorinated solvent waste, and heavy metal wastes that have migrated into the soils of the area. The WPR site is located on dredger tailings east of the Feather River, two miles south of Oroville. The Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) has identified three primary sources of contamination on site: a roundhouse or fueling area, an unlined surface impoundment, and an API oil-water separator. Other industries, also built over the dredger tailings, are in the vicinity of the site. The limited data available on concentrations of contaminants on site and off site are not sufficient to determine if humans are being or have been exposed to levels of contamination that would be expected to cause adverse health effects. Although there is no evidence at this time that WPR is the source, the burning of petroleum and chlorinated solvent wastes, such as took place at the pond on this site, has been known to generate dioxins and furans. Therefore, this site is classified as an indeterminate public health hazard.

  20. Clay and framework mineralogy, cation exchange capacity, matrix density, and porosity from geochemical well logging in Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Herron, M.M.; Grau, J.A.

    1987-05-01

    Elemental concentrations of several inorganic elements were determined in a continuous basis with depth using the Schlumberger gamma-ray spectrometry (GST) and natural gamma-ray spectrometry (NGS) logs in a Santa Fe Energy Company well in the Kern Front field in Bakersfield, California. Logs of Al, Si, Ca, K, Fe, Ti, and non-pore H were processed by a matrix multiplication procedure, used previously for a Venezuelan well, into estimated abundances of quartz, feldspar, calcite, ilmenite, and the clay minerals kaolinite, illite, and smectite. A total of 64 core-plug samples were analyzed for elemental content by x-ray fluorescence and neutron activation analysis and for mineralogy by bulk and < 4 ..mu.. clay x-ray diffraction analyses. Log-derived elemental concentrations and mineral abundances show good agreement with the core values. Cation exchange capacity (CEC) is estimated from the abundances of the clay minerals and typical values for these clays. The CEC log agrees well with CEC values determined on the core samples. The mineral abundance logs also permit an estimation of the average matrix density as a function of depth, derived from typical grain densities for each mineral phase. This matrix density log, combined with the bulk density log, yields a porosity log that compares well with over 200 measurements on core.

  1. 76 FR 30754 - Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement: Riverside and Orange Counties...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ...Environmental Impact Statement: Riverside and Orange Counties, CA AGENCY: Federal Highway...proposed highway project in Riverside and Orange Counties, California. DATES: The comment...91 and Interstate 15 in Riverside and Orange Counties. The State Route 91...

  2. Distribution of nitrate and related nitrogen species in the unsaturated zone, Redlands and vicinity, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, John M.; Bradford, Wesley L.

    1979-01-01

    Nitrogen in the unsaturated soil zone in the vicinity of Redlands in San Bernardino County, Calif., has been suspected as the source of nitrate in water from wells. Plans have been made to recharge the aquifer with imported surface water. If this occurs, the rising water table will intercept soluble nitrate in the unsaturated zone. This study was made to quantify and delineate the distribution of the nitrate in the unsaturated zone. Thirteen test holes were drilled in areas of various land uses, and samples of the unsaturated-zone materials were obtained with depth. In 10 of the test holes, the maximum nitrate-nitrogen (N03--N) concentrations occurred within 10 feet of land surface suggesting N03--N sources at the surface. Ranking the test holes according to near-surface N03--N concentrations showed that, of the top six, only two are in irrigated citrus areas. One is in an abandoned feedlot. Of the lowest six, four are in irrigated citrus areas and one is in the Santa Ana River channel. The control test hole ranked fourth suggesting that relatively high N03--N concentrations can occur in near-surface soils even in the absence of human habitation. Analysis according to one conceptual model suggests that raising the water-table altitude by aquifer recharge will intercept N03--N now in the unsaturated zone causing increases in N03--N concentrations in water from wells of up to 48 milligrams per liter. The largest increases will occur in the vicinity of irrigated citrus areas. (Woodard-USGS).

  3. University of California Allium Workgroup California Garlic and Onion Research Advisory Board

    E-print Network

    Pappu, Hanu R.

    University of California Allium Workgroup and the California Garlic and Onion Research Advisory Board present California Garlic and Onion Symposium 2008 The latest research results for CA growers for Thrips Control in Onions Eric Natwick, County Director, UCCE Imperial County 9:45 Tactics for Reducing

  4. 77 FR 51556 - Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge, Humboldt County and Washoe County, NV; Lake County, OR; Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ...Oregon. The Refuge was established to protect the American pronghorn; it also provides important habitat for greater sage-grouse...of sagebrush-obligate wildlife species such as American pronghorn and greater sage-grouse. Actions to improve the...

  5. i MARIN COUNTY~ ....-_.-"".~

    E-print Network

    : Initiate an amendment to the Building Code updating the County's green building requirements by taking by requiring green building through the building permit review Progess. The adopted Green Building Ordinance that Title 24, Part 6 of the California Building Code are the minimum energy efficiency requirements

  6. Environmental Impact of the Contact and Sonoma Mercury Mines on Water, Sediment, and Biota in Anna Belcher and Little Sulphur Creek Watersheds, Sonoma County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rytuba, James J.; Hothem, Roger L.; May, Jason T.; Kim, Christopher S.; Lawler, David; Goldstein, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The Contact and Sonoma mercury (Hg) deposits are among the youngest Hg deposits in the Coast Range Hg mineral belt and are located in the western part of the Clear Lake volcanic field in Sonoma County, California. The mine workings and tailings are located in the headwaters of Anna Belcher Creek, which is a tributary to Little Sulphur Creek. The Contact Hg mine produced about 1,000 flasks of Hg, and the Sonoma mine produced considerably less. Waste rock and tailings eroded from the Contact and Sonoma mines have contributed Hg-enriched mine waste material to the headwaters of Anna Belcher Creek. The mines are located on federal land managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (USBLM). The USBLM requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) measure and characterize Hg and other geochemical constituents in tailings, sediment, water, and biota at the Contact and Sonoma mines and in Anna Belcher and Little Sulphur Creeks. This report is made in response to the USBLM request, the lead agency mandated to conduct a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) - Removal Site Investigation (RSI). The RSI applies to removal of Hg-contaminated mine waste from the Contact and Sonoma mines as a means of reducing Hg transport to Anna Belcher and Little Sulphur Creeks. This report summarizes data obtained from field sampling of mine tailings, waste rock, sediment, and water at the Contact and Sonoma mines that was initiated on April 20 during a storm event, and on June 19, 2001. Further sampling of water, sediment, and biota in a pond and tributaries that drain from the mine area was completed on April 1, 2003. Our results permit a preliminary assessment of the mining sources of Hg and associated chemical constituents that could elevate levels of monomethyl Hg (MMeHg) in tributaries and biota that are impacted by historic mining.

  7. Post remedial action survey report for Building 003, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California, October 1981; April 1982. Surplus Facilities Management Program

    SciTech Connect

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1983-10-01

    Rockwell International's Santa Susana Laboratories in Ventura County, California, have been the site of numerous Federally-funded projects involving the use of radioactive materials. One such project was the System for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program. Building 003 on the Santa Susana site was used in conjunction with the SNAP Program and contained a highly shielded area designed for remote manipulation of radioactive materials. Such facilities are commonly referred to as hot caves. During the SNAP Program, fuel burnup samples were analyzed and irradiation experiments were evaluated in the Building 003 hot cave. Use of the hot cave facility ended when the SNAP Program was terminated in 1973. Subsequently, the Building 003 facilities were declared excess and were decontaminaed and decommissioned during the first half of calendar year 1975. At that time, the building was given a preliminary release. In 1981, a post-remedial-action (certification) survey of Building 003 was conducted at the request of the Department of Energy. Significant levels of residual contamination were found in various parts of the building. Consequently, additional decontamination was conducted by Rockwell International. A final post-remedial-action survey was conducted during April 1982, and those areas in Building 003 that had been found contaminated in 1981 were now found to be free of detectable radioactive contamination. Sludge samples taken from the sewer sump showed elevated levels of enriched uranium contaminant. Hence, all sewer lines within Building 003 were removed. This permitted unconditional release of the building for unrestricted use. However, the sewer lines exterior to the building, which remain in place, must be considered potentially contaminated and, therefore, subject to restricted use.

  8. Diffusion sampler testing at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego County, California, November 1999 to January 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Peters, Brian C.

    2000-01-01

    Volatile organic compound concentrations in water from diffusion samplers were compared to concentrations in water obtained by low-flow purging at 15 observation wells at the Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California. Multiple diffusion samplers were installed in the wells. In general, comparisons using bladder pumps and diffusion samplers showed similar volatile organic carbon concentrations. In some wells, sharp concentration gradients were observed, such as an increase in cis-1,2-dichloroethene concentration from 100 to 2,600 micrograms per liter over a vertical distance of only 3.4 feet. In areas where such sharp gradients were observed, concentrations in water obtained by low-flow sampling at times reflected an average concentration over the area of influence; however, concentrations obtained by using the diffusion sampler seemed to represent the immediate vicinity of the sampler. When peristaltic pumps were used to collect ground-water samples by low-flow purging, the volatile organic compound concentrations commonly were lower than concentrations obtained by using diffusion samplers. This difference may be due to loss of volatiles by degassing under negative pressures in the sampling lines induced while using the peristaltic pump, mixing in the well screen, or possible short-circuiting of water from an adjacent depth. Diffusion samplers placed in buckets of freephase jet fuel (JP-5) and Stoddard solvent from observation wells did not show evidence of structural integrity loss during the 2 months of equilibration, and volatile organic compounds detected in the free-phase fuel also were detected in the water from the diffusion samplers.

  9. Logs and data from trenches across the Hayward Fault at Tyson's Lagoon (Tule Pond), Fremont, Alameda County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Linenkaemper, James J.; Dawson, Timothy E.; Personius, Stephen F.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Reidy, Liam M.; Schwartz, David P.

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The purpose of this publication is to make available detailed trench logs (sheets 1, 2), radiocarbon dates (table 1) and pollen data (fig. 1) obtained as a result of an intensive subsurface investigation of the Hayward Fault at Tyson's Lagoon (Tule Pond) from August to November 2000 (figs. 1, 2 on sheet 1). The Hayward Fault is recognized to be among the most hazardous in the United States (Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities, 1999). This document makes available geologic evidence for historical and prehistoric surfacerupturing earthquakes that were recorded at the site. Prehistoric earthquakes deduced from geologic evidence are called paleoearthquakes. Establishing a chronology of paleoearthquakes is of immediate use in resolving the level of hazard posed by the Hayward Fault for producing large earthquakes in the future. Preliminary findings of this investigation have been presented in Lienkaemper and others (2001). A formal report on our conclusions based on these data is in preparation. The investigation at Tyson's Lagoon is ongoing, so these products should not be considered final. Lienkaemper, Dawson, and Personius interpreted the geology and logged the trenches. Seitz and Reidy performed analyses on radiocarbon and pollen samples, respectively. Schwartz led the critical-review field team. Previous trenching work was done at Tyson's Lagoon (figs. 2, 3 on sheet 1). Lienkaemper (1992) references the location of most of those trenches. The earlier trenching was generally for the evaluation of local faultrupture hazard, except for the study of Williams (1993), which was a paleoearthquake investigation. An unpublished study by J.N. Alt in 1998 (shown on our site map as trenches 98A and 98B, fig. 3, on sheet 1), also sought evidence of paleoearthquakes. Alt's study and one by Woodward-Clyde and Associates (1970; trenches 70A to 70G, fig. 3) were located south of Walnut Avenue in one of the few areas that still remain undisturbed and were, thus, useful in planning our work in 2000.

  10. Water-resources investigation using analog model techniques in the Saugus-Newhall area, Los Angeles County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robson, Stanley G.

    1972-01-01

    The Saugus-Newhall area is in the upper Santa Clara River valley, in northwestern Los Angeles. County, about 30 miles north of Los Angeles. The area has two main aquifers, the alluvial aquifer and the underlying Saugus aquifer. These two aquifers are the subject of this investigation. The alluvial aquifer consists of river channel alluvium as much as 200 feet thick with a transmissibility ranging from 50,000 to 325,000 gallons per day per foot and a storage coefficient of i0 to 20 percent. In 1945 about 210,000 acre-feet of recoverable ground water was in storage in the alluvial aquifer. The alluvial aquifer is the major source of ground-water pumpage and has supplied about 600,000 acre-feet of effective pumpage during the period 1945 through 1967. Ground-water pumpage and variations in the quantities of surface-water recharge have caused large fluctuations in the water levels in the alluvial aquifer. The Saugus aquifer has. a maximum saturated thickness of about 3,500 feet and ranges in transmissibility from 2,000 to 200,000 gallons per day per foot. Based on limited available data, the Saugus aquifer may contain as much as 6 million acre-feet of ground water in storage under steady-state conditions. Meager available data indicate the water quality in some areas of the Saugus aquifer is poor so that only a fraction of the ground water in storage in the aquifer may be usable for domestic water supplies. Floodflow in the streams in the area is the major source of recharge to the alluvial aquifer and the underlying Saugus aquifer. The chemical quality of the ground water is largely dependent on the chemical quality of the surface-water recharge. Ground-water discharge occurs along the Santa Clara River below Castaic Junction. Water will be imported to supplement the existing water resources. An analog model of the ground-water basin indicates that it will not be possible to artificially recharge the proposed quantities of imported water into the alluvial aquifer above Saugus unless ground-water pumpage from that area is increased. The model further indicates that the alluvial aquifer may not be able to supply enough water, even when artificially recharged with imported water, to meet the estimated maximum pumping rate to 1990 used in the model and that increased pumpage from the Saugus aquifer may cause water-level declines in both aquifers and may eliminate the natural ground-water discharge from the aquifers.

  11. Maps showing estimated sediment yield from coastal landslides and active slope distribution along the Big Sur coast, Monterey and San Luis Obispo Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Green, Krystal R.; Dallas, Kate

    2004-01-01

    The 1982-83 and 1997-98 El Ni?os brought very high precipitation to California?s central coast; this precipitation resulted in raised groundwater levels, coastal flooding, and destabilized slopes throughout the region. Large landslides in the coastal mountains of Big Sur in Monterey and San Luis Obispo Counties blocked sections of California State Route 1, closing the road for months at a time. Large landslides such as these occur frequently in the winter months along the Big Sur coast due to the steep topography and weak bedrock. A large landslide in 1983 resulted in the closure of Highway 1 for over a year to repair the road and stabilize the slope. Resulting work from the 1983 landslide cost over $7 million and generated 30 million cubic yards of debris from landslide removal and excavations to re-establish the highway along the Big Sur coast. Before establishment of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS) in 1992, typical road opening measures involved disposal of some landslide material and excess material generated from slope stabilization onto the seaward side of the highway. It is likely that some or most of this disposed material, either directly or indirectly through subsequent erosion, was eventually transported downslope into the ocean. In addition to the landslides that initiate above the road, natural slope failures sometimes occur on the steep slopes below the road and thus deliver material to the base of the coastal mountains where it is eroded and dispersed by waves and nearshore currents. Any coastal-slope landslide, generated through natural or anthropogenic processes, can result in sediment entering the nearshore zone. The waters offshore of the Big Sur coast are part of the MBNMS. Since it was established in 1992, landslide-disposal practices came under question for two reasons. The U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 15, Section 922.132 prohibits discharging or depositing, from beyond the boundary of the Sanctuary, any material or other matter that subsequently enters the Sanctuary and injures a Sanctuary resource or quality. The landslide-disposal practices previously used had the potential to alter nearshore zone habitat by converting marine habitats from rocky substrate to soft bottom. In addition, the disposal practices had the potential to increase concentrations of suspended sediment in the nearshore zone, and thereby possibly impact coastal biological communities. On the other hand, natural mass-wasting processes, including coastal cliff erosion coastal and landslides, as well as streams deliver sediment to the coast in unknown quantities and thus provide nutrients as well as source material for beaches. Current road maintenance and repair practices along the Coast Highway 1 corridor that restrict disposal of material within the MBNMS may actually reduce sediment input relative to natural processes.

  12. 2002 Water-Table Contours of the Mojave River and the Morongo Ground-Water Basins, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, G.A.; Stamos, C.L.; Predmore, S.K.

    2004-01-01

    The Mojave River and Morongo ground-water basins are in the southwestern part of the Mojave Desert in southern California. Ground water from these basins supplies a major part of the water requirements for the region. The continuous population growth in this area has resulted in ever-increasing demands on local ground-water resources. The collection and interpretation of ground-water data helps local water districts, military bases, and private citizens gain a better understanding of the ground-water flow systems, and consequently, water availability. During 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey and other agencies made approximately 2,500 water-level measurements in the Mojave River and Morongo ground-water basins. These data document recent conditions and, when compared with previous data, changes in ground-water levels. A water-level contour map was drawn using data from about 660 wells, providing coverage for most of the basins. Twenty-eight hydrographs show long-term (up to 70 years) water-level conditions throughout the basins, and 9 short-term (1997 to 2002) hydrographs show the effects of recharge and discharge along the Mojave River. In addition, a water-level-change map was compiled to compare 2000 and 2002 water levels throughout the basins. In the Mojave River ground-water basin, about 66 percent of the wells had water-level declines of 0.5 ft or more since 2000 and about 27 percent of the wells had water-level declines greater than 5 ft. The only area that had water-level increases greater than 5 ft that were not attributed to fluctuations in nearby pumpage was in the Harper Lake (dry) area where there has been a significant reduction in pumpage during the last decade. In the Morongo ground-water basin, about 36 percent of the wells had water-level declines of 0.5 ft or more and about 10 percent of the wells had water-level declines greater than 5 ft. Water-level increases greater than 5 ft were measured only in the Warren subbasin, where artificial-recharge operations have caused water levels to rise almost 60 ft since 2000.

  13. Distribution of faults in a transition zone: Bimodal faulting in the Pit River region, Shasta County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, L. J.; Weldon, R. J.; Paulson, K. T.

    2012-12-01

    Northern California marks a zone of transition between oblique subduction in Cascadia, dextral transtension in Walker Lane, and north-south compression of the Klamath Mountains. Because of its unique location, the region between Mt. Shasta and Lassen Peak provides insight into the distribution of deformation in regions of transitional tectonic regimes. In particular, the Pit River region provides several excellent exposures of faults in a diatomite quarry and in larger regional structures. We present information on the distribution, amount of slip, and orientation of local faults, and demonstrate how these data reflect the interaction of multiple regional stress fields. We have measured and compiled the orientations of many small faults to evaluate the distribution of deformation in a complex zone of oblique extension and compression. A ~0.5 km2 diatomite quarry near the Pit River and Lake Britton exposes hundreds of faults with small amounts of displacement. Two main faulting patterns emerge: 1) high angle NW/SE-striking faults characterized by normal, oblique normal, or strike slip kinematic indicators; and 2) lower angle E/W-striking faults with evidence of reverse to oblique reverse motion. We find that the regional landscape reflects a dominant mode of faulting that is NW/SE-striking normal, oblique normal, or strike slip; the Hat Creek and Rocky Ledge faults, each with tens of meters of oblique normal offset, exemplify this. Observations of numerous smaller faults in the diatomite quarry also show a dominant pattern of NW/SE-striking faults. E/W-striking compressional structures are present, but are less abundant. Faults of differing orientations occur together in the quarry and occasionally cross cut one another. Many faults cross but do not offset each other, indicating that they formed simultaneously. Where cross-cutting faults do exhibit offset, the NW/SE-striking faults offset E/W-striking faults, which suggests that NW/SE oriented faults have been longer lived or have had more recent activity. This relationship indicates that while the two main faulting patterns did coexist for a period of time, NW/SE-striking faults continued to deform after E/W features shut off.

  14. Geologic map of the Hayward fault zone, Contra Costa, Alameda, and Santa Clara counties, California: a digital database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graymer, R.W.; Jones, D.L.; Brabb, E.E.

    1995-01-01

    The Hayward is one of three major fault zones of the San Andreas system that have produced large historic earthquakes in the San Francisco Bay Area (the others being the San Andreas and Calaveras). Severe earthquakes were generated by this fault zone in 1836 and in 1868, and several large earthquakes have been recorded since 1868. The Hayward fault zone is considered to be the most probable source of a major earthquake in the San Francisco Bay Area, as much as 28% chance for a magnitude 7 earthquake before the year 2021 (Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities, 1990). The Hayward fault zone, as described in this work, is a zone of highly deformed rocks, trending north 30 degrees west and ranging in width from about 2 to 10 kilometers. The historic earthquake generating activity has been concentrated in the western portion of the zone, but the zone as a whole reflects deformation derived from oblique right-lateral and compressive tectonic stress along a significant upper crustal discontinuity for the past 10 million or more years. The Hayward fault zone is bounded on the east by a series of faults that demarcate the beginning of one or more structural blocks containing rocks and structures unrelated to the Hayward fault zone. The eastern bounding faults are, from the south, the Calaveras, Stonybrook, Palomares, Miller Creek, and Moraga faults. These faults are not considered to be part of the Hayward fault zone, although they are shown on the map to demarcate its boundary. The western boundary of the zone is less clearly defined, because the alluvium of the San Francisco Bay and Santa Clara Valley basins obscures bedrock and structural relationships. Although several of the westernmost faults in the zone clearly project under or through the alluvium, the western boundary of the fault is generally considered to be the westernmost mapped fault, which corresponds more or less with the margin of thick unconsolidated surficial deposits. The Hayward fault zone is truncated to the south by the Calaveras fault, which trends about north 10 west, and so forms an oblique east and south boundary. All of the faults within the southern part of the zone probably splay into the Calaveras fault. The northern margin of the zone as dealt with herein is San Pablo Bay, but the zone of deformation undoubtedly continues north of the Bay through the area bounded by the Rodgers Creek and Tolay faults.

  15. Geologic map of southwestern Sequoia National Park and vicinity, Tulare County, California, including the Mineral King metamorphic pendant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisson, T. W.; Moore, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    From the late 1940s to the early 1990s, scientists of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) mapped the geology of most of Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, California, and published the results as a series of 15-minute (1:62,500 scale) Geologic Quadrangles. The southwest corner of Sequoia National Park, encompassing the Mineral King and eastern edge of the Kaweah 15-minute topographic quadrangles, however, remained unfinished. At the request of the National Park Service's Geologic Resources Division (NPS-GRD), the USGS has mapped the geology of that area using 7.5-minute (1:24,000 scale) topographic bases and high-resolution ortho-imagery. With partial support from NPS-GRD, the major plutons in the map area were dated by the U-Pb zircon method with the Stanford-USGS SHRIMP-RG ion microprobe. Highlights include: (1) Identification of the Early Cretaceous volcano-plutonic suite of Mineral King (informally named), consisting of three deformed granodiorite plutons and the major metarhyolite tuffs of the Mineral King metamorphic pendant. Members of the suite erupted or intruded at 130-140 Ma (pluton ages: this study; rhyolite ages: lower-intercept concordia from zircon results of Busby-Spera, 1983, Princeton Ph.D. thesis, and from Klemetti et al., 2011, AGU abstract) during the pause of igneous activity between emplacement of the Jurassic and Cretaceous Sierran batholiths. (2) Some of the deformation of the Mineral King metamorphic pendant is demonstrably Cretaceous, with evidence including map-scale folding of Early Cretaceous metarhyolite tuff, and an isoclinally folded aplite dike dated at 98 Ma, concurrent with the large 98-Ma granodiorite of Castle Creek that intruded the Mineral King pendant on the west. (3) A 21-km-long magmatic synform within the 99-100 Ma granite of Coyote Pass that is defined both by inward-dipping mafic inclusions (enclaves) and by sporadic, cm-thick, sharply defined mineral layering. The west margin of the granite of Coyote Pass overlies parts of the adjacent Mineral King pendant, and the pluton probably had an upward-flaring shape, with synformal layering and foliation resulting from compaction and mineral deposition (or flow sorting) at the floor of an elongate, melt-rich magma lens. The NPS-GRD has digitized the published USGS geologic quadrangles for Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, and a goal is to jointly release a geologic map of the combined Parks region.

  16. Geohydrologic Framework of Recharge and Seawater Intrusion in the Pajaro Valley, Santa Cruz and Monterey Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, Randall T.

    2003-01-01

    Pajaro Valley is a coastal watershed of 160 square miles located along Monterey Bay north of Elkhorn Slough and south of the city of Santa Cruz. The valley has been predominantly developed for agriculture since the late 1800s. In 1984 the Pajaro Valley Water Management Agency (PVWMA) was formed and was delegated with the responsibility of the management of the water resources within the Pajaro Valley by the State of California. About 84 percent of the water is used for agriculture and 16 percent is used for industrial and municipal water supply; almost all of the demand is supplied by ground water. Ground-water pumpage varies with seasonal and climatic periods. The alluvial aquifers are composed of Quaternary- and Tertiary-aged sediments that are layered marine and terrestrial coarse-grained deposits separated by extensive fine-grained deposits that potentially restrict vertical movement of ground water and seawater intrusion in the coastal subareas. The coarse-grained deposits, which persist over large areas, control pumpage and related seawater intrusion. The Aromas Sand crops out throughout the north and central parts of the PVWMA area and offshore on the continental shelf and in Monterey submarine canyon. Because many of the wells in the coastal and inland subregions are screened at depths of 200 to 400 feet below land surface, a direct avenue is provided for seawater intrusion through the coarse-grained deposits of the shallower alluvium and Aromas Sand. Geophysical logs from monitoring wells indicate discrete zones of saline water that are related to pumpage and seawater intrusion in the aquifers of the shallower alluvium and upper Aromas Sand in the upper-aquifer system and to deeper saline waters in the lower Aromas Sand within the lower-aquifer system. The precipitation data indicate that there were at least nine dry and nine wet periods that range from 2 to 19 years during the period of record, 1880?1997. The ground-water pumpage, runoff, streamflow and related water quality of streamflow also vary with seasonal and climatic periods. Recharge occurs from deep percolation of precipitation and from infiltration of streamflow. Streamflow originates from local runoff and from outside the valley as inflow from the Pajaro River. Although partly regulated, streamflow in the Pajaro River at Chittenden is less than 200 cubic feet per second 88 percent of the time and is less than 12 cubic feet per second 50 percent of the time. Streamflow water-quality data suggest that there may be several sources of poor-quality water that contribute to elevated chloride, sulfate, and nitrate concentrations in streamflow. The poor water quality occurring during lower streamflows indicates that low flows may be an additional source of salinity for ground-water recharge as streamflow infiltration along the Pajaro River. The geochemical data from this study indicate that the two main sources of recharge are deep percolation of local runoff and streamflow infiltration of Pajaro River water. The geophysical and geochemical data suggest that only the shallow alluvial aquifer and parts of the upper Aromas Sand that constitute the upper-aquifer system are being replenished by recent recharge in the coastal areas of Pajaro Valley and represent the renewable ground-water resources. These data also suggest that there is very little vertical flow through the layered aquifer systems in the coastal regions. The confining aquitards are laterally extensive but may be missing in places owing to fluvial erosion or offsetting by fault movement. Geochemical and geophysical data indicate that the ground water from some parts of the upper and lower Aromas Sand in the coastal regions was recharged thousands of years ago and may, in part, represent nonrenewable ground-water resources. The analysis of major-ion chemistry, in combination with isotope and trace-element/chloride ratios, indicates that the coastal ground-water and surface-water samples

  17. Salton Seismic Imaging Project Line 6: San Andreas Fault and Northern Coachella Valley Structure, Riverside and San Bernardino Counties, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catchings, R. D.; Fuis, G.; Rymer, M. J.; Goldman, M.; Tarnowski, J. M.; Hole, J. A.; Stock, J. M.; Matti, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) is a large-scale, active- and passive-source seismic project designed to image the San Andreas fault (SAF) and adjacent basins (Imperial and Coachella Valleys) in southernmost California. Data and preliminary results from many of the seismic profiles are reported elsewhere (including Fuis et al., Rymer et al., Goldman et al., Langenheim et al., this meeting). Here, we focus on SSIP Line 6, one of four 2-D seismic profiles that were acquired across the Coachella Valley. The 44-km-long, SSIP-Line-6 seismic profile extended from the east flank of Mt. San Jacinto northwest of Palm Springs to the Little San Bernardino Mountains and crossed the SAF (Mission Creek (MCF), Banning (BF), and Garnet Hill (GHF) strands) roughly normal to strike. Data were generated by 10 downhole explosive sources (most spaced about 3 to 5 km apart) and were recorded by approximately 347 Texan seismographs (average spacing 126 m). We used first-arrival refractions to develop a P-wave refraction tomography velocity image of the upper crust along the seismic profile. The seismic data were also stacked and migrated to develop low-fold reflection images of the crust. From the surface to about 7 km depth, P-wave velocities range from about 2.5 km/s to about 7.2 km/s, with the lowest velocities within an ~2-km-deep, ~20-km-wide basin, and the highest velocities below the transition zone from the Coachella Valley to Mt. San Jacinto and within the Little San Bernardino Mountains. The BF and GHF strands bound a shallow sub-basin on the southwestern side of the Coachella Valley, but the underlying shallow-depth (~4 km) basement rocks are P-wave high in velocity (~7.2 km/s). The lack of a low-velocity zone beneath BF and GHF suggests that both faults dip northeastward. In a similar manner, high-velocity basement rocks beneath the Little San Bernardino Mountains suggest that the MCF dips vertically or southwestward. However, there is a pronounced low-velocity zone in basement rocks between about 2 and 7 km depth beneath and southwest of the MCF, suggesting a vertical or slightly southwest-dipping MCF. The apparent northeast dip of the BF and the apparent vertical or southwest dip of the MCF suggests that the two main strands of the SAF (MCF and BF) merge at about 10 km depth. A plot of double-difference earthquake hypocenters (Hauksson, 2000) along the seismic profile shows events that occurred between 1980-2000 (excluding those in 1992, prior to and after the Joshua Tree and Landers earthquakes) are largely confined to the vicinity of the basement low-velocity zone between the MCF and BF. However, a separate alignment of hypocenters occurs southwest of the BF and projects toward the surface beneath Mt. San Jacinto. Collectively, the velocity images and the seismicity data suggest the BF strand of the SAF dips to the northeast at about 50 degrees in the upper 10 km, and the MCF strand is either vertical or dips southwestward about 80 degrees, with both strands merging at about 10 km depth and forming a near-vertical zone of faults to at least 15 km depth. The SSIP Line 6 data are consistent with structures interpreted by Catchings et al. (2009).

  18. First report of the rust Phragmidium violaceum on Pennsylvania blackberry in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In April 2005 a rust fungus was collected on Pennsylvania blackberry, Rubus pensilvanicus Poiret (= R. abactus Bailey) in Humboldt Co., California. Both morphological and molecular data suggest that this rust is Phragmidium violaceum (Schultz) G. Winter. Although this host is native to eastern Nort...

  19. DIETS, ENERGY INTAKE, AND KLEPTOPARASITISM OF NONBREEDING LONG-BILLED CURLEWS IN A NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ESTUARY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LINDA W. LEEMAN; MARK A. COLWELL; THOMAS S. LEEMAN; RYAN L. MATHIS

    2001-01-01

    We documented differences in diet composition of territorial Long-billed Curlews ( Numenius americanus) feeding in different locations within the Elk River Estuary, Humboldt Bay, California. We used direct observations to measure diet because curlews often handled prey for long periods (up to 4 min), which enabled us to identify prey and to estimate size. Curlews ate mainly five benthic organisms:

  20. 40 CFR 81.257 - North Central Iowa Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...County, Floyd County, Franklin County, Grundy County, Hamilton County, Hancock County, Hardin County, Humboldt County, Kossuth County, Mitchell County, Webster County, Winnebago County, Worth County, Wright...

  1. Evaluation of LiDAR Imagery as a Tool for Mapping the Northern San Andreas Fault in Heavily Forested Areas of Mendocino and Sonoma Counties, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, C. S.; Koehler, R. D.; Baldwin, J. N.; Harding, D. J.

    2004-12-01

    We are mapping in detail active traces of the San Andreas Fault in Mendocino and Sonoma Counties in northern California, using recently acquired airborne LiDAR (also known as ALSM) data. The LiDAR data set provides a powerful new tool for mapping geomorphic features related to the San Andreas Fault because it can be used to produce high-resolution images of the ground surfaces beneath the forest canopy along the 70-km-long section of the fault zone encompassed by the data. Our effort represents the first use of LiDAR data to map active fault traces in a densely vegetated region along the San Andreas Fault. We are using shaded relief images generated from bare-earth DEMs to conduct detailed mapping of fault-related geomorphic features (e.g. scarps, offset streams, linear valleys, shutter ridges, and sag ponds) between Fort Ross and Point Arena. Initially, we map fault traces digitally, on-screen, based only on the geomorphology interpreted from LiDAR images. We then conduct field reconnaissance using the initial computer-based maps in order to verify and further refine our mapping. We found that field reconnaissance is of utmost importance in producing an accurate and detailed map of fault traces. Many lineaments identified as faults from the on-screen images were determined in the field to be old logging roads or other features unrelated to faulting. Also, in areas where the resolution of LiDAR data is poor, field reconnaissance, coupled with topographic maps and aerial photographs, permits a more accurate location of fault-related geomorphic features. LiDAR images are extremely valuable as a base for field mapping in this heavily forested area, and the use of LiDAR is far superior to traditional mapping techniques relying only on aerial photography and 7.5 minute USGS quadrangle topographic maps. Comparison with earlier mapping of the northern San Andreas fault (Brown and Wolfe, 1972) shows that in some areas the LiDAR data allow a correction of the fault trace location of up to several hundred meters. To date we have field checked approximately 24 km of the 70-km-long section of the fault for which LiDAR data is available. The remaining 46 km will be field checked in 2005. The result will be a much more accurate map of the active traces of the northern San Andreas Fault, which will be of great use for future fault studies.

  2. Clearing a Career Path: Lessons from Two Communities in Promoting Higher Education Access for the Early Care and Education Workforce. Alameda and Santa Clara Counties, California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dukakis, Kara; Bellm, Dan

    2006-01-01

    This report documents the process through which Alameda and Santa Clara Counties have used the Comprehensive Approaches to Raising Educational Standards (CARES) programs and other resources to leverage systemic change in early care and education (ECE) higher education. It describes a range of new and expanded efforts in both counties, and aims to…

  3. Araucaria humboldtensis (Araucariaceae) on the Southern Slope of Mt. Humboldt, New Caledonia

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hiroaki Setoguchi. (Tokyo Metropolitan University; Makino Herbarium, Faculty of Science ADR; POSTAL)

    2004-03-09

    Araucaria humboldtensis (Araucariaceae) on the southern slope of Mt. Humboldt, New Caledonia. New Caledonia possesses 13 endemics of Araucaria, and they form a monophyletic group with very low differentiation in rbcL sequences.

  4. REPORT OF THE CALIFORNIA BIRD RECORDS COMMITTEE: 2000 RECORDS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RICHARD A. ERICKSON; ROBERT A. HAMILTON

    2001-01-01

    In 2000, the California Bird Records Committee reached decisions on 165 records of 78 species, endorsing 116 of them. New to California were the Glossy Ibis (Plegadis falcinellus), seen and photographed west of Calipatria, Imperial County, and Nutting's Flycatcher (Myiarchus nuttingi), extensively documented in Irvine, Orange County. From Southeast Farallon Island, San Francisco County, in the late 1980s, one specimen

  5. From Alexander von Humboldt to Charles Darwin: Evolution in Observation and Interpretation

    E-print Network

    Baron, Frank

    2010-02-01

    ’s Principles of Population, a work that Darwin read in 1838. That work influenced him profoundly. It helped him formulate the concept of natural selection and reflect in earnest about a theory of evolution. After the 1830s Humboldt’s direct influence...; their works reflected, instead, a joint venture between two generations to understand nature and to contribute to advance in the sciences. Bibliography ? The Autobiography of Charles Darwin (ed. Nora Barlow), in:The Works of Charles Darwin, edited...

  6. Habitat Selection by American Martens in Coastal California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KEITH M. SLAUSON; WILLIAM J. ZIELINSKI; JOHN P. HAYES

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT We investigated habitat selection using single- and mixed-scale modeling at 2 spatial scales, stand and home range, by the only known,population,of American,martens,(Martes americana) remaining,in the historical range of the Humboldt,subspecies (M. a. humboldtensis) in California, USA. During 2000 and 2001, we sampled a 12 3 14 grid with 2-km spacing, using 2 sooted track plates at each grid point.

  7. Fine-scale delineation of the location of and relative ground shaking within the San Andreas Fault zone at San Andreas Lake, San Mateo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, R.D.; Rymer, M.J.; Goldman, M.R.; Prentice, C.S.; Sickler, R.R.

    2013-01-01

    The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission is seismically retrofitting the water delivery system at San Andreas Lake, San Mateo County, California, where the reservoir intake system crosses the San Andreas Fault (SAF). The near-surface fault location and geometry are important considerations in the retrofit effort. Because the SAF trends through highly distorted Franciscan mélange and beneath much of the reservoir, the exact trace of the 1906 surface rupture is difficult to determine from surface mapping at San Andreas Lake. Based on surface mapping, it also is unclear if there are additional fault splays that extend northeast or southwest of the main surface rupture. To better understand the fault structure at San Andreas Lake, the U.S. Geological Survey acquired a series of seismic imaging profiles across the SAF at San Andreas Lake in 2008, 2009, and 2011, when the lake level was near historical lows and the surface traces of the SAF were exposed for the first time in decades. We used multiple seismic methods to locate the main 1906 rupture zone and fault splays within about 100 meters northeast of the main rupture zone. Our seismic observations are internally consistent, and our seismic indicators of faulting generally correlate with fault locations inferred from surface mapping. We also tested the accuracy of our seismic methods by comparing our seismically located faults with surface ruptures mapped by Schussler (1906) immediately after the April 18, 1906 San Francisco earthquake of approximate magnitude 7.9; our seismically determined fault locations were highly accurate. Near the reservoir intake facility at San Andreas Lake, our seismic data indicate the main 1906 surface rupture zone consists of at least three near-surface fault traces. Movement on multiple fault traces can have appreciable engineering significance because, unlike movement on a single strike-slip fault trace, differential movement on multiple fault traces may exert compressive and extensional stresses on built structures within the fault zone. Such differential movement and resulting distortion of built structures appear to have occurred between fault traces at the gatewell near the southern end of San Andreas Lake during the 1906 San Francisco earthquake (Schussler, 1906). In addition to the three fault traces within the main 1906 surface rupture zone, our data indicate at least one additional fault trace (or zone) about 80 meters northeast of the main 1906 surface rupture zone. Because ground shaking also can damage structures, we used fault-zone guided waves to investigate ground shaking within the fault zones relative to ground shaking outside the fault zones. Peak ground velocity (PGV) measurements from our guided-wave study indicate that ground shaking is greater at each of the surface fault traces, varying with the frequency of the seismic data and the wave type (P versus S). S-wave PGV increases by as much as 5–6 times at the fault traces relative to areas outside the fault zone, and P-wave PGV increases by as much as 3–10 times. Assuming shaking increases linearly with increasing earthquake magnitude, these data suggest strong shaking may pose a significant hazard to built structures that extend across the fault traces. Similarly complex fault structures likely underlie other strike-slip faults (such as the Hayward, Calaveras, and Silver Creek Faults) that intersect structures of the water delivery system, and these fault structures similarly should be investigated.

  8. Geohydrology, water quality, and nitrogen geochemistry in the saturated and unsaturated zones beneath various land uses, Riverside and San Bernardino counties, California, 1991-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rees, Terry F.; Bright, D.J.; Fay, R.G.; Christensen, A.H.; Anders, R.B.; Baharie, B.S.; Land, M.T.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Eastern Municipal Water District, the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, and the Orange County Water District, has completed a derailed study of the Hemet groundwater basin. The quantity of ground water stored in the basin in August 1992 is estimated to be 327,000 acre-feet. Dissolved-solids concentration ranged from 380 to 700 mg/L (milligrams per liter), except in small areas where the concentration exceeded 1,000 mg/L. Nitrate concentrations exc__*'ded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 10 mg/L nitrate (its nitrogen) in the southeastern part of the basin, in the Domenigoni Valley area, and beneath a dairy in the Diamond Valley area. Seven sites representing selected land uses-residential, tuff grass irrigated with reclaimed water, citrus grove, irrigated farm, poultry farm, and dairy (two sites)--were selected for detailed study of nitrogen geochemistry in the unsaturated zone. For all land uses, nitrate was the dominant nitrogen species in the unsaturated zone. Although nitrate was seasonally present in the shallow unsaturated zone beneath the residential site, it was absent at moderate depths, suggesting negligible migration of nitrate from the surface at this time. Microbial denitrification probably is occurring in the shallow unsaturated zone. High nitrate concentrations in the deep unsaturated zone (greater than 100 ft) suggest either significantly higher nitrate loading at some time in the past, or lateral movement of nitrate at depth. Nitrate also is seasonally present in the shallow unsaturated zone beneath the reclaimed-water site, and (in contrast with the residential site), nitrate is perennially present in the deeper unsaturated zone. Mictobial identification in the unsaturated zone and in the capillary fringe above the water table decreases, the concentrations of nitrate in pore water to below the MCL before reaching the water table. Pore water in the unsaturated the citrus grove site contains very high concentrations of nitrate. Even though there are zones of microbial denitrification, nitrate seems to be migrating downward to the water table. The presence of a shallow perched-water zone beneath the irrigated-farm site prevents the vertical movement of nitrate from the surface to the regional water table. Above the perched zone, nitrate concentrations in the unsaturated zone are variable, ranging from below the MCL to four times the MCL. Periodically, nitrate is flushed from the shallow unsaturated zone to the perched-water zone. The unsaturated zone pore-moisture quality could not be adequately addressed because of the very dry conditions in the unsaturated zone beneath the poultry-farm site. Surficial clay deposits prevent water from percolating downward. At the two dairy sites, nitrate loading in pore waleratthesurfacewasvezyhigh, as great as 7,000 mg/L. Microbial denitrification in the unsaturated zone causes such concentrations to decrease rapidly with depth. At a depth of 20 R, nitrate concentration was less than 100 mg/L. In= areas where the depth to water is less than 20 ft, nitrate loading to ground water can be very high, whereas in areas where depth to water is greater than 100 ft, most of the nitrate is microbially removed before reaching the water table.

  9. Rainfall-runoff characteristics and effects of increased urban density on streamflow and infiltration in the eastern part of the San Jacinto River basin, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guay, Joel R.

    2002-01-01

    To better understand the rainfall-runoff characteristics of the eastern part of the San Jacinto River Basin and to estimate the effects of increased urbanization on streamflow, channel infiltration, and land-surface infiltration, a long-term (1950?98) time series of monthly flows in and out of the channels and land surfaces were simulated using the Hydrologic Simulation Program- FORTRAN (HSPF) rainfall-runoff model. Channel and land-surface infiltration includes rainfall or runoff that infiltrates past the zone of evapotranspiration and may become ground-water recharge. The study area encompasses about 256 square miles of the San Jacinto River drainage basin in Riverside County, California. Daily streamflow (for periods with available data between 1950 and 1998), and daily rainfall and evaporation (1950?98) data; monthly reservoir storage data (1961?98); and estimated mean annual reservoir inflow data (for 1974 conditions) were used to calibrate the rainfall-runoff model. Measured and simulated mean annual streamflows for the San Jacinto River near San Jacinto streamflow-gaging station (North-South Fork subbasin) for 1950?91 and 1997?98 were 14,000 and 14,200 acre-feet, respectively, a difference of 1.4 percent. The standard error of the mean for measured and simulated annual streamflow in the North-South Fork subbasin was 3,520 and 3,160 acre-feet, respectively. Measured and simulated mean annual streamflows for the Bautista Creek streamflow-gaging station (Bautista Creek subbasin) for 1950?98 were 980 acre-feet and 991 acre-feet, respectively, a difference of 1.1 percent. The standard error of the mean for measured and simulated annual streamflow in the Bautista Creek subbasin was 299 and 217 acre-feet, respectively. Measured and simulated annual streamflows for the San Jacinto River above State Street near San Jacinto streamflow-gaging station (Poppet subbasin) for 1998 were 23,400 and 23,500 acre-feet, respectively, a difference of 0.4 percent. The simulated mean annual streamflow for the State Street gaging station at the outlet of the study basin and the simulated mean annual basin infiltration (combined infiltration from all the channels and land surfaces) were 8,720 and 41,600 acre-feet, respectively, for water years 1950-98. Simulated annual streamflow at the State Street gaging station ranged from 16.8 acre-feet in water year 1961 to 70,400 acre-feet in water year 1993, and simulated basin infiltration ranged from 2,770 acre-feet in water year 1961 to 149,000 acre-feet in water year 1983.The effects of increased urbanization on the hydrology of the study basin were evaluated by increasing the size of the effective impervious and non-effective impervious urban areas simulated in the calibrated rainfall-runoff model by 50 and 100 percent, respectively. The rainfall-runoff model simulated a long-term time series of monthly flows in and out of the channels and land surfaces using daily rainfall and potential evaporation data for water years 1950?98. Increasing the effective impervious and non-effective impervious urban areas by 100 percent resulted in a 5-percent increase in simulated mean annual streamflow at the State Street gaging station, and a 2.2-percent increase in simulated basin infiltration. Results of a frequency analysis of the simulated annual streamflow at the State Street gaging station showed that when effective impervious and non-effective impervious areas were increased 100 percent, simulated annual streamflow increased about 100 percent for low-flow conditions and was unchanged for high-flow conditions. The simulated increase in streamflow at the State Street gaging station potentially could infiltrate along the stream channel further downstream, outside of the model area.

  10. CHARACTERIZATION AND EH/PH-BASED LEACHING TESTS OF MERCURY-CONTAINING MINING WASTES FROM THE SULFUR BANK MERCURY MINE, LAKE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mine waste rock and roaster tailings were collected from the Sulfur Bank Mercury Mine (SBMM) located in Clearlake Oaks, California. The site has been under investigation as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) site. Leaching profiles o...

  11. Santa Clara County Asian Health Survey: Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tom, Soleng; And Others

    This paper describes the methodology used in a study assessing the health needs of the Asian population, specifically the Chinese, Cambodian, and Vietnamese populations, in Santa Clara County, California. The study by the Santa Clara County Health Department is part of a wide-ranging needs assessment project primarily intended to guide…

  12. California Shipwrecks

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This new site from the California State Lands Commission offers a nice collection of resources for actual or armchair underwater archaeologists. The core of the site is a database of over 1500 California shipwrecks, searchable by keyword in twelve fields. Search returns include ship's name, type, years built and sunk, cause, owner, captain, length, beam, tonnage, engine, and county. The other major feature at the site is an exhibition on the wreck and recovery of the Brother Jonathan. The exhibit includes the story of the ship and its specifications, a passenger list, a photo exhibit of artifacts and video of the wreck, and some comments on the significance of the archaeological remains. Other sections of the site include brief articles on the sinking of eight ships, video and audio clips, and links to related sites.

  13. 34. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer unknown, Date unknown INTERIOR, PULPIT - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  14. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey From California State Library Sacramento, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey From California State Library Sacramento, California Original: Ante 1860 Re-photo: February 1940 VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST - Mission San Carlos Borromeo, Rio Road & Lausen Drive, Carmel-by-the-Sea, Monterey County, CA

  15. 32. Historic American Buildings Survey From California State Library Sacramento, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Historic American Buildings Survey From California State Library Sacramento, California Original: Re-photo: February 1940 DETAIL OF ENTRANCE (East Elevation) - Mission San Carlos Borromeo, Rio Road & Lausen Drive, Carmel-by-the-Sea, Monterey County, CA

  16. 33. Historic American Buildings Survey From California State Library Sacramento, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Historic American Buildings Survey From California State Library Sacramento, California Original: 1860's Re-photo: February 1940 INTERIOR OF CHURCH BEFORE RESTORATION - Mission San Carlos Borromeo, Rio Road & Lausen Drive, Carmel-by-the-Sea, Monterey County, CA

  17. 77 FR 1900 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List the Humboldt...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-12

    ...and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 90-Day Finding on a Petition To List the Humboldt...Wildlife Service (Service), announce a 90-day finding on a petition to list the Humboldt...we are to make this finding within 90 days of our receipt of the petition and...

  18. Airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) images over disseminated gold deposits, Osgood Mountains, Humboldt County, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krohn, M. Dennis

    1986-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) acquired airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) images over several disseminated gold deposits in northern Nevada in 1983. The aerial surveys were flown to determine whether TIMS data could depict jasperoids (siliceous replacement bodies) associated with the gold deposits. The TIMS data were collected over the Pinson and Getchell Mines in the Osgood Mountains, the Carlin, Maggie Creek, Bootstrap, and other mines in the Tuscarora Mountains, and the Jerritt Canyon Mine in the Independence Mountains. The TIMS data seem to be a useful supplement to conventional geochemical exploration for disseminated gold deposits in the western United States. Siliceous outcrops are readily separable in the TIMS image from other types of host rocks. Different forms of silicification are not readily separable, yet, due to limitations of spatial resolution and spectral dynamic range. Features associated with the disseminated gold deposits, such as the large intrusive bodies and fault structures, are also resolvable on TIMS data. Inclusion of high-resolution thermal inertia data would be a useful supplement to the TIMS data.

  19. Appraisal of water resources in the Fort McDermitt Indian Reservation, Humboldt County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arteaga, Freddy E.

    1978-01-01

    Consideration of land-management alternatives in parts of the Fort McDermitt Indian Reservation has prompted an evaluation of water resources in the reservation and vicinity. The study area comprises (1) about 9 square miles of reservation land, plus adjacent areas, on and bordering the floor of Quinn River valley near McDermitt, Nev., and (2) the uninhabited 5.6-square-mile Hog John Ranch (also part of the reservation) and adjacent areas along the boundary between Kings River and Desert Valley, about 35 miles southwest of McDermitt. In both areas, the valley-fill reservoir forms the principal source of ground water. The reservoir is at least 1,225 feet deep at one site near McDermitt. Volcanic rocks also form an important source of ground water for several wells near McDermitt. A 12-inch diameter, 720-foot test well drilled on the reservation near McDermitt produced 360 gallons per minute with a drawdown of 149 feet (specific capacity, 2.4 gallons per minute per foot of drawdown). A transmissivity of 640 feet squared per day for this well was obtained from a 44-hour pumping test. Transmissivities for 6 Other wells in the McDermitt area ranged from 710 to 11,000 feet squared per day. In this area, water levels ranging from 3 to 250 feet below land surface have remained almost the same as those of 1964. Depth to water generally increases away from the valley lowlands. The valley-fill reservoir in the Hog John Ranch area is at least 350 feet deep. Depth to water in the vicinity of the Ranch ranges from 0.25 to 48 feet, with deeper water levels generally found at higher land elevations. Net change in these water levels has been negligible for a period of nearly 30 years. Two adjacent test wells at the Ranch were augered to depths of 33 and 90 feet during this study, and completed with well-bottom screens. Differing water levels in the two wells indicate a minimum upward hydraulic gradient of about 0.07 foot per foot in the zone penetrated by the holes. Water quality in the McDermitt area is generally suitable for most uses. In the Ranch area, water salinity appears to decrease with increasing well depth, and is generally suitable for irrigation at depths exceeding 50 feet. The East Fork Quinn River, which flows directly through the inhabited part of the reservation, has an average runoff of about 20,000 acre-feet per year at the gage 7 miles east of McDermitt. Streamflow from Quinn River, Kings River, and Desert Valleys passes intermittently through the Ranch by way of the Quinn River, but the quantity of flow is not known.

  20. Estimated agricultural ground-water pumpage in parts of Fresno, Kings, and Madera Counties, San Joaquin Valley, California, 1974-77

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitten, Hugh T.

    1978-01-01

    Agricultural ground-water pumpage data are presented for 1974-77 for the area on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley in parts of Fresno, Kings, and Madera Counties, Calif., which has approximately the boundaries of the Westlands Water District. The method of estimating pumpage was based on electric-power consumption at the agricultual wells. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Prepared in cooperation with the Orange County Water District, Fountain Valley, California Discovery of Cyanuric Acid During an Assessment of Natural

    E-print Network

    For product and ordering information: World Wide Web: http://www.usgs.gov/pubprod Telephone: 1-888-ASK resources, natural hazards, and the environment: World Wide Web: http://www.usgs.gov Telephone: 1-888-ASK 2007­5048, 13 p. #12;iii Acknowledgments The authors thank Patricia Bagley of the Orange County Flood

  2. Epidemiological study of the incidence of cancer as related to industrial emissions in Contra Costa County, California. Final report September 1978-December 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, D.F.; Nelson, V.E.; Swain, B.E.; Johnson, L.F.

    1984-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of lung cancer incidence in Contra Costa County to ambient levels of air pollution. It was suspected that the presence of heavy industry in the county, mainly petrochemical plants and oil refineries, could be a contributing factor. Initially, an incidence analysis established that the industrial portion of the county had an excess of lung cancer as compared to the remaining non-industrial portion. Air pollution patterns were subsequently determined by five permanent air monitoring stations and ten temporary stations which monitored the levels of 12 air pollutants for a period of one year. By correlating the 1970-79 lung cancer rates for each census tract and tract levels of air pollution constituents, a statistically significant relationship between ambient air SO4 and lung cancer in males, but not in females, was found. However, when adjusted for the percent of the working population categorized as blue collar, the association was eliminated. An interview study of 249 cases and 373 controls was then conducted. Demographic, work history, residential history, dietary, and smoking history questions comprised the bulk of the data collected. Analysis indicated that the major contribution to lung cancer in the county was due to cigarette smoking. No significant association between lung cancer risk and measured constituents of air pollution was found. Of five broad occupational categories (indicating possible hazardous exposures) none had any significant relationship to lung cancer.

  3. Hydrogeology and geochemistry of acid mine drainage in ground water in the vicinity of Penn Mine and Camanche Reservoir, Calaveras County, California; first-year summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamlin, S.N.; Alpers, C.N.

    1995-01-01

    Acid drainage from the Penn Mine in Calaveras County, California, has caused contamination of ground water between Mine Run Dam and Camanche Reservoir. The Penn Mine was first developed in the 1860's primarily for copper and later produced lesser amounts of zinc, lead, silver, and gold from steeply dipping massive sulfide lenses in metamorphic rocks. Surface disposal of sulfidic waste rock and tailings from mine operations has produced acidic drainage with pH values between 2.3 and 2.7 and elevated concentrations of sulfate and metals, including copper, zinc, cadmium, iron, and aluminum. During the mine's operation and after its subsequent abandonment in the late 1950's, acid mine drainage flowed down Mine Run into the Mokelumne River. Construction of Camanche Dam in 1963 flooded part of the Mokelumne River adjacent to Penn Mine. Surface-water diversions and unlined impoundments were constructed at Penn Mine in 1979 to reduce runoff from the mine, collect contaminated surface water, and enhance evaporation. Some of the contaminated surface water infiltrates the ground water and flows toward Camanche Reservoir. Ground- water flow in the study area is controlled by the local hydraulic gradient and the hydraulic characteristics of two principal rock types, a Jurassic metavolcanic unit and the underlying Salt Spring slate. The hydraulic gradient is west from Mine Run impoundment toward Camanche Reservoir. The median hydraulic conductivity was about 10 to 50 times higher in the metavolcanic rock (0.1 foot per day) than in the slate (0.002 to 0.01 foot per day); most flow occurs in the metavolcanic rock where hydraulic conductivity is as high as 50 feet per day in two locations. The contact between the two rock units is a fault plane that strikes N20?W, dips 20?NE, and is a likely conduit for ground-water flow, based on down-hole measurements with a heatpulse flowmeter. Analyses of water samples collected during April 1992 provide a comprehensive characterization of ground water below Mine Run Dam at the Penn Mine. Specific conductance of the samples ranged from 1,810 to 18,000 microsiemens per centimeter. pH values of sampled ground water ranged from 3.7 to 7.8. Dissolved constituents in ground water ranged from less than 0.010 to 86 milligrams per liter for copper, from less than 0.010 to 240 milligrams per liter for iron, from less than 0.01 to 250 milligrams per liter for aluminum, and from 0.020 to 600 milligrams per liter for zinc. A contaminated ground-water plume appears to originate in the metavolcanic unit along the north abutment of Mine Run Dam. The plume is characterized by low pH, high concentrations of sulfate and dissolved metals, and enrichment of the heavy stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen. Dissolved iron and sulfate correlate positively, suggesting pyrite as the probable source of these elements. The concentrations of some dissolved constituents apparently are controlled by equilibrium with solid mineral phases. Poorly crystalline hydrous ferric oxide and microcrystalline gibbsite are close to saturation in ground water with pH values between 4 and 7.8 and probably control the solubility of Fe3+ and Al3+, respectively. Using a range of bulk hydraulic conductivity values for the metavolcanic unit from the median value (0.1 foot per day) to the highest values (50 feet per day), together with a representative cross-sectional area (3,000 square feet) for the contaminated ground-water plume and a hydraulic gradient of 0.14 from August 1992, the following range in ground-water flow rates is estimated by Darcy's law: 42 to 21,000 cubic feet per day, or 105 to 5x107 gallons per year. Multiplying this estimated range in ground-water flow by representative metal concentrations from the contaminated plume gives the following estimates for annual metal transport to Camanche Reservoir by ground water: 86 to 42,000 pounds of copper; 310 to 150,000 pounds of zinc; and 1.5 to 750 pounds of cadmium. These crude preliminary es

  4. Temporal Chemical Data for Sediment, Water, and Biological Samples from the Lava Cap Mine Superfund Site, Nevada County, California-2006-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Andrea L.; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Tufano, Kate; White, Richard III

    2010-01-01

    The Lava Cap Mine is located about 6 km east of the city of Grass Valley, Nevada County, California, at an elevation of about 900 m. Gold was hosted in quartz-carbonate veins typical of the Sierran Gold Belt, but the gold grain size was smaller and the abundance of sulfide minerals higher than in typical deposits. The vein system was discovered in 1860, but production was sporadic until the 1930s when two smaller operations on the site were consolidated, a flotation mill was built, and a 100-foot deep adit was driven to facilitate drainage and removal of water from the mine workings, which extended to 366 m. Peak production at the Lava Cap occurred between 1934 and 1943, when about 90,000 tons of ore per year were processed. To facilitate removal of the gold and accessory sulfide minerals, the ore was crushed to a very fine sand or silt grain size for processing. Mining operations at Lava Cap ceased in June 1943 due to War Production Board Order L-208 and did not resume after the end of World War II. Two tailings retention structures were built at the Lava Cap Mine. The first was a log dam located about 0.4 km below the flotation mill on Little Clipper Creek, and the second, built in 1938, was a larger earth fill and rip-rap structure constructed about 2 km downstream, which formed the water body now called Lost Lake. The log dam failed during a storm that began on December 31, 1996, and continued into January 1997; an estimated 8,000-10,000 m3 of tailings were released into Little Clipper Creek during this event. Most of the fine tailings were deposited in Lost Lake, dramatically increasing its turbidity and resulting in a temporary 1-1.5 m rise in lake level due to debris blocking the dam spillway. When the blockage was cleared, the lake level quickly lowered, leaving a ?bathtub ring? of very fine tailings deposited substantially above the water line. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) initiated emergency action in late 1997 at the mine site to reduce the possibility of future movement of tailings, and began an assessment of the risks posed by physical and chemical hazards at the site. The EPA's assessment identified arsenic (As) as the primary hazard of concern. Three main exposure routes were identified: inhalation/ingestion of mine tailings, dermal absorption/ingestion of As in lake water from swimming, and ingestion of As-contaminated ground water or surface water. Lost Lake is a private lake which is completely surrounded by low-density residential development. Prior to the dam failure, the lake was used by the local residents for swimming and boating. An estimated 1,776 people reside within one mile of the lake, and almost all residents of the area use potable groundwater for domestic use. Risk factors for human exposure to As derived from mine wastes were high enough to merit placement of the mine site and surrounding area on the National Priority List (commonly called ?Superfund?). The Lava Cap Mine Superfund site (LCMS) encompasses approximately 33 acres that include the mine site, the stretch of Little Clipper Creek between the mine and Lost Lake, the lake itself, and the area between the lake and the confluence of Little Clipper Creek with its parent stream, Clipper Creek. The area between the two creeks is named the ?deposition area? due to the estimated 24 m thick layer of tailings that were laid down there during and after active mining. The lobate structure of Lost Lake is also due to deposition in this area. The deposition area and Lost Lake are together estimated to contain 382,277 m3 of tailings. The primary goals of the EPA have been to minimize tailings movement downstream of Lost Lake and to ensure that residents in the area have drinking water that meets national water quality standards. EPA has officially decided to construct a public water supply line to deliver safe water to affected residences, since some residential wells in the area have As concentrations above the curr

  5. The Redwood Coast Tsunami Work Group: a unique organization promoting earthquake and tsunami resilience on California's North Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dengler, L.; Henderson, C.; Larkin, D.; Nicolini, T.; Ozaki, V.

    2012-12-01

    The Northern California counties of Del Norte, Humboldt, and Mendocino account for over 30% of California's coastline and is one of the most seismically active areas of the contiguous 48 states. The region is at risk from earthquakes located on- and offshore and from tsunamis generated locally from faults associated with the Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ) and from distant sources elsewhere in the Pacific. In 1995 the California Geological Survey (CGS) published a scenario for a CSZ earthquake that included both strong ground shaking effects and a tsunami. As a result of the scenario, the Redwood Coast Tsunami Work Group (RCTWG), an organization of government agencies, tribes, service groups, academia and the private sector, was formed to coordinate and promote earthquake and tsunami hazard awareness and mitigation in the three-county region. The RCTWG and its member agencies projects include education/outreach products and programs, tsunami hazard mapping, signage and siren planning. Since 2008, RCTWG has worked with the California Emergency Management Agency (Cal EMA) in conducting tsunami warning communications tests on the North Coast. In 2007, RCTWG members helped develop and carry out the first tsunami training exercise at FEMA's Emergency Management Institute in Emmitsburg, MD. The RCTWG has facilitated numerous multi-agency, multi-discipline coordinated exercises, and RCTWG county tsunami response plans have been a model for other regions of the state and country. Eight North Coast communities have been recognized as TsunamiReady by the National Weather Service, including the first National Park the first State Park and only tribe in California to be so recognized. Over 500 tsunami hazard zone signs have been posted in the RCTWG region since 2008. Eight assessment surveys from 1993 to 2010 have tracked preparedness actions and personal awareness of earthquake and tsunami hazards in the county and additional surveys have tracked public awareness and tourist concerns about tsunami hazard signs. Over the seventeen-year period covered by the surveys, the percent with houses secured to foundations has increased from 58 to 84 percent, respondents aware of a local tsunami hazard increased from 51 to 89 percent and knowing what the Cascadia subduction zone is from 16 to 57 percent. In 2009, the RCTWG was recognized by the Western States Seismic Policy Council (WSSPC) with an award for innovation and in 2010, the RCTWG-sponsored class "Living on Shaky Ground" was awarded WSSPC's overall Award in Excellence. The RCTWG works closely with CGS and Cal EMA on a number of projects including tsunami mapping, evacuation zone planning, siren policy, tsunami safety for boaters, and public education messaging. Current projects include working with CGS to develop a "playbook" tsunami mapping product to illustrate the expected effects from a range of tsunami source events and assist local governments in focusing future response actions to reflect the range expected impacts from distant source events. Preparedness efforts paid off on March 11, 2011 when a tsunami warning was issued for the region and significant damage occurred in harbor regions of Del Norte County and Mendocino County. Full-scale evacuations were carried out in a coordinated manner and the majority of the commercial fishing fleet in Crescent City was able to exit the harbor before the tsunami arrived.

  6. 76 FR 55937 - Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge, Washoe and Humboldt Counties, NV, and Lake County, OR; Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ...Originally established to protect and conserve the American pronghorn, the Refuge provides important habitat for a variety of wildlife...populations of sagebrush obligate wildlife species such as American pronghorn and greater sage-grouse. Actions to improve habitats...

  7. 78 FR 21964 - Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge Humboldt and Washoe Counties, NV, and Lake County, OR; Record of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ...resides in the Great Basin, and was established in 1931 for the conservation and protection of the once-imperiled American pronghorn. Sheldon Refuge (along with the Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge) now conserves habitat for a number of...

  8. Job Satisfaction of Principals and Assistant Principals in Traditional Public High Schools and Charter High Schools in Los Angeles County, California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postell, Lilia M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the job satisfaction of principals and assistant principals in traditional public high schools in Southern California's Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) and those in charter high schools operating within the same boundaries. Methodology: The subjects in the present study were 15…

  9. Child-Care Aid and Quality for California Families: Focusing on San Francisco and Santa Clara Counties. PACE Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Bruce; Chang, Yueh-Wen; Suzuki, Sawako; Kagan, Sharon Lynn

    Against the backdrop of evolving welfare policies in California following the approval of federal welfare reforms in 1996, the Growing Up in Poverty Project is examining how single mothers and their children fare as they move from cash aid to jobs, the types and quality of child care arrangements selected, and if mothers' access to child care…

  10. CHARACTERIZATION AND EH/PH-BASED LEACHING TESTS OF MERCURY-CONTAINING MINING WASTES FROM THE SULFUR BANK MERCURY MINE, LAKE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Clear Lake in northern California has received inputs of mercury (Hg) mining wastes from the Sulfur Bank Mercury Mine (SBMM). About 1.2 million tons of Hg-contaminated overburden and mine tailings were distributed over a 50-ha surface area due to mining operations from 1865 to 19...

  11. California Library Statistics and Directory, 1980. Fiscal Year 1978-79 Data for Public, Academic, Special, State Agency, and County Law Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Collin, Ed.

    This annual directory characterizes libraries in California through statistical tables, a profile of each library, descriptions of state library associations, a public library directory, and several indexes. An introduction explains how to use the directory. Presented in the statistical tables are measures of activities, income, expenditures,…

  12. Flood of September 12-13, 1982 in Gibson, Carroll, and Madison Counties, western Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, Clarence H.; Gamble, Charles R.; Bingham, Roy H.

    1986-01-01

    Intense rainfall on September 12-13, 1982, caused severe local flooding along many streams in Gibson County in western Tennessee. The rainfall resulted from remnants of Hurricane Chris combining with a cool front moving across the western half of the State. A maximum 1-hr rainfall intensity of 3.3 in was recorded at Humboldt. Peak discharge exceeded the 100-yr flood on many small streams. The floods caused three deaths and about 15.3 million dollars damage to crops, roads and bridges, businesses, and residential areas. Long-time residents of Gibson County reported that stream stages have not been as high since at least 1922. (USGS)

  13. DISTRIBUTION OF SEDIMENT MERCURY CONCENTRATIONS IN THE HUMBOLDT RIVER WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1998 the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) required the mining industry to list all releases to the environment exceeding the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) reporting threshold. Mining activities in Arizona, California and Nevada accounted for approx...

  14. An index method to evaluate growers’ pesticide use for identifying on-farm innovations and effective alternative pest management strategies: a case study of winegrape in Madera County, California*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-juan; Qin, Zhi-hao; Zhang, Ming-hua; Browde, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Winegrape is an important perennial crop in California, USA. Each year California winegrape farming consumes about 20 million kilograms of pesticides that have been a pollutant source to the fresh water systems of the state. The variation of pesticide use among winegrape growers has been significant. It has been observed that some growers have developed effective ways to reduce pesticide use, yet control pests efficiently to ensure harvest. Identification of the growers with low and high pesticide use is very helpful to extension programs that aim on reducing pesticide environmental risk. In this study, an index approach is proposed to quantitatively measure pesticide use intensity at grower level. An integrated pesticide use index is developed by taking pesticide quantity and toxicity into account. An additive formula and a multiplying formula were used to calculate the pesticide use index, i.e., PUI and PUIM. It was found that both PUI and PUIM were capable of identifying the low and high pesticide users while PUI was slightly more conservative than PUIM. All pesticides used in California winegrape farming were taken into account for calculating the indices. Madera County, one of the largest winegrape producers in California, was taken as an example to test the proposed approach. In year 2000, among the total 208 winegrape growers, 28 with PUI?10 and 34 with 1060, identified as high pesticide users, had large-sized vineyards, i.e., more fields and large planted areas. They used all types of pesticides and many compounds, which indicated that their pest controls heavily depended on pesticides rather than on-farm management. Through the case study, the proposed approach proved to be useful for analyzing the growers’ pesticide use intensities and interpreting their pesticide use behaviors, which led to a new start point for further investigation of searching ways to reduce pesticide environmental risk. PMID:21370508

  15. An index method to evaluate growers' pesticide use for identifying on-farm innovations and effective alternative pest management strategies: a case study of winegrape in Madera County, California.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-juan; Qin, Zhi-hao; Zhang, Ming-hua; Browde, Joe

    2011-03-01

    Winegrape is an important perennial crop in California, USA. Each year California winegrape farming consumes about 20 million kilograms of pesticides that have been a pollutant source to the fresh water systems of the state. The variation of pesticide use among winegrape growers has been significant. It has been observed that some growers have developed effective ways to reduce pesticide use, yet control pests efficiently to ensure harvest. Identification of the growers with low and high pesticide use is very helpful to extension programs that aim on reducing pesticide environmental risk. In this study, an index approach is proposed to quantitatively measure pesticide use intensity at grower level. An integrated pesticide use index is developed by taking pesticide quantity and toxicity into account. An additive formula and a multiplying formula were used to calculate the pesticide use index, i.e., PUI and PUIM. It was found that both PUI and PUIM were capable of identifying the low and high pesticide users while PUI was slightly more conservative than PUIM. All pesticides used in California winegrape farming were taken into account for calculating the indices. Madera County, one of the largest winegrape producers in California, was taken as an example to test the proposed approach. In year 2000, among the total 208 winegrape growers, 28 with PUI?10 and 34 with 1060, identified as high pesticide users, had large-sized vineyards, i.e., more fields and large planted areas. They used all types of pesticides and many compounds, which indicated that their pest controls heavily depended on pesticides rather than on-farm management. Through the case study, the proposed approach proved to be useful for analyzing the growers' pesticide use intensities and interpreting their pesticide use behaviors, which led to a new start point for further investigation of searching ways to reduce pesticide environmental risk. PMID:21370508

  16. A review of current practices and the future for deep well injection in the upper Miocene Stevens sand, Kern County, California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. C. Kiser; D. W. Chenot

    1991-01-01

    Waste-water disposal is a major concern of the petroleum business, especially because of complications associated with many produced-water surface-impoundment percolation facilities. In the San Joaquin Valley, California, the current environmental regulations protecting the potentially usable groundwaters are stringent. the Stevens has significant potential as a disposal zone that may offer considerable capacity when the project is designed using proper geologic

  17. Geology and ground water in Russian River Valley areas and in Round, Laytonville, and Little Lake Valleys, Sonoma and Mendocino Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardwell, G.T.

    1965-01-01

    This report describes the occurrence, availability, and quality of ground water in seven valley areas along the course of the Russian River in Sonoma and Mendocino Counties, Calif., and in three valleys in the upper drainage reach of the Eel River in Mendocino County. Except for the westward-trending lower Russian River valley, the remaining valley areas along the Russian River (Healdsburg, Alexander, Cloverdale, Sanel, Ukiah, and Potter Valleys) lie in northwest-trending structurally controlled depressions formed in marine rocks of Jurassic and Cretaceous age. The principal aquifer in all the valleys is the alluvium of Recent age, which includes highly permeable channel deposits of gravel and sand. Water for domestic, irrigation, industrial, and other uses is developed by (1) direct diversion from the Russian River and its tributaries, (2) withdrawal of ground water and river water from shallow wells near the river, and (3) withdrawals of ground water from wells in alluvial deposits at varying distances from the river. Surface water in the Russian River and most tributaries is of good chemical quality. The water is a calcium magnesium bicarbonate type and contains 75,200 parts per million of dissolved solids. Ground water is also of good chemical quality throughout most of the drainage basin, but the concentration of dissolved solids (100-300 parts per million) is somewhat higher than that in the surface water. Round, Laytonville, and Little Lake Valleys are in central and northern Mendocino County in the drainage basin of the northwestward flowing Eel River. In Round Valley the alluvium of Recent age yields water of good chemical quality in large quantities. Yields are lower and the chemical quality poorer in Laytonville Valley. Ground water in Little Lake Valley is relatively undeveloped. Selected descriptions of wells, drillers' logs, chemical analyses, and hydrographs showing water-level fluctuations are included in the report. Accompanying maps show the distribution of water-bearing formations and the location of wells.

  18. Ecological Condition of Streams in Northern Nevada EPA R-MAP Humboldt Basin Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents stream data on the Humboldt River Basin in northern Nevada using the R-EMAP Program. Water is of primary importance to both the economy and the ecology of the region. Many of the waters of Nevada have previously received relatively little attention in regar...

  19. Humboldt-Preis fr gute Die HU schreibt fr das kom-

    E-print Network

    Röder, Beate

    WAS KOMMT Humboldt-Preis für gute Lehre 2009 Die HU schreibt für das kom- mende Jahr erstmals den der höchst dotierten ihrer Art. Nominiert werden können alle hauptamtlich an der HU Lehrenden eingereicht werden. http://lehre.hu-berlin.de/preis/ Gesundheitsprogramm für Jugendliche startet Ab Februar

  20. www.hu-berlin.de Die Geschichte der Humboldt-Universitt zu Berlin

    E-print Network

    Freytag, Johann-Christoph

    www.hu-berlin.de Die Geschichte der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin IM ZEICHEN DER EXZELLENZ: DIE Graduiertenschulen und Cluster in HU-Regie werden ebenfalls durch die Exzellenzinitiative gefördert. Mit den, wenn auch der wissenschaftliche Nachwuchs intensiv unterstützt wird. Diesem wird an der HU frühzeitig

  1. Muon g -2 Theory Fred Jegerlehner, DESY Zeuthen/Humboldt University Berlin

    E-print Network

    Röder, Beate

    Muon g - 2 Theory Fred Jegerlehner, DESY Zeuthen/Humboldt University Berlin ' & $ % 10TH EUROPEAN (internal current circulating) µ = gµ e 2mµc s ; gµ = 2 (1 + aµ) Dirac: gµ = 2 , aµ = 2 + · · · muon. Jegerlehner EINN, Paphos, Cyprus , 28 Oct. - 2 Nov., 2013 3 #12;In a uniform magnetic field, as in muon g - 2

  2. An Ecologic Characterization and Landscape Assessment of the Humboldt River Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Humboldt River Basin covers a large part of northern Nevada. Very little is known about the water quality of the entire Basin. The people living in this area depend on clean water. Not knowing about water quality is a concern because people will need to manage the negative...

  3. Beyond institutional repositories *Laurent Romary, INRIA (Gemo research group) & Humboldt Universitt zu Berlin

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Beyond institutional repositories *Laurent Romary, INRIA (Gemo research group) & Humboldt-called institutional repositories, even if it has been a sensible response at an earlier stage, may not answer in the domain of publication repositories). The argument proceeds as follows: firstly, while institutional open

  4. Use of carboxylated microspheres to assess transport potential of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts at the Russian River water supply facility, Sonoma County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metge, D.W.; Harvey, R.W.; Anders, R.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Seymour, D.; Jasperse, J.

    2007-01-01

    Carboxylated microspheres were employed as surrogates to assess the transport potential of Cryptosporidium parvumoocysts during forced- and natural-gradient tests conducted in July and October 2004. The tests involved poorly-sorted, near-surface sediments where groundwater is pumped from an alluvial aquifer underlying the Russian River, Sonoma County, CA. In an off channel infiltration basin and within the river, a mixture (2-, 3-, and 5- ??m diameters) of fluorescently-labeled carboxylated microspheres and bromide tracers were used in two injection and recovery test to assess sediment removal efficiency for the microspheres. Bottom sediments varied considerably in their filtration efficiency for Cryptosporidium.

  5. Assessment of mercury and methylmercury in water, sediment, and biota in Sulphur Creek in the vicinity of the Clyde Gold Mine and the Elgin Mercury Mine, Colusa County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hothem, Roger L.; Rytuba, James J.; Brussee, Brianne E.; Goldstein, Daniel N.

    2013-01-01

    At the request of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, we performed a study during April–July 2010 to characterize mercury (Hg), monomethyl mercury (MMeHg), and other geochemical constituents in sediment, water, and biota at the Clyde Gold Mine and the Elgin Mercury Mine, located in neighboring subwatersheds of Sulphur Creek, Colusa County, California. This study was in support of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act - Removal Site Investigation. The investigation was in response to an abatement notification from the California Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board to evaluate the release of Hg from the Clyde and Elgin mines. Samples of water, sediment, and biota (aquatic macroinvertebrates) were collected from sites upstream and downstream from the two mine sites to evaluate the level of Hg contamination contributed by each mine to the aquatic ecosystem. Physical parameters, as well as dissolved organic carbon, total Hg (HgT), and MMeHg were analyzed in water and sediment. Other relevant geochemical constituents were analyzed in sediment, filtered water, and unfiltered water. Samples of aquatic macroinvertebrates from each mine were analyzed for HgT and MMeHg. The presence of low to moderate concentrations of HgT and MMeHg in water, sediment, and biota from the Freshwater Branch of Sulphur Creek, and the lack of significant increases in these concentrations downstream from the Clyde Mine indicated that this mine is not a significant source of Hg to the watershed during low flow conditions. Although concentrations of HgT and MMeHg were generally higher in samples of sediment and water from the Elgin Mine compared to the Clyde Mine, concentrations in comparable biota from the two mine areas were similar. It is likely that highly saline effluent from nearby hot springs contribute more Hg to the West Fork of Sulphur Creek than the mine waste material at the Elgin Mine.

  6. Basal topographic controls on the rapid retreat of Humboldt Glacier, northern Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Rachel; Vieli, Andreas; Stokes, Chris

    2014-05-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet has rapidly lost mass in the past decade, through a combination of negative surface mass balance and accelerated discharge from marine-terminating outlet glaciers. However, the factors driving changes in ice dynamics are poorly understood. Here, we assess the impact of climatic/oceanic and basal topographic controls on the behaviour of Humboldt Glacier, one of the largest marine-terminating outlet glaciers in Greenland. We use a combination of ESA SAR image Mode data and Landsat imagery to demonstrate that Humboldt Glacier retreated rapidly between 1999 and 2012 (162 ma-1), following decades of gradual retreat between 1975 and 1999 (37 ma-1). Comparison of frontal positions with climatic/oceanic forcing data suggests that the primary driver of retreat was increased summer air temperatures, which warmed by almost 3°c between 1999 and 2012, with a secondary contribution from reduced summer sea ice concentrations. Retreat rates at Humboldt Glacier were an order of magnitude greater on the northern portion of the terminus, which we attribute to the presence of a large basal trough beneath this section. We suggest that this overdeepening brought the northern section close to floatation and increased its sensitivity to climatic/oceanic forcing, thus promoting rapid retreat. The basal trough continues up to 40 km inland and may facilitate sustained and substantial mass loss from Humboldt Glacier throughout the 21st Century. Our results imply that basal topography is likely to be a critical control on the magnitude and rate of mass loss from Humboldt Glacier in the near-future and highlights the potential for overdeepenings to influence contemporary Arctic outlet glacier behaviour.

  7. Fate of Arsenic Within the Lower Humboldt River Basin, Nevada, Under High Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A. P.

    2004-12-01

    The Humboldt Wildlife Management Area (HWMA) has been identified as a wetland ecosystem in decline because of the dominance of salt-tolerant submergent vegetation, loss of indigenous fauna over time, and episodic bird kills. Previous investigations within the HWMA indicated that certain trace elements, including arsenic, were greater than geochemical background concentrations, and in some cases, exceeded protective ecological criteria established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. From 1998 through 2001, arsenic was characterized within the lower Humboldt River system during high-flow conditions. The lower Humboldt River and associated irrigation drains are the primary sources of surface water for HWMA. Arsenic in surface-water samples occurred primarily as dissolved arsenate with concentrations ranging from 14 to 238 ppb. Arsenic concentrations increased downriver with the highest concentrations occurring in Humboldt Lake waters. Although arsenite concentrations were less than U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ecological criteria, the criterion for the watering of livestock (200 ppb) was exceeded in wetland surface waters near the mouth of the river. Arsenic concentrations in wetland sediments ranged from 19 to 57 ppm. Pore-water collected from these sediments contained arsenic concentrations ranging from 90 to 524 ppb of which 5 to 74 percent was arsenite. The Canadian Interim Sediment Quality Guideline (5.9 ppm) and consensus based toxicity-threshold arsenic concentration (9.79 ppm) were exceeded in all wetland-sediment samples. Arsenic concentrations in surface-water samples collected from the outflow of the Humboldt Sink indicate that arsenic may be flushed from the HWMA wetland ecosystem under high-flow conditions.

  8. Progress in Decommissioning the Humboldt Bay Power Plant - 13604

    SciTech Connect

    Rod, Kerry [PG and E Utility, Humboldt Bay Power Plant, 1000 King Salmon Ave. Eureka, CA 95503 (United States)] [PG and E Utility, Humboldt Bay Power Plant, 1000 King Salmon Ave. Eureka, CA 95503 (United States); Shelanskey, Steven K. [Anata Management Solutions, 5180 South Commerce Dr,, Suite F Murray, UT 84107 (United States)] [Anata Management Solutions, 5180 South Commerce Dr,, Suite F Murray, UT 84107 (United States); Kristofzski, John [CH2MHILL, 295 Bradley Blvd. Suite 300, Richland WA 99353 (United States)] [CH2MHILL, 295 Bradley Blvd. Suite 300, Richland WA 99353 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Decommissioning of the Pacific Gas and Electric (PG and E) Company Humboldt Bay Power Plant (HBPP) Unit 3 nuclear facility has now, after more than three decades of SAFSTOR and initial decommissioning work, transitioned to full-scale decommissioning. Decommissioning activities to date have been well orchestrated and executed in spite of an extremely small work site with space constricted even more by other concurrent on-site major construction projects including the demolition of four fossil units, construction of a new generating station and 60 KV switchyard upgrade. Full-scale decommissioning activities - now transitioning from Plant Systems Removal (PG and E self-perform) to Civil Works Projects (contractor performed) - are proceeding in a safe, timely, and cost effective manner. As a result of the successful decommissioning work to date (approximately fifty percent completed) and the intense planning and preparations for the remaining work, there is a high level of confidence for completion of all HBPP Unit 3 decommissions activities in 2018. Strategic planning and preparations to transition into full-scale decommissioning was carried out in 2008 by a small, highly focused project team. This planning was conducted concurrent with other critical planning requirements such as the loading of spent nuclear fuel into dry storage at the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) finishing December 2008. Over the past four years, 2009 through 2012, the majority of decommissioning work has been installation of site infrastructure and removal of systems and components, known as the Plant System Removal Phase, where work scope was dynamic with significant uncertainty, and it was self-performed by PG and E. As HBPP Decommissioning transitions from the Plant System Removal Phase to the Civil Works Projects Phase, where work scope is well defined, a contracting plan similar to that used for Fossil Decommissioning will be implemented. Award of five major work scopes in various stages of development are planned as they include: Turbine Building Demolition, Nuclear Facilities Demolition and Excavation, Intake and Discharge Canal Remediation, Office Facility Demobilization, and Final Site Restoration. Benefits realized by transitioning to the Civil Works Projects Phase with predominant firm fixed-price/fixed unit price contracting include single civil works contractor who can coordinate concrete shaving, liner removal, structural removal, and other demolition activities; streamline financial control; reduce PG and E overhead staffing; and provide a specialized Bidder Team with experience from other similar projects. (authors)

  9. Regime shifts in the Humboldt Current ecosystem [review article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alheit, Jürgen; Niquen, Miguel

    2004-02-01

    Of the four major eastern boundary currents, the Humboldt Current (HC) stands out because it is extremely productive, dominated by anchovy dynamics and subject to frequent direct environmental perturbations of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The long-term dynamics of the HC ecosystem are controlled by shifts between alternating anchovy and sardine regimes that restructure the entire ecosystem from phytoplankton to the top predators. These regime shifts are caused by lasting periods of warm or cold temperature anomalies related to the approach or retreat of warm subtropical oceanic waters to the coast of Peru and Chile. Phases with mainly negative temperature anomalies parallel anchovy regimes (1950-1970; 1985 to the present) and the rather warm period from 1970 to 1985 was characterized by sardine dominance. The transition periods (turning points) from one regime to the other were 1968-1970 and 1984-1986. Like an El Nino, the warm periods drastically change trophic relationships in the entire HC ecosystem, exposing the Peruvian anchovy to a multitude of adverse conditions. Positive temperature anomalies off Peru drive the anchovy population close to the coast as the coastal upwelling cells usually offer the coolest environment, thereby substantially decreasing the extent of the areas of anchovy distribution and spawning. This enhances the effects of negative density-dependent processes such as egg and larval cannibalism and dramatically increases its catchability. Increased spatial overlap between anchovies and the warmer water preferring sardines intensifies anchovy egg mortality further as sardines feed heavily on anchovy eggs. Food sources for juvenile and adult anchovies which prey on a mixed diet of phyto- and zooplankton are drastically reduced because of decreased plankton production due to restricted upwelling in warm years, as demonstrated by lower zooplankton and phytoplankton volumes and the diminution of the fraction of large copepods, their main food source. Horse mackerel and mackerel, the main predators of anchovy, increase predation pressure on juvenile and adult anchovies due to extended invasion into the anchovy habitat in warmer years. In contrast to these periods of warm and cold temperature anomalies on the decadal scale, ENSO events do not play an important role for long-term anchovy dynamics, as the anchovy can recover even from strong ENSO events within 1-2 years. Consequently, the strong 1972-1973 ENSO event (in combination with overfishing) was not the cause of the famous crash of the Peruvian anchovy fishery in the 1970s.

  10. California Urban and Biodiversity Analysis (CURBA)

    E-print Network

    Clarke, Keith

    California Urban and Biodiversity Analysis (CURBA) Model #12;Presentation Overview · Model Overview · Urban Growth Model · Policy Simulation and Evaluation Model · Habitat Fragmentation Analysis · Case Study: Santa Cruz County · Evaluation and Conclusions #12;· Urban Growth Model (Similar to CUF-2

  11. Solar Radiation Monitoring Station (SoRMS): Humboldt State University, Arcata, California (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

    A partnership with HSU and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect solar data to support future solar power generation in the United States. The measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location.

  12. 77 FR 26317 - Exemption of Material for Proposed Disposal Procedures for the Humboldt Bay Power Plant, Unit 3...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

    ...Exemption of Material for Proposed Disposal Procedures for the Humboldt Bay Power...PG&E, the licensee) for alternate disposal of approximately 2,000,000 cubic...Recovery Act (RCRA) Subtitle C hazardous disposal facility located near Grand View,...

  13. An investigation of several aspects of LANDSAT-5 data quality. [Palmer County, Shelby, mt; White sands, NM; Great Salt Lake, UT; San Matted Bridge and Sacramento, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, R. C. (principal investigator)

    1984-01-01

    Band-to-band registration, geodetic registration, interdector noise, and the modulation transfer function (MTE) are discussed for the Palmer County; TX scene. Band combinations for several LANDSAT 4 and LANDSAT 5 scenes; the geodetic registration test for the Sacramento, CA area; periodic noise components in TM band 5; and grey level measurements by detector for Great Salt Lake (UT) dark water forescans and backscans are considered. Results of MTF analyses of the San Mateo Bridge and of TM high resolution and aerial Daedalus scanner imagery are consistent and appear to be repeatable. An oil-on-sand target was constructed on the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The two-image analysis procedure used is summarized.

  14. 1. General South to North view of floor beam and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. General South to North view of floor beam and stringer system used in Parker, Pin-Connected, Through Truss Bridge (Moody Bridge) near Garberville, California. - Moody Bridge, Spanning South Fork Eel River, Garberville, Humboldt County, CA

  15. Ground-water conditions and shallow test-well information in the eastern half of Merced County, California, 1977-82

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    The city of Merced, other municipalities, and irrigation in the vicinity of Merced in the San Joaquin Valley of California depend on ground water for water supply. Water-level data for 1977-81 show that there has been no significant change in water levels, indicating that during this period, recharge in the Merced area balance natural discharge and withdrawals by pumping. Lithologic logs of shallow test wells drilled around Merced indicate shallow fine-grained material in the aquifer that could interfere with surface artificial recharge to the aquifer system. Short-term and seasonal fluctuations of water levels in wells perforated at different depths and in different aquifers show dissimilar patterns in some areas. The expansion and refinement of the observation-well network will provide a data base for water-management decisions and for assessments of ground-water conditions in the future. (USGS)

  16. The occurrence and status of candidate species listed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    The distribution and status of four plant and nine animal species being considered by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) for protection under the Endangered Species Act and one animal species recently listed in the Act as endangered was determined for the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPR-1 and 2). Hoover's woolly-star (Eriastrum hooveri), a Category 2 plant species, was located at 28 sites on NPR-1. The California jewelflower (Caulanthus californicus), Kern mallow (Eremalche kernensis), and San Joaquin woolly-threads (Lembertia congdonii) were not observed. Of these, the Kern mallow is most likely to occur based on habitat utilization and autecology. No evidence was gathered that suggests the Buena Vista Lake shrew (Sorex ornatus relictus) was present on either of the Reserves. Nelson's antelope ground squirrel (Ammospermophilus nelsoni) and the short-nosed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys nitratoides brevinasus) are both Category 2 mammals that were relatively abundant on NPR-1 and 2. The San Joaquin pocket mouse (Perognathus inornatus) was also captured on NPR-1 and 2, but was less numerous. The Tipton kangaroo rat (Dipodomys nitratoides nitratoides), a recently listed endangered species, was found in Section 23S of NPR-1 and Section 18H of NPR-2. No evidence was found that Morrison's blister beetle (Lytta morrisoni), Moestan blister beetle (Lytta moesta), Hopping's blister beetle (Lytta hoppingi), and the Molestan blister beetle (Lytta molesta) exist on either of the Reserves. Similarly, a survey conducted for the striped-skinned snail (Helminthoglypta callistoderma) found no evidence that the snail exists on either of the Reserves. No additional surveys for candidate species that were undetected are needed unless new evidence is collected that suggests the species are or may be present. 17 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act: Fiscal Year 2004-2005. Report Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Susan; Fain, Terry; MacDonald, John; Sehgal, Amber

    2007-01-01

    This document summarizes a report focusing on California counties receiving funds from Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act (JJCPA) programs. These counties are required to report six outcome measures to the California State Legislature on an annual basis to measure the success of the program. These outcome measures are (1) successful completion…

  18. Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act: Fiscal Year 2005-2006. Report Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Susan; Fain, Terry; Sehgal, Amber

    2007-01-01

    This document summarizes a study relating to California counties receiving state funds for Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act (JJCPA) programs. These counties are required to report six outcome measures to the California State Legislature on an annual basis to measure the success of the program. These outcome measures are (1) successful…

  19. Los Angeles County Juvenile Justice Crime Prevention Act: Fiscal Year 2005-2006 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Susan; Fain, Terry; Sehgal, Amber

    2007-01-01

    In 2000, the California State Legislature passed the Schiff-Cardenas Crime Prevention Act, which authorized funding for county juvenile justice programs and designated the Corrections Standards Authority (CSA), formerly named the Board of Corrections, the administrator of funding. California counties receiving state funds for Juvenile Justice…

  20. High-resolution seismic reflection/refraction imaging from Interstate 10 to Cherry Valley Boulevard, Cherry Valley, Riverside County, California: implications for water resources and earthquake hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gandhok, G.; Catchings, R.D.; Goldman, M.R.; Horta, E.; Rymer, M.J.; Martin, P.; Christensen, A.

    1999-01-01

    This report is the second of two reports on seismic imaging investigations conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) during the summers of 1997 and 1998 in the Cherry Valley area in California (Figure 1a). In the first report (Catchings et al., 1999), data and interpretations were presented for four seismic imaging profiles (CV-1, CV-2, CV-3, and CV-4) acquired during the summer of 1997 . In this report, we present data and interpretations for three additional profiles (CV-5, CV-6, and CV-7) acquired during the summer of 1998 and the combined seismic images for all seven profiles. This report addresses both groundwater resources and earthquake hazards in the San Gorgonio Pass area because the shallow (upper few hundred meters) subsurface stratigraphy and structure affect both issues. The cities of Cherry Valley and Beaumont are located approximately 130 km (~80 miles) east of Los Angeles, California along the southern alluvial fan of the San Bernardino Mountains (see Figure 1b). These cities are two of several small cities that are located within San Gorgonio Pass, a lower-lying area between the San Bernardino and the San Jacinto Mountains. Cherry Valley and Beaumont are desert cities with summer daytime temperatures often well above 100 o F. High water usage in the arid climate taxes the available groundwater supply in the region, increasing the need for efficient management of the groundwater resources. The USGS and the San Gorgonio Water District (SGWD) work cooperatively to evaluate the quantity and quality of groundwater supply in the San Gorgonio Pass region. To better manage the water supplies within the District during wet and dry periods, the SGWD sought to develop a groundwater recharge program, whereby, excess water would be stored in underground aquifers during wet periods (principally winter months) and retrieved during dry periods (principally summer months). The SGWD preferred a surface recharge approach because it could be less expensive than a recharging program based on injection wells. However, at an existing surface recharge site, surface recharge of the aquifer was limited by the presence of clayrich layers that impede the downward percolation of the surface water. In boreholes, these clay-rich layers were found to extend from the near surface to about 50 m depth. If practical, the SGWD desired to relocate the recharge ponds to another location within the Cherry Valley–Beaumont area. This required that sites be found where the clay-rich layers were absent. The SGWD elected to explore for such sites by employing a combination of drilling and seismic techniques. A number of near-surface faults have been suggested in the Cherry Valley-Beaumont area (Figure 1b). However, there may be additional unmapped faults that underlie the alluvial valley of San Gorgonio Pass. Because faults are known to act as barriers to lateral groundwater flow in alluvial groundwater systems, mapped and unmapped subsurface faults in the Cherry Valley-Beaumont area would likely influence groundwater flow and the lateral distribution of recharged water. These same faults may pose a significant hazard to the local desert communities and to greater areas of southern California due to the presence of lifelines (water, electrical, gas, transportation, etc.) that extend through San Gorgonio Pass to larger urban areas. The three principal goals of the seismic investigation presented in this report were to laterally map the subsurface stratigraphic horizons, locate faults that may act as barriers to groundwater flow, and measure velocities of shallow sediments that may give rise to amplified shaking during major earthquakes.