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Sample records for hungarian case study

  1. Historic maps and landscape evolution: a case study in the Little Hungarian Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zámolyi, A.; Székely, B.; Draganits, E.; Timár, G.

    2009-04-01

    Georeferenced historic maps provide a useful tool to derive geomorphologic landscape elements largely uninfluenced by anthropogenic activity, thus allowing the study of natural changes in the landscape evolution of increasingly densely populated areas. The study area, the Little Hungarian Plain (LHP), is located at the geologically and geomorphologically highly interesting region at the transition between the mountain chains of the Eastern Alps and the Carpathians. The area, as transport route and exchange zone of goods has had its specific importance since the Neolithic times. Consequently, the environment has been subject to human influence, especially since the onset of the industrial age. Geographically the LHP lies in the vicinity of major settlement areas (Vienna, Bratislava, Sopron, Győr) and stretches from the Leithagebirge, a mountainous area in Eastern Austria, to the City of Győr in Western Hungary. The political division of the area into two separate countries occurred after World War I. Thus, historic mapping in the Habsburg Empire and later in the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy that was organized and conducted before World War I allows a comprehensive overview of the study area. Map sheets of the 2nd Military Survey of the whole Monarchy were mapped in the time from 1807 to 1873 in the area of the entire Empire (Kretschmer et al., 2004). The Kingdom of Hungary, as part of the Empire was mapped in a homogenous campaign in the time from 1819 - 1869. Beside the increasing human impact the area is characterized by active surface processes. The geologic evolution of the Little Hungarian Plain is dominated by tectonic processes related to the lateral extrusion of the Eastern Alps and the acceleration of northward movement of the Carpathians. Subsidence is accommodated mainly along high- and low angle normal faults with a high vertical movement component. Strike-slip movements at these faults are very rare. Most of these processes have been active also in the

  2. Case Marking in Hungarian Children with Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukács, Ágnes; Kas, Bence; Leonard, Laurence B.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines whether children with specific language impairment (SLI) acquiring a language with a rich case marking system (Hungarian) have difficulty with case, and, if so, whether the difficulty is comparable for spatial and nonspatial meanings. Data were drawn from narrative samples and from a sentence repetition task. Suffixes were…

  3. A Pilot Study of Hungarian Discourse Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Der, Csilla Ilona; Marko, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    This study is the first attempt at detecting formal and positional characteristics of single-word simple discourse markers in a spontaneous speech sample of Hungarian. In the first part of the research, theoretical claims made in the relevant literature were tested. The data did not confirm or only partially confirmed the claims that Hungarian…

  4. Case Marking in Hungarian Children with Specific Language Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Lukács, Ágnes; Kas, Bence; Leonard, Laurence B.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines whether children with specific language impairment (SLI) acquiring a language with a rich case marking system (Hungarian) have difficulty with case, and, if so, whether the difficulty is comparable for spatial and nonspatial meanings. Data were drawn from narrative samples and from a sentence repetition task. Suffixes were tested both in their spatial and nonspatial meanings. Participants with SLI were compared to same-age peers and younger typically developing children matched on receptive vocabulary scores ( VC children ). Results show that although case-marking errors are very rare in spontaneous speech in Hungarian children with SLI, the number of case marked nouns and of different case markers is significantly lower in children with SLI. In the elicited production task, overall performance of the children with SLI was significantly below that of VC children, but children with SLI and VC children scored higher with spatial than with nonspatial meanings. The results are in line with expectations based on processing accounts which posit greater difficulties with less transparent details of grammar. PMID:25995530

  5. [Hungarian twin studies: results of four decades].

    PubMed

    Tárnoki, Ádám Domonkos; Tárnoki, Dávid László; Horváth, Tamás; Métneki, Júlia; Littvay, Levente

    2013-10-01

    Twin studies play a role in examining the contribution of genetic variations and environmental factors responsible for the determination of phenotypic variables and of genetic linkage between genotypes. Hungarian twin studies, supported by three twin registries (among them two twin-database), date back to 1970s. Studies mainly focused on various congenital abnormalities, the effect of contraceptive pills and folic acid on the frequency of twin pregnancies, as well as psychosexual and alcohol consumptional behaviors. Monogenic Mendelian inheritance of lactose (mal)absorption was demonstrated for the first time. Hungarian Twin Registry was founded in 2007, which contributed to the current understanding on the background of several disorders, e.g. metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis. As part of an international twin study, among others, arterial stiffness, central blood pressure, carotid intima/media thickness, venous biomechanics, body composition, lung function and smoking characteristics were also assessed. Absence of genetic background in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and high inheritance of carotid plaque characteristics were demonstrated for the first time. The review also aims to summarize future plans of the Hungarian Twin Registry. PMID:24077161

  6. Radon and thoron levels, their spatial and seasonal variations in adobe dwellings - a case study at the great Hungarian plain.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Zsuzsanna; Jordan, Gyozo; Szabó, Csaba; Horváth, Ákos; Holm, Óskar; Kocsy, Gábor; Csige, István; Szabó, Péter; Homoki, Zsolt

    2014-06-01

    Radon and thoron isotopes are responsible for approximately half of the average annual effective dose to humans. Although the half-life of thoron is short, it can potentially enter indoor air from adobe walls. Adobe was a traditional construction material in the Great Hungarian Plain. Its major raw materials are the alluvial sediments of the area. Here, seasonal radon and thoron activity concentrations were measured in 53 adobe dwellings in 7 settlements by pairs of etched track detectors. The results show that the annual average radon and thoron activity concentrations are elevated in these dwellings and that the proportions with values higher than 300 Bq m(-3) are 14-17 and 29-32% for radon and thoron, respectively. The calculated radon inhalation dose is significantly higher than the world average value, exceeding 10 mSv y(-1) in 7% of the dwellings of this study. Thoron also can be a significant contributor to the inhalation dose with about 30% in the total inhalation dose. The changes of weather conditions seem to be more relevant in the variation of measurement results than the differences in the local sedimentary geology. Still, the highest values were detected on clay. Through the year, radon follows the average temperature changes and is affected by the ventilation, whereas thoron rather seems to follow the amount of precipitation. PMID:24437932

  7. Overview of the Hungarian National Youth Fitness Study

    PubMed Central

    Csányi, Tamás; Finn, Kevin J.; Welk, Gregory J.; Zhu, Weimo; Karsai, István; Ihász, Ferenc; Vass, Zoltán; Molnár, László

    2015-01-01

    The 2012 Public Act on Education in Hungary made daily physical education (PE) a mandatory part of the school day starting in the 2012–2013 school year. This directive was linked to a significant reorganization of the Hungarian education system including a new National Core Curriculum that regulates the objectives and contents of PE. The Hungarian School Sport Federation (HSSF) recognized the opportunity and created the Strategic Actions for Health-Enhancing Physical Education or Testnevelés az Egészségfejlesztésben Stratégiai Intézkedések (TESI) project. Physical fitness assessments have been a traditional part of the Hungarian PE program; however, the TESI plan called for the use of a new health-related battery and assessment system to usher in a new era of fitness education in the country. The HSSF enlisted the Cooper Institute to assist in building an infrastructure for full deployment of a national student fitness assessment program based on the FITNESSGRAM® in Hungarian schools. The result is a new software-supported test battery, namely the Hungarian National Student Fitness Test (NETFIT), which uses health-related, criterion-referenced youth fitness standards. The NETFIT system now serves as a compulsory fitness assessment for all Hungarian schools. This article details the development process for the test battery and summarizes the aims and methods of the Hungarian National Youth Fitness Study. PMID:26054954

  8. [Lymphogranuloma venereum: the first Hungarian cases].

    PubMed

    Bánvölgyi, András; Balla, Eszter; Bognár, Péter; Tóth, Béla; Ostorházi, Eszter; Bánhegyi, Dénes; Kárpáti, Sarolta; Marschalkó, Márta

    2015-01-01

    Lymphogranuloma venereum is a sexually transmitted infection caused by the Chlamydia trachomatis serovars L1-3. It has been found to be endemic in tropical countries. In the last decades several cases have been reported in Western Europe, particularly in men who have sex with men population infected with human immunodeficiency virus. The authors present three cases of lymphogranuloma venereum infections, observed at their department in 2013 and 2014. The three human immunodeficiency virus infected patients who belonged to men who have sex with men population had casual sexual contacts in Western Europe. The symptoms included urethral discharge, discomfort and inguinal lymphadenomegaly in two patients, and rectal pain, discharge and perianal ulceration in one patient. The diagnosis was confirmed by nucleic acid amplification test performed in samples obtained from urethral discharge and exudate of perianal ulcer; lymphogranuloma venereum 2b serovars were demonstrated in two patients and serovar 2 in one patient. Doxycyclin (daily dose of two times 100 mg for 21 days) resolved the symptoms in all cases. The authors conclude that lymphogranuloma venereum is a diagnostic challenge in Hungary, too. It is important to be aware of the altered clinical features of this disease to prevent complications and spreading. PMID:25544054

  9. A Comparative Study of Croatian and Hungarian EFL Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihaljevic Djigunovic, Jelena; Nikolov, Marianne; Otto, Istvan

    2008-01-01

    This comparative research aims to provide insights into how Croatian and Hungarian 8th graders' proficiency in English as a foreign language (EFL) compares to one another in relation to organizational macro factors. A total of 717 14-year-old students participated in the study in two neighboring regions and towns of Croatia and Hungary examining…

  10. A Special Issue: Geomathematics in practice: Case studies from earth- and environmental sciences - Proceedings of the Croatian-Hungarian Geomathematical Congress, Hungary 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatvani, István Gábor; Horváth, Janina

    2016-01-01

    The present paper aims to introduce the current problems of geomathematics along with giving on overview on the papers published in the special issue covering the Croatian-Hungarian Geomathematical Congress of 2015 in Hungary.

  11. Hungarian Postpositions vs. English Prepositions: A Contrastive Study. The Hungarian-English Contrastive Linguistics Project, Working Papers No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keresztes, Kalman

    This study was conducted to find and collocate the semantically equivalent form patterns of the English and Hungarian relation-marking systems by contrasting the use of the individual relational morphemes. The ultimate aim of the study is to determine interlingual congruences and contrasts for possible use in language teaching. The investigation…

  12. Human paraoxonase polymorphism: Hungarian population studies in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Szabó, I; Róna, K; Czinner, A; Gachályi, B

    1991-06-01

    The paraoxonase phenotype distribution pattern was studied in a Hungarian population of 102 children and 100 adults. All the subjects were of Caucasian origin and are not related. The adult population showed the trimodality in phenotype distribution similar to other European population data. The gene frequencies obtained were statistically not significantly different either. There was no correlation between the activity of serum paraoxonase and activity of cholinesterase, sex, age and body weight. The phenotype distribution was trimodal in the children's population too. There was a significant difference in gene frequency, however, compared to data from adult population. PMID:1651288

  13. Hungarian case with Costello syndrome and translocation t(1,22)

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-03

    The purpose of this short case report is to document the presence of the Costello syndrome in a Hungarian girl. Clinical manifestations include characteristic facial changes, skeletal involvements, mild mental retardation. Chromosome analysis showed a balanced translocation: 46,XX,t(1,22)(q25,q11). 7 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Hungarian Youth in Transylvania Discuss Hybrid Notions of Civic Identity: Making the Case for Cultural Preservation and Multilingualism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obenchain, Kathryn M.; Alarcón, Jeannette; Ives, Bob; Bellows, Elizabeth; Alama, Madalina

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to understand ways in which Hungarian high school students describe and articulate their civic identity, as members of varied civic communities. We conducted our study in Romania, an emerging democracy with an Hungarian national minority, as it provides a unique opportunity to examine the development of a democratic civic identity…

  15. Overview of the Hungarian National Youth Fitness Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csányi, Tamás; Finn, Kevin J.; Welk, Gregory J.; Zhu, Weimo; Karsai, István; Ihász, Ferenc; Vass, Zoltán; Molnár, László

    2015-01-01

    The 2012 Public Act on Education in Hungary made daily physical education (PE) a mandatory part of the school day starting in the 2012-2013 school year. This directive was linked to a significant reorganization of the Hungarian education system including a new National Core Curriculum that regulates the objectives and contents of PE. The Hungarian…

  16. Retrospective Study of the Hungarian National Transplant Team's Cardiorespiratory Capacity.

    PubMed

    Trájer, E; Bosnyák, E; Komka, Z S; Kováts, T; Protzner, A; Szmodis, M; Tóth, S Z; Udvardy, A; Tóth, M

    2015-01-01

    The low availability of donor organs requires long-term successful transplantation as an accepted therapy for patients with end-stage renal and liver diseases. The health benefits of regular physical activity are well known among healthy individuals as well as patients under rehabilitation programs. Our aim was to describe the cardiorespiratory capacity of the Hungarian National Transplant Team. Twenty-five kidney (n = 21) or liver (n = 4) transplant athletes participated in this study. Maximal cardiorespiratory capacity (VO2max) was measured on a treadmill with the use of gas analysis. After a resting pulmonary function test, subjects completed a vita maxima test until exhaustion. Aerobic capacity of transplant athletes was higher than the age- and sex-predicted cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max, 109.9 ± 21.7% of the predicted values; P = .0101). Resting respiratory function indicators exceeded 80% of predicted age- and sex-matched normal values. There were positive correlations between VO2max and workload (r(2) = 0.40; P = .0463), metabolic equivalent (r(2) = 0.72; P < .0001), and oxygen pulse (r(2) = 0.30; P = .0039). However, age showed negative correlation with VO2max (r(2) = 0.32; P = .0031), and there was no significant correlation between graft age and maximal oxygen consumption (r(2) = 0.15; P = .4561). Although the small amount of participants can not represent the general kidney and liver transplant population, the excellent cardiorespiratory performance suggests that a normal level of physical capacity is available after transplantation and can be even higher with regular physical activity. This favorable physiologic background leads to a state that provides proper graft oxygenization, which is an important factor in long-term graft survival. PMID:26293020

  17. Retrospective assessment of the most common mitochondrial DNA mutations in a large Hungarian cohort of suspect mitochondrial cases.

    PubMed

    Remenyi, Viktoria; Inczedy-Farkas, Gabriella; Komlosi, Katalin; Horvath, Rita; Maasz, Anita; Janicsek, Ingrid; Pentelenyi, Klara; Gal, Aniko; Karcagi, Veronika; Melegh, Bela; Molnar, Maria Judit

    2015-08-01

    Prevalence estimations for mitochondrial disorders still vary widely and only few epidemiologic studies have been carried out so far. With the present work we aim to give a comprehensive overview about frequencies of the most common mitochondrial mutations in Hungarian patients. A total of 1328 patients were tested between 1999 and 2012. Among them, 882 were screened for the m.3243A > G, m.8344A > G, m.8993T > C/G mutations and deletions, 446 for LHON primary mutations. The mutation frequency in our cohort was 2.61% for the m.3243A > G, 1.47% for the m.8344A > G, 17.94% for Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (m.3460G > A, m.11778G > A, m.14484T > C) and 0.45% for the m.8993T > C/G substitutions. Single mtDNA deletions were detected in 14.97%, while multiple deletions in 6.01% of the cases. The mutation frequency in Hungarian patients suggestive of mitochondrial disease was similar to other Caucasian populations. Further retrospective studies of different populations are needed in order to accurately assess the importance of mitochondrial diseases and manage these patients. PMID:24438288

  18. A Comparative Study of Learning Strategies Used by Romanian and Hungarian Preuniversity Students in Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingvay, Mónika; Timofte, Roxana S.; Ciascai, Liliana; Predescu, Constantin

    2015-01-01

    Development of pupils' deep learning approach is an important goal of education nowadays, considering that a deep learning approach is mediating conceptual understanding and transfer. Different performance at PISA tests of Romanian and Hungarian pupils cause us to commence a study for the analysis of learning approaches employed by these pupils.…

  19. Hungarian Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montvay, István; Biró, Tamás

    Rolf Hagedorn is introduced from the personal perspective of two Hungarian physics generations. A colleague (IM) and a student (TB) recount memories and events from the early-70-s to mid-80-s, and evaluate Hagedorn's impact on present particle and nuclear Hungarian physics community.

  20. The statistical signature of morphosyntax: a study of Hungarian and Italian infant-directed speech.

    PubMed

    Gervain, Judit; Guevara Erra, Ramón

    2012-11-01

    Does statistical learning (Saffran, Aslin, & Newport, 1996) offer a universal segmentation strategy for young language learners? Previous studies on large corpora of English and structurally similar languages have shown that statistical segmentation can be an effective strategy. However, many of the world's languages have richer morphological systems, with sometimes several affixes attached to a stem (e.g. Hungarian: iskoláinkban: iskolá-i-nk-ban school.pl.poss1pl.inessive 'in our schools'). In these languages, word boundaries and morpheme boundaries do not coincide. Does the internal structure of words affect segmentation? What word forms does segmentation yield in morphologically rich languages: complex word forms or separate stems and affixes? The present paper answers these questions by exploring different segmentation algorithms in infant-directed speech corpora from two typologically and structurally different languages, Hungarian and Italian. The results suggest that the morphological and syntactic type of a language has an impact on statistical segmentation, with different strategies working best in different languages. Specifically, the direction of segmentation seems to be sensitive to the affixation order of a language. Thus, backward probabilities are more effective in Hungarian, a heavily suffixing language, whereas forward probabilities are more informative in Italian, which has fewer suffixes and a large number of phrase-initial function words. The consequences of these findings for potential segmentation and word learning strategies are discussed. PMID:22874070

  1. Emotional Intelligence of Hungarian Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baracsi, Ágnes

    2016-01-01

    The research focused on the personal and social competencies of Hungarian teachers as unexplored areas. The participants in the survey were 707 Hungarian teachers from elementary and secondary schools. In view of the expectations of the European Union related to new teacher roles, the following research question was formulated to guide the study:…

  2. Use of Noun Morphology by Children with Language Impairment: The Case of Hungarian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukacs, Agnes; Leonard, Laurence B.; Kas, Bence

    2010-01-01

    Background: Children with language impairment often exhibit significant difficulty in the use of grammatical morphology. Although English-speaking children with language impairment have special difficulties with verb morphology, noun morphology can also be problematic in languages of a different typology. Aims: Hungarian is an agglutinating…

  3. Community-Level Approaches in Language Planning: The Case of Hungarian in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatoss, Aniko

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an example of micro-planning which involves community, government and non-government organisations both in the context of immigrants' source and host countries. The community in question is the Hungarian diaspora in Australia. The language planning activities are aimed at maintaining an immigrant heritage language and identity.…

  4. [Environmental epidemiological study on respiratory diseases in two Hungarian towns].

    PubMed

    Posgay, Mária; Varró, Mihály János; Szentmihályi, Renáta; Lang, Zsolt

    2010-03-01

    Authors performed standardized, respiratory and risk factor questionnaire surveys among the adult population of two towns of Hungary: the first in Nyergesújfalu, according to the distance of the flat from asbestos cement factory, and the second in Komárom, a settlement of a smaller burden of industry. They excluded the data of former asbestos industry workers from the calculations. By the analysis of the Nyergesújfalu data they concluded that odds of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) symptoms, other illnesses and tumors were not significantly higher among the inhabitants living in the vicinity of the asbestos factory than those living farther from there, based on raw and adjusted comparisons. However, the odds of these health endpoints were significantly and approximately one and a half to two and a half times greater in Nyergesújfalu than in Komárom. Indeed, more of the odds of the investigated risk factors were also greater in Nyergesújfalu than in Komárom. So the aim of this analysis was to compare the odds of COPD and other illnesses' burdens in the two towns adjusted to the checked lifestyle, household and workplace factors. Logistic regression models were used. The adjusted odds of the most COPD symptoms were also significantly greater in Nyergesújfalu than in Komárom. The conclusion is that the role of the environmental asbestos exposure should furthermore not be excluded, influencing the odds of the COPD symptoms of adults who were not exposed to asbestos occupationally. (However, even this study confirms the significant associations between the health endpoints and gender, age, smoking, alcohol consumption, obesity, occupational exposure, indoor mould and heredity.) The need for performing analytic studies, e.g. by transmission electron microscopy, can be put, for how great are, and, how different are the asbestos concentrations in the air of the two towns (this can allude to the former asbestos concentrations in the air), moreover, how

  5. [Autoimmune pancreatitis. Evidence based management guidelines of the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group].

    PubMed

    Dubravcsik, Zsolt; Farkas, Gyula; Hegyi, Péter; Hritz, István; Kelemen, Dezső; Lásztity, Natália; Morvay, Zita; Oláh, Attila; Pap, Ákos; Párniczky, Andrea; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Szentkereszti, Zsolt; Szmola, Richárd; Takács, Tamás; Tiszlavicz, László; Szücs, Ákos; Czakó, László

    2015-02-22

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a rare disease which can even mimic pancreatic tumor, however, unlike the latter, it requires not surgical but conservative management. Correct diagnosis and differential diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and treatment of these patients requires up-to-date and evidence based management guidelines. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group proposed to prepare an evidence based guideline based on the available international guidelines and evidences. The preparatory and consultation task force appointed by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group translated and complemented and/or modified the international guidelines if it was necessary. 29 relevant clinical questions in 4 topics were defined (Basics; Diagnosis; Differential diagnostics; Therapy). Evidence was classified according to the UpToDate(®) grading system. The draft of the guidelines was presented and discussed at the consensus meeting on September 12, 2014. All clinial questions were accepted with almost total (more than 95%) agreement. The present guideline is the first evidence based autoimmune pancreatitis guideline in Hungary. The guideline may provide very important and helpful data for tuition of autoimmune pancreatitis, for everyday practice and for establishing proper finance. Therefore, the authors believe that these guidelines will widely become a basic reference in Hungary. PMID:25662147

  6. X-ray microprobe studies of Hungarian background and urban aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Toeroek, S.; Sandor, S. . Central Research Inst. for Physics); Xhoffer, C.; Van Grieken, R. . Dept. of Chemistry); Jones, K.W. ); Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L. )

    1991-10-01

    In order to determine the polluting atmospheric sources in urban and background areas source apportionment of the air particulate matter is necessary. Hitherto these studies were mostly based on bulk composition measurements of the aerosol. Source profiles, i.e. the concentrations of several elements for air particulate matter originating from one source, can be deduced from the receptor data using a number of multivariate techniques among which the chemical mass balance. The application is limited by the large number of observations that must be made for each of the variables. Often an elaborated sample preparation is necessary for fractionating the sample into several sub samples, according to the density, particle diameter or other relevant properties. Often this may results in poorly resolved source profiles. The aim of the present work is to find the relative abundance of the particle types originating from two different background monitoring stations in the middle of the Great Hungarian Plain. In urban areas most pollutants originate from traffic and municipal waste incineration. Since heavy metals play an important role in these samples the highly sensitive x-ray microscope (XRM) of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) of the Brookhaven National Laboratory was used. A feasibility study on individual aerosol particles sampled at the above background stations and in the urban area of Budapest is discussed.

  7. On a Surface Structure Constraint in Hungarian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szamosi, Michael

    It is possible to apply the concept of surface-structure constraint to a particular area of Hungarian syntax. A surface-structure constraint, according to David Perlmutter, can be seen as a template which serves as a filter at some level after the transformational component. In the case of Hungarian cooccurrence of noun phrases and verbs in a…

  8. Using Learning Management Systems in Business and Economics Studies in Hungarian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagy, Judit T.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores all uses of LMS in teaching Business Mathematics in Hungarian undergraduate training from the point of view of the instructors. Since no similar survey had been carried out in Hungary earlier, the aim was to fill in this gap and to investigate which LMS systems are being used by the instructors, to what specific purposes and…

  9. A study of Hungarian adolescent outpatients suffering from self-injurious behaviour.

    PubMed

    Csorba, János; Dinya, Elek; Ferencz, Edit; Páli, Eszter; Nagy, Edit; Horváth, Agnes; Vados, Mariann

    2010-03-01

    In this pilot study (Study A), the authors administered the Hungarian standard version of Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the translated version of the Ottawa Self Injury Inventory (OSI) to students of 3 educational facilities in a county town. Fourteen to eighteen year old pupils were tested in order to measure the key symptoms of depression and the frequency and characteristics of self-injurious behaviour among this sample of the high school population. Twentysix youngsters were found to have had any form of self-injurious actions in their life-time. The paper presents descriptive data on the basis of statistics of symptom occurence. Although the depressive symptoms have an expected correlation with the self-injurious ideas,depression seems not to have the same relationships with actual self-harm action. In study B, the authors present descriptive statistics on the data of 48 female outpatients from the total pool of 72 adolescents aged 14 through to-18 years (average age 16.1 years) showing symptoms of self-injurious behavior according to the Ottawa Self Injury Inventory (OSI). All patients were recruited from a one-year clinical,representative sample of the "Pannonia" multicentre adolescent psychiatry survey. Ten point two percent of consecutively referred and 25.6% of treated adolescent patients had symptoms of self-injurious behavior over a one-year period in 4 Transdanubian Child Psychiatric Centers, which is more frequent than the expected rate. Referring to the clinical diagnoses of adolescents confirmed by M.I.N.I. Plus Diagnostic Interview, the authors estimate, that the majority of these young people suffered from episode(s) of present or past major depression, from whatever form of anxiety disorder and/or from suicidal behaviour. The study presents details of risk behavior including motivations, frequency of acts, ideas, afflicted body regions, emotional correlates, secondary obtained benefits , escalation of problem behavior and consequences in

  10. The successful use of familial searching in six Hungarian high profile cases by applying a new module in Familias 3.

    PubMed

    Kling, Daniel; Füredi, Sándor

    2016-09-01

    Commonly DNA profiles obtained from biological samples found at crime scenes or of unknown bodies are searched against a large national or local database of reference and crime scene DNA profiles. The aim is to find a direct match, i.e. an identical profile or in the case of a mixture, at least an overlap of all alleles. Familial searching is, instead, the concept of searching for relatives of a stain donor in the database, i.e. a quest for relatives of the possible perpetrator or an unidentified body. The current paper provides the tool to perform effective searches for relatives of a target DNA profile in a large database. In addition, the algorithm accounts for mixtures which is common in crime stains. Specifically we focus on six high profile Hungarian cases where familial searching has succeeded in providing investigative leads. An implementation of the methods is included in the latest version of the software Familias, freely available at www.familias.no. PMID:27267559

  11. Effects of continuous cover forestry on soil moisture pattern - Beginning steps of a Hungarian study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalicz, Péter; Bartha, Dénes; Brolly, Gábor; Csáfordi, Péter; Csiszár, Ágnes; Eredics, Attila; Gribovszki, Zoltán; Király, Géza; Kollár, Tamás; Korda, Márton; Kucsara, Mihály; Nótári, Krisztina; Kornél Szegedi, Balázs; Tiborcz, Viktor; Zagyvai, Gergely; Zagyvai-Kiss, Katalin Anita

    2014-05-01

    Nowadays Hungarian foresters encounter a new challenge. The traditional management practices do not meet anymore with the demand of the civil society. The good old clearcut is no more a supported technology in forest regeneration. The transition to the continuous cover forestry induces much higher spatial variability compared to the even aged, more or less homogeneous, monoculture stands. The gap cutting is one of the proposed key methods in the Hungarian forestry. There is an active discussion among forest professionals how to determine the optimal gap size to maintain ideal conditions for the seedlings. Among other open questions for example how the surrounding trees modify the moisture pattern of the forest floor in the gap? In the early steps of a multidisciplinary project we established four research plots to study the spatial and temporal variability of soil moisture in the forest gap and the surrounding undisturbed stand. Each plot is located in oak (Quercus spp.) stands. Natural regeneration of oak stands is more problematic in our climate compared to the beech (Fagus sylvatica) which is located in the more humid or semi-humid areas of our country. All plots are located in the western part of Hungary: close to Sopron, Bejcgyertyános, Vép and Vajszló settlements. The last plot is an extensive research area, which is located in the riparian zone of a tributary of Feketevíz River. We monitor here the close-to-surface groundwater level fluctuation with pressure transducers. With a diurnal fluctuation based method it is possible to quantify the evapotranspiration differences between the gap and the stand. In two of the remaining stands (Bejcgyertyános and Vép) the gaps were opened in 2010. The monitoring of soil moisture began in 2013. A mobile sensor is used to monitor soil-moisture in a regular grid. The spatial variability of soil-moisture time-series shows a characteristic pattern during the growing-season. The plot in Sopron was established in 2013

  12. Ethnic Attitudes of Hungarian Students in Romania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ives, Bob; Obenchain, Kathryn M.; Oikonomidoy, Eleni

    2012-01-01

    Participants in this study were ethnic Hungarian secondary students attending high schools in Romania in which Hungarian was the primary language of instruction. Attitudes of participants toward ethnic and cultural groups were measured using a variation of the Bogardus (1933) Scale of Social Distance. Results were consistent with predictions based…

  13. Hungarian Graded Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihalyfy, Ilona; Koski, Augustus A.

    This graded reader is intended to supplement a beginning course in Hungarian after the student has "developed control of about 700 lexical items and can manipulate with fluency much of the basic structure of Hungarian." (It may also be used in an intermediate course.) The 56 reading selections are varied in content and sequenced to develop reading…

  14. Health status among elderly Hungarians and Americans.

    PubMed

    Buss, T F; Beres, C; Hofstetter, C R; Pomidor, A

    1994-07-01

    Selected health status data for elderly populations from similar industrial cities-Youngstown, Ohio, USA, and Debrecen, Hungary-were compared. Because of their impoverished health care system, unregulated heavily industrialized society, and unhealthful life-styles Hungarians were hypothesized to have poorer health status than Americans, even after taking into account demographic mediating factors. The study provides a health status baseline for elderly Hungarians shortly after communism's fall in 1989-1990 and shows how great a gap exists between Hungarian health status and that in the West. Hungarians were in much poorer health as measured by functional status, symptomatology, medical condition, depression, and subjective health status. Distinctions persisted when controlling for gender, age, and education. Poverty-level (and income) did not explain health status differences. The paper concludes that Hungary should pay more attention to health promotion, prevention, and primary care, as well as to reforming patient management in hospitals, nursing homes, and home care programs. PMID:24390093

  15. Hungarian space research 1981-1985: Lectures and review articles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benko, G. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    This monograph presents an overview of Hungarian space research from 1981 to 1985. Topics discussed in the original report include the development of space research centers, the flight of the first Hungarian astronaut, Hungarian participation in international space programs such as the Vega/Halley's Comet mission and the BEALUCA materials science experiment, advances in astronomical research, and activities of the Cosmic Geodetic Observatory. Other topics discussed incude space biomedical studies, meteorological applications of space research, satellite communications, and satellite power supply systems.

  16. Health related quality of life in patients with bladder cancer: a cross-sectional survey and validation study of the Hungarian version of the Bladder Cancer Index.

    PubMed

    Hevér, Noémi V; Péntek, Márta; Balló, András; Gulácsi, László; Baji, Petra; Brodszky, Valentin; Damásdi, Miklós; Bognár, Zita; Tóth, György; Buzogány, István; Szántó, Árpád

    2015-07-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is an important outcome in oncology care although an underexplored area in bladder cancer (BC). Our aims were to assess HRQoL of patients with BC, analyse relationships between diverse HRQoL measures and validate the Hungarian version of the Bladder Cancer Index (BCI) questionnaire. A cross-sectional survey was performed among patients with BC (N = 151). Validated Hungarian versions of the FACT-Bl, SF-36 and EQ-5D were applied and SF-6D was derived. Psychometric analysis of the Hungarian BCI was performed. Pearson correlations between the five measures were analysed. Deterioration in SF-36 Physical Functioning was detected among patients aged 45-64 years. The EQ-5D score did not differ significantly from the age-matched population norm. Correlations between the FACT-Bl, EQ-5D and SF-6D utility measures were strong (r > 0.6). Cronbach alpha coefficients of the Hungarian BCI ranged from 0.75 to 0.97 and factor analysis confirmed that data fit to the six predefined subdomains. Test-retest correlations (reliability, N = 50) ranged from 0.67 to 0.87 and interscale correlations between urinary, bowel and sexual BCI domains were weak or moderate (r = 0.29 to 0.49). Convergent validity revealed a stronger correlation with FACT-Bl (r = 0.126 to 0.719) than with generic health state scores (r = 0.096 to 0.584). Results of divergent validity of the Hungarian BCI by treatment groups by Kruskal Wallis test were promising although limited by low sample sizes in cystectomy subgroups. Generic health state measures have limited capacity to capture HRQoL impact of BC. Validity tests yielded favourable results for the Hungarian BCI. Mapping studies to estimate utility scores from FACT-Bl are encouraged but less recommendable with the BCI. PMID:25434791

  17. Cross-Validation of FITNESSGRAM® Health-Related Fitness Standards in Hungarian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurson, Kelly R.; Saint-Maurice, Pedro F.; Karsai, István; Csányi, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to cross-validate FITNESSGRAM® aerobic and body composition standards in a representative sample of Hungarian youth. Method: A nationally representative sample (N = 405) of Hungarian adolescents from the Hungarian National Youth Fitness Study (ages 12-18.9 years) participated in an aerobic capacity assessment…

  18. Hungarian cosmonaut in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The selection and training of cosmonauts and the preparation of the first Hungarian for flight on Salyut 36 and its linking with Soyuz 6 are described. Biographical sketches of the crew members, the reasons for different types of wearing different types of spacesuits during flight in the space station, and the experiments conducted are discussed. Photographs are included.

  19. The Hungarian Library Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1976

    This booklet includes the Law-Decree No. 15 on Libraries issued by the Presidium of the Hungarian People's Republic in 1976 and the decree of the Council of Ministers on its implementation. The purpose of the decree is to further the fulfilment of citizens' cultural demands, and meet the needs for special literature of both citizens and corporate…

  20. Quantitative Investigations in Hungarian Phonotactics and Syllable Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation investigates statistical properties of segment collocation and syllable geometry of the Hungarian language. A corpus and dictionary based approach to studying language phonologies is outlined. In order to conduct research on Hungarian, a phonological lexicon was created by compiling existing dictionaries and corpora and using a…

  1. Does the Educational Level of Speakers Matter in Hungarian Language Use?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kontra, Miklos

    The standard spoken usage of a language is often referred to as the "educated" version of the language. This study investigated the degree to which this assumption applies to Hungarian. Data were drawn from the 1988 Hungarian National Sociolinguistic Survey of a stratified sample of 850 adult Hungarians. Subjects completed three major types of…

  2. A Contrastive Analysis of English and Hungarian Grammatical Structure. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orosz, Robert A.

    This study, contrasting grammatical structures in English and Hungarian, considers those areas of grammar in the two languages which would cause the greatest interference for the native English speaker learning Hungarian. The choice of topics is based on the author's personal observation, both of English speakers learning Hungarian and of…

  3. Study Abroad Programs as Tools of Internationalization: Which Factors Influence Hungarian Business Students to Participate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huják, Janka

    2015-01-01

    The internationalization of higher education has been on the agenda for decades now all over the world. Study abroad programs are undoubtedly tools of the internationalization endeavors. The ERASMUS Student Mobility Program is one of the flagships of the European Union's educational exchange programs implicitly aiming for the internationalization…

  4. A study of the connection between gambling and crime in Hungarian prisons.

    PubMed

    Tessényi, Judit; Kovács, Péter

    2016-01-01

    In the following study, we examine the connection between crime and gambling addictions. In addition to examining the playing habits of 140 detainees prior to their imprisonment, we also study their demographic characteristics, and their relations.(2) We previously studied these correlations as a part of a data recording in 2009 (Tessényi-Kovács, 2011).(3) By the 10th of October 2012, the use of gaming machines was terminated in Hungary. Therefore, our survey has gained a repeated actuality, since a significant cause of addiction has disappeared from the market. We question whether this factor has had a measurable effect. Although the elapsed time is not necessarily enough to measure the presumed changes in crime due to gambling, we nevertheless make the comparison with the results from 2009. For the study of pathological problem gambling, we applied the original version of the SOGS-questionnaire, complemented with demographics and other relevant questions from the perspective of our survey. PMID:27156475

  5. The Statistical Signature of Morphosyntax: A Study of Hungarian and Italian Infant-Directed Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gervain, Judit; Erra, Ramon Guevara

    2012-01-01

    Does statistical learning (Saffran, Aslin, & Newport, 1996) offer a universal segmentation strategy for young language learners? Previous studies on large corpora of English and structurally similar languages have shown that statistical segmentation can be an effective strategy. However, many of the world's languages have richer morphological…

  6. The Hungarian-Americans of South Bend.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Darlene; Rasmussen, Karen, Ed.

    Developed as part of an ethnic heritage studies program, this historical narrative of Hungarian Americans in South Bend, Indiana, is intended to increase cultural awareness and appreciation. The document is divided into three sections. Section I offers a brief history of Hungary and describes the background of the three emigrant groups; lower…

  7. Hungarian climate change action plan

    SciTech Connect

    Molnar, S.; Takacs, T.; Arpasi, M.; Farago, T.; Palvoelgyi, T.; Harnos, Z.; Lontay, Z.; Somogyi, Z.; Tajthy, T.

    1998-12-31

    In 1994--1996, within the framework of the US Country Studies Program, the Hungarian Country Study Team developed the national greenhouse gas emission inventory, and elaborated the mitigation options for the different sectors of the economy. In 1997, the development of a National Action Plan was begun as the continuation of this work. Results of the inventory study showed that greenhouse gas emissions decreased from the selected base level (i.e., from the yearly average emissions of 1985--1987) until 1994 by cca. 25%. However, this decrease was primarily caused by the deep economic recession. Therefore the policy makers have to face the problem of economic recovery without a relevant increase of greenhouse gas emissions in the near future. This is the main focus of the mitigation analysis and the National Action Plan.

  8. Bilingual and Trilingual Codeswitching between Hungarian, Romanian and English in the Speech of Two Transylvanians Living in North America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Iulia

    2008-01-01

    This case study investigates the bilingual and trilingual codeswitching patterns of two multilinguals who grew up in a Hungarian-Romanian two-language family in Transylvania, and whose bilingual codeswitching changed into trilingual codeswitching after they moved to North America. An analysis of the speakers' discourse reveals the amounts of…

  9. Dr Michaels® (Soratinex®) product for the topical treatment of psoriasis: a Hungarian/Czech and Slovak study.

    PubMed

    Hercogovấ, J; Fioranelli, M; Gianfaldoni, S; Chokoeva, A A; Tchernev, G; Wollina, U; Tirant, M; Novotny, F; Roccia, M G; Maximov, G K; França, K; Lotti, T

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory T cell-mediated skin disease, affecting about 2% of Hungarian population. Genetic predisposition as well as environmental triggering factors, and innate immune processes play a role in its etiology. Treatment of psoriasis during the initial stages and first years of disease tend to be conservative and frequently based on topical agents. The aim of this study was to investigate and to describe the efficacy and safety of Dr Michaels® (Soratinex®) skin-care products for the topical treatment of stable chronic plaque psoriasis in a Hungarian population. Two-hundred-and-eight-six (120 female/166 male) patients, aged 10-80 years old (mean age 43 years) with mild to moderate plaque psoriasis had participated in the study. The products, including cleansing gel containing a coal tar solution, herbal oils and emulsifiers, were used twice daily and in the same manner for all the skin lesions. The study period was eight weeks. Assessment, using the Psoriasis Activity Severity Index (PASI) scores and photographic analysis, was done 2 weeks before treatment, at time 0, and after 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks. Patient’s improvement was determined by the percentage reduction of the PASI scores. Side effects and tolerability were also evaluated. After 8 weeks treatment course, 46 patients had a moderate improvement, with the regression of 25-50% of skin lesions; 77 patients showed a good improvement, with the resolution of 51-75% of lesions. Another 115 patients had an outstanding improvement, with the regression of 76-98.9% of lesions. Only 13 patients did not achieve an improvement of psoriasis. Fifteen patients experienced folliculitis, which resolved after cessation of treatment. Seven patients worsened and discontinued treatment. Thirteen patients dropped out because of non-compliance. Our investigation demonstrates that Dr Michaels® (Soratinex®) products, an Australian treatment, can be used successfully in the treatment of stable chronic plaque

  10. Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Lois A., Ed.; Sue, Valerie M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents two case studies using online surveys for evaluation. The authors begin with an example of a needs assessment survey designed to measure the amount of help new students at a university require in their first year. They then discuss the follow-up survey conducted by the same university to measure the effectiveness of the…

  11. Health-Related Physical Fitness in Hungarian Youth: Age, Sex, and Regional Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welk, Gregory J.; Saint-Maurice, Pedro F.; Csányi, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine region, age, and sex profiles of physical fitness in Hungarian youth. Method: A sample of 2,602 Hungarian youth aged 10 to 18 years old completed a series of physical fitness field tests: the Progressive Aerobic Cardiorespiratory Endurance Run (PACER) fitness test, body mass index (BMI), percent…

  12. A Contrastive Analysis of English and Hungarian Sentence Prosody. The Hungarian-English Contrastive Linguistics Project, Working Papers No. 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varga, Laszlo

    This is a contrastive analysis of British English, American English and Hungarian sentence prosody. The first part is an introduction stating the study's objective, scope and data, and briefly surveying the related literature. It outlines the study's view of prosodic features and its principles of comparison and prediction. Part Two inventories…

  13. Change, Continuity and Path-Dependency in Hungarian Public Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szolár, Éva

    2015-01-01

    In this descriptive study the aim is to analyze the Hungarian educational policy history and event-chain of the comprehensive and post-comprehensive project. As a structuring framework this paper used the historical landmarks and the different institutional arrangement models (governance types and power distribution models). Accordingly, three…

  14. Establishing Normative Reference Values for Handgrip among Hungarian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint-Maurice, Pedro F.; Laurson, Kelly R.; Karsai, István; Kaj, Mónika; Csányi, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine age- and sex-related variation in handgrip strength and to determine reference values for the Hungarian population. Method: A sample of 1,086 Hungary youth (aged 11-18 years old; 654 boys and 432 girls) completed a handgrip strength assessment using a handheld dynamometer. Quantile regression was…

  15. The stigmatization of obesity among Gypsy and Hungarian children.

    PubMed

    Papp, Ildikó; Túry, Ferenc

    2013-06-01

    Prejudice against obese people has been widely confirmed in scientific papers. Therefore, recent studies have increasingly focused on investigating the individual and cultural factors related to attitudes towards obesity. Since there have been no comparative studies involving Gypsy people, our present research aimed at exploring the possible discrepancies in children's attitudes towards obese children between Gypsy and Hungarian cultures. Our survey included 247 children aged 9-16 (108 boys and 139 girls), of which 136 considered themselves Hungarian (55.1 %), while 111 children (44.9 %) claimed themselves as Gypsy. The subjects were asked to rank six male and six female figure drawings according to their preference. Each sequence of figure drawings included a healthy child, an obese child, and four drawings depicted children with disabilities. According to our results, the drawings portraying the healthy child figure were rated most preferable and those portraying the obese child figure the least preferable amongst the subjects regardless of gender and origin. However, the obese girl figures and boy figures were rated significantly more positively by Gypsy children than Hungarian children. Our results suggest that there is a difference in attitude towards obesity among Gypsy and Hungarian children. Therefore, it is worthwhile to further explore this phenomenon. PMID:23760848

  16. Hungarian adaptation of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory: reliability and validity.

    PubMed

    Bencsik, Beata; Tamás, László; Trimmel, Krisztina; Stauder, Adrienne

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the reliability and validity of the Hungarian version of the original Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI). In the study design the original THI (THI-US) was translated into Hungarian by three independent investigators. The final Hungarian version (THI-HUN) was constructed on the basis of these Hungarian interpretations and then administered to 72 patients suffering from chronic tinnitus. Construct validity was assessed using short version of Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS4 version), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) (loudness, annoyance and pitch of tinnitus), pure tone audiometry and tinnitometry. The 72 participants were 43 women and 29 men. Their mean age was 49.86 years with a mean tinnitus duration of 4.16 years. In the results THI-HUN and its subscales showed good internal consistency reliabilities (α = 0.95-0.74), with significant correlation between THI-HUN total score and subscales and the BDI, PSS4 and VAS annoyance. There was a high or moderate correlation between THI-HUN total score and VAS loudness, tinnitus duration, hearing loss and subjective perception of tinnitus loudness. The VAS pitch of tinnitus, the subjective perception of tinnitus pitch, age, gender and level of education did not show any correlation with THI-HUN total score. The test-retest reliability was high (r = 0.97). We conclude that a valid and reliable THI-HUN questionnaire was constructed. PMID:24970290

  17. Case Study: Testing with Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2015-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses using case studies to test for knowledge or lessons learned.

  18. Neurophysiology of Hungarian subject-verb dependencies with varying intervening complexity.

    PubMed

    Jolsvai, Hajnal; Sussman, Elyse; Csuhaj, Roland; Csépe, Valéria

    2011-12-01

    Non-adjacent dependencies are thought to be more costly to process than sentences wherein dependents immediately follow or precede what they depend on. In English locality effects have been revealed, while in languages with rich case marking (German and Hindi) sentence final structures show anti-locality-effects. The motivation of the current study is to test whether locality effects can be directly applied to a typologically different language than those investigated so far. Hungarian is a "topic prominent" language; it permits a variation of possible word sequencing for semantic reasons, including SVO word order. Hungarian also has a rich morphological system (e.g., rich case system) and postpositions to indicate grammatical functions. In the present ERP study, Hungarian subject-verb dependencies were compared by manipulating the mismatch of number agreement between the sentence's initial noun phrase and the sentence's final intransitive verb as well as the complexity of the intervening sentence material, interrupting the dependencies. Possible lexical class and frequency or cloze-probability effects for the first two words of the intervening sentence material were revealed when used separate baseline for each word, while at the third word of the intervening material as well as at the main verb ERPs were not modulated by complexity but at the verb ERPs were enhanced by grammaticality. Ungrammatical sentences enlarged the amplitude of both LAN and P600 components at the main verb. These results are in line with studies suggesting that the retrieval of the first element of a dependency is not influenced by distance from the second element, as the first element is directly accessible when needed for integration (e.g., McElree, 2000). PMID:21740931

  19. Modelling large-scale spatial variability of soil properties with sequential stochastic simulation conditioned by universal kriging in a Hungarian study site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szatmári, Gábor; Barta, Károly; Pásztor, László

    2015-04-01

    were generated, respectively. The set of 200 realizations provides a set of 200 simulated values for each grid node, which can be used to model the cumulative distribution function (CDF) for each grid node and provides statistical inferences for the consideration of the spatial uncertainty. The expected value and the corresponding confidence interval for each grid node were mapped, where latter offers an opportunity for estimating the spatial uncertainty. CDFs can also be used to map specific conditions of the modelled property, e.g. the distribution of probability if RD is less than or equal to 30 centimeters. Utilizing this opportunity, functional "soil maps" were generated for the study area, which were used to delineate (with a predefined confidence level) the highly, moderately and weakly erosion affected areas, as well as the accumulation zones. In the last step, the results of SSUK and UK were compared, which showed that, SSUK gave a similar model of regional tendencies as UK for both variables. However, SSUK did not smooth out the local heterogeneities, which is crucial in large-scale digital soil mapping. In conclusion, SSUK proved to be an appropriate technique to model the large-scale spatial distribution and uncertainty of soil variables. Acknowledgements Our work has been supported by the Hungarian National Scientific Research Foundation (OTKA, Grant No. K105167).

  20. Processing relative clauses by Hungarian typically developing children

    PubMed Central

    Kas, Bence; Lukács, Ágnes

    2011-01-01

    Hungarian is a language with morphological case marking and relatively free word order. These typological characteristics make it a good ground for testing the crosslinguistic validity of theories on processing sentences with relative clauses. Our study focussed on effects of structural factors and processing capacity. We tested 43 typically developing children in two age groups (ages of 4;11–7;2 and 8;2–11;4) in an act-out task. Differences in comprehension difficulty between different word order patterns and different head function relations were observed independently of each other. The structural properties causing difficulties in comprehension were interruption of main clauses, greater distance between the verb and its arguments, accusative case of relative pronouns, and SO head function relations. Importantly, analyses of associations between working memory and sentence comprehension revealed that structural factors made processing difficult by burdening components of working memory. These results support processing accounts of sentence comprehension in a language typologically different from English. PMID:22888179

  1. Case Study: Writing a Journal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prud'homme-Genereux, Annie

    2016-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue describes incorporating a journal article into the classroom by first converting it into a case study.

  2. [Effect of the summer Olympic Games on Hungarian suicide rates].

    PubMed

    Bálint, Lajos; Osváth, Péter; Bozsonyi, Károly; Fekete, Sándor

    2014-01-01

    In our study, we set out to investigate whether there is a significant relationship between the count (raw rate) of suicides committed and the summer Olympic Games in such an achievement-oriented society like the Hungarian one, where summer Olympic Games receive extremely considerable attention. For our study, we examined the suicide cases occurring over 15706 days between 1 January 1970 and 31 December 2012 (43 years), separately for each gender. Because of the age-specific characteristics of suicide, the effect of the Olympic Games was analysed for the middle-aged (30-60 year-old) and the elderly (over 60 year-old) generations, as well as for the whole gender specific population. The role of the summer Olympic Games was examined with the help of time series intervention analysis after the cyclical and seasonal components have been removed. Based on our results, the effect of the Olympic Games is significant for the middle-aged (30-60 year-old) population. Neither in the older male, nor in any of the female age groups could a relationship between suicide and this sports event be detected. In summary, the Olympic Games seem to decrease the rate of suicide among middle-aged men slightly but significantly. In the interpretation of our results we emphasise the importance of the complex approach of suicidal behavior. PMID:25569825

  3. [The Hungarian version of the Nuremberg Geronto-psychological Inventory].

    PubMed

    Pék, G; Fülöp, T

    1991-10-20

    The NAI (Nürnberger Alters Inventar) has been elaborated by Oswald and Fleischmann (1982). The NAI introduced as a standardized psychometric method for the description of the most significant fields of the cognitive performance as well as of the behaviour and general condition of the elderly. This inventory, which is extended currently, tries to join a wide-scope theory with an easy to use psychometric method. It aims at a comprehensive evaluation of psychological aging as well as therapeutical intervention caused effects. The first practical application of the Hungarian version of NAI was a double blind clinical trial to study the effect of centrophenoxine in human dementia. Both the result of this trial and previous experiences confirm the drug sensitivity of the NAI. The main fields of the application of NAI: gerontopsychological research, geriatrical units, social and health care for elderly. The development of the Hungarian standard is in process on 500 elderly people. PMID:1945368

  4. [Patients' rights of the deceased and related problems in Hungarian law].

    PubMed

    Kereszty, Eva Margit

    2012-03-01

    In the Hungarian law, non-burial interventions on cadavers are regulated only by the health law and, therefore, other scientific examinations are theoretically not allowed. Only the international ethical code of museums is used in certain cases. Numerous cultures consider this practice as the mutilation of the cadaver. Beyond this and the criminal forms of mutilation, the medical interventions (trial and training) are also appropriate to hurt the dignity of the dead. As a counterweight, the consent of the patient or his/her relatives is needed for post-mortem interventions. This study presents the Hungarian legislation in which the deceased is a 'patient', and the special enforcement of patients' rights takes place in relation to the body. The relatives have many rights concerning autopsy, and the anatomy institutes are also regulated. The presumption of opting-out is used for organ harvesting; objection is accepted only from the patient. Medical data of the deceased are strictly protected, but there are no obstacles to the interests of the relatives. Graduate and postgraduate medical education pays only little attention to these issues, and the legislation is not in line with the present expectations and possibilities, so that it would be advisable to reconsider the full spectrum of the problem. PMID:22348848

  5. Soil-atmosphere relationships: The Hungarian perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ács, Ferenc; Rajkai, Kálmán; Breuer, Hajnalka; Mona, Tamás; Horváth, Ákos

    2015-10-01

    This study discusses scientific contributions analyzing soil-atmosphere relationships. These studies deal with both the biogeophysical and biogeochemical aspects of this relationship, with biogeophysical aspects being in the majority. All of the studies refer either directly or indirectly to the fundamental importance of soil moisture content. Moisture has a basic influence on the spatiotemporal pattern of evapotranspiration, and so 1) on cloud formation and precipitation events by regulating the intensity of convection, and 2) on the trace-gas exchanges in the near-surface atmosphere. Hungarian modeling efforts have highlighted that soils in the Pannonian Basin have region-specific features. Consequently, shallow and deep convection processes are also, to some extent, region-specific, at least in terms of the diurnal change of the planetary boundary layer height and the spatial distribution of convective precipitation. The soil-dependent region-distinctiveness of these two phenomena has been recognized; at the same time the strength of the relationships has not yet been quantified.

  6. Case Study Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes the history of case study teaching, types of cases, and experimental data supporting their effectiveness. It also describes a model for comparing the efficacy of the various case study methods. (Contains 1 figure.)

  7. Hungarian Folk Traditions Revisited. Educational Curriculum Kit 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biro, Ruth

    This booklet contains materials that highlight Hungarian traditions and customs transplanted to America by Hungarian immigrants. The research and educational activities are designed for practical application in locating, recording, preserving, and analyzing resources on Hungarian American history, particularly those in the Pittsburgh…

  8. Hungarian Folk Arts and Crafts. Educational Curriculum Kit 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boros-Kazai, Andrew

    This booklet provides a brief introduction to Hungarian arts and crafts. A discussion of the historical development and characteristics of Hungarian folk art supplies the background for a section in which regional styles of Hungarian folk art are described (Transdanubia, the Highlands of northern Hungary, Transylvania, and the Great Hungarian…

  9. Y-SNP L1034: limited genetic link between Mansi and Hungarian-speaking populations.

    PubMed

    Fehér, T; Németh, E; Vándor, A; Kornienko, I V; Csáji, L K; Pamjav, H

    2015-02-01

    Genetic studies noted that the Hungarian Y-chromosomal gene pool significantly differs from other Uralic-speaking populations. Hungarians show very limited or no presence of haplogroup N-Tat, which is frequent among other Uralic-speaking populations. We proposed that some genetic links need to be observed between the linguistically related Hungarian and Mansi populations.This is the first attempt to divide haplogroup N-Tat into subhaplogroups by testing new downstream SNP markers L708 and L1034. Sixty Northern Mansi samples were collected in Western Siberia and genotyped for Y-chromosomal haplotypes and haplogroups. We found 14 Mansi and 92 N-Tat samples from 7 populations. Comparative results showed that all N-Tat samples carried the N-L708 mutation. Some Hungarian, Sekler, and Uzbek samples were L1034 SNP positive, while all Mongolians, Buryats, Khanty, Finnish, and Roma samples yielded a negative result for this marker. Based on the above, L1034 marker seems to be a subgroup of N-Tat, which is typical for Mansi and Hungarian-speaking ethnic groups so far. Based on our time to most recent common ancestor data, the L1034 marker arose 2,500 years before present. The overall frequency of the L1034 is very low among the analyzed populations, thus it does not necessarily mean that proto-Hungarians and Mansi descend from common ancestors. It does provide, however, a limited genetic link supporting language contact. Both Hungarians and Mansi have much more complex genetic population history than the traditional tree-based linguistic model would suggest. PMID:25258186

  10. Information system in transition: The Hungarian Scene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubnya, Gyorgy; Herman, Akos Robert

    1994-01-01

    Recent changes in political and economical conditions in eastern European countries are influencing the function and activities of the Hungarian Library and Information network. The National Technical Information Center and Library (OMIKK) is an active participant in this process of transition. In the first part of this paper, the general transformations of Hungarian libraries and information centers are analyzed and some predictions for future trends are presented. The second part is a short summary of the activities of OMIKK and its present and prospective role in the development of national information policy.

  11. Meteorological contribution to the mitigation and adaptation of the 'extreme water events' of Hungarian Great Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Z.; Vincze, E.; Moring, A.

    2012-04-01

    The lack of water is a traditional problem of Hungarian agriculture. Two big rivers cross the territory of Hungary and times to times they produce huge floods. In the Carpathian basin a flood and a drought can occur in the same year. The general problem of Hungarian agriculture is the 'water' in two contexts, in lack of water and in surplus. Not only of the next year but of the next decades the basic question of the Hungarian planning is how the national economy can handle the increasing numbers of unexpected negative events of climate change because the growing numbers of sometimes catastrophic floods and droughts seems to be connected with global warming. Beside the 'normal floods' in the last few years the numbers of so called flash floods show increasing tendency too. The presentation summarises the 'extreme water events' of Hungarian Great Plain, and the forecast problems of Hungarian meteorology together with the National strategy in mitigation and adaptation in connection with climate change. From meteorological point of view the handling of flood and drought problem is totally different. In case of flood the stress is on the forecast, in case of drought mainly of the evaluation of the historical data mainly the short and long term evaluation of drought indices. Drought indices seem to be the simplest tools in drought analysis. The more or less well known and popular indices have been collected and compared not only with the well known simple but more complicated water balance and so called 'recursive' indices beside few ones use remotely sensed data, mainly satellite born information. The indices are classified into five groups, namely 'precipitation', 'water balance', 'soil moisture', 'recursive' and 'remote sensing' indices. For every group typical expressions are given and the possible use in the decision making and hazard risk evaluation and compensation of the farmers after the events. The meteorological elements of new Hungarian agricultural risk

  12. The Use of Tense and Agreement by Hungarian-Speaking Children with Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukacs, Agnes; Leonard, Laurence B.; Kas, Bence; Pleh, Csaba

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Hungarian is a null-subject language with both agglutinating and fusional elements in its verb inflection system, and agreement between the verb and object as well as between the verb and subject. These characteristics make this language a good test case for alternative accounts of the grammatical deficits of children with language…

  13. English-Hungarian Phrasebook with Useful Wordlist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katona, Judy K.; Papp, Bela

    The phrasebook, designed for newly-arrived Hungarian residents in the United States, contains English phrases in 19 units covering a wide range of situations and introducing the daily activities of American life. They are presented in the form of two-line dialogues, are grouped by subject, and are selected for their directness, brevity, and…

  14. HUNGARIAN, BASIC COURSE. UNITS 1-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KOSKI, AUGUSTUS A.; AND OTHERS

    THIS PUBLICATION COMPRISES VOLUME 1 OF A TWO-VOLUME INTRODUCTORY COURSE IN THE HUNGARIAN LANGUAGE. THE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO BE USED WITH TAPE RECORDINGS. THOUGH EMPHASIS IS PLACED ON GIVING THE STUDENT SPOKEN COMMAND OF THE LANGUAGE, BOTH THE VOCABULARY AND THE STRUCTURE NECESSARY FOR IMMEDIATE USE OF WRITTEN MATERIALS ARE INCLUDED. EACH LESSON…

  15. Cultural Representations of Minorities in Hungarian Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weninger, Csilla; Williams, J. Patrick

    2005-01-01

    This article reports research analyzing cultural representations of minorities in Hungarian elementary school textbooks currently used throughout the country. A convenient sample representing more than 75% of first and fourth grade reading books was collected from three academic and public libraries in Hungary. Using content analysis techniques,…

  16. The Syntax of Hungarian. Cambridge Syntax Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiss, Katalin E.

    This book presents a guide to syntax in the Hungarian language. It is intended for students and researchers working on syntax and those interested in Finno-Ugric languages. It describes the key grammatical features of the language, focusing on the phenomena that have proven to be theoretically the most relevant and that have attracted the most…

  17. Case Studies Behavior Modification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wark, David M.

    The case histories of five students enrolled in a university course in how to study are reported. The students ranged in age from 18 to 35, included two males and three females, and varied in school experience from no college in one case and some college in two cases to college degrees in two cases. Students were initially taught to chart their…

  18. Investigation of Ice Phenomena On The Hungarian Danube Reach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keve, G.; Kontur, I.

    The importance of scientific work in the field of ice floods is high on the southern Hungarian reach of the Danube. The most dangerous floods of the reach in the past were almost all icy. This used to be so for two main reasons, out of which one is a hydro-meteorological, the other is a morphological factor. River training works on the reach have been completed, only maintenance and small corrections are being done. In spite of the process of global warming, that can be concluded analyzing the past few decades' data, an unfortunate constellation of hydro-meteorological factors can anytime cause serious frosts, and, consequently, ice floods. In our study we statisti- cally analyzed the past hundred years' data series of the reach in question. The results proved the existence of a 30-years long, almost iceless period, that we investigated the reasons for. Because of the above-mentioned rare occurence of ice phenomena, the observation and study of these processes also deteriorated. It is a big luck that Hungarian experts have dealt a lot with past ice phenomena up to 1970. Starting out from literal data and ideas, our investigations and new observations can be massively based. The newest computer technology features are now used for ice observations on the southern Hungarian Danube reach. We could gain useful experience already in the winter of 2001-2002 in computer-aided ice observation (CAIO). In our presenta- tion we would like to give an overall impression about the current issues of CAIO in southern Hungary.

  19. New Concept of Hungarian Robotic Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegedus, T.; Kiss, Z.; Biro, B.; Jager, Z.

    As the result of a longer innovation of a few Hungarian opto-mechanical and electronic small companies, a concept of fully robotic mounts has been formed some years ago. There are lots of Hungarian Automated Telescopes over the world (in Arizona, South Korea, Izrael and atop Mauna Kea, just below the famous Keck domes). These are cited as HAT telescopes (Bakos et al. 2002), and served thousands of large-frame time-series CCD images since 2004, and the working team found already 6 exoplanets, and a number of new variable stars, etc... The newest idea was to build a more robust robotic mount, hosting larger optics (D > 50 cm) for achieving much fainter celestial objects, than the HAT series (they are operating with Nikon teleobjective lenses) on a still relatively wide celestial area. The very first sample model is the BART-1, a 50cm f/6 telescope.

  20. The case study approach

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The case study approach allows in-depth, multi-faceted explorations of complex issues in their real-life settings. The value of the case study approach is well recognised in the fields of business, law and policy, but somewhat less so in health services research. Based on our experiences of conducting several health-related case studies, we reflect on the different types of case study design, the specific research questions this approach can help answer, the data sources that tend to be used, and the particular advantages and disadvantages of employing this methodological approach. The paper concludes with key pointers to aid those designing and appraising proposals for conducting case study research, and a checklist to help readers assess the quality of case study reports. PMID:21707982

  1. Motivation, Attributions, and Approaches to Learning in British and Hungarian Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Entwistle, Noel; And Others

    This programmatic series of three studies compares, in British and Hungarian secondary schools, two contrasting conceptualizations of motivation and successively relates them to approaches to learning and studying and then to indices of self-concept and attributions of success and failure. The first conceptualization was developed in Hungary and…

  2. A Tradition of Excellence Transitions to the 21st Century: Hungarian Mathematics Education, 1988-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, Julianna

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the development of the Hungarian mathematics education system from the first half of the 20th century to the present day. The study focused on educational programs for mathematically talented students in Hungary, since it is the success of these talented students that has earned Hungary such an impressive…

  3. Factors Influencing Quality of Life of Hungarian Postmenopausal Women Screened by Osteodensitometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maroti-Nagy, Agnes; Paulik, Edit

    2011-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate factors influencing health related quality of life in Hungarian postmenopausal women who underwent osteodensitometry. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was carried out; 359 women aged over 40 years were involved, attending the outpatient Bone Densitometry Centre of Szeged. Two kinds of tools were…

  4. Agreement and Diagnostic Performance of FITNESSGRAM®, International Obesity Task Force, and Hungarian National BMI Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurson, Kelly R.; Welk, Gregory J.; Marton, Orsolya; Kaj, Mónika; Csányi, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined agreement between all 3 standards (as well as relative diagnostic associations with metabolic syndrome) using a representative sample of youth from the Hungarian National Youth Fitness Study. Method: Body mass index (BMI) was assessed in a field sample of 2,352 adolescents (ages 10-18.5 years) and metabolic syndrome…

  5. [New features in the recommendations of the Second Hungarian Therapeutic Consensus Conference].

    PubMed

    Pados, Gyula; Karádi, István; Paragh, György; Halmy, László; Jermendy, György; Zámolyi, Károly; Kiss, István

    2006-07-16

    The First Hungarian Therapeutic Consensus Conference took place on 3rd Nov. 2003 with the participation of 9 medical societies. Over the past 2 years the results of new major studies have been published and the American ATP III has also updated its guidelines issued in 2004. Based on the above proposals, the Second Hungarian Therapeutic Consensus Conference held on 3rd Nov. 2005 partly confirmed its earlier suggestions, but made some changes as well. Within the high risk category the Conference optionally created a very high risk group from those patients who - in addition to their cardiovascular disease--have either diabetes or metabolic syndrome or acut coronaria syndrome or who are chain smokers. We have included - as a complement - into the asymptomatic high risk category such newly emerging risk factors, one of which already in itself means high risk: ankle/arm index < or = 0.9, GFR <60 ml/min, microalbuminuria (30-300 mg), preclinical atherosclerosis (plaque). Besides, 4 other risk factors were also categorised such as Lp/a (> or = 30 mg/dl), CRP (> or = 3mg/l), homocysteine (> or = 12 micromol), familiarity--atherogenic gene constellation, but only the presence of at least two of these verify high risk. In very high risk group the goals of 3.5 mmol/l and 1.8 mmol/l were determined as therapeutic option. The goal in obese patients--expressed earlier only in BMI--can now be equally determined by the abdominal circumference (94 cm for men, 80 cm for women respectively). ACE inhibitors were recommended earlier as a preventive therapy in case of dysfunction of the left ventricle, while at present they are suggested for all patients with cardiovascular disease. In the recent recommendations guidelines related to nutrition, smoking, exercise have also been included. PMID:16999015

  6. Hungarian topics in Zach's German journals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patkós, László

    Two hundred years ago geography and astronomy were very close branches of science. The great task of the era was the determination of exact geographical positions, and astronomical methods were widely used for it. In the volumes of Allgemeine Geographische Ephemeriden (AGE) and in the Monatliche Correspondenz (MC) a large proportion of the Hungarian topics also deal with the geography of Hungary. One can read news from Hungary in letters written mainly by Schedius and (after 1802) by Lipszky. The most important Hungarian scientific enterprise of the era was the geographical mapping of the country. As part of this work the young astronomer Bogdanich determined many astronomical positions, and he also made various different other astronomical observations too. One of the most spectacular astronomical events of the era was the transit of Mercury in front of the sun on May 7, 1799. The four contacts were determined at many observatories all over Europe, among them at Ofen (Buda), Dubitza and Carlsburg (Gyulaféhervár) in Hungary. The observed second and third contacts were used by Wurm to compute the geographical longitudes of these places (AGE 4 (1799) 218 and MC 8 (1803) 115). Three solar eclipses observed at the beginning of the XIXth century were also used for longitude determinations. In Hungary the eclipses of Aug 27, 1802, and of Aug 17, 1803, were observed at Ofen, and that of Feb 11, 1804, at Carlsburg observatory (Wurm: MC 7 (1805) 351). Another solar eclipse (the one on Jun 16, 1806) was used by the same author to determine the longitudes of Ofen and Erlau (Eger), together with a further 38 other European observatories. (MC 27 (1813) 401). The most common astrometric method for longitude determinations at that time was the observation of occultations. In a table published by Triesnecker (AGE 1 (1798) 284) the geographical position of Buda observatory (Ofen) was based on two solar eclipses and twelve stellar occultations. In a table published in MC 7 (1803

  7. [Qualitative case study].

    PubMed

    Debout, Christophe

    2016-06-01

    The qualitative case study is a research method which enables a complex phenomenon to be explored through the identification of different factors interacting with each other. The case observed is a real situation. In the field of nursing science, it may be a clinical decision-making process. The study thereby enables the patient or health professional experience to be conceptualised. PMID:27338694

  8. SETDA Case Studies 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Educational Technology Directors Association, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The State Educational Technology Directors Association (SETDA) published a series of case studies from 28 states to showcase examples of how ARRA EETT ("American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Enhancing Education Through Technology") grant funds have impacted teaching and learning. SETDA collected data for the case studies through a variety…

  9. Breeding value estimation in the Hungarian Sport Horse population.

    PubMed

    Posta, János; Komlósi, István; Mihók, Sándor

    2009-07-01

    The aims of this study were to estimate phenotypic and genetic parameters for a range of traits in Hungarian Sport Horses, and to compare several methods of estimating breeding value (BV) in this breed. The analyses were based on the Hungarian Sport Horse Studbook, results of self-performance tests (SPTs) and show-jumping competition results. An SPT comprises subjective judgement of conformation traits, movement analysis traits and free-jumping performance, assessed via ordinal scores. Genetic parameters of SPTs were estimated with an animal model. Different measurements of the competition performance were compared using the same repeatability model. Estimates of BV for sport were made with random regression models using a first-order Legendre polynomial. Heritability was found to increase and permanent environmental variance to decrease continuously with age. BVs can be estimated at different ages and from these a composite BV index can be computed. It is possible to weight BVs for the specific age of a horse. PMID:19375365

  10. Teaching the Romanian Neighbors Hungarian: Language Ideologies and the Debrecen Summer School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiss, Attila Gyula

    2016-01-01

    This article is a contribution to the hitherto scant literature on learning a historical minority language and on language ideologies in the context of a study abroad program in Hungary, Debrecen. I analyse the language ideologies of the decision makers in Hungary and in the Debrecen Summer School in relation to the teaching of Hungarian to the…

  11. Associations between Attitudes toward Physical Education and Aerobic Capacity in Hungarian High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaj, Mónika; Saint-Maurice, Pedro F.; Karsai, István; Vass, Zoltán; Csányi, Tamás; Boronyai, Zoltán; Révész, László

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to create a physical education (PE) attitude scale and examine how it is associated with aerobic capacity (AC). Method: Participants (n = 961, aged 15-20 years) were randomly selected from 26 Hungarian high schools. AC was estimated from performance on the Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular and Endurance Run…

  12. The Relationship of Intercultural Contact and Language Learning Motivation among Hungarian Students of English and German

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csizer, Kata; Kormos, Judit

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we report the results of a questionnaire survey conducted with 1777 Hungarian primary school children aged between 13 and 14 studying English and German. In our research we investigated the differences in the motivational and intercultural contact measures as well as determinants of motivated behaviour between learners of English and…

  13. Hungarian University Students' Misunderstandings in Thermodynamics and Chemical Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turanyi, Tamas; Toth, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    The misunderstandings related to thermodynamics (including chemical equilibrium) and chemical kinetics of first and second year Hungarian students of chemistry, environmental science, biology and pharmacy were investigated. We demonstrated that Hungarian university students have similar misunderstandings in physical chemistry to those reported in…

  14. Hungarian Community Life in Greater Pittsburgh. Educational Curriculum Kit 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boros-Kazai, Mary; Body, Paul

    This booklet is a guide to Hungarian American churches, organizations, and events in Pittsburgh and western Pennsylvania. In addition to listings of organizations and events, names of contact persons, their addresses and telephone numbers are provided. Information is furnished on: (1) Hungarian religious organizations; (2) social and cultural…

  15. MULTIPLE CONTAMINANTS CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information taken from the arsenic demonstration program projects that have treatment systems removing multiply contaminants from drinking water. The case studies sited in the presentation consist of projects that have arsenic along with either nitrate, ...

  16. Laos case study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Peuan Mit is a Lao organization working to address the needs of children and youth living and working on the streets. This case study outlines how a trusted and strong relationship with local police provides mutual benefit. PMID:22769869

  17. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  18. Oral clefts with associated anomalies: findings in the Hungarian Congenital Abnormality Registry

    PubMed Central

    Sárközi, Andrea; Wyszynski, Diego F; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2005-01-01

    Background Over the years, great efforts have been made to record the frequency of orofacial clefts in different populations. However, very few studies were able to account for the etiological and phenotypic heterogeneity of these conditions. Thus, data of cases with syndromic orofacial clefts from large population-based studies are infrequent. Methods Clinically recognized and notified syndromes and associations including cleft lip with or without cleft palate and other congenital anomalies were selected from the Hungarian Congenital Abnormality Registry (HCAR) between 1973 and 1982 and prevalence rates were calculated. Results Of 3,110 cases reported as having orofacial clefts, 653 had multiple congenital abnormalities. Of these, 60 (9.2%) had a known etiology (monogenic: 25 or 3.8%, chromosomal: 31 or 4.7%, teratogenic: 4 or 0.6%). Seventy-three subjects (11.2%) had schisis in addition to the oral cleft. Skeletal anomalies were the most common malformations among cases with cleft lip with/without cleft palate (CL/P) and cleft palate (CP). Disorders of the central nervous system and cardiovascular malformations were also frequently associated. Conclusion Surveillance systems, such as the HCAR, provide useful information about prevalence rates of congenital anomalies in a population. However, in a field where new syndromes are being discovered and classifications regularly updated, these rates should only be accepted as provisional. PMID:15985166

  19. Tense and Aspect in Childhood Language Impairment: Contributions from Hungarian

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Laurence B.; Lukács, Ágnes; Kas, Bence

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies of children with language impairment (LI) reveal an insensitivity to aspect that may constitute part of the children’s deficit. In this study, we examine aspect as well as tense in Hungarian-speaking children with LI. Twenty-one children with LI, 21 typically developing children matched for age, and 21 typically developing children matched for receptive vocabulary scores were tested on their comprehension and production of both imperfective and perfective verb forms in past tense contexts. Although the groups did not differ in their comprehension performance, the children with LI were less accurate than both comparison groups in producing both imperfective and perfective forms. Based on these results, it appears that children with LI have difficulties selecting the appropriate aspectual marking in past tense contexts. PMID:26028793

  20. HLA genetic diversity in Hungarians and Hungarian Gypsies: complementary differentiation patterns and demographic signals revealed by HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Inotai, D; Szilvasi, A; Benko, S; Boros-Major, A; Illes, Z; Bors, A; Kiss, K P; Rajczy, K; Gelle-Hossó, A; Buhler, S; Nunes, J M; Sanchez-Mazas, A; Tordai, A

    2015-08-01

    Systematic analyses of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) profiles in different populations may increase the efficiency of bone marrow donor selection and help reconstructing human peopling history. We typed HLA-A, -B, and -DRB1 allele groups in two bone marrow donor cohorts of 2402 Hungarians and 186 Hungarian Gypsies and compared them with several Central-European, Spanish Gypsy, and Indian populations. Our results indicate that different European Gypsy populations share a common origin but diverged genetically as a consequence of founder effect and rapid genetic drift, whereas other European populations are related genetically in relation to geography. This study also suggests that while HLA-A accurately depicts the effects of genetic drift, HLA-B, and -DRB1 conserve more signatures of ancient population relationships, as a result of balancing selection. PMID:26149581

  1. Melanoma screening in a hungarian nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Veronika; Somlai, Beáta; Hatvani, Zsófia; Szakonyi, József; Gaudi, István; Kárpáti, Sarolta

    2013-04-01

    The industrial use of the ionizing radiation (IR) particularly stresses the safe work, regular health control is inevitable. Since previous occupational cohorts reported contradictory data on the incidence of melanoma among nuclear industry workers, and in few publications significant increase of it has been described, our clinic was requested by the industry to screen malignant skin tumours among the workers of a power plant. Within a year we have investigated 556 workers, 275 females and 281 males. Out of them 283, majorly males had been officially confirmed as to be employed at hazardous, but strictly controlled environment for an average of 18 years (1-32 years). To distinguish between IR and environmental UV (UVA+UVB) induced cutaneous malignancies we determined the sun and tanning bed exposure of the workers. One in situ melanoma developed in a woman with type I skin, bullous sunburns in the history, who had worked in safe environment for 26 years. Basal cell carcinoma was identified in two men, each of them worked for more than 20 years with IR (in hazardous environment). One had type I skin, the other had type II skin. These results didn't differ significantly (chi-squared test; p = 0, 2437 and 1, 0) from the national population data and the results of Euromelanoma screening campaign in Hungary. Our data clearly show, that 1./UV exposure and skin type should be evaluated in occupation cohort studies. 2./The melanoma incidence was not significantly higher among the employees of the power plant than in the general Hungarian population, according to the results of our study, the only Hungarian power plant is safe as far as the skin carcinogenesis is concerned. PMID:23242566

  2. Geothermal Case Studies

    DOE Data Explorer

    Young, Katherine

    2014-09-30

    database.) In fiscal year 2015, NREL is working with universities to populate additional case studies on OpenEI. The goal is to provide a large enough dataset to start conducting analyses of exploration programs to identify correlations between successful exploration plans for areas with similar geologic occurrence models.

  3. Case Studies in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeakes, Samuel J.

    1989-01-01

    A case study writing exercise used in a course on parasitology was found to be a powerful learning experience for students because it involved discipline-based technical writing and terminology, brought the students in as evaluators, applied current learning, caused interaction among all students, and simulated real professional activities. (MSE)

  4. An assessment of the frequency of mutations in the GBA and VPS35 genes in Hungarian patients with sporadic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Török, Rita; Zádori, Dénes; Török, Nóra; Csility, Éva; Vécsei, László; Klivényi, Péter

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, with cases of either familial or sporadic origin. Several polymorphisms in a number of genes have been proved to have an important role in the development of PD. Particular attention has recently been paid to genes of the glucocerebrosidase (GBA) and the vacuolar protein sorting-associated protein 35 (VPS35). In this study, the three most common mutations (L444P, N370S and R120W) of the GBA gene and the D620N mutation of the VPS35 gene were examined in 124 Hungarian patients diagnosed with sporadic PD (SPD) and 122 control subjects. The frequency of the L444P mutation of the GBA gene proved to be higher in the PD patients (2.4%) than in the controls (0%), although the difference was not statistically significant. All the patients who carried the mutant allele were in the early-onset PD (EOPD) group. However, neither the R120W nor the N370S variant of the GBA gene nor D620N mutation of the VPS35 gene were detected among the PD cases or the controls. Even though these results suggest that the studied mutations are quite rare in SPD patients, the most frequent L444P mutation of the GBA gene may be associated with the development of EOPD in the Hungarian population. PMID:26547032

  5. [3rd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference - Radiotherapy Guidelines].

    PubMed

    Polgár, Csaba; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Csejtei, András; Gábor, Gabriella; Landherr, László; Mangel, László; Mayer, Árpád; Fodor, János

    2016-09-01

    The radiotherapy expert panel revised and updated the radiotherapy (RT) guidelines accepted in 2009 at the 2nd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference based on new scientific evidence. Radiotherapy of the conserved breast is indicated in ductal carcinoma in situ (St. 0), as RT decreases the risk of local recurrence by 60%. In early stage (St. I-II) invasive breast cancer RT remains a standard treatment following breast conserving surgery. However, in elderly (≥70 years) patients with stage I, hormone receptor positive tumour hormonal therapy without RT can be considered. Hypofractionated (15×2.67 Gy) whole breast irradiation and for selected cases accelerated partial breast irradiation are validated treatment alternatives of conventional (25×2 Gy) whole breast irradiation. Following mastectomy RT significantly decreases the risk of locoregional recurrence and improves overall survival of patients having 1 to 3 (pN1a) or ≥4 (pN2a, pN3a) positive axillary lymph nodes. In selected cases of patients with 1 to 2 positive sentinel lymph nodes axillary dissection can be omitted and substituted with axillary RT. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) followed by breast conserving surgery whole breast irradiation is mandatory, while after NAC followed by mastectomy locoregional RT should be given in cases of initial stage III-IV and ypN1 axillary status. PMID:27579722

  6. Hungarian population data on seven PCR-based loci.

    PubMed

    Budowle, B; Woller, J; Koons, B W; Furedi, S; Errera, J D; Padar, Z

    1996-07-01

    Hungarian population data for the loci LDLR, GYPA, HBGG, D7S8, Gc, HLA-DQA1, and D1S80 were generated. The genotype frequency distributions for the loci do not deviate from Hardy Weinberg expectations. Furthermore, there was little evidence for departures from expectations of independence between the loci. Using a test for homogeneity all the loci were similar between two Hungarian population samples and only the HLA-DQA1 locus was statistically different between Hungarians and US Caucasians. There generally would be little forensic differences, whether a Hungarian or a US Caucasian database was used, for estimating multiple locus profile frequencies for the seven PCR-based loci. PMID:8754580

  7. Atrial fibrillation case study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sarah; Wilson, Tracey

    2016-03-01

    This article discusses the irregular heart rhythm caused by atrial fibrillation (AF). A brief overview of the pathophysiology will be provided. A case study is discussed to highlight the treatment and management of AF. The care provision describes common signs and symptoms and also the treatment and management of AF within the maternity care setting. The importance of maintaining the mother-baby dyad is highlighted. For the purpose of maintaining confidentiality the woman will be referred to as Shama. PMID:27044188

  8. [Status report of Hungarian radiotherapy based on treatment data, available infrastucture, and human resources].

    PubMed

    Polgár, Csaba; Major, Tibor; Király, Réka; Fodor, János; Kásler, Miklós

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to report the status of Hungarian radiotherapy (RT) based on the assessment of treatment data in years 2012 to 2014, available infrastructure, and RT staffing. Between December 2014 and January 2015, a RT questionnaire including 3 parts (1. treatment data; 2. infrastructure; 3. staffing) was sent out to all Hungarian RT centers (n=12). All RT centers responded to all questions of the survey. 1. Treatment data: In 2014, 33,162 patients were treated with RT: 31,678 (95.5%) with teletherapy, and 1484 (4.5%) with brachytherapy (BT). Between 2012 and 2014, the number of patients treated with radiotherapy increased with 6.6%, but the number of BT patients decreased by 11%. Forty-two percent of all patients were treated in the two centers of the capital: 9235 patients (28%) at the National Institute of Oncology (NIO), and 4812 (14%) at the Municipial Oncoradiology Center (MOC). Out of the patients treated on megavoltage RT units (n=22,239), only 901 (4%) were treated with intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), and 2018 (9%) with image-guided RT (IGRT). In 2014, 52% of all BT treatments were performed in Budapest: NIO - 539 patients (36%); MOC - 239 patients (16%); and BT was not available in 3 RT centers. Prostate I-125 seed implants and interstitial breast BT was utilized in one, prostate HDR BT in two, and head&neck implants in three centers. 2. Infrastructure: Including ongoing development projects funded by the European Union, by the end of year 2015, 39 megavoltage teletherapy units, and 12 HDR BT units will be in use in 13 available Hungarian RT centers. 3. Staffing: Actually, 92 radiation oncologists (RO), 29 RT residents, 61 medical physicists, and 229 radiation therapy technologists are working in 12 RT centers. There are 23 vacant positions (including 11 RO positions) available at the Hungarian RT centers. According to the professional minimal requirements and WHO guidelines, the implementation of 11 new linear accelerators, and 1 BT units

  9. Establishing Normative Reference Values for Standing Broad Jump among Hungarian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint-Maurice, Pedro F.; Laurson, Kelly R.; Kaj, Mónika; Csányi, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine age and sex trends in anaerobic power assessed by a standing broad jump and to determine norm-referenced values for youth in Hungary. Method: A sample of 2,427 Hungarian youth (1,360 boys and 1,067 girls) completed the standing broad jump twice, and the highest distance score was recorded. Quantile…

  10. Infertility Specific Quality of Life and Gender Role Attitudes in German and Hungarian Involuntary Childless Couples.

    PubMed

    Cserepes, R E; Bugán, A; Korösi, T; Toth, B; Rösner, S; Strowitzki, T; Wischmann, T

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: As gender role attitudes and the evaluation of parenthood and childlessness have subtle variations in each society, cross-country studies focusing on infertility are needed to draw a complex picture in the psychosocial context of infertility. This study investigates similarities and differences between German and Hungarian infertile couples regarding infertility specific quality of life and personal gender role attitudes. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted with data of 540 participants (270 couples) attending the first fertility consultation in one fertility clinic in Germany and in five fertility clinics in Hungary. Data were collected between February 2012 and March 2013. Two psychological questionnaires were applied: The FertiQoL to measure infertility specific quality of life and the PAQ to measure gender role attitudes like "instrumental" acting (as a traditional "masculine" attitude) and "expressive" communicating (as a traditional "femine" attitude) and their combinations "combined" attitude (as both "instrumental" and "expressive") and "neutral" attitude (neither "instrumental" nor "expressive"). Results: German couples seeking assisted reproduction treatment are older aged and have longer lasting relationships than Hungarian couples. Hungarian couples scored higher on all quality of life scales than did German couples. In the Hungarian group, "combined" attitudes (use of both "expressive" and "instrumental" attitudes) is associated with higher levels of quality of life compared with other gender role attitudes. In the German group, individuals with "combined" attitudes seem to show better quality of life than those in "expressive" and "neutral" clusters. Conclusions: The strategy of using combined "expressive" and "instrumental" attitudes proved to act as a buffer against infertility-related stress for both members of the couple in two European countries and can therefore be recommended as helpful in counselling the infertile

  11. Conducting and Reporting Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtman, Merilyn; Taylor, Satomi Izumi

    Issues and elements of case study research are explored and illustrated with the example of a case study of a kindergarten in a suburb of Tokyo (Japan). Case study research is a type of qualitative research that concentrates on a single unit or entity, with boundaries established by the researcher. The case is an example drawn from a larger class,…

  12. Prevalence of accessory tooth cusps in a contemporary and ancestral Hungarian population.

    PubMed

    Mavrodisz, K; Rózsa, N; Budai, M; Soós, A; Pap, I; Tarján, I

    2007-04-01

    Dental morphological characteristics are useful for providing information for phylogenic and genetic studies and understanding variations within and among species. Carabelli and talon cusps are expressed in several degrees and different frequencies between humans, thus being useful in comparing and characterizing populations. The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence and degree of expression of a Carabelli tubercle and talon cusps in a contemporary Hungarian population compared with similar findings in the dentition of skulls dating from the 11th century, the so-called Arpád-era. The data were collected by examination of dental plaster casts of 600 children aged 7-18 years (304 males, 296 females) undergoing orthodontic treatment. The dentitions of 147 skulls, dating from the 11th century, from the ancient Halimba-Cseres cemetery stored at the Hungarian Natural History Museum were also examined. The incidence and degree of expression of a Carabelli cusp was investigated for the upper first permanent molars and scored according to an eight-grade classification system. The talon cusps on the upper permanent lateral incisors were also examined. A chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. The prevalence of Carabelli cusps was 65.34 per cent in the contemporary and 34 per cent in the 11th century population (P < 0.01). The contemporary group showed a prevalence of talon cusps of 2.5 per cent compared with 40.8 per cent for the skills from the Arpád-era, which was significant (P < 0.001). These findings demonstrate that the contemporary Hungarian population is a mixture of European and Mongoloid races. The data are in agreement with linguistic evidence that shows that distant Hungarian ancestors belonged to the Finno-Ugrian family of people, whose habitats extended from the Baltic to the middle Urals. PMID:17317866

  13. Vertebral Angiosarcoma. Case Study.

    PubMed

    Guzik, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Bone angiosarcomas, especially vertebral angiosarcomas, are very rare. There are no studies based on large clinical samples in the literature, and only a few single case reports can be found. The symptoms of the disease are not specific. It is usually detected incidentally or at a late stage when pathological vertebral fractures or neurological complications occur. Diagnostic imaging and history help to recognize the tumour behind the symptoms, but do not allow accurate clinical diagnosis. The basis for a diagnosis is the histopathological examination supported by immunohistochemistry (IHC) assays. The case of a 26-year-old woman with an angiosarcoma involving the eighth thoracic vertebra we report reflects diagnostic problems adversely affecting the efficacy and accuracy of treatment offered to patients. The patient underwent three surgeries of the spine, including two biopsies. A needle biopsy did not provide sufficient information for the diagnosis. An open excisional biopsy, which at the same time temporarily reduced neurological deficits in the patient, was the only chance to obtain an accurate diagnosis. The third surgery was posterior decompression of the spinal cord due to the rapidly escalating paraparesis. It was not until 8 weeks later that the final diagnosis was established. At that time, the patient could not be qualified for any supplementary treatment. The patient died in hospital 6 months after the onset of disease. PMID:26468177

  14. PREDICT : A CASE STUDY.

    SciTech Connect

    Kerscher, W. J. III; Booker, J. M.; Meyer, Mary A.

    2001-01-01

    Delphi Automotive Systems and the Los Alamos National Laboratory worked together to develop PREDICT, a new methodology to characterize the reliability of a new product during its development program. Rather than conducting testing after hardware has been built, and developing statistical confidence bands around the results, this updating approach starts with an early reliability estimate characterized by large uncertainty, and then proceeds to reduce the uncertainty by folding in fresh information in a Bayesian framework. A considerable amount of knowledge is available at the beginning of a program in the form of expert judgment which helps to provide the initial estimate. This estimate is then continually updated as substantial and varied information becomes available during the course of the development program. This paper presents a case study of the application of PREDICT, with the objective of further describing the methodology. PREDICT has been honored with an R&D 100 Award presented by R&D Magazine.

  15. [A peculiar man - about Hans Selye, as reflected in his Hungarian connections].

    PubMed

    Szabó, Katalin

    2015-08-30

    Hans Selye made a great impact on the Hungarian medical, scientific and public life. His first Hungarian publication about the alarm-reaction appeared 1938 in the Orvosi Hetilap. His Hungarian relationship was quite extensive after the war as he published, gave lectures, and accepted Hungarian students for specialized training in his Canadian institute saw. The rich documents in archives about Selye are currently being processed and those will surely shed light on Selye's life in further details. PMID:26299836

  16. Natural Learning Case Study Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Natural Learning Case Study Archives (NLCSA) is a research facility for those interested in using case study analysis to deepen their understanding of common sense knowledge and natural learning (how the mind interacts with everyday experiences to develop common sense knowledge). The database comprises three case study corpora based on experiences…

  17. Case Studies in Wilderness Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Melissa; Tarter, Shana Lee

    Five case studies explore issues in wilderness medicine, with emphasis on evacuation decision making. The cases describe medical problems encountered during wilderness trips involving college or high school students. In each case, the situation and facts of the case are outlined, including the patient's medical history and vital signs, and at…

  18. Termination: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Ahron L

    2015-12-01

    In this article I posit and examine certain criteria and qualities for ending an analysis. The case study describes the end phase of a four-year psychoanalysis in which the patient's decision to move to another area forced the end of his analysis. We continued to explore and work through his core neurotic conflicts that included issues of competitive rivalry, dominance and submission, control, and anxiety about birth and death. A shift in the transference from me as a negative father to me as a supportive but competitive older brother was also examined in the context of ending treatment as well as other aspects of the transference. In addition, we analyzed the meaning of his ending treatment based on an extra-analytic circumstance. In discussing this phase of treatment, the definition and history of the term "termination" and its connotations are reviewed. Various criteria for completing an analysis are examined, and technical observations about this phase of treatment are investigated. It was found that while a significant shift in the transference occurred in this phase of the patient's analysis, conflicts related to the transference were not "resolved" in the classical sense. Terminating treatment was considered as a practical matter in which the patient's autonomy and sense of choice were respected and analyzed. PMID:26583444

  19. Hungarian intelligent road information system (IRIS) Technical Development Agency (TDA) project inception report. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The report provides an overview of the Hungarian Intelligent Road Information System (IRIS), which is designed to apply the latest technologies and transportation skills to provide Hungarians and international road users with the best possible service on the Hungarian roadway system.

  20. Development of the security system of the new Hungarian banknotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterfi, Sandor

    2000-04-01

    The more than 75 year old Hungarian Banknote Printing Corporation is an enterprise with a rich history. It is located in the very center of the capital, only some blocks away form the Parliament. Most people on this side of the Atlantic may not even have heard about the Hungarian currency, the Forint. Some may remember that after the WWII it was Hungary, where the severest hyperinflation in the world took place. As we come from a manufacturing company , we can give you information about deliberation and experiences of application of optically variable features on banknotes and some observations made in the past two years since the new Hungarian bank note series is ins circulation.

  1. [Multidisciplinary approach of hip fractures based on Hungarian data].

    PubMed

    Juhász, Krisztina; Turchányi, Béla; Mintál, Tibor; Somogyi, Péter

    2016-09-01

    Hip fractures are described by increased mortality, loss of quality of life, functional decline and burden of diseases. They show a growing number worldwide. The aim of the present study is to summarise the existing data on the incidence, mortality, complications and rehabilitation of hip fractures, which relevance is reported only by few studies. To reduce mortality and complications of hip fractures the authors emphasize the importance of primary treatment within 12 hours, appropriate selection of surgical methods corresponding to the fracture type after the assessment of femoral head viability, vitamin D supplementation, same conditions for primary treatment during everyday of the week, and an adequate acute treatment and rehabilitation for patient's general health status. In the future integrated processing of multidisciplinary results of hip fractures based on Hungarian data can support the development of efficient treatment and prevention strategies, which can be advantageous for the patient, families, health care system, and the society, too, by the reduction of costly complications of hip fracture healing and mortality. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(37), 1469-1475. PMID:27615197

  2. Calciphylaxis: a case study.

    PubMed

    Kauric-Klein, Zorica

    2012-01-01

    Caring for J.D. was a stressful experience. The extent of her wounds, pain, and limited options for treatment was very frustrating for the nursing staff. Although she did not survive, patient outcomes were met to some degree. Her pain was controlled to a greater extent, and there was less infection present in her wounds. The nurses worked with J.D. closely to improve her pain control and facilitate less painful dressing changes. They were vigilant in assessing the progress of her wound healing and communicating any increased signs of infections from her wounds. They sang with her to help distract her from the pain she was experiencing and to help her cope with her lengthy 8-month hospitalization. Providing care for J.D. was also a very important learning experience for nurses in terms of appropriate pain management for patients with CUA, wound care, and the need to sustain adequate nutrition to promote wound healing. CUA is a rare but potentially fatal disease that occurs in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). Early diagnosis and treatment are essential to prevent the devastating effects of this disease. Nephrology nurses need to reinforce the importance of keeping calcium, phosphorous, and parathyroid levels within normal ranges for their patients on dialysis. They also need to be vigilant in monitoring for potential CUA skin lesions to prevent and treat it early. To date, treatment options are mostly based on findings from case reports. Treatment requires a multidisciplinary approach with input from nephrologists, nurses, pain specialists, infectious disease specialists, and surgeons. The major goals of treatment are controlling risk factors, controlling pain, and preventing wound infection and possible sepsis. More studies need to be conducted to test interventions that may help treat CUA. PMID:23094342

  3. Articulatory characteristics of Hungarian ‘transparent’ vowels

    PubMed Central

    Benus, Stefan; Gafos, Adamantios I.

    2007-01-01

    Using a combination of magnetometry and ultrasound, we examined the articulatory characteristics of the so-called ‘transparent’ vowels [iː], [i], and [eː] in Hungarian vowel harmony. Phonologically, transparent vowels are front, but they can be followed by either front or back suffixes. However, a finer look reveals an underlying phonetic coherence in two respects. First, transparent vowels in back harmony contexts show a less advanced (more retracted) tongue body posture than phonemically identical vowels in front harmony contexts: e.g. [i] in buli-val is less advanced than [i] in bili-vel. Second, transparent vowels in monosyllabic stems selecting back suffixes are also less advanced than phonemically identical vowels in stems selecting front suffixes: e.g. [iː] in ír, taking back suffixes, compared to [iː] of hír, taking front suffixes, is less advanced when these stems are produced in bare form (no suffixes). We thus argue that the phonetic degree of tongue body horizontal position correlates with the phonological alternation in suffixes. A hypothesis that emerges from this work is that a plausible phonetic basis for transparency can be found in quantal characteristics of the relation between articulation and acoustics of transparent vowels. More broadly, the proposal is that the phonology of transparent vowels is better understood when their phonological patterning is studied together with their articulatory and acoustic characteristics. PMID:18389086

  4. Birth outcomes of patients with isolated anorectal malformations: A population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Vermes, Gabor; László, Daniel; Czeizel, Andrew E; Ács, Nándor

    2016-01-01

    In most patients affected by isolated anorectal malformation (IARM) the etiology is largely unknown. Thus, the aim of our project was to analyze possible risk factors for IARM. In the first step, birth outcomes of cases with IARM were analyzed on the basis of maternal socio-demographic variables, and these data are presented in this paper. Gestational age at delivery, birthweight, preterm birth, low birthweight and small for gestational age of cases with IARM were evaluated in the function of maternal age, birth/pregnancy order, marital and employment status of mothers in the population-based large dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities, 1980-1996. The study samples included 231 live-born cases with IARM, 361 matched and 38 151 population controls without any defect. IARMs are more frequent in males, twins and newborn infants with low birthweight and small-for-gestational-age, the latter being the consequence of intrauterine growth restriction. In addition, mothers of cases were younger but with higher birth order, and had lower socio-economic status. These maternal variables are characteristic for the gypsy population in Hungary. The higher proportion of gypsy women among the mothers of cases with IARM was confirmed during the home visits of the study. Male sex and intrauterine growth restriction of cases, in addition to low socioeconomic status and gypsy origin of mothers may have a role in the risk of IARMs. PMID:26259501

  5. Teaching Pharmacology by Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Sue

    1997-01-01

    Using pharmacology case studies with nursing students encourages theory-practice links and infuses real-life content. Cases provide rich qualitative data for evaluating curriculum. However, they are not a substitute for evidence-based practice. (SK)

  6. Emotion, Engagement, and Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Terry, David R.; Lemons, Paula; Armstrong, Norris; Brickman, Peggy; Ribbens, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Three college faculty taught large general biology classes using case studies and personal response systems (clickers). Each instructor taught the same eight cases in two different sections, except the questions within the cases differed. In one section the questions were lower order (LO) factual inquiries, and in the other they were largely…

  7. "Great Expectations:" The Motivational Profile of Hungarian English Language Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kormos, Judit; Csizer, Kata; Menyhart, Adrienn; Torok, Dora

    2008-01-01

    In this article we investigate what characterizes the language learning motivation of Hungarian English language students in terms of Dornyei and Otto's process model of motivation ("Motivation in Action," 1998). We used a mixed-method research design, in which qualitative interviews conducted with 20 students were supplemented with questionnaire…

  8. The Hungarian Electoral System and Its Political Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hidveghi, Balazs

    This lesson summarizes the most significant facts about the communist period in Hungary and briefly examines the Hungarian electoral system. The lesson is structured with: (1) background on the communist period (1948-1989) and the evolution of the democratic political system and institutions during 1989-1990; (2) description of the electoral…

  9. Behaviour Profile of Hungarian Adolescent Outpatients with a Dual Diagnosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinya, Elek; Csorba, Janos; Suli, Agota; Grosz, Zsofia

    2012-01-01

    The behaviour dimensions of 244 Hungarian adolescent psychiatric outpatients with a dual diagnosis (intellectual disability and psychiatric diagnosis) were examined by means of the adapted version of the Behaviour Problem Inventory (BPI, Rojahn, Matson, Lott, Esbensen, & Smalls, 2001). Four IQ subgroups were created: borderline, mild, moderate and…

  10. Media Literacy and Cigarette Smoking in Hungarian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Randy M.; Piko, Bettina F.; Balazs, Mate A.; Struk, Tamara

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess smoking media literacy in a sample of Hungarian youth and to determine its association with current smoking and susceptibility to future smoking. Design: Quantitative cross-sectional survey. Setting: Four elementary and four high schools in Mako, Hungary. Method: A survey form was administered in regularly-scheduled classes to…

  11. Case Study: Case Studies and the Flipped Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Schiller, Nancy A.

    2013-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses the positive and negative aspects of the "flipped classroom." In the flipped classroom model, what is normally done in class and what is normally done as…

  12. Syncope: Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Kleyman, Inna; Weimer, Louis H

    2016-08-01

    Syncope, or the sudden loss of consciousness, is a common presenting symptom for evaluation by neurologists. It is not a unique diagnosis but rather a common manifestation of disorders with diverse mechanisms. Loss of consciousness is typically preceded by a prodrome of symptoms and sometimes there is a clear trigger. This article discusses several cases that illustrate the various causes of syncope. Reflex syncope is the most common type and includes neurally mediated, vasovagal, situational, carotid sinus hypersensitivity, and atypical forms. Acute and chronic autonomic neuropathies and neurodegenerative disorders can also present with syncope. PMID:27445240

  13. Asian-specific mitochondrial genome polymorphism (9-bp deletion) in Hungarian patients with mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Pentelenyi, Klara; Remenyi, Viktoria; Gal, Aniko; Milley, Gyorgy Mate; Csosz, Aranka; Mende, Balazs Gusztav; Molnar, Maria Judit

    2016-05-01

    A 9-bp deletion of the mtDNA is known as an anthropological marker of people with East-Asian origin. This 9-bp mtDNA deletion was analyzed in 1073 Hungarians with suspected mitochondrial disease and in 468 healthy control individuals. Fourteen cases with the 9-bp deletion were found in the cohort of mitochondrial patients, and one individual from 468 controls. In six cases the 9-bp deletion was present together with pathogenic major deletions in the mitochondrial genome. In one patient we found a frame shift mutation in the D-loop region, and in another family a pathogenic m.8322 A > G mutation in the tRNA(Lys) gene. Although the 9-bp deletion is common in the populations of the Pacific region and Asia, it is present in the Hungarian population as well. This 9-bp deletion may induce instability of the mtDNA and may provoke the introduction of other pathogenic mutations. PMID:25242187

  14. The Production of Nominal and Verbal Inflection in an Agglutinative Language: Evidence from Hungarian

    PubMed Central

    Peckham, Don; Szanka, Szilvia; Gazso, Dorottya; Lovassy, Noemi; Ullman, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    The contrast between regular and irregular inflectional morphology has been useful in investigating the functional and neural architecture of language. However, most studies have examined the regular/irregular distinction in non-agglutinative Indo-European languages (primarily English) with relatively simple morphology. Additionally, the majority of research has focused on verbal rather than nominal inflectional morphology. The present study attempts to address these gaps by introducing both plural and past tense production tasks in Hungarian, an agglutinative non-Indo-European language with complex morphology. Here we report results on these tasks from healthy Hungarian native-speaking adults, in whom we examine regular and irregular nominal and verbal inflection in a within-subjects design. Regular and irregular nouns and verbs were stem on frequency, word length, and phonological structure, and both accuracy and response times were acquired. The results revealed that the regular/irregular contrast yields similar patterns in Hungarian, for both nominal and verbal inflection, as in previous studies of non-agglutinative Indo-European languages: the production of irregular inflected forms was both less accurate and slower than of regular forms, both for plural and past-tense inflection. The results replicate and extend previous findings to an agglutinative language with complex morphology. Together with previous studies, the evidence suggests that the regular/irregular distinction yields a basic behavioral pattern that holds across language families and linguistic typologies. Finally, the study sets the stage for further research examining the neurocognitive substrates of regular and irregular morphology in an agglutinative non-Indo-European language. PMID:25769039

  15. The production of nominal and verbal inflection in an agglutinative language: evidence from Hungarian.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Dezso; Janacsek, Karolina; Turi, Zsolt; Lukacs, Agnes; Peckham, Don; Szanka, Szilvia; Gazso, Dorottya; Lovassy, Noemi; Ullman, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    The contrast between regular and irregular inflectional morphology has been useful in investigating the functional and neural architecture of language. However, most studies have examined the regular/irregular distinction in non-agglutinative Indo-European languages (primarily English) with relatively simple morphology. Additionally, the majority of research has focused on verbal rather than nominal inflectional morphology. The present study attempts to address these gaps by introducing both plural and past tense production tasks in Hungarian, an agglutinative non-Indo-European language with complex morphology. Here we report results on these tasks from healthy Hungarian native-speaking adults, in whom we examine regular and irregular nominal and verbal inflection in a within-subjects design. Regular and irregular nouns and verbs were stem on frequency, word length, and phonological structure, and both accuracy and response times were acquired. The results revealed that the regular/irregular contrast yields similar patterns in Hungarian, for both nominal and verbal inflection, as in previous studies of non-agglutinative Indo-European languages: the production of irregular inflected forms was both less accurate and slower than of regular forms, both for plural and past-tense inflection. The results replicate and extend previous findings to an agglutinative language with complex morphology. Together with previous studies, the evidence suggests that the regular/irregular distinction yields a basic behavioral pattern that holds across language families and linguistic typologies. Finally, the study sets the stage for further research examining the neurocognitive substrates of regular and irregular morphology in an agglutinative non-Indo-European language. PMID:25769039

  16. Three Community College Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojtysiak, Joseph; Sutton, William J., II; Wright, Tommy; Brantley, Linda

    2011-01-01

    This article presents three case studies that focus on specific projects that are underway or have been completed. In the first case study, Joseph Wojtysiak and William J. Sutton, II discuss the Green Center of Central Pennsylvania, which is designed to serve as the state's preeminent source for education, training and public information about…

  17. The Big Read: Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Endowment for the Arts, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Big Read evaluation included a series of 35 case studies designed to gather more in-depth information on the program's implementation and impact. The case studies gave readers a valuable first-hand look at The Big Read in context. Both formal and informal interviews, focus groups, attendance at a wide range of events--all showed how…

  18. Instructional Computing: Ten Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargan, Carol; Hunter, Beverly

    These case studies are written for educational institutions that wish to plan, extend, or improve their use of computers for learning and teaching. Each case study includes a brief description of each of the following: profile of the institution, history of the development of instructional computing, organization and management, student access to…

  19. Applications of threshold models and the weighted bootstrap for Hungarian precipitation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, László; Rakonczai, Pál; Zempléni, András

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents applications of the peaks-over-threshold methodology for both the univariate and the recently introduced bivariate case, combined with a novel bootstrap approach. We compare the proposed bootstrap methods to the more traditional profile likelihood. We have investigated 63 years of the European Climate Assessment daily precipitation data for five Hungarian grid points, first separately for the summer and winter months, then aiming at the detection of possible changes by investigating 20 years moving windows. We show that significant changes can be observed both in the univariate and the bivariate cases, the most recent period being the most dangerous in several cases, as some return values have increased substantially. We illustrate these effects by bivariate coverage regions.

  20. Industrial cogeneration case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, D. R.; Isser, S.; Hinkle, B.; Friedman, N. R.

    1980-09-01

    Studies were performed on a number of operating cogeneration systems to determine application, economics, and attitudes of industrial and utility executives toward cogeneration. A literature survey was conducted and an identification of candidate cogeneration sites was carried out. This was followed by a screening of these sites down to 20 to 30 candidate sites. The screening was carried out on the basis of cogeneration capacity, geographical diversity, generation type, and industrial diversity. The remaining sites were contacted as to their willingness to work with EPRI, and an industrial questionnaire was developed on technical, economic, and institutional cogeneration issues. Each of the seventeen sites was visited during this task. A utility questionnaire was developed and utilities with cogeneration systems studied in this survey were contacted as to their attitudes toward cogeneration. In addition, a compilation of a list of operating cogeneration systems was performed.

  1. Family- and school-related stresses in depressed Hungarian children.

    PubMed

    Csorba, J; Rózsa, S; Vetro, A; Gadoros, J; Makra, J; Somogyi, E; Kaczvinszky, E; Kapornay, K

    2001-02-01

    The aim of the study was 1) to identify recent and past life stresses as having a significant differential risk of childhood depression versus other childhood psychiatric illnesses, and 2) to establish if life stresses shared with other family members had a greater impact on the depression of the child than events of only personal relevance. Using a recently developed semi-structured interview (Diagnostic Evaluation Schedule for Children and Adolescents - Hungarian version, DESCA-H ), 68 life events of a total sample of 526 children were investigated. Two hundred and fifteen depressed preadolescents (mean age 12.73 years, SD 2.58) were compared with identical variables of 311 nondepressed mixed clinical controls (mean age: 10.91 years, SD 2.46) referred to child psychiatry care with other psychiatric symptomatology than depression. The life event questionnaire part of the DESCA-H was administered separately by means of lists of recent (within 1 year) and past stresses (events prior to 1 year before the assessment). With the two series of life stresses, two separate logistic regression analyses were performed. Of past stressors, physical punishment of the child by teachers, serious financial problems of the family and mental health problems of family members were found to be significant predictors of depression. From the series of recent stresses, moving to a new school, somatic illness, death of relatives and mental health disorders of family members were proved to be independent risk factors of depression for the children. The findings suggest that significant stresses of the child shared with other family members dominate in demarcating depressed children from nondepressed ones. School-related stresses are critically discussed. PMID:11246288

  2. The Use of Tense and Agreement by Hungarian-Speaking Children with Language Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Lukács, Ágnes; Leonard, Laurence B.; Kas, Bence; Pléh, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Hungarian is a null-subject language with both agglutinating and fusional elements in its verb inflection system, and agreement between the verb and object as well as between the verb and subject. These characteristics make this language a good test case for alternative accounts of the grammatical deficits of children with language impairment (LI). Method Twenty-five children with LI and 25 younger children serving as vocabulary controls (VC) repeated sentences whose verb inflections were masked by a cough. The verb inflections marked distinctions according to tense, person, number, and definiteness of the object. Results The children with LI were significantly less accurate than the VC children, but generally showed the same performance profile across the inflection types. The types of errors were also similar in the two groups. Conclusions Accounts that assume problems specific to agreement do not provide an explanation for the observed pattern of findings. Although the findings are generally compatible with accounts that assume processing limitations in children with LI, one such account, the morphological richness account, was not accurate in all of its predictions. One non-morphosyntactic factor -- the retention of sequences of sounds – appeared to be functionally related to inflection accuracy and may prove to be important in a language with numerous inflections such as Hungarian. PMID:18723597

  3. Implementing new advanced airway management standards in the Hungarian physician staffed Helicopter Emergency Medical Service.

    PubMed

    Soti, Akos; Temesvari, Peter; Hetzman, Laszlo; Eross, Attila; Petroczy, Andras

    2015-01-01

    In 2011 the Hungarian Air Ambulance Nonprofit Limited Company introduced a new Rapid Sequence Intubation standard operating procedure using a template from London's Air Ambulance. This replaced a previous ad-hoc and unsafe prehospital advanced airway management practice. It was hoped that this would increase clinical standards including internationally comparable results. All Rapid Sequence Intubations performed by the units of the Hungarian Air Ambulance under the new procedure between June 2011 and November 2013 were reviewed in a retrospective database analysis. During this period the air ambulance units completed 4880 missions with 433 intubations performed according to the new procedure. The rate of intubations that were successful on first attempt was 95.4% (413), while intubation was successful overall in 99.1% (429) of the cases; there was no failed airway. 90 complications were noted with 73 (16.9%) patients. Average on scene time was 49 minutes (ranging between: 15-110 minutes). This data shows that it is possible to effectively change a system that was in place for decades by implementing a new robust system that is based on a good template. PMID:25571961

  4. [Factors influencing lycopene content of foods, and lycopene intake of Hungarian population].

    PubMed

    Lugasi, Andrea; Hóvári, Judit; Bíró, Lajos; Brandt, Sára; Helyes, Lajos

    2004-01-01

    Lycopene is an acyclic, biologically active carotenoid that constitutes foods, its preventive role in several cancerous diseases have been proved by epidemiological and experimental data. Its beneficial role in maintenance of human health is related to its significant antioxidant properties. Data of dietary lycopene intake of the Hungarian population is not available. The aims of the present complex study were 1) to measure the lycopene content of foods frequently consumed in Hungary, 2) to investigate the effect of agrotechnological procedures and food processing on lycopene content of tomatoes, 3) to estimate the lycopene intake in two groups of the Hungarian population with the use of a three-day dietary record. The best lycopene sources are the raw (5.0-16.0 mg/100 g) and processed tomatoes and tomato products (3.0-80.0 mg/100 g), and also watermelon (3.6-6.2 mg/100 g). The variety of the plants, the growing circumstances, and the weather conditions significantly influence the lycopene content of freshly consumed and processed tomato fruits. Mild technological processes can preserve a considerable amount of the original lycopene content in tomato. The estimated average dietary intakes of the Hungarian children (n=521) and adults (n=205) were 2.98 +/- 4.71 mg/day/capita, and 4.24 +/- 8.47 mg/day/capita, respectively. Optimal climate conditions of Hungary makes possible to produce tomato fruits with high dietary value including significant amount of health protective lycopene. Increased consumption of tomato and tomato products with high concentration of lycopene may improve the antioxidant capacity of human body, and the risk of several cancerous diseases may be reduced. PMID:15351807

  5. Case Studies in Science Ethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Karen

    2010-03-01

    Everyone in science should have ethics education training. I have seen graduate students taken advantage of by their mentors. Many of us have seen misconduct...but what should we do about it? Young scientists are often unaware of the rules in science and make mistakes because of their ignorance of the rules in that particular field of study. Then there are an increasing number of cases in the news of overt cases of misrepresentation in science. All are welcome to attend this discussion of case studies. A case study on topics such as: how to treat data properly, how our values in science affect our work, who gets authorship on scientific papers, who is first author on a paper, what you should do if you uncover misconduct or plagiarism in your university, and we will discuss the scientist's role in society. This will be a painless, non-confrontational small group, then large group discussion of each case

  6. Work Teams: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, M. Scott

    1981-01-01

    An important aspect of work environment is job content and structure. As this case study illustrates, increased productivity, enhanced job satisfaction, substantial cost reduction, and a reduction in turnover are some of the benefits of task reorganization. (CT)

  7. Teaching astronomy with case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Timothy F.

    2015-11-01

    Breaking the students into small, collaborative learning groups to solve a meaningful task together is one of the most successful and fully evaluated teaching techniques implemented over the last century. Although there are many ways to accomplish small group learning, a long-standing and consistently successful collaborative class activity is to use the case study teaching strategy. The use of case studies is common in medical schools and law schools, but not so common in the teaching of astronomy. Case studies create meaningful conversations among students and with the professor by focusing on life-like dilemmas to be solved. Case study tasks ask audience members to synthesize several ideas or evaluate scenarios that have not been explicitly presented to them in the lecture or in available readings.

  8. Case Study: del Amo Bioventing

    EPA Science Inventory

    The attached presentation discusses the fundamentals of bioventing in the vadose zone. The basics of bioventing are presented. The experience to date with the del Amo Superfund Site is presented as a case study.

  9. Hydrogeologic Case Studies (Seattle, WA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  10. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (CHICAGO, IL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  11. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (DENVER PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  12. Nasopharyngeal Case-Control Study

    Cancer.gov

    A case-control study conducted in Taiwan between 1991-1994 among approximately 1,000 individuals to examine the role of viral, environmental, and genetic factors associated with the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

  13. Genotype analysis in Hungarian patients with multiple primary melanoma.

    PubMed

    Hatvani, Zsófia; Brodszky, Valentin; Mazán, Mercédesz; Pintér, Dóra; Hársing, Judit; Tóth, Veronika; Somlai, Beáta; Kárpáti, Sarolta

    2014-05-01

    Multiple primary melanoma patients (MPMps) have better prognosis and are more prone to genetic predisposition than single melanoma patients. We aimed to compare genetic background (CDKN2A, CDK4, MITF, MC1R) of 43 Hungarian MPMps with their clinicopathological data. We observed a higher rate of synchronous first and second melanoma (MM) (49%) and a higher frequency of non-melanoma tumor co-occurrence (42%) than reported previously. CDKN2A mutation frequency was 4.7% (E69G, R99P). We identified a new human MC1R variant (D117G) and reported MC1R variant distributions in Hungarian MMs for the first time. The rare R163Q was exceptionally common among Hungarian MPMps, a variant otherwise frequent in Asia, but not in Europe. MC1R 'R' carriers showed histopathological signs of a more progressive disease than 'r' carriers did; however, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in their second melanomas occurred significantly more frequently. Calculating 5-year overall survival, 'R' carriers showed more unfavourable prognosis (87%) than 'r' carriers did (95%). PMID:24660985

  14. Vitamin D Receptor Gene Polymorphisms and Haplotypes in Hungarian Patients with Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Griger, Zoltán; Dankó, Katalin

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies are autoimmune diseases characterized by symmetrical proximal muscle weakness. Our aim was to identify a correlation between VDR polymorphisms or haplotypes and myositis. We studied VDR-BsmI, VDR-ApaI, VDR-TaqI, and VDR-FokI polymorphisms and haplotypes in 89 Hungarian poly-/dermatomyositis patients (69 females) and 93 controls (52 females). We did not obtain any significant differences for VDR-FokI, BsmI, ApaI, and TaqI genotypes and allele frequencies between patients with myositis and healthy individuals. There was no association of VDR polymorphisms with clinical manifestations and laboratory profiles in myositis patients. Men with myositis had a significantly different distribution of BB, Bb, and bb genotypes than female patients, control male individuals, and the entire control group. Distribution of TT, Tt, and tt genotypes was significantly different in males than in females in patient group. According to four-marker haplotype prevalence, frequencies of sixteen possible haplotypes showed significant differences between patient and control groups. The three most frequent haplotypes in patients were the fbAt, FBaT, and fbAT. Our findings may reveal that there is a significant association: Bb and Tt genotypes can be associated with myositis in the Hungarian population we studied. We underline the importance of our result in the estimated prevalence of four-marker haplotypes. PMID:25649962

  15. [The most important obstacles of the development of Hungarian psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Kalmár, Sándor

    2015-06-01

    A quarter of a century ago the change of the political system in Hungary precipitated a serious value-crisis and caused a lot of harmful effects in nurturing and the development of psychiatry. The author establishes that the attack against psychiatry is more intensive than previously but neither the education and health management nor the psychiatric leadership could cope with these difficulties. It can't be denied that the foundation of lifelong mental health begins in the early life years and about 75% of the first Mental Disorder manifests in adolescence and youth. We are not able to ensure the special rights of every child according to the Hungarian Constitution and the Declaration of the Rights of the Child by the United Nations. The large inequalities within the country, the lack of paramount mental education and nurturing, the lack of essential, consistent eternal values, the lack of required psychiatric care system are huge obstacles of the development of healthy individual and leads to self-destructive behaviour and several, serious physical and mental disorders. The purpose of the author is to call psychiatrists' attention to the main obstacles of the development of Hungarian Psychiatric Care System. The main obstacles of the present psychiatric care system: 1. Unclarified notions, confusion of ideas. 2. Somatic, neurologic, mental, cultural-social and spiritual ignorance. 3. Lack of organization in Mental Education and Psychiatric Care System. 4. Value-crisis in our society despite the fact that the "Council of Wise Men" created a "Scale of the Essential Consistent Eternal Values" for the Hungarian Education System in 2008. 5. Lack of mental health prevention both in education system and health care system. There is no teaching of hygiene lessons in the Hungarian schools. 6. Negligence and selfishness among the population. 7. Disinterest among competent authorities. 8. Leaving the most important possibilities out of consideration. The author establishes

  16. ACE and ACTN3 genes polymorphisms among female Hungarian athletes in the aspect of sport disciplines.

    PubMed

    Bosnyák, E; Trájer, E; Udvardy, A; Komka, Z; Protzner, A; Kováts, T; Györe, I; Tóth, M; Pucsok, J; Szmodis, M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the importance of two sport-associated gene polymorphisms, alpha-actinin-3 R577X (ACTN3) and angiotensin-converting enzyme I/D (ACE), among Hungarian athletes in different sports. The examination was carried out only on women (n = 100). Sport-specific groups were formed in order to guarantee the most homogeneous clusters. Human genomic DNA was isolated from blood, and genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction. To measure the differences between the participating groups, Chi-squared test was performed using Statistica 9.0 for Windows® (significance level: p < 0.05). In comparing the ACE I/D allele frequencies, significant difference was detected between water polo (I = 61.11%; D = 38.89%) and combat sports (I = 35.71%, D = 64.29%) athletes (p < 0.03). There was no statistical difference when ACE I/D alleles in combat sports and kayaking/rowing (p > 0.05) were compared. A similarity was detectable in the I allele frequencies of the water polo (61.11%) and kayaking/rowing (56.67%) groups. The ACTN3 R/X polymorphism showed no differences in comparison with the sport groups. R allele frequencies were higher in every group compared to the X allele. The potential significance of the ACE I allele in sports of an aerobic nature was not clearly confirmed among Hungarian athletes. PMID:26690037

  17. An Investigation into the Relationship of Foreign Language Learning Motivation and Sign Language Use among Deaf and Hard of Hearing Hungarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kontra, Edit H.; Csizer, Kata

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to point out the relationship between foreign language learning motivation and sign language use among hearing impaired Hungarians. In the article we concentrate on two main issues: first, to what extent hearing impaired people are motivated to learn foreign languages in a European context; second, to what extent sign…

  18. Teaching Case: Enterprise Architecture Specification Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steenkamp, Annette Lerine; Alawdah, Amal; Almasri, Osama; Gai, Keke; Khattab, Nidal; Swaby, Carval; Abaas, Ramy

    2013-01-01

    A graduate course in enterprise architecture had a team project component in which a real-world business case, provided by an industry sponsor, formed the basis of the project charter and the architecture statement of work. The paper aims to share the team project experience on developing the architecture specifications based on the business case…

  19. Qualifying lighting remodelling in a Hungarian city based on light pollution effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolláth, Z.; Dömény, A.; Kolláth, K.; Nagy, B.

    2016-09-01

    The public lighting system has been remodelled in several Hungarian cities. In some cases the majority of the old luminaries were fitted with high pressure sodium lamps and they were replaced with white LED lighting with a typical correlated colour temperature of about 4500 K. Therefore, these remodelling works provide a testbed for methods in measurements and modelling. We measured the luminance of the light domes of selected cities by DSLR photometry before and after the remodelling. Thanks to the full cut off design of the new lighting fixtures we obtained a slight decrease even in the blue part of the sky dome spectra of a tested city. However, we have to note that this positive change is the result of the bad geometry (large ULR) of the previous lighting system. Based on Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations we provide a comparison of different indicators that can be used to qualify the remodelling, and to predict the possible changes in light pollution.

  20. Case Studies in Broadcast Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Howard W.

    This collection of case studies, based on factual situations which have challenged broadcast managers in recent years, is designed to stimulate thinking about and solving of "real world" problems in commercial radio and television operations. Topics of a serious, long-run nature include enlarging the radio audience; station revenue and economy;…

  1. Case Studies in Sports Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Nancy

    1988-01-01

    This article presents case studies of two athletes who wanted to affect a change in their body weight in order to enhance athletic performance. Each athlete's problem and the nutrition approach used to solve it are discussed. Caloric values of fast foods are listed. (JL)

  2. Principal Succession: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jeffery C.; Webber, Charles F.

    Principal succession is misunderstood and underutilized as a means of affecting dynamic renewal in school communities. Previously, the replacement of a principal was examined solely through the experiences of principals and teachers. This paper reports on a case study that added the previously neglected perspectives of students, support staff, and…

  3. The Language Dilemma: Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teboul, J. C. Bruno

    2002-01-01

    Presents the case study involving a fictitious company's English-only policy and threats of legal action based on that policy. Includes the following responses: "Legal Issues Posed in the Language Dilemma" (Gregory S. Walden); "English Only: A Workplace Dilemma" (Alan Pakiela); "Problems with English-Only Policies" (Barbara Lynn Speicher); and…

  4. INNOVATIVE CLEAN TECHNOLOGIES CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Innovative Clean Technologies case studies contained herein are the products of the "Pollution Prevention by and for Small Business" Program (P2SB). he P2SB was an outreach program directed to small businesses that had developed innovative concepts for pollution prevention in...

  5. Due Process Hearing Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bateman, David F.; Jones, Marni Gail

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a due process hearing case study of a mother who contended that his son, D.J., has been denied of a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) of his School District after being suspended from school. D.J., an elementary student, had been described as hyperactive, inattentive, defiant, and often volatile. He was identified…

  6. Case Study: Planning as Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Peter A. C.

    2007-01-01

    Proposes that the objectives of strategic planning may be attained more effectively if implemented via a learning paradigm. In support of this claim, describes a case study detailing implementation of such an initiative plus post-implementation interviews. (Contains 5 figures.)

  7. State Planning System. Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherin, Ellen, Ed.

    The State Planning System (SPS) is a policy-oriented management tool intended to help analyze the interrelated effects of alternative policies and their relationships to state goals. Two pilot-test case studies are described--the SPS tuition policy evaluation conducted in Colorado, and New York's SPS evaluation of the applicability of large scale…

  8. Case Studies in Applied Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematical Association of America, Washington, DC.

    This collection of nine case studies in applied mathematics was written primarily for the use of the instructor by a Conference sponsored by the Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics (CUPM). Each chapter contains exercises of varying degrees of difficulty and several include student projects. The materials were used on a trial…

  9. Early Morphological Productivity in Hungarian: Evidence from Sentence Repetition and Elicited Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabor, Balint; Lukacs, Agnes

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates early productivity of morpheme use in Hungarian children aged between 2 ; 1 and 5 ; 3. Hungarian has a rich morphology which is the core marker of grammatical functions. A new method is introduced using the novel word paradigm in a sentence repetition task with masked inflections (i.e. a disguised elicited production task).…

  10. Guide to Historic Hungarian Places in Greater Pittsburgh. Educational Curriculum Kit 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boros-Kazai, Andrew

    This booklet is a guide to buildings and other sites which have played a significant role in the history of the Hungarian community in Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania). A brief summary of the significance or present use is provided for: (1) the Hungarian Nationality room at the University of Pittsburgh's Cathedral of Learning; (2) special collections of…

  11. Accuracy and reliability of the Hungarian digital elevation model (DEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detrekoi, Akos; Melykuti, Gabor; Szabo, Gyorgy

    1994-08-01

    In the period 1991-92 a 50 X 50 meter grid digital elevation model (DEM) was created in Hungary. The design and the quality control of DEM are discussed in this paper. The paper has three parts: (1) the data acquisition methods for DEM by scanning and photogrammetry are discussed, (2) a general overview about the accuracy and reliability of DEMs is given, and (3) the algorithm for the checking of data and some general conclusions about the control activity of the Hungarian DEM are reviewed.

  12. Working condition-related improvement in genotoxicological parameters of Hungarian road pavers.

    PubMed

    Major, J; Jakab, M G; Tompa, A

    2001-03-01

    Multiple-endpoint follow-up genotoxicology monitoring was performed in a group of 22 Hungarian road pavers between 1996 and 1999. The studied endpoints were the determination of structural and numeric chromosome aberration (CA), sister chromatid exchange (SCE), high-frequency SCE and HPRT mutation frequencies, and ultraviolet (UV)-light-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). The workers (8 hand pavers and 14 finishers, mean age 37 yr) used tar-free asphalt. The results were compared with those of 6 work-site controls (35 yr), 101 historical controls (38 yr), and 87 industrial controls (38 yr). The most marked changes were found in the CA frequencies. In the control, the mean CA frequency was 1.6%. In the first study, increased CA frequencies were found in the donors that either had been exposed to hot asphalt fumes or had cleaned the equipment with crude oil. The mean CA frequency of the 14 finishers working in closed cabins was 3.67% in 1996. The increased CA frequency was attributed to the high level of hot asphalt fumes due to insufficient ventilation. By 1999 the mean CA frequency decreased to 1.23%. For the 8 hand pavers working in open air the mean CA frequency was 3.6% in 1996. The obtained data suggested that the increase in CA frequencies was due to the use of petroleum and crude oil; therefore, these substances were replaced with harmless detergents. By 1999 the mean CA frequency decreased to 1%. In finishers the mean CA frequency returned to the control level 1 yr later (1999) than in the case of hand pavers. The chromosome-type aberrations remained predominant during the follow-up. The individual variations observed were attributed to smoking and inadequate personal protection. The obtained results suggest that the use of tar-free asphalt and harmless detergents with adequate personal protection does not increase the frequencies of the genotoxicological parameters compared to controls. Consequently, an improvement in

  13. Dietary calcium intake and calcium supplementation in hungarian patients with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Speer, Gábor; Szamosujvári, Pál; Dombai, Péter; Csóré, Katalin; Mikófalvi, Kinga; Steindl, Tímea; Streicher, Ildikó; Tarsoly, Júlia; Zajzon, Gergely; Somogyi, Péter; Szamosújvári, Pál; Lakatos, Péter

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Adequate calcium intake is the basis of osteoporosis therapy-when this proves insufficient, even specific antiosteoporotic agents cannot exert their actions properly. Methods. Our representative survey analyzed the dietary intake and supplementation of calcium in 8033 Hungarian female and male (mean age: 68 years) (68.01 (CI95: 67.81-68.21)) patients with osteoporosis. Results. Mean intake from dietary sources was 665 ± 7.9 mg (68.01 (CI95: 67.81-68.21)) daily. A significant positive relationship could be detected between total dietary calcium intake and lumbar spine BMD (P = 0.045), whereas such correlation could not be demonstrated with femoral T-score. Milk consumption positively correlated with femur (P = 0.041), but not with lumbar BMD. The ingestion of one liter of milk daily increased the T-score by 0.133. Average intake from supplementation was 558 ± 6.2 mg (68.01 (CI95: 67.81-68.21)) daily. The cumulative dose of calcium-from both dietary intake and supplementation-was significantly associated with lumbar (r = 0.024, P = 0.049), but not with femur BMD (r = 0.021, P = 0.107). The currently recommended 1000-1500 mg total daily calcium intake was achieved in 34.5% of patients only. It was lower than recommended in 47.8% of the cases and substantially higher in 17.7% of subjects. Conclusions. We conclude that calcium intake in Hungarian osteoporotic patients is much lower than the current recommendation, while routinely applied calcium supplementation will result in inappropriately high calcium intake in numerous patients. PMID:23737777

  14. Dietary Calcium Intake and Calcium Supplementation in Hungarian Patients with Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Szamosujvári, Pál; Dombai, Péter; Csóré, Katalin; Mikófalvi, Kinga; Steindl, Tímea; Streicher, Ildikó; Tarsoly, Júlia; Zajzon, Gergely; Somogyi, Péter; Szamosújvári, Pál; Lakatos, Péter

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Adequate calcium intake is the basis of osteoporosis therapy—when this proves insufficient, even specific antiosteoporotic agents cannot exert their actions properly. Methods. Our representative survey analyzed the dietary intake and supplementation of calcium in 8033 Hungarian female and male (mean age: 68 years) (68.01 (CI95: 67.81–68.21)) patients with osteoporosis. Results. Mean intake from dietary sources was 665 ± 7.9 mg (68.01 (CI95: 67.81–68.21)) daily. A significant positive relationship could be detected between total dietary calcium intake and lumbar spine BMD (P = 0.045), whereas such correlation could not be demonstrated with femoral T-score. Milk consumption positively correlated with femur (P = 0.041), but not with lumbar BMD. The ingestion of one liter of milk daily increased the T-score by 0.133. Average intake from supplementation was 558 ± 6.2 mg (68.01 (CI95: 67.81–68.21)) daily. The cumulative dose of calcium—from both dietary intake and supplementation—was significantly associated with lumbar (r = 0.024, P = 0.049), but not with femur BMD (r = 0.021, P = 0.107). The currently recommended 1000–1500 mg total daily calcium intake was achieved in 34.5% of patients only. It was lower than recommended in 47.8% of the cases and substantially higher in 17.7% of subjects. Conclusions. We conclude that calcium intake in Hungarian osteoporotic patients is much lower than the current recommendation, while routinely applied calcium supplementation will result in inappropriately high calcium intake in numerous patients. PMID:23737777

  15. [Research progress on case-control study].

    PubMed

    Zhang, F F; Liu, Z D; Zhang, C X; Jiang, B F

    2016-04-10

    Several new varients related to the case-control designs have been developed in the recent decades, and this article briefly summarized four new designs: two-stage design, case-specular study, exposure-crossover study and case-case-time-control study. This paper involved principles of study design, requisites for application, advantages and disadvantages on all the studies. PMID:27087230

  16. Designing case-control studies.

    PubMed Central

    Yanagawa, T

    1979-01-01

    Identification of confounding factors, evaluation of their influence on cause-effect associations, and the introduction of appropriate ways to account for these factors are important considerations in designing case-control studies. This paper presents designs useful for these purposes, after first providing a statistical definition of a confounding factor. Differences in the ability to identify and evaluate confounding factors and estimate disease risk between designs employing stratification (matching) and designs randomly sampling cases and controls are noted. Linear logistic models for the analysis of data from such designs are described and are shown to liberalize design requirements and to increase relative risk estimation efficiency. The methods are applied to data from a multiple factor investigation of lung cancer patients and controls. PMID:540588

  17. Wrench tectonics control on Neogene-Quaternary sedimentation along the Mid-Hungarian Mobile Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogacsas, Gyorgy; Juhász, Györgyi; Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit; Simon, Szilvia; Lukács, Szilveszter; Csizmeg, János

    2010-05-01

    The Neogene Pannonian basin is underlain by a large orogenic collage which is built up by several tectonostratigraphic terrains. The basement of the Pannonian Basin became imbricate nappes during the Cretaceous Alpine collision. Nappes of Late Cretaceous in age have been proven below the Great Hungarian Plain (Grow et al 1994). The boundary of the two main terrains, the northwestern ALCAPA (Alpine-Carpathian-Pannonian) and the southeastern TISZA, is the Mid-Hungarian Mobile Belt. It is the most significant neotectonic zone of the Pannonian Basin. The structural analysis of the middle section of the Mid-Hungarian Mobile Belt was carried out on a 120km x 50km area, between the Danube and the Tisza river, on the basis of interpretation of seismic data. The structural analysis of the Neogene-Quaternary sediments was supported by sequence stratigraphic interpretation of seismic, well log and core-sample data. Regional seismic profiles were both oriented in the dip direction, which highlights sediment supply routes into the basin, and strike-oriented. The studied segment of the Mid-Hungarian Mobile Belt consists of several long (some ten kilometres long) strike slip fault zones. The offset lengths of the individual strike slipe faults varies between a few and a dozens of kilometres. Activity along the Mid-Hungarian Mobile Belt can be characterised by four periods, the size and shape of facies zones of each development period were controlled by tectonics: 1. During the early Miocene, the ALPACA moved eastward, bounded by sinistral strike-slipe system along its northern side and dextral strike-slipe fault system along its contact with the Southern Alps and the TISZA terrain. The largest movement took part during the Ottnangian-Karpatian (19-16.5 Ma). The TISZA unit moved northeastward over the remnant Carpathian Flysch Basin (Nemcok et al 2006). These terrains movements resulted in right lateral, convergent wide wrench along the Mid-Hungarian Mobile Belt. The ALPACA

  18. A possible association between acute infectious diarrhoea in pregnant women and congenital abnormalities in their offspring--a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Acs, Nándor; Bánhidy, Ferenc; Puhó, Erzsébet H; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2010-05-01

    The possible association between Salmonella gastroenteritis (SGE) and infectious diarrhoea in pregnancy (IDP) and structural birth defects, i.e. congenital abnormalities (CA) in the offspring, has not been studied. The dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities, 1980-1996 was evaluated. There were 15 (0.07%) and 82 (0.36%) out of 22,843 cases and 23 (0.06%) and 70 (0.18%) out of 38,151 (0.34%) controls with mothers who had medically recorded SGE and IDP, respectively. There was no association of SGE and a higher risk of CA. However, a higher risk of cleft lip +/- palate, congenital limb deficiencies, multiple CAs and cardiovascular CAs was found in the offspring of mothers with IDP. A possible explanation for the association of IDP with higher risk for some specific CAs may be the high fever in IDP. PMID:20100117

  19. A case for case studies: exploring the use of case study design in community nursing research.

    PubMed

    Bergen, A; While, A

    2000-04-01

    The case study has become an accepted vehicle for conducting research in a variety of disciplines. However, the meaning behind the term is not always made explicit by researchers and this has given rise to a number of assumptions which are open to challenge, and to questions about the robustness of the method. This paper explores some of the issues arising from one particular definition of case study research, used in a study by Yin which examined the practice of case management in community nursing. Four main areas are discussed. First, defining 'case' is seen to pose questions about the relationship of the phenomenon to its context, the degree of researcher control over case definition, the limits to what may constitute a 'case' and what is meant by the term 'unit of analysis'. Second, the relevance of external validity to case study research is supported through the use of a number of tactics, in particular Yin's concept of replication logic, which involves generalizing to theory, rather than to empirical data. Third, the use of method triangulation (multiple methods of data collection) is advanced as a means of enhancing construct validity in research where data converge around a particular theory. Finally, the relationship of the case study to theory construction, through the prior development of 'propositions' is discussed. Each of these issues is applied to the design and conduct of a research study based closely on Yin's multiple case study framework. Thirteen 'cases' were selected of case management practice and data were collected through interviews and examination of literature and documentation, to explore the suitability of community nurses for the role. It is concluded that, given the appropriate subject matter, context and research aims, the case study method may be seen as a credible option in nursing research. PMID:10759989

  20. Dynamic flood risk: case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Baldassarre, Giuliano

    2013-04-01

    While many progresses have been made in the static assessment of (current) flood risk, additional transdisciplinary research is required for the development of new methods for the dynamic assessment of (future) flood risk, which is very much needed in a rapidly changing environment. To this end, it is essential to understand why flood risk has changed in the past. This presentation shows the scientific outcomes of diverse case studies (the Po river in Italy and a number of African rivers), whereby data and models are utilized to analyse and interpret the dynamics of flood risk. In particular, a number of hypotheses were tested by considering different agents of change, such as climate and/or land-use, flood prevention measures, human population dynamics. These case studies show that one of the main challenges in assessing (dynamic) flood risk is the deep interconnection not only between the different agents of change, but also between the components of risk (i.e. hazard, exposure, vulnerability or resilience). For instance, changes in flood hazard often trigger changes in exposure and vulnerability to flooding, and vice versa. These complex interactions seem to make predictions of future flood risk over long time scales rather difficult, if not impossible.

  1. Language deficits in Pre-Symptomatic Huntington's Disease: Evidence from Hungarian

    PubMed Central

    Németh, Dezso; Dye, Cristina D.; Sefcsik, Tamás; Janacsek, Karolina; Turi, Zsolt; Londe, Zsuzsa; Klivenyi, Péter; Kincses, Tamás Zs.; Nikoletta, Szabó; Vecsei, László; Ullman, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    A limited number of studies have investigated language in Huntington's disease (HD). These have generally reported abnormalities in rule-governed (grammatical) aspects of language, in both syntax and morphology. Several studies of verbal inflectional morphology in English and French have reported evidence of over-active rule processing, such as over-suffixation errors (e.g., walkeded) and over-regularizations (e.g., digged). Here we extend the investigation to noun inflection in Hungarian, a Finno-Ugric agglutinative language with complex morphology, and to genetically proven pre-symptomatic Huntington's disease (pre-HD). Although individuals with pre-HD have no clinical, motor or cognitive symptoms, the underlying pathology may already have begun, and thus sensitive behavioral measures might reveal already-present impairments. Indeed, in a Hungarian morphology production task, pre-HD patients made both over-suffixation and over-regularization errors. The findings suggest the generality of over-active rule processing in both HD and pre-HD, across languages from different families with different morphological systems, and for both verbal and noun inflection. Because the neuropathology in pre-HD appears to be largely restricted to the caudate nucleus and related structures, the findings further implicate these structures in language, and in rule-processing in particular. Finally, the need for effective treatments in HD, which will likely depend in part on the ability to sensitively measure early changes in the disease, suggests the possibility that inflectional morphology, and perhaps other language measures, may provide useful diagnostic, tracking, and therapeutic tools for assessing and treating early degeneration in pre-HD and HD. PMID:22538085

  2. Environmental health aspects of drinking water-borne outbreak due to karst flooding: case study.

    PubMed

    Dura, Gyula; Pándics, Tamás; Kádár, Mihály; Krisztalovics, Katalin; Kiss, Zoltánné; Bodnár, Judit; Asztalos, Agnes; Papp, Erzsébet

    2010-09-01

    Climate change may increase the incidence of waterborne diseases due to extreme rainfall events, and consequent microbiological contamination of the water source and supply. As a result of the complexity of the pathways from the surface to the consumer, it is difficult to detect an association between rainfall and human disease. The water supply of a Hungarian city, Miskolc (174,000 inhabitant), is mainly based on karstic water, a vulnerable underground water body. A large amount of precipitation fell on the catchment area of the karstic water source, causing an unusually strong karstic water flow and flooding, and subsequent microbiological contamination. The presence of several potential sources of contamination in the protective zone of the karstic water source should be emphasized. The water supplier was unprepared to treat the risk of waterborne outbreak caused by an extreme weather event. Public health intervention and hygienic measures were taken in line with epidemiological actions, focusing on the protection of consumers by providing safe drinking water. The contamination was identified, and measures were taken for risk reduction and prevention. This case study underlines the increasing importance of preparedness for extreme water events in order to protect the karstic water sources and to avoid waterborne outbreaks. PMID:20375480

  3. Case Study: A Picture Worth a Thousand Words? Making a Case for Video Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pai, Aditi

    2014-01-01

    A picture, they say, is worth a thousand words. If a mere picture is worth a thousand words, how much more are "moving pictures" or videos worth? The author poses this not merely as a rhetorical question, but because she wishes to make a case for using videos in the traditional case study method. She recommends four main approaches of…

  4. The CZSaw notes case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eric; Gupta, Ankit; Darvill, David; Dill, John; Shaw, Chris D.; Woodbury, Robert

    2013-12-01

    Analysts need to keep track of their analytic findings, observations, ideas, and hypotheses throughout the analysis process. While some visual analytics tools support such note-taking needs, these notes are often represented as objects separate from the data and in a workspace separate from the data visualizations. Representing notes the same way as the data and integrating them with data visualizations can enable analysts to build a more cohesive picture of the analytical process. We created a note-taking functionality called CZNotes within the visual analytics tool CZSaw for analyzing unstructured text documents. CZNotes are designed to use the same model as the data and can thus be visualized in CZSaw's existing data views. We conducted a preliminary case study to observe the use of CZNotes and observed that CZNotes has the potential to support progressive analysis, to act as a shortcut to the data, and supports creation of new data relationships.

  5. STS Case Study Development Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosa de Jesus, Dan A.; Johnson, Grace K.

    2013-01-01

    The Shuttle Case Study Collection (SCSC) has been developed using lessons learned documented by NASA engineers, analysts, and contractors. The SCSC provides educators with a new tool to teach real-world engineering processes with the goal of providing unique educational materials that enhance critical thinking, decision-making and problem-solving skills. During this third phase of the project, responsibilities included: the revision of the Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML) source code to ensure all pages follow World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) standards, and the addition and edition of website content, including text, documents, and images. Basic HTML knowledge was required, as was basic knowledge of photo editing software, and training to learn how to use NASA's Content Management System for website design. The outcome of this project was its release to the public.

  6. Fusarium mycotoxins in cereals harvested from Hungarian fields.

    PubMed

    Tima, Helga; Brückner, Andrea; Mohácsi-Farkas, Csilla; Kiskó, Gabriella

    2016-06-01

    The Fusarium mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone (ZEN) and T-2 frequently contaminate grain crops in Middle and Eastern Europe. In this survey, 116 cereal samples (maize, wheat, barley and oat) were examined for DON, ZEN and T-2 mycotoxins. Samples were collected from different areas in two Hungarian regions (North and South Transdanubia). The method of analysis was indirect competitive ELISA. Maize was the most contaminated grain regarding DON (86%), ZEN (41%) and T-2 (55%) toxins. The average results of the deoxynivalenol and zearalenone tests of maize proved to be significantly higher than those of barley or oat. DON was the most represented Fusarium mycotoxin followed by T-2 and ZEN. The examination of these mycotoxins would be necessary at a larger scale as to re-evaluate permissible levels, so increase of the monitoring programme would be advisable for the future. PMID:26892197

  7. The fate of tyrosinaemic Hungarian patients before the NTBC aera.

    PubMed

    László, Aranka; Rózsa, Mária; Sallay, Eva; Tiszlavicz, László; Janovszky, Agnes; Várkonyi, Agnes; Karg, Eszter; Wittmann, Gyula; Túri, Sándor; Ugarte, Magdalena

    2013-11-30

    Before the introduction of the NTBC treatment (Orfadine) from two tyrosinemic Hungarian families 1-3 tyrosinemic homozygous male patients died of hepatocellular carcinoma and one patient of hepatocellular carcinoma combined with clear cell renal adenocarcinoma. From the third tyrosinemic family one homozygous girl patient has been treated with NTBC (Orfadine), IMTV-AM, she is symptom-free. Her molecular genetic mutations analysis in the FAH gene detected a common intronel mutation, affecting splicing and of predicted severe effect, IVS6-1 g > t/IVS6-1 g > t with systemic name c.456-1 g > t/c.456-1 g > t (Prof. Magdalena Ugarte). PMID:24555242

  8. Using Case Studies To Teach Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabel, Connie

    Using case studies in science instruction develops problem solving and enhances listening and cooperative learning skills. Unlike other disciplines such as law and medicine, the case study method is rarely used in science education to enrich the curriculum. This study investigates the use of content-based case studies as a means of developing…

  9. The fate of Hungarian Jewish dermatologists during the Holocaust Part 1: Six refugees who fled.

    PubMed

    Burgdorf, Walter H C; Bock, Julia; Hoenig, Leonard J; Parish, Lawrence Charles

    2016-01-01

    From the times of Moritz Kaposi, Hungarian Jewish physicians have significantly contributed to the development of dermatology. Part 1 of this special report highlights some of the early Jewish dermatologists in Hungary. It also tells the stories of five Hungarian Jewish dermatologists who fled anti-Semitism in Hungary, or other European countries, between 1920 and 1941: Frederick Reiss, Emery Kocsard, Stephen Rothman, Peter Flesch, and George Csonka. A sixth Hungarian dermatologist, Tibor Benedek, was persecuted by the Nazis, because he had a Jewish wife, forcing the couple to flee Germany. Part 2 will focus on the ordeal faced by Hungarian Jewish dermatologists who did not leave their homeland during World War II. PMID:26903191

  10. Hungarian perspectives on emigration and immigration in the new European architecture.

    PubMed

    Szoke, L

    1992-01-01

    After a brief review of Hungary's history as a receiving country, the author assesses projected changes in Hungarian migration policy designed to prevent a massive new influx of refugees and other migrants from eastern and central Europe. PMID:12285262

  11. Allographic agraphia: A case study

    PubMed Central

    Menichelli, Alina; Rapp, Brenda; Semenza, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of patient MN, diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia, who exhibited a severe impairment in writing letters and words in upper-case print in the face of accurate production of the same stimuli in lower-case cursive. In contrast to her written production difficulties, MN was unimpaired in recognizing visually presented letters and words in upper-case print. We find a modest benefit of visual form cueing in the written production of upper-case letters, despite an inability to describe or report visual features of letters in any case or font. This case increases our understanding of the allographic level of letter-shape representation in written language production. It provides strong support for previous reports indicating the neural independence of different types of case and font-specific letter-shape information; it provides evidence that letter-shape production does not require explicit access to information about the visual attributes of letter shapes and, finally, it reveals the possibility of interaction between processes involved in letter-shape production and perception. PMID:18489965

  12. Case Study: The Chemistry of Cocaine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewprashad, Brahmadeo

    2011-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's case study focuses on the chemistry of cocaine to teach a number of core concepts in organic chemistry. It also requires that students read and analyze an original research paper on…

  13. Case Studies for Inclusive Schools. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Peggy L.

    2005-01-01

    Case Studies for "Inclusive Schools, Second Edition" presents a sampling of case studies that contain realistic problems concerning inclusion issues for teacher education students to solve. This format was chosen because the case study approach to learning is gaining in popularity as it provides students with an opportunity to apply information…

  14. Business and Consumer Education Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delta Pi Epsilon, Minneapolis, Minn. Phi Chapter.

    This publication contains 58 case studies for classroom use in teaching various business and consumer education subjects at the high school level. A supplement to a previous Phi Chapter publication, "Office Education Case Studies" (1973), the case studies are intended to create class discussions and help students acquire the ability to analyze…

  15. Case Study Evaluations: A Decade of Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.

    1997-01-01

    In the last 10 years, there has been increased use of case study methodology, with accompanying refinement and improvement of the methods. Case studies have become legitimate research methods in evaluation, but it is too soon to say whether improvements in methodology are really resulting in improvements in the case studies conducted. (SLD)

  16. Concentrated photovoltaics, a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonini, Piergiorgio; Centro, Sandro; Golfetto, Stelvio; Saccà, Alessandro

    2014-12-01

    Concentrated Photovoltaics (CPV), once a niche technology, has now reached the maturity and reliability for large scale power generation. Especially in regions where temperatures are very high, the use of high efficiency triple junction solar cells with concentrating optics allows stable energy yield. Thus CPV can be seen as complementary and not in concurrence with silicon photovoltaics. The state of the art, the advantages and limitations of this technology will be shown. Among the main advantages of CPV is the possibility of a much higher energy supply, when compared to silicon photovoltaics, both comparing CPV and silicon with same area or the same installed power. The use of recycled and recyclable materials allows a more environmentally friendly production. The possibility to couple CPV with desalination facilities, energy storage will be analysed. As an example a case study of a CPV installation in Northern Italy is discussed. Here the use of mature technologies, derived from automotive and lighting sectors resulted in a simple and efficient module.

  17. Genetic risk and protective factors of TNFSF15 gene variants detected using single nucleotide polymorphisms in Hungarians with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Képíró, László; Széll, Márta; Kovács, László; Keszthelyi, Péter; Kemény, Lajos; Gyulai, Rolland

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes of the tumor necrosis factor ligand superfamily member 15 (TNFSF15) gene in Hungarians with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. A case-control study was performed, and five TNFSF15 SNPs (rs3810936, rs6478108, rs6478109, rs7848647, rs7869487) were genotyped in 319 patients with psoriasis, 105 of whom also have psoriatic arthritis, and in 200 healthy individuals. Three haplotypes (A, B, C) based on these five SNPs were also analyzed. Our findings suggest that the rs6478109 SNP may be a genetic risk factor in psoriasis (p=0.0046), while haplotype C may be protective (p=0.0250). These results suggest that certain variants of the TNFSF15 gene contribute to the pathogenesis of the immune-mediated, multifactorial skin disease psoriasis, and that this difference is more readily apparent when groups of patients with and without psoriatic arthritis are examined separately. PMID:24269700

  18. Demystifying Instructional Innovation: The Case of Teaching with Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kantar, Lina D.

    2013-01-01

    Issues emerging from instructional innovation are inevitable, yet basing any curriculum shift on a theoretical framework is paramount. This paper grounds the case-based pedagogy in three learning theories: behaviorism, cognitivism, and constructivism. The three theories are described and situated in relation to the case study method. An…

  19. Case Studies for Effective Business Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlister-Kizzier, Donna

    This book is designed as a resource for educators who teach business content in a variety of instructional settings. It contains case studies representing all functional areas of business, including corporate training, for grades 7 through graduate education. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the case study method. The history of the case method,…

  20. Neurology Case Studies: Cerebrovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad U; Gorelick, Philip B

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses interesting vascular neurology cases including the management of intracranial stenosis, migraine headache and stroke risk, retinal artery occlusions associated with impaired hearing, intracranial occlusive disease, a heritable cause of stroke and vascular cognitive impairment, and an interesting clinico-neuroradiologic disorder associated with eclampsia. PMID:27445238

  1. Macro- and micro element enrichment in the runoff transported sediment on Hungarian agricultural watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farsang, Andrea; Barta, Károly

    2010-05-01

    ) content. The tests were carried out in accordance with the current Hungarian Standards. In the case of microelements, measurements are made using aqua regia digestion with a Perkin Elmer AAS (Atomic Absorption Spectrometer) 3110. The presentation shows the enrichment ratios of OM, clay fraction, AL- P2O5, Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb and Cd in the runoff transported sediment. Statistical analysis were made between the enrichment ratios and the different soil properties, land use and rainfall conditions. Our results demonstrate the connections between the factors affected to the element transport processes on agricultural lands.

  2. A review of physiological and biochemical aspects of resistance to atrazine and paraquat in Hungarian weeds.

    PubMed

    Szigeti, Zoltán; Lehoczki, Endre

    2003-04-01

    The most important results in the field of atrazine and paraquat resistance research by Hungarian researchers are reviewed. Pleiotropic effects accompanying atrazine resistance were investigated in atrazine-resistant (AR) and susceptible (S) biotypes of horseweed (Conyza canadensis (L) Cronq). No significant difference in carbon dioxide assimilation rate was found between the AR and S plants. The rates of the Hill reaction of the AR and S chloroplasts exhibited different temperature dependence. The thylakoid membrane lipids contained a lower amount of polar lipid and the fatty acid content exhibited a higher degree of unsaturation in the AR biotype. Photosynthetic apparatus of the AR biotype had better adaptive ability at low temperature and showed enhanced susceptibility to high-temperature stress. AR horseweed plants had reduced activity of xanthophyll cycle, limited capacity of light-induced non-photochemical and photochemical quenching, higher photosensitivity and susceptibility to photo-inhibition. In the case of paraquat resistance, horseweed found in Hungary exhibited a resistance factor of 450; the resistance is not based on an elevated level and activity of the antioxidant enzyme system. The suggested role of polyamines in the resistance mechanisms can be excluded. The higher putrescine and total polyamine content of paraquat-treated R leaves can be regarded as a general stress response rather than as a symptom of paraquat resistance. A paraquat-inducible, nuclear-coded protein, which presumably functions by carrying paraquat to the vacuole, is supposed to play a role in resistance. PMID:12701707

  3. Behaviour profile of Hungarian adolescent outpatients with a dual diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Dinya, Elek; Csorba, Janos; Suli, Agota; Grosz, Zsofia

    2012-01-01

    The behaviour dimensions of 244 Hungarian adolescent psychiatric outpatients with a dual diagnosis (intellectual disability and psychiatric diagnosis) were examined by means of the adapted version of the Behaviour Problem Inventory (BPI, Rojahn, Matson, Lott, Esbensen, & Smalls, 2001). Four IQ subgroups were created: borderline, mild, moderate and profound ID subsamples. Significantly higher means were found in the self-injury/stereotyped behaviour/summarized scale categories both in the frequency and severity of symptoms in the more disabled groups against the samples having milder IQ impairment. Adolescents with a dual diagnosis showed much higher BPI scale means than an adult residential ID sample. ADHD and emotional disorders were the most frequent psychiatric diagnostic comorbidities of ID (20.67% and 11.73%). Academic achievement disorder, depression and psychosis had low occurrences (3.35, 2.23 and 1.17%, respectively) but showed convergency with other authors' data. The comorbid emotional disorders may create challenges for the care of the mildly intellectually disabled group. PMID:22537855

  4. [Tempora mutantur... et nos? The future of the Hungarian anatomy teaching in reflection of the German trends].

    PubMed

    Weiczner, Roland

    2015-10-01

    The traditional four-semester anatomy is a subject to change: next to the external pressure, there is an intrinsic need to shift the emphasis. The mapping of the strengths, weaknesses and threats of the Hungarian anatomy teaching helps to formulate the directions of possible development. Current trends in the German medical education should be carefully followed. Nowadays, nearly 25% of the medical students in Germany are studying according to the new, integrated "Modellstudiengang", i.e. all the conventional subjects are reorganised into organ system thematic blocks. The unified German written final exam system provides an objective assessment parameter: to rank the 36 German medical schools according to the results of the anatomy exams. The homepage-published data, the number of semesters or teaching hours, or the thematic concept of the subject alone cannot explain the rankings of the medical schools according to the anatomy exam results. The greatest challenges of the Hungarian anatomy teaching today are: the development of an outcome-oriented, unified, practical system of requirements, the redefinition of the subject, the more effective interaction with the clinical colleagues, solving the problems of faculty recruitment and establishing the vertical integration of anatomy. PMID:26551009

  5. Case Studies for Management Development in Bangladesh.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Gary N.

    Eight case studies appropriate for use in a course in management development were prepared and are provided in this document. The typical case describes a real business situation in which a real manager had to reach a decision. The case gives quantitative and qualitative information that is, or may be, relevant to that decision. Questions for…

  6. Study on Case Teaching of Financial Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Che, Zhenghong; Che, Zhengmei

    2011-01-01

    Case teaching is an efficient teaching method of management. It plays an important role to enhance the students' ability to practice the theory. However, case teaching of financial management has not achieved the expected results. The paper aims to study the importance, characteristics and corresponding methods of case teaching method of financial…

  7. Academic Planning: Four Institutional Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieft, Raymond N.

    As part of a project studying intrainstitutional planning, management, and evaluation, four case studies were undertaken in 1976 of academic planning at Villa Maria College, Kansas City Metropolitan Community College District, West Virginia University, and Western Washington University. The case studies were part of an ongoing project, the…

  8. Case Studies in Neurocritical Care.

    PubMed

    Sakusic, Amra; Rabinstein, Alejandro A

    2016-08-01

    The practice of neurocritical care encompasses multiple acute neurologic and neurosurgical diseases and requires detailed knowledge of neurology and critical care. This article presents 5 cases that illustrate just some of the conditions encountered in the daily practice of neurocritical care and exemplify some of the common diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic challenges facing the neurointensivist. Life-threatening medical complications after severe acute ischemic stroke, seizures and extreme agitation from autoimmune encephalitis, refractory seizures after subdural hemorrhage, neurologic and systemic complications related to aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, and status epilepticus after cardiac arrest are discussed in this article. PMID:27445248

  9. Composites in manufacturing - Case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Strong, A.B. )

    1991-01-01

    The papers presented in this volume focus on 19 cases of applied technology in composites design and manufacturing, all of them dealing with specific products. Topics covered include design using composite in aerospace, innovative materials and processing, tooling, fasteners and adhesives, finishing, repair, specialty applications of composites, and applications in the automotive industry. Papers are presented on the filament winding of isogrid fuselage structures; design and use of aramid fiber in aircraft structures; resin transfer molding of a complex composite aircraft structure; and field repair of an advanced helicopter vertical fin structure.

  10. [Association of the Scientific Societies of Hungarian Medical Doctors (MORTESZ) was founded 80 years ago].

    PubMed

    Kiss, István; Sótonyi, Péter

    2011-07-31

    After the First World War the professional medical societies in Hungary, which have already organized themselves nationwide, started to operate independently from each other. In that time came the idea to create another association above the others to gather them together while retaining their independent functioning. The Association of the Scientific Societies of Hungarian Medical Doctors (MORTESZ), established in 1931, became the nationwide forum for many medical associations. It also organized the first Hungarian Medical Grand-Week which became the annual meeting of the medical society. In the first year the cooperation only consisted of a common topic of two or three associations presented in the "Grand-Week". From year 1935, reports were appointed annually that each professional association could comment on. The proceedings of the "Grand-Week" were published yearly as appendices of the Hungarian Medical Journal. After the Second World War the activities of the independent associations were shut down by the authorities. The scientific and professional associations could continue their work as sections inside of the Doctors and Health Workers' Union. In 1966 the situation was solved thanks to the initiative of the Trade Union, the Department of Medicine and the Medical Section of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences which resulted in the foundation of the Association of the Hungarian Medical Societies (MOTESZ) which continues to gather together the collective work of many scientific associations and carries out tasks of general interest since then, similarly to the now 80-years-old MORTESZ. PMID:21788207

  11. Case studies in conservation science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisulca, Christina

    The research presented in this dissertation covers three separate topics of conservation as defined by the National Science Foundation: 1) Materials Stabilization, Strengthening, Monitoring, and Repair; 2. Understanding Material Degradation and Aging; and 3) Materials and Structural Characterization of Cultural Heritage Objects (the 'technical study'). The first topic is addressed through a study to assess the consolidant tetraethoxysilane for the stabilization of alum treated wood. Falling under materials degradation studies is a study published in American Museum Novitates to understand how environmental conditions affect the aging of fossil resins from five different deposits. Two separate studies are included in technical study of cultural heritage objects which comprises the third research area of materials characterization. The first is a survey of red dyes used in Chinese paintings from the Ming Dynasty to the Early Republic (1364-1911). The second is a study of the pigments, dyes and binders used in Hawaiian barkcloth (kapa) from the 19th century.

  12. Case-Control Study of Writer's Cramp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roze, E.; Soumare, A.; Pironneau, I.; Sangla, S.; de Cock, V. Cochen; Teixeira, A.; Astorquiza, A.; Bonnet, C.; Bleton, J. P.; Vidailhet, M.; Elbaz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Task-specific focal dystonias are thought to be due to a combination of individual vulnerability and environmental factors. There are no case-control studies of risk factors for writer's cramp. We undertook a case-control study of 104 consecutive patients and matched controls to identify risk factors for the condition. We collected detailed data…

  13. A Constructive Controversy Approach to "Case Studies"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Sharon R.; Erickson, Karla A.

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of analysis of student responses to a case study titled "Drinks and Dinner," the authors evaluate the pedagogical potential of using constructive controversy case studies to teach about inequality. "Drinks and Dinner" is designed to capture the complexity of social interactions that defy simple solutions to engage students in…

  14. Self-Employment Training Programs: Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Melissa, Ed.; And Others

    This self-employment training program case study booklet has been developed for general use in exploring the feasibility of this kind of development tool. The case studies describe a number of comprehensive, self-employment training and assistance programs, from the local to the national level. Chapter II includes information on the training plan,…

  15. Chemical Case Studies: Science-Society "Bonding."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstein, Avi; Nae, Nehemia

    1981-01-01

    Describes a unit designed to illustrate the "science-society-technology connection," in which three case studies of the chemical industry in Israel are presented to high school chemistry students. Chosen for the unit are case studies on copper production in Timna, on plastics, and on life from the Dead Sea. (CS)

  16. Twenty Techniques for Teaching with Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sudzina, Mary R.

    2005-01-01

    Problem-based learning and teaching with case studies are instructional approaches that are increasingly being applied in a variety of disciplines, such as business, law, medicine, and education. Instructors who have experienced traditional, teacher-centered instruction are often looking for ways to successfully integrate case studies, a…

  17. Using Case Studies: An International Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClam, Tricia; Woodside, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    Case studies as an instructional strategy have been used in many disciplines, including law, teacher education, science, medicine, and business. Among the benefits of this method of instruction are involving students in learning, developing their critical thinking skills, promoting communication, and engaging in critical analysis. Case studies are…

  18. Library Media Center Problems: Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coburn, Louis

    Problems which arise in school library media centers are considered, using the case study method. The 30 case studies cover: problems in child management; the librarian's role in reading instruction and guidance, and in teaching library skills; conflicting opinions on the management and objectives of the media center; the librarian's role and job…

  19. Collaboration in Distance Education. International Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Louise, Ed.; Mugridge, Ian, Ed.

    This book contains nine case studies of collaboration in distance education. The case studies focus on such aspects of collaboration in distance education as the following: roles of individual institutional partners; importance of personal relationships; benefits of collaboration to individual partners; conflicts between collaboration and…

  20. Teaching Case Studies: A Collaborative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buffington, James R.; Harper, Jeffrey S.

    Many of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accredited schools require undergraduate Management Information Systems (MIS) majors to take a course in the management of information technology. Over half of these schools utilize case studies in the teaching of this course. The authors emphasize that case studies are an…

  1. A Case Study of "Empathetic Teaching Artistry"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risner, Doug

    2014-01-01

    This case study is one of twenty cases derived from Anderson and Risner's international study of teaching artists in dance, and theatre, which investigated participants' (n=172) artistic and academic preparation in dance, and theatre, initial entry into the teaching artist field, rewards, challenges, and obstacles in participants'…

  2. Case Studies for Teaching Students with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macnamara, Gael R.

    2004-01-01

    This easy-to-use book of case studies helps you recognize the signs of dyslexia and prescribe effective teaching strategies for students with dyslexia. It includes a Case Study Analysis Sheet so you can work through important aspects of a student's personal, academic, and social life. You can then compare what you've compiled to the author's…

  3. Is Pain Suffering? A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Helen K.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the case study of an elderly woman shows how bodily pain and suffering meld in her narrative, not as the subjective and objective sides of the same event, but as distinct experiences in which both constructs emerge separately or come together based on the meaning she imputes to the event. The case study shows the clear…

  4. Iowa College Student Aid Commission Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leigh, Rachel A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive case study was to trace the policy production process of a state agency, the Iowa College Student Aid Commission (Commission), to its function today. This case study relied on a review of federal and state statutes, a news article search, biennium reports of the Commission, and information obtained from the…

  5. The Soil Degradation Subsystem of the Hungarian Environmental Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, József; Pirkó, Béla; Szabóné Kele, Gabriella; Dombos, Miklós; László, Péter; Koós, Sándor; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Laborczi, Annamária; Pásztor, László

    2013-04-01

    Regular data collection on the state of agricultural soils has not been in operation in Hungary for more than two decades. In the meantime, mainly thanks to the Hungarian Soil Strategy and the planned Soil Framework Directive, the demand for the information on state of Hungarian soils and the follow up of the harmful changes in their conditions and functioning has greatly increased. In 2010 the establishment of a new national soil monitoring system was supported by the Environment and Energy Operational Programme for Informatics Development. The aim of the project was to collect, manage, analyse and publish soil data related to the state of soils and the environmental stresses attributed to the pressures due to agriculture; setting up an appropriate information system in order to fulfil the directives of the Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection. Further objective was the web-based publication of soil data as well as information to support the related public service mission and to inform publicity. The developed information system operates as the Soil Degradation Subsystem of the National Environmental Information System being compatible with its other elements. A suitable representative sampling method was elaborated. The representativity is meant for soil associations, landuse, agricultural practices and typical degradation processes. Soil data were collected on county levels led by regional representatives but altogether they are representative for the whole territory of Hungary. During the project, about 700,000 elementary data were generated, close to 2,000 parcels of 285 farms were surveyed resulting more than 9,000 analysis, 7,000 samples and 28,000 pictures. The overall number of the recorded parcels is 4500, with a total area of about 250,000 hectares. The effect of agricultural land use on soils manifests in rapid changes -related to natural processes- in qualitative and quantitative soil parameters. In intensively used agricultural areas, particularly

  6. A case study of embarrassment.

    PubMed

    Dann, O T

    1977-01-01

    The psychoanalytic references to embarrassment are reviewed. Embarrassment, in the literature, is seen largely as an affect involving exhibitionistic and scopophilic conflicts and defenses against these. A case in which embarrassment was prominent is discussed. Embarrassment in the patient was an ego response which implied an external object for its manifestation. It involved exhibitionistic and scopophilic conflicts and projective defenses, but also operated in ego-gratifying and adaptive ways. Her embarrassment was understood through the analysis of an initial embarrassing dream of nakedness and other dreams and associated material as the defensive out-grouth of repeated exposures to the primal scene. Embarrassment was a resistance to remembering in the analysis, and the primal-scene experiences were partially reconstructed. The analytic situation was, in many ways, a symbolic re-creation of the primal scene, including the patient's response of embarrassment. The development of embarrassment in the patient's childhood was furthered and confirmed by its being an identification with the attitudes of both parents. Finally, some reflections on embarrassment and shame in its various forms are set forth. PMID:560404

  7. Modern midwifery: two case studies.

    PubMed

    Anderson, S

    1985-01-01

    To gain more understanding of the practices of modern midwives, 2 births occurring in a Botswanan District Hospital Maternity Ward were observed by a research assistant. Naturalistic observation was considered more reliable than interviews with either patients or modern midwives to assess the biosocial aspects of birth in the modern sector. At admission to the labor room, these 2 midwives checked the patient's blood pressure, performed a vaginal examination, checked the fetal heart, palpated the uterus, shaved the public hair, and administered an enema. Both midwives did not communicate with their patients during these procedures or offer information on the results. The patients were told not to push; 1 midwife commented, "In the hospital, nobody delivers by herself." Rather, patients were instructed to do their "breathing exercises," a term with which they were not familiar and was not explained. In the 1st case, an episiotomy was performed. Both births were uneventful in terms of complications, but marked by a lack of attention to the psychological needs of the patient or sufficient explanations as to the progress of the delivery. Overall, all communications between the modern midwives observed and their patients were impersonal, with an emphasis on technical procedures. PMID:12282440

  8. Five case studies of multifamily weatherization programs

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, L; Wilson, T.; Lewis, G.; MacDonald, M.

    1997-12-31

    The multifamily case studies that are the subject of this report were conducted to provide a better understanding of the approach taken by program operators in weatherizing large buildings. Because of significant variations in building construction and energy systems across the country, five states were selected based on their high level of multifamily weatherization. This report summarizes findings from case studies conducted by multifamily weatherization operations in five cities. The case studies were conducted between January and November 1994. Each of the case studies involved extensive interviews with the staff of weatherization subgrantees conducting multifamily weatherization, the inspection of 4 to 12 buildings weatherized between 1991 and 1993, and the analysis of savings and costs. The case studies focused on innovative techniques which appear to work well.

  9. Implementation of the Hungarian RW management project: Results and lessons

    SciTech Connect

    Vigassy, J.; Czoch, I.; Ormai, P.

    1995-12-31

    In 1993, a National RW Management Project was launched to solve handling and disposal of LLW/ILW of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant and to elaborate a complex strategy for the management of radwastes from the NPP, including HLW, spent fuel and wastes from the decommissioning. It was intended to implement the project so as to have selected the possible site (or sites) for the LLW/ILW waste repository by 1996. This paper describes the first results of the nation-wide screening for suitable areas and the problems related to the comparative evaluation process to select potential sites for a surface or geological LLW/ILW disposal facility. International tenders were issued to find the most appropriate technology to reduce the quantity of liquid and solid radwaste in the Nuclear Power Plant. Their results will provide a better basis for planning the characteristics and quantity of radwaste. The applications revealed that supercompacting can be ordered as a service when the need arises, and thus it was possible to re-allocate the funding originally foreseen for the equipment to treat solid wastes. Great importance is attached in the Project to public acceptance and PR activity. An expert organization was selected in a two-phase bidding process, and it was decided that detailed exploration of a potential site will take place only if public acceptance is assured. The original program of the Hungarian RW Management Project was extended in 1994 to perform on-site underground investigations (with Canadian support) in a silt-stone formation. The first results confirm that this is a potential site for deep geological disposal of HLW. The financial and legal framework of the RW management is also to be solved. The new law on nuclear energy -- now in preparation -- will deal with that problem in one of its most important chapters, defining the responsibilities for RW management and the sources of funding.

  10. Theoretical pluralism in psychoanalytic case studies

    PubMed Central

    Willemsen, Jochem; Cornelis, Shana; Geerardyn, Filip M.; Desmet, Mattias; Meganck, Reitske; Inslegers, Ruth; Cauwe, Joachim M. B. D.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the scientific activity of different psychoanalytic schools of thought in terms of the content and production of case studies published on ISI Web of Knowledge. Between March 2013 and November 2013, we contacted all case study authors included in the online archive of psychoanalytic and psychodynamic case studies (www.singlecasearchive.com) to inquire about their psychoanalytic orientation during their work with the patient. The response rate for this study was 45%. It appears that the two oldest psychoanalytic schools, Object-relations psychoanalysis and Ego psychology or “Classical psychoanalysis” dominate the literature of published case studies. However, most authors stated that they feel attached to two or more psychoanalytic schools of thought. This confirms that the theoretical pluralism in psychoanalysis stretches to the field of single case studies. The single case studies of each psychoanalytic school are described separately in terms of methodology, patient, therapist, or treatment features. We conclude that published case studies features are fairly similar across different psychoanalytic schools. The results of this study are not representative of all psychoanalytic schools, as some do not publish their work in ISI ranked journals. PMID:26483725

  11. Rove beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) collected during the long term ecological research in a Hungarian oak forest.

    PubMed

    Balog, Adalbert; Marko, Viktor; Adam, Laszlo

    2008-03-01

    Along term ecological research was carried out in a Hungarian oak forest, in "Bükk" National Park starting with 1972. During the faunistical studies 3,602 insect species and more than 200,000 individuals were collected. The dominant orders were Coleoptera (1,051 species), Lepidoptera (803 species), Hymenoptera (470 species) and Diptera (400 species). The relative species abundance (RSA) for all insects collected in all years of sampling period suggests a rather J shape curve than a not clear scaling property. This means that we were able to identify almost three quarters of the insect species from one ha European oak forest during the survey (from 1987 to 2003), and two third of the staphylinides expected. Considering the staphylinid fauna a total number of 160 species and 4,022 individuals were collected. The most widely occurring species in dominance order were: Ocypus biharicus, Pseudocypus mus, Atheta gagatina, Philonthus quisquiliarius, Oxypoda acuminate, Platydracus chalcocephalus, Atheta crassicomis, Latrimaeum atrocephalum, Haploglossa puncticollis, Philonthus succicola and Anotylus mutator. The pooled value of alpha diversity was 1.51. The Shannon-Weiner Index (H') was relatively high (3.29) in comparison with other studies. PMID:18831387

  12. Outage management: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, S.B.; Barriere, M.T. ); Roberts, K.H. . Walter A. Haas School of Business)

    1992-01-01

    Outage management issues identified from a field study conducted at a two-unit commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR), when one unit was in a refueling outage and the other unit was at full power operation, are the focus of this paper. The study was conduced as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) organizational factors research program, and therefore the issues to be addressed are from an organizational perspective. Topics discussed refer to areas identified by the NRC as critical for safety during shutdown operations, including outage planning and control, personnel stress, and improvements in training and procedures. Specifically, issues in communication, management attention, involvement and oversight, administrative processes, organizational culture, and human resources relevant to each of the areas are highlighted by example from field data collection. Insights regarding future guidance in these areas are presented based upon additional data collection subsequent to the original study.

  13. Outage management: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, S.B.; Barriere, M.T.; Roberts, K.H.

    1992-09-01

    Outage management issues identified from a field study conducted at a two-unit commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR), when one unit was in a refueling outage and the other unit was at full power operation, are the focus of this paper. The study was conduced as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) organizational factors research program, and therefore the issues to be addressed are from an organizational perspective. Topics discussed refer to areas identified by the NRC as critical for safety during shutdown operations, including outage planning and control, personnel stress, and improvements in training and procedures. Specifically, issues in communication, management attention, involvement and oversight, administrative processes, organizational culture, and human resources relevant to each of the areas are highlighted by example from field data collection. Insights regarding future guidance in these areas are presented based upon additional data collection subsequent to the original study.

  14. Case Studies in Literacy Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purvis, Don

    The report details results of a research project to monitor and map the literacy development of three learners of English as a Second Language (ESL) studying in an Australian English program for adult migrants. The objective was to gain a longitudinal picture of their reading and writing development over a period of nine months. Five additional…

  15. A Case Study of Engineering Ethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kazuo

    In Engineering Ethics Class at Shizuoka University, the Code of Ethics and Cases for Electrical Engineers by IEEJ Ethics committee is used to promote for high education effect to correspond large number of students (140students). In this paper, a case study in the class, and survey results for ethics value of students are presented. In addition, some comments for role playing act on the case of virtual experiences by students are described.

  16. Labyrinthine sequestrum: four case studies.

    PubMed

    Lao, Zheng; Sha, Yan; Chen, Bing; Dai, Chun-Fu; Huang, Wen-Hu; Cheng, Yu-Shu

    2012-09-01

    Labyrinthine sequestrum, a rare form of labyrinthitis, is highly distinct from the more commonly encountered labyrinthitis ossificans based on its unique clinical, radiologic, and histologic characteristics. The study included 4 such patients who had undergone clinical and laboratory investigations, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessments followed by surgical procedures and pathological evaluation. Their major symptoms were otorrhea, otalgia, tinnitus, and profound hearing loss. Imaging studies showed an osteolytic soft mass with calcified debris in the inner ear, and the bony labyrinth was eroded partly or completely by granulation mass, with loss of bony morphology. Further pathological examination was coincident with inflammatory granulation tissue with some calcification or osseous tissue. The disease process is attributed to chronic osteomyelitis due to the presence of osteonecrosis. Prompt CT and MRI examinations and optimal therapeutic management facilitate definitive diagnosis and protect against fatal complications. PMID:22467283

  17. [Recurrent European missense mutation in a Hungarian pedigree with Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome].

    PubMed

    Vályi, Péter; Farkas, Katalin; Tripolszki, Kornélia; Sulák, Adrienn; Széll, Márta; Nagy, Nikoletta; Nagy, Katalin

    2014-09-01

    Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome, a rare disease with autosomal recessive inheritance, is characterized by aggressive periodontitis and palmoplantar hyperkeratosis. Mutations of the cathepsin C gene are responsible for the development of the disease. In this study, we aimed to describe in details the clinical symptoms and to determine the underlying genetic abnormality in two Hungarian siblings affected by Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome. The siblings are under regular dental and dermatological care since their symptoms appeared, but, due to the fact that genetic analysis of Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome has been available for one or two years in Hungary, their mutation screenings were just recently performed. We have identified a homozygous missense mutation on the cathepsin C gene, which is an already published mutation and was originally reported from Germany. Our investigations would like to draw attention to a rare disease, Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome, in which first symptom can be the aggressive periodontitis, and in which genetic testing and for helping child-bearing and family planning is now available. PMID:25509509

  18. Psychometric properties and construct validity of the Muscle Appearance Satisfaction Scale among Hungarian men.

    PubMed

    Babusa, Bernadett; Urbán, Róbert; Czeglédi, Edit; Túry, Ferenc

    2012-01-01

    Limited studies have evaluated the psychometric properties of the Muscle Appearance Satisfaction Scale (MASS), a measure of muscle dysmorphia, in different cultures and languages. The aims were to examine the psychometric properties of the Hungarian version of the MASS (MASS-HU), and to investigate its relationship with self-esteem and exercise-related variables. Two independent samples of male weight lifters (ns=289 and 43), and a sample of undergraduates (n=240) completed the MASS, Eating Disorder Inventory, and Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale. Exploratory factor analysis supported the original five-factor structure of the MASS only in the weight lifter sample. The MASS-HU had excellent scale score reliability and good test-retest reliability. The construct validity of the MASS-HU was tested with multivariate regression analyses which indicated an inverse relationship between self-esteem and muscle dysmorphia. The 18-item MASS-HU was found to be a useful measure for the assessment of muscle dysmorphia among male weight lifters. PMID:21962394

  19. Influence of risk-taking health behaviours of adolescents on cervical cancer prevention: a Hungarian survey.

    PubMed

    Marek, E; Berenyi, K; Dergez, T; Kiss, I; D'Cruz, G

    2016-01-01

    An anonymous questionnaire survey was conducted among the Hungarian adolescents to establish their use of tobacco, alcohol and drugs in relation to sexual behaviours, knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer, and beliefs and attitudes towards screening and vaccination. Results indicated that adolescent risk-taking health behaviours correlate with risky sexual behaviours. As risk-taking behaviours do not correlate with a better awareness of the risk associated with HPV infection, it is of crucial importance that HPV/cervical cancer preventing educational programmes shall be sensitive to this 'vulnerable' population and draw the attention of these adolescents to their increased risk of sexually transmitted diseases and undesired pregnancies. Well-designed behavioural change interventions may be effective when in addition to providing adolescents (both men and women) with clear information about the implications of an HPV infection, they also aim to improve safer sex behaviours: consistent condom usage, limiting the number of sex partners, as well as encouraging regular participation in gynaecological screenings and uptake of the HPV vaccine. As this study population demonstrated positive attitudes towards the primary and secondary prevention of cervical cancer, the free HPV vaccination for the 12-13-year-old girls in Autumn 2014 will hopefully increase the currently low uptake of the vaccine in Hungary. PMID:26059166

  20. Brick handling: a case study.

    PubMed

    Webb, R D; Handyside, J

    1982-09-01

    A small change in brick dimensions resulted in an increase in the perceived work-load of men loading and unloading pallets of bricks by hand. A laboratory study indicated that the change in brick dimensions required changes in grip pattern in order to unload bricks at the same rate, moving the same number at a time. These changed grip patterns resulted in increased upper body movement, increased chest-muscle activity and higher heart rates. These differences were reflected in higher subjective ratings of fatigue. PMID:15676442

  1. River sinuosity changes as indicators of the possible neotectonic activity - a case study on the Danube River between Paks (Hungary) and Beograd (Serbia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovszki, Judit

    2010-05-01

    . However, another possible explanation is based on the significant sediment load of the tributary, that is naturally decreases the river sinuosity. Horváth, F., Bada, G., Windhoffer, G., Csontos, L., Dombrádi, E., Dövényi, P., Fodor, L., Grenerczy, Gy., Síkhegyi, F., Szafián, P., Székely, B., Timár, G., Tóth, L., Tóth, T. (2006): A Pannon-medence jelenkori geodinamikájának atlasza: Euro-konform térképsorozat és magyarázó. Magyar Geofizika 47(4), 133-137. Ouchi, S. (1985): Response of alluvial rivers to slow active tectonic movement. Geol. Soc. Am. Bull. 96, 504-515. Timár, G. (2003): Controls on channel sinuosity changes: a case study of the Tisza River, the Great Hungarian Plain. Quaternary Sci. Rev. 22, 2199-2207. Timár, G., Molnár, G., Székely, B., Biszak, S., Varga, J., Jankó, A. (2006): Digitized maps of the Habsburg Empire - The map sheets of the second military survey and their georeferenced version. Arcanum, Budapest, 59 p. van Balen, R. T., Kasse, C., Moor, J. (2008): Impact of groundwater flow on meandering; example from the Geul river, the Netherlands. Earth Surf. Process. and Landf. 33(13), 2010-2028. Zámolyi, A., Székely, B., Draganits, E., Timár, G. (2010): Neotectonic control on river sinuosity at the western margin of the Little Hungarian Plain. Geomorph., in press, DOI: 10.1016/j.geomorph.2009.06.028

  2. Case Studies on Educational Administration. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Theodore J.

    This book contains 24 case studies selected to demonstrate the different types of challenges in contemporary educational leadership. It is intended to help prospective administrators develop decision-making skills. The cases are quite complex with multiple viewpoints and aspects. They represent a range of problems encountered by practitioners in…

  3. Case Studies of Environmental Risks to Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Lynn R.

    1995-01-01

    Presents case studies on children's exposure to pesticides, including risks through the use of the insecticide aldicarb on bananas, the home use of diazinon, and the use of interior house paint containing mercury. These cases illustrate how regulatory agencies, parents, health-care providers, and others who come into contact with children have…

  4. Case Studies in Elementary and Secondary Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boboc, Marius; Nordgren, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    Practical and engaging, this book contains 21 case studies that help students apply curriculum theory to classroom reality. Each case is authored by an in-service teacher, reflecting on ways to improve instruction by making changes to various aspects of the curriculum. These real-life examples investigate up-to-date curricular issues ranging from…

  5. Abbreviated Case Studies in Organizational Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanguri, Deloris McGee

    2005-01-01

    The cases contained within organizational communication texts are generally two to three pages, often followed by questions. These case studies are certainly useful. They generally describe events in the present, provide some type of organizational context, include first-hand data, include a record of what people say and think, develop a…

  6. Case Study Report #8. Lisa Williams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Douglas D.; And Others

    This document presents one in a series of twenty-three case studies derived from in-depth interviews using a sampling of former participants in the Mountain-Plains program, a residential, family-based education program developed to improve the economic potential and lifestyle of selected student families in a six-state area. Each case study…

  7. A Singapore Case of Lesson Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Lu Pien; Yee, Lee Peng

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we present a case study of six Singaporean elementary school teachers working in a Lesson Study team that prepared them for problem solving instruction. The Lesson Study process included preparing, observing, and critiquing mathematics lessons in the context of solving fractions tasks. By conducting Lesson Study, we anticipated…

  8. Medical knowledge and the improvement of vernacular languages in the Habsburg Monarchy: a case study from Transylvania (1770-1830).

    PubMed

    Sechel, Teodora Daniela

    2012-09-01

    In all European countries, the eighteenth century was characterised by efforts to improve the vernaculars. The Transylvanian case study shows how both codified medical language and ordinary language were constructed and enriched by a large number of medical books and brochures. The publication of medical literature in Central European vernacular languages in order to popularise new medical knowledge was a comprehensive programme, designed on the one hand by intellectual, political and religious elites who urged the improvement of the fatherland and the promotion of the common good by perfecting the arts and sciences. On the other hand, the imperial administration's initiatives affected local forms of medical knowledge and the construction of vernacular languages. In the eighteenth century, the construction of vernacular languages in the Habsburg Monarchy took on a significant political character. However, in the process of building of the scientific and medical vocabulary, the main preoccupation was precision, clarity and accessibility of the neologisms being invented to encompass the medical phenomena being described. In spite of political conflicts among the 'nations' living in Transylvania, physicians borrowed words from German, Hungarian and Romanian. Thus they elevated several words used in everyday language to the upper social stratum of language use, leading to the invention of new terms to describe particular medical practices or phenomena. PMID:22595134

  9. Medical knowledge and the improvement of vernacular languages in the Habsburg Monarchy: A case study from Transylvania (1770–1830)

    PubMed Central

    Sechel, Teodora Daniela

    2012-01-01

    In all European countries, the eighteenth century was characterised by efforts to improve the vernaculars. The Transylvanian case study shows how both codified medical language and ordinary language were constructed and enriched by a large number of medical books and brochures. The publication of medical literature in Central European vernacular languages in order to popularise new medical knowledge was a comprehensive programme, designed on the one hand by intellectual, political and religious elites who urged the improvement of the fatherland and the promotion of the common good by perfecting the arts and sciences. On the other hand, the imperial administration’s initiatives affected local forms of medical knowledge and the construction of vernacular languages. In the eighteenth century, the construction of vernacular languages in the Habsburg Monarchy took on a significant political character. However, in the process of building of the scientific and medical vocabulary, the main preoccupation was precision, clarity and accessibility of the neologisms being invented to encompass the medical phenomena being described. In spite of political conflicts among the ‘nations’ living in Transylvania, physicians borrowed words from German, Hungarian and Romanian. Thus they elevated several words used in everyday language to the upper social stratum of language use, leading to the invention of new terms to describe particular medical practices or phenomena. PMID:22595134

  10. BTS Case Study: The Galloway Family Home

    SciTech Connect

    Brandegee Group

    1999-03-08

    Case study of an energy-efficient Habitat for Humanity house that uses 30% less energy than conventional residential construction. The project was part of the Jimmy Carter Work Project in rural Appalachia in 1997.

  11. A Case Study about Communication Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Grace Hui Chin

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this case study was to identify what were Taiwanese University English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners' perceptions about learning communication strategies. This study collected qualitative data about students' beliefs and attitudes as they learned communication strategies. The research question guiding the study was:…

  12. Education and Work Councils: Four Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prager, Audrey; And Others

    This collection of four case studies represents the conclusion of a two-phase study of a federal program to sponsor education and work councils. Following an outline of the history and concept of education and work councils as well as the findings of a study of such councils, the importance of council collaboration with selected sectors is…

  13. Predicting Students Drop Out: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dekker, Gerben W.; Pechenizkiy, Mykola; Vleeshouwers, Jan M.

    2009-01-01

    The monitoring and support of university freshmen is considered very important at many educational institutions. In this paper we describe the results of the educational data mining case study aimed at predicting the Electrical Engineering (EE) students drop out after the first semester of their studies or even before they enter the study program…

  14. A Retrospective Appraisal of 15 Years' Proceedings of the Hungarian Research Student Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revesz, Tamas; Olah, Mate

    2013-01-01

    In 1996 the Hungarian Research Student Association (HRSA) was founded. Since then more than 6000 young, talented researchers have belonged to the Association. The founders set two principal aims: (1) to support the gifted and the most promising high school students and (2) to establish an active community. The movement has grown through the work…

  15. Hungarian Innovation Policy: What's the Best Way Forward? OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 445

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmings, Philip

    2005-01-01

    The Hungarian government has recently been focusing on innovation policy as part of a wider campaign to improve the business environment. This paper first underscores the importance of a good general business climate in encouraging both formal and informal R&D activity as well as ensuring Hungary benefits from the international diffusion of…

  16. Nationwide Network of TalentPoints: The Hungarian Approach to Talent Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csermely, Peter; Rajnai, Gabor; Sulyok, Katalin

    2013-01-01

    In 2006 a novel approach to talent support was promoted by several talent support programmes in Hungary. The new idea was a network approach. The nationwide network of so-called TalentPoints and its framework, the Hungarian Genius Program, gained substantial European Union funding in 2009, and today it is growing rapidly. A novel concept of talent…

  17. Quality Management in Hungarian Higher Education: Organisational Responses to Governmental Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csizmadia, Tibor; Enders, Jurgen; Westerheijden, Don F.

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on responses of higher education institutions to governmental policy. We investigate the influence of organisational characteristics on the implementation of quality management in Hungarian higher education institutions. Our theoretical framework is based on organisational theories (resource dependency and…

  18. Examination of Mathematics Textbooks in Use in Hungarian Primary Schools in Romania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tünde, Baranyai; Gabriella, Stark

    2011-01-01

    A good textbook must meet a number of pedagogical, psychological, scientific, esthetical, and other requirements. The presented research examines whether the mathematics textbooks in use in Hungarian primary schools in Romania meet those requirements. We used documentation, contents analysis and surveys as research methods. We examined the…

  19. The Hungarian Patient: Museum Education in Hungary and the Challenges of Democratic Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasarhelyi, Tamas

    2012-01-01

    This article outlines the changes, developments, activities, and challenges faced by Hungarian museums over the last few decades. It shows that there was life behind the "Iron Curtain," with museums enjoying relative financial stability. While the political and economic changes associated with the transition from a communist to a democratically…

  20. Cross-Validation of a PACER Prediction Equation for Assessing Aerobic Capacity in Hungarian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint-Maurice, Pedro F.; Welk, Gregory J.; Finn, Kevin J.; Kaj, Mónika

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to evaluate the validity of the Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular and Endurance Run (PACER) test in a sample of Hungarian youth. Method: Approximately 500 participants (aged 10-18 years old) were randomly selected across Hungary to complete both laboratory (maximal treadmill protocol) and field assessments…

  1. The "Cosmopolitan" Project and Hungarian Kindergarten Education: Re-Reading Socialism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millei, Zsuzsa; Imre, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we argue that the socialist kindergarten in Hungary (1948-1989) was set up to aid the modernizing of a nation in a particular way and in a historical and political context in which the only way forward was to leave behind aspects of the past and start a new chapter in Hungarian history. Comparing this project to the…

  2. An Optimality Theoretic Account of Hungarian ESL Learners' Acquisition of /[epsilon]/ and /[ash]/

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunta, Ferenc; Major, Roy C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides an Optimality Theoretic account of how Hungarian learners of English acquire /[epsilon]/ and /[ash]/. It is hypothesized that as the learners' pronunciation becomes more nativelike, L1 transfer substitutions will diminish; non-transfer substitutions will be especially prevalent in the intermediate stages, and that all learners…

  3. A Survey of Human Resource Management and Qualification Levels in Hungarian Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berde, Csaba; Piros, Marta

    2006-01-01

    The question of quality and value of human resources have been at the forefront of Hungarian agriculture for the past few years. The decreasing number of agricultural employees in Hungary in the last decade (1990-2000) is a result of the crisis caused by the change of the socio-economic system rather than economic and technological development.…

  4. Gigantic Suprapubic Lymphedema: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanhaeivash, Roozbeh; Franiel, Tobias; Grimm, Marc-Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We present the first case study of idiopathic gigantic suprapubic lymphedema and buried penis treated with puboscrotal reconstruction in a patient with initial extreme obesity after an extensive weight reduction (120 kg). Massive localized lymphedema of the suprapubic region should be differentiated from the scrotal type. Severe lymphedema could not resolve on its own and weight reduction does not seem to be helpful in such cases. PMID:27574599

  5. Gigantic Suprapubic Lymphedema: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Tanhaeivash, Roozbeh; Franiel, Tobias; Grimm, Marc-Oliver; Horstmann, Marcus

    2016-08-01

    We present the first case study of idiopathic gigantic suprapubic lymphedema and buried penis treated with puboscrotal reconstruction in a patient with initial extreme obesity after an extensive weight reduction (120 kg). Massive localized lymphedema of the suprapubic region should be differentiated from the scrotal type. Severe lymphedema could not resolve on its own and weight reduction does not seem to be helpful in such cases. PMID:27574599

  6. Nuclear forensic investigations: two case studies.

    PubMed

    Wallenius, M; Mayer, K; Ray, I

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology and analytical methods used in nuclear forensic investigations. Two case studies are taken as examples to illustrate this. These examples represent typical cases that have been analysed at the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) since last 10 years, i.e. the beginning of the illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. Results of the various analytical techniques are shown, which, together with other type of information, reveal the origin of the material. PMID:16410154

  7. Social Studies Project Evaluation: Case Study and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, John

    1982-01-01

    Describes the development and application of a model for social studies program evaluations. A case study showing how the model's three-step process was used to evaluate the Improving Citizenship Education Project in Fulton County, Georgia is included. (AM)

  8. Technologies in Literacy Learning: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloonan, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This article draws on outcomes of a study which explored changes in teachers' literacy pedagogies as a result of their participation in a collaborative teacher professional learning project. The educational usability of schemas drawn from multiliteracies and Learning by Design theory is illustrated through a case study of a teacher's work on…

  9. Collaborative Assessment: Middle School Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkison, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing a participant observer research model, a case study of the efficacy of a collaborative assessment methodology within a middle school social studies class was conducted. A review of existing research revealed that students' perceptions of assessment, evaluation, and accountability influence their intrinsic motivation to learn. A…

  10. Case Studies of the Migrant Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Ellen L.

    Intended for federal policymakers, this study examined four aspects of the Chapter 1 migrant education program: program administration, program services, students served, and program expenditures. Case studies were conducted in California, Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, Oregon, and Texas between November 1986 and March 1987. State agencies and…

  11. Case Studies in Australian Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Ralph J., Ed.; Rooth, S. John, Ed.

    This publication contains the following 24 case studies of adult education in Australia: "NSW Department of Agriculture Home Study Programme" (O'Neill); "Self-Help Adult Education: The University of the Third Age at the Brisbane CAE" (Swindell); "Marriage Enrichment Programme" (D. Kerr, C. Kerr); "Carringbush Library: A Place to Be" (Letcher);…

  12. A Multiple Case Study of Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Wei; Khoury, Anne E.

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to explore how leadership and contextual factors influence innovation in R&D teams in national laboratories, using the approach of multiple case studies. This paper provides some preliminary findings from two highly innovative teams residing in two national laboratories in the US. The preliminary results suggested several common…

  13. Connecting Reading and Writing: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Zhanfang

    2015-01-01

    Connecting reading and writing, proposed by many scholars, is realized in this case study. The 30 participants in this study are the English majors of the third year in one School of Foreign Languages in Beijing. They are encouraged to write journals every week, based on the source text materials in their Intensive Reading class, with the final…

  14. Anthropology and Popular Culture: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, Jack

    The study of popular culture in the United States is an appropriate anthropological endeavor, as evidenced in a case study of the volcanic eruption of Mt. St. Helens in Oregon. By examining its popular arts, anthropologists gain understanding of the culture and its people. For example, an analysis of reactions to the Mt. St. Helens eruption…

  15. CASE STUDY: DIELDRIN ATTACK IN DALYAN LAGOON

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the first two weeks of December 2005, NATO sponsored an Advanced Study Institute (ASI) in Istanbul, Turkey. Part of this ASI involved a case study of a terrorist attack, where a chemical was assumed to be dumped into Sulunger Lake in Turkey. This chapter documents the re...

  16. Case Studies of Three Interorganizational Arrangements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.; And Others

    As part of their study of interorganizational collaboration, researchers present three detailed case studies of how regional education agencies (REAs) supply knowledge utilization services to the school districts they serve. The three REAs are the Wayne County (Michigan) Intermediate School District (with 36 districts), the Educational Improvement…

  17. [3rd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference - Surgery Guidelines].

    PubMed

    Lázár, György; Bursics, Attila; Farsang, Zoltán; Harsányi, László; Kósa, Csaba; Maráz, Róbert; Mátrai, Zoltán; Paszt, Attila; Pavlovics, Gábor; Tamás, Róbert

    2016-09-01

    Therapy for breast cancer today is characterised by ever more precise diagnostic methods and ever more effective oncological treatments, a trend which will certainly continue in the future. Breast preservation and the application of oncoplastic principles are increasingly popular. A sentinel lymph node biopsy in the surgical treatment of the axilla is primary, with the indication for axillary block dissection (ABD) narrowing and radiation therapy becoming an alternative to ABD in certain cases. This publication summarises our recommendations on the surgical treatment of breast cancer based on the content of the 2nd Breast Cancer Consensus Conference and considering the latest international studies and professional recommendations. PMID:27579720

  18. Integrating ethics into case study assignments.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Pamela A

    2014-12-01

    I teach an upper-level writing course, Genes, Race, Gender, and Society, designed for Life Science majors, in which I utilize a case study to expose students to ethical ways of thinking. Students first work through the topical case study and then are challenged to rethink their responses through the lenses of ethics, taking into account different ethical frameworks. Students then develop their own case study, integrating ethical components. I want to expose my students to this way of thinking because I see technology being driven by the Jurassic Park phenomenon, "Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn't stop to think if they should," and want future physicians grounded in a sense of how their actions relate to the greater good. PMID:25574287

  19. Shuttle Case Study Collection Website Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Khadijah S.; Johnson, Grace K.

    2012-01-01

    As a continuation from summer 2012, the Shuttle Case Study Collection has been developed using lessons learned documented by NASA engineers, analysts, and contractors. Decades of information related to processing and launching the Space Shuttle is gathered into a single database to provide educators with an alternative means to teach real-world engineering processes. The goal is to provide additional engineering materials that enhance critical thinking, decision making, and problem solving skills. During this second phase of the project, the Shuttle Case Study Collection website was developed. Extensive HTML coding to link downloadable documents, videos, and images was required, as was training to learn NASA's Content Management System (CMS) for website design. As the final stage of the collection development, the website is designed to allow for distribution of information to the public as well as for case study report submissions from other educators online.

  20. High prevalence of germline STK11 mutations in Hungarian Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disease characterized by gastrointestinal hamartomatous polyposis and mucocutaneous pigmentation. The genetic predisposition for PJS has been shown to be associated with germline mutations in the STK11/LKB1 tumor suppressor gene. The aim of the present study was to characterize Hungarian PJS patients with respect to germline mutation in STK11/LKB1 and their association to disease phenotype. Methods Mutation screening of 21 patients from 13 PJS families were performed using direct DNA sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Comparative semi-quantitative sequencing was applied to investigate the mRNA-level effects of nonsense and splice-affecting mutations. Results Thirteen different pathogenic mutations in STK11, including a high frequency of large genomic deletions (38%, 5/13), were identified in the 13 unrelated families studied. One of these deletions also affects two neighboring genes (SBNO2 and GPX4), located upstream of STK11, with a possible modifier effect. The majority of the point mutations (88%, 7/8) can be considered novel. Quantification of the STK11 transcript at the mRNA-level revealed that the expression of alleles carrying a nonsense or frameshift mutation was reduced to 30-70% of that of the wild type allele. Mutations affecting splice-sites around exon 2 displayed an mRNA processing pattern indicative of co-regulated splicing of exons 2 and 3. Conclusions A combination of sensitive techniques may assure a high (100%) STK11 mutation detection frequency in PJS families. Characterization of mutations at mRNA level may give a deeper insight into the molecular consequences of the pathogenic mutations than predictions made solely at the genomic level. PMID:21118512

  1. Neotectonic control on river sinuosity at the western margin of the Little Hungarian Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zámolyi, A.; Székely, B.; Draganits, E.; Timár, G.

    2010-10-01

    This study investigates the influence of neotectonic activity on river channel patterns in low-relief areas. Our study area, the westernmost part of the Little Hungarian Plain, belongs to the Danube catchment in the transition zone between the Eastern Alps and Western Carpathians. This area evolved within the Pannonian back-arc basin during the Neogene and was also affected by the major lateral tectonic extrusion of the Eastern Alps. Water course analysis has been carried out on the Leitha, Répce, Rábca, Ikva and Wulka rivers, to detect a possible relationship between their river courses and any on-going tectonic activity that is otherwise difficult to detect in this poorly exposed low-relief area. In order to derive channel geometries hardly modified by human activity (i.e. prior to the major river control works of the last 150 years), calculations of river channel properties were based on georeferenced historical map sheets of the Second Military Survey of the Habsburg Empire. These recorded the channel patterns and geomorphologic situation around 1840. Classic sinuosity values from the reconstructed river courses have been derived using several window sizes. The calculated values show surprisingly strong local variations, considering the low-relief and lithological homogeneity of the area. The spatial distribution of the pronounced sinuosity variations coincides with the location of Late Miocene faults well-known from seismic data. On-going active tectonic activity along these faults is further indicated by the local earthquake record and geomorphic parameters derived from high-resolution digital elevation models. In conclusion, river sinuosity calculations represent a sensitive tool for recognizing neotectonic activity in low-relief areas.

  2. The Science Manager's Guide to Case Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, Kristi M.; Peffers, Melissa S.; Ruegg, Rosalie T.; Vallario, Robert W.

    2001-09-24

    This guide takes the science manager through the steps of planning, implementing, validating, communicating, and using case studies. It outlines the major methods of analysis, describing their relative merits and applicability while providing relevant examples and sources of additional information. Well-designed case studies can provide a combination of rich qualitative and quantitative information, offering valuable insights into the nature, outputs, and longer-term impacts of the research. An objective, systematic, and credible approach to the evaluation of U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science programs adds value to the research process and is the subject of this guide.

  3. [Familial hypobetalipoproteinemia. Familial study of 4 cases].

    PubMed

    Gay, G; Pessah, M; Bouma, M E; Roche, J F; Aymard, J P; Beucler, I; Aggerbeck, L P; Infante, R

    1990-01-01

    A familial study of four cases with hypobetalipoproteinemia is reported. Three members are heterozygous and one is homozygous. This congenital fat malabsorption in homozygous state is commonly associated with an absence of serum apoprotein B and LDL. Neuromuscular and ophthalmological signs are absent in this case. The major role of upper digestive endoscopy in the diagnostic procedure is emphasized. Histochemical and immunoenzymatic stains of enterocytes and intestinal organ culture show defective synthesis apo B in the homozygous patient. Studies of DNA polymorphism in the homozygous patient have shown that the apo B gene doesn't certain major insertions or deletions. These results are discussed. PMID:2096430

  4. Case studies in organic contaminant hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, John A.

    1989-07-01

    The effective management of domestic solid waste and hazardous, toxic, and radioactive waste is a major problem in the area of environmental geology and water sciences over the world. This series of case studies of organic contaminants from both solid and hazardous waste disposal facilities provides examples of these problems. The facilities were investigated to determine risks and liabilities before acquisition, to determine the site hydrogeologic conditions for design of appropriate groundwater monitoring plans, and/or to determine the potential for groundwater contamination. The results of these studies and investigations by Waste Management Inc. (WMI) and its consultants have shown certain relationships in the distribution of organic pollutants to the different geologic and hydrogeologic charac teristics of each facility. In each of the case studies, all 129 priority pollutants were analyzed in private wells and/or monitoring wells at the request of regulatory agencies. The 31 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of the priority pollutant list were the majority of the organic compounds detected and these data are evaluated in each case study. The case studies are on disposal facilities located in glacial tills, carbonaceous weathered clay soils, weathered shale, limestone bedrock, dolomite bedrock, and alluvial and sedimentary deposits. A brief discussion of groundwater quality impacts and remedial measures also is included.

  5. Case study examples using self-assessment.

    PubMed

    Garstecki, D; Hutton, C L; Nerbonne, M A; Newman, C W; Smoski, W J

    1990-10-01

    The following case studies demonstrate the application of self-assessment techniques. The selection of procedures reported here is not meant to imply necessarily that these procedures are more or less effective or more widely used than other available self-assessment tests, but rather to illustrate the various purposes for which self-assessment tools may be employed. Case 1 illustrates the contribution of data obtained from the Hearing Performance Inventory (Giolas, Owens, Lamb, & Shubert, 1979) in the management and counseling of a severely hearing impaired adult. Case 2 involves the use of the Hearing Problem Inventory developed by Hutton in Atlanta (HPI-A, Hutton, 1987). Application of the Self-Assessment of Communication (SAC) and Significant Other Assessment of Communication (SOAC) (Schow and Nerbonne, 1982) is shown in Case 3, whereas Case 4 demonstrates the usefulness of the Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (HHIE, Ventry and Weinstein, 1982). Both the SAC/SOAC and HHIE batteries involve problem cases associated with hearing aid fitting and assessment of benefit. The final illustration (Case 5) is a report on the Children's Auditory Processing Performance Scale (CHAPPS), a new questionnaire developed by Smoski, Brunt, and Tannahill/ISHA (1987) for assessing parent's judgment of children's listening abilities (Appendix). The versatility of self-assessment applications across a broad assortment of impairment levels, age groups, and clinical settings is demonstrated in these cases. Hopefully the reader will see more clearly the application and value of these and other non-audiometric techniques and will be motivated to increase the use of self-assessment tools in the individual work setting. PMID:2269415

  6. Matching and reconstruction of brachytherapy seeds using the Hungarian algorithm (MARSHAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Ameet Kumar; Zhou, Yu; Mustufa, Tabish; Clif Burdette, E.; Chirikjian, Gregory S.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2005-11-15

    Intraoperative dosimetric quality assurance in prostate brachytherapy critically depends on discerning the three-dimensional (3D) locations of implanted seeds. The ability to reconstruct the implanted seeds intraoperatively will allow us to make immediate provisions for dosimetric deviations from the optimal implant plan. A method for seed reconstruction from segmented C-arm fluoroscopy images is proposed. The 3D coordinates of the implanted seeds can be calculated upon resolving the correspondence of seeds in multiple x-ray images. We formalize seed-matching as a combinatorial optimization problem, which has salient features: (a) extensively studied solutions by the computer science community; (b) proof for the nonexistence of any polynomial time exact algorithm; and (c) a practical pseudo-polynomial algorithm that mostly runs in O(N{sup 3}) time using any number of images. We prove that two images are insufficient to correctly match the seeds, while a third image renders the matching problem to be of nonpolynomial complexity. We utilize the special structure of the problem and propose a pseudopolynomial time algorithm. Using three presegmented images, matching and reconstruction of brachytherapy seeds using the Hungarian algorithm achieved complete matching in simulation experiments; and 98.5% in phantom experiments. 3D reconstruction error for correctly matched seeds has a mean of 0.63 mm, and 0.9 mm for incorrectly matched seeds. The maximum seed reconstruction error in each implant was typically around 1.32 mm. Both on synthetic data and in phantom experiments, matching rate and reconstruction error achieved using presegmented images was found to be sufficient for prostate brachytherapy. The algorithm is extendable to deal with arbitrary number of images without any loss in speed or accuracy. The algorithm is sufficiently generic to provide a practical solution to any correspondence problem, across different imaging modalities and features.

  7. Matching and reconstruction of brachytherapy seeds using the Hungarian algorithm (MARSHAL).

    PubMed

    Jain, Ameet Kumar; Zhou, Yu; Mustufa, Tabish; Burdette, E Clif; Chirikjian, Gregory S; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2005-11-01

    Intraoperative dosimetric quality assurance in prostate brachytherapy critically depends on discerning the three-dimensional (3D) locations of implanted seeds. The ability to reconstruct the implanted seeds intraoperatively will allow us to make immediate provisions for dosimetric deviations from the optimal implant plan. A method for seed reconstruction from segmented C-arm fluoroscopy images is proposed. The 3D coordinates of the implanted seeds can be calculated upon resolving the correspondence of seeds in multiple x-ray images. We formalize seed-matching as a combinatorial optimization problem, which has salient features: (a) extensively studied solutions by the computer science community; (b) proof for the nonexistence of any polynomial time exact algorithm; and (c) a practical pseudo-polynomial algorithm that mostly runs in O(N3) time using any number of images. We prove that two images are insufficient to correctly match the seeds, while a third image renders the matching problem to be of nonpolynomial complexity. We utilize the special structure of the problem and propose a pseudopolynomial time algorithm. Using three presegmented images, matching and reconstruction of brachytherapy seeds using the Hungarian algorithm achieved complete matching in simulation experiments; and 98.5% in phantom experiments. 3D reconstruction error for correctly matched seeds has a mean of 0.63 mm, and 0.9 mm for incorrectly matched seeds. The maximum seed reconstruction error in each implant was typically around 1.32 mm. Both on synthetic data and in phantom experiments, matching rate and reconstruction error achieved using presegmented images was found to be sufficient for prostate brachytherapy. The algorithm is extendable to deal with arbitrary number of images without any loss in speed or accuracy. The algorithm is sufficiently generic to provide a practical solution to any correspondence problem, across different imaging modalities and features. PMID:16372418

  8. Matching and reconstruction of brachytherapy seeds using the Hungarian algorithm (MARSHAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Ameet K.; Zhou, Yu; Mustufa, Tabish; Burdette, E. C.; Chirikjian, Gregory S.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative dosimetric quality assurance in prostate brachytherapy critically depends on discerning the 3D locations of implanted seeds. The ability to reconstruct the implanted seeds intraoperatively will allow us to make immediate provisions for dosimetric deviations from the optimal implant plan. A method for seed reconstruction from segmented C-arm fluoroscopy images is proposed. Method: The 3D coordinates of the implanted seeds can be calculated upon resolving the correspondence of seeds in multiple X-ray images. We formalize seed-matching as a network flow problem, which has salient features: (a) extensively studied exact solutions, (b) performance claims on the space-time complexity, (c) optimality bounds on the final solution. A fast implementation is realized using the Hungarian algorithm. Results: We prove that two images can correctly match only about 67% of the seeds, and that a third image renders the matching problem to be of non-polynomial complexity. We utilize the special structure of the problem and propose a pseudo-polynomial time algorithm. Using three images, MARSHAL achieved 100% matching in simulation experiments; and 98.5% in phantom experiments. 3D reconstruction error for correctly matched seeds has a mean of 0:63 mm, and 0:91 mm for incorrectly matched seeds. Conclusion: Both on synthetic data and in phantom experiments, matching rate and reconstruction accuracy were found to be sufficient for prostate brachytherapy. The algorithm is extendable to deal with arbitrary number of images without loss in speed or accuracy. The algorithm is sufficiently generic to be used for establishing correspondences across any choice of features in different imaging modalities.

  9. First investigations into the prevalence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia spp. in Hungarian drinking water.

    PubMed

    Plutzer, J; Takó, M H; Márialigeti, K; Törökné, A; Karanis, P

    2007-12-01

    Safe drinking water is a top priority in preventing disease outbreaks and is of general concern to everyone. This study examines the occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Hungarian drinking water supplies for the first time. A total of 76 raw and drinking water samples were examined using the U.S. EPA Method 1623. From these 15 of 34 (48.4%) raw water samples tested positive for Giardia and 7 (26.6%) for Cryptosporidium. Twelve of 45 (26.7%) drinking water samples were positive for Giardia and 6 (13.3%) for Cryptosporidium. Overall, Giardia cysts and/or Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 48% of the raw water samples and 35% of the drinking water samples. The highest levels in drinking water were found to be 3 oocysts/100 litres of Cryptosporidium and 63.6 cysts/100 litres for Giardia, enough to cause giardiasis. The highest levels in raw water were 1,030 cysts/100 litres for Giardia and 50 oocysts/100 litres for Cryptosporidium and higher oocyst densities were associated with source water receiving effluents from sewage treatment plants or originating from a forest environment. In addition to this monitoring, riverbank filtrated water and raw water from the River Danube in Budapest were monitored in order to ascertain protozoan removal efficiency of riverbank filtration (RBF). A total of 157 samples, including 87 samples from the River Danube and 70 samples post RBF, were examined. Cryptosporidium and Giardia were detected regularly in the river water but never in riverbank filtered water suggesting the effectiveness of RBF as a purification method. The occurrence of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts in the investigated water supplies may require the water utilities and water authorities in Hungary to apply additional monitoring and treatment and/or watershed controls. PMID:17878568

  10. Case Studies of Altruistic Persons: AERA Roundtable.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, William N.

    This document presents information from a body of research called Lives of Service, a collection of case studies of 32 altruistic adults. It begins with a review of the research on altruism, service orientation, giving, helpfulness, social responsibility, and voluntarism. Research on altruism in psychology and in other disciplines is included,…

  11. Lifelong Learning in SMEs: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Rick; Smith, Vikki; Devins, Dave

    2002-01-01

    Learning centers using information-communications technologies were established in three British industrial estates. A case study of one organization shows the center contributed to lifelong learning and enhanced information technology training and employee confidence. Transfer of training and productivity improvements were not as clear. (Contains…

  12. An Effective School: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poindexter, Candace

    An elementary school principal's successful attempts to improve her inner-city school are described in this case study, which includes a diagram representing her formula for better education. The principal, a charismatic, elderly woman, takes an aggressive role in improving the school environment and student nutrition, encouraging and monitoring…

  13. Interdisciplinary Student Teams Projects: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruck, S. E.; Teer, Faye P.

    2009-01-01

    In today's organizations team work has become an integral part of the day-to-day routine. For this reason, University professors are including group projects in many courses. In such group assessments, we advocate the use of interdisciplinary teams, where possible. As a case study, we report an interdisciplinary group technical project with…

  14. A Case Study of Online Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ling; Ku, Heng-Yu

    2006-01-01

    This case study investigated 12 graduate students' online collaborative experiences and attitudes in an instructional design course. The instructor divided students into 4 groups based on their academic backgrounds. Content analysis of asynchronous group discussion board messages was used to measure degrees of collaboration of each group in terms…

  15. Firefighter Workplace Learning: An Exploratory Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracey, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite there being a significant amount of research investigating workplace learning, research exploring firefighter workplace learning is almost nonexistent. The purpose of this qualitative multi-case study was to explore how firefighters conceptualize, report, and practice workplace learning. The researcher also investigated how firefighters…

  16. Framing in the Field: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Diane

    2009-01-01

    Strategic Frame Analysis can inform the daily practice of policy advocates by bringing an evidence-based communications approach to their work. This case study of FrameWorks' decade-long association with the national Kids Count Network shares stories from advocates who are transforming their communications strategies, resulting in more effective…

  17. Grade One: Math Computation. Case Study #1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Sarah R.; Seethaler, Pamela M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to highlight the integral role that progress monitoring (PM) plays throughout any Response to Intervention (RTI) process. This example uses a three-level, responsiveness-to-intervention (RTI) method for identifying students with learning difficulties. Using a fictional first-grade classroom as the setting for…

  18. ESL and Digital Video Integration: Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, J., Ed.; Gromik, N., Ed.; Edwards, N., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    It should come as no surprise that digital video technology is of particular interest to English language learners; students are drawn to its visual appeal and vibrant creative potential. The seven original case studies in this book demonstrate how video can be an effective and powerful tool to create fluid, fun, interactive, and collaborative…

  19. Experiencing Online Pedagogy: A Canadian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Heather E.; Barnett, John

    2010-01-01

    This case study explored the educational experiences of Canadian preservice teachers in a course designed to teach about online teaching. Students gained experience in course design and delivery, and safe and ethical behavior related to technology. Findings indicated that projects in which students actively applied their knowledge were more…

  20. Three Case Studies in Green Cleaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Education Standard, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents case studies from three districts implementing green cleaning. In 2008, Missouri passed legislation requiring state education officials to convene a committee of stakeholders with the purpose of developing green cleaning guidelines and specifications for schools. The guide, published by the Department of Elementary and…

  1. Value for Money Case Studies. Mendip Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kedney, Bob, Ed.

    In response to a shift from the management of curriculum to the management of scarce resources to deliver a changing curriculum, this paper brings together three "value for money" case studies in college administration. The papers identify three levels of activity, ranging from the one-time opportunity for good housekeeping through tactical…

  2. Tachycardia During Resistance Exercise: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Andrew C.; Parks, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    This case study examined a weight-trained (WT) male who had an unusually high heart rate response to heavy resistance exercise and self-administered anabolic androgenic steroids as an ergogenic aid to training. The subject was compared to 18 other WT people. His tachycardia response occurred only in the presence of a pressure load and not with a…

  3. Physics Courses--Some Suggested Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swetman, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    To communicate the relevance and excitement of science activity to students, the use of more imaginative, and even openly speculative, case studies in physics courses is suggested. Some useful examples are Magnetic Monopoles, Constants, Black Holes, Antimatter, Zero Mass Particles, Tachyons, and the Bootstrap Hypothesis. (DF)

  4. Case Study of Home-School Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguerrebere, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    This case study evaluated one site of a California teacher home visit program. Home visits have been an important means of connecting families and schooling. In 1999, California inaugurated a statewide home visit program to promote effective partnership between home and school for low-achieving schools. At this site, families in 3 kindergarten…

  5. Learning To Teach Spanish: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velez-Rendon, Gloria

    This case study explores the student teaching experience of a Spanish language teacher candidate through her own eyes. It sheds light on how the participants' prior learning experience and beliefs inform her initial practice, how she develops her teaching skills, what contextual factors affect her learning-to-teach process, and the sources from…

  6. Performance Support Case Studies from IBM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke-Moran, Celia; Swope, Ginger; Morariu, Janis; deKam, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Presents two case studies that show how IBM addressed performance support solutions and electronic learning. The first developed a performance support and expert coaching solution; the second applied performance support to reducing implementation time and total cost of ownership of enterprise resource planning systems. (Author/LRW)

  7. WMOST v2 Case Study: Monponsett Ponds

    EPA Science Inventory

    This webinar presents an overview of the preliminary results of a case study application of EPA's Watershed Management Optimization Support Tool v2 (WMOST) for stakeholders in the Monponsett Ponds Watershed Workgroup. Monponsett Ponds is a large water system consisting of two ba...

  8. Semantically Redundant Language--A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizza, Chris

    2009-01-01

    In this article, I discuss the concept of semantically redundant language through a case study of the Te Rauparaha Maori haka. I suggest that current linguistic theories cannot give a full account of ritualized speech events, of which the haka is an example, as these theories are based on a traditional dyadic model of interaction involving a…

  9. A Case Study in Learning to Unlearn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Martin; Grummell, Bernie; Murphy, Conor; Ryan, Anne

    2015-01-01

    In this case study, Irish academics reflect on our involvement in a project--Transformative Engagement Network (TEN). This project aims to transform the nature of the engagement between the various stakeholders impacted by or concerned with climate change and to insert the voice and concerns of the most vulnerable food producers into climate…

  10. The Postmodern English Major: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Lawrence

    2003-01-01

    Offers a case study in curriculum change that reveals a very different experience--one that demonstrates a discipline more alive than ever. Presents a story of how the lively canon debates prompted the English department at Montclair State University to restructure the English major. Finds that the culture wars, critical theory, poststructuralism,…

  11. LCA – Unique and Controversial Case Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    This session will focus on case studies and applications that have a unique or controversial aspect. Some of the most recent topics that seem to have significant interest include: LCA-based product declarations, LCA-based standards, LCA-based labels, alternative energy, agricul...

  12. Case Study of Sabrina and Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gourgey, Annette F.; Davis, Kevin; Lane, Linda; Smith, Lonna

    1997-01-01

    Presents a case study of an adult student preparing for her first year of college through a writing course and work in a writing workshop. Explains complicating circumstances in the student's life. Presents four professional responses commenting on the difficulties of the situation and possible solutions. (TB)

  13. Acquaintance Rape: A Case Study Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marinelli, Rosalie D.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a case study approach to acquaintance rape used in a Personal Health and Lifestyles course at the University of Nevada in Reno that allows students to discuss the characters in a scenario, an instructional process seen as less threatening than describing personal experiences. (MDM)

  14. The Verbal Noncommunicator: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujiki, Martin; Brinton, Bonnie

    1991-01-01

    This article presents a case study of a nine-year-old male with language impairment and specific pragmatic disabilities. His interactions with an adult, a language age-matched peer, and a chronological age-matched peer were observed and analyzed to determine conversational responsiveness and assertiveness. Findings support Fey's (1986) verbal…

  15. Aerospace Mechanisms and Tribology Technology: Case Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    This chapter focuses attention on tribology technology practice related to vacuum tribology and space tribology. Two case studies describe aspects of real problems in sufficient detail for the engineer and the scientist to understand the tribological situations and the failures. The nature of the problems is analyzed and the range of potential solutions is evaluated. Courses of action are recommended.

  16. Climate wise case study compendium: Report 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    This case study compendium is one of several Climate Wise tools available to help interested companies identify cost-effective options. Climate Wise, a private-public partnership program, is a key Federal initiative to return greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2000.

  17. Case Studies in Managing Psychological Depth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringer, Martin; Gillis, H. L.

    This paper outlines a model for assessing and managing psychological depth in outdoor and experiential group work, and presents two case studies of the complexity of such management in real life. The model contains eight levels of emotional risk and presents four criteria for assessing the level to which a particular event or discussion may lead…

  18. A Case Study in Acoustical Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledford, Bruce R.; Brown, John A.

    1992-01-01

    Addresses concerns of both facilities planners and instructional designers in planning for the audio component of group presentations. Factors in the architectural design of enclosures for the reproduction of sound are described, including frequency, amplitude, and reverberation; and a case study for creating an acceptable enclosure is presented.…

  19. Library Virtual Tours: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, Beth; Grogg, Jill E.

    2004-01-01

    Virtual tours delivered via the Web have become a common tool for both instruction and outreach. This article is a case study of the creation of a virtual tour for a university library and is intended to provide others interested in creating a virtual tour of their library the opportunity to learn from the mistakes and successes of fellow…

  20. Learning Machine Learning: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavesson, N.

    2010-01-01

    This correspondence reports on a case study conducted in the Master's-level Machine Learning (ML) course at Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden. The students participated in a self-assessment test and a diagnostic test of prerequisite subjects, and their results on these tests are correlated with their achievement of the course's learning…

  1. Case Studies: Windows onto Clinical Supervision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Jim; And Others

    1993-01-01

    By examining the structures and activities common to six case studies of clinical teacher supervision, this article identifies five conditions that facilitate changes in teacher thinking and behavior: development of a supportive, collegial relationship; teacher control over supervision products; continuity over time; focused, descriptive records…

  2. Phonological Precedence in Dyslexia: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider-Zioga, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia is believed to involve a phonological deficit of which the exact properties have not been clearly established. This article presents the findings of a longitudinal case study that suggest that, at least for some people with dyslexia, the fundamental problem involves a disturbance of temporal-spatial ordering abilities. A…

  3. Acoustical case studies of three green buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebein, Gary; Lilkendey, Robert; Skorski, Stephen

    2005-04-01

    Case studies of 3 green buildings with LEED certifications that required extensive acoustical retrofit work to become satisfactory work environments for their intended user groups will be used to define areas where green building design concepts and acoustical design concepts require reconciliation. Case study 1 is an office and conference center for a city environmental education agency. Large open spaces intended to collect daylight through clerestory windows provided large, reverberant volumes with few acoustic finishes that rendered them unsuitable as open office space and a conference room/auditorium. Case Study 2 describes one of the first gold LEED buildings in the southeast whose primary design concepts were so narrowly focused on thermal and lighting issues that they often worked directly against basic acoustical requirements resulting in sound levels of NC 50-55 in classrooms and faculty offices, crosstalk between classrooms and poor room acoustics. Case study 3 is an environmental education and conference center with open public areas, very high ceilings, and all reflective surfaces made from wood and other environmentally friendly materials that result in excessive loudness when the building is used by the numbers of people which it was intended to serve.

  4. Physical Science Connected Classrooms: Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irving, Karen; Sanalan, Vehbi; Shirley, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Case-study descriptions of secondary and middle school classrooms in diverse contexts provide examples of how teachers implement connected classroom technology to facilitate formative assessment in science instruction. Connected classroom technology refers to a networked system of handheld devices designed for classroom use. Teachers were…

  5. Simulations & Case Studies. [SITE 2002 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Cathy R., Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on simulations and case studies from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2002 conference: "3-D Virtual Classroom Technology" (Kimberly Arseneau Miller, Angela Glod); "Simulated Lesson Design Studios" (Willis Copeland); "Lights, Camera, Integration: Presentation Programs and…

  6. Delivering Online Examinations: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howarth, Jason; Messing, John; Altas, Irfan

    2004-01-01

    This paper represents a brief case study of delivering online examinations to a worldwide audience. These examinations are delivered in partnership with a commercial online testing company as part of the Industry Master's degree at Charles Sturt University (CSU). The Industry Master's degree is an academic program for students currently employed…

  7. Comparative Environmental Threat Analysis: Three Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latour, J. B.; Reiling, R.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews how carrying capacity for different environmental problems is operationalized. Discusses whether it is possible to compare threats, using the exceeding of carrying capacity as a yardstick. Points out problems in comparative threat analysis using three case studies: threats to European groundwater resources, threats to ecosystems in Europe,…

  8. New Case Studies of Citizen Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Thomas

    1977-01-01

    Describes a six-unit case study curriculum package designed for secondary and college-level courses relating to environmental education. The units deal with nuclear power, stream channelization, a river dam project, overgrazing of public lands, agribusiness versus the family farm, and swamp preservation. (Author/DB)

  9. Sustainability in Housing: A Curriculum Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrott, Kathleen; Emmel, Joann M.

    2001-01-01

    Explores the influence of environmental issues on the field of housing, from the perspective of sustainable housing. Presents a case study of the development of a college course to address these issues by integrating energy management, air quality, water quality, and waste management. (Author)

  10. Marietta Celebration of Unity Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philbin, Meg; Phillips, Rebecca

    This case study concerns the forming of a Marietta, Ohio unity committee, entitled Citizens for Social and Racial Justice, in response to the local Ku Klux Klan's (KKK) request for a parade permit in order to demonstrate against blacks in this city. Marietta, the county seat of Washington County, Ohio, has a population composed of both white and…

  11. CALIFORNIA PROJECT TALENT. IDENTIFICATION, CASE STUDY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RICE, JOSEPH P.; AND OTHERS

    THE USE OF CASE STUDIES CAN HELP THE TEACHER TO APPRECIATE INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES, TO CAPITALIZE ON INTERESTS AND ABILITIES, TO APPRECIATE AND UTILIZE EXCEPTIONAL SKILLS, AND TO SET UP APPROPRIATE DEVELOPMENTAL GOALS FOR INDIVIDUAL CHILDREN. AN OUTLINE FOR THE IDENTIFICATION PROCESS INCLUDES SCREENING (GROUP DEVICES), NOMINATION (STAFF MATCHES THE…

  12. It's Not Funny: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Méndez-Morse, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    This case study may be used with personnel supervision, school law, and other school leadership courses. It describes the behavior and actions of one teacher toward another. Student discussions can focus on supervision, workplace mobbing, workplace bullying, as well as sexual harassment. Students should focus on a school leader's role in such…

  13. NACASETAC BAY: AN INTERACTIVE CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This interactive case study or "game" was created to provide a "hands on" experience in the application of a weight of evidence approach to sediment assessment. The game proceeds in two phases. In each phase the players work together as a group. A scenario is presented, and the g...

  14. A CASE STUDY OF ENVIRONMENTAL DATA MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to support our ongoing research in watershed ecology and global climate change, we gather and analyze environmental data from several government agencies. This case study demonstrates a researcher’s approach to accessing, organizing, and using intersectoral data. T...

  15. Fraternization in Accounting Firms: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinze, Tim; Kizirian, Tim; Leese, Wallace

    2004-01-01

    This case study sheds light on how to avoid risks caused by manager-subordinate dating relationships (fraternization) such as employee misunderstandings, retaliation charges, favoritism complaints, wrongful termination lawsuits, and sexual harassment lawsuits, as well as associated ethical risks. Risk avoidance can be accomplished through a better…

  16. Teaching the Holocaust through Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misco, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    This article responds to the curricular challenges teachers face with Holocaust education, including cursory treatments and a lack of focus on individual experiences. First, the author argues for a case-study approach to help students reengage concrete and complex features of the Holocaust as a point of departure for subsequent inquiry. In…

  17. The Campus Diversity Initiative: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nayak, Sharada

    2005-01-01

    This Case Study presents the Campus Diversity Initiative (CDI), a three-phase project lead by the Educational Resources Project Centre Trust, in New Delhi, India. In a historic and cultural context different from that of India, the American Diversity Initiative was launched by the Ford Foundation in 1990 and addressed their diversity issues by…

  18. Interactive Videodisc Case Studies for Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Harless, William G.; Zier, Marcia A.; Duncan, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    The TIME Project of the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications is using interactive videodisc, microprocessor and voice recognition technology to create patient simulations for use in the training of medical students. These interactive case studies embody dramatic, lifelike portrayals of the social and medical conditions of a patient and allow uncued, verbal intervention by the student for independent clinical decisions.

  19. School University Collaboration: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Robert; And Others

    A case study of school-university collaboration between Starkville School District (Mississippi) and Mississippi State University (MSU) explored the process of collaboration and the ingredients for successful implementation. MSU offered grant opportunities for university faculty to work with local school district personnel. Starkville School…

  20. The Induction of Marketing Teachers: Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath-Camp, Betty; And Others

    As part of a larger, 5-year national project, case study analyses were conducted of the induction experiences of two beginning teachers of marketing education. One teacher (Mary) entered the profession through a traditional teacher education program in marketing education. The other (Jake) obtained certification based on extensive experience in…

  1. Aerospace Mechanisms and Tribology Technology: Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.

    1999-01-01

    This paper focuses attention on tribology technology practice related to vacuum tribology. A case study describes an aspect of a real problem in sufficient detail for the engineer and scientist to understand the tribological situation and the failure. The nature of the problem is analyzed and the tribological properties are examined.

  2. Evaluating Innovation: The Case Study Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saez, Maria Jose; Carretero, Antonia J.

    1998-01-01

    Characterized the methodology of case studies, using examples from science education, with regard to their potential for the analysis of innovation and formulation of emerging trends. The theoretical and empirical support of evaluation will generate a call for negotiation as the formula that regulates the assessment of a program's efficiency and…

  3. Multiple independent variants in 6q21-22 associated with susceptibility to celiac disease in the Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations.

    PubMed

    Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Bevova, Marianna R; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Monsuur, Alienke; Koskinen, Lotta L E; van't Slot, Ruben; Mulder, Chris; Mearin, M Luisa; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma R; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle; Kere, Juha; Mäki, Markku; Wijmenga, Cisca; Saavalainen, Päivi

    2011-06-01

    Celiac disease is an inflammatory enteropathy caused by intolerance to gluten. Previous linkage studies in the Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations have revealed a locus on chromosome 6q21-22 conferring susceptibility to celiac disease. This locus has previously been implicated in susceptibility to other autoimmune diseases such as Crohn's disease and type 1 diabetes. We performed fine mapping on 446 independent individuals with celiac disease and 641 controls of Dutch origin, testing 872 tagging SNPs in a 22 Mb region of chromosome 6. The 12 most promising SNPs were followed up in 2071 individuals from 284 Finnish and 357 Hungarian celiac disease families to identify risk variants in this region. Multiple markers in the region were significantly associated with celiac disease in the Dutch material. Two SNPs, rs9391227 and rs4946111, were significantly associated with celiac disease in the Finnish population. The association to rs9391227 represents the strongest association signal found in the Finnish (P = 0.003, OR 0.66) as well as the combined Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations (P = 3.6 × 10(-5), OR 0.76). The rs9391227 is situated downstream of the HECT domain and ankyrin repeat containing, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1 (HACE1) gene and is contained within a region of strong linkage disequilibrium enclosing HACE1. Two additional, independent, susceptibility variants in the 6q21-22 region were also found in a meta-analysis of the three populations. The 6q21-22 region was confirmed as a celiac disease susceptibility locus and harbors multiple independent associations, some of which may implicate ubiquitin-pathways in celiac disease susceptibility. PMID:21326284

  4. Multiple independent variants in 6q21-22 associated with susceptibility to celiac disease in the Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations

    PubMed Central

    Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Bevova, Marianna R; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Monsuur, Alienke; Koskinen, Lotta LE; Slot, Ruben van't; Mulder, Chris; Mearin, M Luisa; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma R; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle; Kere, Juha; Mäki, Markku; Wijmenga, Cisca; Saavalainen, Päivi

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is an inflammatory enteropathy caused by intolerance to gluten. Previous linkage studies in the Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations have revealed a locus on chromosome 6q21-22 conferring susceptibility to celiac disease. This locus has previously been implicated in susceptibility to other autoimmune diseases such as Crohn's disease and type 1 diabetes. We performed fine mapping on 446 independent individuals with celiac disease and 641 controls of Dutch origin, testing 872 tagging SNPs in a 22 Mb region of chromosome 6. The 12 most promising SNPs were followed up in 2071 individuals from 284 Finnish and 357 Hungarian celiac disease families to identify risk variants in this region. Multiple markers in the region were significantly associated with celiac disease in the Dutch material. Two SNPs, rs9391227 and rs4946111, were significantly associated with celiac disease in the Finnish population. The association to rs9391227 represents the strongest association signal found in the Finnish (P=0.003, OR 0.66) as well as the combined Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations (P=3.6 × 10−5, OR 0.76). The rs9391227 is situated downstream of the HECT domain and ankyrin repeat containing, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1 (HACE1) gene and is contained within a region of strong linkage disequilibrium enclosing HACE1. Two additional, independent, susceptibility variants in the 6q21-22 region were also found in a meta-analysis of the three populations. The 6q21-22 region was confirmed as a celiac disease susceptibility locus and harbors multiple independent associations, some of which may implicate ubiquitin-pathways in celiac disease susceptibility. PMID:21326284

  5. Importance of the Hungarian phytosociological school established at the University of Debrecen in development of current field botany.

    PubMed

    Borhidi, A; Salamon-Albert, Eva

    2010-01-01

    The paper gives a short panoramic historical survey about the main activities of the Hungarian phytosociology, their chief protagonists, the fundamental role of professor Rezső Soó in the creation and development of the phytosociological school of Debrecen established by him in the Botanical Department of the University of Debrecen, which is celebrating the 80 anniversary of its existence and has played a determinant role in the Hungarian botany. PMID:21565761

  6. Empathy Development Through Case Study and Simulation.

    PubMed

    Mennenga, Heidi A; Bassett, Susan; Pasquariello, Libby

    2016-01-01

    Because empathy is integral to the nurse-patient relationship, nurse educators are challenged to explore teaching strategies that may aid in the development of empathy among students. The purpose of this study was to determine whether consistent exposure to a single patient through case study and simulation had an impact on empathy levels in senior-level baccalaureate nursing students. Results provide interesting conclusions for faculty members and offer a basis for ongoing discussion. PMID:26448156

  7. Seismic damage to pipeline; Case study

    SciTech Connect

    O'Rourke, M.J.; Ayala, G. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1990-03-01

    A case study of damage to a welded steel pipeline in Mexico City, caused by the 1985 Michoacan earthquake, is presented. Seismic damage to pipelines in past earthquakes is briefly reviewed. The damage has typically been due to seismic wave propagation or permanent ground deformations, such as faulting, landslides, or lateral spreads. Physical characteristics of the case study pipeline, pertinent soil conditions, recorded ground motion, and observed seismic damage in Mexico City are then presented. The recorded ground motion in the lake zone of Mexico City suggests a significant contribution from Rayleigh waves. A previously developed analysis procedure is used to estimate stress induced by seismic wave propagation in the case study pipeline. The pipeline stress is a function of the amplitude and wavelength of the ground strain, maximum friction forces at the soil-pipe interface, and the stress-strain characteristics of the pipeline material. It is shown that the estimated stress is only slightly less than the local compressional buckling stress for the case history pipeline.

  8. Generating grounded theory: two case studies.

    PubMed

    Mullen, P D

    1985-01-01

    An inductive research method known as grounded theory is described as a means of building conceptual bridges between real-life situations and formal theory. The procedures are detailed and illustrated via two case studies. The first is a study of the social-psychological problem of cutting losses among heart patients through three stages of recovery. The process of extending the theory generated with the heart patients to other invisible physical impairments and across both visible and invisible chronic conditions is outlined. The second case study offers an example of a structurally-oriented theory, developed from participant observations of the processes of managing patients, staff, and neighbors for an "antipsychiatric" treatment facility for juvenile schizophrenics. PMID:20841268

  9. New European initiatives in colorectal cancer screening: Budapest Declaration. Official appeal during the Hungarian Presidency of the Council of the European Union under the Auspices of the United European Gastroenterology Federation, the European Association for Gastroenterology and Endoscopy and the Hungarian Society of Gastroenterology.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Tibor; Stockbrugger, Reinhold; Herszényi, László; Jonkers, Daisy; Molnár, Béla; Saurin, Jean-Christophe; Regula, Jaroslaw; Malesci, Alberto; Laghi, Luigi; Pintér, Tamás; Teleky, Béla; Dítě, Petr; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common newly diagnosed cancer and the second most common cause of death in the European Union (EU). CRC is an enormous health and economic burden. Early detection and prevention have the possibility of reducing this burden significantly. Many cancer-associated deaths can be avoided through early detection by high-quality colorectal screening programs followed by appropriate treatment. Under the auspices of the United European Gastroenterology Federation (UEGF), the European Association for Gastroenterology and Endoscopy, the Hungarian Society of Gastroenterology and the Hungarian College of Gastroenterology, the 'Budapest Declaration' (2011) was an accepted official scientific program during the Hungarian Presidency of the Council of the European Union. The Budapest Declaration follows the Munich Declaration (2001), the Brussels Declaration (2007), the Transatlantic Declaration (2009), the Barcelona Declaration (2010), the written declaration of CRC screening, a joint initiative with European Parliamentarians coordinated by the UEGF, and finally, the 'European Guidelines for Quality Assurance in Colorectal Cancer Screening and Diagnosis'. The 'Budapest Declaration' together with previous declarations aims to urge the national and supranational healthcare decision makers to launch new Europe-wide initiatives to establish high-quality CRC programs to achieve optimal efficiency in CRC screening. In case of implementation of the proposals, actions and conditions recommended, we can achieve that one of the basic principles of the EU - the chance of equal access - be realized in member states with respect to the prevention of CRC and reduction of cancer-related mortality. To better achieve this goal, we propose to establish an UEGF joint committee, with one participant representing each EU member state to coordinate and supervise the implementation of CRC screening. PMID:22722559

  10. The relationship of Carl Friedrich Gauss with his Hungarian scientist friends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargha, Magda

    Gauss had been in close contact with four Hungarian astronomers: Farkas Bolyai, Franz Xaver von Zach, János Pasquich and Pál Tittel. All these friendships were different from each other, if only because of the various ages and social standings in which these Hungarians lived. Gauss had always shown great interest in the latter. With the exception of Pasquich, all three friendships had started out as close, and in the end Gauss had repaid poorly what he received. His correspondence with Pasquich was quite different. Towards the end of his contact with Pasquich, Gauss had lifted himself above his usual indifference. With the help of his German astronomer friends, Gauss did everything he could to vindicate Pasquich, who had been accused in front of the whole astronomical community of publishing invented observations.

  11. Testing the Tripartite Influence Model of body image and eating disturbance among Hungarian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Papp, Ildikó; Urbán, Róbert; Czeglédi, Edit; Babusa, Bernadett; Túry, Ferenc

    2013-03-01

    We tested the Tripartite Influence Model of body image and eating disturbance on two separate samples of Hungarian boys (n=145) and girls (n=225), aged 10-16 years. Our results supported the model among Hungarian adolescents; however we found notable gender differences. The associations were stronger in girls compared to boys; moreover, internalization and body dissatisfaction mediated the relationship between appearance-related sociocultural influences and self-esteem only in girls. BMI and weight perception were also involved in the model, and we could present evidence that the sociocultural influence and the weight perception predict independently body dissatisfaction. Our data are in line with previous results; however, further exploration of gender, age, and culture-related differences in the pattern of associations may contribute to the refinement of intervention programs. PMID:23352324

  12. IL23R in the Swedish, Finnish, Hungarian and Italian populations: association with IBD and psoriasis, and linkage to celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Koskinen, Lotta LE; Dukes, Emma; Kainu, Kati; Suomela, Sari; Lappalainen, Maarit; Ziberna, Fabiana; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma R; Kurppa, Kalle; Kaukinen, Katri; Ádány, Róza; Pocsai, Zsuzsa; Széles, György; Färkkilä, Martti; Turunen, Ulla; Halme, Leena; Paavola-Sakki, Paulina; Not, Tarcisio; Vatta, Serena; Ventura, Alessandro; Löfberg, Robert; Torkvist, Leif; Bresso, Francesca; Halfvarson, Jonas; Mäki, Markku; Kontula, Kimmo; Saarialho-Kere, Ulpu; Kere, Juha; D'Amato, Mauro; Saavalainen, Päivi

    2009-01-01

    Background Association of the interleukin-23 receptor (IL23R) with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been confirmed in several populations. IL23R also associates with psoriasis, suggesting that the gene may be an important candidate for many chronic inflammatory diseases. Methods We studied association of single-nucleotide variants in IL23R with IBD in Swedish patients, in both Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) subsets. The same genetic variants were also studied in Finnish patients with psoriasis or celiac disease, and in Hungarian and Italian patients with celiac disease. Results Association of IL23R with IBD was replicated in our Swedish patients, and linkage and association of the IL23R region with psoriasis was found in the Finnish population. The IL23R region was also linked to celiac disease in Finnish families, but no association of IL23R variants with celiac disease was found in the Finnish, Hungarian or Italian samples. Conclusion Our study is the first to demonstrate association of IL23R with CD and UC in Swedish patients with IBD. It is also the first study to report linkage and association of the IL23R region with psoriasis in the Finnish population. Importantly, this is the first report of linkage of the IL23R region to celiac disease, a chronic inflammatory condition in which IL23R has not been previously implicated. PMID:19175939

  13. [New models in the model (Managerial challenges in the Hungarian managed care model)].

    PubMed

    Csedö, Zoltán; Nagy, Balázs; Dobák, Miklós; Dózsa, Csaba; Gulácsi, László

    2003-06-01

    The Hungarian managed care model integrates the different levels of health care services. Its goal is a more efficient resource allocation within the health care system, quality improvement of services, developing incentives and financing methods. The basic concept of the model is to introduce the benefits of the American managed care and the British fundholding system. The managed care model brought a new approach in the Hungarian health care system and meets a lot of expectation in both professional and political context. The model has certain problems, but these are handled at macro level. Without an integrated approach of macro, meso and micro levels is hardly believable the efficient and effective functioning of the model. Such macro level problems are the cost-efficiency versus high quality health services, financing incentives, and risk taking. At meso and micro level we are facing with questionable efficiency and effectiveness of the MCOs other health care organisations, which are based on strong bureaucratic paradigms and are convicted to a long lasting crisis in their changing environment. The integrated use of Mintzberg's management models (machine model, network model, performance-control model, virtual government model and normative-control model) adapted by us for the Hungarian managed care model could resolve certain problems or make them at least more solvable. In the changing environment of the health cares organisations the top management has to frame the change-scenario, to initiate, realise and sustain organisational changes. Achieving this, the proposed management models are a useful support. Their practical application could contribute to the efficient and effective functioning of the Hungarian managed care model at macro, meso and micro levels, as well. PMID:12858646

  14. In memory of Eugene (Jenő) von Gothard: a pioneering nineteenth century Hungarian astrophysicist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincze, Ildikő J.; Jankovics, István

    2012-07-01

    Eugene von Gothard was a Hungarian engineer/scientist, instrument-maker and astrophysicist who founded the Herény Astrophysical Observatory in 1881 and carried out pioneering work in astronomical photography and spectroscopy. In this paper we provide biographical material about von Gothard and describe his observatory, before discussing his astronomical observations and the contribution that hemade to the early development of astrophysics.

  15. Hungarian population data for 11 Y-STR and 49 Y-SNP markers.

    PubMed

    Völgyi, Antónia; Zalán, Andrea; Szvetnik, Eniko; Pamjav, Horolma

    2009-03-01

    49 Y-chromosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with TaqMan assay and 11 Y-chromosomal STR loci were tested in 215 independent Hungarian male samples. Genetic distances to 23 other populations were calculated based on haplogroup frequencies with AMOVA implemented in Arlequin2.0. Based on distances phylogenetic tree was constructed with Neighbor-joining method using Phylip 3.66. Haplotype and haplogroup diversity values were calculated. PMID:19215861

  16. Marketing and clinical trials: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Francis, David; Roberts, Ian; Elbourne, Diana R; Shakur, Haleema; Knight, Rosemary C; Garcia, Jo; Snowdon, Claire; Entwistle, Vikki A; McDonald, Alison M; Grant, Adrian M; Campbell, Marion K

    2007-01-01

    Background Publicly funded clinical trials require a substantial commitment of time and money. To ensure that sufficient numbers of patients are recruited it is essential that they address important questions in a rigorous manner and are managed well, adopting effective marketing strategies. Methods Using methods of analysis drawn from management studies, this paper presents a structured assessment framework or reference model, derived from a case analysis of the MRC's CRASH trial, of 12 factors that may affect the success of the marketing and sales activities associated with clinical trials. Results The case study demonstrates that trials need various categories of people to buy in – hence, to be successful, trialists must embrace marketing strategies to some extent. Conclusion The performance of future clinical trials could be enhanced if trialists routinely considered these factors. PMID:18028537

  17. Case studies of soil in art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, C.; Landa, E. R.; Toland, A.; Wessolek, G.

    2015-08-01

    The material and symbolic appropriations of soil in artworks are numerous and diverse, spanning many centuries and artistic traditions, from prehistoric painting and ceramics to early Renaissance works in Western literature, poetry, paintings, and sculpture, to recent developments in film, architecture, and contemporary art. Case studies focused on painting, installation, and film are presented with the view of encouraging further exploration of art about, in, and with soil as a contribution to raising soil awareness.

  18. Neuropathology of supercentenarians - four autopsy case studies.

    PubMed

    Takao, Masaki; Hirose, Nobuyoshi; Arai, Yasumichi; Mihara, Ban; Mimura, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Supercentenarians (aged 110 years old or more) are extremely rare in the world population (the number of living supercentenarians is estimated as 47 in the world), and details about their neuropathological information are limited. Based on previous studies, centenarians (aged 100-109 years old) exhibit several types of neuropathological changes, such as Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body disease pathology, primary age-related tauopathy, TDP-43 pathology, and hippocampal sclerosis. In the present study, we provide results from neuropathological analyses of four supercentenarian autopsy cases using conventional and immunohistochemical analysis for neurodegenerative disorders. In particular, we focused on the pathology of Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body disease, as well as the status of hippocampal sclerosis, TDP-43 pathology, aging-related tau astrogliopathy, and cerebrovascular diseases. Three cases were characterized as an "intermediate" level of Alzheimer's disease changes (NIA-AA guideline) and one was characterized as primary age-related tauopathy. TDP-43 deposits were present in the hippocampus in two cases. Neither Lewy body pathology nor hippocampal sclerosis was observed. Aging-related tau astrogliopathy was consistently observed, particularly in the basal forebrain. Small vessel diseases were also present, but they were relatively mild for cerebral amyloid-beta angiopathy and arteriolosclerosis. Although our study involved a small number of cases, the results provide a better understanding about human longevity. Neuropathological alterations associated with aging were mild to moderate in the supercentenarian brain, suggesting that these individuals might have some neuroprotective factors against aging. Future prospective studies and extensive molecular analyses are needed to determine the mechanisms of human longevity. PMID:27590044

  19. Clidar Mountain Boundary Layer Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Nimmi C. P.; Barnes, John E.

    2016-06-01

    A CCD Camera Lidar system called the CLidar system images a vertically pointing laser from the side with a spatially separated CCD camera and wide angle optics. The system has been used to investigate case studies of aerosols in mountain boundary layers in in the times following sunset. The aerosols detected by the system demonstrate the wide variation of near ground aerosol structure and capabilities of the CLidar system.

  20. Functional Disorders in Neurology: Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jon; Hoeritzauer, Ingrid; Gelauff, Jeannette; Lehn, Alex; Gardiner, Paula; van Gils, Anne; Carson, Alan

    2016-08-01

    Functional, often called psychogenic, disorders are common in neurological practice. We illustrate clinical issues and highlight some recent research findings using six case studies of functional neurological disorders. We discuss dizziness as a functional disorder, describing the relatively new consensus term Persistent Posturo-Perceptual Dizziness (PPPD), axial jerking/myoclonus as a functional movement disorder, functional speech symptoms, post-concussion disorder with functional cognitive symptoms and finally advances in treatment of dissociative seizures and functional motor disorders. PMID:27445247

  1. Shuttle Transportation System Case-Study Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, Khadijah

    2012-01-01

    A case-study collection was developed for NASA's Space Shuttle Program. Using lessons learned and documented by NASA KSC engineers, analysts, and contractors, decades of information related to processing and launching the Space Shuttle was gathered into a single database. The goal was to provide educators with an alternative means to teach real-world engineering processes and to enhance critical thinking, decision making, and problem solving skills. Suggested formats were created to assist both external educators and internal NASA employees to develop and contribute their own case-study reports to share with other educators and students. Via group project, class discussion, or open-ended research format, students will be introduced to the unique decision making process related to Shuttle missions and development. Teaching notes, images, and related documents will be made accessible to the public for presentation of Space Shuttle reports. Lessons investigated included the engine cutoff (ECO) sensor anomaly which occurred during mission STS-114. Students will be presented with general mission infom1ation as well as an explanation of ECO sensors. The project will conclude with the design of a website that allows for distribution of information to the public as well as case-study report submissions from other educators online.

  2. Legionella prevalence and risk of legionellosis in Hungarian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Barna, Zsófia; Kádár, Mihály; Kálmán, Emese; Róka, Eszter; Szax, Anita Sch; Vargha, Márta

    2015-12-01

    Nosocomial legionellosis is a growing concern worldwide. In Hungary, about 20% of the reported cases are health-care associated, but in the absence of legal regulation, environmental monitoring of Legionella is not routinely performed in hospitals. In the present study, 23 hospitals were investigated. The hot water distribution system was colonized by Legionella in over 90%; counts generally exceeded the public health limit value. Hot water temperature was critically low in all systems (<45 °C), and large differences (3-38 °C temperature drop) were observed within buildings, indicating insufficient circulation. Most facilities were older than 30 years (77%); however, new systems (n = 3) were also shown to be rapidly colonized at low hot water temperature. Vulnerable source of drinking water, complex distribution system, and large volume hot water storage increased the risk of Legionella prevalence (OR = 28.0, 27.3, 27.7, respectively). Risk management interventions (including thermal or chemical disinfection) were only efficient if the system operation was optimized. Though the risk factors were similar, in those hospitals where nosocomial legionellosis was reported, Legionella counts and the proportion of L. pneumophila sg 1 isolates were significantly higher. The results of environmental prevalence of legionellae in hospitals suggest that the incidence of nosocomial legionellosis is likely to be underreported. The observed colonization rates call for the introduction of a mandatory environmental monitoring scheme. PMID:26689882

  3. National Environmental Change Information System Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, S. J.; Ritschard, R.; Estes, M. G., Jr.; Hatch, U.

    2001-01-01

    The Global Hydrology and Climate Center and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a fact-finding case study for the Data Management Working Group (DMWG), now referred to as the Data and Information Working Group (DIWG), of the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) to determine the feasibility of an interagency National Environmental Change Information System (NECIS). In order to better understand the data and information needs of policy and decision makers at the national, state, and local level, the DIWG asked the case study team to choose a regional water resources issue in the southeastern United States that had an impact on a diverse group of stakeholders. The southeastern United States was also of interest because the region experiences interannual climatic variations and impacts due to El Nino and La Nina. Jointly, with input from the DIWG, a focus on future water resources planning in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) River basins of Alabama, Georgia, and Florida was selected. A tristate compact and water allocation formula is currently being negotiated between the states and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) that will affect the availability of water among competing uses within the ACF River basin. All major reservoirs on the ACF are federally owned and operated by the U.S. Army COE. A similar two-state negotiation is ongoing that addresses the water allocations in the adjacent Alabama-Coosa-Tallapoosa (ACT) River basin, which extends from northwest Georgia to Mobile Bay. The ACF and ACT basins are the subject of a comprehensive river basin study involving many stakeholders. The key objectives of this case study were to identify specific data and information needs of key stakeholders in the ACF region, determine what capabilities are needed to provide the most practical response to these user requests, and to identify any limitations in the use of federal data and information. The NECIS case study followed the terms of reference

  4. Case study of isosurface extraction algorithm performance

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, P M; Hansen, C D; Shen, H; Schikore, D

    1999-12-14

    Isosurface extraction is an important and useful visualization method. Over the past ten years, the field has seen numerous isosurface techniques published leaving the user in a quandary about which one should be used. Some papers have published complexity analysis of the techniques yet empirical evidence comparing different methods is lacking. This case study presents a comparative study of several representative isosurface extraction algorithms. It reports and analyzes empirical measurements of execution times and memory behavior for each algorithm. The results show that asymptotically optimal techniques may not be the best choice when implemented on modern computer architectures.

  5. Using Case Studies to Teach About Global Issues, Bali: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswald, James M.

    1974-01-01

    The South Pacific island of Bali is used as a case study of overpopulation and food shortage. A brief description of the resources, the typical lifestyle of the Balinese farmer, and possible teaching techniques are given. (DE)

  6. Using Case Study Analysis and Case Writing to Structure Clinical Experiences in a Teacher Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Deborah M.; Bodur, Yasar

    2005-01-01

    This study reports on the design and results of a two-semester study on the use of case study analysis and case writing in clinical experiences in an undergraduate teacher education program. Findings indicated that structured experiences with case studies and case writing increase preservice teachers' informed decision making on educational…

  7. The case study of biomaterials and biominerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Hoyo Martínez, Carmen

    2013-04-01

    The teaching of biomaterials as case study by on-line platform , susceptible to develop both individually and in groups, got different objectives proposed by the European Higher Education System, among which include: participate actively in the teaching-learning process by students, interpreting situations, adapt processes and solutions. It also improves oral and written communication, analytical skills and synthesis and also the ability to think critically. Biomaterials have their origin in biominerals. These are solid inorganic compounds of defined structure, consisting of molecular control mechanisms that operate in biological systems. Its main functions are: structural support, a reservoir of essential elements, sensors, mechanical protection and storage of toxic elements. Following the demand of materials compatible with certain functional systems of our body, developed biomaterials. Always meet the condition of biocompatibility. Should be tolerated by the body and do not provoke rejection. This involves a comprehensive study of physiological conditions and the anatomy of the body where a biomaterial has to be implemented. The possibility of generating new materials from biominerals has a major impact in medicine and other fields could reach as geology, construction, crystallography, etc. While the study of these issues is in its infancy today, can be viewed as an impact on the art and future technology. Planning case study that students would prepare its report for discussion in subgroups. Occurs then the pooling of individual analysis, joint case discussion and adoption by the subgroup of a consensual solution to the problem. The teacher as facilitator and coordinator of the final case analysis, sharing leads to group-wide class and said the unanimous decision reached by the students and gives his opinion on the resolution of the case. REFERENCES D.P. Ausubel. Psicología Educativa. Un punto de vista cognoscitivo. Trillas. Ed. 1983. E.W. Eisner. Procesos

  8. Classification of pasture habitats by Hungarian herders in a steppe landscape (Hungary)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Landscape ethnoecology focuses on the ecological features of the landscape, how the landscape is perceived, and used by people who live in it. Though studying folk classifications of species has a long history, the comparative study of habitat classifications is just beginning. I studied the habitat classification of herders in a Hungarian steppe, and compared it to classifications of botanists and laymen. Methods For a quantitative analysis the picture sort method was used. Twenty-three pictures of 7-11 habitat types were sorted by 25 herders.’Density’ of pictures along the habitat gradient of the Hortobágy salt steppe was set as equal as possible, but pictures differed in their dominant species, wetness, season, etc. Before sorts, herders were asked to describe pictures to assure proper recognition of habitats. Results Herders classified the images into three main groups: (1) fertile habitats at the higher parts of the habitat gradient (partos, lit. on the shore); (2) saline habitats (szík, lit. salt or saline place), and (3) meadows and marshes (lapos, lit. flooded) at the lower end of the habitat gradient. Sharpness of delimitation changed along the gradient. Saline habitats were the most isolated from the rest. Botanists identified 6 groups. Laymen grouped habitats in a less coherent way. As opposed to my expectations, botanical classification was not more structured than that done by herders. I expected and found high correspondence between the classifications by herders, botanists and laymen. All tended to recognize similar main groups: wetlands, ”good grass” and dry/saline habitats. Two main factors could have been responsible for similar classifications: salient features correlated (e.g. salinity recognizable by herders and botanists but not by laymen correlated with the density of grasslands or height of vegetation recognizable also for laymen), or the same salient features were used as a basis for sorting (wetness, and abiotic stress

  9. Teaching Freedom of Speech through the Case Study Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Peter E.

    The use of case studies or case histories of Supreme Court cases concerning freedom of speech often provides the "real world" dimension that is too often lacking in the teaching of this area. The case study or case history is a coherent narrative of the historical events designed to illuminate the issues involved in a specific situation. Such…

  10. Germline MLH1 and MSH2 mutational spectrum including frequent large genomic aberrations in Hungarian hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer families: Implications for genetic testing

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Janos; Kovacs, Marietta E; Olah, Edith

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the prevalence of germline MLH1 and MSH2 gene mutations and evaluate the clinical characteristics of Hungarian hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) families. METHODS: Thirty-six kindreds were tested for mutations using conformation sensitive gel electrophoreses, direct sequencing and also screening for genomic rearrangements applying multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). RESULTS: Eighteen germline mutations (50%) were identified, 9 in MLH1 and 9 in MSH2. Sixteen of these sequence alterations were considered pathogenic, the remaining two were non-conservative missense alterations occurring at highly conserved functional motifs. The majority of the definite pathogenic mutations (81%, 13/16) were found in families fulfilling the stringent Amsterdam I/II criteria, including three rearrangements revealed by MLPA (two in MSH2 and one in MLH1). However, in three out of sixteen HNPCC-suspected families (19%), a disease-causing alteration could be revealed. Furthermore, nine mutations described here are novel, and none of the sequence changes were found in more than one family. CONCLUSION: Our study describes for the first time the prevalence and spectrum of germline mismatch repair gene mutations in Hungarian HNPCC and suspected-HNPCC families. The results presented here suggest that clinical selection criteria should be relaxed and detection of genomic rearrangements should be included in genetic screening in this population. PMID:17569143

  11. Case Study Evaluations: A Case in Point. An Illustrative Report and Mathodological Analysis of Case Study Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malcolm, Cliff; Welch, Wayne

    To provide a real life example of case study methodology for educational evaluation, a naturalistic study of a Catholic junior college in Minneapolis, Minnesota is presented. Conducted as part of the ongoing evaluation of a federally supported project, the study provides an external observer's descriptive portrayal of the school, plus the…

  12. [Vasculitic urticaria: study of 12 cases].

    PubMed

    Hassan, M L; Perez Cejudo, J A; Yachi del Pino, E; Schroh, R G

    1990-01-01

    Twelve cases of chronic urticaria with histopathologic features of lecocitoclastic allergic angitis are studied. The type of cutaneous lesion, personal and familiar atopic history and the presence of autoimmune disease are described. Light microscopy, direct immunofluorescence, anti DNA, antinuclear, antithyroid, Ro, La, Rnp and Sm antibodies, total complement levels, C3 and C4, rheumatoid factor, latex, ASTO, cryoglobulines and complete workup were investigated, taking into account natural progression and response to therapy. Two different groups are defined: 1) normocomplementemic (5 patients) and 2) hypocomplementemic (7 patients). They were all women except one. The cutaneous lesions were indistinguishable in the two groups. Only in the second group there was an associated disease (systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogren syndrome disease, lupus-Sjogren overlap, autoimmune thyroid disease). Urticaria had been present from the onset of the disease in 4 patients, and occurred later during its course in 8 others. Five patients had thyroid disease (Hashimoto thyroiditis or Graves disease), two of them being mother and daughter. Another patient had a family history of Grave's disease and urticaria. Anti DNA antibodies were found in 7 cases, and anti Ro + La + in 3 cases. Response to treatment was variable with spontaneous cycles of worsening and remissions. One of the patients found a relationship with certain foods. Histopathologic results are related in both clinical normocomplementemic and hypocomplementemic groups. No significant differences were found between the two groups, but Ro+ and La+ patients exhibit more intense cariorexis and neutrophilic infiltrates. PMID:2263094

  13. [Psychoses and epilepsy. A case study].

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, W M A; Gunning, W B; Tuerlings, J H A M; Egger, J I M; Tuinier, S

    2006-01-01

    Over the last few decades much research has been done into the raised level of psychiatric comorbidity in epilepsy. On the basis of a case study of a patient suffering from post-ictal psychoses we explain the psychiatric differential diagnosis within the framework of epilepsy and we investigate the frequent psychiatric side-effects of anticonvulsants. It is concluded that the links between epilepsy and psychiatric symptoms are complex and that the neuropsychiatry of epilepsy is concerned with syndromes that are unique and do notfit into modern psychiatric classification systems. PMID:17086946

  14. Reinforcement learning: Solving two case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Ana Filipa; Silva, Pedro; dos Santos, Cristina Peixoto

    2012-09-01

    Reinforcement Learning algorithms offer interesting features for the control of autonomous systems, such as the ability to learn from direct interaction with the environment, and the use of a simple reward signalas opposed to the input-outputs pairsused in classic supervised learning. The reward signal indicates the success of failure of the actions executed by the agent in the environment. In this work, are described RL algorithmsapplied to two case studies: the Crawler robot and the widely known inverted pendulum. We explore RL capabilities to autonomously learn a basic locomotion pattern in the Crawler, andapproach the balancing problem of biped locomotion using the inverted pendulum.

  15. Wind to Hydrogen in California: Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Antonia, O.; Saur, G.

    2012-08-01

    This analysis presents a case study in California for a large scale, standalone wind electrolysis site. This is a techno-economic analysis of the 40,000 kg/day renewable production of hydrogen and subsequent delivery by truck to a fueling station in the Los Angeles area. This quantity of hydrogen represents about 1% vehicle market penetration for a city such as Los Angeles (assuming 0.62 kg/day/vehicle and 0.69 vehicles/person) [8]. A wind site near the Mojave Desert was selected for proximity to the LA area where hydrogen refueling stations are already built.

  16. Metrology in Pharmaceutical Industry - A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuvamoto, Priscila D.; Fermam, Ricardo K. S.; Nascimento, Elizabeth S.

    2016-07-01

    Metrology is recognized by improving production process, increasing the productivity, giving more reliability to the measurements and consequently, it impacts in the economy of a country. Pharmaceutical area developed GMP (Good Manufacture Practice) requeriments, with no introduction of metrological concepts. However, due to Nanomedicines, it is expected this approach and the consequent positive results. The aim of this work is to verify the level of metrology implementation in a Brazilian pharmaceutical industry, using a case study. The purpose is a better mutual comprehension by both areas, acting together and governmental support to robustness of Brazilian pharmaceutical area.

  17. Case study: Bioremediation in the Aleutian Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, K.J.; Laford, H.D.

    1995-12-31

    This case study describes the design, construction, and operation of a bioremediation pile on Adak Island, which is located in the Aleutian Island chain. Approximately 1,900 m{sup 3} of petroleum-contaminated soil were placed in the bioremediation pile. The natural bioremediation process was enhanced by an oxygen and nutrient addition system to stimulate microbial activity. Despite the harsh weather on the island, after the first 6 months of operation, laboratory analyses of soil samples indicated a significant (80%) reduction in diesel concentrations.

  18. The Effect of Using Case Studies in Business Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pariseau, Susan E.; Kezim, Boualem

    2007-01-01

    The authors evaluated the effect on learning of using case studies in business statistics courses. The authors divided students into 3 groups: a control group, a group that completed 1 case study, and a group that completed 3 case studies. Results evidenced that, on average, students whom the authors required to complete a case analysis received…

  19. Building Explanations across Case Studies: A Framework for Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Gretchen B.

    A framework is offered for fostering systematic, creative synthesis across various case studies. The challenge for those seeking to synthesize from case studies is to develop respect for the individual case context while permitting some blurring of unique features to occur in the synthesis. Case studies are meant to render an account of specific…

  20. Formal Methods Case Studies for DO-333

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofer, Darren; Miller, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    RTCA DO-333, Formal Methods Supplement to DO-178C and DO-278A provides guidance for software developers wishing to use formal methods in the certification of airborne systems and air traffic management systems. The supplement identifies the modifications and additions to DO-178C and DO-278A objectives, activities, and software life cycle data that should be addressed when formal methods are used as part of the software development process. This report presents three case studies describing the use of different classes of formal methods to satisfy certification objectives for a common avionics example - a dual-channel Flight Guidance System. The three case studies illustrate the use of theorem proving, model checking, and abstract interpretation. The material presented is not intended to represent a complete certification effort. Rather, the purpose is to illustrate how formal methods can be used in a realistic avionics software development project, with a focus on the evidence produced that could be used to satisfy the verification objectives found in Section 6 of DO-178C.

  1. Case Study of the California Cement Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

    2005-05-01

    California is the largest cement producing state in theU.S., accounting for between 10 percent and 15 percent of U.S. cementproduction and cement industry employment. The cement industry inCalifornia consists of 31 sites that consume large amounts of energy,annually: 1,600 GWh of electricity, 22 million therms of natural gas, 2.3million tons of coal, 0.25 tons of coke, and smaller amounts of wastematerials, including tires. The case study summarized in this paperfocused on providing background information, an assessment ofenergy-efficiency opportunities and barriers, and program recommendationsthat can be used by program planners to better target products to thecement industry. The primary approach to this case study involvedwalk-through surveys of customer facilities and in depth interviews withcustomer decision makers and subsequent analysis of collected data. Inaddition, a basic review of the cement production process was developed,and summary cement industry energy and economic data were collected, andanalyzed. The analysis of secondary data provides background informationon the cement industry and identification of potential energy-efficiencyopportunities. The interviews provide some understanding of the customerperspective about implementation of energy-efficiencyprojects.

  2. Ovarian response, embryo recovery and results of embryo transfer in a Hungarian native pig breed.

    PubMed

    Rátky, J; Brüssow, K P; Solti, L; Torner, H; Sarlós, P

    2001-09-15

    The objective of the study was to use embryo transfer (ET) for propagation of the Swallow Belly Mangalica population. Mangalica is a native Hungarian pig breed adapted to extreme climate and housing conditions and distinguished for excellent meat and fat quality. However, due to their weak reproductive characteristics and relatively high fat proportion, Mangalica pigs have been replaced by modern breeds. Now, there is an increased interest again to safeguard the properties of this breed. We conducted two experiments. First, we used a total of 18 puberal Mangalica gilts to determine an optimal superovulatory treatment. Following estrus synchronization with Regumate, we injected gilts with either 750, 1000 or 1250 IU PMSG, followed by 750 IU hCG 80 h later. We scanned ovaries endoscopically 3 days after hCG administration. The application of 1000 and 1250 IU PMSG resulted in a higher rate of ovulation compared to 750 IU (24.2 +/- 3.6 and 21.0 +/- 2.3 vs. 13.7 +/- 2.7 P<0.05). The number of follicular cysts increased after administration of 1250 IU PMSG compared to 750 and 1000 IU (2.0 +/- 1.3 vs. 0.3 +/- 0.7 and 0.2 +/- 0.3, P<0.05). Thus, we chose 1000 IU PMSG for further stimulation of Mangalica gilts. In the second experiment, we induced superovulation in 10 Mangalica donor gilts by 1000 IU PMSG and 750 IU hCG. Gilts were fixed-time inseminated, and then five days later embryo collection was carried out surgically (n=6) or endoscopically (n=4). Out of the 187 ova recovered, 92.5% were at the morula/blastocyst stage. The embryo recovery rate was higher following surgical flushing than following endoscopy (91.5 +/- 4.4% vs. 71.4 +/- 12.7%, P<0.05). Altogether 143 embryos were transferred surgically or endoscopically into 8 Landrace recipients. Surgical and endoscopic transfer of Mangalica embryos into Landrace gilts resulted in pregnancies in 3 and 2 gilts, respectively; thus the overall farrowing rate was 62.5%. The birth of 59 Mangalica piglets from 5 embryo

  3. Groundwater uptake by forest and herbaceous vegetation in the context of salt accumulation in the Hungarian Great Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribovszki, Zoltán; Kalicz, Péter; Balog, Kitti; Szabó, András; Fodor, Nándor; Tóth, Tibor

    2013-04-01

    In Hungarian Great Plain forested areas has significantly increased during the last century. Hydrological effects of trees differ from that of crops or grasses in that, due to their deep roots, they extract water from much deeper soil layers. It has been demonstrated that forest cover causes water table depression and subsurface salt accumulation above shallow saline water table in areas with a negative water balance. The above mentioned situation caused by the afforestation in the Hungarian Great Plain is examined in the frame of a systematic study, which analyzed all affecting factors, like climatic water balance, water table depth and salinity, three species, subsoil layering and stand age. At the regional scale altogether 108 forested and neighbouring non forested plots are sampled. At the stand scale 18 representative forested and accompanying non forested plots (from the 108) are monitored intensively. In this paper dataset of two neighbouring plots (common oak forest and herbaceous vegetation) was compared (as first results of this complex investigation). On the basis of the analysis it could be summarized that under forest the water table was lower, and the amplitude of diel fluctuation of water table was significantly larger as under the herbaceous vegetation. Both results demonstrate greater groundwater use of forest vegetation. Groundwater uptake of the forest (which was calculated by diel based method) was almost same as potential reference evapotranspiration (calculated by Penman-Monteith equation with locally measured meteorological dataset) along the very dry summer of 2012. Larger amount of forest groundwater use is not parallel with salt uptake, therefore salt accumulates in soil and also in groundwater as can be measured of the representative monitoring sites as well. In the long run this process can result in the decline of biological production or even the dry out of some part of the forest. Greater groundwater uptake and salt accumulation

  4. Microcomputer versus mainframe simulations: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bengtson, Neal M.

    1988-01-01

    The research was conducted to two parts. Part one consisted of a study of the feasibility of running the Space Transportation Model simulation on an office IBM-AT. The second part was to design simulation runs so as to study the effects of certain performance factors on the execution of the simulation model. The results of this research are given in the two reports which follow: Microcomputer vs. Mainframe Simulation: A Case Study and Fractional Factorial Designs of Simulation Runs for the Space Transportation System Operations Model. In the first part, a DOS batch job was written in order to simplify the execution of the simulation model on an office microcomputer. A comparison study was then performed of running the model on NASA-Langley's mainframe computer vs. running on the IBM-AT microcomputer. This was done in order to find the advantages and disadvantages of running the model on each machine with the objective of determining if running of the office PC was practical. The study concluded that it was. The large number of performance parameters in the Space Transportation model precluded running a full factorial design needed to determine the most significant design factors. The second report gives several suggested fractional factorial designs which require far fewer simulation runs in order to determine which factors have significant influence on results.

  5. Detection of a Tumor Suppressor Gene Variant Predisposing to Colorectal Cancer in an 18th Century Hungarian Mummy

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Michal; Hershkovitz, Israel; Sklan, Ella H.; Kahila Bar-Gal, Gila; Pap, Ildikó; Szikossy, Ildikó; Rosin-Arbesfeld, Rina

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene are common and strongly associated with the development of colorectal adenomas and carcinomas. While extensively studied in modern populations, reports on visceral tumors in ancient populations are scarce. To the best of our knowledge, genetic characterization of mutations associated with colorectal cancer in ancient specimens has not yet been described. In this study we have sequenced hotspots for mutations in the APC gene isolated from 18th century naturally preserved human Hungarian mummies. While wild type APC sequences were found in two mummies, we discovered the E1317Q missense mutation, known to be a colorectal cancer predisposing mutation, in a large intestine tissue of an 18th century mummy. Our data suggests that this genetic predisposition to cancer already existed in the pre-industrialization era. This study calls for similar investigations of ancient specimens from different periods and geographical locations to be conducted and shared for the purpose of obtaining a larger scale analysis that will shed light on past cancer epidemiology and on cancer evolution. PMID:26863316

  6. Microgravity isolation system design: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, R. D.; Knospe, C. R.; Allaire, P. E.; Grodsinsky, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    Many acceleration-sensitive, microgravity science experiments will require active vibration isolation from manned orbiters on which they will be mounted. The isolation problem, especially in the case of a tethered payload, is a complex three-dimensional one that is best suited to modern-control design methods. In this paper, extended H(sub 2) synthesis is used to design an active isolator (i.e., controller) for a realistic single-input-multiple-output (SIMO) microgravity vibration isolation problem. Complex mu-analysis methods are used to analyze the isolation system with respect to sensor, actuator, and umbilical uncertainties. The paper fully discusses the design process employed and the insights gained. This design case study provides a practical approach for isolation problems of greater complexity. Issues addressed include a physically intuitive state-space description of the system, disturbance and noise filters, filters for frequency weighting, and uncertainty models. The controlled system satisfies all the performance specifications and is robust with respect to model uncertainties.

  7. Building Energy Information Systems: User Case Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Granderson, Jessica; Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish

    2010-03-22

    Measured energy performance data are essential to national efforts to improve building efficiency, as evidenced in recent benchmarking mandates, and in a growing body of work that indicates the value of permanent monitoring and energy information feedback. This paper presents case studies of energy information systems (EIS) at four enterprises and university campuses, focusing on the attained energy savings, and successes and challenges in technology use and integration. EIS are broadly defined as performance monitoring software, data acquisition hardware, and communication systems to store, analyze and display building energy information. Case investigations showed that the most common energy savings and instances of waste concerned scheduling errors, measurement and verification, and inefficient operations. Data quality is critical to effective EIS use, and is most challenging at the subsystem or component level, and with non-electric energy sources. Sophisticated prediction algorithms may not be well understood but can be applied quite effectively, and sites with custom benchmark models or metrics are more likely to perform analyses external to the EIS. Finally, resources and staffing were identified as a universal challenge, indicating a need to identify additional models of EIS use that extend beyond exclusive in-house use, to analysis services.

  8. Socialization and the Child Rearing Practice. [Proceedings from the] Fenno-Hungarian Conference on Developmental Psychology (4th, Debrecen, Hungary, October 4-6, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugar-Kadar, Julia, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The fourth meeting of the Fenno-Hungarian Conferences on Developmental Psychology had as its theme "Socialization and the Child-Rearing Practice. The conference consisted of three Symposia. The first symposium, "Results of the collaborations on the basis of the series of the Fenno-Hungarian conferences," contains the following papers; (1)…

  9. Measuring Computer Science Knowledge Level of Hungarian Students Specialized in Informatics with Romanian Students Attending a Science Course or a Mathematics-Informatics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiss, Gabor

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of Information Technology knowledge of Hungarian and Romanian students was made with the help of a self developed web based Informatics Test. The goal of this research is an analysis of the Computer Science knowledge level of Hungarian and Romanian students attending a Science course or a Mathematics-Informatics course. Analysed was…

  10. Obsessional Slowness in College Students: Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Aleta

    2014-01-01

    Cases of obsessional slowness, a variant of obsessive compulsive disorder, have been documented in case literature regarding relatively low functioning populations. However, obsessional slowness can also present in higher functioning populations, including college and graduate students, as illustrated here by three case examples from a competitive…

  11. Unraveling phonological conspiracies: A case study

    PubMed Central

    Dinnsen, Daniel A.; Gierut, Judith A.; Morrisette, Michele L.; Rose, Darcy E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on three seemingly unrelated error patterns in the sound system of a child with a phonological delay, Child 218 (male, age 4 years; 6 months) and ascribes those error patterns to a larger conspiracy to eliminate fricatives from the phonetic inventory. Employing Optimality Theory for its advantages in characterizing conspiracies, our analysis offers a unified account of the observed repairs. The contextual restrictions on those repairs are, moreover, attributed to early developmental prominence effects, which are independently manifested in another error pattern involving rhotic consonants. Comparisons are made with a published case study involving a different implementation of the same conspiracy, the intent being to disambiguate the force behind certain error patterns. The clinical implications of the account are also considered. PMID:25000372

  12. Case study on industrial hazmat response teams.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Shelly J

    2009-11-01

    In 1991, Amway formed an industrial hazardous materials (hazmat) team in order to respond quickly and efficiently to potential chemical spills. The company's goals were, and still are today, to protect employees, the environment and the local community, and to reduce the amount of resulting downtime. In 1991, the hazmat team was very well funded, enabling it to become a discrete department with its own management staff and nearly 100 hazmat volunteers. Due to changes in the business climate, Amway reorganised in 2000/01, and the hazmat team became part of a company that incorporated contract work into its scope. When this reorganisation occurred, the hazmat team was thoroughly re-evaluated. Its response function was maintained, but was systematically reinvented in the most lean way practicable while still meeting corporate goals. This case study represents Amway's hazmat team's journey through the evaluation process and subsequent reorganisation. PMID:20378491

  13. Unmasking Cleckley's psychopath: assessing historical case studies.

    PubMed

    DeShong, Hilary L; Helle, Ashley C; Mullins-Sweatt, Stephanie N

    2016-05-01

    The current study investigated original case descriptions of psychopathy (Cleckley, 1941) in relation to current conceptualizations and general personality traits. Attorneys, forensic psychologists and clinical faculty members completed ratings of psychopathy and personality after reading vignettes based on Cleckley's descriptions of a psychopath. The results suggest that professionals' ratings are consistent with current conceptualizations of psychopathy. Furthermore, the five-factor model (FFM) personality traits of the vignettes aligned with the current literature on the FFM and psychopathy (i.e. low neuroticism, conscientiousness and agreeableness). The results further supported that a general trait model, like the FFM, may be well suited to describe the underlying personality traits of psychopathy. Gender differences were also examined. PMID:26931520

  14. Telepractice for pediatric Dysphagia: a case study.

    PubMed

    Malandraki, Georgia A; Roth, Melissa; Sheppard, Justine Joan

    2014-01-01

    A closed-ended intensive pediatric swallowing telepractice program was developed and piloted in one pediatric patient with Opitz BBB/G and Asperger's Syndromes, oropharyngeal dysphagia and aerophagia. The present study is a case report. Outcome variables included behavioral, swallowing and quality of life variables, and were assessed at baseline and at the end of the four-week program. Selective variables were also assessed at a follow-up family interview four weeks post program completion. Over the four-week intervention period, the patient demonstrated substantial improvements in: oral acceptance of eating-related objects and a variety of foods (behavioral variable), timing of voluntary saliva swallows and aerophagia levels (swallowing variables) and quality of life. Follow-up interview analysis showed that most skills were retained or improved one-month post intervention. This intensive telepractice program proved to be feasible and effective for this pediatric patient with dysphagia. PMID:25945217

  15. Raman spectroscopy and polarization: Selected case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossikovski, Razvigor; Picardi, Gennaro; Ndong, Gérald; Chaigneau, Marc

    2012-10-01

    We show, through several selected case studies, the potential benefits that can be obtained by controlling the polarization states of the exciting and scattered radiations in a Raman scattering experiment. When coupled with polarization control, Raman spectroscopy is thus capable of providing extra information on the structural properties of the materials under investigation. The experimental examples presented in this work are taken from the area of both conventional, i.e., far-field, as well as from near-field Raman spectroscopy. They cover topics such as the stress tensor measurement in strained semiconductor structures, the vibration mode assignment in pentacene thin films and the Raman scattering tensor determination from near-field measurements on azobenzene monolayers. The basic theory necessary for modelling the far- and near-field polarized Raman responses is also given and the model efficiency is illustrated on the experimental data.

  16. Unraveling phonological conspiracies: A case study.

    PubMed

    Dinnsen, Daniel A; Gierut, Judith A; Morrisette, Michele L; Rose, Darcy E

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on three seemingly unrelated error patterns in the sound system of a child with a phonological delay, Child 218 (male, age 4 years 6 months) and ascribes those error patterns to a larger conspiracy to eliminate fricatives from the phonetic inventory. Employing Optimality Theory for its advantages in characterizing conspiracies, our analysis offers a unified account of the observed repairs. The contextual restrictions on those repairs are, moreover, attributed to early developmental prominence effects, which are independently manifested in another error pattern involving rhotic consonants. Comparisons are made with a published case study involving a different implementation of the same conspiracy, the intent being to disambiguate the force behind certain error patterns. The clinical implications of the account are also considered. PMID:25000372

  17. Becoming occupation-based: a case study.

    PubMed

    Skubik-Peplaski, Camille; Howell, Dana; Harrison, Anne

    2014-10-01

    This descriptive case study illustrates the experiences of a 55-year-old male with a chronic disability resulting from a stroke, living in the community and a clinician's trial using occupation-based interventions predominately in a rehabilitation setting. The participant engaged in occupation-based interventions three times a week for 5 weeks guided by the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). Data were collected through semi-structured interviews during the intervention sessions and journal entries made by the therapist. Results suggested occupation-based interventions facilitated a transformation for both the client and the therapist by enhancing the participant's occupational performance and the ability to resume previous roles. The therapist's belief in the power and value of occupation-based practice was reinforced and validated, particularly in the rehabilitation of an individual with chronic stroke. PMID:24867352

  18. Telepractice for Pediatric Dysphagia: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Malandraki, Georgia A.; Roth, Melissa; Sheppard, Justine Joan

    2014-01-01

    A closed-ended intensive pediatric swallowing telepractice program was developed and piloted in one pediatric patient with Opitz BBB/G and Asperger’s Syndromes, oropharyngeal dysphagia and aerophagia. The present study is a case report. Outcome variables included behavioral, swallowing and quality of life variables, and were assessed at baseline and at the end of the four-week program. Selective variables were also assessed at a follow-up family interview four weeks post program completion. Over the four-week intervention period, the patient demonstrated substantial improvements in: oral acceptance of eating-related objects and a variety of foods (behavioral variable), timing of voluntary saliva swallows and aerophagia levels (swallowing variables) and quality of life. Follow-up interview analysis showed that most skills were retained or improved one-month post intervention. This intensive telepractice program proved to be feasible and effective for this pediatric patient with dysphagia. PMID:25945217

  19. Automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a case study.

    PubMed

    Spiro, Jon; Theodosiou, Maria; Doshi, Sagar

    2014-02-01

    Rates of survival after cardiac arrest are low and correlate with the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Devices that deliver automated CPR (A-CPR) can provide sustained and effective chest compressions, which are especially useful during patient transfer and while simultaneous invasive procedures are being performed. The use of such devices can also release members of resuscitation teams for other work. This article presents a case study involving a man with acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock and pulmonary oedema. It describes how ED nursing and medical teams worked together to deliver A-CPR, discusses the use of A-CPR devices in a tertiary cardiac centre, and highlights the advantages of using such devices. PMID:24494769

  20. Case Studies for School Administrators: Managing Change in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benham, Maenette K. P. Ah Nee

    This book examines case-based learning in educational leadership courses, discusses case-based learning as an educational tool, exemplifies methods of writing a case study, and contains 14 case-studies by teachers and administrators. "Stakeholders in a House of Cards," by Audrey Burgher, discusses integrating technology with innovation. "Reforming…

  1. Freedom of information: a case study.

    PubMed

    Worsfold, Denise

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this case study was to find out how easy it was to access information on the hygiene standards of eating places open to the public. Using the Freedom of Information (FOI) Act 2000, four adjacent local authorities in South Wales were asked to provide the last food hygiene report of an eating place in their area. The disclosed reports were assessed to determine how useful they would be to an individual seeking more information on a food premise. It was relatively easy to obtain information from two authorities and difficult if not impossible with the others. One local authority refused to release information despite the intervention of the FOI Commissioner. The quality of the information released was variable. This ranged from a completed comprehensive inspection protocol to a hand-written, illegible, incomplete report that failed to adequately differentiate between requirements and recommendations. Without some training in food law and food hygiene it would be difficult to interpret the reports. There was no evidence from the information provided of inspection scoring. The case study raises concerns about the effectiveness of the Act for consumers who wish to obtain information about the hygiene standards of food premises. While the specialist information provided by hygiene inspection reports may be useful to businesses it is not helpful for the lay public. Consumers must be prepared to exercise patience and tenacity if they want this information. Concerns must be raised about the consistency of the inspection process and about the willingness of some local authorities to be transparent about the inspection and enforcement process. PMID:17004406

  2. Maternal Genetic Composition of a Medieval Population from a Hungarian-Slavic Contact Zone in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Csákyová, Veronika; Szécsényi-Nagy, Anna; Csősz, Aranka; Nagy, Melinda; Fusek, Gabriel; Langó, Péter; Bauer, Miroslav; Mende, Balázs Gusztáv; Makovický, Pavol; Bauerová, Mária

    2016-01-01

    The genetic composition of the medieval populations of Central Europe has been poorly investigated to date. In particular, the region of modern-day Slovakia is a blank spot in archaeogenetic research. This paper reports the study of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in ancient samples from the 9th-12th centuries originating from the cemeteries discovered in Nitra-Šindolka and Čakajovce, located in western Slovakia (Central Europe). This geographical region is interesting to study because its medieval multi-ethnic population lived in the so-called contact zone of the territory of the Great Moravian and later Hungarian state formations. We described 16 different mtDNA haplotypes in 19 individuals, which belong to the most widespread European mtDNA haplogroups: H, J, T, U and R0. Using comparative statistical and population genetic analyses, we showed the differentiation of the European gene pool in the medieval period. We also demonstrated the heterogeneous genetic characteristics of the investigated population and its affinity to the populations of modern Europe. PMID:26963389

  3. Maternal Genetic Composition of a Medieval Population from a Hungarian-Slavic Contact Zone in Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Csákyová, Veronika; Szécsényi-Nagy, Anna; Csősz, Aranka; Nagy, Melinda; Fusek, Gabriel; Langó, Péter; Bauer, Miroslav; Mende, Balázs Gusztáv; Makovický, Pavol; Bauerová, Mária

    2016-01-01

    The genetic composition of the medieval populations of Central Europe has been poorly investigated to date. In particular, the region of modern-day Slovakia is a blank spot in archaeogenetic research. This paper reports the study of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in ancient samples from the 9th–12th centuries originating from the cemeteries discovered in Nitra-Šindolka and Čakajovce, located in western Slovakia (Central Europe). This geographical region is interesting to study because its medieval multi-ethnic population lived in the so-called contact zone of the territory of the Great Moravian and later Hungarian state formations. We described 16 different mtDNA haplotypes in 19 individuals, which belong to the most widespread European mtDNA haplogroups: H, J, T, U and R0. Using comparative statistical and population genetic analyses, we showed the differentiation of the European gene pool in the medieval period. We also demonstrated the heterogeneous genetic characteristics of the investigated population and its affinity to the populations of modern Europe. PMID:26963389

  4. Landslide Economics: Concepts and Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Martin; Damm, Bodo

    2015-04-01

    Landslide economics is vital for fundamental understanding of landslide risk as dealing with two important topics: (i) impact assessment, either as damage statistics or cost modeling, and (ii) vulnerability assessment, i.e., the study of exposure, sensitivity, and resilience to landslide damage, ideally from both sociotechnical and financial perspective (e.g., Crovelli and Coe, 2009; Wills et al., 2014). Many aspects addressed in landslide economics have direct influence on landslide risk, including: (i) human activity is often a major causative factor of landslides, not only by predisposing or triggering them, but also as a result of inadequate (low-cost) landslide mitigation; (ii) the level of tolerable or acceptable risk, a measure driving a large part of landslide costs in industrialized countries, is highly variable, differing between individuals, public or private organizations, and societies, with its nature being to change over time; and (iii) decision makers are faced with finding the right balance in landslide mitigation, thus need to weight diverse geological and socioeconomic factors that control its effectiveness in both technical and financial terms (e.g., Klose et al., 2014a). A large part of the complexity in assessing landslide risk as measured by economic costs is due to unique problems in understanding of (i) what types of landslide damage affect human activity and infrastructure in which way, (ii) how society contributes and responds to various kinds of damage, and (iii) how landslide damage is valued in monetary terms. Landslide economics shows the potential to take account of these sociocultural factors to the benefit of risk analysis (e.g., Klose et al., 2014b). The present contribution introduces local and regional case studies in which different economic issues of landslide risk are highlighted using the example of public infrastructures in NW Germany. A special focus is on the following topics: (i) risk culture and created risk, (ii

  5. The Minnesota Case Study Collection: New Historical Inquiry Case Studies for Nature of Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allchin, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The new Minnesota Case Study Collection is profiled, along with other examples. They complement the work of the HIPST Project in illustrating the aims of: (1) historically informed inquiry learning that fosters explicit NOS reflection, and (2) engagement with faithfully rendered samples of Whole Science.

  6. Problem-Based Learning: Case Studies, Experience and Practice. Case Studies of Teaching in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Peter, Ed.; Mennin, Stewart, Ed.; Webb, Graham, Ed.

    The case studies in this book consider many of the most important issues perceived and experienced by people who are using or developing problem-based learning (PBL). The book focuses on politics, administration, resources, the roles of teachers, and the effects of PBL on students. The chapters are: (1) "Come and See the Real Thing" (David…

  7. Case Study: Revising a Formal Case Study Presentation as an Independent Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Patrick R.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the process of researching and revising a case study presentation on an individual who experienced anesthetic awareness during an abdominal surgery and eventually committed suicide. Topics addressed include the author's selection of an undergraduate student with a science and teaching background to work on the case…

  8. Case Study: The Mystery of the Seven Deaths--A Case Study in Cellular Respiration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gazdik, Michaela

    2014-01-01

    Cellular respiration, the central component of cellular metabolism, can be a difficult concept for many students to fully understand. In this interrupted, problem-based case study, students explore the purpose of cellular respiration as they play the role of medical examiner, analyzing autopsy evidence to determine the mysterious cause of death…

  9. Effects of different lairage times after long distance transportation on carcass and meat quality characteristics of Hungarian Simmental bulls.

    PubMed

    Teke, Bulent; Akdag, Filiz; Ekiz, Bulent; Ugurlu, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of three lairage times (24 h, 48 h and 72 h) on the meat quality of tame trained to lead Hungarian Simmental bulls subjected to long commercial transportation of approximately 1800 km. A total of 30 bulls, with an average age of 24 months, were used. During the lairage, bulls received 0.5 kg concentrate feed per animal per day and ad libitum access to the hay and water. As the lairage duration increased, the pH(ult) decreased (P<0.05). Bulls lairaged for 24 h had lower L*, b* and H* values than those lairaged for 48 h and 72 h (P<0.05). The effect of lairage time on WHC, cooking loss and Warner-Bratzler shear force values was not significant. The b* value was considered the best predictor of muscle pH(ult). In conclusion, 72 h quiet lairage time is recommended after transportation in order to prevent the adverse effects of transportation on meat quality. PMID:23916957

  10. Chronostratigraphic relations of Neogene formations of the Great Hungarian Plain based on interpretation of seismic and paleomagnetic data

    SciTech Connect

    Pogacsas, G.; Lakatos, L.; Simon, E.; Vakaros, G.; Varkonyi, L.; Varnai, P. ); Jambor, A.; Hamor, T.; Lantos, M. ); Mattick, R.E. ); Elston, D.P. )

    1990-05-01

    This cooperative study by Hungarian and American geologists and geophysicists, demonstrates the power of the combination of modern paleomagnetic techniques and seismic profiling in working out the stratigraphy of a basin, with only limited paleontologic and isotopic control. Indirect evidence suggests that lake levels in the Pannonian inland sea (a remnant of the Paratethys), although isolated from the world's oceans, were affected by eustatic sea-level changes. Four hiatuses identified by seismic profiles near the northern margin of the Pannonian Basin and inferred to represent non-deposition between 11.5 and 10.5, 7.9 and 7.6, 6.8 and 5.7, 5.4 and 4.6 million years ago. Comparing these hiatuses with the eustatic sea level change curves the accordance is close and systematic. This indicates that the sea level of the Pannonian Inland Sea that became gradually isolated from the world oceans fluctuated in the same phase as global sea level. The hiatus between 6.8 and 5.7 Ma is tentatively correlated with the Messinian global stage during which time evaporite deposition in the Mediterranean was widespread--the so-called Messinian salinity crisis.

  11. Anthocyanin composition, antioxidant efficiency, and α-amylase inhibitor activity of different Hungarian sour cherry varieties (Prunus cerasus L.).

    PubMed

    Homoki, Judit R; Nemes, Andrea; Fazekas, Erika; Gyémánt, Gyöngyi; Balogh, Péter; Gál, Ferenc; Al-Asri, Jamil; Mortier, Jérémie; Wolber, Gerhard; Babinszky, László; Remenyik, Judit

    2016-03-01

    Five Hungarian sour cherry cultivars were studied to determine their anthocyanin contents and their possible inhibitory properties. The water and methanol soluble antioxidant capacities were separately assessed by photoluminescence showing values ranged from 3.4μgmg(-1) to 15.4μgmg(-1), respectively. The "VN1" variety (selected from "Csengődi csokros") showed the highest antioxidant capacity. The anthocyanin content, measured by pH differential method or isolated by solid phase extraction, was the highest also in "VN1". Correlation was found between the anthocyanin content and the high antioxidant capacity. The main anthocyanin components were cyanidin-3-O-rutinoside and cyanidin-3-O-glucoside. The presence of malvidin-3,5-O-diglycoside was verified by MALDI-TOF MS. Sour cherry extracts and selected anthocyanins inhibited the human salivary alpha-amylase catalyzed hydrolysis competitively. The lowest IC50 value, 55μgmL(-1) or 80μM, was measured for malvidin-3,5-O-diglycoside, for which possible binding modes within the alpha-amylase active site could be investigated in silico using molecular docking and molecular dynamics. PMID:26471548

  12. In Case You Teach English: Case Studies in the English Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johannessen, Larry R.

    Case studies can be a powerful strategy to use for helping students learn critical thinking processes that are key to interpreting and responding to literature and writing. Some of the major benefits of applying case methods are: cases provide an environment for active learning; they encourage the creation of a community of learners; cases help…

  13. Case study: Union of Raba River communities

    SciTech Connect

    Shewmake, T.

    1997-08-01

    This paper is a case study of the Union of Raba River Communities in Poland. The City of Cracow receives 60% of its water from the Dobczyce Reservoir, which is located in the Raba River Watershed. The water quality in this reservoir is threatened by pollution from non-point sources and untreated sewage. Because the reservoir and watershed are located outside of Cracow, protecting the water quality falls to communities that do not use the Reservoir. To meet this responsibility, communities in the watershed formed the Union of Raba River Communities (the Union). The Union hired a Cracow consulting firm to conduct a study of watershed management options, which was completed in January 1996. The Union is now evaluating the plan and looking for funding for implementation. The Union is also addressing specific problems in the watershed, including the siting of a much needed but unpopular landfill. There are numerous sources of pollution in the watershed including: sewage; runoff from urban areas, roads, agriculture, logged areas, landfills and dumps, fertilizer and pesticide storage areas, and petrol stations; and air pollution.

  14. Case studies of selected Project "Flash" events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaides, K. A.; Michaelides, S. C.; Savvidou, K.; Orphanou, A.; Constantinides, P.; Charalambous, M.; Michaelides, M.

    2009-03-01

    Flooding is a consequence of the prevailing meteorological situation, the intensity and duration of precipitation, geomorphology, human activities over a geographical region and other factors. Floods result in damage and destruction of infrastructure and private property and, in some cases, in fatalities. Flash floods are sudden and quite localized in extend, characterized by excessive amounts of rainfall within a short period of time and are distinguished from other floods by their degree of severity. The broader knowledge concerning flash floods is useful for the better understanding of the underlying thermodynamic and dynamic mechanisms, as well as the associated physical processes. The wider understanding of flashfloods can form part of an integrated system for short and very short forecasting of these events. In the present study, the synoptic, dynamic and thermodynamic conditions during the development of a baroclinic depression which affected the area of Cyprus on 6 November 2005 are studied. The depression was associated with extreme weather phenomena, such as thunderstorms, a water spout and high precipitation accumulations. The results indicate the importance of the dynamic parameters in the system's development and the thermodynamic analysis has shown the convective potential of the atmosphere.

  15. Preadolescent development: case studies in twins.

    PubMed Central

    Frank, R. A.; Cohen, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    The authors studied eight sets of healthy twins, ranging in physical maturity from prepubertal to late pubertal, and their parents, to assess psychological changes in early adolescence. A phase-specific psychosocial regression correlates with the biological onset of puberty. We present preliminary findings related to twinship, parental reactions, and longitudinal development, based on detailed case studies. Parents experienced increased conflict, detachment, and pride in response to their twins' psychosocial development at puberty. The more advanced child in a pair tended to lead in all spheres of adjustment-school success, heterosexual interest, peer friendships, and independent behavior. Although the more advanced child began to break away from his twin, in general the twin relationships remained close. Differences in personality traits and rate of psychosocial development within a twinship tended to remain consistent or to become accentuated. They were occasionally narrowed but rarely reversed from early childhood through early adolescence. Some of the differences were fostered by dissimilar patterns of identifying with the parents. PMID:7195631

  16. Tactile Astronomy - a Portuguese case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canas, L.; Alves, F.; Correia, A.

    2012-09-01

    Although astronomy plays an important role in the most various outreach initiatives, as well as school science curricula, due to its strong visual component in knowledge acquisition, astronomy subjects are not entirely well addressed and accessed by visually impaired students and/or general public. This stresses the need of more tactile material production, still very scarce in an educational context whether formal or informal. This is a case study activity developed based on different schematic tactile images of several objects present in our solar system. These images in relief, highlight, through touch, several relevant features present in the different astronomical objects studied. The scientific knowledge is apprehended through the use of a tactile key, complemented with additional information. Through proper hands-on activities implementation and careful analysis of the outcome, the adapted images associated with an explanatory key prove to be a valuable resource in tactile astronomy domain. Here we describe the process of implementing such initiative near visually impaired students. The struggles and challenges perceived by all involved and the enrichment experience of engaging astronomy with visually impaired audiences, broadening horizons in an overall experience accessible to all.

  17. DIAGNOSTIC TOOL DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION THROUGH REGIONAL CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Case studies are a useful vehicle for developing and testing conceptual models, classification systems, diagnostic tools and models, and stressor-response relationships. Furthermore, case studies focused on specific places or issues of interest to the Agency provide an excellent ...

  18. Enhancing the quality of case studies in health services research.

    PubMed Central

    Yin, R K

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide guidance on improving the quality of case studies in health services research. DATA SOURCES: Secondary data, drawing from previous case study research. RESEARCH DESIGN: Guidance is provided to two audiences: potential case study investigators (eight items) and reviewers of case study proposals (four additional items). PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The guidance demonstrates that many operational steps can be undertaken to improve the quality of case studies. These steps have been a hallmark of high-quality case studies in related fields but have not necessarily been practiced in health services research. CONCLUSIONS: Given higher-quality case studies, the case study method can become a valuable tool for health services research. Images Figure 3 PMID:10591280

  19. Patenting and Academic Research: Historical Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Presents historical accounts of patenting and past experiments in academic patent management. These cases highlight the motivations, expectations, and results for scientists, their institutions, and the public. (ML)

  20. Risk and protective factors in the origin of conotruncal defects of heart--a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Csáky-Szunyogh, Melinda; Vereczkey, Attila; Kósa, Zsolt; Gerencsér, Balázs; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2013-10-01

    Congenital heart defect (CHD) cases have been evaluated together as a group in some previous epidemiological studies. However, different CHD entities have different etiologies, and the underlying causes are unclear in the vast majority of patients. Thus the aim of this study was to analyze the possible association of different maternal diseases with the risk of four types of conotruncal defects (CTD), that is, truncus arteriosus, d-transposition of the great arteries, tetralogy of Fallot, and double-outlet right ventricle based on autopsy or surgical report diagnosis. Acute and chronic diseases with related drug treatments and peri-conceptual folic acid or multivitamin supplementations were compared in mothers of 598 CTD cases, of 902 matched controls, and 38,151 population controls without any defects, and with 20,896 malformed controls with other isolated non-cardiac defects in the population-based large dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities. Mothers who had medically recorded influenza and the common cold with secondary complications in the prenatal maternity logbook during the second and/or third gestational months were associated with a higher risk of CTD (OR with 95% CI: 2.22, 1.19-3.88). The common denominator of these maternal diseases may be high fever, which could be prevented by antifever therapies. On the other hand, high doses of medically recorded folic acid in early pregnancy were able to reduce the birth prevalence of CTD (OR with 95% CI: 0.54, 0.39-0.73), and this reduction was significant in transposition of the great arteries (0.46, 0.29-0.71) as well. In conclusion, high fever related maternal diseases may have a role in the origin of CTD, while high doses of folic acid in early pregnancy were able to reduce of CTD, particularly transposition of great vessels. PMID:23950097

  1. Quantifying Wetland Functions: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, K. W.; Rogers, J. S.; Hoffman, A. R.; Wu, C.; Hoopes, J. A.; Armstrong, D. E.

    2007-05-01

    Wetlands are reputed to reduce peak flows and improve water quality by trapping sediment and phosphorus. However, there are relatively few studies that quantify these wetland functions. This paper reports on a study of a 45-hectare wetland in southern Wisconsin. The wetland is traversed by a stream channel that drains a predominantly agricultural 17.4 km2 watershed. During the spring and summer of 2006, we collected stage data and water samples at stations upstream and downstream of the wetland, with the former accounting for 82% of the contributing area. Continuous measurements of water stage at these stations were used to construct a streamflow record. During storm events water samples were taken automatically at 2-hour intervals for the first 12 samples and 8-hour intervals for the next 12 samples. Samples were analyzed for total suspended solids, total phosphorus, and dissolved reactive phosphorus. Ten events were observed during the observation period; the two largest events were 1 to 2-year storms. One-dimensional unsteady flow routing was used to estimate the maximum extent of wetland inundation for each event. When normalized for flow volume, all peak flows were attenuated by the wetland, with the maximum attenuation corresponding to the intermediate events. The reduced attenuation of the larger events appears to be due to filling of storage, either due to antecedent conditions or the event itself. In the case of sediment, the amount leaving the wetland in the two largest storms, which accounted for 96% of the exported sediment during the period of observation, was twice the amount entering the wetland. The failure of the wetland to trap sediment is apparently due to the role of drainage ditches, which trap sediment during the wetland-filling phase and release it during drainage. The export of sediment during the largest events appears to result from remobilization of sediment deposited in the low-gradient stream channel during smaller events. This

  2. Racism in the Classroom: Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duhon, Gwendolyn M.

    This book presents 20 cases that address racism in one form or another. Many of the cases are from actual experience. They are intended to bring out actual or possible solutions so that student teachers, novice teachers, and seasoned teachers can find ideas for solving racist problems in their classrooms. The first part focuses on the early years,…

  3. Case study: camptocormia, a rare conversion disorder.

    PubMed

    Rajmohan, Velayudhan; Thomas, Biju; Sreekumar, Kumaran

    2004-09-01

    Camptocormia is a condition characterized by severe frontal flexion of the spinal cord and knees, with passive drooping of both arms. It occurs as a form of conversion disorder. Some cases are associated with behavioral problems. A case of camptocormia of 2-year duration in a south Indian adolescent girl with oppositional defiant disorder and moderate mental retardation is reported. PMID:15322421

  4. Case Study: Camptocormia, a Rare Conversion Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajmohan, Velayudhan; Thomas, Biju; Sreekumar, Kumaran

    2004-01-01

    Camptocormia is a condition characterized by severe frontal flexion of the spinal cord and knees, with passive drooping of both arms. It occurs as a form of conversion disorder. Some cases are associated with behavioral problems. A case of camptocormia of 2-year duration in a south Indian adolescent girl with oppositional defiant disorder and…

  5. The Undergraduate Case Research Study Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vega, Gina

    2010-01-01

    Student-written cases are powerful pedagogical tools that can lead to improved understanding of business situations, more informed analysis, emphasis on reflection, and clearer expository writing, all of which are critical skills for business students. Cases provide an opportunity for students to enjoy an active learning experience and derive the…

  6. Case Study Research in Education. A Qualitative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merriam, Sharan B.

    A practical guide for designing and carrying out qualitative case study in education is provided. How-to advice for managing all phases of case study research is included. The focus is on case studies that draw from what is commonly known as the qualitative research paradigm rather than a quantitative, positivistic, experimental orientation. Three…

  7. Arsenic Removal: Adsorptive Media and Coagulation/Filtration Case Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides information on the results of three case studies from USEPA arsenic demonstration program. The first case study presented is on the Rimrock, AZ project that used an adsorptive media technology (E33 media) to remove arsenic. The second case study is on...

  8. Using the Case Survey Method To Analyze Policy Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.; Heald, Karen A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a case study survey method that allows an analyst to aggregate (by means of a closed-ended questionnaire) the case study experiences and to assess the quality of each case study in a reliable and replicable manner. (Author/IRT)

  9. Teaching in Action: Case Studies from Second Language Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Jack C., Ed.

    The 76 case studies presented here describe how teachers of English as a second language (ESL) respond to problems they encounter in teaching. Each case study describes the context in which the teacher is working, the problem, and the teacher's response. Following each case study is a brief commentary by a teacher educator who reflects that type…

  10. Dynamic optimization case studies in DYNOPT tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozana, Stepan; Pies, Martin; Docekal, Tomas

    2016-06-01

    Dynamic programming is typically applied to optimization problems. As the analytical solutions are generally very difficult, chosen software tools are used widely. These software packages are often third-party products bound for standard simulation software tools on the market. As typical examples of such tools, TOMLAB and DYNOPT could be effectively applied for solution of problems of dynamic programming. DYNOPT will be presented in this paper due to its licensing policy (free product under GPL) and simplicity of use. DYNOPT is a set of MATLAB functions for determination of optimal control trajectory by given description of the process, the cost to be minimized, subject to equality and inequality constraints, using orthogonal collocation on finite elements method. The actual optimal control problem is solved by complete parameterization both the control and the state profile vector. It is assumed, that the optimized dynamic model may be described by a set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) or differential-algebraic equations (DAEs). This collection of functions extends the capability of the MATLAB Optimization Tool-box. The paper will introduce use of DYNOPT in the field of dynamic optimization problems by means of case studies regarding chosen laboratory physical educational models.

  11. Jazz improvisers' shared understanding: a case study.

    PubMed

    Schober, Michael F; Spiro, Neta

    2014-01-01

    To what extent and in what arenas do collaborating musicians need to understand what they are doing in the same way? Two experienced jazz musicians who had never previously played together played three improvisations on a jazz standard ("It Could Happen to You") on either side of a visual barrier. They were then immediately interviewed separately about the performances, their musical intentions, and their judgments of their partner's musical intentions, both from memory and prompted with the audiorecordings of the performances. Statements from both (audiorecorded) interviews as well as statements from an expert listener were extracted and anonymized. Two months later, the performers listened to the recordings and rated the extent to which they endorsed each statement. Performers endorsed statements they themselves had generated more often than statements by their performing partner and the expert listener; their overall level of agreement with each other was greater than chance but moderate to low, with disagreements about the quality of one of the performances and about who was responsible for it. The quality of the performances combined with the disparities in agreement suggest that, at least in this case study, fully shared understanding of what happened is not essential for successful improvisation. The fact that the performers endorsed an expert listener's statements more than their partner's argues against a simple notion that performers' interpretations are always privileged relative to an outsider's. PMID:25152740

  12. High Penetration Photovoltaic Case Study Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, J.; Mather, B.; Keller, J.; Coddington, M.

    2013-01-01

    Technical concerns with integrating higher penetrations of photovoltaic (PV) systems include grid stability, voltage regulation, power quality (voltage rise, sags, flicker, and frequency fluctuations), and protection and coordination. The current utility grid was designed to accommodate power flows from the central generation source to the transmission system and eventually to the distribution feeders. At the distribution level, the system was designed to carry power from the substation toward the load. Renewable distributed generation, particularly solar PV, provides power at the distribution level challenging this classical paradigm. As these resources become more commonplace the nature of the distribution network and its operation is changing to handle power flow in both directions. This report is focused on large PV installations in which penetration is significantly greater than 15% of maximum daytime feeder load. These case studies are intended to demonstrate success stories with integration of large PV plants at the distribution level as well as some of the solutions used by the utility to ensure safe, reliable operation of both the PV system and the distribution network.

  13. Keeping Things Interesting: A Reuse Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troisi, V.; Swick, R.; Seufert, E.

    2006-12-01

    Software reuse has several obvious advantages. By taking advantage of the experience and skill of colleagues one not only saves time, money and resources, but can also jump start a project that might otherwise have floundered from the start, or not even have been possible. One of the least talked about advantages of software reuse is it helps keep the work interesting for the developers. Reuse prevents developers from spending time and energy writing software solutions to problems that have already been solved, and frees them to concentrate on solving new problems, developing new components, and doing things that have never been done before. At the National Snow and Ice Data Center we are fortunate our user community has some unique needs that aren't met by mainstream solutions. Consequently we look for reuse opportunities wherever possible so we can focus on the tasks that add value for our user community. This poster offers a case study of one thread through a decade of reuse at NSIDC that has involved eight different development efforts to date.

  14. Jazz improvisers' shared understanding: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Schober, Michael F.; Spiro, Neta

    2014-01-01

    To what extent and in what arenas do collaborating musicians need to understand what they are doing in the same way? Two experienced jazz musicians who had never previously played together played three improvisations on a jazz standard (“It Could Happen to You”) on either side of a visual barrier. They were then immediately interviewed separately about the performances, their musical intentions, and their judgments of their partner's musical intentions, both from memory and prompted with the audiorecordings of the performances. Statements from both (audiorecorded) interviews as well as statements from an expert listener were extracted and anonymized. Two months later, the performers listened to the recordings and rated the extent to which they endorsed each statement. Performers endorsed statements they themselves had generated more often than statements by their performing partner and the expert listener; their overall level of agreement with each other was greater than chance but moderate to low, with disagreements about the quality of one of the performances and about who was responsible for it. The quality of the performances combined with the disparities in agreement suggest that, at least in this case study, fully shared understanding of what happened is not essential for successful improvisation. The fact that the performers endorsed an expert listener's statements more than their partner's argues against a simple notion that performers' interpretations are always privileged relative to an outsider's. PMID:25152740

  15. Word-gustatory synesthesia: a case study.

    PubMed

    Gendle, Mathew H

    2007-01-01

    A case study of a rare form of synesthesia is presented, where specific words act as the inducer, and gustatory sensations function as the concurrent. The female participant (TD) was twice presented with a list of 806 English words and 222 grammatically correct non-words (with 3 months between presentations). For each presentation, TD was asked to provide: a subjective description of the gustatory experience (if any) associated with each stimulus; a rating (from 0 to 10) of the intensity of the gustatory experience; and an indication (yes/no) if the experience was aversive. TD's responses across the two presentations were quantified, and comparisons are provided. In addition, TD's ability to create and recall novel word-taste associations was compared to that demonstrated by a sample of ten age-matched non-synesthete females. TD's synesthetic experiences were found to be highly consistent, more common in English words than non-words, and rarely aversive. Although TD was superior to control participants in remembering novel word-taste associations, her reported experiences cannot be wholly explained by either an exceptional non-synesthetic learning of taste-word associations over time, or a clear response to phonemes, rather than whole words. These conclusions are compared to the five other published reports of word-gustatory synesthesia, and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:17564196

  16. Environmental injustice: case studies from the South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifuentes, Enrique; Frumkin, Howard

    2007-10-01

    We selected three case studies to illustrate environmental injustice issues in the South. These examples relate to migrant agricultural workers, the maquiladora industry and artisanal mining, while reviewing some of the major mechanisms involved, e.g. multinational corporations, the development of free trade zones, multilateral free trade agreements and the export of hazards. A series of strategies are discussed in order to address environmental injustice and health disparities that exist on a global scale. Some of the recommendations involve policy initiatives; others, such as research and mentorship, fall within the traditional domain of public health practice. In this paper, special attention is given to concerned environmental and occupational health professionals using evidence-based data for advocacy. For lasting changes to be made, however, stronger institutions and legislation are required. Those who have the 'right to know' about environmental injustice issues include communities of concern, workers' representatives and lawyers. Government officials and company officials may eventually work on the basis of conflict resolution, compensation and remediation, to quote some examples. Systematic approaches to protect both the environment and public health must be updated.

  17. Business and Legal Case Genre Networks: Two Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhrig, Karl

    2012-01-01

    The framework of genre systems (Bazerman, 1994; Bhatia, 2004; Swales, 2004) offers an opportunity to illuminate the ways in which students enculturate into their disciplinary cultures (Berkenkotter & Huckin, 1995). To explore the ways in which genre chains are constructed through engagement in specific tasks, this study investigates two…

  18. Ada software productivity prototypes: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hihn, Jairus M.; Habib-Agahi, Hamid; Malhotra, Shan

    1988-01-01

    A case study of the impact of Ada on a Command and Control project completed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is given. The data for this study was collected as part of a general survey of software costs and productivity at JPL and other NASA sites. The task analyzed is a successful example of the use of rapid prototyping as applied to command and control for the U.S. Air Force and provides the U.S. Air Force Military Airlift Command with the ability to track aircraft, air crews and payloads worldwide. The task consists of a replicated database at several globally distributed sites. The local databases at each site can be updated within seconds after changes are entered at any one site. The system must be able to handle up to 400,000 activities per day. There are currently seven sites, each with a local area network of computers and a variety of user displays; the local area networks are tied together into a single wide area network. Using data obtained for eight modules, totaling approximately 500,000 source lines of code, researchers analyze the differences in productivities between subtasks. Factors considered are percentage of Ada used in coding, years of programmer experience, and the use of Ada tools and modern programming practices. The principle findings are the following. Productivity is very sensitive to programmer experience. The use of Ada software tools and the use of modern programming practices are important; without such use Ada is just a large complex language which can cause productivity to decrease. The impact of Ada on development effort phases is consistent with earlier reports at the project level but not at the module level.

  19. Teaching Business French through Case Studies: Presentation of a Marketing Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federico, Salvatore; Moore, Catherine

    The use of case studies as a means for teaching business French is discussed. The approach is advocated because of the realism of case studies, which are based on actual occurrences. Characteristics of a good case are noted: it tells a story, focuses on interest-arousing issues, is set in the past 10 years, permits empathy with the main…

  20. Cases for the Net Generation: An Empirical Examination of Students' Attitude toward Multimedia Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Michael; Vibert, Conor

    2016-01-01

    Case studies have been an important tool in business, legal, and medical education for generations of students. Traditional text-based cases tend to be self-contained and structured in such a way as to teach a particular concept. The multimedia cases introduced in this study feature unscripted web-hosted video interviews with business owners and…

  1. In Case You Are Interested: Results of a Survey of Case Study Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Schiller, Nancy A.; Herreid, Ky F.; Wright, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    Case study teaching had a long tradition in law and business before it made the jump to medical school education in the form of Problem-Based Learning (PBL) in the 1970s. Today, both the University of Delaware's Clearinghouse and the University of Buffalo's National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science (NCCSTS) have hundreds of cases and…

  2. Structured Controversy: A Case Study Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    1996-01-01

    Introduces a dynamic form of the case instruction method that involves debate and compromise. Discusses two versions of structured controversy and presents an example of structured controversy that involves the use of DNA fingerprinting in forensic medicine. (JRH)

  3. Jane: A Case Study in Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willingham, Barbara

    1988-01-01

    The article reports the case history of a 15-year-old Australian girl with anorexia nervosa. Information is also given on prevalence, causes, definitions, and treatments including hospitalization, co-therapy, psychotherapy, behavior modification, family therapy, and counseling. (DB)

  4. Online Learning and Teaching with Technology: Case Studies, Experience and Practice. Case Studies of Teaching in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, David, Ed.; Walker, Rob, Ed.; Webb, Graham, Ed.

    This book contains case studies that look at using technology in a wide range of situations, from fully online courses to more traditional face-to-face settings. The case studies deal with issues related to student interaction, teaching and assessment, planning and development, and policy. The following case studies are included: (1) "Flame War"…

  5. Combining genetic association study designs: a GWAS case study.

    PubMed

    Estus, Janice L; Fardo, David W

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) explore the relationship between genome variability and disease susceptibility with either population- or family-based data. Here, we have evaluated the utility of combining population- and family-based statistical association tests and have proposed a method for reducing the burden of multiple testing. Unrelated singleton and parent-offspring trio cases and controls from the Genetics of Kidneys in Diabetes (GoKinD) study were analyzed for genetic association with diabetic nephropathy (DN) in type 1 diabetics (T1D). The Cochran-Armitage test for trend and the family-based association test were employed using either unrelated cases and controls or trios, respectively. In addition to combining single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) p-values across these tests via Fisher's method, we employed a novel screening approach to rank SNPs based on conditional power for more efficient testing. Using either the population-based or family-based subset alone predictably limited resolution to detect DN SNPs. For 384,197 SNPs passing quality control (QC), none achieved strict genome-wide significance (1.4 × 10(-7)) using 1171 singletons (577/594 cases/controls) or 1738 pooled singletons and offspring probands (841/897). Similarly, none of the 352,004 SNPs passing QC in 567 family trios (264/303 case/control proband trios) reached genome-wide significance. Testing the top 10 SNPs ranked using aggregated conditional power resulted in two SNPs reaching genome-wide significance, rs11645147 on chromosome 16 (p = 1.74 × 10(-4) < 0.05/10 = 0.005) and rs7866522 on chromosome 9 (p = 0.0033). Efficient usage of mixed designs incorporating both unrelated and family-based data may help to uncover associations otherwise difficult to detect in the presence of massive multiple testing corrections. Capitalizing on the strengths of both types while using screening approaches may be useful especially in light of large-scale, next-generation sequencing and rare

  6. Biostratigraphic case studies of six major extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sloan, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    Biostratigraphic case studies of six major extinctions show all are gradual save one, which is a catastrophic extinction of terrestrial origin. These extinctions show a continuum of environmental insults from major to minor. The major causes of these extinctions are positive and negative eustatic sea level changes, temperature, or ecological competition. Extraterrestrial causes should not be posited without positive association with a stratigraphically sharp extinction. The Cretaceous-Tertiary terrestrial extinction is considerably smaller in percentage of extinction than the marine extinction and is spread over 10 my of the Cretaceous and 1 my of the Tertiary. Sixty percent of the 30 dinosaurs in the northern Great Plains of the U.S. and Canada had become extinct in the 9 my before the late Maastrichtian sea level drop. The best data on the Permo-Triassic terrestrial extinction are from the Karoo basin of South Africa. This is a series of 6 extinctions in some 8 my, recorded in some 2800 meters of sediment. Precision of dating is enhanced by the high rate of accumulation of these sediments. Few data are readily available on the timing of the marine Permo-Triassic extinction, due to the very restricted number of sequences of Tatarian marine rocks. The terminal Ordovician extinction at 438 my is relatively rapid, taking place over about 0.5 my. The most significant aspect of this extinction is a eustatic sea level lowering associated with a major episode of glaciation. New data on this extinction is the reduction from 61 genera of trilobites in North America to 14, for a 77 percent extinction. Another Ordovician extinction present over 10 percent of the North American craton occurs at 454 my in the form of a catastrophic extinction due to a volcanic eruption which blanketed the U.S. east of the Transcontinental Arch. This is the only other sizeable extinction in the Ordovician.

  7. Erythroderma: A clinical study of 97 cases

    PubMed Central

    Akhyani, Maryam; Ghodsi, Zahra S; Toosi, Siavash; Dabbaghian, Hossein

    2005-01-01

    Background Erythroderma is a rare skin disorder that may be caused by a variety of underlying dermatoses, infections, systemic diseases and drugs. Methods We reviewed the clinical, laboratory and biopsy material of 97 patients diagnosed with erythroderma who were treated in our department over a 6-year period (1996 through 2002). Results The male-female ratio was 1.85:1. The mean age at diagnosis was 46.2 years. The most common causative factors were dermatoses (59.7%), followed by drug reactions (21.6%), malignancies (11.3%) and idiopathic causes (7.2%). Carbamazepine was the most common drug (57.1%). The best clinicopathologic correlation was found in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and pityriasis rubra pilaris related erythroderma. Apart from scaling and erythema that were present in all patients, pruritus was the most common finding (97.5%), followed by fever (33.6%), lymphadenopathy (21.3%), edema (14.4%) and hyperkeratosis (7.2%). Conclusion This study outlines that underlying etiologic factors of erythroderma may show geographic variations. Our series had a high percentage of erythroderma secondary to preexisting dermatoses and a low percentage of idiopathic cases. There was no HIV-infected patient among our series based on multiple serum antibody tests. The clinical features of erythroderma were identical, irrespective of the etiology. The onset of the disease was usually insidious except in drug-induced erythroderma, where it was acute. The group associated with the best prognosis was that related to drugs. PMID:15882451

  8. Report on Federal Productivity. Volume 2, Productivity Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joint Financial Management Improvement Program, Washington, DC.

    Volume 2 contains 15 productivity case studies which illustrate and expand on the causal factors mentioned in volume 1. The cases illustrate many different approaches to productivity measurement improvement. The case studies are: Development of an Output-Productivity Measure for the Air Force Medical Service; Measuring Effectiveness and Efficiency…

  9. The Analysis of a Murder, a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinan, Frank J.; Szczepankiewicz, Steven H.; Carnaham, Melinda; Colvin, Michael T.

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of a Murder case study can be used in general chemistry or nonscience major chemistry courses to teach data handling and analysis in a non-laboratory context. This case study will help students to respond more enthusiastically and with more interest to a set of material placed before them related to a real case rather than…

  10. Case Study Digest: Preparing Teachers for Education Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Karen L., Ed.

    This case study digest is intended for classroom teachers who wish to discuss a variety of challenges in school leadership. The publication targets classroom teachers who desire leadership training and aspire to become school administrators. The case studies represent actual incidents experienced by school leaders. The cases are formatted to…

  11. Prokaryotic phylogenetic diversity of Hungarian deep subsurface geothermal well waters.

    PubMed

    Németh, Andrea; Szirányi, Barbara; Krett, Gergely; Janurik, Endre; Kosáros, Tünde; Pekár, Ferenc; Márialigeti, Károly; Borsodi, Andrea K

    2014-09-01

    Geothermal wells characterized by thermal waters warmer than 30°C can be found in more than 65% of the area of Hungary. The examined thermal wells located nearby Szarvas are used for heating industrial and agricultural facilities because of their relatively high hydrocarbon content. The aim of this study was to reveal the prokaryotic community structure of the water of SZR18, K87 and SZR21 geothermal wells using molecular cloning methods and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). Water samples from the outflow pipes were collected in 2012 and 2013. The phylogenetic distribution of archaeal molecular clones was very similar in each sample, the most abundant groups belonged to the genera Methanosaeta, Methanothermobacter and Thermofilum. In contrast, the distribution of bacterial molecular clones was very diverse. Many of them showed the closest sequence similarities to uncultured clone sequences from similar thermal environments. From the water of the SZR18 well, phylotypes closely related to genera Fictibacillus and Alicyclobacillus (Firmicutes) were only revealed, while the bacterial diversity of the K87 well water was much higher. Here, the members of the phyla Thermodesulfobacteria, Proteobacteria, Nitrospira, Chlorobi, OP1 and OPB7 were also detected besides Firmicutes. PMID:25261947

  12. Genetic Alterations in Hungarian Patients with Papillary Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tobiás, Bálint; Halászlaki, Csaba; Balla, Bernadett; Kósa, János P; Árvai, Kristóf; Horváth, Péter; Takács, István; Nagy, Zsolt; Horváth, Evelin; Horányi, János; Járay, Balázs; Székely, Eszter; Székely, Tamás; Győri, Gabriella; Putz, Zsuzsanna; Dank, Magdolna; Valkusz, Zsuzsanna; Vasas, Béla; Iványi, Béla; Lakatos, Péter

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancers is increasing worldwide. Some somatic oncogene mutations (BRAF, NRAS, HRAS, KRAS) as well as gene translocations (RET/PTC, PAX8/PPAR-gamma) have been associated with the development of thyroid cancer. In our study, we analyzed these genetic alterations in 394 thyroid tissue samples (197 papillary carcinomas and 197 healthy). The somatic mutations and translocations were detected by Light Cycler melting method and Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction techniques, respectively. In tumorous samples, 86 BRAF (44.2%), 5 NRAS (3.1%), 2 HRAS (1.0%) and 1 KRAS (0.5%) mutations were found, as well as 9 RET/PTC1 (4.6%) and 1 RET/PTC3 (0.5%) translocations. No genetic alteration was seen in the non tumorous control thyroid tissues. No correlation was detected between the genetic variants and the pathological subtypes of papillary cancer as well as the severity of the disease. Our results are only partly concordant with the data found in the literature. PMID:26259532

  13. The Role of Free Internet Resources for Library Technical Services and Reference in a Hungarian LIS Continuing Education Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koltay, Tibor

    2006-01-01

    After providing background to Continuing Professional Education (CPE) of librarians in Hungary, this article outlines the content of a course that seeks to make Hungarian librarians familiar with free Internet resources that are usable for library technical services and reference. One of the most important topics covered in the course is the…

  14. Interethnic differences of cytochrome P450 gene polymorphisms may influence outcome of taxane therapy in Roma and Hungarian populations.

    PubMed

    Szalai, Renata; Ganczer, Alma; Magyari, Lili; Matyas, Petra; Bene, Judit; Melegh, Bela

    2015-12-01

    Taxanes are widely used microtubule-stabilizing chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of cancers. Several cytochrome P450 gene variants have been proven to influence taxane metabolism and therapy. The purpose of this work was to determine the distribution of genetic variations of CYP1B1, CYP2C8 and CYP3A5 genes as the first report on taxane metabolizer cytochrome P450 gene polymorphisms in Roma and Hungarian populations. A total of 397 Roma and 412 Hungarian healthy subjects were genotyped for CYP1B1 c.4326C > G, CYP2C8 c.792C > G and CYP3A5 c.6986A > G variant alleles by PCR-RFLP assay and direct sequencing. We found significant differences in the frequencies of homozygous variant genotypes of CYP1B1 4326 GG (p = 0.002) and CYP3A5 6986 GG (p < 0.001) between Roma and Hungarian populations. Regarding minor allele frequencies, for CYP2C8 a significantly increased prevalence was found in 792G allele frequency in the Hungarian population compared to the Roma population (5.83% vs. 2.14%, p = 0.001). Our results can be used as possible predictive factors in population specific treatment algorithms to developing effective programs for a better outcome in patients treated with taxanes. PMID:26507668

  15. Social cognitive intervention reduces stress in Hungarian university students.

    PubMed

    Bíró, Eva; Veres-Balajti, Ilona; Adány, Róza; Kósa, Karolina

    2014-02-20

    A social cognitive intervention was developed and delivered as a credit course to improve mental distress of university students, based on findings in a previous health survey showing notable mental distress among future teachers in Hungary in 2007. The intervention included increasing information on psychoactive substances used for stress reduction; skills development in stress reduction methods; improving skills in communication and problem-solving. All students who participated in the previous health survey were targeted. Mental status of the participants was assessed by a questionnaire before (n: 128, 22% male, mean age 23.21 years) and after (n: 148, 30% male, mean age 23.54 years) the intervention. Specifically, self-efficacy as outcome was approximated by a trait measure (sense of coherence); psychological distress was measured by the 12-item General Health Questionnaire ( Goldberg et al., 1997. The validity of two versions of the GHQ in the WHO study of mental illness in general health care. Psychological Medicine, 27, 191-197) after the intervention compared with that before. After the intervention, psychological distress was reduced among the participants (p: 0.013). Non-significant improvement occurred in the mean score for sense of coherence (from a mean 60.8 points before to 61.4 points after, p: 0.688). The intervention produced a modest but significant decrease in psychological distress in students at a cost of 54 US$ per 1 point improvement in mental distress. The intervention, a first example of the translation of the social cognitive theory into practice among students in higher education can be integrated into the curriculum as a standardized optional course. PMID:24556027

  16. The use of case studies in teaching undergraduate neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Meil, William M

    2007-01-01

    Case studies have been the cornerstone of many discoveries in neurology and continue to be an indispensable source of knowledge. Attaching a name, face, and story to the study of neurological disorders makes them more "real" and memorable. This article describes the value of the case study methodology and its advantages as a pedagogical approach. It also illustrates how the seminal case of H.M. can be used to highlight the advantages and disadvantages of the case study methodology. Three exercises are described for incorporating case studies into neuroscience courses. The first exercise requires students to conduct a literature review regarding their assigned case and then design an experiment to address a lingering question regarding that neurological disorder. Survey results of 90 students provide quantitative and qualitative support for this approach. The vast majority of students indicated this exercise was a valuable learning experience; sparked interest in the topic and in biopsychology; increased their knowledge and stimulated critical thinking. The second exercise discusses how students might conduct their own case studies. The third exercise emphasizes the use of case studies as a platform to examine competing hypotheses regarding neurological conditions and their treatment. A table listing case studies appropriate for undergraduate neuroscience courses is included. Cases are categorized by the type of neurological disorder and notes regarding the nature of and content of each case are provided. PMID:23493154

  17. The Use of Case Studies in Teaching Undergraduate Neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Meil, William M.

    2007-01-01

    Case studies have been the cornerstone of many discoveries in neurology and continue to be an indispensable source of knowledge. Attaching a name, face, and story to the study of neurological disorders makes them more “real” and memorable. This article describes the value of the case study methodology and its advantages as a pedagogical approach. It also illustrates how the seminal case of H.M. can be used to highlight the advantages and disadvantages of the case study methodology. Three exercises are described for incorporating case studies into neuroscience courses. The first exercise requires students to conduct a literature review regarding their assigned case and then design an experiment to address a lingering question regarding that neurological disorder. Survey results of 90 students provide quantitative and qualitative support for this approach. The vast majority of students indicated this exercise was a valuable learning experience; sparked interest in the topic and in biopsychology; increased their knowledge and stimulated critical thinking. The second exercise discusses how students might conduct their own case studies. The third exercise emphasizes the use of case studies as a platform to examine competing hypotheses regarding neurological conditions and their treatment. A table listing case studies appropriate for undergraduate neuroscience courses is included. Cases are categorized by the type of neurological disorder and notes regarding the nature of and content of each case are provided. PMID:23493154

  18. Case studies: Soil mapping using multiple methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Hauke; Wunderlich, Tina; Hagrey, Said A. Al; Rabbel, Wolfgang; Stümpel, Harald

    2010-05-01

    Soil is a non-renewable resource with fundamental functions like filtering (e.g. water), storing (e.g. carbon), transforming (e.g. nutrients) and buffering (e.g. contamination). Degradation of soils is meanwhile not only to scientists a well known fact, also decision makers in politics have accepted this as a serious problem for several environmental aspects. National and international authorities have already worked out preservation and restoration strategies for soil degradation, though it is still work of active research how to put these strategies into real practice. But common to all strategies the description of soil state and dynamics is required as a base step. This includes collecting information from soils with methods ranging from direct soil sampling to remote applications. In an intermediate scale mobile geophysical methods are applied with the advantage of fast working progress but disadvantage of site specific calibration and interpretation issues. In the framework of the iSOIL project we present here some case studies for soil mapping performed using multiple geophysical methods. We will present examples of combined field measurements with EMI-, GPR-, magnetic and gammaspectrometric techniques carried out with the mobile multi-sensor-system of Kiel University (GER). Depending on soil type and actual environmental conditions, different methods show a different quality of information. With application of diverse methods we want to figure out, which methods or combination of methods will give the most reliable information concerning soil state and properties. To investigate the influence of varying material we performed mapping campaigns on field sites with sandy, loamy and loessy soils. Classification of measured or derived attributes show not only the lateral variability but also gives hints to a variation in the vertical distribution of soil material. For all soils of course soil water content can be a critical factor concerning a succesful

  19. Caddis Case Studies Final Reports (2010)

    EPA Science Inventory

    These reports provide examples of how some assessors have developed and interpreted evidence to determine causes of biological impairments and in some cases have improved the quality of an ecosystem. They provide different examples of how to organize an assessment report, anal...

  20. Olympus Imaging Fraud Scandal: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elam, Dennis; Madrigal, Marion; Jackson, Maura

    2014-01-01

    This case examines the two decade long tobashi scheme by Olympus Imaging Executives to hide $1.7 billion in losses. In the 1980s, a soaring yen and falling dollar caused bottom line income problems for many Japanese companies. Some companies sought to offset the declining revenue with zaiteku, a form of speculative investment. While early…

  1. Visual Diagnosis: Pearling: a case study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We present the case of a patient who attempted to perform a type of body modification known as "pearling" or "genital beading" while in prison. This patient unfortunately caused severe trauma to his penis, requiring surgical intervention. Photographs of the traumatic injuries are presented. PMID:22152103

  2. Stuttering, Cluttering, and Phonological Complexity: Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaSalle, Lisa R.; Wolk, Lesley

    2011-01-01

    The phonological complexity of dysfluencies in those who clutter and/or stutter may help us better understand phonetic factors in these two types of fluency disorders. In this preliminary investigation, cases were three 14-year-old males, diagnosed as a Stutterer, a Clutterer, and a Stutterer-Clutterer. Spontaneous speech samples were transcribed,…

  3. Using Online Case Studies to Enhance Teacher Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, Laila

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact interactive, online case studies have on learning for preservice teachers. More specifically, it evaluated whether the use of online case studies in instruction could enhance the level of knowledge the preservice teacher gained from the content material. This study utilized a nonequivalent group,…

  4. Multiculturalism and Mother Tongue Maintenance--The Case of the Hungarian Diaspora in Queensland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatoss, Aniko

    2004-01-01

    Multicultural policies and language policies claim to provide a favorable environment for the maintenance of immigrant languages. However, the relationship between multiculturalism and multilingualism is complex and contested. Rates of language loss and shift in Australia show that the multilingual heritage is very vulnerable even within the…

  5. Public Administration Education in a Continental European Legalistic Setting: The Hungarian Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellén, Márton

    2014-01-01

    The Trans-European Dialogue in 2013 was dedicated to the revisiting of the research undertaken by György Hajnal in 2003 (Hajnal, 2003) on public administration education in Europe. As part of the preparations to the conference, Hajnal also revisited his research after 10 years. The findings presented on the conference offer a theoretical framework…

  6. Case Studies in the Field of Marketing Education: Learner Impact, Case Performance, and Cost Efficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spais, George S.

    2005-01-01

    The major objective of this study is to identify a methodology that will help educators in marketing to efficiently manage the design, impact, and cost of case studies. It is my intention is to examine the impact of case study characteristics in relation to the degree of learner involvement in the learning process. The author proposes that…

  7. A case study of preferential bestiality.

    PubMed

    Earls, Christopher M; Lalumière, Martin L

    2009-08-01

    In a previous article, we presented phallometric data to illustrate a case of preferential bestiality or zoophilia (Earls & Lalumière, Sex Abuse: J Res Treat, 14:83-88, 2002). Based on the available literature, we argued that a marked preference for having sex with animals over sex with humans is extremely rare. In the present article, we describe a second case of zoophilia that challenges the widely held assumptions that men who have sex with animals are generally of below average intelligence and come from rural areas. In addition, we provide a brief review of a burgeoning quantitative literature using large groups of zoophiles recruited from internet sources. Although estimates of the prevalence of zoophilia are not possible at this time, it appears that zoophilia is not as rare as once thought and shares many features with other atypical sexual interests. PMID:18157625

  8. Responsibility and Responsiveness. Case Studies in Further Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kedney, Bob, Ed.; Parkes, David, Ed.

    These eight case studies illustrate the capacity of United Kingdom Colleges of Further Education to respond effectively to training needs of local industry and commerce. Case 1 demonstrates shifts across a range of local authority colleges towards provision in the new information technologies and the service industries. Case 2 illustrates a…

  9. Insider Threat Case Studies at Radiological and Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, Noah Gale; Hobbs, Christopher

    2015-04-13

    Seven case studies are presented. The cases include thefts of various materials and sabotage. For each case there is an overview of the incident, a timeline, a profile of the perpetrator, and a discussion of the security system failures which allowed the incident to take place.

  10. Television Medical Dramas as Case Studies in Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millard, Julie T.

    2009-01-01

    Several case studies from popular television medical dramas are described for use in an undergraduate biochemistry course. These cases, which illustrate fundamental principles of biochemistry, are used as the basis for problems that can be discussed further in small groups. Medical cases provide an interesting context for biochemistry with video…

  11. Communicating Ocean Sciences to Informal Audiences (COSIA): Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inverness Research, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The three case studies presented in this paper are descriptive and evaluative in nature, and are designed to describe, explain, and portray in some detail three examples of COSIA partnerships. These cases are context bound; the place-based aspect of these cases is critical to the phenomenon being explored. Consistent with the goal for employing a…

  12. Case Studies for Management Development in Bangladesh. Second Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Gary N.

    These 15 case studies developed by faculty at institutions in Bangladesh are appropriate for use in a course in management development. The typical case describes a real business situation in which a real manager had to reach a decision. The case gives quantitative and qualitative information that is, or may be, relevant to that decision.…

  13. Reproductive rights in Hungarian law: a new right to assisted procreation?

    PubMed

    Sándor, J

    2000-01-01

    Hungary has a mixed record in terms of fulfilling reproductive rights as a whole, but in the context of artificially assisted procreation, it provides reproductive health services far beyond those offered by its neighbors, beyond what is stipulated by the ICPD Programme of Action, and, arguably, beyond the internationally accepted parameters of reproductive rights. Recent legislation on assisted procreation has established important new regulations and formulated a new "right to continuation of infertility treatment" applicable to women who have been widowed or divorced. The new legislation is examined in the context of the international reproductive rights movement, with comparisons to other European countries and with reference to Hungarian attitudes and laws on abortion and surrogacy. PMID:10796975

  14. [Rare diseases and their patient organization: the Hungarian Federation of People with Rare and Congenital Diseases].

    PubMed

    Pogány, Gábor

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the author is to discuss special issues of rare diseases, with emphasis on circumstances present in Hungary, including those leading to the foundation of the non-governmental organization, the Hungarian Federation of People with Rare and Congenital Diseases. The author briefly reviews the most important findings of current international surveys which have been performed with or without the involvement of member associations of the Hungarian Federation of People with Rare and Congenital Diseases. At the level of medical and social services in Hungary, it is still "incidental" to get to the appropriate expert or centre providing the diagnosis or treatment. It is difficult to find the still very few existing services due to the lack of suitable "pathways" and referrals. There are long delays in obtaining the first appointment, resulting in vulnerability and inequality along the regions. The overall consequence is the insufficiency or lack of access to medical and social services. There are also difficulties related to the supply of orphan medication and the long duration of hospitalization. At the level of patient organizations financial scarcity and uncertainty are typical, combined with inappropriate infrastructural background and human resources. The poor quality of organization of patient bodies along with insufficient cooperation among them are characteristic as well. The author concludes that a National Plan or Strategy is needed to improve the current fragmentation of services which would enable patients and health, social and educational professionals to provide and use the best care in the practice. This would ensure all patients with rare diseases to be diagnosed within a possible shortest time allowing access to the care and support needed in time resulting in a decrease in burden of families and society. PMID:24566696

  15. [Participation of Hungarians in the Elaboration of Principles of Genetics and of Biotehchnology].

    PubMed

    Sótonyi, Gergely

    2015-01-01

    It was in 1983 that Robert Bud, director of The Science Museum in London, made it public that the principles of biotechnology, and the term itself were first put into words by a Hungarian scientist, Károly Ereky (The use of life. A history of biotechnology. Cambridge - New York--Melbourne, Cambridge University Press, 1993). Károly Ereky stated that if raw material is used to produce consumer goods with the help of living organisms, the workflow data can be collected in biotechnology. He phrased the principles of biotechnology in his book published in German in 1919 called Biotechnology, ranking him among the world's greatest (Verlag Paul Parey, Berlin, 1919). In 1918 in Brno, three years before the birth of Mendel, count Imre Festetics formulated his theses in 4 points in his publication "Die genetische Gesetze der Natur" (Oekonomische Neuigkeiten und Verhandlungen. Brünn, 22: 169-170, 1819), using the word 'genetics' for the first time in the world. It was Vitezslav Orel, director of the Mendel Museum in Brno, who brought the attention of the world to this fact in 1989, based on the documents possessed by the Museum. The English scientist J.R. Wood published his new findings in 2001, accord- ing to which Festetics summarized his results in the form of four genetic laws well before Mendel, describing principles of the process of mutation and inheritance. Festetics provided evidence for the improvement of the stock by cross-breeding. He stated Mendel's second law on the importance of selection. He called attention to the priority of internal genetic fac- tors. Hungarians can rightly be proud of Károly Ereky (1878-1952) and count Imre Festetics (1764-1847). PMID:26875293

  16. A Framework for Analysis of Case Studies of Reading Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlisle, Joanne F.; Kelcey, Ben; Rosaen, Cheryl; Phelps, Geoffrey; Vereb, Anita

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development and study of a framework to provide direction and guidance for practicing teachers in using a web-based case studies program for professional development in early reading; the program is called Case Studies Reading Lessons (CSRL). The framework directs and guides teachers' analysis of reading instruction by…

  17. Use of Case Studies for Stimulating Thinking and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeakes, Samuel J.

    Noting that a case-study approach can stimulate student thinking and learning, this paper describes how students in a writing-intensive course on parasitology wrote brief medical case studies of parasites already studied for other students to read, evaluate, and identify the parasite. The paper presents a brief description of the course, an…

  18. A Mixed Methods Sampling Methodology for a Multisite Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Julia L.; Mobley, Catherine; Hammond, Cathy; Withington, Cairen; Drew, Sam; Stringfield, Sam; Stipanovic, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    The flexibility of mixed methods research strategies makes such approaches especially suitable for multisite case studies. Yet the utilization of mixed methods to select sites for these studies is rarely reported. The authors describe their pragmatic mixed methods approach to select a sample for their multisite mixed methods case study of a…

  19. Impact of Research on Education: Some Case Studies. Summaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suppes, Patrick, Ed.

    Significant cases of research in terms of their effect on school practices have been extensively documented by educational researchers. This booklet summarizes nine such studies, which are published in detail in a companion volume ("Impact of Research on Education: Some Case Studies"). These studies have a variety reasonably characteristic of…

  20. Using Case Studies in Calculus-based Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Debora M.

    2006-12-01

    Do your students believe that the physics only works in your classroom or laboratory? Or do they see that physics underlies their everyday experience? Case studies in physics help students connect physics principles to their everyday experience. For decades, case studies have been used to teach law, medicine and biology, but they are rarely used in physics. I am working on a calculus-based physics textbook for scientists and engineers. Case studies are woven into each chapter. Stop by and get a case study to test out in your classroom. I would love to get your feedback.

  1. A Strategy of Assumed Incumbency: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Larry; Shelby, Annette

    1981-01-01

    Outlines a political campaign strategy employed by incumbents using three stages of development: legitimacy, identification, and reinforcement. A case study demonstrates the effectiveness of the strategy. (JMF)

  2. Congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome: a case study.

    PubMed

    Donders, Jacobus; Mullarkey, Sr Kathryn; Allchin, Joel

    2009-02-01

    We report the case of a 14-year-old boy with bilateral congenital perisylvian syndrome as evidenced by polymicrogyria in the left and right frontotemporal regions, pseudobulbar paresis, seizures, and spastic diplegia. This is the first description of comprehensive neuropsychological assessment in a child with this syndrome. The results reflect significant impairments in auditory processing and independent learning and retention, but relatively preserved cognitive performance on interactive tasks involving frequent feedback and redirection. The findings are interpreted in the context of the neuropathology of this syndrome, with an emphasis on pragmatic implications for rehabilitation. PMID:18618376

  3. A case study of preferential bestiality (zoophilia).

    PubMed

    Earls, Christopher M; Lalumière, Martin L

    2002-01-01

    Humans show a wide array of sexual preferences and behaviors. Although most humans prefer and have sex with consenting adults of the opposite sex, some individuals have unconventional preferences with regard to the sex or age of sexual partners, or with regard to the nature of sexual activities. In this paper, we describe a rare case of preferential bestiality, or zoophilia. The client meets the most stringent criteria for the diagnosis of zoophilia. In particular, his phallometrically measured arousal pattern shows a sexual preference for horses over other species, including humans. PMID:11803597

  4. Situational Psychogenic Anejaculation: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, Rajesh; Thangadurai, Packirisamy; Kuruvilla, Anju; Jacob, Kuruthukulangara Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Anejaculation is an uncommon clinical entity that may result from a variety of causes, both organic and psychological. Psychogenic anejaculation is influenced by relationship, behavioral, and psychological factors. We present a clinical case of situational anejaculation, which was managed with a combination of techniques that addressed these factors including changes in masturbatory technique, improved marital communication and quality, and reduction of anxiety using cognitive behavioral techniques. It is suggested that the standard techniques of sex therapy be modified and tailored to manage the specific problems of the individual patient. PMID:25035564

  5. Pelvic kidney in organ donation: case study.

    PubMed

    Yushkov, Yuriy; Giudice, Anthony

    2009-12-01

    An ectopic kidney is a rare congenital anomaly that occurs when the kidney fails to ascend to its normal position. Often an ectopic kidney is asymptomatic and the kidney is an unexpected finding during organ recovery. The kidney described in this case report had normal function and could have been used for transplantation, if it had been recovered without 2 renal arteries being damaged because of anatomic variation. The renal vasculature in this type of abnormality usually ascends from the iliac vessels, and this variation in anatomy should be taken into consideration by the recovering surgeon during arterial cannulation for organ flushing. PMID:20050461

  6. Comparison of mtDNA haplogroups in Hungarians with four other European populations: a small incidence of descents with Asian origin.

    PubMed

    Nadasi, Edit; Gyurus, P; Czakó, Márta; Bene, Judit; Kosztolányi, Sz; Fazekas, Sz; Dömösi, P; Melegh, B

    2007-06-01

    Hungarians are unique among the other European populations because according to history, the ancient Magyars had come from the eastern side of the Ural Mountains and settled down in the Carpathian basin in the 9th century AD. Since variations in the human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) are routinely used to infer the histories of different populations, we examined the distribution of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) sites of the mtDNA in apparently healthy, unrelated Hungarian subjects in order to collect data on the genetic origin of the Hungarian population. Among the 55 samples analyzed, the large majority belonged to haplogroups common in other European populations, however, three samples fulfilled the requirements of haplogroup M. Since haplogroup M is classified as a haplogroup characteristic mainly for Asian populations, the presence of haplogroup M found in approximately 5% of the total suggests that an Asian matrilineal ancestry, even if in a small incidence, can be detected among modern Hungarians. PMID:17585514

  7. Late glacial river-bed changes on the Little Hungarian Plain based on preliminary chronological, geological and paleontological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sávai, Szilvia; Molnár, Dávid; Sümegi, Pál

    2015-10-01

    Comprehensive chronological, geological and paleontological investigations were conducted as part of archaeological excavations in 2011 and 2012, prior to the construction of the M85 motorway between Gyor and Csorna, Hungary. These studies clearly show that the alluvial fan that underlies much of the Little Hungarian Plain was built up by streams flowing in a southeasterly to northwesterly direction from the nearby Bakony Hills, and continued to form until the end of the last glacial period. The northern part of the fan, now named the Csorna Plain, became inactive (i.e. became a fossil river-bed system) at about 25-15 ka, when the Rába and Marcal rivers changed theirflowdirection fromsouth-north towest-east.As a result of this change in flow direction, the Rába and Marcal rivers became incised, capturing the Bakony stream beds, stopping sediment deposition on the northern side of the alluvial fan (essentially the left bank of the Rába-Marcal river system), although the southern part of the fan continue to form as before. On the northern side of the fan, the sediment surface dried out due to falling groundwater levels, and aeolian sand-drifts began to form. Eventually, accumulation of the sand-drift sediments ceased due to the deposition of loess-type sediments, which fixed the surface, conserved the sand-drift shapes, and contributed to the straightening and eventual canalization of the fluvial channels. Geoarchaeological examinations indicate that the development of present fluvial features were strongly affected by the settlement and tillage activity of human communities on the Csorna Plain.

  8. Methodology Series Module 2: Case-control Studies.

    PubMed

    Setia, Maninder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Case-Control study design is a type of observational study. In this design, participants are selected for the study based on their outcome status. Thus, some participants have the outcome of interest (referred to as cases), whereas others do not have the outcome of interest (referred to as controls). The investigator then assesses the exposure in both these groups. The investigator should define the cases as specifically as possible. Sometimes, definition of a disease may be based on multiple criteria; thus, all these points should be explicitly stated in case definition. An important aspect of selecting a control is that they should be from the same 'study base' as that of the cases. We can select controls from a variety of groups. Some of them are: General population; relatives or friends; and hospital patients. Matching is often used in case-control control studies to ensure that the cases and controls are similar in certain characteristics, and it is a useful technique to increase the efficiency of the study. Case-Control studies can usually be conducted relatively faster and are inexpensive - particularly when compared with cohort studies (prospective). It is useful to study rare outcomes and outcomes with long latent periods. This design is not very useful to study rare exposures. Furthermore, they may also be prone to certain biases - selection bias and recall bias. PMID:27057012

  9. Methodology Series Module 2: Case-control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Setia, Maninder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Case-Control study design is a type of observational study. In this design, participants are selected for the study based on their outcome status. Thus, some participants have the outcome of interest (referred to as cases), whereas others do not have the outcome of interest (referred to as controls). The investigator then assesses the exposure in both these groups. The investigator should define the cases as specifically as possible. Sometimes, definition of a disease may be based on multiple criteria; thus, all these points should be explicitly stated in case definition. An important aspect of selecting a control is that they should be from the same ‘study base’ as that of the cases. We can select controls from a variety of groups. Some of them are: General population; relatives or friends; and hospital patients. Matching is often used in case-control control studies to ensure that the cases and controls are similar in certain characteristics, and it is a useful technique to increase the efficiency of the study. Case-Control studies can usually be conducted relatively faster and are inexpensive – particularly when compared with cohort studies (prospective). It is useful to study rare outcomes and outcomes with long latent periods. This design is not very useful to study rare exposures. Furthermore, they may also be prone to certain biases – selection bias and recall bias. PMID:27057012

  10. Combined Deterministic and Stochastic Approach to Determine Spatial Distribution of Drought Frequency and Duration in the Great Hungarian Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, J. A.; Kuti, L.; Bakacsi, Zs.; Pásztor, L.; Tahy, Á.

    2009-04-01

    data for the multi-year simulation of SVAT processes. In order to test the elaborated methods, a sub-area of the full domain has been designated as a pilot area for this study. Considering our aims, major achievements with respect to the objectives have been accomplished for the pilot area within the scope of this work includes: - Harmonized 3D grid model to describe hydraulic properties of the unsaturated zone has been created (Pásztor, L. et al 2002 and 2005, Kuti, L. 2007); - The spatially distributed physically based distributed parameter SVAT model DIWA (DIstributed WAtershed) (Szabó, J.A., 2007) has been adapted; - The stochastic characteristics and parameters of the weather generator has been derived from measured data series; - Coupling the stochastic weather generator with the deterministic DIWA SVAT-type model also has been done. In this paper, the results of the coupled (deterministic - stochastic) model simulation based analysis of regional drought frequency and duration for a sub-area of the full domain of the Great Hungarian Plain will be reported. First the harmonized 3D grid model of the hydraulic properties of the unsaturated zone will be presented. Then a brief characterisation of the DIWA model will be given. The Markov chain based stochastic weather generator also will be presented. Finally, the results of multi-year drought frequency and duration analysis at the pilot area and conclusions will be discussed. Keywords: Drought frequency and duration analysis; multivariate analyses; recurrence analyses; extreme events; stochastic weather generator; spatially distributed SVAT model; 3D grid model of hydraulic properties of the unsaturated zone. References: Kuti, L. (2007): Agrogeological investigation of soil fertility limiting factors int he soil-parent roc-groundwater system in Hungary. In: Environment & Progress, Cluj-Napoca, nr. 10. pp. 131-145. Pásztor, L. - Szabó, J. - Bakacsi, Zs. (2002): GIS processing of large scale soil maps in Hungary

  11. Methylbromide intoxication: a clinical case study.

    PubMed

    Breeman, Wim

    2009-01-01

    The port of Rotterdam, The Netherlands, is the world's largest container port. In 2006, one of these containers caused a chemical incident. Methylbromide is used in some countries as a pesticide for the fumigation of maritime containers. Because of an insufficiently performed detoxification, this insecticide intoxicated several employees and some of the ambulance crew and Mobile Medical Team (MMT). The victims displayed symptoms of sore throat, irritated eyes, and hypersalivation. One of the victims suffered from multiple epileptic seizures. Two victims were admitted to the intensive care unit for respiratory support. Three other employees showed milder symptoms and received supportive care but were not admitted to the hospital. This complicated case shows that the safety of the ambulance crew and MMT must be guaranteed. It also demonstrates that healthcare providers cannot always oversee the accident scene and that there are some pitfalls that are almost impossible to prevent. PMID:20118865

  12. Cornelia de Lange syndrome: a case study.

    PubMed

    Kalal, Goud Iravathy; Raina, Vimarsh P; Nayak, Veerabhadra S; Teotia, Pooja; Gupta, Bhushan V

    2009-02-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CDLS) is a relatively common multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation disorder with an unknown genetic and molecular pathogenesis. The essential features of this developmental malformation syndrome are retardation in growth, developmental delay, various structural limb abnormalities, and distinctive facial features. Most cases are sporadic and are thought to result from a new dominant mutation. Consequently, hypotheses regarding the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying the two distinct phenotypes, classic and mild, are purely speculative. The recent discovery of molecular techniques and identification of the NIPBL gene has allowed etiologic diagnosis of this disorder. In this article, we describe a patient with CDLS in whom conventional cytogenetics, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and NIPBL gene mutation analysis determined an etiologic diagnosis, providing precise genetic counseling and facilitated the family to make an evidence-based decision for conception and also alleviated the extreme degree of anxiety associated with the thought of having a second child in this set of circumstances. PMID:19309268

  13. Microwave cataract and litigation: a case study.

    PubMed

    Joyner, K H

    1989-10-01

    This paper gives details of a recent court case conducted in Australia concerning a compensation claim made by a radar technician for subcapsular posterior cataracts allegedly caused by exposure to microwave radiation. A discussion of some relevant material, including the likely invalidation of certain in vivo ocular exposures due to the use of a metallic cannula and the relevance of in vitro exposures of rat lenses, are presented. The key findings of the court are also summarized. The ruling of the court was that it was probable that the level of microwave exposure did not cause, or accelerate the development of, the cataracts or contribute to doing so. Consequently, the claim was dismissed. PMID:2529231

  14. A statistical process control case study.

    PubMed

    Ross, Thomas K

    2006-01-01

    Statistical process control (SPC) charts can be applied to a wide number of health care applications, yet widespread use has not occurred. The greatest obstacle preventing wider use is the lack of quality management training that health care workers receive. The technical nature of the SPC guarantees that without explicit instruction this technique will not come into widespread use. Reviews of health care quality management texts inform the reader that SPC charts should be used to improve delivery processes and outcomes often without discussing how they are created. Conversely, medical research frequently reports the improved outcomes achieved after analyzing SPC charts. This article is targeted between these 2 positions: it reviews the SPC technique and presents a tool and data so readers can construct SPC charts. After tackling the case, it is hoped that the readers will collect their own data and apply the same technique to improve processes in their own organization. PMID:17047496

  15. Congenital amusia in childhood: a case study.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Marie-Andrée; Moreau, Patricia; McNally-Gagnon, Andréane; Mignault Goulet, Geneviève; Peretz, Isabelle

    2012-06-01

    Here we describe the first documented case of congenital amusia in childhood. AS is a 10-year-old girl who was referred to us by her choir director for persisting difficulties in singing. We tested her with the child version of the Montreal Battery for the Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) which confirmed AS's severe problems with melodic and rhythmic discrimination and memory for melodies. The disorder appears to be limited to music since her audiometry as well as her intellectual and language skills are normal. Furthermore, the musical disorder is associated to a severe deficit in detecting small pitch changes. The electrical brain responses point to an anomaly in the early stages of auditory processing, such as reflected by an abnormal mismatch negativity (MMN) response to small pitch changes. In singing, AS makes more pitch than time errors. Thus, despite frequent and regular musical practice, AS's profile is similar to the adult form of congenital amusia. PMID:21453912

  16. Cancer Advocacy in Africa: case studies of innovative practices

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present six case studies describing innovative cancer advocacy programs in Africa. For each case study, an example of an advocacy activity, list of factors contributing to the success of the organization, and an example of an obstacle addressed by the organization are described. PMID:23902662

  17. Training over the Intranet--A Shockwave Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snydar, Sean

    This case study explains how the Boeing Company has used the World Wide Web to deliver flight and maintenance computer-based training (CBT) that was originally created on a Macintosh computer and converted to Windows format. The case study begins with a brief discussion of the advantages of using corporate and institutional internal networks…

  18. Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This draft document presents two case studies of nanoscale titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) used (1) to remove arsenic from drinking water and (2) as an active ingredient in topical sunscreen. The draft case studies are organized around a comprehensive environmental asses...

  19. Case Study: Student-Produced Videos for the Flipped Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prud'homme-Genereux, Annie

    2016-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue describes a way of building a library of student-produced videos to use in the flipped classroom.

  20. Case Studies for Educational Leadership: Solving Administrative Dilemmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midlock, Stephen F.

    2010-01-01

    "Case Studies for Educational Leadership" gives educational leadership students an opportunity to project themselves into real-life administrative situations and prepare for their future positions in the field. Each case study contained in this practical first edition book asks students to analyze complex problems, consider the moral ramifications…