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1

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the work done so far on Hunton Formation in West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. West Carney Field produces oil and gas from the Hunton Formation. The field was developed starting in 1995. Some of the unique characteristics of the field include decreasing water oil and ratio over time, decreasing gas-oil ratio at the beginning of production, inability to calculate oil reserves in the field based on long data, and sustained oil rates over long periods of time.

Kelkar, Mohan

2001-05-08

2

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Hunton formation in Oklahoma has been the subject of attention for the last ten years. The new interest started with the drilling of the West Carney field in 1995 in Lincoln County. Subsequently, many other operators have expanded the search for oil and gas in Hunton formation in other parts of Oklahoma. These fields exhibit many unique production characteristics, including: (1) decreasing water-oil or water-gas ratio over time; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can optimize the production from fields with similar characteristics.

Mohan Kelkar

2007-06-30

3

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect

Hunton formation in Oklahoma has displayed some unique production characteristics. These include high initial water-oil and gas-oil ratios, decline in those ratios over time and temporary increase in gas-oil ratio during pressure build up. The formation also displays highly complex geology, but surprising hydrodynamic continuity. This report addresses three key issues related specifically to West Carney Hunton field and, in general, to any other Hunton formation exhibiting similar behavior: (1) What is the primary mechanism by which oil and gas is produced from the field? (2) How can the knowledge gained from studying the existing fields can be extended to other fields which have the potential to produce? (3) What can be done to improve the performance of this reservoir? We have developed a comprehensive model to explain the behavior of the reservoir. By using available production, geological, core and log data, we are able to develop a reservoir model which explains the production behavior in the reservoir. Using easily available information, such as log data, we have established the parameters needed for a field to be economically successful. We provide guidelines in terms of what to look for in a new field and how to develop it. Finally, through laboratory experiments, we show that surfactants can be used to improve the hydrocarbons recovery from the field. In addition, injection of CO{sub 2} or natural gas also will help us recover additional oil from the field.

Mohan Kelkar

2005-02-01

4

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the work done so far on Hunton Formation in West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. West Carney Field produces oil and gas from the Hunton Formation. The field was developed starting in 1995. Some of the unique characteristics of the field include decreasing water oil ratio over time, decreasing gas-oil ratio at the beginning of production, inability to calculate oil reserves in the field based on log data, and sustained oil rates over long periods of time. To understand the unique characteristics of the field, an integrated evaluation was undertaken. Production data from the field were meticulously collected, and over forty wells were cored and logged to better understand the petrophysical and engineering characteristics. Based on the work done in this budget period so far, some of the preliminary conclusions can be listed as follows: (1) Based on PVT analysis, the field most likely contains volatile oil with bubble point close to initial reservoir pressure of 1,900 psia. (2) The initial oil in place, which is contact with existing wells, can be determined by newly developed material balance technique. The oil in place, which is in communication, is significantly less than determined by volumetric analysis, indicating heterogeneous nature of the reservoir. The oil in place, determined by material balance, is greater than determined by decline curve analysis. This difference may lead to additional locations for in fill wells. (3) The core and log evaluation indicates that the intermediate pores (porosity between 2 and 6 %) are very important in determining production potential of the reservoir. These intermediate size pores contain high oil saturation. (4) The limestone part of the reservoir, although low in porosity (mostly less than 6 %) is much more prolific in terms of oil production than the dolomite portion of the reservoir. The reason for this difference is the higher oil saturation in low porosity region. As the average porosity increases, the remaining oil saturation decreases. This is evident from log and core analysis. (5) Using a compositional simulator, we are able to reproduce the important reservoir characteristics by assuming a two layer model. One layer is high permeability region containing water and the other layer is low permeability region containing mostly oil. The results are further verified by using a dual porosity model. Assuming that most of the volatile oil is contained in the matrix and the water is contained in the fractures, we are able to reproduce important reservoir performance characteristics. (6) Evaluation of secondary mechanisms indicates that CO{sub 2} flooding is potentially a viable option if CO{sub 2} is available at reasonable price. We have conducted detailed simulation studies to verify the effectiveness of CO{sub 2} huff-n-puff process. We are in the process of conducting additional lab tests to verify the efficacy of the same displacement. (7) Another possibility of improving the oil recovery is to inject surfactants to change the near well bore wettability of the rock from oil wet to water wet. By changing the wettability, we may be able to retard the water flow and hence improve the oil recovery as a percentage of total fluid produced. If surfactant is reasonably priced, other possibility is also to use huff-n-puff process using surfactants. Laboratory experiments are promising, and additional investigation continues. (8) Preliminary economic evaluation indicates that vertical wells outperform horizontal wells. Future work in the project would include: (1) Build multi-well numerical model to reproduce overall reservoir performance rather than individual well performance. Special emphasis will be placed on hydrodynamic connectivity between wells. (2) Collect data from adjacent Hunton reservoirs to validate our understanding of what makes it a productive reservoir. (3) Develop statistical methods to rank various reservoirs in Hunton formation. This will allow us to evaluate other Hunton formations based on old well logs, and determine, apriori, if

Mohan Kelkar

2003-10-01

5

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect

The main objectives of the proposed study are as follows: (1) To understand and evaluate an unusual primary oil production mechanism which results in decreasing (retrograde) oil cut (ROC) behavior as reservoir pressure declines. (2) To improve calculations of initial oil in place so as to determine the economic feasibility of completing and producing a well. (3) To optimize the location of new wells based on understanding of geological and petrophysical properties heterogeneities. (4) To evaluate various secondary recovery techniques for oil reservoirs producing from fractured formations. (5) To enhance the productivity of producing wells by using new completion techniques. These objectives are important for optimizing field performance from West Carney Field located in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. The field, which was discovered in 1980, produces from Hunton Formation in a shallow-shelf carbonate reservoir. The early development in the field was sporadic. Many of the initial wells were abandoned due to high water production and constraints in surface facilities for disposing excess produced water. The field development began in earnest in 1995 by Altex Resources. They had recognized that production from this field was only possible if large volumes of water can be disposed. Being able to dispose large amounts of water, Altex aggressively drilled several producers. With few exceptions, all these wells exhibited similar characteristics. The initial production indicated trace amount of oil and gas with mostly water as dominant phase. As the reservoir was depleted, the oil cut eventually improved, making the overall production feasible. The decreasing oil cut (ROC) behavior has not been well understood. However, the field has been subjected to intense drilling activity because of prior success of Altex Resources. In this work, we will investigate the primary production mechanism by conducting several core flood experiments. After collecting cores from representative wells, we will study the wettability of the rock and simulate the depletion behavior by mimicking such behavior under controlled lab conditions.

Mohan Kelkar

2002-09-30

6

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect

West Carney Field produces from Hunton Formation. All the wells produce oil, water and gas. The main objective of this study is to understand the unique behavior observed in the field. This behavior includes: (1) Decrease in WOR over time; (2) Decrease in GOR at initial stages; (3) High decline rates of oil and gas; and (4) strong hydrodynamic connectivity between wells. This report specifically addresses two issues relevant to our understanding of the West Carney reservoir. By using core and log data as well as fluorescence information, we demonstrate that our hypothesis of how the reservoir is formed is consistent with these observations. Namely, oil migrated in water wet reservoir, over time, oil changed the wettability of some part of the reservoir, oil eventually leaked to upper formations prompting re-introduction of water into reservoir. Because of change in wettability, different pore size distributions responded differently to water influx. This hypothesis is consistent with fluorescence and porosity data, as we explain it in this quarterly report. The second issue deals with how to best calculate connected oil volume in the reservoir. The log data does not necessarily provide us with relevant information regarding oil in place. However, we have developed a new material balance technique to calculate the connected oil volume based on observed pressure and production data. By using the technique to four different fields producing from Hunton formation, we demonstrate that the technique can be successfully applied to calculate the connected oil in place.

Mohan Kelkar

2003-04-01

7

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect

West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we present the data on surfactant injection in near well bore region. We demonstrate that by injecting the surfactant, the relative permeability of water could be decreased, and that of gas could be increased. This should result in improved gas recovery from the reservoir. Our geological analysis of the reservoir develops the detailed stratigraphic description of the reservoir. Two new stratigraphic units, previously unrecognized, are identified. Additional lithofacies are recognized in new core descriptions. Our engineering analysis has determined that well density is an important parameter in optimally producing Hunton reservoirs. It appears that 160 acre is an optimal spacing. The reservoir pressure appears to decline over time; however, recovery per well is only weakly influenced by the pressure. This indicates that additional opportunity to drill wells exists in relatively depleted fields. A simple material balance technique is developed to validate the recovery of gas, oil and water. This technique can be used to further extrapolate recoveries from other fields with similar field characteristics.

Mohan Kelkar

2004-10-01

8

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect

The West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma is one of few newly discovered oil fields in Oklahoma. Although profitable, the field exhibits several unusual characteristics. These include decreasing water-oil ratios, decreasing gas-oil ratios, decreasing bottomhole pressures during shut-ins in some wells, and transient behavior for water production in many wells. This report explains the unusual characteristics of West Carney Field based on detailed geological and engineering analyses. We propose a geological history that explains the presence of mobile water and oil in the reservoir. The combination of matrix and fractures in the reservoir explains the reservoir's flow behavior. We confirm our hypothesis by matching observed performance with a simulated model and develop procedures for correlating core data to log data so that the analysis can be extended to other, similar fields where the core coverage may be limited.

Mohan Kelkar

2002-03-31

9

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect

West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we continue to describe the use of surfactant to alter the wettability of the rock. By altering the wettability, we should be able to change the water-gas ratio in the reservoir and, hence, improve the productivity from the well. In our Engineering and Geological Analysis section, we present our rock typing analysis work which combines the geological data with engineering data to develop a unique rock characteristics description. The work demonstrates that it is possible to incorporate geological description in engineering analysis so that we can come up with rock types which have unique geological characteristics, as well as unique petrophysical characteristics. Using this rock typing scheme, we intend to develop a detailed reservoir description in our next quarterly report.

Mohan Kelkar

2005-07-01

10

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we continue to describe the use of surfactant to alter the wettability of the rock. By altering the wettability, we should be able to change the water-gas ratio in the reservoir and, hence, improve productivity from the well. In our Engineering and Geological Analysis section, we present our rock typing analysis work which combines the geological data with engineering data to develop a unique rock characteristics description. By using porosity as a variable, we can generate alternate rock type descriptions at logged wells. This procedure also allows us to quantify uncertainties in rock type description.

Mohan Kelkar

2005-10-01

11

Helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic geophysical survey data, Hunton anticline, south-central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report is a digital data release for multiple geophysical surveys conducted in the Hunton anticline area of south-central Oklahoma. The helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic surveys were flown on March 16–17, 2007, in four areas of the Hunton anticline in south-central Oklahoma. The objective of this project is to improve the understanding of the geohydrologic framework of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer. The electromagnetic sensor for the helicopter electromagnetic survey consisted of six different transmitter-receiver orientations that measured the earth's electrical response at six distinct frequencies from approximately 500 Hertz to approximately 115,000 Hertz. The electromagnetic measurements were converted to electrical resistivity values, which were gridded and plotted on georeferenced maps. The map from each frequency represents a different depth of investigation for each area. The range of subsurface investigation is comparable to the depth of shallow groundwater. The four areas selected for the helicopter electromagnetic study, blocks A–D, have different geologic and hydrologic settings. Geophysical and hydrologic information from U.S. Geological Survey studies are being used by modelers and resource managers to develop groundwater resource plans for the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer.

Smith, Bruce D.; Smith, David V.; Deszcz-Pan, Maryla; Blome, Charles D.; Hill, Patricia

2011-01-01

12

Field trip guide to selected outcrops, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Arbuckle Mountains, named for Brigadier General Matthew Arbuckle, are located in south-central Oklahoma. The formations that comprise the Arbuckle Mountains have been extensively studied for hydrocarbon source rock and reservoir rock characteristics that can be applied to the subsurface in the adjacent Anadarko and Ardmore basins. Numerous reports and guidebooks have been written concerning the Arbuckle Mountains. A few important general publications are provided in the list of selected references. The purpose of this handout is to provide general information on the geology of the Arbuckle Mountains and specific information on the four field trip stops, adapted from the literature. The four stops were at: (1) Sooner Rock and Sand Quarry; (2) Woodford Shale; (3) Hunton Anticline and Hunton Quarry; and (4) Tar Sands of Sulfur Area. As part of this report, two papers are included for more detail: Paleomagnetic dating of basinal fluid migration, base-metal mineralization, and hydrocarbon maturation in the Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma and Laminated black shale-bedded chert cyclicity in the Woodford Formation, southern Oklahoma.

NONE

1991-11-17

13

Hunton Group core workshop and field trip  

SciTech Connect

The Late Ordovician-Silurian-Devonian Hunton Group is a moderately thick sequence of shallow-marine carbonates deposited on the south edge of the North American craton. This rock unit is a major target for petroleum exploration and reservoir development in the southern Midcontinent. The workshop described here was held to display cores, outcrop samples, and other reservoir-characterization studies of the Hunton Group and equivalent strata throughout the region. A field trip was organized to complement the workshop by allowing examination of excellent outcrops of the Hunton Group of the Arbuckle Mountains.

Johnson, K.S. [ed.

1993-12-31

14

Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A report on the research activities at the USDA-ARS, Plant Science Research Laboratory in Stillwater, Oklahoma, were compiled for WERA-066 Meeting that was held in Ft. Collins, Colorado, February 13, 2008. Research presentations included barley breeding research, sorghum breeding research, wheat br...

15

SUBSURFACE WELL-LOG CORRELATION OF ARSENIC-BEARING LITHOFACIES IN THE PERMIAN GARBER SANDSTONE AND WELLINGTON FORMATION, CENTRAL OKLAHOMA AQUIFER (COA), CLEVELAND COUNTY, OKLAHOMA  

EPA Science Inventory

The fluvial Garber Sandstone and the underlying Wellington Formation are important sources of drinking water in central Oklahoma. These formations, which make up much of the COA, consist of amalgamated sandstones with some interbedded mudstones, siltstones, and local mudstone- a...

16

Formation of Mesoscale Lines of Pirecipitation: Severe Squall Lines in Oklahoma during the Spring.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Four distinct kinds of severe, mesoscale convective-line development are identified in Oklahoma during the spring based on the analysis of an 11-year period of reflectivity data from the National Severe Storms Laboratory's 10-cm radar in Norman, Oklahoma. The primary classes of fine formation are broken line, back building, broken areal and embedded areal. Each is described in detail, along with illustrative examples. Comparisons are made with other observations and with numerical model simulations. The former two classes of line formation have been previously documented, while the latter two have not. Only the broken-areal squall line has been realistically simulated numerically.The environment for each of the types of line development was determined from data from the standard National Weather Service surface and upper-air networks and from special rawinsonde launches. It was found that broken-line formation tends to occur along cold fronts in a multicell environment, while back building occurs along any boundary in a supercell environment. The former formation is associated with a steering level with respect to cell motion, while the others are not. A steering level with respect to line motion exists around 6 or 7 km MSL in all cases. Cells within back-building squall lines have high relative helicity, like supercells, while cells within broken-line squall lines have low relative helicity. Most lines were oriented approximately 40° to the left of the pressure-weighted vertical shear vector in the troposphere, along the pressure-weighted vertical shear vector in the lowest 1 km and at a large angle to the shear somewhere in the lower portion of the middle troposphere.

Bluestein, Howard B.; Jain, Michael H.

1985-08-01

17

Oklahoma Today  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Published since the 1950s, Oklahoma Today is a production of several state agencies, and it is designed to showcase various cultural, historical, and social aspects of Oklahoma. Over the past several years, Oklahoma State University has digitized back issues of the magazine, and visitors can now read all the way back to the first issue from 1956. Visitors can browse back issues by decade, and they can also perform key-word searches. First-time visitors should start by reading through the spring 1960 issue, which contains pieces on rattlesnakes, Oklahoma wildflowers, and the Washington Irving Trail. While the name Washington Irving may not be commonly associated with Oklahoma, the author spent part of 1832 wandering through the state with a Native American guide. More recent issues feature profiles of singer Vince Gill and Route 66.

18

A transgression-regression event during the deposition of the Upper Cambrian Honey Creek formation in the southern Oklahoma aulacogen  

SciTech Connect

The transgression that inundated the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen during the upper Cambrian enveloped a landscape that consisted of hills of rhyolite up to 350 m in high. Initial deposits on this topography have been interpreted as alluvium. These, together with succeeding tidally-influenced marine siliciclastics form the Reagan Formation. The siliciclastics grains are made up of fragments of local origin (i.e., rhyolite), quartz (derived from a distal source) and authigenic glauconite. The upward passage from the Reagan to the Honeycreek Formation is defined by the addition to the siliciclastics of carbonate detritus in the form of tidally-influenced grainstones, mostly composed of pelmatozoan fragments. The passage from the Honeycreek to the overlying Fort Sill Formation of the Arbuckle Group is marked by the incoming of beds of lime mudstone and the gradual disappearance of grainstones and siliciclastics. Evidence of the existence of rhyolite topography (i.e., an archipelago) can be detected to within 50 m of the top of the Fort Sill. While the overall facies pattern undoubtedly records a widespread transgression, a newly-discovered slightly angular unconformity within the lower part of the Honeycreek is best interpreted as a record of a temporary regression. Three distinctive lithologies are involved in this relationship: the lowest beds are light grey cross-bedded pelmatozoan grainstones with minor amounts of quartz and rhyolite grains. Syntaxial cements at the base of this unit are homogenous under cathode luminescence, while cements near the top display up to 27 zones of reflectance, interpreted as a fluctuating marine-meteoric groundwater imprint. The overlying bed is a red-brown mud-supported limestone that contains abundant angular rhyolite pebbles and a rich trilobite fauna. Some of the pebbles are coated by pelmatozoans.

McElmoyl, C.; Donovan, R.N. (Texas Christian Univ., Ft. Worth, TX (United States). Geology Dept.)

1993-02-01

19

THE OKLAHOMA MESONET  

EPA Science Inventory

The Oklahoma Mesonet, operated and maintained by the Oklahoma Climatological Survey, is Oklahoma's premier climatological data collection system. For the area covered, which includes the entire state, no other system within the United States or internationally has the degree of ...

20

PDC Bits Find Applications in Oklahoma Drilling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drilling in Oklahoma is difficult by any standards. Polycrystalline diamond cutter (PDC) bits, with proven success drilling soft, homogenous formations common in the North Sea and U.S. Gulf Coast regions, have found some significant ''spot'' applications in Oklahoma. Applications qualified by bit design and application development over the past two (2) years include slim hole drilling in the deep Anadarko

L. A. Offenbacher; J. D. McDermaid; C. R. Patterson

1983-01-01

21

Internal anatomy of a fractured low permeability carbonate reservoir revealed by performance--West Edmond Hunton lime field, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

With primary production now approaching the economic limit of operation, actual gas recovery indicates gas in place initially was about double the solution gas in place calculated by material balance methods when average reservoir pressure had declined about 800 to 900 psi below the saturation pressure and double that calculated by volumetric methods after complete development of the field. This

Elkins

1968-01-01

22

Earthquake activity in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oklahoma is one of the most seismically active areas in the southern Mid-Continent. From 1897 to 1988, over 700 earthquakes are known to have occurred in Oklahoma. The earliest documented Oklahoma earthquake took place on December 2, 1897, near Jefferson, in Grant County. The largest known Oklahoma earthquake happened near El Reno on April 9, 1952. This magnitude 5.5 (mb)

K. V. Luza; J. E. Jr. Lawson

1989-01-01

23

Oklahoma Agriculture Agriculture  

E-print Network

's Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources promotes sustainable land use and embraces the landOklahoma Agriculture Agriculture #12;Oklahoma Agriculture 2011Oklahoma Agriculture 2011 Oklahoma agriculture affects each of us every day, young and old, whether we live in largely rural regions or the state

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

24

PDC bits find applications in Oklahoma drilling  

SciTech Connect

Drilling in Oklahoma is difficult by any standards. Polycrystalline diamond cutter (PDC) bits, with proven success drilling soft, homogenous formations common in the North Sea and U.S. Gulf Coast regions, have found some significant ''spot'' applications in Oklahoma. Applications qualified by bit design and application development over the past two (2) years include slim hole drilling in the deep Anadarko Basin, deviation control in Southern Oklahoma, drilling on mud motors, drilling in oil base mud, drilling cement, sidetracking, coring and some rotary drilling in larger hole sizes. PDC bits are formation sensitive, and care must be taken in selecting where to run them in Oklahoma. Most of the successful runs have been in water base mud drilling hard shales and soft, unconsolidated sands and lime, although bit life is often extended in oil-base muds.

Offenbacher, L.A.; McDermaid, J.D.; Patterson, C.R.

1983-02-01

25

Texas-Oklahoma  

Atmospheric Science Data Center

article title:  Texas-Oklahoma Border     View ... SpectroRadiometer (MISR) images of Oklahoma and north Texas were acquired on March 12, 2000 during Terra orbit 1243. The three images ... The south bank of the Red River marks the boundary between Texas and Oklahoma. Traversing brush-covered and grassy plains, rolling hills, ...

2014-05-15

26

Oklahoma Forestry Services  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The mission of the Oklahoma Forestry Services (OFS) is "to conserve, enhance and protect the forest resources of Oklahoma for present and future generations." As part of this mission the OFS website contains information about fire reports, tree and forest health, and water quality. First-time visitors should start their journey through the site by clicking on the "Oklahoma's Forests" section. Here they will find information about Oklahoma's major forest types, the ecoregions of Oklahoma, and several Trees of Oklahoma fact sheets. Back on the homepage, visitors can learn about upcoming workshops and events, read a list of forestry bulletins, and find out about the Forest Heritage Center Museum. Residents of Oklahoma may also wish to look through the "Home and Community Trees" area to learn more about planning their own trees and Arbor Day related activities.

27

Three-dimensional geologic model of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer, south-central Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer of south-central Oklahoma encompasses more than 850 square kilometers and is the principal water resource for south-central Oklahoma. Rock units comprising the aquifer are characterized by limestone, dolomite, and sandstones assigned to two lower Paleozoic units: the Arbuckle and Simpson Groups. Also considered to be part of the aquifer is the underlying Cambrian-age Timbered Hills Group that contains limestone and sandstone. The highly faulted and fractured nature of the Arbuckle-Simpson units and the variable thickness (600 to 2,750 meters) increases the complexity in determining the subsurface geologic framework of this aquifer. A three-dimensional EarthVision (Trademark) geologic framework model was constructed to quantify the geometric relationships of the rock units of the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in the Hunton anticline area. This 3-D EarthVision (Trademark) geologic framework model incorporates 54 faults and four modeled units: basement, Arbuckle-Timbered Hills Group, Simpson Group, and post-Simpson. Primary data used to define the model's 54 faults and four modeled surfaces were obtained from geophysical logs, cores, and cuttings from 126 water and petroleum wells. The 3-D framework model both depicts the volumetric extent of the aquifer and provides the stratigraphic layer thickness and elevation data used to construct a MODFLOW version 2000 regional groundwater-flow model.

Faith, Jason R.; Blome, Charles D.; Pantea, Michael P.; Puckette, James O.; Halihan, Todd; Osborn, Noel; Christenson, Scott; Pack, Skip

2010-01-01

28

Formation resistivity as an indicator of the onset of oil generation in the Woodford Shale, Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian Woodford Shale is a black, organic-rich shale that is a major hydrocarbon source rock in the Anadarko basin. With the onset of oil generation, nonconductive hydrocarbons begin to replace conductive pore water in the Woodford, and formation resistivity increases. Crossplots of formation resistivity versus either vitrinite reflectance (RO) or Lopatin's time-temperature index of thermal maturity (TTI) define two data populations that represent immature shales and shales that have generated oil. The midpoint of the resistivity zone marking the transition between immature and mature shales is -35 ohm-m. The onset of appreciable oil generation in the Woodford Shale of the study area occurs at maturity levels of RO near 0.57% and of TTI between 33 and 48.

Schmoker, James W.; Hester, Timothy C.

1989-01-01

29

MIXED HERONRIES OF OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of this 3-year study were to locate mixed heronries in Oklahoma, census breeding pairs of each species, and indentify site characteristics that may be important to heron ecology. During the study, 17 mixed heronries, containing a total of six ardeid species, were found in Oklahoma. The majority of heronries (82%) were located within the oak-woodland fauna region. Other

G. William Sallee

1982-01-01

30

Oklahoma Tribes: A History  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oklahoma is a microcosm of American Indian country. Water rights, tribal government impotence, jurisdiction, tribal membership, treaty rights, taxation, sovereignty, racism, and poor housing, education, and health are all vital issues facing the Indian tribes of Oklahoma. In order to understand the complexity of these issues, a review of the…

Gover, Kevin

1977-01-01

31

Pride in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet is intended to be used as background material by social studies and history classroom teachers as they develop and implement educational programs on Oklahoma's heritage. It includes background information on the land and people of Oklahoma (geology, climate, topography, vegetation, animals, prehistoric peoples, French explorers,…

Moore, Gordon; Blackburn, Bob L.

32

Hydrogeologic information on the Glorieta Sandstone and the Ogallala Formation in the Oklahoma Panhandle and adjoining areas as related to underground waste disposal  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Oklahoma Panhandle and adjacent areas in Texas, Kansas, Colorado, and New Mexico have prospered because of the development of supplies of fresh water and of oil and gas. The Ogallala and, in places, Cretaceous rocks produce fresh water for irrigation, public supply, and domestic and stock use through approximately 9,000 irrigation and public supply wells and a large but undetermined number of other wells. Disposal of oil-field brine and other wastes into the Glorieta Sandstone is of concern to many local residents because of the possibility of pollution of the overlying fresh-water aquifers, particularly the Ogallala Formation. Permits for 147 disposal wells into the Glorieta have been issued in this area. This report summarizes the data on geology, hydrology, and water development currently available to the U.S. Geological Survey. Geologic information indicates that, in the report area, the Glorieta Sandstone lies at depths ranging from about 500 to 1,600 feet below the base of the Ogallala Fox, nation. The rocks between those two formations are of relatively impermeable types, but solution and removal of salt has resulted in collapse of the rocks in some places. Collapse and fracturing of the rocks could result in increased vertical permeability. This might result in movement of brine under hydrostatic head from the Glorieta Sandstone into overlying fresh-water aquifers, in places where an upward hydraulic gradient exists or is created by an increase in pressure within the Glorieta. Abandoned or inadequately sealed boreholes also are possible conduits for such fluids. The mixing of water in the fresh-water aquifers with brines injected into the Glorieta is not known to have occurred anywhere in the report area, but the information available is not adequate to show positively whether or not this may have occurred locally. Much additional information on the stratigraphy and hydrology--particularly, data on the potentiometric surface of water in the Glorieta--needs to be collected and analyzed before conclusions can be drawn regarding the possibility of vertical movement of oil-field brines from the Glorieta to fresh-water aquifers above.

Irwin, James Haskell; Morton, Robert B.

1969-01-01

33

State summaries: Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2005, Oklahoma mines produced both industrial minerals and coal. No metals were mined in the state. Based on value, leading industrial minerals include crushed stone followed by cement, construction sand and gravel, industrial sand and gravel, iodine and gypsum. The Oklahoma Department of Mines (ODOM) reported that more than 343 mine operators produced nonfuel minerals from 405 mines in the state. However, 530 mining permitted sites were on file. The Oklahoma Miner Training Institute (OMTI) held 239 classes for 33,768 classroom hours of instruction, in which 84 coal miners and 4,587 metal/nonmetal miners were trained.

Krukowski, S.T.

2006-01-01

34

Folding at two different scales of the Paradox anticline in the Ordovician Cool Creek Formation, Arbuckle Group, Slick Hills, southwestern Oklahoma: A paleomagnetic fold test study.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The carbonates in the Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle Group, part of the southern Oklahoma aulacogen, has been the subject of previous paleomagnetic studies with a focus primarily on their origin of the magnetizations. Most previous studies indicate late Paleozoic magnetizations that reside in hematite. However, Elmore et al. (1988) conducted a paleomagnetic study of the Arbuckle Group carbonates from the Slick Hills area utilizing six sites from a north-plunging tightly folded Paradox anticline. Alternating field and thermal demagnetization results from their study indicated a post-tilting remanence that resides primarily in magnetite. Also, based on the difference between the observed and expected remanence directions, they suggested a possible 30° block rotation. As a continuation of their work, this paleomagnetic study was conducted to corroborate the observed 30° rotations utilizing more sites from the Paradox anticline and the use of a more sensitive 2G Cryogenic magnetometer. In addition, the major focus of this paleomagnetic study is to examine the relationship between the timing of remanence acquisition with respect to the primary (F1) and the secondary (F2) folds of the Paradox anticline. To this extent, oriented samples of carbonates have been collected from the Ordovician Cool Creek Formation of the Paradox anticline from the Slick Hills area from both the F1 and the F2 folds. Low temperature demagnetization protocols have been carried out on these samples to remove the effects of multidomain magnetite grains thereby isolating better the characteristic remanence components. Post-low temperature cleaning, the thermal step-demagnetization procedure isolates primarily two components: 1.) a low-temperature steep downward viscous remanent magnetization; and, 2.) a high-temperature characteristic remanent magnetization component, residing primarily in magnetite, with shallow remanence directions scattered towards the east-south-east to south-east. Fold test results indicate a post-tilting remanence for the F1 major folding of the Paradox anticline similar to that observed by Elmore et al. (1988). However, an interesting new observation is the paleomagnetic fold test results from the F2 fold that indicates a syntilting remanent magnetization. In addition, the south-easterly scattered shallow remanence directions from these Ordovician Cool Creek carbonates substantiates a possible 30° rotation that is likely attributed to the left-lateral wrench faulting observed in this area.

Pannalal, S. J.; Zechmeister, M. S.; Elmore, D. R.

2007-12-01

35

Earthquake activity in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Oklahoma is one of the most seismically active areas in the southern Mid-Continent. From 1897 to 1988, over 700 earthquakes are known to have occurred in Oklahoma. The earliest documented Oklahoma earthquake took place on December 2, 1897, near Jefferson, in Grant County. The largest known Oklahoma earthquake happened near El Reno on April 9, 1952. This magnitude 5.5 (mb) earthquake was felt from Austin, Texas, to Des Moines, Iowa, and covered a felt area of approximately 362,000 km{sup 2}. Prior to 1962, all earthquakes in Oklahoma (59) were either known from historical accounts or from seismograph stations outside the state. Over half of these events were located in Canadian County. In late 1961, the first seismographs were installed in Oklahoma. From 1962 through 1976, 70 additional earthquakes were added to the earthquake database. In 1977, a statewide network of seven semipermanent and three radio-telemetry seismograph stations were installed. The additional stations have improved earthquake detection and location in the state of Oklahoma. From 1977 to 1988, over 570 additional earthquakes were located in Oklahoma, mostly of magnitudes less than 2.5. Most of these events occurred on the eastern margin of the Anadarko basin along a zone 135 km long by 40 km wide that extends from Canadian County to the southern edge of Garvin County. Another general area of earthquake activity lies along and north of the Ouachita Mountains in the Arkoma basin. A few earthquakes have occurred in the shelves that border the Arkoma and Anadarko basins.

Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. (Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman (USA))

1989-08-01

36

Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program  

E-print Network

OKLAHCJ1A INDUSTRIAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM* Wayne C. Turner Richard E. Webb James M. Phillips Trevor A. Viljoen School of Industrial Engineering and Management Oklahoma Department of Energy Oklahoma State University Stillwater...

Turner, W. C.; Webb, R. E.; Phillips, J. M.; Viljoen, T. A.

1979-01-01

37

State Documents Collection in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A questionnaire was distributed to a selected group of Oklahoma academic, public, and special libraries to survey their patterns of acquisition, organization, and reference use of Oklahoma state documents collections. Findings revealed serious deficiencies in the provision of current, comprehensive, and well organized collections of Oklahoma

Tomberlin, Irma R.

38

Strengthening Oklahoma Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Established by the state legislature in 1980, the Oklahoma Citizens' Commission on Education (OCCE) aimed to evaluate the state's schools and prescribe goals for its future educational system. This report presents OCCE's recommendations and background materials. The first section comprises OCCE's 42 recommendations and statements, with supporting…

Oklahoma Citizens' Commission on Education, Oklahoma City.

39

Geologic provinces of Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The geologic provinces of Oklahoma are mainly the product of tectonics and attendant sedimentation of Pennsylvanian age. Most boundaries are structural; thus, the provinces map is a generalized tectonic map. Permian and post-Paleozoic strata tend to mask those structures, but most of those strata have been removed by erosion, except in the Anadarko Basin and the Wichita Uplift provinces. The

R. A. Northcutt; J. A. Campbell

1995-01-01

40

Oklahoma NASA EPSCoR  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The mission of Oklahoma EPSCoR is to make Oklahoma researchers more successful in competing for research funding. Specific goals, objectives, and strategies were developed for each federal EPSCoR program, based on federal and state needs. A theme of stimulating collaboration among campuses and building on common research strengths is a strong component of the Oklahoma EPSCoR strategic plan. It extends also to our relationships with the federal agencies, and wherever possible, Oklahoma EPSCoR projects are developed collaboratively with federal research laboratories and program offices. Overall, Oklahoma EPSCoR seeks to capitalize on unique research capabilities and opportunities. The NASA EPSCoR Program in Oklahoma was developed through this grant as a joint effort between Oklahoma EPSCoR and the NASA Oklahoma Space Grant Consortium (OSGC). The major goal of the Oklahoma NASA EPSCoR Plan established in 1996 is to develop an academic research enterprise directed towards a long-term, self-sustaining, nationally competitive capability in areas of mutual self-interest to NASA and Oklahoma. Our final technical summary pie chart demonstrates the strong successes we have achieved during this period as a result of the award.

Snowden, Victoria Duca

2002-01-01

41

Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History & Culture  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The 46th state, Oklahoma, presents its unusual history with the online version of The Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. The Encyclopedia was prepared by over 500 "university-based scholars and independent historians and scholars," and was a joint effort by The Oklahoma Historical Society and Oklahoma State University Library Electronic Publishing Center. Visitors can click on the "Table of Contents" link near the bottom of the homepage to "Browse Entries Alphabetically", "Browse Entries Chronologically", or "Browse Entries by Subject". Browsing via chronology introduces visitors to Oklahoma starting with the "Precontact Era", through the "Westward Expansion" and on to "Twentieth Century to Present". Subject categories include "African Americans", "Farming", "Military", and "Petroleum". When searching, visitors will be taken to the Electronic Publishing Center Search Page, so they will need to choose the specific collection, Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, from the drop down box, to confine the search to the Encyclopedia.

42

Oklahoma Digital Maps  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A team of talented librarians at the Oklahoma State University Library have created this collection of 3,600 maps, a true find for those with an interest in Sooner history, geography, culture, and more. The cartographic resources are divided into four collections, including the WPA Collection and the USGS Collection. This first collection consists of almost 2,400 detailed county maps produced in the 1930s by the Works Progress Administration and the Oklahoma Tax Commission to determine real estate values. Moving on, the USGS Collection is made up of 300 detailed maps generated from 1892 to the 1950s documenting topographical conditions throughout the state. Interested parties can view all of the maps here via a nice digital image tool and are also welcome to search across the entire collection by keyword.

43

Oklahoma Healthy Homes Initiative  

PubMed Central

Compelling scientific evidence suggests that a strong association exists between housing-related hazards and the health and safety of their residents. Health, safety, and environmental hazards (such as asthma and allergy triggers), unintentional injury hazards, lead-based paint hazards, and poor indoor air quality are interrelated with substandard housing conditions. This article describes a Healthy Homes initiative to address these hazards in a coordinated fashion in the home, rather than taking a categorical approach, even in the presence of multiple hazards. It also provides an overview of Oklahoma's Healthy Homes initiative and its pilot project, the Tulsa Safe and Healthy Housing Project, which is currently administered in Tulsa in collaboration with Children First, Oklahoma's Nurse-Family Partnership program. This pilot project seeks to open new areas of research that can lead to a greater understanding of environmental health issues related to substandard housing in the United States, which will eventually make homes safer and healthier. PMID:21563709

Khan, Fahad

2011-01-01

44

OklahomaState  

Cancer.gov

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY, OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY is inviting applications for two full-time, Assistant Professor, tenure track positions in Quantitative Psychology and Clinical Health Psychology or Behavior Medicine beginning August, 2015. Candidates are expected to have a strong background in and dedication to scholarly activity, and to interact well with colleagues and students. They must also demonstrate the capacity to maintain a high quality research program leading to scholarly productivity in the form of professional publications, presentations, and grantsmanship.

45

78 FR 32007 - Environmental Impact Statement for Tulsa-Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Statement for Tulsa--Oklahoma City Passenger Rail Corridor, Oklahoma, Lincoln, Creek...Oklahoma Department of Transportation (ODOT) Rail Division intend to prepare an EIS pursuant...for the State of Oklahoma High-Speed Rail Initiative: Tulsa--Oklahoma City...

2013-05-28

46

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA GRADUATE COLLEGE  

E-print Network

ON NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF SUPERCELLS AND TORNADOES OF THE 3 MAY 1999 OKLAHOMA TORNADO OUTBREAK A DISSERTATION ON NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF SUPERCELLS AND TORNADOES OF THE 3 MAY 1999 OKLAHOMA TORNADO OUTBREAK A DISSERTATION. Alan Shapiro provided many helpful comments on various aspects of my work, and we've had many

Xue, Ming

47

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA GRADUATE COLLEGE  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA GRADUATE COLLEGE 3DVAR AND CLOUD ANALYSIS WITH WSR-88D Level-II DATA of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy By Ming Hu Norman, Oklahoma 2005 #12;2 3DVAR AND CLOUD, but not least, I could not have fulfilled my dream here without the support and sacrifice of my family. My

Xue, Ming

48

Industrial extension, the Oklahoma way  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oklahoma has established a customer-driven industrial extension system. A publicly-chartered, private non-profit corporation, the Oklahoma Alliance for Manufacturing Excellence, Inc. (`the Alliance') coordinates the system. The system incorporates principles that Oklahoma manufacturers value: (1) decentralization and local accessibility; (2) coordinated existing resources; (3) comprehensive help; (4) interfirm cooperation; (5) pro-active outreach; (6) self- help and commitment from firms; (7) customer governance; and (8) performance accountability. The Oklahoma system consists of: (1) a network of locally-based broker/agents who work directly with manufacturers to diagnose problems and find appropriate assistance; (2) a group of industry sector specialists who collect and disseminate sector specific technological and market intelligence to the broker/agents and their clients; (3) all the specialized public and private sector resources coordinated by the system; and (4) a customer- driven coordination and evaluation mechanism, the Alliance.

Farrell, Edmund J.

1994-03-01

49

Oklahoma and American Indian Imagery  

E-print Network

In the late 1980s and early 1990s marketing firms conducted an in-depth examination of the general public's image of Oklahoma as part of their efforts to make the state a profitable tourist destination. This study found ...

Anderson, William Brett

2011-12-31

50

Geothermal resource assessment in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

In September 1980, the Oklahoma Geological Survey began a program to assess the geothermal potential of the state. The program, thus far, consists of: the preparation of a detailed geothermal-gradient map of Oklahoma at a scale of 1:500,000; and site-specific investigations of gradient and subsurface conditions in areas that appear to have geothermal potential. Two areas where recent mapping showed

M. L. Prater; P. K. Cheung; K. V. Luza; W. E. Harrison

1981-01-01

51

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University NREM-9017 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Tommy Puffinbarger Extension Educator, Alfalfa County Oklahoma State

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

52

40 CFR 81.337 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section...otherwise noted. Oklahoma—Ozone (1-Hour Standard)2 Designated...noted. 2 The 1-hour ozone standard is revoked effective... Oklahoma—1997 8-Hour Ozone NAAQS (Primary and...

2013-07-01

53

40 CFR 81.337 - Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Section...otherwise noted. Oklahoma—Ozone (1-Hour Standard)2 Designated...noted. 2 The 1-hour ozone standard is revoked effective...otherwise noted. Oklahoma—Ozone (8-Hour Standard)...

2012-07-01

54

Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma  

E-print Network

of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University #12;Chickasaw Plum for Wildlife in Oklahoma Authors from the Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management, Oklahoma State University in at least 27 states, ranging from Nebraska to New Jersey on the north and from New Mexico to Florida

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

55

the university of oklahoma Annual Report  

E-print Network

the university of oklahoma ADVENTURE A Year Of Annual Report July 2005 ­ June 2006 #12;Board S S I O N Statement The Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History at the University of Oklahoma Conducting and disseminating research to increase knowledge Teaching university students to develop critical

Oklahoma, University of

56

Oklahoma Higher Education: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A major headline in recent years has been that cash-strapped state governments are cutting back support for many services, including public higher education. Oklahoma is no different. Indeed, in the most recent state budget crafted by Oklahoma policymakers, Oklahoma's public colleges and universities received a 5.8 percent cut in state…

Denhart, Matthew; Matgouranis, Christopher

2011-01-01

57

STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES CODE -1 THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

of the University of Oklahoma is charged in the Constitution of the State of Oklahoma with governing the University of the United States and the State of Oklahoma and the University of Oklahoma Student Association. Those. Student Rights Students of the University of Oklahoma are guaranteed certain rights by the Constitutions

Oklahoma, University of

58

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 1999.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on eight indicators of child well-being: (1) low birth weight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) child poverty; (7) high school…

Ingraham, Sandy

59

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook, 2002.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count Factbook details county and statewide trends in the well-being of children in Oklahoma. The statistical portrait is based on seven indicators or benchmarks of child well-being: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to young teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child and teen death; (6) high school…

Ingraham, Sandy

60

Oklahoma Kids Count Factbook '98.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count report details county and statewide trends in the well-being of Oklahoma's children. The statistical portrait is based on eight indicators of child well-being: (1) low birthweight infants; (2) infant mortality; (3) births to teens; (4) child abuse and neglect; (5) child death; (6) child poverty; (7) high school dropouts; and (8)…

Oklahoma Inst. for Child Advocacy, Inc., Oklahoma City. Oklahoma Kids Count.

61

University of Oklahoma Norman Campus  

E-print Network

University of Oklahoma Norman Campus TORNADO Safety Information GENERAL INFORMATION OU is very concerned about the safety and well-being of everyone associated with the Norman Campus. During tornado season, we work to provide timely severe weather safety information that we hope will be carefully

Oklahoma, University of

62

Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources  

E-print Network

E-1014 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University E-1014 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural.S. Department of Agriculture, the Director of Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service, Oklahoma State University

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

63

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

/Wildlife and Fisheries Consultant Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation Shannon I. Ferrell Extension Agricultural Economics Specialist Department of Agricultural Economics Oklahoma State University Dwayne Elmore Extension Wildlife net income is often greater than traditional agricultural uses alone. Oklahoma Cooperative Extension

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

64

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

county OCES agricultural educator or Joe Armstrong, OSU Extension Weeds Specialist, at (405) 744Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University PSS-2779 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

65

A Systematic Approach to Process Evaluation in the Central Oklahoma Turning Point (COTP) Partnership  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Formation is an important stage of partnership development. Purpose: To describe the systematic approach to process evaluation of a Turning Point initiative in central Oklahoma during the formation stage. The nine-month collaborative effort aimed to develop an action plan to promote health. Methods: A sound planning framework was used in the…

Tolma, Eleni L.; Cheney, Marshall K.; Chrislip, David D.; Blankenship, Derek; Troup, Pam; Hann, Neil

2011-01-01

66

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University PSS-2161 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Jason Warren Soil Conservation Extension Specialist Kevin Meeks

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

67

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University BAE-1109 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Carol Jones Stored Products Engineering Specialist Edmond Bonjour

Jones, Carol

68

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University NREM-9016 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Dwayne Elmore Extension Wildlife Specialist, OSU Terry Bidwell

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

69

9th Annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History  

E-print Network

9th Annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair Sam Noble Oklahoma from the Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair! We are pleasedK ­ 12th) · Song in Native American Language (PreK ­ 12th) NEW for 2011

Oklahoma, University of

70

University of Oklahoma [INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY POLICY] The University of Oklahoma |IP Policy 1  

E-print Network

University of Oklahoma [INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY POLICY] The University of Oklahoma |IP Policy 1 INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY POLICY 3.27.1 PREAMBLE (A) The people of the State of Oklahoma may reasonably expect and Nation. Such new industry creates greater employment opportunities for citizens of the State

Oklahoma, University of

71

Oklahoma Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Imaging, Digital Mapping and Immersion Visualization of Evaporite Karst in Western Oklahoma investigates a novel and innovative procedure that combines electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), digital mapping

72

Oklahoma Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

Tomographic Imaging, Digital Mapping and Immersion Visualization of Evaporite Karst in Western Oklahoma mapping and immersion visualization hardware and software to provide a digital image of subsurface conduit

73

The Significance of Stratigraphy and Lithology in Landform Development in Washington County, Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This winning entry in the museum's Young Naturalist Awards 1999 by Katie, a 15 year old student from Oklahoma, takes a look at the development of Washington County, Oklahoma. Katie's essay has a field-journal focus and explains stratigraphy and lithology, two of the main factors controlling the shape of the land in her county. She provides an overview of the six different formations in the Skiatook Group and the five different formations that outcrop in the Bartlesville area. There are descriptions of the many rock samples she took for this study.

74

Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Oklahoma, 2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper profiles the student subgroup achievement and gap trends in Oklahoma for 2010. Oklahoma made progress in narrowing achievement gaps for most major subgroups on the End-of-Instruction (EOI) test in Algebra I. Trends in achievement gaps could not be determined for other grades in math, or for any grades in reading, because the state…

Center on Education Policy, 2010

2010-01-01

75

Onion transplant production system for Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Onions are a valuable specialty crop. Unfortunately, commercially available transplants in Oklahoma are often produced in a different area of the country and shipped into Oklahoma, resulting in a limited cultivar selection, non-adapted cultivars, poor crop stands, high bolting incidence, and low pro...

76

75 FR 18048 - Oklahoma Regulatory Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Oklahoma Department of Mines (ODM, Oklahoma, or...other changes to permit design or plans, but such revision...necessary approval of designs or plans but such permit...regulation under the Mine Safety and Health Act...12866--Regulatory Planning and Review This...

2010-04-09

77

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Assistant Professor The School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Oklahoma State University is pleased to invite applications for six areas of mechanical and aerospace engineering are encouraged to apply. Applicants with a research

78

Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil  

SciTech Connect

Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

1991-03-30

79

76 FR 59766 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00056  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 09/21/2011. Incident: Oklahoma County Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/30/2011 through 09/01/2011. Effective Date: 09/21/2011. Physical Loan Application...

2011-09-27

80

Adult Education in the State of Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development of adult education in Oklahoma has followed the general American pattern. After World War II, several Oklahoma public schools began adult education programs and later took advantage of Federally supported vocational and literacy programs. However, differing attitudes toward educational purpose and financing between eastern and…

Harrison, Arthur Reading

81

Did Divorces Decline after the Oklahoma City Bombing?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995 was an act of terrorism that had many potential influences on the city and state, including influences on families. We analyzed divorce data from 1985 to 2000 for all 77 counties in Oklahoma to assess the divorce response to the Oklahoma City bombing. Our prediction was that divorce rates in Oklahoma would…

Nakonezny, Paul A.; Reddick, Rebecca; Rodgers, Joseph Lee

2004-01-01

82

Restoration of One-Room School Facilities in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Within the last 4 years, four one-room school houses have been restored for use as educational museum facilities. These include the Pleasant Valley School in Stillwater, Oklahoma; the Rose Hill School at Perry, Oklahoma; the old school located on the grounds of the Harn Homestead Museum in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; and the Old Roll School, located…

McKinley, Kenneth H.

83

REGISTRATION PACKET 9th Annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair  

E-print Network

REGISTRATION PACKET 9th Annual Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair, Lists, and Entry Forms to: Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum Oklahoma Native American Youth Language Fair For questions about the ONAYLF, forms

Oklahoma, University of

84

Lower Permian algal stromatolites from Kansas and Oklahoma  

E-print Network

Contributions—Paper 43 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Field and laboratory research on the Wellington For- mation has been supported by the National Science Foundation (Grants G-4150, G-7320, G-14141). Over a period of years TASCH has investigated some of the more obscure...-grained calcite, with clay and FIG. 1. Ostracode-pellet band from bed 14 of Wellington Formation at Loc. 8, Oklahoma. /. Vertical section of specimen showing laminated struc- ture and sag in zone between domes, X 1. 2. Detail of Fig. / showing circular...

Tasch, P.; Kidson, E.; Johnson, J. Harlan

1969-10-01

85

77 FR 26598 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00059  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes and Hail. DATES: Effective April 26, 2012. Incident Period: April 13, 2012 through April 15, 2012. Physical Loan...

2012-05-04

86

76 FR 23522 - Oklahoma Regulatory Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...limitations affecting post-mine contours; adding a subsidence...Oklahoma Department of Mines, 2915 N. Classen...minimum criteria and design certification. Their...relation to the underground mine workings. The full...12866--Regulatory Planning and Review This...

2011-04-27

87

76 FR 77578 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00057  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 12/07/2011. Incident: Earthquakes. Incident Period: 11/05/2011 and continuing. Effective Date: 12/07/2011. Physical Loan Application...

2011-12-13

88

77 FR 61651 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00067  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of OKLAHOMA dated 10/01/2012. Incident: Multiple Wildfires. Incident Period: 07/30/2012 Through 08/12/2012. Effective Date: 10/01/2012. Physical Loan...

2012-10-10

89

Groundwater quality and water-well characteristics in the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma Jurisdictional Area, central Oklahoma, 1948--2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma, compiled historical groundwater-quality data collected from 1948 to 2011 and water-well completion information in parts of Lincoln, Oklahoma, and Pottawatomie Counties in central Oklahoma to support the development of a comprehensive water-management plan for the Tribe’s jurisdictional area. In this study, water-quality data from 155 water wells, collected from 1948 to 2011, were retrieved from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System database; these data include measurements of pH, specific conductance, and hardness and concentrations of the major ions, trace elements, and radionuclides that have Maximum Contaminant Levels or Secondary Maximum Contaminant Levels in public drinking-water supplies. Information about well characteristics includes ranges of well yield and well depth of private water wells in the study area and was compiled from the Oklahoma Water Resources Board Multi-Purpose Well Completion Report database. This report also shows depth to water from land surface by using shaded 30-foot contours that were created by using a geographic information system and spatial layers of a 2009 potentiometric surface (groundwater elevation) and land-surface elevation. Wells in the study area produce water from the North Canadian River alluvial and terrace aquifers, the underlying Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formation that compose the Garber–Wellington aquifer, and the Chase, Council Grove, and Admire Groups. Water quality varies substantially between the alluvial and terrace aquifers and bedrock aquifers in the study area. Water from the alluvial aquifer has relatively high concentrations of dissolved solids and generally is used for livestock only, whereas water from the terrace aquifer has low concentrations of dissolved solids and is used extensively by households in the study area. Water from the bedrock aquifer also is used extensively by households but may have high concentrations of trace elements, including uranium, in some areas where groundwater pH is above 8.0. Well yields vary and are dependent on aquifer characteristics and well-completion practices. Well yields in the unconsolidated alluvial and terrace aquifers generally are higher than yields from bedrock aquifers but are limited by the thickness and extent of these river deposits. Well yields in the alluvium and terrace aquifers commonly range from 50 to 150 gallons per minute and may exceed 300 gallons per minute, whereas well yields in the bedrock aquifers commonly range from 25 to 50 gallons per minute in the western one-third of study area (Oklahoma County) and generally less than 25 gallons per minute in the eastern two-thirds of the study area (Lincoln and Pottawatomie Counties).

Becker, Carol J.

2013-01-01

90

Digital geologic map of Beaver County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This data set consists of digital data and accompanying documentation for the surficial geology of Beaver County, Oklahoma. The original data are from the Hydrogeologic Map, sheet 1 of 3, included in the U.S. Geological Survey publication, Reconnaissance of the Water Resources of Beaver County, Oklahoma, Hydrologic Investigations Atlas HA-450, Morton and Goemaat, 1973. The geology was compiled by S.L. Schoff, 1953.

Cederstrand, J.R.

1997-01-01

91

Oklahoma Space Industry Development Authority  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this grant was to increase the awareness of students of space sciences and commerce through experimentation. This objective was carried out through the award and administration, by OSIDA, the Oklahoma Space Industry Development Authority, of eleven smaller grants to fund thirteen projects at schools determined by competitive application. Applications were graded on potential outreach, experimentation objectives and impact on students' awareness of space sciences. We chose projects from elementary, middle and high schools as well as colleges that would encourage students through research and experimentation to consider education and careers in related disciplines. Each organization did not receive an equal share of the grant; instead, OSIDA distributed the money to each project based on the organization's need. A copy of the dispersement record is enclosed with this final grant report. The projects covered topics such as: space colonization, space stations, constellations, model rocketry, and space commerce.

2002-01-01

92

High School to College-Going Rates for Oklahoma High School Graduates to Oklahoma Colleges: Linear College-Going Rate, Combined College-Going Rate. Oklahoma High School Educational Indicators Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four tables report on college-going rates for high school graduates in Oklahoma from 1989 to 1993. The report cites the Oklahoma State Department of Education and the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education as data sources. The tables report on "Linear College-Going Rates" of those who go directly from Oklahoma high schools to Oklahoma

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

93

Oklahoma seismic network. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established rigorous guidelines that must be adhered to before a permit to construct a nuclear-power plant is granted to an applicant. Local as well as regional seismicity and structural relationships play an integral role in the final design criteria for nuclear power plants. The existing historical record of seismicity is inadequate in a number of areas of the Midcontinent region because of the lack of instrumentation and (or) the sensitivity of the instruments deployed to monitor earthquake events. The Nemaha Uplift/Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly is one of five principal areas east of the Rocky Mountain front that has a moderately high seismic-risk classification. The Nemaha uplift, which is common to the states of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska, is approximately 415 miles long and 12-14 miles wide. The Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly extends southward from Minnesota across Iowa and the southeastern corner of Nebraska and probably terminates in central Kansas. A number of moderate-sized earthquakes--magnitude 5 or greater--have occurred along or west of the Nemaha uplift. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, in cooperation with the geological surveys of Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa, conducted a 5-year investigation of the seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha uplift and associated geologic features in the Midcontinent. This investigation was intended to provide data to be used to design nuclear-power plants. However, the information is also being used to design better large-scale structures, such as dams and high-use buildings, and to provide the necessary data to evaluate earthquake-insurance rates in the Midcontinent.

Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States)]|[Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Energy Center

1993-07-01

94

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University NREM-2874 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http and Management Terrence G. Bidwell Professor and Extension Specialist Rangeland Ecology and Management Case R

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

95

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University HLA-6435 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Landscaping and Gardening for Birds David Hillock Assistant Extension Specialist, Consumer Horticulturist Mike

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

96

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University EPP-7461 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Brad Kard Extension Pesticide Coordinator Kevin Shelton Extension Coordinator Charles Luper Extension

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

97

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University HLA-6430 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Stephanie A. Smith Entomology and Wildlife Extension Program Assistant Ron Masters Extension Wildlife

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

98

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University NREM-9201 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http,theproductionofaquaticanimalsandplants under controlled conditions, is the fastest growing form of alternative agriculture in the United States

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

99

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University EPP-7602 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: http://osufacts.okstate.edu Eric Rebek Associate Professor/State Extension Specialist Horticultural Entomology Jennifer Olson

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

100

Service Assessment Mother's Day Weekend Tornado in Oklahoma and  

E-print Network

impact was in northeast Oklahoma and southwest Missouri. A tornado, rated EF4 on the Enhanced Fujita scale, moved southeast from the town of Picher, Oklahoma, into southwest Missouri. The tornado caused 21

101

The early planning and development of Oklahoma City  

E-print Network

An analysis of the planning, development, and implementation of Oklahoma City's Grand Boulevard. In the early days of 1909, a plan emerged to build an expansive parks and boulevard system to encircle Oklahoma City. Such ...

Humphreys, Blair D. (Blair David)

2009-01-01

102

25 CFR 169.24 - Railroads in Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Railroads in Oklahoma. 169.24 Section 169...RIGHTS-OF-WAY OVER INDIAN LANDS § 169.24 Railroads in Oklahoma. (a) The Act...otherwise determined by the Secretary, railroad rights-of-way in Oklahoma...

2010-04-01

103

Social and Economic Consequences of Indian Gaming in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The balancing framework of Indian gaming as it operates in Oklahoma constrains Oklahoma Indian nations from operating facilities according to the dictates of the marketplace on a large-scale Class III basis. Indian gaming actually brings substantial net economic benefits to the state, contrary to claims that Oklahoma Indian gaming benefits come at…

Grant, Kenneth W., II; Spilde, Katherine A.; Taylor, Jonathan B.

2004-01-01

104

Why Norman?: Meteorology Comes to University of Oklahoma  

E-print Network

Why Norman?: Meteorology Comes to University of Oklahoma by John M. Lewis A presentation at the 50th Anniversary University of Oklahoma's School of Meteorology October 8, 2010 #12;2 Extended Abstract A review of the University of Oklahoma's (OU's) meteorology program/department over its first 15 years

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

105

Drought and grazing effects on Oklahoma phlox (Polemoniaceae, Phlox oklahomensis)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Oklahoma phlox (Phlox oklahomensis Wherry) is endemic to Butler, Chautauqua, Comanche, Cowley, and Elk Counties of Kansas and Woods and Woodward Counties of Oklahoma. The species comprises populations of a few scattered individuals to several hundred in mixed-grass prairie sites in Oklahoma where co...

106

STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES CODE -1 THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

of the University of Oklahoma is charged in the Constitution of the State of Oklahoma with governing the University of the United States and the State of Oklahomaand the University of Oklahoma StudentAssociation. Those documents Rights Students of the University of Oklahomaare guaranteed certain rights by the Constitutions

Oklahoma, University of

107

77 FR 74689 - Land Acquisitions; Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Indian Affairs Land Acquisitions; Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs...acres of land in trust for the Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma on December 6, 2012. FOR...acres of land into trust for the Tonkawa Tribe of Oklahoma under the authority of...

2012-12-17

108

Oklahoma City, Canadian River, OK, USA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This view of Oklahoma City, OK (35.5N, 97.5W) surrounded by the grasslands of the central plains, is detailed enough to use as a map of the major highways and throughfares within the city and surrounding area. Tinker Air Force Base and Will Rogers International Airport as well as Lakes Hefner, Stanley Draper and nearby recreation areas. The smaller community of Norman, on the banks of the Canadian River to the south, is home to the University of Oklahoma.

1991-01-01

109

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

to be found in canola grown in Oklahoma are the army cutworm and the diamondback moth. Army cutworm (Euxoa auxiliaris) Description and Life History: Army cutworm moths (Figure 1) have a wingspan of 1 to 1½ inches

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

110

Analysis of Best Hydraulic Fracturing Practices in the Golden Trend Fields of Oklahoma Shahab D. Mohaghegh, West Virginia University  

E-print Network

Analysis of Best Hydraulic Fracturing Practices in the Golden Trend Fields of Oklahoma Shahab D of optimized hydraulic fracturing procedure. Detail stimulation data from more than 230 wells in the Golden of hydraulic fractures. Therefore, it is highly recommended that the clastic and carbonate formations

Mohaghegh, Shahab

111

Eliminating Barriers to Dual Enrollment in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Policy, financial, and transportation barriers have limited participation in dual enrollment for marginalized (low-socioeconomic, first-generation, and ethnic minority) students in Oklahoma. This chapter presents a collaborative effort by education and community leaders that has successfully eliminated these barriers and increased the number of…

Roach, Rick; Gamez Vargas, Juanita; David, Kevin M.

2015-01-01

112

Oklahoma Curriculum Guide for Teaching Safety Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developed by classroom teachers, university professors, and personnel from the Oklahoma State Department of Education, this guide is an effort to assist teachers in locating and utilizing safety materials as well as to assist them in developing well-balanced safety programs for the children and young people in the state. The preschool and…

Oklahoma Curriculum Improvement Commission, Oklahoma City.

113

REGENTS' POLICY MANUAL THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

.7.6 College of Law Library 2.8 Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History Collections Management Policy 2.4.2 Advertising and Promotion 3.4.3 Endorsement Prohibited 3.4.4 Purchasing Advertising 3.4.5 University Name

Oklahoma, University of

114

House Damage from 2011 Oklahoma Earthquake  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

House damage in central Oklahoma from the magnitude 5.6 earthquake on Nov. 6, 2011. Research conducted by USGS geophysicist Elizabeth Cochran and her university-based colleagues suggests that this earthquake was induced by injection into deep disposal wells in the Wilzetta North field....

115

SIMULATION OF PEANUT GROWTH IN OKLAHOMA.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Two peanut growth models of varying complexity were calibrated for Oklahoma varieties and growing conditions. Both models predicted pod growth quite well. The models were then used to simulate the effects of various soil moisture levels on peanut growth. The more complex model has potential as a management tool.

Grosz, Gerald D.; Elliott, Ronald L.; Young, James H.

1986-01-01

116

The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center  

E-print Network

to give the Certification of Birth/Care of a Newborn form to your health care provider for completionThe University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center HUMAN RESOURCES Dear On we were notified that you (FMLA). The purpose of this letter is to provide you with the form your health care provider needs

Oklahoma, University of

117

The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center  

E-print Network

The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center HUMAN RESOURCES Dear On we were notified that you). The purpose of this letter is to provide you with the form your health care provider to complete and return. Your leave is not approved as FMLA until we have received the Certification of Birth/Care of a Newborn

Oklahoma, University of

118

Public Library Service to Children in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Because of the low density of its population and subsequent low property tax support, library service in Oklahoma is based on the multicounty library operating as a single unit. With the help of federal funds, such units now cover one-third of the state and 60 percent of its population utilizing branch libraries and bookmobile service. Service to…

Wentroth, Mary Ann

119

University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology  

E-print Network

University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology Rapid-response Graduate Degree Application Form This application form is used by the School of Meteorology to provide a rapid, no-cost response to the applicant on prospects to be admitted to the School of Meteorology for pursuit of a graduate degree. The applicant should

Oklahoma, University of

120

Electromagnetic Radiation from Severe Storms in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of observing the radiation from lightning discharge processes indicated that major radio frequency electrical activity was associated with the tornado-producing severe storms that struck Oklahoma City during this period. Rates of occurrence of atmospherics at frequencies from 10 kHz to above 3 MHz were observed by using short time constant circuits to preserve the burst nature of the

WILLIAM L. TAYLOR

1973-01-01

121

Women of Oklahoma, 1890-1920.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book examines the lives of representative White, Black, and American Indian women on the Oklahoma frontier after the abrupt opening of Indian Territory to non-Indian settlement in 1889. Drawing on primary sources, particularly diaries and letters, it focuses on the intersection of race, gender, class, and culture in the relationships among…

Reese, Linda Williams

122

State Education Finance and Governance Profile: Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the state education finance and governance profile of Oklahoma. The state uses a State Aid Formula to determine the appropriation of funds to various districts. Along with the aid formula, the state collects revenue from the following sources: compensatory programs, special education, vocational programs, transportation…

Slosburg, Tucker

2010-01-01

123

77 FR 53247 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00063  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4078-DR), dated 08/22/2012. Incident: Freedom Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/03/2012 through 08/14/2012. Effective Date: 08/22/2012. Physical Loan Application...

2012-08-31

124

76 FR 60959 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00055  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Oklahoma dated 09/21/2011. Incident: Pawnee County Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/07/2011 through 08/14/2011. Effective Date: 09/21/2011. Physical Loan Application...

2011-09-30

125

77 FR 61652 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00066  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of OKLAHOMA dated 10/01/2012. Incident: Luther Wildfire. Incident Period: 08/03/2012 Through 08/10/2012. Effective Date: 10/01/2012. Physical Loan Application...

2012-10-10

126

State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oklahoma edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher quality…

National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

2009-01-01

127

Oklahoma Water Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

. The vast number of landfill sites and ubiquitous nature of alluvial deposits make the results of this study stability of the Canadian River adjacent to the Norman, Oklahoma landfill. The USGS provided access to the extensive data already collected at the site as well as assistance with obtaining cores for the project

128

HYDROGEOLOGY AND RECHARGE OF A GYPSUM - DOLOMITE KARST AQUIFER IN SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA, U.S.A  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gypsum and dolomite beds of the Permian Blaine Formation make up a major karst aquifer that is being naturally and artifically recharged to provide irrigation water in 2,500 sq. km making up the Hollis Basin of southwestern Oklahoma, U.S.A. The Blaine aquifer typically is 50 to 65 m thick, and it consists of a sequence of laterally persistent gypsum, dolomite,

Kenneth S. Johnson

129

Oklahoma BEEF Incorporated (OBI) Bull Delivery Sheet Central bull testing at Oklahoma BEEF, Incorporated, is managed and supervised with the emphasis on the performance, health, and safety of the bulls; however, Oklahoma  

E-print Network

for Oklahoma Cattle *Out of state cattle must comply with Oklahoma Animal Health requirements Date TestedOklahoma BEEF Incorporated (OBI) Bull Delivery Sheet Central bull testing at Oklahoma BEEF, injury, sickness, death, or any other cause while the bulls are at the central test station. Delivery

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

130

40 CFR 81.124 - North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control...Control Regions § 81.124 North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air...

2010-07-01

131

78 FR 16036 - Service Level Environmental Impact Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Statement for the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study Corridor, South Texas to Oklahoma...improved high- speed intercity passenger rail service along an 850-mile corridor...Level EIS, the Texas Oklahoma Passenger Rail Study (Study) also includes...

2013-03-13

132

High School to College-Going Rates for Oklahoma High School Graduates to Oklahoma Colleges. Oklahoma High School Indicators Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The counts from the current annual report and reports of the previous two years have been combined to provide a three-year average Oklahoma college-going rate. This report includes single-year reports that are provided for each of the three years used to construct the average college-going rates: the college-going rate for 1995-96, 1996-97, and…

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

133

A digital geologic map database for the state of Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This dataset is a composite of part or all of the 12 1:250,000 scale quadrangles that make up Oklahoma. The result looks like a geologic map of the State of Oklahoma. But it is only an Oklahoma shaped map clipped from the 1:250,000 geologic maps. This is not a new geologic map. No new mapping took place. The geologic information from each quadrangle is available within the composite dataset.

Heran, William D.; Green, Gregory N.; Stoeser, Douglas B.

2003-01-01

134

Largest Dinosaur Ever Discovered Found in Oklahoma  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Originally discovered in a remote corner of Oklahoma in 1994, the fossil of what may have been the largest creature to ever walk the earth has been excavated by a research team from the University of Oklahoma. Dubbed Sauroposeidon proteles, or "thunder lizard," the dinosaur was almost 100 feet long, with a 39 foot neck and weighing over 50 tons, so big that it would have created minor seismic activity just by walking, according to scientists. The new find is about 110 million years old and consists of neck vertebrae, some almost five feet in length, together with neck ribs nearly twelve feet long. The find is also significant because it may shed light on the last of the North American sauropods, who died out about 100 million years ago. A paper on this new find is scheduled to appear in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. The sites listed provide information and background material about this momentous discovery.

de Nie, Michael Willem.

135

Helminth fauna of waterfowl in central Oklahoma.  

PubMed

Free-ranging waterfowl wintering in and migrating through central Oklahoma were collected and examined for intestinal helminths. Seventy-one ducks, including mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), American widgeons (Anas americana), blue-winged teal (Anas discors), and green-winged teal (Anas crecca) were examined; 64 (90.1%) harbored one or more species of metazoa. Six cestodes, 6 trematodes, 6 nematodes, and 1 acanthocephalan were identified, An experimental, non-flying population of ducks was established and monitored to determine the extent of helminth transmission in central Oklahoma. Seven species of helminths were acquired by the sentinel birds during the study. The significance of the parasites recovered and variations in prevalence and species composition of the infections are discussed as they relate to the life cycles of the parasites and the ecology of the hosts. PMID:7373725

Shaw, M G; Kocan, A A

1980-01-01

136

Passive electrical measurements from three Oklahoma tornados  

Microsoft Academic Search

Passive electrical measurement of three tornados in the Oklahoma area have been made and are being reported upon. The measurements made include point discharge current, 18.5-kc\\/s sferics, along with 10-, 50-, 100-, and 175-kc\\/s, and 30-Mc\\/s sferics. The preceding measurements of tornados are compared with a typical local thunderstorm. In this comparison, it is shown that the electrical discharges within

P. A. Silberg

1965-01-01

137

N3280RDCOTTONWOODRD PayneOklahoma 11  

E-print Network

51 2 54 11 51 49 4 11 2 11 10 72 51 96 26 47 51 2651 26 76 76 26 4 32 11 26 3 11 26 10 72 51 31 26 51 11 2626 72 11 49 10 11 26 11 26 96 76 26 41 11 76 51 1011 74 31 51 11 SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY Soil Survey Area: Payne County, Oklahoma Spatial Version of Data: 2 Soil Map Compilation Scale: 1

Ghajar, Afshin J.

138

Paleomagnetism of paleozoic asphaltic deposits in southern Oklahoma, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Paleomagnetic measurements on asphaltic samples from two formations in southern Oklahoma have been performed. A bioclastic unit from the Boggy Formation, known as the Buckhorn asphalt, exhibited a stable, characteristic remanent moment (RM) after A.F. demagnetization between 5-20 mT. We infer from our data that very fine, possibly authigenic magnetite, like that shown to have a genetic relationship with the migration through rocks of hydrocarbons [Elmore et al., 1987], is the primary RM carrier in these samples. The tilt corrected paleopole for the Buckhorn asphalt (121.9 E; 43.5N; ?p=1.3 ?m=2.3) falls on the Early Permian Apparent Polar Wander Path for North America of Irving and Irving [1982], using a 30 Ma window (270-280 Ma). Because the Boggy Form-ation, containing the Buckhorn asphalt, was depos-ited during the Late Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian), we interpret the data to indicate magnetization during minor uplift in the Early Permian of the Arbuckle Mountain region. The RM appears to have been acquired at this time, probably as the result of magnetite production facilitated by the introduction time of sulfate reducing bacteria.

Ellwood, Brooks B.; Crick, Rex E.

1988-05-01

139

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Sherman Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Uranium favorability of the Sherman Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma, was evaluated using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Surface and subsurface geologic studies were supplemented by aerial radiometric surveys and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance studies. A total of 1537 rock, soil, and stream-sediment samples were analyzed for 30 elements. Environments favorable for sandstone-type uranium deposits are present in the Cretaceous Antlers and Woodbine Formations, Pennsylvanian arkoses, and the Permian Wichita-Albany Group. The Antlers Formation is locally radioactive; and rock, stream-sediment, and ground-water samples show uranium enrichment. Dip-oriented sand belts may contain subsurface uranium deposits. Arkosic wedges in the Pennsylvanian Strawn, Canyon, and Cisco Groups were partially derived from a favorable Wichita Mountain source, were highly permeable, and contained downdip reductants; gamma-ray logs showed some anomalies. The Permian Wichita-Albany Group contained small uranium occurrences. The Woodbine Formation had an excellent uranium source in updip volcaniclastic correlatives, good permeability, and organic precipitants; but there is little direct evidence of uranium occurrences. Environments considered unfavorable for uranium deposits are limestones and shales of Cambrian to Pennsylvanian age, Pennsylvanian sandstones derived from a Ouachita source, Lower Cretaceous shales, limestones, and sandstones, Upper Cretaceous marine strata, and sparse Cenozoic sediments. Unevaluated environments include Precambrian granites and metasediments of the buried Muenster Arch.

Hobday, D.K.; Rose, F.G. Jr.

1982-08-01

140

Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP)  

SciTech Connect

The DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, with the support from the State of Oklahoma and from the three universities, Oklahoma State University, University of Oklahoma and Langston University, resulted in establishing of the Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics (OCHEP) in 2004. Currently, OCHEP continues to flourish as a vibrant hub for research in experimental and theoretical particle physics and an educational center in the State of Oklahoma. All goals of the original proposal were successfully accomplished. These include foun- dation of a new experimental particle physics group at OSU, the establishment of a Tier 2 computing facility for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Tevatron data analysis at OU and organization of a vital particle physics research center in Oklahoma based on resources of the three universities. OSU has hired two tenure-track faculty members with initial support from the grant funds. Now both positions are supported through OSU budget. This new HEP Experimental Group at OSU has established itself as a full member of the Fermilab D0 Collaboration and LHC ATLAS Experiment and has secured external funds from the DOE and the NSF. These funds currently support 2 graduate students, 1 postdoctoral fellow, and 1 part-time engineer. The grant initiated creation of a Tier 2 computing facility at OU as part of the Southwest Tier 2 facility, and a permanent Research Scientist was hired at OU to maintain and run the facility. Permanent support for this position has now been provided through the OU university budget. OCHEP represents a successful model of cooperation of several universities, providing the establishment of critical mass of manpower, computing and hardware resources. This led to increasing Oklahoma�¢����s impact in all areas of HEP, theory, experiment, and computation. The Center personnel are involved in cutting edge research in experimental, theoretical, and computational aspects of High Energy Physics with the research areas ranging from the search for new phenomena at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider to theoretical modeling, computer simulation, detector development and testing, and physics analysis. OCHEP faculty members participating on the D0 collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron and on the ATLAS collaboration at the CERN LHC have made major impact on the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson search, top quark studies, B physics studies, and measurements of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) phenomena. The OCHEP Grid computing facility consists of a large computer cluster which is playing a major role in data analysis and Monte Carlo productions for both the D0 and ATLAS experiments. Theoretical efforts are devoted to new ideas in Higgs bosons physics, extra dimensions, neutrino masses and oscillations, Grand Unified Theories, supersymmetric models, dark matter, and nonperturbative quantum field theory. Theory members are making major contributions to the understanding of phenomena being explored at the Tevatron and the LHC. They have proposed new models for Higgs bosons, and have suggested new signals for extra dimensions, and for the search of supersymmetric particles. During the seven year period when OCHEP was partially funded through the DOE EPSCoR implementation grant, OCHEP members published over 500 refereed journal articles and made over 200 invited presentations at major conferences. The Center is also involved in education and outreach activities by offering summer research programs for high school teachers and college students, and organizing summer workshops for high school teachers, sometimes coordinating with the Quarknet programs at OSU and OU. The details of the Center can be found in http://ochep.phy.okstate.edu.

S. Nandi; M.J. Strauss; J. Snow; F. Rizatdinova; B. Abbott; K. Babu; P. Gutierrez; C. Kao; A. Khanov; K.A. Milton; H. Neaman; H. Severini, P. Skubic

2012-02-29

141

Seismic and gravity study of the lithospheric structure of the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen and surrounding region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen (SOA) is easily recognizable in gravity and magnetic maps as perhaps the second largest gravity anomaly in North America (second to the Mid-continental rift). The SOA lies in the Granite Rhyolite province of Oklahoma. It is characterized by large magnitude basement faults that were active during Cambrian rifting and were reactivated as thrust faults during the late Paleozoic (313-285 Ma) during the Ouachita Orogeny. The SOA was originally considered to be a failed rift of a triple junction associated with Cambrian-aged opening of the Iapetan Ocean. This model is supported by the three-armed pattern of gravity highs at the junction of the SOA with Ouachita orogen, the age of the bimodal series of gabbroic and rhyolitic rock (that are clearly mantle derived), and the interpretation of a thick sequence of clastic metasedimentary rock as rift-fill. These metasedimentary rock, however, have been found to be much older than the SOA faulting and volcanism. More recent investigations favor models that describe the SOA as a system of leaky transform faults that are roughly parallel to the Alabama-Oklahoma transform fault, which partially frames part of the Iapetan margin of Southern Laurentia. This study will try to use seismic and gravity modeling to resolve the nature of the SOA and to determine the depth (into the mantle) to which features related to the formation of the SOA are preserved. The EarthScope transportable array (TA) has completed data acquisition in Oklahoma and Texas. We have made receiver functions (RF) from the TA along the SOA and found that the there is an abrupt change in crustal structure across the SOA. RF analysis shows that a mid-crustal boundary occurs at about 15 km south of the SOA that dips toward the SOA. North of the SOA, this midcrustal boundary appears to be 5 km shallower and flat. The Moho appears to be 45 km deep to the south of the SOA but appears to be at a depth of about 38 km to the north. Additional processing is underway to map out variation in the Vp/Vs ratio throughout the region and into the mantle. Several uncharacteristically large earthquakes occurred in west Texas and Oklahoma during the period that the TA was in the region (including a 5.6 in east-central Oklahoma, a 5.3 in southeastern Colorado, a 4.8 near the Gulf Coast, and a 4.2 in central Texas; all of which had many aftershocks between 3.5 and 4). We will use these events to perform Pn tomography throughout the area.

Tave, M.; Gurrola, H.; Mickus, K. L.; Thomas, W. A.

2012-12-01

142

DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT1 PINE CREEK DAM, OKLAHOMA2  

E-print Network

#12;#12;DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT1 PINE CREEK DAM, OKLAHOMA2 DAM SAFETY MODIFICATION3 &4 Environmental Assessment Pine Creek Dam, Oklahoma Dam Safety Modification & Interim Risk Reduction Measure and risk reduction measures necessary to correct structural and maintenance deficiencies of Pine Creek Dam

US Army Corps of Engineers

143

FIRST YEAR BIOMASS PRODUCTION FROM CRP ACREAGE IN WESTERN OKLAHOMA  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The primary objective of this research was to determine the biomass/bioenergy yield and economic value of typical CRP land in northwestern Oklahoma. Three CRP locations were identified in cooperation with the NRCS District Conservationist stationed at Buffalo, Oklahoma. Within each location, a sit...

144

Certification Standards Adopted by the Oklahoma State Board of Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document presents the standards adopted by the Oklahoma State Board of Education for qualification and certification of persons for instructional, supervisory, and administrative positions and services in Oklahoma public schools. Included are rules and regulations governing the issuance and revocation of certificates for county…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

145

Color Variation Among Northern Flickers Collected in Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The eastern (yellow-shafted) race of the northern flicker (Colaptes auratus auratus) is resident in Oklahoma. Except at the western end of the panhandle where it breeds, the western (red-shafted) race (C. a. cafer) occupies the state only during migration and winter. The two races interbreed widely. A total of 179 northern flicker (Colaptes auratus) specimens from Oklahoma were examined for

Vickie A. Ivey; Jack D. Tyler

146

The Oklahoma PN/ADN Articulation Project Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In response to a critical nursing shortage in the state of Oklahoma, the Oklahoma Practical Nursing (PN)/Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) Articulation Project Coordinating Committee was formed in spring 1990 to develop a proposal for program articulation. A curriculum matrix was designed and adopted for use by five regional subcommittees which…

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

147

75 FR 23280 - Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma Alcohol Control Ordinance  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Indian Affairs Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma Alcohol Control Ordinance AGENCY: Bureau of Indian...publishes the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma's Alcohol Control Ordinance, which was adopted...CB-64-2010 enacted on March 13, 2010. The Alcohol Control Ordinance regulates and...

2010-05-03

148

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

in Oklahoma. - Decision Support Model for Evaluating Alternative Water Supply Infrastructure Scenarios (Dr their water supply infrastructure needs and will further assist in planning and locating funding for needed Pricing Protocol for Oklahoma Water Planning: Lake Tennkiller Case Study Project Number: 2007OK78B Start

149

Anderson Productions Cruisin' Oklahoma US 66 video archive Transcripts  

E-print Network

:38:00 ­ 14:39:26 from Hi8#9. See ľ" #O. BC-metal 60ml. 26 TC 14:39:26 ­ 15:27:17 from Hi8#9, Phillips ľ". See'd. 26 Oct 1993. 7 Central Oklahoma Christian Home geriatric park. c/a's Will Rogers. 8 Oklahoma

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

150

The University of Oklahoma (Norman Campus) Tuberculosis Testing and Certification  

E-print Network

The University of Oklahoma (Norman Campus) Tuberculosis Testing and Certification As part of the University of Oklahoma has adopted a Tuberculosis Testing Policy, effective August 16, 2007. All staff and faculty that fit any of the criteria listed below must comply with the Tuberculosis Testing Requirement

Oklahoma, University of

151

Needs Assessment for Oklahoma Academic Librarians: Summary Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Oklahoma Chapter of the Association of College and Research Libraries (OK-ACRL) and the Oklahoma Library Association, College and University Division (OLA-CUD) co-sponsored a survey of professional academic librarians to obtain institutional and background data on their characteristics, their preferences for academic professional association…

McClure, Charles R.

152

Management of Sclerotinia and southern blights in Oklahoma peanuts  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Although peanut acres in Oklahoma have declined in recent years, the peanut crop remains an important economic crop for those who choose to grow it. A major problem for Oklahoma peanut production is to grow the crop profitably. Yield limiting factors such as diseases, adverse weather conditions, w...

153

The University of Oklahoma 15-PASSENGER VAN POLICY  

E-print Network

. Limit the number of passengers, when passenger transport is necessary, to 8 passengers, I. Require allThe University of Oklahoma 15-PASSENGER VAN POLICY I. POLICY STATEMENT AND SCOPE The safe travel, at the University of Oklahoma is the goal of this policy. This policy applies to the discontinuance of 15-passenger

Oklahoma, University of

154

IMPLICATIONS OF NEW ARSENIC STANDARDS ON OKLAHOMA WATER RESOURCES  

EPA Science Inventory

The new national standard for arsenic in drinking water supplies, slated to take effect in 2006, is having an unexpected impact on a number of Oklahoma communities. Currently, several municipalities in north central Oklahoma are in compliance with existing arsenic standards (50 ...

155

Oklahoma's Indian People: Images of Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed to be combined with the social studies curriculum, this guide promotes awareness of American Indian contributions to Oklahoma's development and cultural heritage. Lessons help students in grades 6 through 9 strengthen powers of critical thinking, practice writing skills, and develop creative expression, while learning about Oklahoma's 34…

Chisholm, Anita, Ed.

156

78 FR 36556 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...amounts as you find necessary for Federal disaster assistance and administrative expenses...Individual Assistance and assistance for debris removal and emergency protective measures...Coordinating Officer for this major disaster. The following areas of the State...as adversely affected by this major disaster: Cleveland, Lincoln, McClain, Oklahoma...Oklahoma, and......

2013-06-18

157

ELECTION AGREEMENT FOR Oklahoma Teachers' Retirement System (OTRS)  

E-print Network

By completing this form you are choosing to participate in the Oklahoma Teachers' Retirement System (OTRSELECTION AGREEMENT FOR Oklahoma Teachers' Retirement System (OTRS) For Hourly­Paid Employee information to help you make an informed decision. The University may not advise you as to whether

Oklahoma, University of

158

Biology and epidemiology of peanut soilborne pathogens in Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Pressure from soil borne diseases limits yields and increases production costs to Oklahoma peanut growers. Sclerotinia blight, caused by the fungus Sclerotinia minor, and southern blight, caused by the fungus Sclerotium rolfsii, are the most economically damaging peanut diseases in Oklahoma. The c...

159

Oklahoma Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-print Network

concluded the fourth year of our 4.5-year project to update the Oklahoma Comprehensive Water Plan. We worked for inclusion in the revised Water Plan. · OWRRI director, Dr. Will Focht, served as Past into the efficacy of ADCP for measuring sediment load in Oklahoma streams under both low and high discharge

160

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

soils tend to collapse and prairie dogs avoid The black-tailed prairie dog is a keystone species species of prairie dogs and the only species that occurs in Oklahoma. They are highly social burrowing by grasses, while the center is made up of forbs and dwarf shrubs. Many wildlife species utilize these areas

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

161

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

increased disposable income to be spent in the community. What the Entrepreneur Must Do With the economic a 1994 survey found that 125,000 Oklahoma home-based businesses generated over $3 billion in income. What successful business. The owner, through the sale of products and services, generates income from which

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

162

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets  

E-print Network

on all grasses, except during very cold winters. The fungus overwinters as dormant thread-like fungal of true spores does not occur. Therefore, spread of this fungus can are mild and prolonged periods of high humidity exist. In Oklahoma, infection of susceptible grasses begins

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

163

Oklahoma Aerospace Intellectual Capital/Educational Recommendations: An Inquiry of Oklahoma Aerospace Executives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scope and Method of Study: The purpose of this qualitative study was to conduct detailed personal interviews with aerospace industry executives/managers from both the private and military sectors from across Oklahoma to determine their perceptions of intellectual capital needs of the industry. Interviews with industry executives regarding…

Nelson, Erin M.

2010-01-01

164

DISABILITIES IN OKLAHOMA--ESTIMATES AND PROJECTIONS, REPORT OF THE OKLAHOMA SURVEY OF DISABILITIES.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE PURPOSE OF THE STUDY WAS TO PROVIDE REASONABLY ACCURATE ESTIMATES OF THE NUMBER AND TYPES OF DISABLED PERSONS AND THEIR NEEDS AS A BASIS FOR BOTH PRESENT AND FUTURE PLANNING. PERSONAL INTERVIEWS WERE CONDUCTED WITH ADULT RESPONDENTS IN 3,000 HOUSEHOLDS IN OKLAHOMA, A RANDOM SAMPLE STATIFIED ON THE RURAL-URBAN DIMENSION. DATA FROM 2,058…

BOHLEBER, MICHAEL E.

165

Biological assessment of environmental flows for Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Large-scale patterns in fish assemblage structure and functional groups are influenced by alterations in streamflow regime. In this study, we defined an objective threshold for alteration for Oklahoma streams using a combination of the expected range of 27 flow indices and a discriminant analysis to predict flow regime group. We found that fish functional groups in reference flow conditions had species that were more intolerant to flow alterations and preferences for stream habitat and faster flowing water. In contrast, altered sites had more tolerant species that preferred lentic habitat and slower water velocity. Ordination graphs of the presence and functional groups of species revealed an underlying geographical pattern roughly conforming to ecoregions, although there was separation between reference and altered sites within the larger geographical framework. Additionally, we found that reservoir construction and operation significantly altered fish assemblages in two different systems, Bird Creek in central Oklahoma and the Kiamichi River in southeastern Oklahoma. The Bird Creek flow regime shifted from a historically intermittent stream to one with stable perennial flows, and changes in fish assemblage structure covaried with changes in all five components of the flow regime. In contrast, the Kiamichi River flow regime did not change significantly for most flow components despite shifts in fish assemblage structure; however, most of the species associated with shifts in assemblage structure in the Kiamichi River system were characteristic of lentic environments and were likely related more to proximity of reservoirs in the drainage system than changes in flow. The spatial patterns in fish assemblage response to flow alteration, combined with different temporal responses of hydrology and fish assemblage structure at sites downstream of reservoirs, indicate that interactions between flow regime and aquatic biota vary depending on ecological setting. This supports the notion that regional variation in natural flow regimes could affect the development of flow recommendations.

Fisher, William L.; Seilheimer, Titus S.; Taylor, Jason M.

2012-01-01

166

Naturally occurring hepatozoonosis in coyotes from Oklahoma.  

PubMed

Nine of 16 free-ranging coyotes (Canis latrans) from central Oklahoma (USA) had naturally acquired infections of Hepatozoon americanum. Infections were confirmed by recognition of tissue stages closely resembling H. americanum in skeletal and cardiac muscle. At the time coyotes were collected they were infested with a variety of ticks, including adult Gulf Coast ticks (Amblyomma maculatum). We propose that the high prevalence of H. americanum in this small sample of free-ranging coyotes and the ability of these same animals to harbor adult populations of A. maculatum is an important component of the epizootiology of canine hepatozoonosis in North America. PMID:10073352

Kocan, A A; Breshears, M; Cummings, C; Panciera, R J; Ewing, S A; Barker, R W

1999-01-01

167

University of Oklahoma: History of Science Collections  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Oklahoma Libraries have done a wonderful job with their history of science collections. Visitors to the site will find seven collections here to keep their minds busy. Their number includes "Copernicus's De revolutionibus" and "Scientific Instruments and Historical Artifacts." Of course this first volume is nothing less than a classic, presenting Copernicus's evidence and arguments in support of heliocentric theory. This volume also contains extensive marginalia from a circle of astronomers located in Paris in the decade following the book's publication in 1543. Moving on, the "Scientific Instruments and Historical Artifacts" area contains 16 wonderful items, including an ancient Mesopotamian cuneiform tablet and videos of historically significant refractometers.

2012-09-21

168

Oklahoma High School Indicators Project. High School to College-Going Rates for Oklahoma High School Graduates to Oklahoma Colleges: Linear College-Going Rate, Combined College-Going Rate.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides a single-year rate and a 3-year average of the Oklahoma college-going rate. The average linear college-going rate for Oklahoma colleges in 1993-94 was 43.9 percent of the Oklahoma high school graduates from 1990-91, 1991-92, and 1992-93. Of 1992-93 high school graduates, 44.7 percent went directly to an Oklahoma college the…

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

169

Late Mississippian productoid brachiopods Inflatia, Keokukia, and Adairia, Ozark region of Oklahoma and Arkansas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Specimens of the Late Mississippian productoid genera Inflatia and Keokukia from northeastern Oklahoma and northwestern Arkansas, collected from the Boone and "Moorefield' formations, Hindsville Limestone, and Fayetteville Shale, display morphologic similarities and differences that delineate species and determine their biostratigraphic ranges. Generic assignments are based primarily on internal characters. Systematic descriptions include seven species of Inflatia Muir-Wood and Cooper. Also proposed and described is a new genus, Adairia, with its type species Productus (Marginifera) adairensis Drake. All these species of Inflatia, Keokukia and Adairia have biostratigraphically restricted ranges within the Meramecian and Chesterian sequence in the Ozark region. -from Authors

Gordon, M., Jr.; Henry, T.W.; Treworgy, J.D.

1993-01-01

170

Depositional environment of Red Fork sandstones, deep Anadarko Basin, western Oklahoma  

E-print Network

with thick marine shales. On the broad Anadarko shelf, north and east of the study area, the Red Fork sandstones have been interpreted as fluvio-deltaic deposits (Zeliff, 1975; Hill and Clark, 1980). However, the basinal section may not be a deltaic... Moore (1979) and Evans (1979) Page Regional structure on top of the Red Fork Formation in the deep Anadarko basin of west-central Oklahoma showing locations of cored wells and fields. Typical gamma-ray log character of the two main Red Fork...

Whiting, Philip Howard

1982-01-01

171

Echinoderm Faunas from the Bromide Formation (Middle Ordovician) of Oklahoma  

E-print Network

echinoderm zones and beds that may have affected the compostion of echinoderm faunas 70 21. Possible reasons for the occurrence of Bromide echinoderms in thin, rich zones 73 22. Calceocrinid species used in phylogeny study 92 23. Characters measured... echinoderm zones and beds that may have affected the compostion of echinoderm faunas 70 21. Possible reasons for the occurrence of Bromide echinoderms in thin, rich zones 73 22. Calceocrinid species used in phylogeny study 92 23. Characters measured...

1982-01-01

172

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Lawton Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Texas  

SciTech Connect

Uranium resources of the Lawton Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Texas, were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Five areas of uranium favorability were delineated. Diagenetically altered, quartzose and sublithic, eolian and marginal-marine sandstones of the Permian Rush Springs Formation overlying the Cement Anticline are favorable for joint-controlled deposits in sandstone, non-channel-controlled peneconcordant deposits, and Texas roll-front deposits. Three areas contain lithologies favorable for channel-controlled peneconcordant deposits: arkosic sandstones and granule conglomerates of the Permian Post Oak Conglomerate south of the Wichita Mountains; subarkosic and sublithic Lower Permian fluvio-deltaic and coastal-plain sandstones of the eastern Red River Valley; and subsurface arkosic, subarkosic, and sublithic alluvial-fan and fan-delta sandstones of the Upper Pennsylvanian-Lower Permian sequence in the eastern Hollis Basin. The coarse-grained facies of the Cambrian Quanah Granite and genetically related aplite and pegmatite dikes in the Wichita Mountains are favorable for orthomagmatic and autometasomatic deposits, respectively.

Al-Shaieb, Z.; Thomas, R.G.; Stewart, G.F.

1982-04-01

173

Fluid injection triggering of 2011 earthquake sequence in Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Significant earthquakes are increasingly occurring within the United States midcontinent, with nine having moment-magnitude (Mw) ?4.0 and five with Mw?5.0 in 2011 alone. In parallel, wastewater injection into deep sedimentary formations has increased as unconventional oil and gas resources are developed. Injected fluids may lower normal stress on existing fault planes, and the correlation between injection wells and earthquake locations led to speculation that many 2011 earthquakes were triggered by injection. The largest earthquake potentially related to injection (Mw5.7) struck in November 2011 in central Oklahoma. Here we use aftershocks to document the fault patterns responsible for the M5.7 earthquake and a prolific sequence of related events, and use the timing and spatial correlation of the earthquakes with injection wells and subsurface structures to show that the earthquakes were likely triggered by fluid injection. The aftershock sequence details rupture along three distinct fault planes, the first of which reaches within 250 meters of active injection wells and within 1 km of the surface. This earthquake sequence began where fluids are injected at low pressure into a depleted oil reservoir bound by faults that effectively seal fluid flow. Injection into sealed compartments allows reservoir pressure to increase gradually over time, suggesting that reservoir volume, in this case, controls the triggering timescale. This process allows multi-year lags between the commencement of fluid injection and triggered earthquakes.

Keranen, K. M.; Savage, H. M.; Abers, G. A.; Cochran, E. S.

2012-12-01

174

National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Wichita Falls Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The uranium favorability of the Wichita Falls Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma, was determined by using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria; by subsurface studies of structure, facies distribution, and gamma-ray anomalies in well logs to a depth of 1500 m; and by surface studies involving extensive field sampling and radiometric surveying. These were supplemented by both aerial radiometric and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance studies. Favorable environments were identified in fluviodeltaic to fan-delta sandstones in the upper Strawn, Canyon, and Cisco Groups (Pennsylvania to Lower Permian), which occur exclusively in the subsurface. Evaluation was based on the presence of a good uranium source, abundant feldspar, good hydrogeologic characteristics, association with carbonaceous shales, presence of coal and oil fields, and anomalies in gamma logs. Additional favorable environments include deltaic to alluvial sandstones in the Wichita-Albany Group (Lower Permian), which crops out widely and occurs in the shallow subsurface. Evaluation was based on high uranium values in stream-sediment samples, a small uranium occurrence located during the field survey, anomalous gamma logs, good uranium source, and hydrogeologic characteristics. Unfavorable environments include Cambrian to Permian limestones and shales. Pennsylvanian to Permian fluviodeltaic systems that have poor uranium sources, and Permian, Cretaceous, and Pleistocene formations that lack features characteristic of known uranium occurrences.

Edwards, M.B.; Andersen, R.L.

1982-08-01

175

75 FR 15450 - Oklahoma; Major Disaster and Related Determinations  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...disaster. The following areas of the State of Oklahoma have been designated as adversely affected by this major disaster: Alfalfa, Caddo, Cleveland, Comanche, Cotton, Delaware, Dewey, Ellis, Grady, Greer, Harmon, Haskell, Hughes,...

2010-03-29

176

AN OKLAHOMA WEATHER MODIFICATION PROGRAM STATUS REPORT AND PROJECT REVIEW  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent history of the Oklahoma Weather Modification Program (OWMP) is presented, the 2001 field program summarized, and the current status of the statewide rainfall stimulation and hail suppression program reported. Some suggestions for program improvement are also enumerated.

Timothy E. Sedlock; Nathan R. Kuhnert; Rebecca L. Resler; Michael E. Mathis; Bruce A. Boe; Brian Vance

177

40 CFR 282.86 - Oklahoma State-Administered Program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Oklahoma Underground Storage Tank Regulation Act...Chapter 25: Underground Storage Tanks, Subchapter 9: Inspections, Testing, and Monitoring Part 1: Inspections Part 5: Penalties...Chapter 27: Petroleum Storage Tank Release...

2010-07-01

178

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY School of Applied Health and Educational Psychology  

E-print Network

Resources to Support Educational Programs EDUC 5993 Instructional Effectiveness in Higher Education Thesis Development EPSY 5963: Developing Resources to Support Educational Programs Sample Electives for nonOKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY School of Applied Health and Educational Psychology M. S. ~ Educational

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

179

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Spoken Language Performance  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Spoken Language Performance Category Description Students are invited to present spoken language performances in Native American languages. Traditional are welcome. Please remember the point of the ONAYLF is to demonstrate Native American language use

Oklahoma, University of

180

Geohydrology and water quality of the Roubidoux Aquifer, northeastern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Roubidoux aquifer is an important source of freshwater for public supplies, commerce, industry, and rural water districts in northeastern Oklahoma. Ground-water withdrawals from the aquifer in 1981 were estimated to be 4.8 million gallons per day, of which about 90 percent was withdrawn in Ottawa County. Wells drilled at the beginning of the 20th century originally flowed at the land surface, but in 1981 water levels ranged from 22 to 471 feet below land surface. A large cone of depression has formed as a result of ground water withdrawals near Miami. Wells completed in the Roubidoux aquifer have yields that range from about 100 to more than 1,000 gallons per minute. An aquifer test and a digital ground-water flow model were used to estimate aquifer and confining-layer hydraulic characteristics. Using these methods, the transmissivity of the aquifer was estimated to be within a range of 400 to 700 square feet per day. The leakance of the confining layer was determined to be within a range from 0 to 0.13 per day, with a best estimate value in a range from 4.3 x 10-8 to 7.7 x 10-8 per day. Analyses of water samples collected as part of this study and of water-quality data from earlier work indicate that a large areal change in major-ion chemistry occurs in ground water in the Roubidoux aquifer in northeastern Oklahoma. The ground water in the easternmost part of the study unit has relatively small dissolved-solids concentrations (less than 200 milligrams per liter) with calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate as the major ions. Ground water in the westernmost part of the study unit has relatively large dissolved-solids concentrations (greater than 800 milligrams per liter) with sodium and chloride as the major ions. A transition zone of intermediate sodium, chloride, and dissolved-solids concentrations exists between the easternmost and westernmost parts of the study unit. Three water-quality problems are apparent in the Roubidoux aquifer in northeast Oklahoma: (1) Contamination by mine water, (2) large concentrations of sodium and chloride, and (3) large radium-226 concentrations. Many wells in the mining area have been affected by mine-water contamination. At present (1990), all instances of ground-water contamination by mine water can be explained by faulty seals or leaky casings in wells that pass through the zone of mine workings and down to the Roubidoux aquifer. None of the data available to date demonstrate that mine water has migrated from the Boone Formation through the pores and fractures of the intervening geologic units to the Roubidoux aquifer. Ground water with large concentrations of sodium and chloride occurs at some depth throughout the study unit. In the eastern part of the study unit, chloride concentrations greater than 250 milligrams per liter are found at depths greater than approximately 1,200 to 1,500 feet. Data are too few to determine the depth to ground water with large concentrations of sodium and chloride in the southern and southwestern parts of the study unit. Large concentrations of gross-alpha radioactivity in ground water occur near the western edge of the transition zone. Generally, ground water with large concentrations of gross-alpha radioactivity was found to exceed the maximum contaminant level for radium-226. (available as photostat copy only)

Christenson, S.C.; Parkhurst, D.L.; Fairchild, R.W.

1990-01-01

181

Soil moisture determination study. [Guymon, Oklahoma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Soil moisture data collected in conjunction with aircraft sensor and SEASAT SAR data taken near Guymon, Oklahoma are summarized. In order to minimize the effects of vegetation and roughness three bare and uniformly smooth fields were sampled 6 times at three day intervals on the flight days from August 2 through 17. Two fields remained unirrigated and dry. A similar pair of fields was irrigated at different times during the sample period. In addition, eighteen other fields were sampled on the nonflight days with no field being sampled more than 24 hours from a flight time. The aircraft sensors used included either black and white or color infrared photography, L and C band passive microwave radiometers, the 13.3, 4.75, 1.6 and .4 GHz scatterometers, the 11 channel modular microwave scanner, and the PRT5.

Blanchard, B. J.

1979-01-01

182

SFC to cease operations at Gore, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

On February 16, Sequoyah Fuels Corporation (SFC) formally notified the Nuclear Regulatory Commission it intends to terminate operations and commence decommissioning at its uranium conversion facility at Gore, Oklahoma. SFC officially requested that its NRC operating license be terminated July 31, 1993. SFC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of General Atomics Corporation (GA), will be responsible for the estimated $21.2-million decommissioning plan. GA has contended that it is not financially liable for the cleanup but stated it would be available to offer financial assistance if needed. Over the proposed 10-year cleanup schedule, GA said SFC can finance the decommissioning by drawing on SFC's estimated $70-million in revenue from a fee-for-contract agreement in its recently formed joint-venture with AlliedSignal Inc., called ConverDyn.

Not Available

1993-03-01

183

MISR Scans the Texas-Oklahoma Border  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

These MISR images of Oklahoma and north Texas were acquired on March 12, 2000 during Terra orbit 1243. The three images on the left, from top to bottom, are from the 70-degree forward viewing camera, the vertical-viewing (nadir) camera, and the 70-degree aftward viewing camera. The higher brightness, bluer tinge, and reduced contrast of the oblique views result primarily from scattering of sunlight in the Earth's atmosphere, though some color and brightness variations are also due to differences in surface reflection at the different angles. The longer slant path through the atmosphere at the oblique angles also accentuates the appearance of thin, high-altitude cirrus clouds.

On the right, two areas from the nadir camera image are shown in more detail, along with notations highlighting major geographic features. The south bank of the Red River marks the boundary between Texas and Oklahoma. Traversing brush-covered and grassy plains, rolling hills, and prairies, the Red River and the Canadian River are important resources for farming, ranching, public drinking water, hydroelectric power, and recreation. Both originate in New Mexico and flow eastward, their waters eventually discharging into the Mississippi River.

A smoke plume to the north of the Ouachita Mountains and east of Lake Eufaula is visible in the detailed nadir imagery. The plume is also very obvious at the 70-degree forward view angle, to the right of center and about one-fourth of the way down from the top of the image.

MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

2000-01-01

184

Last Glacial Maximum Development of Parna Dunes in Panhandle Oklahoma, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Though dunefields are a ubiquitous feature of the North American Great Plains, those studied to date have consisted primarily of sand grains. In Beaver County of the Oklahoma panhandle, however, upland dune forms consist of sand-sized aggregates of silt and clay. These aptly named parna dunes occur in two swarms, range in height from 10-15 m, and have asymmetrical dome morphologies with approximate north-south dune orientations. Despite their morphological similarities to sand dunes of the region, their origin and evolution is unknown. Documenting parna dune formation in the Oklahoma panhandle will help improve our understanding of prehistoric landscape instability and climate change, particularly in the central Great Plains where such records are limited. Panhandle parna dunes are typified by Blue Mound, our best documented parna dune thus far. Coring has documented a basal paleosol buried at a depth equivalent to the surrounding landscape—14C ages from this soil indicate its formation about 25-21 ka. The paleosol is a hydric Mollisol with a pronounced C3 isotopic signature reflecting hydric plant communities, rather than the regionally dominated C4 prairie vegetation. Hydric soils are associated with many of the playas on the surrounding landscape today, which suggests that they may have been more prevalent during the LGM. The overlying 8-10 m of parna is low in organic C and high in calcite, with indications of up to ten major episodes of sediment flux, which are documented with magnetic, isotope, soil-stratigraphic, particle-size, and color data. Near-surface luminescence (OSL) ages from Blue Mound are similar to the 14C ages from the basal paleosol, indicating rapid dune construction, with little or no Holocene accumulation of sediment. Marine isotope stage (MIS) 3 loess records indicate that upland areas of the region were relatively stable with attendant widespread pedogenesis prior to development of the parna dunes. At the onset of the LGM, however, the landscape destabilized, and aeolian processes dominated. Peoria Loess began accumulating throughout parts of Oklahoma and much of Kansas, Nebraska, and beyond, until landscape stabilization was re-attained about 14-13 ka. Our chronological and geomorphic data suggest that parna dune construction in the Oklahoma panhandle was the result of strong, northerly winds, which precipitated aeolian activity at the beginning of MIS 2. Furthermore, these features appear to be more analogous to the regional loess record than the sand dune activation record, and, with more research, may prove to be a reliable record of late-Quaternary landscape change in the central Great Plains.

Johnson, W. C.; Halfen, A. F.; McGowen, S.; Carter, B.; Fine, S.; Bement, L. C.; Simms, A. R.

2012-12-01

185

77 FR 34975 - Seminole Nation of Oklahoma-Alcohol Control and Enforcement Ordinance  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Affairs Seminole Nation of Oklahoma--Alcohol Control and Enforcement Ordinance AGENCY...publishes the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma--Alcohol Control and Enforcement Ordinance. The...the Seminole Nation Code of Laws and the Alcohol Control and Enforcement Ordinance...

2012-06-12

186

Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources  

E-print Network

E-1025 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Burning in the Growing Season Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences Associate, Natural Resource Ecology and Management Dwayne Elmore Assistant Professor and Extension

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

187

Learn To Read and the World Opens Wide. Oklahoma Literacy Media Packet.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This packet, which is intended for literacy program leaders throughout Oklahoma, contains the materials developed by the Literacy Office of the Oklahoma Department of Libraries for its 1995 literacy awareness campaign. The first third of the packet is a project guide that includes the following materials: overview of Oklahoma's first statewide…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Libraries, Oklahoma City.

188

FEDERAL ORDER Domestic Quarantine of Counties in Oklahoma and Tennessee for  

E-print Network

FEDERAL ORDER Domestic Quarantine of Counties in Oklahoma and Tennessee for Imported Fire Ant (IFA discussion with the State Plant Regulatory Official of Oklahoma and Tennessee. Effective immediately determinations have been made by the APHIS Administrator in reference to Oklahoma and Tennessee. The 7 CFR 301

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

189

OKLAHOMA 4-H ANNUAL REPORT 2008 The Four H's for 99 Years.  

E-print Network

Oklahoma 4-H Youth Development Charles Cox Assistant Director, Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service and 4-H Program Leader 205 4-H Youth Development Bldg. Stillwater, OK 74078 http://oklahoma4h University, in compliance with Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Executive Order 11246

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

190

Water-level changes in the Ogallala aquifer, northwestern Oklahoma.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Ogallala aquifer, that part of the High Plains aquifer in Oklahoma, is part of a regional aquifer system that underlies parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. In 1978 the US Geological Survey began a 5- year study of the High Plains regional aquifer system to provide hydrologic information for evaluation of the effects of long-term development of the aquifer and to develop a capability for predicting aquifer response to various ground-water-management alternatives (Weeks, 1978). -from Author

Havens, J.S.

1985-01-01

191

Oklahoma State University proposed Advanced Technology Research Center. Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluating the construction and equipping of the proposed Advanced Technology Research Center (ATRC) at Oklahoma State University (OSU) in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

NONE

1995-06-01

192

Digital-map grids of mean-annual precipitation for 1961-90, and generalized skew coefficients of annual maximum streamflow for Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This digital report contains two digital-map grids of data that were used to develop peak-flow regression equations in Tortorelli, 1997, 'Techniques for estimating peak-streamflow frequency for unregulated streams and streams regulated by small floodwater retarding structures in Oklahoma,' U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 97-4202. One data set is a grid of mean annual precipitation, in inches, based on the period 1961-90, for Oklahoma. The data set was derived from the PRISM (Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model) mean annual precipitation grid for the United States, developed by Daly, Neilson, and Phillips (1994, 'A statistical-topographic model for mapping climatological precipitation over mountainous terrain:' Journal of Applied Meteorology, v. 33, no. 2, p. 140-158). The second data set is a grid of generalized skew coefficients of logarithms of annual maximum streamflow for Oklahoma streams less than or equal to 2,510 square miles in drainage area. This grid of skew coefficients is taken from figure 11 of Tortorelli and Bergman, 1985, 'Techniques for estimating flood peak discharges for unregulated streams and streams regulated by small floodwater retarding structures in Oklahoma,' U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 84-4358. To save disk space, the skew coefficient values have been multiplied by 100 and rounded to integers with two significant digits. The data sets are provided in an ASCII grid format.

Rea, A.H.; Tortorelli, R.L.

1997-01-01

193

Thermal conditions in the Anadarko basin, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Heat flow, bottom-hole temperature (BHT), and thermal conductivity data are used to evaluate the present thermal conditions in the Anadarko basin. Heat flow values decrease from 54-62 mWm{sup {minus}2} in the northern part of the basin to 39-53 mWm{sup {minus}2} in the southern portion of the basin. The variation in the regional conductive heat flow is controlled by basin geometry and by the distribution of radiogenic elements in the basement. The heat flow, thermal conductivity, and lithologic information were combined to construct a 3-D model of the temperature structure of the Anadarko basin. The highest temperatures sedimentary rocks older than Pennsylvanian are offset 35 km north-northwest of the deepest part of the basin. This offset is related to the regional increase in heat flow to the north and to the presence of high thermal conductivity granite wash adjacent to the Wichita Mountains. A plot of the temperature difference between the equilibrium temperatures estimated from the model and the measured BHTs as a function of depth is remarkably similar to the published correction curve for BHTs for wells in Oklahoma. Vitrinite reflectance and apatite fission-track (FT) data are used to estimate the paleogeothermal conditions in the basin. Published vitrinite reflectance values are consistent with a past geographic temperature distribution comparable to the observed distribution with the maximum values offset from the basin axis. FT analysis of sandstones from wells in the southeastern portion of the basin indicates that subsurface temperatures were at least 30C higher than at present, suggest the possibility of substantial erosion in this area.

Kelley, S.A.; Gallardo, J.D.; Carter, L.C.; Blackwell, D.D. (Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States))

1991-03-01

194

Oklahoma blast forces unsettling design questions  

SciTech Connect

The bomb that brought down a government building in Oklahoma City killed hundreds of people after it was detonated near the building`s key supports. The blast has reopened a long-simmering debate on safety by design. Structurally, it`s not practical to designing bomb-proof buildings. But it is possible to engineer a structure to deform rather than go through immediate progressive collapse. Delaying collapse gives occupants extra time to evacuate. And that could mean the difference between life and death. The construction material of choice really {open_quotes}depends on the height of the building and the lateral load resisting system,{close_quotes} says Charles H. Thornton of Thornton-Tomasetti/Engineers, New York City. But whether in steel or reinforced concrete, moment-resisting frames, which are inherently redundant, give horizontal components the ability to take reversals of stress common in explosions, he says. Simple frames do not. {open_quotes}They go down like a house of cards,{close_quotes} says Thornton. In reinforced concrete moment frames, beam reinforcing steel is continuous. In simple reinforced concrete frames, beam rebar only penetrates the column for a determined number of inches based on the length of the span. And it is absent from the mid-span of the beam. In a blast from below, the beam, its top usually in compression and bottom in tension, deflects up, throwing the beam top into tension. With no rebar, it loses structural integrity, and falls apart. With rebar, it has a chance of surviving. If a building is not designed for blasts, a steel frame might be better under a reasonably small bomb because steel has equal capacity in tension and compression, and concrete has capacity only in compression, says Thornton.

NONE

1995-05-01

195

Characteristics of successful aviation leaders of Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scope and method of study. The purpose of the study was to examine the personal traits, skills, practices, behaviors, background, academic, and career success patterns of selected aviation leaders in Oklahoma. A purposive sample of 18 leaders who had achieved a top-ranked position of aviation leadership in an organization or a position of influence in the community was selected for interview. The leaders chosen for interview came from a variety of aviation organizations including government, academia, military, corporate aviation, and air carrier leadership as well as community leadership (specifically those aviation personnel who were engaged in a political or civic leadership role). Findings and conclusions. This study identified no common career choices, educational, family, or other background factors exclusively responsible for leadership success of all of the participants. Some of the more significant findings were that a high percentage of the leaders held undergraduate and advanced degrees; however, success had been achieved by some who had little or no college education. Aviation technical experience was not a prerequisite for aviation leadership success in that a significant number of the participants held no airman rating and some had entered positions of aviation leadership from non-aviation related careers. All had received some positive learning experience from their family background even those backgrounds which were less than desirable. All of the participants had been involved in volunteer civic or humanitarian leadership roles, and all had received numerous honors. The most frequently identified value expressed by the leaders was honesty; the predominant management style was participative with a strong backup style for directing, the most important skills were communication and listening skills, and the most frequently mentioned characteristics of success were honesty, credibility, vision, high standards, love for aviation and fiscal responsibility. The most frequently identified curriculum need across all aviation disciplines was that of communication skills.

Kutz, Mary N. Hill

196

The University of Oklahoma Independent Contractor Form (ICF)  

E-print Network

be reviewed and approved by Human Resources BEFORE services are provided. Important Notice: The University of Oklahoma reserves the right to reclassify the contractor's status to that of an employee in accordance on the methods used to provide your service as long as it produces the desired results? 2. Training - Will you

Oklahoma, University of

197

STUDENT ALCOHOL POLICY -1 The University of Oklahoma  

E-print Network

STUDENT ALCOHOL POLICY - 1 The University of Oklahoma STUDENT ALCOHOL POLICY Revised and Responsibilities Code, and the Student Alcohol Policy. (1) All fraternities, sororities, and residence halls shall be dry. Alcoholic beverages will not be allowed inside fraternity houses, sorority houses and OU

Oklahoma, University of

198

Oklahoma Native Plant Record Volume 11, December 2011  

E-print Network

OF REMOVAL OF JUNIPERUS VIRGINIANA L. TREES AND LITTER FROM A CENTRAL OKLAHOMA GRASSLAND Jerad S. Linneman1 1, ordination ABSTRACT We studied species composition after Juniperus virginiana tree and litter removal dynamics (Facelli and Pickett 1991b). Within the tallgrass prairie region, eastern redcedar (Juniperus

Palmer, Michael W.

199

The University of Oklahoma Office of Human Resources  

E-print Network

) Divorce or legal separation from the employee; or 4) The employee becomes entitled to Medicare. Dependent's hours of employment with the university; 3) The employee's divorce or legal separation; 4) The employee the responsibility to inform The University of Oklahoma Office of Human Resources in writing of a divorce, legal

Oklahoma, University of

200

Field Evaluation of a Near Zero Energy Home in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The authors evaluated a zero energy home built by Ideal Homes in Edmond, Oklahoma, that included an extensive package of energy-efficient technologies and a photovoltaic array for site electricity generation. The home was part of a Building America research project in partnership with the Building Science Consortium to exhibit high efficiency technologies while keeping costs within the reach of average home buyers.

Hendron, R.; Hancock, E.; Barker, G.; Reeves, P.

2008-08-01

201

Annual report of the University of Oklahoma Employee Benefits Committee  

E-print Network

employees. Wellness initiative: The EBC has been one of a number of voices on campus encouraging more University initiatives for employee wellness. In its RFP for the health insurance contract, the UniversityAnnual report of the University of Oklahoma Employee Benefits Committee Academic Year 2008-09 Once

Oklahoma, University of

202

Estimating bioenergy feedstock potential of red cedar in western Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Red cedar (Juniperus virginiana L.) is an invasive species that seriously degrades tallgrass prairie and adjacent landscapes in the southern plains region of the US with an estimated 8 million acres impacted in the state of Oklahoma alone. This study is part of a larger project to improve grassland...

203

Degrees Conferred in Oklahoma Higher Education. 1974-1975.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These tables summarize degrees conferred in both state and private Oklahoma colleges and universities. They cover a period from 1973-75 and compare this period with previous semesters. Included are associate degrees, certificates, bachelors, first professional, and graduate degrees. Tables list students' sex, division of study, and field of study.…

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

204

Annual Report, 1979-80: Oklahoma Cultural Understanding Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This final report describes a project in Oklahoma which tried to increase students' and the general public's awareness, understanding, and appreciation of the cultures of the world. In the project's first phase, 38 school districts and higher education institutions located throughout the state were surveyed to determine the need in the areas of…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

205

STATUS OF RARE AND ENDANGERED FRESHWATER MUSSELS IN SOUTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

States is freshwater mussels (Family Unionidae; Strayer et al., 2004). The United States Fish ectoparasites on a fish host (McMahon and Bogan, 2001). These life-history characteristics have made them parSTATUS OF RARE AND ENDANGERED FRESHWATER MUSSELS IN SOUTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA HEATHER S. GALBRAITH

Vaughn, Caryn

206

The northwest extension of the Meers Fault in southwestern Oklahoma  

E-print Network

). General Geologic History and Stratigraphy There are three stages in the geologic history of Southern Oklahoma (Ham et al. , 1964). During the first stage, an aulocogen is thought to have formed in the region as is evidenced by intrusion of diabase...

Cetin, Hasan

1991-01-01

207

Computational Logic in the Undergraduate Curriculum University of Oklahoma  

E-print Network

searches the typical undergraduate curriculum in computer science for opportunities to include materialComputational Logic in the Undergraduate Curriculum Rex Page University of Oklahoma School of Computer Science Norman, OK 73019 USA +1 450 325 4042 page@ou.edu ABSTRACT Logic provides the mathematical

Page, Rex L.

208

Students' Perceptions of Bullying in Oklahoma Public Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We studied perceptions of Oklahoma public school students (n = 7,848) regarding bullying. Specifically, we asked for their thoughts about the seriousness of bullying, the hurtfulness of bullying, their involvement in bullying (as victim or perpetrator), their responses to being bullied or seeing someone else being bullied, and what they wanted…

Hughes, Patricia Paulsen; Middleton, Katherine M.; Marshall, David D.

2009-01-01

209

Hydrogen manufacture by Lurgi gasification of Oklahoma coal  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Advantages and disadvantages of using the Lurgi gasification process to produce hydrogen from Oklahoma coal are listed. Special attention was given to the production of heat for the process; heat is generated by burning part of pretreated coal in the steam generator. Overall performance of the Lurgi process is summarized in tabular form.

1975-01-01

210

Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences  

E-print Network

E-1010 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural and Director Water Research and Extension Center J.D. Carlson Associate Researcher Biosystems and Agriculture Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist Natural Resource Ecology and Management Terrence G. Bidwell

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

211

How a School Coped with the Oklahoma City Bombing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Following the Oklahoma City bombing, fifth graders at a nearby elementary school coped with ensuing uncertainty, pain, and loss. They wrote appreciative letters to fire and rescue workers; shared personal stories with classmates; compiled an anthology of poems, prayers, and stories; attended an assembly to honor parents participating in rescue…

Aspy, David N.; Aspy, Cheryl B.

1996-01-01

212

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Native American Language Book  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Native American Language Book Category Description Students are invited to enter books in a Native American language. Please remember the point of the ONAYLF is to demonstrate Native American language use. Keep this in mind when creating your book or instructing students

Oklahoma, University of

213

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Category Description  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Film/Video Category Description Students are invited to send in original film or video creations that are in a Native American language or about Native American language. These must be primarily made by students. This category encourages the use of Native

Oklahoma, University of

214

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Language Advocacy Essay  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Language Advocacy Essay Category Description Students are invited to prepare an essay on the importance of Native American languages. Many entries contain introductions, sentences or words in the author's Native American language, but this essay should be primarily

Oklahoma, University of

215

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Masters Spoken Language Performance  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Masters Spoken Language Performance Category Description Students who have grown up speaking a Native American language in a Native American home. Students should use this opportunity to display their creativity and skill in using Native American

Oklahoma, University of

216

CONSENSUAL SEXUAL RELATIONS COMPLAINT FORM UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA  

E-print Network

CONSENSUAL SEXUAL RELATIONS COMPLAINT FORM UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA You do not have to use this form to receive assistance If you believe you have been sexually assaulted or harassed by any member it to the attention of the Sexual Misconduct Officer (SMO), and /or other University official. This form is to be used

Oklahoma, University of

217

Personal Touches Warm up Oklahoma City U.'s Campus  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oklahoma City University prides itself on treating its faculty and staff members like family. It is the kind of place where new employees are welcomed in the president's house, staff members kick in to raise money when a colleague faces hard times, and promising young workers are offered flexible work schedules and free tuition to help them…

Mangan, Katherine

2009-01-01

218

Investigaciones en la producción orgánica de vegetales en Oklahoma, USA  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Nationally recognized standards for certified organic farming were established in 2002 in the United States. This action stimulated increased scientific research on production methods that can be used in certified organic growing. In 2003, a multi-disciplinary scientific team in Oklahoma that cons...

219

77 FR 61466 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00063  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4078-DR), dated 08/22/ 2012. Incident: Freedom and Noble Wildfires. Incident Period: 08/03/2012 through 08/14/2012. Effective Date: 09/27/2012. Physical Loan Application...

2012-10-09

220

77 FR 63409 - Oklahoma Disaster Number OK-00063  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...declaration of a major disaster for the State of Oklahoma (FEMA-4078-DR), dated 08/22/ 2012. Incident: Freedom and Noble Wildfires. Incident Period: 08/03/2012 through 08/14/2012. DATES: Effective Date: 10/05/2012. Physical Loan...

2012-10-16

221

Climate variability in Oklahoma - get ready for more  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Our climate is changing relatively rapidly now, with the most critical changes for agriculture in Oklahoma manifesting as increases in the number of intense rainfall events and prolonged droughts, wild swings in the winter and early spring between "too cold" and "too hot", and higher-than-previous o...

222

Improving Print Management at at the University of Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes how business students at the University of Oklahoma improved the school's print management by initiating an alternative charging system, networking the printers, and choosing the right hardware and software. Reasons why the UnipriNT Print Management system was chosen to manage the computer lab's printing services are discussed. (GR)

Colaw, Lee M.

1999-01-01

223

Private Water Well Education for Adult Residents of Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The scope of this study involved an investigation into the education of the adult residents of Oklahoma regarding private water wells. The groundwater supply for the private resident is directly connected to a shared water source. This source of water can become contaminated by simple lack of education and proper maintenance of the well. Without…

Robbins, Sharon M.

2012-01-01

224

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY School of Applied Health and Educational Psychology  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY School of Applied Health and Educational Psychology Ph.D. Program in Educational Psychology Program Description for Educational Psychology Option School Mission The mission of the School of Applied Health and Educational Psychology is to foster the development, integration

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

225

Oklahoma State University GENDER DISCRIMINATION/SEXUAL HARASSMENT IS PROHIBITED  

E-print Network

Oklahoma State University GENDER DISCRIMINATION/SEXUAL HARASSMENT IS PROHIBITED THE LAW Gender discrimination/sexual harassment is prohibited by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as amended, Title IX that gender discrimination and sexual harassment of students, staff, and faculty is prohibited. OSU subscribes

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

226

Emergency Department Impact of the Oklahoma City Terrorist Bombing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study objective: To collect descriptive epidemiologic injury data on patients who suffered acute injuries after the April 19, 1995, Oklahoma City bombing and to describe the effect on metropolitan emergency departments. Methods: A retrospective review of the medical records of victims seen for injury or illness related to the bombing at 1 of the 13 study hospitals from 9:02 AM

David E Hogan; Joseph F Waeckerle; Daniel J Dire; Scott R Lillibridge

1999-01-01

227

University of Oklahoma: Chemical, Biological, and Materials Engineering  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Oklahoma offers information on research in the areas of bioengineering, polymers science and engineering, environmental engineering, and energy studies. Examples include the Engineering Virtual Library and the Chemical Engineering Virtual Library, related government research labs, discipline-specific groupings of Chemical Engineering online resources, and selected corporate Web pages.

228

Ecoregions and stream morphology in eastern Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Broad-scale variables (i.e., geology, topography, climate, land use, vegetation, and soils) influence channel morphology. How and to what extent the longitudinal pattern of channel morphology is influenced by broad-scale variables is important to fluvial geomorphologists and stream ecologists. In the last couple of decades, there has been an increase in the amount of interdisciplinary research between fluvial geomorphologists and stream ecologists. In a historical context, fluvial geomorphologists are more apt to use physiographic regions to distinguish broad-scale variables, while stream ecologists are more apt to use the concept of an ecosystem to address the broad-scale variables that influence stream habitat. For this reason, we designed a study using ecoregions, which uses physical and biological variables to understand how landscapes influence channel processes. Ecoregions are delineated by similarities in geology, climate, soils, land use, and potential natural vegetation. In the fluvial system, stream form and function are dictated by processes observed throughout the fluvial hierarchy. Recognizing that stream form and function should differ by ecoregion, a study was designed to evaluate how the characteristics of stream channels differed longitudinally among three ecoregions in eastern Oklahoma, USA: Boston Mountains, Ozark Highlands, and Ouachita Mountains. Channel morphology of 149 stream reaches was surveyed in 1st- through 4th-order streams, and effects of drainage area and ecoregion on channel morphology was evaluated using multiple regressions. Differences existed (? ? 0.05) among ecoregions for particle size, bankfull width, and width/depth ratio. No differences existed among ecoregions for gradient or sinuosity. Particle size was smallest in the Ozark Highlands and largest in the Ouachita Mountains. Bankfull width was larger in the Ozark Highlands than in the Boston Mountains and Ouachita Mountains in larger streams. Width/depth ratios of the Boston Mountains and Ozark Highlands were not statistically different. Significant differences existed, however, between the Boston Mountains and Ozark Highlands when compared individually to the Ouachita Mountains. We found that ecoregions afforded a good spatial structure that can help in understanding longitudinal trends in stream reach morphology surveyed at the reach scale. The hierarchy of the fluvial system begins within a broad, relatively homogenous setting that imparts control on processes that affect stream function. Ecoregions provide an adequate regional division to begin a large-scale geomorphic study of processes in stream channels.

Splinter, Dale K.; Dauwalter, Daniel C.; Marston, Richard A.; Fisher, William L.

2010-10-01

229

University of Oklahoma - High Energy Physics  

SciTech Connect

The High Energy Physics program at the University of Oklahoma, Pat Skubic, Principal Investigator, is attempting to understand nature at the deepest level using the most advanced experimental and theoretical tools. The four experimental faculty, Brad Abbott, Phil Gutierrez, Pat Skubic, and Mike Strauss, together with post-doctoral associates and graduate students, are finishing their work as part of the D0 collaboration at Fermilab, and increasingly focusing their investigations at the Large Hadron Collidor (LHC) as part of the ATLAS Collaboration. Work at the LHC has become even more exciting with the recent discovery by ATLAS and the other collaboration, CMS, of the long-sought Higgs boson, which plays a key role in generating masses for the elementary constituents of matter. Work of the OUHEP group has been in the three areas of hardware, software, and analysis. Now that the Higgs boson has been discovered, completing the Standard Model of fundamental physics, new efforts will focus on finding hints of physics beyond the standard model, such as supersymmetry. The OUHEP theory group (Kim Milton, PI) also consists of four faculty members, Howie Baer, Chung Kao, Kim Milton, and Yun Wang, and associated students and postdocs. They are involved in understanding fundamental issues in formulating theories of the microworld, and in proposing models that carry us past the Standard Model, which is an incomplete description of nature. They therefore work in close concert with their experimental colleagues. One also can study fundamental physics by looking at the large scale structure of the universe; in particular the ``dark energy'' that seems to be causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate, effectively makes up about 3/4 of the energy in the universe, and yet is totally unidentified. Dark energy and dark matter, which together account for nearly all of the energy in the universe, are an important probe of fundamental physics at the very shortest distances, or at the very highest energies. The outcomes of the group's combined experimental and theoretical research will be an improved understanding of nature, at the highest energies reachable, from which applications to technological innovation will surely result, as they always have from such studies in the past.

Skubic, Patrick L. [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma

2013-07-31

230

Ecoregions and stream morphology in eastern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Broad-scale variables (i.e., geology, topography, climate, land use, vegetation, and soils) influence channel morphology. How and to what extent the longitudinal pattern of channel morphology is influenced by broad-scale variables is important to fluvial geomorphologists and stream ecologists. In the last couple of decades, there has been an increase in the amount of interdisciplinary research between fluvial geomorphologists and stream ecologists. In a historical context, fluvial geomorphologists are more apt to use physiographic regions to distinguish broad-scale variables, while stream ecologists are more apt to use the concept of an ecosystem to address the broad-scale variables that influence stream habitat. For this reason, we designed a study using ecoregions, which uses physical and biological variables to understand how landscapes influence channel processes. Ecoregions are delineated by similarities in geology, climate, soils, land use, and potential natural vegetation. In the fluvial system, stream form and function are dictated by processes observed throughout the fluvial hierarchy. Recognizing that stream form and function should differ by ecoregion, a study was designed to evaluate how the characteristics of stream channels differed longitudinally among three ecoregions in eastern Oklahoma, USA: Boston Mountains, Ozark Highlands, and Ouachita Mountains. Channel morphology of 149 stream reaches was surveyed in 1st- through 4th-order streams, and effects of drainage area and ecoregion on channel morphology was evaluated using multiple regressions. Differences existed (?????0.05) among ecoregions for particle size, bankfull width, and width/depth ratio. No differences existed among ecoregions for gradient or sinuosity. Particle size was smallest in the Ozark Highlands and largest in the Ouachita Mountains. Bankfull width was larger in the Ozark Highlands than in the Boston Mountains and Ouachita Mountains in larger streams. Width/depth ratios of the Boston Mountains and Ozark Highlands were not statistically different. Significant differences existed, however, between the Boston Mountains and Ozark Highlands when compared individually to the Ouachita Mountains. We found that ecoregions afforded a good spatial structure that can help in understanding longitudinal trends in stream reach morphology surveyed at the reach scale. The hierarchy of the fluvial system begins within a broad, relatively homogenous setting that imparts control on processes that affect stream function. Ecoregions provide an adequate regional division to begin a large-scale geomorphic study of processes in stream channels. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

Splinter, D.K.; Dauwalter, D.C.; Marston, R.A.; Fisher, W.L.

2010-01-01

231

Geologic and hydraulic characteristics of selected shaly geologic units in Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Information was collected on the geologic and hydraulic characteristics of three shale-dominated units in Oklahoma-the Dog Creek Shale and Chickasha Formation in Canadian County, Hennessey Group in Oklahoma County, and the Boggy Formation in Pittsburg County. The purpose of this project was to gain insight into the characteristics controlling fluid flow in shaly units that could be targeted for confinement of hazardous waste in the State and to evaluate methods of measuring hydraulic characteristics of shales. Permeameter results may not indicate in-place small-scale hydraulic characteristics, due to pretest disturbance and deterioration of core samples. The Dog Creek Shale and Chickasha Formation hydraulic conductivities measured by permeameter methods ranged from 2.8 times 10 to the negative 11 to 3.0 times 10 to the negative 7 meter per second in nine samples and specific storage from 3.3 times 10 to the negative 4 to 1.6 times 10 to the negative 3 per meter in four samples. Hennessey Group hydraulic conductivities ranged from 4.0 times 10 to the negative 12 to 4.0 times 10 to the negative 10 meter per second in eight samples. Hydraulic conductivity in the Boggy Formation ranged from 1.7 times 10 to the negative 12 to 1.0 times 10 to the negative 8 meter per second in 17 samples. The hydraulic properties of isolated borehole intervals of average length of 4.5 meters in the Hennessey Group and the Boggy Formation were evaluated by a pressurized slug-test method. Hydraulic conductivities obtained with this method tend to be low because intervals with features that transmitted large volumes of water were not tested. Hennessey Group hydraulic conductivities measured by this method ranged from 3.0 times 10 to the negative 13 to 1.1 times 10 to the negative 9 meter per second; the specific storage values are small and may be unreliable. Boggy Formation hydraulic conductivities ranged from 2.0 times 10 to the negative 13 to 2.7 times 10 to the negative 10 meter per second and specific storage values in these tests also are small and may be unreliable. A substantially higher hydraulic conductivity of 3.0 times 10 to the negative 8 meter per second was measured in one borehole 30 meters deep in the Boggy Formation using an open hole slug-test method.

Becker, C.J.; Overton, M.D.; Johnson, K.S.; Luza, K.V.

1997-01-01

232

Certified organic farming research and demonstration project by Oklahoma State University and USDA's Agricultural Research Service at Lane, Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In 2003, Oklahoma State University and USDA, Agricultural Research Service, South Central Agricultural Research Laboratory received organic certification for 8 acres at the Lane Agricultural Center, Lane, OK. The certified organic land was used to develop a cooperative project with a diversity of a...

233

Identification and Evaluation of Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic (Class 1 Oil) Reservoirs in Oklahoma: Yearly technical progress report for January 1-December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geo Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaged in a five-year program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes a systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all FDD oil reservoirs in Oklahoma and the recovery technologies that have been (or could be) applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. During 1996, three highly successful FDD workshops involving 6 producing formations (4 plays) were completed: (1) Layton and Osage-Layton April 17 (2) Prue and Skinner June 19 and 26 (3) Cleveland October 17 (4) Peru October 17 (combined with Cleveland play). Each play was presented individually using the adopted protocol of stratigraphic interpretations, a regional overview, and two or more detailed field studies. The project goal was to have one field study from each play selected for waterflood simulation in order to demonstrate enhanced recovery technologies that can be used to recovery secondary oil. In this effort, software utilized for reservoir simulation included Eclipse and Boast 111. In some cases, because of poor production records and inadequate geologic data, field studies completed in some plays were not suitable for modeling. All of the workshops included regional sandstone trend analysis, updated field boundary identification, a detailed bibliography and author reference map, and detailed field studies. Discussion of general FDD depositional concepts was also given. In addition to the main workshop agenda, the workshops provided computer mapping demonstrations and rock cores with lithologic and facies interpretations. In addition to the workshops, other elements of FDD program were improved during 1996. Most significant was the refinement of NRIS MAPS - a user-friendly computer program designed to access NRIS data and interface with mapping software such as Arc View in order to produce various types of information maps. Most commonly used are well base maps for field studies, lease production maps, and regional maps showing well production codes, formation show codes, well spud dates, and well status codes. These regional maps are valuable in identifying areas of by-passed oil production, field trends, and time periods of development for the various FDD plays in Oklahoma. Besides maps, NRIS MAPS provides data in table format which can be used to generate production decline curves and estimates of cumulative hydrocarbon production for leases and fields. Additionally, many computer-related services were provided by support staff concerning technical training, private consultation, computer mapping, and data acquisition.

Banken, M.K.; Andrews, R.

1997-11-17

234

Employment Advertising Request -University of Oklahoma (Norman Campus) To place a University of Oklahoma employment advertisement with an external publication, complete and return  

E-print Network

Employment Advertising Request - University of Oklahoma (Norman Campus) To place a University of Oklahoma employment advertisement with an external publication, complete and return this form to the Office, call Employment & Compensation Services at (405) 325-1826. Deadline for receipt of advertising requests

Oklahoma, University of

235

Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 2011, Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental  

E-print Network

Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 2011, Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental program for graduate assistants. The Delta Dental PPO­Point of Service program affords you access to two Delta Dental networks--Delta Dental

Oklahoma, University of

236

Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 2012, Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental program for  

E-print Network

Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 2012, Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental program for graduate assistants. The Delta Dental PPO­Point of Service program affords you access to two Delta Dental networks--Delta Dental

Oklahoma, University of

237

Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 201 , Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental program for  

E-print Network

Dear University of Oklahoma Graduate Assistant: Effective September 1, 201 , Delta Dental of Oklahoma (DDOK) will provide a fully-insured, voluntary dental program for graduate assistants. The Delta Dental PPO­Point of Service program affords you access to two Delta Dental networks--Delta Dental

Oklahoma, University of

238

Technology 2000: Recommendations on the Utilization of Information Technology in the Oklahoma Higher Education System. A Report to the Oklahoma State Regents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the fall of 1996, as the expansion of Oklahoma's statewide communications and information network (OneNet) became fully implemented, the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education began a strategic planning initiative focused on the utilization of technology throughout the state's system of higher education. The planning process began with a…

Mingle, James R.

239

Estimated flood peak discharges on Twin, Brock, and Lightning creeks, Southwest Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, May 8, 1993  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The flash flood in southwestern Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, May 8, 1993, was the result of an intense 3-hour rainfall on saturated ground or impervious surfaces. The total precipitation of 5.28 inches was close to the 3-hour, 100-year frequency and produced extensive flooding. The most serious flooding was on Twin, Brock, and Lightning Creeks. Four people died in this flood. Over 1,900 structures were damaged along the 3 creeks. There were about $3 million in damages to Oklahoma City public facilities, the majority of which were in the three basins. A study was conducted to determine the magnitude of the May 8, 1993, flood peak discharge in these three creeks in southwestern Oklahoma City and compare these peaks with published flood estimates. Flood peak-discharge estimates for these creeks were determined at 11 study sites using a step-backwater analysis to match the flood water-surface profiles defined by high-water marks. The unit discharges during peak runoff ranged from 881 cubic feet per second per square mile for Lightning Creek at SW 44th Street to 3,570 cubic feet per second per square mile for Brock Creek at SW 59th Street. The ratios of the 1993 flood peak discharges to the Federal Emergency Management Agency 100-year flood peak discharges ranged from 1.25 to 3.29. The water-surface elevations ranged from 0.2 foot to 5.9 feet above the Federal Emergency Management Agency 500-year flood water-surface elevations. The very large flood peaks in these 3 small urban basins were the result of very intense rainfall in a short period of time, close to 100 percent runoff due to ground surfaces being essentially impervious, and the city streets acting as efficient conveyances to the main channels. The unit discharges compare in magnitude to other extraordinary Oklahoma urban floods.

Tortorelli, R.L.

1996-01-01

240

Petrologic evolution of plagioclase-rich cumulates from the Wichita Mountains, Oklahoma: Effects upon magnetic remanence properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Glen Mountains layered complex (GMLC) of the Wichita Mountains of Oklahoma is a coarse-grained analog to Layer 3 gabbros of the sea floor. The slowly cooled, mafic, layered complex developed in the site of an aulacogen, which is interpreted as a failed, intracontinental rift. The remanent magnetism of rocks of the layered complex is extremely stable due to the presence of magnetic inclusions in the major phases, primarily plagioclase. The early formation of plagioclase facilitated the formation of these magnetically important inclusions. Petrologic processes that promote the formation of magnetically stable mineralogic inclusions in coarsegrained gabbros should be operative in oceanic slow-spreading ridges. Therefore, the contribution of magnetization of Layer 3 gabbros should be greater in slower spreading ridges than in faster spreading ridges because of their differences in petrologic evolution.

Scofield, N.; Roggenthen, W. M.

1986-11-01

241

40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Oklahoma: Alfalfa County, Beaver County, Blaine County, Cimarron County, Custer County, Dewey County, Ellis County, Harper County, Major County, Roger Mills County, Texas County, Woods County, Woodward...

2010-07-01

242

Aerobiology of Juniperus Pollen in Oklahoma, Texas, and New Mexico  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Pollen from members of the Cupressaceae are major aeroallergens in many parts of the world. In the south central and southwest United States, Juniperus pollen is the most important member of this family with J. ashei (JA) responsible for severe winter allergy symptoms in Texas and Oklahoma. In New Mexico, pollen from J. monosperma (JM) and other Juniperus species are important contributors to spring allergies, while J. pinchotii (JP) pollinates in the fall affecting sensitive individuals in west Texas, southwest Oklahoma and eastern New Mexico. Throughout this region, JA, JM, and JP occur in dense woodland populations. Generally monitoring for airborne allergens is conducted in urban areas, although the source for tree pollen may be forested areas distant from the sampling sites. Improved pollen forecasts require a better understanding of pollen production at the source. The current study was undertaken to examine the aerobiology of several Juniperus species at their source areas for the development of new pollen forecasting initiatives.

Levetin, Estelle; Bunderson, Landon; VandeWater, Pete; Luvall, Jeff

2014-01-01

243

NESTING ECOLOGY OF THE LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE IN SOUTHWESTERN OKLAHOMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

AssraAcr.-Loggerhead Shrike (Lank ludovicianus) nests were studied in southwestern Oklahoma from 1985 through 1988. Pairing began in late February to early March, and completed nests were found from 13 March to 20 June. Nesting peaked in mid-April, with second nestings from late May to late June. Average length of the nesting season was 11 weeks. Almost one-third of all nests

JACK D. TYLER

244

The Native American Studies Program at the University of Oklahoma  

E-print Network

The Native American Studies Program at The University of Oklahoma Clara Sue Kidwell The Native American Studies (NAS) program at the University of Okla homa was approved by the State Regents for Higher Education in January of 1994..., and Music departments together with a group of courses offered under the NAS program rubric. The NAS courses include Tribal Sovereignty, Tribal Educational Policy, and Tribal Economic Development. The program has three full-time staff members: Dr. Clara...

Kidwell, Clara Sue

2001-03-01

245

Source of shallow Simpson Group Oil in Murray County, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oils produced from the Simpson Group (Middle Ordovician) in three shallow fields located north of the Arbuckle Mountains in Murray County, Oklahoma, have widely differing compositions: SW Sandy Creek, 28.9° API, 0.57% sulfur; Davis NE, 25.9° API, 0.72% sulfur; Sulfur NW, 16.4° API, 1.44% sulfur. From gas chromatography and biomarker analysis, they determined that the oils were derived from the

I. Zemmels; D. M. Tappmeyer; C. C. Walters

1987-01-01

246

Crinoids of the Francis Shale (Missourian) of Oklahoma  

E-print Network

collection but subsequently pur- chased and reposited at the University of Okla- homa. We are deeply obligated to Dr. CARL C. BRANSON, former Director of the Oklahoma Geo- logical Survey, for allowing us to study the material. Additional species reported here... large, not extending ap- preciably above summit of cup, faceted for two equidimensional tube plates; primibrach I low, primibrach 2 axillary, short; column large, pen- talobate, bearing long cirri in proximal region, lumen pentagonal in outline. SPECI ES...

Strimple, H. L.; Moore, R. C.

1971-11-30

247

Variable seismic response to fluid injection in central Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seismicity in Oklahoma since 2009 has been concentrated in the central portion of the state, in the areas of Jones, Prague, and Luther. These three regions account for ~75% of earthquakes in the 2009-2013 Oklahoma Geological Survey catalog. A swarm in the Jones region began in late 2008, with a maximum magnitude of 4.0, and activity continuing to the present. After relocation, the initially diffuse earthquakes in the Jones swarm delineate multiple subparallel faults. The Wilzetta fault zone ruptured in the Prague region in 2010 and again in 2011, with magnitudes up to Mw5.7, and the Luther region experienced two earthquakes of M4.4 and M4.2, with related aftershocks, in 2013. The earthquakes near Prague have previously been linked to wastewater disposal; here we show that the earthquakes near Jones and Luther may also be induced by deep disposal based on the upsurge in seismicity in central Oklahoma coupled with local relationships to pumping and reservoir structure. The timing of each sequence with respect to injection and the distribution of seismic activity differs, highlighting the variability in seismic response to fluid injection related to local permeability structure.

Keranen, K. M.; Hogan, C.; Savage, H. M.; Abers, G. A.; van der Elst, N.

2013-12-01

248

Ames Hole Oklahoma: Impact-formed petroleum reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Ames Hole is a 16 km wide circular subsurface structure centered at 361{degrees}5{prime}north, 098{degrees}12{prime}west in Major County, northern Oklahoma. An impact origin is confirmed by the presence of shock metamorphosed mineral grains and impact melt rocks recovered from drill cores and by a negative Bouger gravity anomaly over its center. Buried about three km deep, the structure is composed of shattered, central zone of uplifted Precambrian granite and Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle dolomite surrounded by two concentric rims of fractured and brecciated Arbuckle dolomite. The crater is filled with, and covered by, marine sediments of the middle Ordovician Oil Creek shale. The crater was formed during Ordovician time in a shallow sea on the northern shelf of the Anadarko Basin. Restricted water circulation and anoxic conditions within the deep crater promoted precipitation of plankton-rich sediments. This Oil Creek shale became both the source and the sealing rocks for hydrocarbons which migrated into underlying porous target rocks fractured during the impact event. About one hundred wells within the area underlain by the Ames Hole astroblem presently produce nearly half of Oklahoma`s oil and gas.

Mchone, J.F. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

1996-12-31

249

Dakota sandstone facies, western Oklahoma panhandle  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Cretaceous Dakota Sandstone in Cimarron County comprised three sandstone units and intervening mudrocks; it overlies the Kiowa Shale Member of the Purgatoire Formation. Deposits include shoreface, beach (foreshore) and dune, estuarine and tidal channel, marine marginal bay and swamp\\/marsh in a generally progradational sequences associated with marine regression in the Western Interior. The shoreface sand, characterized by ripple lamination,

E. Atalik; C. F. Mansfield

1984-01-01

250

Paleokarstic phenomena of the Lower Ordovician red bed sequences of the Arbuckle group, southern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Oil and gas production has been reported recently from paleokarstic Arbuckle reservoirs in the Ardmore and Arkoma basin. The West Spring Creek and the Kindblade formations apparently exhibit karstic features. The most extensive surface exposure of these formations is on the southern flank of the Arbuckle anticline along Interstate 35 north of Ardmore, Oklahoma. The lithology is predominantly limestone, ranging from argillaceous mudstone to oolitic and/or bioclastic grainstones. However, minor amounts of sandstone were also observed.These lithologies are characteristic of various peritidal facies. Of particular interest in this outcrop are three distinct red bed zones. Although the zones are part of the repetitive shallowing-upward cycles that characterize the West Spring Creek Formation, ample evidence suggests the red beds represent subaerial exposure surfaces where karstification took place. Many of the thin bedded, rubbly mudstones and wackestones actually represent varieties of breccia commonly associated with karst. Collapse and crackle breccia are most commonly observed. Small solution channels and other vugs are usually completely occluded by calcite cement. However, solution cavities or vugs with diameters larger than 10 cm (3.9 in.) are lined with drusy calcite. Hematite-impregnated sediment occurs as thinly laminated infilling of solution vugs and cavities and also acts as a cementing agent of collapse breccias. Preliminary evidence suggests that karstification processes were active during Arbuckle deposition.

Musselman, J.L. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater (United States))

1991-06-01

251

Comparison of ground-water quality in samples from selected shallow and deep wells in the central Oklahoma aquifer, 2003-2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The aquifer units of the Central Oklahoma aquifer underlie about 2,890 square miles of central Oklahoma and are used extensively to supply water for municipal, domestic, industrial, and agricultural needs. The Central Oklahoma aquifer also is commonly referred to as the Garber-Wellington aquifer because the Garber Sandstone and Wellington Formation yield the greatest quantities of usable water for domestic and high-capacity wells. The major water-quality concerns for the Central Oklahoma aquifer described by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program (1987 to 1992) were elevated concentrations of nitrate nitrogen in shallow water and the occurrence of arsenic, chromium, and selenium in parts of the aquifer. The quality of water from deep public-water supply wells in the Central Oklahoma aquifer is monitored by the State of Oklahoma. The chemical quality of water from shallow domestic wells is not monitored, and, therefore, there is a concern that well owners may be unknowingly ingesting water with nitrate nitrogen, arsenic, chromium, selenium, and other chemical constituents at concentrations that are considered harmful. As a result of this concern, the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality and the U.S. Geological Survey collaborated on a study to sample water during June 2003 through August 2005 from 23 shallow wells (less than 200 feet in depth) and 28 deep wells (200 feet or greater in depth) completed in the bedrock aquifer units of the Central Oklahoma aquifer. The objectives of the study were to describe the chemical quality of water from shallow and deep wells and to determine if the differences in constituent concentrations are statistically significant. Water from shallow wells had significantly higher concentrations of calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, sulfate, chloride, and nitrate nitrogen than water from deep wells. There were no significant differences between concentrations of dissolved solids, sodium, and fluoride in water from shallow and deep wells. Water from 9 shallow wells had nitrate nitrogen concentrations greater than 2 milligrams per liter, suggesting nitrogen sources at land surface have had an effect on water from these wells. Water from three shallow wells (13 percent) exceeded the nitrate nitrogen maximum contaminant level of 10 milligrams per liter in drinking water. Water from shallow wells had significantly lower concentrations of arsenic, chromium, iron, and selenium than water from deep wells, whereas, concentrations of barium, copper, manganese, and zinc were similar. Water-quality data indicate that arsenic frequently occurs in shallow ground water from the Central Oklahoma aquifer, but at low concentrations (<10 micrograms per liter). The occurrence of chromium and selenium in water from shallow wells was infrequent and at low concentrations in this study. It does not appear that the quality of water from a shallow well can be predicted based on the quality of water from a nearby deep well. The results show that in general terms, shallow ground water has significantly higher concentrations of most major ions and significantly lower concentrations of arsenic, chromium, and selenium than water from deep wells.

Becker, Carol J.

2006-01-01

252

Funding for Local Government and Schools in Rural Oklahoma. ERS Staff Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oil, gas, and agriculture are the bases of rural Oklahoma's economy, and income from these sectors varied widely during the 1980s. This study investigated revenue sources and the effects of changing revenues for county and town governments and school systems in 36 rural Oklahoma counties. Major sources of local revenue were sales taxes, property…

Sloggett, Gordon; Doeksen, Gerald

253

Secondary Agricultural Education Teachers as Agents of Change in Oklahoma and the Adoption of Precision Agriculture  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research indicates that precision agricultural education (PAE) in Oklahoma affects environmental quality, water conservation, and crop yields. The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore the nature and perceived effectiveness of PAE in Oklahoma secondary agricultural education classes. The study was framed by the diffusion of…

Nickeson, Beth

2013-01-01

254

Ooh La La! Oklahoma Culinary Programs Cook up Great Partnerships with French Counterparts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The dream of a Franco-Oklahoma partnership began over a year ago when Chantal Manes, now from the French Ministry of Education, visited Oklahoma. The Technologie Academie in Soissons, France, had a goal for all the career and technical students in the Picardie Region of France to have an international experience before completing their technical…

McCharen, Belinda

2009-01-01

255

Thirty-Fourth Annual Report of Indian Education in Eastern Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A narrative summary of program accomplishments, tabular data detailing program expenditures, and modifications of the negotiated contract between the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Oklahoma State Department of Education comprise the 1981 annual report of the Johnson-O'Malley (JOM) Indian Education Program in Eastern Oklahoma, which provides…

Butler, Bill

256

The University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology RECOMMENDATION FORM for Graduate Degree Applicant  

E-print Network

The University of Oklahoma School of Meteorology RECOMMENDATION FORM for Graduate Degree Applicant in meteorology, and the applicant's general character. If you need room for additional comments please feel free the completed form to: School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, 120 David L. Boren Blvd. Suite 5900

Oklahoma, University of

257

76 FR 5363 - Intent To Compromise Claim Against the State of Oklahoma Department of Education  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...United States Department of Education (Department) intends to compromise...the Oklahoma Department of Education (Oklahoma) now pending before...Counsel, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW...telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD), you may call...

2011-01-31

258

Twister! Employment responses to the 3 May 1999 Oklahoma City tornado  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research examined the impact of the 3 May 1999 tornado on the Oklahoma City labour market. We estimated time series models that allow for time-varying variance in employment growth. The models include intervention variables designed to capture the tornado's effect at initial impact as well as over the post-tornado period. In terms of total employment growth, the Oklahoma City

Bradley T. Ewing; Jamie B. Kruse; Mark A. Thompson

2009-01-01

259

An Evaluation of the Oklahoma Training for Child Care Careers Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The major purpose of this study was to evaluate the past achievements and current status of the Oklahoma Training for Child Care Careers (OTCCC) project in relation to the overall goals of providing child care training which is both accessible to and suitable for Oklahoma caregivers. Resources for the study were provided by a Title XX contract and…

Powell, Judith A.; And Others

260

Fire History in the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma Michael C. Stambaugh & Richard P. Guyette &  

E-print Network

Fire History in the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma Michael C. Stambaugh & Richard P. Guyette & Joseph history in northeastern Oklahoma on lands once occupied by the Cherokee Nation. A fire event chronology and their many fire cultures (Delcourt and Delcourt 1997). Fire history information has provided increased per

Stambaugh, Michael C

261

Distribution, Abundance, and Habitat Affinities of Oklahoma Muskrats (Ondatra zibethicus): New Insight from Trapper Reports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Distributional records of the muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus) are missing for much of Okla- homa. In the spring of 2005, I further investigated the status of Oklahoma muskrats by collecting surveys from Oklahoma fur trappers and United States Department of Agri- culture wildlife technicians (government trappers). Surveyed individuals were asked to give county locations of muskrat sightings\\/collections, as well as habitats

Brandon McDonald

2006-01-01

262

33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. 208.28 Section 208...28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. The Bureau of Reclamation...flows in excess of bankfull on the Washita River downstream of the reservoir. In...

2012-07-01

263

33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. 208.28 Section 208...28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. The Bureau of Reclamation...flows in excess of bankfull on the Washita River downstream of the reservoir. In...

2011-07-01

264

33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. 208.28 Section 208...28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. The Bureau of Reclamation...flows in excess of bankfull on the Washita River downstream of the reservoir. In...

2010-07-01

265

33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. 208.28 Section 208...28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. The Bureau of Reclamation...flows in excess of bankfull on the Washita River downstream of the reservoir. In...

2013-07-01

266

33 CFR 208.28 - Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...false Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. 208.28 Section 208...28 Foss Dam and Reservoir, Washita River, Oklahoma. The Bureau of Reclamation...flows in excess of bankfull on the Washita River downstream of the reservoir. In...

2014-07-01

267

Hydrocarbon Research Program of the University of Oklahoma Energy Center: Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this research program was to develop, edit, maintain, utilize and make publicly available a computerized Natural Resources Information System (NRIS) for the State of Oklahoma. Task 13 funded the collecting and computerizing of oil and gas completion report data available for the southeastern corner of Oklahoma (the Ouachita Mountain and Arkoma Basin areas), as well as supplemental

Mankin

1988-01-01

268

Status of the Oklahoma SOICC/NOICC Network. July 1, 1989 -June 30, 1990.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This 1989-1990 status report of the Oklahoma State Occupational Information Coordinating Committee (SOICC) includes the following: mission statement; organization chart; information on SOICC publications, including a labor supply and demand report; a listing of occupations licensed in Oklahoma, and a note on a career tabloid; descriptions of the…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Oklahoma State Occupational Information Coordinating Committee.

269

Southwestern Association of Naturalists Feeding Ecology of Three Omnivorous Fishes in Lake Texoma (Oklahoma-Texas)  

E-print Network

Southwestern Association of Naturalists Feeding Ecology of Three Omnivorous Fishes in Lake Texoma OMNIVOROUS FISHES IN LAKE TEXOMA (OKLAHOMA-TEXAS) KEITHB. GIDO* Universityof Oklahoma,BiologicalStation and Departmentof Zoology,Norman, OK 73019 *Correspondent:kgido@ou.edu ABSTRACT-Feeding ecology of 3 omnivorous

Gido, Keith B.

270

BOARD OF REGENTS FOR THE OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL MARCH 7,2014  

E-print Network

Watkins Agriculture Research and Extension Center 83 Approval to Accept a Gift of Real Property 83MINUTES of the BOARD OF REGENTS FOR THE OKLAHOMA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGES for the MARCH AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGES March 7. 2014 Items Pertaining to the Board of Regents for the Oklahoma A

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

271

76 FR 50753 - Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application OKNM 126630, Oklahoma  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...OKNM 126630) are available for review from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday: BLM New Mexico State Office, 301 Dinosaur Trail, Santa Fe, New Mexico; and BLM, Oklahoma Field Office, 7906 East 33rd Street Suite 101, Tulsa, Oklahoma....

2011-08-16

272

A HISTORICAL REVIEW OF THE AEROSPACE ENGINEERING CURRICULUM AT OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  

E-print Network

A HISTORICAL REVIEW OF THE AEROSPACE ENGINEERING CURRICULUM AT OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY E. A. Falk, the development and success of the Aerospace Engineering program at the Oklahoma State cannot be strictly. This paper focuses specifically on the history and development of the Aerospace Engineering curriculum

273

Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil. Quarterly report No. 6  

SciTech Connect

Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

1991-03-30

274

Tornado-Related Deaths and Injuries in Oklahoma due to the 3 May 1999 Tornadoes  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the evening hours of 3 May 1999, 58 tornadoes occurred in Oklahoma. One tornado reached F5 intensity and left a widespread path of death, injury, and destruction in and around the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. Other communities across the state were also affected. Data on persons who died or were injured were collected from medical examiner reports, hospital medical

Sheryll Brown; Pam Archer; Elizabeth Kruger; Sue Mallonee

2002-01-01

275

40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked...

2012-07-01

276

40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked...

2011-07-01

277

40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked...

2013-07-01

278

40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked...

2010-07-01

279

40 CFR 81.65 - Joplin (Missouri)-Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Northeast Oklahoma Interstate Air Quality Control Region, designated on December 8, 1970, and consisting of the counties of Barton, Jasper, McDonald, and Newton in the State of Missouri and Craig, Delaware, and Ottawa in the State of Oklahoma, is revoked...

2014-07-01

280

The Oklahoma's Promise Program: A National Model to Promote College Persistence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using a multi-method approach involving fixed effects and logistic regressions, this study examined the effect of the Oklahoma's Promise Program on student persistence in relation to the Pell and Stafford federal programs and according to socio-economic characteristics and class level. The Oklahoma's Promise is a hybrid state program that pays…

Mendoza, Pilar; Mendez, Jesse P.

2013-01-01

281

Oklahoma Gardening Information Sheet (#3545) OETA air date: May 9 and 10, 2009  

E-print Network

Oklahoma Gardening Information Sheet (#3545) OETA air date: May 9 and 10, 2009 OETA airtime: Saturday 11:00 a.m., Sunday 3:30 p.m. This week on Oklahoma Gardening we visit TLC Florist and Greenhouses to present new annuals for the garden. Sun Coleus, Coleus hybrids Lemon Twist Kingswood Carnival Black Knight

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

282

Ground-water levels in observation wells in Oklahoma, 1980-82  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the 1980-82 Climatic Years, the U. S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, collected ground-water level data in Oklahoma from 1,122 sites in 77 counties. This report presents this data.

Goemaat, Robert L.; Mize, Lionel D.; Spiser, Dannie E.

1983-01-01

283

The current state of electronic health record (EHR) use in Oklahoma.  

PubMed

There is ample evidence of the positive impact of electronic health records (EHR) on operational efficiencies and quality of care. Yet, growth in the adoption of EHR and sharing of information among providers has been slow. The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009 provides financial incentives for eligible providers to adopt and implement EHR. Until now, little information was available regarding the use of EHR in Oklahoma. Sponsored by the Oklahoma Health Information Exchange Trust (OHIET), this study reveals that the frequency of use of EHR among Oklahoma providers is near the national average. Although a large number of Oklahoma physicians have received Medicaid incentive payments for planned adoption, implementation, or upgrade of EHR systems, relatively few eligible providers in Oklahoma have been certified to receive Medicare incentive payments through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and even fewer have actually received these incentive payments. PMID:23620983

Khaliq, Amir A; Mwachofi, Ari K; Hughes, Danny R; Broyles, Robert W; Wheeler, Denna; Roswell, Robert H

2013-02-01

284

State Income Tax Withholding -The University of Oklahoma Incomplete or inaccurate information can delay the processing of this form. The university complies with  

E-print Network

State Income Tax Withholding - The University of Oklahoma Incomplete or inaccurate information can of Oklahoma will not withhold Oklahoma state income taxes if you do not live or work in Oklahoma. We are required to withhold taxes for the state in which you live and work. To do this you will need to return

Oklahoma, University of

285

Did fertility go up after the oklahoma city bombing? An analysis of births in metropolitan counties in Oklahoma, 1990–1999  

Microsoft Academic Search

Political and sociocultural events (e.g., Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 and the German reunification in 1989) and natural disasters (e.g., Hurricane Hugo in 1989) can affect fertility.\\u000a In our research, we addressed the question of whether the Oklahoma City bombing in April 1995, a man-made disaster, influenced\\u000a fertility patterns in Oklahoma. We defined three theoretical orientations—replacement theory, community

Joseph Lee Rodgers; Craig A. St. John; Ronnie Coleman

2005-01-01

286

Oklahoma State University Department of Animal Science: Goats  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This great informational website from Oklahoma State University's Department of Animal Science is all about goats (_Capra hircus_). The site provides subpages with photos and information for many breeds of goats from Alpine to Zhongwei. Site visitors can search for specific goat breeds by clicking on a letter of the alphabet or by perusing an alphabetical list of goat breeds. Links are also provided to other breeds of livestock including cattle, horses, sheep, and swine. Additionally, visitors can link to information on livestock breeds by region, livestock research, and to the Virtual Livestock Library.

1995-01-01

287

Sulfide mineralization and magnetization, Cement oil field, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geochemical, petrographic, and rock-magnetic studies were undertaken to investigate possible sources for reported positive aeromagnetic anomalies over the Cement oil field, Oklahoma. Ferrimagnetic pyrrhotite (monoclinic, Fe7S8 ), intergrown with more-abundant, nonmagnetic pyrite (FeS2), is present in well-cutting, core, and quarry samples at Cement, and it is the only identified source of possible enhanced magnetization in rocks over the field. Magnetite, found only in well cuttings from Cement, is contamination from drilling. Magnetite was considered previously by others to be the source of magnetic anomalies at Cement.

Reynolds, Richard L.; Fishman, Neil S.; Webring, Michael W.; Wanty, Richard B.; Goldhaber, Martin B.

1989-01-01

288

Dakota sandstone facies, western Oklahoma panhandle  

SciTech Connect

The Cretaceous Dakota Sandstone in Cimarron County comprised three sandstone units and intervening mudrocks; it overlies the Kiowa Shale Member of the Purgatoire Formation. Deposits include shoreface, beach (foreshore) and dune, estuarine and tidal channel, marine marginal bay and swamp/marsh in a generally progradational sequences associated with marine regression in the Western Interior. The shoreface sand, characterized by ripple lamination, bioturbation and the trace fossils Teichichnus and Thalassinoides, is fine-grained, 5-10 m (15-30 ft) thick and grades into the underlying Kiowa Shale. Beach and associated dune deposits are 2-5 m (6-16 ft) thick, medium to fine-grained, medium to thick-bedded, tabular-planar cross-bedded, and lenticular; cross-bed paleocurrent headings are northeasterly and northwesterly. Estuarine channel deposits are 3-5 m (10 to 16 ft) thick, trough to tabular-planar cross-bedded, and medium to coarse-grained with local conglomerate overlying the scoured base which commonly cuts into the Kiowa Shale or overlying shoreface sandstone; rip-up clasts and wood pieces are common but trace fossils are rare; southeasterly and southwesterly paleocurrents predominate. Tidal channel deposits are thinner (up to 2 m of 6 ft) and finer grained (medium to fine-grained) that the estuarine channel deposits; they occur within fine-grained sandstone and mudrock sequences, are trough cross-bedded, and commonly contain trace fossils (e.g., Skolithos) and wood fragments. Marine marginal (tidal flat or bay.) deposits comprise fine-grained sandstone, siltstone and interbedded shale, that are 1-3m (3-10 ft) thick with abundant burrows, small ripple marks, and parallel lamination. These grade into the fine to very fine-grained sandstones, siltstones, shales, and coals of the swamp/marsh deposits that are 1-5m (3-16 ft) thick and contain ripple marks, burrows, other trace fossils, and parallel lamination.

Atalik, E.; Mansfield, C.F.

1984-04-01

289

Environmental Characteristics and Geographic Information System Applications for the Development of Nutrient Thresholds in Oklahoma Streams  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S.Environmental Protection Agency has developed nutrient criteria using ecoregions to manage and protect rivers and streams in the United States. Individual states and tribes are encouraged by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to modify or improve upon the ecoregion approach. The Oklahoma Water Resources Board uses a dichotomous process that stratifies streams using environmental characteristics such as stream order and stream slope. This process is called the Use Support Assessment Protocols, subchapter15. The Use Support Assessment Protocols can be used to identify streams threatened by excessive amounts of nutrients, dependant upon a beneficial use designation for each stream. The Use Support Assessment Protocols, subchapter 15 uses nutrient and environmental characteristic thresholds developed from a study conducted in the Netherlands, but the Oklahoma Water Resources Board wants to modify the thresholds to reflect hydrologic and ecological conditions relevant to Oklahoma streams and rivers. Environmental characteristics thought to affect impairment from nutrient concentrations in Oklahoma streams and rivers were determined for 798 water-quality sites in Oklahoma. Nutrient, chlorophyll, water-properties, and location data were retrieved from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency STORET database including data from the U.S. Geological Survey, Oklahoma Conservation Commission, and Oklahoma Water Resources Board. Drainage-basin area, stream order, stream slope, and land-use proportions were determined for each site using a Geographic Information System. The methods, procedures, and data sets used to determine the environmental characteristics are described.

Masoner, Jason R.; Haggard, Brian E.; Rea, Alan

2002-01-01

290

Quantitative analysis and paleoecology of the Secor Coal and roof-shale floras (middle Pennsylvania, Oklahoma)  

SciTech Connect

The Secor Coal of Oklahoma (Boggy Formation, lower Desmoinesian/Westphalian D equivalent) is one of the few coals discovered, to date, in which Anabathra pulcherrima (=Paralycopodites brevifolius) was a dominant element. Anabathra and Lepidophloios define the major assemblages in the coal, which also contains elements of medullosan pteridosperms and Cardiocarpus spinatus producing cordaites. The Lepidophloios to Medullosa gradient is not obscured by the numerous Anabathra-dominated zones, and a disturbance element is suggested in association with Anabathra abundance. Comparison of the coal-ball flora with a clastic-compression flora from the roof of the coal reveals widely divergent patterns of dominance and diversity. The compression flora is strongly dominated by medullosan pteridosperms with subdominant marattialean tree ferns. As in most instances, the compression flora from the immediate roof of the coal is not an accurate representation of the peat-forming vegetation, at either the level of species composition or the relative abundance of major groups of plants. The swamp and surrounding clastic deltaic environments were edaphically distinct and supported separate floras between which there was limited species exchange.

Dimichele, W.A.; McBrinn, G.E. (Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (United States)); Phillips, T.L. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (United States))

1991-08-01

291

A contribution to the geology of northeastern Texas and southern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The region in central and northeastern Texas and southern Oklahoma known as the Black and Grand prairies abounds in features of interest to physiographers, geologists, and paleontologists, and the pioneer investigators of this region must have experienced renewed satisfaction in each day's exploration. The reports of Joseph A. Taff, Robert T. Hill, and others, published chiefly under the auspices of State and Federal surveys, represent with approximate accuracy at most places the general distribution of the outcrops of the formations in this region, and contain detailed descriptions of many sections that constitute a mine of useful information. The reader of the present paper is urged, therefore, to hold as most important the general excellence of the earlier reports of these authors and to relegate the inaccuracies and mistakes to which his attention will be called to the relatively unimportant place in which they belong, remembering at the same time that a future generation of investigators may find our own shortcomings as great as those we now criticize.

Stephenson, Lloyd William

1919-01-01

292

Frontal passage and cold pool detection using Oklahoma Mesonet observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For over a dozen years the Oklahoma Mesonet network has provided surface observations at over 100 stations. These observations are used to analyze mass flux estimates from surface divergence, frontal passages, and cold pools, the latter defined herein as active regions where precipitation processes are creating near-surface cold air masses. Case studies are detailed and a 15-yr climatology of frontal passages and cold pools was computed in this research. Convergence, divergence, and precipitation are most strongly correlated in the summer months and least correlated in the winter months. Wet spring and summer days had the highest average convergence and divergence values while dry summer and fall days had the lowest average convergence and divergence. Frontal passages and cold pools are tracked throughout the Mesonet in various case studies, four of which are covered herein. The methodology is able to represent front location and cold pool areas quite well despite the low resolution of the Mesonet grid. The climatology of front and cold pool data yielded many similarities. Winter has the largest magnitude changes in DeltaT, DeltaP, and Deltah/cp while spring and fall had the largest magnitude change in Deltaqv. Summer has the lowest with the exception of spring DeltaT. Correlations between these variables are lowest in the more convectively active summer season. Convergence is roughly equal ahead of fronts from spring through fall; however, divergence is present in summer frontal passages earlier and stronger compared to the other seasons. Fronts and cold pools are most likely to occur in summer and spring with summer having the highest percentage of fronts which lead to cold pools. Fronts and cold pools are substantially more likely to occur during the late afternoon and early evening in the summer; other seasons had a slighter nocturnal increase in frequency. Western Oklahoma had higher frequencies of frontal passages and cold pools than Eastern Oklahoma with frontal passages having the stronger signal. These findings help identify seasonal, diurnal, and geographic distributions of fronts and cold pools and can be used in modeling studies to better the understanding of cold pool processes and parameterizations.

Lesage, Andrew T.

293

Depth-Duration Frequency of Precipitation for Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A regional frequency analysis was conducted to estimate the depth-duration frequency of precipitation for 12 durations in Oklahoma (15, 30, and 60 minutes; 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours; and 1, 3, and 7 days). Seven selected frequencies, expressed as recurrence intervals, were investigated (2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, and 500 years). L-moment statistics were used to summarize depth-duration data and to determine the appropriate statistical distributions. Three different rain-gage networks provided the data (15minute, 1-hour, and 1-day). The 60-minute, and 1-hour; and the 24-hour, and 1-day durations were analyzed separately. Data were used from rain-gage stations with at least 10-years of record and within Oklahoma or about 50 kilometers into bordering states. Precipitation annual maxima (depths) were determined from the data for 110 15-minute, 141 hourly, and 413 daily stations. The L-moment statistics for depths for all durations were calculated for each station using unbiased L-mo-ment estimators for the mean, L-scale, L-coefficient of variation, L-skew, and L-kur-tosis. The relation between L-skew and L-kurtosis (L-moment ratio diagram) and goodness-of-fit measures were used to select the frequency distributions. The three-parameter generalized logistic distribution was selected to model the frequencies of 15-, 30-, and 60-minute annual maxima; and the three-parameter generalized extreme-value distribution was selected to model the frequencies of 1-hour to 7-day annual maxima. The mean for each station and duration was corrected for the bias associated with fixed interval recording of precipitation amounts. The L-scale and spatially averaged L-skew statistics were used to compute the location, scale, and shape parameters of the selected distribution for each station and duration. The three parameters were used to calculate the depth-duration-frequency relations for each station. The precipitation depths for selected frequencies were contoured from weighted depth surfaces to produce maps from which the precipitation depth-duration-frequency curve for selected storm durations can be determined for any site in Oklahoma.

Tortorelli, Robert L.; Rea, Alan; Asquith, William H.

1999-01-01

294

77 FR 15273 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision AGENCY: Environmental...implement its base hazardous waste management program. We authorized the...21. The Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (``OHWMA'')...

2012-03-15

295

78 FR 32161 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision AGENCY: Environmental...implement its base hazardous waste management program. We authorized the...21. The Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (``OHWMA'')...

2013-05-29

296

76 FR 18927 - Oklahoma: Final Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Authorization of State Hazardous Waste Management Program Revision AGENCY: Environmental...implement its base hazardous waste management program. We authorized the...21. The Oklahoma Hazardous Waste Management Act (``OHWMA'')...

2011-04-06

297

Supreme Court standing requirements: Has Wyoming v. Oklahoma set the stage for future conflict  

SciTech Connect

In Wyoming v. Oklahoma, an Oklahoma law requiring its coal-fired electric utilities to burn a minimum ten percent mixture of Oklahoma-mined coal was struck down by the United States Supreme Court. Describing the law as [open quotes]protectionist and discriminatory,[close quotes] the Court struck it down as a violation of the Commerce Clause. The majority opinion first focused on the issues of Wyoming's standing to sue and the Supreme Court's power to assert its original jurisdiction. Then the majority performed a textbook Dormant Commerce Clause analysis of the Oklahoma statute, finding it virtually per se invalid. This paper reviews the case and discusses the possible implications of Supreme Court standing requirements.

Not Available

1993-01-01

298

JOB OPPORTUNITIES (SUBSURFACE PROTECTION AND REMEDIATION DIVISION, ADA, OKLAHOMA, NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY)  

EPA Science Inventory

This page lists job opportunities at NRMRL's Subsurface Protection and Remediation Division (SPRD) located in Ada, Oklahoma. These include both EPA Postdoctoral Positions and National Research Council Postdoctoral Positions. SPRD's research programs include basic studies to enha...

299

40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.123 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123...

2012-07-01

300

40 CFR 81.124 - North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false North Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.124 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.124 North...

2013-07-01

301

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 false Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central...

2014-07-01

302

40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79...

2013-07-01

303

40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79...

2012-07-01

304

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central...

2011-07-01

305

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central...

2013-07-01

306

40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... false Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79...

2014-07-01

307

40 CFR 81.125 - Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... false Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.125 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.125...

2012-07-01

308

40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.123 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123...

2010-07-01

309

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central...

2012-07-01

310

40 CFR 81.125 - Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Southwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.125 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.125...

2013-07-01

311

40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.123 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123...

2013-07-01

312

40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79...

2011-07-01

313

40 CFR 81.123 - Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... false Southeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.123 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.123...

2011-07-01

314

40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...geographically located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oklahoma: Alfalfa County, Beaver County, Blaine County, Cimarron County, Custer County, Dewey County, Ellis County, Harper County, Major County,...

2014-07-01

315

40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...geographically located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oklahoma: Alfalfa County, Beaver County, Blaine County, Cimarron County, Custer County, Dewey County, Ellis County, Harper County, Major County,...

2012-07-01

316

40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...geographically located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oklahoma: Alfalfa County, Beaver County, Blaine County, Cimarron County, Custer County, Dewey County, Ellis County, Harper County, Major County,...

2011-07-01

317

40 CFR 81.126 - Northwestern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...geographically located within the outermost boundaries of the area so delimited): In the State of Oklahoma: Alfalfa County, Beaver County, Blaine County, Cimarron County, Custer County, Dewey County, Ellis County, Harper County, Major County,...

2013-07-01

318

The association of pseudoephedrine sales restrictions on emergency department urine drug screen results in Oklahoma.  

PubMed

On June 15, 2004, Oklahoma became the first state to reclassify pseudoephedrine as a Schedule V drug. Arrests in Oklahoma for the manufacture of methamphetamines in clandestine laboratories precipitously declined. It was hypothesized that a decrease in methamphetamine use could be shown in the patient population in Oklahoma's largest emergency department. To test this hypothesis, all urine drug screen results in the Saint Francis Hospital Trauma Emergency Center from January 2003 through May 2005 were reviewed. There was a significant increase in the total tests performed and the percentage of positive test results for the amphetamine drug class (p = 0.0004, R2 = 0.3785) over time. These results suggest that methamphetamine usage has not decreased in the emergency department patient population. Possibly, methamphetamine usage in Oklahoma has not been impacted by the passage of HB 2176 due to an increase in drug trafficking of methamphetamine into the state. PMID:18183861

Brandenburg, M A; Brown, S J; Arneson, W L; Arneson, D L

2007-11-01

319

59 Gaylord Family-Oklahoma Memorial Stadium 60 Barry Switzer Center  

E-print Network

CAMPUS MAP 59 Gaylord Family-Oklahoma Memorial Stadium 60 Barry Switzer Center 61 Jones House 62 Training Center 67 Mosier Indoor Athletic Facility 68 Jacobs Track and Field Facility 69 Cate Center 70

Oklahoma, University of

320

76 FR 37827 - Notice of Proposed Audit Delegation Renewals for the States of Oklahoma and Montana  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...ONRR-2011-0018] Notice of Proposed Audit Delegation Renewals for the States of Oklahoma...ACTION: Notice of States' proposals for audit delegation renewals...Revenue (ONRR) renew current delegations of audit and investigation authority. This...

2011-06-28

321

Spatial patterns of ice storm disturbance in the forested landscape of Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma  

E-print Network

and southeastern Oklahoma and examined approximately 6000 km2 of forest between 150 and 800 m elevation. Normalized Difference Vegeation Index (NDVI) difference values were calculated using two Landsat 7 ETM+ scenes to identify NDVI changes that potentially...

Isaacs, Rachel E.

2009-05-15

322

A Summary of Convective-Core Vertical Velocity Properties Using ARM UHF Wind Profilers in Oklahoma  

E-print Network

, Colorado ** University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (Manuscript received 16 July 2012, in final form 8 May, Oklahoma @ Bureau of Meteorology, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia & Cooperative Institute for Research

Ohta, Shigemi

323

The Agricultural Benefits of Salinity Control on the Red River of Texas and Oklahoma  

E-print Network

Salinity of the waters from the Red River and its major tributaries has virtually eliminated its use for irrigation of agricultural crops in Texas and Oklahoma. A chloride control project has been proposed whereby the source salt waters...

Laughlin, D. H.; Lacewell, R. D.; Moore, D. S.

324

40 CFR 81.47 - Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Central Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.47 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.47 Central...

2010-07-01

325

40 CFR 81.79 - Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... false Northeastern Oklahoma Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.79 Section 81...CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.79...

2010-07-01

326

76 FR 81838 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oklahoma; Interstate Transport of Pollution  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Implementation Plans; Oklahoma; Interstate Transport of Pollution AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION...307(b)(2).) List of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Air pollution control, Environmental protection, Incorporation by...

2011-12-29

327

76 FR 64065 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oklahoma; Interstate Transport of Pollution  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Oklahoma; Interstate Transport of Pollution AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency...concluded within the Cross State Air Pollution Rule (CSAPR or Transport Rule) and...Analysis and Actions for the Cross State Air Pollution Rule II. Proposed Action A....

2011-10-17

328

77 FR 29275 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...entitled ``Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Programs'', Oklahoma's authorized hazardous waste program. The EPA will incorporate...EPA will enforce under the Solid Waste Disposal Act, commonly referred to as...

2012-05-17

329

Current Operating Income and Expenditures: Oklahoma State Colleges and Universities, Fiscal Year 1997-98.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report contains analyses of income and expenditures for Oklahoma state colleges and universities for the fiscal year 1997-98. Educational and General Part I Income was reported at $751,750,307 for the 25 Oklahoma institutions for 1997-98, an increase of 7.3% from income reported for the preceding year, and 25.7% over the previous three years.…

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

330

Updated Distribution of Aedes albopictus in Oklahoma, and Implications in Arbovirus Transmission.  

PubMed

A series of statewide surveys were conducted in Oklahoma in the summers between 1991 and 2004 to identify the distribution of Aedes albopictus. Adult mosquitoes were identified in 63 counties, bringing the currently known distribution of Ae. albopictus in the state to 69 of 77 counties. The widespread presence of Ae. albopictus in Oklahoma has important current and future public and veterinary health implications for surveillance and control efforts. PMID:25843181

Noden, Bruce H; Coburn, Lisa; Wright, Russell; Bradley, Kristy

2015-03-01

331

Ground-water levels in observation wells in Oklahoma, period of record to March 1985  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During the 1984-85 climatic years, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources, collected ground-water level data in Oklahoma from 1,018 sites in 76 of the State's 77 counties. This report is a compilation of all available data through March 1985 for each well currently in the network. Some of the data were collected as early as 1937.

Goemaat, Robert L.; Mize, Lionel D.; Madaj, Ambrose J.; Spiser, Dannie E.

1986-01-01

332

Cambrian extensional tectonics and magmatism within the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The tectonic evolution of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen is partially constrained by the petrological consequences of a bimodal igneous suite associated with the Cambrian rift. Mineralogical and compositional layers and erosional surfaces are recognized as initially subplanar, subhorizontal markers. The progressive rotation of these horizons can be explained by uniform-sense normal faulting. Magmatism, confined to the aulacogen trend, elevated the thermal gradient producing a crustal strength-anisotropy. This ensured the localization of the extension throughout the Cambrian rifting event. The presence of a substantial volume of mafic igneous rocks within the crust along the aulacogen's trend suggests that crustal attenuation was compensated for by the addition of mantle derived material during extension.

McConnell, D. A.; Gilbert, M. C.

1990-03-01

333

Comparing reactions to two severe tornadoes in one Oklahoma community.  

PubMed

The authors compared the effect of the 3 May 1999 F5 and 8 May 2003 F3 tornadoes on the community of Moore, Oklahoma, by canvassing damaged areas after both tornadoes and surveying residents. Significantly more 1999 than 2003 residents reported property damage and injuries. Television and tornado sirens were the most common warnings each year, however, more 1999 residents received and responded to television warnings. Importantly, storm shelters were used more frequently in 2003. Fifty-one per cent of residents who experienced both tornadoes took the same amount of protective action in 2003 as they had in 1999; 22% took less; and 27% took more. Residents who took less action said that the reason for doing so was inadequate warning and shelter. First-hand experience of tornadoes prompts people to heed warnings when adequate notification is received and to take effective protective action when adequate shelter is available. PMID:16108992

Comstock, R Dawn; Mallonee, Sue

2005-09-01

334

Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oklahoma Consumer's Guide  

SciTech Connect

Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oklahoma Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

Not Available

2007-08-01

335

University of Oklahoma Libraries: Bass Business Oral Histories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Bass Business History Collection at the University of Oklahoma Libraries began in 1955, and since that time the collection has grown to include books, videos, journals and oral histories. The oral histories here include 24 interviews with business professors at the University about everything from the time management studies of Frederick Taylor to the development of organizational theory. Visitors can browse the alphabetical list of interviewees on the right-hand side of the page, and they have the option of listening to the interview or downloading it for later use. Also, visitors can browse the interviews by key names, words, or subjects. Finally, users can opt to sign up for updates when new interviews are added to this enticing collection.

336

Detection of Dirofilaria immitis and Ehrlichia species in coyotes (Canis latrans), from rural Oklahoma and Texas.  

PubMed

There is a lack of knowledge regarding the prevalence of Dirofilaria immitis and Ehrlichia spp. in coyotes in Oklahoma and Texas. Documenting the prevalence of these vector-borne disease agents in coyotes from Oklahoma and Texas underscores the importance of wild canids as reservoir hosts that infect companion animals and humans. To learn more about the sylvatic cycle of D. immitis and Ehrlichia spp. in coyotes from Oklahoma and Texas, we tested for infection with and exposure to, respectively, these disease agents. Coyote carcasses were collected opportunistically from animal control experts and hunters in seven counties in Oklahoma and Texas from January to March, 2010. Serum samples from 77 coyotes were tested with a commercial ELISA test. Five (6.5%) coyotes had D. immitis antigens, and four (5.2%) had antibodies to Ehrlichia spp. The overall prevalence of D. immitis was low relative to studies from the eastern United States. Little is known about the prevalence of Ehrlichia spp. throughout the United States, but coyotes from rural Oklahoma in the current study had a higher exposure rate than those reported from California, and a lower rate than data from an earlier study from Oklahoma. PMID:22448722

Paras, Kelsey L; Little, Susan E; Reichard, Mason V; Reiskind, Michael H

2012-07-01

337

Bibliography of Oklahoma hydrology; reports prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey and principal cooperating agencies, 1901-93  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This bibliography lists reports on hydrology in Oklahoma prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey and the principal State cooperating agencies, the Oklahoma Geological Survey and the Oklahoma Water Resources Board. Included are citations of about 550 reports, abstracts, and journal articles issued from 1901 through July 1993. The reports are listed by agency and report type, and are indexed by author, subject, and USGS report number.

Havens, J. S., (compiler)

1993-01-01

338

High School to College-Going Rates: For Oklahoma High School Graduates to Oklahoma Colleges. Linear College-Going Rate, Combined College-Going Rate. Oklahoma High School Indicators Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The report presents data on the rate of Oklahoma high school graduates going on to colleges within the state. Two kinds of rates are reported: (1) for students proceeding directly to college after high school graduation (linear), and (2) for students who have delayed college entry for a year or more after graduation. Tables present data on:…

Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

339

Bibliography of Oklahoma hydrology; reports prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey and principal cooperating agencies, 1901-88  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Reports on the hydrology of Oklahoma have been issued by the U.S. Geological Survey since 1901. This bibliography lists reports on hydrology in Oklahoma prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey and the principal State cooperating agencies, the Oklahoma Geological Survey and the Oklahoma Water Resources Board. Of the nearly 350 reports issued from 1901 through 1988, about 200 have been concerned primarily with groundwater; the remainder have dealt with some aspect of surface water, water quality, or geology. The reports are listed by agency and report type, and are indexed both by author and subject. (USGS)

Havens, John S., (compiler)

1989-01-01

340

COCORP profiling across the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen: Overthrusting of the Wichita Mountains and compression within the Anadarko Basin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

COCORP (Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling) deep reflection profiles recorded across the Wichita Mountains and Anadarko Basin suggest that significant crustal shortening occurred in the final stages of the evolution of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen. The crystalline rocks of the Wichita Mountains were thrust in Pennsylvanian time northeastward over sedimentary rocks of the Anadarko Basin along a series of faults with moderate (average 30° to 40°) and southwesterly dips. These faults can be traced possibly as deep as 20 to 24 km. Listric thrust faults and hanging-wall anticlines developed in the sedimentary rocks of the basin. These features contrast with conventional interpretations of Pennsylvanian structures as the result of predominantly vertical movements along high-angle faults, and they suggest that Pennsylvanian downwarping of the Anadarko Basin was at least partially due to thrust loading. Truncations of reflections from Cambrian-Ordovician rocks in the deepest part of the basin suggest normal faulting, which would support ideas of an early extensional stage in the aulacogen cycle. The distinctive Precambrian layering seen on earlier COCORP data recorded south of the Wichita Mountains cannot be recognized under the Anadarko Basin, and the Proterozoic basin containing that layering may have been bounded on its north side by a Precambrian fault. This inferred fault was probably twice reactivated during formation of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen—once during late Precambrian(?)-Early Cambrian extension, and again during Pennsylvanian compression. The popular view that aulacogens originated from radial rifting of updomed, homogeneous continental crust is probably too simplified, and a more important constraint on their location and development may be the nature of pre-existing lines of weakness. *Present address: Department of Earth Sciences, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB3 OEZ, England

Brewer, J. A.; Good, R.; Oliver, J. E.; Brown, L. D.; Kaufman, S.

1983-02-01

341

Geographic Information Systems Methods for Determining Drainage-Basin Areas, Stream-Buffered Areas, Stream Length, and Land Uses for the Neosho and Spring Rivers in Northeastern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Geographic Information Systems have many uses, one of which includes the reproducible computation of environmental characteristics that can be used to categorize hydrologic features. The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality are investigating Geographic Information Systems techniques to determine partial drainage-basin areas, stream-buffer areas, stream length, and land uses (drainage basin and stream characteristics) in northeastern Oklahoma. The U.S Geological Survey, in cooperation with Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality, documented the methods used to determine drainage-basin and stream characteristics for the Neosho and Spring Rivers above Grand Lake Of the Cherokees in northeastern Oklahoma and calculated the characteristics. The drainage basin and stream characteristics can be used by the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality to aid in natural-resource assessments.

Masoner, Jason R.; March, Ferrella

2006-01-01

342

A comparison of the speech patterns and dialect attitudes of Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The lexical dialect usage of Oklahoma has been well-studied in the past by the Survey of Oklahoma Dialects, but the acoustic speech production of the state has received little attention. Apart from two people from Tulsa and two people from Oklahoma City that were interviewed for the Atlas of North American English, no other acoustic work has been performed within the state. This dissertation begins to fill in these gaps by presenting twelve respondents interviewed by the Research on Dialects of English in Oklahoma (RODEO) project. For each speaker, a brief biography is given, including some of their regional and speech attitudes of Oklahoma. Then acoustic data from a wordlist and reading task are presented and compared. Analysis will consider plots of each speaker's vowel system as a whole, and will also examine many environments in isolation. These environments were chosen for their likely presence in Oklahoma, and include such dialect features as the Southern Shift, the pin/pen merger, the caught/cot merger, monophthongization of the PRICE vowel, and neutralization of tense vowels before /l./ After considering each respondent separately, some of their results will be pooled together to give a preliminary sense of the state of dialect within Oklahoma. Demographic variables such as age, gender, and urban/rural upbringing will be related to speakers' attitudes and acoustic production. This will serve two goals - first, to compare modern-day production to the findings of previous scholars, and second, to suggest a dialect trajectory for the state that could be studied further in additional research.

Bakos, Jon

343

Middle Pennsylvanian recurrent uplift of the, Ouachita fold belt and basin subsidence in, the Arkoma basin, Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recurrent uplift of the Ouachita fold belt in Oklahoma coincided with the disruption of the Arkoma basin following the deposition of the Boggy Formation (early Desmoinesian time). The Boggy, composed of sandstone-shale sequences that record southerly progradation of coal-bearing, fluvially dominated deltaic complexes into the Arkoma basin, was folded at the time of uplift of the Ouachita fold belt. The uplift ended the progressive subsidence of the Arkoma basin and shifted the depocenter to the northwest. Subsequently, the Thurman Formation (middle Desmoinesian), which had a source in the southeast, was deposited in the smaller resurgent foreland basin over the folded and eroded surface of the Boggy. Chert-pebble conglomerates in the Thurman were derived from the erosion of newly elevated Ordovician and Devonian cherts in the core of the Ouachita foldbelt. Sandstone-shale packages are found in both formations. The origin of the coal-bearing cycles in the Boggy are enigmatic, but they probably were controlled by a combination of factors such as glacio-eustatic changes in sea level and delta-lobe abandonment. In contrast, cycles in the Thurman probably were strongly influenced by episodic thrust faulting and uplift in the Ouachitas.

Elmore, R. Douglas; Sutherland, Patrick K.; White, Perry B.

1990-09-01

344

Non-visual orientation of desert sand scorpions. R. McKee & D. Gaffin, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, U.S.A  

E-print Network

Non-visual orientation of desert sand scorpions. R. McKee & D. Gaffin, University of Oklahoma. Detection of vibrations in sand by tarsal sense organs of the nocturnal scorpion Paruroctonus mesaensis sensilla (BCSS), which are groups of eight slits that are responsive to vibrational waves in sand (Brownell

Gaffin, Doug

345

Identification and Evaluation of Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic (Class 1 Oil) Reservoirs in Oklahoma: Yearly technical progress report for January 1December 31, 1996  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geo Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaged in a five-year program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes a systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all FDD oil reservoirs in

M. K. Banken; R. Andrews

1997-01-01

346

A Study of Public Higher Education in the Oklahoma City Area with Special Focus on Community College Services. Report on the Delivery of Comprehensive Community College Services in Metropolitan Oklahoma City.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In response to a legislative mandate, a study was conducted to identify and address the basic factors which should be considered in the expansion of postsecondary educational opportunities in metropolitan Oklahoma City, with specific focus on the steps to be taken by Oklahoma City Community College (OCCC). Study findings, based on demographic…

Priest, Bill J.; And Others

347

75 FR 62840 - Award of a Single-Source Expansion Supplement to the University of Oklahoma, National Resource...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Oklahoma, National Resource Center for Youth Services...Oklahoma, National Resource Center for Youth Services...administer the National Resource Center for Youth Development...foster care and young adults formerly in foster care...agencies to remain in contact with youth who may...

2010-10-13

348

Regional differences in food and nutrient intakes of college women from the United States: Oregon and Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diets of 83 American college women from Oregon and 116 from Oklahoma were compared for total energy and nutrient content, nutrient density, and food sources of nutrients. The Oregon women consumed diets closer to current dietary recommendations for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and iron deficiency anemia than did the Oklahoma women. They ate significantly more energy, protein,

Constance C. Georgiou; Andrea B. Arquitt

1992-01-01

349

Political Protest, Conflict, and Tribal Nationalism: The Oklahoma Choctaws and the Termination Crisis of 1959-1970  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma is headquartered in southeastern Oklahoma and has a tribal citizenry of just over 175,000. The tribal government currently compacts almost all of the tribe's Bureau of Indian Affairs and Indian Health Service program funding and runs dozens of tribal businesses that today fund more than 80 percent of the tribal…

Lambert, Valerie

2007-01-01

350

A Grid/Group Study of Gender Perceptions of the Culture of the Oklahoma Civil Air Patrol  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to describe member perceptions of the culture of the Oklahoma CAP using an online version of the Douglas Grid/Group typology. This study further described and compared differences in how men and women in the organization view its culture. All senior members of the Oklahoma CAP with a valid email address on file…

Wardlaw, Kelly Ann

2011-01-01

351

Current ReportOklahoma Cooperative Extension Fact Sheets are also available on our website at: osufacts.okstate.edu  

E-print Network

Sciences Department of Entomology & Plant Pathology Typically about half of the winter wheat in Oklahoma-7088 Rev. 0812 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Effect of Planting Date and Seed Treatment Entomologist Department of Entomology & Plant Pathology Department of Entomology & Plant Pathology Dr. Jeff

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

352

Oklahoma School Testing Program: Writing Assessment Component. 1993 Summary Report. Stanford Writing Assessment Program for Grades 7 and 10.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report provides an overview of the Oklahoma School Testing Program (OSTP) and summarizes students' average writing assessment scores from 1987 through 1993. In 1992, the Stanford Writing Assessment replaced the MAT-6 Writing Test as the instrument for measuring writing achievement for 7th and 10th graders in Oklahoma. Student papers were hand…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

353

Multispectral analysis of limestone, dolomite, and granite, Mill Creek, Oklahoma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Spectral reflectance and thermal emission data were collected at the Mill Creek, Oklahoma test site during NASA missions 132 and 133 in June 1970. The data were collected by three aircraft flown several times during the diurnal cycle at altitudes of 150 to 17,000 m above mean terrain. Reflectance of the main rock types (limestone, dolomite, and granite) was determined from the data collected using a 12-channel multispectral scanner during mission 133 and from thermal infrared images recorded during mission 132 on an RS-7 scanner from 17,000 m above terrain. A preliminary rock recognition map was generated automatically using data collected from 900 m above terrain. The discrimination provided by the map is reasonably accurate. Misidentification occurred in areas of unusually high dolomite reflectivity. High altitude thermal infrared (10 to 12 micrometers) images show regional folds and faults distinguished by the presence of thermally contrasting materials. Linear and curvilinear structural features two to three times smaller than the nominal 17 m resolution could be detected.

Rowan, L. C.; Watson, K.

1970-01-01

354

Airborne Doppler lidar observations of convective phenomena in Oklahoma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On 30 June 1981, the wind fields around a variety of convective clouds, ranging from large thunderstorm complexes to isolated cumulus congestus, were observed in Oklahoma using an airborne Doppler lidar operated by NASA. By steering the pulsed infrared laser beam alternately along differing horizontal directions, a network of independent radial velocity measurements is obtained, which permits high-resolution synthesis of the full horizontal wind vector field in a swath adjacent to the aircraft flight track. The bright reflections of the laser signal by cloud surfaces permit direct identification of the locus of cloud edges, information which is prerequisite to detailed study of the relationships between the winds inside and outside clouds. The horizontal wind fields derived from the lidar data reveal waves and vortices along the gust front of a storm which eventually produced a gust-front tornado, and cloud-scale convergence patterns around an isolated cumulus congestus. Despite the presence of some questionable data associated with undersampling and delayed recording of certain aircraft motion parameters, most of the lidar results appear consistent with cloud photographs made during the experiment, with surface meteorological data, with aircraft flight-level wind data, and with previous observational and theoretical work.

Mccaul, Eugene W., Jr.; Bluestein, Howard B.; Doviak, Richard J.

1987-01-01

355

Introduction of a Science Policy Course at the University of Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In modern society, science and policy are two processes that have a symbiotic relationship to each other; wherein policy dictates the direction of science while science shapes the future of policy. Although the policy side is often ignored in scientific environments, the rate of scientific advancement is heavily influenced by policy. Science policy is very different from the conduct of science itself and future scientists need to be aware of the issues and factors that dictate the present and future direction of science. Based on the intricate relationship between science and policy, it is essential to introduce an overview of the policy process to future scientists and decision makers. In the context of climate change, policy implications are extensive and critical owing to their large socio-economic impacts. Hence, knowledge of the policy process is even more relevant to earth scientists. In this regard, the proposal to start an introductory course in science policy is currently being discussed in the department of Meteorology at the University of Oklahoma. If such a course is approved, an interactive graduate level class will be introduced for students pursuing a career in science. Such a course will be cross- disciplinary and will be offered to a wide audience across the university. Since the American Meteorological Society's (AMS) Summer Policy Colloquium has been a very successful program in educating scientists about the policy process, a format similar to the colloquium may be adopted. The primary topics will include the understanding of policy fundamentals, effective communication, ethics and integrity in the conduct of scientific research, executive leadership in science and the responsibilities of a scientific leader, impact of science on globalization and international diplomacy, etc. The AMS policy program office will be consulted to help design the course curriculum. An overview of the steps involved in introducing the class will be presented at the meeting along with the latest course curriculum.

Mishra, S.; Parsons, D.

2012-12-01

356

Testing a Mahalanobis distance model of black bear habitat use in the Ouachita Mountains of Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Regional wildlife-habitat models are commonly developed but rarely tested with truly independent data. We tested a published habitat model for black bears {Ursus americanus) with new data collected in a different site in the same ecological region (i.e., Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma, USA). We used a Mahalanobis distance model developed from relocations of black bears in Arkansas to produce a map layer of Mahalanobis distances on a study area in neighboring Oklahoma. We tested this modeled map layer with relocations of black bears on the Oklahoma area. The distributions of relocations of female black bears were consistent with model predictions. We conclude that this modeling approach can be used to predict regional suitability for a species of interest.

Hellgren, E.C.; Bales, S.L.; Gregory, M.S.; Leslie, D.M., Jr.; Clark, J.D.

2007-01-01

357

Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy; November 16-17, 1996; Bartlesville, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Thirty-three Native American tribal members, council members, and other interested parties gathered in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, to attend the Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy on October 16 and 17 1996, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and BDM-Oklahoma, Inc. Tribes represented at the workshop included the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Hopi, Jicarilla Apache, Osage, Seminole, and Ute. Representatives of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and the Minerals Management Service (MMS) also attended. BDM-Oklahoma developed and organized the Native American Conference on Petroleum Energy to help meet the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Domestic Gas and Oil Initiative to help Native American Tribes become more self-sufficient in developing and managing petroleum resources.

NONE

1999-04-27

358

Summary of Sonic Boom Rise Times Observed During FAA Community Response Studies over a 6-Month Period in the Oklahoma City Area  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The sonic boom signature data acquired from about 1225 supersonic flights, over a 6-month period in 1964 in the Oklahoma City area, was enhanced with the addition of data relating to rise times and total signature duration. These later parameters, not available at the time of publication of the original report on the Oklahoma City sonic boom exposures, are listed in tabular form along with overpressure, positive impulse, positive duration, and waveform category. Airplane operating information along with the surface weather observations are also included. Sonic boom rise times include readings to the 1/2, 3/4, and maximum overpressure values. Rise time relative probabilities for various lateral locations from the ground track of 0, 5, and 10 miles are presented along with the variation of rise times with flight altitude. The tabulated signature data, along with corresponding airplane operating conditions and surface and upper level atmospheric information, are also available on electronic files to provide it in the format for more efficient and effective utilization.

Maglieri, Domenic J.; Sothcott, Victor E.

1990-01-01

359

Relations between extensional tectonics and magmatism within the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Variations in the geometry, distribution and thickness of Cambrian igneous and sedimentary units within southwest Oklahoma are related to a late Proterozoic - early Paleozoic rifting event which formed the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen. These rock units are exposed in the Wichita Mountains, southwest Olkahoma, located on the northern margin of a Proterozoic basin, identified in the subsurface by COCORP reflection data. Overprinting of the Cambrian extensional event by Pennyslvanian tectonism obsured the influence of pre-existing basement structures and contrasting basement lithologies upon the initial development of the aulacogen.

McConnell, D. A.; Gilbert, M. C.

360

Voluminous subalkaline silicic magmas related to intracontinental rifting in the southern Oklahoma aulacogen  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Extrusive rhyolites and cogenetic granites of the Wichita province genetically related to the southern Oklahoma aulacogen are entirely sub-alkaline in character. Peralkaline granites occur in the province but are volumetrically minor and have been interpreted by earlier workers as differentiation products of subalkaline magma. The large volumes of sub-alkaline silicic magma in the southern Oklahoma aulacogen represent a style of magmatism which contrasts markedly with the alkaline igneous activity generally associated with intracontinental rifting. *Present address: Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory and Department of Geological Sciences of Columbia University, Palisades, New York 10964

Hanson, Richard E.; Al-Shaieb, Zuhair

1980-04-01

361

Summary of proceedings: Oklahoma and Texas wind energy forum, April 2-3, 1981  

SciTech Connect

The Wind Energy Forum for Oklahoma and Texas was held at the Amarillo Quality Inn in Amarillo, Texas on April 2-3, 1981. Its purpose was to bring together the diverse groups involved in wind energy development in the Oklahoma and Texas region to explore the future commercial potential and current barriers to achieving this potential. Major topics of discussion included utility interconnection of wind machines and the buy-back rate for excess power, wind system reliability and maintenance concerns, machine performance standards, and state governmental incentives. A short summary of each presentation is included.

Nelson, S.C.; Ball, D.E.

1981-06-01

362

Hydrology of an abandoned coal-mining area near McCurtain, Haskell County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water quality was investigated from October 1980 to May 1983 in an area of abandoned coal mines in Haskell county, Oklahoma. Bedrock in the area is shale, siltstone, sandstone, and the McAlester (Stigler) and Hartshorne coals of the McAlester Formation and Hartshorne Sandstone of Pennsylvanian age. The two coal beds, upper and lower Hartshorne, associated with the Hartshorne Sandstone converge or are separated by a few feet or less of bony coal or shale in the McCurtain area. Many small faults cut the Hartshorne coal in all the McCurtain-area mines. The main avenues of water entry to and movement through the bedrock are the exposed bedding-plane openings between layers of sandstone, partings between laminae of shale, fractures and joints developed during folding and faulting laminae of shale, fractures and joints developed during folding and faulting of the brittle rocks, and openings caused by surface mining--the overburden being shattered and broken to form spoil. Water-table conditions exist in bedrock and spoil in the area. Mine pond water is in direct hydraulic connections with water in the spoil piles and the underlying Hartshorne Sandstone. Sulfate is the best indicator of the presence of coal-mine drainage in both surface and ground water in the Oklahoma coal field. Median sulfate concentrations for four sites on Mule Creek ranged from 26 to 260 milligrams per liter. Median sulfate concentrations increased with increased drainage from unreclaimed mined areas. The median sulfate concentration in Mule Creek where it drains the reclaimed area is less than one-third of that at the next site downstream where the stream begins to drain abandoned (unreclaimed) mine lands. Water from Mule Creek predominantly is a sodium sulfate type. Maximum and median values for specific conductance and concentrations of calcium, magnesium, sodium, sulfate, chloride, dissolved solids, and alkalinity increase as Mule Creek flows downstream and drains increasing areas of abandoned (unreclaimed) mining lands. Constituent concentrations in Mule Creek, except those for dissolved solids, iron, manganese, and sulfate, generally do not exceed drinking-water limits. Reclamation likely would result in decreased concentrations of dissolved solids, calcium, magnesium, sodium, sulfate, and alkalinity in Mule Creek in the vicinity of the reclaimed area. Ground water in the area is moderately hard to very hard alkaline water with a median pH of 7.2 to 7.6. It predominately is a sodium sulfate type and, except for dissolved solids, iron manganese, and sulfate, constituent concentrations generally do not exceed drinking-water limits. Ground-water quality would likely be unchanged by reclamation. The quality of water in the two mine ponds is quite similar to that of the shallow ground water in the area. Constituents in water from both ponds generally do not exceed drinking-water limits and the water quality is unlikely to be changed by reclamation in the area.

Slack, L.J.

1983-01-01

363

Hydrogeology of the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Murray County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Travertine District (Park) of the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, operated and maintained by the National Park Service, is near the City of Sulphur in south-central Oklahoma. The Park was established in 1902 because of its unique hydrologic setting, which includes Rock Creek, Travertine Creek, numerous mineralized and freshwater springs, and a dense cover of riparian vegetation. Since the turn of the century several flowing artesian wells have been drilled within and adjacent to the Park. Discharge from many of these springs and the numbers of flowing wells have declined substantially during the past 86 years. To determine the cause of these declines, a better understanding of the hydrologic system must be obtained. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, has appraised hydrologic information obtained for the Park from several studies conducted during 1902-87. The principal geologic units referred to in this report are the Arbuckle Group and the overlying Simpson Group. These rocks are of Upper Cambrian to Middle Ordovician age and are composed of dolomitic limestone, with some sandstones and shales in the Simpson Group. Surface geologic maps give a general understanding of the regional subsurface geology, but information about the subsurface geology within the Park is poor. The Simpson and Arbuckle aquifers are the principal aquifers in the study area. The two aquifers are not differentiated readily in some parts of the study area because of the similarity of the Simpson and Arbuckle rocks; thus, both water-bearing units are referred to frequently as the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer. The aquifers are confined under the Park, but are unconfined east and south of the Park. Precipitation on the outcrop area of the Arbuckle aquifer northeast and east of the Park recharges the freshwater springs (Antelope and Buffalo Springs) near the east boundary of the Park. The source of water from mineralized springs located in the central part of the Park, and flowing wells within and north of the Park, is believed to be a mix of waters from rocks of the Arbuckle and Simpson Groups. The source of water from two highly mineralized springs, Bromide and Medicine, that ceased to flow in the early 1970?s is believed to be from the Simpson Group. Water-quality characteristics reflect the sources of ground water in the study area. The highly mineralized springs near the western end of the Park are a sodium chloride type with dissolved solids greater than 4,500 mg/L. The freshwater springs near the eastern end of the Park are a calcium bicarbonate type with total dissolved solids of less than 400 mg/L. Flow from the artesian wells has declined substantially during the past 86 years and the wells are estimated to currently discharge only about 10 percent of the total flow reported in 1939. The depletion is believed to be caused by a gradual lowering of the hydraulic head within the aquifer. The influence on the hydrologic system of local municipal and industrial pumping from the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer is difficult to discern because the system is much more sensitive to precipitation than to pumpage. Ground-water levels and spring flows in this region respond rapidly to precipitation. The effects of withdrawals from the City of Sulphur and Oklahoma Gas and Electric Company power-plant water-well fields are not discernible at wells and springs. The hydrologic system may be influenced by pumping, particularly during extended dry periods of several years, but the impact of pumping on the system cannot be determined without further investigation.

Hanson, Ronald L.; Cates, Steven W.

1994-01-01

364

Shallow subsurface geological investigation near the Meers fault, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Meers fault is part of a complex system of northwest-trending faults forming the boundary between the Wichita Mountains (south) and the Anadarko basin (north). The frontal fault system is dominated by moderately dipping to steeply dipping reverse faults which have a combined net vertical displacement of over 9 km. Of these faults, the Meers fault has a Pennsylvanian-Permian throw of about 2 km. The Meers fault trends N. 60[degree]W. and displaces Permian conglomerate and shale for a distance of at least 26 km, from near the Comanche-Kiowa County boundary to East Cache Creek. At the northwest end of the fault trace, the fault displaces limestone-pebble conglomerates (Post Oak), whereas at the southeast end siltstones and calcrete-bearing shales of the Hennessey are displaced. Multiple radiocarbon ages of soil-humus samples from 2 Canyon Creek trenches (S24, T4N, R13W) show the last surface faulting occurred 1,200--1,300 yr ago. In 1988--89, the Oklahoma Geological Survey drilled 4 core holes to basement in the vicinity of the trench sites. The holes were drilled along a 200-m-long transect normal to the strike of the Meers fault. Two holes were drilled on the north side of the fault and penetrated highly fractured and altered rhyolite at about 58 m. A third hole drilled 25 m south of the fault, intersected weathered and sheared gabbro at 58 m. The basement material in the fourth hole consisted of dark greenish brown, highly fractured and sheared rock. The drill holes encountered Permian, poorly sorted, matrix-supported, 0.5--3 m thick, conglomerate interbedded with shale and siltstone. Drill holes 1--3 contained 3--5 m thick, granite cobble-boulder, clast supported conglomerate resting on rhyolite and/or gabbro. The core-hole information suggests the Meers-fault zone is at least 200 meters wide.

Luza, K.V. (Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States))

1993-02-01

365

Prevalence and species of ticks on horses in central Oklahoma.  

PubMed

Ticks are common on horses, but there is a dearth of contemporary data on infestation prevalence, predominant species, and tick-borne disease agents important in this host. To determine the species of ticks most common on horses and the prevalence of equine exposure to and infection with tick-borne disease agents, ticks and blood samples were collected from 73 horses during May, June, and July of 2010. Adult ticks were identified to species, and antibodies to Ehrlichia spp., Anaplasma spp., and Borrelia burgdorferi were identified using indirect fluorescence antibody assay, a commercial point-of-care enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, or both. In total, 1,721 ticks were recovered at the majority (85%) of equid examinations. Amblyomma americanum (L.) was the most common tick collected (1,598 out of 1,721; 92.9%) followed by Dermacentor variabilis (Say, 1821) (85 out of 1,721; 4.9%) and Amblyomma maculatum Koch, 1844 (36 out of 1,721; 2.1%); single specimens of Ixodes scapularis Say, 1821 and Dermacentor albipictus (Packard, 1869) were also identified. Antibodies reactive to Ehrlichia spp. were found in 18 out of 73 (24.7%) of horses tested, and were more commonly identified in horses with moderate or high tick infestations than those with low tick infestations (P < 0.001). These data support A. americanum as the most common tick species infesting horses in central Oklahoma from May through July and suggest horses are also commonly exposed to an Ehrlichia sp. PMID:24843940

Duell, Jason R; Carmichael, Robert; Herrin, Brian H; Holbrook, Todd C; Talley, Justin; Little, Susan E

2013-11-01

366

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Michael P. Masser  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University SRAC-361 and environmentally safe way to manage aquatic weeds. SRAC-360, Aquatic Weed Management - Control Methods, contains the foliage. Use only registered aquatic surfactants and follow product label directions. Surfactants

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

367

The Interrelationship of School District Expenditures and Student Academic Achievement in Oklahoma Public Elementary School Districts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose and Method of Study. The primary purpose of this quantitative study was to analyze the relationship between school district expenditures and student academic achievement in 102 public elementary school districts in the state of Oklahoma. The secondary purpose was to investigate the relationship between school district expenditures and…

Moore, Glenn M.

2012-01-01

368

Joseph P. Havlicek, Chuong T. Nguyen, and Mark Yeary University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA  

E-print Network

of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, USA ABSTRACT We compute joint AM-FM models that characterize infrared targets of nonstationary, quasi-sinusoidal functions admitting locally narrowband amplitude and frequency modulations spectrum, and multispectral color features that have been used in IR target detection and tracking systems

Havlicek, Joebob

369

Additional Records of the Little-Known Corixidea major (Heteroptera: Schizopteridae) from Arkansas and Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Corixidea major is reported for the first time from Arkansas and Oklahoma. Although described eighty years ago, this minute insect, measuring less than 1.5 mm, has remained one of the rarest North American heteropterans. Previously known only from the Florida, Tennessee, and Virginia, our records e...

370

LITTLE BLUESTEM [SCHIZACHYRIUM SCOPARIUM (MICHX.) NASH]: USEFUL FORAGE FOR GRAZING ANIMALS IN CENTRAL OKLAHOMA?  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium, SCSC) and big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii, ANGE) are among the dominant species of tallgrass prairie in central Oklahoma. Little bluestem is considered less valuable for grazing due to its tussock growth form and perceived lower forage quality. Productiv...

371

Faculty Research, Publications, In-Service Activities at Northeastern Oklahoma State University.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contained in this publication of Northeastern Oklahoma State University are faculty publications and research reports; abstracts fo faculty-student research projects; a list of individual and group inservice activities and research in progress by college department and divisions; and a bibliography of published articles, books, and creative works.…

Northeastern Oklahoma State Univ., Tahlequah.

372

Entomology and Plant Pathology, Oklahoma State University 127 Noble Research Center, Stillwater, OK 74078  

E-print Network

Entomology and Plant Pathology, Oklahoma State University 127 Noble Research Center, Stillwater, OK: Blackleg of Canola Jennifer DominiakOlson, Asst. Ext. Specialist, Plant Disease Diagnostician, Tom. Asst., OSU PASS A sample of canola plants was collected by Heath Sanders from Alfalfa County

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

373

Does Universal Preschool Improve Learning? Lessons from Georgia and Oklahoma. Backgrounder. No. 2272  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

More than a decade after offering students universal preschool, neither Georgia nor Oklahoma has shown impressive progress in student academic achievement, as measured by the National Assessment of Educational Progress. As Congress considers whether the federal government should encourage states to offer universal preschool, the author advocates…

Burke, Lindsey

2009-01-01

374

Discrimination against and Adaptation of Italians in the Coal Counties of Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the late 1800s and early 1900s coal reigned supreme in what is now southeastern Oklahoma. As was the case in the northeastern United States, Italians and other immigrants from southern and eastern Europe were brought in as a form of inexpensive labor to work the mines. Italians had different customs, a different language, a unique appearance,…

LoConto, David G.

2004-01-01

375

American Indian Women and Screening Mammography: Findings from a Qualitative Study in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Breast cancer is an important public health issue within the American Indian (AI) community in Oklahoma; however, there is limited information to explain the low screening mammography rates among AI women. Purpose: To identify the motivational factors affecting an AI woman's decision to obtain a mammogram. Methods: Through the use of…

Tolma, Eleni; Batterton, Chasity; Hamm, Robert M.; Thompson, David; Engelman, Kimberly K.

2012-01-01

376

A Survey of Nurse Training Needs in Oklahoma Health Care Institutions. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was conducted to identify staffing patterns for nursing personnel in the health care institutions of Oklahoma in order to predict future needs for nursing education and training. Structured interviews with administrators and directors of nursing from eighteen hospitals and eighteen nursing homes were used to elicit demographic data…

Frazier, William D.

377

Halotolerant Aerobic Heterotrophic Bacteria from the Great Salt Plains of Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Salt Plains National Wildlife Refuge (SPNWR) near Cherokee, Oklahoma, contains a barren salt flat where Permian brine rises to the surface and evaporates under dry conditions to leave a crust of white salt. Rainfall events dissolve the salt crust and create ephemeral streams and ponds. The rapidly changing salinity and high surface temperatures, salinity, and UV exposure make this

T. M. Caton; L. R. Witte; H. D. Ngyuen; J. A. Buchheim; M. A. Buchheim; M. A. Schneegurt

2004-01-01

378

Delivering an Organizational Leadership PhD Program at a Distance: University of Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this chapter, the authors identify and review a number of key features in the successful development and maintenance of a PhD program delivered at a distance. The University of Oklahoma's PhD program in organizational leadership was developed in the early 1990s and delivered (primarily, but not completely) to military personnel and families…

Rodgers, Joseph Lee; Williams, T. H. Lee

2011-01-01

379

Five Indian Tribes of Eastern Oklahoma: Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, Seminole.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 18 lessons in this unit of study are intended to promote an awareness of the contribution of the American Indian to the development of Oklahoma and to preserve the culture and heritage of the American Indians of the state. Each lesson includes a concept (one-sentence statement of the main idea), background information, learning activities…

Milligan, Dorothy; Bland, Anna

380

Comparision of production and n consentration of Indian-origin guar (Cyanoposis Tetragonoloba) lines in Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The warm-season pulse guar (Cyanoposis tetragonoloba) has potential to provide alternative crops for the southern Great Plains (SGP). This study evaluated the potential of 3 Indian-origin lines of guar for forage and grain production in Oklahoma, and nitrogen (N) concentrations of biomass. Replicate...

381

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programs (IBDP) in Oklahoma: A Mixed Methods Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scope and Method of Study: As Oklahoma grows in technical markets, the need for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) educated individuals will continue to increase. Our focus in aviation should be at focusing to attract students into STEM related fields, however, a stronger focus needs to be in retaining the top tier category…

Hood, Susan J.

2012-01-01

382

Twenty-Second Annual Report of Indian Education in Oklahoma Under State Contract.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Prepared by the director of Indian Education in Oklahoma, this 1968-69 annual report presents information and statistical data pertaining to each district supported by Johnson O'Malley (JOM) funds. Discussed in the narrative portion are the visiting coordinator program and its accomplishments, the basis on which JOM funds are allocated, the…

Laney, L. J.

383

Multi-year precipitation variations and water resources in west-central Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Persistent, multi-year departures in annual precipitation from mean have been observed in central Oklahoma. Precipitation departures caused by a sequence of predominantly wet or dry years and lasting 5 or more years are called wet or dry periods, respectively. Impacts of wet and dry periods on water...

384

Making Traditional Spaces: Cultural Compromise at Two-Spirit Gatherings in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ways in which men in the Green Country Two-Spirit Society of Oklahoma use the annual gathering to compensate for the lack of opportunities to express sexual identity and gender difference within mainstream Native cultural contexts is discussed. Two-spirit men have developed alternative communal spaces in which to express both their indigenous…

Gilley, Brian Joseph

2004-01-01

385

Oklahoma Special Education-Vocational Rehabilitation Cooperative Work-Study Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oklahoma's work study program for handicapped high school students, a cooperative effort between public schools and the State Departments of Education and Human Services, is described. Responsibilities of each party are discussed, and basic training elements (adjustment training, career awareness, and employer-employee relations) are noted.…

Green, Lowell E.; Jones, C. D., Jr.

386

CHARACTERIZATION OF SUBSURFACE BACTERIA ASSOCIATED WITH TWO SHALLOW AQUIFERS IN OKLAHOMA  

EPA Science Inventory

The bacterial microflora of two shallow aquifers in Oklahoma was characterized by direct observation with light (LM) and electron microscopy (EM), by plating, and by examination of colony morphology and distribution. Total cell counts varied only slightly from sample to sample, w...

387

78 FR 73858 - Public Water System Supervision Program Revision for the State of Oklahoma  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Oklahoma has adopted three EPA drinking water rules, namely the: (1) Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT2), (2) the Stage 2 Disinfectants...Byproducts Rule (DBP2), and (3) the Ground Water Rule (GWR). EPA has determined...

2013-12-09

388

30 CFR 936.15 - Approval of Oklahoma regulatory program amendments.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2-7-6; 2-8; 20-15-11 through 14. September 30, 1999 December 17, 1999 Oklahoma Bond Release Guidelines...Appendix A; Policy Statements dated May 21, 1996, and September 30, 1999. January 13, 2000 May 26,...

2010-07-01

389

A Study of the Needs of Oklahoma Citizens for Information About Vocational-Technical Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study was undertaken to identify the kinds of information that the Oklahoma public wants about vocational education. Two data collection methodologies were used, the Delphi Technique and task force procedure. Participants were 240 volunteers from a statewide master list of 653 persons selected as representative. After four meetings the task…

DeGuglielmo, Bob; And Others

390

Fort Cobb Reservoir Watershed, Oklahoma and Thika River Watershed, Kenya Twinning Pilot Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Fort Cobb Reservoir Watershed (FCRW) (830 km2) is a watershed within the HELP Washita Basin, located in Caddo and Washita Counties, OK. It is also a benchmark watershed under USDA's Conservation Effects Assessment Project, a national project to quantify environmental effects of USDA and other conservation programs. Population in south-western Oklahoma, in which FCRW is located, is sparse and

D. Moriasi; J. Steiner; J. Arnold; P. Allen; J. Dunbar; C. Shisanya; J. Gathenya; J. Nyaoro; J. Sang

2007-01-01

391

Ecological Investigation of the Invasive White Perch in Kaw Lake, Oklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following an unintentional introduction of white perch (Morone americana) into Kaw Reservoir, Oklahoma, questions were raised about the potential impacts this new spe- cies may have on resident sport fish populations. White perch, white crappie (Pomoxis annularis), and white bass (Morone chrysops) were collected from 2001 through 2004 using a variety of sampling techniques. White perch catch rates were low

Kurt E. Kuklinski

2007-01-01

392

VILAS A. PRABHU M.B.A., Management/ Finance, Southwestern Oklahoma State University -1991  

E-print Network

VILAS A. PRABHU Education: M.B.A., Management/ Finance, Southwestern Oklahoma State University -1991 Ph.D., Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Texas at Austin - 1977 M.S., Pharmaceutical /Professional Development Experiences: 2006 Institute of Education Management (IEM), Harvard University School

Hardy, Christopher R.

393

ECONOMIC INJURY LEVEL FOR THE GREENBUG, SCHIZAPHIS GRAMINUM, IN OKLAHOMA WINTER WHEAT  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The effect of greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Rondani), feeding on the yield of winter wheat cultivars was studied during four years in central Oklahoma. Each year, a 0.4-ha planting of 'Karl' (1993), 'Karl-92' (1995, 1996, and 1997), or '2163 (1997) winter wheat was made between October 1 and 15. ...

394

A Strategic Action Plan for Building Oklahoma's Future. Enacting the NCTAF Recommendations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet presents a plan for improving Oklahoma's K-12 education. Section 1, "Getting Serious about Standards for Both Students and Teachers," includes: developing high quality student standards linked to high quality teacher standards; establishing state professional standards boards; professionally accrediting all schools of education;…

Oklahoma State Commission for Teacher Preparation.

395

Baseline ambient gaseous ammonia concentrations in the Four Corners area and eastern Oklahoma, USA.  

PubMed

Ambient ammonia monitoring using Ogawa passive samplers was conducted in the Four Corners area and eastern Oklahoma, USA during 2007. The resulting data will be useful in the multipollutant management of ozone, nitrogen oxides, and visibility (atmospheric regional haze) in the Four Corners area, an area with growing oil/gas production and increasing coal-based power plant construction. The passive monitoring data also add new ambient ammonia concentration information for the U.S. and will be useful to scientists involved in present and future visibility modeling exercises. Three week integrated passive ammonia samples were taken at five sites in the Four Corners area and two sites in eastern Oklahoma from December, 2006 through December, 2007 (January, 2008 for two sites). Results show significantly higher regional background ammonia concentrations in eastern Oklahoma (1.8 parts per billion (ppb) arithmetic mean) compared to the Four Corners area (0.2 ppb arithmetic mean). Annual mean ammonia concentrations for all Four Corners area sites for the 2007 study ranged from 0.2 ppb to 1.5 ppb. Peak ambient ammonia concentrations occurred in the spring and summer in both areas. The passive samplers deployed at the Stilwell, Oklahoma site compared favorably with other passive samplers and a continuous ammonia monitoring instrument. PMID:18974901

Sather, Mark E; Mathew, Johnson; Nguyen, Nghia; Lay, John; Golod, George; Vet, Robert; Cotie, Joseph; Hertel, Terry; Aaboe, Erik; Callison, Ryan; Adam, Jacque; Keese, Danielle; Freise, Jeremy; Hathcoat, April; Sakizzie, Brenda; King, Michael; Lee, Chris; Oliva, Sylvia; San Miguel, George; Crow, Leon; Geasland, Frank

2008-11-01

396

Watershed sediment yield reduction through soil conservation in a west-central Oklahoma watershed  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Soil conservation practices on the Fort Cobb Reservoir watershed in West-Central Oklahoma were few before the 1950s. In the second half of the 20th century, extensive soil conservation measures were implemented to protect agriculturally fertile but erosion-prone soils. Fortuitously, the U.S. Geolo...

397

Not Gone with the Wind: Libraries in Oklahoma in the 1930s  

Microsoft Academic Search

:Oklahoma in the 1930s dealt with severe depression and drought, both of which affected the development of the state's public libraries. While the libraries experienced growth at the beginning of the century, helped along by the contributions of women's clubs, the establishment of a state library association and agency, and funding legislation, leaner times appeared in the middle years of

Allen Finchum; Tanya Ducker Finchum

2011-01-01

398

Not Gone with the Wind: Libraries in Oklahoma in the 1930s  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oklahoma in the 1930s dealt with severe depression and drought, both of which affected the development of the state's public libraries. While the libraries experienced growth at the beginning of the century, helped along by the contributions of women's clubs, the establishment of a state library association and agency, and funding legislation, leaner times appeared in the middle years of

Allen Finchum; Tanya Ducker Finchum

2011-01-01

399

The role of seed predation in the maintenance of the Cross Timbers ecotone of Oklahoma, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

I investigated how seed predation differed among tree species and among microhabitats across the Cross Timbers and what that variation may tell us about how this ecotone is maintained. The ecotone is located in Oklahoma, USA, between the eastern deciduous forest and tallgrass prairie where seeds of eight common tree species were placed in three microhabitats (oak forest, tallgrass prairie,

Randall W. Myster

2012-01-01

400

OATE Journal: Oklahoma Association of Teacher Educators. Volume 14, Spring 2010  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "OATE Journal" is published annually by the Oklahoma Association of Teacher Educators. Articles in this issue include: (1) "The Transition of Middle School Students into High School" by Aric Sappington, Malinda Hendricks Green, Jennifer J. R. Endicott, and Susan C. Scott; (2) "Graduate Students' Perceptions of Teacher Effectiveness" by Sarah…

Green, Malinda Hendricks, Ed.

2010-01-01

401

'Right-to-Work' Laws and Economic Development in Oklahoma. Briefing Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The bulk of this position paper consists of statements in opposition to a September 2001 referendum on adopting 'right-to-work' (RTW) legislation in Oklahoma. The statements are by Joan Fitzgerald, William Sschweke, Raymond Hogler, Steven Shulman, Stephan Weiler, Ann Markusen, Robert G. Lynch, David R. Howell, James Galbraith, Colin Gordon, Wim…

Mishel, Lawrence, Ed.

402

OSU Human Resources 106 Whitehurst, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (405) 744-5449 PREGNANCY, NEWBORN  

E-print Network

OSU Human Resources ­ 106 Whitehurst, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 ­ (405) 744-5449 PREGNANCY to help guide you through your pregnancy up to six weeks after birth. The program offers a healthy pregnancy calendar, videos on topics such as eating habits, exercise, and stress, physical/emotional changes

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

403

Roster of Oklahoma Public and Institutional Libraries. July 1, 1994 - June 30, 1995.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is a directory of Oklahoma public libraries and library boards, institutional libraries, and key personnel. The first section, which makes up the bulk of this publication is an alphabetical listing by library community of public libraries, complete with address, phone and fax numbers, staff, and board members. The second section…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Libraries, Oklahoma City.

404

Serologic Survey of Oklahoma Rodents: Evidence for the Presence of a Hantavirus and an Arenavirus  

Microsoft Academic Search

We conducted a statewide survey of Oklahoma small mammals to test for antibod- ies against rodent-borne viral diseases. Four rodent species had antibody to Sin Nombre virus (SNV), the primary causative agent of hantavirus pulmonary syn- drome (HPS), and two species had antibody to Whitewater Arroyo virus, an arenavirus associated with human fatalities. The rodent reservoirs for other HPS- causing

Richard A. Nisbett; Michael D. Stuart; Gloria M. Caddell; Charles H. Calisher

2001-01-01

405

40 CFR 272.1851 - Oklahoma State-administered program: Final authorization.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...from the State's Office of Administrative...OK 73152-3390; Phone number: 405-521-4911...Minnesota 55164- 0526; Phone: 1-800-328-4880...Dallas, Texas 75202 (Phone number (214) 665-8533...material at NARA, call 202-741-6030... (ii) Oklahoma Open Meetings Act,...

2011-07-01

406

The Vascular Flora of the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, Osage County, Oklahoma  

E-print Network

The Vascular Flora of the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, Osage County, Oklahoma Michael W. Palmer, environmental, and taxonomic research (Palmer et al. 2000). The purpose of this paper is to present a checklist of the preserve are in Hamil- ton (1996) and a brief description of research projects at the preserve is in Palmer

Palmer, Michael W.

407

Long-term directional changes in upland Quercus forests throughout Oklahoma, USA  

E-print Network

Santis, Stephen W. Hallgren, Thomas B. Lynch, Jesse A. Burton & Michael W. Palmer Abstract Questions: (1) How have Palmer Drought Severity Index. Introduction Anthropogenic changes in disturbance regimes have altered Agricultural Hall, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, USA. Palmer, M. W. (mike.palmer

Palmer, Michael W.

408

Integrated science to support the assessment of conservation practices in the Fort Cobb watershed, southwestern Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Remediating non-point source pollution in agricultural watersheds remains an intransigent problem worldwide. Conservation and research in an agricultural watershed above the Fort Cobb Reservoir in southwestern Oklahoma serves as a case study in how a multitude of players address such a challenge. ...

409

Knocking at the College Door: Projections of High School Graduates. Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

National and regional trends mask important variation among states in the supply of high school graduates. This profile provides brief indicators for Oklahoma related to: current levels of educational attainment, projections of high school graduates into the future, and two common barriers to student access and success--insufficient academic…

Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2013

2013-01-01

410

76 FR 23639 - Oklahoma Disaster #OK-00046 Declaration of Economic Injury  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...of an Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) declaration for the State of Oklahoma, dated 04/19/2011. Incident: Severe snow storms. Incident Period: 01/31/2011 through 02/05/2011. Effective Date: 04/19/2011. EIDL Loan...

2011-04-27

411

INTENSIVE SURVEY OF THE ILLINOIS RIVER (ARKANSAS AND OKLAHOMA) IN AUGUST 1985  

EPA Science Inventory

A water quality survey of the Illinois River Basin was conducted August 16-29, 1985, in response to concerns that water clarity had decreased in the lower reach which is designated as an Oklahoma scenic river. The survey results demonstrated that background phosphorus concentrati...

412

75 FR 19667 - Oklahoma Disaster # OK-00036 Declaration of Economic Injury  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) declaration for the State of Oklahoma, dated 04/09/2010. Incident: Severe Freezing Rain, Ice and Snowstorms. Incident Period: 01/28/2010 through 02/18/2010. Effective Date: 04/09/2010. EIDL...

2010-04-15

413

Journalism in the Community Classroom: A Curriculum Model for Cultural Journalism in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper introduces the medium of cultural journalism as an effective means of intensified basic communication training and community involvement. Part one contains a report of a needs assessment and a subsequent pilot project on cultural journalism that was conducted at an Oklahoma high school. The needs assessment also reports on similar…

Howard, Linda C.

414

The Fiscal Impact of Tax-Credit Scholarships in Oklahoma. State Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study seeks to provide outcomes-based information on Oklahoma's proposal to give tax credits for contributing to organizations that provide scholarships to K-12 private schools. The study constructs a model to determine the fiscal impact of tax-credit scholarships on the state and on local school districts. The author estimates the impact…

Gottlob, Brian

2011-01-01

415

Indian Education in Eastern Oklahoma. A Report of Fieldwork Among the Cherokee. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A field study of Cherokee Indians in Eastern Oklahoma revealed the following information: (1) educators were ignorant of and indifferent to the language, values, and cultural traditions of the Tribal (rural) Cherokee; (2) the Tribal Cherokees were an impoverished people; (3) both adults and children were educationally disadvantaged; and (4) Tribal…

Wax, Murray L.; And Others

416

Shallow seismic reflection profile of the Meers fault, Comanche County, Oklahoma  

E-print Network

.J., The Meers fault tectonic activity in south- western Oklahoma, U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, NUREG ICR-4852, 1-25, A1-A25, 1987. McLean, R., and Stearns, D.W., Fault analysis in the Wichita Mountains [Abs. ], AAPG Bull. 67, 511-512, 1983. Miller...

Myers, Paul B.; Miller, Richard D.; Steeples, Don W.

1987-07-01

417

DISTRIBUTION OF PROTOZOA IN SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS OF A PRISTINE GROUNDWATER STUDY SITE IN OKLAHOMA (JOURNAL VERSION)  

EPA Science Inventory

Most-probable-number counting methods were applied to determine the distribution of protozoa in a depth profile at a groundwater microbiology study site near Lula, Oklahoma in January and June, 1985. Aseptic procedures were used to ensure minimal airborne contamination samples. N...

418

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Spoken Language with Power Point  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Spoken Language with Power Point® Category Description® presentation in a Native American language. Presentations may cover any number of topics and should use is to demonstrate Native American language use, so the focus of the Power Point® should be Native American language

Oklahoma, University of

419

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Poster Art on the Language Theme  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Poster Art on the Language Theme Category Description artwork that may include Native American language. When creating your posters or instructing your students, and therefore will not be judged. · Words in the artwork must be in a Native American Language. Words

Oklahoma, University of

420

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Song in Native American Language  

E-print Network

OKLAHOMA NATIVE AMERICAN YOUTH LANGUAGE FAIR Song in Native American Language Category Description Students are invited to perform in songs in Native American languages, and be accompanied by music if needed. Please remember that the point of the ONAYLF is to demonstrate Native American language use

Oklahoma, University of

421

Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History Department of Native American Languages  

E-print Network

Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History Department of Native American Languages Restrictions archives for language materials, especially for Native Americans. A. The Department of Native American collections in the Department of Native American Languages archives: · central location for Tribal access

Oklahoma, University of

422

Integrated grassland observation sites and integrated cropland observation sites at El Reno, Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

With the financial support from the National Science Foundation and the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, a team of researchers from the University of Oklahoma and the USDA ARS Grazinglands Research Laboratory have worked together and established two Integrated Grassland Observation s...

423

Twenty-Ninth Annual Report of Indian Education in Eastern Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Comprised mainly of tabular data, this 1975-76 annual report on the American Indian Education Program in Eastern Oklahoma presents statistics, a brief narrative highlighting the year's accomplishments, and an appendix. Specifically, this report includes statistical tables on the: number of schools; enrollment and average daily attendance of all…

James, Overton

424

Oklahoma City FILM Even Start Family Literacy Program Evaluation, 2000-2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents findings from the evaluation of the Oklahoma City Public Schools Even Start Program, also called the Family Intergenerational Literacy Model (FILM), now in its twelfth full year of operation. The evaluation focuses on the total population of adult students, preschoolers, adult graduates, and preschool graduates. The…

Richardson, Donna Castle; Shove, Joanie; Brickman, Sharon; Terrell, Sherry; Shields, Jane

425

77 FR 54922 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease OKNM 119314, Oklahoma  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for reinstatement of oil and gas lease OKNM 119314 from the lessee Jones Energy, Ltd., for lands in Woodward County, Oklahoma. The petition was filed on time and was accompanied by all the...

2012-09-06

426

March 4, 2015 | Hyatt Regency Hotel | Tulsa, Oklahoma Please Register by February 20, 2015  

E-print Network

March 4, 2015 | Hyatt Regency Hotel | Tulsa, Oklahoma Please Register by February 20, 2015 Learn, startup companies and non-profit organizations. Today she is Chief Design Officer at The Medicines Company a Life" Shannon Mabrey Rotenberg, an Oklahoman native, started her career with non-profit organizations

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

427

Literacy and Education among Adult Indians in Oklahoma. Volume II: Appendixes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The second volume in a 3-volume report on the Adult Indian Education Project (AIEP, a 15-month U.S. Office of Education project designed to identify the literacy levels and educational needs of Oklahoma's adult American Indians), this volume presents supporting data in the form of appendices to Volume I. These appendices include: (1) Tribal…

Hall, Paul R.; And Others

428

A Total Lightning Perspective of the 20 May 2013 Moore, Oklahoma Supercell  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the early afternoon of 20 May 2013, a storm initiated to the west-southwest of Newcastle, Oklahoma. This storm would rapidly intensify into the parent supercell of the tornado that struck the city of Moore, Oklahoma. This article describes what contributions total lightning observations from the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array could provide to operational forecasters had these observations been available in real-time. This effort includes a focus on the GOES-R pseudo-geostationary lightning mapper demonstration product as well as the NASA SPoRT / Meteorological Development Laboratory's total lightning tracking tool. These observations and tools identified several contributions. Two distinct lightning jumps at 1908 and 1928 UTC provided a lead time of 19 minutes ahead of severe hail and 26 minutes ahead of the Moore, Oklahoma tornado's touchdown. These observations provide strong situational awareness to forecasters, as the lightning jumps are related to the rapid strengthening of the storm's updraft and mesocyclone and serve as a precursor to the stretching of the storm vortex ahead severe weather.

Stano, Geoffrey T.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Carey, Lawrence D.; MacGorman, Don R.; Calhoun, Kristin M.

2014-01-01

429

Report on the projected future climate of the Fort Cobb Watershed, Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This report provides technical information on projected climate change and associated monotonic trends of precipitation and air temperature at the ARS Fort Cobb Experimental Watershed in west-central Oklahoma. The report is an attachment to the full report of the multi-location project MLP 464: “Est...

430

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Case Medlin  

E-print Network

),Scotchthistle(Onopordiumacanthium),distaffthistle (Carthamus lanatus), and Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense). These five thistles were introduced from Europe not allowed to flower, and no other infestations have been reported. Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense) (Figure in Oklahoma include bull thistle (Cirsium vulgare), musk thistle (Carduus nutans

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

431

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Terrence G. Bidwell  

E-print Network

Early records indicate that historically the eastern wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris) was found throughout the eastern two-thirds of Oklahoma and the Rio Grande turkey (Meleagris gallopavo belong to the single and variable species Meleagris gallopavo with six recognized subspecies; two

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

432

Oklahoma State University doesn't have a material science department,  

E-print Network

to ceramics, to develop new materials for dental crowns. Smay was first exposed to the "robocasting technique perfected with his robocasting technique. s A new approach for fabricating dental crowns may transform the dental industry. Scientists Developing New Dental Materials Photo by Erika Contreras Research at Oklahoma

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

433

First report of seedling blight caused by Sclerotium rolfsii on wheat in Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is an important crop in Oklahoma and throughout the Central Plains of the United States. The soilborne fungus, Sclerotium rolfsii, is a major pathogen on peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) but is not known to cause major damage on wheat. During September of 1998, damping-off...

434

Building the Future: From Stone Age to Space Age in Oklahoma.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fourth-graders in Oklahoma City used the Internet to find an expert to identify a 75-pound Pleistocene-Era mammoth femur they found in a nearby river. A superintendent explains how his technologically backward district wired its schools for Internet learning and facilitated genuine instructional improvement. (MLH)

Kitchens, Joe

2000-01-01

435

Automation of Oklahoma School Library Media Centers: Directory of Computer Applications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This directory is designed to allow media specialists in regional areas of Oklahoma to share their experiences in computer applications for libraries. The first of two sections lists schools using computers for circulation, computerized catalogs, library management, CD-ROM, laser disk programs, and online information systems. Schools are listed…

Estes-Rickner, Bettie, Ed.

436

State Teacher Policy Yearbook: What States Can Do to Retain Effective New Teachers, 2008. Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents the Oklahoma edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's 2008 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook". The 2008 "Yearbook" focuses on how state policies impact the retention of effective new teachers. This policy evaluation is broken down into three areas that encompass 15 goals. Broadly, these goals examine the impact of…

National Council on Teacher Quality, 2008

2008-01-01

437

75 FR 36609 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

The EPA proposes to codify in the regulations entitled ``Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Programs'', Oklahoma's authorized hazardous waste program. The EPA will incorporate by reference into the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) those provisions of the State regulations that are authorized and that the EPA will enforce under the Solid Waste Disposal Act, commonly referred to as the......

2010-06-28

438

77 FR 46994 - Oklahoma: Incorporation by Reference of State Hazardous Waste Management Program  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

The EPA proposes to codify in the regulations entitled ``Approved State Hazardous Waste Management Programs'', Oklahoma's authorized hazardous waste program. The EPA will incorporate by reference into the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) those provisions of the State regulations that are authorized and that the EPA will enforce under the Solid Waste Disposal Act, commonly referred to as the......

2012-08-07

439

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA BOND ISSUE TAX CODE AND SECURITIES LAW COMPLIANCE  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA BOND ISSUE TAX CODE AND SECURITIES LAW COMPLIANCE POLICY I. GENERAL and Federal law pertaining to issuance and existence of governmental bonds, including but not limited to, the "Code"), provisions of Federal securities laws, including those statutes, rules and regulations

Oklahoma, University of

440

UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA BOND ISSUE TAX CODE AND SECURITIES LAW COMPLIANCE  

E-print Network

-1- UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA BOND ISSUE TAX CODE AND SECURITIES LAW COMPLIANCE POLICY I. GENERAL and Federal law pertaining to issuance and existence of governmental bonds, including but not limited to, the "Code"), provisions of Federal securities laws, including those statutes, rules and regulations

Oklahoma, University of

441

Aphids and parasitoids in wheat and nearby canola fields in central Oklahoma  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In central Oklahoma, winter canola has recently become the primary rotational winter crop with wheat. Annual aphid pest outbreaks in canola have resulted in widespread insecticide applications. Insect parasitoids, which frequently suppress aphids in nearby wheat, may move to canola due to the larg...

442

Plan of study for the High Plains regional aquifer-system analysis in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Ogallala Formation and associated Tertiary and Quarternary deposits from the principal aquifers supporting irrigation in the High Plains of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. The volume of water in storage within the aquifers is declining in most of the High Plains because water is being withdrawn in excess of the rate of replenishment. The U.S. Geological Survey has initiated a 5-year study of the High Plains aquifer system to develop the geohydrologic data base and computer models of the ground-water flow system needed to evaluate the response of the aquifer system to ground-water management alternatives. This report describes the objectives, plan, and organization of the study and outlines the work to be accomplished in each State in the study area. (Woodard-USGS)

Weeks, John B.

1978-01-01

443

Chemical analysis of water samples and geophysical logs from cored test holes drilled in the central Oklahoma Aquifer, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Chemical analyses of water from eight test holes and geophysical logs for nine test holes drilled in the Central Oklahoma aquifer are presented. The test holes were drilled to investigate local occurrences of potentially toxic, naturally occurring trace substances in ground water. These trace substances include arsenic, chromium, selenium, residual alpha-particle activities, and uranium. Eight of the nine test holes were drilled near wells known to contain large concentrations of one or more of the naturally occurring trace substances. One test hole was drilled in an area known to have only small concentrations of any of the naturally occurring trace substances. Water samples were collected from one to eight individual sandstone layers within each test hole. A total of 28 water samples, including four duplicate samples, were collected. The temperature, pH, specific conductance, alkalinity, and dissolved-oxygen concentrations were measured at the sample site. Laboratory determinations included major ions, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, and trace elements (aluminum, arsenic, barium, beryllium, boron, cadmium, chromium, hexavalent chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, lithium, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, silver, strontium, vanadium, and zinc). Radionuclide activities and stable isotope d values also were determined, including: gross-alpha-particle activity, gross-beta-particle activity, radium-226, radium-228, radon-222, uranium-234, uranium-235, uranium-238, total uranium, carbon-13/carbon-12, deuterium/hydrogen-1, oxygen-18/oxygen-16, and sulfur-34/sulfur-32. Additional analyses of arsenic and selenium species are presented for selected samples as well as analyses of density and iodine for two samples, tritium for three samples, and carbon-14 for one sample. Geophysical logs for most test holes include caliper, neutron, gamma-gamma, natural-gamma logs, spontaneous potential, long- and short-normal resistivity, and single-point resistance. Logs for test-hole NOTS 7 do not include long- and short-normal resistivity, spontaneous-potential, or single-point resistivity. Logs for test-hole NOTS 7A include only caliper and natural-gamma logs.

Schlottmann, Jamie L.; Funkhouser, Ron A.

1991-01-01

444

Promoting Student Engagement and Creativity by Infusing Art across the Curriculum: The Arts Integration Initiative at Oklahoma City University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Christopher E. Garrett describes a faculty learning community program at Oklahoma City University that focused on improving teaching and learning through integrating the arts in a variety of disciplines, some of which may surprise you. (Contains 9 notes.)

Garrett, Christopher E.

2013-01-01

445

The Impact of Declining Groundwater Supply in the Northern High Plains of Texas and Oklahoma on Expenditures for Community Services  

E-print Network

Reduced availability of groundwater in the Northern High Plains of Texas and Oklahoma is expected to have repercussions throughout the regional economy due to the reduction in agricultural income. The decline in the economic base is expected to lead...

Williford, G. H.; Beattie, B. R.; Lacewell, R. D.

446

78 FR 45266 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Resource Management Plan for the Oklahoma, Kansas, and Texas...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Prepare a Resource Management Plan for the Oklahoma...Kansas, and Texas Planning Area and an Associated...Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION...where applicable, management decisions brought...from existing planning documents....

2013-07-26

447

Employee Performance Evaluation & Development Guidelines University of Oklahoma staff performance evaluations will be conducted in accordance with the  

E-print Network

Employee Performance Evaluation & Development Guidelines University of Oklahoma staff performance levels of performance; · Assist employee and supervisor in identifying future performance goals the performance discussion. Adequate time should be allowed for preparation, performance review and the feedback

Oklahoma, University of

448

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Weed Control in Christmas tree plantations is one of  

E-print Network

Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources · Oklahoma State University Weed Control.Weedscompeteforwater,nutrients,andlight andextendthetimerequiredtoproduceamarketabletree. Successful weed control helps the grower produce high.Finally, reductionofweedsreducesinterferencewithlaborandequip- mentmovementandimprovestheplantation'sappearance forconsumers. Methods of Weed Control Site

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

449

Gaseous Oxidized Mercury Dry Deposition Measurements in Southwestern USA: Comparison between texas, Eastern Oklahoma, and the Four Corners Area  

EPA Science Inventory

Gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) dry deposition measurements using aerodynamic surrogate surface passive samplers were collected in central and eastern Texas and eastern Oklahoma, from September 2011 to September 2012.The purpose of this study was to provide an initial characteriza...

450

Fate and groundwater impacts of produced water releases at OSPER "B" site, Osage County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

For the last 5 a, the authors have been investigating the transport, fate, natural attenuation and ecosystem impacts of inorganic and organic compounds in releases of produced water and associated hydrocarbons at the Osage-Skiatook Petroleum Environmental Research (OSPER) "A" and "B" sites, located in NE Oklahoma. Approximately 1.0 ha of land at OSPER "B", located within the active Branstetter lease, is visibly affected by salt scarring, tree kills, soil salinization, and brine and petroleum contamination. Site "B" includes an active production tank battery and adjacent large brine pit, two injection well sites, one with an adjacent small pit, and an abandoned brine pit and tank battery site. Oil production in this lease started in 1938, and currently there are 10 wells that produce 0.2-0.5 m3/d (1-3 bbl/d) oil, and 8-16 m3/d (50-100 bbl/d) brine. Geochemical data from nearby oil wells show that the produced water source is a Na-Ca-Cl brine (???150,000 mg/L TDS), with high Mg, but low SO4 and dissolved organic concentrations. Groundwater impacts are being investigated by detailed chemical analyses of water from repeated sampling of 41 boreholes, 1-71 m deep. The most important results at OSPER "B" are: (1) significant amounts of produced water from the two active brine pits percolate into the surficial rocks and flow towards the adjacent Skiatook reservoir, but only minor amounts of liquid petroleum leave the brine pits; (2) produced-water brine and minor dissolved organics have penetrated the thick (3-7 m) shale and siltstone units resulting in the formation of three interconnected plumes of high-salinity water (5000-30,000 mg/L TDS) that extend towards the Skiatook reservoir from the two active and one abandoned brine pits; and (3) groundwater from the deep section of only one well, BR-01 located 330 m upslope and west of the site, appear not to be impacted by petroleum operations. ?? 2007.

Kharaka, Y.K.; Kakouros, E.; Thordsen, J.J.; Ambats, G.; Abbott, M.M.

2007-01-01

451

Interpretation of Pennsylvania Bartlesville sandstone in southeastern Kansas and northeastern Oklahoma from continuous dipmeter and gamma-ray logs  

E-print Network

INTERPRETATION OF PENNSYLVANIAN BARTLESVILLE SANDSTONE IN SOUTHEASTERN KANSAS AND NORTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA FROM CONTINUOUS DIPMETER AND GAMMA-RAY LOGS A Thesis by DWIGHT STANLEY KRANZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... Oklahoma from Continuous Diometer and Gamma-Ray Logs (May 1981) Dwight Stanley Kranz, B. S. , Texas aBI1 L~niversity Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Robert R. Berg The Bartlesville sandstones form stratigraohic traps which have produced...

Kranz, Dwight Stanley

1981-01-01

452

Climate Change Impacts on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer in South-Central Oklahoma due to Projected Precipitation Variations  

E-print Network

Precipitation Variations on the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer in South-Central Oklahoma due to Projected Climate Change Impacts Cesalea N. Osborne Environmental Science Haskell Indian Nations University This project was sponsored by Kiksapa Consulting... through NASA CAN NNX10AU65A The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer spans five counties in south-central Oklahoma: Carter, Coal, Johnston, Murray, and Pontotoc Base Data • Aquifer study area, roads, rural/non-rural communities, state/county boundaries Methodology...

Osborne, Cesalea

2014-11-19

453

Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class I oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Final report, August 1998  

SciTech Connect

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geo Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma have engaged in a five-year program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program included a systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all FDD oil reservoirs in Oklahoma and the recovery technologies that have been (or could be) applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. The execution of this project was approached in phases. The first phase began in January, 1993 and consisted of planning, play identification and analysis, data acquisition, database development, and computer systems design. By the middle of 1994, many of these tasks were completed or nearly finished including the identification of all FDD reservoirs in Oklahoma, data collection, and defining play boundaries. By early 1995, a preliminary workshop schedule had been developed for project implementation and technology transfer activities. Later in 1995, the play workshop and publication series was initiated with the Morrow and the Booch plays. Concurrent with the initiation of the workshop series was the opening of a computer user lab that was developed for use by the petroleum industry. Industry response to the facility initially was slow, but after the first year lab usage began to increase and is sustaining. The remaining six play workshops were completed through 1996 and 1997, with the project ending on December 31, 1997.

Banken, M.K.

1998-11-01

454

The Deese and Collings ranch conglomerates of the Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma: Evidence of strike-slip movement during the deformation stage of the southern Oklahoma Aulacogen  

SciTech Connect

It has been widely recognized that the Pennsylvanian conglomerates of the Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma, record the deformation stage of the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen. Two of these units are the Desmoinesian Deese Conglomerate, exposed in the Mill Creek Syncline area between the Reagan and Mill Creek fault zones, and the Middle Virgilian Collings Ranch Conglomerate, exposed along the Washita Valley fault zone in the Turner Falls area. The authors investigated clast size, geometry, and content, primary sedimentary structures, petrography, petrology, and diagenesis of the two conglomerate units, as well as the geometric relationship of their basins with nearby faults. Their evidence suggests that the two conglomerates were deposited as alluvial fans in basins formed by strike-slip movements. The Collings Ranch Conglomerate was deposited in a basin formed as the result of left-stepping along the nearby Washita Valley strike-slip fault zone. The Deese Conglomerate was deposited in a basin formed due to the combined effect of strike-slip and dip-slip movements along the Reagan and Mill Creek fault zones. In the Collings Ranch basin, the deposition was accomplished primarily by channel-fill and sieve deposits in the proximal region of the fan. The Deese Conglomerate was deposited as an alluvial fan or fans which included several channel deposits while, in the deeper parts of the basin, fine-grained materials and limestones were deposited. These observations and their possible interpretations suggest that the Washita Valley, Mill Creek, and Reagan fault zones have experienced substantial strike-slip movement during the deformation stage of the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen.

Cemen, I.; Pybas, K.; Stafford, C.; Al-Shaieb, Z. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States). School of Geology)

1993-02-01

455

Permian dust in Oklahoma: Source and origin for Middle Permian (Flowerpot-Blaine) redbeds in Western Tropical Pangaea  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Analogous to many Permian units globally, the Middle Permian of Oklahoma (Flowerpot Shale and Blaine Formation) contains voluminous fine-grained redbeds. These units have long been interpreted to record marine to marginal-marine deposition owing to minor evaporite/dolomite strata; this interpretation, however, disregards the predominant siliciclastic material. Siltstone predominates, and all siliciclastic material is of inferred aeolian origin owing to the fine and remarkably uniform grain size, internally massive structure, blanket-like geometry, and common palaeosols, especially in the Flowerpot Shale. Previously suggested alternative environments for such abundant fine-grained material, such as distal deltaic deposition, are inconsistent with the absence of key sedimentary structures (e.g., graded beds), associated facies (e.g., channelised units), and vertical or lateral trends (e.g., upward coarsening). The minor claystone and associated evaporite and dolomite facies of the Blaine Formation exhibit evidence for subaqueous deposition, but with aeolian delivery of the siliciclastic component. An aeolian dust origin for the siliciclastic material reinforces the interpretation of generally semiarid conditions for this equatorial region of western Pangaea. Whole-rock geochemical and detrital-zircon geochronological data on the siliciclastic units indicate a mixed provenance that includes a mafic component exhibiting a composition similar to reference populations from the Ouachita orogen. The dominant zircon populations reflect transport from easterly/southeasterly directions, with fewer grains likely derived from basement located to the west. Combining an aeolian delivery with the provenance signal indicates predominant equatorial easterlies during deposition of the study units, and subordinate westerlies, consistent with Pangaean monsoonal circulation. Permian redbeds preserved in many parts of former low-latitude Pangaea bear attributes similar to those of the units documented here, suggesting a possible greater role for dust deposition during this time than previously appreciated.

Sweet, Alisan C.; Soreghan, Gerilyn S.; Sweet, Dustin E.; Soreghan, Michael J.; Madden, Andrew S.

2013-02-01

456

Statistical analysis of stream water-quality data and sampling network design near Oklahoma City, central Oklahoma, 1977-1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water-quality data collected from 1993-99 at five sites on Bluff, Deer, and Chisholm Creeks and from 1988-99 at five sites in the North Canadian River indicated that there were significant differences in constituent values among sites for water properties, major ions, trace elements, nutrients, turbidity, pesticides, and bacteria. Concentrations of dissolved solids and sulfate generally decreased as streams flowed through the Oklahoma City urban area. Concentrations of organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus compounds, lindane, and 2,4-D, and frequencies of detection of pesticides increased in the North Canadian River as it flowed through the urban area. Volatile organic compounds were not detected in samples collected quarterly from 1988-90 at sites on the North Canadian River. Concentrations of some compounds, including dissolved oxygen, sulfate, chloride, ammonia, manganese, diazinon, dieldrin, and fecal coliform bacteria periodically exceeded Federal or state water-quality standards at some sites. Regression analyses were used to identify trends in constituent concentrations related to streamflow, season, and time. Trends for some constituents were indicated at all sites, but most trends were site-specific. Seasonal trends were evident for several constituents: suspended solids, organic nitrogen, and biochemical oxygen demand were greatest during summer. Dissolved oxygen, ammonia, and nitrite plus nitrate-nitrogen were greatest during winter. Concentrations of dissolved oxygen, fluoride, sulfate, total suspended solids, iron, and manganese generally increased with time. Concentrations of chloride, nitrite plus nitrate-nitrogen, dissolved phosphorus, dissolved orthophosphate, biochemical oxygen demand, dieldrin, and lindane decreased with time. There was relatively little change in land use from the late 1970s to the mid-1990s due to relatively modest rates of population growth in the study area during that period. Most changes in water quality in these streams and rivers may be due to changes in chemical use and wastewater treatment practices. The sampling network was evaluated with respect to areal coverage, sampling frequency, and analytical schedules. Areal coverage could be expanded to include one additional watershed that is not part of the current network. A new sampling site on the North Canadian River might be useful because of expanding urbanization west of the city, but sampling at some other sites could be discontinued or reduced based on comparisons of data between the sites. Additional real-time or periodic monitoring for dissolved oxygen may be useful to prevent anoxic conditions in pools behind new low-water dams. The sampling schedules, both monthly and quarterly, are adequate to evaluate trends, but additional sampling during flow extremes may be needed to quantify loads and evaluate water quality during flow extremes. Emerging water-quality issues may require sampling for volatile organic compounds, sulfide, total phosphorus, chlorophyll-a, Escherichia coli, and enterococci, as well as use of more sensitive laboratory analytical methods for determination of cadmium, mercury, lead, and silver.

Brigham, Mark E.; Payne, Gregory A.; Andrews, William J.; Abbott, Marvin M.

2002-01-01

457

Altitude and configuration of the 1980 water table in the High Plains regional aquifer, northwestern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 1978, the U.S. Geological Survey began a 5-year study of the High Plains regional aquifer system to provide hydrologic information for evaluation of the effects of long-term development of the aquifer and to develop computer models for prediction of aquifer response to alternative changes in ground-water management (Weeks, 1978). This report is one of a series presenting hydrologic information of the High Plains aquifer in Oklahoma. The altitude and configuration of the water table are shown for the eastern area, consisting of Harper, Ellis, Woodward, Dewey, and Roger Mills Counties (sheet 1), and for the Panhandle area, consisting of Cimarron, Texas, and Beaver Counties (sheet 2). Water levels were measured in January, February, and March 1980 by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board.

Havens, John S.

1982-01-01

458

Heat flow and thermal history of the Anadarko Basin and the western Oklahoma Platform  

Microsoft Academic Search

The average geothermal gradient in the Anadarko Basin and the Oklahoma Platform estimated from 856 corrected bottom-hole temperatures (BHTs) is 21°C\\/km. Analysis of previously published thermal maturation data indicates that the Anadarko Basin has undergone from 1 to 3 km of erosion starting about 40 to 50 Ma. The average thermal gradient at the time of maximum burial was in

Youngmin Lee; David Deming

1999-01-01

459

Linear features determined from Landsat imagery in the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A map (scale 1:500,000) shows the linear features determined from Landsat imagery in the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles. The linear features, sometimes called linear trends or lineaments, are not identified as to type or origin. Most probably represent fractures or fracture zones, which may affect the movement of water or other fluids through rocks. The linear features are classified as to length--less than 30 mi/mg and more than 30 mi/mg. (USGS)

Cooley, M.E.

1984-01-01

460

Tobacco control and prevention in Oklahoma: best practices in a preemptive state.  

PubMed

For more than a decade, the Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust and Oklahoma State Department of Health have collaborated to implement best practices in tobacco control through state and community interventions, including legislated and voluntary policy approaches, health communication, cessation programs, and surveillance and evaluation activities. This partnership eliminates duplication and ensures efficient use of public health dollars for a comprehensive tobacco control program based on a systems and social norm change approach. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe strategies to reduce tobacco use despite a rare policy environment imposed by the presence of near-complete state preemption of tobacco-related law. Key outcome indicators were used to track progress related to state tobacco control and prevention programs. Data sources included cigarette excise tax stamp sales, statewide surveillance systems, Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline registration data, and local policy tracking databases. Data were collected in 2001-2013 and analyzed in 2012 and 2013. Significant declines in cigarette consumption and adult smoking prevalence occurred in 2001-2012, and smoking among high school students fell 45%. Changes were also observed in attitudes and behaviors related to secondhand smoke. Community coalitions promoted adoption of local policies where allowable, with 92 ordinances mirroring state clean indoor air laws and 88 ordinances mirroring state youth access laws. Tobacco-free property policies were adopted by 292 school districts and 309 worksites. Moving forward, tobacco use will be prioritized as an avoidable health hazard in Oklahoma as it is integrated into a wellness approach that also targets obesity reduction. PMID:25528709

Rhoades, Rebekah R; Beebe, Laura A

2015-01-01

461

Costs and Economies of Size in Texas-Oklahoma Cattle Feedlot Operations.  

E-print Network

Costs and Economies of Size in I Texas-Oklahoma Cattle Feedlot Operat ions B-1083 May 1969 TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Texas Agricultural Experiment Station H. 0. Kunkel, Acting Director, College Station, Texas In Cooperation with the U. S... This research was conducted by the Texas Agri- cultural Experiment Station of Texas A&M University under a cooperative agreement with Marketing Ece nomics Division, ERS, USDA and under Texas Agri- cultural Experiment Station Project HM-2489, Live- stock...

Dietrich, Raymond A.

1969-01-01

462

A vegetational analysis of the Phillips Agricultural Demonstration Project Ranch, Foraker, Oklahoma  

E-print Network

LiBRARy %4 B COLLEOE OF TEXAS A VEGETATIONAL ANALYSIS OF THE PHILLIPS AGRICULTURAL DEMONSTRATION PROJECT RANCH? FORAKERy OKLAHOMA A Theei. e by + RONALD G& GARDHER Sulmf. tted to the Graduate School of' the Agrioultural and !-:echanioal... appreciation is due Mr. K, S. Adsmss Chair~an~ Board oi' Directors, Phillips Petroleum Company, owner of the ranch upon which the research was conducted, The cooperat1on received from the ranoh employees and members of the staff of Phillips Agricultural...

Gardner, Ronald Gilbert

1958-01-01

463

Biogeography, ecoregions, and geomorphology affect fish species composition in streams of eastern Oklahoma, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stream fish assemblages are structured by biogeographical, physical and biological factors acting on different spatial scales.\\u000a We determined how physical factors, geomorphology and stream habitat, influenced fish species composition (presence–absence)\\u000a in eastern Oklahoma, USA relative to the ecoregion and biogeographic effects previously reported. We sampled fish assemblages\\u000a and surveyed geomorphology and habitat at 107 stream sites in the Boston Mountains,

Daniel C. Dauwalter; Dale K. Splinter; William L. Fisher; Richard A. Marston

2008-01-01

464

Measurement of soil moisture trends with airborne scatterometers. [Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In an effort to investigate aircraft multisensor responses to soil moisture and vegetation in agricultural fields, an intensive ground sampling program was conducted in Guymon, Oklahoma and Dalhart, Texas in conjunction with aircraft data collected for visible/infrared and passive and active microwave systems. Field selections, sampling techniques, data processing, and the aircraft schedule are discussed for both sites. Field notes are included along with final (normalized and corrected) data sets.

Jones, C. L.; Mcfarland, M. J.; Rosethal, W. D.; Theis, S. W. (principal investigators)

1982-01-01

465

National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) performance in southern Arizona, Texas, and Oklahoma in 2003–2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four field campaigns were conducted in southern Arizona (AZ) and in northern Texas and southern Oklahoma (TX-OK) in 2003 and 2004 to evaluate the performance of the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network™ (NLDN) in detecting cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning after an upgrade in 2002 and 2003. The 2-year average flash detection efficiency (DE) in AZ was 93% (1024\\/1097), and the measured

Christopher J. Biagi; Kenneth L. Cummins; Kenneth E. Kehoe; E. Philip Krider

2007-01-01

466

National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) performance in southern Arizona, Texas, and Oklahoma in 2003-2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four field campaigns were conducted in southern Arizona (AZ) and in northern Texas and southern Oklahoma (TX-OK) in 2003 and 2004 to evaluate the performance of the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network™ (NLDN) in detecting cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning after an upgrade in 2002 and 2003. The 2-year average flash detection efficiency (DE) in AZ was 93% (1024\\/1097), and the measured

Christopher J. Biagi; Kenneth L. Cummins; Kenneth E. Kehoe; E. Philip Krider

2007-01-01

467

Predictability of littoral-zone fish communities through ontogeny in Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Synopsis  We sampled larval, juvenile and adult fishes from littoral-zone areas of a large reservoir (Lake Texoma, Oklahoma-Texas) (1) to characterize environmental factors that influenced fish community structure, (2) to examine how consistent fish–environment relationships were through ontogeny (i.e., larval vs. juvenile and adult), and (3) to measure the concordance of larval communities sampled during spring to juvenile and adult communities

Michael A. Eggleton; Raul Ramirez; Chad W. Hargrave; Keith B. Gido; Jason R. Masoner; Gary D. Schnell; William J. Matthews

2005-01-01

468

Tree seedling survivorship, growth, and allocation in the Cross Timbers ecotone of Oklahoma, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to better understand tree dynamics and maintenance of the ecotone between eastern deciduous forest and tallgrass\\u000a prairie, I planted seedlings of five different species into a Cross Timbers area in North West Oklahoma for one-year. The\\u000a seedlings were planted in four different patch-types under two different herbivore treatments. I found that (1) out of the\\u000a original 200 seedlings,

Randall W. Myster

2009-01-01

469

Detection of Trichinella murrelli in coyotes ( Canis latrans) from Oklahoma and North Texas  

Microsoft Academic Search

We determined the prevalence and mean intensity of Trichinella sp. infection in coyotes from six counties in Oklahoma and one in northern Texas. Tongues from 77 coyotes were examined using histology and artificial tissue digestion. Histological examination showed a prevalence of 3.9% (3 of 77) whereas the prevalence was 6.5% (5 of 77) based on artificial digestion of 5.0g of

Mason V. Reichard; Kathryn E. Tiernan; Kelsey L. Paras; Maria Interisano; Michael H. Reiskind; Roger J. Panciera; Edoardo Pozio

2011-01-01

470

Diagnosing Meteorological Conditions Associated with Sprites and Lightning with Large Charge Moment Changes (CMC) over Oklahoma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sprites are a category of Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) that occur in the upper atmosphere above the tops of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs). They are commonly associated with lightning that produce large charge moment changes (CMCs). Synergistic use of satellite and radar-retrieved observations together with sounding data, forecasts, and lightning-detection networks allowed the diagnosis and analysis of the meteorological conditions associated with sprites as well as large-CMC lightning over Oklahoma.

Flores-Rivera, Lizxandra; Lang, Timothy J.

2014-01-01

471

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF OKLAHOMA ABANDONED DRILLING AND PRODUCTION SITES AND ASSOCIATED PUBLIC EDUCATION/OUTREACH ACTIVITIES  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy has participated with the Oklahoma Energy Resource Board (OERB) since 1995 by providing grant funding for on-going work in both environmental assessment of abandoned oilfield exploration and production sites and associated public education/outreach activities. The OERB, a state agency created in 1993 by the Oklahoma legislature, administers programs funded by an assessment of one tenth of one percent on all oil and natural gas produced and sold in the state of Oklahoma. Approximately one half of the funds are used to assess and remediate abandoned oilfield sites and the other half are being used to educate about the importance of the oil and natural gas industry and OERB's environmental efforts. Financial participation through grant funding by the U.S. D.O.E. has been $200,000 annually which represents approximately 3 percent of OERB's private funding. Most of OERB's revenues come from an assessment of 1/10th of 1% on the sale of crude and natural gas in Oklahoma. The assessment is considered voluntary in that any interest owner may ask for a refund annually of their contributions to the fund. On average, 95% of the assessment dollars have remained with OERB, which shows tremendous support by the industry. This Final Report summarizes the progress of the three year grant. The purpose of this three-year project was to continue the progress of the OERB to accomplish its environmental and educational objectives and transfer information learned to other organizations and producing states in the industry.

Mike Terry

2002-03-01

472

Ground-water records for the area surrounding the Chickasaw National Recreation Area, Murray County, Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report is a compilation of ground-water records, water levels, and water-quality field determinations, for wells in a 132 square-mile (342 square kilometer) area surrounding the Chickasaw National Recreational Area in south-central Oklahoma. This information was collected in cooperation with the National Park Service. The location of the study area is shown on figure 1; the well locations are shown on figure 2. Data from 101 wells are summarized in this report.

Goemaat, Robert L.; Willard, Cass C.

1983-01-01

473

Digital data sets of depth-duration frequency of precipitation for Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

These geospatial data sets were produced as part of a regional precipitation frequency analysis for Oklahoma. The data sets consist of surface grids of precipitation depths for seven frequencies (expressed as recurrence intervals of 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, and 500-years) and 12 durations (15-, 30-, and 60-minutes; 1-, 2-, 3-, 6-, 12-, and 24-hours; and 1-, 3-, and 7-days). Eighty-four depth-duration-frequency surfaces were produced from precipitation-station data. Precipitation-station data from which the surfaces were interpolated and contour lines derived from each surface also are included. Contour intervals vary from 0.05 to 0.5 inch. Data were used from precipitation gage stations with at least 10 years of record within Oklahoma and a zone extending about 50 kilometers into bordering states. Three different rain gage networks provided the data (15-minute, 1-hour, and 1-day). Precipitation annual maxima (depths) were determined from the station data for each duration for 110 15-minute, 141 hourly, and 413 daily stations. Statistical methods were used to estimate precipitation depths for each duration-frequency at each station. These station depth-duration-frequency estimates were interpolated to produce continuous grids with grid-cell spacing of 2,000 meters. Contour lines derived from these surfaces (grids) were used to produce the maps in the 'Depth-Duration Frequency of Precipitation for Oklahoma,' by R.L. Tortorelli, Alan Rea, and W.H. Asquith, U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 99-4232. The geospatial data sets are presented in digital form for use with geographic information systems. These geospatial data sets may be used to determine an interpolated value of depth-duration-frequency of precipitation for any point in Oklahoma.

Rea, Alan; Tortorelli, Robert L.

1999-01-01

474

Thickness variation of Simpson group in south-central Oklahoma and its tectonic significance  

SciTech Connect

The Middle Ordovician Simpson Group in the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen is composed of interbedded sandstone, limestone, and shale. Several pulses of subsidence controlled the deposition of these sediments. Simpson Group thickness variations, based on an isopach map and corresponding regional cross sections, define the presence of two distinct depositional basins flanked on their northern sides by a stable cratonic shelf. The anomalous thickness of Simpson sediments within these basins is related to syndepositional subsidence along zones of weakness initiated during the rifting stage of aulacogen development. The larger basin covers the western part of south-central Oklahoma. The northern flank of this basin illustrates a zone of rapid thickening of sediments. The updip portion of the northern flank is the northernmost limit of the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen. The depocenter of the larger basin is positioned in the Ardmore basin. Paleostress studies using calcite twin lamellae along the southeastern portion of the Sulfur fault within the smaller basin reveal an east-west compression followed by north-south compression. Surface folds formed by the east-west compression are highly faulted and overturned, whereas the folds formed by the north-south compression are open, slightly asymmetric, with rounded hinges and limbs. Similar east-west-trending structures in the subsurface could be a favorable target for hydrocarbon exploration. In general, these basins are genetically related but are separated by a large Precambrian basement block (Tishomingo Granite).

Islam, Q.T.; Crump, J. (ARCO Oil and Gas Co., Plano, TX (USA))

1989-08-01

475

Assessment of Local Recharge Area Characteristics of Four Caves in Northern Arkansas and Northeastern Oklahoma, 2004-07  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A study was conducted from 2004 to 2007 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to assess the characteristics of the local recharge areas of four caves in northern Arkansas and northeastern Oklahoma that provide habitat for a number of unique organisms. Characterization of the local recharge areas are important because the caves occur in a predominately karst system and because land use proximal to the caves, including areas suspected to lie within the local recharge areas, may include activities with potentially deleterious effects to cave water quality. An integrated approach was used to determine the hydrogeologic characteristics and the extent of the local recharge areas of Civil War Cave, January-Stansbury Cave, Nesbitt Spring Cave, and Wasson's Mud Cave. This approach incorporated methods of hydrology, structural geology, geomorphology, and geochemistry. Continuous water-level and water-temperature data were collected at each cave for various periods to determine recharge characteristics. Field investigations were conducted to determine surficial controls affecting the groundwater flow and connections of the groundwater system to land-surface processes in each study area. Qualitative groundwater tracing also was conducted at each cave to help define the local recharge areas. These independent methods of investigation provided multiple lines of evidence for effectively describing the behavior of these complex hydrologic systems. Civil War Cave is located near the city of Bentonville in Benton County, Arkansas, and provides habitat for the Ozark cavefish. Civil War Cave is developed entirely within the epikarst of the upper Boone Formation, and recharge to Civil War Cave occurs from the Boone Formation (Springfield Plateau aquifer). The daily mean discharge for the period of study was 0.59 cubic feet per second and ranged from 0.19 to 2.8 cubic feet per second. The mean water temperature for Civil War Cave was 14.0 degrees Celsius. The calculated recharge area for Civil War Cave ranged from 0.13 to 2.5 square miles using the water-balance equation to 3.80 square miles using a normalized base-flow method. Tracer tests indicated a portion of the water within Civil War Cave was from across a major topographic divide located to the southwest. January-Stansbury Cave is located in Delaware County in northeastern Oklahoma, and provides habitat for the Oklahoma cave crayfish and the Ozark cavefish. January-Stansbury Cave is developed in the St. Joe Limestone member of the Boone Formation. The daily mean discharge for the period of study was 1.0 cubic foot per second and ranged from 0.35 to 8.7 cubic feet per second. The mean water temperature for January-Stansbury Cave was 14.3 degrees. The calculated recharge area for January-Stansbury Cave using the water-balance equation ranged from approximately 0.04 to 0.83 square miles. Tracer tests generally showed water discharging from January-Stansbury Cave during high flow originates from within the topographic drainage area and from an area outside the topographic drainage area to the southwest. Nesbitt Spring Cave is located near the city of Mountain View in north-central Arkansas and provides habitat for the Hell Creek cave crayfish. Nesbitt Spring Cave is developed in the Plattin Limestone (Ozark aquifer) and is recharged through the Boone Formation (Springfield Plateau aquifer). The mean daily discharge for the period of study was 4.5 cubic feet per second and ranged from 0.39 to 70.7 cubic feet per second. The mean water temperature for Nesbitt Spring Cave was 14.2 degrees Celsius. The calculated recharge area for Nesbitt Spring Cave using the water-balance equation ranged from 0.49 square mile to 4.0 square miles. Tracer tests generally showed a portion of water discharging from Nesbitt Spring during high flow originates from outside the topographic drainage area. Wasson's Mud Cave is located near the city of Springtown

Gillip, Jonathan A.; Galloway, Joel M.; Hart, Rheannon M.

2009-01-01

476

Inter-comparison of soil moisture sensors from the soil moisture active passive marena Oklahoma in situ sensor testbed (SMAP-MOISST)  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The diversity of in situ soil moisture network protocols and instrumentation led to the development of a testbed for comparing in situ soil moisture sensors. Located in Marena, Oklahoma on the Oklahoma State University Range Research Station, the testbed consists of four base stations. Each station ...

477

Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class I oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geo Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma are engaged in a program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD reservoirs and the recovery technologies that have been (or could be) applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. This data collection and evaluation effort will be the foundation for an aggressive, multifaceted technology transfer program that is designed to support all of Oklahoma`s oil industry, with particular emphasis on smaller companies and independent operators in their attempts to maximize the economic producibility of FDD reservoirs. Specifically, this project will identify all FDD oil reservoirs in the State; group those reservoirs into plays that have similar depositional origins; collect, organize and analyze all available data conduct characterization and simulation studies on selected reservoirs in each play; and implement a technology transfer program targeted to the operators of FDD reservoirs. Activities were focused primarily on technology transfer elements of the project. This included regional play analysis and mapping, geologic field studies, and reservoir modeling for secondary water flood simulations as used in publication folios and workshops. The computer laboratory was fully operational for operator use. Computer systems design and database development activities were ongoing.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States)] [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Banken, M.K. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)] [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1995-11-30

478

Recent developments at Wilburton field, Latimer County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Recent deeper drilling in Wilburton field has resulted in new production from the Spiro, Cromwell, and Arbuckle formations in a structurally high fault block in situ beneath the old field pay in the overthrusted Spiro. ARCO Oil and Gas Company first found production from Spiro in situ beneath a low-angle thrust fault in Sec. 36, T5N, R17E. Nine wells now produce from this reservoir. Two wells have been completed below the Spiro in the in-situ Cromwell reservoir, and others are thought to be productive. Three wells are currently being drilled for insitu Spiro and Cromwell. Structural data generated by drilling the in-situ Spiro and Cromwell pays revealed a southwest-dipping, upthrown fault block with nearly 2,000 ft of vertical relief. ARCO tested this feature with their ARCO 2 Yourman well in Sec. 15, T5N, R18E, discovering prolific gas production from the Arbuckle. The Arbuckle reservoir consists largely of vugs and solution-enlarged fractures in a clean dolostone. Conventional neutron-density logs show very low porosity, but cores and formation microscanner images reveal the vugs, some of which are several inches across. Permeability is created by a pervasive system of younger fractures and microfaults. All current production is from the uppermost 700 ft of the Arbuckle, with a gas column of at least 1,100 ft. To date, six Arbuckle wells have been completed, two are in completion, and two are being drilled.

Hook, R.C. (Anadarko Petroleum Corp., Oklahoma City, OK (USA))

1989-08-01

479

Watershed boundaries and digital elevation model of Oklahoma derived from 1:100,000-scale digital topographic maps  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This document provides a general description of the procedures used to develop the data sets included on this compact disc. This compact disc contains watershed boundaries for Oklahoma, a digital elevation model, and other data sets derived from the digital elevation model. The digital elevation model was produced using the ANUDEM software package, written by Michael Hutchinson and licensed from the Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies at The Australian National University. Elevation data (hypsography) and streams (hydrography) from digital versions of the U.S. Geological Survey 1:100,000-scale topographic maps were used by the ANUDEM package to produce a hydrologically conditioned digital elevation model with a 60-meter cell size. This digital elevation model is well suited for drainage-basin delineation using automated techniques. Additional data sets include flow-direction, flow-accumulation, and shaded-relief grids, all derived from the digital elevation model, and the hydrography data set used in producing the digital elevation model. The watershed boundaries derived from the digital elevation model have been edited to be consistent with contours and streams from the U.S. Geological Survey 1:100,000-scale topographic maps. The watershed data set includes boundaries for 11-digit Hydrologic Unit Codes (watersheds) within Oklahoma, and 8-digit Hydrologic Unit Codes (cataloging units) outside Oklahoma. Cataloging-unit boundaries based on 1:250,000-scale maps outside Oklahoma for the Arkansas, Red, and White River basins are included. The other data sets cover Oklahoma, and where available, portions of 1:100,000-scale quadrangles adjoining Oklahoma.

Cederstrand, J.R.; Rea, A.H.

1995-01-01

480

Paleomagnetism and age of Mafic Plutons, Wichita Mountains, Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A paleomagnetic reconnaissance (43 samples) of the Raggedy Mountain Gabbro Group, which is comprised of a layered complex of anorthosites, anorthositic gabbros, and massive gabbro, shows: (1) stable remanent magnetization and (2) consistent directions which differ significantly from those of the nearby Cambrian Wichita Granite Group, with exception of one site near the granite contact. These results suggest a Precambiran age for the gabbro group. The difference in pole positions between the granitic and mafic groups demonstrates that the plutonic episodes responsible for the mafic and granitic magmas are significantly separated in time. Models of formation of the Wichita aulacogen should be altered to account for the difference in time between the mafic and silicic plutonism.

Roggenthen, William M.; Fischer, Joseph F.; Napoleone, Giovanni; Fischer, Alfred G.

1981-02-01

481

The importance of applying [open quotes]intuition factors[close quotes] to reservoir volume calculations: A case study in Wilburton Field, Arkoma Basin, southeastern Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Calculating or extrapolating accurate reservoir parameters for recoverable reserve determinations is often difficult. Average porosities determined from logs can be incorrect due either to tool resolution in thin beds, wellbore rugosity, or faulty tool calibration. Water saturation estimates can vary depending upon the availability of measured or calculated Rw values. Reservoir thickness and aerial extent are only as accurate as the isopach maps from which they are derived. Measured reservoir pressures can be low in tight gas formations due to inadequate build-up times. Only formation temperature and abandonment pressure are more reliable numbers. Characterization of the Spiro Sandstone reservoir in Wilburton Field, southeastern Oklahoma, requires the utilization of various [open quotes]intuition factors[close quotes]. Extreme heterogeneity resulting from both depositional and diagenetic variability presents problems in accurately assessing pore volume calculations. By relying upon a systematic approach which allows scientific intuition to be merged with measured reservoir parameters, it is possible to predict economic and uneconomic results of proposed infill drilling locations.

Wray, L.L. (Amoco Production Co., Denver, CO (United States))

1996-01-01

482

Hydrologic Drought of Water Year 2006 Compared with Four Major Drought Periods of the 20th Century in Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Water Year 2006 (October 1, 2005, to September 30, 2006) was a year of extreme hydrologic drought and the driest year in the recent 2002-2006 drought in Oklahoma. The severity of this recent drought can be evaluated by comparing it with four previous major hydrologic droughts, water years 1929-41, 1952-56, 1961-72, and 1976-81. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board, completed an investigation to summarize the Water Year 2006 hydrologic drought and compare it to the four previous major hydrologic droughts in the 20th century. The period of water years 1925-2006 was selected as the period of record because before 1925 few continuous record streamflow-gaging sites existed and gaps existed where no streamflow-gaging sites were operated. Statewide annual precipitation in Water Year 2006 was second driest and statewide annual runoff in Water Year 2006 was sixth driest in the 82 years of record. Annual area-averaged precipitation totals by the nine National Weather Service Climate Divisions from Water Year 2006 are compared to those during four previous major hydrologic droughts to show how rainfall deficits in Oklahoma varied by region. Only two of the nine climate divisions, Climate Division 1 Panhandle and Climate Division 4 West Central, had minor rainfall deficits, while the rest of the climate divisions had severe rainfall deficits in Water Year 2006 ranging from only 65 to 73 percent of normal annual precipitation. Regional streamflow patterns for Water Year 2006 indicate that Oklahoma was part of the regionwide below-normal streamflow conditions for Arkansas-White-Red River Basin, the sixth driest since 1930. The percentage of long-term stations in Oklahoma (with at least 30 years of record) having below-normal streamflow reached 80 to 85 percent for some days in August and November 2006. Twelve long-term streamflow-gaging sites with periods of record ranging from 62 to 78 years were selected to show how streamflow deficits varied by region. The hydrologic drought worsened going from north to south in Oklahoma, ranging from 45 percent in the north, to just 14 percent in east-central Oklahoma, and 20 percent of normal annual streamflow in the southwest. The low streamflows resulted in only 86.3 percent of the statewide conservation storage available at the end of the water year in major reservoirs, and 7 to 47 percent of hydroelectric power generation at sites in Oklahoma in Calendar Year 2005.

Tortorelli, Robert L.

2008-01-01

483

Oklahoma Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 IRC  

SciTech Connect

The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Oklahoma homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from Chapter 11 of the 2009 International Residential Code (IRC) is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Oklahoma homeowners will save $5,786 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $408 for the 2012 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

2012-06-15

484

Assessment of conservation practices in the Fort Cobb Reservoir watershed, southwestern Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Fort Cobb Reservoir watershed encompasses about 813 square kilometers of rural farm land in Caddo, Custer, and Washita Counties in southwestern Oklahoma. The Fort Cobb Reservoir and six stream segments were identified on the Oklahoma 1998 303(d) list as not supporting designated beneficial uses because of impairment by nutrients, suspended solids, sedimentation, pesticides, and unknown toxicity. As a result, State and Federal agencies, in collaboration with conservation districts and landowners, started conservation efforts in 2001 to decrease erosion and transport of sediments and nutrients to the reservoir and improve water quality in tributaries. The U.S. Department of Agriculture selected the Fort Cobb Reservoir watershed in 2003 as 1 of 14 benchmark watersheds under the Conservation Effectiveness Assessment Project with the objective of quantifying the environmental benefits derived from agricultural conservation programs in reducing inflows of sediments and phosphorus to the reservoir. In November 2004, the Biologic, Geographic, Geologic, and Water Disciplines of the U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with the Agricultural Research Service, Grazinglands Research Laboratory in El Reno, Oklahoma, began an interdisciplinary investigation to produce an integrated publication to complement this program. This publication is a compilation of 10 report chapters describing land uses, soils, geology, climate, and water quality in streams and the reservoir through results of field and remote sensing investigations from 2004 to 2007. The investigations indicated that targeting best-management practices to small intermittent streams draining to the reservoir and to the Cobb Creek subwatershed may effectively augment efforts to improve eutrophic to hypereutrophic conditions that continue to affect the reservoir. The three major streams flowing into the reservoir contribute nutrients causing eutrophication, but minor streams draining cultivated fields near the reservoir appeared to be disproportionate contributors of nutrients. Increasing conservation practices on small streams may have a greater effect in mitigating eutrophication in the reservoir than additional installation of such measures on the larger creeks.

Becker, Carol J.

2011-01-01

485

Low-cost digital image processing at the University of Oklahoma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Computer assisted instruction in remote sensing at the University of Oklahoma involves two separate approaches and is dependent upon initial preprocessing of a LANDSAT computer compatible tape using software developed for an IBM 370/158 computer. In-house generated preprocessing algorithms permits students or researchers to select a subset of a LANDSAT scene for subsequent analysis using either general purpose statistical packages or color graphic image processing software developed for Apple II microcomputers. Procedures for preprocessing the data and image analysis using either of the two approaches for low-cost LANDSAT data processing are described.

Harrington, J. A., Jr.

1981-01-01

486

Organic petrology of epi-impsonite at Page, Oklahoma, U.S.A.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Impsonite (asphaltic pyrobitumen) occurs as fracture-filling veins cutting massive sandstone in the frontal Ouachita Mountains near Page, Oklahoma. The Page impsonite formed from low-temperature alteration of crude oil. Mean maximum bitumen reflectance in oil immersion (Rmax) of seven samples is 1.41-1.96%. Mean apparent bireflectance of these samples is 0.15-0.54%. The Page deposit classifies at the upper end of epi-impsonite in the generic classification for solid bitumen, based on physical, chemical, and optical characteristics, and as post-oil with unlimited migration in the genetic classification for solid bitumen. ?? 1991.

Cardott, B.J.

1991-01-01

487

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibrations Stimulation in Osage County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2001 to September 30, 2001. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The vibration stimulation well is permitted as Well 111-W-27, section 8 T26N R6E Osage County Oklahoma. It was spud July 28, 2001 with Goober Drilling Rig No. 3. The well was drilled to 3090-feet cored, logged, cased and cemented. The Rig No.3 moved off August 6, 2001. Phillips Petroleum Co. has begun analyzing the cores recovered from the test well. Standard porosity, permeability and saturation measurements will be conducted. They will then begin the sonic stimulation core tests Calumet Oil Company, the operator of the NBU, has begun to collect both production and injection wells information to establish a baseline for the project in the pilot field test area. Green Country Submersible Pump Company, a subsidiary of Calumet Oil Company, will provide both the surface equipment and downhole tools to allow the Downhole Vibration Tool to be operated by a surface rod rotating system. The 7-inch Downhole Vibration Tool (DHVT) has been built and is ready for initial shallow testing. The shallow testing will be done in a temporarily abandoned well operated by Calumet Oil Co. in the Wynona waterflood unit. The data acquisition doghouse and rod rotating equipment have been placed on location in anticipation of the shallow test in Well No.20-12 Wynona Waterflood Unit. A notice of invention disclosure was submitted to the DOE Chicago Operations Office. DOE Case No.S-98,124 has been assigned to follow the documentation following the invention disclosure. A paper covering the material presented to the Oklahoma Geologic Survey (OGS)/DOE Annual Workshop in Oklahoma City May 8,9 2001 has been submitted for publication to the OGS. A technical paper draft has been submitted for the ASME/ETCE conference (Feb 2002) Production Technology Symposium. A one-day SPE sponsored short course which is planned to cover seismic stimulation efforts around the world, will be offered at the SPE/DOE Thirteenth Symposium on Improved Oil Recovery in Tulsa, OK, April 13-17, 2002. Dan Maloney, Phillips and Bob Westermark, OGCI will be the instructors. In addition, a proposed technical paper has been submitted for this meeting.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2001-09-30

488

Integration of geological, geochemical, and geophysical spatial data of the Cement oil field, Oklahoma, test site  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Measurement pertaining to geology, geochemistry, and geophysics of the Cement oil field, Oklahoma, test site were collected employing both airborne sensors and ground-based data collection. The measurements include: (1) airborne gamma-ray spectrometry (supplying bismuth 214, thalium 208, and potassium 40 gamma-ray intensities); (2) aeromagnetic survey data; (3) multi-frequency airborne resistivity survey data (supplying apparent electrical resistivity of near surface materials); (4) gravity data; (5) geological and topographic maps; and (6) image data from Landsat MSS and U-2 photography.

Termain, Patricia A.; Donovan, Terrence J.; Chavez, Pat S.

1980-01-01

489

Occurrence of organic wastewater and other contaminants in cave streams in northeastern Oklahoma and northwestern Arkansas  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The prevalence of organic wastewater compounds in surface waters of the United States has been reported in a number of recent studies. In karstic areas, surface contaminants might be transported to groundwater and, ultimately, cave ecosystems, where they might impact resident biota. In this study, polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCISs) and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were deployed in six caves and two surface-water sites located within the Ozark Plateau of northeastern Oklahoma and northwestern Arkansas in order to detect potential chemical contaminants in these systems. All caves sampled were known to contain populations of the threatened Ozark cavefish (Amblyopsis rosae). The surface-water site in Oklahoma was downstream from the outfall of a municipal wastewater treatment plant and a previous study indicated a hydrologic link between this stream and one of the caves. A total of 83 chemicals were detected in the POCIS and SPMD extracts from the surface-water and cave sites. Of these, 55 chemicals were detected in the caves. Regardless of the sampler used, more compounds were detected in the Oklahoma surface-water site than in the Arkansas site or the caves. The organic wastewater chemicals with the greatest mass measured in the sampler extracts included sterols (cholesterol and ??-sitosterol), plasticizers [diethylhexylphthalate and tris (2-butoxyethyl) phosphate], the herbicide bromacil, and the fragrance indole. Sampler extracts from most of the cave sites did not contain many wastewater contaminants, although extracts from samplers in the Oklahoma surfacewater site and the cave hydrologically linked to it had similar levels of diethylhexyphthalate and common detections of carbamazapine, sulfamethoxazole, benzophenone, N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET), and octophenol monoethoxylate. Further evaluation of this system is warranted due to potential ongoing transport of wastewaterassociated chemicals into the cave. Halogenated organics found in caves and surface-water sites included brominated flame retardants, organochlorine pesticides (chlordane and nonachlor), and polychlorinated biphenyls. The placement of samplers in the caves (near the cave mouth compared to farther in the system) might have influenced the number of halogenated organics detected due to possible aerial transport of residues. Guano from cave-dwelling bats also might have been a source of some of these chlorinated organics. Seven-day survival and growth bioassays with fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to samples of cave water indicated initial toxicity in water from two of the caves, but these effects were transient, with no toxicity observed in follow-up tests. ??Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009.

Bidwell, J.R.; Becker, C.; Hensley, S.; Stark, R.; Meyer, M.T.

2010-01-01

490

Characterization ofSubsurface Bacteria Associated withTwo Shallow Aquifers inOklahoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thebacterial microflora oftwoshallow aquifers (saturated subsurface zones) inOklahoma was character- izedbydirect observation withlight andelectron microscopy, byplating, andbyexamination ofcolony morphology anddistribution. Isolated bacterial strains were alsoexamined. Totalcell countsvaried only slightly (2.9 x 106to9.8x 106g(drywtf-') fromsample tosample, whereas colony counts varied widely (6.3 X 102to6.5x 106CFU g (drywtf-'). Colony counts on nutritionally richmediawere lowerthanon low-nutrient media, especially insamples fromthesaturated zone.Thevariety ofcolony types

DAVID L. BALKWILL; WILLIAM C. GHIORSE

1985-01-01

491

Parameterization and application of the AquaCrop model for simulating bioenergy crops in Oklahoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective of this study was to parameterize the AquaCrop model for two bioenergy crops, switchgrass and forage sorghum, using field measurements from Stillwater, Oklahoma in 2011. The parameterized model was then validated for additional sites at Chickasha and Woodward, Oklahoma. After parameterization at Stillwater, the simulated canopy cover closely matched the measured canopy cover dynamics with a RMSE of 6% in switchgrass and 5% in forage sorghum. The water stress thresholds for canopy expansion and stomatal conductance were similar for switchgrass and forage sorghum, but senescence was induced at 35% available water depletion for forage sorghum compared to 85% for switchgrass. The maximum rooting depth of switchgrass was estimated at 190 cm and that of forage sorghum at 120 cm. The normalized water productivity of switchgrass was found to be 14 g m-2, approximately half that of forage sorghum which was 27 g m-2. The parameterized model reasonably simulated soil water depletion at Stillwater (RMSE < 34 mm) and canopy cover at Chickasha and Woodward (RMSE < 11%) for both crops. This calibrated model was then used to predict ethanol yields as a simulation study at Goodwell, Oklahoma. The corn, forage sorghum and switchgrass were simulated using AquaCrop five water levels: rainfed with initial soil moisture conditions of 60% available water capacity, 80% available water capacity, 100% available water capacity, and irrigation treatments at 70% allowable depletion, and at 50% allowable depletion. The simulation study was done over a period of ten years 2002-2011 to assess the long term performance. County average yields were consistent with simulated grain yields for corn under irrigated and rainfed conditions. Forage sorghum produced 30 % higher theoretical ethanol yields than corn under irrigated environments but not under rainfed environments. Switchgrass did not produce significantly higher theoretical ethanol yields than corn at any water level. Based on this modeling study, forage sorghum may have potential as an alternative to corn in the Oklahoma Panhandle given the advent of cellulosic ethanol production but forage sorghum is unlikely to help meet the challenge of groundwater depletion.

Bilga, Navneet Kaur

492

Occurrence of organic wastewater and other contaminants in cave streams in northeastern Oklahoma and northwestern Arkansas.  

PubMed

The prevalence of organic wastewater compounds in surface waters of the United States has been reported in a number of recent studies. In karstic areas, surface contaminants might be transported to groundwater and, ultimately, cave ecosystems, where they might impact resident biota. In this study, polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCISs) and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were deployed in six caves and two surface-water sites located within the Ozark Plateau of northeastern Oklahoma and northwestern Arkansas in order to detect potential chemical contaminants in these systems. All caves sampled were known to contain populations of the threatened Ozark cavefish (Amblyopsis rosae). The surface-water site in Oklahoma was downstream from the outfall of a municipal wastewater treatment plant and a previous study indicated a hydrologic link between this stream and one of the caves. A total of 83 chemicals were detected in the POCIS and SPMD extracts from the surface-water and cave sites. Of these, 55 chemicals were detected in the caves. Regardless of the sampler used, more compounds were detected in the Oklahoma surface-water site than in the Arkansas site or the caves. The organic wastewater chemicals with the greatest mass measured in the sampler extracts included sterols (cholesterol and beta-sitosterol), plasticizers [diethylhexylphthalate and tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate], the herbicide bromacil, and the fragrance indole. Sampler extracts from most of the cave sites did not contain many wastewater contaminants, although extracts from samplers in the Oklahoma surface-water site and the cave hydrologically linked to it had similar levels of diethylhexyphthalate and common detections of carbamazapine, sulfamethoxazole, benzophenone, N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET), and octophenol monoethoxylate. Further evaluation of this system is warranted due to potential ongoing transport of wastewater-associated chemicals into the cave. Halogenated organics found in caves and surface-water sites included brominated flame retardants, organochlorine pesticides (chlordane and nonachlor), and polychlorinated biphenyls. The placement of samplers in the caves (near the cave mouth compared to farther in the system) might have influenced the number of halogenated organics detected due to possible aerial transport of residues. Guano from cave-dwelling bats also might have been a source of some of these chlorinated organics. Seven-day survival and growth bioassays with fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to samples of cave water indicated initial toxicity in water from two of the caves, but these effects were transient, with no toxicity observed in follow-up tests. PMID:19763679

Bidwell, Joseph R; Becker, Carol; Hensley, Steve; Stark, Richard; Meyer, Michael T

2010-02-01

493

A study of the relationship between certain moisture parameters and severe convective storms in central Oklahoma  

E-print Network

for 1800 CST ?6 April 1970. 29 11. LPW chart (from 1934-2000 CST) 26 April 1970. . . 12. UPW chart (from 1934-2000 CST) 26 April 1970. . . 13. Plot for 0' tilt angle for 1815 CST 26 April 1970. . . 30 31 33 14. Plot of PVIL centers for the storm... storm events associated with the storm system on this evening, but the one of interest occurred, according to Storm Data, at Lawton, Oklahoma, 61 nm southwest of the NSSL radar site at 1815 CST. Gusty winds estimated at 70 kts turned over...

Scott, Carven Allen

1977-01-01

494

Effects of Occupational Education Programs Offered by the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education, Skills Centers Division, on the Recidivism Rate of Selected Groups of Released Offenders in Oklahoma  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scope and Method of Study: The purpose of this study was to describe the effects of career and technical education (CTE) on recidivism for offenders enrolled in the Oklahoma Department of Corrections CareerTech Skills Center School Systems (SCSS) programs. Specifically, the study mined existing CareerTech and ODOC data to: (a) compare the…

Ely, Joseph William

2012-01-01

495

I have been advised that the University of Oklahoma Staff Handbook is available on the University of Oklahoma web page at http://hr.ou.edu/handbook/default.asp.  

E-print Network

. The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center is an equal opportunity affirmative action employer personnel who also hold a part-time teaching or research appointment. *Disclosure of your Social Security on active duty in the U.S. military, ground, naval, or air service, participated ina U.S. military operation

Oklahoma, University of

496

Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2000 to September 30, 2000. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Since this is the first Quarterly report, much of the work done is of a preliminary nature. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The selection of the pilot test area has been completed. The drilling of the test well is waiting on rig availability. Phillips has begun sonic core testing of offset cores, waiting on the core from the well to be drilled. Design work is progressing for the tool, which will be built to fit the test well. Installation of monitoring equipment and the downhole vibration tool will occur after the well is drilled. Technical transfer efforts have begun with the submission of an abstract for a technical paper for the Oklahoma City Society of Petroleum Engineers meeting in March 2001.

J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

2000-09-30

497

Identification of brome grass infestations in southwest Oklahoma using multi-temporal Landsat imagery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The extensive infestation of brome grasses (Cheatgrass, Rye brome and Japanese brome) in southwest Oklahoma imposes negative impacts on local economy and ecosystem in terms of decreasing crop and forage production and increasing fire risk. Previously proposed methodologies on brome grass detection are found ill-suitable for southwest Oklahoma as a result of similar responses of background vegetation to inter-annual variability of rainfall. In this study, we aim to identify brome grass infestations by detecting senescent brome grasses using the 2011 Cultivated Land Cover Data Sets and the difference Normalized Difference Infrared Index (NDII) derived from multi-temporal Landsat imagery. Landsat imageries acquired on May 18th and June 10th 2013 by Operational Land Imager and Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus were used. The imagery acquisition dates correspond to the peak growth and senescent time of brome grasses, respectively. The difference NDII was calculated by subtracting the NDII image acquired in May from the June NDII image. Our hypotheses is that senescent brome grasses and crop/pasture fields harvested between the two image acquisition dates can be distinguished from background land cover classes because of their increases in NDII due to decreased water absorption by senescent vegetation in the shortwave infrared region. The Cultivated Land Cover Data Sets were used to further separate senescent brome grass patches from newly harvested crop/pasture fields. Ground truth data collected during field trips in June, July and August of 2013 were used to validate the detection results.

Yan, D.; de Beurs, K.

2013-12-01

498

Microhabitat use, home range, and movements of the alligator snapping turtle, Macrochelys temminckii, in Oklahoma  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Little is known about the ecology of the alligator snapping turtle, Macrochelys temminckii, particularly dentography and behavior. To learn more about the species in Oklahoma, we conducted a telemetry project on 2 small streams at Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge, an 8,417.5-ha refuge located in east-central Oklahoma. Between June 1999 and August 2000, we fitted 19 M. temminckii with ultrasonic telemetry tags and studied turtle movements and microhahitat use. Turtles were checked 2 to 3 times weekly in summer and sporadically in winter. Several microhabitat variables were measured at each turtle location and a random location to help quantify microhabitat use vs. availability. We recorded 147 turtle locations. Turtles were always associated with submerged cover with a high percentage of overhead canopy cover. Turtles used deeper depths in late summer (but not deeper depths than random locations) and deeper depths in mid-winter (and deeper depths than random locations) than in early summer. They used shallower depths than random locations in early summer. This seasonal shift in depth use might be thermoregulatory, although evidence for this is indirect. The mean linear home range for all turtles was 777.8 m. Females had larger home ranges than males, and juveniles had larger home ranges than adults, although the latter was not statistically significant. Macrochelys temminckii used submerged structures as a core site, and stayed at each core site for an average of 12.3 d.

Riedle, J.D.; Shipman, P.A.; Fox, S.F.; Leslie, D.M., Jr.

2006-01-01

499

Endozoochory of seeds and invertebrates by migratory waterbirds in Oklahoma, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Given their abundance and migratory behavior, waterbirds have major potential for dispersing plants and invertebrates within North America, yet their role as vectors remains poorly understood. We investigated the numbers and types of invertebrates and seeds within freshly collected faecal samples (n = 22) of migratory dabbling ducks and shorebirds in November 2008 in two parts of Lake Texoma in southern Oklahoma. Killdeer Charadrius vociferus were transporting a higher number and diversity of both plants and invertebrates than the green-winged teal Anas carolinensis. Ten plant taxa and six invertebrate taxa were identified to at least genus level, although viability was not confirmed for most of these taxa. Bryozoan statoblasts (from four species not previously recorded from Oklahoma) were especially abundant in killdeer faeces, while the ostracod Candona simpsoni was detected as a live adult in torpor in the teal faeces. Cyperaceae and Juncaceae were the most abundant plant families represented and Cyperus strigosus seeds germinated after extraction from killdeer faeces. This snapshot study underlines the importance of waterbirds as vectors of passive dispersal of many organisms and the need for more research in this discipline.

Green, Andy J.; Frisch, Dagmar; Michot, Thomas C.; Allain, Larry K.; Barrow, Wylie C.

2013-01-01

500

Potential ecological distribution of Cytauxzoon felis in domestic cats in Oklahoma, Missouri, and Arkansas.  

PubMed

The ecological distribution of Cytauxzoon felis, an often-fatal tick-borne apicomplexan that infects domestic cats, has not been evaluated or identified despite its continued emergence. Infection of C. felis is characterized by lethargy, icterus, fever, anorexia, anemia, and death. The natural vertebrate reservoir of C. felis is the bobcat (Lynx rufus). To determine the possible distribution of C. felis in three states where infection is common (Oklahoma, Missouri, and Arkansas), two separate approaches to ecological niche modeling were implemented. First, a model relating several different climatic layers to geographic locations where cases of C. felis infection were confirmed in domestic cats was developed to predict the possible distribution of the parasite. The second model incorporated occurrences of bobcats with environmental layers and land cover suitable for tick vectors to identify areas of overlap where C. felis transmission was likely. Results of both models indicated a high probability of C. felis from central Oklahoma to south-central Missouri. However, other predicted areas of C. felis occurrence varied between the two modeling approaches. Modeling the vertebrate reservoir and the tick vector predicted a broader possible distribution compared to modeling cases of C. felis infection in domestic cats. Our results suggest that C. felis is likely to extend beyond areas predicted by case modeling due to the presence of both the vector and reservoir. PMID:23131576

Mueller, Elisha K; Baum, Kristen A; Pape?, Monica; Cohn, Leah A; Cowell, Annette K; Reichard, Mason V

2013-02-18