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Sample records for hussar tetsuji sato

  1. RAPID COMMUNICATION: On the applicability of Sato's equation to capacitative radio frequency sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, J.; Nagabhushana, G. R.

    2000-12-01

    We show that the time-dependent version of Sato's equation, when applied to capacitative radio frequency sheaths, is no longer independent of the electric field of the space charge, and we discuss the use of the equation for a specific sheath model.

  2. Bifurcations, chaos, and sensitivity to parameter variations in the Sato cardiac cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otte, Stefan; Berg, Sebastian; Luther, Stefan; Parlitz, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of a detailed ionic cardiac cell model proposed by Sato et al. (2009) is investigated in terms of periodic and chaotic action potentials, bifurcation scenarios, and coexistence of attractors. Starting from the model's standard parameter values bifurcation diagrams are computed to evaluate the model's robustness with respect to (small) parameter changes. While for some parameters the dynamics turns out to be practically independent from their values, even minor changes of other parameters have a very strong impact and cause qualitative changes due to bifurcations or transitions to coexisting attractors. Implications of this lack of robustness are discussed.

  3. Performance Comparison of Variable Step Size Techniques of Sato and Godard-Based Blind Equalizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suthendran, K.; Arivoli, T.

    2015-04-01

    The modern digital high speed wireless communication system demands quick convergence rate and low steady state error. The balancing between the demands can be achieved by opting step size. Thus, it is essential to define new algorithms to equalize channels and mitigate noise in communications. It is renowned that time varying step size blind equalization technique can speed up the convergence rate and minimize the misadjustment. This work presents a variable step size (VSS) approach based on godard blind equalization algorithm to resolve the conflict between the convergence rate and precision of the fixed step-size godard algorithm. The results of this projected approach is compared with the existing variable step size sato algorithm for a pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) input symbol.

  4. Hydrogen and hydroxyl production rates of Comet Tago-Sato-Kosaka /1969 IX/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, H. U.; Lillie, C. F.

    1978-01-01

    Comet Tago-Sato-Kosaka (1969 IX) was observed with the ultraviolet photometers on OAO 2 from January 16.41 to January 29.89, 1970, while its heliocentric distance increased from 0.78 to 1.03 AU. The production rates of hydrogen and hydroxyl are derived from Lyman-alpha (1216 A) and OH (0-0) band (3090 A) emission. The variations of the hydrogen and hydroxyl production ran parallel to one another, while their ratio was about 3:1. These results are consistent with the assumption that vaporization of water ice controlled the production rate of gas during this interval. The hydrogen production rates of four nonperiodic comets are compared.

  5. Two new species of Ergasilus Nordmann, 1832 (Copepoda: Ergasilidae) and a redescription of Ergasilus salmini Thatcher & Brazil-Sato, 2008 from Salminus brasiliensis Cuvier and S. franciscanus Lima & Britsky (Teleostei: Characidae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Marques, Taísa Mendes; Boeger, Walter A; de Carvalho Brasil-Sato, Marília

    2015-01-01

    Three species of Ergasilus Nordmann, 1832 are reported from the gills of Salminus spp. in Brazil. Ergasilus salmini Thatcher & Brazil-Sato, 2008 from Salminus brasiliensis Cuvier is redescribed, based on examination of paratypes. The study revealed morphological differences from the original description, especially in the morphology of the cephalothorax and the ornamentation of antenna, antennule and legs. Ergasilus lacusauratus n. sp. described from S. brasiliensis in lake Lagoa Dourada (Paraná) differs from the only known species from this host group, E. salmini, in the shape and size of the cephalothorax and the general morphology of the egg-sacs. Ergasilus sinefalcatus n. sp. from S. franciscanus Lima & Britsky in River São Francisco (Minas Gerais) closely resembles E. pitalicus, E. coatiarus and E. leporinidis in the lack of a pectinate seta on the first exopodal segment, a feature common in species of Ergasilus in the Neotropics. Ergasilus sinefalcatus n. sp. differs from these species in the presence of a spiniform process on the coxae of legs 2, 3 and 4, an ornament never reported from freshwater species of Ergasilus in South America. PMID:25557749

  6. Erratum: Water Science and Technology 72 (7): Development of a new wastewater treatment process for resource recovery of carotenoids, H. Sato, H. Nagare, T. N. C. Huynh and H. Komatsu, doi: 10.2166/wst.2015.330.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    A new wastewater treatment process that involves coagulation, ozonation, and microalgae cultivation has been developed. Here, two challenges are discussed. The first was minimizing phosphorus removal during coagulation in order to maximize algal production. The second was to optimize microalgae cultivation; algal species that grow rapidly and produce valuable products are ideal for selection. Haematococcus pluvialis, which produces the carotenoid astaxanthin, was used. Growth rate, nutrient removal ability, and astaxanthin production of H. pluvialis in coagulated wastewater were investigated. After coagulation with chitosan, the turbidity and suspended solids decreased by 89% ± 8% and 73% ± 16%, respectively. The nitrogen and phosphorus contents of the supernatant remained at 86% ± 6% and 67% ± 24%, respectively. These results indicate that coagulation with chitosan can remove turbidity and SS while preserving nutrients. H. pluvialis grew well in the supernatant of coagulated wastewater. The astaxanthin yield from coagulated wastewater in which microalgae were cultured was 3.26 mg/L, and total phosphorus and nitrogen contents decreased 99% ± 1% and 90% ± 8% (Days 31-35), respectively. PMID:27508383

  7. EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Kong, M. G.; Zimmermann, J. L.

    2009-11-01

    -pressure microwave plasmas in an N2 and O2 gas mixture M K Singh, A Ogino and M Nagatsu Degradation of adhesion molecules of G361 melanoma cells by a non-thermal atmospheric pressure microplasma H J Lee, C H Shon, Y S Kim, S Kim, G C Kim and M G Kong The acidification of lipid film surfaces by non-thermal DBD at atmospheric pressure in air A Helmke, D Hoffmeister, N Mertens, S Emmert, J Schuette and W Vioel Reduction and degradation of amyloid aggregates by a pulsed radio-frequency cold atmospheric plasma jet D L Bayliss, J L Walsh, G Shama, F Iza and M G Kong The effect of low-temperature plasma on bacteria as observed by repeated AFM imaging René Pompl, Ferdinand Jamitzky, Tetsuji Shimizu, Bernd Steffes, Wolfram Bunk, Hans-Ulrich Schmidt, Matthias Georgi, Katrin Ramrath, Wilhelm Stolz, Robert W Stark, Takuya Urayama, Shuitsu Fujii and Gregor Eugen Morfill Removal and sterilization of biofilms and planktonic bacteria by microwave-induced argon plasma at atmospheric pressure Mi Hee Lee, Bong Joo Park, Soo Chang Jin, Dohyun Kim, Inho Han, Jungsung Kim, Soon O Hyun, Kie-Hyung Chung and Jong-Chul Park Cell permeabilization using a non-thermal plasma M Leduc, D Guay, R L Leask and S Coulombe Physical and biological mechanisms of direct plasma interaction with living tissue Danil Dobrynin, Gregory Fridman, Gary Friedman and Alexander Fridman Nosocomial infections-a new approach towards preventive medicine using plasmas G E Morfill, T Shimizu, B Steffes and H-U Schmidt Generation and transport mechanisms of chemical species by a post-discharge flow for inactivation of bacteria Takehiko Sato, Shiroh Ochiai and Takuya Urayama Low pressure plasma discharges for the sterilization and decontamination of surfaces F Rossi, O Kylián, H Rauscher, M Hasiwa and D Gilliland Contribution of a portable air plasma torch to rapid blood coagulation as a method of preventing bleeding S P Kuo, O Tarasenko, J Chang, S Popovic, C Y Chen, H W Fan, A Scott, M Lahiani, P Alusta, J D Drake and M Nikolic A two

  8. EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Kong, M. G.; Zimmermann, J. L.

    2009-11-01

    -pressure microwave plasmas in an N2 and O2 gas mixture M K Singh, A Ogino and M Nagatsu Degradation of adhesion molecules of G361 melanoma cells by a non-thermal atmospheric pressure microplasma H J Lee, C H Shon, Y S Kim, S Kim, G C Kim and M G Kong The acidification of lipid film surfaces by non-thermal DBD at atmospheric pressure in air A Helmke, D Hoffmeister, N Mertens, S Emmert, J Schuette and W Vioel Reduction and degradation of amyloid aggregates by a pulsed radio-frequency cold atmospheric plasma jet D L Bayliss, J L Walsh, G Shama, F Iza and M G Kong The effect of low-temperature plasma on bacteria as observed by repeated AFM imaging René Pompl, Ferdinand Jamitzky, Tetsuji Shimizu, Bernd Steffes, Wolfram Bunk, Hans-Ulrich Schmidt, Matthias Georgi, Katrin Ramrath, Wilhelm Stolz, Robert W Stark, Takuya Urayama, Shuitsu Fujii and Gregor Eugen Morfill Removal and sterilization of biofilms and planktonic bacteria by microwave-induced argon plasma at atmospheric pressure Mi Hee Lee, Bong Joo Park, Soo Chang Jin, Dohyun Kim, Inho Han, Jungsung Kim, Soon O Hyun, Kie-Hyung Chung and Jong-Chul Park Cell permeabilization using a non-thermal plasma M Leduc, D Guay, R L Leask and S Coulombe Physical and biological mechanisms of direct plasma interaction with living tissue Danil Dobrynin, Gregory Fridman, Gary Friedman and Alexander Fridman Nosocomial infections-a new approach towards preventive medicine using plasmas G E Morfill, T Shimizu, B Steffes and H-U Schmidt Generation and transport mechanisms of chemical species by a post-discharge flow for inactivation of bacteria Takehiko Sato, Shiroh Ochiai and Takuya Urayama Low pressure plasma discharges for the sterilization and decontamination of surfaces F Rossi, O Kylián, H Rauscher, M Hasiwa and D Gilliland Contribution of a portable air plasma torch to rapid blood coagulation as a method of preventing bleeding S P Kuo, O Tarasenko, J Chang, S Popovic, C Y Chen, H W Fan, A Scott, M Lahiani, P Alusta, J D Drake and M Nikolic A two

  9. Clues to prolific productivity among prominent scientists.

    PubMed

    Kantha, S S

    1992-10-01

    In a survey based on the biographical sketches, obituary notes and eulogies of notable scientists, eight were identified as belonging to an elite group, having authored more than 1000 research publications, which include books, monographs and patents. They were, in chronological order, Thomas Alva Edison, Paul Karrer, Margaret Mead, Giulio Natta, Hans Selye, Herbert C Brown, Tetsuji Kametani and Carl Djerassi. Among these, Karrer, Natta and Brown were Nobelists in chemistry. Four criteria which can be identified as clues to their prolific productivity are, 1) enthusiasm for compulsive work and eccentric life style, 2) physical and/or environmental handicap, 3) pioneering efforts in a new research field, and 4) selection of research area, predominantly organic chemistry. PMID:1461180

  10. Influence of impulsivity-reflexivity when testing dynamic spatial ability: sex and g differences.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, M Angeles; Hernández, José Manuel; Rubio, Victor; Shih, Pei Chun; Santacreu, José

    2007-11-01

    This work analyzes the possibility that the differences in the performance of men and women in dynamic spatial tasks such as the Spatial Orientation Dynamic Test-Revised (SODT-R; Santacreu & Rubio, 1998), obtained in previous works, are due to cognitive style (Reflexivity-Impulsivity) or to the speed-accuracy tradeoff (SATO) that the participants implement. If these differences are due to cognitive style, they would be independent of intelligence, whereas if they are due to SATO, they may be associated with intelligence. In this work, 1652 participants, 984 men and 668 women, ages between 18 and 55 years, were assessed. In addition to the SODT-R, the "Test de Razonamiento Analitico, Secuencial e Inductivo" (TRASI [Analytical, Sequential, and Inductive Reasoning Test]; Rubio & Santacreu, 2003) was administered as a measure of general intelligence. Impulsivity scores (Zi) of Salkind and Wright (1977) were used to analyze reflexivity-impulsivity and SATO. The results obtained indicate that (a) four performance groups can be identified: Fast-accurate, Slow-inaccurate, Impulsive, and Reflexive. The first two groups solve the task as a function of a competence variable and the last two as a function of a personality variable; (b) performance differences should be attributed to SATO; (c) SATO differs depending on sex and intelligence level. PMID:17992956

  11. Commuting flows and conservation laws for noncommutative Lax hierarchies

    SciTech Connect

    Hamanaka, Masashi

    2005-05-01

    We discuss commuting flows and conservation laws for Lax hierarchies on noncommutative spaces in the framework of the Sato theory. On commutative spaces, the Sato theory has revealed essential aspects of the integrability for wide class of soliton equations which are derived from the Lax hierarchies in terms of pseudodifferential operators. Noncommutative extension of the Sato theory has been already studied by the author and Toda, and the existence of various noncommutative Lax hierarchies are guaranteed. In this paper, we present conservation laws for the noncommutative Lax hierarchies with both space-space and space-time noncommutativities and prove the existence of infinite number of conserved densities. We also give the explicit representations of them in terms of Lax operators. Our results include noncommutative versions of KP, KdV, Boussinesq, coupled KdV, Sawada-Kotera, modified KdV equation and so on.

  12. Variations in Cognitive Maps: Understanding Individual Differences in Navigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisberg, Steven M.; Schinazi, Victor R.; Newcombe, Nora S.; Shipley, Thomas F.; Epstein, Russell A.

    2014-01-01

    There are marked individual differences in the formation of cognitive maps both in the real world and in virtual environments (VE; e.g., Blajenkova, Motes, & Kozhevnikov, 2005; Chai & Jacobs, 2010; Ishikawa & Montello, 2006; Wen, Ishikawa, & Sato, 2011). These differences, however, are poorly understood and can be difficult to…

  13. Misunderstandings of Communicative Language Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Wen

    2008-01-01

    Although Communicative Language Teaching is accepted by many English teachers in China as one of the most effective approach in English language teaching, there are still a number of misunderstandings about it. By comparing Johnstone; Sato and Kleinsasser and Thompson as well as Spada, this article focuses on four of the main misunderstandings,…

  14. Solution to the cosmological horizon problem proposed by Zee

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, M.D.

    1981-08-15

    Applying a theory of gravity with broken symmetry, Zee has suggested a solution to the cosmological horizon problem. His idea has been criticized on two independent grounds by Linde and by Sato. In this paper, we suggest answers to both these criticisms.

  15. Underachievement in Gifted Students: A Case Study of Three College Physics Students in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Kuei-Fang; Fu, Guopeng

    2016-01-01

    This case study provides an explanatory account on the underachievement of three gifted students studying physics in a Taiwanese university. The students' physics underachievement was diagnosed by Sato's student-problem analysis chart. These students were invited to complete a questionnaire and a follow-up interview in order to (1) understand the…

  16. An Appetite for Creative Destruction: Should the Role of Senior Academic Technology Officer Be Modeled on a CIO or a CTO?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shurville, Simon; Browne, Tom; Whitaker, Marian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to examine the emerging role of the Senior Academic Technology Officer (SATO) in higher education. It aims to consider two existing templates for this professional role derived from mainstream information management and information technology: the Chief Information Officer (CIO) and the Chief Technology Officer (CTO).…

  17. Employing Online S-P Diagnostic Table for Qualitative Comments on Test Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chien-hwa; Chen, Cheng-ping

    2013-01-01

    The major concerns of adaptive testing studies have concentrated on effectiveness and efficiency of the system built for the research experiments. It has been criticised that such general information has fallen short of providing qualitative descriptions regarding learning performance. Takahiro Sato of Japan proposed an analytical diagram called…

  18. Item-Level Time Limits Are Not a Panacea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitz, Florian; Wilhelm, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The excellent paper by Goldhammer (this issue) deals with a most relevant and very pervasive problem of ability assessment: the evaluation of performance by considering speed and accuracy of performance. Goldhammer proposes item-level time limits as a possible remedy for individual differences in the speed-accuracy trade-off (SATO) to keep time…

  19. Feature Integration Theory Revisited: Dissociating Feature Detection and Attentional Guidance in Visual Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Louis K. H.; Hayward, William G.

    2009-01-01

    In feature integration theory (FIT; A. Treisman & S. Sato, 1990), feature detection is driven by independent dimensional modules, and other searches are driven by a master map of locations that integrates dimensional information into salience signals. Although recent theoretical models have largely abandoned this distinction, some observed results…

  20. Increasing Compatibility Between Educational Practices and the Educational Needs of Pupils Who are Asian With Emphasis on Their Language and Cultural Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Lydia R.; Ponce, Corazon A.

    The contents of this document are organized in eight parts, as follows. Part One, "Speech of Dr. Esther M. T. Sato," the consultant, Associate Professor at the College of Education, University of Hawaii, discusses the following topics: in the background of Filipinos in Hawaii, their social problems, Filipino cultural values, guidelines to help the…

  1. Absolute gravity measurements in Southeast Alaska and continuous gravity observation in Juneau by ISEA2 project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Kazama, T.; Miura, S.; Ohta, Y.; Okubo, S.; Fujimoto, H.; Kaufman, M.; Herreid, S. J.; Larsen, C. F.; Freymueller, J. T.

    2012-12-01

    It is known that Southeast Alaska (SE-AK) shows a large uplift rates exceeding 32 mm/year at the maximum mainly due to the three ice changes in ages, i.e. in the Large Glacier Maximum, the Little Ice Age and the present day. Comparisons between rates of change obtained from GPS and absolute gravimeter (AG) observations and the rates predicted by model computations based on independently estimated ice mass changes indicate the existence of a very thin lithosphere (on the order of 60 km) and a low viscousity upper mantle (on the order of 1.E18 Pa s) beneath SE-AK (Larsen et al., 2005; Sato et al, 2011; Sato et al., 2012). On the other hand, it is also known that there are very large oceanic tidal loading effects in SE-AK, i.e. exceeding 2.7 cm and 8 microGals for the M2 constituent of the vertical displacement and gravity, respectively (Sato et al., 2008; Inazu et al., 2009; Sun et al., 2010; Sato et al., 2012). These regional large loading and unloading effects provide good signals to study the viscoelastic structure beneath SE-AK. A joint observation project (ISEA2) between Japan and USA groups has restarted as a five years project beginning in 2012. In June 2012, we conducted the AG measurements at the 6 sites in SE-AK at where the AG measurements were conducted by the previous ISEA1 project (Sun et al., 2010). Continuous gravity observation started also on June 2012 with a portable super conducting gravimeter (iGrav) at the EGAN library of UAS. We will introduce the results for these observations and comparisons with the previous observations and model computations. It is noted that the precipitation during the period from the winter in 2011 to the spring in 2012 was very large compared with the usual amount. We evaluate this effect on our gravity observations with a hydrological model computation (Kazama and Okubo, 2009) using the observed precipitation data as an input data. The observation with the iGrav super conducting gravimeter shall give us a useful data

  2. [The mammals of Guinea as reservoirs and carriers of arboviruses].

    PubMed

    Konstantinov, O K; Diallo, S M; Inapogi, A P; Ba, A; Kamara, S K

    2006-01-01

    A great body of data on the fauna and ecology of wild mammals and their participation in the circulation of arboviruses were collected when the ecology of the latter of the Republic of Guinea was studied in 1978 to 1989. A hundred and eighteen species belonging to 10 orders were identified. Over 2,000 biological specimens were virologically and serologically examined. Six arboviruses were isolated. These included Dugbe virus (from the hussar monkey Cercopithecus (Erythrocebus patas) and 5 viruses from chiropters: Rift valley fever, from Micropteropus pusillus, Miniopterus schreibersi, and Hipposideros caffer, Saboya, Fomede, and Ank 6909 from Nycteris gambiensis and Kolenter from Hipposideros sp. Fomede, Kolente, and Ank 6909 viruses turned out to be new species for science. Rodents were found to have viral antigens of Lass fever (Mastomys natalensis, Tatera valida kempi and Rattus rattus), Dugbe and Chikungunya fevers (M. natalensis) and West Nile fever (Mus sp.). A serological survey of mammals revealed that the latter had antibodies to 12 arboviruses. Thus, the mammals of Guinea participate in the circulation of 18 arboviruses, 13 of them are pathogenic for man. PMID:16562748

  3. New species of Hercostomus Loew, 1857 (Dolichopodidae, Diptera) from Japan.

    PubMed

    Negrobov, O P; Kumazawa, T; Tago, T; Sato, M

    2016-01-01

    Six new species of the genus Hercostomus Loew, 1857, are described from Japan: Hercostomus acutiformis Negrobov, Kumazawa & Tago sp. nov., H. falcilis Negrobov, Kumazawa & Tago sp. nov., H. flavipalpus Negrobov, Kumazawa, Tago & Sato sp. nov., H. nigricollaris Negrobov, Kumazawa & Tago sp. nov., H. spathulatus Negrobov, Kumazawa, Tago & Sato sp. nov., H. spinitibialis Negrobov, Kumazawa & Tago sp. nov. Hercostomus flaveolus Negrobov & Chalaya, 1987 is newly recorded from Japan, and Hercostomus arcticus Yang, 1996 is newly synonymized with Hercostomus flaveolus (syn. nov.). The holotype of Hercostomus flaviventris Smirnov & Negrobov, 1979 is redescribed. Hercostomus ussurianus Stackelberg is transferred to the genus Gymnopternus Loew, 1857 (stat. nov.). A key to the eleven recognized species of Japanese Hercostomus is provided. PMID:27615870

  4. Search for ferromagnetism in transition-metal-doped piezoelectric ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaldin, Nicola A.

    2004-03-01

    We present results of a computational study of ZnO in the presence of Co and Mn substitutional impurities. The goal of our work is to identify potential ferromagnetic ground states within the (Zn,Co)O or (Zn,Mn)O material systems that are also good candidates for piezoelectricity. We find that robust ferromagnetism is not obtained by substitution of Co or Mn on the Zn site, unless additional carriers (holes) are also incorporated. This is consistent with the conventional wisdom that carriers are required to induce ferromagnetism in diluted magnetic semiconductors, but in contrast to a previous theoretical prediction for this system [K. Sato and H. Katayama-Yoshida, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., Part 2 39, L555 (2000); K. Sato and H. Katayama-Yoshida, Phys. Status Solidi B 229, 673 (2002)]. We propose a practical scheme for achieving such p-type doping in ZnO.

  5. [Parasitism on medfly by Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Ashmead) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) in different guava cultivars].

    PubMed

    Paranhos, Beatriz A J; Walder, Júlio M M; Alvarenga, Clarice D

    2007-01-01

    The parasitism efficiency of the Braconidae wasp, Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Ashmead), was checked on four guava cultivars (Paluma, Sassaoca, Pedro Sato and Kumagai) infested with larvae of medfly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae). Five blocks of eight fruits, each with two fruits of each cultivar, were put inside C. capitata adult cages, during 2h for oviposition, and a week later, when the larvae inside guavas were developed, the fruits were exposed to parasitoids for 24h. The mean fruit weight, larvae mortality, number of pupae, percentage of medfly and parasitoid emergence were evaluated. There was not statistical difference among cultivars to weight, larvae mortality, number of pupae e emergence of medfly. The percentage of parasitism was higher in Pedro Sato cultivar (19.8%) compared with Kumagai cultivar (2.9%), but it was statistically similar to the other cultivars. PMID:17607457

  6. Lithium Batteries: Carbon-Rich Active Materials with Macrocyclic Nanochannels for High-Capacity Negative Electrodes in All-Solid-State Lithium Rechargeable Batteries (Small 25/2016).

    PubMed

    Sato, Sota; Unemoto, Atsushi; Ikeda, Takuji; Orimo, Shin-Ichi; Isobe, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    On page 3381, S. Sato, S. Orimo, H. Isobe, and co-workers present the first macrocyclic material to be utilized in negative electrodes of all-solid-state, rechargeable lithium batteries. Assembled to align the molecular openings, the macrocycle paves paths for lithium to migrate to the π-stack intercalation sites for the storage. The macrocyclic nanochannel of a nanometer-scale diameter further provides extra spaces for the lithium storage to surpass conventional graphitic electrodes in the capacity. PMID:27364310

  7. Network Dynamics Underlying Speed-Accuracy Trade-Offs in Response to Errors

    PubMed Central

    Agam, Yigal; Carey, Caitlin; Barton, Jason J. S.; Dyckman, Kara A.; Lee, Adrian K. C.; Vangel, Mark; Manoach, Dara S.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to dynamically and rapidly adjust task performance based on its outcome is fundamental to adaptive, flexible behavior. Over trials of a task, responses speed up until an error is committed and after the error responses slow down. These dynamic adjustments serve to optimize performance and are well-described by the speed-accuracy trade-off (SATO) function. We hypothesized that SATOs based on outcomes reflect reciprocal changes in the allocation of attention between the internal milieu and the task-at-hand, as indexed by reciprocal changes in activity between the default and dorsal attention brain networks. We tested this hypothesis using functional MRI to examine the pattern of network activation over a series of trials surrounding and including an error. We further hypothesized that these reciprocal changes in network activity are coordinated by the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and would rely on the structural integrity of its white matter connections. Using diffusion tensor imaging, we examined whether fractional anisotropy of the posterior cingulum bundle correlated with the magnitude of reciprocal changes in network activation around errors. As expected, reaction time (RT) in trials surrounding errors was consistent with predictions from the SATO function. Activation in the default network was: (i) inversely correlated with RT, (ii) greater on trials before than after an error and (iii) maximal at the error. In contrast, activation in the right intraparietal sulcus of the dorsal attention network was (i) positively correlated with RT and showed the opposite pattern: (ii) less activation before than after an error and (iii) the least activation on the error. Greater integrity of the posterior cingulum bundle was associated with greater reciprocity in network activation around errors. These findings suggest that dynamic changes in attention to the internal versus external milieu in response to errors underlie SATOs in RT and are mediated by the PCC

  8. Synthesis of Conjugated Polymers Containing cis-Phenylenevinylenes by Titanium Mediated Reductions

    PubMed Central

    Moslin, Ryan M.; Espino, Christine G.; Swager, Timothy M.

    2009-01-01

    The utility of Sato's titanium-mediated reduction of alkynes towards the synthesis of all cis-poly(phenylenevinylene)s (PPVs) is demonstrated by the syn-selective reduction of a variety of model diynes as well as a tetrayne. This technique was then applied to the reduction of a poly(phenyleneethynylene) (PPE) to provide the corresponding all-cis PPV polymer. PMID:20827441

  9. Geometry of operator cross ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Zelikin, M I

    2006-02-28

    The operator cross ratio, which is meaningful, in particular, for the infinite-dimensional Sato Grassmannian is defined and investigated. Its homological interpretation is presented. A matrix and operator analogue of the Schwartzian differential operator is introduced and its relation to linear Hamiltonian systems and Riccati's equation is established. The aim of these constructions is application to the KP-hierarchy (the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili hierarchy)

  10. Preliminary investigation of multispectral retinal tissue oximetry mapping using a hyperspectral retinal camera.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Michèle; Sylvestre, Jean-Philippe; Jafari, Reza; Kulasekara, Susith; Rose, Kalpana; Trussart, Rachel; Arbour, Jean Daniel; Hudson, Chris; Lesage, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Oximetry measurement of principal retinal vessels represents a first step towards understanding retinal metabolism, but the technique could be significantly enhanced by spectral imaging of the fundus outside of main vessels. In this study, a recently developed Hyperspectral Retinal Camera was used to measure relative oximetric (SatO2) and total hemoglobin (HbT) maps of the retina, outside of large vessels, in healthy volunteers at baseline (N = 7) and during systemic hypoxia (N = 11), as well as in patients with glaucoma (N = 2). Images of the retina, on a field of view of ∼30°, were acquired between 500 and 600 nm with 2 and 5 nm steps, in under 3 s. The reflectance spectrum from each pixel was fitted to a model having oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin as the main absorbers and scattering modeled by a power law, yielding estimates of relative SatO2 and HbT over the fundus. Average optic nerve head (ONH) saturation over 8 eyes was 68 ± 5%. During systemic hypoxia, mean ONH saturation decreased by 12.5% on average. Upon further development and validation, the relative SatO2 and HbT maps of microvasculature obtained with this imaging system could ultimately contribute to the diagnostic and management of diseases affecting the ONH and retina. PMID:27060375

  11. List of participants at SIDE IV meeting, Tokyo, 27 November--1 December 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-12-01

    Mark J Ablowitz, Vsevolod Adler, Mark Alber, Said Belmehdi, Marco Boiti, Claude Brezinski, R Bullough, Y M Chiang, Theodore Chihara, Peter A Clarkson, Robert Conte, Adam Doliwa, Vladimir Dorodnitsyn, Mitsuaki Eguchi, Claire Gilson, Basil Grammaticos, Valeri Gromak, Rod Halburd, Koji Hasegawa, Jarmo Hietarinta, Ryogo Hirota, Xing Biao Hu, M Idzumi, J Inoguchi, Hiroya Ishikara, Mourad Ismail, Shin Isojima, Kenichi Ito, Yoshiaki Itoh, Masashi Iwasaki, Klara Janglajew, Michio Jimbo, Nalini Joshi, Kenji Kajiwara, Saburo Kakei, Masaru Kamata, Satoshi Kamei, Rinat Kashaev, Shingo Kawai, Taeko Kimijima, K Kimura, Anatol Kirillov, Koichi Kondo, Boris Konopelchenko, Martin Kruskal, Atsuo Kuniba, Wataru Kunishima, Franklin Lambert, Serguei Leble, Decio Levi, Shigeru Maeda, Manuel Manas, Ken-Ichi Maruno, Tetsu Masuda, J Matsukidaira, Atsushi Matsumiya, Shigeki Matsutani, Yukitaka Minesaki, Mikio Murata, Micheline Musette, Atsushi Nagai, Katsuya Nakagawa, Atsushi Nakamula, Akira Nakamura, Yoshimasa Nakamura, Frank Nijhoff, J J C Nimmo, Katsuhiro Nishinari, Michitomo Nishizawa, A Nobe, Masatoshi Noumi, Yaeko Ohsaki, Yasuhiro Ohta, Kazuo Okamoto, Alexandre Orlov, Naoki Osada, Flora Pempinelli, Spiro Pyrlis, Reinout Quispel, Orlando Ragnisco, Alfred Ramani, Jean-Pierre Ramis, Andreas Ruffing, Simon Ruijsenaars, Satoru Saito, Noriko Saitoh, Hidetaka Sakai, Paulo Santini, Narimasa Sasa, Ryu Sasaki, Yoshikatsu Sasaki, Junkichi Satsuma, Sergei Sergeev, Nobuhiko Shinzawa, Evgueni Sklyanin, Juris Suris, Norio Suzuki, Yukiko Tagami, Katsuaki Takahashi, Daisuke Takahashi, Tomoyuki Takenawa, Yoshiro Takeyama, K M Tamizhmani, T Tamizhmani, Kouichi Toda, Morikatsu Toda, Tetsuji Tokihiro, Takayuki Tsuchida, Yohei Tsuchiya, Teruhisa Tsuda, Satoru Tsujimoto, Walter Van Assche, Claude Viallet, Luc Vinet, Shinsuke Watanabe, Yoshihida Watanabe, Ralph Willox, Pavel Winternitz, Yasuhiko Yamada, Yuji Yamada, Jin Yoneda, Haruo Yoshida, Katsuhiko Yoshida, Daisuke Yoshihara, Fumitaka Yura, J

  12. Relationship Between Afterslip of 2003 Tokachi Earthquakes and Coseismic-slip of 2004 Kushiro Earthquakes Using Viscoelastic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Takemura, H.

    2010-12-01

    The studies of afterslip distribution of large plate interface earthquakes are important for revealing frictional properties on faults, and investigating trigger processes to adjacent faults. After 2003 Tokachi Earthquake (M8.0), Hokkaido, Japan, post seismic deformation was observed, and this observation indicates occurrence of afterslip at eastern side of the earthquake. After 1.2 yr of the Tokachi Earthquake, two large events (M7.1, M6.9) occurred at off Kushiro, which is located 150km east from the Tokachi Earthquake. It is considered that these two events may be triggered by the afterslip of the Tokachi Earthquake. To investigate the trigger process, we estimate special and temporal afterslip distribution. The effect of viscoelastic relaxation at the asthenosphere is important on post seismic surface deformation (Matsu’ura and Sato, GJI, 1989; Sato and Matsu’ura, GJI, 1992). We estimate afterslip distribution of large interplate earthquakes using viscoelastic media. We consider not only viscoelastic responses of coseismic slip but also viscoelastic responses of afterslips (Sato and Higuchi, AGU Fall Meeting, 2009). Because many studies suggested that the magnitude of afterslips was comparable to that of coseismic slip, viscoelastic responses of afterslips should not be negligible. Therefore, surface displacement data include viscoelastic response of coseismic slip, viscoelastic response of afterslips which occurred just after coseismic period to just before the present, and elastic response of the present afterslip. We estimate afterslip distribution of the Tokachi Earthquake using GPS data by GSI, Japan. We use CAMP model (Hashimoto et al, PAGEOPH, 2004) as a plate interface between the Pacific plate and the North American plate. The viscoelastic results show that afterslips concentrate deeper parts of the plate interface at the eastern adjoining area of the Tokachi Earthquake. Just before the Kushiro Events (1-1.2 yr after the Tokachi Earthquake

  13. Chaotic dynamics around astrophysical objects with nonisotropic stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Dubeibe, F. L.; Pachon, Leonardo A.; Sanabria-Gomez, Jose D.

    2007-01-15

    The existence of chaotic behavior for the geodesics of the test particles orbiting compact objects is a subject of much current research. Some years ago, Gueron and Letelier [Phys. Rev. E 66, 046611 (2002)] reported the existence of chaotic behavior for the geodesics of the test particles orbiting compact objects like black holes induced by specific values of the quadrupolar deformation of the source using as models the Erez--Rosen solution and the Kerr black hole deformed by an internal multipole term. In this work, we are interested in the study of the dynamic behavior of geodesics around astrophysical objects with intrinsic quadrupolar deformation or nonisotropic stresses, which induces nonvanishing quadrupolar deformation for the nonrotating limit. For our purpose, we use the Tomimatsu-Sato spacetime [Phys. Rev. Lett. 29 1344 (1972)] and its arbitrary deformed generalization obtained as the particular vacuum case of the five parametric solution of Manko et al. [Phys. Rev. D 62, 044048 (2000)] characterizing the geodesic dynamics throughout the Poincare sections method. We found only regular motion for the geodesics in the Tomimatsu-Sato {delta}=2 solution. Additionally, using the deformed generalization of Tomimatsu-Sato {delta}=2 solution given by Manko et al. we found chaotic motion for oblate deformation instead of prolate deformation, which is in contrast to the results by Gueron and Letelier. It opens the possibility that the particles forming the accretion disk around a large variety of different astrophysical bodies (nonprolate, e.g., neutron stars) could exhibit chaotic dynamics. We also conjecture that the existence of an arbitrary deformation parameter is necessary for the existence of chaotic dynamics.

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of New Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segawa, Kouji

    2012-02-01

    In this talk, I will show detailed information on synthesizing process and characterization results of new topological insulator (TI) materials with interesting properties. Among the synthesized materials, TlBiSe2 was the first ternary TI and has the largest bulk band gap [1], TlBi(S1-x,Sex)2 presents a topological phase transition with unexpected Dirac mass [2], BiTe2Se presents a large bulk resistivity [3], and Bi1.5Sb0.5Te1.7Se1.3 has finally achieved the surface-dominated transport in bulk single crystals [4]. It is essentially easy to grow single crystals of all the chalcogenides above, because those compounds melt congruently at relatively low temperatures. Therefore, the melt-growth method is applicable if the raw materials are in a sealed condition, e.g., in a quartz tube. However, crucial techniques for obtaining high-quality samples vary between the systems. Besides the growth method, characterizations of the transport properties, ARPES, the X-ray diffraction, and quantitative chemical analysis will also be presented. [4pt] This work is in collaboration with A. A. Taskin, S. Sasaki, Zhi Ren, K. Eto, T. Minami, and Y. Ando (Osaka Univ.), and T. Sato, S. Souma, H. Guo, K. Sugawara, K. Kosaka and K. Nakayama, and T. Takahashi (Tohoku Univ.). [4pt] [1] T. Sato, Kouji Segawa, T. Takahashi, Y. Ando et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 136802 (2010). [2] T. Sato, Kouji Segawa, Y. Ando, T. Takahashi et al., Nature Physics, 7, 840 (2011). [3] Zhi Ren, Kouji Segawa, Y. Ando et al., Phys. Rev. B (Rapid Comm.) 82, 241306(R) (2010). [4] A. A. Taskin, Kouji Segawa, and Y. Ando et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 016801 (2011).

  15. A Comment on the New Formulation of a Many-Level Shell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasumoto, S.; Shimizu, Y. R.

    2003-11-01

    In order to construct a set of orthonormalized basis vectors in a many-level shell model space, we introduced a new type of CFP in a previous paper [K. Takada, M. Sato and S. Yasumoto, Prog. Theor. Phys. 104 (2000), 173]. There, we also presented one of its analytic representations. In this paper, we improve that representation by making it much simpler and applicable to the case of the five-level. Using this improved representation, it is possible to develop a general-use computer program for the shell-model calculation.

  16. Design of dilute magnetic semiconductors with room temperature ferromagnetism by controlling spinodal decompostion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kazunori

    2008-03-01

    Owing to the recent development of the first-principles method for calculating magnetic properties of dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS), it has been recognized that the magnetic percolation effect is disastrous to the high temperature ferromagnetism in DMS in particular for low concentrations [1]. The exchange interactions calculated from first-principles are strong for nearest neighbors, but those interactions are short ranged and can not play an important role for realizing high- TC because the solubility of magnetic impurities into DMS is too low to achieve magnetic percolation. To overcome this difficulty and realize room temperature ferromagnetism, we focus on the spinodal decomposition in DMS, and suggest that by controlling the spinodal decomposition high blocking temperature can be realized leading to ferromagnetic behaviour at high temperature [2]. We calculate electronic structure of DMS from first-principles by using the Korringa- Kohn-Rostoker coherent potential approximation (KKR-CPA) method. Then, chemical pair interactions and magnetic exchange interactions between magnetic are calculated. We use the Monte Carlo techniques to simulate spinodal decomposition of DMS and to estimate the magnetic properties of them [3]. The computer simulations for the magnetization process of the decomposition phases indicate that we can control super-paramagnetic blocking temperature by optimizing the size of the clusters by changing the crystal growth condition. This simulation suggests the material design of high blocking temperature DMS by controlling the spinodal decomposition [2].As another approach for realizing high-Tc DMS we propose co-doping method to increase solubility limit of transition metal impurities in DMS [4]. This work is based on the collaboration with H. Katayama-Yoshida and T. Fukushima. [1] L. Bergqvist et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 137202 (2004), K. Sato et al., Phys. Rev. B 70, 201202 (2004) [2] K. Sato et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 46, L682

  17. Macroscale particle simulation of kinetic Alfven waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Motohiko; Sato, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Akira

    1987-01-01

    Two types of simulations of the kinetic Alfven wave are presented using a macroscale particle simulation code (Tanaka and Sato, 1986) which enables individual particle dynamics to be followed in the MHD scales. In this code, low frequency electromagnetic fields are solved by eliminating high frequency oscillations such as the light modes, and the scalar potential electric field is solved by eliminating Lagrangian oscillations. The dependences of the frequency and the Landau damping on the perpendicular wavenumber were studied, and good agreement was found between simulation and theoretical predictions. Some fundamental nonlinear interactions of the kinetic Alfven wave with the particles (parallel acceleration of the electrons) were also noted.

  18. Chemoselective Schwartz Reagent Mediated Reduction of Isocyanates to Formamides.

    PubMed

    Pace, Vittorio; de la Vega-Hernández, Karen; Urban, Ernst; Langer, Thierry

    2016-06-01

    Addition of the in situ generated Schwartz reagent to widely available isocyanates constitutes a chemoselective, high-yielding, and versatile approach to the synthesis of variously functionalized formamides. Steric and electronic factors or the presence of sensitive functionalities (esters, nitro groups, nitriles, alkenes) do not compromise the potential of the method. Full preservation of the stereochemical information contained in the starting materials is observed. The use of formamides in the nucleophilic addition of organometallic reagents (Chida-Sato allylation, Charette-Huang addition to imidoyl triflate activated amides, Matteson homologation of boronic esters) is briefly investigated. PMID:27218199

  19. Measurement of the partial cross sections {sigma}{sub TT}, {sigma}{sub LT}, and ({sigma}{sub T} + {epsilon}{sigma}{sub L}) of the {sup 1}H(e, e{sup '{pi}+})n reaction in the {Delta}(1232) resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, J. M.; Calarco, J.; Holtrop, A.; Sparveris, N. F.; Nakagawa, I.; Bernstein, A. M.; Bertozzi, W.; Botto, T.; Casagrande, F.; Dow, K.; Farkondeh, M.; Gilad, S.; Kowalski, S.; Milner, R.; Sirca, S.; Stave, S.; Tsentalivich, G.; Tschalaer, C.; Turchinetz, W.; Zhou, Z.-L.

    2011-08-15

    We report precision {sup 1}H(e, e{sup '{pi}+})n measurements in the {Delta}(1232) resonance at Q{sup 2}=0.127(GeV/c){sup 2} obtained at the MIT-Bates out-of-plane scattering facility. These are the lowest, but nonzero, Q{sup 2} measurements in the {pi}{sup +} channel. The data offer tests of the theoretical calculations, particularly of the background amplitude contributions. The chiral effective field theory and Sato-Lee model calculations are not in agreement with this experiment.

  20. Operation status of the electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Gunma University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souda, H.; Yamada, S.; Kanai, T.; Takeshita, E.; Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Kanazawa, M.; Izumiya, H.; Kano, Y.

    2014-02-01

    An ECR ion source of Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, so-called KeiGM [M. Muramatsu, A. Kitagawa, Y. Sakamoto, S. Sato, Y. Sato, H. Ogawa, S. Yamada, H. Ogawa, Y. Yoshida, and A. G. Drentje, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 76, 113304 (2005)], has been operated for cancer therapy and physical/biological experiment since 2010. KeiGM produces typically 230 μA of 10 keV/u C4+ ions from CH4 gases. The vacuum pressure is kept between 1.2 × 10-4 and 1.7 × 10-4 Pa so as to suppress the pulse-to-pulse current fluctuation within ±10%. The extraction electrode is cleaned every 6-8 months in order to remove deposited carbon, which increases the leak current and discharge. In order to investigate the possibility of long-term operation without such maintenances, oxygen aging for the cleaning of the extraction electrode has been tested in the test bench. The same-designed ion sources at National Institute of Radiological Sciences and SAGA Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Tosu (SAGA-HIMAT) are also operated with stable C4+ current, which are suitable for the continuous operation for cancer therapy.

  1. Investigation on the effects of guava (Psidium guajava L.) infusions on germination, root tips and meristematic cells of Latuca sativa.

    PubMed

    Luber, Jaquelini; Palmieri, Marcel J; Botelho, Carolina M; Rinaldo, Daniel; Andrade-Vieira, Larissa F

    2015-01-01

    Guava (Psidium guajava L.) is a plant often employed in popular medicine. Recently several studies have alerted about the toxicity of substances present in medicinal plants, which can pose risks to the human health. In this sense, the present work aimed to investigate the phytotoxic, cytotoxic and genotoxic action of three guava varieties - Paluma, Pedro Sato and Roxa ("purple") - on the plant test system Lactuca sativa L. Thus, macro- and microscopic evaluations were carried out for five infusion concentrations (2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 20.0 and 40.0 g.L(-1)) prepared from each variety. Distilled water was used as negative control. Chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis by HPLC-PAD indicated that the chemical composition of the infusion of Roxa is different than that of the infusions of the varieties Paluma and Pedro Sato. It was observed that seed germination and root growth in L. sativa exposed to infusions decreased with increasing infusion concentration, regardless of the tested cultivar. For the mitotic index, no statistical differences were observed. On the other hand, a significant increase in the frequency of cell cycle alterations was verified, especially for the highest concentrations tested. The cytogenotoxic effect was significant. Therefore, guava should not be used indiscriminately in popular medicine. PMID:25993362

  2. Ethanol, errors, and the speed-accuracy trade-off.

    PubMed

    Tiplady, B; Drummond, G B; Cameron, E; Gray, E; Hendry, J; Sinclair, W; Wright, P

    2001-01-01

    Ethanol has been shown to have a relatively greater effect on error rates in speeded tasks than temazepam, and this may be due to a differential effect on the speed-accuracy trade-off (SATO). This study used different instruction sets to influence the SATO. Forty-nine healthy volunteers (24 males, aged 18-41 years) were allocated at random to one of three instruction conditions--emphasising accuracy, neutral, and emphasising speed. After familiarisation, they took part in two sessions spaced at least 4 days apart in which they received either ethanol (0.8 g/kg, max 60 g males, 50 g females) or placebo in randomised order. Tests were administered starting at 30 and 75 min postdrug. Instructions significantly affected performance. In two maze tasks, one on paper, the other on a pen computer, the pattern of instruction effects was as expected. A significant increase in errors with ethanol was seen for both maze tasks, and there was a tendency to speed up with ethanol (significant only for the pen computer task). Responses to fixed stimulus sequences on the Four-Choice Reaction Test also showed a tendency to speed up and an increase in errors with ethanol, while all other tests showed both slowing and increases in errors with ethanol compared to placebo. Error scores are consistently increased by ethanol in all test situations, while the effects of ethanol on speed are variable across tests. PMID:11509226

  3. Dislocated interests and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Steven J.; Diffenbaugh, Noah

    2016-06-01

    The predicted effects of climate change on surface temperatures are now emergent and quantifiable. The recent letter by Hansen and Sato (2016 Environ. Res. Lett. 11 034009) adds to a growing number of studies showing that warming over the past four decades has shifted the distribution of temperatures higher almost everywhere, with the largest relative effects on summer temperatures in developing regions such as Africa, South America, southeast Asia, and the Middle East (e.g., Diffenbaugh and Scherer 2011 Clim. Change 107 615–24 Anderson 2011 Clim. Change 108 581; Mahlstein et al 2012 Geophys. Res. Lett. 39 L21711). Hansen and Sato emphasize that although these regions are warming disproportionately, their role in causing climate change—measured by cumulative historical CO2 emissions produced—is small compared to the US and Europe, where the relative change in temperatures has been less. This spatial and temporal mismatch of climate change impacts and the burning of fossil fuels is a critical dislocation of interests that, as the authors note, has ‘substantial implications for global energy and climate policies.’ Here, we place Hansen and Sato’s ‘national responsibilities’ into a broader conceptual framework of problematically dislocated interests, and briefly discuss the related challenges for global climate mitigation efforts.

  4. The forced radiation efficiency of finite size flat panels that are excited by incident sound.

    PubMed

    Davy, John L

    2009-08-01

    The radiation efficiency of an infinite flat panel that radiates a plane wave into a half space is equal to the inverse of the cosine of the angle between the direction of propagation of the plane wave and the normal to the panel. The fact that this radiation efficiency tends to infinity as the angle tends to 90 degrees causes problems with simple theories of sound insulation. Sato calculated numerical values of radiation efficiency for a finite size rectangular panel in an infinite baffle whose motion is forced by sound incident at an angle to the normal from the other side. This paper presents a simple two dimensional analytic strip theory, which agrees reasonably well with Sato's numerical calculations for a rectangular panel. This leads to the conclusion that it is mainly the length of the panel in the direction of radiation, rather than its width that is important in determining its radiation efficiency. A low frequency correction is added to the analytic strip theory. The theory is analytically integrated over all angles of incidence, with the appropriate weighting function, to obtain the diffuse sound field forced radiation efficiency of a panel. PMID:19640035

  5. Temporal variation of crustal deformation during the days preceding a thrust-type great earthquake — The 1944 Tonankai earthquake of magnitude 8.1, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, Kiyoo

    1984-11-01

    The temporal variation in precursory ground tilt prior to the 1944 Tonankai (Japan) earthquake, which is a great thrust-type earthquake along the Nankai Trough, is discussed using the analysis of data from repeated surveys along short-distance leveling routes. Sato (1970) pointed out that an anomalous tilt occurred one day before the earthquake at Kakegawa near the northern end of the focal region of the earthquake. From the analysis of additional leveling data, Sato's result is re-examined and the temporal change in the ground tilt is deduced for the period of about ten days beginning six days before the earthquake. A remarkable precursory tilt started two or three days before the earthquake. The direction of the precursory tilt was up towards the south (uplift on the southern Nankai Trough side), but the coseismic tilt was up towards the southeast, perpendicular to the strike of the main thrust fault of the Tonankai earthquake. The postseismic tilt was probably opposite of the coseismic tilt. The preseismic tilt is attributed to precursory slip on part of the main fault. If similar precursory deformation occurs before a future earthquake expected to occur in the adjacent Tokai region, the deformation may help predict the time of the Tokai earthquake.

  6. It's only a matter of time: the altered role of subsidies in a warming world.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, Eoin J

    2016-09-01

    Clockwise from left: an experimental stream reach from the study, highlighting the fences used to contain fish as the apex predator; a cutthroat trout from the experiment, the only fish species in the study streams; stomach contents from a fish, highlighting the major role of the terrestrial subsidy (mealworms) in the diet. In Focus: Sato, T., El-Sabaawi, R.W., Campbell, K., Ohta, T. & Richardson, J.S. (2016) A test of the effects of timing of a pulsed resource subsidy on stream ecosystems. Journal of Animal Ecology, 85, 1136-1146. Cross-ecosystem subsidies play a critical role in maintaining the structure and functioning of natural communities, especially if they are asynchronous with resource production in the recipient ecosystem. Sato et al. () use a large-scale field experiment to show that changes in the timing of a pulsed terrestrial subsidy can alter stream dynamics from the individual to the ecosystem level. With increasing evidence that global warming will alter the timing, magnitude and frequency of allochthonous inputs, these findings make an important contribution to our understanding of how such changes will reverberate throughout ecosystems that depend on subsidies. PMID:27511321

  7. [The Chinese nuclear test and 'atoms for peace' as a measure for preventing nuclear armament of Japan: the nuclear non-proliferation policy of the United States and the introduction of light water reactors into Japan, 1964-1968].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masakatsu

    2014-07-01

    Japan and the United States signed in 1968 a new atomic energy agreement through which US light-water nuclear reactors, including those of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant of Tokyo Electric Power Company, were to be introduced into Japan. This paper studies the history of negotiations for the 1968 agreement using documents declassified in the 1990s in the US and Japan. After the success of the Chinese nuclear test in October 1964, the United States became seriously concerned about nuclear armament of other countries in Asia including Japan. Expecting that Japan would not have its own nuclear weapons, the US offered to help the country to demonstrate its superiority in some fields of science including peaceful nuclear energy to counter the psychological effect of the Chinese nuclear armament. Driven by his own political agenda, the newly appointed Prime Minister Eisaku Sato responded to the US expectation favorably. When he met in January 1965 with President Johnson, Sato made it clear that Japan would not pursue nuclear weapons. Although the US continued its support after this visit, it nevertheless gave priority to the control of nuclear technology in Japan through the bilateral peaceful nuclear agreement. This paper argues that the 1968 agreement implicitly meant a strategic measure to prevent Japan from going nuclear and also a tactic to persuade Japan to join the Nuclear Non -Proliferation Treaty. PMID:25296517

  8. Operation status of the electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Gunma University

    SciTech Connect

    Souda, H. Yamada, S.; Kanai, T.; Takeshita, E.; Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Kanazawa, M.; Izumiya, H.; Kano, Y.

    2014-02-15

    An ECR ion source of Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, so-called KeiGM [M. Muramatsu, A. Kitagawa, Y. Sakamoto, S. Sato, Y. Sato, H. Ogawa, S. Yamada, H. Ogawa, Y. Yoshida, and A. G. Drentje, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 76, 113304 (2005)], has been operated for cancer therapy and physical/biological experiment since 2010. KeiGM produces typically 230 μA of 10 keV/u C{sup 4+} ions from CH{sub 4} gases. The vacuum pressure is kept between 1.2 × 10{sup −4} and 1.7 × 10{sup −4} Pa so as to suppress the pulse-to-pulse current fluctuation within ±10%. The extraction electrode is cleaned every 6–8 months in order to remove deposited carbon, which increases the leak current and discharge. In order to investigate the possibility of long-term operation without such maintenances, oxygen aging for the cleaning of the extraction electrode has been tested in the test bench. The same-designed ion sources at National Institute of Radiological Sciences and SAGA Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Tosu (SAGA-HIMAT) are also operated with stable C{sup 4+} current, which are suitable for the continuous operation for cancer therapy.

  9. Long-term variations of absolute and superconducting gravity values in Southeast Alaska, observed by the ISEA2 project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazama, T.; Hideaki, H.; Miura, S.; Kaufman, M.; Sato, T.; Larsen, C. F.; Freymueller, J. T.

    2013-12-01

    It is well known that gravity values have been decreasing in Southeast Alaska, mainly due to glacier mass changes from the end of the Little Ice Age to the present. For example, absolute gravity measurements made by the ISEA1 project (2006-2008) showed a maximum gravity change rate of -5.6 micro-gal/year (Sun et al., 2010; Sato et al., 2012a), which was consistent with large uplift rates obtained from GPS data (Larsen et al., 2005). However, the newly-obtained absolute gravity values in 2012 were about 10 micro-gal greater than expected based on the gravity trends of Sun et al. (2010), possibly because of above-average snowfall in the winter of 2011-2012 (Sato et al., 2012b). In order to monitor spatiotemporal gravity changes associated with glacier mass changes, seasonal hydrological gravity changes should be quantified via continuous gravity observations and/or hydrological modeling. We thus installed a superconducting gravimeter iGrav (serial number: 003) at Egan Library, University of Alaska Southeast in June 2012, as part of the ISEA2 project (2011-2015). The mass position (unit: volts) and air pressure have been recorded every second since June 2012, and the gravity value was then calculated from the mass position, using the scale factor of -89.561 micro-gal/V (Sato et al., 2012b). After the removal of tidal gravity changes using the BAYTAP software (Tamura et al., 1991), a gravity change of 4 micro-gal in peak to peak was extracted from the long-term superconducting gravity data from June 2012 to July 2013. Note that this non-tidal gravity change includes the instrumental drift, although the drift rate was very small (less than 1 micro-gal/year) according to the linear regression to the gravity change. We will discuss possible physical mechanisms of the non-tidal gravity change associated with water redistribution, using a hydrological model (e.g., Kazama et al., 2012) and/or long-term weather data. In addition, we also measured absolute gravity values at 6

  10. The Coagulative Profile of Cyanotic Children Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: The Role of Whole Blood Preoperative Thromboelastometry on Postoperative Transfusion Requirement.

    PubMed

    Vida, Vladimiro L; Spiezia, Luca; Bortolussi, Giacomo; Marchetti, Marta E; Campello, Elena; Pittarello, Demetrio; Gregori, Dario; Stellin, Giovanni; Simioni, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the preoperative coagulation pattern and its association to postoperative blood products transfusion in children with congenital heart disease (CHD), focusing on cyanotic patients (oxygen saturation, SATO 2  < 85%). From January to August 2014, preoperative standard coagulation tests and rotational thromboelastometry assays were performed on 81 pediatric patients (<16 years old) who underwent surgery for CHD with the aid of cardiopulmonary bypass. Sixty patients (74%) were acyanotic and 21 (26%) cyanotic. Mean age at time of surgery was 7.9 months (interquartile range 2.9-43.6 months). Cyanotic patients had a significantly higher hematocrit (P < 0.001), a reduced prothrombin activity (PT) (P = 0.01) level, and a lower platelet count (P = 0.02) than acyanotic patients. An inverse linear association was found between patient's SATO2 and clot formation time (CFT) (INTEM, P = 0.001, and EXTEM, P < 0.0001). A direct linear association was found between patient's SATO2 and maximum clot firmness (MCF) (INTEM, P = 0.04, and EXTEM, P = 0.05). Preoperative cyanosis was also associated with a lower median MCF in FIBTEM (P = 0.02). Cyanotic patients required more frequent postoperative transfusions of fibrinogen (7/21 patients, 33% vs. 4/60 patients, 6.7%, P = 0.01) and fresh frozen plasma (14/21, 67% vs. 25/60, 42%, P = 0.08). Patients with a lower presurgery PT and platelet count subsequently required more fibrinogen transfusion P = 0.02 and P = 0.003, respectively); the same goes for patients with a longer CFT (INTEM, P = 0.01 and EXTEM, P = 0.03) and a reduced MCF (INTEM, P = 0.02 and FIBTEM, P = 0.01) as well. Cyanotic patients showed significant preoperative coagulation anomalies and required a higher postoperative fibrinogen supplementation. The preoperative MCF FIBTEM has become an important factor in our postoperative thromboelastometry-guided transfusion

  11. Online EM with weight-based forgetting.

    PubMed

    Celaya, Enric; Agostini, Alejandro

    2015-05-01

    In the online version of the EM algorithm introduced by Sato and Ishii ( 2000 ), a time-dependent discount factor is introduced for forgetting the effect of the old estimated values obtained with an earlier, inaccurate estimator. In their approach, forgetting is uniformly applied to the estimators of each mixture component depending exclusively on time, irrespective of the weight attributed to each unit for the observed sample. This causes an excessive forgetting in the less frequently sampled regions. To address this problem, we propose a modification of the algorithm that involves a weight-dependent forgetting, different for each mixture component, in which old observations are forgotten according to the actual weight of the new samples used to replace older values. A comparison of the time-dependent versus the weight-dependent approach shows that the latter improves the accuracy of the approximation and exhibits much greater stability. PMID:25710091

  12. Octahedral boron nitride fullerenes formed by electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golberg, D.; Bando, Y.; Stéphan, O.; Kurashima, K.

    1998-10-01

    Here we report on the formation of fullerenes with a reduced number of layers (typically ⩽3) in boron nitride (BN) which was subjected to in situ electron irradiation at 20 and 490 °C in a high resolution 300 kV transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The BN fullerenes exhibited B/N stoichiometry of ˜1 as confirmed by electron energy loss spectroscopy using a 1 nm electron probe. The fullerene HRTEM images revealed rectangle-like shapes when viewed in specific projections, unlike the quasispherical carbon fullerene morphology. The octahedral BN fullerene model [O. Stéphan, Y. Bando, A. Loiseau, F. Willaime, N. Shramchenko, T. Tamiya, and T. Sato, Appl. Phys. A 67, 107 (1998)] is verified by the BN fullerene observations at different viewing angles.

  13. Development of three-dimensional site-site Smoluchowski-Vlasov equation and application to electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, Kento; Sato, Hirofumi

    2014-06-01

    Site-site Smoluchowski-Vlasov (SSSV) equation enables us to directly calculate van Hove time correlation function, which describes diffusion process in molecular liquids. Recently, the theory had been extended to treat solute-solvent system by Iida and Sato [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 034506 (2012)]. Because the original framework of SSSV equation is based on conventional pair correlation function, time evolution of system is expressed in terms of one-dimensional solvation structure. Here, we propose a new SSSV equation to calculate time evolution of solvation structure in three-dimensional space. The proposed theory was applied to analyze diffusion processes in 1M NaCl aqueous solution and in lithium ion battery electrolyte solution. The results demonstrate that these processes are properly described with the theory, and the computed van Hove functions are in good agreement with those in previous works.

  14. On the similarity of theories of anelastic and scattering attenuation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wennerberg, L.; Frankel, A.

    1989-01-01

    We point out basic parallels between theories of anelastic and scattering attenuation. We consider approximations to scattering effects presented by O'Doherty and Anstey (1971), Sato (1982), and Wu (1982). We use the linear theory of anelasticity. We note that the frequency dependence of Q can be related to a distribution of scales of physical properties of the medium. The frequency dependence of anelastic Q is related to the distribution of relaxation times in exactly the same manner as the frequency dependence of scattering Q is related to the distribution of scatterer sizes. Thus, the well-known difficulty of separating scattering from intrinsic attenuation is seen from this point of view as a consequence of the fact that certain observables can be interpreted by identical equations resulting from either of two credible physical theories describing fundamentally different processes. -from Authors

  15. Combined Cycle Users' Group completes another successful year

    SciTech Connect

    Peltier, R.

    2006-06-15

    Presentations at the third annual meeting of the Combined Cycle Users' Group (CCUG) touched on a wide variety of topics. Among the more eclectic was repowering combined-cycle plants to burn gasified coal. Among the more mundane were selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system maintenance, the effects of cycling heat-recovery steam generators (HRSGs), staff training, and adopting best practices in O & M. Judging from the lively discussions and questions following the presentations, it was clear that operating a power plant is still as much art as science. Dr. S. Sato, senior engineering advisor for Mitsubishi Power Systems, highlighted the development history and aggressive R & D work under way to bring the company's integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) plant to market. 1 tab., 5 photos.

  16. Liver vessel segmentation based on extreme learning machine.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ye Zhan; Zhao, Yu Qian; Liao, Miao; Zou, Bei Ji; Wang, Xiao Fang; Wang, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Liver-vessel segmentation plays an important role in vessel structure analysis for liver surgical planning. This paper presents a liver-vessel segmentation method based on extreme learning machine (ELM). Firstly, an anisotropic filter is used to remove noise while preserving vessel boundaries from the original computer tomography (CT) images. Then, based on the knowledge of prior shapes and geometrical structures, three classical vessel filters including Sato, Frangi and offset medialness filters together with the strain energy filter are used to extract vessel structure features. Finally, the ELM is applied to segment liver vessels from background voxels. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively segment liver vessels from abdominal CT images, and achieves good accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27132031

  17. Nonadditive entropy reconciles the area law in quantum systems with classical thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Filippo; Tsallis, Constantino

    2008-08-01

    The Boltzmann-Gibbs-von Neumann entropy of a large part (of linear size L ) of some (much larger) d -dimensional quantum systems follows the so-called area law (as for black holes), i.e., it is proportional to Ld-1. Here we show, for d=1,2 , that the (nonadditive) entropy Sq satisfies, for a special value of q not equal to 1, the classical thermodynamical prescription for the entropy to be extensive, i.e., Sq proportional variant Ld. Therefore, we reconcile with classical thermodynamics the area law widespread in quantum systems. Recently, a similar behavior was exhibited in mathematical models with scale-invariant correlations [C. Tsallis, M. Gell-Mann, and Y. Sato, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.102 15377 (2005)]. Finally, we find that the system critical features are marked by a maximum of the special entropic index q. PMID:18850781

  18. Single pi+ Electroproduction on the Proton in the First and Second Resonance Regions at 0.25GeV^2 < Q^2 < 0.65GeV^2 Using CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    H. Egiyan; I.G. Aznauryan; V.D. Burkert; K.A. Griffioen; K. Joo; R. Minehart; L.C. Smith

    2006-01-05

    The ep {yields} e'pi{sup +}n reaction was studied in the first and second nucleon resonance regions in the 0.25 GeV{sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 0.65 GeV{sup 2} range using the CLAS detector at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. For the first time the absolute cross sections were measured covering nearly the full angular range in the hadronic center-of-mass frame. The structure functions {sigma}{sub TL}, {sigma}{sub TT} and the linear combination {sigma}{sub T} + {epsilon}{sigma}{sub L} were extracted by fitting the {phi}-dependence of the measured cross sections, and were compared to the MAID and Sato-Lee models.

  19. A review of the Japanese species of the family Tischeriidae (Lepidoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shigeki; Sato, Hiroaki; Hirano, Nagao; Yamada, Kazutaka; Hirowatari, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This paper provides taxonomic and biological data on one new and one newly recorded species of Coptotriche Walsingham and one new and one newly recorded species of Tischeria Zeller from Japan. Coptotriche symplocosella Kobayashi & Hirowatari, sp. n. (host Symplocos lucida, Symplocaceae), and Tischeria kumatai Sato, Kobayashi & Hirowatari, sp. n. (host Tilia japonica, Malvaceae) are described. The pupal morphology of Coptotriche symplocosella is illustrated with scanning electron micrographs. Coptotriche minuta Diškus & Stonis, 2014 and Tischeria relictana Ermolaev, 1986 are newly recorded from Japan. The female, hostplants (Carpinus, Corylus, and Ostrya species), and immature stages of Coptotriche minuta and the adult features, female, and hostplants (Betula species) of Tischeria relictana are described with photographs and drawings for the first time. Mine types and characters of Japanese Tischeriidae are reviewed with photographs. PMID:27551192

  20. Is guava phenolic metabolism influenced by elevated atmospheric CO2?

    PubMed

    Mendes de Rezende, Fernanda; Pereira de Souza, Amanda; Silveira Buckeridge, Marcos; Maria Furlan, Cláudia

    2015-01-01

    Seedlings of Psidium guajava cv. Pedro Sato were distributed into four open-top chambers: two with ambient CO(2) (∼390 ppm) and two with elevated CO(2) (∼780 ppm). Monthly, five individuals of each chamber were collected, separated into root, stem and leaves and immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen. Chemical parameters were analyzed to investigate how guava invests the surplus carbon. For all classes of phenolic compounds analyzed only tannins showed significant increase in plants at elevated CO(2) after 90 days. There was no significant difference in dry biomass, but the leaves showed high accumulation of starch under elevated CO(2). Results suggest that elevated CO(2) seems to be favorable to seedlings of P. guajava, due to accumulation of starch and tannins, the latter being an important anti-herbivore substance. PMID:25129845

  1. Binary Darboux Transformations in Bidifferential Calculus and Integrable Reductions of Vacuum Einstein Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimakis, Aristophanes; Müller-Hoissen, Folkert

    2013-02-01

    We present a general solution-generating result within the bidifferential calculus approach to integrable partial differential and difference equations, based on a binary Darboux-type transformation. This is then applied to the non-autonomous chiral model, a certain reduction of which is known to appear in the case of the D-dimensional vacuum Einstein equations with D-2 commuting Killing vector fields. A large class of exact solutions is obtained, and the aforementioned reduction is implemented. This results in an alternative to the well-known Belinski-Zakharov formalism. We recover relevant examples of space-times in dimensions four (Kerr-NUT, Tomimatsu-Sato) and five (single and double Myers-Perry black holes, black saturn, bicycling black rings).

  2. Optimization of Focal Position of Ultrasonic Beam in Measurement of Small Change in Arterial Wall Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masaru; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2001-05-01

    We have previously developed a method for measurement of a small change in thickness of the arterial wall during a single cardiac cycle [H. Kanai, M. Sato, Y. Koiwa and N. Chubachi: IEEE Trans. UFFC 43 (1996) 791]. The resultant change in thickness is shown to be useful for the in vivo assessment of the regional elasticity of the arterial wall. Although the accuracy of the measurement of the change in thickness is found to be within 1 μm, it is affected by the interference of ultrasonic pulses. In this study, we simulate the propagation of ultrasonic pulses transmitted and received by a linear probe. In the simulation experiments, the ultrasonic pulses generated by a computer are reflected by a tube, which has a small change in wall thickness of 10 μm. The optimum focal position of the ultrasonic beam is determined by evaluating the root-mean-square (rms) error in the measured change in thickness.

  3. Clifford Algebra Derivations of Tau-Functions for Two-Dimensional Integrable Models with Positive and Negative Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aratyn, Henrik; van de Leur, Johan

    2007-02-01

    We use a Grassmannian framework to define multi-component tau functions as expectation values of certain multi-component Fermi operators satisfying simple bilinear commutation relations on Clifford algebra. The tau functions contain both positive and negative flows and are shown to satisfy the 2n-component KP hierarchy. The hierarchy equations can be formulated in terms of pseudo-differential equations for n × n matrix wave functions derived in terms of tau functions. These equations are cast in form of Sato-Wilson relations. A reduction process leads to the AKNS, two-component Camassa-Holm and Cecotti-Vafa models and the formalism provides simple formulas for their solutions.

  4. The extended Z N -Toda hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuanzhong; He, Jingsong

    2015-11-01

    We construct the extended flow equations of a new Z N -Toda hierarchy taking values in a commutative subalgebra Z N of gl( N, C). We give the Hirota bilinear equations and tau function of this new extended Z N -Toda hierarchy. Taking the presence of logarithmic terms into account, we construct some extended vertex operators in generalized Hirota bilinear equations, which might be useful in topological field theory and the Gromov-Witten theory. We present the Darboux transformations and bi-Hamiltonian structure of this hierarchy. Using Hamiltonian tau-symmetry, we obtain another tau function of this hierarchy with some unknown mysterious relation to the tau function derived using the Sato theory.

  5. New Pathologies of Skin Disorders Identified from the History of Perspiration Research.

    PubMed

    Yokozeki, Hiroo

    2016-01-01

    This chapter introduces the history of perspiration research and the latest perspiration research findings. Many investigators worldwide, particularly those in Japan, have carried forward globally leading studies on perspiration. This chapter will introduce the history of studies on the physiology of perspiration and perspiration research by classifying it in three stages, namely the early, maturation, and development stages, with a focus on Japanese researchers who have played active roles in each stage. In particular, I will introduce two historical physiologists in detail, Dr. Yasu Kuno, a former professor of Nagoya University, who dramatically revealed the physiology of perspiration in the early and maturation stages, and Dr. Kenzo Sato, a former professor of the University of Iowa. PMID:27584956

  6. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements of the capillary fountain jet produced via ultrasonic atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Yohko F.; Douguchi, Junya; Kumagai, Atsushi; Iijima, Takao; Tomida, Yukinobu; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Matsuura, Kazuo

    2006-11-01

    In situ x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for investigating the liquid structure in the ultrasonic fountain jet to consider the mechanism of the "ultrasonic ethanol separation" reported by Sato et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2382 (2001)]. For pure liquids (water and ethanol), it was found that the high frequency ultrasound does not affect the liquid structure microscopically. For the 20mol% ethanol-water mixture, the estimated ethanol mole fraction in the ultrasonic fountain jet by using the position of the main maximum in the x-ray diffraction profile coincided with that in the reservoir. This result suggests that the ethanol separation is not caused by any distorted liquid structure under the ultrasound irradiation and occurs when or after the generation of the liquid droplet mist.

  7. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements of the capillary fountain jet produced via ultrasonic atomization.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yohko F; Douguchi, Junya; Kumagai, Atsushi; Iijima, Takao; Tomida, Yukinobu; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Matsuura, Kazuo

    2006-11-01

    In situ x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for investigating the liquid structure in the ultrasonic fountain jet to consider the mechanism of the "ultrasonic ethanol separation" reported by Sato et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2382 (2001)]. For pure liquids (water and ethanol), it was found that the high frequency ultrasound does not affect the liquid structure microscopically. For the 20 mol % ethanol-water mixture, the estimated ethanol mole fraction in the ultrasonic fountain jet by using the position of the main maximum in the x-ray diffraction profile coincided with that in the reservoir. This result suggests that the ethanol separation is not caused by any distorted liquid structure under the ultrasound irradiation and occurs when or after the generation of the liquid droplet mist. PMID:17100459

  8. Topological invariants of magnetic fields, and the effect of reconnections

    SciTech Connect

    Ruzmaikin, A. ); Akhmetiev, P. )

    1994-02-01

    Properties of the second-order topological invariant (the helicity) and the third-order topological invariant for the Borromean rings'' (three linked rings no two of which link each other) are discussed. A fourth-order topological invariant of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is constructed in an integral form. This invariant is determined by the properties of Seifert surfaces bounded by two coupled flux tubes. In particular, for the Whitehead link, it represents the fourth-order Sato--Levine invariant. The effect of reconnections on the topological invariants in the limit of small diffusivity is considered. In this limit the helicity is approximately conserved and the higher-order invariants decay rapidly under the action of diffusivity. The destruction of the higher-order invariants, however, creates helicity fluctuations.

  9. Determinant Representation for Dynamical Correlation Functions of the Quantum Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, T.; Korepin, V. E.; Slavnov, N. A.

    Painlevé analysis of correlation functions of the impenetrable Bose gas by M. Jimbo, T. Miwa, Y. Mori and M. Sato [1] was based on the determinant representation of these correlation functions obtained by A. Lenard [2]. The impenetrable Bose gas is the free fermionic case of the quantum nonlinear Schrödinger equation. In this paper we generalize the Lenard determinant representation for ψ (0,0)ψ (x,t)> to the non-free fermionic case. We also include time and temeprature dependence. In forthcoming publications we shall perform the JMMS analysis of this correlationl function. This will give us a completely integrable equation and asymptotic for the quantum correlation function of interacting fermions.

  10. Development of three-dimensional site-site Smoluchowski-Vlasov equation and application to electrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kasahara, Kento; Sato, Hirofumi

    2014-06-28

    Site-site Smoluchowski-Vlasov (SSSV) equation enables us to directly calculate van Hove time correlation function, which describes diffusion process in molecular liquids. Recently, the theory had been extended to treat solute-solvent system by Iida and Sato [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 034506 (2012)]. Because the original framework of SSSV equation is based on conventional pair correlation function, time evolution of system is expressed in terms of one-dimensional solvation structure. Here, we propose a new SSSV equation to calculate time evolution of solvation structure in three-dimensional space. The proposed theory was applied to analyze diffusion processes in 1M NaCl aqueous solution and in lithium ion battery electrolyte solution. The results demonstrate that these processes are properly described with the theory, and the computed van Hove functions are in good agreement with those in previous works.

  11. The mechanisms of convective and standing wave mode generation in the wake behind very slender asisymmetric bodies by selective excitation of unstable helical modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Joseph T. C.; Lee, Keseok

    2013-11-01

    Experiments of Asai, et al. (2011) confirm earlier experiments of Sato & Okada (1966), Peterson & Hama (1976) that, for sufficiently slender axisymmetric bodies of revolution placed in a stream parallel to the axes, only convectively unstable modes exist. However, in the downstream nonlinear region, the present theoretical/computational work shows that the imposition of the most unstable helical modes results in the generation of a stationary harmonic-helical mode that persists downstream. This is elucidated from energy transfer mechanism from the mean flow and inter-mode energy transfer via triad interactions. While absolute unstable modes behind bluff bodies of revolution are a natural occurrence according to the linear theory, the presence of such modes behind very slender bodies of revolution is a consequence of downstream nonlinear interactions between the excited helical modes.

  12. The Nash Equilibrium Revisited: Chaos and Complexity Hidden in Simplicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellman, Philip V.

    The Nash Equilibrium is a much discussed, deceptively complex, method for the analysis of non-cooperative games (McLennan and Berg, 2005). If one reads many of the commonly available definitions the description of the Nash Equilibrium is deceptively simple in appearance. Modern research has discovered a number of new and important complex properties of the Nash Equilibrium, some of which remain as contemporary conundrums of extraordinary difficulty and complexity (Quint and Shubik, 1997). Among the recently discovered features which the Nash Equilibrium exhibits under various conditions are heteroclinic Hamiltonian dynamics, a very complex asymptotic structure in the context of two-player bi-matrix games and a number of computationally complex or computationally intractable features in other settings (Sato, Akiyama and Farmer, 2002). This paper reviews those findings and then suggests how they may inform various market prediction strategies.

  13. Schur function expansions of KP τ-functions associated to algebraic curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnad, J.; Ènol'skii, Viktor Z.

    2011-08-01

    The Schur function expansion of Sato-Segal-Wilson KP \\tau-functions is reviewed. The case of \\tau-functions related to algebraic curves of arbitrary genus is studied in detail. Explicit expressions for the Plücker coordinate coefficients appearing in the expansion are obtained in terms of directional derivatives of the Riemann \\theta-function or Klein \\sigma-function along the KP flow directions. By using the fundamental bi-differential it is shown how the coefficients can be expressed as polynomials in terms of Klein's higher-genus generalizations of Weierstrass' \\zeta- and \\wp-functions. The cases of genus-two hyperelliptic and genus-three trigonal curves are detailed as illustrations of the approach developed here. Bibliography: 53 titles.

  14. Ultraviolet observations of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Code, A. D.; Houck, T. E.; Lillie, C. F.

    1972-01-01

    The first observations of a comet in the vacuum ultraviolet were obtained on January 14, 1970, when OAO-2 recorded the spectrum of the bright comet Tago-Sato-Kosaka (1969g). The observations revealed, among other things, the predicted extensive hydrogen Lyman alpha halo. OAO-2 continued to collect spectrophotometric measurements of this comet throughout January of that year; a photograph of the nucleus in Lyman alpha revealed finer scale structures. In February of 1970, the bright comet Bennet (1969i) became favorable for space observations. On the basis of the OAO discovery, OGO-V made several measurements of comet Bennet with low spatial resolution photometers. Comet Enke was detected by OGO in January of 1971 at a large heliocentric distance from its Lyman alpha emission.

  15. Molecular Realizations of Quantum Computing 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Mikio; Ota, Yukihiro; Rahimi, Robabeh; Kondo, Yasushi; Tada-Umezaki, Masahito

    2009-06-01

    Liquid-state NMR quantum computer: working principle and some examples / Y. Kondo -- Flux qubits, tunable coupling and beyond / A. O. Niskanen -- Josephson phase qubits, and quantum communication via a resonant cavity / M. A. Sillanpää -- Quantum computing using pulse-based electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR): molecular spin-qubits / K. Sato ... [et al.] -- Fullerene C[symbol]: a possible molecular quantum computer / T. Wakabayashi -- Molecular magnets for quantum computation / T. Kuroda -- Errors in a plausible scheme of quantum gates in Kane's model / Y. Ota -- Yet another formulation for quantum simultaneous noncooperative bimatrix games / A. SaiToh, R. Rahimi, M. Nakahara -- Continuous-variable teleportation of single-photon states and an accidental cloning of a photonic qubit in two-channel teleportation / T. Ide.

  16. A review of the Japanese species of the family Tischeriidae (Lepidoptera).

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shigeki; Sato, Hiroaki; Hirano, Nagao; Yamada, Kazutaka; Hirowatari, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides taxonomic and biological data on one new and one newly recorded species of Coptotriche Walsingham and one new and one newly recorded species of Tischeria Zeller from Japan. Coptotriche symplocosella Kobayashi & Hirowatari, sp. n. (host Symplocos lucida, Symplocaceae), and Tischeria kumatai Sato, Kobayashi & Hirowatari, sp. n. (host Tilia japonica, Malvaceae) are described. The pupal morphology of Coptotriche symplocosella is illustrated with scanning electron micrographs. Coptotriche minuta Diškus & Stonis, 2014 and Tischeria relictana Ermolaev, 1986 are newly recorded from Japan. The female, hostplants (Carpinus, Corylus, and Ostrya species), and immature stages of Coptotriche minuta and the adult features, female, and hostplants (Betula species) of Tischeria relictana are described with photographs and drawings for the first time. Mine types and characters of Japanese Tischeriidae are reviewed with photographs. PMID:27551192

  17. Measures for environmental conservation in enclosed coastal seas.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Akio; Nakura, Yoshio; Ishikawa, Takuya

    2016-01-30

    With putting a focus on the balance among the nutrient salts such as nitrogen and phosphorus, the Ministry of the Environment (MOE) developed the Action Plan for Healthy Material Circulation in Ocean (just called the Healthy Plan). The plan aims to facilitate the healthy and smooth circulation of the nutrients with an integrated management over land and sea as a package in respective sea areas. The Healthy Plan is now in a pilot phase and is to be implemented for some selected model regions. Meanwhile, devastating tsunamis caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11th, 2011 severely damaged the natural environments in the affected regions. In the affected bays, seaweed beds and spawning grounds disappeared in a blink. MOE has launched on the recovery activities of Zostera (eelgrass) beds, using the concepts and the methods used in the "Sato-umi Creation" activity which is a purposeful environmental recovery project. PMID:26969298

  18. Topological phase transition and unexpected mass acquisition of Dirac fermion in TlBi(S1-xSex)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Chengwang; Dai, Ying; Zhu, Yingtao; Lu, Jibao; Ma, Yandong; Huang, Baibiao

    2012-10-01

    Based on first-principles calculations and effective Hamiltonian analysis, we predict a topological phase transition from normal to topological insulators and the opening of a gap without breaking the time-reversal symmetry in TlBi(S1-xSex)2. The transition can be driven by modulating the Se concentration, and the rescaled spin-orbit coupling and lattice parameters are the key ingredients for the transition. For topological surface states, the Dirac cone evolves differently as the explicit breaking of inversion symmetry and the energy band can be opened under asymmetry surface. Our results present theoretical evidence for experimental observations [Xu et al., Science 332, 560 (2011); Sato et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 840 (2011)].

  19. Comparison of techniques that use the single scattering model to compute the quality factor Q from coda waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Novelo-Casanova, D. A.; Lee, W.H.K.

    1991-01-01

    Using simulated coda waves, the resolution of the single-scattering model to extract coda Q (Qc) and its power law frequency dependence was tested. The back-scattering model of Aki and Chouet (1975) and the single isotropic-scattering model of Sato (1977) were examined. The results indicate that: (1) The input Qc models are reasonably well approximated by the two methods; (2) almost equal Qc values are recovered when the techniques sample the same coda windows; (3) low Qc models are well estimated in the frequency domain from the early and late part of the coda; and (4) models with high Qc values are more accurately extracted from late code measurements. ?? 1991 Birkha??user Verlag.

  20. Chest physiotherapy in preterm infants with lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In neonatology the role of chest physiotherapy is still uncertain because of the controversial outcomes. Methods The aim of this study was to test the applicability in preterm infants of 'reflex rolling', from the Vojta method, in preterm neonates with lung pathology, with particular attention to the effects on blood gases and oxygen saturation, on the spontaneous breathing, on the onset of stress or pain. The study included 34 preterm newborns with mean gestational age of 30.5 (1.6) weeks - mean (DS) - and birth weight of 1430 (423) g - mean (DS) -, who suffered from hyaline membrane disease, under treatment with nasal CPAP (continuous positive airways pressure), or from pneumonia, under treatment with oxygen-therapy. The neonates underwent phase 1 of 'reflex rolling' according to Vojta method three times daily. Respiratory rate, SatO2, transcutaneous PtcCO2 e PtcO2 were monitored; in order to evaluate the onset of stress or pain following the stimulations, the NIPS score and the PIPP score were recorded; cerebral ultrasound scans were performed on postnatal days 1-3-5-7, and then weekly. Results In this population the first phase of Vojta's 'reflex rolling' caused an increase of PtcO2 and SatO2 values. No negative effects on PtcCO2 and respiratory rate were observed, NIPS and PIPP stress scores remained unmodified during the treatment; in no patient the intraventricular haemorrhage worsened in time and none of the infants developed periventricular leucomalacia. Conclusions Our experience, using the Vojta method, allows to affirm that this method is safe for preterm neonates, but further investigations are necessary to confirm its positive effects and to evaluate long-term respiratory outcomes. PMID:20868518

  1. Afterslip Distribution of Large Earthquakes Using Viscoelastic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Higuchi, H.

    2009-12-01

    One of important parameters in simulations of earthquake generation is frictional properties of faults. To investigate the frictional properties, many authors studied coseismic slip and afterslip distribution of large plate interface earthquakes using coseismic and post seismic surface deformation by GPS data. Most of these studies used elastic media to get afterslip distribution. However, the effect of viscoelastic relaxation at the asthenosphere is important on post seismic surface deformation (Matsu’ura and Sato, GJI, 1989; Sato and Matsu’ura, GJI, 1992). Therefore, the studies using elastic media did not estimate correct afterslip distribution because they forced the cause of surface deformation on only afterslips at plate interface. We estimate afterslip distribution of large interplate earthquakes using viscoelastic media. We consider not only viscoelastic responses of coseismic slip but also viscoelastic responses of afterslips. Because many studies suggested that the magnitude of afterslips was comparable to that of coseismic slip, viscoelastic responses of afterslips can not be negligible. Therefore, surface displacement data include viscoelastic response of coseismic slip, viscoelastic response of afterslips which occurred just after coseismic period to just before the present, and elastic response of the present afterslip. We estimate afterslip distribution for the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake, Hokkaido, Japan using GPS data by GSI, Japan. We use CAMP model (Hashimoto et al, PAGEOPH, 2004) as a plate interface between the Pacific plate and the North American plate. The viscoelastic results show clearer that afterslips distribute on areaes where the coseismic slip does not occur. The viscoelastic results also show that the afterslips concentrate deeper parts of the plate interface at the eastern adjoining area of the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake.

  2. Intrinsic and scattering attenuation in the crust of the Abu Dabbab area in the eastern desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Fattah, Ali K.; Morsy, M.; El-Hady, Sh.; Kim, K. Y.; Sami, M.

    2008-05-01

    Fifty-five microearthquakes recorded by a digital-temporary seismic network in the Abu Dabbab area in the Eastern Desert of Egypt were used to estimate the direct S-wave ( Qβ), coda ( Qc), intrinsic ( Qi), and scattering quality factors ( Qs). Sato's [Sato H., 1977] single-scattering assumption was used to fit the amplitude envelopes of the coda at seven central frequency bands (1.5, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 Hz), obtaining a Qc varying with frequency as generally observed in tectonically active areas. Lapse time dependence was also studied for the area, with the coda waves analyzed at window lengths ranging from 10 to 40 s starting from the onset of the S-wave arrival. The direct S-wave Qβ was estimated using the coda normalization method [Aki, K., 1980a]. The frequency dependence of Q was investigated for the direct S-waves and coda waves. Results show a low quality factor and a high frequency parameter, indicating that the upper lithosphere of the Abu Dabbab area is seismically active and heterogeneous. Using the independent estimates of Qc and Qβ, the intrinsic quality factor Qi was separated from the scattering quality factor. The results suggest that intrinsic dissipation plays a predominant role with respect to scattering phenomena in the area; the obtained Q values seem closer to those reported by analyzing volcano-tectonic earthquakes. This finding reflects that the cause of Abu Dabbab earthquake swarms might be igneous activity where the magma is ascending through joints or serpentinized joints that are dewatering.

  3. Performance simulation of a spaceborne infrared coherent lidar for measuring tropospheric wind profiles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Philippe; Ishii, Shoken; Kyoka, Gamo; Mizutani, Kohei; Chikako, Takahashi; Itabe, Toshikazu; Iwasaki, Toshiki; Kubota, Takuji; Okamoto, Kozo; Oki, Riko; Satoh, Masaki; Satoh, Yohei

    2014-05-01

    An effort has begun in Japan to develop a spaceborne instrument for measuring tropospheric winds. This project is a collaboration between the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the Meteorological Research Institute (MRI, Japan) and the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT, Japan) [1,2]. The aim is to measure the horizontal wind field in the troposphere on a global scale with a precision better than 3 ms-1, and a vertical and horizontal (along the satellite ground track) resolution better than 1 km and 100 km, respectively. In order to support the definition and the development of the instrument, an end-to-end simulator has been implemented including modules for i) simulating the time-dependent laser shot return power, ii) for averaging the spectral power of several returns and iii) for estimating the line-of-sight wind from the Doppler shift of the averaged spectra. The simulations take into account the satellite position and motion along the orbit track, the observational and instrumental characteristics, a 3-D representation of the relevant atmospheric parameters (i.e. wind field, cloud coverage and aerosols distribution) and the Earth surface characteristics. The simulator and the method for estimating the line-of-sight wind will be presented. We will show the results obtained for a payload composed of two 2-μm coherent LIDARs looking in orthogonal directions, and for a satellite moving on a low orbit. The precision, accuracy and the vertical and horizontal resolution of the wind estimates will be discussed. References: [1] S. Ishii, T. Iwasaki, M. Sato, R. Oki, K. Okamoto, T. Ishibashi, P. Baron, and T. Nishizawa, Future Doppler lidar wind measurement from space in Japan, Proc. of SPIE Vol. 8529, 2012 [2] S. Ishii, H. Iwai, K. Mizutani, P. Baron, T. Itabe, H. Fukuoka, T. Ishikawa, A. Sato and A. Asai, 2-μm coherent LIDAR for CO2 and wind measurements, Proc. of SPIE Vol. 8872, 2013

  4. Deep seismic reflection profiling of the subduction megathrust across the Sagimi trough and Tokyo bay, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Iwasaki, Takaya; Abe, Susumu; Saito, Hideo; Kawanaka, Taku; Hirata, Naoshi

    2010-05-01

    Beneath the metropolitan Tokyo, the Philippine Sea plate, in particular the fore arc portion of the Izu-Bonin island arc, has been subducted. Subduction megathrust beneath Tokyo generated M-8 class earthquakes, such as the 1923 Kanto (M7.9) and 1703 Genroku (M8.0) earthquakes. Due to the buyant subduction of the Izu-Bonin arc, the megathrust lies very shallow part of the crust. The Kozu-Matsuda fault, probable spray fault from the megathrust, emerged at the surface. In 2009, we acquired the deep seismic reflection data across the toe of the thrust system to reveal the connectivity of the probable spray fault to the megathrust. Together with the deep seismic section acquired in 2003, we show a 120-km-long deep seismic reflection profile from the front to 30 km in depth and discuss the geometry and characteristics of the thrust system. We performed deep seismic profiling across the Sagami trough for a 70-km-long seismic line in September 2009, using two ships for offshore seismic data acquisition: a gun-ship with a 3020 cu. inch air-gun and a cable-ship with a 2-km-long, streamer cable and a 480 cu. inch air-gun. The seismic signals were recorded at Miura and Izu peninsulas located both ends of the seismic line. At both sides of the onshore line, off-line recorders were deployed along total 20-km-long seismic lines at a 50m interval. Seismic reflection data were acquired by different offset of ships making large-offset gathers. The northeast end of the seismic line connected with the 2003 Tokyo bay seismic line (Sato et al., 2005: Science). The obtained seismic sections portray the detailed geometry of the spray faults, suggesting an emergent thrust with 4 km thick landward dipping strata. It merges to the megathrust at 6-7 sec (TWT). Judging from the geometry of fault-related fold in the trough fill sediments, the tip of the megathrust is located at 3 sec (TWT) beneath the trough axis. According to the co-seismic crustal deformation, the slip of the 1923 Kanto

  5. Multi-component diffusion between molten SiO2 inclusions and surrounding felsic melt in an indochinite: Tektites as natural laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macris, C. A.; Eiler, J. M.; Asimow, P. D.; Stolper, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Tektites are natural glasses thought to have formed as a result of melting and quenching of distally ejected terrestrial material upon hypervelocity (>11 km/s) impact on Earth. Some tektites contain inclusions of lechatelierite (nearly pure SiO2 glass; 99-100 wt. % SiO2), generally thought to be the amorphous relicts of partially digested quartz grains (Koeberl, 1994). Electron and ion microprobe analyses of major and minor elements were performed on transects between lechatelierite inclusions and the surrounding felsic glass in an indochinite (sample from Newman et al., 1995). The surrounding glass is peraluminous with an average composition of 73.4 wt.% SiO2, 12.8 wt.% Al2O3, 4.5 wt. % FeO, 2.3 wt.% K2O, and < 2 wt.% (each) CaO, MgO, Na2O, and TiO2. The boundary between the lechatelierite and felsic glass is broad (~30 μm), with complex concentration profiles reflecting diffusion between the two melts at high temperatures (>2200 °C for formation of lechatelierite; Bunch et al., 2012) prior to quenching. Although all components except SiO2 are pinned to near zero at the same point at the lechatelierite end of the profiles, the shapes of the oxide concentration profiles differ, with Ca and Mg falling off from their far-field values first, followed in order by Fe, Ti, Al, Na, and K. K has apparently propagated the longest distance, diffusing faster than other components from the surrounding melt toward the lechatelierite. Furthermore, concentration profiles of K2O systematically increase, reach a maximum, then decrease closest to lechatelierite, indicating uphill diffusion of K against its concentration gradient. All concentration profiles are asymmetric, becoming steepest towards the most silicic portions of the interdiffusion zone approaching lechatelierite, likely due to the sharp compositional contrast between matrix glass and inclusions. Sato (1974) observed similar alkali enrichment in coronas around quartz xenocrysts in basalt and andesite, where K, and to

  6. A new Holocene eruptive history of Erebus volcano, Antarctica using cosmogenic 3He and 36Cl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmelee, D. E.; Kyle, P. R.; Kurz, M. D.; Marrero, S.

    2013-12-01

    Unraveling the timing of a volcano's most recent eruptions is crucial to understanding its present and future behavior. In this study, we use cosmogenic 3He and 36Cl in mineral separates (clinopyroxene and anorthoclase, respectively) to date the 10 most recent lava flows on Erebus volcano. Erebus is a 2,170-km3 active stratovolcano on Ross Island, Antarctica that is known for its persistent anorthoclase phonolite lava lake and frequent Strombolian eruptions. Previous anorthoclase 40Ar/39Ar ages from the 10 flows [1, 2] suggest they were erupted at roughly regular intervals between 17 and 0 ka. However, the uncertainties on the Ar ages are large (up to 39 %), and the likelihood of excess 40Ar in melt inclusions may skew the Ar ages older than eruption ages. The new cosmogenic ages provide new insights into Erebus eruption chronology. We used two different models to scale production rates: the Lal/Stone model [3] and the new Sato/Lifton model [4]. We find ~20-25 % younger ages with the Sato/Lifton model, attributable to different treatment of atmospheric pressure effects, solar modulation effects, and muogenic production rates in each model. 3He and 36Cl exposure ages of the same 10 flows range from 4.5 × 0.1 to 9.7 × 0.2 ka (Lal/Stone) or 3.5 × 0.1 to 7.5 × 0.2 ka (Sato/Lifton), significantly different than the Ar ages, with a much shorter eruption period. Surprisingly, three of the flows have exposure ages older than their Ar ages, despite the exposure ages being considered minimum ages of eruption and the Ar ages maxima. Concordance of the 3He and 36Cl ages measured in the same samples strengthens the validity of our results and implies that the 3He and 36Cl production rates [5] are well-calibrated for high latitude, high altitude sites and that the methodologies are robust. Regardless of which scaling model is used, the results yield a new understanding of the current eruptive phase of Erebus, particularly in documenting the short timespan over which the

  7. Energy cost and optimisation in breath-hold diving.

    PubMed

    Trassinelli, M

    2016-05-01

    We present a new model for calculating locomotion costs in breath-hold divers. Starting from basic mechanics principles, we calculate the work that the diver must provide through propulsion to counterbalance the action of drag, the buoyant force and weight during immersion. Compared to those in previous studies, the model presented here accurately analyses breath-hold divers which alternate active swimming with prolonged glides during the dive (as is the case in mammals). The energy cost of the dive is strongly dependent on these prolonged gliding phases. Here we investigate the length and impacts on energy cost of these glides with respect to the diver characteristics, and compare them with those observed in different breath-hold diving species. Taking into account the basal metabolic rate and chemical energy to propulsion transformation efficiency, we calculate optimal swim velocity and the corresponding total energy cost (including metabolic rate) and compare them with observations. Energy cost is minimised when the diver passes through neutral buoyancy conditions during the dive. This generally implies the presence of prolonged gliding phases in both ascent and descent, where the buoyancy (varying with depth) is best used against the drag, reducing energy cost. This is in agreement with past results (Miller et al., 2012; Sato et al., 2013) where, when the buoyant force is considered constant during the dive, the energy cost was minimised for neutral buoyancy. In particular, our model confirms the good physical adaption of dolphins for diving, compared to other breath-hold diving species which are mostly positively buoyant (penguins for example). The presence of prolonged glides implies a non-trivial dependency of optimal speed on maximal depth of the dive. This extends previous findings (Sato et al., 2010; Watanabe et al., 2011) which found no dependency of optimal speed on dive depth for particular conditions. The energy cost of the dive can be further

  8. Clinical factors associated with extreme sleep apnoea [AHI>100 events per hour] in Peruvian patients: A case-control study–A preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Rey de Castro, Jorge; Huamaní, Charles; Escobar-Córdoba, Franklin; Liendo, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The severity of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) ranges from mild or moderate to severe sleep apnoea. However, there is no information available on the clinical characteristics associated with cases involving more than 100 events per hour. This is a preliminary report and our goal was to characterise the demographics and sleep characteristics of patients with Extreme OSA and compare with patients with sleep apnoea of lesser severity. We hypothesised that patients with Extreme OSA (AHI>100) is associated with an increased comorbidities and/or risk factors. Methods We carried out a case-control study on male patients with OSA who were seen in a private hospital in Lima, Peru between 2006 and 2012. Cases were identified if their apnoea/hypopnea index (AHI) was higher than 100 (Extreme OSA), and four controls were selected per case: two with 15–29 AHI and two with 30–50 AHI, matched according to case diagnosis dates. We evaluated demographic, past medical history, and oxygen saturation variables Results We identified 19 cases that were matched with 54 controls. In the multivariate model, only arterial hypertension, neck circumference, age, and over 10% in SatO2Hb≤90% in total sleep time (T90) were associated with Extreme OSA. Arterial hypertension had an OR=6.31 (CI95%: 1.71–23.23) of Extreme OSA. Each 5-cm increment in neck circumference was associated with an increase of OR=4.34 (CI95%: 1.32–14.33), while T90>10% had an OR=19.68 (CI95%: 4.33–89.49). Age had a marginal relevance (OR=0.95; CI95%: 0.92–0.99) Conclusion Our results suggest that arterial hypertension, neck circumference, and over 10% SatO2Hb≤90% in total sleep time were associated with a higher probability of Extreme OSA. We recommend investigators to study this population of Extreme OSA looking for an early diagnosis and the identification of prognostic factors in comparison with moderate to severe levels. PMID:26483940

  9. Measuring the scattering mean free path of Rayleigh waves on a volcano from spatial phase decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermann, Anne; Larose, Eric; Margerin, Ludovic; Rossetto, Vincent

    2014-05-01

    We analyze the statistics of phase fluctuations of seismic signals obtained from a temporary small aperture array deployed on a volcano in the French Auvergne. We demonstrate that the phase field satisfies Circular Gaussian statistics. We then determine the scattering mean free path of Rayleigh waves from the spatial phase decoherence. This phenomenon, observed for diffuse wavefields, is found to yield a good approximation of the scattering mean free path. Contrary to the amplitude, spatial phase decoherence is free from absorption effects and provides direct access to the scattering mean free path. Our method may find applications in various areas of seismology where the effects of scattering are prominent and a knowledge of the scattering properties is necessary to describe the propagation. As an example, an unbiased estimate of the scattering mean free path is crucial for the localization of changes in multiply scattering media, where a sensitivity kernel based on diffusion theory is used (Larose et al. 2010; Obermann et al. 2013a,b). Our experimental approach may also provide independent estimates of the scattering mean free path in volcanic areas where particularly strong scattering has been proposed, based on the fitting of energy envelopes using energy transport approaches (Wegler & Lühr 2001; Yamamoto & Sato 2010). References: Larose, E., Planès, T., Rossetto, V. & Margerin, L., 2010. Locating a small change in a multiple scattering environment, Appl. Phys. Lett., 96(204101), 1-3. Obermann, A., Planès, T., Larose, E. & Campillo, M., 2013a. Imaging pre and co-eruptive structural and mechanical changes on a volcano with ambient seismic noise, J. geophys. Res., 118, 1-10. Obermann, A., Planès, T., Larose, E., Sens-Schönfelder, C. & Campillo,M., 2013b. Depth sensitivity of seismic coda waves to velocity perturbations in an elastic heterogeneous medium, Geophys. J. Int., 194(1), 372-382. Wegler, U. & Lühr, B.G., 2001. Scattering behaviour at Merapi volcano

  10. ISEA (International geodetic project in SouthEastern Alaska) for rapid uplifting caused by glacial retreat: (3) Absolute gravity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W.; Miura, S.; Sato, T.; Kaufman, A. M.; Cross, R.; Freymueller, J. T.; Schiel, A.

    2006-12-01

    The southeast Alaska is undergoing a rapid ice-melting and land uplift due to the effect of global warming in the last three hundred years. The corresponding crustal deformation caused by the post-glacial rebound has been clearly detected by modern geodetic techniques, e.g., GPS and tidal gauge measurements (Larsen et al., 2004; Sato et al., 2005). The geodetic deformation provides us useful information in evaluating ice-melting rate, effect of global warming, and even the viscosity beneath the crust. For this purpose, however, integrated geodetic observation, especially including gravity measurement, is considered very important (Miura et al., a separate presentation at the same AGU conference; Wahr et al., 1995). Therefore, to detect the crutal deformation caused by the post-glacial rebound and to study the viscoelastic structure of the earth in the southeast Alaska, a joint team of Japanese and U.S. researchers has begun a three year project of GPS, earth tide, and absolute gravity measurements. In this presentation, results of the absolute gravity observation carried out between June 3 and June 18, 2006 are reported. During the 2006 observation campaign, a network of absolute gravity was for the first time established which is composed of five sites about 100 km around of Juneau: Bartlett Cove at Gustavus, Russell Island, Hains Fairground at Hains, UAS Egan Library at Juneau and Mendenhall Glacier Visitors Center at Juneau, Alaska. Absolute gravity data were acquired at the five sites using a Micro-LaCoste absolute gravimeter, serial number 111. A typical occupation recorded a set of 100 single measurements every half hour. At each site data were collected over a 48~62 hour period. Due to the bad ocean model in this area, ocean loading correction seems not efficient because large tidal residuals remain in the observed results. To carry out an accurate tidal correction, on site tidal observation was also performed. Detail discussions on tidal observation and

  11. Significance of hydrous silicate lamellae in pyrope-rich garnets from the Garnet Ridge in the Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogasawara, Y.; Sakamaki, K.; Sato, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Pyrope-rich garnets originated from the upper mantle underneath the Colorado Plateau occur at the Garnet Ridge. These garnets contain the following lamellae of hydrous and anhydrous minerals; Rt, Ilm, crichtonites, Cr-Spl, Amp, Cpx, Chl, rarely Apt, srilankite and carmichealite. The origin of these lamellae in the garnets is controversial; exsolved origin or epitaxial growth. We emphasize here the close relations between the presence of hydrous lamellae and the OH concentrations in the host garnets. Lamella phases were identified with a standard-less quantitative EDS system and a laser Raman spectrometer with Ar+ laser (514.5 nm). OH concentrations in garnets were quantitated on the basis of IR absorption spectra of garnet by micro FT-IR method using IR absorption coefficient (8770 L/mol/cm2, Katayama et al., 2006). Pyrope-rich reddish brown garnet (group B by Sato et al., AGU2014F) has large variations of major chemical compositions (Prp: 49-76, Alm: 6-43, Grs: 6-26 mol%), and OH contents (2-177 ppm wt. H2O). Among this group garnets, Ca-rich ones (Prp: 49-66; Alm: 18-28; Grs: 16-26 mol%) have lamellae of both hydrous (Amp and Chl) and anhydrous (Rt, Ilm, and Cpx) minerals. Amp and Chl lamellae are pargasitic amphibole and clinochlore, respectively, and their host garnets contain significantly low amounts of OH (2-42 ppm). Cr and pyrope-rich garnet (group A by Sato et al., AGU2014F) has chemical compositions of Prp: 67-74, Alm: 13-18, Grs: 7-11 mol% with Cr2O3 up to 5.9 wt.%, and contains lamellae of anhydrous minerals (Rt, Ilm, crichtonites, and Cr-Spl). The host garnet with these anhydrous lamellae contains a little higher OH ranging 24 to 115 ppm. Summarizing the present results, the OH contents of the host garnets depend on the presence of hydrous silicate lamella phase; OH in the garnet with hydrous silicate lamellae is lower than that in the garnet with anhydrous lamellae. The precursor OH incorporated in the host garnet structure was exsolved as hydrous

  12. The Interrelationship Between Microstructure, Coercivity and Magnetic Viscosity in Cobalt-Aluminum and Cobalt-Nickel Fine-Particle Ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Adam J.

    In this investigation, Co-24.8 wt.% Al and Co -17.7 at.% Ni-26.8 at.% Al beta-phase (B2, CsCl-type crystal structure) alloys have been studied using conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and magnetic measurements in an attempt to correlate the development of specific magnetic properties with the evolution of microstructure. In particular, the temperature dependence of coercivity and magnetic viscosity (time-dependence of magnetization) have been examined. The as-quenched Co-Ni-Al alloy exhibits characteristic tweed contrast and diffuse < 110> _beta and < 112 >_beta streaking in the TEM. It is concluded that a fine-scale decomposition occurs on the quench resulting in a dispersion of very small, acicular particles of a metastable Sato phase with an orthorhombic crystal structure. A preferential strain relaxation due to C^' softening combined with tetragonal strain centers produced by decomposition on the quench is suggested as the cause of tweed contrast. Upon aging, the Sato phase particles enrich in cobalt and transform to a metastable hcp varepsilon-phase. These single-domain Co-rich hcp particles have a slightly elongated plate-shaped morphology, an irregular {112 }_beta interface and a high density of internal faults on the basal planes. Aging the binary alloy results in similar microstructures and both HREM and a crystallographic analysis based on an invariant line hypothesis indicate an additional rotation around the close-packed directions away from an exact Burgers and toward a Potter orientation relationship. High resolution imaging reveals a high density of stacking faults on the basal plane and the presence of ledges on the {110}_beta and {112}_beta interphase interfaces. The age hardening curve for the ternary alloy has been found to be similar to binary alloy; however, the temperature dependence of coercivity curve exhibits a flattening at elevated temperatures rather than an increase. Magnetic

  13. Study for Nuclear Structures of 22-35Na Isotopes via Measurements of Reaction Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Shinji

    2014-09-01

    T. Ohtsubo, M. Nagashima, T. Ogura, Y. Shimbara (Grad. Sch. of Sc., Niigata Univ.), M.Takechi, H. Geissel, M. Winkler (GSI), D. Nishimura, T. Sumikama (Dept. of Phys., Tokyo Univ. of Sc.), M. Fukuda, M. Mihara, H. Uenishi (Dept. of Phys., Osaka Univ.), T. Kuboki, T. Suzuki, T. Yamaguchi, H. Furuki, C. S. Lee, K. Sato (Dept. of Phys., Saitama Univ.), A. Ozawa, H. Ohnishi, T. Moriguchi, S. Fukuda, Y. Ishibashi, D. Nagae, R. Nishikiori, T. Niwa (Inst. of Phys., Univ. of Tsukuba), N. Aoi (RCNP), Rui-Jiu Chen, N. Inabe, D. Kameda, T. Kubo, M. Lantz, T. Ohnishi, K. Okumura, H. Sakurai, H. Suzuki, H. Takeda, S. Takeuchi, K. Tanaka, Y. Yanagisawa (RIKEN), De-Qing Fang, Yu-Gang Ma (SINAP), T. Izumikawa (RI Ctr., Niigata Univ.), and S. Momota (Fac. of Engn., Kochi Univ. of Tech.) Reaction cross sections (σR) for 22-35Na isotopes have been measured at around 240 MeV/nucleon. The σR for 22-35Na were measured for the first time. Enhancement in cross sections is clearly observed from the systematics for stable nuclei, for isotopes with large mass numbers. These enhancement can be mainly ascribed to the nuclear deformation. We will discuss the nuclear structure (neutron skin, nuclear shell structure) for neutron-excess Na isotopes. T. Ohtsubo, M. Nagashima, T. Ogura, Y. Shimbara (Grad. Sch. of Sc., Niigata Univ.), M.Takechi, H. Geissel, M. Winkler (GSI), D. Nishimura, T. Sumikama (Dept. of Phys., Tokyo Univ. of Sc.), M. Fukuda, M. Mihara, H. Uenishi (Dept. of Phys., Osaka Univ.), T. Kuboki, T. Suzuki, T. Yamaguchi, H. Furuki, C. S. Lee, K. Sato (Dept. of Phys., Saitama Univ.), A. Ozawa, H. Ohnishi, T. Moriguchi, S. Fukuda, Y. Ishibashi, D. Nagae, R. Nishikiori, T. Niwa (Inst. of Phys., Univ. of Tsukuba), N. Aoi (RCNP), Rui-Jiu Chen, N. Inabe, D. Kameda, T. Kubo, M. Lantz, T. Ohnishi, K. Okumura, H. Sakurai, H. Suzuki, H. Takeda, S. Takeuchi, K. Tanaka, Y. Yanagisawa (RIKEN), De-Qing Fang, Yu-Gang Ma (SINAP), T. Izumikawa (RI Ctr., Niigata Univ.), and S. Momota (Fac. of Engn

  14. Effect of an Orphan Response Regulator on Streptococcus mutans Sucrose-Dependent Adherence and Cariogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Idone, Vincent; Brendtro, Stacy; Gillespie, Robert; Kocaj, Steve; Peterson, Erica; Rendi, Mara; Warren, Wayne; Michalek, Suzanne; Krastel, Kirsten; Cvitkovitch, Dennis; Spatafora, Grace

    2003-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the principal acidogenic component of dental plaque that demineralizes tooth enamel, leading to dental decay. Cell-associated glucosyltransferases catalyze the sucrose-dependent synthesis of sticky glucan polymers that, together with glucan binding proteins, promote S. mutans adherence to teeth and cell aggregation. We generated an S. mutans Tn916 transposon mutant, GMS315, which is defective in sucrose-dependent adherence and significantly less cariogenic than the UA130 wild-type progenitor in germfree rats. The results of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blotting, and N-terminal sequence analysis confirmed the absence of a 155-kDa glucosyltransferase S (Gtf-S) from GMS315 protein profiles. Mapping of the unique transposon insertion in GMS315 revealed disruption of a putative regulatory region located upstream of gcrR, a gene previously described by Sato et al. that shares significant amino acid identity with other bacterial response regulators (Y. Sato, Y. Yamamoto, and H. Kizaki, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 186: 187-191, 2000). The gcrR regulator, which we call “tarC,” does not align with any of the 13 proposed two-component signal transduction systems derived from in silico analysis of the S. mutans genome, but rather represents one of several orphan response regulators in the genome. The results of Northern hybridization and/or real-time reverse transcription-PCR experiments reveal increased expression of both Gtf-S and glucan binding protein C (GbpC) in a tarC knockout mutant (GMS900), thereby supporting the notion that TarC acts as a negative transcriptional regulator. In addition, we noted that GMS900 has altered biofilm architecture relative to the wild type and is hypocariogenic in germfree rats. Taken collectively, these findings support a role for signal transduction in S. mutans sucrose-dependent adherence and aggregation and implicate TarC as a potential target for controlling S. mutans

  15. Modulation of gamma-secretase for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Tate, Barbara; McKee, Timothy D; Loureiro, Robyn M B; Dumin, Jo Ann; Xia, Weiming; Pojasek, Kevin; Austin, Wesley F; Fuller, Nathan O; Hubbs, Jed L; Shen, Ruichao; Jonker, Jeff; Ives, Jeff; Bronk, Brian S

    2012-01-01

    The Amyloid Hypothesis states that the cascade of events associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD)-formation of amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, synaptic loss, neurodegeneration, and cognitive decline-are triggered by Aβ peptide dysregulation (Kakuda et al., 2006, Sato et al., 2003, Qi-Takahara et al., 2005). Since γ-secretase is critical for Aβ production, many in the biopharmaceutical community focused on γ-secretase as a target for therapeutic approaches for Alzheimer's disease. However, pharmacological approaches to control γ-secretase activity are challenging because the enzyme has multiple, physiologically critical protein substrates. To lower amyloidogenic Aβ peptides without affecting other γ-secretase substrates, the epsilon (ε) cleavage that is essential for the activity of many substrates must be preserved. Small molecule modulators of γ-secretase activity have been discovered that spare the ε cleavage of APP and other substrates while decreasing the production of Aβ(42). Multiple chemical classes of γ-secretase modulators have been identified which differ in the pattern of Aβ peptides produced. Ideally, modulators will allow the ε cleavage of all substrates while shifting APP cleavage from Aβ(42) and other highly amyloidogenic Aβ peptides to shorter and less neurotoxic forms of the peptides without altering the total Aβ pool. Here, we compare chemically distinct modulators for effects on APP processing and in vivo activity. PMID:23320246

  16. Post-seismic deformation of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyriakopoulos, C.; Masterlark, T.; Chini, M.; Bignami, C.; Stramondo, S.

    2012-04-01

    The Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake on March 11, 2011 occurred near the northeast coast of Honshu, Japan. The earthquake resulted from a thrust faulting on the subduction zone boundary between the Pacific and North America plates. Surface displacements due to the Tohoku-Oki earthquake were observed by more than 1200 continuously recording Global Positioning System (GPS) sites, installed and operated by the Geodetic Survey of Japan (GSI). For the first time, in a megathrust event, the displacement above the hypocenter is detected from 5 GPS installed in the seafloor (Sato et., al 2011), giving new insights into the megathrust mechanism. The link, i.e. Green's Functions, between the surface displacement and the model parameters is obtained from a 3D Finite Element (FE) model for the 11 March earthquake. Several geophysical features of the Japan trench are implemented into the FE model. The Subducting slab geometry is implemented from USGS and Gavin Hayes Slab 1.0 project. Bathymetry and topography from the ETOPO Global Relief Project (NOAA) are implemented as well. Moreover, the model is designed to simulate coseismic and postseismic (poroelastic) deformation while simultaneously account for the known geologic structure and geophysical context (Zhao et al., 1992 ) of the Japanese subduction zone. The postseismic deformation is explored using the postseismic GPS vectors available in the literature. Furthermore, we applied DInSAR (Differential SAR interferometry) to infer the post-seismic deformation field by exploiting the available SAR images acquired by the ENVISAT satellite.

  17. Differential equations for singular values of products of Ginibre random matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strahov, Eugene

    2014-08-01

    It was proved by Akemann et al (2013 Phys. Rev. E 88 052118) that squared singular values of products of M complex Ginibre random matrices form a determinantal point process whose correlation kernel is expressible in terms of Meijer's G-functions. Kuijlaars and Zhang (arXiv:1308.1003) recently showed that at the edge of the spectrum, this correlation kernel has a remarkable scaling limit {{K}_{M}}(x,y) which can be understood as a generalization of the classical Bessel kernel of random matrix theory. In this paper we investigate the Fredholm determinant of the operator with the kernel {{K}_{M}}(x,y){{\\chi }_{J}}(y), where J is a disjoint union of intervals, J={{\\cup }_{j}}({{a}_{2j-1}},{{a}_{2j}}), and {{\\chi }_{J}} is the characteristic function of the set J. This Fredholm determinant is equal to the probability that J contains no particles of the limiting determinantal point process defined by {{K}_{M}}(x,y) (the gap probability). We derive the Hamiltonian differential associated with the corresponding Fredholm determinant, and relate them with the monodromy preserving deformation equations of the Jimbo, Miwa, Môri, Ueno and Sato theory. In the special case J=(0,s) we give a formula for the gap probability in terms of a solution of a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations.

  18. Application of bimane-peptide substrates to spectrofluorometric assays of metalloendopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, K; Kumazaki, T; Sato, E; Kanaoka, Y; Ishii, S

    1991-09-01

    A spectrofluorometric method for sensitive determination of metalloendopeptidase activity has been developed by using a bimane-peptide containing a tryptophan residue, i.e. 1,7-dioxo-2,5,6-trimethyl-1H,7H-pyrazolo[1,2-alpha]pyrazol-3-yl-methyl- thiomethylcarbonyl-phenylalanyl-tryptophanyl-leucine (Bim-SCH2CO-Phe-Trp-Leu-OH). Such an "intramolecularly quenched" substrate was originally designed for a sensitive assay of angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) [Sato, E. et al. (1989) Chem. Pharm. Bull. 37, 145-147]. All the typical metalloendopeptidases tested, such as thermolysin, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Ps.) elastase, Streptomyces griseus metalloendopeptidases I and II (SGMPI and SGMPII), and alkinonase A, a metalloendopeptidase from Streptomyces violaceorectus, cleaved this substrate strictly at a Phe-Trp bond, leading to a marked increase in fluorescence. Kinetic parameters of the enzymatic hydrolyses of five kinds of analogous bimane substrates were compared to examine how the nature of neighboring amino acid residues on either side of the cleavable bond affects the catalytic efficiency of each of the metalloendopeptidases. Bim-SCH2CO-Phe-Trp-Leu-OH was most efficiently hydrolyzed by all of these enzymes. The use of this substrate made it possible to determine minute amounts of metalloendopeptidases, especially those originating from Streptomycetes (for example, as little as 10 fmol of SGMPII). PMID:1769960

  19. Development of enzyme technology for Aspergillus oryzae, A. sojae, and A. luchuensis, the national microorganisms of Japan.

    PubMed

    Ichishima, Eiji

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the modern enzymology in Japanese bioindustries. The invention of Takadiastase by Jokiti Takamine in 1894 has revolutionized the world of industrial enzyme production by fermentation. In 1949, a new γ-amylase (glucan 1,4-α-glucosidase, EC 3.2.1.3) from A. luchuensis (formerly designated as A. awamori), was found by Kitahara. RNase T1 (guanyloribonuclease, EC 3.1.27.3) was discovered by Sato and Egami. Ando discovered Aspergillus nuclease S1 (single-stranded nucleate endonuclease, EC 3.1.30.1). Aspergillopepsin I (EC 3.4.23.18) from A. tubingensis (formerly designated as A. saitoi) activates trypsinogen to trypsin. Shintani et al. demonstrated Asp76 of aspergillopepsin I as the binding site for the basic substrate, trypsinogen. The new oligosaccharide moieties Man10GlcNAc2 and Man11GlcNAc2 were identified with α-1,2-mannosidase (EC 3.2.1.113) from A. tubingensis. A yeast mutant compatible of producing Man5GlcNAc2 human compatible sugar chains on glycoproteins was constructed. The acid activation of protyrosinase from A. oryzae at pH 3.0 was resolved. The hyper-protein production system of glucoamylase was established in a submerged culture. PMID:27151561

  20. Suppression of ionization probability due to Rabi oscillations in the resonance two-photon ionization of He by EUV free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sako, Tokuei; Adachi, Junichi; Yagishita, Akira; Yabashi, Makina; Tanaka, Takashi; Nagasono, Mitsuru; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2011-11-15

    The two-photon resonance ionization probability of atoms in strong extreme-ultraviolet free-electron laser (EUV FEL) pulses has been investigated by the model of time-dependent wave packet propagation of a light-coupled multilevel atom. Under the simulation within the model assuming single-mode FEL pulses, the ionization probability P{sub ion} has shown characteristic dependences on the scaled coupling parameter U{sub gi} between two levels of the ground (g) and intermediate (i) resonance states, namely, P{sub ion}{proportional_to}(U{sub gi}){sup n}, with n being equal to {approx}2, less than 1, and {approx}1 for the small, medium, and large U{sub gi} regimes, respectively. This power dependence of the ionization probability has been interpreted due to Rabi oscillations between g and i states. To compare with recent experimental results on the same condition, the multimode nature of self-amplitude spontaneous emission (SASE) FEL pulses has been managed in the simulation. Then, the recent experimental laser-power dependence of the two-photon resonance ionization of He [Sato et al., J. Phys. B 44, 161001 (2011)] has been well described by that for the large U{sub gi} regime of the simulation, i.e., n{approx} 1. Thus, the observed linear laser-power dependence has been rationalized as being caused by the strong Rabi oscillations between the (2p)-(1s) states.

  1. Electron Fluxes Enhancement At Auroral Arc Edge Caused By Wave Turbulence Dc ­ Electric Field Synergy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza de Assis, Altair

    In earlier papers, Sato and Okuda[1980], Marklund[1982], Borovsky[1988], Fälthammar[1989], Fung and Hoffman[1991], Borovsky[1992], Marklund[1997], Mozer[1997], Calvert[1997], and Marklund[1998] have shown the importance of dc electric fields in the auroral acceleration process and reported that intense auroral electron fluxes are generated by quasistatic potential structures. Furthermore, Bryant[1998], Dendy[1995], Bryant[1994] and Bryant et al.[1992] showed that the auroral electron fluxes can also be formed by wave turbulence. These two theories have successfully explained a majority of ground and spacecraft measurements showing that the acceleration pattern is related to the structure of the observed background electric fields or wave turbulence. However, there are observations of auroral arcs where the electron flux is seen to be enhanced near the arc edge where wave turbulence occurs[Lynch et al. 1999; Ivchenko et el. 1999]. Though the reports on such events are few in the literature, their existence can not readly be explained by the current theories cited above and a further explanation is necessary. In this paper we present a theoretical discussion that supports the conjecture of wave-particle interactions assisted by a background electric field working so as to enhance the electron fluxes at the auroral arc edge.

  2. Investigation of transverse Peltier effect on top-seeded melt textureYBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}}

    SciTech Connect

    He, Z.H.; Ma, Z.G.; Li, Q.Y.; Luo, Y.Y.; Zhang, J.X.; Meng, R.L.; Chu, C.W.

    1996-12-01

    The transverse Peltier effect is investigated on the top-seeded melt texture superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} (YBCO). By restricting the heat absorbing or evolving on one of the sample{close_quote}s surfaces, the Peltier heat flow is converted into a temperature difference for measurement. The temperature difference is found proportional to the current applied, which is in accordance with the prediction of transverse Peltier effect. Based on a simplified model, the difference of the Seebeck coefficients between the {ital ab} plane and the {ital c} axis, {vert_bar}{ital S}{sub {ital ab}}{minus}{ital S}{sub {ital c}}{vert_bar}, is about 35 {mu}V/K. It is in good agreement with that of large single crystal [I. Terasaki, Y. Sato, S. Tajima, S. Miyamoto, and S. Tanaka, Physica C {bold 235-240}, 1413 (1994)]. The transverse Peltier effect is verified. This supports the idea that the off-diagonal thermoelectric effect is responsible for the anomalously high laser-induced transient transverse voltage on the oriented YBCO superconducting thin films. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Quantitative evaluation of noise reduction and vesselness filters for liver vessel segmentation on abdominal CTA images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luu, Ha Manh; Klink, Camiel; Moelker, Adriaan; Niessen, Wiro; van Walsum, Theo

    2015-05-01

    Liver vessel segmentation in CTA images is a challenging task, especially in the case of noisy images. This paper investigates whether pre-filtering improves liver vessel segmentation in 3D CTA images. We introduce a quantitative evaluation of several well-known filters based on a proposed liver vessel segmentation method on CTA images. We compare the effect of different diffusion techniques i.e. Regularized Perona-Malik, Hybrid Diffusion with Continuous Switch and Vessel Enhancing Diffusion as well as the vesselness approaches proposed by Sato, Frangi and Erdt. Liver vessel segmentation of the pre-processed images is performed using a histogram-based region grown with local maxima as seed points. Quantitative measurements (sensitivity, specificity and accuracy) are determined based on manual landmarks inside and outside the vessels, followed by T-tests for statistic comparisons on 51 clinical CTA images. The evaluation demonstrates that all the filters make liver vessel segmentation have a significantly higher accuracy than without using a filter (p  <  0.05) Hybrid Diffusion with Continuous Switch achieves the best performance. Compared to the diffusion filters, vesselness filters have a greater sensitivity but less specificity. In addition, the proposed liver vessel segmentation method with pre-filtering is shown to perform robustly on a clinical dataset having a low contrast-to-noise of up to 3 (dB). The results indicate that the pre-filtering step significantly improves liver vessel segmentation on 3D CTA images.

  4. Substrate specificity of recombinant osteoclast-specific cathepsin K from rabbits.

    PubMed

    Aibe, K; Yazawa, H; Abe, K; Teramura, K; Kumegawa, M; Kawashima, H; Honda, K

    1996-08-01

    A cDNA clone encoding the rabbit cysteine proteinase cathepsin K, which is predominantly expressed in osteoclasts and is closely related to cathepsins L (EC 3.4.22.15) and S (EC 3.4.22.27) [Tezuka K., Tezuka Y., Maejima A., Sato T., Nemoto K., Kamioka H., Hakeda Y., Kumegawa M., J. Biol. Chem., 269, 1106 (1994)], was expressed at high levels in Escherichia coli in a T7 expression system. The insoluble recombinant enzyme was solubilized in urea and refolded at an alkaline pH. Cathepsin K (37-kDa) was purified by gel filtration and its enzymatic characteristics were determined. The enzymatic activity of cathepsin K was strongly inhibited by cysteine proteinase inhibitors and its optimal pH was pH 5.5. Synthetic substrate benzyloxycarbonyl-Phe-Arg-7-(4-methyl)coumaryl-amide, which is hydrolyzed by cathepsins L and S, was also cleaved by cathepsin K. On the other hand, benzyloxycarbonyl-Gly-Pro-Arg-7-(4-methyl)coumaryl-amide was the most suitable substrate for cathepsin K, but was hardly hydrolyzed by cathepsin L. The substrate specificity of cathepsin K, as determined using various chemogenic substrates, showed different characteristics from cathepsins L and S. PMID:8874809

  5. Modelling the Combined Effects of Deterministic and Statistical Structure for Optimization of Regional Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanborn, C. J.; Fitzpatrick, M.; Cormier, V. F.

    2012-12-01

    The differences between earthquakes and explosions are largest in the highest recordable frequency band. In this band, scattering of elastic energy by small-scale heterogeneity (less than a wavelength) can equilibrate energy on components of motion and stabilize the behavior of the Lg wave trapped in the Earth's crust. Larger scale structure (greater than a wavelength) can still assume major control over the efficiency or blockage of the Lg and other regional/local seismic waves. We seek to model the combined effects of the large-scale (deterministic) and the small scale (statistical) structure to invert for improved structural models and to evaluate the performance of yield estimators and discriminants at selected IMS monitoring stations in Eurasia. To that end we have modified a 3-D ray tracing code for calculating ray trajectory1 in large-scale deterministic structure by adding new code to calculate mean free path, scattering angle, polarization, and amplitude required by radiative transport theory for the effects of small-scale statistical structure.2 This poster explores the methods of radiative transport for both deterministic and statistical structure, with particular attention given to the scattering model, and presents preliminary synthetic seismograms generated by the code both with and without the effects of statistical scattering. References: (1) Menke, W., www.iris.edu/software/downloads/plotting/. (2) Shearer, P. M., and P.S. Earle, in Advances in Geophysics, Volume 50: Earth Heterogeneity and Scattering Effects on Seismic Waves, H. Sato and M.C. Fehler (ed.), 2008.

  6. Synchrotron radiation macrobeam and microbeam X-ray diffraction studies of interfacial crystallization of fats in water-in-oil emulsions.

    PubMed

    Wassell, Paul; Okamura, Airi; Young, Niall W G; Bonwick, Graham; Smith, Christopher; Sato, Kiyotaka; Ueno, Satoru

    2012-04-01

    Using macrobeam and microbeam techniques, we performed synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD) analyses of fat crystallization in water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion, in combination with DSC and polarized optical microscopic observation. Particular focus was on the crystallization of the fats around water droplets in the W/O emulsion systems using food emulsifiers of polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR) alone (PGPR emulsion), and PGPR and monobehenoylglycerol (MB) (PGPR+MB emulsion). We obtained the following results: (1) macrobeam SR-XRD confirmed that adding MB promoted fat crystallization during cooling, (2) microbeam SR-XRD indicated that the lamellar planes of fat crystals near the water and oil interfaces are arranged almost parallel to the interface planes in both PGPR emulsion and PGPR+MB emulsion, and (3) adding MB resulted in the formation of tiny fat crystals because it promoted crystallization, which occurred both in the bulk oil phase and at the W/O interfaces. The present study is the first to apply microbeam SR-XRD to observe the microscopic features of fat crystallization in W/O emulsion, following fat crystallization in the oil droplets in the oil-in-water (O/W) emulsion (Arima, S.; Ueno, S.; Ogawa, A.; Sato, K. Langmuir 2009, 25, 9777-9784). PMID:22339396

  7. A deep non-hydrostatic compressible atmospheric model on a Yin-Yang grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, T.; Zerroukat, M.

    2016-08-01

    The singularity in the traditional spherical polar coordinate system at the poles is a major factor in the lack of scalability of atmospheric models on massively parallel machines. Overset grids such as the Yin-Yang grid introduced by Kageyama and Sato [1] offer a potential solution to this problem. In this paper a three-dimensional, compressible, non-hydrostatic atmospheric model is developed and tested on the Yin-Yang grid building on ideas previously developed by the authors on the solution of Elliptic boundary value problems and conservation on overset grids. Using several tests from the literature, it is shown that this model is highly stable (even with little off-centering), accurate, and highly efficient in terms of computational cost. The model also incorporates highly efficient and accurate approaches to achieve positivity, monotonicity and conservative transport, which are paramount requirements for any atmospheric model. The parallel scalability of this model, using in excess of 212 million unknowns and more than 6000 processors, is also discussed and shown to compare favourably with a highly optimised latitude-longitude model in terms of scalability and actual run times.

  8. Kozu-Matsuda fault system in northern Izu collision zone, western part of Kanagawa Prefecture, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odawara, K.; Aketagawa, T.; Yoshida, A.

    2010-12-01

    Western area of Kanagawa Prefecture is techtonically highlighted by its geological setting that the Izu-Bonin volcanic arc collides with the Japan Island arc there. The Kozu-Matsuda fault system which consists of the Kozu-Matsuda fault, the Matsuda-kita fault, the Hinata fault and the Hirayama fault is a surface manifestation of the plate boundary. Research of the Kozu-Matsuda fault has advanced dramatically after the 1995 Kobe Earthquake. Having conducted a trench survey, Kanagawa Prefectural Government (2004) reported that the Kozu-Matsuda fault was activated at least four times in the past 4000 years and the latest activity occurred 650-950 years ago (AD. 1350-1050). However, details of the activity of the Hinata and Hirayama faults, the northern extension of the Kozu-Matsuda fault, are not well understood. The Special Project for Earthquake Disaster Mitigation in Urban areas (DaiDaiToku) made a 2040 m deep drilling in 2004 in Yamakita Town (Hayashi et al., 2006). DaiDaiToku also carried out the seismic reflection profiling along a route from Odawara to Yamanashi in 2005 (Sato et al., 2005). The study done by DaiDaiToku elucidated presence of two north-dipping thrusts. The northern thrust corresponds to the Hinata fault, and the southern one which is also considered to be a continuation of the Kozu-Matsuda fault probably represents a frontal thrust (Miyauchi et al., 2006). We have conducted paleoseismic investigations using data from boreholes across these thrusts.

  9. Dual-mode type algorithms for blind equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weerackody, Vijitha; Kassam, Saleem A.

    1994-01-01

    Adaptive channel equalization accomplished without resorting to a training sequence is known as blind equalization. The Godard algorithm and the generalized Sato algorithm are two widely referenced algorithms for blind equalization of a QAM system. These algorithms exhibit very slow convergence rates when compared to algorithms employed in conventional data-aided equalization schemes. In order to speed up the convergence process, these algorithms may be switched over to a decision-directed equalization scheme once the error level is reasonably low. We present a scheme which is capable of operating in two modes: blind equalization mode and a mode similar to the decision-directed equalization mode. In this proposed scheme, the dominant mode of operation changes from the blind equalization mode at higher error levels to the mode similar to the decision-directed equalization mode at lower error levels. Manual switch-over to the decision-directed mode from the blind equalization mode, or vice-versa, is not necessary since transitions between the two modes take place smoothly and automatically.

  10. xCt cystine transporter expression in HEK293 cells: pharmacology and localization.

    PubMed

    Shih, A Y; Murphy, T H

    2001-04-20

    xCT, the core subunit of the system x(c)(-) high affinity cystine transporter, belongs to a superfamily of glycoprotein-associated amino acid transporters. Although xCT was shown to promote cystine transport in Xenopus oocytes, little work has been done with mammalian cells (Sato, H., Tamba, M., Ishii, T., and Bannai, S. J. Biol. Chem. 274, 11455-11458, 1999). Therefore, we have constructed mammalian expression vectors for murine xCT and its accessory subunit 4F2hc and transfected them into HEK293 cells. We report that this transporter binds cystine with high affinity (81 microM) and displays a pharmacological profile expected for system x(c)(-). Surprisingly, xCT transport activity in HEK293 cells is not dependent on the co-expression of the exogenous 4F2hc. Expression of GFP-tagged xCT indicated a highly clustered plasma membrane and intracellular distribution suggesting the presence of subcellular domains associated with combating oxidative stress. Our results indicate that HEK293 cells transfected with the xCT subunit would be a useful vehicle for future structure-function and pharmacology experiments involving system x(c)(-). PMID:11302733

  11. Glucosyltransferase gene polymorphism among Streptococcus mutans strains.

    PubMed Central

    Chia, J S; Hsu, T Y; Teng, L J; Chen, J Y; Hahn, L J; Yang, C S

    1991-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in genes coding for the glucosyltransferases were detected among Streptococcus mutans serotype c strains by Southern blot analysis with DNA probes located within the gtfB gene (H. Aoki, T. Shiroza, M. Hayakawa, S. Sato, and H. K. Kuramitsu, Infect. Immun. 53:587-594, 1986). Restriction endonucleases were used to examine genomic DNAs isolated from serotype a to h strains. The variations were readily detected among 33 strains of serotype c by EcoRI and PstI restriction enzyme digestions. Serotypes e and f, which are genetically similar to serotype c, also had comparable polymorphism; however, serotypes a, b, d, g, and h did not hybridize to the same DNA probes in parallel experiments. Further analysis of enzymatic activities for glucan synthesis and sucrose-dependent adherence revealed no significant differences among the serotype c strains. Our results suggested that genetic polymorphisms existing in S. mutans serotype c strains may reflect a complexity in genes coding for the glucosyltransferases, which are produced ubiquitously in members of the S. mutans group. Images PMID:1826894

  12. Quantum Nash Equilibria and Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellman, Philip Vos; Post, Jonathan Vos

    In 2004, At the Fifth International Conference on Complex Systems, we drew attention to some remarkable findings by researchers at the Santa Fe Institute (Sato, Farmer and Akiyama, 2001) about hitherto unsuspected complexity in the Nash Equilibrium. As we progressed from these findings about heteroclinic Hamiltonians and chaotic transients hidden within the learning patterns of the simple rock-paper-scissors game to some related findings on the theory of quantum computing, one of the arguments we put forward was just as in the late 1990's a number of new Nash equilibria were discovered in simple bi-matrix games (Shubik and Quint, 1996; Von Stengel, 1997, 2000; and McLennan and Park, 1999) we would begin to see new Nash equilibria discovered as the result of quantum computation. While actual quantum computers remain rather primitive (Toibman, 2004), and the theory of quantum computation seems to be advancing perhaps a bit more slowly than originally expected, there have, nonetheless, been a number of advances in computation and some more radical advances in an allied field, quantum game theory (Huberman and Hogg, 2004) which are quite significant. In the course of this paper we will review a few of these discoveries and illustrate some of the characteristics of these new "Quantum Nash Equilibria". The full text of this research can be found at http://necsi.org/events/iccs6/viewpaper.php?id-234

  13. Solubility control in dilute magnetic semiconductors by using the co-doping method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kazunori; Fujii, Hitoshi; Bergqvist, Lars; Dederichs, Peter H.; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2009-03-01

    To overcome low solubility limit of magnetic impurities in dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS) and realize room temperature ferromagnetism, we propose a co-doping method to increase solubility of magnetic impurities in DMS [1]. We calculate electronic structure of (Ga, Mn)As, (Ga, Mn)N, (Ga, Cr)N and (Zn, Cr)Te with interstitial impurities, such as Li, Na and Cu, from first-principles by using the Korringa-Kohn- Rostoker coherent potential approximation (KKR-CPA) method. From the total energy results, it is shown that the mixing energy of magnetic impurity becomes negative and the solubility of magnetic impurities is strongly enhanced under the existence of interstitials [1]. In general, the co-dopants compensate hole carriers, thus the system becomes paramagnetic. However, owing to the large diffusivity of these interstitial impurities, we can anneal out the co-dopants after the crystal growth to recover the ferromagnetism. As an example, kinetic Monte Carlo simulations for the diffusion of interstitial co-dopants in DMS will be shown. [1] K. Sato et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 46 L1120 (2007)

  14. Structural, magnetic, and transport properties of (Zn,V)Te semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weigang; Ni, Chaoying; Zhu, Tao; Zhang, Huiwu; Xiao, John Q.

    2006-04-01

    Vanadium-doped ZnTe has been predicted to be one of the candidates for ferromagnetic semiconductors with a high Curie temperature [K. Sato and H. Katayama-Yoshida, Semicond. Sci. Technol. 17, 367 (2002)]. In this paper, we report the structural, magnetic, and transport properties of (Zn,V)Te films prepared by magnetron sputtering. Samples were fabricated on both GaAs and thermally oxidized silicon substrate at elevated temperature. Oriented sample (100) can be achieved on GaAs substrates and only polycrystalline samples are observed on Si substrates. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM) show no magnetic precipitates in the (Zn,V)Te film. The magnetization measurement shows that the oriented sample is paramagnetic at 5 K, while films on Si substrate shows weak ferromagnetism at 5 K. The sign of magnetoresistance (MR=[R(H)-R(0)]/R(0)) gradually changes from negative to positive with temperature, and positive MR at high temperatures shows H2 dependence, indicating ordinary MR effect. It is believed the observed negative MR corresponds to the ferromagnetic ordering at lower temperature.

  15. Materials and device design with III-V and II-VI compound-based diluted magnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi; Sato, Kazunori

    2002-03-01

    Since the discovery of the carrier induced ferromagnetism in (In, Mn)As and (Ga, Mn)As, diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) have been of much interest from the industrial viewpoint because of their potentiality as a new functional material (spintronics). In this paper, the magnetism in DMS is investigated based on the first principles calculations, and materials and device design with the DMS is proposed toward the spintronics. The electronic structure is calculated by the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method combined with the coherent potential approximation based on the local spin density approximation. We calculate the electronic structure of ferromagnetic and spin-glass DMS, and total energy difference between them is calculated to estimate whether the ferromagnetic state is stable or not. It is shown that V-, Cr- and Mn-doped III-V compounds, V- and Cr-doped II-VI compounds and Fe-, Co- and Ni-doped ZnO are promising candidates for a high-Curie temperature ferromagnet. A chemical trend in the ferromagnetism is well understood based on the double exchange mechanism [1]. Based upon this material design, some prototypes of the spintronics devices, such as a spin-FET, a photo-induced-magnetic memory and a coherent-spin-infection device, are proposed. [1] K. Sato and H. Katayama-Yoshida, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 39 (2000) L555, 40 (2001) L334, L485 and L651.

  16. Ferromagnetism in Co- and Mn-doped ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodoropoulou, N. A.; Hebard, A. F.; Norton, D. P.; Budai, J. D.; Boatner, L. A.; Lee, J. S.; Khim, Z. G.; Park, Y. D.; Overberg, M. E.; Pearton, S. J.; Wilson, R. G.

    2003-12-01

    Bulk single crystals of Sn-doped ZnO were implanted with Co or Mn at doses designed to produce transition metal concentrations of 3-5 at.% in the near-surface (˜2000 Å) region. The implantation was performed at ˜350 °C to promote dynamic annealing of ion-induced damage. Following annealing at 700 °C, temperature-dependent magnetization measurements showed ordering temperatures of ˜300 K for Co- and ˜250 K for Mn-implanted ZnO. Clear hysteresis loops were obtained at these temperatures. The coercive fields were ⩽100 Oe for all measurement temperatures. X-ray diffraction showed no detectable second phases in the Mn-implanted material. One plausible origin for the ferromagnetism in this case is a carrier-induced mechanism. By sharp contrast, the Co-implanted material showed evidence for the presence of Co precipitates with hexagonal symmetry, which is the cause of the room temperature ferromagnetism. Our results are consistent with the stabilization of ferromagnetic states by electron doping in transition metal-doped ZnO predicted by Sato and Katayama-Yoshida [Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 40 (2001) L334]. This work shows the excellent promise of Mn-doped ZnO for potential room temperature spintronic applications.

  17. Spinodal nanotechnology as a new class of bottom-up one and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi; Fukushima, Tetsuya; Kizaki, Hidetoshi; Oshitani, Masamune; Sato, Kazunori

    2010-03-01

    We discuss the nano-materials design of spinodal nano-decomposition as a new class of bottom-up nanotechnology by combining ab initio calculations and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. We include all the complexity in the fabrication process of spinodal nano-decomposition (Konbu- and Dairiseki-phase) into advanced materials design with inhomogeneous materials. We compare the theoretical predictions with available experiments, such as (i)semiconductor nano-spintronics in dilute magnetic semiconductors, (ii)colossal thermoelectric-power responses of spincaloritronics, (iii)self-repaired nano-catalysis in La(Fe,Pd)O3, (iv)high-efficiency solar-cells, (v)high-efficiency light-emitting diode and Lasers. (1) K. Sato, et al., Reviews of Modern Physics, in printing (2009). (2) H. Katayama-Yoshida, et al.,Handbook of Spintronic Semiconductors, (Pan Stanford Pub.), p.1-79, (2009). (3) H. Katayama-Yoshida, et al.,Semiconductors and Semimetals, 82,433 (2008). (4) H. Katayama-Yoshida, et al.,Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 46, L777 (2007). (5) H. Kizaki, et al.,Applied Physics Express 1, 104001, (2008).

  18. Computational Nano-materials Design of Self-Organized Cd(Te,S) and Cd(Te,Se)Type II Nanowire (Konbu-Phase) by Spinodal Nano-Decomposition for High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Solar-Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi; Oshitani, Masamune; Sato, Kazunori

    2012-02-01

    Based on multi-scale simulations combined ab initio electronic structure calculation (KKR-CPA) and Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) of the two-dimensional layer-by-layer crystal growth, we have designed the self-organized quasi-one-dimensional nano-structures (Konbu-Phase) fabricated by two-dimensional spinodal nano-decomposition for high-efficiency photovoltaic solar cells (PVSCs) in Cd(Te1-xSx), and Cd(Te1-xSex). The Konbu-Phase enhances the nano-scale electron-hole separation in PVSCs due to their Type II band alignment. The Konbu-Phase also increases the efficiency of PVSCs by multi-exciton formation using the inverse Auger effect in the self-organized quasi-one-dimensional nanostructures. We also discuss how to fabricate Konbu-Phase starting from the uniform nano-particles made by the photo-chemical reactions. Reference: M. Oshitani, K. Sato, H. Katayama-Yoshida, Applied Physics Express 4 (2011) 022302.

  19. Stabilization of Ferromagnetic States by Electron Doping in ZnO-Based Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kazunori; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2001-03-01

    In order to investigate functionality of ZnO as a diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS), we had studied the magnetism in ZnO doped with 3d transition metal atoms (TM) and showed that it was also a candidate for a new functional magnetic material [1]. In this paper, we develop our previous work and give detailed materials design with ZnO-based DMS based on ab initio calculations. The electronic structure of a TM-doped ZnO was calculated within the local density approximation by the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method combined with the coherent potential approximation. Total energies of Zn_1-xTM^\\uparrow_xO and Zn_1-xTM^\\uparrow_x/2TM^downarrow_x/2O, where up and down arrows mean the directions of respective atomic magnetic moments, were compared and appearance of the ferromagnetism was discussed. Effects of carrier doping to these systems were also considered. It was found that their magnetic states were controllable by changing the carrier density. In particular, ferromagnetic states were stabilized by electron doping in the case of Fe, Co or Ni doped ZnO. From the point of practical applications, it is favorable feature to realize high Curie temperature ferromagnet, because n-type ZnO is easily available. [1] K. Sato and H. Katayama-Yoshida, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 39 (2000) L555.

  20. Promoting external inosculation of prevascularised tissue constructs by pre-cultivation in an angiogenic extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Laschke, M W; Mussawy, H; Schuler, S; Eglin, D; Alini, M; Menger, M D

    2010-01-01

    The engineering of preformed microvessels offers the promising opportunity to rapidly vascularise implanted tissue constructs by the process of inosculation. Herein, we analyzed whether this process may further be accelerated by cultivation of prevascularised tissue constructs in Matrigel before implantation. Nano-size hydroxyapatite particles/poly(ester-urethane) scaffolds were implanted into the flank of FVB/N-TgN (Tie2/GFP) 287 Sato mice to allow the ingrowth of a granulation tissue with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive blood vessels. After harvesting, these prevascularised constructs were then transferred into dorsal skinfold chambers of FVB/N recipient mice to study the process of inosculation. The constructs were implanted directly after embedding in Matrigel or after 3 days of cultivation in the extracellular matrix. Matrigel-free constructs served as control. Cultivation in Matrigel resulted in the outgrowth of CD31/GFP-positive vascular sprouts. Vascularisation of these constructs was markedly improved when compared to the other two groups, as indicated by a significantly elevated functional microvessel density between days 6 to 14 after implantation into the dorsal skinfold chamber. This was associated with an increased number of GFP-positive blood vessels growing into the surrounding host tissue. Thus, the blood supply to prevascularised tissue constructs can be accelerated by their pre-cultivation in an angiogenic extracellular matrix, promoting external inosculation of the preformed microvascular networks with the host microvasculature. PMID:21154242

  1. The Stability of Hoyle-Lyttleton Accretion in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blondin, John M.; Raymer, E.

    2011-05-01

    The gravitational accretion of gas onto a compact star moving supersonically through a uniform ambient medium is dynamically unstable in the restricted case of two-dimensional planar geometry (a cylindrical star). Numerical simulations in 3D (e.g., the series of papers by Ruffert) show some hint of instability, but not the dramatic flip-flop seen in 2D planar simulations. We extend the recent 2D numerical simulations of Blondin and Pope (2009) to 3D using the overset spherical grid approach developed by Kageyama and Sato (2004). Using this grid geometry on current supercomputers allows us to simulate the smallest accretors studied in previous 3D work, but with an order of magnitude higher spatial resolution. For an ideal gas with a ratio of specific heats of 5/3, we find relatively minor time variability in the subsonic flow between the head of the accretion bow shock and the accreting star. Overall the bow shock and mass accretion rate remain nearly constant in time, with negligible angular momentum accreted onto the compact star.

  2. Cross-Sectional Elasticity Imaging of Carotid Arterial Wall in Short-Axis Plane by Transcutaneous Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Nozomi; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2004-05-01

    We have developed the phased tracking method [H. Kanai, M. Sato, Y. Koiwa and N. Chubachi: IEEE Trans. UFFC 43 (1996) 791.] for measuring the minute change in thickness during one heartbeat and the elasticity of the arterial wall with transcutaneous ultrasound. When this method is applied to a plane perpendicular to the axis of the artery (short-axis plane) using a linear-type probe, only an ultrasonic beam which passes through the center of the artery coincides with the direction of the change in thickness. At other beam positions, the wall motion cannot be accurately tracked because the direction of wall expansion slips off the beam. To obtain the cross-sectional image of elasticity in the short-axis plane using transcutaneous ultrasound, in this paper, the directions of ultrasonic beams are designed so that each beam always passes through the center of the artery; thus, they always coincide with the direction of the wall expansion. In basic experiments, the accuracy in elasticity measurement was evaluated using a silicone rubber tube. In in vivo experiments, the minute change in wall thickness was measured along each ultrasonic beam, and the cross-sectional image of elasticity was obtained in the short-axis plane with transcutaneous ultrasound.

  3. Plasmon Energy shift in Porous Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannella, Norman; Gabetta, Giuseppe; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2001-03-01

    In order to provide experimental support for quantum confinement models describing electronic effects in porous silicon (p-Si) [1], the Si2s and Si2p plasmon losses have been studied by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Although plasmon losses in the XPS core lines of p-Si have already been reported [2], the modality according to which we performed the experiment and the conclusions are remarkably different. In particular, the plasmon losses observed in the present experiment are representative of the real material (p-Si) since possible artifacts due to ion sputtering have been avoided. We discuss extensively the influence of the satellite structures relative to the oxidized-Silicon core lines, whose presence is expected since oxygen is an intrinsic component of the p-Si anodization process. The p-Si plasmon energy was found at a value 1.5 eV higher than that of bulk Si (17.4 eV), as measured on the cleaned Si substrate as a reference. The magnitude of this shift suggests possible quantum confinement effects ascribed to the p-Si nanostructures. [1]A. G. Cullis and L. T. Canham, Nature 353, 335 (1991) [2]S. Sato, S. Rath, S. Akiyama, S. Nozaki and H. Morisaki, J. Appl. Phys. 86, 1774 (1999)

  4. Dynamics of H2 Eley-Rideal abstraction from W(110): Sensitivity to the representation of the molecule-surface potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétuya, R.; Larrégaray, P.; Crespos, C.; Busnengo, H. F.; Martínez, A. E.

    2014-07-01

    Dynamics of the Eley-Rideal (ER) abstraction of H2 from W(110) is analyzed by means of quasi-classical trajectory calculations. Simulations are based on two different molecule-surface potential energy surfaces (PES) constructed from Density Functional Theory results. One PES is obtained by fitting, using a Flexible Periodic London-Eyring-Polanyi-Sato (FPLEPS) functional form, and the other by interpolation through the corrugation reducing procedure (CRP). Then, the present study allows us to elucidate the ER dynamics sensitivity on the PES representation. Despite some sizable discrepancies between both H+H/W(110) PESs, the obtained projectile-energy dependence of the total ER cross sections are qualitatively very similar ensuring that the main physical ingredients are captured in both PES models. The obtained distributions of the final energy among the different molecular degrees of freedom barely depend on the PES model, being most likely determined by the reaction exothermicity. Therefore, a reasonably good agreement with the measured final vibrational state distribution is observed in spite of the pressure and material gaps between theoretical and experimental conditions.

  5. Quasi-Classical Trajectory Study of Atom-Diatomic Molecule Collisions in Symmetric Hyperspherical Coordinates: The F + HCl Reaction as a Test Case.

    PubMed

    Freixas-Lemus, Victor Manuel; Martínez-Mesa, Aliezer; Uranga-Piña, Llinersy

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the reactive dynamics of the triatomic system F + HCl → HF + Cl for total angular momentum equal zero and for different low-lying rovibrational states of the diatomic molecule. For each of the initial vibrational quantum numbers, the time evolution of the atom-diatom collision process is investigated for a wide range of impact angles and collision energies. To this purpose, the Quasi-Classical Trajectories (QCT) method was implemented in a hyperspherical configuration space. The Hamilton equations of motion are solved numerically in an intermediate effective Cartesian space to exploit the relative simplicity of this intermediate representation. Interatomic interactions are described by a London-Eyring-Polanyi-Sato potential energy surface, specifically developed for the title reaction, and the results of the QCT simulations are discussed in terms of the time-evolution of the hyperangles. The analysis of the collision dynamics using symmetric hyperspherical coordinates provides, in addition to the description in terms of a natural reaction coordinate (the hyperradius), a more striking representation of the exchange dynamics, in terms of the time-dependent probability distribution along the kinematic rotation hyperangle, and a precise distinction between direct and indirect mechanisms of the reaction. PMID:27002240

  6. Element Genesis - Solving the Mystery (Video Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Yuko

    2001-10-01

    Our institute (RIKEN) produced a video on nucleosynthesis. Its new English version is presented. Y. M., I. Tanihata, Y. Yano, and R. Boyd are science editors for this. Time length of the video is 30 minutes. The primary characteristic of this video is that we have employed a number of 2-D and 3-Dimensional visualizations and animations based on an updated understanding of nuclear physics and astrophysics. One of the emphasized points is that microscopic physics (i.e., nuclear physics) and macroscopic physics (i.e., astrophysics) are strongly connected. It contains explanation on the chart of the nuclides, nuclear burning in the sun, big-bang nucleosynthesis, stellar nucleosynthesis, ``beta-stability valley", the s-process, the r-process, production of an RI beam, etc., and professors D. Arnett, T. Kajino, K. Langanke, K. Sato, C. Sneden, I. Tanihata, and F.-K. Thielemann appear as interviewees. Our prime target is college freshmen. We hope that this video would be useful for education both in the fields of astrophysics and nuclear physics at universities and even at high schools. Our institute is accordingly developing a distribution system of this video and it will be available soon at the cost price (please visit our web site for details: http://www.rarf.riken.go.jp/video). The Japanese version was awarded the prize of the Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan 2001.

  7. Cognition and the Default Mode Network in Children with Sickle Cell Disease: A Resting State Functional MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, Maria; Rampazzo, Patrizia; Ermani, Mario; Talenti, Giacomo; Baracchini, Claudio; Favero, Angela; Basso, Giuseppe; Manara, Renzo; Sainati, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrovascular complications are frequent events in children with sickle cell disease, yet routinely used techniques such as Transcranial Doppler (TCD), Magnetic Resonance (MRI) and Angiography (MRA), insufficiently explain the cause of poor cognitive performances. Forty children with SS-Sβ° (mean age 8 years) underwent neurocognitive evaluation and comprehensive brain imaging assessment with TCD, MRI, MRA, Resting State (RS) Functional MRI with evaluation of the Default Mode Network (DMN). Sixteen healthy age-matched controls underwent MRI, MRA and RS functional MRI.Children with SCD display increased brain connectivity in the DMN even in the absence of alterations in standard imaging techniques. Patients with low neurocognitive scores presented higher brain connectivity compared to children without cognitive impairment or controls, suggesting an initial compensatory mechanism to maintain performances. In our cohort steady state haemoglobin level was not related to increased brain connectivity, but SatO2<97% was. Our findings provide novel evidence that SCD is characterized by a selective disruption of connectivity among relevant regions of the brain, potentially leading to reduced cognition and altered functional brain dynamics. RS functional MRI could be used as a useful tool to evaluate cognition and cerebral damage in SCD in longitudinal trials. PMID:27281287

  8. Back-arc Mantle Evolution inferred from Peridotite Xenotlishs from the Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, T.; Ichiyama, Y.; Tamura, A.; Arai, S.

    2014-12-01

    Peridotite xenoliths are recovered in basaltic to andesitic lavas from several localities in the Japan Sea, a Miocene back-arc basin of the Western Pacific region. These peridotites are classified into two groups: two-pyroxene peridotitess and dunite-wehrlite groups. Although slight chemical modifications are observed in these peridotite samples, two-pyroxene peridotite group has retained their original residual mantle geochemical signatures left after partial melting. The dunite-wehrlite group is, on the other hand, probably formed by extensive interaction of the two-pyroxene peridotite group. We examined trace element characteristics of clinopyroxene in these xenoliths. Light REE-depleted clinopyroxenes that are usually interpreted as a simple residual mantle after anhydrous partial melting are similar to those of abyssal peridotite recovered from mid-ocean ridges and back-arc basins. Other samples show LREE-enriched patterns that are residues after influx melting caused by hydrous melt/supercritical fluids released from the subducted slab at high pressure conditions. The geotectonic and geochemical variations of the peridotite xenoliths from the Japan Sea (Shirabeshi Seamount, Seifu Seamount and Oshima-Oshima Island) suggest that the mantle beneath the Japan Sea are suffered from hydrous to anhydrous melting as the Japan Sea forms. This is consistent with the geochemical and isotopic results from Miocene basaltic rocks formed during opening of the Japan Sea (Sato et al., Jour. Petrol., 2013). The Japan Sea peridotite xenoliths also shed lights on the origin of ophiolites.

  9. Precursory Slope Deformation around Landslide Area Detected by Insar Throughout Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, T.; Wada, K.; Yamanaka, M.; Kamiya, I.; Nakajima, H.

    2016-06-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technique is able to detect a slope deformation around landslide (e.g., Singhroy et al., 2004; Une et al., 2008; Riedel and Walther, 2008; Sato et al., 2014). Geospatial Information Authority (GSI) of Japan has been performing the InSAR analysis regularly by using ALOS/PALSAR data and ALOS-2/PALSAR-2 data throughout Japan. There are a lot of small phase change sites except for crustal deformation with earthquake or volcano activity in the InSAR imagery. Most of the phase change sites are located in landslide area. We conducted field survey at the 10 sites of those phase change sites. As a result, we identified deformation of artificial structures or linear depressions caused by mass movement at the 9 sites. This result indicates that InSAR technique can detect on the continual deformation of landslide block for several years. GSI of Japan will continue to perform the InSAR analysis throughout Japan. Therefore, we will be able to observe and monitor precursory slope deformation around landslide areas throughout Japan.

  10. Mechanisms of Cardiovascular Homeostasis and Pathophysiology--From Gene Expression, Signal Transduction to Cellular Communication.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    During embryogenesis, progenitor cells are specified and differentiated into mature cardiomyocytes. Soon after birth, the ability of cardiomyocytes to proliferate is strongly restrained, and thereafter, they grow in size without cell division. Under pathological conditions, cardiomyocytes show adaptive and maladaptive responses through complex intracellular signaling pathways and cross-talking networks of intercellular and inter-tissue communications, but ultimately, they become dysfunctional and undergo cell death or degeneration. Cardiovascular diseases remain the most prevalent, costly, disabling, and deadly medical conditions. To develop novel therapies for them, it is important to elucidate the underlying mechanisms that govern gene expression, signal transduction to cellular communication. In this review article for the 2014 SATO Memorial Award, an approach to uncover molecular and cellular pathophysiology is summarized, focusing on homeobox transcription factor Nkx2-5 in the transcriptional regulation of the cardiac gene program, 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1, in the regulation of postnatal cardiomyocyte growth, survival, and function, angiotensin II type 1 receptor in the development of pathological hypertrophy and remodeling, and mast cell infiltration in the pathogenesis of atrial remodeling and fibrillation. PMID:26538467

  11. Myosin assembly critical for the enzyme activity of smooth muscle myosin phosphatase: effects of MgATP, ionic strength, and Mg(2+).

    PubMed

    Sato, O; Ogawa, Y

    2001-06-01

    We suggested that an assembled form of phosphorylated myosin (P-myosin) might exhibit higher affinity for smooth muscle myosin phosphatase (SMMP) than dissociated P-myosin on the basis of the effect of MgATP [Sato and Ogawa (1999) J. Biochem. 126, 787-797]. To further deepen our understanding, we examined the SMMP activity and P-myosin assembly with various ionic strengths and Mg(2+) concentrations, with and without MgATP, all of which are well known to be critical for myosin assembly. The structure of myosin molecules was directly observed by electron microscopy using a rotary shadowing procedure, which was found to be consistent with the sedimentation assay. We found that the SMMP activity was always high when P-myosin was assembled. MgATP, which disassembled P-myosin mostly into a folded conformation, in contrast, decreased the enzyme activity. We also found that glycerol had a dissociating action on P-myosin, primarily dissociating it into an extended conformation, resulting in reduced SMMP activity, and that increases in the ionic strength and Mg(2+) (>5 mM) inhibited SMMP. These results indicate that myosin assembly is essential for SMMP activity. PMID:11388902

  12. Photo-induced Magnetism and Spintronics in Organic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jung Woo

    2009-03-01

    Recent years have witnessed growing attention on manipulating spins in organic species. One of the interesting phenomena in organic-based magnets is controlling magnetic properties by optical stimulus, a property not exhibited in metallurgical magnets. Three classes of known phenomena and mechanism will be discussed: i) manipulation of number of spins by optically induced charge transfer in cyano-bimetallic complexes [1], ii) optical control of exchange coupling in Mn(TCNE)2 compound [2], iii) light-induced change of magnetic anisotropy in the magnetic semiconductor V(TCNE)x [3]. The second part of this talk will be devoted to ongoing research on transferring spin polarized carriers through organic semiconductors. Recently, there have been lively activities as well as controversies on the application of organic semiconductors for transporting spin information. However, the understanding of spin injection and transport in organic semiconductors is still limited. We will address detailed mechanisms for spin injection and transport in organic semiconductor film of our rubrene (C42H28)-based spin valve and potential applications of organic-based spintronics. [4pt] [1] O. Sato, T. Iyoda, A. Fujishima, and K. Hashimoto, Science 272, 704 (1996).[0pt] [2] D. A. Pejakovic', C. Kitamura, J. S. Miller, and A. J. Epstein, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 057202 (2002).[0pt] [3] J. W. Yoo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 247205 (2006); 99, 157205 (2007).

  13. [A historical review of the therapeutic use of wood creosote. Part II: Original plant source of crude drug wood creosote].

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Nobuaki; Sato, Akane; Shibata, Takashi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    Wood creosote is a medicine that has been listed in the Japanese Pharmacopoeia (JP) since the first edition published in 1886. Medicines containing wood creosote and other natural ingredients have been very popular in Japan and Southeast Asian countries. In Japan, one such medicine, named Seirogan, has been used for more than 100 years. In this paper, we report the results of our examination on the historical aspects of wood creosote. One finding was that creosote, called "kereosote" at that time, was imported to Japan for the first time to Nagasaki by Johann Erdewin Niemann, who was the Director of the Dutch Mercantile House, and prescribed by Johannes Lijdius Catharinus Pompe van Meerdervoort and Anthonius Franciscus Bauduin. From our findings, we concluded that wood creosote was one of the essential medicines for the successful introduction and progression of Western medicine in Japan. Furthermore, we found that Dutch physicians introduced wood creosote to Japanese physicians, including Taizen Sato, Dokai Hayashi, and Jun Matsumoto, and that wood creosote was subsequently popularized by Rintaro (Ogai) Mori during the Russo-Japanese war. In addition, we examined the original plant for wood creosote, and consequently confirmed that the 15th edition of the JP, Supplement Two, clarifying the original plant for wood creosote, matches the pharmaceutical and historical facts. We also provide drug information relating to distinguishing between wood creosote and the creosote bush. PMID:22164686

  14. Colossal Spincaloritronic Cooling by Adiabatic Spin-Entropy Expansion in Nanospintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi; Fukushima, Tetsuya; Dinh, Van An; Sato, Kazunori

    2009-03-01

    The exchange interactions in DMS are short ranged and can not play an important role for realizing high-TC because the solubility of magnetic impurity is too low to achieve magnetic percolation [1]. We show that spinodal nano-decomposition under layer-by-layer crystal growth condition (2D) leads to characteristic quasi-one dimensional nano-structures (Konbu- Phase) with highly anisotropic shape and high TC (> 1000K) even for low concentrations in DMS [2]. We design a spin-currents- controlled 100 Tera bits/icnh^2, Tera Hz switching, and non- volatile MRAM without Si-CMOS based on Konbu-Phase [3]. In addition to the conventional Peltier effect, we propose a colossal spincaloritronic cooling based on the adiabatic spin- entropy expansion in a Konbu-Phase (Zn,Cr)Te with very high blocking temperature (TB > 1000 K) by spinodal nano- decomposition and by nano-column of Half-Heusler NiMnSi (TC = 1050 K) [4]. [1] K. Sato et al., Phys. Rev. B70, 201202 (2004). [2] H. Katayama-Yoshida et al., Phys. stat. sol. (a) 204 (2007) 15. [3] Japanese Patent: JP3571034, US Patent: US 7,164,180 B2, EU Patent: EP 1548832A1, Taiwan Patent:1262593, Korean Patent: 0557387. [4] H. Katayama-Yoshida et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 46 (2007) L777.

  15. Estrogen Stimulates Homing of Endothelial Progenitor Cells to Endometriotic Lesions.

    PubMed

    Rudzitis-Auth, Jeannette; Nenicu, Anca; Nickels, Ruth M; Menger, Michael D; Laschke, Matthias W

    2016-08-01

    The incorporation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) into microvessels contributes to the vascularization of endometriotic lesions. Herein, we analyzed whether this vasculogenic process is regulated by estrogen. Estrogen- and vehicle-treated human EPCs were analyzed for migration and tube formation. Endometriotic lesions were induced in irradiated FVB/N mice, which were reconstituted with bone marrow from FVB/N-TgN (Tie2/green fluorescent protein) 287 Sato mice. The animals were treated with 100 μg/kg β-estradiol 17-valerate or vehicle (control) over 7 and 28 days. Lesion growth, cyst formation, homing of green fluorescent protein(+)/Tie2(+) EPCs, vascularization, cell proliferation, and apoptosis were analyzed by high-resolution ultrasonography, caliper measurements, histology, and immunohistochemistry. Numbers of blood circulating EPCs were assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro, estrogen-treated EPCs exhibited a higher migratory and tube-forming capacity when compared with controls. In vivo, numbers of circulating EPCs were not affected by estrogen. However, estrogen significantly increased the number of EPCs incorporated into the lesions' microvasculature, resulting in an improved early vascularization. Estrogen further stimulated the growth of lesions, which exhibited massively dilated glands with a flattened layer of stroma. This was mainly because of an increased glandular secretory activity, whereas cell proliferation and apoptosis were not markedly affected. These findings indicate that vasculogenesis in endometriotic lesions is dependent on estrogen, which adds a novel hormonally regulated mechanism to the complex pathophysiology of endometriosis. PMID:27315780

  16. Recent developments in cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    A new cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling model based on analytical fits to Monte Carlo simulations of atmospheric cosmic ray flux spectra (both of which agree well with measured spectra) enables identification and quantification of the biases in previously published models (Lifton, N., Sato, T., Dunai, T., in review, Earth and Planet. Sci. Lett.). Scaling predictions derived from the new model (termed LSD) suggest two potential sources of bias in the previous models: different energy responses of the secondary neutron detectors used in developing the models, and different geomagnetic parameterizations. In addition, the particle flux spectra generated by the LSD model allow one to generate nuclide-specific scaling factors that reflect the influences of the flux energy distribution and the relevant excitation functions (probability of nuclide production in a given nuclear reaction as a function of energy). Resulting scaling factors indicate 3He shows the strongest positive deviation from the flux-based scaling, while 14C exhibits a negative deviation. These results are consistent with previous studies showing an increasing 3He/10Be ratio with altitude in the Himalayas, but with a much lower magnitude for the effect. Furthermore, the new model provides a flexible framework for exploring the implications of future advances in model inputs. For example, the effects of recently updated paleomagnetic models (e.g. Korte et al., 2011, Earth and Planet Sci. Lett. 312, 497-505) on scaling predictions will also be presented.

  17. Topology of nonsymmorphic crystalline insulators and superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozaki, Ken; Sato, Masatoshi; Gomi, Kiyonori

    2016-05-01

    Topological classification in our previous paper [K. Shiozaki and M. Sato, Phys. Rev. B 90, 165114 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.90.165114] is extended to nonsymmorphic crystalline insulators and superconductors. Using the twisted equivariant K theory, we complete the classification of topological crystalline insulators and superconductors in the presence of additional order-two nonsymmorphic space-group symmetries. The order-two nonsymmorphic space groups include half-lattice translation with Z2 flip, glide, twofold screw, and their magnetic space groups. We find that the topological periodic table shows modulo-2 periodicity in the number of flipped coordinates under the order-two nonsymmorphic space group. It is pointed out that the nonsymmorphic space groups allow Z2 topological phases even in the absence of time-reversal and/or particle-hole symmetries. Furthermore, the coexistence of the nonsymmorphic space group with time-reversal and/or particle-hole symmetries provides novel Z4 topological phases, which have not been realized in ordinary topological insulators and superconductors. We present model Hamiltonians of these new topological phases and analytic expressions of the Z2 and Z4 topological invariants. The half-lattice translation with Z2 spin flip and glide symmetry are compatible with the existence of boundaries, leading to topological surface gapless modes protected by the order-two nonsymmorphic symmetries. We also discuss unique features of these gapless surface modes.

  18. Revealing the physicochemical mechanism for ultrasonic separation of alcohol-water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirpalani, D. M.; Toll, F.

    2002-08-01

    The selective separation of ethanol from ethanol-water mixtures by ultrasonic atomization has been reported recently by Sato, Matsuura, and Fujii [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2382 (2001)]. In that work, experimental data were reported that confirmed the generation of an ethanol-rich droplet mist and attempted to explain the selective separation in terms of parametric decay instability of the capillary wave formed during sonication. In the present work, an alternate mechanism based on the conjunction theory has been postulated for the process of ultrasonic atomization. This mechanism involves the formation of cavitating bubbles in the liquid during sonication and their eventual collapse at the liquid surface into a cloud of microbubbles that moves upwards in a capillary fountain jet. The selective separation of alcohols has been explained as a corollary effect of the physical mechanism resulting in a surface excess of alcohol molecules formed at the surface of the microbubbles. The alcohol molecules vaporize into the microbubbles and release an alcohol-rich mist on their collapse in regions of high accumulation of acoustic energy.

  19. Spectroscopic Investigation of Temperature Effects on the Hydration Structure of the Phenol Cluster Cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Reona; Kasahara, Yasutoshi; Ishikawa, Haruki

    2015-06-01

    Owing to recent technical developments of various spectroscopies, microscopic hydration structures of various clusters in the gas phase have been determined so far. The next step for further understanding of the microscopic hydration is to reveal the temperature effect, such as a fluctuation of the hydration structure. Thus, we are carrying out photodissociation spectroscopy on the hydrated phenol cation clusters, [PhOH(H_2O)_n]^+. Since electronic spectra of [PhOH(H_2O)_n]^+ have been reported already, this system is suitable for our purpose. In the present study, we use our temperature-variable 22-pole ion trap apparatus. The ions in the trap become thermal equilibrium condition by multiple collisions with temperature-controlled He buffer gas. By this way, the temperature of the ions can be controlled. In the electronic spectrum of the n = 5 cluster measured at 30 K, a sharp band is observed. It shows that the temperature of ions are well-controlled. Contrary to the n = 5 cluster, the n = 6 cluster exhibits a wider band shape. The temperature dependence of the band shape indicates the existence of several, at least two, isomers in the present experimental condition. S.~Sato, N.~Mikami J.~Phys.~Chem. 100, 4765 (1996). H.~Ishikawa, T.~Nakano, T.~Eguchi, T.~Shibukawa, K.~Fuke Chem. Phys. Lett. 514, 234 (2011).

  20. [Dermatological evaluation of a flame retardant, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) on guinea pig by using the primary irritation, sensitization, phototoxicity and photosensitization of skin].

    PubMed

    Momma, J; Kaniwa, M; Sekiguchi, H; Ohno, K; Kawasaki, Y; Tsuda, M; Nakamura, A; Kurokawa, Y

    1993-01-01

    As one of the projects in the safety evaluation of chemical constituents in common house-hold products, effects of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) were evaluated by primary skin irritation, skin sensitization, phototoxicity and photosensitization using guinea pigs. Primary skin irritation was not observed in HBCD emulsified in distilled water by the Draize test method. Skin sensitization test was carried out according to the maximization test method of Magnusson and Kligman. For this test, HBCD was dissolved in olive oil to give 5, 0.5 and 0.05%. When induction of sensitization occurred, challenged doses of 0.005, 0.05, 0.5 and 5% of HBCD (dissolved in acetone) were applied to its respective sensitized groups. The results showed that the induction dose of greater than 0.5% and the challenge dose of greater than 0.05% elicited a positive response. The increase in the concentration of induction and challenge doses did not further increase the percentage of positive response or the intensity of skin response. Phototoxicity test was carried out with 0, 0.5 and 5% of HBCD dissolved in acetone. Phototoxicity was not observed at all HBCD concentration tested. Photosensitization test was performed according to the Sato's adjuvant-strip method. The skin sensitization and challenge reaction doses were 5 and 0.5% and 0 and 0.5% HBCD (dissolved in acetone), respectively, and no positive reaction was observed. It is clear from the foregoing results that HBCD is a mild skin allergen. PMID:7920564

  1. Surface energy fluxes at Central Florida during the convection and precipitation electrification experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nie, D.; Demetriades-Shah, T. D.; Kanemasu, E. T.

    1993-01-01

    One of the objectives of CaPE is to better understand the convective process in central and south Florida during the warm season. The energy and moisture exchanges between the surface and the atmosphere are closely related to this process. Some recent studies have shown that the surface energy balance plays an important role in the climatic fields (Shukla and Mintz, 1982; Sud and Smith, 1985; Sato et. al, 1989). Surface energy fluxes and related surface processes such as evapotranspiration and sensible heat transfer directly effect the temperature, humidity, cloud formation and precipitation. For example, mesoscale circulation around a discontinuity in vegetation type were shown to be stronger with wet soil than with dry soil using an evapotranspiration model (Pinty et. al, 1989). In order to better describe the processes in the atmosphere at various scales and improve our ability of modeling and predicting weather related events, it is crucial to understand the mechanism of surface energy transfer in relation to atmospheric events. Surface energy flux measurements are required to fully understand the interactions between the atmosphere and the surface.

  2. Geometric properties of commutative subalgebras of partial differential operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheglov, A. B.; Kurke, H.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate further algebro-geometric properties of commutative rings of partial differential operators, continuing our research started in previous articles. In particular, we start to explore the simplest and also certain known examples of quantum algebraically completely integrable systems from the point of view of a recent generalization of Sato's theory, developed by the first author. We give a complete characterization of the spectral data for a class of 'trivial' commutative algebras and strengthen geometric properties known earlier for a class of known examples. We also define a kind of restriction map from the moduli space of coherent sheaves with fixed Hilbert polynomial on a surface to an analogous moduli space on a divisor (both the surface and the divisor are part of the spectral data). We give several explicit examples of spectral data and corresponding algebras of commuting (completed) operators, producing as a by-product interesting examples of surfaces that are not isomorphic to spectral surfaces of any (maximal) commutative ring of partial differential operators of rank one. Finally, we prove that any commutative ring of partial differential operators whose normalization is isomorphic to the ring of polynomials k \\lbrack u,t \\rbrack is a Darboux transformation of a ring of operators with constant coefficients. Bibliography: 39 titles.

  3. On the relative scattering of P- and S-waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, P. E.; Phinney, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Using a single-scattering approximation, equations for the scattering attenuation coefficients of P-body and S-body waves are derived. The results are discussed in the light of the energy-renormalization approaches of Wu (1980, 1982) and Sato (1982) to seismic wave scattering. Practical methods for calculating the scattering attenuation coefficients for various earth models are emphasized. The conversions of P-waves to S-waves and S-waves to P-waves are included in the theory. The earth models are assumed to be randomly inhomogeneous, with their properties known only through their average-wavenumber power spectra. The power spectra are approximated with piecewise constant functions, each segment of which contributes to the net frequency-dependent scattering attenuation coefficient. The smallest and largest wavenumbers of a segment can be plotted along with the wavevectors of the incident and scattered waves on a wavenumber diagram. This diagram gives a geometric interpretation for the frequency behavior associated with each spectral segment, including a transition peak that is due entirely to the wavenumber limits of the segment. For regions of the earth where the inhomogeneity spectra are concentrated in a band of wavenumbers, it should be possible to observe such a peak in the apparent attenuation of seismic waves. Both the frequency and distance limits on the accuracy of the theoretical results are given.

  4. Long-term self-assembly of inorganic layered materials influenced by the local states of the interlayer cations.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kiminori; Numata, Kazuomi; Dai, Weili; Hunger, Michael

    2014-06-14

    A wide variety of parameters as, e.g., temperature, humidity, particle size, and cation state are known to influence the agglomeration process of two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets, called self-assembly, in inorganic layered materials. The detailed studies on which parameters are decisive and how they influence the self-assembly, however, have not been performed yet. Here, the long-term self-assembly was studied for layered stevensite and hectorite, and compared with our previous data of saponite for elucidating an influence of local states of the interlayer cations. The results were analyzed with respect to a recently established rheological model, in which 2D nanosheets migrate parallel to the layer direction aided by water molecules as lubricants [K. Sato et al., J. Phys. Chem. C, 2012, 116, 22954]. With decreasing the strength of the local electric fields facing to the interlayer spaces, cation positions split into two or three, which makes the distribution of water molecules more uniformly. These water molecules enhance the rheological motion of the 2D nanosheets parallel to the layer direction, thus accelerating the self-assembly process. PMID:24770790

  5. Hydrogen Concentrations on C-class Asteroids from Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivkin, A. S.; Davies, J. K.; Johnson, J. R.; Ellison, S. L.; Trilling, D. E.; Brown, R. H.; Lebofsky, L. A.

    2002-01-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of 16 asteroids from 1.9-3.6 microns, collected from the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) from 1996-2000. Of these 16 asteroids, 11 show some evidence of a 3-micron hydrated mineral absorption feature greater than 2 sigma at 2.9 microns. Using relations first recognized for carbonaceous chondrite powders by Miyamoto and Zolensky (1994) and Sato et al. (1997), we have determined the hydrogen/silicon ratio for these asteroids and calculated their equivalent water contents, assuming all the hydrogen was in water. The asteroids split into two groups, roughly defined as equivalent water contents of greater than approx. 7% (eight asteroids) and less than approx. 3 % (the remaining eight asteroids). This latter group includes some asteroids for which there is a small but statistically significant 3-micron band of non-zero depth. The G-class asteroids in the survey have higher water contents, consistent with CM chondrites. This strengthens the connection between CM chondrites and G asteroids that was proposed by Burbine (1998). We find that the 0.7-micron and 3-micron band depths are correlated for the population of target objects.

  6. Hydrogen Concentrations on C-Class Asteroids Derived from Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivkin, A. S.; Davies, J. K.; Johnson, J. R.; Ellison, S. L.; Trilling, D. E.; Brown, R. H.; Lebofsky, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of 16 asteroids from 1.9-3.6 microns collected from the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) from 1996-2000. Of these 16 asteroids, 11 show some evidence of a 3 microns hydrated mineral absorption feature greater than 2(sigma) at 2.9 microns. Using relations first recognized for carbonaceous chondrite powders by Miyamoto and Zolensky and Sato et al., we have determined the hydrogen to silicon ratio for these asteroids and calculated their equivalent water contents, assuming all the hydrogen was in water. The asteroids split into 2 groups, roughly defined as equivalent water contents approx. greater than 7% (8 asteroids, all with 3 microns band depths approx. greater than 20%) and approx. greater than 3% for the remaining 8 asteroids. This latter group includes some asteroids for which a weak but statistically significant 3 microns band of non-zero depth exists. The G-class asteroids in the survey have higher water contents, consistent with CM chondrites. This strengthens the connection between CM chondrites and G asteroids that was proposed by Burbine. We find that the 0.7 microns and 3 microns band depths are correlated for the population of target objects.

  7. Hydrogen Concentrations on C-class Asteroids Derived from Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivkin, A. S.; Davies, J. K.; Johnson, J. R.; Ellison, S. L.; Trilling, D. E.; Brown, R. H.; Lebofsky, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of 16 asteroids from 1.9-3.6 microns collected from the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) from 1996-2000. Of these 16 asteroids, 11 show some evidence of a 3 micron hydrated mineral absorption feature greater than 2 sigma at 2.9 microns. Using relations first recognized for carbonaceous chondrite powders by Miyamoto and Zolensky (1994) and Sato et al. (1997), we have determined the hydrogen to silicon ratio for these asteroids and calculated their equivalent water contents, assuming all the hydrogen was in water. The asteroids split into 2 groups, roughly defined as equivalent water contents greater than approximately 7% (8 asteroids, all with 3 micron band depths greater than approximately 20%) and less than approximately 3% for the remaining 8 asteroids. This latter group includes some asteroids for which a weak but statistically significant 3 micron band of non-zero depth exists. The G-class asteroids in the survey have higher water contents, consistent with CM chondrites. This strengthens the connection between CM chondrites and G asteroids that was proposed by Burbine (1998). We find that the 0.7 micron and 3 micron band depths are correlated for the population of target objects.

  8. Cosmological solutions with Calabi-Yau compactification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, K.

    1986-01-01

    Assuming a Calabi-Yau compactification, cosmological solutions are presented in ten-dimensional, N=1 Yang-Mills supergravity theory with the curvature squared term (R2μνϱσ -4Rμν2 + R2). In a vacuum state, Kasner-type soluti ons exist as well as (four-dimensional Minkoswki space-time)×(a Calabi-Yau space). In the later stage of the universe the (four-dimensional Friedmann universe)×(a constant Calabi-Yau space) is realized asymptotically like an attractor. This solution is asymptotically stable against small perturbations. The author would like to thank P. Candelas, T. Futamase, H. Ishihara, H. Nishino and C.E. Vayonakis for useful discussions. He also acknowledges Professor H. Sato for hospitality at the Research Institute for Fundamental Physics, Kyoto University, where part of this work was done, and Professor N. Dallaporta and Professor D.W. Sciama for their kind hospitality at the SISSA.

  9. Palonosetron-A Single-Dose Antiemetic Adjunct for Hepatic Artery Radioembolization: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqi, Nasir H.; Khan, Atif J.; Devlin, Phillip M.

    2009-01-15

    Nausea and vomiting may occur in a significant minority of patients following hepatic artery embolization with yttrium-90 spheres (K. T. Sato et al. Radiology 247:507-515, 2008). This encumbers human and economic resources and undercuts the assertion that it is as a well-tolerated outpatient treatment. A single intravenous dose of palonosetron HCl was administered before hepatic artery embolization with yttrium-90 spheres to ameliorate posttreatment nausea and vomiting, in 23 consecutive patients. The patients were discharged the day of procedure on oral antiemetics, steroids, and blockers of gastric acid release. All patients had clinical and laboratory evaluation at 2 weeks after the procedure. The data were gathered and reviewed retrospectively. At 2-week follow-up, none reported significant nausea, vomiting, additional antiemetic use, need for parenteral therapy, hospital readmission, or palonosetron-related side effects. All patients recovered from postembolization symptoms within a week after treatment. In conclusion, this retrospective study suggests that single-dose palonosetron is feasible, safe, and effective for acute and delayed nausea and vomiting in this group of patients. The added cost may be offset by benefits.

  10. First measurement of target and double spin asymmetries for polarized e- polarized p --> e p pi0 in the nucleon resonance region above the Delta(1232)

    SciTech Connect

    Biselli, Angela; Burkert, Volker; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Asryan, Gegham; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Baltzell, Nathan; Battaglieri, Marco; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Bookwalter, Craig; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bosted, Peter; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; Dale, Daniel; Dashyan, Natalya; De Masi, Rita; De Vita, Raffaella; De Sanctis, Enzo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Deur, Alexandre; Dhamija, Seema; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fedotov, Gleb; Feuerbach, Robert; Fersch, Robert; Forest, Tony; Fradi, Ahmed; Garcon, Michel; Gavalian, Gagik; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Gohn, Wesley; Gothe, Ralf; Graham, Lewis; Griffioen, Keith; Guidal, Michel; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hassall, Neil; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keller, Dustin; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Viacheslav; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, David; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; MacCormick, Marion; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; McKinnon, Bryan; McNabb, John; Mecking, Bernhard; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Mirazita, Marco; Mokeev, Viktor; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kil; Park, Seungkyung; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Pereira, Sergio; Pierce, Joshua; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Price, John; Prok, Yelena; Protopopescu, Dan; Raue, Brian; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Sabatie, Franck; Saini, Mukesh; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schott, Diane; Schumacher, Reinhard; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Smith, Elton; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinskiy, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Taiuti, Mauro; Tedeschi, David; Tkabladze, Avtandil; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Todor, Luminita; Ungaro, Maurizio; Vineyard, Michael; Vlassov, Alexander; Watts, Daniel; Weinstein, Lawrence; Weygand, Dennis; Williams, M.; Wolin, Elliott; Wood, Michael; Yegneswaran, Amrit; Yurov, Mikhail; Zana, Lorenzo; Zhang, Jixie; Zhao, Bo; Zhao, Zhiwen

    2008-10-01

    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevC.78.045204
    The exclusive channel polarized proton(polarized e,e prime p)pi0 was studied in the first and second nucleon resonance regions in the Q2 range from 0.187 to 0.770 GeV2 at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). Longitudinal target and beam-target asymmetries were extracted over a large range of center-of-mass angles of the pi0 and compared to the unitary isobar model MAID, the dynamic model by Sato and Lee, and the dynamic model DMT. A strong sensitivity to individual models was observed, in particular for the target asymmetry and in the higher invariant mass region. This data set, once included in the global fits of the above models, is expected to place strong constraints on the electrocoupling amplitudes A_{1/2} and S_{1/2} for the Roper resonance N(1400)P11, and the N(1535)S11 and N(1520)D13 states.

  11. Isolation and characterization of major histocompatibility complex class IIB genes from the nurse shark.

    PubMed Central

    Bartl, S; Weissman, I L

    1994-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) contains a set of linked genes which encode cell surface proteins involved in the binding of small peptide antigens for their subsequent recognition by T lymphocytes. MHC proteins share structural features and the presence and location of polymorphic residues which play a role in the binding of antigens. In order to compare the structure of these molecules and gain insights into their evolution, we have isolated two MHC class IIB genes from the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum. Two clones, most probably alleles, encode proteins which differ by 13 amino acids located in the putative antigen-binding cleft. The protein structure and the location of polymorphic residues are similar to their mammalian counterparts. Although these genes appear to encode a typical MHC protein, no T-cell-mediated responses have been demonstrated in cartilaginous fish. The nurse shark represents the most phylogenetically primitive organism in which both class IIA [Kasahara, M., Vazquez, M., Sato, K., McKinney, E.C. & Flajnik, M.F. (1992) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci USA 89, 6688-6692] and class IIB genes, presumably encoding the alpha/beta heterodimer, have been isolated. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8278377

  12. Applied Mathematics for Earth Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Ronald T.

    Writing an applied mathematics book can be hazardous to one's ego. First, there typically are strong and incompatible opinions on what should go into such a book, and second, there are already many excellent applied mathematics books on the market. Nevertheless, three prestigious geophysicists from Toyko University, Rikitake, Sato, and Hagiwara, have correctly identified a niche to be filled in this competitive market, and they have attempted to fill it with the publication of Applied Mathematics for Earth Sciences.A more appropriate title for this book might be “Applied Mathematics for Geophysicists” it is at geophysicists and not at, say, stratigraphers that the book is aimed. The book is divided into Part I, Fundamentals (164 pages) and Part II, Applications (271 pages). The main subtitles of Part I are, in order, Fourier transform, Laplace transform, Heaviside operator, spectral analysis, special functions, Laplace equation, wave equation, and relaxation method. As separate books have been written on virtually all of these topics, one can correctly anticipate that the material presented here will be very condensed. The applications part consists of 10 chapters of examples that draw strongly on papers published by the authors. Seismology constitutes roughly a third of the applications part, with the remainder going to selected topics on Earth's gravity, rotation and tides, heat conduction, magnetic and electrical potentials, electromagnetic induction, and magnetohydrodynamics. Emphasis throughout the book is placed on selected analytical theory, as opposed to methods of numerical analysis.

  13. The early history of odontogenic ghost cell lesions: from Thoma to Gorlin.

    PubMed

    Ide, Fumio; Kikuchi, Kentaro; Miyazaki, Yuji; Kusama, Kaoru; Saito, Ichiro; Muramatsu, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    To reappraise the early history of odontogenic ghost cell lesions (OGCL), the extensive world literature published from 1838 to 1962 was reviewed. In light of the long history of OGCL, the term "calcifying epithelioma of Malherbe" first appeared in a 1931 French report, and the term "ghost cells" had its origin in two American seminal articles by Thoma and Goldman in 1946. Although Gorlin et al. coined the term "calcifying odontogenic cyst" (COC) in 1962, this type of cyst was initially reported three decades earlier by Rywkind in Russia, and almost concurrently by Blood good in the United States and Sato in Japan. In 1948, Willis provided the initial histological evidence of a peripheral COC in his British pathology textbook. Credit for the earliest clinical presentation of odontoma associated calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor belongs to the American radiology textbook by Thoma in 1917. A Scandinavian journal report published in 1953 by Husted and Pindborg was the first to address a dentinogenic ghost cell tumor, and its peripheral counterpart was originally reported in the Swiss literature 7 years later. The current concept of COC was undoubtedly established by Gorlin et al. but the history of OGCL really started with Thoma's pioneering work about a century ago. PMID:24972654

  14. Fault slip model of the historical 1797 earthquake on the Mentawai segment of the Sunda Megathrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubis, A.; Hill, E. M.; Philibosian, B.; Meltzner, A. J.; Barbot, S.; Sieh, K. E.

    2012-12-01

    Paleogeodetic observations from coral reef studies have provided estimates of coseismic deformation associated with two great earthquakes on the Sunda megathrust, in 1797 and 1833. Since the corals die when they are uplifted, they do not record the full coseismic displacement. In previous work [Natawidjaja et al., 2006], co-seismic offsets were estimated by linear extrapolation of inter-seismic coral data. This meant that they ignored any post-seismic deformation, despite the fact that it could contribute significantly to displacement of the coral. Here, we use the earthquake cycle model (Sato et al., 2006) to estimate a slip distribution for the historical 1797 earthquake on the Mentawai segment. After calculating model parameters related to the earthquake cycle model, with an assumed earth structure, we use the ABIC inversion algorithm (Yabuki and Matsuura, 1992) to invert the coral datasets. We find that the slip distribution is concentrated in two main asperities, and it is consistent with the present coupling area (Chlieh et al. 2008). A significant slip patch of ~5 m is imaged at the northern end of the slip region of the September 2007 Mw 8.4 earthquake, and a second smaller asperity beneath Siberut island. Based on this model, the moment magnitude (Mw) for the 1797 earthquake is estimated to be 8.4. In order to validate our source model, we will use earthquake cycle 3D-FEM to reconstruct the displacement time series as measured by the corals.

  15. Clay-oil droplet suspensions in electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozynek, Zbigniew; Fossum, Jon Otto; Kjerstad, Knut; Mikkelsen, Alexander; Castberg, Rene

    2012-02-01

    Silicone oil droplets containing synthetic smectite clay submerged in immiscible organic oil have been studied by observing clay particle movement and oil circulation when an electric field is applied. Results show how electric field strength, dielectric and electrorheological properties as well as electrohydrodynamics determine the fluid flow and clay particle formation. In a presence of the DC electric fields the clay particles formed a ribbon-like structure onto the inner surface of the droplet. The structure consists of short chain-like clay elements orienting parallel to the electric field direction. It is suggested that a combination of two phenomena, namely the induced viscous flow (electrohydrodynamic effect) and the polarization of the clay particles (dielectric effect), contribute to the ribbon-like structure formation. -/abstract- References [1] G. Taylor, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A. Mathematical and Physical Sciences 291 (1966) 159--166. [2] J. R. Melcher and G. I. Taylor, Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics 1 (1969) 111--146. [3] H. Sato, N. Kaji, T. Mochizuki, and Y. H. Mori, Physics of Fluids 18 (2006) 127101. [4] D. A. Saville, Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics 29 (1997) 27--64. [5] J. O. Fossum, Y. M'eheust, K. P. S. Parmar, K. D. Knudsen, K. J. Måløy, and D. M. Fonseca Europhysics Letters 74

  16. Thomson scattering diagnostics of atmospheric pressure plasmas - Pulsed filament discharges and plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Kentaro

    2015-09-01

    Recently, non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas have received much attention. Because the characteristics of the plasmas are governed by free electrons, measurements of the electron density (ne) and electron temperature (Te) are a prerequisite for understanding plasma behavior. To contribute to the understanding of non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas, we have been developing a laser Thomson scattering (LTS) technique as a diagnostic method for measuring ne and Te of two types of plasmas; a pulsed-filament discharge and He flow plasma jet. The pulsed filament discharge has a short current width (a few tens of ns) and a small size. In order to apply LTS to such plasmas, reproducibility of time and space of the plasmas were improved using a high-speed semiconductor switch. Spatiotemporal evolutions of ne and Te of a main discharge have been obtained. Now we try to apply LTS at a time of primary streamer. Regarding to the He flow plasma jet, the discharge was generated with He gas flow with N2/O2(20%) or N2 shielding gas. It was confirmed that the ne at the center of the plasma with N2/O2 shielding gas was around 50% higher than that with the N2 shielding gas. In collaboration with Keiichiro Urabe, The University of Tokyo; Naoki Shirai, Tokyo Metropolitan University; Safwat Hassaballa, Al-Azhar University; Nima Bolouki, Munehiro Yoneda, Takahiro Shimizu, Yuta Sato, and Kiichiro Uchino, Kyushu University.

  17. First measurement of target and double spin asymmetries for e-vectorp-vector{yields}ep{pi}{sup 0} in the nucleon resonance region above the {delta}(1232)

    SciTech Connect

    Biselli, A. S.; Burkert, V. D.; Avakian, H.; Boiarinov, S.; Bosted, P.; Carman, D. S.; Degtyarenko, P. V.; Deur, A.; Egiyan, H.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Ito, M. M.; Kubarovsky, V.; Laget, J. M.; Mecking, B. A.; Mestayer, M. D.; Niczyporuk, B. B.; Nozar, M.; Sapunenko, V.

    2008-10-15

    The exclusive channel p-vectore-vector,e{sup '}p){pi}{sup 0} was studied in the first and second nucleon resonance regions in the Q{sup 2} range from 0.187 to 0.770 GeV{sup 2} at Jefferson Lab using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Longitudinal target and beam-target asymmetries were extracted over a large range of center-of-mass angles of the {pi}{sup 0} and compared to the unitary isobar model MAID, the dynamic model by Sato and Lee, and the dynamic model DMT. A strong sensitivity to individual models was observed, in particular for the target asymmetry and in the higher invariant mass region. This data set, once included in the global fits of the above models, is expected to place strong constraints on the electrocoupling amplitudes A{sub 1/2} and S{sub 1/2} for the Roper resonance N(1400)P{sub 11} and the N(1535)S{sub 11} and N(1520)D{sub 13} states.

  18. Target and double spin asymmetries for {rvec e} {rvec p} {yields} e{prime} p {pi}{sup 0}

    SciTech Connect

    Angela Biselli

    2004-03-01

    An extensive experimental program to measure the spin structure of the nucleons is carried out in Hall B with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab using a polarized electron beam incident on a polarized target. Spin degrees of freedom offer the possibility to test, in an independent way, existing models of resonance electroproduction. The present analysis selects the exclusive channel {rvec p}({rvec e}, e{prime}, p){pi}{sup 0} from data taken in 2000-2001, to extract single and double asymmetries in a Q{sup 2} range from 0.2 to 0.75 GeV{sup 2} and W range from 1.1 to 1.6 GeV/c{sup 2}. Results of the asymmetries will be presented as a function of the center of mass decay angles of the {pi}{sup 0} and compared with the unitary isobar model MAID, the dynamic model by Sato and Lee and the dynamic model DMT.

  19. The role of ice shelves in the Holocene evolution of the Antarctic ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernales, Jorge; Rogozhina, Irina; Thomas, Maik

    2014-05-01

    Using the continental-scale ice sheet-shelf model SICOPOLIS (Greve, 1997 [1]; Sato and Greve, 2012 [2]), we assess the influence of ice shelves on the Holocene evolution and present-day geometry of the Antarctic ice sheet. We have designed a series of paleoclimate simulations driven by a time-evolved climate forcing that couples the surface temperature record from the Vostok ice core with precipitation pattern using an empirical relation of Dahl-Jensen et al., (1998) [3]. Our numerical experiments show that the geometry of ice shelves is determined by the evolution of climate and ocean conditions over time scales of 15 to 25 kyr. This implies that the initial configuration of ice shelves at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, about 21 kyr before present) has a significant effect on the modelled Early Holocene volume of ice shelves (up to 20%) that gradually diminishes to a negligible level for the present-day ice shelf configuration. Thus, the present-day geometry of the Antarctic ice shelves can be attained even if an ice-shelf-free initial condition is chosen at the LGM. However, the grounded ice volume, thickness and dynamic states are found to be sensitive to the ice shelf dynamics over a longer history spanning several tens of thousands of years. A presence of extensive marine ice at the LGM, supported by sediment core reconstructions (e.g. Naish et al., 2009 [4]), has a clear buttressing effect on the grounded ice that remains significant over a period of 30 to 50 kyr. If ice-shelf-free conditions are prescribed at the LGM, the modelled Early Holocene and present-day grounded ice volumes are underestimated by up to 10%, as opposed to simulations incorporating ice shelf dynamics over longer periods. The use of ice-shelf-free LGM conditions thus results in 50 to over 200 meters thinner ice sheet across much of East Antarctica. References [1] Greve, R. (1997). Application of a polythermal three-dimensional ice sheet model to the Greenland ice sheet: response to

  20. Effects of Present-Day Ice Melting on the Geodetic Measurements in Southeast Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Larsen, C. F.; Miura, S.; Ohta, Y.; Fujimoto, H.; Sun, W.; Sugano, T.; Kaufman, A. M.; Freymueller, J. T.

    2008-12-01

    It is known that the southeast Alaska (SE-AK) is undergoing a rapid land uplift, which is considered to be mainly due to the effect of melting of past ice, especially in the last two hundred years after the little ice age (LIA). The crustal deformation caused by the post-glacial rebound (PGR) has been clearly detected by GPS and tidal gauge measurements and modeled (Larsen et al., 2004 and 2005). On the other hand, it is considered also that the observed uplift rate is affected by the present-day ice melting (PDIM), which is considered to be the effect of recent global warming (Larsen et al., 2005; Sato et al., 2006). The displacement measurements provide us useful information to evaluate the ice-melting rate and to discuss the viscosity of the earth. However, usually, it is difficult to separate the uplift rate due to the long- term viscous response of the earth by only using displacement observations, because the two effects (i.e. the elastic and viscous deformations) are mixed in the observed data. Related to this problem, Wahr et al. (1995) demonstrated a method to separate the viscous contribution from the observed data by collocating position and gravity measurements. Considered this, since 2006, we, a joint team of Japanese and U.S. researchers are carrying out the absolute gravity (AG) measurements once a year adding to the temporal and continuous GPS observations in SE-AK. Combining the AG measurements and GPS measurements is useful because the attraction part of gravity measurement is sensitive to a mass change of the present-day ice melting, while the past-ices should have no effect to the attraction part of the observed gravity change. In this context of the discussion, precise numerical estimation of the PDIM effect is important (Sato et al., 2007). Based on the two kinds of DEM (Digital Elevation Model), i.e. one is from the 2000 Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and other is that from air photo dating data which were obtained in the period of

  1. One atmosphere viscosity measurements of MORBs from ODP Leg 206, Hole 1256D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Nakamura, H.; Ishibashi, H.

    2009-12-01

    We carried out viscosity measurements of MORBs from ODP Leg 206, Hole 1256D at one atmosphere both in hyperliquidus and subliquidus conditions. Three samples examined are #1 (core 39R1), #2(core 27R19) and #3 (core 3R4). They are typical MORBs but have different Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratios of 0.60, 0.48, and 0.42. Viscosity measurements were carried out mostly after the method of Sato (2005, J. Mineral. Petrol. Sci),. The oxygen fugacity of the furnace was controlled by mixed gas of CO2:H2(400/20ml/min), at FMQ buffer conditions. Rotational viscometer was connected to a ceramic rod of 6 mm diameter, the end of which immersed in the sample crucible 30 mm inner diameter and 60 mm high. The system is calibrated with standard viscosity oils for different depths. The samples were initially melted at ca. 50 C higher temperature than liquidus, and kept for 3 days before viscometry and sampling. After the viscometry and sampling, the furnace temperature was decreased by 5 to 30 C, and kept for 1-3 days before another viscometry and sampling. These steps are repeated until the high viscosity of the melt precluded the measurements. The quenched samples were analayzed for phase chemistry and textural features. Sample #1 crystallized plagioclase and olivine at 1215 C, followed by augite at 1205 C. Total crystal content increased to 29 vol% at 1185 C. Sample #2 crystallized plagioclase and pigeonite at 1175 C, followed by olivine and augite at 1165 C. Total crystal content increased up to 25 vol% at 1152 C. Sample #3 crystallized plagioclase, pigeonite and olivine at 1155 C. Total crystal content increased up to 25 vol% at 1133 C. Bulk viscosity increased from 46 to 74 Pa s at hyperliquidus temperatures of 1240 to 1210 C, whereas it increased up to 2908 Pa s in subliquidus temperatures of 1185 C in the sample #1. In the sample #2, bulk viscosity also increased slowly from 42 Pa s at 1232 C to 79 Pa s at 1172 C, then increased much rapidly to 3422 Pa s at 1152 C. Similarly, the sample #3

  2. Seismic structure of southern margin of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake aftershocks area: slab-slab contact zone beneath northeastern Kanto, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurashimo, E.; Sato, H.; Abe, S.; Mizohata, S.; Hirata, N.

    2011-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake (Mw9.0) occurred on the Japan Trench off the eastern shore of northern Honshu, Japan. The southward expansion of the afterslip area has reached the Kanto region, central Japan (Ozawa et al., 2011). The Philippine Sea Plate (PHS) subducts beneath the Kanto region. The bottom of the PHS is in contact with the upper surface of the Pacific Plate (PAC) beneath northeastern Kanto. Detailed structure of the PHS-PAC contact zone is important to constrain the southward rupture process of the Tohoku-Oki Earthquake and provide new insight into the process of future earthquake occurrence beneath the Kanto region. Active and passive seismic experiments were conducted to obtain a structural image beneath northeastern Kanto in 2010 (Sato et al., 2010). The geometry of upper surface of the PHS has been revealed by seismic reflection profiling (Sato et al., 2010). Passive seismic data set is useful to obtain a deep structural image. Two passive seismic array observations were conducted to obtain a detailed structure image of the PHS-PAC contact zone beneath northeastern Kanto. One was carried out along a 50-km-long seismic line trending NE-SW (KT-line) and the other was carried out along a 65-km-long seismic line trending NW-SE (TM-line). Sixty-five 3-component portable seismographs were deployed on KT-line with 500 to 700 m interval and waveforms were continuously recorded during a four-month period from June, 2010. Forty-five 3-component portable seismographs were deployed on TM-line with about 1-2 km spacing and waveforms were continuously recorded during the seven-month period from June, 2010. Arrival times of earthquakes were used in a joint inversion for earthquake locations and velocity structure, using the iterative damped least-squares algorithm, simul2000 (Thurber and Eberhart-Phillips, 1999). The relocated hypocenter distribution shows that the seismicity along the upper surface of the PAC is located at depths of 45-75 km beneath

  3. GRAVI-2 space experiment: investigating statoliths displacement and location effects on early stages of gravity perception pathways in lentil roots.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizet, François; Eche, Brigitte; Pereda Loth, Veronica; Badel, Eric; Legue, Valerie; Brunel, Nicole; Label, Philippe; Gérard, Joëlle

    2016-07-01

    The plants ability to orient their growth with respect to external stimuli such as gravity is a key factor for survival and acclimation to their environment. Belowground, plant roots modulate their growth towards gravity, allowing soil exploration and uptake of water and nutrients. In roots, gravity sensing cells called statocytes are located in the center of the root cap. Statocytes contain starch-filled plastids denser than the cytoplasm, which sedimentation along the direction of gravity is widely accepted as being involved into early stages of gravity perception (the starch-statolith hypothesis; Sack, 1991). Root gravitropism following statoliths displacement is based on auxin redistribution in the root apex, inducing differential growth between the root upward and downward sides. However at the cell scale, the chain of transduction starting from statoliths displacement and leading to auxin redistribution remains poorly documented. Signaling molecules such as calcium, reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate are serious candidates previously shown to be involved within minutes before modification of the expression of auxin-related genes (Morita, 2010; Sato et al., 2015). Here, we observe and quantify statoliths displacements and locations at various levels of gravity to investigate two hypothesis: (i) Are contacts between statoliths and the endoplasmic reticulum necessary to induce gravitropism? (ii) Are very low displacements of statoliths sufficient to initiate transduction pathways such as the calcium's one? These questionings have led to an experiment called GRAVI-2 which took place aboard the ISS in 2014. During the experiment, lentil roots were grown in the European modular cultivation system for several hours in microgravity and were then submitted to short high gravity stimulus (5 and 15 minutes at 2 g) before the return to Earth for analyses. Ongoing cytological measurements will reveal the effects of statoliths

  4. Subsurface structure along the eastern marginal fault zone of Yokote Basin by Seismic reflection profiling studies, Northeast Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagohara, K.; Imaizumi, T.; Echigo, T.; Miyauchi, T.; Sato, H.

    2005-12-01

    Typical reverse faults, which are known as Senya earthquake faults appeared along the western foot of the Mahiru Mountains, associated with The Rikuu Earthquake (Mj7.2) of 1896 in Northeast Japan. Eastern marginal fault zone of the Yokote Basin consist of four main surface ruptures, about 35 km long, Obonai fault, Shiraiwa fault, Ota fault and Senya fault, depending on their continuity and strike (Matsuda et al., 1980). We carried out the seismic reflection profiling across these faults (Kawaguchi03 Seismic line, Unjono04 Seismic line and Kotaki05 Seismic line) to clarify the subsurface structure of these reverse fault system based on the data of tectonic geomorphology and structural geology and furthermore, to discuss the timing of migration of the thrusting from the range front to the basin margin. The seismic source was mini-vibrator trucks, with 20seconds of 10-100Hz signals at 10m or 5m intervals. The sweep signals were recorded by a digital telemetry system (GDAPS-4a) with 10 Hz geophones. The obtained seismic reflection data were processed by conventional Common mid-point (CMP) methods, including post-stack migration and depth conversion. The resulting seismic reflection profile reveals a thrust structure beneath these areas. At the Center of Senya hills there are two thrusts and one high angle reverse fault (1997 Seismic Line). Senya fault is an active frontal emergent thrust with flat and ramp structure. Although, the high angle reverse fault, located along the foot of the range is a short-cut branching fault from the Senya fault in the central part of the Senya hill (Sato et al., 1998), in the Unjono04 seismic line, the depth of the flat and ramp structure gradually shallow in the north part of the Senya hill, where the flexure scarp accompanied with antithetic faults formed on the fluvial terraces. In the Kawaguchi03 seismic line, the concealed fault, 0.5km below the surface, branched from the master Ota fault, form a flexure scarplet on the alluvial fan

  5. Collision and subduction structure of the Izu-Bonin arc, central Japan: Recent studies from refraction/wide-angle reflection analysis and seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, R.; Iwasaki, T.; Sato, H.; Abe, S.; Hirata, N.

    2009-12-01

    Since the middle Miocene, the Izu-Bonin arc has been colliding from south with the Honshu arc in central Japan associated with subduction of the Philippine Sea plate. This process is responsible for forming a complex crustal structure called the Izu collision zone. Geological studies indicate the several geological blocks derived from the Izu-Bonin arc, such as the Misaka Mountains (MM), the Tanzawa Mountains (TM) and the Izu Peninsula (IP), were accreted onto the Honshu crust in the course of the collision, forming several tectonic boundaries in and around this collision zone (e.g. Amano, 1991). Recent seismic experiments succeeded in revealing the deep crustal structure in the eastern part of the Izu collision zone by reflection analysis (Sato et al., 2005) and refraction/wide-angle reflection analysis (Arai et al., 2009). Although these studies delineate the collision boundary between the Honshu crust and TM, and the upper surface of the subducting Philippine Sea plate, the southern part of the profile including the Kozu-Matsuda Fault (KMF, the tectonic boundary between TM and IP) is not well constrained due to the poor ray coverage. Moreover, clear images of tectonic boundaries are not obtained for the central or western part of the collision zone. In order to construct the structure model dominated by collision and subduction for the whole part of the collision zone, we carried out the following two analyses: (1) refraction tomography of active source data including another profile line in the western part of the collision zone (Sato et al., 2006), and (2) seismic tomography combining active and passive source data. In the analysis (1), we applied first arrival seismic tomography (Zelt and Barton, 1998) to the refraction data .We inverted over 39,000 travel times to construct a P wave velocity model for the 75-km-long transect, and a fine-scale structure with strong lateral heterogeneity was recovered. We conducted checkerboard resolution test to evaluate a

  6. Quantum Bio-Informatics IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardi, Luigi; Freudenberg, Wolfgang; Ohya, Masanori

    2011-01-01

    The QP-DYN algorithms / L. Accardi, M. Regoli and M. Ohya -- Study of transcriptional regulatory network based on Cis module database / S. Akasaka ... [et al.] -- On Lie group-Lie algebra correspondences of unitary groups in finite von Neumann algebras / H. Ando, I. Ojima and Y. Matsuzawa -- On a general form of time operators of a Hamiltonian with purely discrete spectrum / A. Arai -- Quantum uncertainty and decision-making in game theory / M. Asano ... [et al.] -- New types of quantum entropies and additive information capacities / V. P. Belavkin -- Non-Markovian dynamics of quantum systems / D. Chruscinski and A. Kossakowski -- Self-collapses of quantum systems and brain activities / K.-H. Fichtner ... [et al.] -- Statistical analysis of random number generators / L. Accardi and M. Gabler -- Entangled effects of two consecutive pairs in residues and its use in alignment / T. Ham, K. Sato and M. Ohya -- The passage from digital to analogue in white noise analysis and applications / T. Hida -- Remarks on the degree of entanglement / D. Chruscinski ... [et al.] -- A completely discrete particle model derived from a stochastic partial differential equation by point systems / K.-H. Fichtner, K. Inoue and M. Ohya -- On quantum algorithm for exptime problem / S. Iriyama and M. Ohya -- On sufficient algebraic conditions for identification of quantum states / A. Jamiolkowski -- Concurrence and its estimations by entanglement witnesses / J. Jurkowski -- Classical wave model of quantum-like processing in brain / A. Khrennikov -- Entanglement mapping vs. quantum conditional probability operator / D. Chruscinski ... [et al.] -- Constructing multipartite entanglement witnesses / M. Michalski -- On Kadison-Schwarz property of quantum quadratic operators on M[symbol](C) / F. Mukhamedov and A. Abduganiev -- On phase transitions in quantum Markov chains on Cayley Tree / L. Accardi, F. Mukhamedov and M. Saburov -- Space(-time) emergence as symmetry breaking effect / I. Ojima

  7. Long term gravity change and rapid uplifting caused by glacial isostatic adjustment in southeastern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, S.; Sato, T.; Sun, W.; Sugano, T.; Kaufman, A. M.; Freymueller, J. T.; Fujimoto, H.

    2007-12-01

    Glaciers at high latitudes are considered to be extremely sensitive to climate change and thus monitoring of glaciers is a clue to evaluate the future effect of global warming and the related phenomena. Ice mass changes also produce a time-variable surface load and give us useful data to investigate subsurface structure of the earth, especially to constrain the flow characteristics of the mantle. Larsen et al. (EPSL05) have extensively studied on vertical crustal movement in SE Alaska by means of raised shorelines, tide gauge measurements, and GPS to reveal the world¡¦s fastest glacial isostatic uplifting, which can be attributed to the response associated with glacier retreat. Displacement data, however, can only be used to constrain the sum of the elastic response to present-day ice melting (PDIM) and the viscoelastic one to past changes in ice. A Japan-US joint research project, ISEA (International geodetic research project in SouthEast Alaska), was initiated in 2005 to add new geodetic data sets and to refine the viscoelastic model derived by the previous studies. The outline of the project and some results are presented in this paper. In June, 2006, three kinds of field work were carried out. Absolute gravity (AG) surveys were performed at five sites in and around Glacier Bay using a Micro-g LaCoste absolute gravimeter, FG5#111 (Bilham and Sasagawa, EOS94). Gravity tide (GT) observation using a Scintrex¡¦s CG3M gravimeter was started in the campus of University of Alaska, Southeast (Sato et al., this meeting) to give precise corrections for the effect of ocean tide loading, which are the keys to increase the observation accuracy of AG and GPS. New continuous GPS (CGPS) sites were also established to examine not only the secular uplifting but the possible seasonal variation due to snow loading in the winter and ice loss in the summer. In December, 2006, another gravimeter, LaCoste and Romberg G-type #578, for GT observation with an electrostatic feedback

  8. Antarctic glaciations under Pliocene climate conditions from numerical modeling and compilation of local field-based reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernales, Jorge; Rogozhina, Irina; Greve, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    The mid-Pliocene (3.15 to 2.85 million years before present) is the most recent period in Earth's history when temperatures and CO2 concentrations were likely sustainedly higher than pre-industrial values. Furthermore, the positions of the continents and their sea-land distributions had already reached their present configuration, sharing some similarities with today's patterns of ocean circulation and vegetation distributions. Although significant differences exist -such as a peak sea level that could have been 22 ± 10 m higher than it is today and sea surface temperatures particularly warmer at higher latitudes, mid-Pliocene has been identified as an ideal interval for studying the climate system under conditions similar to those projected for the end of this century. Among the sources of uncertainty in the projections, the response of the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) to warmer-than-today conditions seems to play a central role. Therefore, a better understanding of AIS's behavior during periods like the mid-Pliocene will provide valuable information that could help improve future predictions. For this purpose, we have compiled a wide range of local field-based reconstructions of the ice-sheet margin from Pliocene sediments (with the inclusions of organic matters such as, for instance, diatoms or palynoflora, or ice rafted debris), geochemical records, volcanic ashes and rocks, and geomorphology, and designed numerical experiments of the AIS dynamics during the mid-Pliocene warm period using the large-scale polythermal ice sheet-shelf model SICOPOLIS (Greve, 1997 [1]; Sato and Greve, 2012 [2]). The model is run with a horizontal resolution of 40 × 40 km by the climatology obtained from the PlioMIP Atmosphere Ocean Global Circulation Model experiments (Dolan et al., 2012 [3]). Parameters of the AIS model (e.g. ice calving, sub-ice shelf and surface ice melt, basal sliding, etc.) have initially been estimated using ice-sheet simulations driven by the present

  9. Global Properties of X-Ray Flashes and X-Ray-Rich Gamma-Ray Bursts Observed by Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Takanori; Yamazaki, Ryo; Barthelmy, Scott; Gehrels, Neil; Osborne, Julian; Hullinger, Derek; Sato, Goro; Barbier, Louis; Cummings, Jay; Fenimore, Ed; Krimm, Hans; Lamb, Don; Markwardt, Craig; Palmer, David; Parsons, Ann; Stamatikos, Michael; Tueller, Jack

    Takanori Sakamoto, Taka.Sakamoto@nasa.gov NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States Ryo Yamazaki, ryo@theo.phys.sci.hiroshima-u.ac.jp Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Japan Scott Barthelmy, scott@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States Neil Gehrels, gehrels@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States Julian Osborne, julo@star.le.ac.uk University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom Derek Hullinger, derek.hullinger@gmail.com Moxtek, Inc, Orem, Utah, United States Goro Sato, Goro.Sato@nasa.gov Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States Louis Barbier, lmb@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States Jay Cummings, jayc@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States Ed Fenimore, efenimore@lanl.gov Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, California, United States Hans Krimm, hans.krimm@nasa.gov Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States Don Lamb, d-lamb@uchicago.edu University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States Craig Markwardt, Craig.Markwardt@nasa.gov Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States David Palmer, palmer@lanl.gov Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, California, United States Ann Parsons, Ann.M.Parsons@nasa.gov Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States Michael Stamatikos, michael@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States Jack Tueller, jack.tueller@nasa.gov Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, United States We present the spectral and temporal characteristics of the prompt emission and X-ray afterglow emission of X-ray flashes (XRFs) and X-ray-rich gamma-ray bursts (XRRs) detected and observed by Swift between December 2004 and September 2006. We compare these characteristics to a sample of conventional

  10. Back-trajectory Analyses of Water Vapor in Northern Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, Y.; Asanuma, J.

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge of precipitation sources is indispensable for prediction of extreme events as droughts and flood [Dirmeyer and Brubaker, 1999]. In this paper, the transport pathways of water vapor that precipitates in northern Mongolia were identified using back-trajectory analyses in order to find out factors causing such events in arid/semi-arid area. First, a back-trajectory model of atmospheric water vapor was developed. An air parcel is placed on an isentropic plane over the target site at each time of precipitation. Then, back trajectories was calculated with a kinematic method following the implicit technique [Merrill et al., 1986; Merrill, 1989]. Each of the air parcels was tagged with the precipitation time and the altitude, and then tracked back in time for 5 days on the isentropic surface. Japanese 25-year Reanalysis/JMA Climate Data Assimilation System (JRA-25/JCDAS) of Japan Meteorological Agency [Onogi et al., 2007] was used for 3D field of meteorological variables for the calculation. As a validation, the model was compared with two others, namely, Meteorological Data Explorer of the Center for Global Environmental Reserch (METEX/CGER) [Zeng et al., 2003], and the trajectory model of the National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) [Tomikawa and Sato, 2005]. The comparison found that model results are fairly robust within 5 days from the computational start, i.e., the end of the trajectory, regardless of different datasets and different schemes employed in these models. Then, the back-trajectory model was applied to the observed precipitation at the target site, a surface station in northern Mongolia called Kherlenbayan-Ulaan(KBU), where highly accurate and temporarily dense precipitation measurements are available. Back trajectory lines were calculated for each of the observed precipitation during the warm season of the years 2003 to 2009, on the isentropic surfaces of 300K, 310K and 320K where the highest value of water vapor is observed. The results show

  11. Models of polarized infrared emission from bipolar nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, M. S.; Johnson, P.; Thronson, H. A., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Many stars with circumstellar dust shells show a high degree of linear polarization (Sato et al. 1985). We are developing a model which assumes that the polarization arises from scattering by circumstellar dust. Our model assumes a geometry in which the star is surrounded by an optically thin spherical dust shell and embedded within an optically thick disk. This geometry is consistent with that proposed for objects with bipolar molecular outflow. This is important because many bipolar flow objects have also been observed to be highly polarized. The high degree of linear polarization is produced because the disk differentially attenuates the light from the star. The light incident from the point source is attenuated by a factor of exp(-tau/cos theta) where theta is the angle between a ray from the point source to the scatterer and a ray normal to the disk; tau is the optical depth at the wavelength of interest. Hence, the light scattered from the regions directly above and below the disk give the largest contribution to the total flux. The scattering angle for light from these regions is near 90 deg., so the light is strongly polarized and, in the Rayleigh scattering regime, is polarized parallel to the disk. The Stokes parameters for the scattered light from each particle in the shell are calculated by using the scattering matrix elements generated by a Mie scattering program. After the Stokes parameters for each particle are computed they are summed to give the Stokes parameters for the entire shell. Two graphs are presented which show the intensity and polarization spectrum generated by our model using the optical constants for astronomical silicates as defined by Draine and Lee (1984).

  12. A Revisit of the Masuda Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rui; Xu, Yan; Wang, Haimin

    2011-03-01

    We revisit the flare that occurred on 13 January 1992, which is now universally termed the “Masuda flare”. The new analysis is motivated not just by its uniqueness despite the increasing number of coronal observations in hard X-rays, but also by the improvement of Yohkoh hard X-ray image processing, which was achieved after the intensive investigations on this celebrated event. Using an uncertainty analysis, we show that the hard X-ray coronal source is located closer to the soft X-ray loop by about 5000 km (or 7 arcsec) in the re-calibrated Hard X-ray Telescope (HXT) images than in the original ones. Specifically, the centroid of the M1-band (23 - 33 keV) coronal source is above the maximum brightness of the Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) loop by 5000±1000 km (9600 km in the original data) and above the apex of the SXT loop represented by the 30% brightness contour by 2000±1000 km (˜ 7000 km in the original data). The change is obviously significant, because most coronal sources are above the thermal loop by less than 6 arcsec. We suggest that this change may account for the discrepancy in the literature, i.e., the spectrum of the coronal emission was reported to be extremely hard below ˜ 20 keV in the pre-calibration investigations, whereas it was reported to be considerably softer in the literature after the re-calibration done by Sato, Kosugi, and Makishima ( Pub. Astron. Soc. Japan 51, 127, 1999). Still, the coronal spectrum is flatter at lower energies than at higher energies, due to the lack of a similar, co-spatial source in the L-band (14 - 23 keV), for which a convincing explanation is absent.

  13. Population Balance Modeling of Polydispersed Bubbly Flow in Continuous-Casting Using Multiple-Size-Group Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Linmin; Qi, Fengsheng; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka

    2015-02-01

    A population balance model based on the multiple-size-group (MUSIG) approach has been developed to investigate the polydispersed bubbly flow inside the slab continuous-casting mold and bubble behavior including volume fraction, breakup, coalescence, and size distribution. The Eulerian-Eulerian approach is used to describe the equations of motion of the two-phase flow. All the non-drag forces (lift force, virtual mass force, wall lubrication force, and turbulent dispersion force) and drag force are incorporated in this model. Sato and Sekiguchi model is used to account for the bubble-induced turbulence. Luo and Svendsen model and Prince and Blanch model are used to describe the bubbles breakup and coalescence behavior, respectively. A 1/4th water model of the slab continuous-casting mold was applied to investigate the distribution and size of bubbles by injecting air through a circumferential inlet chamber which was made of the specially-coated samples of mullite porous brick, which is used for the actual upper nozzle. Against experimental data, numerical results showed good agreement for the gas volume fraction and local bubble Sauter mean diameter. The bubble Sauter mean diameter in the upper recirculation zone decreases with increasing water flow rate and increases with increasing gas flow rate. The distribution of bubble Sauter mean diameter along the width direction of the upper mold increases first, and then gradually decreases from the SEN to the narrow wall. Close agreements between the predictions and measurements demonstrate the capability of the MUSIG model in modeling bubbly flow inside the continuous-casting mold.

  14. Single-Molecule Magnet Properties of Transition-Metal Ions Encapsulated in Lacunary Polyoxometalates: A Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Aravena, Daniel; Venegas-Yazigi, Diego; Ruiz, Eliseo

    2016-07-01

    Single-molecule magnet (SMM) properties of transition-metal complexes coordinated to lacunary polyoxometalates (POM) are studied by means of state of the art ab initio methodology. Three [M(γ-SiW10O36)2] (M = Mn(III), Fe(III), Co(II)) complexes synthesized by Sato et al. (Chem. Commun. 2015, 51, 4081-4084) are analyzed in detail. SMM properties for the Co(II) and Mn(III) systems can be rationalized due to the presence of low-energy excitations in the case of Co(II), which are much higher in energy in the case of Mn(III). The magnetic behavior of both cases is consistent with simple d-orbital splitting considerations. The case of the Fe(III) complex is special, as it presents a sizable demagnetization barrier for a high-spin d(5) configuration, which should be magnetically isotropic. We conclude that a plausible explanation for this behavior is related to the presence of low-lying quartet and doublet states from the iron(III) center. This scenario is supported by ab initio ligand field analysis based on complete active space self-consistent field results, which picture a d-orbital splitting that resembles more a square-planar geometry than an octahedral one, stabilizing lower multiplicity states. This coordination environment is sustained by the rigidity of the POM ligand, which imposes a longer axial bond distance to the inner oxygen atom in comparison to the more external, equatorial donor atoms. PMID:27299178

  15. PREFACE: IUMRS-ICA 2008 Symposium 'AA. Rare-Earth Related Material Processing and Functions'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Takayuki; Sato, Tsugio; Machida, Ken-ichi; Fukunaga, Hirotoshi

    2009-02-01

    Rare-earth related materials have been widely used in various advanced technologies and devices because of their novel functions such as excellent magnetic and optical properties. For the fabrication of the next generation of new rare-earth related materials with novel functions, it is necessary to design a wide range of materials from nano-scale to macro-scale and to develop novel techniques realizing such designs. Indeed, there has been great progress in the preparation, processing and characterization of new rare-earth materials covering magnetic alloys, inorganic and organic fluorescence materials. In the International Union of Materials Research Societies International Conference in Asia 2008 (IUMRS-ICA2008) (9-13 December, Nagoya, Japan), the symposium on 'AA: Rare-Earth Related Material Processing and Functions' was organized to provide an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of recent advances in fabrication processing and applications of rare-earth related materials with various scaled and unique morphologies. Many papers were presented in the symposium, and some papers were accepted to be published in this proceeding after review. Editors: Takayuki KOMATSU (Nagaoka University of Technology, Japan) Tsugio SATO (Tohoku University, Japan) Ken-ichi MACHIDA (Osaka University, Japan) Hirotoshi FUKUNAGA (Nagasaki University, Japan) Jiro YAMASAKI (Kyushu Institute of Technology, Japan) Honjie ZHANG (Chinese Academy of Sciences, China) Chun Hua YAN (Peking University, China) Jianrong QIU (Zhejiang University, China) Jong HEO (Pohang University, Korea) Setsuhisa TANABE (Kyoto University, Japan) Hiroshi TATEWAKI (Nagoya City University, Japan) Tomokatsu HAYAKAWA (Nagoya Institute of Technology, Japan) Yasufumi FUJIWARA (Osaka University, Japan)

  16. Bubble reconstruction method for wire-mesh sensors measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukin, Roman V.

    2016-08-01

    A new algorithm is presented for post-processing of void fraction measurements with wire-mesh sensors, particularly for identifying and reconstructing bubble surfaces in a two-phase flow. This method is a combination of the bubble recognition algorithm presented in Prasser (Nuclear Eng Des 237(15):1608, 2007) and Poisson surface reconstruction algorithm developed in Kazhdan et al. (Poisson surface reconstruction. In: Proceedings of the fourth eurographics symposium on geometry processing 7, 2006). To verify the proposed technique, a comparison was done of the reconstructed individual bubble shapes with those obtained numerically in Sato and Ničeno (Int J Numer Methods Fluids 70(4):441, 2012). Using the difference between reconstructed and referenced bubble shapes, the accuracy of the proposed algorithm was estimated. At the next step, the algorithm was applied to void fraction measurements performed in Ylönen (High-resolution flow structure measurements in a rod bundle (Diss., Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule ETH Zürich, Nr. 20961, 2013) by means of wire-mesh sensors in a rod bundle geometry. The reconstructed bubble shape yields bubble surface area and volume, hence its Sauter diameter d_{32} as well. Sauter diameter is proved to be more suitable for bubbles size characterization compared to volumetric diameter d_{30}, proved capable to capture the bi-disperse bubble size distribution in the flow. The effect of a spacer grid was studied as well: For the given spacer grid and considered flow rates, bubble size frequency distribution is obtained almost at the same position for all cases, approximately at d_{32} = 3.5 mm. This finding can be related to the specific geometry of the spacer grid or the air injection device applied in the experiments, or even to more fundamental properties of the bubble breakup and coagulation processes. In addition, an application of the new algorithm for reconstruction of a large air-water interface in a tube bundle is

  17. Effects of 3D Velocity and Attenuation in the Tonga-Fiji Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, B.; Wiens, D. A.; Tromp, J.

    2005-12-01

    The current understanding of a subduction zone's temperature and composition is limited. Much of our recent knowledge of subduction zones comes from earthquake locations, geochemical measurements, and lab based experiments. Recently, two studies of the Tonga-Fiji subduction zone have presented tomographic images of velocity and attenuation (Roth et al., 1999; Zhao et al., 1997). Roth et al. (2000) then combined these two tomographic models of the Tonga-Fiji subduction zone to derive an empirical relationship between changes in velocity and attenuation. This relationship agrees well with two independent, experimental data sets (Jackson et al., 1992; Sato et al., 1989). Using the tomographic velocity model and the empirical relationship between velocity and attenuation we create synthetic seismograms for the Tonga-Fiji subduction zone to test whether a simple increase in velocity accurately depicts this subduction zone. To construct the model we use the tomographic model of Zhao et al. (1997) to create a shear velocity model using a simple Vs/Vp ratio. Following Roth et al. (2000) these tomographic models are combined with the empirical relation between velocity and attenuation to create an attenuation model. The resulting synthetics are compared to recorded data to validate the tomographic velocity model and the empirical relation between velocity and attenuation. Any mismatch in this comparison will provide a basis for further refinement of the tomographic models and the velocity-attenuation relation. The synthetics are created using the SPECFEM3D global code (Komatitsch et al., 2002) with the new addition of a three-dimensional attenuation operator. Attenuation is simulated by a set of standard linear solids over the desired frequency range as described in Liu et al. (1976). Our initial results at a minimum period of 3.3 seconds suggest that the attenuation structure plays a minor role for the present source-receiver geometry. The addition of the 3D attenuation

  18. Materials design of dilute magnetic semiconductors based on the control of spinodal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kazunori

    2010-03-01

    Recently, spinodal decomposition phenomena attract much attention in the fabrication of dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS). Many experimental results indicate that the magnetic properties of DMS are strongly affected by the occurrence of spinodal decomposition [1], thus people are now interested in controlling the magnetic properties of DMS by tuning the spinodal decomposition. In this talk, I will discuss spinodal decomposition in DMS based on the first-principles calculation. The electronic structure of DMS is calculated by using the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker coherent potential approximation method. Based on the calculated mixing energy I will discuss phase diagrams of DMS systems and their chemical trends. By using the calculated chemical pair interactions between magnetic impurities in DMS, the self-organization of nano-structures in DMS of the nano-structures are simulated by using the Monte Carlo method. The simulation results indicate that we can control super-paramagnetic blocking temperature by optimizing the size of the nano-structures by changing the crystal growth condition [2]. Next, I will propose co-doping method to control solubility limit of magnetic impurities in DMS. From the total energy calculations, it is shown that the solubility of magnetic impurities is strongly enhanced under the existence of interstitial donors [2]. However, due to the compensation of holes by the co-dopants, the ferromagnetism is suppressed. Based on the kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, we propose low temperature annealing method to remove interstitial co-dopants for recovering the ferromagnetism. By combining the co-doping and the low temperature annealing, we can fabricate DMS with high concentration of magnetic impurities which should show high-Tc. This work is based on the collaboration with H. Fujii, L. Bergqvist, P. H. Dederichs and H. Katayama-Yoshida.[4pt] [1] A. Bonanni, Semicond. Sci. Technol. 22 (2007) R41.[0pt] [2] K. Sato et al., Rev. Mod. Phys. Phys

  19. Wide band gap ferromagnetic semiconductors and oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearton, S. J.; Abernathy, C. R.; Overberg, M. E.; Thaler, G. T.; Norton, D. P.; Theodoropoulou, N.; Hebard, A. F.; Park, Y. D.; Ren, F.; Kim, J.; Boatner, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    Recent advances in the theory and experimental realization of ferromagnetic semiconductors give hope that a new generation of microelectronic devices based on the spin degree of freedom of the electron can be developed. This review focuses primarily on promising candidate materials (such as GaN, GaP and ZnO) in which there is already a technology base and a fairly good understanding of the basic electrical and optical properties. The introduction of Mn into these and other materials under the right conditions is found to produce ferromagnetism near or above room temperature. There are a number of other potential dopant ions that could be employed (such as Fe, Ni, Co, Cr) as suggested by theory [see, for example, Sato and Katayama-Yoshida, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., Part 2 39, L555 (2000)]. Growth of these ferromagnetic materials by thin film techniques, such as molecular beam epitaxy or pulsed laser deposition, provides excellent control of the dopant concentration and the ability to grow single-phase layers. The mechanism for the observed magnetic behavior is complex and appears to depend on a number of factors, including Mn-Mn spacing, and carrier density and type. For example, in a simple Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida carrier-mediated exchange mechanism, the free-carrier/Mn ion interaction can be either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic depending on the separation of the Mn ions. Potential applications for ferromagnetic semiconductors and oxides include electrically controlled magnetic sensors and actuators, high-density ultralow-power memory and logic, spin-polarized light emitters for optical encoding, advanced optical switches and modulators and devices with integrated magnetic, electronic and optical functionality.

  20. An extended magnetic viscous relaxation dating for calibrating an older age: an example of tsunamigenic coral boulders in Ishigaki Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Nakamura, N.; Goto, K.; Kumagai, Y.; Minoura, K.; Nagahama, H.

    2015-12-01

    A key to the understanding of past tsunami events is the ability to accurately date them. Analysis of past tsunami sediments is one of the most important tools for past tsunami reconstruction. A typical example of such tsunami sediment is tsunamigenic boulders. In Ishigaki Island, Japan, coral boulders that had been transported by tsunamis were distributed on the beach and land areas. Although the historical occurrences of several huge tsunamis were estimated based on large numbers of radiocarbon dating for coral boulders, radiocarbon dating can not determine a multiple rotational history by multiple tsunamis. A viscous remanet magnetization (VRM) dating method can be used to date any geological event that results in significant movements of a rock. Sato et al. (2014) applied VRM dating for comparing the radiocarbon age of these boulders. If a magnetic-mineral bearing rock is moved or re-oriented, the magnetism of the smaller magnetic grains re-aligns to the direction of the ambient magnetic field with time. This phenomenon is well known as Néel's (1949, 1955) single-domain (SD) relaxation theory. Pullaiah et al. (1975) derived a time-temperature (t-T relation) relation by assuming Néel's (1949, 1955) theory of magnetite. In principle, an experimental combination of short relaxation time and high temperature for removing VRM can determine the unknown relaxation time (tsunami age) at room temperature. We have been applied t-T relation to the coral boulders on Ishigaki Island, but their estimated ages showed older than radiocarbon dating. The longer relaxation time means that the observed magnetic relaxation is slower than the original Néel's theory. Such slow relaxation has been described by a stretched exponential function. The stretched exponential law provided a reasonable fit to the published experimental data. Thus, in this study, we revisit Néel's theory to provide a new t-T relation based on stretched exponential function.

  1. Validation and modeling of earthquake strong ground motion using a composite source model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Y.

    2001-12-01

    Zeng et al. (1994) have proposed a composite source model for synthetic strong ground motion prediction. In that model, the source is taken as a superposition of circular subevents with a constant stress drop. The number of subevents and their radius follows a power law distribution equivalent to the Gutenberg and Richter's magnitude-frequency relation for seismicity. The heterogeneous nature of the composite source model is characterized by its maximum subevent size and subevent stress drop. As rupture propagates through each subevent, it radiates a Brune's pulse or a Sato and Hirasawa's circular crack pulse. The method has been proved to be successful in generating realistic strong motion seismograms in comparison with observations from earthquakes in California, eastern US, Guerrero of Mexico, Turkey and India. The model has since been improved by including scattering waves from small scale heterogeneity structure of the earth, site specific ground motion prediction using weak motion site amplification, and nonlinear soil response using geotechnical engineering models. Last year, I have introduced an asymmetric circular rupture to improve the subevent source radiation and to provide a consistent rupture model between overall fault rupture process and its subevents. In this study, I revisit the Landers, Loma Prieta, Northridge, Imperial Valley and Kobe earthquakes using the improved source model. The results show that the improved subevent ruptures provide an improved effect of rupture directivity compared to our previous studies. Additional validation includes comparison of synthetic strong ground motions to the observed ground accelerations from the Chi-Chi, Taiwan and Izmit, Turkey earthquakes. Since the method has evolved considerably when it was first proposed, I will also compare results between each major modification of the model and demonstrate its backward compatibility to any of its early simulation procedures.

  2. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Relationship of Arbekacin for Treatment of Patients Infected with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Reiko; Tanigawara, Yusuke; Kaku, Mitsuo; Aikawa, Naoki; Shimizu, Kihachiro

    2006-01-01

    Arbekacin is widely used in Japan for the treatment of patients infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In this study, we have determined the optimal concentration targets of arbekacin for both efficacy and safety. A pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic analysis was performed to relate exposure to the drug and clinical cure/improvement or nephrotoxicity. Since we have reported the population pharmacokinetic parameters for arbekacin in the preceding paper (Y. Tanigawara, R. Sato, K. Morita, M. Kaku, N. Aikawa, and K. Shimizu, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 50:3754-3762, 2006), individual exposure parameters, such as area under the concentration-time curve (AUC), peak concentration (Cmax), AUC/MIC, Cmax/MIC, and trough concentration (Cmin) were estimated by the Bayesian method. Logistic regression was used to describe the relationship between exposure to the drug and the probability of clinical cure/improvement or nephrotoxicity. For the clinical efficacy analysis, 174 patients confirmed to have an MRSA infection were evaluated. The Cmax, Cmin, and AUC of arbekacin were associated with the probability of clinical cure/improvement during monotherapy. It was shown that the probability of cure/improvement rose when the Cmax of arbekacin was increased, with an odds ratio of 6.7 for a change in Cmax from 7.9 to 12.5 μg/ml (P = 0.037). For the nephrotoxic risk analysis, 333 patients were included, regardless of whether a pathogen was identified. Logistic regression analysis revealed Cmin and AUC as risk factors of nephrotoxicity (P < 0.005). The estimated probabilities of arbekacin-induced nephrotoxicity were 2.5, 5.2, and 13.1% when the Cmin values were 1, 2, and 5 μg/ml, respectively. The present findings are useful for optimizing the individual dose of arbekacin for the treatment of MRSA-infected patients. PMID:17065622

  3. X-Ray Crystallographic Structure of the Norwalk Virus Protease at 1.5-Å Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Zeitler, Corinne E.; Estes, Mary K.; Venkataram Prasad, B. V.

    2006-01-01

    Norwalk virus (NV), a member of the Caliciviridae family, is the major cause of acute, epidemic, viral gastroenteritis. The NV genome is a positive sense, single-stranded RNA that encodes three open reading frames (ORFs). The first ORF produces a polyprotein that is processed by the viral cysteine protease into six nonstructural proteins. We have determined the structure of the NV protease to 1.5 and 2.2 Å from crystals grown in the absence or presence, respectively, of the protease inhibitor AEBSF [4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl fluoride]. The protease, which crystallizes as a stable dimer, exhibits a two-domain structure similar to those of other viral cysteine proteases with a catalytic triad composed of His 30, Glu 54, and Cys 139. The native structure of the protease reveals strong hydrogen bond interactions between His 30 and Glu 54, in the favorable syn configuration, indicating a role of Glu 54 during proteolysis. Mutation of this residue to Ala abolished the protease activity, in a fluorogenic peptide substrate assay, further substantiating the role of Glu 54 during proteolysis. These observations contrast with the suggestion, from a previous study of another norovirus protease, that this residue may not have a prominent role in proteolysis (K. Nakamura, Y. Someya, T. Kumasaka, G. Ueno, M. Yamamoto, T. Sato, N. Takeda, T. Miyamura, and N. Tanaka, J. Virol. 79:13685-13693, 2005). In the structure from crystals grown in the presence of AEBSF, Glu 54 undergoes a conformational change leading to disruption of the hydrogen bond interactions with His 30. Since AEBSF was not apparent in the electron density map, it is possible that these conformational changes are due to subtle changes in pH caused by its addition during crystallization. PMID:16641296

  4. Incorporation of copper into lysyl oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kosonen, T; Uriu-Hare, J Y; Clegg, M S; Keen, C L; Rucker, R B

    1997-10-01

    Lysyl oxidase is a copper-dependent enzyme involved in extracellular processing of collagens and elastin. Although it is known that copper is essential for the functional activity of the enzyme, there is little information on the incorporation of copper. In the present study we examined the insertion of copper into lysyl oxidase using 67Cu in cell-free transcription/translation assays and in normal skin fibroblast culture systems. When a full-length lysyl oxidase cDNA was used as a template for transcription/translation reactions in vitro, unprocessed prolysyl oxidase appeared to bind copper. To examine further the post-translational incorporation of copper into lysyl oxidase, confluent skin fibroblasts were incubated with inhibitors of protein synthesis (cycloheximide, 10 microg/ml), glycosylation (tunicamycin, 10 microg/ml), protein secretion (brefeldin A, 10 microg/ml) and prolysyl oxidase processing (procollagen C-peptidase inhibitor, 2.5 microg/ml) together with 300 microCi of carrier-free 67Cu. It was observed that protein synthesis was a prerequisite for copper incorporation, but inhibition of glycosylation by tunicamycin did not affect the secretion of 67Cu as lysyl oxidase. Brefeldin A inhibited the secretion of 67Ci-labelled lysyl oxidase by 46%, but the intracellular incorporation of copper into lysyl oxidase was not affected. In addition, the inhibition of the extracellular proteolytic processing of prolysyl oxidase to lysyl oxidase had minimal effects on the secretion of protein-bound 67Cu. Our results indicate that, similar to caeruloplasmin processing [Sato and Gitlin (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 5128-5134], copper is inserted into prolysyl oxidase independently of glycosylation. PMID:9355764

  5. Modeling of magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail using global MHD simulation with an effective resistivity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den, M.; Horiuchi, R.; Fujita, S.; Tanaka, T.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is considered to play an important role in space phenomena such as substorm in the Earth's magnetosphere. Tanaka and Fujita reproduced substorm evolution process by numerical simulation with the global MHD code [1]. In the MHD framework, the dissipation model is introduced for modeling of the kinetic effects. They found that the normalized reconnection viscosity, one of the dissipation model employed there, gave a large effect for the dipolarization, central phenomenon in the substorm development process, though that viscosity was assumed to be a constant parameter. It is well known that magnetic reconnection is controlled by microscopic kinetic mechanism. Frozen-in condition is broken due to particle kinetic effects and collisionless reconnection is triggered when current sheet is compressed as thin as ion kinetic scales under the influence of external driving flow [2, 3]. Horiuchi and his collaborators showed that reconnection electric field generated by microscopic physics evolves inside ion meandering scale so as to balance the flux inflow rate at the inflow boundary, which is controlled by macroscopic physics [2]. That is, effective resistivity generated through this process can be expressed by balance equation between micro and macro physics. In this paper, we perform substorm simulation by using the global MHD code developed by Tanaka [3] with this effective resistivity instead of the empirical resistivity model. We obtain the AE indices from simulation data, in which substorm onset can be seen clearly, and investigate the relationship between the substorm development and the effective resistivity model. [1] T. Tanaka, A, Nakamizo, A. Yoshikawa, S. Fujita, H. Shinagawa, H. Shimazu, T. Kikuchi, and K. K. Hashimoto, J. Geophys. Res. 115 (2010) A05220,doi:10.1029/2009JA014676. [2] W. Pei, R. Horiuchi, and T. Sato, Physics of Plasmas,Vol. 8 (2001), pp. 3251-3257. [3] A. Ishizawa, and R. Horiuchi, Phys. Rev. Lett., Vol. 95, 045003 (2005). [4

  6. Validation of Broadband Ground Motion Simulations for Japanese Crustal Earthquakes by the Recipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwaki, A.; Maeda, T.; Morikawa, N.; Miyake, H.; Fujiwara, H.

    2015-12-01

    The Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion (HERP) of Japan has organized the broadband ground motion simulation method into a standard procedure called the "recipe" (HERP, 2009). In the recipe, the source rupture is represented by the characterized source model (Irikura and Miyake, 2011). The broadband ground motion time histories are computed by a hybrid approach: the 3-D finite-difference method (Aoi et al. 2004) and the stochastic Green's function method (Dan and Sato, 1998; Dan et al. 2000) for the long- (> 1 s) and short-period (< 1 s) components, respectively, using the 3-D velocity structure model. As the engineering significance of scenario earthquake ground motion prediction is increasing, thorough verification and validation are required for the simulation methods. This study presents the self-validation of the recipe for two MW6.6 crustal events in Japan, the 2000 Tottori and 2004 Chuetsu (Niigata) earthquakes. We first compare the simulated velocity time series with the observation. Main features of the velocity waveforms, such as the near-fault pulses and the large later phases on deep sediment sites are well reproduced by the simulations. Then we evaluate 5% damped pseudo acceleration spectra (PSA) in the framework of the SCEC Broadband Platform (BBP) validation (Dreger et al. 2015). The validation results are generally acceptable in the period range 0.1 - 10 s, whereas those in the shortest period range (0.01-0.1 s) are less satisfactory. We also evaluate the simulations with the 1-D velocity structure models used in the SCEC BBP validation exercise. Although the goodness-of-fit parameters for PSA do not significantly differ from those for the 3-D velocity structure model, noticeable differences in velocity waveforms are observed. Our results suggest the importance of 1) well-constrained 3-D velocity structure model for broadband ground motion simulations and 2) evaluation of time series of ground motion as well as response spectra.

  7. Different role of the Jalpha helix in the light-induced activation of the LOV2 domains in various phototropins.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Takayuki; Iwata, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Sato, Yoshiaki; Matsuoka, Daisuke; Tokutomi, Satoru; Kandori, Hideki

    2009-08-18

    Phototropins (phot) are blue light receptors in plants which are involved in phototropism, stomatal opening, and chloroplast movements. Phototropin has two LOV domains (LOV1 and LOV2), and the LOV2 domain is responsible for activation of Ser/Thr kinase. There is an alpha-helix at the C-terminal side of the LOV2 domain, which is called the Jalpha helix. The functional importance of the Jalpha helix has been established for Arabidopsis phot1, where light-induced structural perturbation takes place in the Jalpha helix during the photocycle of LOV2 domains. However, the present FTIR study reports a different role of the Jalpha helix in light-induced signal transduction of LOV2 domains. Here we construct LOV2 domains with (LOV-Jalpha) and without (LOV-core) the Jalpha helix for Arabidopsis phot1 and phot2 and Adiantum neochrome 1 and compare their light-induced difference FTIR spectra. Light-induced protein structural changes differ significantly between LOV-Jalpha and LOV-core for Arabidopsis phot1 [Yamamoto, A., Iwata, T., Sato, Y., Matsuoka, D., Tokutomi, S., and Kandori, H. (2009) Biophys. J. 96, 2771-2778]. In contrast, the difference spectra are identical between LOV-Jalpha and LOV-core for Adiantum neochrome 1. In Arabidopsis phot2, the protein structural changes are intermediate between Arabidopsis phot1 and Adiantum neochrome 1. These results suggest that the conformational changes of the Jalpha helix and the interaction between the LOV-core and the Jalpha helix are different among phototropins. The role of the Jalpha helix for signal transduction in phototropins is discussed. PMID:19601589

  8. Responses of cultured neural retinal cells to substratum-bound laminin and other extracellular matrix molecules.

    PubMed

    Adler, R; Jerdan, J; Hewitt, A T

    1985-11-01

    The responses of cultured chick embryo retinal neurons to several extracellular matrix molecules are described. Retinal cell suspensions in serum-free medium containing the "N1" supplement (J. E. Bottenstein, S. D. Skaper, S. Varon, and J. Sato, 1980, Exp. Cell Res. 125, 183-190) were seeded on tissue culture plastic surfaces pretreated with polyornithine (PORN) and with one of the factors to be tested. Substantial cell survival could be observed after 72 hr in vitro on PORN pretreated with serum or laminin, whereas most cells appeared to be degenerating on untreated PORN, PORN-fibronectin, and PORN-chondronectin. Cell attachment, although quantitatively similar for all these substrata, was temperature-dependent on serum and laminin but not on fibronectin or untreated PORN. In a short-term bioassay, neurite development was abundant on laminin, scarce on serum and fibronectin, and absent on PORN. No positive correlation between cell spreading and neurite production could be seen: cell spreading was more extensive on PORN and fibronectin than on laminin or serum, while on laminin-treated dishes, spreading was similar for neurite-bearing and non-neurite-bearing cells. Laminin effects on retinal neurons were clearly substratum dependent. When bound to tissue culture plastic, laminin showed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on cell attachment and did not stimulate neurite development. PORN-bound laminin, on the other hand, did not affect cell attachment but caused marked stimulation of neurite development, suggesting that laminin conformation and/or the spatial distribution of active sites play an important role in the neurite-promoting function of this extracellular matrix molecule. Investigation of the embryonic retina with ELISA and immunocytochemical methods showed that laminin is present in this organ during development. Therefore, in vivo and in vitro observations are consistent with the possibility that laminin might influence neuronal development in the retina

  9. A fast lightstripe rangefinding system with smart VLSI sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruss, Andrew; Carley, L. Richard; Kanade, Takeo

    1989-01-01

    The focus of the research is to build a compact, high performance lightstripe rangefinder using a Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) smart photosensor array. Rangefinding, the measurement of the three-dimensional profile of an object or scene, is a critical component for many robotic applications, and therefore many techniques were developed. Of these, lightstripe rangefinding is one of the most widely used and reliable techniques available. Though practical, the speed of sampling range data by the conventional light stripe technique is severely limited. A conventional light stripe rangefinder operates in a step-and-repeat manner. A stripe source is projected on an object, a video image is acquired, range data is extracted from the image, the stripe is stepped, and the process repeats. Range acquisition is limited by the time needed to grab the video images, increasing linearly with the desired horizontal resolution. During the acquisition of a range image, the objects in the scene being scanned must be stationary. Thus, the long scene sampling time of step-and-repeat rangefinders limits their application. The fast range sensor proposed is based on the modification of this basic lightstripe ranging technique in a manner described by Sato and Kida. This technique does not require a sampling of images at various stripe positions to build a range map. Rather, an entire range image is acquired in parallel while the stripe source is swept continuously across the scene. Total time to acquire the range image data is independent of the range map resolution. The target rangefinding system will acquire 1,000 100 x 100 point range images per second with 0.5 percent range accuracy. It will be compact and rugged enough to be mounted on the end effector of a robot arm to aid in object manipulation and assembly tasks.

  10. The alpha effectiveness for formation of SO3- in barite: an essential factor for ESR dating of submarine hydrothermal barite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isono, Y.; Toyoda, S.; Nishido, H.; Kayama, M.

    2013-12-01

    While Kasuya et al. (1991) first pointed out that ESR (electron spin resonance) dating of barite (BaSO4) is possible, the method was first practically applied by Okumura et al. (2010) to a sample formed by the submarine hydrothermal activity. A subsequent study by Sato et al. (2011) studied the thermal stability of the signal and concluded that the dating signal due to SO3- is stable so that dating method is applicable up to at least several thousand years. Barite crystals formed by submarine hydrothermal activities contains large amount of Ra which replaces Ba in the crystal lattice where all dose rate is due to radiation from Ra. Okumura et al. (2010) reported a concentration of 7.7 Bq/g of Ra in a hydrothermal sulfide including barite where the internal alpha dose rate in barite contributes 40 to 60 % of total dose rate. Determination of alpha effectiveness is thus the one of the essential factors for improving the precision of dating of barite by ESR. Toyoda et al. (2012) investigated the alpha effectiveness for the ESR signal due to SO3- in barite by comparing the dose responses of the signal for gamma irradiation and for He ion implantation with an energy of 4 MeV. A value 0.043 ×0.018 was obtained for a sample from Morocco. However, the dose response was far from 'good', where the number of points is not sufficient. The experiments of He ion implantation was repeated in the present study for several samples to determine the precise alpha effectiveness. A value of 0.019 ×0.0096 and 0.0062 ×0.0036 were obtained for the samples from Morocco and from Funaoka Mine, Japan, respectively. The results of further repeated analysis will be presented.

  11. Growth and Properties of Magnetic Spinel Ferrite Thin Films and Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Arunava

    2013-03-01

    There is considerable interest in the growth of single crystal spinel ferrites films because of their numerous technological applications in areas such as microwave integrated devices, magnetoelectric coupling heterostructures, and potentially as an active barrier material in an emerging class of spintronic devices called spin filters. Unlike perovskites, the study of spinel ferrite films is quite limited in part due to the complex crystal structure with a large unit cell consisting of many interstitial sites and that the transition metal cations can adopt various oxidation states. We have grown high-quality, atomically smooth epitaxial ferrite (NiFe2O4, CoFe2O4 and LiFe5O8) films using chemical vapor deposition and pulsed laser deposition techniques and carried out detailed studies of their structural, magnetic and optical properties. Of particular interest are systematic studies on the formation of antiphase boundaries in epitaxial NiFe2O4 films grown on different substrates and the accurate determination of the band gap of this material using optical spectroscopy and first principles calculations. Additionally, we have grown ferrite films on piezoelectric substrates and observed large shifts in the ferromagnetic resonance profile due to magnetoelectric coupling resulting from electrostatic field-induced changes in the magnetic anisotropy field. Work done in collaboration with N. Z. Bao, W. H. Butler, R. Datta, B. S. Holinsworth, M. Iliev, S. Kanuri, S. V. Karthik, G. Kim, T. M. Klein, N. Li, M. Liu, P. R. LeClair, J. X. Ma, D. Mazumdar, T. Mewes, D. V. B. Murthy, J. L. Musfeldt, K. R. O'Neal, N. Pachauri, V. M. Petrov, H. Sato, S. Schäfer, L. Shen, H. Sims, G. Srinivasan, N. X. Sun, Q. -C. Sun, and Z. Zhou. The work was supported by ONR (Grant Number N00014-12-1-0102)

  12. Simulation of tectonic evolution of the Kanto Basin of Japan since 1 Ma due to subduction of the Pacific and Philippine Sea plates and the collision of the Izu-Bonin arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashima, Akinori; Sato, Toshinori; Sato, Hiroshi; Asao, Kazumi; Furuya, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Shuji; Kameo, Koji; Miyauchi, Takahiro; Ito, Tanio; Tsumura, Noriko; Kaneda, Heitaro

    2016-06-01

    The Kanto Basin, the largest lowland in Japan, developed by flexure as a result of (1) the subduction of the Philippine Sea (PHS) and the Pacific (PAC) plates and (2) the repeated collision of the Izu-Bonin arc fragments with the Japanese island arc. Geomorphological, geological, and thermochronological data on vertical movements over the last 1 My suggest that subsidence initially affected the entire basin after which the area of subsidence gradually narrowed until, finally, the basin began to experience uplift. In this study, we modeled the tectonic evolution of the Kanto Basin following the method of Matsu'ura and Sato (1989) for a kinematic subduction model with dislocations, in order to quantitatively assess the effects of PHS and PAC subduction. We include the steady slip-rate deficit (permanent locking rate at the plate interface) in our model to account for collision process. We explore how the latest collision of the Izu Peninsula block has been affected by a westerly shift in the PHS plate motion vector with respect to the Eurasian plate, thought to have occurred between 1.0-0.5 Ma, using long-term vertical deformation data to constrain extent of the locked zone on the plate interface. We evaluated the change in vertical deformation rate for two scenarios: (1) a synchronous shift in the orientation of the locked zone as PHS plate motion shifts and (2) a delayed shift in the orientation of the locked zone following the shift in plate motion. Observed changes in the uplift/subsidence pattern are better explained by scenario (2), suggesting that recent (< 1 My) deformation in the Kanto Basin shows a lag in crustal response to the plate motion shift. We also calculated stress accumulation rates and found a good match with observed earthquake mechanisms, which shows that intraplate earthquakes serve to release stress accumulated through long-term plate interactions.

  13. The preliminary results of new submarine caldera on the west of Kume-jima island, Central Ryukyu Arc, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harigane, Y.; Ishizuka, O.; Shimoda, G.; Sato, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Ryukyu Arc occurs between the islands of Kyushu and Taiwan with approximately 1200 km in the full length. This volcanic arc is caused by subduction of the Philippine Sea plate beneath the Eurasia Plate along the Ryukyu trench, and is composed of forearc islands, chains of arc volcanoes, and a back-arc rift called Okinawa Trough. The Ryukyu Arc is commonly divided into three segments (northern, central and southern) that bounded by the Tokara Strait and the Kerama Gap, respectively (e.g., Konishi 1965; Kato et al., 1982). Sato et al. (2014) mentioned that there is no active subaerial volcano in the southwest of Iotori-shima in the Central Ryukyu Arc whereas the Northern Ryukyu Arc (i.e., the Tokara Islands) has active frontal arc volcanoes. Therefore, the existence of volcanoes and volcanotectonic history of active volcanic front in the southwestern part of the Central Ryukyu Arc are still ambiguous. Detailed geophysical and geological survey was mainly conducted using R/V Kaiyou-maru No.7 during GK12 cruise operated by the Geological Survey of Japan/National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan. As a result, we have found a new submarine volcanic caldera on the west of Kume-jima island, where located the southwestern part of Central Ryukyu Arc. Here, we present (1) the bathymetrical feature of this new submarine caldera for the first time and (2) the microstructural and petrological observations of volcanic rocks (20 volcanic samples in 13 dredge sites) sampled from the small volcanic cones of this caldera volcano. The dredged samples from the caldera consist of mainly rhyolite pumice with minor andesites, Mn oxides-crust and hydrothermally altered rocks. Andesite has plagioclase, olivine and pyroxene phenocrysts. Key words: volcanic rock, caldera, arc volcanism, active volcanic front, Kume-jima island, Ryukyu Arc

  14. Aerosol Disinfection Capacity of Slightly Acidic Hypochlorous Acid Water Towards Newcastle Disease Virus in the Air: An In Vivo Experiment.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Hakimullah; Thammakarn, Chanathip; Suguro, Atsushi; Ishida, Yuki; Nakajima, Katsuhiro; Kitazawa, Minori; Takehara, Kazuaki

    2015-12-01

    Existence of bioaerosol contaminants in farms and outbreaks of some infectious organisms with the ability of transmission by air increase the need for enhancement of biosecurity, especially for the application of aerosol disinfectants. Here we selected slightly acidic hypochlorous acid water (SAHW) as a candidate and evaluated its virucidal efficacy toward a virus in the air. Three-day-old conventional chicks were challenged with 25 doses of Newcastle disease live vaccine (B1 strain) by spray with nebulizer (particle size <3 μm in diameter), while at the same time reverse osmosis water as the control and SAHW containing 50 or 100 parts per million (ppm) free available chlorine in pH 6 were sprayed on the treated chicks with other nebulizers. Exposed chicks were kept in separated cages in an isolator and observed for clinical signs. Oropharyngeal swab samples were collected from 2 to 5 days postexposure from each chick, and then the samples were titrated with primary chicken kidney cells to detect the virus. Cytopathic effects were observed, and a hemagglutination test was performed to confirm the result at 5 days postinoculation. Clinical signs (sneezing) were recorded, and the virus was isolated from the control and 50 ppm treatment groups, while no clinical signs were observed in and no virus was isolated from the 100 ppm treatment group. The virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strain Sato, too, was immediately inactivated by SAHW containing 50 ppm chlorine in the aqueous phase. These data suggest that SAHW containing 100 ppm chlorine can be used for aerosol disinfection of NDV in farms. PMID:26629621

  15. Population Balance Modeling of Polydispersed Bubbly Flow in Continuous-Casting Using Multiple-Size-Group Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Linmin; Qi, Fengsheng; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka

    2014-09-01

    A population balance model based on the multiple-size-group (MUSIG) approach has been developed to investigate the polydispersed bubbly flow inside the slab continuous-casting mold and bubble behavior including volume fraction, breakup, coalescence, and size distribution. The Eulerian-Eulerian approach is used to describe the equations of motion of the two-phase flow. All the non-drag forces (lift force, virtual mass force, wall lubrication force, and turbulent dispersion force) and drag force are incorporated in this model. Sato and Sekiguchi model is used to account for the bubble-induced turbulence. Luo and Svendsen model and Prince and Blanch model are used to describe the bubbles breakup and coalescence behavior, respectively. A 1/4th water model of the slab continuous-casting mold was applied to investigate the distribution and size of bubbles by injecting air through a circumferential inlet chamber which was made of the specially-coated samples of mullite porous brick, which is used for the actual upper nozzle. Against experimental data, numerical results showed good agreement for the gas volume fraction and local bubble Sauter mean diameter. The bubble Sauter mean diameter in the upper recirculation zone decreases with increasing water flow rate and increases with increasing gas flow rate. The distribution of bubble Sauter mean diameter along the width direction of the upper mold increases first, and then gradually decreases from the SEN to the narrow wall. Close agreements between the predictions and measurements demonstrate the capability of the MUSIG model in modeling bubbly flow inside the continuous-casting mold.

  16. KIF2 is a new microtubule-based anterograde motor that transports membranous organelles distinct from those carried by kinesin heavy chain or KIF3A/B.

    PubMed

    Noda, Y; Sato-Yoshitake, R; Kondo, S; Nangaku, M; Hirokawa, N

    1995-04-01

    Kinesin is known as a representative cytoskeletal motor protein that is engaged in cell division and axonal transport. In addition to the mutant assay, recent advances using the PCR cloning technique have elucidated the existence of many kinds of kinesin-related proteins in yeast, Drosophila, and mice. We previously cloned five different members of kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) in mouse brain (Aizawa, H., Y. Sekine, R. Takemura, Z. Zhang, M. Nangaku, and N. Hirokawa. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 119:1287-1296) and demonstrated that one of them, KIF3A, is an anterograde motor (Kondo, S., R. Sato-Yashitake, Y. Noda, H. Aizawa, T. Nakata, Y. Matsuura, and N. Hirokawa. J. Cell Biol. 1994. 125:1095-1107). We have now characterized another axonal transport motor, KIF2. Different from other KIFs, KIF2 is a central type motor, since its motor domain is located in the center of the molecule. Recombinant KIF2 exists as a dimer with a bigger head and plus-end directionally moves microtubules at a velocity of 0.47 +/- 0.11 microns/s, which is two thirds that of kinesin's. Immunocytological examination showed that native KIF2 is abundant in developing axons and that it accumulates in the proximal region of the ligated nerves after a 20-h ligation. Soluble KIF2 exists without a light chain, and KIF2's associated-vesicles, immunoprecipitated by anti-KIF2 antibody, are different from those carried by existing motors such as kinesin and KIF3A. They are also distinct from synaptic vesicles, although KIF2 is accumulated in so-called synaptic vesicle fractions and embryonal growth cone particles. Our results strongly suggest that KIF2 functions as a new anterograde motor, being specialized for a particular group of membranous organelles involved in fast axonal transport. PMID:7535303

  17. CFD model of an aerating hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, D.; Sabourin, M.; Beaulieu, S.; Papillon, B.; Ellis, C.

    2014-03-01

    Improving water quality in the tailrace below hydroelectric dams has become a priority in many river systems. In warm climates, water drawn by the turbine from deep in a reservoir can be deficient in dissolved oxygen (DO), a critical element in maintaining a healthy aquatic ecosystem. Many different solutions have been proposed in order to increase the DO levels in turbine discharge, including: turbine aeration systems (adding air to the water through either the turbine hub, the periphery or through distributed aeration in the runner blades); bubble diffusers in the reservoir or in the tailrace; aerating weirs downstream of the dams; and surface water pumps in the reservoir near the dam. There is a significant potential to increase the effectiveness of these solutions by improving the way that oxygen is introduced into the water; better distributions of bubbles will result in better oxygen transfer. In the present study, a two-phase Computational Fluid Dynamics model has been formulated using a commercial code to study the distribution of air downstream of a simple aerating hydrofoil. The two-phase model uses the Eulerian-Eulerian approach. Appropriate relations are used to model the interphase forces, including the Grace drag force model, the Favre averaged drag force and the Sato enhanced eddy viscosity. The model is validated using experimental results obtained in the water tunnel at the University of Minnesota's Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory. Results are obtained for water velocities between 5 and 10 m/s, air flow rates between 0.5 and 1.5 sL/min and for angles of attack between 0° and -8°. The results of this study show that the CFD model provides a good qualitative comparison to the experimental results by well predicting the wake location at the different flow rates and angles of attack used.

  18. Effect of plant dynamic processes on African vegetation responses to climate change: Analysis using the spatially explicit individual-based dynamic global vegetation model (SEIB-DGVM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SATO, H.; Ise, T.

    2012-12-01

    We applied a dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM) to the African continent. After calibration, the model reproduced geographical distributions of the continent's biomes, annual gross primary productivity (GPP), and biomass under current climatic conditions. The model is driven by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES) A1B scenario of rising CO2, and by climate changes during the 21st century resulting from the change in CO2 concentrations, simulated by a coupled Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate (MIROC) ocean atmosphere model. Simulations under this condition revealed time lags between environmental change and biome change, with the extent of these lags depending largely on the type of biome change. A switch in forest type was accompanied by the longest delay in biome change among all changes classified, indicating that resident trees largely prevent the establishment of non-resident tree types adapted to the new environment, and that tree growth requires additional years after successful establishment. In addition, assumptions for tree dispersal, which determine whether non-resident tree types can be established, modified the patterns of biome change under the 21st century environment: under the assumption that non-resident tree types cannot be established even if environmental conditions change, the extent of the forest type switch and the development of forest and savanna were suppressed, while forest dieback was enhanced. These changes accompanied a slowing of the increasing trend in net primary productivity (NPP), biomass, and soil carbon during the 21st century and in subsequent years. These results quantitatively demonstrate that both patch dynamics and invasive tree recruitment significantly modify the transient change in vegetation distribution and function under a changing environment on the African continent. Sato H & Ise T (2012) Journal of Geophysical Research - Biogeosciences

  19. IL-2 or IL-4 mRNA as a potential flow cytometric marker molecule for selective collection of living T helper 1 or T helper 2 lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Kaname; Tsuji, Akihiko

    2003-06-01

    Flow cytometry has been widely used to analyze and sort out particular types of living cells that have specific marker molecules. In many cases, marker proteins are present on the cell surface and are detected by monoclonal antibodies against them. However, there are some cases in which cells do not have specific marker molecules on their surface. In this situation, it would be useful if mRNA that is expressed specifically in the particular cell could be used as a marker molecule. We previously reported that mRNA can be detected in living cells by hybridizing a pair of fluoreophore (donor or acceptor)-labeled oligonucleotides to adjacent locations on the target mRNA in the cytoplasm of cells (Tsuji, A.; Koshimoto, H.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, M.; Sei-Iida, Y.; Kondo, S.; Ishibashi, K. Biophys. J. 2000, 78, 3260-3274). On the formed hybrid of the two fluorescent oligonucleotides with the target mRNA, the distance between the two fluorophores becomes very close, which results in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Combining this fluorescent labeling method for mRNA with flow cytometry, we have examined the isolation of living CD4+ T helper lymphocytes expressing IL-2 mRNA (Th1) or IL-4 mRNA (Th2). A pair of fluorescent oligonucleotides for hybridizing to IL-2 or IL-4 mRNA were introduced into activated CD4+ T lymphocytes by electroporation. The cells were applied to FACS and analyzed by FRET signals. Th1 or Th2 lymphocytes were exclusively sorted from their mixed populations in activated CD4+ T cells. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to use mRNA as marker molecules to analyze and isolate living cells in flow cytometry. PMID:12948141

  20. The use of biotopes in assessing the environmental quality of tidal estuaries in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducrotoy, Jean-Paul

    2010-02-01

    In Europe, the Water Framework Directive (WFD) (European Commission 2000) - and the recently proposed EU Marine Strategy Directive - have established a framework for the protection of groundwater, inland surface waters, estuarine (transitional) waters and coastal waters. TheWFD has several objectives: to prevent water ecosystem deterioration, to protect and to enhance the status of water resources but the most important aspect is to achieve a 'Good Ecological Status' (GES) for all waters, by 2015. In essence, the WFD requires a water body to be compared against a reference condition and then its ecological status designated - if the water body does not meet good or high ecological status, i.e. it is in moderate, poor or bad ecological status, then remedial measures have to be taken (e.g. pollution has to be removed). Many indices were developed from benthic work and are often thought fit for purpose. Based on the successional model proposed by Pearson and Rosenberg (1978), most of these indices were effectively established for soft sediment benthos. However, those developed in the framework of the WFD were derived from work on the subtidal. They are difficult to use in the intertidal and in transitional waters. As they were derived from work on organic pollution, there is no or little evident link with chemical and physical pollution. Ecomorphology brings together a biological approach and a sedimentological approach to estuarine ecology. It considers the use of the biotope and related concepts (biocenosis, bio-facies, ecotone, habitat…) as a basis to a novel approach to environmental quality assessment. It addresses the problem of the estuarine quality paradox in recognising the role of nutrients and organic matter in biogeochemical cycles. The discussion shows the complementarity of biotopes with the Sato-Umi and the ecohydrolgy approaches.

  1. Location of the Bombyx mori aminopeptidase N type 1 binding site on Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa toxin.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Shogo; Mizuno, Eri; Hara, Hirotaka; Nakanishi, Kazuko; Kitami, Madoka; Miura, Nami; Tabunoki, Hiroko; Watanabe, Ayako; Sato, Ryoichi

    2005-07-01

    We analyzed the binding site on Cry1Aa toxin for the Cry1Aa receptor in Bombyx mori, 115-kDa aminopeptidase N type 1 (BmAPN1) (K. Nakanishi, K. Yaoi, Y. Nagino, H. Hara, M. Kitami, S. Atsumi, N. Miura, and R. Sato, FEBS Lett. 519:215-220, 2002), by using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that block binding between the binding site and the receptor. First, we produced a series of MAbs against Cry1Aa and obtained two MAbs, MAbs 2C2 and 1B10, that were capable of blocking the binding between Cry1Aa and BmAPN1 (blocking MAbs). The epitope of the Fab fragments of MAb 2C2 overlapped the BmAPN1 binding site, whereas the epitope of the Fab fragments of MAb 1B10 did not overlap but was located close to the binding site. Using three approaches for epitope mapping, we identified two candidate epitopes for the blocking MAbs on Cry1Aa. We constructed two Cry1Aa toxin mutants by substituting a cysteine on the toxin surface at each of the two candidate epitopes, and the small blocking molecule N-(9-acridinyl)maleimide (NAM) was introduced at each cysteine substitution to determine the true epitope. The Cry1Aa mutant with NAM bound to Cys582 did not bind either of the two blocking MAbs, suggesting that the true epitope for each of the blocking MAbs was located at the site containing Val582, which also consisted of 508STLRVN513 and 582VFTLSAHV589. These results indicated that the BmAPN1 binding site overlapped part of the region blocked by MAb 2C2 that was close to but excluded the actual epitope of MAb 2C2 on domain III of Cry1Aa toxin. We also discuss another area on Cry1Aa toxin as a new candidate site for BmAPN1 binding. PMID:16000811

  2. Location of the Bombyx mori Aminopeptidase N Type 1 Binding Site on Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Atsumi, Shogo; Mizuno, Eri; Hara, Hirotaka; Nakanishi, Kazuko; Kitami, Madoka; Miura, Nami; Tabunoki, Hiroko; Watanabe, Ayako; Sato, Ryoichi

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed the binding site on Cry1Aa toxin for the Cry1Aa receptor in Bombyx mori, 115-kDa aminopeptidase N type 1 (BmAPN1) (K. Nakanishi, K. Yaoi, Y. Nagino, H. Hara, M. Kitami, S. Atsumi, N. Miura, and R. Sato, FEBS Lett. 519:215-220, 2002), by using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that block binding between the binding site and the receptor. First, we produced a series of MAbs against Cry1Aa and obtained two MAbs, MAbs 2C2 and 1B10, that were capable of blocking the binding between Cry1Aa and BmAPN1 (blocking MAbs). The epitope of the Fab fragments of MAb 2C2 overlapped the BmAPN1 binding site, whereas the epitope of the Fab fragments of MAb 1B10 did not overlap but was located close to the binding site. Using three approaches for epitope mapping, we identified two candidate epitopes for the blocking MAbs on Cry1Aa. We constructed two Cry1Aa toxin mutants by substituting a cysteine on the toxin surface at each of the two candidate epitopes, and the small blocking molecule N-(9-acridinyl)maleimide (NAM) was introduced at each cysteine substitution to determine the true epitope. The Cry1Aa mutant with NAM bound to Cys582 did not bind either of the two blocking MAbs, suggesting that the true epitope for each of the blocking MAbs was located at the site containing Val582, which also consisted of 508STLRVN513 and 582VFTLSAHV589. These results indicated that the BmAPN1 binding site overlapped part of the region blocked by MAb 2C2 that was close to but excluded the actual epitope of MAb 2C2 on domain III of Cry1Aa toxin. We also discuss another area on Cry1Aa toxin as a new candidate site for BmAPN1 binding. PMID:16000811

  3. Scattered surface wave energy in the seismic coda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zeng, Y.

    2006-01-01

    One of the many important contributions that Aki has made to seismology pertains to the origin of coda waves (Aki, 1969; Aki and Chouet, 1975). In this paper, I revisit Aki's original idea of the role of scattered surface waves in the seismic coda. Based on the radiative transfer theory, I developed a new set of scattered wave energy equations by including scattered surface waves and body wave to surface wave scattering conversions. The work is an extended study of Zeng et al. (1991), Zeng (1993) and Sato (1994a) on multiple isotropic-scattering, and may shed new insight into the seismic coda wave interpretation. The scattering equations are solved numerically by first discretizing the model at regular grids and then solving the linear integral equations iteratively. The results show that scattered wave energy can be well approximated by body-wave to body wave scattering at earlier arrival times and short distances. At long distances from the source, scattered surface waves dominate scattered body waves at surface stations. Since surface waves are 2-D propagating waves, their scattered energies should in theory follow a common decay curve. The observed common decay trends on seismic coda of local earthquake recordings particular at long lapse times suggest that perhaps later seismic codas are dominated by scattered surface waves. When efficient body wave to surface wave conversion mechanisms are present in the shallow crustal layers, such as soft sediment layers, the scattered surface waves dominate the seismic coda at even early arrival times for shallow sources and at later arrival times for deeper events.

  4. Prospective, noncomparative, nonrandomized case study of short-term outcomes of 360° suture trabeculotomy ab interno in patients with open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tomoki; Hirata, Akira; Mizoguchi, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Background In this paper, we describe 360° suture trabeculotomy (360°LOT) ab interno and the short-term course in patients who underwent this procedure. Methods We prospectively studied 12 patients (12 eyes) with open-angle glaucoma who underwent 360°LOT ab interno at the Sato Eye Clinic between February and July 2014. The surgical procedure involved making a 1.7 mm temporal corneal incision, exposing an approximately 15° opening in the inner wall of Schlemm’s canal (nasal side) using a Trabectome with a gonioscope, and inserting a 5-0 nylon suture rounded at the tip into Schlemm’s canal opened via the anterior chamber. The suture was then threaded around Schlemm’s canal, and the tip of the suture that emerged on the other side was then advanced through the opening to make a circumferential incision. Intraocular pressure (IOP), number of anti-glaucoma medications used, complications, and the surgery completion rate were prospectively studied. Results Mean IOP, which was 19.4 mmHg at baseline, showed a significant decrease at each of the monthly observation points, reaching 13.8 mmHg at 6 months after surgery (P=0.0004, paired t-test). The mean number of anti-glaucoma medications decreased from 3.2 at baseline to 1.1 at 6 months after surgery. IOP spikes ≥30 mmHg were seen in 25% of patients, but there were no other serious complications and the surgery completion rate was 92%. Conclusion The 360°LOT ab interno procedure preserves the conjunctiva and sclera, and has a high surgery completion rate when using the anterior chamber approach, and could therefore be an effective short-term treatment of open-angle glaucoma. PMID:25609906

  5. Local conductivity enhancement due to the tetragonal domain structure in LaAlO3- SrTiO3 heterointerfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moler, Kathryn

    2014-03-01

    Progress in the difficult task of growing oxide heterostructures has enabled the field of oxide interface engineering. The ability to control materials properties through interface engineering is demonstrated by the appearance of conductivity at the interface of certain insulators, most famously the {001}interface of the band insulators LaAlO3 (LAO) and TiO2-terminated SrTiO3 (STO). The prevailing explanation of conduction at the interface is electronic reconstruction due to a `polar catastrophe' in which charge migrates from the top LAO layer to the interface. Transport and other measurements in this system display a plethora of diverse physical phenomena. To better understand the interface conductivity, we used scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopy to image the magnetic field locally generated by current in an interface. At low temperature, we found that the current flowed in conductive narrow paths oriented along the crystallographic axes, embedded in a less conductive background. The configuration of these paths changed upon thermal cycling above the STO cubic to tetragonal structural transition temperature, implying that the local conductivity is strongly modified by the STO tetragonal domain structure. In this talk, I will summarize these results and also report on measurements of conductivity and diamagnetism in related materials that firmly establish the influence of the STO tetragonal domains on electronic properties. Coauthors C. Bell, H.K. Sato, M. Hosoda, Y. Xie, Y. Hikita, & H.Y. Hwang (SIMES); R. Jany & C. Richter (Augsburg); C. Woltmann, G. Pfanzelt, & J. Mannhart (MP Stuttgart); B. Kalisky, E.M. Spanton, H. Noad, K.C. Nowack, A. Rosenberg, & J.R. Kirtley.

  6. Porphyrias in Japan: compilation of all cases reported through 2002.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Masao; Yano, Yuzo; Shirataka, Masuo; Urata, Gumpei; Sassa, Shigeru

    2004-06-01

    The first case of porphyria on record in Japan was a patient with congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) reported by Sato and Takahashi in 1920. Since then until the end of December 2002, 827 cases of porphyrias have been diagnosed from characteristic clinical and/or laboratory findings (463 males, 358 females, and 6 of unknown sex). Essentially all inherited porphyrias have been found in Japan, with the incidences and clinical symptoms generally being similar to those reported for other countries. The male-female ratio was approximately 1:1 for CEP, whereas it was higher for erythropoietic protoporphyria. In contrast, preponderances of female patients exist with acute hepatic porphyrias, such as acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), variegate porphyria (VP), and hereditary coproporphyria (HCP), and with undefined acute porphyria. Although porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) is believed to be increasing recently in women in other countries because of smoking and the use of contraceptives, it is still by far more prominent in males in Japan than in females. The recent increasing contribution of hepatitis C virus infection to PCT in Japan has also been recognized. but there have been no PCT cases in Japan with HFE gene mutations. Familial occurrence and consanguinity were high for CEP, as expected; however, significant consanguinity was also noted in families where CEP, AIP, HCP, VP, or PCT occurred as a single isolated case without a family history of disease. This survey also revealed that as many as 71% of acute hepatic porphyria cases were initially diagnosed as nonporphyria and later revised or corrected to porphyria, indicating the difficulty of diagnosing porphyria in the absence of specific laboratory testing for porphyrins and their precursors in urine, stool, plasma, and erythrocyte samples. PMID:15239394

  7. Cancer immunotherapy utilizing gene-modified T cells: From the bench to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Duong, Connie P M; Yong, Carmen S M; Kershaw, Michael H; Slaney, Clare Y; Darcy, Phillip K

    2015-10-01

    The immune system plays a critical role in the elimination and suppression of pathogens. Although the endogenous immune system is capable of immune surveillance resulting in the elimination of cancer cells, tumor cells have developed a variety of mechanisms to escape immune recognition often resulting in tumor outgrowth. The presence of immune infiltrate in tumors has been correlated with a good prognosis following treatment (Sato et al., 2005; Loi et al., 2013; Clemente et al., 1996; Galon et al., 2006). As such, immune cells such as T cells, have been harnessed in order to target cancer. Tumor reactive lymphocytes, called tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) have been isolated and expanded from the tumor and reinfused back into patients for the treatment of melanoma. The promise of adoptive immunotherapy utilizing TILs as a robust treatment for cancer has been highlighted in patients with advanced melanoma with greater than 50% of patients responding to treatment (Dudley et al., 2005). Although TIL therapy has shown promising results in melanoma patients, it has proved difficult to translate this approach to other cancers, given that the numbers of TILs that can be isolated are generally low. To broaden this therapy for other cancers, T cells have been genetically modified to endow them with tumor reactivity using either a T cell receptor (TCR) (Parkhurst et al., 2009, 2011; Chinnasamy et al., 2011) or a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) (Grupp et al., 2013; Park et al., 2007). This review will outline the origins and development of adoptive immunotherapy utilizing TILs leading to genetic modification strategies to redirect T cells to cancer. Potential hurdles and novel strategies will be discussed for realizing the full potential of adoptive immunotherapy becoming a standard of care treatment for cancer. PMID:25595028

  8. PREFACE Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Migaku; Saito, Hitoshi; Yoshimura, Satoru; Takanashi, Koki; Sahashi, Masashi; Tsunoda, Masakiyo

    2011-01-01

    23 countries, with about 40 percent of participants attending from overseas (see figure). The program involved 4 plenary talks (45 minutes each), 37 invited talks (30 minutes), 85 contributed talks (15 minutes), and 352 posters. Pie chart Organizing Committee of ISAMMA 2010 M TakahashiTohoku Univ., Japan, Chairman K TakanashiTohoku Univ., Japan, Chair of the Program Committee H SaitoAkita Univ., Japan, Chair of the Publication Committee M SahashiTohoku Univ., Japan, Chair of the Treasury Committee M TsunodaTohoku Univ., Japan, General Secretary H AkinagaAIST, Japan H FukunagaNagasaki Univ., Japan K HonoNIMS, Japan S IshioAkita Univ., Japan S IwataNagoya Univ., Japan K NakagawaNihon Univ., Japan S NakagawaTokyo Inst. of Tech., Japan T OnoKyoto Univ., Japan Y SuzukiOsaka Univ., Japan M TanakaEhime Univ., Japan T Tanaka Univ. of Tokyo, Japan Program Committee of ISAMMA 2010 K TakanashiTohoku Univ., Japan, ChairS MizukamiTohoku Univ., Japan M MizuguchiTohoku Univ., Japan, Vice-chairH NaganumaTohoku Univ., Japan M DoiTohoku Univ., JapanS NakagawaTokyo Inst. of Tech., Japan A FujitaTohoku Univ., JapanK NakamuraTohoku Univ., Japan K IshiyamaTohoku Univ., JapanK OnoKEK, Japan T KatoNagoya Univ., JapanT OnoKyoto Univ., Japan T KawagoeOsaka Pref. Univ.of Edu., JapanF SatoTohoku Univ., Japan O KitakamiTohoku Univ., JapanM ShiraiTohoku Univ., Japan Y KitamotoTokyo Inst. of Tech., JapanS SugimotoTohoku Univ., Japan F MatsukuraTohoku Univ., JapanM YamaguchiTohoku Univ., Japan C MitsumataHitachi Metals, Japan Publication Committee of ISAMMA 2010 H SaitoAkita Univ., Japan, ChairS MitaniNIMS, Japan S YoshimuraAkita Univ., Japan, Vice-chairH MuraokaTohoku, Japan Y AndoTohoku Univ., JapanM NakanoNagasaki Univ., Japan J AriakeAIT, JapanR NakataniOsaka Univ., Japan H AsanoNagoya Univ., JapanK O'GradyUniv. of York, UK M FutamotoChuo Univ., JapanA SakumaTohoku Univ., Japan J HayakawaHitachi, ARL, JapanT SatoKeio Univ., Japan T HondaKyushu Inst. of Tech., JapanT SatoShinshu Univ., Japan M

  9. PREFACE Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Migaku; Saito, Hitoshi; Yoshimura, Satoru; Takanashi, Koki; Sahashi, Masashi; Tsunoda, Masakiyo

    2011-01-01

    23 countries, with about 40 percent of participants attending from overseas (see figure). The program involved 4 plenary talks (45 minutes each), 37 invited talks (30 minutes), 85 contributed talks (15 minutes), and 352 posters. Pie chart Organizing Committee of ISAMMA 2010 M TakahashiTohoku Univ., Japan, Chairman K TakanashiTohoku Univ., Japan, Chair of the Program Committee H SaitoAkita Univ., Japan, Chair of the Publication Committee M SahashiTohoku Univ., Japan, Chair of the Treasury Committee M TsunodaTohoku Univ., Japan, General Secretary H AkinagaAIST, Japan H FukunagaNagasaki Univ., Japan K HonoNIMS, Japan S IshioAkita Univ., Japan S IwataNagoya Univ., Japan K NakagawaNihon Univ., Japan S NakagawaTokyo Inst. of Tech., Japan T OnoKyoto Univ., Japan Y SuzukiOsaka Univ., Japan M TanakaEhime Univ., Japan T Tanaka Univ. of Tokyo, Japan Program Committee of ISAMMA 2010 K TakanashiTohoku Univ., Japan, ChairS MizukamiTohoku Univ., Japan M MizuguchiTohoku Univ., Japan, Vice-chairH NaganumaTohoku Univ., Japan M DoiTohoku Univ., JapanS NakagawaTokyo Inst. of Tech., Japan A FujitaTohoku Univ., JapanK NakamuraTohoku Univ., Japan K IshiyamaTohoku Univ., JapanK OnoKEK, Japan T KatoNagoya Univ., JapanT OnoKyoto Univ., Japan T KawagoeOsaka Pref. Univ.of Edu., JapanF SatoTohoku Univ., Japan O KitakamiTohoku Univ., JapanM ShiraiTohoku Univ., Japan Y KitamotoTokyo Inst. of Tech., JapanS SugimotoTohoku Univ., Japan F MatsukuraTohoku Univ., JapanM YamaguchiTohoku Univ., Japan C MitsumataHitachi Metals, Japan Publication Committee of ISAMMA 2010 H SaitoAkita Univ., Japan, ChairS MitaniNIMS, Japan S YoshimuraAkita Univ., Japan, Vice-chairH MuraokaTohoku, Japan Y AndoTohoku Univ., JapanM NakanoNagasaki Univ., Japan J AriakeAIT, JapanR NakataniOsaka Univ., Japan H AsanoNagoya Univ., JapanK O'GradyUniv. of York, UK M FutamotoChuo Univ., JapanA SakumaTohoku Univ., Japan J HayakawaHitachi, ARL, JapanT SatoKeio Univ., Japan T HondaKyushu Inst. of Tech., JapanT SatoShinshu Univ., Japan M

  10. Late Holocene sea level changes and tectonic movements inferred from fossil diatom assemblages in Tainohama, Tokushima prefecture, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, T.; Fujino, S.; Kobori, E.

    2014-12-01

    freshwater species, suggesting paleo-sea level changes. The sea level in this area declined gradually to modern sea level from +50cm higher level than modern by eustatic sea level fall during the late Holocene (Sato 2014), thus the fluctuations suggest co-seismic or inter-seismic crustal movements of the past interplate earthquakes along the Nankai Trough.

  11. PREFACE: 3rd International Symposium on Functional Materials 2009 (ISFM 2009) 3rd International Symposium on Functional Materials 2009 (ISFM 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiwon, Kim; Li, Lu; Taehyun, Nam; Jouhyeon, Ahn

    2010-05-01

    The 3rd International Symposium on Functional Materials 2009 (ISFM 2009) and its preconference, Advances in Functional Materials 2009 (AFM 2009), were successfully held in the Republic of Korea from 15-18 June 2009 and in the People's Republic of China from 8-12 June 2009, respectively. The two conferences attracted over 300 oral and poster presentations from over 12 countries including Australia, Canada, China, Germany, Japan, India, Israel, Korea, The Netherlands, Thailand, the UK and the USA. In the two conferences, eight keynote lectures were delivered by S Miyazaki, S A Akbar, D J Singh, C Suryanarayana, M~Greenblatt, H Zhang, T Sato and J Ding. This topical issue of Physica Scripta contains papers presented at the ISFM 2009 and AFM 2009. Keyan Li from Dalian University, People's Republic of China, presents some empirical formulae to estimate the elastic moduli of rocksalt-, zincblende- and chalcopyrite-structured crystals, on the basis of electronegativities of bonded atoms in the crystallographic frame. Min-Jung Kim from Hanyang University, Korea, reports on the preparation and characterization of carboxyl functionalization of magnetite nanoparticles for oligonucleotide immobilization. F Yan from the National University of Singapore studies the fabrication of Bi(Fe0.5Sc0.5)O3-PbTiO3 (BSF-PT) thin films by pulsed laser deposition, and the enhanced magnetic moment with respect to BiFeO3-PbTiO3. Dong-Gil Lee from Pusan National University, Korea, reports on the sterilization of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli using nanofiber TiO2 films prepared by the electrostatic spray method. Sang-Eun Park from the Korea Institute of Science and Technology reports on the study of encapsulated Fe3O4 nanoparticles with a silica thin layer with a reversible capacity of about 363 mAhg-1. Other researchers report on many other exiting achievements in the fields of ferromagnetic materials, magneto-optical materials, thermoelectric materials, shape memory materials, fuel-cell and

  12. Monitoring of seafloor crustal deformation using GPS/Acoustic technique along the Nankai Trough, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, K.; Tadokoro, K.; Ikuta, R.; Watanabe, T.; Fujii, C.; Matsuhiro, K.; Sayanagi, K.

    2014-12-01

    Seafloor crustal deformation is crucial for estimating the interplate locking at the shallow subduction zone and has been carried out at subduction margins in Japan, e.g., Japan Trench and Nankai Trough [Sato et al., 2011; Tadokoro et al., 2012]. Iinuma et al. [2012] derived slip distributions during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake using GPS/Acoustic data and on-land GPS data. The result showed that maximum slip is more than 85 m near the trench axis. The focal area along the Nankai trough extended to the trough axis affected this earthquake by cabinet office, government of Japan.  We monitored seafloor crustal deformation along the Nankai trough, Japan. Observation regions are at the eastern end of Nankai trough (named Suruga trough) and at the central Nankai trough. We established and monitored by two sites across the trough at each region. In the Suruga trough region, we repeatedly observed from 2005 to 2013. We observed 13 and 14 times at a foot wall side (SNE) and at a hanging wall side (SNW), respectively. We estimated the displacement velocities with relative to the Amurian plate from the result of repeated observation. The estimated displacement velocity vectors at SNE and SNW are 42±8 mm/y to N94±3˚W direction and 39±11 mm/y to N84±9˚W direction, respectively. The directions are the same as those measured at the on-land GPS stations. The magnitudes of velocity vector indicate significant shortening by approximately 4 mm/y between SNW and on-land GPS stations at hanging wall side of the Suruga Trough. This result shows that the plate interface at the northernmost Suruga trough is strongly locked. In the central Nankai trough region, we established new two stations across the central Nankai trough (Both stations are about 15km distance from trough) and observed only three times, August 2013, January 2014, and June 2014. We report the results of monitoring performed in this year.

  13. A STIMULUS PARADIGM FOR ANALYSIS OF NEAR-FIELD HYDRODYNAMIC SENSITIVITY IN CRUSTACEANS

    PubMed

    Wilkens; Douglass

    1994-04-01

    dippers (Wilkens and Larimer, 1972; Wiese et al. 1976; Wiese and Schultz, 1982; Reichert et al. 1983) or by water drops (Laverack, 1962b; Strandburg and Krasne, 1985). Another form of fluid-coupled stimulation involves small jets of saline (Laverack, 1963; Tautz, 1990; Schmitz, 1992). In other studies, receptor hairs have been stimulated directly by using a stylus in place of the dipole, e.g. a needle or glass capillary in contact with the hair (Laverack, 1962a; Killian and Page, 1992a; Yen et al. 1992; Nagayama and Sato, 1993) or a miniature wire loop or capillary tube placed over the hair shaft (Mellon, 1963; Wiese, 1976; Tautz et al. 1981; Killian and Page, 1992b). PMID:9317769

  14. Study of wind retrieval from space-borne infrared coherent lidar in cloudy atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Philippe; Ishii, Shoken; Mizutani, Kohei; Okamoto, Kozo; Ochiai, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    Future spaceborne tropospheric wind missions using infrared coherent lidar are currently being studied in Japan and in the United States [1,2]. The line-of-sight wind velocity is retrieved from the Doppler shift frequency of the signal returned by aerosol particles. However a large percentage (70-80%) of the measured single-shot intensity profiles are expected to be contaminated by clouds [3]. A large number of cloud contaminated profiles (>40%) will be characterized by a cloud-top signal intensity stronger than the aerosol signal by a factor of one order of magnitude, and by a strong attenuation of the signal backscattered from below the clouds. Profiles including more than one cloud layer are also expected. This work is a simulation study dealing with the impacts of clouds on wind retrieval. We focus on the three following points: 1) definition of an algorithm for optimizing the wind retrieval from the cloud-top signal, 2) assessment of the clouds impact on the measurement performance and, 3) definition of a method for averaging the measurements before the retrieval. The retrieval simulations are conducted considering the instrumental characteristics selected for the Japanese study: wavelength at 2 µm, PRF of 30 Hz, pulse power of 0.125 mJ and platform altitude between 200-400 km. Liquid and ice clouds are considered. The analysis uses data from atmospheric models and statistics of cloud effects derived from CALIPSO measurements such as in [3]. A special focus is put on the average method of the measurements before retrieval. Good retrievals in the mid-upper troposphere implie the average of measured single-range power spectra over large horizontal (100 km) and vertical (1 km) ranges. Large differences of signal intensities due to the presence of clouds and the clouds non-uniform distribution have to be taken into account when averaging the data to optimize the measurement performances. References: [1] S. Ishii, T. Iwasaki, M. Sato, R. Oki, K. Okamoto, T

  15. A new MRI land surface model HAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, M.

    2011-12-01

    A land surface model HAL is newly developed for MRI-ESM1. It is used for the CMIP simulations. HAL consists of three submodels: SiByl (vegetation), SNOWA (snow) and SOILA (soil) in the current version. It also contains a land coupler LCUP which connects some submodels and an atmospheric model. The vegetation submodel SiByl has surface vegetation processes similar to JMA/SiB (Sato et al. 1987, Hirai et al. 2007). SiByl has 2 vegetation layers (canopy and grass) and calculates heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. The snow submodel SNOWA can have any number of snow layers and the maximum value is set to 8 for the CMIP5 experiments. Temperature, SWE, density, grain size and the aerosol deposition contents of each layer are predicted. The snow properties including the grain size are predicted due to snow metamorphism processes (Niwano et al., 2011), and the snow albedo is diagnosed from the aerosol mixing ratio, the snow properties and the temperature (Aoki et al., 2011). The soil submodel SOILA can also have any number of soil layers, and is composed of 14 soil layers in the CMIP5 experiments. The temperature of each layer is predicted by solving heat conduction equations. The soil moisture is predicted by solving the Darcy equation, in which hydraulic conductivity depends on the soil moisture. The land coupler LCUP is designed to enable the complicated constructions of the submidels. HAL can include some competing submodels (precise and detailed ones, and simpler ones), and they can run at the same simulations. LCUP enables a 2-step model validation, in which we compare the results of the detailed submodels with the in-situ observation directly at the 1st step, and follows the comparison between them and those of the simpler ones at the 2nd step. When the performances of the detailed ones are good, we can improve the simpler ones by using the detailed ones as reference models.

  16. Dust Particle Alignment in the Solar Magnetic Field: a Possible Cause of the Cometary Circular Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolokolova, L.; Koenders, C.; Rosenbush, V.; Kiselev, N.; Ivanova, A.; Afanasiev, V.

    2015-12-01

    Circular polarization (CP) produced by scattering of sunlight on cometary dust has been observed in 11 comets, and showed the values from 0.01% to 0.8%. CP of both signs was observed, although negative (left-handed) CP dominates. Recent observations of several comets using SCORPIO-2 focal reducer at the 6-m BTA telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory (Russia) allowed producing maps of CP in the comet continuum filter at 684 nm and red wide-band filter. A gradual increase of the CP with the nucleocentric distance was usually observed. The most plausible reason why the light scattered by cometary dust becomes circularly polarized is alignment of the dust particles in the solar magnetic field. However, in-situ data for comet Halley, indicated that the solar magnetic field could not penetrate deep into the coma, limited by the diamagnetic cavity, and, thus, could not be responsible for the CP observed closer than ~4000 km from the nucleus. Advanced theoretical studies of interaction of the solar magnetic field with cometary ions led to reconsidering the diamagnetic cavity boundary - it is defined by the cometary ionopause, at which a balance is achieved between the magnetic pressure in the magnetic pile up region and the neutral friction force. The nucleocentric distance where this balance is achieved depends on the comet characteristics, increasing with the increase of the gas production rate, and local solar wind conditions, approximatively given by the comet location, specifically, its heliocentric distance. The size of diamagnetic cavity was calculated for the conditions of our CP observations. We found that it could be as small as dozens (comets 73P, 8P, 290P) or hundreds (comets Q4 NEAT, K1 PanSTARRS, Tago-Sato-Kosaka) kilometers. Thus, non-zero CP close to the nucleus can be easily explained by the interaction of the dust particles with the solar magnetic field. This mechanism also explains the observed increase in CP with the distance from the

  17. Fault Model of the 1703 Genroku Kanto Earthquake Based on Newly Imaged Upper- Surface of Philippine Sea Plate, Coseismic Coastal Movements, and Tsunami Inundation Heights Along the Eastern Boso Coast, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namegaya, Y.; Shishikura, M.; Satake, K.

    2008-12-01

    We propose a fault model of the 1703 Genroku Kanto earthquake by using recently imaged shape of Philippine Sea Plate, distributions of coseismic coastal movements, and tsunami inundation heights along the eastern Boso coast. The Genroku Kanto earthquake occurred in southern Kanto, less than 100 km away from Tokyo, on December 31, 1703. Its magnitude is estimated to be 7.9-8.2 (Usami, 2003). The source is located on subducting Philippine Sea Plate. Several fault models have been proposed from distributions of the coseismic coastal vertical movements or tsunami inundated heights (e.g. Kasahara et al., 1973; Matsuda et al., 1978; Aida, 1991; Shishikura, 2003). Recently, upper-surface of the subducted Philippine Sea Plate has been imaged in detail by using deep seismic reflection profiling (e.g. Sato et al., 2005; Takeda et al., 2007; Tsumura et al., 2008). One of the features is low dip angle in the shallow region (Tsumura et al., 2008). In this study, we first compiled the above three images and estimated the shape of the plate. Next, 49 subfaults whose size is 10 km x 10 km are located on the upper surface of Philippine Sea Plate in such a way that they do not overlap with each other. Vertical movement on the coast from each subfault (Green functions) is calculated for a unit amount of slip. The slip amounts of each subfault are estimated by an inversion of measured vertical movement (Shishikura, 2000). As a result, the slip amount of more than 10 m is estimated on the plate surface in the south part of Boso peninsula and Miura peninsula, while small slip is estimated between two peninsulas. To discuss with tsunami inundation height, we next locate additional large two faults whose size is 30 km x 28 km and 50 km x 28 km off southern (S) and southeastern (SE) Boso peninsula, respectively. Tsunami inundation heights along the eastern Boso coast is calculated using the estimated slip distribution of the 49 subfaults and the additional two faults with slip amount of 7

  18. Fourier Transform Microwave Spectra of CO{2}-ETHYLENE Sulfide, CO{2}-ETHYLENE Oxide and CO{2}-PROPYLENE Oxide Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orita, Yukari; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Hirota, Eizi

    2010-06-01

    We have previously examined the difference in roles of O and S in structure and dynamics of the CO-ethylene oxide (EO) and CO-ethylene sulfide (ES) complexes. We have extended the investigation to CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES for comparison. We have also observed the CO{2}-propylene oxide (PO) complex, which is an important intermediate in the reaction of PO with CO{2} leading to polycarbonate. Both a-type and b-type transitions were observed for the CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES, but no c-type transitions were observed at all. We also detected the {34}S and {13}C isotopic species in natural abundance and the species containing {18}OCO and C{18}O% {2}, which were synthesized by burning paper in an {18}O{2} and{% 16}O{2} mixture. By analyzing the observed spectra we concluded the CO{2} moiety of CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES located in a plane % prependicular to the three-membered ring and bisecting the COC or CSC angle of EO or ES, respectively, as in the case of CO-EO and CO-ES complexes. An % ab initio MO calculation at the level of MP2/6-311G(d, p) yielded an optimized structure in good agreement with the experimental result. We have derived from the observed spectra the distance, the stretching force constant, and the binding energy of the bonds between the constituents of the CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES complexes and have found that the distances of the two complexes were shorter by 0.2Å than those in CO-EO and CO-ES, respectively, and that the intermolecular bonds were two times stronger in the CO{2} complexes than in the corresponding CO complexes. We have concluded from the observed spectra that the CO{2} moiety in CO{2}-PO is located on the PO three-membered ring plane opposite to the methyl group. The constituents in CO{2}-PO were more weakly bound than those in CO{2}-EO and CO{2}-ES. S. Sato, Y. Kawashima, Y. Tatamitani, and E. Hirota, 63rd International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, WF05 (2008).

  19. The PHITS code for space applications: status and recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihver, Lembit; Ploc, Ondrej; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Niita, Koji; Hashimoto, Shintaro; El-Jaby, Samy

    Since COSPAR 2012, the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System, PHITS, has been upgraded and released to the public [1]. The code has been improved and so has the contents of its package, such as the attached data libraries. In the new version, the intra-nuclear cascade models INCL4.6 and INC-ELF have been implemented as well as the Kurotama model for the total reaction cross sections. The accuracies of the new reaction models for transporting the galactic cosmic-rays were investigated by comparing with experimental data. The incorporation of these models has improved the capabilities of PHITS to perform particle transport simulations for different space applications. A methodology for assessing the pre-mission exposure of space crew aboard the ISS has been developed in terms of an effective dose equivalent [2]. PHITS was used to calculate the particle transport of the GCR and trapped radiation through the hull of the ISS. By using the predicted spectra, and fluence-to-dose conversion factors, the semi-empirical ISSCREM [3,4,5] code was then scaled to predict the effective dose equivalent. This methodology provides an opportunity for pre-flight predictions of the effective dose equivalent, which can be compared to post-flight estimates, and therefore offers a means to assess the impact of radiation exposure on ISS flight crew. We have also simulated [6] the protective curtain experiment, which was performed to test the efficiency of water-soaked hygienic tissue wipes and towels as a simple and cost-effective additional spacecraft shielding. The dose from the trapped particles and low energetic GCR, was significantly reduced, which shows that the protective curtains are efficient when they are applied on spacecraft at LEO. The results of these benchmark calculations, as well as the mentioned applications of PHITS to space dosimetry, will be presented. [1] T. Sato et al. J. Nucl. Sci. Technol. 50, 913-923 (2013). [2] S. El-Jaby, et al. Adv. Space Res. doi: http

  20. Density measurements and structural properties of liquid and amorphous metals under high pressure studied by in situ X-ray scattering (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morard, G.; Garbarino, G.; Andrault, D.; Antonangeli, D.; Guignot, N.; Siebert, J.; Roberge, M.; Boulard, E.; Lincot, A.; Denoeud, A.; Petitgirard, S.

    2013-12-01

    Density determination for crystalline materials under high pressure and high temperature is straightforward using X-ray diffraction. For liquid and amorphous materials, it is more complicated due to the absence of long-range order. Different high pressure techniques have been developed: in-situ X-ray absorption 1-4 or ex-situ sink/float method 5-8. However, these techniques suffer several limitations, such as the limited pressure range or the long exposure time required. We have implemented an in situ X-ray diffraction analysis method suitable for the determination of Pressure-Volume-Temperature equations of state (P-V-T EoS) in the critical case of liquid and amorphous materials over an extended thermodynamic range (T>2000 K and P> 40 GPa). This method is versatile, it can be applied to data obtained using various angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction high-pressure apparatus and, contrary to in situ X-ray absorption techniques, is independent from the sample geometry. Further advantage is the fast data acquisition (between 10 to 300 seconds integration time). Information on macroscopic bulk properties (density) and local atomic arrangement (pair distribution function g(r)) can be gathered in parallel. To illustrate the method, we present studies on liquid Fe-S alloys in Paris Edinburgh press and in laser-heated diamond anvil cell, and measurements on Ce glass in diamond anvil cell at room temperature. References 1 G. Shen, N. Sata, M. Newville et al., App. Phys. Lett. 81 (8), 1411 (2002). 2 C. Sanloup, F. Guyot, P. Gillet et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 27 (6), 811 (2000). 3 Y. Katayama, K. Tsuji, O. Shimomura et al., J. Synch. Rad. 5, 1023 (1998). 4 T. Sato and N. Funamori, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 255502 (2008). 5 R. Knoche and R. W. Luth, Chem. Geol. 128, 229 (1996). 6 P.S. Balog, R.A. Secco, D.C. Rubie et al., J. Geophys. Res. 108 (B2), 2124 (2003). 7 C. B. Agee and D. Walker, J. Geophys. Res. 93 (B4), 3437 (1988). 8 E. Ohtani, A. Suzuki, and T. Kato, Proc. Jpn. Acad

  1. [Use of new elastomeric pumps and PCA in postoperative pain control in thoraco-abdominal surgery].

    PubMed

    Testa, G; Borzomati, V; Costantini, D; De Chiara, A; Picarazzi, A; Capelli, O

    1996-01-01

    36 patients submitted to interventions for thoraco-abdominal surgery has been submitted to antalgic post-operatory therapy with elastomeric pump at a continuous intravenous infusion and patient controlled analgesia (PCA). The patients have been randomized in three groups. The patients of the 1 degree group received 30 minutes before of the end of the surgical intervention 30 mg of Ketorolac. At the end of the anesthesia came started an infusion of 150 mg of Ketorolac (5 vials) in 60 ml of isotonic chlorinated solution at the rate of 0.5 ml/h. The pump had besides the capability of disperse a maximum of 4 bolus/ h, everyone of 0.5 ml, on demand of the patient. The 2 degrees group received a solution containing 60 ml of Morphine in 60 ml of isotonic chlorinated solution with the same formality of administration. The 3 degrees group (placebo) received 60 ml of isotonic chlorinated solution in pumps from infusion and Ketorolac intramuscular on demand. To the times T0 (awakening), T1 (3 h), T2 (6h), T3 (12 h), T4 (24 h), T5 (30 h, was collected algometrical consequences according to VAS (Visual Analogous Scale of Sc modification of the PA increase, FC, FR, SatO2.. The obtained results have highlighted like in the 1 degree group, to the 1 degree algometric consequence (T0), there is a good sedative effect on the pain (intensity of the middle low pain 3.70 +/- 1.64); this antalgic effect has also continued in the other consequences effected in the post-operatory. In the 2 degree group to the awakening (T0), the pain was middle-tall (5.50 +/- 2.32) and an expressive reduction appeared at the time T2 (3.60 +/- 1.35 P < 0.005). In the 3 degrees group have not recorded a diminution of the pain if not after 24 hours from the end of the intervention deposit the intramuscular antalgic therapy. In conclusion, the system infusion + PCA represents an indubitable advantage in comparison with the traditional antalgic therapy as for concern the entity of the reduction of the pain as

  2. ISEA (International geodetic project in SouthEastern Alaska) for Rapid Uplifting Caused by Glacial Retreat: (2) Establishment of Continuous GPS Sites (CGPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, A. M.; Freymueller, J. T.; Miura, S.; Cross, R. S.; Sato, T.; Sun, W.; Fujimoto, H.

    2006-12-01

    Rapid disintegration and thinning of Glacier Bay's tidewater glaciers and ice fields followed the end of the Little Ice Age. Geodetic studies by Larsen et al. have quantified average rates of post-glacial isostatic rebound (PGR) in the vicinity of Glacier Bay in Southeast Alaska. PGR continues today with maximum uplift rates of 30 mm/yr in Glacier Bay's upper West Arm and 32 mm/yr in the Yakutat Icefield. ISEA is a collaborative Japanese-American project which will combine CGPS measurements of uplift with absolute gravity and gravity tide observations in Southeast Alaska. ISEA will build on previous work in Glacier Bay with a multi-pronged geophysical approach similar to that used by Sato et al. in Svalbard, Norway. CGPS data sets from Gustavus and elsewhere in Alaska show seasonal variability in vertical velocity. We hypothesize this is due to winter snow loading and summer ice loss in adjacent mountain ranges. If uplift rates are found to accelerate over the five year span of this project, this would suggest increasing rates of present day ice loss in Glacier Bay. CGPS measurements of seasonal crustal deformation might be used as a powerful integrating tool for mass balance monitoring over an extensive, glacierized area. ISEA supplements existing CGPS stations [U.S. Coast Guard and Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO)] and improves the spatial array with new stations in and around Glacier Bay. During June and September of 2006, an ISEA field team established five new CGPS stations. Two new sites within Glacier Bay National Park, at Blue Mouse Cove and Queen Inlet, are near the zone of maximum uplift. The third CGPS was placed to the east, on Eldred Rock, in northern Lynn Canal. The fourth site, to the west near Dry Bay, completes a 200 km east-west "transect" through this uplift peak. The fifth site lies to the northeast along the Haines Highway in Yukon, Canada. A sixth site in the Tatshenshini River region, north of Glacier Bay, is proposed for 2007. Site

  3. ISEA (International geodetic project in SouthEastern Alaska) for rapid uplifting caused by glacial retreat: (1) Outline of the project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, S.; Sato, T.; Fujimoto, H.; Sun, W.; Freymueller, J. T.; Kaufman, A. M.; Cross, R.

    2006-12-01

    Glaciers at high latitudes are considered to be extremely sensitive to climate change and thus monitoring of glaciers is a clue to evaluate the future effect of global warming and the related phenomena. Ice mass changes also produce a time-variable surface load and give us useful data to investigate subsurface structure of the earth, especially to constrain the flow characteristics of the mantle. Larsen et al. (JGR03, GJI04, EPSL05) have extensively studied on vertical crustal movement in SE Alaska by means of raised shorelines, tide gauge measurements, and GPS to reveal the world's fastest glacial isostatic uplifting, which can be attributed to the response associated with glacier retreat. Displacement data, however, can only be used to constrain the sum of the elastic response to present-day ice melting (PDIM) and the viscoelastic one to past changes in ice. Wahr et al. (GRL95) proposed a method to distinguish the one from the other by combining surface displacement and absolute gravity measurements, though the approach may have limited spatial resolution. A Japan-US joint research project, ISEA (International geodetic research project in SouthEast Alaska), was initiated in 2005 to add new geodetic data sets and to refine the viscoelastic model derived by the previous studies. In June, 2006 three kinds of field work were carried out. Absolute gravity (AG) surveys (Sun et al., this meeting) were performed at five sites in and around Glacier Bay. Gravity tide (GT) observation using Scintrex's CG3M gravimeter was started in the campus of University of Alaska, Southeast (Sato et al., this meeting) to give precise corrections for the effect of ocean tide loading, which are the keys to increase the observation accuracy of AG and GPS,. Finally, new continuous GPS (CGPS) sites were established (Kaufman et al., this meeting) to examine not only the secular uplifting but the possible seasonal variation due to snow loading in the winter and ice loss in the summer. This

  4. ISEA (International geodetic project in SouthEastern Alaska) for rapid uplifting caused by glacial retreat: (4) Gravity tide observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Miura, S.; Sun, W.; Kaufman, A. M.; Cross, R.; Freymueller, J. T.; Heavner, M.

    2006-12-01

    The southeastern Alaska shows a large uplift rate as 30 mm/yr at most, which is considered to be closely related to the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) including two effects of the past and present-day ice melting (Larsen et al., 2004). So, this area is important to improve our knowledge of the viscoelastic property of the earth and to consider the global changes. Combing the displacement and gravity observations is useful to constrain the model computation results for GIA (Sato et al., 2006). In order to progress the previous work by the group of Univ. Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF), an observation project by Japan and USA groups was started in 2005 (Miura et al., this meeting). Under this project, June 2006, the continuous GPS measurements started (M. Kufman et al., this meeting) and the absolute gravity (AG) measurements were conducted (W. Sun et al., this meeting). Precise correction for the effect of ocean tide loading is one of the key to increase the observation accuracy of the GPS and gravity observations, especially for the AG measurement. Thanks for the satellite sea surface altimeters such as TOPEX/Poseidon and Jason-1, the accuracy of global ocean tide models based on these data has been much improved, and its accuracy is estimated at a level better than 1.3 cm as a RMS error of the vector differences of the 8 main tidal waves (Matsumoto et al., 2006). However, on the other hand, it is known that the southeastern Alaska is a place that shows a large discrepancy among the proposed global ocean tide models mainly due to a complex topography and bathymetry of the fjord area. In order to improve the accuracy of the ocean tide correction, we started the gravity tide observation at Juneau from June 2006. Two kinds of gravimeters are used for the observation. Sampling interval of the data is at every 1 min. We analyzed the 1 month data from the beginning of the observation and compared the tidal analysis results with the model tide including both effects of the

  5. Active Tectonics of off-Hokuriku, Central Japan, by two ships seismic reflection profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Naoko; Sato, Hiroshi; Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Abe, Susumu; Shiraishi, Kazuya

    2015-04-01

    earthquake occurred by the oblique motion on source fault dipping 60 degrees, which is favorable normal faulting. The geometry is well constrained by deep seismic reflection profiling using two-ships and hypocentral distribution (Sato et al., 2007, BERI ).

  6. Extraterrestrial Impact Event Recorded in the Late Triassic Deep-Sea Deposits from Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Shirai, N.; Ebihara, M.; Nozaki, T.; Suzuki, K.; Onoue, T.; Kiyokawa, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Late Triassic is marked by the formation of several large impact structures on the Earth, including the 90-km-diameter Manicouagan crater in Canada (Spray and Kelly, 1998). Anomalously high platinum group element (PGE) concentrations have been reported from the Upper Triassic deep-sea deposits in Japan, which have been interpreted to be derived from an extraterrestrial impact event forming the Manicouagan crater (Onoue et al., 2012; Sato et al., 2013). However, previous studies have not clarified the composition of the projectile. Here we report the PGE element ratios and osmium (Os) isotopic compositions of the Upper Triassic ejecta layers in Japan in order to understand the projectile component. Evidence for the Late Triassic impact event has been discovered in the deep-sea claystone layers at four bedded chert sections in the Japanese accretionary complex. The claystone layers contain microspherules, Ni-rich magnetite grains and high abundance of PGEs (Onoue et al., 2012). Biostratigraphic analysis of radiolarian fossils from the studied sections revealed that the claystone layers occur embedded in the upper middle Norian (Sugiyama, 1997; Onoue et al., 2012). Identification of the projectile is attempted by comparing the isotope and elemental ratios of the ejecta deposit with similar data obtained from meteorites. The Ru/Ir and Pt/Ir ratios of all the claystone samples from the study sites are plotted along the mixing line between chondrites and upper continental crust. Although chondrites cannot be distinguished from iron meteorites by using PGE/Ir ratios, the claystone layers have Cr/Ir ratios between 104-105, indicating that the claystone layers are clearly contaminated by chondritic material. The Os isotope data show an abrupt and marked negative excursion from an initial Os isotope ratio of ~0.477 to unradiogenic values of ~0.126 in a claystone layer within a middle Norian bedded chert, indicating the input of chondrite-derived Os into seawater. The

  7. Role of Yield Stress in Magma Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurokawa, A.; Di Giuseppe, E.; Davaille, A.; Kurita, K.

    2012-04-01

    Magmas are essentially multiphase material composed of solid crystals, gaseous bubbles and silicate liquids. They exhibit various types of drastic change in rheology with variation of mutual volumetric fractions of the components. The nature of this variable rheology is a key factor in controlling dynamics of flowing magma through a conduit. Particularly the existence of yield stress in flowing magma is expected to control the wall friction and formation of density waves. As the volumetric fraction of solid phase increases yield stress emerges above the critical fraction. Several previous studies have been conducted to clarify this critical value of magmatic fluid both in numerical simulations and laboratory experiments ([Lejeune and Pascal, 1995], [Saar and Manga 2001], [Ishibashi and Sato 2010]). The obtained values range from 13.3 to 40 vol%, which display wide variation and associated change in rheology has not been clarified well. In this presentation we report physical mechanism of emergence of yield stress in suspension as well as the associated change in the rheology based on laboratory experiments using analog material. We utilized thermogel aqueous suspension as an analog material of multiphase magma. Thermogel, which is a commercial name for poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (PNIPAM) undergoes volumetric phase change at the temperature around 35C:below this temperature the gel phase absorbs water and swells while below this it expels water and its volume shrinks. Because of this the volumetric fraction of gel phase systematically changes with temperature and the concentration of gel powder. The viscosity measured at lower stress drastically decreases across this phase change with increasing temperature while the viscosity at higher stress does not exhibit large change across the transition. We have performed a series of rheological measurements focusing on the emergence of yield stress on this aqueous suspension. Since the definition of yield stress is not

  8. Relationship of the crustal structure and its deformation from arc to back-arc basin in the eastern Japan Sea deduced from the seismic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takeshi; No, Tetsuo; Miura, Seiichi; Kodaira, Shuichi; Sato, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    The Japan Sea is a back-arc basin in the northwestern Pacific. Based on geophysical, geological, and petrological results, it is suggested that the opening of the Japan Sea was initiated by crustal rifting and the separation of Japan Island arcs from the Asian continent in the Early Oligocene, followed by the ocean floor spreading in the Late Oligocene (e.g., Tamaki et al., 1992). After 3.5 Ma, the crustal shortening by a strong compression occurred in the eastern margin (e.g., Sato, 1994). In the eastern margin, because of the extension associated with the opening of the Japan Sea and this shortening, the deformation such as active faults and folds formed have developed and large earthquakes with magnitudes-7 class repeatedly occurred (e.g., Okamura et al., 2007). The Japan Sea has a unique setting in terms of the connection between the back-arc basin opening and the crustal deformation. However, we have little information concerning with a crustal structure formed by the back-arc opening in the margin and the deformation. To obtain the information, we have been carrying out active-source seismic surveys using ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) and multi-channel streamer system (MCS) to cover the eastern margin of the Japan Sea. The obtained results show a difference in crustal structures between the northern and the southern parts of the eastern Japan Sea. In the northern part from the arc to the back-arc basin, the crust is divided into three types; the rifted island arc crust, the thicker oceanic crust and the oceanic crust, based on the comparison of the P-wave velocity distribution and the crustal thickness of a typical oceanic crust (White et al., 1992) and of the northeastern Japan Island arc crust (Iwasaki et al., 2001). On the other hand, the southern part from the arc to the back-arc basin has two crustal types, which are the rifted island arc crust and the thicker oceanic crust. In the northern part, the deformation is distributed in a structural boundary

  9. Study of aerosol properties in the upper haze of Venus from SPICAV IR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luginin, Mikhail; Fedorova, Anna; Belyaev, Denis; Montmessin, Franck; Wilquet, Valérie; Korablev, Oleg; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Vandaele, Ann-Carine

    2015-04-01

    Upper haze of Venus lies above cloud layer and extends from 70 to 90 km. According to previous missions results the upper haze consists of submicron particles that are considered to be droplets of concentrated sulfuric acid (75%) [Kawabata et al., 1980; Lane and Opstbaum, 1983; Sato et al., 1996]. Recently, from the observations of Venus Express spacecraft a bimodal particle distribution was discovered as well as presence of detached haze layers at 80-90 km. This may be due to abundance of different kinds of particles [Montmessin et al., 2008; Wilquet et al., 2009]. Moreover, study of aerosol particles at altitudes above 90 km could be the key to solution of the sulfur oxides problem recently discovered in this altitude range [Belyaev et al., 2012]. SPICAV IR spectrometer is a part of SPICAV/SOIR experiment on board the Venus Express orbiter [Korablev et al., 2012]. It measures a vertical structure of Venus atmosphere using solar occultation method at altitudes 70-100 km in spectral range of 0.65 1.7 µm. The spectrometer is sensitive to abundance of submicron (mode 1) and micron (mode 2) particles in the Venus' upper haze. Using sulfuric acid refractive indices, Mie scattering theory, and spectral dependence of aerosol extinction, one can derive vertical distribution of particles size and number density assuming bimodal as well as unimodal cases. In this paper we present vertical profiles of extinction, number density and size distribution from more than 200 occultations obtained between May 2006 and September 2014. Aerosol scale height is found to be equal to ~4 km in the upper haze. At the equator, upper haze top lies at higher altitudes than near the North Pole. A detached haze layers were observed in ~50% of all observations in latitude range from 60°N to 90°N where the best spatial resolution is achieved. According to our statistics bimodal distribution is typical for altitudes from 75 to 85 km, while unimodal distribution dominates at altitudes 70-75 km

  10. Seismic structure at the Kairei Hydrothermal vent field near the Rodriguez Triple Junction in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, H.; Sato, T.; Imai, Y.; Mori, T.; Noguchi, Y.; Kono, A.; Yamada, T.; Shinohara, M.

    2014-12-01

    Central Indian Ridge is located at the north of the Rodriguez Triple Junction and shows slow-intermediate spreading rate. The Kairei hydrothermal Field (KHF) was discovered in the first segment of Central Indian Ridge near the Rodriguez Triple Junction. The vent fluid which is extruding at the KHF has higher H2 content compared with other hydrothermal vent fluid in the world. Although The KHF itself exists above a basaltic rock massif, gabbro and mafic rocks were discovered on the seafloor around the KHF. These deep-seated rocks may contribute to the high H2concentration of the Kairei vent fluid .To understand how gabbro and mafic rocks are uplifted and exhumed on the seafloor, we conducted a seismic refraction/reflection survey using ocean bottom seismograms (OBSs). We conducted the seismic refraction/reflection survey from January 27 to March 19 in 2013 using S/V Yokosuka of Jamstec. In the experiment, we used 21 OBSs, an air gun (G.I.gun) and a single channel steamer cable. We obtained 5 survey lines NNW-SSE direction parallel to the ridge axis, 5 lines E-W direction and 5 lines NNE-SSW direction. In addition to these lines, we acquired other 5 lines passing through the point above the KHF or Yokoniwa Rise, which is the north of the KHF. In analysis of refraction data, firstly, we estimated 2D velocity model under survey lines, which are parallel to the ridge axis, using the progressive model development method developed by Sato and Kennett (2000). Then, we constructed a 3D initial model and run the 3D tomographic method developed by Zelt and Barton (1998). The 1D velocity profile of the KHF seems to be similar to that of mid ocean ridges such as Mid Atlantic Ridge, East Pacific Rise. Seismic velocities under the KHF and Yokoniwa Rise reach about 6km/s at depth of 1~2 km below seafloor, probably indicating uplift of deep-seated rocks. In this presentation we will show 3D seismic structure of this area.

  11. Relocations and 3-D Velocity Structure for Aftershocks of the 2000 W. Tottori (Japan) Earthquake and 2001 Gujarat (India) Earthquake, Using Waveform Cross-correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enescu, B.; Mori, J.

    2004-12-01

    The newly developed double-difference tomography method (Zhang and Thurber,2003) makes use of both absolute and relative arrival times to produce an improved velocity model and highly accurate hypocenter locations. By using this technique, we relocate the aftershocks of the 2000 Western Tottori earthquake (Mw 6.7) and 2001 Gujarat (Mw 7.7) earthquake and obtain a 3D-velocity model of the aftershock region. The first data set consists of 1035 aftershocks recorded at 62 stations during a period of about a month following the mainshock (Shibutani et al.,2002). In order to get the best arrival times a cross-correlation analysis was used to align the waveforms. The epicentral distribution of the relocated events reveals clear earthquake lineations, some of them close to the mainshock, and an increased clustering. The aftershocks' depth distribution shows a mean shift of the hypocenters' centroid of about 580m; a clear upper cutoff of the seismic activity and some clustering can be also seen. The final P-wave velocity model shows higher-value anomalies in the vicinity of the mainshock's hypocenter, in good agreement with the results of Shibutani et al.(2004). The second data set consists of about 1300 earthquakes, recorded during one week of observations by a Japanese-Indian research team in the aftershock region of the Gujarat earthquake (Sato et al.,2001). Using the double-difference algorithm and waveform cross-correlations, we were able to identify a more clear alignment of hypocenters that define the mainshock's fault and an area of relatively few aftershocks in the region of the mainshock's hypocenter. Both studies demonstrate that the cross-correlation techniques applied for events with inter-event distances as large as 10km and cross correlation coefficients as low as 50% can produce more accurate locations than those determined from catalog phase data. We are going to discuss briefly the critical role of frequency filtering and of the time window used for cross

  12. Quantum Bio-Informatics II From Quantum Information to Bio-Informatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardi, L.; Freudenberg, Wolfgang; Ohya, Masanori

    2009-02-01

    / H. Kamimura -- Massive collection of full-length complementary DNA clones and microarray analyses: keys to rice transcriptome analysis / S. Kikuchi -- Changes of influenza A(H5) viruses by means of entropic chaos degree / K. Sato and M. Ohya -- Basics of genome sequence analysis in bioinformatics - its fundamental ideas and problems / T. Suzuki and S. Miyazaki -- A basic introduction to gene expression studies using microarray expression data analysis / D. Wanke and J. Kilian -- Integrating biological perspectives: a quantum leap for microarray expression analysis / D. Wanke ... [et al.].

  13. Equation of State of Amorphous MgSiO3 and (MgFe)SiO3 to Lowermost Mantle Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinmyo, R.; Petitgirard, S.; Malfait, W.; Kupenko, I.; Rubie, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Melting phenomena have a crucial importance during the Earth's formation and evolution. For example, a deep magma ocean of 1000 km or more has lead to the segregation of the core. Tomographic images of the Earth reveal ultra-low velocity zones at the core-mantle boundary that may be due to the presence of dense magmas or remnant zones of a deep basal magma ocean [1]. Unfortunately, measurements of amorphous silicate density over the entire pressure regime of the mantle are scarce and the density contrast between solid and liquid are difficult to assess due to the lack of such data. Only few studies have reported density measurements of amorphous silicates at high-pressure, with limitation up to 60 GPa. High-pressure acoustic velocity measurements have been used to calculate the density of MgSiO3 glass up to 30 GPa [2] but exhibit a large discrepancy compared to recent calculations [3]. SiO2 glass was measured up to 55 GPa using the X-ray absorption method through the diamond anvils [4] and very recently, X-ray diffraction has been used to infer the density of basaltic melt up to 60 GPa [5]. Here we report density measurement of MgSiO3 glass up to 130 GPa and (MgFe)SiO3 glass up to 55 GPa using a novel variation of the X-ray absorption method. The sample contained in a beryllium gasket was irradiated with a micro-focus X-ray beam in two directions: perpendicular and parallel to the compression axis to obtain the absorption coefficient and density under pressure. Our data constrain the first experimental EoS for (Mg,Fe)SiO3 and the first EoS for MgSiO3 up to lowermost mantle pressures. Technical details and EoS parameters will be shown in the presentation. We will address the implications for melts in the deep Earth based on compressibility, bulk modulus and density contrasts between iron-free and iron-bearing glasses. [1] Labrosse S. et al. Nature 2007 [2] Sanchez-Valle C. et al. Earth Planet. Sc. Lett. 2010 [3] Ghosh D. et al Am. Mineral. 2014 [4] Sato T. et al

  14. Coupled LBM-DEM Three-phase Simulation on Gas Flux Seeping from Marine Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Y.; Sato, T.

    2014-12-01

    One of the main issues of the geological storage of CO2 under the seabed is a risk of CO2 leakage. Once CO2seeps into the ocean, it rises in water column dissolving into seawater, which results in the acidification of seawater and/or returning to the air. Its behaviour significantly depends on flow rate and bubble size (Kano et al., 2009; Dewar et al., 2013). As for porous media, bubble size is generally predicted through simple force balance based on flow rate, surface tension and channel size which is estimated by porosity and grain size. However, in shallow marine sediments, grains could be mobilised and displaced by buoyant gas flow, which causes distinctive phenomena such as blow-out or formation of gas flow conduit. As a result, effective gas flux into seawater can be intermissive, and/or concentrated in narrow area (QICS, 2012; Kawada, 2013). Bubble size is also affected by these phenomena. To predict effective gas flux and bubble size into seawater, three-phase behaviour of gas-water-sediment grains should be revealed. In this presentation, we will report the results of gas-liquid-solid three-phase simulations and their comparisons with experimental and observation data. Size of solid particles is based on grain size composing marine sediments at some CCS project sites. Fluid-particle interactions are solved using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), while the particle-particle interactions are treated by coupling with the Discrete Element method (DEM). References: Dewar, M., Wei, W., McNeil, D., Chen, B., 2013. Small-scale modelling of the physiochemical impacts of CO2leaked from sub-seabed reservoirs or pipelines within the North Sea and surrounding waters. Marine Pollution Bulletin 73(2), 504-515. Kano, Y., Sato, T., Kita, J., Hirabayashi, S., Tabeta, S., 2009. Model prediction on the rise of pCO2 in uniform flows by leakage of CO2purposefully stored under the seabed. Int. J. Greenhouse Gas Control, Vol. 3(5), 617-625. Kawada, R. 2014. A study on the

  15. Long-period Ground Motion Simulation in the Osaka Basin during the 2011 Great Tohoku Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, T.; Kubo, H.; Asano, K.; Sato, K.; Aoi, S.

    2014-12-01

    Large amplitude long-period ground motions (1-10s) with long duration were observed in the Osaka sedimentary basin during the 2011 Tohoku earthquake (Mw9.0) and its aftershock (Ibaraki-Oki, Mw7.7), which is about 600 km away from the source regions. Sato et al. (2013) analyzed strong ground motion records from the source region to the Osaka basin and showed the following characteristics. (1) In the period range of 1 to 10s, the amplitude of horizontal components of the ground motion at the site-specific period is amplified in the Osaka basin sites. The predominant period is about 7s in the bay area where the largest pSv were observed. (2) The velocity Fourier amplitude spectra with their predominant period of around 7s are observed at the bedrock sites surrounding the Osaka basin. Those characteristics were observed during both of the mainshock and the largest aftershock. Therefore, large long-period ground motions in the Osaka basin are generated by the combination of propagation-path and basin effects. They simulated ground motions due to the largest aftershock as a simple point source model using three-dimensional FDM (GMS; Aoi and Fujiwara, 1999). They used a three-dimensional velocity structure based on the Japan Integrated Velocity Structure Model (JIVSM, Koketsu et al., 2012), with the minimum effective period of the computation of 3s. Their simulation result reproduced the observation characteristics well and it validates the applicability of the JIVSM for the long period ground motion simulation. In this study, we try to simulate long-period ground motions during the mainshock. The source model we used for the simulation is based on the SMGA model obtained by Asano and Iwata (2012). We succeed to simulate long-period ground motion propagation from Kanto area to the Osaka basin fairly well. The long-period ground motion simulations with the several Osaka basin velocity structure models are done for improving the model applicability. We used strong motion

  16. Evaluating the benefit of recorded early reflections from a classroom for speech intelligibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Jeffery B.

    Recent standards for classrooms acoustics recommend achieving low levels of reverberation to provide suitable conditions for speech communication (ANSI, 2002; ASHA, 1995). Another viewpoint recommends optimizing classroom acoustics to emphasize early reflections and reduce later arriving reflections (Boothroyd, 2004; Bradley, Sato, & Picard, 2003). The idea of emphasizing early reflections is based in the useful-to-detrimental ratio (UDR) model of speech intelligibility in rooms (Lochner & Burger, 1964). The UDR model predicts that listeners integrate energy from early reflections to improve the signal-to-noise (SNR) of the direct speech signal. However, both early and more recent studies of early reflections and speech intelligibility have used simulated reflections that may not accurately represent the effects of real early reflections on the speech intelligibility of listeners. Is speech intelligibility performance enhanced by the presence of real early reflections in noisy classroom environments? The effect of actual early reflections on speech intelligibility was evaluated by recording a binaural impulse response (BRIR) with a K.E.M.A.R. in a college classroom. From the BRIR, five listening conditions were created with varying amounts of early reflections. Young-adult listeners with normal hearing participated in a fixed SNR word intelligibility task and a variable SNR task to test if speech intelligibility was improved in competing noise when recorded early reflections were present as compared to direct speech alone. Mean speech intelligibility performance gains or SNR benefits were not observed with recorded early reflections. When simulated early reflections were included, improved speech understanding was observed for simulated reflections but for with real reflections. Spectral, temporal, and phonemic analyses were performed to investigate acoustic differences in recorded and simulated reflections. Spectral distortions in the recorded reflections may have

  17. PREFACE: 4th International Symposium on Functional Materials (ISFM2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shu; Sekino, Tohru; Tanaka, Shun-ichiro; Sato, Tsugio; Lu, Li; Xue, Dongfeng

    2012-01-01

    express our sincere appreciation to all the members of the International Advisory Committee, the Organizing Committee, and all the authors and participants. It is expected that the published output of this special issue will be accepted as an original and valuable contribution to the literature in the functional materials field. Guest Editors Dr Shu Yin Tohoku University, Japan Dr Tohru Sekino Tohoku University, Japan Professor Shun-ichiro Tanaka, IMRAM, Tohoku University, Japan Professor Tsugio Sato IMRAM, Tohoku University, Japan Professor Li Lu National University of Singapore, Singapore Professor Dongfeng Xue Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China Conference photograph Group photograph of the participants of ISFM2011 held in Sendai, 4 August 2011

  18. Newborn piglet traits associated with survival and growth performance until weaning.

    PubMed

    Panzardi, A; Bernardi, M L; Mellagi, A P; Bierhals, T; Bortolozzo, F P; Wentz, I

    2013-06-01

    Pre-weaning piglet mortality represents significant economic losses, and approximately half of this mortality occurs within the first 3 days after birth. Factors involved in postnatal mortality can also be associated with a poor growth performance until weaning. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of some variables measured right after birth on piglet survival during the first week of life and growth performance until weaning. Piglets included in the analysis (n=612) were born from 3 to 5 parity sows. Piglets were monitored for blood oxygen saturation (SatO2), heart rate (HR), blood glucose concentration, rectal temperature at birth (RT0 h) and at 24h after birth (RT24 h). Genetic line, birth following or not an obstetric intervention, birth order, sex, skin color, integrity of the umbilical cord, and time elapsed from birth until first attempts to stand were also recorded. Piglets were weighed at birth (BW), and at 7, 14 and 21 days after birth in order to evaluate their postnatal development. Cumulative mortality rates were 3.3%, 5.4% and 8.7% at 3, 7 and 21 days after birth, respectively. Body temperature at birth (RT0 h) did not affect (P>0.05) the survival nor the piglet growth performance. Piglets with cyanotic skin and those that took more than 5 min to stand showed higher chance of mortality (P<0.05) compared to normal skin piglets and to piglets which stood before 1 min, respectively. Piglets with broken umbilical cord had higher odds (P<0.05) of mortality up to 3 days after birth, respectively. Higher odds (P<0.05) of mortality up to 3 or 7 days were associated with later birth order (>9), low BW (<1275g), low (24-30 mg/dl) and high (45-162 mg/dl) blood glucose concentrations, or low RT24 h (<38.1°C). Piglets with BW<1545 g, low RT24 h (<38.6°C) and female piglets had higher odds of a low weight at weaning (P<0.05). Among the factors studied, cyanotic skin, delay for standing, broken umbilical cord, high birth order, low BW, low RT24 h, and

  19. Characteristics of mesosphere echoes over Antarctica obtained using PANSY and MF radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, Masaki; Nakamura, Takuji; Sato, Toru; Nishimura, Koji; Sato, Kaoru; Tomikawa, Yoshihiro; Kohma, Masashi

    2016-07-01

    In the polar region characteristic radar echoes are observed from the mesosphere by using a VHF system. The nature of the echoes is distinctively different between summer and winter and those echoes are called Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSEs) and Polar Mesosphere Winter Echoes (PMWEs), respectively. Since the PMSEs are usually very strong and can be easily measured with a small radar system, their nature is relatively well understood. On the other hand PMWEs are much weaker and they are still only poorly understood. The PANSY radar (47MHz) at Syowa station (69S) is the only large aperture atmospheric radar in the Antarctic, and can continuously survey the dynamics of the middle atmosphere with high time and height resolutions [Sato et al., 2014]. Nishiyama et al [2014] reported the first study of PMWEs using PANSY radar and showed a seasonal and local time dependence of these echoes. An MF radar system (2.4MHz) is co-located at Syowa, and has been operating for mesosphere and lower thermosphere observations. Although the MF radar has only a much poorer height resolution and is incapable of vertical wind measurement, it can almost continuously measure mesosphere day and night. In this study the nature of the mesosphere echoes, mainly PMWEs, are being studied using the two radars based on the observation made in 2015. These radars are operated using largely different radio frequencies and can provide complementary information with each other such as wind velocities and also echo scattering mechanisms. Horizontal wind velocities have been compared between the two radars with a great care mostly in the MF radar winds in order to avoid possible biases inherent in the correlation analysis technique employed for the MF radar wind measurement. A careful analysis has shown that the horizontal wind velocities agree well between the two systems with a high correlation coefficient around 0.8 throughout the height region of 65-85km. Aspect sensitivities estimated using

  20. Potentiation Following Ballistic and Nonballistic Complexes: The Effect of Strength Level.

    PubMed

    Suchomel, Timothy J; Sato, Kimitake; DeWeese, Brad H; Ebben, William P; Stone, Michael H

    2016-07-01

    Suchomel, TJ, Sato, K, DeWeese, BH, Ebben, WP, and Stone, MH. Potentiation following ballistic and nonballistic complexes: the effect of strength level. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1825-1833, 2016-The purpose of this study was to compare the temporal profile of strong and weak subjects during ballistic and nonballistic potentiation complexes. Eight strong (relative back squat = 2.1 ± 0.1 times body mass) and 8 weak (relative back squat = 1.6 ± 0.2 times body mass) males performed squat jumps immediately and every minute up to 10 minutes following potentiation complexes that included ballistic or nonballistic concentric-only half-squat (COHS) performed at 90% of their 1 repetition maximum COHS. Jump height (JH) and allometrically scaled peak power (PPa) were compared using a series of 2 × 12 repeated measures analyses of variance. No statistically significant strength level main effects for JH (p = 0.442) or PPa (p = 0.078) existed during the ballistic condition. In contrast, statistically significant main effects for time existed for both JH (p = 0.014) and PPa (p < 0.001); however, no statistically significant pairwise comparisons were present (p > 0.05). Statistically significant strength level main effects existed for PPa (p = 0.039) but not for JH (p = 0.137) during the nonballistic condition. Post hoc analysis revealed that the strong subjects produced statistically greater PPa than the weaker subjects (p = 0.039). Statistically significant time main effects existed for time existed for PPa (p = 0.015), but not for JH (p = 0.178). No statistically significant strength level × time interaction effects for JH (p = 0.319) or PPa (p = 0.203) were present for the ballistic or nonballistic conditions. Practical significance indicated by effect sizes and the relationships between maximum potentiation and relative strength suggest that stronger subjects potentiate earlier and to a greater extent than weaker subjects during ballistic and nonballistic potentiation

  1. [The Japanese Colonial Medicine as Seen Through the Life of Fujita Tsuguakira].

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyu-Jin

    2016-04-01

    Fujita Tsuguakira was a man who established Jahyeuiwon, a governmental medical facility, during the Residency-General Period and took over the presidency of a committee in the Japanese Government-General of Chosun after Chosun was annexed to Japanese. In addition, he is a man well qualified to be placed on the top of the list when discussing the Japanese colonial medicine in Chosun, considering his personal history of getting evolved in the colonial rule of Taiwan for seven years as an army surgeon. He led the colonial medicine in Chosun for nine years before and after the Japanese annexation of Korea. He was engaged in almost all the areas related to the colonial medicine such as anti-cholera projects, Hansung Sanitation Union, Deahan Hospital, Chosun Chongdokbu Hospital, Jahyeuiwon, medical schools affiliated to the Japanese Government-General of Chosun. In all respects, his life was in sync with the expansionist strategies of Imperial Japan. Especially, his deeds in Chosun was an "active aid to the instructions" from Army Minister Terauchi Masatake " as Sato Kozo testifies. Fujita was chosen by the military, and so he faithfully served the role given from it. The rewards that he received form the military attest to this fact. He took the position of Surgeon General in Army Medical Service on September, 1912, the top place that an army surgeon could hold. The position was first given to the officer who worked outside Japan proper, and he was the only army surgeon with no doctorial degree to receive such title except for Ishiguro Tadanori who was the first army surgeon in Japan. To sum up, Fujita was not a "doctor" but a "military officer". His walk of life mainly lay in the role of an aider adjusted to the ups and downs and the speeds of the plans of Imperial Japan to invade the continent. Therefore, the Japanese colonial medicine controlled by such man as Fujita in Chosun was inevitably studded with the military things. As a chief in the army medicine, what was

  2. Fourier Transform Microwave Spectrum of CO{_2} -(CH{_3}){_2} S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Moritani, Takayuki; Hirota, Eizi

    2012-06-01

    , A. Sato, Y. Orita, and E. Hirota J. Phys. Chem. A 116, 1224 2012. J. J. Newby, R. A. Peebles, and S. A. Peebles J. Phys. Chem. A 108, 11234 2004.

  3. Investigation of the Neutral Sheet Profile during Magnetic Reconnection in a Laboratory Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Masaaki

    1999-11-01

    Recent detailed data from laboratory plasma experiments, satellite observations, theoretical analyses, and computer simulations have contributed significantly to the understanding of magnetic reconnection both in space and laboratory plasmas. As magnetic field lines break and reconnect around the neutral region, a neutral sheet current is generated. This current then heats the plasma, and the opposing magnetic fields form a stationary equilibrium with the plasma thermal pressure. This region is a focal point of reconnection since it requires proper treatment of local non-MHD effects in a plasma which is highly conductive globally (with large Lundquist number S). Particularly, the profile of the neutral sheet current is a very good indicator of the nature of reconnection. In this talk, we focus on the diverse and very intriguing features of the neutral sheet in driven magnetic reconnection experiments on MRX(M. Yamada et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78), 3117 (1997); M. Yamada et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 1936 (1997)., which was built to investigate the fundamental physics of magnetic reconnection. The MHD approximation (S >> 1, ρi << L, v_A<< c) is satisfied globally in MRX plasmas. In recent MRX experiments, the magnetic field profile of the neutral sheet was measured precisely by magnetic probes with a spatial resolution of 0.25-0.5ρ_i, and B(x) data fit excellently to the Harris profile(E. G. Harris, Il Nuovo Cimento 23), 115 (1962); S. M. Mahajan, Phys. Fluids B 1, 43 (1989). B(x) ~ tanh[(x-x_0)/δ], indicating the formation of a stable, axisymmetric neutral sheet. The sheet thickness δ is found to be equal to the ion skin depth c/ω_pi, which is in very good agreement with recent numerical simulations(J. F. Drake et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 24), 2921 (1997); D. Biskamp et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 3850 (1995); R. Horiuchi and T. Sato, Phys. Plasmas 4, 277 (1997).. These data are also consistent with space observations both in the geotail region and the magnetopause

  4. Seismic velocity structure and spatial distribution of reflection intensity off the Boso Peninsula, Central Japan, revealed by an ocean bottom seismographic experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Akihiro; Sato, Toshinori; Shinohara, Masanao; Mochizuki, Kimihiro; Yamada, Tomoaki; Uehira, Kenji; Shinbo, Takashi; Machida, Yuuya; Hino, Ryota; Azuma, Ryosuke

    2016-04-01

    Off the Boso Peninsula, central Japan, where the Sagami Trough is in the south and the Japan Trench is in the east, there is a triple junction where the Pacific plate (PAC), the Philippine Sea plate (PHS) and the Honshu island arc (HIA) meet each other. In this region, the PAC subducts beneath the PHS and the HIA, and the PHS subducts beneath the HIA. Due to the subduction of 2 oceanic plates, numerous seismic events took place in the past. In order to understand these events, it is important to image structure of these plates. Hence, many researchers attempted to reveal the substructure from natural earthquakes and seismic experiments. Because most of the seismometers are placed inland area and the regular seismicity off Boso is inactive, it is difficult to reveal the precise substructure off Boso area using only natural earthquakes. Although several marine seismic experiments using active sources were conducted, vast area remains unclear off Boso Peninsula. In order to improve the situation, a marine seismic experiment, using airgun as an active source, was conducted from 30th July to 4th of August, 2009. The survey line has 216 km length and 20 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBSs) were placed on it. We estimated 2-D P-wave velocity structure from the airgun data using the PMDM (Progressive Model Development Method; Sato and Kenett, 2000) and the FAST (First Arrival Seismic Tomography ; Zelt and Barton, 1998). Furthermore, we identified the probable reflection phases from the data and estimated the location of reflectors using Travel time mapping method (Fujie et al. 2006). We found some reflection phases from the data, and the reflectors are located near the region where P-wave velocity is 5.0 km/s. We interpret that the reflectors indicate the plate boundary between the PHS and the HIA. The variation of the intensity of reflection along the upper surface of PHS seems to be consistent with the result from previous reflection seismic experiment conducted by Kimura et

  5. Attenuation of coda waves in the Northeastern Region of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazarika, Devajit; Baruah, Saurabh; Gogoi, Naba Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Coda wave attenuation quality factor Qc is estimated in the northeastern region of India using 45 local earthquakes recorded by regional seismic network. The quality factor Qc was estimated using the single backscattering model modified by Sato (J Phys Earth 25:27-41, 1977), in the frequency range 1-18 Hz. The attenuation and frequency dependence for different paths and the correlation of the results with geotectonics of the region are described in this paper. A total of 3,890 Qc measurements covering 187 varying paths are made for different lapse time window of 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90 s in coda wave. The magnitudes of the analyzed events range from 1.2 to 3.9 and focal depths range between 7 and 38 km. The source-receiver distances of the selected events range between 16 and 270 km. For 30-s duration, the mean values of the estimated Qc vary from 50 ± 12 (at 1 Hz) to 2,078 ± 211(at 18 Hz) for the Arunachal Himalaya, 49 ± 14 (at 1 Hz) to 2,466 ± 197 (at 18 Hz) for the Indo-Burman, and 45 ± 13 (at 1 Hz) to 2,069 ± 198 (at 18 Hz) for Shillong group of earthquakes. It is observed that Qc increases with frequency portraying an average attenuation relation Qc=52.315± 1.07f ^{left( {1.32 ± 0.036} right)} for the region. Moreover, the pattern of Qc - 1 with frequency is analogous to the estimates obtained in other tectonic areas in the world, except with the observation that the Qc - 1 is much higher at 1 Hz for the northeastern region. The Qc - 1 is about 10 - 1.8 at 1 Hz and decreases to about 10 - 3.6 at 18 Hz indicating clear frequency dependence. Pertaining to the spatial distribution of Qc values, Mikir Hills and western part of Shillong Plateau are characterized by lower attenuation.

  6. Fourier Transform Microwave Spectrum of N{_2}-(CH{_2}){_2}O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Hirota, Eizi

    2013-06-01

    atoms and/or groups in, or internal rotations of, N{_2} and EO. Y. Kawashima, A. Sato, Y. Orita, and E. Hirota J. Phys. Chem. A {116}, 1224 2012. Y. Kawashima, Y. Tatamitani, Y. Morita, and E. Hirota 61st International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, TE10 2006.

  7. Monitoring underground migration of sequestered CO2 using self-potential methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishido, T.; Pritchett, J.; Tosha, T.; Nishi, Y.; Nakanishi, S.

    2013-12-01

    known as a 'geobattery' (e.g. Sato & Mooney, Geophysics 1960; Bigalke & Grabner, Electrochimica Acta 1997): the metallic well casing acts as a vertical electronic conductor connecting regions of differing redox potential. Electrons flow upward though the casing from a deeper reducing environment to a shallower oxidizing environment, and simultaneously a compensating vertical flow of ions is induced in the surrounding formation to maintain charge neutrality. If the redox potential in the deeper region is then increased by injecting an oxidizing substance, the difference in redox potential between the shallower and deeper regions will be reduced, resulting in an SP increase near the wellhead. We will report the results of SP measurements during gas (CO2 or air) injection tests at various sites and numerical simulations carried out using the extended SP postprocessor, which incorporates the above 'geobattery' mechanism in addition to electrokinetic coupling, and discuss the possibility mentioned above more quantitatively.

  8. Empirical Photometric Normalization for the Seven Band UV-VIS Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Wide Angle Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, A. K.; Robinson, M. S.; Nuno, R. G.; Sato, H.

    2014-12-01

    .36 in some areas. The range of reflectance on the Moon is 10x from the least to most reflective.The new empirical normalized reflectance presented here correlates with an independent Hapke model based normalization [3] with an R-squared value of 0.985.[1] Scholten et al. LPSC XVII (2011) [2] Denevi et al. JGR Planets (2014) [3] Sato et al. JGR Planets (2014)

  9. A shock tube and theory study of the dissociation of acetone and subsequent recombination of methyl radicals.

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Kiefer, J. H.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. of llinois at Chicago

    2009-01-01

    The dissociation of acetone: CH{sub 3}C{double_bond}OCH{sub 3} {yields} CH{sub 3}C{double_bond}O + CH{sub 3}, quickly followed by CH{sub 3}CO {yields} CH{sub 3} + CO, has been examined with Laser-Schlieren measurements in incident shock waves over 32-717 Torr and 1429-1936 K using 5% acetone dilute in krypton. A few very low pressure experiments ({approx}10 Torr) were used in a marginal effort to resolve the extremely fast vibrational relaxation of this molecule. This effort was partly motivated as a test for molecular, 'roaming methyl' reactions, and also as a source of methyl radicals to test the application of a recent high-temperature mechanism for ethane decomposition [J.H. Kiefer, S. Santhanam, N.K. Srinivasan, R.S. Tranter, S.J. Klippenstein, M.A. Oehlschlaeger, Proc. Combust. Inst. 30 (2005) 1129-1135] on the reverse methyl combination. The gradient profiles show strong initial positive gradients and following negative values fully consistent with methyl radical formation and its following recombination. Thus C-C fission is certainly a large part of the process and molecular channels cannot be responsible for more than 30% of the dissociation. Rates obtained for the C-C fission show strong falloff well fit by variable reaction coordinate transition state theory when combined with a master equation. The calculated barrier is 82.8 kcal/mol, the fitted <{Delta}E>{sub down} = 400 (T/298) cm{sup -1}, similar to what was found in a recent study of C-C fission in acetaldehyde, and the extrapolated k{sub {infinity}} = 10{sup 25.86} T{sup -2.72} exp(?87.7 (kcal/mol)/RT), which agrees with the literature rate for CH{sub 3} + CH{sub 3}CO. Large negative (exothermic) gradients appearing late from methyl combination are accurately fit in both time of onset and magnitude by the earlier ethane dissociation mechanism. The measured dissociation rates are in close accord with one earlier shock-tube study [K. Sato, Y. Hidaka, Combust. Flame 122 (2000) 291-311], but show much

  10. Undersea interplate coupling off the western Japan revealed by GPS-A observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Watanabe, S. I.; Tashiro, T.

    2015-12-01

    The recurring devastating earthquakes in the Nankai and Sagami Troughs subduction zone between the Philippine Sea plate and the continental plates (Eurasian and North American plates) have a potential to cause an extremely dangerous natural disaster in not-so-distant future. Many studies assumed the interplate coupling ratios using the onshore geodetic data only. However, the offshore region that has a potential to derive a devastating tsunami cannot be resolved enough due to the observation network that is biased to land area. The Hydrographic and Oceanographic Department of Japan (JHOD) have constructed the seafloor geodetic observation network on the seafloor surface using a GPS-acoustic combination technique (GPS-A) [e.g., Sato et al., 2011, Science] and observed seafloor crustal movements directly above the Nankai and Sagami Troughs subduction zones. We have set 17 sites off the western Japan to lead an undersea interplate coupling distribution. The observations around the Sagami Trough are consistent with the block motions presented by Nishimura [2011, Tectonophysics]. On the other hand, our seafloor geodetic observation network along the Nankai Trough revealed heterogeneity and complexity interplate coupling off the western Japan. The fast displacement rates observed in the eastern area indicate a strong interplate coupling around not only the future Tokai earthquake source region but also the Paleo-Zenisu ridge. Our observations in the westernmost area also suggest that the area off the Cape Ashizuri has a high-coupling ratio. The slow displacement rate observed in the shallower area than the 1946 Nankaido earthquake source region off the Cape Muroto-zaki reflects a weakening interplate coupling probably due to a subducting seamount. The observation in the westernmost area differs depending on the depth. The north deep area below Bungo-channel has a high-coupling ratio. The south shallow area has a low-coupling ratio. In these deep and shallow areas, VLFEs