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Sample records for humic acid complexation

  1. Effects of humic acid-metal complexes on hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase, carnitine acetyltransferase and catalase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fungjou Lu; Youngshin Chen . Dept. of Biochemistry); Tienshang Huang . Dept. of Medicine)

    1994-03-01

    A significant increase in activities of hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase and carnitine acetyltransferase was observed in male Balb/c mice intraperitoneally injected for 40 d with 0.125 mg/0.1 ml/d humic acid-metal complexes. Among these complexes, the humic acid-As complex was relatively effective, whereas humic acid-25 metal complex was more effective, and humic acid-26 metal complex was most effective. However, humic acid or metal mixtures, or metal such as As alone, was not effective. Humic acid-metal complexes also significantly decreased hepatic catalase activity. A marked decrease of 60-kDa polypeptide in liver cytoplasm was also observed on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after the mice had been injected with the complexes. Morphological analysis of a histopathological biopsy of such treated mice revealed several changes in hepatocytes, including focal necrosis and cell infiltration, mild fatty changes, reactive nuclei, and hypertrophy. Humic acid-metal complexes affect activities of metabolic enzymes of fatty acids, and this results in accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and increase of the lipid peroxidation. The products of lipid peroxidation may be responsible for liver damage and possible carcinogenesis. Previous studies in this laboratory had shown that humic acid-metal complex altered the coagulation system and that humic acid, per se, caused vasculopathy. Therefore, humic acid-metal complexes may be main causal factors of not only so-called blackfoot disease, but also the liver cancer prevailing on the southwestern coast of Taiwan.

  2. Metal ion adsorption to complexes of humic acid and metal oxides: Deviations from the additivity rule

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeer, A.W.P.; McCulloch, J.K.; Van Riemsdijk, W.H.; Koopal, L.K.

    1999-11-01

    The adsorption of cadmium ions to a mixture of Aldrich humic acid and hematite is investigated. The actual adsorption to the humic acid-hematite complex is compared with the sum of the cadmium ion adsorptivities to each of the isolated components. It is shown that the sum of the cadmium ion adsorptivities is not equal to the adsorption to the complex. In general, the adsorption of a specific metal ion to the complex can be understood and qualitatively predicted using the adsorptivities to each of the pure components and taking into account the effect of the pH on the interaction between humic acid and iron oxide on the metal ion adsorption. Due to the interaction between the negatively charged humic acid and the positively charged iron oxide, the adsorption of metal ions on the mineral oxide in the complex will increase as compared to that on the isolated oxide, whereas the adsorption to the humic acid will decrease as compared to that on the isolated humic acid. As a result, the overall adsorption of a specific metal ion to the complex will be smaller than predicted by the additivity rule when this metal ion has a more pronounced affinity for the humic acid than for the mineral oxide, whereas it will be larger than predicted by the additivity rule when the metal ion has a higher affinity for the oxide than for the humic acid.

  3. Peat humic acids and their complex forming properties as influenced by peat humification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudare, D.; Klavins, M.

    2012-04-01

    To study paleoenvironmental changes of importance is understanding of processes of organic matter diagenesis, especially changes of refractory part of natural organic substances - humic substances. Studies of the living organic matter humification process are also essential for understanding of the carbon biogeochemical cycle. The aim of this study was to analyze peat organic matter diagenesis: changes of properties of humic acids, relations between the humification process, properties of peat, peat humic acids, their ability to interact with metal ions, as well ability to accumulate metals. The analysis were carried out on samples of humic substances preparatively extracted from three ombrotrophic bog peat profiles to identify the links between peat age, decomposition and humification degree, botanical composition and properties of peat humic acids elemental (C, H, N, O), functional (-COOH, -OH) composition, structural characteristics - UV, fluorescence, FTIR. The found variability of peat properties is less significant than differences in the properties of peat-forming living matter, thus revealing the dominant impact of humification process on the properties of peat. Correspondingly, composition of peat humic acids is little affected by differences in the properties of precursor living organic material, and such indicators as decomposition degree, humification degree, humic acid elemental ratio and concentrations of acidic functional groups are the best descriptors of changes in organic matter during the process of organic matter diagenesis and humification. Peat ability to accumulate major and trace elements depends on the character of element supply, potency of metal ions to bind functionalities in the peat, with an emphasis on the structure of peat humic acid, pH reaction, oxygen presence, presence of complexing compounds, inorganic ions and many other factors. Major and trace element presence in peat is of importance as an indicator of peat genesis and

  4. Nickel(II) and copper(II) complexes with humic acid anions and their derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabova, I.N.

    2008-01-15

    Complexation of Ni(II) and Cu(II) in aqueous solutions with anions of humic acids, extracted from naturally oxidized coal, and with their hydroxymethyl derivatives is studied spectrophotometrically and potentiometrically. The complexation stoichiometry and the stability constants of the complexes are determined.

  5. [The favorable effect of humic acid based complex micro-element preparations in cadmium exposure].

    PubMed

    Hudák, A; Náray, M; Nagy, I; Molnár, M; Gömöry, I; Ungváry, G

    1997-06-01

    The authors have studied the effect of consumption of a humic acid based complex microelement preparation (potassium, magnesium, iron, zinc, manganese, copper, vanadium, cobalt, molibden, selenium bound to humic acids) for six weeks (10 ml daily) on the biological exposure indices (blood and urine cadmium levels) and clinical laboratory parameters (liver and kidney tests, blood picture) of men (n = 18; 39.7 +/- 10.4 years of age;) working in cadmium exposure for 8.3 +/- 5.0 years. The initial mean blood and urine cadmium levels of the non-smoking subjects was twice higher than that of the non-smoking male controls living in the same urban area (n = 35), and significantly correlated with the length of exposure. Their mean serum alanin-aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl-transferase, creatinine, uric acid and urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase levels were significantly higher than that of the controls. After the six-week treatment blood cadmium level, activity of serum alanin-aminotransferase, serum uric acid and urinary protein concentrations decreased significantly, the abnormal serum iron levels normalized. According to this results, the absorption of cadmium decreased on the effect of the complex microelement supplementation and the adverse laboratory changes attributable partly to cadmium exposure improved. Therefore humic acid based complex microelement supplementation is recommended as an effective tool for prevention and health protection in occupational cadmium exposure as well as for smokers known to be considerably burdened by cadmium. PMID:9254361

  6. Metal ion-humic acid nanoparticle interactions: role of both complexation and condensation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Town, Raewyn M; van Leeuwen, Herman P

    2016-07-21

    Purely Donnan type models for electrostatic binding by humic acid (HA) nanoparticles are shown to be physically incomplete. To describe the extent of ion binding by HA, such models need to invoke parameters that are not consistent with experimental observations. These disparate parameters include anomalously high Donnan potentials, as well as intrinsic affinity constants for electrostatically associating ions such as Ca(2+). In contrast, the recently introduced counterion condensation - Donnan model (CCD) provides a physicochemically realistic description of the electrostatic contribution to metal ion binding by humic acid nanoparticles. The extent of Ca(2+)-HA association can be adequately described solely in terms of electrostatics only, including counterion condensation in the intraparticulate double layer in addition to Donnan partitioning in the remainder of the particle body. The binding of Cd(ii), Pb, (ii) and Cu(ii) by HA also involves inner-sphere complex formation leading to intraparticulate metal species distributions with major proportions of condensed and complexed ions. PMID:27327433

  7. Humic Acid Complexation of Th, Hf and Zr in Ligand Competition Experiments: Metal Loading and Ph Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Jennifer C.; Foustoukos, Dionysis I.; Sonke, Jeroen E.; Salters, Vincent J. M.

    2014-01-01

    The mobility of metals in soils and subsurface aquifers is strongly affected by sorption and complexation with dissolved organic matter, oxyhydroxides, clay minerals, and inorganic ligands. Humic substances (HS) are organic macromolecules with functional groups that have a strong affinity for binding metals, such as actinides. Thorium, often studied as an analog for tetravalent actinides, has also been shown to strongly associate with dissolved and colloidal HS in natural waters. The effects of HS on the mobilization dynamics of actinides are of particular interest in risk assessment of nuclear waste repositories. Here, we present conditional equilibrium binding constants (Kc, MHA) of thorium, hafnium, and zirconium-humic acid complexes from ligand competition experiments using capillary electrophoresis coupled with ICP-MS (CE- ICP-MS). Equilibrium dialysis ligand exchange (EDLE) experiments using size exclusion via a 1000 Damembrane were also performed to validate the CE-ICP-MS analysis. Experiments were performed at pH 3.5-7 with solutions containing one tetravalent metal (Th, Hf, or Zr), Elliot soil humic acid (EHA) or Pahokee peat humic acid (PHA), and EDTA. CE-ICP-MS and EDLE experiments yielded nearly identical binding constants for the metal- humic acid complexes, indicating that both methods are appropriate for examining metal speciation at conditions lower than neutral pH. We find that tetravalent metals form strong complexes with humic acids, with Kc, MHA several orders of magnitude above REE-humic complexes. Experiments were conducted at a range of dissolved HA concentrations to examine the effect of [HA]/[Th] molar ratio on Kc, MHA. At low metal loading conditions (i.e. elevated [HA]/[Th] ratios) the ThHA binding constant reached values that were not affected by the relative abundance of humic acid and thorium. The importance of [HA]/[Th] molar ratios on constraining the equilibrium of MHA complexation is apparent when our estimated Kc, MHA values

  8. nC60 deposition kinetics: the complex contribution of humic acid, ion concentration, and valence.

    PubMed

    McNew, Coy P; LeBoeuf, Eugene J

    2016-07-01

    The demonstrated toxicity coupled with inevitable environmental release of nC60 raise serious concerns about its environmental fate and transport, therefore it is crucial to understand how nC60 will interact with subsurface materials including attached phase soil and sediment organic matter (AP-SOM). This study investigated the attachment of nC60 onto a Harpeth humic acid (HHA) coated silica surface under various solution conditions using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The HHA coating greatly enhanced nC60 attachment at low ion concentrations while hindering attachment at high ion concentrations in the presence of both mono and divalent cations. At low ion concentrations, the HHA greatly reduced the surface potential of the silica, enhancing nC60 deposition through reduction in the electrostatic repulsion. At high ion concentrations however, the reduced surface potential became less important due to the near zero energy barrier to deposition and therefore non-DLVO forces dominated, induced by compaction of the HHA layer, and leading to hindered attachment. In this manner, observed contributions from the HHA layer were more complex than previously reported and by monitoring surface charge and calculated DLVO interaction energy alongside attachment experiments, this study advances the mechanistic understanding of the variable attachment contributions from the humic acid layer. PMID:27061365

  9. Studying Arsenite-Humic Acid Complexation Using Size Exclusion Chromatography-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic (As) can form complexes with dissolved organic matter (DOM), which affects the fate of arsenic in waste sites and natural environments. It remains a challenge to analyze DOM-bound As, in particular by using a direct chromatographic separation method. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) hyphenated with UV spectrophotometer and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was developed to characterize the complexation of arsenite (AsIII) with DOM. This SEC-UV-ICP-MS method is able to differentiate AsIII-DOM complexes from free As species and has the advantage of direct determination of both free and DOM-bound AsIII through mild separation. The suitability of this method for studying AsIII-DOM complexation was demonstrated by its application, in combination with the Scatchard plot and nonlinear regression of ligand binding model, for characterizing AsIII complexation with humic acid (HA) in the absence or presence of natural sand. The results suggest that, consistent with polyelectrolytic nature of HA, the AsIII-HA complexation should be accounted for by multiple classes of binding sites. By loosely classifying the binding sites into strong (S1) and weak (S2) sites, the apparent stability constants (Ks) of the resulting As-DOM complexes were calculated as log Ks1 = 6.5–7.1 while log Ks2 = 4.7–5.0. PMID:22664255

  10. Influence of Humic Acid Complexation with Metal Ions on Extracellular Electron Transfer Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Shanshan; Yuan, Yong; Lu, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Humic acids (HAs) can act as electron shuttles and mediate biogeochemical cycles, thereby influencing the transformation of nutrients and environmental pollutants. HAs commonly complex with metals in the environment, but few studies have focused on how these metals affect the roles of HAs in extracellular electron transfer (EET). In this study, HA-metal (HA-M) complexes (HA-Fe, HA-Cu, and HA-Al) were prepared and characterized. The electron shuttle capacities of HA-M complexes were experimentally evaluated through microbial Fe(III) reduction, biocurrent generation, and microbial azoreduction. The results show that the electron shuttle capacities of HAs were enhanced after complexation with Fe but were weakened when using Cu or Al. Density functional theory calculations were performed to explore the structural geometry of the HA-M complexes and revealed the best binding sites of the HAs to metals and the varied charge transfer rate constants (k). The EET activity of the HA-M complexes were in the order HA-Fe > HA-Cu > HA-Al. These findings have important implications for biogeochemical redox processes given the ubiquitous nature of both HAs and various metals in the environment. PMID:26593782

  11. Influence of Humic Acid Complexation with Metal Ions on Extracellular Electron Transfer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Shanshan; Yuan, Yong; Lu, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Humic acids (HAs) can act as electron shuttles and mediate biogeochemical cycles, thereby influencing the transformation of nutrients and environmental pollutants. HAs commonly complex with metals in the environment, but few studies have focused on how these metals affect the roles of HAs in extracellular electron transfer (EET). In this study, HA-metal (HA-M) complexes (HA-Fe, HA-Cu, and HA-Al) were prepared and characterized. The electron shuttle capacities of HA-M complexes were experimentally evaluated through microbial Fe(III) reduction, biocurrent generation, and microbial azoreduction. The results show that the electron shuttle capacities of HAs were enhanced after complexation with Fe but were weakened when using Cu or Al. Density functional theory calculations were performed to explore the structural geometry of the HA-M complexes and revealed the best binding sites of the HAs to metals and the varied charge transfer rate constants (k). The EET activity of the HA-M complexes were in the order HA-Fe > HA-Cu > HA-Al. These findings have important implications for biogeochemical redox processes given the ubiquitous nature of both HAs and various metals in the environment. PMID:26593782

  12. Influence of Humic Acid Complexation with Metal Ions on Extracellular Electron Transfer Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Shanshan; Yuan, Yong; Lu, Qin

    2015-11-01

    Humic acids (HAs) can act as electron shuttles and mediate biogeochemical cycles, thereby influencing the transformation of nutrients and environmental pollutants. HAs commonly complex with metals in the environment, but few studies have focused on how these metals affect the roles of HAs in extracellular electron transfer (EET). In this study, HA-metal (HA-M) complexes (HA-Fe, HA-Cu, and HA-Al) were prepared and characterized. The electron shuttle capacities of HA-M complexes were experimentally evaluated through microbial Fe(III) reduction, biocurrent generation, and microbial azoreduction. The results show that the electron shuttle capacities of HAs were enhanced after complexation with Fe but were weakened when using Cu or Al. Density functional theory calculations were performed to explore the structural geometry of the HA-M complexes and revealed the best binding sites of the HAs to metals and the varied charge transfer rate constants (k). The EET activity of the HA-M complexes were in the order HA-Fe > HA-Cu > HA-Al. These findings have important implications for biogeochemical redox processes given the ubiquitous nature of both HAs and various metals in the environment.

  13. Effect of environmental factors on the complexation of iron and humic acid.

    PubMed

    Fang, Kai; Yuan, Dongxing; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Lifeng; Chen, Yaojin; Wang, Yuzhou

    2015-01-01

    A method of size exclusion chromatography coupled with ultraviolet spectrophotometry and off-line graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was developed to assess the complexation properties of iron (Fe) and humic acid (HA) in a water environment. The factors affecting the complexation of Fe and HA, such as ionic strength, pH, temperature and UV radiation, were investigated. The Fe-HA complex residence time was also studied. Experimental results showed that pH could influence the deprotonation of HA and hydrolysis of Fe, and thus affected the complexation of Fe and HA. The complexation was greatly disrupted by the presence of NaCl. Temperature had some influence on the complexation. The yield of Fe-HA complexes showed a small decrease at high levels of UV radiation, but the effect of UV radiation on Fe-HA complex formation at natural levels could be neglected. It took about 10 hr for the complexation to reach equilibrium, and the Fe-HA complex residence time was about 20 hr. Complexation of Fe and HA reached a maximum level under the conditions of pH 6, very low ionic strength, in the dark and at a water temperature of about 25°C, for 10 hr. It was suggested that the Fe-HA complex could form mainly in freshwater bodies and reach high levels in the warm season with mild sunlight radiation. With changing environmental parameters, such as at lower temperature in winter or higher pH and ionic strength in an estuary, the concentration of the Fe-HA complex would decrease. PMID:25597677

  14. Complexation of Hg (II) ions with humic acids of tundra soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilevich, Roman

    2013-04-01

    Humic acids (HA) play an important role in processes of heavy metals migration, controlling their geochemical streams in environment. Accumulative and detoxification abilities of HA to heavy metals are realized by means of formation of steady complexes salycylate and pyrocatechin types. Modern researches show that HA of the Arctic and Subarctic areas are poorly enriched by aromatic frames, so and metalbinding centres. The work purpose is to study interaction mechanisms of Hg (II) ions with HA and to define tread possibilities of a tundra soils humic acids. It is established that binding ability of Hg (II) ions depends on concentration of an element, on quantity of functional groups in peripheral and nuclear parts of HA molecule as well as on a solution pH. coomplexation proceeds at pH 2.5-3.5 efficiently. On the basis of kinetic models it is shown that HA interaction with Hg (II) ions, at microconcentration of a pollutant (0.025-5.0 mkmol/dm3), has a zero order of reaction. Rate of a reaction does not depend on initial components concentration and is defined by process of Hg (II) ions diffusion to organic ligands. High correlation of a HA sorption capacity to Hg (II) ions is observed: with the nitrogen content and maintenance of amino groups (according to a 13C-NMR, element composition) and negative correlation - with degree of HA aromaticity. It testifies to primary binding of Hg (II) ions by amino-acid fragments of a HA molecule peripheral part. When concentration of Hg (II) ions increases, binding proceeds on carboxylic and phenolic groups of a molecule nuclear part. Higher order of kinetic models reaction and FTIR spectroscopy data testify to it. Comparison of FTIR spectra of HA preparations and mercury humates, shows that Hg (II) ions binding in humate complexes is carried out mainly by -COOH. Reduction of a spectral line intensity not ionized -COOH at 1700-1720 sm-1 and intensity increases of dissymetric valency vibration at 1610-1650 sm-1 diagnose increase

  15. Complexation of mercury(II) ions with humic acids in tundra soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilevich, R. S.; Beznosikov, V. A.; Lodygin, E. D.; Kondratenok, B. M.

    2014-03-01

    The interaction mechanisms of mercury(II) ions with preparations of humic acids (HAs) isolated from organic horizons of surface-gleyed soils (Haplic Stagnosol (Gelic, Siltic)) of shrub tundra and hydromorphic peat gley soils (Histic Cryosol (Reductaquic, Siltic)) of moss-lichen tundra have been studied. The particular features of the interactions between the mercury(II) ions and the HAs are related to the molecular structure of the HAs, the mercury concentration range, and the environmental parameters. The fixation of mercury(II) ions into stable coordination compounds is most efficient in the pH range of 2.5-3.5. At the element concentrations below 0.50 μmol/dm3, the main complexing sites of HAs are their peripheral aminoacid functional groups. Pyrocatechol, salicylate, and phenolic groups from the nuclear moiety of molecules interact in the concentration range of 0.0005-0.50 mmol/dm3; the physical sorption of mercury hydroxo complexes by the surface of HAs is the main process occurring in the system.

  16. Fluorescence spectrometry for quantitative characterization of cobalt(II) complexation by Leonardite humic acid.

    PubMed

    Monteil-Rivera, Fanny; Dumonceau, Jacques

    2002-11-01

    Quenching of the fluorescence of a Leonardite humic acid by Co(II) has been studied at different pH. The interaction was monitored by emission fluorescence and by synchronous fluorescence with two different offsets (deltalambda=20 and 80 nm). It was found that synchronous fluorescence performed with the smaller offset resolves the individual components of the heterogeneous material better than emission or synchronous fluorescence performed with the larger offset. Enhancement of the signal induced by Cobalt(II) complexation resulted in more complex behavior for measurements performed by synchronous fluorescence with an offset of 20 nm, however. The quenching profiles obtained for pH 5.0, 6.0, and 7.0 ([KNO(3)]=0.1 mol L(-1); [LHA]=3.3 mg(C) L(-1); [Co(II)]=1.0 x 10(-6)-1.6 x 10 (-3) mol L(-1)) by emission and synchronous (deltalambda=80 nm) fluorescence were analyzed by two methods: 1. a non-linear least-squares procedure that leads to conditional constants; and 2. a pH-dependent discrete logK spectrum model that leads to stability constants. The first method resulted in poor fitting and unreasonable values for maximum capacities. The second procedure resulted in smooth fitting that accounted well for the pH changes when results for pH 6.0 and 5.0 were predicted by use of the four values of logK(Co)(i) (4.31, 3.76, 7.32, and 7.67 corresponding to the four sites (i) of the respective pKa(i) values 4, 6, 8, and 10) calculated at pH 7.0 for the equilibrium PMID:12458428

  17. Investigations of the uptake of transuranic radionuclides by humic and fulvic acids chemically immobilized on silica gel and their competitive release by complexing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Bulman, R.A.; Szabo, G.; Clayton, R.F.; Clayton, C.R.

    1998-07-01

    The chemistry of the interactions of transuranic elements (TUs) with humic substances needs to be understood so that humate-mediated movement of transuranic radionuclides through the environment can be predicted. This paper reports the chemical immobilization on silica gel of humic and fulvic acids and evaluates the potential of these new materials for the retention of Pu and Am. In addition to the preparation of the foregoing immobilized humic substances, other low molecular weight metal-binding ligands have also been immobilized on silica gel to investigate the binding sites for transuranic elements (TUs) in humic substances. The X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) of Th(IV) complexed by humic acid and the immobilized humic acid are similar thus it appears that immobilization of humic acid does not generate any configurational changes in the Th(IV)-binding sites of the macromolecule. A variety of chelating agents partly mobilize these TUs sorbed on the solid phases. A batch method was used to determine the distribution coefficients (R{sub d}) of Pu and Am between the silica gels and aqueous solutions of phosphate and citrate. The effects of the immobilized ligands, the anions and pH in the solution on sorption were assessed. Distributed coefficients (R{sub d}) for the uptake of Pu and Am by these prepared solid phases are, in some cases, of a similar order of magnitude as those determined for soil and particles suspended in terrestrial surface waters.

  18. Use of the ion exchange method for the determination of stability constants of trivalent metal complexes with humic and fulvic acids--part I: Eu3+ and Am3+ complexes in weakly acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Wenming, Dong; Hongxia, Zhang; Meide, Huang; Zuyi, Tao

    2002-06-01

    The conditional stability constants for tracer concentrations of Eu(III) and Am(III) with a red earth humic acid (REHA), a red earth fulvic acid (REFA) and a fulvic acid from weathered coal (WFA) were determined at pH 5.2-6.4 (such values are similar to those in non-calcareous soils) in the presence of HAc/NaAc or NaNO3 by using the cation exchange method. It was found that 1:1 complexes were predominately formed in weakly acidic conditions. The total exchangeable proton capacities and the degrees of dissociation of these humic substances were determined by using a potentiometric titration method. The key parameters necessary for the experimental determination of the conditional stability constants of metal ions with humic substances in weakly acidic conditions by using the cation exchange method were discussed. The conditional stability constants of 1:1 complexes obtained in this paper were compared with the literature data of Am(III) determined by using the ion exchange method and the solvent extraction method and with the stability constants of 1:1 complexes of UO2(2+) and Th4+ with the same soil humic substances. These results indicate the great stability of bivalent UO2(2+), trivalent Eu3+, Am3+ and tetravalent Th4+ complexes with humic and fulvic acids in weakly acidic conditions. PMID:12102358

  19. Immobilization of metal-humic acid complexes in anaerobic granular sludge for their application as solid-phase redox mediators in the biotransformation of iopromide in UASB reactors.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Zavala, Aracely S; Pat-Espadas, Aurora M; Rangel-Mendez, J Rene; Chazaro-Ruiz, Luis F; Ascacio-Valdes, Juan A; Aguilar, Cristobal N; Cervantes, Francisco J

    2016-05-01

    Metal-humic acid complexes were synthesized and immobilized by a granulation process in anaerobic sludge for their application as solid-phase redox mediators (RM) in the biotransformation of iopromide. Characterization of Ca- and Fe-humic acid complexes revealed electron accepting capacities of 0.472 and 0.556milli-equivalentsg(-1), respectively. Once immobilized, metal-humic acid complexes significantly increased the biotransformation of iopromide in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors. Control UASB reactor (without humic material) achieved 31.6% of iopromide removal, while 80% was removed in UASB reactors supplied with each metal-humic acid complex. Further analyses indicated multiple transformation reactions taking place in iopromide including deiodination, N-dealkylation, decarboxylation and deacetylation. This is the first successful application of immobilized RM, which does not require a supporting material to maintain the solid-phase RM in long term operation of bioreactors. The proposed redox catalyst could be suitable for enhancing the redox conversion of different recalcitrant pollutants present in industrial effluents. PMID:26868154

  20. Insoluble Fe-humic acid complex as a solid-phase electron mediator for microbial reductive dechlorination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunfang; Zhang, Dongdong; Li, Zhiling; Akatsuka, Tetsuji; Yang, Suyin; Suzuki, Daisuke; Katayama, Arata

    2014-06-01

    We report that the insoluble Fe-HA complex, which was synthesized with both commercial Aldrich humic acid (HA) and natural HA, functions as a solid-phase electron mediator (EM) for the anaerobic microbial dechlorination of pentachlorophenol. Spectroscopic characterizations and sequential Fe extraction demonstrated that the Fe-HA complex was predominated with Na4P2O7-labile Fe (represented as the organically bound Fe fraction) and poorly ordered Fe fraction (the fraction left in the residue after the sequential extraction), which were associated with different possible binding processes with carboxylate and phenolic groups. The change in the electron-mediating activity caused by Fe extraction indicated that the electron-mediating function of the Fe-HA complex is attributable to the Na4P2O7-labile Fe fraction. The Fe-HA complex also accelerated the microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxide, which suggested the presence of multiple electron-mediating functions in the complex. The electron shuttle assay showed that the Fe-HA complex had an electron-accepting capacity of 0.82 mequiv g(-1) dry Fe-HA complex. The presence of redox-active moieties in the Fe-HA complex was verified by cyclic voltammetry analysis of the sample after electrical reduction, with a redox potential estimated at 0.02 V (vs a standard hydrogen electrode). PMID:24758743

  1. Lanthanide--humic substances complexation. II. Calibration of humic ion-binding model V.

    PubMed

    Sonke, Jeroen E

    2006-12-15

    The experimental complexation of the lanthanides (Sc, Y, and rare earth elements) with Suwannee river fulvic acid, Leonardite coal humic acid, and Elliot soil humic acid is described with Humic Ion-Binding Model V. The fitted intrinsic equilibrium constants for metal-proton exchange, pKMHA, for Eu3+ are similar to previously published experimental fits, and linear free energy relationship (LFER) estimated values. The experimentally observed lanthanide contraction effect in REE-humic complex stability is reflected in the gradual decrease in pKMHA from La to Lu. In Model V, a decrease in pKMHA from La to Lu indicates an increase in complex stability. Fitted pKMHA values for heavy REE are lower than those estimated by LFERs. Consequently, REE fractionation by humic substances complexation could be more pronounced than previously thought. Recommended pKMHA values for lanthanide-fulvic and -humic acid complexation are derived by superimposing the fitted trends in pKMHA for all REE, i.e., the decrease in pKMHA from La to Lu, on the average Eu pKMHA value for all literature datasets. These results will allow modeling assessments of organic matter induced REE fractionation in aquatic environments, taking into account changes in pH, ionic strength, and ion competition. A simulation of dissolved REE speciation in an average world river suggests that organic matter outcompetes carbonate complexation, even under alkaline conditions. PMID:17256484

  2. Copper(II) complexation by humic and fulvic acids from pig slurry and amended and non-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Plaza, C; Senesi, N; García-Gil, J C; Polo, A

    2005-11-01

    The effect of the consecutive annual additions of pig slurry at rates of 0 (control), 90 and 150 m3 ha(-1) y(-1) over a 4-year period on the binding affinity for Cu(II) of soil humic acids (HAs) and fulvic acids (FAs) was investigated in a field plot experiment under semiarid conditions. A ligand potentiometric titration method and a single site model were used for determining the Cu(II) complexing capacities and the stability constants of Cu(II) complexes of HAs and FAs isolated from pig slurry and control and amended soils. The HAs complexing capacities and stability constants were larger than those of the corresponding FA fractions. With respect to the control soil HA, pig-slurry HA was characterized by a much smaller binding capacity and stability constant. Amendment with pig slurry decreased the binding affinity of soil HAs. Similar to the corresponding HAs, the binding affinity of pig-slurry FA was much smaller while that of amended-soil FAs were slightly smaller when compared to the control soil FA. The latter effect was, however, more evident with increasing the amount of pig slurry applied to soil per year and the number of years of pig slurry application. PMID:16219505

  3. Melanin and humic acid-like polymer complex from olive mill waste waters. Part I. Isolation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Khemakhem, Maissa; Papadimitriou, Vassiliki; Sotiroudis, Georgios; Zoumpoulakis, Panagiotis; Arbez-Gindre, Cécile; Bouzouita, Nabiha; Sotiroudis, Theodore G

    2016-07-15

    A water soluble humic acid and melanin-like polymer complex (OMWW-ASP) was isolated from olive mill waste waters (OMWW) by ammonium sulfate fractionation to be used as natural additive in food preparations. The dark polymer complex was further characterized by a variety of biochemical, physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques. OMWW-ASP is composed mainly of proteins associated with polyphenols and carbohydrates and the distribution of its relative molecular size was determined between about 5 and 190 kDa. SDS-PAGE shows the presence of a well separated protein band of 21.3 kDa and a low molecular weight peptide. The OMWW-ASP complex exhibits a monotonically increasing UV-Vis absorption spectrum and it contains stable radicals. Antioxidant activity measurements reveal the ability of the OMWW protein fraction to scavenge both the cationic 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS(+)) radical, as well as the stable nitroxide free radical 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPOL). PMID:26948649

  4. Isolation of humic acids from leonardite

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, S.B.; Tartamella, T.L.; Lee, S.; Kulik, C.J.

    1996-12-31

    The primary interest in humic acid is its use as an effective fertilizer. Humic substances, found commonly in low-rank coals, enhance plant growth directly through positive physiological effects and indirectly by affecting the properties of the soil. Humic acids have traditionally been defined as the dark-colored organic matter that can be extracted from soil by dilute alkali and other reagents and which is insoluble in dilute acid. This paper discusses the isolation of humic acid from leonardite using the alkaline extraction method and the subsequent characterization using elemental analysis and infrared spectroscopy techniques. In this study, yields of more than 60% were obtained.

  5. Equivalent weight of humic acid from peat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pommer, A.M.; Breger, I.A.

    1960-01-01

    By means of discontinuous titration, the equivalent weight of humic acid isolated from a peat was found to increase from 144 to 183 between the third and fifty-second day after the humic acid was dissolved. Infra-red studies showed that the material had probably condensed with loss of carbonyl groups. ?? 1960.

  6. Pyrolysis of humic and fulvic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Bohner, G.E., Jr.

    1969-01-01

    Pyrolysis of humic and fulvic acids isolated from a North Carolina soil yields a variety of aromatic, heterocyclic and straight chain organ compounds. The pyrolysis products identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry indicate that humic and fulvic acids have aromatic and polysaccharide structures in their molecules. ?? 1969.

  7. Adsorption of humic acids and trace metals in natural waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, W. H.

    1982-01-01

    Studies concerning the interactions between suspended hydrous iron oxide and dissolved humic acids and trace metals are reported. As a major component of dissolved organic matters and its readiness for adsorption at the solid/water interface, humic acids may play a very important role in the organometallic geochemistry of suspended sediments and in determining the fate and distribution of trace metals, pesticides and anions in natural water systems. Most of the solid phases in natural waters contain oxides and hydroxides. The most simple promising theory to describe the interactions of hydrous iron oxide interface is the surface complex formation model. In this model, the adsorptions of humic acids on hydrous iron oxide may be interpreted as complex formation of the organic bases (humic acid oxyanions) with surface Fe ions. Measurements on adsorptions were made in both fresh water and seawater. Attempts have been made to fit our data to Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Adsorption equilibrium constants were determined.

  8. Europium(III) complexed by HPSEC size-fractions of a vertisol humic acid: small differences evidenced by time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Reiller, Pascal E; Brevet, Julien; Nebbioso, Antonio; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2011-03-01

    The size fractionation of a humic acid (HA) by high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) was used as a proxy for the filtration effect during HA transport through a porous medium with minimum specific chemical interactions. The modification of the Eu(III)-HA complexes' formation with the different size-fractions, as compared to the bulk HA, was studied in time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy (TRLS). Clear modifications in Eu(III)-HA complexes' structures were shown and related to the molecular characteristics of the separated size-fractions. The properties of most of size-fractions did not induce a major alteration of the affinity towards Eu(III). Only the most hydrophilic fractions eluted in the tail of the chromatographic peak, representing about 11% of total fractions-weight, gave some significantly different parameters. Using a simplistic complexation model, it was found that the available complexation sites decreased with the size reduction of humic fractions. PMID:21242102

  9. Europium(III) complexed by HPSEC size-fractions of a vertisol humic acid: Small differences evidenced by time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiller, Pascal E.; Brevet, Julien; Nebbioso, Antonio; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2011-03-01

    The size fractionation of a humic acid (HA) by high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) was used as a proxy for the filtration effect during HA transport through a porous medium with minimum specific chemical interactions. The modification of the Eu(III)-HA complexes' formation with the different size-fractions, as compared to the bulk HA, was studied in time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy (TRLS). Clear modifications in Eu(III)-HA complexes' structures were shown and related to the molecular characteristics of the separated size-fractions. The properties of most of size-fractions did not induce a major alteration of the affinity towards Eu(III). Only the most hydrophilic fractions eluted in the tail of the chromatographic peak, representing about 11% of total fractions-weight, gave some significantly different parameters. Using a simplistic complexation model, it was found that the available complexation sites decreased with the size reduction of humic fractions.

  10. Aliphatic structure of humic acids; a clue to their origin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Maciel, G.E.; Dennis, L.W.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra (both 1H and 13C) of humic acids from diverse depositional environments indicate the presence of aromatic chemical structures, most likely derived from lignin of vascular plants, and complex, paraffinic structures, most likely derived from algal or microbial sources. The latter components account for a major fraction of humic acid structures in both terrestrial and aquatic environments, suggesting that algae or microbes play a large role in humification of organic remains from both systems. ?? 1981.

  11. Increase in complexation ability of humic acids with the addition of ligneous bulking agents during sewage sludge composting.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiong; Yan-Xia, Li; Ming, Yang; Feng-Song, Zhang; Wei, Li

    2010-12-01

    Wood sawdust and maize straw were selected to co-compost sewage sludge to investigate the effects of organic bulking agents on the formation and molecular transformation of humic substances. The results showed that composting process increased humic acids (HA) while decreased fulvic acids (FA), and the wood sawdust and maize straw promoted the formation of HA by 25.6% and 16.1%, respectively. Results from fluorescence titration demonstrated that organic bulking agents also increased the binding ability of HA with the heavy metal ions, Cu(II) and Cd(II), but had little influence on that of FA. These findings indicate that organic materials especially wood sawdust may be used as bulking agents to reduce the mobility and bioavailability of toxic metals in solid waste composts. PMID:20724147

  12. Concept model of the formation process of humic acid-kaolin complexes deduced by trichloroethylene sorption experiments and various characterizations.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaojing; He, Jiangtao; Su, Sihui; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Wang, Fei

    2016-05-01

    To explore the interactions between soil organic matter and minerals, humic acid (HA, as organic matter), kaolin (as a mineral component) and Ca(2+) (as metal ions) were used to prepare HA-kaolin and Ca-HA-kaolin complexes. These complexes were used in trichloroethylene (TCE) sorption experiments and various characterizations. Interactions between HA and kaolin during the formation of their complexes were confirmed by the obvious differences between the Qe (experimental sorbed TCE) and Qe_p (predicted sorbed TCE) values of all detected samples. The partition coefficient kd obtained for the different samples indicated that both the organic content (fom) and Ca(2+) could significantly impact the interactions. Based on experimental results and various characterizations, a concept model was developed. In the absence of Ca(2+), HA molecules first patched onto charged sites of kaolin surfaces, filling the pores. Subsequently, as the HA content increased and the first HA layer reached saturation, an outer layer of HA began to form, compressing the inner HA layer. As HA loading continued, the second layer reached saturation, such that an outer-third layer began to form, compressing the inner layers. In the presence of Ca(2+), which not only can promote kaolin self-aggregation but can also boost HA attachment to kaolin, HA molecules were first surrounded by kaolin. Subsequently, first and second layers formed (with inner layer compression) via the same process as described above in the absence of Ca(2+), except that the second layer continued to load rather than reach saturation, within the investigated conditions, because of enhanced HA aggregation caused by Ca(2+). PMID:26933902

  13. Complexing of metal ions by humic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, N.D.; Zhang, Y.; Jones, M.N.

    1995-12-31

    The interaction of metal ions with humic substances is being studied using two different techniques. UV-scanning ultracentrifugation is being used to determine molecular weights and to investigate changes in aggregation brought about by metal ion complexation. The relationship between cation charge and conformation of the humic ligands is also being investigated. The complexation of actinide elements (U, Np, Pu, Am) by humic substances from soils contaminated by both natural processes and by low-level effluent releases is also being studied. Gel permeation chromatography has been used to show both that different fractions of humic substances vary greatly in their effectiveness as ligands and that different actinide elements associate with different fractions. These studies have also shown that uranium desorption is kinetically controlled by humic substances.

  14. Adsorption interactions of humic acids with biocides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mal'Tseva, E. V.; Ivanov, A. A.; Yudina, N. V.

    2009-11-01

    The chemical composition of humic acids from brown coal (Aldrich) was determined by element analysis, 13C NMR spectroscopy, and potentiometric titration. The adsorption ability of humic acids with different biocides (cyproconasol, propiconasol, tebuconasol, irgarol 1051, and DCOIT) was studied. The adsorption ability of a mixture of biocides in aqueous solutions was higher than that of the individual components. The limiting concentration of humic acids at which adsorption of biocides was maximum was determined. Adsorption constants were calculated by the Freundlich equation for each biocide in aqueous solution.

  15. Boron isotopic fractionation related to boron sorption on humic acid and the structure of surface complexes formed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemarchand, Emmanuel; Schott, Jacques; Gaillardet, Jérôme

    2005-07-01

    Boron isotopic fractionation during adsorption onto Ca-flocculated Aldrich humic acid (HA) has been investigated experimentally as a function of solution pH at 25°C and I = 0.15 M. Boron aqueous concentration and isotopic composition were determined by Cs 2BO 2+ Positive Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry analysis, while the structure of B surface complexes on HA was characterized using 11B Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR). Significant B sorption on HA was observed at 6 < pH < 12 with a maximum value of Kd, the partition coefficient between adsorbed and aqueous boron, equal to 40 at pH = 9.5-10. Combined 11B MAS NMR analysis and FITEQL modeling of B sorption on HA showed that this element forms tetrahedrally coordinated five- or six-membered ring chelates, most likely 1,2-diol and 1,3-diol complexes at alkaline pH (8 < pH < 11) and dicarboxylic complexes at near neutral conditions (6 < pH < 9). Results of this study demonstrate for the first time that boron sorption on HA induces a strong pH-dependent isotope fractionation—with 11B depleted at the surface of HA—that reaches a maximum at 5 < pH < 9 (α = 0.975, Δ = -25‰) and decreases sharply at pH >9. The measured isotope fractionation cannot be modeled assuming that the isotopic composition of the sorbed borate species is identical to that of B(OH) 4- species in the parent solution. It is shown that the extent of isotopic fractionation depends not only on B aqueous speciation but also on the distribution and structure of the borate surface complexes formed. In agreement with energetic constrains, calculation of the isotope fractionation factors between aqueous boric acid and boron surface complexes suggests that the formation of the strained six-membered ring 1,3-diol complex yields a much higher fractionation (α BL P1-III = 0.954-0.960, Δ = -41/-47‰) than that of the very stable five-membered ring 1,2-diol (α BL P2-III = 0.983, Δ = -18‰). The results of this study open

  16. Origin of sedimentary humic acids, potential carriers of ore-forming elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatcher, P. G.

    Humic acids are complex, macromolecular organic components of sediments and are defined by their solubility in dilute alkali insolubility in dilute acid. Because of their general structural characteristics (for example, their high proportion of oxygen functional groups), humic acids can complex with inorganic cations and may be important in forming ore deposits. In some instances (such as uranium ores), ore bodies are believed to have originated by mobilization of an ore-forming element complexed with humic acids and subsequent precipitation. Knowledge of the mechanism for the formation of humic acids is being applied to two major ore deposits. Carlin-type gold ores from Nevada show that humic acids may have been precursors. This suggests that the humic acids could have played a major role in the transport and accumulation of the ore.

  17. Phase transitions and hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles containing humic acid and mixtures of humic acid and ammonium sulphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, C. L.; George, I.; Griffiths, P. T.; Braban, C. F.; Cox, R. A.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2006-03-01

    The phase transitions and hygroscopic growth of two humic acid aerosols (Aldrich sodium salt and Leonardite Standard (IHSS)) and their mixtures with ammonium sulphate have been investigated using a combination of two techniques, Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and tandem differential mobility analysis (TDMA). A growth factor of 1.16 at 85% relative humidity (RH) was found for the Aldrich humic acid which can be regarded as an upper limit for growth factors of humic-like substances (HULIS) found in atmospheric aerosol and is significantly smaller than that of typical atmospheric inorganics. We find that the humic acid aerosols exhibit water uptake over all relative humidities with no apparent phase changes, suggesting that these aerosols readily form supersaturated droplets. In the mixed particles, the humic acid component decreases the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) and increases the efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) of the ammonium sulphate component, and there is some degree of water uptake prior to ammonium sulphate deliquescence. In addition, at low RH, the FTIR spectra show that the ammonium is present in a different chemical environment in the mixed aerosols than in crystalline ammonium sulphate, perhaps existing as a complex with the humic materials. The growth factors of the mixed aerosols are intermediate between those of the single-component aerosols and can be predicted assuming that the inorganic and organic fractions take up water independently.

  18. Phase transitions and hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles containing humic acid and mixtures of humic acid and ammonium sulphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badger, C. L.; George, I.; Griffiths, P. T.; Braban, C. F.; Cox, R. A.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2005-10-01

    The phase transitions and hygroscopic growth of two humic acid aerosols (Aldrich sodium salt and Leonardite Standard (IHSS)) and their mixtures with ammonium sulphate have been investigated using a combination of two techniques, Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and tandem differential mobility analysis (TDMA). A growth factor of 1.16 at 85% relative humdity (RH) was found for the Aldrich humic acid which can be regarded as an upper limit for growth factors of humic-like substances (HULIS) found in atmospheric aerosol and is significantly smaller than that of typical atmospheric inorganics. We find that the humic acid aerosols exhibit water uptake over all relative humidites with no apparent phase changes, suggesting that these aerosols readily form supersaturated droplets. In the mixed particles, the humic acid component decreases the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) and increases the efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) of the ammonium sulphate component, and there is some degree of water uptake prior to ammonium sulphate deliquescence. In addition, at low RH, the FTIR spectra show that the ammonium is present in a different chemical environment in the mixed aerosols than in crystalline ammonium sulphate, perhaps existing as a complex with the humic materials. The growth factors of the mixed aerosols are intermediate between those of the single component aerosols and can be predicted assuming that the inorganic and organic fractions take up water independently.

  19. Iodine binding to humic acid.

    PubMed

    Bowley, H E; Young, S D; Ander, E L; Crout, N M J; Watts, M J; Bailey, E H

    2016-08-01

    The rate of reactions between humic acid (HA) and iodide (I(-)) and iodate (IO3(-)) have been investigated in suspensions spiked with (129)I at concentrations of 22, 44 and 88 μg L(-1) and stored at 10 °C. Changes in the speciation of (129)I(-), (129)IO3(-) and mixed ((129)I(-) + (129)IO3(-)) spikes were monitored over 77 days using liquid chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LC-ICP-MS). In suspensions spiked with (129)I(-) 25% of the added I(-) was transformed into organic iodine (Org-(129)I) within 77 days and there was no evidence of (129)IO3(-) formation. By contrast, rapid loss of (129)IO3(-) and increase in both (129)I(-) and Org-(129)I was observed in (129)IO3(-)-spiked suspensions. However, the rate of Org-(129)I production was greater in mixed systems compared to (129)IO3(-)-spiked suspensions with the same total (129)I concentration, possibly indicating IO3(-)I(-) redox coupling. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) demonstrated that Org-(129)I was present in both high and low molecular weight fractions of the HA although a slight preference to bond with the lower molecular weight fractions was observed indicating that, after 77 days, the spiked isotope had not fully mixed with the native (127)I pool. Iodine transformations were modelled using first order rate equations and fitted rate coefficients determined. However, extrapolation of the model to 250 days indicated that a pseudo-steady state would be attained after ∼200 days but that the proportion of (129)I incorporated into HA was less than that of (127)I indicating the presence of a recalcitrant pool of (127)I that was unavailable for isotopic mixing. PMID:27231879

  20. Intraparticulate speciation analysis of soft nanoparticulate metal complexes. The impact of electric condensation on the binding of Cd(2+)/Pb(2+)/Cu(2+) by humic acids.

    PubMed

    Town, Raewyn M; van Leeuwen, Herman P

    2016-04-21

    In aqueous dispersions of soft, charged nanoparticles, the physicochemical conditions prevailing within the particle body generally differ substantially from those in the bulk medium. Accordingly it is necessary to define intrinsic descriptors that appropriately reflect the chemical speciation inside the particle's microenvironment. Herein the speciation of divalent metal ions within the body of negatively charged soft nanoparticulate complexants is elaborated for the example case of humic acid association with Cd(ii), Pb(ii) and Cu(ii). The electrostatic effects are described by a two-state model that accounts for counterion condensation in the intraparticulate double layer shell at the particle/medium interface and Donnan partitioning within the bulk of the particle body. Inner-sphere complex formation is defined by an intrinsic binding constant expressed in terms of local reactant concentrations as controlled by the pertinent electrostatic conditions. For the high particle charge density case (Debye length smaller than charged site separation), three distinct intraparticulate metal species are identified, namely free hydrated ions, electrostatically condensed ions, and inner-sphere metal-humic complexes. For all metal ions studied, the electrostatic contribution to the association of the metal ion with the oppositely charged particle is found to account for a substantial fraction of the total metal bound. PMID:27004844

  1. Sorption and coprecipitation of copper to ferrihydrite and humic acid organomineral complexes and controls on copper availability.

    PubMed

    Seda, Neila N; Koenigsmark, Faye; Vadas, Timothy M

    2016-03-01

    Coprecipitation of Fe oxide and organic matter in redox dynamic sediments controls the net retention and form of Cu in the solid precipitates. In this study, coprecipitation and sorption of Cu with organomineral precipitation solids formed at different Fe:organic carbon (OC) ratios were compared for net Cu removal and extractability. As more humic acid was present during precipitation of Fe, TEM images indicated smaller Fe oxide particles formed within an organic matrix as expected. In coprecipitation reactions, as the ratio of Fe:OC decreased, more Cu was removed from solution at pH 5.5 and below. However, in sorption reactions, there was an inhibition of Cu removal at low OC concentrations. As the pH increased from 5.5 to 7 and as solution phase OC concentration increased, more Cu remained dissolved in both coprecipitation and sorption reactions. The addition of Ca(2+), glycine, histidine and citric acid or lowering the pH resulted in more extractable Cu from the coprecipitation compared with the sorption reactions. The variations in Cu extraction were likely due to a combination of a more amorphous structure in CPT products, and the relative abundance of available Fe oxide or OC binding sites. This has implications for the assumption of additivity in binding phases and for researchers conducting binding or exposure experiments. PMID:26766365

  2. The effect of aerobic conditions on the complexation ability between mercury and humic acid from landfill leachate and its implication for the environment.

    PubMed

    Chai, Xiaoli; Hao, Yongxia; Liu, Guixiang; Li, Zhonggen; Zhao, Youcai

    2013-07-01

    Three-dimensional excitation emission matrix (3DEEM) fluorescence spectroscopy was employed to investigate the structure and characteristics of humic acid (HA) from landfills at different stabilization processes. The results show that the HA in anaerobic landfill leachate stabilized more rapidly than that in semi-aerobic landfill leachate. There were strong interactions between HA and Hg, the S content as well as the oxygen-containing ligands of the HA played a key role in the complexation with mercury. The higher complexation capacity (CL) and stability constant (logK) of HA from anaerobic landfill leachate implies that it is important to strengthen the control of mercury transportation in anaerobic landfills during the early stabilization process. The logK and CL of HA from semi-aerobic landfill leachate increased with the landfill time indicate that control of leachate Hg contamination in the latter stage is of great significance in semi-aerobic landfills. PMID:23523228

  3. Characterization of pH-fractionated humic acids with respect to their dissociation behaviour.

    PubMed

    Klučáková, Martina

    2016-04-01

    Humic acids were divided into several fractions using buffer solutions as extraction agents with different pH values. Two methods of fractionation were used. The first one was subsequent dissolution of bulk humic acids in buffers adjusted to different pH. The second one was sequential dissolution in buffers with increasing pH values. Experimental data were compared with hypothesis of partial solubility of humic acids in aqueous solutions. Behaviour of humic fractions obtained by sequential dissolution, original bulk sample and residual fractions obtained by subsequent dissolution at pH 10 and 12 agrees with the hypothesis. Results demonstrated that regardless the common mechanism, solubility and dissociation degree of various humic fractions may be very different and can be estimated using parameters of the model based on the proposed mechanism. Presented results suggest that dissolving of solid humic acids in water environment is more complex than conventional solubility behaviour of sparingly soluble solids. PMID:26746402

  4. Humic acid interference with virus recovery by electropositive microporous filters.

    PubMed Central

    Guttman-Bass, N; Catalano-Sherman, J

    1986-01-01

    The effects of humic acid on poliovirus type 1 recovery from water by Zeta Plus 60S filters were investigated. The humic acid interfered by preventing virus adsorption to the filters, and the interference increased as a function of the amount of humic acid filtered. Humic acid decreased virus adsorption when filtered before the virus, but did not elute virus which had adsorbed to the filters. The effects on virus recovery were not due to alterations in virus titer or neutralizability. The addition of AlCl3, which improved virus recovery by electronegative filters in the presence of humic acid, did not aid in overall virus recovery by the Zeta Plus filters in the presence or absence of humic acid. However, the salt and humic acid in combination improved virus adsorption and concurrently reduced virus elution efficiency. The addition of NaH2PO4 had no direct effect on virus recovery and did not alter the effect of humic acid. In an attempt to identify the components of humic acid responsible for the interference, humic materials were fractionated by size by using Sephadex gel chromatography and dialysis, and the fractions were tested for interfering activity. Interference was not associated with specific size fractions of the humic materials. PMID:3021058

  5. Reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene mediated by humic-metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    O`Loughlin, E.J.; Burris, D.R.; Delcomyn, C.A.

    1999-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine if transition metal-humic acid complexes can act as e{sup {minus}} transfer mediators in the reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) using Ti(III) citrate as the bulk reductant. In the presence of Ni-Aldrich humic acid (AHA) complexes, TCE reduction was rapid, with complete removal of TCE in less than 23 h. Cu-AHA complexes were less effective as e{sup {minus}} mediators than Ni-AHA complexes; only 60% of TCE was reduced after 150 h. Partially dechlorinated intermediates were observed during TCE reduction; however, they were transitory, and at no time accounted for more than 2% of the initial TCE mass on a mole C basis. Ethane and ethene were the primary end products of TCE reduction; however, a suite of other non-chlorinated hydrocarbons consisting of methane and C{sub 3} to C{sub 6} alkanes and alkenes were also observed. The results suggest that humic-metal complexes may represent a previously unrecognized class of electron mediators in natural environments.

  6. Uptake of metal ions on humic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Pehlivan, E.; Arslan, G.

    2006-09-15

    The kinetics, the sorption capacities, pH and temperature dependence of sorption of humic acids (HAs) of Turkish brown coals with respect to Zn(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II) and Pb(II) ions were investigated, and the roles of the carboxylic and phenolic groups in the adsorption of metals ion on HAs were searched in this work. These metal ions are able to form complex compounds with carboxylic and phenolic groups of HAs. Adsorption equilibrium was achieved in between 50 and 60 min for all studied cations. HAs extracted from different brown coals have been characterized by chemical and physical methods. The chemical properties of HAs showed differences depending on the source from which they were obtained. The sorption of metals on the surface of HAs depends strongly on the pH, and sorption decreases with decreasing pH. Maximum removal of metal ions was demonstrated at pH values of 4.1-5.0. The Langmuir adsorption isotherm was used to describe observed sorption phenomena. The {Delta}G{sup 0} became negative as the temperature increased, and so the equilibrium constant decreased slightly. The investigation proved that the HAs are suitable materials for the studied heavy metal ion removal from aqueous solution and could be considered as potential material for purification of effluent polluted with toxic metal ions.

  7. Understanding Humic Acid / Zr(IV) Interaction - A Spectromicroscopy Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, Joerg; Plaschke, Markus; Denecke, Melissa A.

    2007-02-02

    Complexation of Zr(IV) by humic acid (HA) and polyacrylic acid (PAA) is investigated from the point of view of the organic ligand. STXM Spectromicroscopy and C 1s-NEXAFS point to different interaction mechanisms between Zr(IV) cations and oxo/hydroxo colloids and PAA. Under conditions where the metal aquo ion is stable, strong complexes are formed. In contrast, unspecific surface coating is identified when PAA is contacted with Zr(IV) oxo/hydroxide colloids. HA exhibits similar C 1s-NEXAFS features indicating a complexation reaction.

  8. Investigation of the Effect of Humic Acids on Phototransformation of Naphthalene Illuminated by Visible and UV Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechaev, L. V.; Tchaikovskaya, O. N.

    2016-04-01

    Results of investigation of the effect of humic acids on the degree of photochemical transformation of naphthalene in an aqueous solution illuminated by model solar and UV light are presented. The constant of complexation of naphthalene and humic acids is determined. It is established that the molecular complex of the humic acid and naphthalene is more stable to illumination by UV light then by model sunlight.

  9. Amino acid composition of humic substances in tundra soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilevich, R. S.; Beznosikov, V. A.

    2015-06-01

    Peripheral amino acid fragments of humic and fulvic acid molecules from tundra soils have been identified and quantified. A significant weight fraction of amino acids has been found in humic acid preparations, which exceeds their content in fulvic acids. Features of the amino acid composition of humic substances along the soil profile and depending on the degree of hydromorphism and the proportions of different (neutral, basic, acidic, cyclic) groups in amino acids have been revealed. The molar ratio between the hydroxy and heterocyclic amino acids reflects the degree of humification of the soil.

  10. Use of solid-state 13C NMR in structural studies of humic acids and humin from Holocene sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; VanderHart, D.L.; Earl, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    13C NMR spectra of solid humic substances in Holocene sediments have been obtained using cross polarization with magic-angle sample spinning techniques. The results demonstrate that this technique holds great promise for structural characterizations of complex macromolecular substances such as humin and humic acids. Quantifiable distinctions can be made between structural features of aquatic and terrestrial humic substances. The aliphatic carbons of the humic substances are dominant components suggestive of input from lipid-like materials. An interesting resemblance is also noted between terrestrial humic acid and humin spectra. ?? 1980.

  11. Humic acids: Characterization and interactions in natural and wastewater systems. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the absorptive and complexation properties of humic and fulvic acids. Characterization and the occurrence of these acids in wastewater systems and natural systems are studied. The interaction of humic substances with metallic pollutants and chlorinated hydrocarbons, and removal of humic acids by precipitation are among the topics discussed. Wastewater treatment processes are discussed in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Humic acids: Characterization and interactions in natural and wastewater systems. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the absorptive and complexation properties of humic and fulvic acids. Characterization and the occurrence of these acids in wastewater systems and natural systems are studied. The interaction of humic substances with metallic pollutants and chlorinated hydrocarbons, and removal of humic acids by precipitation are among the topics discussed. Wastewater treatment processes are discussed in separate bibliographies. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  13. Humic acids: Characterization and interactions in natural and wastewater systems. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the absorptive and complexation properties of humic and fulvic acids. Characterization and the occurrence of these acids in wastewater systems and natural systems are studied. The interaction of humic substances with metallic pollutants and chlorinated hydrocarbons, and removal of humic acids by precipitation are among the topics discussed. Wastewater treatment processes are discussed in separate bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  14. FORMATION OF ACIDIC TRACE ORGANIC BY-PRODUCTS FROM THE CHLORINATION OF HUMIC ACIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method for concentrating and analyzing acidic trace organics produced by the chlorination of humic acids at concentrations approximating common drinking water levels is described. Data are compared from several humic acid sources. Specific compound analyses of the extracts were...

  15. Complexation of transuranic ions by humic substances: Application of laboratory results to the natural system

    SciTech Connect

    Czerwinski, K.; Kim, J.

    1997-12-31

    Environmental investigations show transuranic ions sorb to humic substances. The resulting species are often mobile and are expected to be important vectors in the migration of transuranic ions in natural systems. However, these environmental studies yield no quantitative data useful for modeling. Laboratory complexation experiments with transuranic ions and humic substances generate thermodynamic data required for complexation modeling. The data presented in this work are based on the metal ion charge neutralization model, which is briefly described. When a consistent complexation model is used, similar results are obtained from different experimental conditions, techniques, and laboratories. Trivalent transuranic ions (Cm(III), Am(III)) have been extensively studied with respect to pH, ionic strength, origin of humic acid, and mixed species formation. The complexation of Np(V) has been examined over a large pH and metal ion concentration range with different humic acids. Some data does exist on the complexation ion concentration range with different humic acids. Some data does exist on the complexation of plutonium with humic acid, however further work is needed. Calculations on the Gorleben aquifer system using the thermodynamic data are presented. Critical information lacking from the thermodynamic database is identified. 55 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. [Effect of organic composition of humic acids on Enterobacteria multiplication].

    PubMed

    Buzoleva, L S; Sidorenko, M L

    2001-01-01

    Enterobacteria have been found to be capable of active multiplication in humic acids isolated from bentonite clays containing carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. Humic acids fractions have been found to be heterogeneous by their molecular weight and organic composition; consequently, they have been found to produce different influence in the multiplication of bacteria. PMID:11548272

  17. Surface-active properties of humic and sulfochlorohumic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabova, I.N.; Mustafina, G.A.; Akkulova, Z.G.; Satymbaeva, A.S.

    2009-10-15

    The surface tension of alkaline solutions of humic acids and their sulfochloroderivatives, which are synthesized by sulfonation of chlorohumic acids isolated from coal chlorinated by the electrochemical method, is investigated. It is established that humic compounds possess weak surface activity. Basic adsorption parameters are calculated.

  18. Properties and structure of peat humic acids depending on humification and precursor biota in bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-04-01

    Humic substances form most of the organic component of soil, peat and natural waters, but their structure and properties very much differs depending on their source. The aim of this study is to characterize humic acids from raised bog peat profiles to evaluate the homogeneity of humic acids isolated from the bog bodies and study peat humification impact on properties of humic acids. A major impact on the structure of peat humic acids have raised bog biota (dominantly represented by bryophytes of different origin) void of lignin. For characterization of peat humic acids their elemental (CHNOS), functional (-COOH, phenolic OH) analysis, spectroscopic characterization (UV, fluorescence, FTIR, 1H NMR, CP/MAS 13C NMR, ESR) and degradation studies (Py-GC/MS) were done. Peat humic acids (HA) have an intermediate position between the living organic matter and coal organic matter and their structure is formed in a process in which more labile structures (carbohydrates, amino acids, etc.) are destroyed, but thermodynamically more stable aromatic and polyaromatic structures emerge. Comparatively, the studied peat HAs are at the start of the transformation process of living organic matter. Concentrations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups changes depending on the depth of peat from which HAs have been isolated: and carboxylic acidity is increasing with depth of peat location and the humification degree. The ability to influence the surface tension of peat humic acids isolated from a well-characterized bog profile demonstrates dependence on age and humification degree. With increase of the humification degree and age of humic acids, their molecular complexity and ability to influence surface tension decreases; even so, the impact of the biological precursor (peat-forming bryophytes and plants) can be identified.

  19. Lability of copper bound to humic acid.

    PubMed

    Mao, Lingchen; Young, Scott D; Bailey, Elizabeth H

    2015-07-01

    Geochemical speciation models generally include the assumption that all metal bound to humic acid and fulvic acid (HA, FA) is labile. However, in the current study, we determined the presence of a soluble 'non-labile' Cu fraction bound to HA extracted from grassland and peat soils. This was quantified by determining isotopically-exchangeable Cu (E-value) and EDTA-extraction of HA-bound Cu, separated by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and assayed by coupled ICP-MS. Evidence of time-dependent Cu fixation by HA was found during the course of an incubation study (160 d); up to 50% of dissolved HA-bound Cu was not isotopically exchangeable. This result was supported by extraction with EDTA where approximately 40% of Cu remained bound to HA despite dissolution in 0.05 M Na2-EDTA. The presence of a substantial non-labile metal fraction held by HA challenges the assumption of wholly reversible equilibrium which is central to current geochemical models of metal binding to humic substances. PMID:25863164

  20. Sorption of {sup 60}Co, {sup 85}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 237}Np and {sup 241}Am on soil under coexistence of humic acid: Effects of molecular size of humic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Tadao; Senoo, Muneaki

    1995-12-31

    Sorption experiments have been performed by a batch method, to study the effects of humic acid of different molecular size on the complexing stability with {sup 60}Co, {sup 85}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 237}Np and {sup 241}Am, and on the sorption behavior of these radionuclides on a sandy soil. Equilibrium constants K in the sorption of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 237}Np onto the soil were not changed at different concentrations of humic acid since {sup 137}Cs and {sup 237}Np do not interact with humic acid, while those of {sup 60}Co and {sup 241}Am decreased with increasing humic acid concentration due to forming humic complexes. However, the K of {sup 85}Sr was not changed at different humic acid concentrations, despite {sup 85}Sr interacts with humic acid. This contradiction was probably caused from that a main binding of {sup 85}Sr with humic acid is not based on coordination bond but electrostatic force, due to relatively high concentration of non-radioactive strontium. The theoretical sorption model taking account of the interaction of {sup 60}Co and {sup 241}Am with humic acid could well reproduce the values of K for each radionuclide at different concentrations of humic acid. Concentration profiles of the radionuclides in each size fraction of the solution before and after the sorption experiments were examined by ultrafiltration technique. The reduction of concentration of {sup 60}Co in the fraction less than 300,000 of cutoff molecular weight (MW) and that of concentration of {sup 241}Am in the fraction larger than 100,000MW, respectively, by the sorption onto the soil decreased with increasing humic acid concentration. This decrease resulted in the decrease in the K of {sup 60}Co and {sup 241}Am with increasing humic acid concentration.

  1. Pyrrolidone - a new solvent for the methylation of humic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Pinckney, D.J.; Booker, S.E.

    1975-01-01

    In the past, humic acid has been methylated by suspending it in a solution of diazomethane in diethyl ether, and degrading the partly methylated humic acid to release those parts of the molecule that were methylated. Only small fragments of the molecule have been identified by this technique. In the procedure described here the humic acid is dissolved in 2-pyrrolidone and methylated by the addition of diazomethane in diethyl ether and ethanol to the solution. Because the humic acid is completely dissolved in the reaction medium, disaggregation of the humic acid particles takes place and much more complete methylation is obtained. The methylated products may be fractionated by countercurrent distribution and analyzed by mass spectrometry.

  2. Np(V) reduction by humic acid: contribution of reduced sulfur functionalities to the redox behavior of humic acid.

    PubMed

    Schmeide, K; Sachs, S; Bernhard, G

    2012-03-01

    The role of sulfur-containing functional groups in humic acids for the Np(V) reduction in aqueous solution has been studied with the objective to specify individual processes contributing to the overall redox activity of humic substances. For this, humic acid model substances type M1-S containing different amounts of sulfur (1.9, 3.9, 6.9 wt.%) were applied. The sulfur functionalities in these humic acids are dominated by reduced-sulfur species, such as thiols, dialkylsulfides and/or disulfides. The Np(V) reduction behavior of these humic acids has been studied in comparison to that of the sulfur-free humic acid type M1 at pH 5.0, 7.0 and 9.0 under anaerobic conditions by means of batch experiments. For Np redox speciation in solution, solvent extraction and ultrafiltration were applied. In addition, redox potentials of the sample solutions were monitored. At pH 5.0, both rate and extent of Np(V) to Np(IV) reduction were found to increase with increasing sulfur content of the humic acids. At pH 7.0 and 9.0, sulfur functional groups had only a slight influence on the reduction behavior of humic acid toward Np(V). Thus, in addition to quinoid moieties and non-quinoid phenolic OH groups, generally acknowledged as main redox-active sites in humic substances, sulfur functional groups have been identified as further redox-active moieties of humic substances being active especially in the slightly acidic pH range as shown for Np(V). Due to the low sulfur content of up to 2 wt.% in natural humic substances, their contribution to the total reducing capacity is smaller than that of the other redox-active functional groups. PMID:22285088

  3. Beneficial effects of humic acid on micronutrient availability to wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackowiak, C. L.; Grossl, P. R.; Bugbee, B. G.

    2001-01-01

    Humic acid (HA) is a relatively stable product of organic matter decomposition and thus accumulates in environmental systems. Humic acid might benefit plant growth by chelating unavailable nutrients and buffering pH. We examined the effect of HA on growth and micronutrient uptake in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown hydroponically. Four root-zone treatments were compared: (i) 25 micromoles synthetic chelate N-(4-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (C10H18N2O7) (HEDTA at 0.25 mM C); (ii) 25 micromoles synthetic chelate with 4-morpholineethanesulfonic acid (C6H13N4S) (MES at 5 mM C) pH buffer; (iii) HA at 1 mM C without synthetic chelate or buffer; and (iv) no synthetic chelate or buffer. Ample inorganic Fe (35 micromoles Fe3+) was supplied in all treatments. There was no statistically significant difference in total biomass or seed yield among treatments, but HA was effective at ameliorating the leaf interveinal chlorosis that occurred during early growth of the nonchelated treatment. Leaf-tissue Cu and Zn concentrations were lower in the HEDTA treatment relative to no chelate (NC), indicating HEDTA strongly complexed these nutrients, thus reducing their free ion activities and hence, bioavailability. Humic acid did not complex Zn as strongly and chemical equilibrium modeling supported these results. Titration tests indicated that HA was not an effective pH buffer at 1 mM C, and higher levels resulted in HA-Ca and HA-Mg flocculation in the nutrient solution.

  4. Beneficial effects of humic acid on micronutrient availability to wheat.

    PubMed

    Mackowiak, C L; Grossl, P R; Bugbee, B G

    2001-01-01

    Humic acid (HA) is a relatively stable product of organic matter decomposition and thus accumulates in environmental systems. Humic acid might benefit plant growth by chelating unavailable nutrients and buffering pH. We examined the effect of HA on growth and micronutrient uptake in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown hydroponically. Four root-zone treatments were compared: (i) 25 micromoles synthetic chelate N-(4-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (C10H18N2O7) (HEDTA at 0.25 mM C); (ii) 25 micromoles synthetic chelate with 4-morpholineethanesulfonic acid (C6H13N4S) (MES at 5 mM C) pH buffer; (iii) HA at 1 mM C without synthetic chelate or buffer; and (iv) no synthetic chelate or buffer. Ample inorganic Fe (35 micromoles Fe3+) was supplied in all treatments. There was no statistically significant difference in total biomass or seed yield among treatments, but HA was effective at ameliorating the leaf interveinal chlorosis that occurred during early growth of the nonchelated treatment. Leaf-tissue Cu and Zn concentrations were lower in the HEDTA treatment relative to no chelate (NC), indicating HEDTA strongly complexed these nutrients, thus reducing their free ion activities and hence, bioavailability. Humic acid did not complex Zn as strongly and chemical equilibrium modeling supported these results. Titration tests indicated that HA was not an effective pH buffer at 1 mM C, and higher levels resulted in HA-Ca and HA-Mg flocculation in the nutrient solution. PMID:11885604

  5. Interaction of humic acids and humic-acid-like polymers with herpes simplex virus type 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klöcking, Renate; Helbig, Björn

    The study was performed in order to compare the antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) of synthetic humic-acid-like polymers to that of their low-molecular-weight basic compounds and naturally occurring humic acids (HA) in vitro. HA from peat water showed a moderate antiviral activity at a minimum effective concentration (MEC) of 20 µg/ml. HA-like polymers, i.e. the oxidation products of caffeic acid (KOP), hydrocaffeic acid (HYKOP), chlorogenic acid (CHOP), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (3,4-DHPOP), nordihydroguaretic acid (NOROP), gentisinic acid (GENOP), pyrogallol (PYROP) and gallic acid (GALOP), generally inhibit virus multiplication, although with different potency and selectivity. Of the substances tested, GENOP, KOP, 3,4-DHPOP and HYKOP with MEC values in the range of 2 to 10 µg/ml, proved to be the most potent HSV-1 inhibitors. Despite its lower antiviral potency (MEC 40 µg/ml), CHOP has a remarkable selectivity due to the high concentration of this polymer that is tolerated by the host cells (>640 µg/ml). As a rule, the antiviral activity of the synthetic compounds was restricted to the polymers and was not preformed in the low-molecular-weight basic compounds. This finding speaks in favour of the formation of antivirally active structures during the oxidative polymerization of phenolic compounds and, indirectly, of corresponding structural parts in different HA-type substances.

  6. The relationship between dissolved humic acids and soluble iron in estuaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, L. E.

    1984-01-01

    Dissolved humic acid and soluble iron appear to be chemically unassociated in estuaries despite their coincident removal. This conclusion is supported by differences in the aggregation kinetics of soluble iron and dissolved humic acid, the inability of extracted humic acid to stabilize laboratory preparations of ferric hydroxide, and decreasing ratios of humic acid carbon to soluble iron along the axes of some estuaries.

  7. Generation of hydroxyl radicals from metal-loaded humic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Paciolla, M.D.; Jansen, S.A.; Davies, G.

    1999-06-01

    Humic acids (HAs) are naturally occurring biopolymers that are ubiquitous in the environment. They are most commonly found in the soil, drinking water, and a variety of plants. Pharmacological and therapeutic studies involving humic acids have been reported to some extent. However, when certain transition metals are bound to humic acids, e.g., iron and copper, they can be harmful to biological organisms. For this study, humic acids were extracted from German, Irish, and New Hampshire soils that were selectively chosen because of their reich abundance in humic material. Each sample was treated at room temperature with 0.1 M ferric and cupric solutions for 48 h. The amount of iron and copper adsorbed by humic acid was accurately quantitated using atomic absorption spectroscopy. The authors further demonstrate that these metal-loaded humic acids can produce deleterious oxidizing species such as the hydroxyl radical (HO*) through the metal-driven Fenton reaction. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) employing spin trapping techniques with 5,5-dimethylpyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) is used to confirm the generation of hydroxyl radicals. The DMPO-OH adduct with hyperfine splitting constants A{sub N} = A{sub H} = 14.9 G is observed upon the addition of exogenous hydrogen peroxide. The concentration of hydroxyl radical was determined using 4-hydroxytempo (TEMPO-OH) as a spin standard. The presence of another oxidizing species, Fe{double_bond}O{sup 2+}, is also proposed in the absence of hydrogen peroxide.

  8. Determination of humic and fulvic acids in commercial solid and liquid humic products by alkaline extraction and gravimetric determination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased use of humic substances in agriculture has generated intense interest among producers, consumers, and regulators for an accurate and reliable method for quantification of humic (HA) and fulvic acids (FA) in raw ores and products. Here we present a thoroughly validated method, the Humic Pro...

  9. Use of humic acids derived from peat and lignite as phenanthrene sorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofikitis, Elias; Giannouli, Andriana; Kalaitzidis, Stavros; Christanis, Kimon; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.; Papanicolaou, Cassiani

    2015-04-01

    A broad range of materials is being applied for environmental remediation of water, among them sorbents such as humic acids. Being natural substances, the extraction and purification of humic acids might be cheaper than the production of synthetic sorbents. Having higher absorbing capacity than most of the sorbents used to date, humic acids have a competitive advantage against commonly used sorbents such as active charcoals and biochar. Humic acids are "complex colloidal super-mixtures" that are characterized by their functional groups. Therefore, composition and molecular formula can vary depending on the properties of the parent material. The aim of this project was (a) to study the sorption capacity of humic acids derived from peat and lignite samples picked up from deposits spread throughout Greece and (b) to compare the results with these of the parent materials. This comparison provides an insight to which matrix samples are suitable for further chemical treatment for the isolation of humic acids to be used as sorbents. The selected model pollutant was phenanthrene, which is a PAH that consists of three fused benzene rings. Humic acids were extracted according to the methodology proposed by the IHSS, slightly modified, in order to fit better to the properties of organic sediments. Sorption experiments were conducted by mixing 0.004 g of the sorbent (peat or lignite or humic acid) with aqueous solutions of phenanthrene at different concentrations of 30, 50, 100, 300, and 500 μg/L. The results show that phenanthrene sorption is higher for the humic acid than for the original lignite and peat samples. The original samples display higher sorption at the lower phenanthere solutions (30 μg/L; Kd ranges from 15,000 to 47,000 L/kg) than at the higher one (500 μg/L; Kd ranges from 4,100 to 13,000 L/Kg) suggesting non-linear sorption. The humic acids display mainly linear isotherms with Kd ranges from 6,600 to 120,000 L/kg. Concerning the suitability of the studied

  10. Study of coagulation processes of selected humic acids under copper ions influence*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguta, Patrycja; Sokolowska, Zofia

    2013-04-01

    (carbon analyzer: Multi NC2000, Analityk Jena) and measurements of copper content in solution (atomic absorption spectrometer: Contraa300, Analityk Jena). On the base of obtained results initial and end point of coagulation was determined for each of humic acids. Results showed that coagulation points differed for different humic acids and it was probably depended on sorption possibilities. Coagulation points determined from UV-VIS measurements overlapped with points from carbon measurement. Loss of carbon during coagulation was almost total but loss of copper in solution during humic acid coagulation was much smaller and did not cover exactly points of carbon precipitation. So that, coagulation of humic acids under copper influence could resulted from both bonding of metal by functional groups and creating complexes and also from increasing ionic strength. Important is that organic carbon went to insoluble form and copper stayed in movable compounds. Such studies and conclusions coming from them, can be very important from ecological side. *This work was partly supported by the National Science Centre in Poland, grant No. UMO-2011/03/N/NZ9/04239.

  11. Potentiometric titration and equivalent weight of humic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pommer, A.M.; Breger, I.A.

    1960-01-01

    The "acid nature" of humic acid has been controversial for many years. Some investigators claim that humic acid is a true weak acid, while others feel that its behaviour during potentiometric titration can be accounted for by colloidal adsorption of hydrogen ions. The acid character of humic acid has been reinvestigated using newly-derived relationships for the titration of weak acids with strong base. Re-interpreting the potentiometric titration data published by Thiele and Kettner in 1953, it was found that Merck humic acid behaves as a weak polyelectrolytic acid having an equivalent weight of 150, a pKa of 6.8 to 7.0, and a titration exponent of about 4.8. Interdretation of similar data pertaining to the titration of phenol-formaldehyde and pyrogallol-formaldehyde resins, considered to be analogs for humic acid by Thiele and Kettner, leads to the conclusion that it is not possible to differentiate between adsorption and acid-base reaction for these substances. ?? 1960.

  12. Capillary zone electrophoresis of humic acids from the American continent.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Maria de Lourdes; Havel, Josef

    2002-01-01

    A multicomponent background electrolyte (BGE) was developed and its composition optimized using artificial neural networks (ANN). The optimal BGE composition was found to be 90 mM boric acid, 115 mM Tris, and 0.75 mM EDTA (pH 8.4). A separation voltage of 20 kV, 20 degrees C and detection at 210 nm were used. The method was applied to characterize several humic acids originating from various countries of the American continent: soil (Argentina), peat (Brazil), leonardite (Guatemala and Mexico) and coal (United States). Comparison with humic acids of International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) standard samples was also done. Well reproducible electropherograms showing a relatively high number of peaks were obtained. Characterization of the samples by elemental analysis and UV spectrophotometry was also done. In spite of the very different origins, the similarities between humic acids are high and by matrix assisted desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF)-mass spectrometry it was shown that most of the m/z patterns are the same in all humic acids. This means that humic acids of different origin have the same structural units or that they contain the same components. PMID:11840535

  13. Effect of humic acid source on humic acid adsorption onto titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Erhayem, Mohamed; Sohn, Mary

    2014-02-01

    In many studies, different humic acid (HA) sources are used interchangeably to evaluate the effect of organic matter on geochemical processes in the environment. This research looks more specifically at the effect of HA source on HA adsorption onto nano-TiO2 and how HA adsorption affects the fate and transport of nano-TiO2. In this study, six humic acids (HAs) were studied which were derived from soils (SLHA), or from sediments (SDHA) all originating from the state of Florida. Humic acid adsorption onto titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) and the sedimentation of HA-coated and uncoated nano-TiO2 were monitored by Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy. Synchronous scan fluorescence (SSF) spectroscopy was used to complement the study of HA adsorption onto nano-TiO2. Phosphate buffer was found to reduce the amount of HA adsorbed onto nano-TiO2 relative to solutions of NaCl of the same pH and ionic strength. Adsorption constant values (Kads) for HAs varied in the order SLHA>FSDHA (freshwater sedimentary HA)>ESDHA (estuarine sedimentary HA). SSF results suggested that the more highly conjugated fractions of HA, which are more prevalent in SLHAs versus SDHAs, were preferentially adsorbed. In order to better understand the relationship between adsorption and aggregation, sedimentation studies were conducted and it was found that the percentage of nano-TiO2 sedimentation was preferentially enhanced in the order of the presence of SLHA>FSDHA>ESDHA. The extent of nano-TiO2 sedimentation was decreased with increasing HA concentration. TEM imaging of nano-TiO2 confirmed that nano-TiO2 was aggregated in the presence of HAs. The findings in this study suggest that HAs from different sources influence the fate and transport of nano-TiO2 in the environment differently. PMID:24140685

  14. Phytoremediation of Cu and Zn by vetiver grass in mine soils amended with humic acids.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Carmen; Pérez-Esteban, Javier; Escolástico, Consuelo; Masaguer, Alberto; Moliner, Ana

    2016-07-01

    Phytoremediation of contaminated mine soils requires the use of fast-growing, deep-rooted, high-biomass, and metal-tolerant plants with the application of soil amendments that promote metal uptake by plants. A pot experiment was performed to evaluate the combined use of vetiver grass (Chrysopogon zizanioides) and humic acid for phytoremediation of Cu and Zn in mine soils. Vetiver plants were grown in soil samples collected from two mine sites of Spain mixed with a commercial humic acid derived from leonardite at doses of 0, 2, 10, and 20 g kg(-1). Plant metal concentrations and biomass were measured and metal bioavailability in soils was determined by a low molecular weight organic acid extraction. Results showed that humic acid addition decreased organic acid-extractable metals in soil. Although this extraction method is used to estimate bioavailability of metals, it was not a good estimator under these conditions due to competition with the strong chelators in the added humic acid. High doses of humic acid also promoted root growth and increased Cu concentrations in plants due to formation of soluble metal-organic complexes, which enhanced removal of this metal from soil and its accumulation in roots. Although humic acid was not able to improve Zn uptake, it managed to reduce translocation of Zn and Cu to aerial parts of plants. Vetiver resulted unsuitable for phytoextraction, but our study showed that the combined use of this species with humic acid at 10-20 g kg(-1) could be an effective strategy for phytostabilization of mine soils. PMID:27030238

  15. Changes in humic acid conformation during coagulation with ferric chloride: implications for drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Siéliéchi, J-M; Lartiges, B S; Kayem, G J; Hupont, S; Frochot, C; Thieme, J; Ghanbaja, J; d'Espinose de la Caillerie, J B; Barrès, O; Kamga, R; Levitz, P; Michot, L J

    2008-04-01

    Electrophoretic mobility, pyrene fluorescence, surface tension measurements, transmission electron microscopy on resin-embedded samples, and X-ray microscopy (XRM) were combined to characterize the aggregates formed from humic colloids and hydrolyzed-Fe species under various conditions of pH and mixing. We show that, at low coagulant concentration, the anionic humic network is reorganized upon association with cationic coagulant species to yield more compact structures. In particular, spheroids about 80nm in size are evidenced by XRM at pH 6 and 8 just below the optimal coagulant concentration. Such reorganization of humic colloids does not yield surface-active species, and maintains negative functional groups on the outside of humic/hydrolyzed-Fe complex. We also observe that the humic network remains unaffected by the association with coagulant species up to the restabilization concentration. Upon increasing the coagulant concentration, restructuration becomes limited: indeed, the aggregation of humic acid with hydrolyzed-Fe species can be ascribed to a competition between humic network reconformation rate and collision rate of destabilized colloids. A decrease in stirring favors the shrinkage of humic/hydrolyzed-Fe complexes, which then yields a lower sediment volume. Elemental analyses also reveal that the iron coagulant species are poorly hydrolyzed in the destabilization range. This suggests that destabilization mechanisms such as sweep flocculation or adsorption onto a hydroxyde precipitate are not relevant to our case. A neutralization/complexation destabilization mechanism accompanied by a restructuration of flexible humic network is then proposed to occur in the range of pHs investigated. PMID:18155268

  16. Redox and complexation interactions of neptunium(V) with quinonoid-enriched humic derivatives.

    PubMed

    Shcherbina, Natalia S; Perminova, Irina V; Kalmykov, Stepan N; Kovalenko, Anton N; Haire, Richard G; Novikov, Alexander P

    2007-10-15

    Actinides in their higher valence states (e.g., MO2+ and MO2(2+), where M can be Np, Pu, etc) possess a higher potential for migration and in turn pose a substantial environmental threat. To minimize this potential for migration, reducing them to lower oxidation states (e.g., their tetravalent state) can be an attractive and efficient remedial process. These lower oxidation states are often much less soluble in natural aqueous media and are, therefore, less mobile in the environment. The research presented here focuses on assessing the performance of quinonoid-enriched humic derivatives with regardsto complexing and/ or reducing Np(V) present in solution. These "designer" humics are essentially derived reducing agents that can serve as reactive components of a novel humic-based remediation technology. The derivatives are obtained by incorporating different quinonoid-moieties into leonardite humic acids. Five quinonoid-derivatives are tested in this work and all five prove more effective as reducing agents for selected actinides than the parent leonardite humic acid, and the hydroquinone derivatives are better than the catechol derivatives. The reduction kinetics and the Np(V) species formed with the different derivatives are studied via a batch mode using near-infrared (NIR)-spectroscopy. Np(V) reduction by the humic derivatives under anoxic conditions at 293 K and at pH 4.7 obeys first-order kinetics. Rate constants range from 1.70 x 10(-6) (parent humic acid) to 1.06 x 10(-5) sec(-1) (derivative with maximum hydroquinone content). Stability constants for Np(V)-humic complexes calculated from spectroscopic data produce corresponding Logbeta values of 2.3 for parent humic acid and values ranging from 2.5 to 3.2 at pH 4.7 and from 3.3 to 3.7 at pH 7.4 for humic derivatives. Maximum constants are observed for hydroquinone-enriched derivatives. It is concluded that among the humic derivatives tested, the hydroquinone-enriched ones are the most useful for addressing

  17. Redox and complexation interactions of neptunium(V) with quinonoid-enriched humic derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Shcherbina, Natalia S.; Perminova, Irina V.; Kalmykov, Stephan N.; Kovalenko, Anton N.; Novikov, Alexander P.; Haire, Richard {Dick} G

    2007-01-01

    Actinides in their higher valence states (e.g., MO{sub 2}{sup +} and MO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, where M can be Np, Pu, etc) possess a higher potential for migration and in turn pose a substantial environmental threat. To minimize this potential for migration, reducing them to lower oxidation states (e.g., their tetravalent state) can be an attractive and efficient remedial process. These lower oxidation states are often much less soluble in natural aqueous media and are, therefore, less mobile in the environment. The research presented here focuses on assessing the performance of quinonoid-enriched humic derivatives with regards to complexing and/or reducing Np(V) present in solution. These 'designer' humics are essentially derived reducing agents that can serve as reactive components of a novel humic-based remediation technology. The derivatives are obtained by incorporating different quinonoid-moieties into leonardite humic acids. Five quinonoid-derivatives are tested in this work and all five prove more effective as reducing agents for selected actinides than the parent leonardite humic acid, and the hydroquinone derivatives are better than the catechol derivatives. The reduction kinetics and the Np(V) species formed with the different derivatives are studied via a batch mode using near-infrared (NIR)-spectroscopy. Np(V) reduction by the humic derivatives under anoxic conditions at 293 K and at pH 4.7 obeys first-order kinetics. Rate constants range from 1.70 x 10{sup -6} (parent humic acid) to 1.06 x 10{sup -5} sec{sup -1} (derivative with maximum hydroquinone content). Stability constants for Np(V)-humic complexes calculated from spectroscopic data produce corresponding Log{beta} values of 2.3 for parent humic acid and values ranging from 2.5 to 3.2 at pH 4.7 and from 3.3 to 3.7 at pH 7.4 for humic derivatives. Maximum constants are observed for hydroquinone-enriched derivatives. It is concluded that among the humic derivatives tested, the hydroquinone-enriched ones

  18. Quenching of fluorescence of phenolic compounds and modified humic acids by cadmium ions.

    PubMed

    Tchaikovskaya, O N; Nechaev, L V; Yudina, N V; Mal'tseva, E V

    2016-08-01

    The interaction of a number of phenolic compounds, being 'model fragments' of humic acids, with cadmium ions was investigated. The fluorescence quenching method was used to determine the complexation constants of these compounds with cadmium ions. It was established that bonding of phenolic compounds by cadmium ions at рН 7 is weak and reaches a maximum value of 15% for interaction with resorcinol. It was demonstrated that modification of humic acids by the mechanoactivation method increases by three times bonding of cadmium ions, which is caused by strengthening the acid properties of carboxyl and hydroxyl groups at the aromatic ring. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26729402

  19. Sequential photochemical and microbial degradation of organic molecules bound to humic Acid.

    PubMed

    Amador, J A; Alexander, M; Zika, R G

    1989-11-01

    We studied the effects of photochemical processes on the mineralization by soil microorganisms of [2-C]glycine bound to soil humic acid. Microbial mineralization of these complexes in the dark increased inversely with the molecular weight of the complex molecules. Sunlight irradiation of glycine-humic acid complexes resulted in loss of absorbance in the UV range and an increase in the amount of C-labeled low-molecular-weight photoproducts and the rate and extent of mineralization. More than half of the radioactivity in the low-molecular-weight photoproducts appears to be associated with carboxylic acids. Microbial mineralization of the organic carbon increased with solar flux and was proportional to the loss of A(330). Mineralization was proportional to the percentage of the original complex that was converted to low-molecular-weight photoproducts. Only light at wavelengths below 380 nm had an effect on the molecular weight distribution of the products formed from the glycine-humic acid complexes and on the subsequent microbial mineralization. Our results indicate that photochemical processes generate low-molecular-weight, readily biodegradable molecules from high-molecular-weight complexes of glycine with humic acid. PMID:16348046

  20. Sequential Photochemical and Microbial Degradation of Organic Molecules Bound to Humic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Amador, José A.; Alexander, Martin; Zika, Rod G.

    1989-01-01

    We studied the effects of photochemical processes on the mineralization by soil microorganisms of [2-14C]glycine bound to soil humic acid. Microbial mineralization of these complexes in the dark increased inversely with the molecular weight of the complex molecules. Sunlight irradiation of glycine-humic acid complexes resulted in loss of absorbance in the UV range and an increase in the amount of 14C-labeled low-molecular-weight photoproducts and the rate and extent of mineralization. More than half of the radioactivity in the low-molecular-weight photoproducts appears to be associated with carboxylic acids. Microbial mineralization of the organic carbon increased with solar flux and was proportional to the loss of A330. Mineralization was proportional to the percentage of the original complex that was converted to low-molecular-weight photoproducts. Only light at wavelengths below 380 nm had an effect on the molecular weight distribution of the products formed from the glycine-humic acid complexes and on the subsequent microbial mineralization. Our results indicate that photochemical processes generate low-molecular-weight, readily biodegradable molecules from high-molecular-weight complexes of glycine with humic acid. PMID:16348046

  1. Sequential photochemical and microbial degradation of organic molecules bound to humic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Amador, J.A.; Zika, R.G. ); Alexander, M. )

    1989-11-01

    We studied the effects of photochemical processes on the mineralization by soil microorganisms of (2-{sup 14}C)glycine bound to soil humic acid. Microbial mineralization of these complexes in the dark increased inversely with the molecular weight of the complex molecules. Sunlight irradiation of glycine-humic acid complexes resulted in loss of absorbance in the UV range and an increase in the amount of {sup 14}C-labeled low-molecular-weight photoproducts and the rate and extent of mineralization. More than half of the radioactivity in the low-molecular-weight photoproducts appears to be associated with carboxylic acids. Microbial mineralization of the organic carbon increased with solar flux and was proportional to the loss of A{sub 330}. Mineralization was proportional to the percentage of the original complex that was converted to low-molecular-weight photoproducts. Only light at wavelengths below 380 nm had an effect on the molecular weight distribution of the products formed from the glycine-humic acid complexes and on the subsequent microbial mineralization. Our results indicate that photochemical processes generate low-molecular-weight, readily biodegradable molecules from high-molecular-weight complexes of glycine with humic acid.

  2. Ozonization of humic acids in brown coal oxidized in situ

    SciTech Connect

    S.A. Semenova; Yu.F. Patrakov; M.V. Batina

    2008-10-15

    The effect of the ozonization of humic acids in chloroform and glacial acetic acid media on the yield and component composition of the resulting products was studied. The high efficiency of ozonization in acetic acid was found. Water-soluble low-molecular-weight substances were predominant among the ozonization products.

  3. Simple method of isolating humic acids from organic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, O. H.; Susilawati, K.; Nik Muhamad, A. B.; Khanif, M. Y.

    2009-04-01

    Humic substances particularly humic acids (HA) play a major role in soil conditioning e.g. erosion control, soil cation exchange capacity, complexation of heavy metal ions and pesticides, carbon and nitrogen cycles, plant growth and reduction of ammonia volatilization from urea. Humified substances such as coal, composts, and peat soils have substantial amounts of HA but the isolation of these acids is expensive, laborious, and time consuming. Factors that affect the quality and yield of HA isolated from these materials include extraction, fractionation, and purification periods. This work developed a simple, rapid, and cost effective method of isolating HA from peat soils. There was a quadratic relationship between extraction period and HA yield. Optimum extraction period was estimated at 4 h instead of the usual range of 12 to 48 h. There was no relationship between fractionation period and HA yield. As such 2 h instead of the usual range of 12 to 24 h fractionation period could be considered optimum. Low ash content (5%), remarkable reduction in K, coupled with the fact that organic C, E4/E6, carboxylic COOH, phenolic OH, and total acidity values of the HA were consistent with those reported by other authors suggest that the HA dealt with were free from mineral matter. This was possible because the distilled water used to purify the HA served as Bronsted-Lowry acid during the purification process of the HA. Optimum purification period using distilled waster was 1 h instead of the usual range of 1 and 7 days (uses HF and HCl and dialysis). Humic acids could be isolated from tropical peat soils within 7 h (i.e. 4 h extraction, 2 h fractionation, and 1 h purification) instead of the existing period of 2 and 7 days. This could facilitate the idea of producing organic fertilizers such as ammonium-humate and potassium-humate from humified substances since techniques devised in this study did not alter the true nature of the HA. Besides, the technique is rapid, simple

  4. Comparison of Cd(II), Cu(II), and Pb(II) biouptake by green algae in the presence of humic acid.

    PubMed

    Lamelas, Cristina; Slaveykova, Vera I

    2007-06-01

    The present study examines the role of humic acid, as a representative of dissolved organic matter, in Cd(II), Cu(II), and Pb(II) speciation and biouptake by green microalgae. Cellular and intracellular metal fractions were compared in the presence of citric and humic acids. The results demonstrated that Cd and Cu uptake in the presence of 10 mg L(-1) humic acid was consistent with that predicted from measured free metal concentrations, while Pb biouptake was higher. By comparing Cd, Cu, and Pb cellular concentrations in the absence and presence of humic acid, it was found that the influence of the increased negative algal surface charge, resulting from humic acid adsorption, on cellular metal was negligible. Moreover, the experimental results for all three metals were in good agreement with the ternary complex hypothesis. Given that metal has much higher affinity with algal sites than humic acid adsorbed to algae, the contribution of the ternary complex to metal bioavailability was negligible in the case of Cd (II) and Cu (II). In contrast, the ternary complex contributed to over 90% of total cellular metal for Pb(II), due to the comparable affinity of Pb to algal sites in comparison with humic acid adsorbed to algae. Therefore, the extension of the biotic ligand model by including the formation of the ternary complex between the metal, humic acid, and algal surface would help to avoid underestimation of Pb biouptake in the presence of humic substances by green algae Chlorella kesslerii. PMID:17612207

  5. Variability of humic acid properties depending on their precursor material: a study of peat profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2015-04-01

    Analysis of variation of peat composition, presence of trace elements in the peat and HSs within peat profiles can give information on the character of transformation of organic matter, important for C biogeochemical cycling, but also about impacts of climate change and human activities. In peat the transformation and decay process of living organic matter (humification) is retarded by the acidic and anaerobic environment, but at the same time the peat can provide information on environmental and paleo-environmental conditions of the past. The aim of the present study is to analyze the elemental and functional composition, spectral characteristics of humic acids isolated from a well characterized raised bog peat profiles to evaluate the impact of the character of humification processes on the peat HA properties. A comparative and complex characterization of humic acids (HAs) isolated from peat profiles of different origin in Latvia was carried out. Elemental and functional analysis of the isolated HAs was done, their acidity and molecular weights estimated. Spectral characterization included UV-Vis, IR, and electron spin resonance and fluorescence spectra. Structural characterization of HAs was by both 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. Comparison of position of studied humic acids in the Van Krevelen graph was done, thus locating them in the biogeochemical transformation processes of organic matter. Properties of HAs isolated from the Latvian peat were compared with HA from other sources (soil, water, coal and synthetic humic substances). Major properties of peat HAs depended on their origin, indicating the importance of humification processes. HAs isolated from peat of more recent origin were more similar to soil HAs, but from older sources there was a greater degree of humification. Changes of surface tension of solutions of humic acids stress the differences in aggregation character - ability to form supramacromolecular complexes of humic substances

  6. Effects of humic acids on the growth of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, V. V.; Yakushev, A. V.; Zavgorodnyaya, Yu. A.; Byzov, B. A.; Demin, V. V.

    2010-03-01

    The influence of humic acids of different origins on the growth of bacterial cultures of different taxa isolated from the soil and the digestive tracts of earthworms ( Aporrectodea caliginosa)—habitats with contrasting conditions—was studied. More than half of the soil and intestinal isolates from the 170 tested strains grew on the humic acid of brown coal as the only carbon source. The specific growth rate of the bacteria isolated from the intestines of the earthworms was higher than that of the soil bacteria. The use of humic acids by intestinal bacteria confirms the possibility of symbiotic digestion by earthworms with the participation of bacterial symbionts. Humic acids at a concentration of 0.1 g/l stimulated the growth of the soil and intestinal bacteria strains (66 strains out of 161) on Czapek’s medium with glucose (1 g/l), probably, acting as a regulator of the cell metabolism. On the medium with the humic acid, the intestinal bacteria grew faster than the soil isolates did. The most active growth of the intestinal isolates was observed by Paenibacillus sp., Pseudomonas putida, Delftia acidovorans, Microbacterium terregens, and Aeromonas sp.; among the soil ones were the representatives of the Pseudomonas genus. A response of the bacteria to the influence of humic acids was shown at the strain level using the example of Pseudomonas representatives. The Flexom humin preparation stimulated the growth of the hydrocarbon-oxidizing Acinetobacter sp. bacteria. This effect can be used for creating a new compound with the elevated activity of bacteria that are destroyers of oil and oil products.

  7. Change in the chemical composition of humic acids in peat thermolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tarnovskaya, L.I.; Maslov, S.G.

    1994-12-31

    The preliminary heat treatment of peat to 250 degrees centigrade may be a very effective factor in regulating the selectivity of a number of processes of complex peat processing schemes. Thermolysis of humic acids (in peat) was performed and solid residues were studied.

  8. SUBCHRONIC TOXICOLOGY OF HUMIC ACID FOLLOWING CHLORINATION IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A subchronic 90-day study was conducted with chlorinated and non-chlorinated humic acids with male Sprague-Dawley rats. Body weight gain, terminal organ and body weights, food and fluid consumption, clinical chemistries, hematological parameters, and urinalyses were determined fo...

  9. Stabilization of polynuclear plutonium(IV) species by humic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsac, Rémi; Banik, Nidhu Lal; Marquardt, Christian Michael; Kratz, Jens Volker

    2014-04-01

    Although the formation of tetravalent plutonium (Pu(IV)) polymers with natural organic matter was previously observed by spectroscopy, there is no quantitative evidence of such reaction in batch experiments. In the present study, Pu(IV) interaction with humic acid (HA) was investigated at pH 1.8, 2.5 and 3, as a function of HA concentration and for Pu total concentration equal to 6 × 10-8 M. The finally measured Pu(IV) concentrations ([Pu(IV)]eq) are below Pu(IV) solubility limit. Pu(IV)-HA interaction can be explained by the complexation of Pu(IV) monomers by HA up to [Pu(IV)]eq ∼ 10-8 M. However, the slope of the log-log Pu(IV)-HA binding isotherm changes from ∼0.7 to ∼3.5 for higher [Pu(IV)]eq than ∼10-8 M and at any pH. This result suggests the stabilization of hydrolyzed polymeric Pu(IV) species by HA, with a 4:1 Pu:HA stoichiometry. This confirms, for the first time, previous observations made by spectroscopy in concentrated systems. The humic-ion binding model, Model VII, was introduced into the geochemical speciation program PHREEQC and was used to simulate Pu(IV) monomers binding to HA. The simulations are consistent with other tetravalent actinides-HA binding data from literature. The stabilization of a Pu tetramer (Pu4(OH)88+) by HA was proposed to illustrate the present experimental results for [Pu(IV)]eq > 10-8 M. Predictive simulations of Pu(IV) apparent solubility due to HA show that the chosen Pu(IV)-polymer has no impact for pH > 4. However, the comparison between these predictions and recent spectroscopic results suggest that more hydrolyzed polymeric Pu(IV) species can be stabilized by HA at pH > 4. Polymeric Pu(IV)-HA species might significantly enhance Pu(IV) apparent solubility due to humics, which support a colloid-facilitated transport of this low solubility element.

  10. Capillary Electrophoresis Profiles and Fluorophore Components of Humic Acids in Nebraska Corn and Philippine Rice Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As humic substances represent relatively high molecular mass polyelectrolytes containing aromatic, aliphatic and heterocyclic subunits, capillary electrophoresis (CE) has become an attractive method for “finger-print” characterization of humic acids. In addition, fluorescence excitation-emission ma...

  11. Transformation of chlorinated phenols and anilines in the presence of humic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.W.; Dec, J.; Kim, J.E.; Bollag, J.M.

    2000-02-01

    Incubations of chlorinated phenols and anilines with oxidoreductive catalysts (peroxidase, laccase, tyrosinase, and birnessite) in the presence of humic acid led to oligomerization of the substrates or their binding to organic matter. The effect of humic acid on the overall transformation depended on the substrate, type of catalyst, and the concentration and source of humic acid. At low humic acid concentrations, the transformation of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) was enhanced, but at higher concentrations of humic acid, no further enhancement occurred. The transformation of 4-chloroaniline (4-CA) was only slightly affected after the addition of humic acid. In experiments with {sup 14}C-labeled substrates, 4-CP was mainly bound to humic acid and formed few oligomers, whereas 4-CA was largely subject to oligomerization with less binding to humic acid. Binding and oligomerization of 4-CP did not change with increasing concentration of humic acid, but with 4-CA, binding increased and oligomerization decreased. It appears that nucleophilic binding of 4-CA depended largely on the availability of carbonyl and quinone groups in humic acid and, therefore, the distribution of the transformed substrate between oligomers and organic matter greatly depended on the source of humic acid.

  12. Characterization of humic acids by two-dimensional correlation fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, K.; Xing, Shaoyong; Gong, Yongkuan; Miyajima, Toru

    2008-07-01

    We have investigated interaction between humic acids and heavy metal ions by fluorescence spectroscopy. The humic acids examined are Aldrich humic acid (AHA) and Dando humic acid (DHA), and heavy metal ions are Cu 2+ and Pb 2+. The binding constants between the humic acids and the heavy metal ions are obtained by a conventional fluorescence quenching technique. The two prominent bands in the fluorescence spectra of the humic acids give different binding constants, implying that the two bands are originated from different fluorescent species in the matrices of the humic acids. This was confirmed by two-dimensional correlation analysis based on the quenching perturbation on the fluorescence spectra. Two prominent cross peaks corresponding to the two fluorescence bands are obtained in the asynchronous maps, indicating that the two fluorescence bands belong to different species. The order of the response of the two fluorescence bands to the quenching perturbation is also elucidated based on Noda's rule.

  13. Relevant role of dissolved humic matter in phosphorus bioavailability in natural and agronomical ecosystems through the formation of Humic-(Metal)-Phosphate complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baigorri, Roberto; Urrutia, Óscar; Erro, Javier; Pazos-Pérez, Nicolás; María García-Mina, José

    2016-04-01

    Natural Organic Matter (NOM) and the NOM fraction present in soil solution (dissolved organic matter: DOM) are currently considered as fundamental actors in soil fertility and crop mineral nutrition. Indeed, decreases in crop yields as well as soil erosion are closely related to low values of NOM and, in fact, the use of organic amendments as both soil improvers and plant growth enhancers is very usual in countries with soils poor in NOM. This role of NOM (and DOM) seems to be associated with the presence of bio-transformed organic molecules (humic substances) with high cation chelating-complexing ability. In fact, bioavailable micronutrients with metallic character in soil solutions of alkaline and calcareous soils are forming stable complexes with DOM. This beneficial action of DOM also concerns other plant nutrients such as inorganic phosphate (Pi). Among the different mechanisms involved in the beneficial action of DOM on P bioavailability, the possible formation of poly-nuclear complexes including stable chemical bonds between negative binding sites in humic substances and Pi through metal bridges in soil solution might be relevant, especially in acidic soils. In fact, several studies have proven that these complexes can be obtained in the laboratory and are very efficient in prevent Pi soil fixation and improve Pi root uptake. However, clear experimental evidence about their presence in soil solutions of natural and agronomical soil ecosystems has not published yet. We present here experimental results supporting the real presence of stable Pi-metal-Humic (PMH) complexes in the soil solution of several acidic soils. The study is based on the physico-chemical characterization (31P-NMR, FTIR, TEM-EDAX, ICP-OES) of the DOM fraction isolated by ultrafiltration from the soil solution of several representative acidic soils. In average, more than 60 % of Pi was found in the soil solution humic fraction forming stable humic-metal (Fe, Al) complexes.

  14. Dicarboxylic acids generated by thermal alteration of kerogen and humic acids.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, K; Kaplan, I R

    1987-01-01

    Significant amounts (up to 2% of organic geopolymers) of low molecular weight (LMW) dicarboxylic acids (C2-C10) have been detected during thermal alteration (270 degrees C, 2 h) of kerogens and humic acids isolated from young or ancient lithified sediments. Their distribution is characterized by predominance of oxalic acid followed by succinic, fumaric and methylsuccinic acids. These acids are probably released by the breakdown of macromolecular structures, which have incorporated biogenic organic compounds, including diacids, during early diagenesis in sediments. Because of their reactivity, LMW diacids may play the following geochemically important roles under natural conditions: (1) the diacids dissolve carbonates and clay minerals to increase porosity and permeability, which enhances migration of oils and gas generated from catagenesis of kerogen dispersed in shale, and (2) the diacids may form organo-metal complexes, which are important for mobilization, transport and accumulation of trace metals in sedimentary basins. PMID:11542084

  15. Mid-Infrared Spectroscopic Properties of Humic Acid and Fulvic Acid-Soil Mixtures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The detection of humic materials in soils is essential in order to determine organic matter (SOM) stability and C sequestration on agricultural land. Mid-Infrared (MidIR) spectroscopy has been used to characterize SOM quality [1], study extracted soil humic acids [2], develop calibrations for quanti...

  16. Mid-Infrared Spectroscopic Properties of Humic Acid and Fulvic Acid-Soil Mixtures.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The detection of humic materials in soils is essential in order to determine organic matter (SOM) stability and C sequestration on agricultural land. Mid-Infrared (MidIR) spectroscopy has been used to characterize SOM quality [1], study extracted soil humic acids [2], develop calibrations for quanti...

  17. Environmental conditions that influence the ability of humic acids to induce permeability in model biomembranes.

    PubMed

    Ojwang', Loice M; Cook, Robert L

    2013-08-01

    The interaction of humic acids (HAs) with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-Sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) large unilamellar vesicle (LUV) model biomembrane system was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. HAs from aquatic and terrestrial (including coal) sources were studied. The effects of HA concentration and temperature over environmentally relevant ranges of 0 to 20 mg C/L and 10 to 30 °C, respectively, were investigated. The dosage studies revealed that the aquatic Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA) causes an increased biomembrane perturbation (percent leakage of the fluorescent dye, Sulforhodamine B) over the entire studied concentration range. The two terrestrial HAs, namely Leonardite humic acid (LAHA) and Florida peat humic acid (FPHA), at concentrations above 5 mg C/L, show a decrease or a plateau effect attributable to the competition within the HA mixture and/or the formation of "partial aggregates". The temperature studies revealed that biomembrane perturbation increases with decreasing temperature for all three HAs. Kinetic studies showed that the membrane perturbation process is complex with both fast and slow absorption (sorption into the bilayer) components and that the slow component could be fitted by first order kinetics. A mechanism based on "lattice errors" within the POPC LUVs is put forward to explain the fast and slow components. A rationale behind the concentration and temperature findings is provided, and the environmental implications are discussed. PMID:23805776

  18. Impact of humic acid fouling on membrane performance and transport of pharmaceutically active compounds in forward osmosis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ming; Nghiem, Long D; Price, William E; Elimelech, Menachem

    2013-09-01

    The impact of humic acid fouling on the membrane transport of two pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) - namely carbamazepine and sulfamethoxazole - in forward osmosis (FO) was investigated. Deposition of humic acid onto the membrane surface was promoted by the complexation with calcium ions in the feed solution and the increase in ionic strength at the membrane surface due to the reverse transport of NaCl draw solute. The increase in the humic acid deposition on the membrane surface led to a substantial decrease in the membrane salt (NaCl) permeability coefficient but did not result in a significant decrease in the membrane pure water permeability coefficient. As the deposition of humic acid increased, the permeation of carbamazepine and sulfamethoxazole decreased, which correlated well with the decrease in the membrane salt (NaCl) permeability coefficient. It is hypothesized that the hydrated humic acid fouling layer hindered solute diffusion through the membrane pore and enhanced solute rejection by steric hindrance, but not the permeation of water molecules. The membrane water and salt (NaCl) permeability coefficients were fully restored by physical cleaning of the membrane, suggesting that humic acid did not penetrate into the membrane pores. PMID:23764606

  19. Humic substances in natural waters and their complexation with trace metals and radionuclides: a review. [129 references

    SciTech Connect

    Boggs, S. Jr.; Livermore, D.; Seitz, M.G.

    1985-07-01

    Dissolved humic substances (humic and fulvic acids) occur in surface waters and groundwaters in concentrations ranging from less than 1 mg(C)/L to more than 100 mg(C)/L. Humic substances are strong complexing agents for many trace metals in the environment and are also capable of forming stable soluble complexes or chelates with radionuclides. Concentrations of humic materials as low as 1 mg(C)/L can produce a detectable increase in the mobility of some actinide elements by forming soluble complexes that inhibit sorption of the radionuclides onto rock materials. The stability of trace metal- or radionuclide-organic complexes is commonly measured by an empirically determined conditional stability constant (K'), which is based on the ratio of complexed metal (radionuclide) in solution to the product concentration of uncomplexed metal and humic complexant. Larger values of stability constants indicate greater complex stability. The stability of radionuclide-organic complexes is affected both by concentration variables and envionmental factors. In general, complexing is favored by increased of radionuclide, increased pH, and decreased ionic strength. Actinide elements are generally most soluble in their higher oxidation states. Radionuclides can also form stable, insoluble complexes with humic materials that tend to reduce radionuclide mobility. These insoluble complexes may be radionuclide-humate colloids that subsequently precipitate from solution, or complexes of radionuclides and humic substances that sorb to clay minerals or other soil particulates strongly enough to immobilize the radionuclides. Colloid formation appears to be favored by increased radionuclide concentration and lowered pH; however, the conditions that favor formation of insoluble complexes that sorb to particulates are still poorly understood. 129 refs., 25 figs., 19 tabs.

  20. Mutagenic by-products from chlorination of humic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, J.R.; Ringhand, H.P.; Coleman, W.E.; Schenck, K.M.; Munch, J.W.; Streicher, R.P.; Kaylor, W.H.; Kopfler, F.C.

    1986-11-01

    Chlorination of humic and fulvic acid results in the formation of direct-acting mutagenicity, detectable in the Salmonella/microsome assay (Ames test). This mutagenicity is being characterized as part of an overall effort aimed at evaluating potential health risks associated with the presence of mutagenic chemicals in drinking water. A number of chlorinated organic compounds, including several known mutagens, have been identified and quantified in diethyl either extracts of chlorinated humic acid solutions. However, the total mutagenicity of these compounds accounts for only about 7% of the original mutagenicity. Synergistic or antagonistic interactions among the identified components have been ruled out as possible explanations for the failure to account for a higher percentage of the activity. Recent progress has been made to separate the activity into neutral and strong acid fractions. Further isolation of the strong acids by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) has resulted in the purification of the mutagenicity into a major peak of activity with a specific mutagenicity of about 20,000 TA100 revertants per milligram. Several trichlorohydroxyfuranone isomers have been tentatively identified in this fraction. The contribution of these types of compounds to the mutagenicity of chlorinated humic acid is under investigation.

  1. Effect of solution chemistry on the extent of binding of phenanthrene by a soil humic acid: A comparison of dissolved and clay bound humic

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.D.; Tiller, C.L.

    1999-02-15

    The effect of pH, ionic strength, and cation in solution on the binding of phenanthrene by a soil humic acid in the aqueous phase was determined using fluorescence quenching. The phenanthrene binding coefficient with the dissolved soil humic, K{sub oc}, decreased with increasing ionic strength and solution cation valence. At low values of ionic strength, K{sub oc} values for this soil humic acid increased with increasing pH. For this humic sample, the experimental results were consistent with a conformational model of the humic substance in aqueous solution where, depending on solution conditions, some parts of the humic structure may be more open to allow increased PAH access to attachment sites. After sorption onto clays, supernatant solutions of the unadsorbed humic fraction yielded lower K{sub oc} values than the original bulk humic acid, suggesting that the humic substance was fractionating during its sorption onto the clays. Additionally, the extent of phenanthrene binding with the adsorbed humic fraction was lower than the results determined for the bulk humic acid prior to adsorption. The conformation of the humic substance when sorbed onto the inorganic surface appears to be affecting the level of phenanthrene binding by the humic acid.

  2. Cd(II) Sorption on Montmorillonite-Humic acid-Bacteria Composites.

    PubMed

    Du, Huihui; Chen, Wenli; Cai, Peng; Rong, Xingmin; Dai, Ke; Peacock, Caroline L; Huang, Qiaoyun

    2016-01-01

    Soil components (e.g., clays, bacteria and humic substances) are known to produce mineral-organic composites in natural systems. Herein, batch sorption isotherms, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and Cd K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy were applied to investigate the binding characteristics of Cd on montmorillonite(Mont)-humic acid(HA)-bacteria composites. Additive sorption and non-additive Cd(II) sorption behaviour is observed for the binary Mont-bacteria and ternary Mont-HA-bacteria composite, respectively. Specifically, in the ternary composite, the coexistence of HA and bacteria inhibits Cd adsorption, suggesting a "blocking effect" between humic acid and bacterial cells. Large positive entropies (68.1~114.4 J/mol/K), and linear combination fitting of the EXAFS spectra for Cd adsorbed onto Mont-bacteria and Mont-HA-bacteria composites, demonstrate that Cd is mostly bound to bacterial surface functional groups by forming inner-sphere complexes. All our results together support the assertion that there is a degree of site masking in the ternary clay mineral-humic acid-bacteria composite. Because of this, in the ternary composite, Cd preferentially binds to the higher affinity components-i.e., the bacteria. PMID:26792640

  3. Cd(II) Sorption on Montmorillonite-Humic acid-Bacteria Composites

    PubMed Central

    Du, Huihui; Chen, Wenli; Cai, Peng; Rong, Xingmin; Dai, Ke; Peacock, Caroline L.; Huang, Qiaoyun

    2016-01-01

    Soil components (e.g., clays, bacteria and humic substances) are known to produce mineral-organic composites in natural systems. Herein, batch sorption isotherms, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and Cd K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy were applied to investigate the binding characteristics of Cd on montmorillonite(Mont)-humic acid(HA)-bacteria composites. Additive sorption and non-additive Cd(II) sorption behaviour is observed for the binary Mont-bacteria and ternary Mont-HA-bacteria composite, respectively. Specifically, in the ternary composite, the coexistence of HA and bacteria inhibits Cd adsorption, suggesting a “blocking effect” between humic acid and bacterial cells. Large positive entropies (68.1 ~ 114.4 J/mol/K), and linear combination fitting of the EXAFS spectra for Cd adsorbed onto Mont-bacteria and Mont-HA-bacteria composites, demonstrate that Cd is mostly bound to bacterial surface functional groups by forming inner-sphere complexes. All our results together support the assertion that there is a degree of site masking in the ternary clay mineral-humic acid-bacteria composite. Because of this, in the ternary composite, Cd preferentially binds to the higher affinity components-i.e., the bacteria. PMID:26792640

  4. Nitrogen incorporation into lignite humic acids during microbial degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, L.H.; Yuan, H.L.

    2009-07-01

    Previous study showed that nitrogen content in lignite humic acids (HA) increased significantly during lignite biodegradation. In this paper we evaluated the factors responsible for the increased level of N in HA and the formation of new nitrogen compound following microbial degradation. When the ammonium sulfate concentration in lignite medium was 0.5%, the N-content in HA was higher than that in the crude lignite humic acid (cHA); when the ammonium sulfate concentration was epsilon 0.5%, both the biodegraded humic acid (bHA) N-content and the content of bHA in lignite increased significantly, but at 2.0% no increase was observed. This indicated that HA incorporated N existing in the lignite medium, and more HA can incorporate more N with the increase of bHA amount in lignite during microbial degradation. CP/MAS {sup 15}N NMR analysis showed that the N incorporated into HA during biotransformation was in the form of free or ionized NH{sub 2}-groups in amino acids and sugars, as well as NH{sub 4}{sup +}. We propose nitrogen can be incorporated into HA biotically and abiotically. The high N content bHA has a potential application in agriculture since N is essential for plant growth.

  5. Forms and Lability of Phosphorus in Humic Acid Fractions of Hord Silt Loam Soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorus (P) has long been known to be present in soil humic fractions, but little is known about specific P forms in humic fractions, or their lability. We extracted the mobile humic acid (MHA) and recalcitrant calcium humate (CaHA) fractions from a Nebraska Hord silt loam soil under continuous c...

  6. Characterisation of humic acid by means of SERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, E.; Geßner, R.; Hayes, M. H. B.; Kiefer, W.

    1999-05-01

    Humic acid from Oak Forest extracted at pH 7, was investigated by means of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The substance was deposited on two different SERS substrates: ex-situ roughened silver electrodes and silver island films. A comparison of the SERS spectra excited with the 514 nm and the 647 nm lines shows considerable differences in the relative intensities of the bands. These alterations may be a result of resonance enhancement and/or photochemically induced conformation changes of the molecule. Differences in the SERS spectra of the sample adsorbed on different SERS substrates indicate a strong dependence of the adsorption configuration of the humic acid on the metal surface, on the surface potential, and on the coadsorption of anions.

  7. Reduced humic acid nanosheets and its uses as nanofiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duraia, El-shazly M.; Henderson, B.; Beall, Gary W.

    2015-10-01

    Leonardite is highly oxidized form of lignite coal and contains a number of carboxyl groups around the edges of a graphene-like core. A novel approach has been developed to synthesize graphene oxide-like nanosheets in large scale utilizing leonardite as a starting material. Humic acid extracted from leonardite has been reduced by performing a high pressure catalytic hydrogenation. The reaction was carried out inside a high pressure stirred reactor at 150 °C and 750 psi (~5.2×106 Pa). Morphology of the as-synthesized samples showed porous platy particles and EDAX analysis indicates the carbon and oxygen atomic ratios as 96:4-97:3%. The as-synthesized material has been used as nanofiller in polyurethane. The reduced humic acid-polyurethane nanocomposite showed over 250% increase of Young's modulus. This new approach provides a low cost and scalable source for graphene oxide-like nanosheets in nanocomposite applications.

  8. Uranium Adsorption on Ferrihydrite - Effects of Phosphate and Humic Acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payne, T.E.; Davis, J.A.; Waite, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    Uranium adsorption on ferrihydrite was studied as a function of pH in systems equilibrated with air, in the presence and absence of added phosphate and humic acid (HA). The objective was to determine the influence of PO43- and HA on uranium uptake. Below pH 7, the sorption of UO22+ typically increases with increasing pH (the 'low pH sorption edge'), with a sharp decrease in sorption above this pH value (the 'high pH edge'). The presence of ??PO43- of 10-4 mol/L moved the low pH edge to the left by approximately 0.8 pH units. The PO43- was strongly bound by the ferrihydrite surface, and the increased uptake of U was attributed to the formation of ternary surface complexes involving both UO22+ and PO43-. The addition of HA (9 mg/L) increased U uptake at pH values below 7, with little effect at higher pH values. The positions of the pH edges were also affected by the ionic strength and total U content. These experiments show that sorption interactions involving PO43 and HA must be considered in order to model the behavior of U in natural systems, in which these components are often present.

  9. X-ray absorption spectroscopic evidence for the complexation of Hg(II) by reduced sulfur in soil humic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, K.; Skyllberg, U.L.; Bleam, W.F.; Helmke, P.A.; Bloom, P.R.; Nater, E.A.

    1999-01-15

    Analysis of Hg(II) complexed by a soil humic acid (HA) using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) revealed the importance of reduces sulfur functional groups (thiol (R-SH) and disulfide (R-SS-R)/disulfane (R-SSH)) in humic substances in the complexation of Hg(II). A two-coordinate binding environment with one oxygen atom and one sulfur atom at distances of 2.02 and 2.38 {angstrom}, respectively, was found in the first coordination shell of Hg(II) complexed by humic acid. Model calculations show that a second coordination sphere could contain one carbon atom and a second sulfur atom at 2.78 and 2.93 {angstrom}, respectively. This suggests that in addition to thiol S, disulfide/disulfane S may be involved with the complexation of Hg(II) in soil organic matter. The appearance of carbon atom in the second coordination shell suggests that one O-containing ligand such as carboxyl and phenol ligands rather than H{sub 2}O molecule is bound to the Hg(II). The involvement of oxygen ligand in addition to the reduced S ligands in the complexation of Hg(II) is due to the low density of reduced S ligands in humic substances. The XAS results from this experiment provided direct molecular level evidence for the preference of reduced S functional groups over oxygen ligands by Hg(II) in the complexation with humic substances.

  10. Fractionation of humic acids upon adsorption on montmorillonite and palygorskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseeva, T. V.; Zolotareva, B. N.

    2013-06-01

    The adsorption of three humic acid (HA) preparations by clays—montmorillonite (Wyoming, USA) and palygorskite (Kolomenskoe district, Moscow oblast)—has been studied. The HA preparations were isolated from samples of the humus-accumulative horizons of a leached chernozem (Voronezh) and a chestnut soil (Volgograd), and a commercial preparation of sodium humate (Aldrich) was also used. The solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy and IR spectroscopy revealed the selective adsorption of structural HA fragments (alkyls, O-alkyls (carbohydrates), and acetal groups) on these minerals. As a result, the aromaticity of the organic matter (OM) in the organic-mineral complexes (OMCs) and the degree of its humification have been found to be lower compared to the original HA preparations. The fractionation of HAs is controlled by the properties of the mineral surfaces. The predominant enrichment of OMCs with alkyls has been observed for montmorillonite, as well as an enrichment with O-alkyls (carbohydrates) for palygorskite. A decrease in the C : N ratio has been noted in the elemental composition of the OM in complexes, which reflected its more aromatic nature and (or) predominant sorption of N-containing structural components of HA molecules. The adsorption of HA preparations by montmorillonite predominantly occurs on the external surface of mineral particles, and the interaction of nonpolar alkyl groups of HAs with this mineral belongs to weak (van der Waals, hydrophobic) interactions. The adsorption of HA preparations by palygorskite is at least partly of chemical nature: Si-OH groups of minerals are involved in the adsorption process. The formation of strong bonds between the OM and palygorskite explains the long-term (over 300 million years) retention of fossil fulvate-type OM in its complex with palygorskite, which we revealed previously.

  11. A comparison of water solubility enhancements of organic solutes by aquatic humic materials and commercial humic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chlou, C.T.; Kile, D.E.; Brinton, T.I.; Malcolm, R.L.; Leenheer, J.A.; MacCarthy, P.

    1987-01-01

    Water solubility enhancements of 1,1-bis(p-chloro-phenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane (p,p???-DDT), 2,4,5,2???,5???-pentachlorobiphenyl (2,4,5,2???,5???-PCB), and 2,4,4???-tri-chlorobiphenyl (2,4,4???-PCB) by dissolved organic matter have been studied with the following samples: (1) acidic water samples from the Suwannee River, Georgia, and the Sopchoppy River, Florida; (2) a humic extract of a nearly neutral pH water from the Calcasieu River, Louisiana; (3) commercial humic acids from the Aldrich Chemical Co. and Fluka-Tridom Chemical Corp. The calculated partition coefficients on a dissolved organic carbon basis (Kdoc) for organic solutes with water samples and aquatic humic extracts from this and earlier studies indicate that the enhancement effect varies with the molecular composition of the aquatic humic materials. The Kdoc values with water and aquatic humic samples are, however, far less than the observed Kdoc values obtained with the two commercial samples, by factors of about 4-20. In view of this finding, one should be cautious in interpreting the effects of the dissolved organic matter on solubility enhancement of organic solutes on the basis of the use of commercial humic acids.

  12. The effect of humic acids on the element release from high level waste glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Van Iseghem, P.

    1997-12-31

    Eu and Am doped glasses were interacted with synthetic interstitial clay water (SiC) and corresponding reference leachant, humic acids free interstitial solution (IS) to investigate the influence of humic acids on the leaching behavior of the waste glass. Static leach tests were carried out at 40 C and 90 C. The release of the lanthanide Eu and the actinide Am from the glass was obviously enhanced by the presence of humic acids. The leaching of transition elements, Fe and Ti strongly depends on the humic acids concentration. The leaching of glass matrix components, Al and B was also influenced by the concentrations of humic acids. However, humic acids have little effect on the leaching of glass matrix element Si.

  13. Chemical composition and bioactivity properties of size-fractions separated from a vermicompost humic acid.

    PubMed

    Canellas, Luciano P; Piccolo, Alessandro; Dobbss, Leonardo B; Spaccini, Riccardo; Olivares, Fábio L; Zandonadi, Daniel B; Façanha, Arnoldo R

    2010-01-01

    Preparative high performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) was applied to humic acids (HA) extracted from vermicompost in order to separate humic matter of different molecular dimension and evaluate the relationship between chemical properties of size-fractions (SF) and their effects on plant root growth. Molecular dimensions of components in humic SF was further achieved by diffusion-ordered nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (DOSY-NMR) based on diffusion coefficients (D), while carbon distribution was evaluated by solid state (CP/MAS) (13)C NMR. Seedlings of maize and Arabidopsis were treated with different concentrations of SF to evaluate root growth. Six different SF were obtained and their carbohydrate-like content and alkyl chain length decreased with decreasing molecular size. Progressive reduction of aromatic carbon was also observed with decreasing molecular size of separated fractions. Diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) spectra showed that SF were composed of complex mixtures of aliphatic, aromatic and carbohydrates constituents that could be separated on the basis of their diffusion. All SF promoted root growth in Arabidopsis and maize seedlings but the effects differed according to molecular size and plant species. In Arabidopsis seedlings, the bulk HA and its SF revealed a classical large auxin-like exogenous response, i.e.: shortened the principal root axis and induced lateral roots, while the effects in maize corresponded to low auxin-like levels, as suggested by enhanced principal axis length and induction of lateral roots. The reduction of humic heterogeneity obtained in HPSEC separated size-fractions suggested that their physiological influence on root growth and architecture was less an effect of their size than their content of specific bioactive molecules. However, these molecules may be dynamically released from humic superstructures and exert their bioactivity when weaker is the humic conformational stability as that obtained

  14. In vivo cytogenetic effects of natural humic acid.

    PubMed

    Bernacchi, F; Ponzanelli, I; Minunni, M; Falezza, A; Loprieno, N; Barale, R

    1996-09-01

    As humic compounds are naturally widespread in the environment and present in surface water, studies on their genotoxicity are justified. Humic acid (HA) has not been demonstrated to be genotoxic either in vitro or in vivo. In the present paper we investigated its activity both in intestinal and bone marrow cells following a single dose (100 mg/kg b.w. corresponding to 0.5 ml per animal of an aqueous solution of 4 g/l) of HA administered to mice by gastric intubation, to mimic the most likely route of human exposure. HA induced structural and, in particular, numerical chromosome abnormalities in intestinal cells. A marginal, non-significant induction of aneuploidy was also found in bone marrow cells. PMID:8921508

  15. Experimental investigation of aqueous corrosion of R7T7 nuclear glass at 90{degrees}C in the presence of humic acids: A kinetic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Gin, S.; Godon, N.; Mestre, J.P.; Vernaz, E.Y.

    1994-12-31

    The dissolution kinetics of the French {open_quotes}R7T7{close_quotes} nonradioactive LWR reference glass in solutions containing dissolved humic acids were investigated at 9O{degrees}C during static tests with imposed or free pH. Experiments conducted in highly dilute media, with a glass-surface-area-to-solution-volume (SA/V) ratio of 5 m{sup -1}, showed that the glass dissolution surface reaction is catalyzed by humic acids. With higher degrees of reaction progress (SA/V = 100 m{sup -1} and free pH) the humic acids impose pH modifications on the system compared with inorganic media; moreover, they directly or indirectly enhance the dissolution of certain alkali metals and transition elements, forming aqueous complexes with the latter. During experiments with an imposed pH of 8.5 (SA/V = 1300 and 5300 m{sup -1}), the humic acids appear to cause increased silica solubility that cannot be accounted for by the formation of silica complexes. A residual corrosion rate in the humic acid media exceeding the rate measured in inorganic media suggests that, in addition to silica, one or more element complexes formed by humic acids may be a kinetically limiting factor. This hypothesis must be confirmed, however, as the quantity of humic acids per unit glass surface area was too small in this experiment to allow unambiguous characterization of the phenomenon.

  16. Exploring the high-mass components of humic acid by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chilom, Gabriela; Chilom, Ovidiu; Rice, James A

    2008-05-01

    Leonardite and Elliot soil humic acids have been analyzed by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS) in the m/z 4000-200,000 range. Positive ion mass spectra for each humic acid obtained under optimum conditions showed a broad high-mass distribution between m/z 20,000 and 80,000. The dependence of the mass distribution on instrumental parameters and solution conditions was used to investigate the nature of the high-mass peaks from humic acid spectra. Our data suggests that macromolecular ions and humic acid aggregates have the same probability of occurrence while cluster ion formation has a low probability of occurrence. PMID:18421699

  17. The contribution of humic substances to the acidity of colored natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oliver, B.G.; Thurman, E.M.; Malcolm, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    An operationally defined carboxyl content of humic substances extracted from rivers, streams, lakes, wetlands, and groundwaters throughout the United States and Canada is reported. Despite the diversity of the samples, only small variations were observed in this humic carboxyl content. The dissociation behavior of two combined fulvic/humic acid extracts was studied and it was found that the dissociation of the humics varied in a predictable manner with pH. Using a carboxyl content of 10 ??eq/ mg humic organic carbon, and mass action quotient calculated from sample pH, the ionic balances of three highly colored Nova Scotia rivers were estimated. ?? 1983.

  18. Natural and pyrogenic humic acids at goethite and natural oxide surfaces interacting with phosphate.

    PubMed

    Hiemstra, Tjisse; Mia, Shamim; Duhaut, Pierre-Benoît; Molleman, Bastiaan

    2013-08-20

    Fulvic and humic acids have a large variability in binding to metal (hydr) oxide surfaces and interact differently with oxyanions, as examined here experimentally. Pyrogenic humic acid has been included in our study since it will be released to the environment in the case of large-scale application of biochar, potentially creating Darks Earths or Terra Preta soils. A surface complexation approach has been developed that aims to describe the competitive behavior of natural organic matter (NOM) in soil as well as model systems. Modeling points unexpectedly to a strong change of the molecular conformation of humic acid (HA) with a predominant adsorption in the Stern layer domain at low NOM loading. In soil, mineral oxide surfaces remain efficiently loaded by mineral-protected organic carbon (OC), equivalent with a layer thickness of ≥ ~0.5 nm that represents at least 0.1-1.0% OC, while surface-associated OC may be even three times higher. In natural systems, surface complexation modeling should account for this pervasive NOM coverage. With our charge distribution model for NOM (NOM-CD), the pH-dependent oxyanion competition of the organo-mineral oxide fraction can be described. For pyrogenic HA, a more than 10-fold increase in dissolved phosphate is predicted at long-term applications of biochar or black carbon. PMID:23875678

  19. Interaction of trace elements in acid mine drainage solution with humic acid.

    PubMed

    Suteerapataranon, Siripat; Bouby, Muriel; Geckeis, Horst; Fanghänel, Thomas; Grudpan, Kate

    2006-06-01

    The release of metal ions from a coal mining tailing area, Lamphun, Northern Thailand, is studied by leaching tests. Considerable amounts of Mn, Fe, Al, Ni and Co are dissolved in both simulated rain water (pH 4) and 10 mg L(-1) humic acid (HA) solution (Aldrich humic acid, pH 7). Due to the presence of oxidizing pyrite and sulfide minerals, the pH in both leachates decreases down to approximately 3 combined with high sulfate concentrations typical to acid mine drainage (AMD) water composition. Interaction of the acidic leachates upon mixing with ground- and surface water containing natural organic matter is simulated by subsequent dilution (1:100; 1:200; 1:300; 1:500) with a 10 mg L(-1) HA solution (ionic strength: 10(-3) mol L(-1)). Combining asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) with UV/Vis and ICP-MS detection allows for the investigation of metal ion interaction with HA colloid and colloid size evolution. Formation of colloid aggregates is observed by filtration and AsFlFFF depending on the degree of the dilution. While the average HA size is initially found to be 2 nm, metal-HA complexes are always found to be larger. Such observation is attributed to a metal induced HA agglomeration, which is found even at low coverage of HA functional groups with metal ions. Increasing the metal ion to HA ratio, the HA bound metal ions and the HA entities are growing in size from <3 to >450 nm. At high metal ion to HA ratios, precipitation of FeOOH phases and HA agglomeration due to colloid charge neutralization by complete saturation of HA complexing sites are responsible for the fact that most of Fe and Al precipitate and are found in a size fraction >450 nm. In the more diluted solutions, HA is more relevant as a carrier for metal ion mobilization. PMID:16631855

  20. Root-Shoot Signaling crosstalk involved in the shoot growth promoting action of rhizospheric humic acids

    PubMed Central

    Olaetxea, Maite; Mora, Verónica; García, Andrés Calderin; Santos, Leandro Azevedo; Baigorri, Roberto; Fuentes, Marta; Garnica, María; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro; Zamarreño, Angel Maria; Garcia-Mina, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Numerous studies have shown the ability of humic substances to improve plant development. This action is normally reflected in an enhancement of crop yields and quality. However, the mechanisms responsible for this action of humic substances remain rather unknown. Our studies have shown that the shoot promoting action of sedimentary humic acids is dependent of its ability to increase root hydraulic conductivity through signaling pathways related to ABA, which in turn is affected in roots by humic acids in an IAA-NO dependent way. Furthermore, these studies also indicate that the primary action of humic acids in roots might also be physical, resulting from a transient mild stress caused by humic acids associated with a fouling-cleaning cycle of wall cell pores. Finally the role of alternative signal molecules, such as ROS, and corresponding signaling pathways are also discussed and modeled in the context of the above-mentioned framework. PMID:26966789

  1. Molecular characteristics of humic acids isolated from vermicomposts and their relationship to bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Balmori, Dariellys; Spaccini, Riccardo; Aguiar, Natália Oliveira; Novotny, Etelvino Henrique; Olivares, Fábio Lopes; Canellas, Luciano Pasqualoto

    2014-11-26

    Vermitechnology is an effective composting method, which transforms biomass into nutrient-rich organic fertilizer. Mature vermicompost is a renewable organic product containing humic substances with high biological activity. The aim of this study was to assess the chemical characteristics and the bioactivity of humic acids isolated from different vermicomposts produced with either cattle manure, sugar cane bagasse, sunflower cake from seed oil extraction, or filter cake from a sugar cane factory. More than 200 different molecules were found, and it was possible to identify chemical markers on humic acids according to the nature of the organic source. The large hydrophobic character of humic extracts and the preservation of altered lignin derivatives confer to humic acids the ability to induce lateral root emergence in maize seedlings. Humic acid-like substances extracted from plant biomass residues represent an additional valuable product of vermicomposting that can be used as a plant growth promoter. PMID:25379603

  2. Investigation of humic acid samples from different sources by photon correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caceci, Marco S.; Moulin, Valerie

    Photon correlation spectroscopy (dynamic light scattering) indicated that relatively large scatterers (50-200 nm diameter) are present in a number of soil, lake and groundwater humic and fulvic acids, as well as in natural waters of high humic content, but absent in synthetic humic acid. The influence of ionic strength, Ca(II), La(III), EDTA, fluoride ions, surfactants, and ultrasound on size and zeta potential of these scatterers has also been investigated.

  3. Modeling adsorption of copper(II), cadmium(II) and lead(II) on purified humic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, A.; Gonzalez, R.D.

    2000-04-18

    In this study, a system consisting of Pb, Cu and Cd as typical heavy metal pollutants, and purified Aldrich humic acid as a representative of natural organic materials were selected as prototypes to model the environmental system. The effect of environmental factors such as pH, salinity, and concentration on the interaction between metals and humic acid were investigated in detail. The experimental results show that pH and ionic strength are the most important variables in controlling metal adsorption on humic acid. The results also show a high complexation capacity of humic acid for the metals, especially Cu and Pb. The strength of binding of the three metals is in the sequence of Pb > Cu > Cd. A theoretical model featured by surface complexation reactions and double layer theory combined with the Poisson-Boltzmann equation was applied to simulate the experimental data. Titration data of humic acid with NaOH and Ba(OH){sub 2} were used as concentrations of strong and weak acid groups on HA and the input data for the model calculations. Intrinsic adsorption constants and capacitance are estimated based on literature values and optimized to obtain the best agreement between the experimental and the model results. The model was also used to predict surface properties such as the speciation of the metals adsorbed on humic acid. Good agreement between theoretical modeling results and experimental data suggests the applicability of the theoretical model to this system. Given these parameters, theoretical calculations obtained using the model proposed in this study can give a detailed picture of the actual environmental conditions. Also, the model calculations will help in the evaluation of the actual toxicity of heavy metal pollutants in the aquasystem.

  4. Composition of Humic Acids of the Lake Baikal Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnyakova, O.; Chimitdorzhieva, G.; Andreeva, D.

    2012-04-01

    Humic substances are the final stage of the biogeochemical transformation of organic matter in the biosphere. Its natural compounds are found not only in soil, peat, coal, and sediments of basins. Chemical composition and properties of humic substances are determined by the functioning of the ecosystem as a whole. Therefore the study of the unique Lake Baikal sediments can provide information about their genesis, as well as the processes of organic matter transformation. For this purpose, preparations of humic acids (HA) were isolated by alkaline extraction method. The composition of HA was investigated by the elemental analyzer CHNS/O PerkinElmer Series II. Various located sediments of the Lake Baikal were the objects of the study: 1 - Chivyrkuisky Bay, 2 - Kotovo Bay, 3 - Selenga river delta near Dubinino village, 4 - Selenga river delta near Murzino village. Data on the elemental composition of HA in terms of ash-free portion show that the carbon content (CC) is of 50-53% with a maximum value in a sample 3, and minimum - in a sample 2. Such values are characteristic also for the soils with low biochemical activity. The hydrogen content is of 4,2-5,3%, a maximum value is in a sample 1. Data recalculation to the atomic percentages identified following regularities. The CC of HA is of 35-39 at. %. Hydrogen content is of 37-43 at. %. According to the content of these elements investigated substances are clearly divided into two groups: HA of the sediments of the Lake Baikal and river Selenga delta. The magnitude of the atomic ratio H/C can be seen varying degrees of condensation of the molecules of humic acids. The high atomic ratio H/C in HA of the former group indicates the predominance of aliphatic structures in the molecules. Humic acids of the later group are characterized by a low value H/C (<1), suggesting a large proportion of aromatic components in HA composition. In sediments of the Selenga river delta there is an addition of organic matter of terrigenous

  5. Proton-binding study of standard and reference fulvic acids, humic acids, and natural organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Jason D.; Perdue, E. Michael

    2003-01-01

    The acid-base properties of 14 standard and reference materials from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) were investigated by potentiometric titration. Titrations were conducted in 0.1 M NaCl under a nitrogen atmosphere, averaging 30 min from start to finish. Concentrations of carboxyl groups and phenolic groups were estimated directly from titration curves. Titration data were also fit to a modified Henderson-Hasselbalch model for two classes of proton-binding sites to obtain "best fit" parameters that describe proton-binding curves for the samples. The model was chosen for its simplicity, its ease of implementation in computer spreadsheets, and its excellent ability to describe the shapes of the titration curves. The carboxyl contents of the IHSS samples are in the general order: terrestrial fulvic acids > aquatic fulvic acids > Suwannee River natural organic matter (NOM) > aquatic humic acids > terrestrial humic acids. Overall, fulvic acids and humic acids have similar phenolic contents; however, all of the aquatically derived samples have higher phenolic contents than the terrestrially derived samples. The acid-base properties of reference Suwannee River NOM are surprisingly similar to those of standard Suwannee River humic acid. Results from titrations in this study were compared with other published results from both direct and indirect titrations. Typically, carboxyl contents for the IHSS samples were in agreement with the results from both methods of titration. Phenolic contents for the IHSS samples were comparable to those determined by direct titrations, but were significantly less than estimates of phenolic content that were based on indirect titrations with Ba(OH) 2 and Ca(OAc) 2. The average phenolic-to-carboxylic ratio of the IHSS samples is approximately 1:4. Models that assume a 1:2 ratio of phenolic-to-carboxylic groups may overestimate the relative contribution of phenolic groups to the acid-base chemistry of humic substances.

  6. Properties and structure of raised bog peat humic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-10-01

    Humic substances form most of the organic components of soil, peat and natural waters, and their structure and properties differ very much depending on their source. The aims of this study are to characterize humic acids (HAs) from raised bog peat, to evaluate the homogeneity of peat HAs within peat profiles, and to study peat humification impact on properties of HAs. A major impact on the structure of peat HAs have lignin-free raised bog biota (dominantly represented by bryophytes of different origin). On diagenesis scale, peat HAs have an intermediate position between the living organic matter and coal organic matter, and their structure is formed in a process in which more labile structures (carbohydrates, amino acids, etc.) are destroyed, while thermodynamically more stable aromatic and polyaromatic structures emerge as a result of abiotic synthesis. However, in comparison with soil, aquatic and other HAs, aromaticity of peat HAs is much lower. Comparatively, the raised bog peat HAs are at the beginning of the transformation process of living organic matter. Concentrations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups change depending on the peat age and decomposition degree from where HAs have been isolated, and carboxylic acidity of peat HAs increases with peat depth and humification degree.

  7. Competitive effect of iron(III) on metal complexation by humic substances: characterisation of ageing processes.

    PubMed

    Lippold, H; Evans, N D M; Warwick, P; Kupsch, H

    2007-03-01

    Aiming at an assessment of counteractive effects on colloid-borne migration of actinides in the event of release from an underground repository, competition by Fe(III) in respect of metal complexation by dissolved organic matter was investigated for the example of Eu(III) as an analogue of trivalent actinides. Complexation with different humic materials was examined in cation exchange experiments, using (59)Fe and (152)Eu as radioactive tracers for measurements in dilute systems as encountered in nature. Competitive effects proved to be significant when Fe is present at micromolar concentrations. Flocculation as a limiting process was attributed to charge compensation of humic colloids. Fe fractions bound to humic acids (HA) were higher than 90%, exceeding the capacity of binding sites at high Fe concentrations. It is thus concluded that the polynuclear structure of hydrolysed Fe(III) is maintained when bound to HA, which is also inferred from UV-Vis spectrometry. The competitive effect was found to be enhanced if Fe and HA were in contact before Eu was added. Depending on the time of Fe/HA pre-equilibration, Eu complexation decreased asymptotically over a time period of several weeks, the amount of bound Fe being unchanged. Time-dependent observations of UV-Vis spectra and pH values revealed that the ageing effect was due to a decline in Fe hydrolysis rather than structural changes within HA molecules. Fe polycations are slowly degraded in contact with humic colloids, and more binding sites are occupied as a consequence of dispersion. The extent of degradation as derived from pH shifts depended on the Fe/HA ratio. PMID:17140629

  8. Analysis of Phosphorus in Soil Humic Acid Fractions by Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Ultraviolet Irradiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Humic acid is an important soil component which influences chemical, biological, and physical soil properties. In this study, we investigated lability of phosphorus (P) in the mobile humic acid (MHA) and calcium humate (CaHA) fractions of four soils by orthophosphate-releasing enzymatic hydrolysis a...

  9. KINETIC ASPECTS OF CATION-ENHANCED AGGREGATION IN AQUEOUS HUMIC ACIDS. (R822832)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cation-enhanced formation of hydrophobic domains in aqueous humic acids has been shown to be a slow process, consistent with the evolution and disintegration of humic acid configurations over periods lasting from days to weeks. After the addition of a magnesium salt to a humi...

  10. EFFECT OF HUMIC ACID ON UPTAKE AND TRANSFER OF COPPER FROM MICROBES TO CILIATES TO COPEPODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research is part of an ongoing project designed to determine the effect of humic acid on the uptake and transfer of metals by marine organisms at the lower end of the food chain. Binding affinities for Cu, Cd, Zn, and Cr to Suwannee River humic acid were determined at variou...

  11. Enzymatically- and Ultraviolet-labile Phosphorus in Humic Acid Fractions From Rice Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Humic acid is an important soil component which can improve nutrient availability and impact other important chemical, biological, and physical properties of soils. We investigated the lability of phosphorus (P) in the mobile humic acid (MHA) and calcium humate (CaHA) fractions of four rice soils as...

  12. Adsorption/desorption in a system consisting of humic acid, heavy metals, and clay minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, A.; Gonzalez, R.D.

    1999-10-01

    Metal adsorption/desorption in a system consisting of humic acid, metal ions, and clay minerals is described. Montmorillonite and purified humic acid were selected as prototype materials for this study. At a constant ionic strength, the amount of humic acid adsorbed on montmorillonite decreases when pH is increased. A slight increase in humic acid adsorption on montmorillonite is observed when there are bivalent metals present in the system. The metal adsorption on montmorillonite does not correlate to the amount of humic acid adsorbed on montmorillonite. Montmorillonite with preadsorbed humic acid does not show a significant change in the capacity of adsorbed metal ions. An increase in the ionic strength at a pH of 6.5 results in an increase in the adsorption of lead on montmorillonite in the presence of humic acid, while at a lower pH, the increase in ionic strength results in a decrease in metal adsorption. The bridging of bivalent metal ions between montmorillonite and humic acid is proposed as the dominant adsorption mechanism.

  13. Reduction and Reoxidation of Humic Acid: Influence on Spectroscopic Properties and Proton Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, F.; Christl, I; Kretzschmar, R

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies on proton and metal binding to humic substances have not considered a potential influence of reduction and oxidation of functional groups. Therefore, we investigated how proton binding of a purified soil humic acid was affected by reduction. Reduction of the humic acid was carried out using an electrochemical cell that allowed us to measure the amounts of electrons and protons involved in reduction reactions. We further applied spectroscopic methods (UV-vis, fluorescence, FT-IR, C-1s NEXAFS) to detect possible chemical changes in the humic acid induced by reduction and reoxidation. The effect of reduction on proton binding was determined with acid-base titrations in the pH range 4-10 under controlled redox conditions. During reduction, 0.54 mol kg{sup -1} protons and 0.55 mol kg{sup -1} electrons were transferred to humic acid. NICA-Donnan modeling revealed an equivalent increase in proton-reactive sites (0.52 mol kg{sup -1}) in the alkaline pH-range. Our results indicate that reduction of humic acid increased the amount of proton-reactive sites by 15% compared to the untreated state. Spectroscopic differences between the untreated and reduced humic acid were minor, apart from a lower UV-vis absorption of the reduced humic acid between 400 and 700 nm.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF HUMIC ACID SIZE FRACTIONS BY SEC AND MALS (R822832)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Latahco silt-loam humic acid was separated on a preparatory scale by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) on a gravity-fed Sepharose column. Four fractions from this separation were collected and further analyzed, along with whole humic acid, by high-performance SEC coupled with a...

  15. Activators of Biochemical and Physiological Processes in Plants Based on Fine Humic Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churilov, G.; Polishuk, S.; Kutskir, M.; Churilov, D.; Borychev, S.

    2015-11-01

    This article describes the application of ultrafine humic acids as growth promoters and development of crops, for example corn. During the study we determined the optimal concentration of humic acids in ultrafine state for presowing treatment of seeds of maize. An analysis of laboratory and field tests was presented. We showed the relationship between physiological changes and biochemical processes.

  16. Lanthanide humic substances complexation. I. Experimental evidence for a lanthanide contraction effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonke, Jeroen E.; Salters, Vincent J. M.

    2006-03-01

    The interaction of the lanthanides (Ln) with humic substances (HS) was investigated with a novel chemical speciation tool, Capillary Electrophoresis-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (CE-ICP-MS). By using an EDTA-ligand competition method, a bi-modal species distribution of LnEDTA and LnHS is attained, separated by CE, and detected online by sector field ICP-MS. We quantified the binding of all 14 rare earth elements (REEs), Sc and Y with Suwannee river fulvic acid, Leonardite coal humic acid, and Elliot soil humic acid under environmental conditions (pH 6-9, 0.001-0.1 mol L -1 NaNO 3, 1-1000 nmol L -1 Ln, 10-20 mg L -1 HS). Conditional binding constants for REE-HS interaction ( Kc) ranged from 8.9 < log Kc < 16.5 under all experimental conditions, and display a lanthanide contraction effect, ΔLKc: a gradual increase in Kc from La to Lu by 2-3 orders of magnitude as a function of decreasing ionic radius. HS polyelectrolyte effects cause Kc to increase with increasing pH and decreasing ionic strength. ΔLKc increases significantly with increasing pH, and likely with decreasing ionic strength. Based on a strong correlation between ΔLKc values and denticity for organic acids, we suggest that HS form a range of tri- to tetra-dentate complexes under environmental conditions. These results confirm HS to be a strong complexing agent for Ln, and show rigorous experimental evidence for potential REE fractionation by HS complexation.

  17. The sorption of humic acids to mineral surfaces and their roles in contaminant binding

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, E.M.; Zachara, J.M.; Smith, S.C.; Phillips, J.L.

    1990-11-01

    Humic substances dissolved in groundwater may adsorb to certain mineral surfaces, rendering hydrophilic surfaces hydrophobic and making them sorbents for hydrophobic organic compounds (HOC). The sorption of humic and fulvic acids (International Humic Substance Society, IHSS, reference samples) on hematite and kaolinite was investigated to determine how natural organic coatings influence HOC sorption. The sorption behavior of the humic substances was consistent with a ligand-exchange mechanism, and the amount of sorption depended on the concentration of hydroxylated surface sites on the mineral and the properties of the humic substance. The sorption of the humic substances to two solids was proportional to their aromatic carbon content and inversely proportional to the O/C ratio. Increasing quantities of sorbed humic substances (f{sub oc}0.01 to 0. 5%) increased the sorption of carbazole, dibenzothiophene, and anthracene. Peat humic acid, the most aromatic coating, showed the greatest sorption enhancement of HOC when sorbed to hematite. In addition, HOC sorption was greater on organic coating formed at low ionic strength (I = 0.005) as compared to higher ionic strength (I = 0.1). We suggest that both the mineral surface and the ionic strength of the electrolyte affect the interfacial configuration of the sorbed humic substance, altering the size or accessibly of hydrophobic domains on the humic molecule to HOC. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  18. The influence of mechanochemical modification on prevention of toxic ability of humic acids towards phenanthrene in aquatic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhovtsova, N. S.; Maltseva, E. V.; Glyzina, T. S.; Ovchinnikova, I. S.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the research work is to quantify interaction between phenanthrene with modified humic acids in aquatic environment. The changes in the structure and properties of humic acids after modifications were studied with 1H NMR spectroscopy and potentiometric titration methods. Our research demonstrates that the application of thiourea as a modified agent increases the binding capacity of humic acids towards phenanthrene.

  19. Pb(II), Cr(VI) and atrazine sorption behavior on sludge-derived biochar: role of humic acids.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fengsa; Wang, Hong; Fang, Sheng'en; Zhang, Weihua; Qiu, Rongliang

    2015-10-01

    Pyrolyzing municipal wastewater treatment sludge into biochar can be a promising sludge disposal approach, especially as the produced sludge-derived biochar (SDBC) is found to be an excellent sorbent for heavy metals and atrazine. The aim of this study was to investigate how and why the coexisting humic acids influence the sorption capacity, kinetic, and binding of these contaminants on SDBC surface. Results showed humic acids enhanced Pb(II)/Cr(VI) sorption binding, and increased the corresponding Pb(II) Langmuir sorption capacity at pH 5.0 from 197 to 233 μmol g(-1), and from 688 to 738 μmol g(-1) for Cr(VI) at pH 2.0. It can be mainly attributed to the sorbed humic acids, whose active functional groups can offer the additional sites to form stronger inner-sphere complexes with Pb(2+), and supply more reducing agent to facilitate the transformation of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). However, humic acids reduced the atrazine adsorption Freundlich constant from 1.085 to 0.616 μmol g(-1). The pore blockage, confirmed by the decreased BET-specific surface area, as well as the more hydrophilic surface with more sorbed water molecules may be the main reasons for that suppression. Therefore, the coexisting humic acids may affect heavy metal stabilization or pesticide immobilization during SDBC application to contaminated water or soils, and its role thus should be considered especially when organic residues are also added significantly to increase the humic acid content there. PMID:26062468

  20. Proton and metal ion binding to natural organic polyelectrolytes-II. Preliminary investigation with a peat and a humic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marinsky, J.A.; Reddy, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    We summarize here experimental studies of proton and metal ion binding to a peat and a humic acid. Data analysis is based on a unified physico-chemical model for reaction of simple ions with polyelectrolytes employing a modified Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. Peat exhibited an apparent intrinsic acid dissociation constant of 10-4.05, and an apparent intrinsic metal ion binding constant of: 400 for cadmium ion; 600 for zinc ion; 4000 for copper ion; 20000 for lead ion. A humic acid was found to have an apparent intrinsic proton binding constant of 10-2.6. Copper ion binding to this humic acid sample occurred at two types of sites. The first site exhibited reaction characteristics which were independent of solution pH and required the interaction of two ligands on the humic acid matrix to simultaneously complex with each copper ion. The second complex species is assumed to be a simple monodentate copper ion-carboxylate species with a stability constant of 18. ?? 1984.

  1. Comparison of some spectroscopic and physico-chemical properties of humic acids extracted from sewage sludge and bottom sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polak, J.; Bartoszek, M.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2009-04-01

    Comparison of the physico-chemical properties was carried out for humic acids extracted from sewage sludge and bottom sediments. The isolated humic acids were investigated by means of EPR, IR, UV/vis spectroscopic methods and elementary analysis AE. On the basis of earlier studies it was stated that humic acids extracted from sewage sludge can be divided into humic acids extracted from raw sewage sludge and from sewage sludge after the digestion process. The digestion process was found to have the most significant effect on the physico-chemical properties of humic acids extracted from sludge during sewage treatment. Humic acids extracted from sewage sludge had higher free radical concentration than humic acid extracted from bottom sediments. Values of the g-factor were similar for all studied samples. However, it is noteworthy that g-factor values for humic acid extracted from raw sewage sludge and from bottom sediments were lower in comparison to the humic acid extracted from sewage sludge after the fermentation processes. The IR spectra of all studied humic acids confirmed the presence of functional groups characteristic for humic substances. It was also observed that humic acids extracted from bottom sediments had a more aromatic character and contained less carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen than those extracted from the sewage sludge.

  2. [Comparison study of enhanced coagulation on humic acid and fulvic acid removal].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ling-ling; Zhang, Yong-ji; Ye, He-xiu; Zhang, Yi-qing

    2012-08-01

    Enhanced coagulation effects of four coagulants, such as aluminium sulfate, ferric chloride, aluminium polychloride and poly-ferric chloride, were examined, with an emphasis on pH, turbidity, Ca+ and relative contents of humic acid and fulvic acid. The result showed that the removal efficiency of four kinds of coagulant for humic acid was higher than that for fulvic acid. Compared with aluminium polychloride and poly-ferric chloride, aluminium sulfate and ferric chloride possessed a better coagulation effect. At the coagulant dosage of 40 mg x L(-1), ferric chloride, aluminium sulfate, poly-ferric chloride and aluminium polychloride removed fulvic acid from 10 mg x L(-1) to 3.22 mg x L(-1), 4.34 mg x L(-1), 5.85 mg x L(-1) and 4.86 mg x L(-1) respectively, while the four coagulants removed humic acid from 10 mg x L(-1) to 1.13 mg x L(-1), 2.13 mg x L(-1), 3.44 mg x L(-1) and 2.50 mg x L(-1) respectively in water. At pH between 5.5 and 6.5, aluminium sullfate and ferric chloride had the best coagulation effect. The coagulant had the lower efficiency with increase of organic carbon in water. Especially, the content ratio of fulvic acid and humic acid was above 0.4, the coagulation effect markedly decreased. Turbidity has a little influence on organic carbon removal rate. With the concentration of Ca2+, the removal efficiency of humic acid and fulvic acid increased. PMID:23213890

  3. Effects of acid rain on soil humic compounds.

    PubMed

    Calace, N; Fiorentini, F; Petronio, B M; Pietroletti, M

    2001-06-21

    The modifications induced by acid rain on the solubility, molecular configuration and molecular weight distribution of humic (HA) and fulvic (FA) acids were studied. A natural soil was subjected to simulated acid rain until a soil pH of 4 was obtained; HA and FA acids were then extracted and characterised. The results obtained were compared both with those of natural soil and with those of a soil subjected to acid rain. Elute analysis indicates the continuous release of soluble organic compounds as a consequence of acid rain simulation, although no relationship was found with the process of soil acidification. The yields of HA and FA show that HA values are the same while FA amount is higher in the natural soil; in acid soils their water solubility increases. The molecular weight distribution shows that HA consist of a mixture of compounds of different molecular weights; they are molecules for the most part larger than 100 kDa and their distribution is not changed by soil acidification. FA can be considered to form a much more homogeneous system; in natural soil, the molecules are larger than 50 kDa, while in acidified soil they are for the most part smaller than 3 kDa. PMID:18968306

  4. Separation of Gd-humic complexes and Gd-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent in river water with QAE-Sephadex A-25 for the fractionation analysis.

    PubMed

    Matsumiya, Hiroaki; Inoue, Hiroto; Hiraide, Masataka

    2014-10-01

    Gadolinium complexed with naturally occurring, negatively charged humic substances (humic and fulvic acids) was collected from 500 mL of sample solution onto a column packed with 150 mg of a strongly basic anion-exchanger (QAE-Sephadex A-25). A Gd-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent (diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N″,N″-pentaacetato aquo gadolinium(III), Gd-DTPA(2-)) was simultaneously collected on the same column. The Gd-DTPA complex was desorbed by anion-exchange with 50mM tetramethylammonium sulfate, leaving the Gd-humic complexes on the column. The Gd-humic complexes were subsequently dissociated with 1M nitric acid to desorb the humic fraction of Gd. The two-step desorption with small volumes of the eluting agents allowed the 100-fold preconcentration for the fractionation analysis of Gd at low ng L(-1) levels by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). On the other hand, Gd(III) neither complexed with humic substances nor DTPA, i.e., free species, was not sorbed on the column. The free Gd in the effluent was preconcentrated 100-fold by a conventional solid-phase extraction with an iminodiacetic acid-type chelating resin and determined by ICP-MS. The proposed analytical fractionation method was applied to river water samples. PMID:25059192

  5. On the dissolution kinetics of humic acid particles. Effect of monocarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Brigante, Maximiliano; Zanini, Graciela; Avena, Marcelo

    2008-05-01

    The dissolution kinetics of humic acid particles has been studied in batch experiments, and the effects of monocarboxylic (formic, acetic, and propionic) acids are reported. The dissolution rate of the particles is significantly affected by the presence of monocarboxylic acids in the pH range 4-10. At pH 7, for example, propionic acid increases 30 times this dissolution rate. The capacity of increasing the dissolution rate is in the order formic acidacidacid, and this dissolving capacity of carboxylics seems to be directly related to their affinity for HA molecules located at the surface of the solid particles. The results indicate that carboxylics and related compounds may affect markedly the mobility and transport of humic substances in the environment. PMID:18328533

  6. Bio-liquefaction/solubilization of lignitic humic acids by white-rot fungus (Phanerochaete chrysosporium)

    SciTech Connect

    Elbeyli, I.Y.; Palantoken, A.; Piskin, S.; Peksel, A.; Kuzu, H.

    2006-08-15

    Humic acid samples obtained from lignite were liquefied/solubilized by using white-rot fungus, and chemical characterization of the products was investigated by FTIR and GC-MS techniques. Prior to the microbial treatment, raw lignite was oxidized with hydrogen peroxide and nitric acid separately, and then humic acids were extracted by alkali solution. The prepared humic acid samples were placed on the agar surface of the fungus and liquid products formed by microbial affects were collected. The products were analyzed and the chemical properties were compared. The results show that oxidation agent and oxidation degree affect composition of the liquid products formed by microbial attack.

  7. Effect of Acid-Base Equilibrium on Absorption Spectra of Humic acid in the Presence of Copper Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrik, N. L.; Mulloev, N. U.

    2014-03-01

    The reaction between humic acid (HA, sample IHSS) and a metal ion (Cu2+) that was manifested as absorption bands in the range 210-350 nm was recorded using absorption spectroscopy. The reaction was found to be more effective as the pH increased. These data were interpreted in the framework of generally accepted concepts about the influence of acid-base equilibrium on the dissociation of salts, according to which increasing the solution pH increases the concentration of HA anions. It was suggested that [HA-Cu2+] complexes formed.

  8. Preparation of waxes and humic acids from brown coal from the Sergeevskoe deposit

    SciTech Connect

    L.P. Noskova; A.V. Rokhin; A.P. Sorokin

    2007-06-15

    The comparative extraction of coal with organic solvents was performed. Humic acids were separated from solid residues. The yields, particle-size distributions, and chemical compositions of the resulting products were analyzed. It was demonstrated that brown-coal wax and humic fertilizers can potentially be obtained using coal from the Sergeevskoe deposit.

  9. Enhanced humification by carbonated basic oxygen furnace steel slag--I. Characterization of humic-like acids produced from humic precursors.

    PubMed

    Qi, Guangxia; Yue, Dongbei; Fukushima, Masami; Fukuchi, Shigeki; Nie, Yongfeng

    2012-01-01

    Carbonated basic oxygen furnace steel slag (hereinafter referred to as "steel slag") is generated during iron and steel manufacturing and is often classified as waste. The effect of steel slag on humification process was investigated. Catechol, glycine and glucose were used as model humic precursors from degraded biowastes. To verify that humification occurred in the system, humic-like acids (HLAs) were isolated and characterized structurally by elemental analysis, FTIR spectra, solid-state CP-MAS (13)C NMR spectra, and TMAH-Py-GC/MS. Characteristics of the steel slag-HLA were compared with those of HLAs formed in the presence of zeolite and birnessite, and with that of mature compost humic acid. The results showed that steel slag-HLA, like zeolite- and birnessite-HLA, is complex organic material containing prominent aromatic structures. Steel slag substantially accelerated the humification process, which would be highly significant for accelerating the stabilization of biowastes during composting (e.g. municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, and food waste). PMID:22130079

  10. Evaluation of a proposed standardized analytical method for the determination of humic and fulvic acids in commercial products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A constraint to growth of the commercial humic products industry has been the lack of a widely accepted procedure for determining humic acid and fulvic acid concentrations of the products, which has raised regulatory issues. On behalf of the U.S.-based Humic Products Trade Association, we developed ...

  11. Mechanistic insights into interaction of humic acid with silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Manoharan, Vijayan; Ravindran, Aswathy; Anjali, C H

    2014-01-01

    Humic acid (HA) is one of the major components of the natural organic matter present in the environment that alters the fate and behavior of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs). Transformation of Ag NPs happens upon interaction with HA, thereby, changing both physical and chemical properties. Fluorescence spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to analyze the interaction of Ag NPs with HA. In pH and time-dependent studies, the near field electro dynamical environment of Ag NPs influenced the fluorescence of HA, indicated by fluorescence enhancement. SEM revealed not only morphological changes, but also significant reduction in size of Ag NPs after interaction with HA. Based on these studies, a probable mechanism was proposed for the interaction of HA with Ag NPs, suggesting the possible transformation that these nanoparticles can undergo in the environment. PMID:23801156

  12. Effects of heating on composition, degree of darkness, and stacking nanostructure of soil humic acids.

    PubMed

    Katsumi, Naoya; Yonebayashi, Koyo; Okazaki, Masanori

    2016-01-15

    Wildfires and prescribed burning can affect both the quality and the quantity of organic matter in soils. In this study, we investigated qualitative and quantitative changes of soil humic substances in two different soils (an Entisol from a paddy field and an Inceptisol from a cedar forest) under several controlled heating conditions. Soil samples were heated in a muffle furnace at 200, 250, or 300 °C for 1, 3, 5, or 12h. The humic acid and fulvic acid contents of the soil samples prior to and after heating were determined. The degree of darkness, elemental composition, carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios, (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and X-ray diffraction patterns of humic acids extracted from the soils before and after heating were measured. The proportion of humic acids in total carbon decreased with increasing heating time at high temperature (300 °C), but increased with increasing heating time at ≤ 250 °C. The degree of darkness of the humic acids increased with increasing heating time and temperature. During darkening, the H/C atomic ratios, the proportion of aromatic C, and the carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios increased, whereas the proportions of alkyl C and O-alkyl C decreased. X-ray diffraction analysis verified that a stacking nanostructure developed by heating. Changes in the chemical structure of the humic acids from the heated soils depended on the type of soil. The major structural components of the humic acids from the heated Entisol were aromatic C and carboxylic C, whereas aliphatic C, aromatic C, and carboxylic C structural components were found in the humic acids from the heated Inceptisol. These results suggest that the heat-induced changes in the chemical structure of the humic acids depended on the source plant. PMID:26398447

  13. An experimental and modeling study of humic acid concentration effect on H(+) binding: Application of the NICA-Donnan model.

    PubMed

    Vidali, Roza; Remoundaki, Emmanouela; Tsezos, Marios

    2009-11-15

    Humic substances are the most abundant components of the colloidal and the dissolved fraction of natural organic matter (NOM) and they are characterized by a strong binding capacity for both metals and organic pollutants, affecting their mobility and bioavailability. The understanding of the humic acidic character is the first necessary step for the study of the mechanisms of binding of other positively charged soluble metal species by humic molecules. The present work, which constitutes part of the Ph.D. thesis of Roza Vidali, reports results on the influence of the concentration of humic acids on the binding of protons obtained through both an experimental and a modeling approach. A reference purified peat humic acid (PPHA) isolated by the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) and a humic acid from a Greek soil (GHA) were experimentally studied at various humic acid concentrations, ranging from 20 to 200mgL(-1). The proton binding isotherms obtained at different humic acid concentrations have shown that proton binding is dependent on the concentration of both humic acids. Proton binding experimental data were fitted to the NICA-Donnan model and the model parameter values were calculated for humic acid concentrations of 20 and >or=100mgL(-1). The results obtained for the NICA-Donnan parameters at humic acid concentrations >or=100mgL(-1) are in excellent agreement with those reported in the literature. However, these model parameter values cannot be used for modeling and predicting cation binding in natural aquatic systems, where humic acid concentrations are much lower. Two sets of the NICA-Donnan parameters are reported: one for humic acid concentrations of >or=100mgL(-1) and one for humic acid concentration of 20mgL(-1). The significance of the parameters values for each concentration level is also discussed. PMID:19744666

  14. Neutralization of the antimicrobial effect of glyphosate by humic acid in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Awad A; Kühnert, Manfred; Haufe, Svent; Krüger, Monika

    2014-06-01

    In the present study, the neutralization ability of the antimicrobial effect of glyphosate by different humic acids was investigated. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of glyphosate for different bacteria such as Bacillus badius, Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Escherichia coli, E. coli 1917 strain Nissle, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella typhimurium were determined in the presence or absence of different concentrations of humic acid (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 mg mL(-1)). Our findings indicated that humic acids inhibited the antimicrobial effect of glyphosate on different bacteria. This information can help overcome the negative impact of glyphosate residues in feed and water. PMID:24268342

  15. Distribution of proton dissociation constants for model humic and fulvic acid molecules.

    PubMed

    Atalay, Yasemin B; Carbonaro, Richard F; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2009-05-15

    The intrinsic proton binding constants of 10 model humic acid and six model fulvic acid molecules are calculated using SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry (SPARC). The accuracy of the SPARC calculations is examined using estimated microscopic binding constants of various small organic acids. An equimolar mixture of the appropriate hypothetical molecules is used as a representation of soil and aqueous humic acid and fulvic acid. The probability distributions of the mixture microscopic proton binding constants and the intrinsic proton binding constants in the metal speciation models WHAM V and WHAM VI (Windermere humic aqueous models) are compared. The idea is to assess the predictive value of the molecular mixture models as representations of heterogeneous natural organic matter. For aqueous humic and fulvic acids, the results are comparable to the WHAM distribution. For soil humic acid, the WHAM probability distribution is less acidic for the carboxylic sites but similar to that of the phenolic sites. Computations made using the WHAM molecular distributions and WHAM VI are comparable to titration data for Suwannee River fulvic acid. These results suggest that mixture molecular models can be used to investigate and predict the binding of metal cations to humic and fulvic acids. PMID:19544864

  16. Effects of peat fires on the characteristics of humic acid extracted from peat soil in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Yustiawati; Kihara, Yusuke; Sazawa, Kazuto; Kuramitz, Hideki; Kurasaki, Masaaki; Saito, Takeshi; Hosokawa, Toshiyuki; Syawal, M Suhaemi; Wulandari, Linda; Hendri I; Tanaka, Shunitz

    2015-02-01

    When peat forest fires happen, it leads to burn soil and also humic acids as a dominant organic matter contained in peat soil as well as the forest. The structure and properties of humic acids vary depending on their origin and environment, therefore the transformation of humic acid is also diverse. The impacts of the peat fires on peat soil from Central Kalimantan, Indonesia were investigated through the characterization of humic acids, extracted from soil in burnt and unburnt sites. The characterization of humic acids was performed by elemental composition, functional groups, molecular weight by HPSEC, pyrolysate compounds by pyrolysis-GC/MS, fluorescence spectrum by 3DEEM spectrofluorometer, and thermogravimetry. The elemental composition of each humic substance indicated that the value of H/C and O/C of humic acids from burnt sites were lower than that from unburnt sites. The molecular weight of humic acids from burnt sites was also lower than that from unburnt sites. Pyrolysate compounds of humic acids from unburnt sites differed from those of humic acids from burnt soil. The heating experiment showed that burning process caused the significant change in the properties of humic acids such as increasing the aromaticity and decreasing the molecular weight. PMID:24781330

  17. Charge adjustments upon adsorption of a weak polyelectrolyte to a mineral oxide: The hematite-humic acid system

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeer, A.W.P.; Koopal, L.K.

    1999-04-01

    The proton adsorption to a mixture of purified Aldrich humic acid (PAHA) and hematite is investigated. Basic insight into the charge adjustment process is obtained by using a self-consistent-field lattice theory for polyelectrolyte adsorption. The calculations indicate that upon adsorption the component with the highest initial charge density tends to induce charges on the other component. The number of induced charges can show a maximum when the surface charge and the charge of the segments in direct contact with the surface roughly balance each other. Experimentally, the humic acid-hematite system is investigated by proton titrations. The alterations in charge density caused by adsorption of PAHA to hematite are investigated by comparing the proton adsorption on the individual samples with that on their mixtures. Upon adsorption a part of the functional groups of humic acid forms complexes with some of the surface sites of hematite. This interaction reduces the proton binding to the humic acid at relatively low pH and it promotes the proton adsorption on the oxide surface at relatively high pH.

  18. Sorption of humic acids and alpha-endosulfan by clayminerals

    SciTech Connect

    Hengpraprom, S.; Lee, C.M.; Coates, R.T.

    2005-02-18

    Sorption of alpha-endosulfan by kaolinite andmontmorillonite alone and in the presence of sorbed and dissolved humicacid (HA) was investigated (pH 8 and 25oC). Three types of HA, Elliotsoil HA (EHA), Peat HA (PHA), and Summit Hill HA (SHHA), were used torepresent typical humic substances found in soils. For sorption of HA byeither mineral, Freundlich sorption coefficient (Kf) values appeared todecrease in the order of EHA>PHA>SHHA, which followedincreasing polarity (expressed as the O/C atomic ratio) and decreasingpercent-carbon content. For both clays, sorption of alpha-endosulfan bythe HA mineral complex was greater than for sorption by the clay alone.Sorption of alpha-endosulfan by the HA mineral complexes followed thesame order as the Kf of the HAs (EHA>PHA>SHHA). Based on theamount of HA adsorbed by each mineral, organic carbon partitioncoefficients (KOC) were determined for sorption of alpha-endosulfan bytwo of the HA mineral complexes. The value of KOC for alpha-endosulfansorption was greater for kaolinite EHA than kaolinite SHHA. However, theopposite trend was found with the montmorillonite HA complexes.Montmorillonite appeared to sorb alpha-endosulfan and/or HA with higheraffinity than kaolinite, which likely is due to its 2:1 layer structureand higher surface area. Sorption of endosulfan diol, a hydrolysisproduct, by the minerals was much less than the parentpesticide.

  19. Isolation of the stable fraction (the core) of the humic acid.

    PubMed

    Adani, Fabrizio; Ricca, Giuliana; Tambone, Fulvia; Genevini, Pierluigi

    2006-11-01

    Humic acid consists of a recalcitrant (unhydrolysed fraction) (the core) and labile (hydrolysable fraction) fraction. Core-humic acid (core-HA) isolation was performed by treating source material with apolar and polar solvents (organic solvents+acid hydrolysis) before alkaline extraction. Leonardite, soil Ah horizont and dry blood were chosen for this study because of their different origin and degree of humification. Chemical analysis (elemental analysis, total acidity, E(4):E(6)), spectroscopic analysis (DRIFT and (1)H NMR), and complete mass balance were used to investigate the effect of purifying humic acids. The results obtained showed that purification produced a slight modification of Leonardite humic acids as was expected for these highly humified organic matrices. On the other hand, about 500 g kg(-1) of soil humic acids were lost by purification. The fractions lost mainly consisted of carbohydrates. Dry blood showed the presence of humic acids that contrasted with its origin, thus indicating the limitations of the common analytical methods used for HA extraction. Nevertheless, in practice, purification caused the complete disappearance (914 g kg(-1) of HA was lost) of these HAs. The results obtained in this work suggest that the HA fraction isolated (named core-HA) effectively represents the HA structure proposed by the existing literature, since the purification proposed was able to eliminate the adsorbed organic molecules (interference materials) coating the HA structure. PMID:16735055

  20. A new standardized method for quantification of humic and fulvic acids in humic ores and commercial products.

    PubMed

    Lamar, Richard T; Olk, Daniel C; Mayhew, Lawrence; Bloom, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    Increased use of humic substances in agriculture has generated intense interest among producers, consumers, and regulators for an accurate and reliable method to quantify humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA) in raw ores and products. Here we present a thoroughly validated method, the new standardized method for determination of HA and FA contents in raw humate ores and in solid and liquid products produced from them. The methods used for preparation of HA and FA were adapted according to the guidelines of the International Humic Substances Society involving alkaline extraction followed by acidification to separate HA from the fulvic fraction. This is followed by separation of FA from the fulvic fraction by adsorption on a nonionic macroporous acrylic ester resin at acid pH. It differs from previous methods in that it determines HA and FA concentrations gravimetrically on an ash-free basis. Critical steps in the method, e.g., initial test portion mass, test portion to extract volume ratio, extraction time, and acidification of alkaline extract, were optimized for maximum and consistent recovery of HA and FA. The method detection limits for HA and FA were 4.62 and 4.8 mg/L, respectively. The method quantitation limits for HA and FA were 14.7 and 15.3 mg/L, respectively. PMID:25051616

  1. Intrahorizon differentiation of the structural-functional parameters of the humic acids from a typical chernozem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukov, S. N.; Golubkov, M. S.; Ryumin, A. G.

    2010-11-01

    It is shown that some structural-functional parameters of humic acids from the surface (0-5 cm) layer of a typical chernozem differ from those in a deeper (5-20 cm) layer. The Cha-to-Cfa ratio in the surface layer is by 1.7 times lower, and the concentration of free radicals is by almost an order of magnitude lower than that in the layer of 5-20 cm. The stimulating effect of humic acids from the surface layer on the processes of photosynthesis is sharply retarded, whereas their effect on respiration of Chlorella vulgaris is more pronounced. Humic acids from the deeper layer of chernozem have a much stronger stimulating effect on photosynthesis and a very weak stimulating effect of respiration. The concentration of free radicals in humic acids and the activity of physiological processes of photosynthesis in Chlorella vulgaris display a tight correlative relationship.

  2. Effects of humic acids on the aggregation and sorption of nano-TiO2.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanjie; Yang, Chen; Guo, Xuetao; Dang, Zhi; Li, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Qian

    2015-01-01

    In this study, humic acids (HAs) from three sources, peat, sediment and straw, used to coat nano-TiO2 were investigated. The results indicated that HAs isolated from peat were aromatic-rich, whereas those isolated from sediment and straw were aliphatic-rich. The nano-TiO2 sedimentation experiments indicated that the presence of aromatic-rich HAs was more capable of stabilizing nano-TiO2 particles than was the presence of aliphatic-rich HAs. This result is because the deionized phenolic groups in the HAs were preferentially adsorbed on the nano-TiO2 surfaces, which generated a higher charge density on the nano-TiO2 surfaces and caused stronger repulsive forces among particles. Furthermore, the aromatic-rich TiO2-HA complexes exhibited a greater sorption capacity than the aliphatic-rich TiO2-HAs complexes and nonlinear phenanthrene sorption because of their higher affinity and the condensed state of aromatic fractions. Note that natural organic matters, such as humic acids, in aquatic environments can not only increase the stability of nanoparticles but can also influence the mobility of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs). PMID:24992218

  3. Dicarboxylic acids generated by thermal alteration of kerogen and humic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamura, Kimitaka; Kaplan, I. R.

    1987-01-01

    Significant amounts (up to 2 percent of organic geopolymers) of low-molecular-weight (LMW) dicarboxylic acids (C2-C10) have been detected during thermal alteration (270 C, 2 h) of kerogens and humic acids isolated from young or ancient lithified sediments. Their distribution is characterized by the predominance of oxalic acid followed by succinic, fumaric, and methylsuccinic acids. These acids are probably released by the breakdown of macromolecular structures, which have incorporated biogenic organic compounds, including diacids, during early digenesis in sediments. Because of their reactivity, LMW diacids may play geochemically important roles under natural conditions.

  4. Interactions of Zn(II) Ions with Humic Acids Isolated from Various Type of Soils. Effect of pH, Zn Concentrations and Humic Acids Chemical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Boguta, Patrycja; Sokołowska, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study was the analysis of the interaction between humic acids (HAs) from different soils and Zn(II) ions at wide concentration ranges and at two different pHs, 5 and 7, by using fluorescence and FTIR spectroscopy, as well as potentiometric measurements. The presence of a few areas of HAs structures responsible for Zn(II) complexing was revealed. Complexation at α-sites (low humified structures of low-molecular weight and aromatic polycondensation) and β-sites (weakly humified structures) was stronger at pH 7 than 5. This trend was not observed for γ-sites (structures with linearly-condensed aromatic rings, unsaturated bonds and large molecular weight). The amount of metal complexed at pH5 and 7 by α and γ-structures increased with a decrease in humification and aromaticity of HAs, contrary to β-areas where complexation increased with increasing content of carboxylic groups. The stability of complexes was higher at pH 7 and was the highest for γ-structures. At pH 5, stability decreased with C/N increase for α-areas and -COOH content increase for β-sites; stability increased with humification decrease for γ-structures. The stability of complexes at α and β-areas at pH 7 decreased with a drop in HAs humification. FTIR spectra at pH 5 revealed that the most-humified HAs tended to cause bidentate bridging coordination, while in the case of the least-humified HAs, Zn caused bidentate bridging coordination at low Zn additions and bidentate chelation at the highest Zn concentrations. Low Zn doses at pH 7 caused formation of unidentate complexes while higher Zn doses caused bidentate bridging. Such processes were noticed for HAs characterized by high oxidation degree and high oxygen functional group content; where these were low, HAs displayed bidentate bridging or even bidentate chelation. To summarize, the above studies have showed significant impact of Zn concentration, pH and some properties of HAs on complexation reactions of humic

  5. Quantum chemical modeling of humic acid/air equilibrium partitioning of organic vapors.

    PubMed

    Niederer, Christian; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2007-05-15

    Classical approaches for predicting soil organic matter partition coefficients of organic compounds require a calibration with experimental partition data and, for good accuracy, experimental compound descriptors. In this study we evaluate the quantum chemical model COSMO-RS in its COSMOtherm implementation for the prediction of about 200 experimental Leonardite humic acid/air partition coefficients without calibration or experimental compound descriptors, but simply based on molecular structures. For this purpose a Leonardite Humic Acid model monomer limited to 31 carbon atoms was derived from 13C NMR analysis, elemental analysis, and acidic function analysis provided in the literature. Altogether the COSMOtherm calculations showed a good performance and we conclude that it may become a very promising tool for the prediction of sorption in soil organic matter for compounds for which the molecular structure is the only reliable information available. COSMOtherm can be expected to be very robust with respectto new and complex compound structures because its calculations are based on a fundamental assessment of the underlying intermolecular forces. In contrast, other empirical models that are also based on the molecular structure of the sorbate have an application domain that is limited by their calibration data set that is often unknown to the user. PMID:17547191

  6. Humic acids as electron acceptors for anaerobic microbial oxidation of vinyl chloride and dichloroethene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Lovley, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride and [1,2- 14C]dichloroethene to 14CO2 under humic acid-reducing conditions was demonstrated. The results indicate that waterborne contaminants can be oxidized by using humic acid compounds as electron acceptors and suggest that natural aquatic systems have a much larger capacity for contaminant oxidation than previously thought.

  7. Humic acids as electron acceptors for anaerobic microbial oxidation of vinyl chloride and dichloroethane

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Lovley, D.R.

    1998-08-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of [1,2-{sup 14}C]vinyl chloride and [1,2-{sup 14}C]dichloroethene to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} under humic acid-reducing conditions was demonstrated. The results indicate that waterborne contaminants can be oxidized by using humic acid compounds as electron acceptors and suggest that natural aquatic systems have a much larger capacity for contaminant oxidation than previously thought.

  8. Comparative study of humic acid removal and floc characteristics by electrocoagulation and chemical coagulation.

    PubMed

    Semerjian, Lucy; Damaj, Ahmad; Salam, Darine

    2015-11-01

    The current study aims at investigating the efficiency of electrocoagulation for the removal of humic acid from contaminated waters. In parallel, conventional chemical coagulation was conducted to asses humic acid removal patterns. The effect of varying contributing parameters (matrix pH, humic acid concentration, type of electrode (aluminum vs. iron), current density, solution conductivity, and distance between electrodes) was considered to optimize the electrocoagulation process for the best attainable humic acid removal efficiencies. Optimum removals were recorded at pH of 5.0-5.5, an electrical conductivity of 3000 μS/cm at 25 °C, and an electrode distance of 1 cm for both electrode types. With aluminum electrodes, a current density of 0.05 mA/cm2 outperformed 0.1 mA/cm2 yet not higher densities, whereas a current density of 0.8 mA/cm2 was needed for iron electrodes to exhibit comparable performance. With both electrode types, higher initial humic acid concentrations were removed at a slower rate but ultimately attained almost complete removals. On the other hand, the best humic acid removals (∼90%) by chemical coagulation were achieved at 4 mg/L for both coagulants. Also, higher removals were attained at elevated initial humic acid concentrations. Humic acid removals of 90% or higher at an initial HA concentration of 40 mg/L were exhibited, yet alum performed better at the highest experimented concentration. It was evident that iron flocs were larger, denser, and more geometrical in shape compared to aluminum flocs. PMID:26439123

  9. Analysis of carbon functional groups in mobile humic acid and recalcitrant calcium humate extracted from eight US soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solid state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a common tool to study the structure of soil humic fractions; however, knowledge regarding carbon structural relationships in humic fractions is limited. In this study, mobile humic acid (MHA) and recalcitrant calcium humate (CaHA) fr...

  10. The dissolution of calcite in aqueous acid: The influence of humic species

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, R.G.; Sanders, G.H.W. )

    1993-07-01

    The kinetics of proton-induced calcite dissolution in aqueous solution in the presence of humic acids and their sodium salts are reported. In equilibrated acid solutions (pH <4) there is no inhibition by humic material and dissolution proceeds at a rate simply determined by the solution pH. Contrastingly the sodium salts of humic acids were found to have a significant inhibitory effect on the acid catalyzed dissolution. This was quantified using a novel channel flow cell experiment which employed two electrodes, the upstream of which was used to inject protons into a neutral solution, which also contained sodium salts of humic acid, via electrolytic oxidation of dissolved hydroquinone. The two electrodes were located immediately upstream and downstream of a calcite crystal so that the proton injection served to dissolve the calcite in the (inhibiting) presence of humic salts unequilibrated with the solution pH. The amount of H[sup +] which survived passage to the downstream detector'' electrode was used to quantify the rate of dissolution and hence the inhibitory effects of the humic acid. The latter were found to operate in a manner not inconsistent with Langmuirian adsorption.

  11. Modeling of the structure-specific kinetics of abiotic, dark reduction of Hg(II) complexed by O/N and S functional groups in humic acids while accounting for time-dependent structural rearrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Tao; Skyllberg, Ulf; Wei, Shiqiang; Wang, Dingyong; Lu, Song; Jiang, Zhenmao; Flanagan, Dennis C.

    2015-04-01

    Dark reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) in deep waters, soils and sediments accounts for a large part of legacy Hg recycling back to the atmosphere. Natural organic matter (NOM) plays a dual role in the process, acting as an electron donor and complexation agent of Hg(II). Experimental determination of rates of dark Hg(II) reduction is complicated by the simultaneously ongoing kinetics of Hg(II) rearrangement from the abundant, relatively weakly bonding RO/N (carboxyl, amino) groups in NOM to the much stronger bonding RSH (thiol) group. In this study, kinetics of the rearrangement are accounted for and we report rates of dark Hg(II) reduction for two molecular structures in presence of humic acids (HA) extracted from three different sources. Values on the pseudo first-order rate constant for the proposed structure Hg(OR)2 (kredHg(OR)2) were 0.18, 0.22 and 0.35 h-1 for Peat, Coal and Soil HA, respectively, and values on the constant for the proposed structure RSHgOR (kred RSHgOR) were 0.003 and 0.006 h-1 for Peat and Soil HA, respectively. The Hg(SR)2 structure is the thermodynamically most stable, but the limited time of the experiment (53 h) did not allow for a determination of the rate of the very slow reduction of Hg(II) in this structure. For two out of three HA samples the concentration of RSH groups optimized by the kinetic model (0.6 × 10-3 RSH groups per C atoms) was in good agreement with independent estimates provided by sulfur X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (S XANES). Experiments conducted at varying concentrations of Hg(II) and HA demonstrated a positive relationship between Hg(II) reduction and concentrations of specific Hg(II) structures and electron donor groups, suggesting first order in each of these two components. The limitation of the Hg(II) reduction by electron donating groups of HA, as represented by the native reducing capacity (NRC), was demonstrated for the Coal HA sample. Normalization to NRC resulted in pseudo second-order rate

  12. Separation of humic acids from Bayer process liquor by membrane filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Awadalla, F.T.; Kutowy, O.; Tweddle, A. ); Hazlett, J.D. )

    1994-05-01

    Humic acids of high molecular weight were removed from spent Bayer liquor by polymeric ultrafiltration membranes. Among the commercial and laboratory-cast membranes tested, Radel-R polyphenylsulfone on a polypropylene backing material was found to be the most promising candidate for this separation. However, the maximum separation of humic acids obtained at operating conditions of 50[degree]C and 0.34 MPa, as measured by spectrophotometric analysis, was only in the 50 to 55% range. In order to explain this limited membrane separation of humic acids in spent Bayer liquor, a synthetic alkaline solution of humic acids was treated using the same membranes. These tests indicated much higher separation of humic acids (92%). Humic substances in Bayer liquor appear to be hydrolyzed and degraded to low molecular weight fractions (molecular weight < 1000 daltons) by the combined action of the strongly alkaline Bayer liquor and high digestion temperatures. These low molecular weight fractions cannot be retained by standard ultrafiltration membranes. However, some preliminary tests with laboratory-cast Radel-R nanofiltration membranes showed improved color separation (> 70%) when treating spent Bayer liquor. 23 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. A united physicochemical description of the protonation and metal ion complexation equilibria of natural organic acids (humic and fulvic acids). 2. Influence of polyelectrolyte properties and functional group heterogeneity on the protonation equilibria of fulvic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ephraim, J.; Alegret, S.; Mathuthu, A.; Bicking, M.; Malcolm, R.L.; Marinsky, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Potentiometric studies of the neutralization of several fulvic acid sources with standard base in aqueous and nonaqueous media have been conducted. Analysis of the results with a recently developed unified physicochemical model has shown that the protonation behavior of these fulvic acid sources is a reflection of (1) their polyelectrolyte nature and (2) their heterogeneity. It has been possible to ascribe the polyelectrolyte properties observed to a rather inflexible fulvic acid molecule whose variably charged surface is impermeable to simple electrolyte. ?? 1986 American Chemical Society.

  14. Influence of humic acid applications on soil physicochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gümüş, İ.; Şeker, C.

    2015-09-01

    Soil structure is often said to be the key to soil productivity since a fertile soil, with desirable soil structure and adequate moisture supply, constitutes a productive soil. Soil structure influences soil water movement and retention, erosion, crusting, nutrient recycling, root penetration and crop yield. The objective of this work is to study, humic acid (HA) application on some physical and chemical properties in weak structured soils investigated. The approach involved establishing a plot experiment in the laboratory conditions. Different rates of HA (control, 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 %) were applied to soil at three incubation periods (21, 42 and 62 days). At the end of the each incubation period, the changes in physicochemical properties were measured. Generally, HA addition increased EC values at the all incubation periods. HA applications decreased soil modulus of rupture. Application of HA at the rate of 4 % was significantly increased soil organic carbon contents. HA applications at the rate of 4 % significantly increased both mean soil total nitrogen content and aggregate stability after at three incubation periods (p < 0.05). Therefore, HA was potential to improve structure of soil in short term.

  15. Effect of humic acid (HA) on sulfonamide sorption by biochars.

    PubMed

    Lian, Fei; Sun, Binbin; Chen, Xi; Zhu, Lingyan; Liu, Zhongqi; Xing, Baoshan

    2015-09-01

    Effect of quantity and fractionation of loaded humic acid (HA) on biochar sorption for sulfonamides was investigated. The HA was applied in two different modes, i.e. pre-coating and co-introduction with sorbate. In pre-coating mode, the polar fractions of HA tended to interact with low-temperature biochars via H-bonding, while the hydrophobic fractions were likely to be adsorbed by high-temperature biochars through hydrophobic and π-π interactions, leading to different composition and structure of the HA adlayers. The influences of HA fractionation on biochar sorption for sulfonamides varied significantly, depending on the nature of interaction between HA fraction and sorbate. Meanwhile, co-introduction of HA with sulfonamides revealed that the effect of HA on sulfonamide sorption was also dependent on HA concentration. These findings suggest that the amount and fractionation of adsorbed HA are tailored by the surface properties of underlying biochars, which differently affect the sorption for organic contaminants. PMID:26057361

  16. Effect of humic acids on the adsorption of paraquat by goethite.

    PubMed

    Brigante, Maximiliano; Zanini, Graciela; Avena, Marcelo

    2010-12-15

    The adsorption of the herbicide paraquat (PQ(2+)) on goethite and on the binary system humic acid-goethite has been studied in batch experiments by performing adsorption isotherms under different conditions of pH, supporting electrolyte concentration and temperature. The results were completed with capillary electrophoresis (CE) in order to measure the binding isotherm between PQ(2+) and humic acid (HA) molecules in solution. PQ(2+) adsorption is negligible on the bare goethite surface but important on the HA-goethite adsorbent. In this last case, the adsorption increases by increasing pH and decreasing electrolyte concentration. There are no significant effects of temperature on the adsorption. The adsorption takes place by direct binding of PQ(2+) to adsorbed HA molecules leading to the formation of surface species of the type goethite-HA-PQ(2+). The results are consistent with a mechanism where PQ(2+) binds negatively charged groups of HA (carboxylates and phenolates) forming ionic pairs or outer-sphere complexes. Since goethite in nature usually contains adsorbed HA molecules, it may act as a good adsorbent for cationic herbicides. This will not only benefit the deactivation of the herbicides but also reduce their leaching and transport through groundwater. PMID:20828932

  17. Carbon isotope composition of dissolved humic and fulvic acids in the Tokachi River system.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Seiya; Kodama, Hiroki; Aramaki, Takafumi; Fujitake, Nobuhide; Uchida, Masao; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2011-07-01

    This study reports carbon isotopic ratios (Δ(14)C and δ(13)C) of dissolved humic and fulvic acids in the Tokachi River system, northern Japan. These acids have a refractory feature and they represent the largest fraction of dissolved organic matter in aquatic environments. The acids were isolated using the XAD extraction method from river water samples collected at three sites (on the upper and lower Tokachi River, and from one of its tributaries) in June 2004 and 2005. δ(13)C values were -27.8 to -26.9 ‰ for humic and fulvic acids. On the other hand, the Δ(14)C values ranged from -247 to +26 ‰ and the average values were -170 ± 79 ‰ for humic acid and -44 ± 73 ‰ for fulvic acid. The difference was attributed to the residence time of fulvic acid in the watershed being shorter than that of humic acid. The large variation suggested that humic substances have a different pathway in each watershed environment. PMID:21515623

  18. Limitations in the use of commercial humic acids in water and soil research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malcolm, R.L.; MacCarthy, P.

    1986-01-01

    Seven samples of commercial "humic acids", purchased from five different suppliers, were studied, and their characteristics were compared with humic and fulvic acids isolated from streams, soils, peat, leonardite, and a dopplerite sample. Cross-polarization and magic-angle spinning 13C NMR spectroscopy clearly shows pronounced differences between the commercial materials and all other samples. Elemental and infrared spectroscopic data do not show such clear-cut differences but can be used as supportive evidence, with the 13C NMR data, to substantiate the above distinctions. As a result of these differences and due to the general lack of information relating to the source, method of isolation, or other pretreatment of the commercial materials, these commercial products are not considered to be appropriate for use as analogues of true soil and water humic substances, in experiments designed to evaluate the nature and reactivity of humic substances in natural waters and soils.

  19. Limitations in the use of commercial humic acids in water and soil research

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm, R.L.; MacCarthy, P.

    1986-09-01

    Seven samples of commercial humic acids, purchased from five different suppliers, were studied, and their characteristics were compared with humic and fulvic acids isolated from streams, soils, peat, leonardite, and a dopplerite sample. Cross-polarization and magic-angle spinning /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy clearly shows pronounced differences between the commercial materials and all other samples. Elemental and infrared spectroscopic data do not show such clear-cut differences but can be used as supportive evidence, with the /sup 13/C NMR data, to substantiate the above distinctions. As a result of these differences and due to the general lack of information relating to the source, method of isolation, or other pretreatment of the commercial materials, these commercial products are not considered to be appropriate for use as analogues of true soil and water humic substances, in experiments designed to evaluate the nature and reactivity of humic substances in natural waters and soils.

  20. Lanthanides in humic acids of soils, paleosols and cultural horizons (Southern Urals, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dergacheva, Maria; Nekrasova, Olga

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, commercial interest in this element group increases. As consequence, their content may increase in environment, including soil and soil components. This requires quantitative estimations of rare metal accumulation by soils and their humic acids. The latter began to be actively used as fertilizers and it is alarming, because information about rare element participation (including lanthanides) in metabolism of live organisms is inconsistent. There was investigated lanthanide content in humic acids extracted from humus horizons of different objects of archaeological site Steppe 7 (Southern Urals, Russia). Humic acids were extracted from modern background soils and paleosols and cultural horizons of the Bronze Age as well. According to archaeological data burial of paleosols under a barrow and formation of the cultural layer (CL) took place 3600 and 3300-3200 years BP, respectively. The area of the site is located in the forest-steppe landscape, far from industrial plants. Lanthanides in soils are immobile elements, and such number of objects will allow to receive information about their content changing over time and to have more detailed basis for the future monitoring of this territory as well. Humic acids were precipitated from 0,1 n NaOH extraction after preliminary decalcification. Cleaning of humic acid preparations by 6N HCl or HF+HCl was not carried out. Determination of La, Ce, Sm, Eu, Tb, Yb and Lu was performed by multi-element neutron-activation analysis. According to carried out diagnostics and reconstruction of natural conditions of all object formation, all objects correspond to steppe type landscape with a different level of humidity. Analysis of received data has shown that cerium is presented in humic acid preparations in the largest quantities among lanthanides (on average 4,0-6,6 mg/kg of preparation mass). The average content of samarium, europium, ytterbium and lutetium in the humic acids in the order of magnitude ranges from 0

  1. Influence of humic acid on the toxicity of copper, cadmium and lead to the unicellular alga, Synechosystis aquatilis

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmukhappa, H.; Neelakantan, K. )

    1990-06-01

    Humic acids are known to play a significant role in phytoplankton productivity by regulating the trace metals required for plant growth. Although few attempts have been made to evaluate the influence of humic acids on heavy metal toxicity to aquatic organisms, their interaction in natural waters is well documented. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of humic acids (HA) extracted from mangrove sediments on Cu, Cd and Pb toxicity to the unicellular alga, Synechosystis aquatilis.

  2. Removal of arsenate with hydrous ferric oxide coprecipitation: effect of humic acid.

    PubMed

    Du, Jingjing; Jing, Chuanyong; Duan, Jinming; Zhang, Yongli; Hu, Shan

    2014-02-01

    Insights from the adverse effect of humic acid (HA) on arsenate removal with hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) coprecipitation can further our understanding of the fate of As(V) in water treatment process. The motivation of our study is to explore the competitive adsorption mechanisms of humic acid and As(V) on HFO on the molecular scale. Multiple complementary techniques were used including macroscopic adsorption experiments, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, flow-cell attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) measurement, and charge distribution multisite complexation (CD-MUSIC) modeling. The As(V) removal efficiency was reduced from over 95% to about 10% with the increasing HA concentration to 25 times of As(V) mass concentration. The SERS analysis excluded the HA-As(V) complex formation. The EXAFS results indicate that As(V) formed bidentate binuclear surface complexes in the presence of HA as evidenced by an As-Fe distance of 3.26-3.31 angstroms. The in situ ATR-FTIR measurements show that As(V) replaces surface hydroxyl groups and forms innersphere complex. High concentrations of HA may physically block the surface sites and inhibit the As(V) access. The adsorption of As(V) and HA decreased the point of zero charge of HFO from 7.8 to 5.8 and 6.3, respectively. The CD-MUSIC model described the zeta potential curves and adsorption edges of As(V) and HA reasonably well. PMID:25076514

  3. Chronic bioassays of chlorinated humic acids in B6C3F1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    van Duuren, B.L.; Melchionne, S.; Seidman, I.; Pereira, M.A.

    1986-11-01

    Humic acids (Fluka), chlorinated to carbon:chlorine (C:Cl) ratios of 1:1 and 1:0.3, were administered to B6C3F1 mice, 50 males and 50 females per group, in the drinking water at a total organic carbon (TOC) level of 0.5 g/L. The mice were 6 to 8 weeks old at the beginning of the bioassays. The doses used were based on short-term (8 weeks) evaluations for toxicity, palatability, and weight gain. The chronic bioassays included the following control groups: unchlorinated humic acids (0.5 g/L), no-treatment (100 males and 100 females), dibromoethane (DBE, 2.0 mM in drinking water; positive control) and 0.44% sodium chloride in drinking water, i.e., at the same concentration as those receiving chlorinated humic acids. The chlorinated humic acids were prepared freshly and chemically assayed once per week. All chemicals were, with the exception of DBE, administered for 24 months; DBE was administered for 18 months. The volumes of solutions consumed were measured once weekly. All treatment groups showed normal weight gain except the DBE group. No markedly significant increases in tumor incidences were evident in any of the organs and tissues examined in the chlorinated humic acid groups compared to unchlorinated humic acids and the no-treatment control groups. DBE caused the expected high incidence of squamous carcinomas of the forestomach. The chlorinated humic acids tested contained direct-acting alkylating agents, based on their reactivity with p-nitrobenzylpyridine (PNBP), and showed mutagenic activity in S. typhimurium.

  4. TiO2 nanoparticles aggregation and disaggregation in presence of alginate and Suwannee River humic acids. pH and concentration effects on nanoparticle stability.

    PubMed

    Loosli, Frédéric; Le Coustumer, Philippe; Stoll, Serge

    2013-10-15

    The behavior of manufactured TiO2 nanoparticles is studied in a systematic way in presence of alginate and Suwannee River humic acids at variable concentrations. TiO2 nanoparticles aggregation, disaggregation and stabilization are investigated using dynamic light scattering and electrophoretic experiments allowing the measurement of z-average hydrodynamic diameters and zeta potential values. Stability of the TiO2 nanoparticles is discussed by considering three pH-dependent electrostatic scenarios. In the first scenario, when pH is below the TiO2 nanoparticle point of zero charge, nanoparticles exhibit a positively charged surface whereas alginate and Suwannee River humic acids are negatively charged. Fast adsorption at the TiO2 nanoparticles occurs, promotes surface charge neutralization and aggregation. By increasing further alginate and Suwannee River humic acids concentrations charge inversion and stabilization of TiO2 nanoparticles are obtained. In the second electrostatic scenario, at the surface charge neutralization pH, TiO2 nanoparticles are rapidly forming aggregates. Adsorption of alginate and Suwannee River humic acids on aggregates leads to their partial fragmentation. In the third electrostatic scenario, when nanoparticles, alginate and Suwannee River humic acids are negatively charged, only a small amount of Suwannee River humic acids is adsorbed on TiO2 nanoparticles surface. It is found that the fate and behavior of individual and aggregated TiO2 nanoparticles in presence of environmental compounds are mainly driven by the complex interplay between electrostatic attractive and repulsive interactions, steric and van der Waals interactions, as well as concentration ratio. Results also suggest that environmental aquatic concentration ranges of humic acids and biopolymers largely modify the stability of aggregated or dispersed TiO2 nanoparticles. PMID:23969399

  5. The role of natural purified humic acids in modifying mercury accessibility in water and soil

    SciTech Connect

    Cattani, I.; Zhang, H.; Beone, G.M.; Del Re, A.A.M.; Boccelli, R.; Trevisan, M.

    2009-03-15

    We investigated the influence of different humic acids (HAs, extracted from lignite, compost, and forest soil) on mercury mobility and availability both in a model solution and in soil samples from a mercury-polluted region. The technique of diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT), which is capable of measuring: (i) free metal in solution: (ii) dissociated metal complexes previously mobilized by HA; (iii) mobilized metal-HA complexes that liberate metals by dissociation or by exchange reaction between the metal-HA complexes and the chelating groups on the resin-gel, was used in solutions and soils. The DGT measurements in solution, together with ultrafiltration, allowed estimation of the lability of Hg-HA complexes. Ultrafiltration results were also compared with predictions made by the windermere humic-aqueous model (WHAM). According to both these different approaches, Hg{sup 2+} resulted nearly 100% complexed by HAs, whereas results from ultrafiltration showed that 32 to 72% of the CH{sub 4}Hg{sup +} was bound to the HAs, with higher values for compost and lower values for forest and Aldrich HA. The DGT-measured mercury in soils was below 0.20 {mu}g L{sup -1}, irrespective of the extent of the contamination. Addition of HA increased the concentration of DGT-measured mercury in soil solution up to 100-fold in the contaminated soil and up to 30-fold in the control soil. The level of the increase also depended on the HA. The smallest increase (about 10 times) was found for lignite HA in both control and contaminated soils. The addition of forest HA gave the largest increases in DGT-measured mercury, in particular for the contaminated soil. Overall, the results demonstrated that DGT can be used for estimating the lability of mercury complexes in solution and for verifying enhanced mercury mobility when HA is added to contaminated soils.

  6. Potential origin and formation for molecular components of humic acids in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiDonato, Nicole; Chen, Hongmei; Waggoner, Derek; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    2016-04-01

    Soil humic acids are the base soluble/acid insoluble organic components of soil organic matter. Most of what we know about humic acids comes from studies of their bulk molecular properties or analysis of individual fractions after extraction from soils. This work attempts to better define humic acids and explain similarities and differences for several soils varying in degrees of humification using advanced molecular level techniques. Our investigation using electrospray ionization coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FTICR-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) has given new insight into the distinctive molecular characteristics of humic acids which suggest a possible pathway for their formation. Humic acids from various ecosystems, climate regions and soil textural classes are distinguished by the presence of three predominant molecular components: lignin-like molecules, carboxyl-containing aliphatic molecules and condensed aromatic molecules that bear similarity to black carbon. Results show that humification may be linked to the relative abundance of these three types of molecules as well as the relative abundance of carboxyl groups in each molecular type. This work also demonstrates evidence for lignin as the primary source of soil organic matter, particularly condensed aromatic molecules often categorized as black carbon and is the first report of the non-pyrogenic source for these compounds in soils. We also suggest that much of the carboxyl-containing aliphatic molecules are sourced from lignin.

  7. Humic and fluvic acids and organic colloidal materials in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A.; Clark, S.B.

    1996-04-01

    Humic substances are ubiquitous in the environment, occurring in all soils, waters, and sediments of the ecosphere. Humic substances arise from the decomposition of plant and animal tissues yet are more stable than their precursors. Their size, molecular weight, elemental composition, structure, and the number and position of functional groups vary, depending on the origin and age of the material. Humic and fulvic substances have been studied extensively for more than 200 years; however, much remains unknown regarding their structure and properties. Humic substances are those organic compounds found in the environment that cannot be classified as any other chemical class of compounds. They are traditionally defined according to their solubilities. Fulvic acids are those organic materials that are soluble in water at all pH values. Humic acids are those materials that are insoluble at acidic pH values (pH < 2) but are soluble at higher pH values. Humin is the fraction of natural organic materials that is insoluble in water at all pH values. These definitions reflect the traditional methods for separating the different fractions from the original mixture. The humic content of soils varies from 0 to almost 10%. In surface waters, the humic content, expressed as dissolved organic carbon (DOC), varies from 0.1 to 50 ppm in dark-water swamps. In ocean waters, the DOC varies from 0.5 to 1.2 ppm at the surface, and the DOC in samples from deep groundwaters varies from 0.1 to 10 ppm. In addition, about 10% of the DOC in surface waters is found in suspended matter, either as organic or organically coated inorganic particulates. Humic materials function as surfactants, with the ability to bind both hydrophobic and hydrophyllic materials, making numic and fluvic materials effective agents in transporting both organic and inorganic contaminants in the environment.

  8. Humic Acid Metal Cation Interaction Studied by Spectromicroscopy Techniques in Combination with Quantum Chemical Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Plaschke, M.; Rothe, J; Armbruster, M; Denecke, M; Naber, A; Geckeis, H

    2010-01-01

    Humic acids (HA) have a high binding capacity towards traces of toxic metal cations, thus affecting their transport in aquatic systems. Eu(III)-HA aggregates are studied by synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the carbon K-edge and laser scanning luminescence microscopy (LSLM) at the {sup 5}D{sub 0} {yields} {sup 7}F{sub 1,2} fluorescence emission lines. Both methods provide the necessary spatial resolution in the sub-micrometre range to resolve characteristic aggregate morphologies: optically dense zones embedded in a matrix of less dense material in STXM images correspond to areas with increased Eu(III) luminescence yield in the LSLM micrographs. In the C 1s-NEXAFS of metal-loaded polyacrylic acid (PAA), used as a HA model compound, a distinct complexation effect is identified. This effect is similar to trends observed in the dense fraction of HA/metal cation aggregates. The strongest complexation effect is observed for the Zr(IV)-HA/PAA system. This effect is confirmed by quantum chemical calculations performed at the ab initio level for model complexes with different metal centres and complex geometries. Without the high spatial resolution of STXM and LSLM and without the combination of molecular modelling with experimental results, the different zones indicating a 'pseudo'-phase separation into strong complexing domains and weaker complexing domains of HA would never have been identified. This type of strategy can be used to study metal interaction with other organic material.

  9. Models for association of metal ions with heterogeneous environmental sorbents. 1. Complexation of Co(II) by leonardite humic acid as a function of pH and NaClO{sub 4} concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Westall, J.C.; Jones, J.D.; Turner, G.D. |; Zachara, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    A discrete log K spectrum model has been developed to represent the binding of protons and Co(II) to leonardite humic acid (LHA) over a wide variation of solution composition: pH 4.5-9.5, [NaClO{sub 4}] 0.01-0.1 M, T{sub Co} 200 nM-500 $mu@M. The model is internally self-consistent over the range indicated without an explicit electrostatic term. The LHA was represented by four acid sites (HL{sub i} = H{sup +} + L{sub i}{sup -}) with a fixed pK{sub a} spectrum: pK{sub a} = 4, 6, 8, and 10. From the acid-base titration data, total concentrations of these sites and Na{sup +} binding constants (L{sub i}{sup -} + Na{sup +} = NaL{sub i}) were obtained. From Co{sup 21} binding as a function of pH, constants for the reaction L{sub i}{sup -} + Co{sup 21} = CoL{sub i}{sup +} were obtained. Total concentrations of sites and binding constants were similar to those expected from other studies. This discrete log K approach has been selected as the easiest way to parameterize multidimensional data (i.e., data with variations in many solution chemistry parameters) for subsequent application in transport models. 37 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Interactions of humic acid with nanosized inorganic oxides.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun; Lin, Daohui; Xing, Baoshan

    2009-04-01

    Adsorption of natural organic matter (NOM) on nanoparticles (NPs) is important for evaluating their transport, transfer, and fate in the environment, which will also affect sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) by NPs and thereby potentially alter the toxicity of NPs and the fate, transport, and bioavailability of HOCs in the environment. Therefore, the adsorption behavior of humic acids (HA) by four types of nano-oxides (i.e., TiO2, SiO2, Al2O3, and ZnO) was examined in this study to explore their interaction mechanisms using techniques including Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and elemental, zeta potential, and surface area analyses. Adsorption of HA was observed on nanosized TiO2, Al2O3, and ZnO but not on nano-SiO2. Furthermore, HA adsorption was pH-dependent. HA adsorption by nano-oxides was mainly induced by electrostatic attraction and ligand exchange between HA and nano-oxide surfaces. Surface hydrophilicity and negative charges of nano-oxides affected their adsorption of HA. However, the maxima of HA adsorption on nano-oxides were limited by the surface area of nano-oxides. HA phenolic OH and COOH groups were responsible for its ligand exchange with nano-TiO2 and nano-ZnO, respectively, while either HA COOH or HA phenolic/aliphatic OH was responsible for its ligand exchange with nano-Al2O3. HA adsorption decreased the micropore surface area of nano-oxides but not the external surface area because of the micropore blockage. HA adsorption also decreased the zeta potential of nano-oxides, indicating that HA-coated nano-oxides could be more easily dispersed and suspended and more stable in solution than uncoated ones because of their enhanced electrostatic repulsion. PMID:19708146

  11. Sorption of norfloxacin onto humic acid extracted from weathered coal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Zhao, Ling; Dong, Yuan-Hua; Huang, Guan-Yi

    2012-07-15

    Norfloxacin (NOR), is an ionizable and polar antimicrobial compound, and it may enter the environment in substantial amounts via the application of manure or sewage as a fertilizer. Sorption of NOR onto humic acid (HA) may affect its environmental fate. In this study, HA extracted from weathered coal was used to investigate the sorption of NOR at different solution chemistry conditions (pH, ionic strength) and temperatures. The sorption of NOR onto HA showed a two-stage sorption process with an equilibration time of 48 h. The sorption kinetic curve fitted well with a pseudo second-order kinetic model. Thermodynamic characteristics demonstrated that the sorption of NOR onto HA was a spontaneous and exothermic process predominated by physical sorption. All sorption isotherms fitted well with the Freundlich and Langmuir models and they were highly nonlinear with values of n between 0.4 and 0.5, suggesting the high heterogeneity of HA. Increasing Ca2+ concentration resulted in a considerable reduction in the K(d) values of NOR, hinting that Ca2+ had probably competed with NOR(+,0) for the cation exchange sites on the surfaces of HA. The sorption reached a maximum at pH 6.0 over the pH range of 2.0-8.0, implying that the primary sorption mechanism was cation exchange interaction between NOR(+,0) species and the negatively charged functional groups of HA. Spectroscopic evidence demonstrated that the piperazinyl moiety of NOR was responsible for sorption onto HA, while the carbonyl group and the aromatic structure of HA participated in adsorbing NOR. PMID:22459013

  12. Cation binding of antimicrobial sulfathiazole to leonardite humic acid.

    PubMed

    Richter, Merle K; Sander, Michael; Krauss, Martin; Christl, Iso; Dahinden, Manuel G; Schneider, Manuel K; Schwarzenbach, René P

    2009-09-01

    Sorption of sulfathiazole (STA) and three structural analogs to Leonardite humic acid (LHA) was investigated in single- and binary-solute systems to elucidate the sorption mechanism of sulfonamides to soil organic matter (SOM). Cation binding of STA+ to anionic sites A- in LHA governed sorption up to circumneutral pH, based on the following findings: (i) From pH 7.7 to 3.3, the increase in extent and nonlinearity (i.e., concentration dependence) of STA sorption paralleled the increase in STA+. (ii) From pH 3.3 to 1.7, sorption decreased and nonlinearity increased, consistent with strong competition of STA+ and H+ for A-. (iii) Replacement of the protonable aniline group in STA by an apolar methylbenzene group resulted in much weaker, linear, and pH-independent sorption. (iv) Only analogs with aniline moieties displaced STA from LHA in binary-solute systems. Displacement occurred up to pH 5.4, at which <1% of STA in solution was cationic. (v) STA sorption was well-described (R2 = 0.98) by the NICA-Donnan cation-binding model, yielding high median affinities for STA+ to carboxylic and phenolic A- (log K(STA+,1) = 3.25 +/- 0.08 log (L mol(-1)) and log K(STA+,2) = 8.76 +/- 0.11 log (L mol(-1)), respectively). High affinity cation binding explains sorption of polar sulfonamides in agricultural soils and the strong dependence of sorption on SOM content and pH. PMID:19764228

  13. Novel humic acid-bonded magnetite nanoparticles for protein immobilization.

    PubMed

    Bayrakci, Mevlut; Gezici, Orhan; Bas, Salih Zeki; Ozmen, Mustafa; Maltas, Esra

    2014-09-01

    The present paper is the first report that introduces (i) a useful methodology for chemical immobilization of humic acid (HA) to aminopropyltriethoxysilane-functionalized magnetite iron oxide nanoparticles (APS-MNPs) and (ii) human serum albumin (HSA) binding to the obtained material (HA-APS-MNPs). The newly prepared magnetite nanoparticle was characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and elemental analysis. Results indicated that surface modification of the bare magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) with aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) and HA was successfully performed. The protein binding studies that were evaluated in batch mode exhibited that HA-APS-MNPs could be efficiently used as a substrate for the binding of HSA from aqueous solutions. Usually, recovery values higher than 90% were found to be feasible by HA-APS-MNPs, while that value was around 2% and 70% in the cases of MNPs and APS-MNPs, respectively. Hence, the capacity of MNPs was found to be significantly improved by immobilization of HA. Furthermore, thermal degradation of HA-APS-MNPs and HSA bonded HA-APS-MNPs was evaluated in terms of the Horowitz-Metzger equation in order to determine kinetic parameters for thermal decomposition. Activation energies calculated for HA-APS-MNPs (20.74 kJmol(-1)) and HSA bonded HA-APS-MNPs (33.42 kJmol(-1)) implied chemical immobilization of HA to APS-MNPs, and tight interactions between HA and HA-APS-MNPs. PMID:25063152

  14. Sorption of tylosin and sulfamethazine on solid humic acid.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuetao; Tu, Bei; Ge, Jianhua; Yang, Chen; Song, Xiaomei; Dang, Zhi

    2016-05-01

    Tylosin (TYL) and sulfamethazine (SMT) are ionizable and polar antimicrobial compounds, which have seeped into the environment in substantial amounts via fertilizing land with manure or sewage. Sorption of TYL and SMT onto humic acid (HA) may affect their environmental fate. In this study, the sorption of TYL and SMT on HA at different conditions (pH, ionic strength) was investigated. All sorption isotherms fitted well to the Henry and Freundlich models and they were highly nonlinear with values of n between 0.5 and 0.8, which suggested that the HA had high heterogeneity. The sorption of TYL and SMT on HA decreased with increasing pH (2.0-7.5), implying that the primary sorption mechanism could be due to cation exchange interactions between TYL(+)/SMT(+) species and the functional groups of HA. Increasing ionic strength resulted in a considerable reduction in the Kd values of TYL and SMT, hinting that interactions between H bonds and π-π EDA might be an important factor in the sorption of TYL and SMT on HA. Results of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and (13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis further demonstrated that carboxyl groups and O-alkyl structures in the HA could interact with TYL and SMT via ionic interactions and H bonds, respectively. Overall, this work gives new insights into the mechanisms of sorption of TYL and SMT on HA and hence aids us in assessing the environmental risk of TYL and SMT under diverse conditions. PMID:27155426

  15. Humic substances increase survival of freshwater shrimp Caridina sp. D to acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Holland, Aleicia; Duivenvoorden, Leo J; Kinnear, Susan H W

    2013-02-01

    Humic substances (HS) are known to decrease the toxicity of heavy metals to aquatic organisms, and it has been suggested that they can provide buffering protection in low pH conditions. Despite this, little is known about the ability for HS to increase survival to acid mine drainage (AMD). In this study, the ability of HS to increase survival of the freshwater shrimp (Caridina sp. D sensu Page et al. in Biol Lett 1:139-142, 2005) to acid mine drainage was investigated using test waters collected from the Mount Morgan open pit in Central Queensland with the addition of Aldrich humic acid (AHA). The AMD water from the Mount Morgan open pit is highly acidic (pH 2.67) as well as contaminated with heavy metals (1780 mg/L aluminum, 101 mg/L copper [Cu], 173 mg/L manganese, 51.8 mg/L zinc [Zn], and 51.8 mg/L iron). Freshwater shrimp were exposed to dilutions in the range of 0.5 % to 5 % AMD water with and without the addition of 10 or 20 mg/L AHA. In the absence of HS, all shrimp died in the 2.5 % AMD treatment. In contrast, addition of HS increased survival in the 2.5 % AMD treatment by ≤66 % as well as significantly decreased the concentration of dissolved Cu, cobalt, cadmium, and Zn. The decreased toxicity of AMD in the presence of HS is likely to be due to complexation and precipitation of heavy metals with the HS; it is also possible that HS caused changes to the physiological condition of the shrimp, thus increasing their survival. These results are valuable in contributing to an improved understanding of potential role of HS in ameliorating the toxicity of AMD environments. PMID:23135152

  16. Humic acid adsorption on fly ash and its derived unburned carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaobin; Zhu, Z H

    2007-11-01

    Fly ash is solid waste from combustion process, containing oxide minerals and unburned carbon. In this investigation, fly ash has been separated into metal oxide mineral section and unburned carbon. The fly ash with different contents of unburned carbon was employed for humic acid adsorption to investigate the influence of unburned carbon on adsorption. It is found that metal oxides and unburned carbon in fly ash exhibit significant difference in humic acid adsorption. The unburned carbon plays the major role in adsorption. Higher content of unburned carbon in fly ash results in higher surface area and thus higher humic acid adsorption. Fly ash and unburned carbon exhibit adsorption capacity of humic acid of 11 and 72 mg/g, respectively, at 30 degrees C, pH 7. Humic acid adsorption is also affected by ion strength, pH, and temperature. The thermodynamic calculations indicate that the adsorption is endothermic nature with DeltaH(0) and DeltaS(0) as 5.79 kJ/mol and 16.0 J/K mol, respectively. PMID:17628583

  17. Influence of phosphate ions on buffer capacity of soil humic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boguta, P.; Sokołowska, Z.

    2012-02-01

    The object of this study was to determine change of natural buffer capacity of humic acids by strong buffering agents, which were phosphate ions. Studies were carried out on the humic acids extracted from peat soils. Additional information was obtained by determination of water holding capacity, density, ash and pH for peats and optical parameter Q4/6 for humic acids. Humic acid suspensions exhibited the highest buffer properties at low pH and reached maximum at pH ~ 4. Phosphates possessed buffer properties in the pH range from 4.5 to 8.0. The maximum of buffering was at pH~6.8 and increased proportionally with an increase in the concentration of phosphate ions. The study indicated that the presence of phosphate ions may strongly change natural buffer capacity of humic acids by shifting buffering maximum toward higher pH values. Significant correlations were found for the degree of the secondary transformation with both the buffer capacity and the titrant volume used during titration.

  18. Isolation of Soil Bacteria Adapted To Degrade Humic Acid-Sorbed Phenanthrene

    PubMed Central

    Vacca, D. J.; Bleam, W. F.; Hickey, W. J.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of these studies was to determine how sorption by humic acids affected the bioavailability of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to PAH-degrading microbes. Micellar solutions of humic acid were used as sorbents, and phenanthrene was used as a model PAH. Enrichments from PAH-contaminated soils established with nonsorbed phenanthrene yielded a total of 25 different isolates representing a diversity of bacterial phylotypes. In contrast, only three strains of Burkholderia spp. and one strain each of Delftia sp. and Sphingomonas sp. were isolated from enrichments with humic acid-sorbed phenanthrene (HASP). Using [14C]phenanthrene as a radiotracer, we verified that only HASP isolates were capable of mineralizing HASP, a phenotype hence termed “competence.” Competence was an all-or-nothing phenotype: noncompetent strains showed no detectable phenanthrene mineralization in HASP cultures, but levels of phenanthrene mineralization effected by competent strains in HASP and NSP cultures were not significantly different. Levels and rates of phenanthrene mineralization exceeded those predicted to be supported solely by the metabolism of phenanthrene in the aqueous phase of HASP cultures. Thus, competent strains were able to directly access phenanthrene sorbed by the humic acids and did not rely on desorption for substrate uptake. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of (i) a selective interaction between aerobic bacteria and humic acid molecules and (ii) differential bioavailability to bacteria of PAHs sorbed to a natural biogeopolymer. PMID:16000791

  19. Copper binding to soil fulvic and humic acids: NICA-Donnan modeling and conditional affinity spectra.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinling; Tan, Wenfeng; Xiong, Juan; Wang, Mingxia; Fang, Linchuan; Koopal, Luuk K

    2016-07-01

    Binding of Cu(II) to soil fulvic acid (JGFA), soil humic acids (JGHA, JLHA), and lignite-based humic acid (PAHA) was investigated through NICA-Donnan modeling and conditional affinity spectrum (CAS). It is to extend the knowledge of copper binding by soil humic substances (HS) both in respect of enlarging the database of metal ion binding to HS and obtaining a good insight into Cu binding to the functional groups of FA and HA by using the NICA-Donnan model to unravel the intrinsic and conditional affinity spectra. Results showed that Cu binding to HS increased with increasing pH and decreasing ionic strength. The amount of Cu bound to the HAs was larger than the amount bound to JGFA. Milne's generic parameters did not provide satisfactory predictions for the present soil HS samples, while material-specific NICA-Donnan model parameters described and predicted Cu binding to the HS well. Both the 'low' and 'high' concentration fitting procedures indicated a substantial bidentate structure of the Cu complexes with HS. By means of CAS underlying NICA isotherm, which was scarcely used, the nature of the binding at different solution conditions for a given sample and the differences in binding mode were illustrated. It was indicated that carboxylic group played an indispensable role in Cu binding to HS in that the carboxylic CAS had stronger conditional affinity than the phenolic distribution due to its large degree of proton dissociation. The fact was especially true for JGFA and JLHA which contain much larger amount of carboxylic groups, and the occupation of phenolic sites by Cu was negligible. Comparable amounts of carboxylic and phenolic groups on PAHA and JGHA, increased the occupation of phenolic type sites by Cu. The binding strength of PAHA-Cu and JGHA-Cu was stronger than that of JGFA-Cu and JLHA-Cu. The presence of phenolic groups increased the chance of forming more stable complexes, such as the salicylate-Cu or catechol-Cu type structures. PMID:27061366

  20. Evaluating the sorption of organophosphate esters to different sourced humic acids and its effects on the toxicity to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Pang, Long; Liu, Jingfu; Yin, Yongguang; Shen, Mohai

    2013-12-01

    Because of large usage as flame retardants and additives, organophosphate esters (OPEs) are widely detected in the environment and regarded as emerging contaminants. However, the sorption of OPEs to organic matter and its effects have scarcely been studied. In the present study, the sorption of 9 commonly used OPEs to 4 representative humic acids--Elliott Soil humic acid, Suwannee River humic acid, Aldrich humic acid, and Acros humic acid--in the range of 0 mg/L to 50 mg/L dissolved organic carbon (DOC), was evaluated with negligible-depletion solid-phase microextraction and verified by its impacts on the toxicity to the aquatic invertebrate Daphnia magna. Whereas OPEs with a high octanol/water partition coefficient (log K(OW)=4.51-6.64) were associated with humic acids mainly by hydrophobic interaction with DOC partition coefficient (K(DOC)) in the range of 10²·²² to 10⁵·³¹, the sorption of low-K(OW) OPEs (log K(OW)=-0.65 to 2.59) to humic acids was not hydrophobic interaction-dominant, with K(DOC) in the range of 10³·⁴⁷ to 10⁴·²⁹. These results were corroborated by the effects of humic acids on the acute toxicity of 3 high-K(OW) OPEs to D. magna. The sorption of OPEs to Suwannee River humic acid was weak and had negligible effects on the toxicity of high-K(OW) OPEs; the presence of terrestrial Acros humic acid (50 mg/L DOC), however, significantly decreased the toxicity by 53% to 60%. The results indicated that the strong sorption between high-K(OW) OPEs and terrestrial humic acid might affect their transportation and bioavailability. PMID:23966232

  1. The impact of humic acid on chromium phytoextraction by aquatic macrophyte Lemna minor.

    PubMed

    Kalčíková, Gabriela; Zupančič, Marija; Jemec, Anita; Gotvajn, Andreja Žgajnar

    2016-03-01

    Studies assessing chromium phytoextration from natural waters rarely consider potential implications of chromium speciation in the presence of ubiquitous humic substances. Therefore, the present study investigated the influence of environmentally relevant concentration of humic acid (TOC = 10 mg L(-1)) on chromium speciation (Cr = 0.15 mg L(-1)) and consequently on phytoextraction by aquatic macrophyte duckweed Lemna minor. In absence of humic acid, only hexavalent chromium was present in water samples and easily taken up by L. minor. Chromium uptake resulted in a significant reduction of growth rate by 22% and decrease of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b contents by 48% and 43%, respectively. On the other hand, presence of humic acid significantly reduced chromium bioavailability (57% Cr uptake decrease) and consequently it did not cause any measurable effect to duckweed. Such effect was related to abiotic reduction of hexavalent chromium species to trivalent. Hence, findings of our study suggest that presence of humic acid and chromium speciation cannot be neglected during phytoextraction studies. PMID:26766370

  2. Humic acids from mechanically treated coals: a review

    SciTech Connect

    A.G. Proidakov

    2009-02-15

    In this review, attention is focused on the prospects of the use of mechanochemical activation and mechanical oxidative degradation of starting raw materials in order to increase the yield of isolated humic preparations and to modify their properties as biologically active compounds. 87 refs., 1 tab.

  3. An innovative zinc oxide-coated zeolite adsorbent for removal of humic acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zinc oxide (ZnO)-coated zeolite adsorbents were developed by both nitric acid modification and Zn(NO3)2•6H2O functionalization of zeolite. The developed adsorbents were used for the removal of humic acid (HA) from aqueous solutions. The adsorption capacity of the adsorbents ...

  4. An innovative zinc oxide-coated zeolite adsorbent for removal of humic acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zinc oxide (ZnO)-coated zeolite adsorbents were developed by both nitric acid modification and Zn(NO3)2•6H2O functionalization of zeolite. The developed adsorbents were used for the removal of humic acid (HA) from aqueous solutions. The adsorption capacity of the adsorbents at 21...

  5. Single crystalline graphene synthesized by thermal annealing of humic acid over copper foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beall, Gary W.; Duraia, El-Shazly M.; Yu, Q.; Liu, Z.

    2014-02-01

    Production of graphene by thermal annealing on copper foil substrates has been studied with different sources of carbon. The three carbon sources include humic acid derived from leonardite, graphenol, and activated charcoal. Hexagonal single crystalline graphene has been synthesized over the copper foil substrates by thermal annealing of humic acid, derived from leonardite, in argon and hydrogen atmosphere (Ar/H2=20). The annealing temperature was varied between 1050 °C and 1100 °C at atmospheric pressure. Samples have been investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. At lower temperatures the thermal annealing of the three carbon sources used in this study produces pristine graphene nanosheets which cover almost the whole substrate. However when the annealing temperature has been increased up to 1100 °C, hexagonal single crystalline graphene have been observed only in the case of the humic acid. Raman analysis showed the existence of 2D band around 2690 cm-1.

  6. ENHANCED MOBILITY OF DENSE NONAQUEOUS-PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPLs) USING DISSOLVED HUMIC ACIDS

    SciTech Connect

    EDWIN S. OLSON; JOHN R. GALLAGHER; MARC D. KURZ

    1998-10-01

    The specific objectives of this subtask are as follows: � Evaluate the suitability of using humic acids to enhance the solubility and mobility of DNAPL contaminants sorbed to soils. � Evaluate the toxicity and bioavailablity of the DNAPLs to biodegrading microorganisms. To meet the first objective, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) evaluated a set of humic acids (two) with different chemical compositions and polarities for the following: � Ability of the humates to mobilize/solubilize selected (three) DNAPLs � Mobilization/solubilization in batch soil�water experiments (one soil) � Removal rate via biotreatment with a well-established active microbial culture. The second objective was met by evaluating the inhibiting effects of a leonardite-derived humic acid on active microbial populations.

  7. Interaction of some metals between marine-origin humic acids and aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Huljev, D.J.

    1986-08-01

    The interaction of metal ions (carrier-free form) in aquatic medium with humic acids is a complicated process depending on the properties of humic acids (elementary, chemical, and trace element composition), metals studied (valence, charge, chemical form, concentration), and medium used (pH, ionic strength). The use of radionuclides was found to be very suitable for a rapid and precise determination of the distribution coefficient K/sub d/ (ratio of the concentration of a certain trace metal association with a gram of humic acid over the concentration of the same trace metal per milliliter of solution) of the investigated system. Isolated humic acids from offshore sediments from the North Adriatic (Lim channel, near Rovinj, Yugoslavia) were characterized according to their elementary composition, the amount of products of hydrolysis, and the trace elements bound. All experiments were carried out between pH 3 and 5. It was found that conditions usually present at the site where humic acid interacts with metal ions (anaerobic conditions, H/sub 2/S) in brackish (21% S) and standard seawater (38% S) are determined in the pH range 3 to 5. The results of the pick-up (uptake) and replacement (release) experiments are presented as a distribution coefficient (K/sub d/), as a function of contact time. Processes of pick-up and replacement of a number of metals under various physicochemical conditions were investigated and special attention was paid to the influence of salinity. With the increase in NaCl concentration and pH in the system, the fixation of ruthenium, zinc, cobalt, and mercury by humic acids decreased.

  8. Cotransport of bacteria with hematite in porous media: Effects of ion valence and humic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiyan; Ge, Zhi; Wu, Dan; Tong, Meiping; Ni, Jinren

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of multiple colloids (hematite and humic acid) on the transport and deposition of bacteria (Escherichia coli) in packed porous media in both NaCl (5 mM) and CaCl2 (1 mM) solutions at pH 6. Due to the alteration of cell physicochemical properties, the presence of hematite and humic acid in cell suspensions significantly affected bacterial transport and deposition in quartz sand. Specifically, the presence of hematite (5 mg/L) decreased cell transport (increased cell deposition) in quartz sand in both NaCl and CaCl2 solutions, which could be attributed to the less negative overall zeta potentials of bacteria induced by the adsorption of positively charged hematite onto cell surfaces. The presence of a low concentration (0.1 mg/L) of humic acid in bacteria and hematite mixed suspensions reduced the adsorption of hematite onto cell surfaces, leading to increased cell transport in quartz sand in NaCl solutions, whereas, in CaCl2 solutions, the presence of 0.1 mg/L humic acid increased the formation of hematite-cell aggregates and thus decreased cell transport in quartz sand. When the concentration of humic acid was increased to 1 mg/L, enhanced cell transport was observed in both NaCl and CaCl2 solutions. The decreased adsorption of hematite onto cell surfaces as well as the competition of deposition sites on quartz sand with bacteria by the suspended humic acid contributed to the increased cell transport. PMID:26558710

  9. Effects of Humic Acid and Sunlight on the Generation and Aggregation State of Aqu/C60 Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aqueous suspensions of nanoscale C60 aggregates (aqu/C60) were produced by stirring in water with Suwanee River Humic Acid (humic acid) and water from Call’s Creek, a small stream near Athens, GA. Time course experiments were conducted to determine the effects of sunlight and sol...

  10. Investigation of adsorptive fractionation of humic acid on graphene oxide using fluorescence EEM-PARAFAC.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo-Mi; Seo, Young-Soo; Hur, Jin

    2015-04-15

    In this study, the adsorptive fractionation of a humic acid (HA, Elliott soil humic acid) on graphene oxide (GO) was examined at pH 4 and 6 using absorption spectroscopy and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM)-parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). The extent of the adsorption was greater at pH 4.0 than at pH 6.0. Aromatic molecules within the HA were preferentially adsorbed onto the GO surface, and the preferential adsorption was more pronounced at pH 6, which is above the zero point of charge of GO. A relative ratio of two PARAFAC humic-like components (ex/em maxima at 270/510 nm and at (250, 265)/440 nm) presented an increasing trend with larger sizes of ultrafiltered humic acid fractions, suggesting the potential for using fluorescence EEM-PARAFAC for tracking the changes in molecular sizes of aromatic HA molecules. The individual adsorption behaviors of the two humic-like components revealed that larger sized aromatic components within HA had a higher adsorption affinity and more nonlinear isotherms compared to smaller sized fractions. Our results demonstrated that adsorptive fractionation of HA occurred on the GO surface with respect to their aromaticity and the sizes, but the degree was highly dependent on solution pH as well as the amount of adsorbed HS (or available surface sites). The observed adsorption behaviors were reasonably explained by a combination of different mechanisms previously suggested. PMID:25682051

  11. Characterization of the interaction of uranyl ions with humic acids by x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, T.; Denecke, M.A.; Pompe, S.

    1995-11-01

    Humic substances are present throughout the environment in soil and natural water. They are organic macromolecules with a variable structural formula, molecular weight, and a wide variety of functional groups depending on their origin. In natural waters, humic substances represent the main component of the {open_quotes}dissolved organic carbon{close_quotes} (DOC). The DOC may vary considerably from 1 mg/L at sea water surfaces to 50 mg/L at the surface in dark water swamps. There is strong evidence that all actinides form complexes with humic substances in natural waters. Therefore, humic substances can play an important role in the environmental migration of radionuclides by enhancing their transport. Retardation through humic substance interaction may be also possible due to formation of precipitating agglomerates. For remediation and restoration of contaminated environmental sites and risk assessment of future nuclear waste repositories, it is important to improve the predictive capabilities for radionuclide migration through a better understanding of the interaction of radionuclides with humic substances.

  12. Mössbauer and magnetic studies of nanocomposites containing iron oxides and humic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistyakova, N. I.; Shapkin, A. A.; Gubaidulina, T. V.; Matsnev, M. E.; Sirazhdinov, R. R.; Rusakov, V. S.

    2014-04-01

    Nanocomposites containing iron oxides and humic acids were studied by Mössbauer and magnetic measurements. The concentrations of humic acids as the precursor in nanocomposites were varied. Mössbauer investigations were carried out at temperature range from room temperature to 5 K. The magnetization M( T, H) was measured in the temperature interval 80-300 K and magnetic field up to 10 kOe. It was found that particles of investigated nanocomposites exhibit superparamagnetic properties. The core of the nanocomposite was a mixture of non-stoichiometric magnetite and maghemite. The "iron-polymer" interface was formed on the surface of the iron oxide particles.

  13. Characterization of humic acid fractions by C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Thorn, K.A.; Pinckney, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Soil humic acids from different environments were fractionated by adsorption chromatography on Sephadex and characterized by C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The C-13 NMR spectra of the fractions consist of some sharp, well-resolved lines and some broad bands in contrast to the spectra of the unfractionated humic acids, where the bands are broader and less well-resolved. The marked increase in resolution is apparently due to increased homogeneity of the fractions. These spectra are compared to the spectra of model compounds.

  14. Influence of cations on noncovalent interactions between 6-propionyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (PRODAN) and dissolved fulvic and humic acids.

    PubMed

    Gadad, Praveen; Nanny, Mark A

    2008-12-01

    The influence of cations (Na(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) on noncovalent interactions between 6-propionyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (PRODAN) and dissolved fulvic acids (FAs) (Norman landfill leachate fulvic acid (NLFA) and Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA)) and dissolved humic acids (HAs) (Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA) and Leonardite humic acid (LHA)) was examined using steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy at pH 4, 7 and 10 as a function of cation concentration (up to 25-100mM). Regardless of pH and cation concentration, PRODAN quenching by FA was unaffected by cations. However, interactions between PRODAN and HA decreased in the presence of cations at pH 7 and 10. Cation concentrations below the HA charge density resulted in the greatest decrease of PRODAN quenching, while very little additional decrease in PRODAN quenching occurred at cation concentrations above the HA charge density. This suggests that as the HA carboxylic acid functional groups form inner sphere complexes with divalent cations, intramolecular interactions result in a contraction of the HA molecular structure, thereby preventing PRODAN from associating with the condensed aromatic, electron accepting moieties inherent within HA molecules and responsible for PRODAN quenching. However, once the HA carboxylic acid functional groups are fully titrated with divalent cations, PRODAN quenching is no longer significantly influenced by the further addition of cations, even though these additional cations facilitate intermolecular interactions between the HA molecules to form supramolecular HA aggregates that can continue to increase in size. Regardless of FA and HA type, pH, cation type and concentration, the lack of blue-shifted fluorescence emission spectra indicated that micelle-like hydrophobic regions, amenable to PRODAN partitioning, were not formed by intra- and intermolecular interactions of FA and HA. PMID:18849058

  15. Effects of hardness and alkalinity on the removal of arsenic(V) from humic acid-deficient and humic acid-rich groundwater by zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Mak, Mark S H; Rao, Pinhua; Lo, Irene M C

    2009-09-01

    The effects of hardness (Ca(2+)) and alkalinity (HCO(3)(-)) on arsenic(V) removal from humic acid (HA)-deficient and HA-rich groundwater by zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) were investigated using batch experiments. Arsenic, in general, is removed from groundwater possibly by adsorption and co-precipitation with the iron corrosion products. However, in the co-presence of HCO(3)(-) and Ca(2+), the removal rate of arsenic increased with increasing concentrations of either Ca(2+) or HCO(3)(-). It was observed that the removal of arsenic was significantly enhanced by the formation of CaCO(3) as a nucleation seed for the growth of large iron (hydr)oxide particles. In the co-existence of Ca(2+), HCO(3)(-) and HA, the presence of HA diminished the positive role of Ca(2+) due to the formation of Fe-humate complexes in solution and delaying of the formation of CaCO(3). As a result, the formation of the large iron (hydr)oxide particles was inhibited in the earlier stage which, in turn, affected the removal of arsenic. However, after the formation of CaCO(3) and the subsequent growth of such particles, the presence of large iron (hydr)oxide particles resulted in the rapid removing of arsenic and Fe-humate by adsorption and/or co-precipitation. PMID:19580986

  16. 13C-NMR spectra and contact time experiment for Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malcolm, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The T(CP) and T(1p) time constants for Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids were determined to be short with T(CP) values ranging from 0.14 ms to 0.53 ms and T(1p) values ranging from 3.3 ms to 5.9 ms. T(CP) or T(1p) time constants at a contact time of 1 ms are favorable for quantification of 13C-NMR spectra. Because of the short T(CP) values, correction factors for signal intensity for various regions of the 13C-NMR spectra would be necessary at contact times greater than 1.1 ms or less than 0.9 ms. T(CP) and T(1p) values have a limited non-homogeneity within Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids. A pulse delay or repeat time of 700 ms is more than adequate for quantification of these 13C-NMR spectra. Paramagnetic effects in these humic substances are precluded due to low inorganic ash contents, low contents of Fe, Mn, and Co, and low organic free-radical contents. The observed T(CP) values suggest that all the carbon types in Skjervatjern fulvic and humic acids are fully cross-polarized before significant proton relaxation occurs. The 13C-NMR spectra for Skjervatjern fulvic acid is similar to most aquatic fulvic acids as it is predominantly aliphatic, low in aromaticity (fa1 = 24), low in phenolic content, high in carboxyl content, and has no resolution of a methoxyl peak. The 13C-NMR spectra for Skjervatjern humic acid is also similar to most other aquatic humic acids in that it is also predominantly aliphatic, high in aromaticity (fa1 = 38), moderate in phenolic content, moderate in carboxyl content, and has a clear resolution of a methoxyl carbon region. After the consideration of the necessary 13C-NMR experimental conditions, these spectra are considered to be quantitative. With careful consideration of the previously determined 13C-NMR experimental conditions, quantitative spectra can be obtained for humic substances in the future from the HUMEX site. Possible changes in humic substances due to acidification should be determined from 13C-NMR data.

  17. Characterization of the International Humic Substances Society standard and reference fulvic and humic acids by solution state carbon-13 (13C) and hydrogen-1 (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Folan, Daniel W.; MacCarthy, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Standard and reference samples of the International Humic Substances Society have been characterized by solution state carbon-13 and hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. Samples included the Suwannee River, soil, and peat standard fulvic and humic acids, the Leonardite standard humic acid, the Nordic aquatic reference fulvic and humic acids, and the Summit Hill soil reference humic acid. Aqueous-solution carbon-13 NMR analyses included the measurement of spin-lattice relaxation times, measurement of nuclear Overhauser enhancement factors, measurement of quantitative carbon distributions, recording of attached proton test spectra, and recording of spectra under nonquantitative conditions. Distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer carbon-13 NMR spectra also were recorded on the Suwannee River fulvic acid in deuterated dimethyl sulfoxide. Hydrogen-1 NMR spectra were recorded on sodium salts of the samples in deuterium oxide. The carbon aromaticities of the samples ranged from 0.24 for the Suwannee River fulvic acid to 0.58 for the Leonardite humic acid.

  18. Two-dimensional NMR studies of size fractionated Suwannee River fulvic and humic acid reference.

    PubMed

    Haiber, S; Herzog, H; Burba, P; Gosciniak, B; Lambert, J

    2001-11-01

    Two-dimensional phase sensitive 13C,1H correlation spectra were applied to the investigation of substructures in size fractions obtained by tangential flow multistage ultrafiltration (MST-UF) of humic substances (HS) Suwannee River Fulvic Acid Reference (HS SR FA) and Suwannee River Humic Acid Reference (HS SR HA), purchased from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). After size fractionation with MST-UF the HS samples give well resolved two-dimensional 13C,1H-correlated NMR spectra which offer a great potential for substructure elucidation and even quantification. It is shown that low molecular size lignin moieties undergo demethylation of the methoxy groups, accompanied by removal of the phenylpropane side chains and subsequent reaggregation of the aromatic rings. These findings provide insight into the processes of lignin degradation. Only the fraction >100 kDa contains macromolecules that have spin-spin relaxation times too short for investigations employing NMR multipulse sequences. PMID:11718344

  19. Extractive and oxidative removal of copper bound to humic acid in soil.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Bo-Ram; Kim, Eun-Jung; Yang, Jung-Seok; Baek, Kitae

    2015-04-01

    Copper (Cu) is often found strongly bound to natural organic matter (NOM) in soil through the formation of strong Cu-NOM complexes. Therefore, in order to successfully remediate Cu-contaminated soils, effective removal of Cu bound to soil organic matter should be considered. In this study, we investigated soil washing methods for Cu removal from a synthetic Cu-contaminated model silica soil coated with humic acid (HA) and from field contaminated soil. Various reagents were studied to extract Cu bound to NOM, which included oxidant (H2O2), base (NaOH), and chelating agents (citric acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)). Among the wash reagents, EDTA extracted Cu most effectively since EDTA formed very strong complexes with Cu, and Cu-HA complexes were transformed into Cu-EDTA complexes. NaOH extracted slightly less Cu compared to EDTA. HA was effectively extracted from the model soil under strongly alkaline conditions with NaOH, which seemed to concurrently release Cu bound to HA. However, chemical oxidation with H2O2 was not effective at destroying Cu-HA complexes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis revealed that chelating agents such as citrate and EDTA were adsorbed onto the model soil via possible complexation between HA and extraction agents. The extraction of Cu from a field contaminated soil sample was effective with chelating agents, while oxidative removal with H2O2 and extractive removal with NaOH separated negligible amounts of Cu from the soil. Based on these results, Cu bound to organic matter in soil could be effectively removed by chelating agents, although remnant agents may remain in the soil. PMID:25388560

  20. Complexation humic substances of soils with metal ions as the main way migration of matals from soil to water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, Marina

    2013-04-01

    Organic matter (OM) of natural waters can bind with the ions metals (IM) entering the system, thus reducing their toxic properties. OM in water consists predominantly (up to 80%) of humic acids (HA), represented by highmolecular, dyed, polyfunctional compounds. The natural-climatic zones feature various ratios of fulvic (FA) and humic acids. An important specific feature of metals as contamination elements is the fact that when they occur in the environment, their potential toxicity and bioavailability depend significantly on their speciation. In recent years, lakes have been continuously enriched in hazardous elements such as Pb, Cd, Al, and Cr on a global (regional) basis. The most important organic ligands are humic matter (HM) washed out from soils in water and metals occur in natural waters as free ions, simple complexes with inorganic and organic ligands, and mineral and organic particles of molecules and ions sorbed on the surface. The occurrence of soluble metal forms in natural waters depends on the presence of organic and inorganic anions. However, direct determinations are rather difficult. The goal was the calculation and analysis of the forms of metals in the system catchment basin, based on the chemical composition of the water body and the structural features of soil humic substances (HS).We used the following analytical techniques - leaching of humic substances from soil and sample preparation (Orlov DS, 1985), the functional characteristics of humic substances - spectral analysis methods, the definition of conditional stability constants of complexes - electrochemical methods of analysis. Our results show thet HAs of selected soil types are different in functions, and these differences effect substantially the complexing process. When analyzing the results obtained in the course of spectrometric investigation of HMs in selected soil types, we determined the following main HA characteristics: (1) predominance of oxygen bearing groups in HM of the

  1. Detection and characterization of uranium-humic complexes during 1D transport studies

    SciTech Connect

    Lesher, Emily K.; Honeyman, Bruce D.; Ranville, James F.

    2013-05-01

    The speciation and transport of uranium (VI) through porous media is highly dependent on solution conditions, the presence of complexing ligands, and the nature of the porous media. The dependency on many variables makes prediction of U transport in bench-scale experiments and in the field difficult. In particular, the identification of colloidal U phases poses a technical challenge. Transport of U in the presence and absence of natural organic matter (Suwannee River humic acid, SRHA) through silica sand and hematite coated silica sand was tested at pH 4 and 5 using static columns, where flow is controlled by gravity and residence time between advective pore volume exchanges can be strictly controlled. The column effluents were characterized by traditional techniques including ICPMS quantification of total [U] and [Fe], TOC analysis of [DOC], and pH analysis, and also by non-traditional techniques: flow field flow fractionation with online ICPMS detection (FlFFF-ICPMS) and specific UV absorbance (SUVA) characterization of effluent fractions. Key results include that the transport of U through the columns was enhanced by pre-equilibration with SRHA, and previously deposited U was remobilized by the addition of SRHA. The advanced techniques yielded important insights on the mechanisms of transport: FlFFF-ICPMS identified a U-SRHA complex as the mobile U species and directly quantified relative amounts of the complex, while specific UV absorbance (SUVA) measurements indicated a composition-based fractionation onto the porous media.

  2. Removal of co-present chromate and arsenate by zero-valent iron in groundwater with humic acid and bicarbonate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongzhou; Rao, Pinhua; Mak, Mark S H; Wang, Peng; Lo, Irene M C

    2009-05-01

    The interactions of co-present Cr(VI) and As(V), and the influences of humic acid and bicarbonate in the process of Cr(VI) and As(V) removal by Fe(0) were investigated in a batch setting using simulated groundwater with 5 mM NaCl, 1 mM Na(2)SO(4), and 0.8 mM CaCl(2) as background electrolytes at an initial pH value of 7. Cr(VI) and As(V) were observed to be subject to different impacts induced by co-existing As(V) or Cr(VI), humic acid and bicarbonate, originating from their distinct removal mechanisms by Fe(0). Cr(VI) removal is a reduction-dominated process, whereas As(V) removal principally involves adsorption onto iron corrosion products. Experimental results showed that Cr(VI) removal was not affected by the presence of As(V) and humic acid. However, As(V) removal appeared to be inhibited by co-present Cr(VI). When the Cr(VI) concentration was 2, 5, and 10 mg/L, in the absence of humic acid and bicarbonate, As(V) removal rate constants were decreased by 27.9%, 49.0%, and 61.2%, respectively, which probably resulted from competition between Cr(VI) and As(V) for adsorption sites of the iron corrosion products. Furthermore, the presence of humic acid significantly varied As(V) removal kinetics by delaying the formation and aggregation of iron hydroxides due to the formation of soluble Fe-humate complexes and stably dispersed fine iron hydroxides colloids. In the presence of bicarbonate, both Cr(VI) and As(V) removal was increased and the inhibitory effect of Cr(VI) on As(V) removal was suppressed, resulting from the buffering effects and the promoted iron corrosion induced by bicarbonate, and the formation of CaCO(3) in solution, which enhanced As(V) adsorption. PMID:19321187

  3. CARBON CONTRIBUTION AND CHARACTERISTICS OF HUMIC ACID, FULVIC ACID, PARTICULATE ORGANIC MATTER AND GLOMALIN IN DIVERSE ECOSYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Global climate change and soil carbon sequestration issues are entering the forefront of public policy, and emphasis is growing for research on carbon sinks and long-term terrestrial carbon stabilization. Humic acid (HA), fulvic acid (FA), humin and particulate organic matter (POM) have traditionall...

  4. Chemical modeling of boron adsorption by humic materials using the constant capacitance model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The constant capacitance surface complexation model was used to describe B adsorption behavior on reference Aldrich humic acid, humic acids from various soil environments, and dissolved organic matter extracted from sewage effluents. The reactive surface functional groups on the humic materials wer...

  5. THE ROLE OF SELECTED CATIONS IN THE FORMATION OF PSEUDOMICELLES IN AQUEOUS HUMIC ACID (R822832)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fluorescence intensity enhancement of a pyrene probe in aqueous humic acid solutions was assessed in terms of added lanthanide and thorium cations. Among the trivalent ions it was found that size played a role, with the small Lu3+ ion producing the greatest increase in pyrene...

  6. Synthesis and utilization of Mg/Al hydrotalcite for removing dissolved humic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santosa, Sri Juari; Kunarti, Eko Sri; Karmanto

    2008-09-01

    It has been synthesized Mg/Al layered double hydroxide anionic clay (Mg/Al hydrotalcite) through direct precipitation by adding 0.5 M NaOH solution into a mixed solution containing Mg(NO 3) 2 and Al(NO 3) 3 with molar ratio of 0.1:0.05 until the medium acidity reached pH 10.1. The synthesized Mg/Al hydrotalcite was then utilized to remove dissolved humic acid in aqueous medium. The humic acid was isolated from peat soil taken in Gambut District, South Kalimantan, Indonesia using the recommended procedure of IHSS (International Humic Substances Society). The removal of humic acid was mostly occurred through simple sorption process without accompanied by significant intercalation. The sorption was optimum at pH 9.0, with the first order rate constant, capacity and energy of sorption were 5.50 × 10 -3 min -1, 0.12 mmol g -1 (69 mg g -1), and 28.32 kJ mol -1, respectively.

  7. Effect of Humic Acid and Sunlight on the Generation of aqu/C60

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known about the effect of sunlight and natural organic matter, such as humic acid, on the aqueous suspension of fullerene C60. This knowledge gap limits our ability to determine the environmental impact of potential environmental releases of these materials. Aqueous sus...

  8. C-1s NEXAFS spectroscopy reveals chemical fractionation of humic acid by cation-induced coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Christl,I.; Kretzschmar, R.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of cation-induced coagulation on the chemical composition of dissolved and coagulated fractions of humic acid was investigated in batch coagulation experiments for additions of aluminum at pH 4 and 5, iron at pH 4, and calcium and lead at pH 6. The partitioning of organic carbon and metals was determined by analyzing total organic carbon and total metal contents of the dissolved phase. Both the dissolved and the coagulated humic acid fractions were characterized using synchrotron scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and C-1s near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Intensities of {pi}* transitions of carboxyl carbon and {sigma}* transitions of alkyl, O-alkyl, and carboxyl carbon decreased with increasing metal concentration for the dissolved humic acid fractions. This decrease was accompanied by an increase of the respective intensities in the coagulated fraction as shown for lead. Intensities of aromatic and phenolic carbon were affected to a larger extent only by aluminum and iron additions. The changes observed in the C-1s NEXAFS spectra coincided with an increasing removal of organic carbon from the dissolved phase with increasing total metal concentrations. We conclude that humic acid was chemically fractionated by cation-induced coagulation, which preferentially removed functional groups involved in metal-cation binding from solution.

  9. COMPOSITIONAL AND FUNCTIONAL FEATURES OF HUMIC ACIDS FROM ORGANIC AMENDMENTS AND AMENDED SOILS IN MINNESOTA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of organic amendments requires an adequate control of the chemical quality of their humic acid (HA)-like fractions and of the effects that these materials may have on the status, quality, chemistry and functions of native soil HAs. In this work, the compositional, functional and structural p...

  10. Removal of dissolved humic acid from water by photocatalytic oxidation using a silver orthophosphate semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Hatakeyama, Keisuke; Okuda, Masukazu; Kuki, Takahiro; Esaka, Takao

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► The photocatalytic property of a silver orthophosphate (Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) was investigated for humic acid degradation. ► The Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} shows high photocatalytic activity under visible light. ► The photocatalytic activity was greatly improved by employing the precipitation method. -- Abstract: In order to remove dissolved organic matter such as humic acid from water, a silver orthophosphate (Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) was newly employed as a heterogeneous photocatalyst. Here, Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} was prepared by simple ion-exchange and precipitation methods, and the physico-chemical properties were characterized by X-ray diffraction, ultraviolet–visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, particle distribution measurements and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analysis. The degradation of humic acid was faster over Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} catalyst than over conventional TiO{sub 2} (P-25). The total photocatalytic properties were improved by employing not an ion-exchange method but a precipitation method; humic acid degradation was performed with a removal ratio of dissolved organic carbon of 75% under visible light (λ = 451 nm) for 2-h irradiation.

  11. THE EFFECT OF MOLECULAR SIZE ON HUMIC ACID ASSOCIATIONS (R822832)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Aqueous solutions of two humic acids were subjected to UV photolysis, resulting in chain scission of the solute. The molecular fragments were found to have diminished detergent properties, indicated by a reduced tendency to associate with small hydrophobic spe...

  12. Spectroscopic studies of the progress of humification processes in humic acid extracted from sewage sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polak, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.; Bartoszek, M.; Papież, W.

    2005-06-01

    The humic acids extracted from sludge collected from the digestion chamber and the sludge drying beds were studied. The sludge samples were collected, dried and humic acids were extracted. The progress of the humification processes was studied with EPR, IR and NMR spectroscopic methods. For extracted humic acids, concentration of free radicals and g factor was determined with EPR. The presence of characteristic functional groups was confirmed with IR and NMR spectroscopy. To study the changes in content of the elements, the elemental analysis was performed to determine the percentage of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen. Taking all the obtained results into account it was found that on the sewage drying beds, humification processes take place in the sludge. In the first two weeks when the sludge on the drying beds an intensive enrichment of humic acids in free radicals takes place. This is the result of the intensive humification process course after the stage in the fermentation chamber where the mesophilic fermentation takes place. Moreover, the humidity of sludge influences the intensive development of free radical concentration at the beginning of the storing period, whereas the humification processes still continue.

  13. Preparative yield and properties of humic acids obtained by sequential alkaline extractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodov, V. A.; Yaroslavtseva, N. V.; Konstantinov, A. I.; Perminova, I. V.

    2015-10-01

    The preparative yield, composition, and structure of humic acids obtained by sequential alkaline extractions from two soils (a soddy-podzolic soil under forest and a typical chernozem in treatment with permanent black fallow of a long-term experiment since 1964) have been studied. The preparative yield of humic acids from the first extraction is 0.40 and 0.94% for the soddy-podzolic soil (Retisols) and the chernozem, respectively. The preparative yield from the second extraction is lower by several times, and the yield from the third extraction is lower by an order of magnitude. The study of the obtained preparations by elemental analysis, gel-permeation chromatography, and 13C NMR spectroscopy has shown insignificant changes in the elemental, molecular-weight, and structural-group composition of humic acids among the extractions. It has been supposed that this is related to the soil features: typical climatic factors for the formation of soil subtype in the case of soddy-podzolic soil and the land use in the long-term experiment in the case of typical chernozem. It has been concluded that that a single extraction is sufficient for the separation of humic acids and the preparation of a representative sample.

  14. Potential origin and formation for molecular components of humic acids in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatcher, Patrick; DiDonato, Nicole; Waggoner, Derek

    2016-04-01

    Humification is defined as the process by which plant and microbial debris are transformed in to humic substances. Proposed pathways for the formation of humic substances, include the lignin and lignin decomposition theories, the lignin-polyphenol theory as well as the melanoidin pathway. It is generally accepted that a combination of several of these pathways with some modifications may be responsible for producing humic substances. The current study examines humic acids from numerous soil samples to demonstrate their molecular composition. In addition we provide an explanation for the formation of these molecules that introduces a new perspective of the humification process. Our work utilizes advanced analytical techniques such as ESI-FTICR-MS and solid state NMR to more completely characterize humic acids at the molecular level. Methods Humic acids were extracted from soils using 0.5 M NaOH followed by treatment with a Dowex™ ion-exchange resin to remove sodium ions. Solid State 13C NMR spectra were obtained on a Bruker 400 MHz Avance II spectrometer equipped with a 4 mm solid state MAS probe. ESI-FTICR-MS analysis was conducted in the negative ion mode on a Bruker Daltonics 12 Tesla Apex Qe FTICR-MS instrument equipped with an Apollo II ESI source. Results: Soil humic acids from numerous soils were investigated in this study. The molecular formulas calculated from ultrahigh resolution mass spectra of well humified soils fall clearly into two predominant regions consisting of condensed aromatic molecules as well as high H/C, low O/C carboxyl-containing aliphatic molecules (CCAM). In contrast, the spectral data for humic acids from a poorly humified spodosol soil show a less dramatic separation of these regions, with relatively more molecular formula plotting in the lignin-like region and relatively fewer condensed aromatic molecules. From the mass spectral observations made for the humic acids, we can readily discern a relationship based on degree of

  15. Particle size, charge and colloidal stability of humic acids coprecipitated with Ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Angelico, Ruggero; Ceglie, Andrea; He, Ji-Zheng; Liu, Yu-Rong; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Colombo, Claudio

    2014-03-01

    Humic acids (HA) have a colloidal character whose size and negative charge are strictly dependent on surface functional groups. They are able to complex large amount of poorly ordered iron (hydr)oxides in soil as a function of pH and other environmental conditions. Accordingly, with the present study we intend to assess the colloidal properties of Fe(II) coprecipitated with humic acids (HA) and their effect on Fe hydroxide crystallinity under abiotic oxidation and order of addition of both Fe(II) and HA. TEM, XRD and DRS experiments showed that Fe-HA consisted of Ferrihydrite with important structural variations. DLS data of Fe-HA at acidic pH showed a bimodal size distribution, while at very low pH a slow aggregation process was observed. Electrophoretic zeta-potential measurements revealed a negative surface charge for Fe-HA macromolecules, providing a strong electrostatic barrier against aggregation. Under alkaline conditions HA chains swelled, which resulted in an enhanced stabilization of the colloid particles. The increasing of zeta potential and size of the Fe-HA macromolecules, reflects a linear dependence of both with pH. The increase in the size and negative charge of the Fe-HA precipitate seems to be more affected by the ionization of the phenolic acid groups, than by the carboxylic acid groups. The main cause of negative charge generation of Fe/HA is due to increased dissociation of phenolic groups in more expanded structure. The increased net negative surface potential induced by coprecipitation with Ferrihydrite and the correspondent changes in configuration of the HA could trigger the inter-particle aggregation with the formation of new negative surface. The Fe-HA coprecipitation can reduce electrosteric repulsive forces, which in turn may inhibit the aggregation process at different pH. Therefore, coprecipitation of Ferrihydrite would be expected to play an important role in the carbon stabilization and persistence not only in organic soils, but

  16. The aqueous photolysis of α-pinene in solution with humic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Marvin C.; Cunningham, Kirkwood M.; Aiken, George R.; Weiner, Eugene R.

    1992-01-01

    Terpenes are produced abundantly by environmental processes but are found in very low concentrations in natural waters. Aqueous photolysis of solutions containing α-pinene, a representative terpene, in the presence of humic acid resulted in degradation of the pinene. Comparison of this reaction to photolysis of α-pinene in the presence of methylene blue leads to the conclusion that the reactive pathway for the abiotic degradation of α-pinene is due to reaction with singlet oxygen produced by irradiation of the humic material. The initial product of single oxygen and α-pinene is a hydroperoxide. Since humic materials are prevalent in most natural waters, this mechanism of photodecomposition for α-pinene probably also applies to other terpenes in surface waters and may be reasonably considered to contribute to their low environmental concentration.

  17. Secondary Ultraweak Luminescence from Humic Acids Induced by γ-Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Gorączko, Wieslaw; Slawiński, Janusz

    2004-01-01

    Humic substances (HSs) are products of biochemical transformations of plant and animal residues that make up a major fraction of the organic carbon of soil and aquatic systems in the environment. Because radioisotopes occur in the Earth’s crust and because the entire biosphere is continuously exposed to cosmic radiation, ionizing radiation continually interacts with HSs. This chronic irradiation could have a significant ecological impact. However, very few publications are available that address possible consequences of chronic exposure of HSs to ionizing radiation from terrestrial and cosmic sources. This study was conducted to investigate possible impacts of exposure of HSs to ionizing radiation. Dried humic acid (HA) or its associated aqueous solution (in 0.1 M Na2CO3) were exposed to absorbed γ-radiation in high doses of 1–90 kGy using a 60Co source. Following the γ-ray exposures, a secondary, ultraweak radiation emanation with wavelengths in the spectral range λ= 340–650 nm was recorded as a long-lived chemiluminescence (CL) from the aqueous solutions; however, the CL was not observed after irradiating dry HA. Absorption spectra (for λ=240–800 nm) of irradiated solutions indicated that polymerization/degradation processes were operating on the HA macromolecules. The effect of specific CL enhancers (luminol and lucigenin) on the intensity and kinetics of the CL implicated the participation of reactive oxygen species and free radicals in the CL and polymerization/degradation processes. For the range of absorbed doses used (1–10 kGy), the intensity of the induced CL was nonlinearly related to dose, suggesting that complex radical formation mechanisms were involved. PMID:19330147

  18. Humic preperations from Russian lignites

    SciTech Connect

    Rodeh, V.V.; Ryzhkov, O.G.

    1994-12-31

    THe objective of this work was to study lignites as the precursor materials to humic substances. Lignites contain humic substances primarily as humic acids. Their extraction requires the processing of coals with alkali.

  19. EFFECTS OF HUMIC ACID PURIFICATION ON INTERACTION WITH HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC MATTER: EVIDENCE FROM FLUORESCENCE BEHAVIOR. (R822832)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conventional isolation of humic materials from natural
    matrixes includes demineralization by treatment with HF/HCl. The possible effect of this on the structural integrity of
    humic acid (HA) was investigated by comparing the
    interactions of two aqueous HAs, one produc...

  20. A method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, J.; Dong, W.; Tokunaga, T.K.

    2011-02-01

    Acidic uranium (U) contaminated plumes have resulted from acid-extraction of plutonium during the Cold War and from U mining and milling operations. A sustainable method for in-situ immobilization of U under acidic conditions is not yet available. Here, we propose to use humic acids (HAs) for in-situ U immobilization in acidic waste plumes. Our laboratory batch experiments show that HA can adsorb onto aquifer sediments rapidly, strongly and practically irreversibly. Adding HA greatly enhanced U adsorption capacity to sediments at pH below 5.0. Our column experiments using historically contaminated sediments from the Savannah River Site under slow flow rates (120 and 12 m/y) show that desorption of U and HA were non-detectable over 100 pore-volumes of leaching with simulated acidic groundwaters. Upon HA-treatment, 99% of the contaminant [U] was immobilized at pH < 4.5, compared to 5% and 58% immobilized in the control columns at pH 3.5 and 4.5, respectively. These results demonstrated that HA-treatment is a promising in-situ remediation method for acidic U waste plumes. As a remediation reagent, HAs are resistant to biodegradation, cost effective, nontoxic, and easily introducible to the subsurface.

  1. Method to attenuate U(VI) mobility in acidic waste plumes using humic acids.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jiamin; Dong, Wenming; Tokunaga, Tetsu K

    2011-03-15

    Acidic uranium (U) groundwater plumes have resulted from acid-extraction of plutonium during the Cold War and from U mining and milling operations. A sustainable method for in situ immobilization of U under acidic conditions is not yet available. Here, we propose to use humic acids (HAs) for in situ U immobilization in acidic waste plumes. Our laboratory batch experiments show that HA can adsorb onto aquifer sediments rapidly, strongly and practically irreversibly. Adding HA greatly enhanced U adsorption capacity to sediments at pH below 5.0. Our column experiments using historically contaminated sediments from the Savannah River Site under slow flow rates (120 and 12 m/year) show that desorption of U and HA were nondetectable over 100 pore-volumes of leaching with simulated acidic groundwaters. Upon HA-treatment, 99% of the contaminant [U] was immobilized at pH ≤ 4.5, compared to 5% and 58% immobilized in the control columns at pH 3.5 and 4.5, respectively. These results indicate that HA-treatment is a promising in situ remediation method for acidic U waste plumes. As a remediation reagent, HAs are resistant to biodegradation, cost-effective, nontoxic, and easily introducible to the subsurface. PMID:21319737

  2. Tritium Enrichment in the Hydration Sphere of Humic Substances

    SciTech Connect

    Wierczinski, Birgit; Muellen, Guenther; Tuerler, Andreas

    2005-07-15

    Humic and fulvic acid can be combined under the term 'humic substances' and are natural substances with a complex structure. The structural details are not known, however, due to the functional groups present in these compounds the formation of hydrogen bonds is easily attained. Several humic substances were investigated for their potential use as compounds, which are applicable for tritium enrichment from aqueous solution. For comparison a simple compound, malonic acid, representing only few functional groups was investigated. The experiments were performed using a cryosublimation apparatus, which was run well below equilibrium vapor pressure to avoid any isotope fractionation of HTO and H{sub 2}O. A higher enrichment factor was found for natural humic acid compared to fulvic acid, however, no enrichment could be found for a synthetic humic acid and malonic acid. Interpretation of the results is difficult since no detailed information on the chemical structure of humic substances is known.

  3. Spectroscopic evidence for biochar amendment promoting humic acid synthesis and intensifying humification during composting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Tu, Qiaoping; Dong, Da; Strong, P J; Wang, Hailong; Sun, Bin; Wu, Weixiang

    2014-09-15

    Despite the many benefits of biochar amendment in composting, little information is available about its effects on organic matter humification during the process. In this study the analytical results for two in-vessel composting piles were compared, one amended with biochar (VPSB, pig manure+sawdust+biochar) and the other serving as a control (VPS, pig manure+sawdust). During the 74 days of humification, the increased content of humic acid carbon in VPSB is 16.9% more than that of the control. Spectroscopic analyses show a higher O-alkyl C/alkyl C ratio and aromaticity in VPSB at the thermophilic phase, and peak intensities of fulvic-like and humic-like substances were achieved faster in VPSB than VPS. These data inferred that biochar amendment promoted the neo-synthesis of humic acids and intensified the humification of pig manure. Increase in carboxylic groups of biochar as a result of oxidation reactions and sorption of humic substances may correspond to the faster formation of aromatic polymers in biochar-supplemented composting pile. The results suggest that biochar amendment might be a potential method to enhance humification during pig manure composting. PMID:25194558

  4. Characterization of noncovalent interactions between 6-propionyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (PRODAN) and dissolved fulvic and humic acids.

    PubMed

    Gadad, Praveen; Lei, Hongxia; Nanny, Mark A

    2007-11-01

    Noncovalent interactions between the fluorescent probe 6-propionyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (PRODAN) and dissolved Norman Landfill leachate fulvic acid, Suwannee River fulvic acid, Suwannee River humic acid, and Leonardite humic acid were examined as a function of pH, fulvic and humic acid (FA and HA) concentration, and solvent polarity using steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy. Static quenching processes, as indicated by linear Stern-Volmer plots and high K(d) values, were positively correlated with the % aromaticity of the FA and HAs, as well as with solution pH. Results illustrate that for FA molecules with relatively low % aromaticity values, solvophobic interactions between PRODAN and FA are the primary interaction mode. For HA molecules with higher % aromaticity, PRODAN engages in both solvophobic interactions and pi-pi interactions, in particular electron donor-acceptor interactions, via condensed aromatic, electron-accepting moieties inherent within HA molecules. Experiments modifying solvent polarity demonstrated that protonation of carboxylic acid functional groups at low pH ( approximately 4) increased the hydrophobicity of the dissolved FA and HA molecules, thereby enhancing noncovalent interactions with PRODAN through increased solvophobic forces. PMID:17632208

  5. Dynamic modeling of copper bioaccumulation by Mytilus edulis in the presence of humic acid aggregates.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Marín, Paula; Aierbe, Eneko; Lorenzo, J Ignacio; Mubiana, Valentine K; Beiras, Ricardo; Blust, Ronny

    2016-09-01

    Copper (Cu) complexation by humic acids (HA) is expected to decrease Cu bioavailability for aquatic organisms as predicted by metal bioavailability models, such as the biotic ligand model (BLM). This has been confirmed for non-feeding organisms such as marine invertebrate embryos or microalgae, but for filter-feeding organisms such as the mussel Mytilus edulis, Cu bioaccumulation was higher in the presence of HA, suggesting that part of the Cu-HA complexes were available for uptake. This study shows the dynamic modeling of Cu accumulation kinetics in the gills and rest of the soft-body of M. edulis in the absence and presence of HA. Assuming that truly dissolved Cu is taken in the body via the gills following BLM premises, and including uptake of Cu-HA aggregates via the gut into the rest compartment, this two-compartmental model could successfully explain the observed bioaccumulation data. This modeling approach gives strong evidence to the hypothesis that Cu-HA aggregates can be ingested by mussels leading to Cu absorption in the digestive system. PMID:27498364

  6. The Role of Humic Acid in Cobalt Sorption to Soil Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Gemma; Peacock, Caroline; Thompson, Olivia; Law, Gareth; Fariña, Alba Otero; Burke, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Batch sorption experiments have been carried out to investigate cobalt sorption to ferrihydrite, kaolinite, and humic acid (HA) as a function of pH; and to ferrihydrite-HA and kaolinite-HA composites at three different total carbon contents. Sorption to the composites was enhanced at low pH values (<7) compared to the pure ferrihydrite and kaolinite systems. For the ferrihydrite-HA composites, there was no significant difference in the amount that sorption was enhanced by for the different composites. However, sorption was dependent on the C content of the kaolinite-HA composites, with more Co sorbed to the composites at higher C concentrations. Changes in Co speciation in the kaolinite and kaolinite-HA composite system was investigated using XAS analysis. EXAFS spectra collected from kaolinite samples at pH 5-6 show a single shell of 6 O backscatters; indicative of Co present in an outer-sphere sorption complex. At pH 7-8, Co-Al(Si) and Co-Co backscatters were also resolved indicating Co present in inner-sphere complexes or as Co(OH)2 surface precipitates. At pH 5-6, EXAFS spectra for Co sorption to pure HA and the kaolinite-HA composite are similar, with Co-carboxyl bonding evident, suggesting that Co is predominantly associated with the HA phase of the composite at low pH. Co sorption to natural humic acid was also studied as a function of pH, and determined in samples after filtration at both 0.22μm and 10kDa. Data from the samples filtered at 10kDa (<˜2nm) represent the best estimate of true sorption behaviour. Co sorption increased with increasing pH, reaching ˜90% at pH 7. The 0.22μm filtered samples showed incomplete sorption above pH 5, indicating that increased solvation of HA at high pH values results in a 1.5-220nm Co-HA phase that is potentially mobile at pH values where high Co sorption would be expected.

  7. Characterization of humic acids from antarctic soils by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukov, S. N.; Abakumov, E. V.; Tomashunas, V. M.

    2015-11-01

    The elemental composition and structural features of humic acids (HAs) from Antarctic soils (King George Island, Larsemann Hills, Lindsay Island) have been studied. It has been found that their elemental composition and molecular structure are intermediate between those of the HAs and fulvic acids (FAs) of Eurasian soils (from the average values). The degree of hydrophilicity of the studied HAs is comparable to that of FAs. The low content of aromatic moieties in the HAs is related to the absence or very low proportions of phenyl propane fragments in the sources of humus formation. It has been shown that the HAs from Antarctic soils compose a separate group of humic acids whose specific features are related to hard climatic conditions and specific features of humus formation sources.

  8. Determination of humic substances in natural waters by cathodic stripping voltammetry of their complexes with iron.

    PubMed

    Laglera, Luis M; Battaglia, Gianluca; van den Berg, Constant M G

    2007-09-01

    A new voltammetric method is presented for the measurement of humic substances (HS) in natural waters. The method is based on catalytic cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) and makes use of adsorptive properties of iron-HS complexes on the mercury drop electrode at natural pH. A fulvic acid standard (IHSS) was used to confirm the voltammetric response (peak potential and sensitivity) for the HS for natural water samples. Optimized conditions included the linear-sweep mode, deposition at -0.1 V, pH buffered at 8 and a scan rate of 50 mV s(-1). At a deposition time of 240 s in the presence of 10 nM iron and 30 mM bromate, the detection limit was 5 microg L(-1) HS in seawater, which could be lowered further by an increase in the bromate concentration, or in the adsorption time. The method was used to determine HS in the Irish Sea which were found to occur at levels between 60 and 600 microg L(-1). The new method is sufficiently sensitive to detect the low HS content in oceanic samples and has implications to the study of iron speciation. PMID:17765064

  9. Metal loading effect on rare earth element binding to humic acid: Experimental and modelling evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsac, Rémi; Davranche, Mélanie; Gruau, Gérard; Dia, Aline

    2010-03-01

    The effect of metal loading on the binding of rare earth elements (REE) to humic acid (HA) was studied by combining ultrafiltration and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry techniques. REE-HA complexation experiments were performed at pH 3 for REE/C molar ratios ranging from ca 4 × 10 -4 to 2.7 × 10 -2. Results show that the relative amount of REE bound to HA strongly increases with decreasing REE/C. A middle-REE (MREE) downward concavity is shown by patterns at high metal loading, whereas patterns at low metal loading display a regular increase from La to Lu. Humic Ion Model VI modelling are close to the experimental data variations, provided that (i) the ΔLK 2 parameter (i.e. the Model VI parameter taken into account the presence of strong but low density binding sites) is allowed to increase regularly from La to Lu (from 1.1 to 2.1) and (ii) the published log KMA values (i.e. the REE-HA binding constants specific to Model VI) are slightly modified, in particular with respect to heavy REE. Modelling approach provided evidence that logKdREE patterns with varying REE/C likely arises because REE binding to HA occurs through two types of binding sites in different density: (i) a few strong sites that preferentially complex the heavy REE and thus control the logKdREE atterns at low REE/C; (ii) a larger amount of weaker binding sites that preferentially complex the middle-REE and thus control the logKdREE pattern at high REE/C. Hence, metal loading exerts a major effect on HA-mediated REE binding, which could explain the diversity of published conditional constants for REE binding with HA. A literature survey suggests that the few strong sites activated at low REE/C could be multidentate carboxylic sites, or perhaps N-, or P-functional groups. Finally, an examination of the literature field data proposed that the described loading effect could account for much of the variation in REE patterns observed in natural organic-rich waters (DOC > 5 mg L -1 and 4

  10. Water solubility enhancement of some organic pollutants and pesticides by dissolved humic and fulvic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiou, C.T.; Malcolm, R.L.; Brinton, T.I.; Kile, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    Water solubility enhancements by dissolved humic and fulvic acids from soil and aquatic origins and by synthetic organic polymers have been determined for selected organic pollutants and pesticides (p,p???-DDT, 2,4,5,2???,5???-PCB, 2,4,4???-PCB, 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene, and lindane). Significant solubility enhancements of relatively water-insoluble solutes by dissolved organic matter (DOM) of soil and aquatic origins may be described in terms of a partition-like interaction of the the solutes with the microscopic organic environment of the high-molecular-weight DOM species; the apparent solute solubilities increase linearly with DOM concentration and show no competitive effect between solutes. With a given DOM sample, the solute partition coefficient (Kdom) increases with a decrease of solute solubility (Sw) or with an increase of the solute's octanol-water partition coefficient (Kow). The Kdom values of solutes with soil-derived humic acid are approximately 4 times greater than with soil fulvic acid and 5-7 times greater than with aquatic humic and fulvic acids. The effectiveness of DOM in enhancing solute solubility appears to be largely controlled by the DOM molecular size and polarity. The relative inability of high-molecular-weight poly(acrylic acids) to enhance solute solubility is attributed to their high polarities and extended chain structures that do not permit the formation of a sizable intramolecular nonpolar environment.