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Sample records for hvof sprayed inconel

  1. Mechanical Property of HVOF Inconel 718 Coating for Aeronautic Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyphout, Christophe; Fasth, Angelica; Nylen, Per

    2014-02-01

    The module of elasticity is one of the most important mechanical properties defining the strength of a material which is a prerequisite to design a component from its early stage of conception to its field of application. When a material is to be thermally sprayed, mechanical properties of the deposited layers differ from the bulk material, mainly due to the anisotropy of the highly textured coating microstructure. The mechanical response of the deposited layers significantly influences the overall performance of the coated component. It is, therefore, of importance to evaluate the effective module of elasticity of the coating. Conventional experimental methods such as microindentation, nanoindentation and four-point bending tests have been investigated and their results vary significantly, mainly due to inhomogeneous characteristics of the coating microstructure. Synchrotron radiation coupled with a tensile test rig has been proposed as an alternative method to determine the coating anisotropic elastic behavior dependence on crystallographic orientations. The investigation was performed on Inconel 718 (IN718) HVOF coatings sprayed on IN718 substrates. Combining these experimental techniques yield a deeper understanding of the nature of the HVOF coating Young's modulus and thus a tool for Design Practice for repair applications.

  2. A new HVOF thermal spray concept

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, J.A.; Matus, R.J.; Richter, H.J.

    1995-12-31

    HVOF plays an important role in the commercial production of thermal spray coatings from powder. Initially, both the chamber and duct modes were used. Today, the best coatings are produced by high-pressure chamber guns with some manufacturers having switched their designs from the duct to the chamber mode. There has been little or no spraying of wire with HVOF equipment. A new HVOF process -- the shock-stabilized mode -- compliments chamber powder spraying by offering the user a very simple device for wire use. Calculations show that the much higher jet velocities of the chamber mode make that design the better suited for use with powder. Conversely, the greatly increased jet temperatures offered by shock-stabilized combustion give extremely high wire melt-off rates.

  3. Manual HVOF thermal spray repair of nickel aluminum bronze castings

    SciTech Connect

    Brenna, R.T.; McCaw, R.L.; Pugh, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    Manual high velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) thermal spray repairs were accomplished on a large nickel aluminum bronze propeller castings. The repairs were done on three different configurations of surface defects of up to 100 square inches and as deep as 90 mils. Nickel aluminum bronze alloy powder, sieve sized for the HVOF process, was sprayed. High quality, high coating density, repairs were achieved even on porous areas of the castings. Prior to performance of the repairs, a procedure was qualified in accordance with MIL-STD-1687 and a mock-up simulating the repair was produced. After HVOF spraying of the mock-up, the sprayed surface was sanded, milled, and drilled to determine how finishing of the actual castings would be done. After successful procedure qualification, the HVOF equipment was moved to the job site, metal masking was devised for the spray areas and grit blasting and manual HVOF spraying was done. Results of HVOF coating chemical analyses, bend tests, coating tensile bond strength tests, coating microscopic examinations, and mock-up evaluations are reported along with the spray procedures and techniques used in the repairs.

  4. Erosion/corrosion of HVOF sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Simard, S.; Arsenault, B.; Legoux, J.G.; Hawthorne, H.M.

    1999-11-01

    Cermet based materials are known to have an excellent performance under several different wear conditions. High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying technology allows the deposition of such hard materials in the form of protective coatings onto different surfaces. Under slurry erosion, the performance of the coating is influenced by the occurrence of corrosion reactions with the metallic matrix. Slurry erosion tests were conducted with a jet impingement rig with a 9.1wt% alumina particle/water slurry. Indeed, wet conditions promote the dissolution of metallic binder resulting in a potential synergy between the corrosion and wear mechanisms. Coatings based on tungsten carbide embedded in four different metallic binders were evaluated with regard to wear and corrosion. Depending on the composition of the metallic binder, different degradation rates were observed.

  5. Oxidation in HVOF-sprayed steel

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.F.; Neiser, R.A.; Dykhuizen, R.C.

    1997-08-01

    It is widely held that most of the oxidation in thermally sprayed coatings occurs on the surface of the droplet after it has flattened. The evidence in this paper suggests that, for the conditions studied here, oxidation of the top surface of flattened droplets is not the dominant oxidation mechanism. In this study, a mild steel wire (AISI 1025) was sprayed using a high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) torch onto copper and aluminum substrates. Ion milling and Auger spectroscopy were used to examine the distribution of oxides within individual splats. Conventional metallographic analysis was also used to study oxide distributions within coatings that were sprayed under the same conditions. An analytical model for oxidation of the exposed surface of a splat is presented. Based on literature data, the model assumes that diffusion of iron through a solid FeO layer is the rate limiting factor in forming the oxide on the top surface of a splat. An FeO layer only a few thousandths of a micron thick is predicted to form on the splat surface as it cools. However, the experimental evidence shows that the oxide layers are typically 100x thicker than the predicted value. These thick, oxide layers are not always observed on the top surface of a splat. Indeed, in some instances the oxide layer is on the bottom, and the metal is on the top. The observed oxide distributions are more consistently explained if most of the oxide formed before the droplets impact the substrate.

  6. HVOF and plasma sprayed molybdenum coatings -- microstructure and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, S.; Kreye, H.

    1995-12-31

    High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and plasma spray experiments were carried out to investigate the oxidation mechanism of molybdenum in the spray process and to determine how the various process parameters affect the microstructure and properties of the coatings. HVOF coatings exhibit their highest hardness and wear resistance at an oxygen content of 6 to 8% by weight. Such an oxygen level can be achieved with Mo and Mo-MoO{sub 2} composite powders as well. In the plasma spray process oxidation of molybdenum is less pronounced and Mo-MoO{sub 2} composite powders containing 6 to 8% oxygen have to be used to obtain similar properties as compared to HVOF-coatings. When Mo-Mo{sub 2}C composite powders are used oxidation of molybdenum becomes greatly reduced and highly wear resistant coatings are obtained at a low hardness level in both spray processes.

  7. On the gas dynamics of HVOF thermal sprays. [HVOF (High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel)

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, C.M.; Settles, G.S.; Miller, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study has been performed on the gas dynamic aspects of the HVOF thermal spray process. A commercially-available HVOF gun (Hobart Tafa JP-5000) is used in this study. Optical diagnostic techniques including microsecond-exposure schlieren and shadowgraph imaging are applied to visualize the hot supersonic jet produced by this equipment without any particle injection. Rapid turbulent mixing of the jet with the surrounding atmosphere is observed, which is an issue of concern in coating quality because of the possibility of oxidation of the sprayed particles. This mixing appears principally to be a function of the density ratio between the hot jet and the cold atmosphere, rather than depending upon the combustion-chamber pressure or barrel length. The supersonic core of the HVOF jet dissipates rapidly due to the, mixing, so that the jet is no longer supersonic when it impinges upon the target surface being sprayed. Secondary issues also observed in this study include strong jet-noise radiation from the HVOF plume and the entrainment and induced bulk motion of the surrounding air. All these issues have a background in the field of gas dynamics which has not been previously applied to thermal spray technology.

  8. Chromium coatings by HVOF thermal spraying: Simulation and practical results

    SciTech Connect

    Knotek, O.; Lugscheider, E.; Jokiel, P.; Schnaut, U.; Wiemers, A.

    1994-12-31

    Within recent years High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying has been considered an asset to the family of thermal spraying processes. Especially for spray materials with melting points below 3,000 K it has proven successful, since it shows advantages when compared to coating processes that produce similar qualities. In order to enlarge the fields of thermal spraying applications into regions with rather low thickness, e.g. about 50--100 {micro}m, especially HVOF thermally sprayed coatings seem to be advantageous. The usual evaluation of optimized spraying parameters, including spray distance, traverse speed, gas flow rates etc. is, however, based on numerous and extensive experiments laid out by trial-and-error or statistical experimental design and thus being expensive: man-power and material is required, spray systems are occupied for experimental works and the optimal solution is questioned, for instance, when a new powder fraction or nozzle is used. In this paper the possibility of reducing such experimental efforts by using modeling and simulation is exemplified for producing thin chromium coatings with a CDS{trademark}-HVOF system. The aim is the production of thermally sprayed chromium coatings competing with galvanic hard chromium platings, which are applied to reduce friction and corrosion but are environmentally disadvantageous during their production.

  9. Comparison of the characteristics of HVOF and plasma thermal spray

    SciTech Connect

    Fincke, J.R.; Swank, W.D.; Haggard, D.C.

    1994-12-31

    In spraying oxygen sensitive materials, such as WC:Co it is often observed that the carbide fraction present in the deposit is significantly less than in the original particles. This lowers the hardness of the coating, resulting in inferior wear resistance. The cause is the in-flight, high temperature decomposition of carbides by reaction with entrained oxygen. The degree of decomposition is determined by a combination of particle temperature, residence time and entrainment characteristics of the jet. The fundamental differences between HVOF and plasma thermal spray are examined in this context. Even though the HVOF process may actually subject a particle to greater oxygen exposure than plasma spraying, the lower particle temperatures experienced lead to coatings which exhibit less carbide loss than plasma sprayed coatings fabricated in air.

  10. HVOF thermal spraying: An alternative to hard chrome plating

    SciTech Connect

    Bolles, D.C.

    1995-10-01

    In recent years pressure to find alternatives to chromium electroplating has accelerated dramatically. While it is not likely that the process will be banned completely, the trend points to severe limitations. Industries must now look closely at their applications, and actively consider alternatives to hard chrome plaint. One of the most viable alternatives in thermal spraying. Recent advances in high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) technology offer an environmentally safer, cleaner and less-expensive alternative to chromium plating. It has been shown here that HVOF coatings can be used as chromium plating alternatives for many different applications. The HVOF process offers several advantages over chromium plaint including thicker coating capability, no part size restrictions and no hazardous waste products. A number of HVOF coatings have had excellent results in laboratory and field testing, and can be considered as effective replacements for hard chrome. The choice for a suitable replacement can only be made after careful assessment of the conditions associated with the application in question.

  11. Research On HVOF Thermal Sprays. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Settles, G. S.

    2003-04-02

    Independent control of particle velocity and temperature in the HVOF process has been achieved in this research, allowing the variables to change by 170 m/s and 200{degree}C, respectively. The independence was achieved using a specially designed nozzel with multiple axial injection ports, and with an inert diluent added to the oxygen used for combustion. With these changes, notable changes in splat morphology, porosity, and coating oxidation are readily apparent. Increased particle velocity correlates with improved splat deformation, but appears to have little effect on porosity or oxidation. Particle temperature, however, correlates strongly with splat deformation, porosity, and oxidation. In fact, highly dense coatings that have little oxidation can be formed with relatively low velocity particles that have average temperatures in the vicinity of the melting point of the material. This surprising result suggests particle temperature control is the key to creating dense, low-oxide HVOF-sprayed coatings.

  12. Assessment HVOF sprayed coatings for reducing wear on pump components

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufold, R.; McCaul, C.; Brunhouse, S.

    1994-12-31

    Long-term pump efficiency and durability are directly related to the wear and corrosion resistance of materials used to manufacture pump components. Conventional OEM design materials often do not provide long-term resistance to wear caused by abrasive grains, particle erosion, corrosion, and cavitation. As a result, pump components can fail prematurely causing pump downtime and interrupting service life. Thermal-sprayed coatings, in particular, those deposited by HVOF, can help prevent this loss by reducing premature pump failure resulting from accelerated wear. The intent of this paper is to assess the degree of wear protection provided by various materials deposited by HVOF as compared to those coatings accepted by pump manufacturers. The materials tested ranged from tungsten carbide to chromium carbide to nickel-base alloys. The coating properties were analyzed by metallographic characterization, abrasive wear, corrosive wear, and anti-galling.

  13. HVOF thermal spray process for internal diameter applications

    SciTech Connect

    Poe, M.W.

    1994-12-31

    Thermal spray has been selected as the coating process of choice for many OEM and repair/restoration applications. Although the thermal spray process has historically been limited to coating `line-of-sight` surfaces, advances in thermal spray equipment design now allow protective and/or restorative coatings to be applied to deep internal diameters utilizing state-of-the-art HVOF processing. The advanced designs include both `standard` and `mini` torches to coat rotating components, plus a rotating extension for coating stationary ID`s. In addition, a wide range of coating materials has been developed and engineered to combat the deleterious effects of wear found in severe service environments. The resultant coatings have exceptionally high bond strength with no interconnected porosity and low residual stress. This unique process provides an important adjunct to the field of thermal spray process capabilities.

  14. Microstructure and Stresses in HVOF-Sprayed Iron Aluminide Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Totemeier, Terry Craig; Wright, Richard Neil; Swank, William David

    2002-09-01

    The microstructure and state of stress present in Fe3Al coatings produced by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying in air at varying particle velocities were characterized using metallography, curvature measurements, x-ray analysis, and microhardness measurements. Sound coatings were produced for all conditions. The microstructures of coatings prepared at higher velocities showed fewer unmelted particles and a greater extent of deformation. Residual stresses in the coatings were compressive and varied from nearly zero at the lowest velocity to approximately -450 MPa at the highest velocity. X-ray line broadening analyses revealed a corresponding increase in the extent of cold work present in the coating, which was also reflected in increased microhardness. Values of mean coefficient of thermal expansion obtained for as-sprayed coatings using x-ray analysis were significantly lower than those for powder and bulk alloy.

  15. Numerical Modeling of Suspension HVOF Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadidi, M.; Moghtadernejad, S.; Dolatabadi, A.

    2016-02-01

    A three-dimensional two-way coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian scheme is used to simulate suspension high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying process. The mass, momentum, energy, and species equations are solved together with the realizable k-ɛ turbulence model to simulate the gas phase. Suspension is assumed to be a mixture of solid particles [mullite powder (3Al2O3·2SiO2)], ethanol, and ethylene glycol. The process involves premixed combustion of oxygen-propylene, and non-premixed combustion of oxygen-ethanol and oxygen-ethylene glycol. One-step global reaction is used for each mentioned reaction together with eddy dissipation model to compute the reaction rate. To simulate the droplet breakup, Taylor Analogy Breakup model is applied. After the completion of droplet breakup, and solvent evaporation/combustion, the solid suspended particles are tracked through the domain to determine the characteristics of the coating particles. Numerical simulations are validated against the experimental results in the literature for the same operating conditions. Seven or possibly eight shock diamonds are captured outside the nozzle. In addition, a good agreement between the predicted particle temperature, velocity, and diameter, and the experiment is obtained. It is shown that as the standoff distance increases, the particle temperature and velocity reduce. Furthermore, a correlation is proposed to determine the spray cross-sectional diameter and estimate the particle trajectories as a function of standoff distance.

  16. CDS HVOF sprayed coatings: Influence of process variables on coating characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.; Smith, R.W.; Lugscheider, E.

    1994-12-31

    High velocity, oxyfuel (HVOF) coating processes are fast becoming one of today`s dominant thermal spray areas, particularly for the deposition of carbide coatings where HVOF spray can produce results comparable, or even superior, to vacuum and air plasma spray processes. Results and analysis of NiCr, WC/Co, and Cr3C2NiCr coatings sprayed with the continuous detonation system (CDS) HVOF gun are presented. The investigation focused the influence of spray distance, gun/part relative speed, and fuel:oxygen ratio on coating microstructure, microhardness, and phase content. Coatings were sprayed using oxygen and propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}) fuel, at typical flow rates of 420 I/min, and 55 I/min, respectively. Coatings were sprayed onto 25 x 75 mm (1 in. x 3in.) 1018-steel substrates, nominally 3 mm (01.25 in.) thick. The coating materials were (-45 {mu}m + 10 {mu}) 80/20 NiCr, (-45 {mu} + 11 {mu}) 88/12 WC/Co, and (-45 {mu} + 11 {mu}m) 75/25 Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}/NiCr. The CDS HVOF sprayed coatings were analyzed by optical microscopy, microhardness (VHN{sub 300}) and X-ray diffraction techniques to determine the effects of variations in process parameters on the microstructure and characteristics of the coatings and to investigate phase changes in the coating material caused by the HVOF process.

  17. The functional TiO2-biodegradable plastic composite material produced by HVOF spraying process.

    PubMed

    Bang, Hee-Seon; Bang, Han-Sur; Lee, Yoon-Ki

    2007-11-01

    Photocatalytic TiO2 coatings on bio-degradable plastic(polybutylene succinate: PBS) were prepared by HVOF spraying using three kinds of agglomerated powders (P200: 200 nm, P30: 30 nm, P7: 7 nm). The microstructures of the coatings were characterized with SEM and XRD analysis, and the photocatalytic efficiency of the coatings was evaluated by photo degradation of gaseous acetaldehyde. For both the HVOF sprayed P200 and P30 coatings, high anatase ratio of 100% was achieved, regardless of the fuel gas pressure. On the other hand, for the HVOF sprayed P7 coating, the anatase ratio decreased from 100% to 49.1% with increasing fuel gas pressure. This decrease may be attributed to the much higher susceptibility to heat of the 7 nm agglomerated powders than the 30 nm and 200 nm agglomerated powders. In terms of the photocatalytic efficiency, HVOF sprayed P200 and P30 coatings seemed to outperform the P7 coatings because of their higher anatase ratios. However, the HVOF sprayed P7 coatings did not show photocatalytic activity possibly because of the extremely small reaction surface area to the photo-catalytic activity and low anatase ratio. Therefore, the present study found that functional PBS plastic with photocatalytic performance could be produced by spraying of ceramics such as TiO2. PMID:18047069

  18. The HVOF process - the hottest topic in the thermal spray industry

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.W. . Center for the Plasma Processing of Materials); Irving, B.; Knight, R.

    1993-07-01

    High-velocity combustion or oxyfuel spraying started up more than 35 years ago with the development of the detonation gun or D-Gun process. Described as the newest and fastest growing member of the family of coating, or surfacing, technologies known collectively as thermal spray'', HVOF processes have carved out a significant, specialized niche in the thermal spray coating business, particularly for the deposition of wear-resistant carbide coatings. HVOF processes are able to deposit very dense coatings, typically with reduced changes in the phase composition of the material, compared with plasma arc spray processes. HVOF also offers a number of potential advantages over, and alternatives to, competing processes, including lower capital costs, portability, and ease of use in the field.

  19. Application of commercially pure titanium coatings using HVOF thermal spray for machinery component restoration

    SciTech Connect

    McCaw, R.L.; Hays, R.A.; Brenna, R.T.

    1994-12-31

    Alloy 625 has been shown to be susceptible to crevice corrosion under tight metal to nonmetal crevices in both natural and treated seawater. Under similar conditions, commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) has been shown to be immune. Therefore, coating alloy 625 sealing areas with CP Ti is a potentially effective crevice corrosion countermeasure. Specialized thermal spray techniques were developed utilizing the high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) process to apply coatings of CP Ti to alloy 625 substrates in atmosphere. Coating quality was similar to plasma sprayed coatings of other less reactive, metals. Crevice corrosion tests were conducted and issues relating to implementation of HVOF thermal spraying on a production basis were considered.

  20. Effect of particle state on the adhesive strength of HVOF sprayed metallic coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chang-Jiu; Wang, Yu-Yue

    2002-12-01

    NiCrBSi and Ni-50Cr coatings were deposited using the high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spray process under different spray parameters with two powders of different sizes to clarify the influence of the melting state of spray particles on the adhesive strength of the coating. The adhesive strength of the coating was estimated according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C633-79. The melting state of the spray droplet was examined from the coating microstructure. It was found that the melting state of spray particles had a significant effect on the adhesive strength of HVOF sprayed Ni-based coatings. The significant melting of the spray particle did not contribute to the increase in the adhesion of HVOF metallic coatings. On the other hand, the deposition of a partially melted large particle contributed to the substantial improvement of adhesive strength of the HVOF coating. The subsequent coating presented a dense microstructure and yielded an adhesive strength of more than 76 MPa, which was double that of the coating deposited with completely molten particles. It can be suggested that the good melting of the spray particle is mainly related to the mechanical interlocking effect, which reaches the limited and approximately defined adhesive strength up to 40 50 MPa.

  1. Effect of Spray Parameters on the Corrosion Behavior of HVOF Sprayed WC-Co-Cr Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sheng; Wu, Yuping; Zheng, Yugui; Wang, Bo; Gao, Wenwen; Li, Gaiye; Ying, Guobing; Lin, Jinran

    2014-04-01

    WC-10Co-4Cr cermet coatings were deposited on the substrate of AISI 1045 steel by using high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying process. The Taguchi method including the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio and the analysis of variance (ANOVA) was employed to optimize the porosity and, in turn, the corrosion resistance of the coatings. The spray parameters evaluated in this study were spray distance, oxygen flow, and kerosene flow. The results indicated that the important sequence of spray parameters on the porosity of the coatings was spray distance > oxygen flow > kerosene flow, and the spray distance was the only significant factor. The optimum spraying condition was 300 mm for the spray distance, 1900 scfh for the oxygen flow, and 6.0 gph for the kerosene flow. The results showed the significant influence of the microstructure on the corrosion resistance of the coatings. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impendence spectroscopy (EIS) results showed that the WC-10Co-4Cr cermet coating obtained by the optimum spraying condition with the lowest porosity exhibits the best corrosion resistance and seems to be an alternative to hard chromium coating.

  2. Interface bonding between particle and substrate during HVOF spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ce; Guo, Lei; Lu, Guanxiong; Lv, Yanbing; Ye, Fuxing

    2014-10-01

    The impact processes of Ni particles at initial temperature of 900 K on Al, Cu and Steel substrates were numerically analyzed by using ANSYS/LS-DYNA. Initial kinetic energy of the particle dissipated to particle and substrate simultaneously, the proportion of which was defined as energy distribution coefficient (K). The K values for Ni/Al, Ni/Cu and Ni/steel combinations were approximated to 4, 0.4 and 0.1, respectively. Individual Ni60 particles were deposited experimentally onto 6061-T6 aluminum alloy, copper and 304 stainless steel by High Velocity Oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying. The contact between Ni particles and three substrates was not perfect. The bonding ratio, which is the effective contact area divided by total area, for Ni/Cu combination is 55.41%, larger than those for Ni/Al (40.78%) and Ni/steel (32.70%) combinations, indicating that moderate K value is beneficial for interface bonding between particle and substrate.

  3. Calculation of the limiting parameters for oxide ceramic particles during HVOF spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Kadyrov, V.; Evdokimenko, Y.; Kisel, V.; Kadyrov, E.

    1994-12-31

    The authors analyze numerically gas-dynamical schemes peculiar for HVOF spraying equipment and present methods to calculate velocity and thermal state of sprayed particles which allow one to find the limiting values of these parameters and to define the applicability limitations of modern HVOF spraying apparatus. The method includes gas dynamical calculations of gas flow in accelerating channel (AC) and calculations of sprayed particle motion and its thermal state (temperature and melted mass fraction). The calculations were performed for particles of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide with the size distributions of 10--80 {micro}m. Three different jet schemes were considered: with supersonic AC, with subsonic AC, and with combined gas dynamical path having functionally separated regions of heating and acceleration. Analysis of the results obtained at limiting parameters of jet operation suggests that energetic potentialities of HVOF method are not utilized completely. Although accelerated to a high speed the ceramic oxide particles have a thermal state which is far from optimal. It is possible to significantly increase the powder temperature and fraction of melted material by using new configuration solutions without essential constructive complications. The authors propose one of the possible solutions to optimize gas dynamical path. The results obtained for heating and acceleration in such a path suggest that the utilized approach is correct and allows one to predict the creation of a new family of more efficient HVOF torches and an expanded applicability of HVOF method.

  4. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the passive films formed on thermally sprayed and wrought Inconel 625

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakare, M. S.; Voisey, K. T.; Roe, M. J.; McCartney, D. G.

    2010-11-01

    There is a well known performance gap in corrosion resistance between thermally sprayed corrosion resistant coatings and the equivalent bulk materials. Interconnected porosity has an important and well known effect, however there are additional relevant microstructural effects. Previous work has shown that a compositional difference exists between the regions of resolidified and non-melted material that exist in the as-sprayed coatings. The resolidified regions are depleted in oxide forming elements due to formation of oxides during coating deposition. Formation of galvanic cells between these different regions is believed to decrease the corrosion resistance of the coating. In order to increase understanding of the details of this effect, this work uses X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to study the passive films formed on thermally sprayed coatings (HVOF) and bulk Inconel 625, a commercially available corrosion resistant Ni-Cr-Mo-Nb alloy. Passive films produced by potentiodynamic scanning to 400 mV in 0.5 M sulphuric acid were compared with air-formed films. The poorer corrosion performance of the thermally sprayed coatings was attributed to Ni(OH) 2, which forms a loose, non-adherent and therefore non-protective film. The good corrosion resistance of wrought Inconel 625 is due to formation of Cr, Mo and Nb oxides.

  5. Theoretical investigation of the gas-powder particles transport phenomena in HVOF spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, V.V.; Guilemany, J.M.; Calero, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    A mathematical model is developed to predict the particle velocity and temperature during High Velocity Oxy Fuel (HVOF) spraying. This model accounts for fluid-particle interactions, variation of fluid parameters, internal heat conduction in powder particles, their heating, fusion, cooling and solidification, particle form influence on its thermal behavior and composite structure of the particles. The analytical results are obtained describing the particle velocity and temperature variations. The dependence of the fluid velocity on particles density and volume fraction is shown to exist. The obtained results agree well with the empirically established HVOF spraying practice.

  6. Effect of Plasma Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing on HVOF-Sprayed Stainless Steel Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gayoung; Bae, Gyuyeol; Moon, Kyungil; Lee, Changhee

    2013-12-01

    In this work, the effects of plasma nitriding (PN) and nitrocarburizing on HVOF-sprayed stainless steel nitride layers were investigated. 316 (austenitic), 17-4PH (precipitation hardening), and 410 (martensitic) stainless steels were plasma-nitrided and nitrocarburized using a N2 + H2 gas mixture and the gas mixture containing C2H2, respectively, at 550 °C. The results showed that the PN and nitrocarburizing produced a relatively thick nitrided layer consisting of a compound layer and an adjacent nitrogen diffusion layer depending on the crystal structures of the HVOF-sprayed stainless steel coatings. Also, the diffusion depth of nitrogen increased when a small amount of C2H2 (plasma nitrocarburizing process) was added. The PN and nitrocarburizing resulted in not only an increase of the surface hardness, but also improvement of the load bearing capacity of the HVOF-sprayed stainless steel coatings because of the formation of CrN, Fe3N, and Fe4N phases. Also, the plasma-nitrocarburized HVOF-sprayed 410 stainless steel had a superior surface microhardness and load bearing capacity due to the formation of Cr23C6 on the surface.

  7. Significance of melt-fraction in HVOF sprayed hydroxyapatite particles, splats and coatings.

    PubMed

    Khor, K A; Li, H; Cheang, P

    2004-01-01

    Microstructure characterization and property evaluation of high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) splats and coatings were conducted in the present study as a function of the proportion of melting that occurred in HA particles during HVOF spray. In vitro behavior of single and folded HA splats in simulated body fluid was also investigated. Results showed that phase composition of as-sprayed HA coatings was influenced significantly by the melt fraction in HVOF sprayed particles. Melt fraction of the HA powders were experimentally determined from particle morphology analysis. It was found that the spray parameters and starting powder size influenced the melt fraction of the particles. In vitro investigation of individual HA splats made from different HA particles revealed decisive role of local phase composition in influencing their dissolution/precipitation behavior during the test. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy qualitative inspection on the sprayed HA particles (partial melted) revealed that thermal decomposition occurred within the melted part rather than the unmelted zone. Young's modulus and micro-hardness of the as-sprayed particles and coatings were determined using nano-indentation technique. The resolidified zone of the sprayed HA particles exhibited an average Young's modulus value of 41.25 GPa. The measured values ranged from 23.1 to 65.3 GPa. The unmelted part of the HA powders showed a markedly narrower range. Young's modulus value of 83.9 GPa (+/-9.4 GPa) was recorded for this region. This succinctly highlight the difference between the unmelted region and melted regions of a HA particle. Young's moduli values measured on HVOF coatings were found to mirror the trend found in the spheroidised particles and splats with apt fidelity. PMID:14643591

  8. Investigation of erosion-resistant chromium carbide coatings sprayed with the high pressure HVOF process

    SciTech Connect

    Irons, G.; Kratochvil, W.R.; Bullock, W.R.; Roy, A.

    1994-12-31

    Eight different chromium carbide materials were sprayed at various conditions with the high pressure HVOF process. The coatings were erosion tested with both high and low angle impingement of erodent. All of the materials, including a less-expensive blended powder, exhibited excellent erosion resistance compared to standard plasma sprayed coatings. Other evaluations included metallographic examinations, macro and microhardness tests, bond tests, X-ray diffraction and chemical analyses. Several important correlations were investigated, including the effects of powder size and heat treatment.

  9. Correlations between spraying conditions and microstructure for alumina coatings produced by HVOF and VPS

    SciTech Connect

    Ramm, D.A.J.; Clyne, T.W.; Sturgeon, A.J.; Dunkerton, S.

    1994-12-31

    Coatings have been produced on steel substrates by thermal spraying of alumina, using the High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) and Vacuum Plasma Spraying (VPS) techniques. Only fine powder ({approximately} 10 {micro}m) could be sprayed by HVOF, but VPS was carried out both with this powder and two coarser ones. Particle impact velocities were measured using a mechanical technique based on twin rotating cylinders. These were shown to be in the range 100--300 m s{sup {minus}1} for VPS, depending primarily on the chamber pressure. The limited data obtained to date indicate that velocities during HVOF are appreciably higher. The phase constitutions of the coatings were studied using three different techniques. The coatings were in all cases found to consist largely of {gamma}-alumina. The {alpha}-alumina content, attributable to the presence of unmolten particles, varied between about 10% and 30%. Porosity contents, determined using high precision densitometry, were in the range 2--8%. For the VPS coatings, higher impact velocities, lower {alpha} phase contents and lower porosity levels were found for the intermediate size ({approximately} 15 {micro}m) particles, the latter two being similar to those for the HVOF coatings. The erosion resistance of these two coatings were also found to be similar.

  10. Fabrication and corrosion resistance of HVOF-sprayed Ni2Si intermetallic compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdian, M. M.; Raeissi, K.; Salehi, M.

    2013-05-01

    In this study, Ni2Si powders were deposited onto 420 stainless steel substrate using high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) process. The coatings were characterized by X-ray diffractometery, optical and scanning electron microscopy and microhardness measurements. Tafel polarization tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were employed to study corrosion performance of the coatings in 70% H2SO4 media at room temperature. Here, a dense sintered Ni2Si was used as reference material. The results showed the phase composition of HVOF coating is similar to that of feedstock powders. The corrosion rate of HVOF Ni2Si coatings was much lower than that of 420 stainless steel substrate but slightly higher than that of bulk Ni2Si. Further investigation showed that both thermally sprayed and sintered (reference) Ni2Si alloys exhibited similar anodic polarization behavior including a narrow active section followed by a wide passive region.

  11. Processing-microstructure-property relations in HVOF sprayed calcium phosphate based bioceramic coatings.

    PubMed

    Khor, K A; Li, H; Cheang, P

    2003-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) based bioceramic coatings were deposited onto titanium alloy substrates using the high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray technique. This study aimed to reveal the relations among processing parameters, microstructure, and properties of the bioceramic coatings. The processing conditions were altered through changing the starting HA powder size, content of bioinert ceramic additives or composite powder preparation techniques. Coating structure was characterized through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM); and the mechanical properties, Young's modulus and fracture toughness, of the coatings were evaluated through indentation techniques. Results demonstrated dominant influence of the melt state of HA powders on the phase composition of resultant coatings, and it was found that the HVOF HA coatings possess competitive mechanical properties. Furthermore, addition of titania or zirconia, as secondary phase in HA, showed promising effect on improving the mechanical properties of the HVOF HA-based coatings. Chemical reactions between HA and titania; and, HA and zirconia during coating deposition were revealed and characterized. Incorporation modes of the additives into HA and their reinforcing mechanisms were elucidated. The relationship among the processing, microstructure, and mechanical properties of the HVOF sprayed bioceramic coatings was summarily examined. PMID:12699659

  12. What Do We Know, What are the Current Limitations of Suspension HVOF Spraying?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killinger, A.; Müller, P.; Gadow, R.

    2015-10-01

    Suspension spraying has evolved during the past decades and now is at the threshold of a commercial utilization. Compared to standard powder spray methods, mainly DC plasma spraying and (high velocity) flame spraying, it is quite clear that suspension spraying will not replace these well-established technologies but can extend them by adding new coating properties. Still there remain many issues to be solved. Suspension interaction with the hot gas stream is much more complex than in ordinary powder spray processes. In case of HVOF when axial injection into the combustion chamber is used, a direct observation of the liquid flame interaction is not possible. This paper discusses the present status of suspension HVOF-spraying (high velocity suspension flame spraying) including torch concepts, torch configuration in case of a TopGun system as well as different injector concepts and their influence on suspension atomization. The role of suspensions is discussed regarding their rheological and thermodynamical properties, mainly given by the solvent type and the solid content. An overview of different available diagnostic methods and systems and the respective applicability is given. Coating properties are shown and discussed for several oxide ceramics in respect to their possible applications.

  13. Laser fusing of HVOF thermal sprayed alloy 625 on nickel-aluminum bronze

    SciTech Connect

    Brenna, R.T.; Pugh, J.L.; Denney, P.E.

    1994-12-31

    A preliminary study has been conducted to determine the feasibility of laser fusing alloy 625 onto nickel-aluminum-bronze base metal. Laser fusing was performed by melting a pre-coated surface of alloy 625 that had been applied by the high velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) thermal spray process. The laser fusing was successful in producing a metallurigical bond between alloy 625 and the substrate. Minor modification to the heat-affected zone of the base metal was observed by microhardness measurements, and defect-free interfaces were produced between alloy 625 and nickel-aluminum-bronze by the process. The laser is a high energy density source that can be used for precise thermal processing of materials including surface modification. Laser fusing is the full or partial melting of a coating material that has been previously applied in some fashion to the substrate. Thermal spray coating of nickel-aluminum-bronze material with alloy 625 was conducted at the David Taylor Research Center. Nickel-aluminum-bronze specimens 2 x 3-in. by 1/2-in. thick were coated with alloy 25 utilizing the HVOF equipment. Coating thicknesses of approximately 0.014-in. (0.3 mm) were produced for subsequent laser fusing experiments. A preliminary study has been conducted to determine the feasibility of laser fusing a HVOF thermal sprayed alloy 625 coating onto nickel-aluminum-bronze base metal. Conclusions of this investigation were as follows: (1) Laser fusing was successful in producing a metallurgical bond between HVOF thermal sprayed alloy 625 and the nickel-aluminum-bronze. (2) Only minor microstructural modification to the heat-affected zone of the base metal ws observed by microhardness measurements. (3) Defect-free interfaces were produced between thermal sprayed alloy 625 and nickel-aluminum-bronze by laser fusing.

  14. Optimizing HVOF Spray Parameters to Maximize Bonding Strength of WC-CrC-Ni Coatings on AISI 304L Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiruvikraman, C.; Balasubramanian, V.; Sridhar, K.

    2014-06-01

    High velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF)-sprayed cermet coatings are extensively used to combat erosion-corrosion in naval applications and in slurry environments. HVOF spray parameters such as oxygen flow rate, fuel flow rate, powder feed rate, carrier gas flow rate, and spray distance have significant influence on coating characteristics like adhesion bond strength and shear strength. This paper presents the use of statistical techniques in particular response surface methodology (RSM), analysis of variance, and regression analysis to develop empirical relationships to predict adhesion bond strength and lap shear bond strength of HVOF-sprayed WC-CrC-Ni coatings. The developed empirical relationships can be effectively used to predict adhesion bond strength and lap shear bond strength of HVOF-sprayed WC-CrC-Ni coatings at 95% confidence level. Response graphs and contour plots were constructed to identify the optimum HVOF spray parameters to attain maximum bond strength in WC-CrC-Ni coatings.

  15. HVOF-Sprayed Nano TiO2-HA Coatings Exhibiting Enhanced Biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, R. S.; Dimitrievska, S.; Bureau, M. N.; Marple, B. R.; Petit, A.; Mwale, F.; Antoniou, J.

    2010-01-01

    Biomedical thermal spray coatings produced via high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) from nanostructured titania (n-TiO2) and 10 wt.% hydroxyapatite (HA) (n-TiO2-10wt.%HA) powders have been engineered as possible future alternatives to HA coatings deposited via air plasma spray (APS). This approach was chosen due to (i) the stability of TiO2 in the human body (i.e., no dissolution) and (ii) bond strength values on Ti-6Al-4V substrates more than two times higher than those of APS HA coatings. To explore the bioperformance of these novel materials and coatings, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were cultured from 1 to 21 days on the surface of HVOF-sprayed n-TiO2 and n-TiO2-10 wt.%HA coatings. APS HA coatings and uncoated Ti-6Al-4V substrates were employed as controls. The profiles of the hMSCs were evaluated for (i) cellular proliferation, (ii) biochemical analysis of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, (iii) cytoskeleton organization (fluorescent/confocal microscopy), and (iv) cell/substrate interaction via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The biochemical analysis indicated that the hMSCs cultured on n-TiO2-10 wt.%HA coatings exhibited superior levels of bioactivity than hMSCs cultured on APS HA and pure n-TiO2 coatings. The cytoskeleton organization demonstrated a higher degree of cellular proliferation on the HVOF-sprayed n-TiO2-10wt.%HA coatings when compared to the control coatings. These results are considered promising for engineering improved performance in the next generation of thermally sprayed biomedical coatings.

  16. Computational fluid dynamic analysis of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, B.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.

    1995-09-01

    The gas dynamics of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) torch are analyzed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. The thermal spray device analyzed is similar to a Metco Diamond Jet torch with powder feed. The injection nozzle is assumed to be axisymmetric with premixed fuel and oxygen fed from an annulus, and air cooling injected along the interior surface of the aircap. The aircap, a cronically converging nozzle, achieves choked flow conditions at the exit and a supersonic, under-expanded jet develops externally. Finite difference equations for mass, momentum, and energy conservation are solved for the gas dynamics. The combustion process is modeled using a single-step and a 12-step quasi-global finite-rate chemistry model with dissociation of the gas and a total of nine species. Turbulent flow inside the aircap and in the free-jet decay is modeled using a two-equation k-{epsilon} model. An iterative, implicit, finite volume numerical method is used to solve the gas dynamic equations inside and outside the torch . The CFD results are compared with recent experimental measurements of pressure inside the HVOF aircap. Comparisons are made for two flow rates of premixed fuel and oxygen and air cooling. This paper presents the first published comparisons of CFD predictions and experimental measurements for HVOF tbermal spraying.

  17. Simulation of gas particle flow in a HVOF torch

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.H.; Moore, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    A transient two-dimensional numerical simulation of Inconel spraying in an HVOF torch barrel has been performed. The gas flow is treated as a continuum multicomponent chemically reacting flow, while particles are modeled using a stochastic particle spray model, fully coupled to the gas flow. The calculated results agree well with experimental data, and show important statistical aspects of particle flow in the torch.

  18. Microstructure and Sliding Wear Behavior of Fe-Based Coatings Manufactured with HVOF and HVAF Thermal Spray Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanti, A.; Matikainen, V.; Bolelli, G.; Koivuluoto, H.; Lusvarghi, L.; Vuoristo, P.

    2016-04-01

    The microstructure and micromechanical behavior of thermally sprayed Fe-based coatings manufactured with high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) and high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) processes were investigated. Fe-Cr-Ni-Si-B-C and Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo-Si-B-C powders were used as the feedstock materials. The coatings showed a highly dense microstructure with near-zero oxidation. The microstructure of the feedstock powders was better retained when sprayed with HVAF process. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed two small exothermic peaks at about 600 °C for the HVOF-sprayed coatings, without any increase in weight in thermogravimetric analysis. It suggested the re-precipitation of carbides that were dissolved during spraying due to the higher particle temperature reported by spray diagnostics system during the HVOF process (≈1800 °C) compared to the HVAF one (≈1400 °C). Micro- and nano-indentations helped to show the difference in inter-lamellar cohesive strength and, in turn, in the particle deposition mechanism. Coatings sprayed with Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo-Si-B-C composition possessed higher sliding wear resistance than that of Fe-Cr-Ni-Si-B-C due to higher nano-hardness. More specifically, HVOF-sprayed Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo-Si-B-C coating showed the largest intra-lamellar hardness, the largest elasticity, and high quality of particle interfaces which resulted in lower sliding wear rate.

  19. Microstructure and Sliding Wear Behavior of Fe-Based Coatings Manufactured with HVOF and HVAF Thermal Spray Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanti, A.; Matikainen, V.; Bolelli, G.; Koivuluoto, H.; Lusvarghi, L.; Vuoristo, P.

    2016-06-01

    The microstructure and micromechanical behavior of thermally sprayed Fe-based coatings manufactured with high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) and high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) processes were investigated. Fe-Cr-Ni-Si-B-C and Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo-Si-B-C powders were used as the feedstock materials. The coatings showed a highly dense microstructure with near-zero oxidation. The microstructure of the feedstock powders was better retained when sprayed with HVAF process. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed two small exothermic peaks at about 600 °C for the HVOF-sprayed coatings, without any increase in weight in thermogravimetric analysis. It suggested the re-precipitation of carbides that were dissolved during spraying due to the higher particle temperature reported by spray diagnostics system during the HVOF process (≈1800 °C) compared to the HVAF one (≈1400 °C). Micro- and nano-indentations helped to show the difference in inter-lamellar cohesive strength and, in turn, in the particle deposition mechanism. Coatings sprayed with Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo-Si-B-C composition possessed higher sliding wear resistance than that of Fe-Cr-Ni-Si-B-C due to higher nano-hardness. More specifically, HVOF-sprayed Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo-Si-B-C coating showed the largest intra-lamellar hardness, the largest elasticity, and high quality of particle interfaces which resulted in lower sliding wear rate.

  20. Analysis of a High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch. Part 2, Computational results

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Talpallikar, M.

    1993-12-31

    The fluid dynamics inside and outside a High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) torch are analyzed using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) techniques. The thermal spray device analyzed is similar to a Metco Diamond Jet torch with powder injection. The spray nozzle is axisymmetric with powder injected on the centerline, premixed fuel and oxygen fed from an annulus, and air cooling injected along the interior surface of the aircap choked flow conditions occur at the exit of the aircap and a supersonic, under-expanded jet develops externally. The details of the CFD simulation are given in a companion paper. This paper describes the general gas dynamic features of HVOF spraying and then gives a detailed discussion of the computational predictions of the present analysis. The gas velocity, temperature, pressure and Mach number distributions are presented for various locations inside and outside the torch. Characteristics of the metal spray particle velocity, temperature, Mach number, trajectory, and phase state (solid or liquid) are also presented and discussed. Extensive numerical flow visualization is provided to show flow features such as mixing layers, shock waves, and expansion waves.

  1. Numerical modeling of in-flight characteristics of inconel 625 particles during high-velocity oxy-fuel thermal spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, S.; McCartney, D. G.; Eastwick, C. N.; Simmons, K.

    2004-06-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is developed to predict particle dynamic behavior in a high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun in which premixed oxygen and propylene are burnt in a combustion chamber linked to a long, parallel-sided nozzle. The particle transport equations are solved in a Lagrangian manner and coupled with the two-dimensional, axisymmetric, steady state, chemically reacting, turbulent gas flow. Within the particle transport model, the total flow of the particle phase is modeled by tracking a small number of particles through the continuum gas flow, and each of these individual particles is tracked independently through the continuous phase. Three different combustion chamber designs were modeled, and the in-flight particle characteristics of Inconel were 625 studied. Results are presented to show the effect of process parameters, such as particle injection speed and location, total gas flow rate, fuel-to-oxygen gas ratio, and particle size on the particle dynamic behavior for a parallel-sided, 12 mm long combustion chamber. The results indicate that the momentum and heat transfer to particles are primarily influenced by total gas flow. The 12 mm long chamber can achieve an optimum performance for Inconel 625 powder particles ranging in diameter from 20 to 40 µm. At a particular spraying distance, an optimal size of particles is observed with respect to particle temperature. The effect of different combustion chamber dimensions on particle dynamics was also investigated. The results obtained for both a 22 mm long chamber and also one with a conical, converging design are compared with the baseline data for the 12 mm chamber.

  2. Optimization of the laser remelting process for HVOF-sprayed Stellite 6 wear resistant coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciubotariu, Costel-Relu; Frunzăverde, Doina; Mărginean, Gabriela; Șerban, Viorel-Aurel; Bîrdeanu, Aurel-Valentin

    2016-03-01

    Cobalt base alloys are used in all industrial areas due to their excellent wear resistance. Several studies have shown that Stellite 6 coatings are suitable not only for protection against sliding wear, but also in case of exposure to impact loading. In this respect, a possible application is the protection of hydropower plant components affected by cavitation. The main problem in connection with Stellite 6 is the deposition procedure of the protective layers, both welding and thermal spraying techniques requesting special measures in order to prevent the brittleness of the coating. In this study, Stellite 6 layers were HVOF thermally sprayed on a martensitic 13-4 stainless steel substrate, as usually used for hydraulic machinery components. In order to improve the microstructure of the HVOF-sprayed coatings and their adhesion to the substrate, laser remelting was applied, using a TRUMPF Laser type HL 124P LCU and different working parameters. The microstructure of the coatings, obtained for various remelting conditions, was evaluated by light microscopy, showing the optimal value of the pulse power, which provided a homogenous Stellite 6 layer with good adhesion to the substrate.

  3. Development of HVOF Sprayed Erosion/Oxidation Resistant Coatings for Composite Structural Components in Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivosevic, M.; Twardowski, T.; Kalidindi, S.; Knight, R.; Sutter, J.; Kim, D. Y.

    1990-01-01

    Thermally sprayed coatings are being studied and developed as methods of enabling lightweight composites to be used more extensively as structural components in propulsion applications in order to reduce costs and improve efficiency through weight reductions. The primary goal of this work is the development of functionally graded material [FGM] polymer/metal matrix composite coatings to provide improved erosion/oxidation resistance to polyimide-based polymer matrix composite [PMC] substrates. The goal is to grade the coating composition from pure polyimide, similar to the PMC substrate matrix on one side, to 100% WC-Co on the other. Both step-wise and continuous gradation of the loading of the WC-Co reinforcing phase are being investigated, Details of the coating parameter development will be presented, specifically the high velocity oxy-fuel [HVOF] combustion spraying of pure PMR-I1 matrix material and layers of various composition PMR-II/WC-Co blends onto steel and PMR-15 composite substrates. Results of the HVOF process optimization, microstructural characterization, and analysis will be presented. The sprayed coatings were evaluated using standard metallographic techniques - optical and scanning electron microscopy [SEMI. An SEM + electron dispersive spectroscopy [EDS] technique has also been used to confirm retention of the PMR-I1 component. Results of peel/butt adhesion testing to determine adhesion will also be presented.

  4. Development of HVOF Sprayed Erosion/Oxidation Resistant Coatings for Composite Structural Components in Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, R.; Ivosevic, M.; Twardowski, T. E.; Kalidindi, S. R.; Sutter, James K.; Kim, D. Y.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Thermally sprayed coatings are being studied and developed as methods of enabling lightweight composites to be used more extensively as structural components in propulsion applications in order to reduce costs and improve efficiency through weight reductions. The primary goal of this work is the development of functionally graded material [FGM] polymer/metal matrix composite coatings to provide improved erosion/oxidation resistance to polyimide-based polymer matrix composite [PMC] substrates. The goal is to grade the coating composition from pure polyimide, similar to the PMC substrate matrix on one side, to 100 % WC-Co on the other. Both step-wise and continuous gradation of the loading of the WC-Co reinforcing phase are being investigated. Details of the coating parameter development will be presented, specifically the high velocity oxy-fuel [HVOF] combustion spraying of pure PMR-11 matrix material and layers of various composition PMR-II/WC-Co blends onto steel and PMR-15 composite substrates. Results of the HVOF process optimization, microstructural characterization, and analysis will be presented. The sprayed coatings were evaluated using standard metallographic techniques - optical and scanning electron microscopy [SEM]. An SEM + electron dispersive spectroscopy [EDS] technique has also been used to confirm retention of the PMR-II component. Results of peel/butt adhesion testing to determine adhesion will also be presented.

  5. Iron-Based Amorphous Coatings Produced by HVOF Thermal Spray Processing-Coating Structure and Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Beardsley, M B

    2008-03-26

    The feasibility to coat large SNF/HLW containers with a structurally amorphous material (SAM) was demonstrated on sub-scale models fabricated from Type 316L stainless steel. The sub-scale model were coated with SAM 1651 material using kerosene high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) torch to thicknesses ranging from 1 mm to 2 mm. The process parameters such as standoff distance, oxygen flow, and kerosene flow, were optimized in order to improve the corrosion properties of the coatings. Testing in an electrochemical cell and long-term exposure to a salt spray environment were used to guide the selection of process parameters.

  6. Analysis of the porosity formation during HVOF spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, V.V.; Guilemany, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    On the basis of the proposed physical and mathematical models the formation of the gas and shrinkage porosity during the thermal spraying is investigated. The gas porosity model takes into account the parameters of spraying, powder particle material and substrate, droplet flattening and solidification heat and mass transfer processes and pores interaction. A model of the shrinkage porosity development includes the equations describing its formation under the solidification of the coating layers of the different shapes on account of the melt tension with the shrinkage. The shrinkage porosity microzones are shown to be formed near the crystals of the different shapes and its macrozones are established to be developed in the surface parts of the coating layers. The porosity parameters evolution is studied. The obtained results agree well with the tendencies of the gas and shrinkage porosity behavior observed experimentally.

  7. Corrosion behavior of HVOF coated sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Abdul-Aleem, B. J.; Khalid, M.

    2003-12-01

    High velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coating finds application in industry due to its superior resistance to corrosion and thermal loading. In the HVOF process, the metallic powders at elevated temperature are sprayed at supersonic speed onto a substrate material. The powder granules sprayed impact onto each other, forming a mechanical bonding across the coating layer. In most of the cases, the distances among the particles (powder granules sprayed) are not the same, which in turn results in inhomogeneous structure across the coating layer. Moreover, the rate of oxidation of the powder granules during the spraying process varies. Consequently, the electrochemical response of the coating layer surfaces next to the base material and free to atmosphere differs. In the current study, the electrochemical response of a coating sheet formed during HVOF thermal spraying was investigated. NiCrMoNb alloy (similar to Inconel 625) wass used for the powder granules. Thermal spraying was carried out onto a smooth surface of stainless steel workpiece (without grid blasting), and later the coating layer was removed from the surface to obtain the coating sheet for the electrochemical tests. It was found that the corrosion rate of the smooth surface (surface next to the stainless steel surface before its removal) is considerably larger than that corresponding to the rough surface (free surface) of the coating sheet, and no specific patterns were observed for the pit sites.

  8. Characterization and High-Temperature Erosion Behaviour of HVOF Thermal Spray Cermet Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pardeep; Sidhu, Buta Singh

    2016-01-01

    High-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spray, carbide-cermet-based coatings are usually employed in high-temperature erosive and erosive-corrosive environments. Extensive literature is available on high-temperature erosion performance of HVOF coatings under moderate to low particle flux and velocities for application in boiler tubes. This research work presents the characterization and high-temperature erosion behaviour of Cr3C2-25NiCr and WC-10Co-4Cr HVOF-sprayed coatings. Coatings were formulated on the substrate steel of type AISI 304, commonly used for the fabrication of pulverized coal burner nozzles (PCBN). Erosion testing was carried out in high-temperature air-jet erosion tester after simulating the conditions akin to that prevailing in PCBN in the boiler furnace. The coatings were tested for erosion behaviour at different angles and temperatures by freezing other test parameters. Brittle erosion behaviour was depicted in erosion testing, and the coatings couldn't restrain the erodent attacks to protect the substrate. High particle velocity and high particle flux were attributed to be the reasons of extensive erosive weight loss of the coatings. The surface morphology of the eroded specimens was analysed from back-scattered electron images to depict the probable mechanism of material removal. The coatings were characterized with optical microscopy, SEM-EDS analysis, XRD analysis, micro-hardness testing, porosity measurements, surface roughness testing and bond strength testing. The work was undertaken to investigate the performance of the selected coatings in highly erosive environment, so as to envisage their application in PCBNs for protection against material degradation. The coatings could only sustain in oblique impact erosion at room temperature and depleted fully under all other conditions.

  9. Investigation of Properties and Wear Behavior of HVOF Sprayed TiC-Strengthened Fe Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, Kirsten; Schlaefer, Thomas; Richardt, Katharina; Warda, Thomas; Reisel, Guido

    2009-12-01

    High-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) sprayed carbide based coatings (such as Cr3C2/NiCr) are industrially well established for wear protection applications. Due to their high carbide content of typically 75 wt.% and more, they provide very high hardness and excellent wear resistance. Unfortunately, costs for matrix materials such as nickel underlie strong fluctuations and are normally well above the prices for iron. Therefore an alternative concept to conventional carbides is based on TiC-strengthened low-cost Fe-base materials, which are already used for sintering processes. Depending on the carbon content, the Fe-base material can additionally offer a temperable matrix for enhanced wear behavior. The sprayability of TiC-strengthened Fe-powders with a gaseous and a liquid fuel driven HVOF system was investigated in this study. The resulting coatings were analyzed with respect to microstructure, hardness, and phase composition and compared with galvanic hard chrome, NiCrBSi, and Cr3C2/NiCr (80/20) coatings as well as with sintered Fe/TiC reference materials. Furthermore, the Fe/TiC coatings were heat treated to proof the retained temperability of the Fe matrix after thermal spray process. Tribometer tests (pin-on-disk tests) were conducted to determine wear properties.

  10. Microstructure and Properties of HVOF-Sprayed Ni-50Cr Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Joel A. Simpson; Terry C. Totemeier; Richard N. Wright

    2006-06-01

    Thermal spray coatings represent a potential cost-effective means of protecting structural components in advanced fossil energy systems. Previous work at the INL has focused on relationships between thermal spray processing conditions, structure, and properties in alumina- and silica-forming coatings, namely Fe3Al, FeAl, and Mo-Si-B alloys. This paper describes the preparation and characterization of chromia-forming Ni-50%Cr coatings, an alloy similar to the INCOCLAD 671 cladding, which has shown excellent performance in the Niles Plant service tests. The structure and properties of Ni-50Cr coatings are similar to other HVOF-sprayed metallic coatings: a typical lamellar microstructure is observed with essentially no porosity and little oxide. The microhardness and compressive residual stress both increase with increased spray particle velocity. Corrosion tests were performed on a variety of free-standing coatings (removed from the substrate, wrought Fe3Al alloy, and Grade 91 steel in a simulated coal combustion gas (N2-10%CO-5%CO2-2%H2O-0.12%H2S) and gas-slag environments (same gas, with iron sulfide powder in contact with the coating surface). The coatings tested included Fe3Al, FeAl, and Ni-50Cr alloys sprayed at different velocities. In these tests the iron aluminides in wrought and coating form showed the best performance, with Ni-50Cr coatings slightly worse; the Grade 91 steel was severely attacked.

  11. HVOF particle flow field characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, W.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Haggard, D.C.; Irons, G.; Bullock, R.

    1994-12-31

    The effect of varying fuel/oxygen mixture ratio and combustion chamber pressure on the sprayed particle temperature and velocity in the supersonic, high pressure HVOF process is examined. Particle temperature is shown to correlate to the fuel/oxygen mixture and particle velocity is a function of combustion chamber pressure. inconel 718 coatings were fabricated at the same conditions as the particle measurements. High particle velocities resulted in high micro hardness. Deposition efficiency is a function of both particle temperature and velocity. The optimal deposition efficiency occurs at an average particle temperature which is below the melting point of Inconel 718 and the lowest velocity investigated. Oxide content is a function of substrate temperature and not entrained air or excess combustion oxygen.

  12. Mechanical and Physical Properties of HVOF-Sprayed Iron Aluminide Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Totemeier, Terry Craig; Wright, Richard Neil; Swank, William David

    2003-10-01

    Tensile tests and thermal-expansion measurements were performed on free-standing, high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed Fe3Al coatings produced at spray-particle velocities of 390, 560, and 620 m/s. To examine the relationship between properties and spray conditions, the microstructures of the coatings were characterized in terms of the fractions of unmelted particles, porosity, and oxide inclusions, as well as the dislocation density assessed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) line-broadening analysis. Residual coating stresses were determined as a function of coating thickness using curvature measurements. The tensile behavior was entirely brittle at room temperature; fracture strengths increased with spray-particle velocity; and the increase in fracture-strength results from decreasing fractions of microstructural defects and better interparticle bonding. The mean thermal-expansion coefficients for the coatings were lower than those for an equivalent wrought material; the differences were attributed to a 7 to 15 vol pct fraction of oxide inclusions.

  13. Erosion Performance of HVOF-Sprayed Cr3C2-NiCr Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Gang-Chang; Li, Chang-Jiu; Wang, Yu-Yue; Li, Wen-Ya

    2007-12-01

    Cr3C2-NiCr coatings were deposited by high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spraying process under spray conditions of different flows of oxygen and propane gases, and spray distances. The orthogonal regression experimental design method was used for systematic investigation of the influence of spray parameters on the erosion performance of Cr3C2-NiCr coatings. Erosion tests were performed at different jet angles of abrasive particles. The erosion mechanism of Cr3C2-NiCr coatings was examined through the surface morphology and cross-sectional microstructure of the eroded coatings. The correlations of the carbide particle size and carbide content with the erosion rate were examined. It was found that the erosion occurred dominantly by spalling of splats from the lamellar interfaces. The spalling resulted from the propagation of cracks parallel to the interfaces between the lamellae exposed to the surface and underlying coating. The carbide particle size and content in the coating influenced significantly the erosion performance of Cr3C2-NiCr coatings.

  14. Quality optimization of thermally sprayed coatings produced by the JP-5000 (HVOF) gun using mathematical modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawfik, Hazem

    1994-01-01

    Currently, thermal barrier coatings (TBC) of gas-turbine blades and similar applications have centered around the use of zirconia as a protective coating for high thermal applications. The advantages of zirconia include low thermal conductivity and good thermal shock resistance. Thermally sprayed tungsten carbide hardface coatings are used for a wide range of applications spanning both the aerospace and other industrial markets. Major aircraft engine manufacturers and repair facilities use hardface coatings for original engine manufacture (OEM), as well as in the overhaul of critical engine components. The principle function of these coatings is to resist severe wear environments for such wear mechanisms as abrasion, adhesion, fretting, and erosion. The (JP-5000) thermal spray gun is the most advanced in the High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) systems. Recently, it has received considerable attention because of its relative low cost and its production of quality coatings that challenge the very successful but yet very expensive Vacuum Plasma Spraying (VPS) system. The quality of thermal spray coatings is enhanced as porosity, oxidation, residual stress, and surface roughness are reduced or minimized. Higher densification, interfacial bonding strength, hardness and wear resistance of coating are desirable features for quality improvement.

  15. Influence of the Spray Angle on the Properties of HVOF Sprayed WC-Co Coatings Using (-10 + 2 μm) Fine Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Baumann, I.; Hollingsworth, P.; Laemmerhirt, I.-A.

    2013-03-01

    The application of fine powders in thermal spray technology represents an innovative approach to apply dense and smooth near-net shape coatings on tools with complex geometry. However, this aim can only be achieved as long as the influence of the handling parameters of the spray process, such as the spray angle, is sufficiently understood. In this study, the influence of the spray angle on the deposition rate as well as on the coating properties (microhardness, roughness, and porosity) of HVOF-sprayed, fine-structured coatings are investigated. A fine, agglomerated, and sintered WC-12Co powder (agglomerate size: 2-10 μm, WC-particle Fisher sub-sieve size = 400 nm) was used as feedstock material. It has been shown that HVOF spraying of fine powders is less susceptible to an alteration of the spray angle than most other thermal spray processes such as plasma- or arc-spraying. The reduction of the spray angle results in a decrease in the deposition rate, while no significant degradation of the coating properties is found up to 30°. However, at spray angles below 30° the coating strength is negatively affected by the formation of pores and cracks.

  16. Thermal interaction between WC-Co coating and steel substrate in process of HVOF spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Guilemany, J.M.; Sobolev, V.V.; Nutting, J.; Dong, Z.; Calero, J.A. . Metalurgia Fisica-Ciencia de Materials)

    1994-10-01

    The WC-Co powders can be used to produce good adhesive and wear resistant HVOF thermal spray coatings on steel and light alloys substrates. In order to understand the properties of this kind of coating, the phases which are present in the coatings and structure changes during post heat treatments have been investigated. Although the coating properties depend very much on the structure developed in the substrate-coating interfacial region it has not been yet investigated in detail. The present study is devoted to the experimental and theoretical analysis of this interfacial region. The structure characterization has been performed mainly through the use of transmission electron microscopy. To provide a theoretical investigation a realistic prediction model of the process has been developed and on its base the mathematical simulation of the substrate-coating thermal interaction has been undertaken.

  17. Effect of substrate roughness on splatting behavior of HVOF sprayed polymer particles: Modeling and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivosevic, M.; Gupta, V.; Knight, R.; Cairncross, R. A.; Baldoni, J. A.; Twardowski, T. E.

    2006-12-01

    A three-dimensional model of particle splatting on rough surfaces has been developed for high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) sprayed polymer particles and related to experimentally observed polymer splats. Fluid flow and particle deformation were predicted using a volume of fluid (VoF) method using Flow-3D software. Splatting behavior and final splat shapes were simulated on a realistic rough surface, generated by optical interferometry of an actual grit-blasted steel surface. Predicted splat shapes were compared with scanning electron microscopy images of nylon 11 splats deposited onto grit-blasted steel substrates. Rough substrates led to the formation of fingers and other asymmetric three-dimensional instabilities that are seldom observed in simulations of polymer splatting on smooth substrates.

  18. Sliding Wear Properties of HVOF Thermally Sprayed Nylon-11 and Nylon-11/Ceramic Composites on Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, L.; Ivosevic, M.; Knight, R.; Cairncross, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    Polymer and polymer/ceramic composite coatings were produced by ball-milling 60 μm Nylon-11 together with nominal 10 vol.% of nano and multiscale ceramic reinforcements and by HVOF spraying these composite feedstocks onto steel substrates to produce semicrystalline micron and nanoscale reinforced polymer matrix composites. Room temperature dry sliding wear performance of pure Nylon-11, Nylon-11 reinforced with 7 nm silica, and multiscale Nylon-11/silica composite coatings incorporating 7-40 nm and 10 μm ceramic particles were characterized using a pin-on-disk tribometer. Coefficient of friction and wear rate were determined as a function of applied load and coating composition. Surface profilometry and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize and analyze the coatings and wear scars. The pure Nylon-11 coating experienced less wear than the composites due to the occurrence of two additional wear mechanisms: abrasive and fatigue wear.

  19. Coating of High-Alloyed, Ledeburitic Cold Work Tool Steel Applied by HVOF Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekaran, B.; Mauer, G.; Vassen, R.; Röttger, A.; Weber, S.; Theisen, W.

    2010-03-01

    This study demonstrates the processing of a cold work tool steel (X220CrVMo13-4) coating using HVOF spraying. The coating formation was analyzed based on microstructure, phase, hardness, porosity, oxidation, and adhesion characteristics. An online diagnostic tool was utilized to find out the in-flight characteristics of powder such as temperature and velocity during the coating process to identify the influencing parameters to achieve dense cold work tool steel coatings with low oxidation. The influence of powder size, process parameters, and in-flight characteristics on the formation of cold work tool steel coatings was demonstrated. The results indicated that thick and dense cold work tool steel coatings with low oxidation can be obtained by the selection of appropriate powder size and process parameters.

  20. In vitro behavior of HVOF sprayed calcium phosphate splats and coatings.

    PubMed

    Khor, K A; Li, H; Cheang, P; Boey, S Y

    2003-02-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings and splats deposited by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray technique was investigated in vitro. HA coatings prepared from two different HA powder size range (30+/-5 and 50 +/-5 microm) were immersed in a simulated body fluid with various incubation periods of maximum 6 weeks. The dissolution/precipitation behavior was studied and the degradation of HA coatings caused by in vitro ageing was demonstrated by measuring the changes in flexural modulus through a 3-point bend test. It was found that the dissolution and precipitation behavior of the coatings was significantly dependent upon the incipient coating phase composition and the precipitation of bone-like hydroxyapatite on the coating's surface was found to be directly related to the dissolution process. Higher dissolution rates of tricalcium phosphate, tetracalcium phosphate and amorphous calcium phosphate relative to HA, resulted in accelerated precipitation. Furthermore, analysis of coatings' surface morphology demonstrated that advanced precipitation invariably occurred at regions where dissolution took place. Results showed that the changes in flexural modulus of investigated HA coatings accompanying different incubation duration was not systematic but was found to be dependent upon changes of coating structure and other factors brought about by in vitro ageing. In vitro investigation of individual HA splats collected from different HA particle sizes revealed, after 3 days ageing, that the rate ratio of precipitation to dissolution was directly determined by the local phase composition, and this phenomenon could be effectively used to explain the behavior of thermally sprayed HA coatings in vitro. It implied that the precipitation was strongly dependent on the first molecule attachment. To achieve rapid precipitation in vitro, partial molten state of HA particles during HVOF coating deposition was recommended. PMID:12485791

  1. Analysis of a High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch. Part 1, Numerical formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Talpallikar, M.

    1994-01-01

    The fluid and particle dynamics of a High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) torch are analyzed using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) techniques. The thermal spray device analyzed is similar to a Metco Diamond Jet torch with powder injection. The spray nozzle is axisymmetric with powder injection on the centerline, premixed fuel and oxygen fed from an annulus, and air cooling injected along the interior surface of the aircap. Choked flow conditions occur at the exit of the aircap and a supersonic, under-expanded jet develops externally. The CFD simulation assumes three injection streams (solid metal particles with argon as a carrier gas, premixed oxygen/fuel, and air) inside the aircap and solves the combusting two-phase flow until the external spray stream decays to sonic conditions. The numerical formulation solves the mass, momentum, and energy transfer for both the gas and particle phase and strongly couples each phase. The combustion process is modeled using approximate equilibrium chemistry with dissociation of the gas with a total of nine species. Melting and re-solidification of the metal panicles is modeled as a lumped-mass system. Turbulent flow is modeled by a two equation k-{epsilon} turbulence model, including compressibility effects on turbulent dissipation. A time iterative, implicit, finite volume numerical method is used to solve the partial differential equations. A companion paper [10] presents the results of the numerical simulation and gives a detailed discussion of the gas and panicle dynamics.

  2. Corrosion, erosion-corrosion and wear resistance of HVOF sprayed WC type coatings with a corrosion resistant binder

    SciTech Connect

    Rogne, T.; Berget, J.; Solem, T.

    1999-07-01

    WC based coatings with high alloy binders were investigated with respect to structure, corrosion and wear. The coatings were made by HVOF spraying of different powders. All powders studied were made by agglomeration/sintering, i.e. agglomeration of metal particles with WC particles with subsequent sintering. Some powders were made using pre-alloyed metal particles. A blend of ceramic-metallic powder and pure metallic powder was also studied. Different methods were used for characterization of the powders and coatings.

  3. Fireside Corrosion Behavior of HVOF and Plasma-Sprayed Coatings in Advanced Coal/Biomass Co-Fired Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, T.; Dudziak, T.; Simms, N. J.; Nicholls, J. R.

    2013-06-01

    This article presents a systematic evaluation of coatings for advanced fossil fuel plants and addresses fireside corrosion in coal/biomass-derived flue gases. A selection of four candidate coatings: alloy 625, NiCr, FeCrAl and NiCrAlY were deposited onto superheaters/reheaters alloy (T91) using high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and plasma spraying. A series of laboratory-based fireside corrosion exposures were carried out on these coated samples in furnaces under controlled atmosphere for 1000 h at 650 °C. The tests were carried out using the "deposit-recoat" test method to simulate the environment that was anticipated from air-firing 20 wt.% cereal co-product mixed with a UK coal. The exposures were carried out using a deposit containing Na2SO4, K2SO4, and Fe2O3 to produce alkali-iron tri-sulfates, which had been identified as the principal cause of fireside corrosion on superheaters/reheaters in pulverized coal-fired power plants. The exposed samples were examined in an ESEM with EDX analysis to characterize the damage. Pre- and post-exposure dimensional metrologies were used to quantify the metal damage in terms of metal loss distributions. The thermally sprayed coatings suffered significant corrosion attack from a combination of aggressive combustion gases and deposit mixtures. In this study, all the four plasma-sprayed coatings studied performed better than the HVOF-sprayed coatings because of a lower level of porosity. NiCr was found to be the best performing coating material with a median metal loss of ~87 μm (HVOF sprayed) and ~13 μm (plasma sprayed). In general, the median metal damage for coatings had the following ranking (in the descending order: most to the least damage): NiCrAlY > alloy 625 > FeCrAl > NiCr.

  4. Titanium dioxide reinforced hydroxyapatite coatings deposited by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Khor, K A; Cheang, P

    2002-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings with titania addition were produced by the high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray process. Mechanical properties of the as-sprayed coatings in terms of adhesive strength, shear strength and fracture toughness were investigated to reveal the effect of the titania reinforcement on HA. Qualitative phase analysis with X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that mutual chemical reaction between TiO2 and HA, that formed CaTiO3 occurred during coating formation. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis of the starting powders showed that the mutual chemical reaction temperature was approximately 1410 degrees C and the existence of TiO2 can effectively inhibit the decomposition of HA at elevated temperatures. The positive influence of TiO2 addition on the shear strength was revealed. The incorporation of 10 vol% TiO2 significantly improved the Young's modulus of HA coatings from 24.82 (+/- 2.44) GPa to 43.23 (+/- 3.20) GPa. It decreased to 38.51 (+/- 3.65) GPa as the amount of TiO2 increased to 20 vol%. However, the addition of TiO2 has a negative bias on the adhesive strength of HA coatings especially when the content of TiO2 reached 20 vol%. This is attributed to the weak chemical bonding and brittle phases existing at the splats' interface that resulted from mutual chemical reactions. The fracture toughness exhibited values of 0.48 (+/- 0.08) MPa m0.5, 0.60 (+/- 0.07) MPa m0.5 and 0.67 (+/- 0.06) MPa m0.5 for the HA coating, 10 vol% TiO2 blended HA coating and 20 vol% TiO2 blended HA coating respectively. The addition of TiO2 in HA coating with the amount of less than 20 vol% is suggested for satisfactory toughening effect in HVOF HA coating. PMID:11762858

  5. Characterization and electrochemical properties of Ni(Si)/Ni5Si2 multiphase coatings prepared by HVOF spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdian, M. M.; Raeissi, K.; Salehi, M.

    2012-11-01

    Ni(Si)/Ni5Si2 powders were produced by mechanical alloying (MA) of Ni-25 at.% Si powder mixture. Then, the as-milled powders were sprayed onto copper substrate using high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) process. The phase composition and microstructure of the coatings were examined by X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. Polarization tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were also employed to study corrosion performance of the coatings in 3.5% NaCl solution. The results showed that although single phase Ni3Si was formed during annealing of Ni(Si)/Ni5Si2 powders, but, only Ni(Si) and Ni5Si2 are present in HVOF coatings and no new phase has been formed during spraying. The coatings had microhardness up to 746 HV0.05. Further investigations showed the corrosion performance of multiphase coatings in 3.5% NaCl solution was better than that of copper substrate. The phase transitions during MA, HVOF and annealing processes were discussed in association with Ni-Si phase diagram and nature of each process.

  6. Comparative High-Temperature Corrosion Behavior of Ni-20Cr Coatings on T22 Boiler Steel Produced by HVOF, D-Gun, and Cold Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, Gagandeep; Bala, Niraj; Kaur, Narinder; Singh, Harpreet; Prakash, Satya

    2014-01-01

    To protect materials from surface degradations such as wear, corrosion, and thermal flux, a wide variety of materials can be deposited on the materials by several spraying processes. This paper examines and compares the microstructure and high-temperature corrosion of Ni-20Cr coatings deposited on T22 boiler steel by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF), detonation gun spray, and cold spraying techniques. The coatings' microstructural features were characterized by means of XRD and FE-SEM/EDS analyses. Based upon the results of mass gain, XRD, and FE-SEM/EDS analyses it may be concluded that the Ni-20Cr coating sprayed by all the three techniques was effective in reducing the corrosion rate of the steel. Among the three coatings, D-gun spray coating proved to be better than HVOF-spray and cold-spray coatings.

  7. High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of HVOF-sprayed Coatings for Use in Thixoextrusion Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Picas, J. A.; Punset, M.; Menargues, S.; Campillo, M.; Baile, M. T.; Forn, A.

    2011-05-04

    The dies used for the thixoextrusion of steels have to be capable of withstanding complex thermal and mechanical loads, while giving a sufficient wear resistance against abrasion and adhesion at very high temperatures. In order to improve the wear resistance and reduce the heating of the extrusion die it can be protected with a hard cermet coating. The purpose of this work is to study the high-temperature performance of CrC-CoNiCrAlY coating and explore the potential application of this coating to improve dies used in thixoextrusion processes. A two-layer 75CrC-25CoNiCrAlY coating with a CoNiCrAlY bond-coating was fabricated by the HVOF thermal spray process on a steel substrate. Coatings were heat-treated at a range of temperatures between 900 deg. C and 1100 deg. C. The microstructural characterization of the coatings before and after heat treatment was conducted by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and an X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The mechanical properties of coatings were determined as a function of the temperature of heat treatment. The bond coat effect on the thermal shock resistance of CrC-CoNiCrAlY coating was analyzed.

  8. High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of HVOF-sprayed Coatings for Use in Thixoextrusion Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picas, J. A.; Punset, M.; Menargues, S.; Campillo, M.; Baile, M. T.; Forn, A.

    2011-05-01

    The dies used for the thixoextrusion of steels have to be capable of withstanding complex thermal and mechanical loads, while giving a sufficient wear resistance against abrasion and adhesion at very high temperatures. In order to improve the wear resistance and reduce the heating of the extrusion die it can be protected with a hard cermet coating. The purpose of this work is to study the high-temperature performance of CrC-CoNiCrAlY coating and explore the potential application of this coating to improve dies used in thixoextrusion processes. A two-layer 75CrC-25CoNiCrAlY coating with a CoNiCrAlY bond-coating was fabricated by the HVOF thermal spray process on a steel substrate. Coatings were heat-treated at a range of temperatures between 900 °C and 1100 °C. The microstructural characterization of the coatings before and after heat treatment was conducted by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and an X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The mechanical properties of coatings were determined as a function of the temperature of heat treatment. The bond coat effect on the thermal shock resistance of CrC-CoNiCrAlY coating was analyzed.

  9. Microstructure and Wear Resistance of Fe-Based Amorphous Metallic Coatings Prepared by HVOF Thermal Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z.; Wang, L.; He, D. Y.; Wang, F. C.; Liu, Y. B.

    2010-12-01

    Amorphous metallic coatings with a composition of Fe48Cr15Mo14C15B6Y2 were fabricated by means of high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying process. The microstructure and wear performance of the coatings were characterized simultaneously in this article. It is found that the coatings present a dense layered structure with the porosity below 1.5%. The coatings primarily consist of amorphous matrix and some precipitated nanocrystals, though a fraction of Fe-rich phases and oxide stringers also formed during deposited process. High thermal stability enables the amorphous coatings to work below 920 K temperature without crystallization. Depending on the structural advantage, the amorphous coatings exhibit high average microhardness of 997.3 HV0.2, and excellent wear resistance during dry frictional wear process. The dominant wear mechanism of amorphous coating under this condition is fatigue wear, leading to partial or entire flaking off of the lamellae. In addition, the appearance of oxidative wear accelerates the failure of fatigue wear.

  10. Sliding and Rolling Wear Behavior of HVOF-Sprayed Coatings Derived from Conventional, Fine and Nanostructured WC-12Co Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Baumann, I.; Hollingsworth, P. S.; Hagen, L.

    2014-01-01

    Fine structured and nanostructured materials represent a promising class of feedstock for future applications, which has also attracted increasing interest in the thermal spray technology. Within the field of wear protection, the application of fine structured or nanostructured WC-Co powders in the High Velocity Oxy-Fuel flame spraying technique (HVOF) provides novel possibilities for the manufacturing of cermet coatings with improved mechanical and tribological characteristics. In this study the tribological behavior of HVOF sprayed coatings derived from conventional, fine and nanostructured WC-12Co powders under sliding and rolling wear are investigated and the results are compared to C45 steel (Mat.-No. 1.0503). In addition, sliding and rolling wear effects on a microscopic level are scrutinized. It has been shown that under optimized spray conditions the corresponding fine and nanostructured WC-12Co coatings are able to obtain higher wear resistances and lower friction coefficients than the conventional coatings. This can be attributed to several scaling effects of the microstructure and to the phase evolution of the coating, which are discussed.

  11. Influence of particle velocity and molten phase on the chemical and mechanical properties of HVOF-sprayed structural coatings of alloy 316L

    SciTech Connect

    Voggenreiter, H.; Huber, H.; Beyer, S.; Spies, H.J.

    1995-12-31

    The HP/HVOF spraying process allows the production of oxide-low, thick coatings with low porosity. This fact implies the feasibility of load-bearing HP/HVOF-sprayed structures. Optimum mechanical properties are required for structural applications of HP/HVOF-sprayed iron base alloy 316L. Process-parameter-dependent particle properties like temperature and velocity strongly influence the microstructure and the chemical and mechanical properties of HP/HVOF-sprayed alloy 316L. Results of metallographical and chemical analysis and laser-optic-aided particle velocity measurement lead to a new understanding of particle oxidation based on a high volume fraction of liquid phase and high particle impact velocity. The volume fraction of oxides greatly affects the mechanical properties of homogenized HP/HVOF-316 L. Optimum process parameters result in reduced oxide content less than 0.9% and consequently in strength and elongation comparable to that of wrought alloy 316L. Additionally to these excellent mechanical properties, a low porosity level of about 0.1 to 0.2% is achieved. These fundamental results were transferred successfully to a new type of combustion chamber for hypersonic aircraft with reduced complexity and weight.

  12. Supplementary Microstructural Features Induced During Laser Surface Melting of Thermally Sprayed Inconel 625 Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Nauman; Voisey, K. T.; McCartney, D. G.

    2014-02-01

    Laser surface melting of thermally sprayed coatings has the potential to enhance their corrosion properties by incorporating favorable microstructural changes. Besides homogenizing the as-sprayed structure, laser melting may induce certain microstructural modifications (i.e., supplementary features) in addition to those that directly improve the corrosion performance. Such features, being a direct result of the laser treatment process, are described in this paper which is part of a broader study in which high velocity oxy-fuel sprayed Inconel 625 coatings on mild-steel substrates were treated with a diode laser and the modified microstructure characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The laser treated coating features several different zones, including a region with a microstructure in which there is a continuous columnar dendritic structure through a network of retained oxide stringers.

  13. The characteristics of alumina scales formed on HVOF-sprayed MCrAlY coatings[High Velocity Oxygen Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Toma, D.; Brandl, W.; Koester, U.

    2000-02-01

    HVOF MCrAlY (M = Ni, Co) coatings were isothermally oxidized in synthetic air between 850 and 1050 C for times up to 167 hr. During thermal spraying, aluminum and yttrium oxidized to form a fine oxide dispersion. The HVOF MCrAlY coatings exhibited a microstructure similar to ODS alloys. The fine dispersion consisted of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and aluminum-yttrium oxides. The oxidation experiments showed that the oxidation rate of HVOF coatings was two times slower than the oxidation rate of VPS MCrAlY coatings. The oxidation mechanism changed mainly in the transient-stage (no metastable modification of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed) and it was assumed that the oxide dispersion hindered diffusion of various elements from the bulk material during oxidation. The formation of the fine oxide dispersion also influenced the adherence of the oxide scale. The microstructures of the transient oxide scales were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  14. Cracking and Spalling Behavior of HVOF Thermally Sprayed WC-Co-Cr Coating in Bend and Axial Fatigue Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, M.; Eybel, R.; Asselin, B.; Monerie-Moulin, F.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, WC-10Co-4Cr coating was sprayed by high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) process on Almen strip and axial fatigue coupon. Three-point bend test was used to bend Almen strip coating specimens with tensile and compressive stress applied to the coating. Axial fatigue coating specimens were tested at a load stress of 1250 MPa and a stress ratio of R = -1. Process condition of Thermal spraying was found to have an effect on spalling performance of the coating in the fatigue test. The mechanism of cracking and spalling process in the coating was studied in bend and fatigue conditions. Based on deformation difference between the coating and the substrate, the factors, especially coating thickness, to impact the coating spalling behavior in axial fatigue test are discussed. HVOF-sprayed WC-10Co-4Cr coating matches the deformation of base substrate by cracking when tensile stress is applied in bend and fatigue tests because the coating has very limit deformation capability. In axial fatigue test of WC-10Co-4Cr coating specimen, the substrate works in a stress-to-strain manner; however the coating works in a strain-to-stress manner and is stressed due to the substrate deformation.

  15. Corrosion behavior of an HVOF-sprayed Fe3Al coating in a high-temperature oxidizing/sulfidizing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Shrestha, S.; Harvey, D.

    2005-01-01

    An iron aluminide (Fe3Al) intermetallic coating was deposited onto a F22 (2.25Cr-1Mo) steel substrate using a JP-5000 high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray system. The as-sprayed coating was examined by electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction and was characterized in terms of oxidation and adhesion. Fe3Al-coated steel specimens were exposed to a mixed oxidizing/sulfidizing environment at 500, 600, 700, and 800DGC for approximately seven days. The gaseous environment consisted of N2-10%CO-5%CO2-2%H2O-0.12%H2S (by volume). All specimens gained mass after exposure to the environment and the mass gains were found to be inversely proportional to temperature increases. Representative specimens exposed at each temperature were cross-sectioned and subjected to examination under a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray mapping. Results are presented in terms of corrosion weight gain and corrosion product formation. The purpose of the research presented here was to evaluate the effectiveness of an HVOF-sprayed Fe3Al coating in protecting a steel substrate exposed to a fossil energy environment.

  16. A new high-velocity oxygen fuel process for making finely structured and highly bonded inconel alloy layers from liquid feedstock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X. Q.; Roth, J.; Gandy, D. W.; Frederick, G. J.

    2006-12-01

    High-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spray processes are used in applications requiring the highest density and adhesion strength, which are not achievable in most other thermal spray processes. Similar to other thermal spray processes, however, a normal HVOF process is unable to apply fine powders less than 10 µm via a powder feeder. The advantages of using smaller and even nanosized particles in a HVOF process include uniform microstructure, higher cohesion and adhesion, full density, lower internal stress, and higher deposition efficiency. In this work, a new process has been developed for HVOF forming of fine-grained Inconel 625 alloy layers using a liquid feedstock containing small alloy particles. Process investigations have shown the benefits of making single and duplex layered coatings with full density and high bond strength, which are attributed to the very high kinetic energy of particles striking on the substrates and the better melting of the small particles.

  17. Influence of HVOF sprayed WC/Co coatings on the high-cycle fatigue strength of mild steel

    SciTech Connect

    Steffens, H.D.; Wilden, J.; Nassenstein, K.; Moebus, S.

    1995-12-31

    HVOF thermally sprayed WC/Co coatings are applied onto components which are exposed to wear caused by abrasion, erosion, fretting and sliding. Beside wear attacks and static stresses in lots of cases alternating mechanical stresses caused by dynamic loads occur additionally. Therefore, the fatigue resistance of WC/Co 88/12 and WC/Co 83/17 coated specimens was investigated by high-cycle fatigue tests (HCF). The results of the fatigue tests were documented in statistically ascertained Woehler-diagrams (S-N-curves). Furthermore, the mechanisms of failure are discussed.

  18. HVOF-Sprayed Coatings Engineered from Mixtures of Nanostructured and Submicron Al2O3-TiO2 Powders: An Enhanced Wear Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, R. S.; Moreau, C.; Marple, B. R.

    2007-12-01

    In previous studies, it has been demonstrated that nanostructured Al2O3-13 wt.%TiO2 coatings deposited via air plasma spray (APS) exhibit higher wear resistance when compared to that of conventional coatings. This study aimed to verify if high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF)-sprayed Al2O3-13 wt.%TiO2 coatings produced using hybrid (nano + submicron) powders could improve even further the already recognized good wear properties of the APS nanostructured coatings. According to the abrasion test results (ASTM G 64), there was an improvement in wear performance by a factor of 8 for the HVOF-sprayed hybrid coating as compared to the best performing APS conventional coating. When comparing both hybrid and conventional HVOF-sprayed coatings, there was an improvement in wear performance by a factor of 4 when using the hybrid material. The results show a significant antiwear improvement provided by the hybrid material. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at low/high magnifications showed the distinctive microstructure of the HVOF-sprayed hybrid coating, which helps to explain its excellent wear performance.

  19. Improvement on mechanical properties and wear resistance of HVOF sprayed WC-12Co coatings by optimizing feedstock structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ning; Guo, Lei; Cheng, Zhenxiong; Wu, Huantao; Ye, Fuxing; Zhang, Keke

    2014-11-01

    WC-12Co powders with a bimodal size distributed WC particles were used to produce coating by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying (B coating), and HVOF sprayed WC-12Co coatings from microstructured, submicrostructured and nanostructured powders were also fabricated for comparison. The phase constitution, microstructure, mechanical properties and wear performance of the coatings were investigated. Decarburization occurred during coatings preparation, and the carbide retention of B coating was 0.934, higher than that of nanostructured coating. B coating exhibited typical multimodal microstructure, and had considerably high microhardness and the highest fracture toughness among the four coatings, with the values of 1291 HV0.1 and 10.76 MPa m1/2, respectively. When sliding against GCr15 ring in block-on-ring configuration, B coating exhibited the lowest wear rate and relatively lower friction coefficient compared with other coatings, with the average values of 0.94 × 10-7 mm3 N-1 m-1 and 0.63 at 245 N load, respectively, which could be attributed to the concrete-like structure.

  20. Deposition behavior and microstructural development of TiNi powder particles in low temperature-HVOF spraying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Q. S.; Zhou, K. S.; Deng, C. M.; Liu, M.; Xiao, X. L.; Deng, C. G.

    2013-10-01

    TiNi alloy particles were deposited at high velocity on Q235 steel substrate in thermally softened solid state by the modified high-velocity oxygen fuel spraying process (so called low temperature HVOF). Microstructural developments and deposition behaviors of a deposited single particle were observed by high resolution scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A single TiNi particle sprayed onto the substrate was severely deformed and the jetting-out phenomenon occurred in the margin of the splat. Extremely fine grains were observed along the interfacial boundary of the deposited particles where the most severe deformation had taken place. The grain refinement at the high deformed region of a splat was arisen from dynamic recrystallization of heavily deformed grain during deformation.

  1. Influence of the HVOF Gas Composition on the Thermal Spraying of WC-Co Submicron Powders (-8 + 1 μm) to Produce Superfine Structured Cermet Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Vogli, E.; Baumann, I.; Matthaeus, G.; Ostrowski, T.

    2008-12-01

    Thermal spraying technology represents a novel and promising approach to protect forming tools with complex surfaces and highest shape accuracy against abrasive wear and galling. However, due to high or nonuniform layer thicknesses or inappropriate surface roughness conventional coarse-structured coatings are not suitable to achieve this aim. The application of novel submicron or nanoscaled feedstock materials in the thermal spray process can provide the deposition of cermet coatings with significantly improved characteristics and is recently of great interest in science and industry. In this collaborative study, the feeding and HVOF spraying of WC-Co submicron powders (-8 + 1 μm) have been investigated to manufacture superfine structured, wear resistant, near-net-shape coatings with improved macroscopic properties and smooth surfaces. The influences of varying HVOF gas compositions on the spray process and the coating properties have been analyzed.

  2. Progress in fabrication of large magnetic sheilds by using extended YBCO thick films sprayed on stainless steel with the HVOF technique

    SciTech Connect

    Pavese, F.; Bergadano, E.; Ferri, D.

    1997-06-01

    Fabricating a full box-type magnetic shield, by spraying a thick film of commercial YBCO powder on stainless steel with the oxygen-fuel high-velocity technique (HVOF, also referred to as {open_quotes}continuous detonation spray{close_quotes} (CDS)), requires the solution of several specific problems since the design stage of the project. The design problems of this type of shield are examined and the results obtained in the early stages of the realization are discussed.

  3. Analytical methods to characterize heterogeneous raw material for thermal spray process: cored wire Inconel 625

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, T.; Bonebeau, S.; Drehmann, R.; Grund, T.; Pawlowski, L.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    In wire arc spraying, the raw material needs to exhibit sufficient formability and ductility in order to be processed. By using an electrically conductive, metallic sheath, it is also possible to handle non-conductive and/or brittle materials such as ceramics. In comparison to massive wire, a cored wire has a heterogeneous material distribution. Due to this fact and the complex thermodynamic processes during wire arc spraying, it is very difficult to predict the resulting chemical composition in the coating with sufficient accuracy. An Inconel 625 cored wire was used to investigate this issue. In a comparative study, the analytical results of the raw material were compared to arc sprayed coatings and droplets, which were remelted in an arc furnace under argon atmosphere. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis were used to determine the chemical composition. The phase determination was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results were related to the manufacturer specifications and evaluated in respect to differences in the chemical composition. The comparison between the feedstock powder, the remelted droplets and the thermally sprayed coatings allows to evaluate the influence of the processing methods on the resulting chemical and phase composition.

  4. Deposition Mechanisms and Oxidation Behaviors of Ti-Ni Coatings Deposited in Low-Temperature HVOF Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Q. S.; Zhou, K. S.; Deng, C. M.; Liu, M.; Xu, L. P.; Deng, C. G.

    2014-08-01

    Three kinds of Ti-Ni powders were deposited on 316L stainless steel by low-temperature high-velocity oxygen fuel (LT-HVOF) spraying process, respectively. Deposition mechanisms and oxidation behaviors of the coatings were researched in this paper. The coating deposited from TiNi intermetallic powder had obvious laminar structure and the oxygen content was the highest among the three kinds of coatings. The oxygen content of the coating deposited from small-sized Ni-clad Ti powder was still high due to the melting of parts of particles. However, most of the coarse Ni-clad Ti powder was deposited in solid states without changes of chemical compositions and phase compositions. The oxygen content of the coating deposited from coarse Ni-clad Ti powder was the lowest among the three kinds of coatings. It indicated that the deposition behavior of the coating could effectively preserve the inner titanium from oxidation. The results of the present research demonstrated that it is entirely feasible to deposit active metal materials such as titanium and titanium alloy through the optimizing selection of powder in the LT-HVOF process.

  5. Physicochemical Characteristics of Dust Particles in HVOF Spraying and Occupational Hazards: Case Study in a Chinese Company

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haihong; Li, Haijun; Li, Xinyu

    2016-06-01

    Dust particles generated in thermal spray process can cause serious health problems to the workers. Dust particles generated in high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying WC-Co coatings were characterized in terms of mass concentrations, particle size distribution, micro morphologies, and composition. Results show that the highest instantaneous exposure concentration of dust particles in the investigated thermal spray workshop is 140 mg/m3 and the time-weighted average concentration is 34.2 mg/m3, which are approximately 8 and 4 times higher than the occupational exposure limits in China, respectively. The large dust particles above 10 μm in size present a unique morphology of polygonal or irregular block of crushed powder, and smaller dust particles mainly exist in the form of irregular or flocculent agglomerates. Some heavy metals, such as chromium, cobalt, and nickel, are also found in the air of the workshop and their concentrations are higher than the limits. Potential occupational hazards of the dust particles in the thermal spray process are further analyzed based on their characteristics and the workers' exposure to the nanoparticles is assessed using a control banding tool.

  6. The microstructure and wear mechanisms of wire-arc sprayed Inconel 625 coatings on 319 aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Popoola, O.; McCune, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    The direct formation of valve seats on aluminum cylinder heads provides enhanced conductive cooling of the valves and the opportunity to redesign the head for larger valves and improved engine performance. A two-wire arc-spray process was used to deposit coatings from Inconel 625 feedstock wire onto 319 cast aluminum test pieces, simulating the situation in an engine head. The microstructure and apparent wear mechanisms in dry sliding against a 4620 steel counterpiece were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray energy-dispersive microanalysis. Wear tests were conducted using the ASTM G66-77 block-on-ring test with wear volume measured using 3D laser probe profilometer. The wear mechanisms of this tribosystem are principally adhesive and delamination wear.

  7. HVOF Spraying of Fe-Based MMC Coatings with In Situ Formation of Hard Particles by Hot Isostatic Pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röttger, A.; Weber, S. L.; Theisen, W.; Rajasekaran, B.; Vaßen, R.

    2012-03-01

    Thick (2-3 mm) Fe-base coatings with admixed ferrotitanium (Fe30Ti70) were applied to austenitic steel by a high-velocity oxy-fuel process (HVOF). Hot-isostatic pressing (HIP) was carried out to the decrease porosity and to increase the material strength, wear resistance, and adhesive bond strength of the deposited coating to the substrate material. SEM and XRD investigations confirmed the formation of hard titanium carbide (TiC) particles during HIP treatment as a result of strong carbon diffusion out of the metal matrix and into the Fe30Ti70 particles. The mechanical and wear properties of the densified coatings were investigated by means of shear tests, hardness measurements, and abrasive wear tests. A comparison of the coatings in the as-sprayed and the HIPed state showed a large increase in the wear resistance due to in situ TiC formation.

  8. High Power Diode Laser-Treated HP-HVOF and Twin Wire Arc-Sprayed Coatings for Fossil Fuel Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, B. S.

    2013-08-01

    This article deals with high power diode laser (HPDL) surface modification of twin wire arc-sprayed (TWAS) and high pressure high velocity oxy-fuel (HP-HVOF) coatings to combat solid particle erosion occurring in fossil fuel power plants. To overcome solid particle impact wear above 673 K, Cr3C2-NiCr-, Cr3C2-CoNiCrAlY-, and WC-CrC-Ni-based HVOF coatings are used. WC-CoCr-based HVOF coatings are generally used below 673 K. Twin wire arc (TWA) spraying of Tafa 140 MXC and SHS 7170 cored wires is used for a wide range of applications for a temperature up to 1073 K. Laser surface modification of high chromium stainless steels for steam valve components and LPST blades is carried out regularly. TWA spraying using SHS 7170 cored wire, HP-HVOF coating using WC-CoCr powder, Ti6Al4V alloy, and high chromium stainless steels (X20Cr13, AISI 410, X10CrNiMoV1222, 13Cr4Ni, 17Cr4Ni) were selected in the present study. Using robotically controlled parameters, HPDL surface treatments of TWAS-coated high strength X10CrNiMoV1222 stainless steel and HP-HVOF-coated AISI 410 stainless steel samples were carried out and these were compared with HPDL-treated high chromium stainless steels and titanium alloy for high energy particle impact wear (HEPIW) resistance. The HPDL surface treatment of the coatings has improved the HEPIW resistance manifold. The improvement in HPDL-treated stainless steels and titanium alloys is marginal and it is not comparable with that of HPDL-treated coatings. These coatings were also compared with "as-sprayed" coatings for fracture toughness, microhardness, microstructure, and phase analyses. The HEPIW resistance has a strong relationship with the product of fracture toughness and microhardness of the HPDL-treated HP-HVOF and TWAS SHS 7170 coatings. This development opens up a possibility of using HPDL surface treatments in specialized areas where the problem of HEPIW is very severe. The HEPIW resistance of HPDL-treated high chromium stainless steels and

  9. A Study on Wear Resistance of HVOF-Sprayed Ni-MoS2 Self-Lubricating Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. L.; Jeng, M. C.; Hwang, J. R.; Chang, C. H.

    2015-02-01

    Composite coating techniques are becoming increasingly popular owing to their peculiar performances. In this study, the wear resistance of thermally sprayed Ni-MoS2 composite coatings on an AISI 1020 steel substrate was investigated. Ni-MoS2 composite powder (size: 60-90 μm) containing 25 wt.% of dispersed MoS2 was prepared by electroless plating. Ni-MoS2 composite coatings were then prepared by HVOF thermal spraying. The coatings were characterized by structural, surface morphological, and compositional analyses by means of microhardness tests, SEM/EDS, XRD, and ICP-AES. For the evaluation of their anti-wear properties, the composites were subjected to ball-on-disk dry wear tests based on the ASTM G99 standard at room temperature. Experimental results showed that some of the MoS2 content dispersed in the Ni-based composite coating burnt away during the high-temperature spraying process, thereby reducing the MoS2 concentration in the coating. In the wear test, the weight loss in the Ni-MoS2 composite coating was minimal under a low load (<15 N) but increased rapidly with increasing load (>30 N). The average wear rate of the coatings was found to be ~1/40 times that of a Ni coating, showing that the wear resistance of the composite coatings was significantly improved by MoS2 addition.

  10. Effect of Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Properties of HVOF-Sprayed Co-Cr-W Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdková, Šárka; Smazalová, Eva; Pala, Zdeněk

    2016-02-01

    Co-Cr-W HVOF-sprayed protective coatings are used for their high oxidation and wear resistance. Apart from the oxidation resistance, the stability of their mechanical properties in relation to thermal loading is crucial with respect to the most common high-temperature application areas. This work is focused mainly on evaluation of the heat-induced changes in the phase composition and related mechanical properties. It was shown that the original powder, composed fully from face-centered cubic Co-based alloy, partly changes its phase composition during spraying to a hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure. The annealing further increases the ratio of the hcp phase in the structure. The heat-induced phase changes are accompanied by an increase in the coatings' hardness and cohesion strength. The abrasive and adhesive wear behavior was evaluated. While the coatings' heat treatment had a positive effect on the coefficient of friction, the abrasive and adhesive wear resistance of annealed coating was lower compared to as-sprayed coating.

  11. Nano-Borides and Silicide Dispersed Composite Coating on AISI 304 Stainless Steel by Laser-Assisted HVOF Spray Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prashant; Majumdar, Jyotsna Dutta

    2014-10-01

    The study concerned a detailed microstructural investigation of nano-borides (Cr2B and Ni3B) and nano-silicide (Ni2Si) dispersed γ-nickel composite coating on AISI 304 stainless steel by HVOF spray deposition of the NiCrBSi precursor powder and subsequent laser surface melting. A continuous wave diode laser with an applied power of 3 kW and scan speed of 20 mm/s in argon shroud was employed. The characterization of the surface in terms of microstructure, microtexture, phases, and composition were carried out and compared with the as-coated (high-velocity oxy-fuel sprayed) surface. Laser surface melting led to homogenization and refinement of microstructures with the formation of few nano-silicides of nickel along with nano-borides of nickel and chromium (Ni3B, Cr2B, and Cr2B3). A detailed microtexture analysis showed the presence of no specific texture in the as-sprayed and laser-melted surface of Cr2B and Ni3B phases. The average microhardness was improved to 750-900 VHN as compared to 250 VHN of the as-received substrate. Laser surface melting improved the microhardness further to as high as 1400 VHN due to refinement of microstructure and the presence of silicides.

  12. Study of the HVOF Ni-Based Coatings' Corrosion Resistance Applied on Municipal Solid-Waste Incinerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilemany, J. M.; Torrell, M.; Miguel, J. R.

    2008-06-01

    Oxidation of exchanger steel tubes causes important problems in Municipal Solid-Waste Incinerator (MSWI) plants. The present paper shows a possible solution for this problem through High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coatings. A comparative study was carried out between powder and wire Ni-based thermal spray coatings (with the same composition). These optimized coatings were compared based on their microstructure, wear properties (ASTM G99-90, ASTM G65-91), and erosion-corrosion (E-C) resistance. An E-C test designed in the Thermal Spray Centre was performed to reproduce the mechanisms that take place in a boiler. Studying the results of this test, the wire HVT Inconel coating sprayed by propylene appears to be the best alternative. A commercial bulk material with a composition similar to Ni-based coatings was tested to find the products of the oxidation reactions. The protective mechanisms of these materials were assessed after studying the results obtained for HVOF coatings and the bulk material where the presence of nickel and chromium oxides as a corrosion product can be seen. Kinetic evolution of the Ni-based coatings can be studied by thermogravimetric analysis. The protection that Inconel coatings give to the tube through the difference of the gain mass can be seen. Ni-based HVOF coatings by both spray conditions are a promising alternative to MSWI protection against chlorine environments, and their structures have a very important role.

  13. Characterization of the bone-like apatite precipitated on high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed calcium phosphate deposits.

    PubMed

    Khor, K A; Li, H; Cheang, P

    2003-02-01

    Bone-like apatite was precipitated on the surface of thermal sprayed calcium phosphate coatings following in vitro incubation in a simulated body fluid. The coatings were initially deposited on titanium alloy substrates by the high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray technique. Structural characterization and mechanical evaluation of the precipitated apatite layer were conducted. Results showed that the precipitation rate was directly influenced by the local Ca(2+) concentration in the vicinity of the coating's surface and that preferential dissolution of certain phases was found to accelerate the precipitation of the bone-like apatite. The dense precipitates exhibited a competitive Young's modulus value of approximately 120GPa, which was obtained through nanoindentation. This compared favorably to the calcium phosphate matrix. Differences in microstructure at various locations within the layer resulted in altered Young's modulus and microhardness values. Precipitation mechanism investigation was carried out through a comparative experiment. Chemical analysis showed that the precipitation of bone-like apatite on the calcium phosphate coating was quite conceivably a partial diffusion-controlled process. PMID:12485795

  14. Properties of heat-treated calcium phosphate coatings deposited by high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Khor, K A; Cheang, P

    2002-05-01

    The influence of crystallization, upon heat treatment, on the properties of high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings was investigated. The characterization of the HA coating was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) was employed to determine the crystallization temperature of the amorphous phase in an as-sprayed HA coating. The study demonstrated the effect of crystallization on the coating properties by considering the changes in materials chemistry, crystallinity level, and mechanical performance. Results showed that complete crystallization of the amorphous phase occurred at approximately 700 degrees C and the crystallization temperature was dependent on sample heating rate in the DSC test. The changes of ion groups were detected by FTIR, before and after the phase transformation. The crystallization of the coating after annealing at 750 degrees C resulted in a significant increase of the coatings' adhesive strength and shear strength, which attained maximum values 34 +/- 3 and 14.1 -/+ 0.8 MPa, respectively. Young's modulus increased from 21 +/- 1 to 25 +/- 2 GPa. Microhardness measurements confirmed the changes in coating properties. It is also found that the transformation from the amorphous phase has crystalline HA as the only resultant phase detected by XRD. PMID:11962650

  15. The influence of WC-Co HVOF thermal spraying on the microstructure of an Al-4 Cu alloy substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Guilemany, J.M.; Nutting, J.; Dong, Z.; Paco, J.M. de

    1995-10-01

    The High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying process can be used to produce a dense hard coating onto a metallic surface with a good bond between the coating and the substrate. Having developed techniques for the examination of the coating substrate interfacial regions with steel it was thought appropriate to examine the interfacial structure with other substrates. An aluminium copper alloy was chosen for this study for the following reasons: (1) There had been little earlier work on substrate reactions when using aluminium alloys, the published data was chiefly concerned with characterizing the coatings. (2) Aluminium alloys have a much lower melting point than steel, hence the substrate melted zone was likely to be much greater than that found in steel. (3) The structural characteristics of aged aluminium copper alloys have been well described and hence the structural changes produced in the alloy by thermal spraying could be compared with clearly established structural data so giving markers for the temperature profile well below the immediate interface region. As in the previous investigation the transmission electron microscope was used to examine thin foils prepared from the interface region and at various depths below the interface into the substrate.

  16. Effects of Rare Earth Elements on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of HVOF-Sprayed WC-Co Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Gou, Guoqing; Wang, Xiaomin; Jia, Qiang; Chen, Hui; Tu, Mingjing

    2014-10-01

    Rare earth has been widely used in materials manufacturing to improve hardness and toughness. In this paper, conventional, nanostructured, and rare earth CeO2-doped WC-12Co powders were sprayed by using HVOF spraying technology. Microstructure, hardness, elastic modulus, and fracture toughness of the three coatings were investigated. The results showed that nanostructured WC-12Co coatings possessed the densest microstructure and excellent combination of strength and toughness. The WC particles with the size ranging from 50 to 500 nm distributed uniformly in the nanostructured WC-12Co coating. The average free path of Co matrix in rare earth-doped WC-12Co coating was shorter than that of conventional WC-12Co coating. XRD results showed no obvious decarburization in all three coatings. The addition of rare earth could improve the mechanical properties of the coating compared with that without rare earth. The hardness value of nanostructured WC-12Co coating (12.2 GPa) was similar to that of rare earth-doped WC-12Co coating (12.2 GPa), which was 15.1% higher than that of conventional WC-12Co coating. The elastic modulus and fracture toughness of nanostructured WC-12Co coating were the highest, and that of conventional WC-12Co coating was the lowest.

  17. Effect of High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) Thermal Spraying on Physical and Mechanical Properties of Type 316 Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Terry C. Totemeier

    2005-09-01

    Data on the microstructural, physical, and mechanical characteristics of high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF)-sprayed type 316 stainless steel coatings are presented and compared with properties of wrought 316 stainless steel. Coatings were prepared at three different spray particle velocities; coating characteristics are presented as a function of velocity. The coatings had relatively low porosity and oxide contents and were significantly harder than annealed, wrought 316 stainless steel. The hardness difference is primarily attributed to high dislocation densities resulting from peening imparted by high-velocity spray particles. The coating hardness increased with increasing spray particle velocity, reflecting increased peening effects. The elastic modulus of the coatings was essentially identical to wrought material. The mean coefficient of thermal expansion of as-sprayed coatings was lower than wrought material, but the expansion of annealed coatings matched the wrought behavior.

  18. Investigations on the Behavior of HVOF and Cold Sprayed Ni-20Cr Coating on T22 Boiler Steel in Actual Boiler Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, Niraj; Singh, Harpreet; Prakash, Satya; Karthikeyan, J.

    2012-01-01

    High temperature corrosion accompanied by erosion is a severe problem, which may result in premature failure of the boiler tubes. One countermeasure to overcome this problem is the use of thermal spray protective coatings. In the current investigation high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and cold spray processes have been used to deposit commercial Ni-20Cr powder on T22 boiler steel. To evaluate the performance of the coatings in actual conditions the bare as well as the coated steels were subjected to cyclic exposures, in the superheater zone of a coal fired boiler for 15 cycles. The weight change and thickness loss data were used to establish kinetics of the erosion-corrosion. X-ray diffraction, surface and cross-sectional field emission scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive spectroscopy (FE-SEM/EDS) and x-ray mapping techniques were used to analyse the as-sprayed and corroded specimens. The HVOF sprayed coating performed better than its cold sprayed counterpart in actual boiler environment.

  19. Assessment of Abrasive Wear of Nanostructured WC-Co and Fe-Based Coatings Applied by HP-HVOF, Flame, and Wire Arc Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, C. R. C.; Libardi, R.; Camargo, F.; Fals, H. C.; Ferraresi, V. A.

    2014-10-01

    Thermal spray processes have been widely used to minimize losses caused by wear mechanisms. Sprayed deposits using conventional wire and powder materials have been long solving tribological problems in engineering equipment. More recently, the option for new different technologies and consumables like nanostructured powder materials and nanocomposite cored wires have expanded the possibilities for technical solutions. Cored wire technology allows the use of compositions that cannot be drawn into wire form like carbides in metallic matrix and high-temperature materials, thus, intensifying the use of spraying processes with low operating cost to demanding wear and corrosion applications. The objective of this work was to study the mechanical characteristics and wear performance of coatings obtained by Flame, Wire Arc, and HVOF spraying using selected nanostructured WC10Co4Cr, WC12Co, and Fe-based 140 MXC powder and wire materials. Abrasive wear performance of the coatings was determinate following the ASTM G-65 standard. Based on the results, a higher abrasive wear resistance was found for the HVOF-sprayed WC10Co4Cr nanostructured coating.

  20. Effect of Spray Particle Velocity on Cavitation Erosion Resistance Characteristics of HVOF and HVAF Processed 86WC-10Co4Cr Hydro Turbine Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R. K.; Kamaraj, M.; Seetharamu, S.; Pramod, T.; Sampathkumaran, P.

    2016-06-01

    The hydro plants utilizing silt-laden water for power generation suffer from severe metal wastage due to particle-induced erosion and cavitation. High-velocity oxy-fuel process (HVOF)-based coatings is widely applied to improve the erosion life. The process parameters such as particle velocity, size, powder feed rate, temperature, affect their mechanical properties. The high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) technology, with higher particle velocities and lower spray temperatures, gives dense and substantially nonoxidized coating. In the present study, the cavitation resistance of 86WC-10Co4Cr-type HVOF coating processed at 680 m/s spray particle velocity was compared with HVAF coatings made at 895, 960, and 1010 m/s. The properties such as porosity, hardness, indentation toughness, and cavitation resistance were investigated. The surface damage morphology has been analyzed in SEM. The cohesion between different layers has been examined qualitatively through scratch depth measurements across the cross section. The HVAF coatings have shown a lower porosity, higher hardness, and superior cavitation resistance. Delamination, extensive cracking of the matrix interface, and detachment of the WC grains were observed in HVOF coating. The rate of metal loss is low in HVAF coatings implying that process parameters play a vital role in achieving improved cavitation resistance.

  1. Effect of Spray Particle Velocity on Cavitation Erosion Resistance Characteristics of HVOF and HVAF Processed 86WC-10Co4Cr Hydro Turbine Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R. K.; Kamaraj, M.; Seetharamu, S.; Pramod, T.; Sampathkumaran, P.

    2016-08-01

    The hydro plants utilizing silt-laden water for power generation suffer from severe metal wastage due to particle-induced erosion and cavitation. High-velocity oxy-fuel process (HVOF)-based coatings is widely applied to improve the erosion life. The process parameters such as particle velocity, size, powder feed rate, temperature, affect their mechanical properties. The high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) technology, with higher particle velocities and lower spray temperatures, gives dense and substantially nonoxidized coating. In the present study, the cavitation resistance of 86WC-10Co4Cr-type HVOF coating processed at 680 m/s spray particle velocity was compared with HVAF coatings made at 895, 960, and 1010 m/s. The properties such as porosity, hardness, indentation toughness, and cavitation resistance were investigated. The surface damage morphology has been analyzed in SEM. The cohesion between different layers has been examined qualitatively through scratch depth measurements across the cross section. The HVAF coatings have shown a lower porosity, higher hardness, and superior cavitation resistance. Delamination, extensive cracking of the matrix interface, and detachment of the WC grains were observed in HVOF coating. The rate of metal loss is low in HVAF coatings implying that process parameters play a vital role in achieving improved cavitation resistance.

  2. Formation Mechanisms, Structure, and Properties of HVOF-Sprayed WC-CoCr Coatings: An Approach Toward Process Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varis, T.; Suhonen, T.; Ghabchi, A.; Valarezo, A.; Sampath, S.; Liu, X.; Hannula, S.-P.

    2014-08-01

    Our study focuses on understanding the damage tolerance and performance reliability of WC-CoCr coatings. In this paper, the formation of HVOF-sprayed tungsten carbide-based cermet coatings is studied through an integrated strategy: First-order process maps are created by using online-diagnostics to assess particle states in relation to process conditions. Coating properties such as hardness, wear resistance, elastic modulus, residual stress, and fracture toughness are discussed with a goal to establish a linkage between properties and particle characteristics via second-order process maps. A strong influence of particle state on the mechanical properties, wear resistance, and residual stress stage of the coating was observed. Within the used processing window (particle temperature ranged from 1687 to 1831 °C and particle velocity from 577 to 621 m/s), the coating hardness varied from 1021 to 1507 HV and modulus from 257 to 322 GPa. The variation in coating mechanical state is suggested to relate to the microstructural changes arising from carbide dissolution, which affects the properties of the matrix and, on the other hand, cohesive properties of the lamella. The complete tracking of the coating particle state and its linking to mechanical properties and residual stresses enables coating design with desired properties.

  3. The effect of spraying parameters on micro-structural properties of WC-12%Co coating deposited on copper substrate by HVOF process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathwara, Nishit; Jariwala, C.; Chauhan, N.; Raole, P. M.; Basa, D. K.

    2015-08-01

    High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal sprayed coatingmade from Tungsten Carbide (WC) isconsidered as one of the most durable materials as wear resistance for industrial applications at room temperature. WC coating offers high wear resistance due to its high hardness and tough matrix imparts. The coating properties strongly depend on thermal spray processing parameters, surface preparation and surface finish. In this investigation, the effect of variousHVOF process parameters was studied on WC coating properties. The WC-12%Co coating was produced on Copper substrate. Prior to coating, theCopper substrate surface was prepared by grit blasting. WC-12%Co coatings were deposited on Coppersubstrates with varying process parameters such as Oxygen gas pressure, Air pressure, and spraying distance. Microstructure of coating was examined using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and characterization of phasespresentin the coating was examined by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Microhardness of all coatingswas measured by VickerMicrohardness tester. At low Oxygen Pressure(10.00 bar), high Air pressure (7bar) and short nozzle to substrate distance of 170mm, best coating adhesion and porosity less structure isachieved on Coppersubstrate.

  4. The effect of spraying parameters on micro-structural properties of WC-12%Co coating deposited on copper substrate by HVOF process

    SciTech Connect

    Sathwara, Nishit; Jariwala, C. Chauhan, N.; Raole, P. M.; Basa, D. K.

    2015-08-28

    High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal sprayed coatingmade from Tungsten Carbide (WC) isconsidered as one of the most durable materials as wear resistance for industrial applications at room temperature. WC coating offers high wear resistance due to its high hardness and tough matrix imparts. The coating properties strongly depend on thermal spray processing parameters, surface preparation and surface finish. In this investigation, the effect of variousHVOF process parameters was studied on WC coating properties. The WC-12%Co coating was produced on Copper substrate. Prior to coating, theCopper substrate surface was prepared by grit blasting. WC-12%Co coatings were deposited on Coppersubstrates with varying process parameters such as Oxygen gas pressure, Air pressure, and spraying distance. Microstructure of coating was examined using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and characterization of phasespresentin the coating was examined by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Microhardness of all coatingswas measured by VickerMicrohardness tester. At low Oxygen Pressure(10.00 bar), high Air pressure (7bar) and short nozzle to substrate distance of 170mm, best coating adhesion and porosity less structure isachieved on Coppersubstrate.

  5. Heat treatment effects on the tribological performance of HVOF sprayed Co-Mo-Cr-Si coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolelli, G.; Lusvarghi, L.

    2006-12-01

    The tribological behavior of high-velocity oxyfuel sprayed Co-28%Mo-17%Cr-3%Si coatings, both assprayed and after heat treatments at 200, 400, and 600 °C for 1 h, has been studied. The as-sprayed coating contains oxide stringers and is mostly amorphous. It has low hardness (˜6.7 GPa) and toughness and undergoes adhesive wear against 100Cr6 steel. The friction coefficient increases up to ˜0.9, so the flash temperature reaches a critical oxidation value; then, friction decreases and increases again. This phenomenon occurs periodically. Much adhesive wear occurs in the first stage. Abrasive wear prevails against alumina pin: the coating wear rate is lower because it possesses good plasticity. Thermal effects still occur. The 600 °C treatment causes formation of submicrometric crystals. Hardness increases (˜8.8 GPa), adhesive wear is prevented, the friction coefficient has no peaks. Against the alumina pin, wear rates remain similar to the as-sprayed case. Nevertheless, the friction coefficient has no peaks and its final value is lowered (from 0.84 to 0.75).

  6. Mechanical property changes in HVOF sprayed nano-structured WC-17wt.%Ni(80/20)Cr coating with varying substrate roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Mahmud, Tarek A.; Saha, Gobinda C.; Khan, Tahir I.

    2014-06-01

    Thermally sprayed coatings developed by use of high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) process are known for their superior wear characteristics. In many industrial applications, new parts as well as repaired and refurbished parts coated with WC-Co microstructured coatings have shown enhanced erosion-corrosion and abrasive resistant properties when compared with other surface modification technologies such as chrome replacement, fusion welding, and cladding. This research has been further directed towards the development of HVOF technique to deposit dense nanostructured ceramic-metallic composites. The mechanism of plastic deformation, which determines the strength and ductility of materials, in nanostructured materials are different, thereby leading to novel mechanical properties. Various parameters can influence these properties, but the substrate surface preparation by grit blasting before thermal spraying is one critical parameter. The grit blasting process generates a surface roughness, which ensures mechanical anchoring between the coating and the substrate surface. In this work, the sliding wear behavior and microhardness of WC-17wt.%Ni(80/20)Cr cermet coatings deposited onto carbon steel substrates are examined as a function of three different surface roughness values under different loads. The results show that as-prepared surface with different blasting profiles have a direct influence on the surface roughness and wear performance of the coatings. The sliding wear resistance of the coatings increased as the substrate surface roughness increased. The wear depth decreased with increasing surface roughness.

  7. Effect of Mn on the Formation of Oxide Buildups Upon HVOF-Sprayed MCrAlY-Ceramic-Type Cermet Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tsai-Shang

    2011-03-01

    Thermal spray coatings have been widely used on hearth rolls in a continuous annealing line to improve steel sheet quality and to prolong the roll service life. One of the common defects formed on a working hearth roll is the oxide buildup. HVOF-sprayed CoCrAlY-CrB2-Y2O3 coating was used in this study to duplicate buildups by reacting with Fe and Mn oxides. The reaction was performed in a furnace at 900 °C with inert gases flowing through. After reacting for 8 days, large Mn-rich buildups were formed on the coating while the buildups without Mn were very small. Mn was shown to enhance the formation of buildups. Buildups from a hearth roll were also examined and compared with the laboratory ones.

  8. Study of the Splat Formation for HVOF Sprayed NiCr on Stainless Steel Substrates and the Effects of Heating and Boiling Pre-Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossard, S.; Munroe, P. R.; Hyland, M. M.

    2010-09-01

    The HVOF process is a widely applied thermal spray technique used to form dense coatings with high bond strength. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which the coating forms and adheres to the substrate. The present study investigates the splat formation process by examining the morphology and microstructure of NiCr single splats sprayed on to stainless steel, using a range of electron microscopy techniques. Notable features include evidence of the deformation of the steel substrate by the impacting particle, the presence of porosity towards the centre of the splat, and under the rim due to the curling-up of the splat, and the identification of several oxide phases, including Cr2O3, FeO and NiO. From these observations, a description of the splat formation process is proposed. Effects of the substrate surface chemistry were studied by comparing the morphology of the splats on several substrates having undergone various pre-treatments.

  9. Bond Strength of Multicomponent White Cast Iron Coatings Applied by HVOF Thermal Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maranho, Ossimar; Rodrigues, Daniel; Boccalini, Mario; Sinatora, Amilton

    2009-12-01

    Multicomponent white cast iron is a new alloy that belongs to system Fe-C-Cr-W-Mo-V, and because of its excellent wear resistance it is used in the manufacture of hot rolling mills rolls. To date, this alloy has been processed by casting, powder metallurgy, and spray forming. The high-velocity oxyfuel process is now also considered for the manufacture of components with this alloy. The effects of substrate, preheating temperature, and coating thickness on bond strength of coatings have been determined. Substrates of AISI 1020 steel and of cast iron with preheating of 150 °C and at room temperature were used to apply coatings with 200 and 400 μm nominal thickness. The bond strength of coatings was measured with the pull-off test method and the failure mode by scanning electron microscopic analysis. Coatings with thickness of 200 μm and applied on substrates of AISI 1020 steel with preheating presented bond strength of 87 ± 4 MPa.

  10. Development and Application of HVOF Sprayed Spinel Protective Coating for SOFC Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomann, O.; Pihlatie, M.; Rautanen, M.; Himanen, O.; Lagerbom, J.; Mäkinen, M.; Varis, T.; Suhonen, T.; Kiviaho, J.

    2013-06-01

    Protective coatings are needed for metallic interconnects used in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks to prevent excessive high-temperature oxidation and evaporation of chromium species. These phenomena affect the lifetime of the stacks by increasing the area-specific resistance (ASR) and poisoning of the cathode. Protective MnCo2O4 and MnCo1.8Fe0.2O4 coatings were applied on ferritic steel interconnect material (Crofer 22 APU) by high velocity oxy fuel spraying. The substrate-coating systems were tested in long-term exposure tests to investigate their high-temperature oxidation behavior. Additionally, the ASRs were measured at 700 °C for 1000 h. Finally, a real coated interconnect was used in a SOFC single-cell stack for 6000 h. Post-mortem analysis was carried out with scanning electron microscopy. The deposited coatings reduced significantly the oxidation of the metal, exhibited low and stable ASR and reduced effectively the migration of chromium.

  11. Application of high velocity oxygen fuel flame (HVOF) spraying to fabrication of La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.8Mg0.2O3 electrolyte for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shan-Lin; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu; Yang, Guan-Jun; Liu, Meilin

    2016-01-01

    La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.8Mg0.2O3 (LSGM) is considered a promising electrolyte for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs) due to its high ionic conductivity and stability under fuel cell operating conditions. Here we report our findings in investigating the feasibility of using a high velocity oxygen fuel flame (HVOF) spraying process for cost-effective fabrication of dense LSGM electrolyte membranes. The flame and in-flight particle behavior were simulated numerically to optimize the microstructure and phase compositions of the LSGM deposits. The measured gas leakage rate of an LSGM deposit is ∼7 × 10-7 cm4gf-1 s-1. The single cell assembled with 50-55 μm HVOF-sprayed LSGM electrolyte shows open circuit voltage (OCV) of 1.08 V at 800 °C, suggesting that the as-sprayed LSGM deposit is dense enough for direct application as SOFC electrolyte. At 800 °C, the ionic conductivity of the sprayed LSGM deposit is ∼0.04 S cm-1, indicating that the HVOF spraying is a promising process for low-temperature fabrication of dense LSGM electrolyte membranes for IT-SOFCs.

  12. Effect of ultrasonic cavitation erosion on corrosion behavior of high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) sprayed near-nanostructured WC-10Co-4Cr coating.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sheng; Wu, Yuping; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zheng, Yugui; Qin, Yujiao; Lin, Jinran

    2015-11-01

    The effect of ultrasonic cavitation erosion on electrochemical corrosion behavior of high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) sprayed near-nanostructured WC-10Co-4Cr coating in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution, was investigated using free corrosion potential, potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in comparison with stainless steel 1Cr18Ni9Ti. The results showed that cavitation erosion strongly enhanced the cathodic current density, shifted the free corrosion potential in the anodic direction, and reduced the magnitude of impedance of the coating. The impedance of the coating decreased more slowly under cavitation conditions than that of the stainless steel 1Cr18Ni9Ti, suggesting that corrosion behavior of the coating was less affected by cavitation erosion than that of the stainless steel. PMID:26186856

  13. Structure and Tribological Characteristics of HVOF Coatings Sprayed from Powder Blends of Cr3C2-25NiCr and NiCrBSi Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Määttä, A.; Kanerva, U.; Vuoristo, P.

    2011-01-01

    HVOF spraying was used to prepare coatings from mechanical blends of Cr3C2-25NiCr and NiCrBSi powders. The aim of this study is to study the tribological behavior of coatings prepared from such powder blends. The coatings were studied under dry sliding conditions particularly at high temperatures. Tribological properties of the coatings were characterized using a specific hot-button tribological tester at the temperature of 300 °C in air, and a pin-on-disk test at room temperature. Addition of NiCrBSi resulted in coatings, which showed low coefficient of friction in high temperatures, and in high levels of contact pressure and sliding speed.

  14. Mechanical and Tribological Properties of HVOF-Sprayed (Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni) Composite Coating on Ductile Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksiazek, Marzanna; Boron, Lukasz; Radecka, Marta; Richert, Maria; Tchorz, Adam

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the investigations was to compare the microstructure, mechanical, and wear properties of Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni and Cr3C2-NiCr coatings deposited by HVOF technique (the high-velocity oxygen fuel spray process) on ductile cast iron. The effect of nickel particles added to the chromium carbide coating on mechanical and wear behavior in the system of Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr+Ni/ductile cast iron was analyzed in order to improve the lifetime of coated materials. The structure with particular emphasis of characteristic of the interface in the system of composite coating (Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr+Ni)/ductile cast iron was studied using the optical, scanning, and transmission electron microscopes, as well as the analysis of chemical and phase composition in microareas. Experimental results show that HVOF-sprayed Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni composite coating exhibits low porosity, high hardness, dense structure with large, partially molten Ni particles and very fine Cr3C2 and Cr7C3 particles embedded in NiCr alloy matrix, coming to the size of nanocrystalline. The results were discussed in reference to examination of bending strength considering cracking and delamination in the system of composite coating (Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr+Ni)/ductile cast iron as well as hardness and wear resistance of the coating. The composite structure of the coating provides the relatively good plasticity of the coating, which in turn has a positive effect on the adhesion of coating to the substrate and cohesion of the composite coating (Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni) in wear conditions.

  15. High-Temperature Exposure Studies of HVOF-Sprayed Cr3C2-25(NiCr)/(WC-Co) Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harpreet; Kaur, Manpreet; Prakash, Satya

    2016-06-01

    In this research, development of Cr3C2-25(NiCr) + 25%(WC-Co) composite coating was done and investigated. Cr3C2-25(NiCr) + 25%(WC-Co) composite powder [designated as HP2 powder] was prepared by mechanical mixing of [75Cr3C2-25(NiCr)] and [88WC-12Co] powders in the ratio of 75:25 by weight. The blended powders were used as feedstock to deposit composite coating on ASTM SA213-T22 substrate using High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) spray process. High-temperature oxidation/corrosion behavior of the bare and coated boiler steels was investigated at 700 °C for 50 cycles in air, as well as, in Na2SO4-82%Fe2(SO4)3 molten salt environment in the laboratory. Erosion-corrosion behavior was investigated in the actual boiler environment at 700 ± 10 °C under cyclic conditions for 1500 h. The weight-change technique was used to establish the kinetics of oxidation/corrosion/erosion-corrosion. X-ray diffraction, field emission-scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectroscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and EDS elemental mapping techniques were used to analyze the exposed samples. The uncoated boiler steel suffered from a catastrophic degradation in the form of intense spalling of the scale in all the environments. The oxidation/corrosion/erosion-corrosion resistance of the HVOF-sprayed HP2 coating was found to be better in comparison with standalone Cr3C2-25(NiCr) coating. A simultaneous formation of protective phases might have contributed the best properties to the coating.

  16. High-Temperature Exposure Studies of HVOF-Sprayed Cr3C2-25(NiCr)/(WC-Co) Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harpreet; Kaur, Manpreet; Prakash, Satya

    2016-08-01

    In this research, development of Cr3C2-25(NiCr) + 25%(WC-Co) composite coating was done and investigated. Cr3C2-25(NiCr) + 25%(WC-Co) composite powder [designated as HP2 powder] was prepared by mechanical mixing of [75Cr3C2-25(NiCr)] and [88WC-12Co] powders in the ratio of 75:25 by weight. The blended powders were used as feedstock to deposit composite coating on ASTM SA213-T22 substrate using High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) spray process. High-temperature oxidation/corrosion behavior of the bare and coated boiler steels was investigated at 700 °C for 50 cycles in air, as well as, in Na2SO4-82%Fe2(SO4)3 molten salt environment in the laboratory. Erosion-corrosion behavior was investigated in the actual boiler environment at 700 ± 10 °C under cyclic conditions for 1500 h. The weight-change technique was used to establish the kinetics of oxidation/corrosion/erosion-corrosion. X-ray diffraction, field emission-scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectroscopy (FE-SEM/EDS), and EDS elemental mapping techniques were used to analyze the exposed samples. The uncoated boiler steel suffered from a catastrophic degradation in the form of intense spalling of the scale in all the environments. The oxidation/corrosion/erosion-corrosion resistance of the HVOF-sprayed HP2 coating was found to be better in comparison with standalone Cr3C2-25(NiCr) coating. A simultaneous formation of protective phases might have contributed the best properties to the coating.

  17. Mechanical and Tribological Properties of HVOF-Sprayed (Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni) Composite Coating on Ductile Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksiazek, Marzanna; Boron, Lukasz; Radecka, Marta; Richert, Maria; Tchorz, Adam

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the investigations was to compare the microstructure, mechanical, and wear properties of Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni and Cr3C2-NiCr coatings deposited by HVOF technique (the high-velocity oxygen fuel spray process) on ductile cast iron. The effect of nickel particles added to the chromium carbide coating on mechanical and wear behavior in the system of Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr+Ni/ductile cast iron was analyzed in order to improve the lifetime of coated materials. The structure with particular emphasis of characteristic of the interface in the system of composite coating (Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr+Ni)/ductile cast iron was studied using the optical, scanning, and transmission electron microscopes, as well as the analysis of chemical and phase composition in microareas. Experimental results show that HVOF-sprayed Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni composite coating exhibits low porosity, high hardness, dense structure with large, partially molten Ni particles and very fine Cr3C2 and Cr7C3 particles embedded in NiCr alloy matrix, coming to the size of nanocrystalline. The results were discussed in reference to examination of bending strength considering cracking and delamination in the system of composite coating (Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr+Ni)/ductile cast iron as well as hardness and wear resistance of the coating. The composite structure of the coating provides the relatively good plasticity of the coating, which in turn has a positive effect on the adhesion of coating to the substrate and cohesion of the composite coating (Cr3C2-NiCr+Ni) in wear conditions.

  18. Characterization and Evaluation of Cyclic Hot Corrosion Resistance of Detonation-Gun Sprayed Ni-5Al Coatings on Inconel-718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saladi, Sekar; Menghani, Jyoti V.; Prakash, Satya

    2015-06-01

    The high temperature hot corrosion behavior of bare and detonation-gun-sprayed Ni-5Al coatings on Ni-based superalloy Inconel-718 is comparatively discussed in the present study. Hot corrosion studies were carried out at 900 °C for 100 cycles in Na2SO4-60% V2O5 molten salt environment under cyclic heating and cooling conditions. The thermo-gravimetric technique was used to establish the kinetics of hot corrosion. X-ray diffraction, SEM/EDAX, and X-ray mapping techniques were used to analyze the hot corrosion products of bare and coated superalloys. The results indicate that Ni-5Al-coated superalloy showed very good hot corrosion resistance. The overall weight gain and parabolic rate constant of Ni-5Al-coated superalloy were less in comparison with the bare superalloy. The D-gun-sprayed Ni-5Al coating was found to be uniform, adherent, and dense in hot corrosion environment. The formation of nickel- and aluminum-rich oxide scale might have contributed for the better hot corrosion resistance of the coated superalloy.

  19. Corrosion and Wear Studies of Cr3C2NiCr-HVOF Coatings Sprayed on AA7050 T7 Under Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnani, M.; Suegama, P. H.; Espallargas, N.; Fugivara, C. S.; Dosta, S.; Guilemany, J. M.; Benedetti, A. V.

    2009-09-01

    In this work, cermet coatings were prepared by high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) technique using a Diamalloy 3007 powder. The influence of the spray parameters on corrosion, friction, and abrasive wear resistance was studied. The samples were obtained using the standard conditions (253 L/min of oxygen and 375 L/min of compressed air), higher oxygen flux (341 L/min), and higher carrier gas flux (500 L/min). The coatings were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD). X-ray diffraction and SEM studies showed well-bounded coating/substrate interface, pores, metallic matrix, chromium oxides, carbides, and carbides dissolution into the matrix. In comparison with the standard condition, the sample prepared using higher oxygen flux showed the highest carbide dissolution because of the high temperature achieved in the spray process. When the carrier gas flux was increased, the sample showed denser structure because of the higher particle velocity. The friction and abrasive wear resistance of the coatings were studied using rubber wheel and ball-on-disk tests. All samples showed similar sliding and abrasive behavior, and all of them showed better performance than the aluminum alloy. The electrochemical behavior was evaluated using open-circuit potential ( E OC) measurements, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and potentiodynamic polarization curves. The coating prepared with higher carrier gas flux showed the highest corrosion resistance in 3.5% NaCl solution and probably no pitting attack to the substrate occurred even after around 26 h of test. Tests performed for longer immersion times showed that the total impedance values significantly decreased (6 and 4 times) for samples sprayed using standard and higher oxygen flux, and no great change for sample sprayed using higher carrier gas flux was observed. The last sample presents a corrosion resistance around 200 times higher than the others.

  20. Effect of composition and corrosion properties of the metallic matrix on the erosion-corrosion behavior of HVOF sprayed WC-coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Rogne, T.; Solem, T.; Berget, J.

    1998-12-31

    In corrosive media the wear resistance of ceramic-metallic coatings is dependent on the corrosion resistance of the metal matrix. Other factors that will affect the coating deterioration are the corrosivity of the medium and any galvanic interaction from the surrounding material. This paper presents results from a study where different types of WC(Co/Cr/Mo/Ni) powders have been sprayed by HVOF, Diamond Jet 2600 Hybrid equipment. The properties of the sprayed coatings have been verified by metallographic studies and by erosion-corrosion testing both under corrosive and non-corrosive conditions. The results clearly demonstrate the importance of having a metal matrix at least as corrosion resistance as the surrounding materials. When wear exposed components in pipe systems, pumps or valves are coated with a WC type coating, the corrosion resistance of the metal matrix should be compatible to the material of the rest of the system. This is especially important when the surrounding materials are corrosion resistant alloys as stainless steels, where the coatings otherwise will act as an anode. This work is relevant for field production equipment in the oil and gas industry.

  1. Influence of Fine Powder Feedstock (-10 + 2 μm) on the HVOF Spraying Characteristics, Coating Morphology, and Properties of WC-CoCr 86-10-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Nebel, J.; Piotrowski, W.

    2013-03-01

    The use of fine feedstock powder can extend the feasibility and scope of HVOF coatings to new fields of applications. Especially for the purpose of near-net-shape coatings, these powders facilitate homogeneous layer morphologies, and smooth coating surfaces. However, the small particle sizes also lead to several challenges. One major issue is the in-flight behavior which is distinctly affected by the low mass and relatively large specific surface of the particles. In this paper, the in-flight and coating characteristics of WC-CoCr 86-10-4 (-10 + 2 μm) were investigated. It was determined that the fine powder feedstock shows a high sensitivity to the gas flow, velocity, and temperature of the spray jet. Because of their low mass inertia, their velocity, for example, is actually influenced by local pressure nodes (shock diamonds) in the supersonic flow. Additionally, the relatively large specific surface of the particles promotes partial overheating and degradation. Nevertheless, the morphological and mechanical properties of the sprayed layer are hardly affected. In fact, the coatings feature a superior surface roughness, porosity, hardness, and wear resistance.

  2. The effect of HVOF sprayed coatings on the elevated temperature high cycle fatigue behavior of a martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    This study reports the influence of three High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) applied coatings on the high cycle fatigue resistance of a martensitic stainless steel substrate at room and elevated temperatures. It was found that chromium carbide and tungsten carbide coated specimens exhibited significantly lower fatigue capability compared to the substrate material at elevated temperatures while IN625 coated specimens exhibited a small beneficial effect. An attempt is made to explain the observed behavior in terms of elastic modulus mismatch, thermal expansion mismatch, residual stress and coating/substrate properties. It is concluded that coated metallic components must be analyzed as composite structures and that data generated for design properties must be performed on specimens which represent the geometry and characteristics of intended component.

  3. Synergistic effect of ultrasonic cavitation erosion and corrosion of WC-CoCr and FeCrSiBMn coatings prepared by HVOF spraying.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sheng; Wu, Yuping; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zheng, Yugui; Zheng, Yuan; Lin, Jinran

    2016-07-01

    The high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) spraying process was used to fabricate conventional WC-10Co-4Cr coatings and FeCrSiBMn amorphous/nanocrystalline coatings. The synergistic effect of cavitation erosion and corrosion of both coatings was investigated. The results showed that the WC-10Co-4Cr coating had better cavitation erosion-corrosion resistance than the FeCrSiBMn coating in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. After eroded for 30 h, the volume loss rate of the WC-10Co-4Cr coating was about 2/5 that of the FeCrSiBMn coating. In the total cumulative volume loss rate under cavitation erosion-corrosion condition, the pure cavitation erosion played a key role for both coatings, and the total contribution of pure corrosion and erosion-induced corrosion of the WC-10Co-4Cr coating was larger than that of the FeCrSiBMn coating. Mechanical effect was the main factor for cavitation erosion-corrosion behavior of both coatings. PMID:26964984

  4. Ultrasonic cavitation erosion of high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) sprayed near-nanostructured WC-10Co-4Cr coating in NaCl solution.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sheng; Wu, Yuping; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zheng, Yugui; Qin, Yujiao; Lin, Jinran

    2015-09-01

    The high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) spraying process was used to prepare near-nanostructured WC-10Co-4Cr coating. The cavitation erosion behavior and mechanism of the coating in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution were analyzed in detail. The results showed that the amorphous phase and WC grain were present in the coating. The cavitation erosion resistance of the coating was about 1.27 times that of the stainless steel 1Cr18Ni9Ti under the same testing conditions. The effects of erosion time on the microstructural evolution were discussed. It was revealed that cracks initiated at the edge of pre-existing pores and propagated along the carbide-binder interface, leading to the pull-out of carbide particle and the formation of pits and craters on the surface. The main failure mechanism of the coating was erosion of the binder phases, brittle detachment of hard phases and formation of pitting corrosion products. PMID:25617967

  5. Effect of Water Vapor on the 1100oC Oxidation Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed TBCs with HVOF NiCoCrAlX Bond Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, James A; Unocic, Kinga A; Pint, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    With the goal of investigating the reported detrimental effect of water vapor on thermal barrier coating (TBC) performance, furnace cycle experiments were conducted in dry O2 and air with 10 and 50% water vapor at 1100 C. The TBC systems evaluated were air plasma-sprayed (APS), yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coatings with high velocity oxy fuel (HVOF)-deposited NiCoCrAlY or NiCoCrAlYHfSi bond coating. Average TBC lifetime was reduced by ~30% in air with 10% water vapor compared to cycling in dry O2, using 1h cycle durations. Superalloy substrates with Y and La additions also were investigated but showed no statistical change in the average TBC lifetime compared to the base CMSX4 superalloy. In all cases, the bond coating with Hf and Si additions increased YSZ lifetime by 20% or more. Experiments that increased water vapor to 50% showed no further decrease in TBC lifetime. Increasing the cycle frequency to 100h resulted in a large increase in TBC lifetime, especially for the NiCoCrAlYHfSi bond coatings. Co-doping the NiCoCrAl bond coat with Y and Hf was beneficial to TBC lifetime, but did not mitigate the detrimental impact of water vapor.

  6. Erosion behaviour of WC-10Co-4Cr coating on 23-8-N nitronic steel by HVOF thermal spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kumar, Avnish; Sharma, Ashok; Goel, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    WC-10Co-4Cr coating was deposited by high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) process on cast and solution treated (1220 °C/150 min) 23-8-N nitronic steel substrates. Solution treated substrate has shown higher toughness, ductility and impact energy with a marginal reduction in hardness as compared to cast substrate. This influence the coating deposition efficiency and erosion behaviour. Erosion resistance of coatings was evaluated by air jet erosion tester on two different impact angles (30° and 90°). Phases, microstructure and eroded surface of the coating were characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) respectively. It is observed that coating on solution treated substrate was superior to cast substrate. The reason being that coating has dense and well-bonded structure with low porosity, less decarburization and inter-splat oxidation. Higher erosion resistance of coated solution treated 23-8-N nitronic steel was attributed to combination of high fracture toughness and hardness of coating including optimum mechanical properties of the substrate. FESEM analysis reveals that erosion response of WC-10Co-4Cr coating also dependent on the relative size of the impact crater with respect to the WC grain size. Coating is removed by combined mode of ductile and brittle erosion.

  7. Evaluation of Cyclic Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Behavior of HVOF-Sprayed WC-Co/NiCrAlY Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somasundaram, B.; Kadoli, Ravikiran; Ramesh, M. R.

    2014-08-01

    Corrosion of metallic structural materials at an elevated temperature in complex multicomponent gas environments are potential problems in many fossil energy systems, especially those using coal as a feedstock. Combating these problems involves a number of approaches, one of which is the use of protective coatings. The high velocity oxy fuel (HVOF) process has been used to deposit WC-Co/NiCrAlY composite powder on two types of Fe-based alloys. Thermocyclic oxidation behavior of coated alloys was investigated in the static air as well as in molten salt (Na2SO4-60%V2O5) environment at 700 °C for 50 cycles. The thermogravimetric technique was used to approximate the kinetics of oxidation. WC-Co/NiCrAlY coatings showed a lower oxidation rate in comparison to uncoated alloys. The oxidation resistance of WC-Co/NiCrAlY coatings can be ascribed to the oxide layer of Al2O3 and Cr2O3 formed on the outermost surface. Coated alloys extend a protective oxide scale composed of oxides of Ni and Cr that are known to impart resistance to the hot corrosion in the molten salt environment.

  8. Thermal spraying of nanocrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Maggy L.

    The present research addresses the fundamental synergism between thermal spray synthesis, microstructural evolution and mechanical behavior of Ni, Inconel 718 and Fe based 316-stainless steel nanocrystalline materials. Nanocrystalline Ni powders produced by mechanical milling in liquid nitrogen were investigated under isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. Significant grain growth occurred in the case of cryomilled Ni powders even when annealing at lower temperatures (equivalent to about 0.17 Tm), indicating the poor thermal stability of these powders. The activation energy for grain growth was calculated to be 146.2 kJ/mol. The values of the time exponent, n, were very close to 4.0, implying that grain growth was controlled by grain boundary diffusion mechanism. The grain growth behavior of the nanocrystalline Ni powders under non-isothermal annealing conditions showed good correspondence between the experimental results and the theoretical simulation. The grain growth behavior of the milled Inconel 718 powders and coatings, under isothermal annealing indicated that the nanocrystalline powders and coatings exhibited thermal stability against grain growth up to 1073 K (0.67Tm). The average grain sizes of methanol milled powders after annealing at 1273 K for 1 hr, cryomilled powders, HVOF coating of the methanol milled powders and HVOF coatings of the cryomilled Inconel 718 powders were 91, 84, 137 and 102 nm, respectively. In the present study, Zener pinning of nanoscale oxides of (Cr,Fe) contributed to the stability against grain growth during thermal annealing of the nanocrystalline Inconel 718 powders and coatings. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  9. Computational analysis of a three-dimensional High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) Thermal Spray torch

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, B.; Lopez, A.R.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1995-07-01

    An analysis of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray torch is presented using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Three-dimensional CFD results are presented for a curved aircap used for coating interior surfaces such as engine cylinder bores. The device analyzed is similar to the Metco Diamond Jet Rotating Wire torch, but wire feed is not simulated. To the authors` knowledge, these are the first published 3-D results of a thermal spray device. The feed gases are injected through an axisymmetric nozzle into the curved aircap. Argon is injected through the center of the nozzle. Pre-mixed propylene and oxygen are introduced from an annulus in the nozzle, while cooling air is injected between the nozzle and the interior wall of the aircap. The combustion process is modeled assuming instantaneous chemistry. A standard, two-equation, K-{var_epsilon} turbulence model is employed for the turbulent flow field. An implicit, iterative, finite volume numerical technique is used to solve the coupled conservation of mass, momentum, and energy equations for the gas in a sequential manner. Flow fields inside and outside the aircap are presented and discussed.

  10. Microstructural Characterization and Tribological Behavior of HVOF Sprayed NiMoAl Coating from 20 to 800 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Zhou, Huidi; Zhao, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jianmin; An, Yulong; Yan, Fengyuan

    2015-02-01

    NiMoAl coating was deposited by high velocity oxy-fuel spraying from gas-atomized powders and its tribological properties from 20 to 800 °C under unlubricated conditions were evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the coating and corresponding wear tracks to determine the lubrication mechanisms. The friction coefficient of NiMoAl coating that decreased gradually with the increase of temperature exhibited the highest value of 0.8 at 20 °C and the lowest value of 0.29 at 800 °C. Meanwhile, NiMoAl coating also possessed an excellent anti-wear property and the wear rate of the coating maintained at a relatively low value at all test temperatures. Characterizations of worn surfaces revealed that the coating suffered abrasive wear at the low temperature. When the temperature elevated to 600 and 800 °C, molybdenum oxide and nickel molybdate that were formed through tribo-chemistry reactions acted as lubricants at the high temperature. In addition, NiMoAl coating experienced no obvious oxidation or phase transition on the unrubbed surface during the friction test at 800 °C, indicating that the coating performed both thermal stability and lubrication function at the high temperature.

  11. Microstructure and Properties of HVOF-Sprayed NiCrAlY Coatings Modified by Rare Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. F.; Liu, S. Y.; Wang, Y.; Sun, X. G.; Zou, Z. W.; Li, X. W.; Wang, C. H.

    2014-06-01

    Rare earth (RE)-modified NiCrAlY powders were prepared by ultrasonic gas atomization and deposited on stainless steel substrate by high-velocity oxygen fuel spraying. The effects of the RE on the microstructure, properties, and thermal shock resistance of the NiCrAlY coatings were investigated. The results showed that the NiCrAlY powders were refined and distributed uniformly after adding RE, while the number of unmelted particles in the coatings was reduced. Moreover, the RE-modified coatings showed improved microhardness and distribution uniformity. The microhardness of the coating reached a maximum after adding 0.9 wt.% RE, being 34.4 % higher than that of coatings without RE. The adhesive strength increased and reached a maximum after adding 0.6 wt.% RE, being 18.8 % higher than that of coatings without RE. Excessive RE decreased the adhesive strength. The thermal cycle life of NiCrAlY coatings increased drastically with RE addition. The coating with 0.9 wt.% RE showed optimum thermal shock resistance, being 21.2 % higher than that of coatings without RE.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of a wire-feed, high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.R.; Hassan, B.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.

    1996-09-01

    The fluid and particle dynamics of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray torch are analyzed using computational and experimental techniques. Three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results are presented for a curved aircap used for coating interior surfaces such as engine cylinder bores. The device analyzed is similar to the Metco Diamond Jet Rotating Wire (DJRW) torch. The feed gases are injected through an axisymmetric nozzle into the curved aircap. Premixed propylene and oxygen are introduced from an annulus in the nozzle, while cooling air is injected between the nozzle and the interior wall of the aircap. The combustion process is modeled using a single-step finite-rate chemistry model with a total of 9 gas species which includes dissociation of combustion products. A continually-fed steel wire passes through the center of the nozzle and melting occurs at a conical tip near the exit of the aircap. Wire melting is simulated computationally by injecting liquid steel particles into the flow field near the tip of the wire. Experimental particle velocity measurements during wire feed were also taken using a Laser Two-Focus (L2F) velocimeter system. Flow fields inside and outside the aircap are presented and particle velocity predictions are compared with experimental measurements outside of the aircap.

  13. Hot Corrosion Studies of HVOF-Sprayed Coating on T-91 Boiler Tube Steel at Different Operating Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Rakesh; Singh, Hazoor; Sidhu, Buta Singh

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate the usefulness of high velocity oxy fuel-sprayed 75% Cr3C2-25% (Ni-20Cr) coating to control hot corrosion of T-91 boiler tube steel at different operating temperatures viz 550, 700, and 850 °C. The deposited coatings on the substrates exhibit nearly uniform, adherent and dense microstructure with porosity less than 2%. Thermogravimetry technique is used to study the high temperature hot corrosion behavior of uncoated and coated samples. The corrosion products of the coating on the substrate are analyzed by using XRD, SEM, and FE-SEM/EDAX to reveal their microstructural and compositional features for the corrosion mechanisms. It is found that the coated specimens have shown minimum weight gain at all the operating temperatures when compared with uncoated T-91 samples. Hence, coating is effective in decreasing the corrosion rate in the given molten salt environment. Oxides and spinels of nickel-chromium may be the reason for successful resistance against hot corrosion.

  14. A Study on the Cyclic Oxidation Behavior of Detonation-Gun-Sprayed Ni-5Al Coatings on Inconel-718 at 900 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saladi, Sekar; Menghani, Jyoti; Prakash, Satya

    2014-12-01

    Cyclic oxidation behavior of detonation-gun-sprayed Ni-5Al coating on Inconel-718 is discussed in the present study. Oxidation studies were carried out on both bare and coated superalloy substrates in air at 900 °C for 100 cycles. The thermogravimetric technique was used to establish kinetics of oxidation. X-ray diffraction, FESEM/EDAX, and x-ray mapping techniques were used to analyze the oxidation products of bare and coated samples. The weight gain of bare superalloy was higher than the Ni-5Al-coated superalloy. Both bare and Ni-5Al-coated superalloys followed nearly parabolic oxidation behavior. The Ni-5Al coating was able to reduce the overall weight gain by 26.2% in comparison with bare superalloy in the given environment. The better oxidation resistance of Ni-5Al coating may be due the formation of protective oxides phases such as NiO, Al2O3, and NiAl2O4 on the oxidized coating and Cr2O3 at the coating-substrate interface. The Ni-5Al coatings obtained from detonation-gun-spraying process showed very little porosity and low surface roughness values.

  15. HVOF: Particle, flame diagnostics and coating characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalsky, K.A.; Marantz, D.R. ); Smith, M.F.; Oberkampf, W.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Dual focus laser velocimetry (L2F), photographic techniques, and pressure measurements were used to investigate particle and flame characteristics of a high velocity oxygen/fuel (HVOF) flame spray gun known as CDS''. Velocities of alumina, tungsten carbide, and Triballoy particles within the HVOF effluent stream have been measured using L2F techniques. Photographs of the exiting gases were used to determine the local Mach numbers within the gas stream. Measurements of Mach angles in the photographs were used to determine the actual gas velocity in the free jet of the device. Pressure measurements were made on the HVOF device which enabled calculations of the gas content, R, and the specific heat ratio, {kappa}. These calculations combined with estimates of gas temperature are used to calculate gas velocities at Mach 1 (nozzle exit). The HVOF device was used to produce dense WC/12 wt. % Co and Triballoy T-400 coatings. For the two gas flow conditions examined, higher hardness values and densities were observed for coatings deposited at the higher gas flow rates. 1 ref., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. A pragmatic analysis and comparison of HVOF processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, M. L.; Richter, H. J.

    1992-06-01

    A number of high-velocity oxygen-fuel flame (HVOF) systems have evolved during the last 9 years. The most advanced is now challenging the coating qualities produced by the very successful detonation (D-Gun) process. The fundamentals of these various processes are described and compared. A mathematical analysis of an established HVOF gun is profiled. Gas and particle temperatures, velocities, pressures, and Mach numbers are calculated and plotted at various points within the gun and spray stream. Significantly, all measured values were in close agreement with calculated and predicted values. Flow patterns and shock-wave phenomena are also described and compared with actual observations.

  17. In-Service Evaluation of HVOF Coated Main Landing Gear on Navy P-3 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devereaux, jon L.; Forrest, Clint

    2008-01-01

    Due to the environmental and health concerns with Electroplated Hard Chrome (EHC), the Hard Chrome Alternatives Team (HCAT) has been working to provide an alternative wear coating for EHC. The US Navy selected Tungsten-Carbide Cobalt (WC- 17Co) High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coating for this purpose and completed service evaluations on select aircraft components to support the HCAT charter in identifying an alternative wear coating for chrome plating. Other benefits of WC-Co thermal spray coatings over EHC are enhanced corrosion resistance, improved durability, and exceptional wear properties. As part of the HCAT charter and to evaluate HVOF coatings on operational Navy components, the P-3 aircraft was selected for a service evaluation to determine the coating durability as compared to chrome plating. In April 1999, a VP-30 P-3 aircraft was outfitted with a right-hand Main Landing Gear (MLG) shock strut coated with WCCo HYOF thermal spray applied to the piston barrel and four axle journals. The HVOF coating on the piston barrel and axle journals was applied by Southwest United Industries, Inc. This HVOF coated strut assembly has since completed 6,378 landings. Teardown analysis .for this WC-Co HVOF coated MLG asset is significant in assessing the durability of this wear coating in service relative to EHC and to substantiate Life Cycle Cost (LCC) data to support a retrograde transition from EHC to HVOF thermal spray coatings. Findings from this teardown analysis may also benefit future transitions to HVOF thermal spray coatings by identifying enhancements to finishing techniques, mating bearing and liner material improvements, improved seal materials, and improvements in HVOF coating selection.

  18. HVOF repair of steering rams for the USS Saipan

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, A.L.; Jones, S.A.; Wykle, R.J.; McCaw, B.; Hays, R.

    1995-12-31

    The steering rams aboard the USS Saipan (LHA-2) were badly corroded after 18 years of service. These rams are hydraulically operated and change the angle of the ship`s rudder. This corrosion allowed excessive leaking of hydraulic fluid into the machinery space. Permanent repairs were required as the ship has more than 20 years of service life remaining. Two methods of repair were considered, chrome plating and a HVOF applied coating. The size, 13 in. diameter and 15 ft in length, posed a significant problem for either process. The cost of the repair was similar but the time for completion was better with the HVOF process since chrome plating would have to be accomplished off yard. The HVOF process was not available within the shipyard at the time and the process and material to be used had not been approved. Extensive testing was required to get approval to proceed, a facility to accomplish the work had to be built, and the operators and HVOF procedure had to be qualified. After completion of spraying, single point machining and honing was used to obtain the required surface finish. This was the largest single HVOF coating applied by the Navy and great interest to all concerned.

  19. Development of Processing Windows for HVOF Carbide-Based Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Andrew Siao Ming; Howse, Hugo; Wade, Scott A.; Berndt, Christopher C.

    2016-01-01

    Optimized processing windows for spraying high-quality metal carbide-based coatings are developed using particle diagnostic technology. The cermet coatings were produced via the high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spray process and are proposed for service applications such as marine hydraulics. The traditional "trial and error" method for developing coating process parameters is not technically robust, as well as being costly and time consuming. Instead, this contribution investigated the use of real-time monitoring of parameters associated with the HVOF flame jets and particles using in-flight particle diagnostics. Subsequently, coatings can be produced with knowledge concerning the molten particle size, temperature, and velocity profile. The analytical results allow identification of optimized coating process windows, which translate to coatings of lower porosity and improved mechanical performance.

  20. High temperature intermetallic binders for HVOF carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, K.G.; Gruninger, M.F.; Jarosinski, W.J.

    1994-12-31

    Gas turbines technology has a long history of employing the desirable high temperature physical attributes of ceramic-metallic (cermet) materials. The most commonly used coatings incorporate combinations of WC-Co and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr, which have also been successfully utilized in other non-turbine coating applications. Increased turbine operating temperatures and other high temperature service conditions have made apparent the attractive notion of increasing the temperature capability and corrosion resistance of these coatings. In this study the intermetallic binder NiAl has been used to replace the cobalt and NiCr constituents of conventional WC and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} cermet powders. The composite carbide thermal spray powders were fabricated for use in the HVOF coating process. The structure of HVOF deposited NiAl-carbide coatings are compared directly to the more familiar WC-Co and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coatings using X-ray diffraction, back-scattered electron imaging (BEI) and electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Hardness variations with temperature are reported and compared between the NiAl and Co/NiCr binders.

  1. High-Power Diode Laser Surface Treated HVOF Coating to Combat High Energy Particle Impact Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, B. S.; Arya, Vivek; Pant, B. K.

    2013-07-01

    High-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF)-sprayed coatings have performed exceptionally well in low-energy particle impact wear and are accepted worldwide. However, their application for high-energy particle impact wear (HEPIW) requires a different approach and more efforts. HVOF-coating systems typically use WC-Co, WC-Co-Cr, WC-Ni-Cr, and FeCrAlY-Cr3C2 powders. WC-Co-Cr powders are preferred when there is a high demand for corrosion resistance. WC-10Co-4Cr coating powder has been selected in the current study. To improve coating properties such as microhardness, fracture toughness, and HEPIW resistance, a new approach of surface treatment with robotically controlled high-power diode laser (HPDL) is attempted. The robotically controlled HVOF-coating deposition and laser surface treatment were monitored using real-time diagnostic control. The HPDL-treated coating has been compared with "as-sprayed" HVOF coating for HEPIW resistance, fracture toughness, microhardness and microstructure. The coating characteristics and properties after laser surface treatment have improved many times compared with "as-sprayed" HVOF coating. This is due to the elimination of pores in the coating and formation of a metallurgical bond between coating and substrate. This new development opens up a possibility of using such laser treatments in specialized areas where HEPIW damages are acute. The fracture toughness and HEPIW resistance along with optical micrographs of HPDL-treated and untreated HVOF coatings are discussed and reported in this article. HEPIW resistance is observed to be proportional to the product of fracture toughness and microhardness of the HVOF coating.

  2. Characteristics of MCrAlY coatings sprayed by high velocity oxygen-fuel spraying system

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Y.; Saitoh, M.; Tamura, M.

    2000-01-01

    High velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) spraying system in open air has been established for producing the coatings that are extremely clean and dense. It is thought that the HVOF sprayed MCrAlY (M is Fe, Ni and/or Co) coatings can be applied to provide resistance against oxidation and corrosion to the hot parts of gas turbines. Also, it is well known that the thicker coating can be sprayed in comparison with any other thermal spraying systems due to improved residual stresses. However, thermal and mechanical properties of HVOF coatings have not been clarified. Especially, the characteristics of residual stress, that are the most important property from the view point of production technique, have not been made clear. In this paper, the mechanical properties of HVOF sprayed MCrAlY coatings were measured in both the case of as-sprayed and heat-treated coatings in comparison with a vacuum plasma sprayed MCrAlY coatings. It was confirmed that the mechanical properties of HVOF sprayed MCrAlY coatings could be improved by a diffusion heat treatment to equate the vacuum plasma sprayed MCrAlY coatings. Also, the residual stress characteristics were analyzed using a deflection measurement technique and a X-ray technique. The residual stress of HVOF coating was reduced by the shot-peening effect comparable to that of a plasma spray system in open air. This phenomena could be explained by the reason that the HVOF sprayed MCrAlY coating was built up by poorly melted particles.

  3. Particle velocity measurements in HVOF and APS systems

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.; Smith, R.W.; Xiao, Z.; Hoffman, T.T.

    1994-12-31

    Production of reliable, repeatable coatings requires precise control of the process used to deposit them. Significant advances have recently been made in controlling the inputs to thermal spray processes, however, much work remains to be done to control process outputs and to correlate these with coatings characteristics. Thermal spray processes comprise the heating/melting, acceleration, impact, rapid solidification and incremental build-up of a large number of individual particles. Particle velocity is a key process parameter in determining coating properties such as density/porosity, bond strength and residual stress. Laser Stroboscopy and optical image analysis techniques have been used to image particles traveling in high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and air plasma spray (APS) jets. Results indicate that these techniques can be used to measure particle velocity, trajectory and velocity distribution(s) in thermal spray jets. mean particle velocities of {approximately}400 m/s and {approximately}100 m/s have been measured for HVOF and APS respectively.

  4. Oxygen partial pressure measurement in the HVOF gun tail flame

    SciTech Connect

    Korpiola, K.; Hirvonen, J.P.; Jalkanen, H.; Laas, L.; Rossi, F.

    1995-12-31

    An important aspect of the HVOF thermal spray process is the turbulent mixing of the spray jet with the surrounding air. The air mixing into the jet causes undesirable oxidation of the sprayed coating. In this paper a low cost and accurate method to determine the degree of air mixing is presented. This method was used to measure for the first time the partial pressure of oxygen in the thermal spray flame. The measuring method is based on electrochemical determination of oxygen potential in the tail flame using a solid electrolyte cell. The oxygen partial pressure in the HVOF-gun tail flame was measured with the fuel-to-oxygen ratio, the fuel flow rate and the stand-off distance as variables. The oxygen content of the tail flame was measured and found to vary between 4 to 17% depending on fuel to oxygen ratios and stand-off distances. Such high oxygen contents are several magnitudes too high if serious oxidation in the coating is to be avoided.

  5. Numerical simulation of gas and particle flow field characteristics in HVOF guns

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.; Eidelman, S.; Lottati, I.

    1995-12-31

    The particle flow field characteristics in an HVOF gun are examined using numerical simulation techniques. The authors consider the particle injection, acceleration, convection heat transfer, and particle barrel interaction processes in a TAFA JP-5000 HVOF gun. Details of particle trajectories and temperature history as a function of particle size and other parameters are simulated and analyzed. A parameter study is conducted for different particle size, particle injection direction, and particle velocity. The number of distinct particle injection regimes was predicted and analyzed. Particle velocity and temperature at the exit of the barrel are listed. Using numerical simulation, the injection condition can be designed as a function of the set of flow parameters as well as particle properties, including particle size and material properties, to optimize the thermal spray process. A companion paper by the same authors in this proceedings presents a comprehensive analysis of the gas flow conditions for the HVOF gun.

  6. Laser Surface Treatment of Stellite 6 Coating Deposited by HVOF on 316L Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoja-Razavi, Reza

    2016-07-01

    This research aimed to study the effects of laser glazing treatment on microstructure, hardness, and oxidation behavior of Stellite 6 coating deposited by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spraying. The as-sprayed Stellite 6 coating (ST-HVOF) was subjected to single-pass and multiple-pass laser treatments to achieve the optimum glazing parameters. Microstructural characterizations were performed by x-ray diffractometry and field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Two-step optimization showed that laser treatment at the power of 200 W with a scan rate of 4 mm/s causes a surface layer with a thickness of 208 ± 32 µm to be remelted, while the underlying layers retain the original ST-HVOF coating structure. The obtained sample (ST-Glazing) exhibited a highly dense and uniform structure with an extremely low porosity of ~0.3%, much lower than that of ST-HVOF coating (2.3%). The average microhardness of ST-Glazing was measured to be 519 Hv0.3 indicating a 17% decrease compared to ST-HVOF (625 Hv0.3) due to the residual stress relief and dendrite coarsening from submicron size to ~3.4 µm after laser treatment. The lowest oxidation mass gain was obtained for ST-Glazing by 2 mg/cm2 after 8 cycles at 900 °C indicating 52 and 84% improvement in oxidation resistance in comparison to ST-HVOF and bare 316L steel substrates, respectively.

  7. Laser Surface Treatment of Stellite 6 Coating Deposited by HVOF on 316L Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoja-Razavi, Reza

    2016-05-01

    This research aimed to study the effects of laser glazing treatment on microstructure, hardness, and oxidation behavior of Stellite 6 coating deposited by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spraying. The as-sprayed Stellite 6 coating (ST-HVOF) was subjected to single-pass and multiple-pass laser treatments to achieve the optimum glazing parameters. Microstructural characterizations were performed by x-ray diffractometry and field emission scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Two-step optimization showed that laser treatment at the power of 200 W with a scan rate of 4 mm/s causes a surface layer with a thickness of 208 ± 32 µm to be remelted, while the underlying layers retain the original ST-HVOF coating structure. The obtained sample (ST-Glazing) exhibited a highly dense and uniform structure with an extremely low porosity of ~0.3%, much lower than that of ST-HVOF coating (2.3%). The average microhardness of ST-Glazing was measured to be 519 Hv0.3 indicating a 17% decrease compared to ST-HVOF (625 Hv0.3) due to the residual stress relief and dendrite coarsening from submicron size to ~3.4 µm after laser treatment. The lowest oxidation mass gain was obtained for ST-Glazing by 2 mg/cm2 after 8 cycles at 900 °C indicating 52 and 84% improvement in oxidation resistance in comparison to ST-HVOF and bare 316L steel substrates, respectively.

  8. Particle melting behavior during high-velocity oxygen fuel thermal spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Ice, M.; Lavernia, E.

    2001-03-01

    Particle melting behavior during high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying was investigated using Inconel 625 powders. The powder characteristics and coating properties were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray, and microhardness studies. Results indicated that the volume fraction of unmelted particles in the coatings was dependent on the proportion of powder within a specified size range, in these experiments, 30 to 50 µm. This particle size range was primarily determined by the particle temperature, which was measured during spraying. Particle temperature significantly decreased as particle size increased. The microhardness values for the coatings containing unmelted particles were predicted by a simple rule-of-mixtures equation for the case of a low volume fraction of unmelted particles. However, for the condition of high volume fraction of unmelted particles, the measured microhardness values did not compare favorably with the calculated values, probably due to the presence of porosity, which occurred in the form of voids found among unmelted particles. The microstructure and characteristics of the feedstock powder were retained in the corresponding coating under certain spray conditions.

  9. Influence of the multilayer coating obtained by the HVOF method on behavior of the steel barrier at dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radchenko, Pavel; Radchenko, Andrey; Batuev, Stanislav

    2013-06-01

    The high velocity (supersonic) oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray technology is a rather recent addition to family of thermal spray processes. This technique is considered most modern of technologies of spraying. The increase in velocity of the particles at lower temperatures allowed reducing level of oxidation of the particles and to increase the density of a powder coating. In HVOF dry dusting applicators of the first and second generations was used the cylindrical nozzle, whereas in the third generation expanding Laval nozzles are used. This method allows the velocity of a gas flow to exceed to 2000 m/sec, and the velocities of the powder particles 800 m/sec. Recently many results on elastic and strength properties of the multilayer coatings obtained by supersonic flame spraying method are received. But the main part of works on research of the coating obtained by the HVOF method is devoted to research of their stress-strain state at static loadings. In this work the behavior of the steel barrier with the multilayer coating applied by HVOF is researched, at dynamic loading of projectile structure at different velocities of interaction. The problem was solved numerically within Lagrangian approach, a finite element method with the use of the explicit finite difference scheme of G. Johnson.

  10. Hot corrosion behavior of Ni based Inconel 617 and Inconel 738 superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Awadi, G. A.; Abdel-Samad, S.; Elshazly, Ezzat S.

    2016-08-01

    Superalloys are extensively used at high temperature applications due to their good oxidation and corrosion resistance properties in addition to their high stability were made at high temperature. Experimental measurements of hot corrosion at high temperature of Inconel 617 and Inconel 738 superalloys. The experiments were carried out at temperatures 700 °C, 800 °C and 900 °C for different exposure times to up to 100 h. The corrosive media was NaCl and Na2SO4 sprayed on the specimens. Seven different specimens were used at each temperature. The corrosion process is endothermic and the spontaneity increased by increasing temperature. The activation energy was found to be Ea = 23.54 and Ea = 25.18 KJ/mol for Inconel 738 and Inconel 617 respectively. X-ray diffraction technique (XRD) was used to analyze the formed scale. The morphology of the specimen and scale were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that the major corrosion products formed were NiCr2O4, and Co Cr2O4 spinles, in addition to Cr2O3.

  11. Carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum nanocomposite via plasma and high velocity oxy-fuel spray forming.

    PubMed

    Laha, T; Liu, Y; Agarwal, A

    2007-02-01

    Free standing structures of hypereutectic aluminum-23 wt% silicon nanocomposite with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) reinforcement have been successfully fabricated by two different thermal spraying technique viz Plasma Spray Forming (PSF) and High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) Spray Forming. Comparative microstructural and mechanical property evaluation of the two thermally spray formed nanocomposites has been carried out. Presence of nanosized grains in the Al-Si alloy matrix and physically intact and undamaged carbon nanotubes were observed in both the nanocomposites. Excellent interfacial bonding between Al alloy matrix and MWCNT was observed. The elastic modulus and hardness of HVOF sprayed nanocomposite is found to be higher than PSF sprayed composites. PMID:17450788

  12. Analytical and mechanical testing of high velocity oxy-fuel thermal sprayed and plasma sprayed calcium phosphate coatings.

    PubMed

    Haman, J D; Chittur, K K; Crawmer, D E; Lucas, L C

    1999-01-01

    Plasma spraying (PS) is the most frequently used coating technique for implants; however, in other industries a cheaper, more efficient process, high-velocity oxy-fuel thermal spraying (HVOF), is in use. This process provides higher purity, denser, more adherent coatings than plasma spraying. The primary objective of this work was to determine if the use of HVOF could improve the mechanical properties of calcium phosphate coatings. Previous studies have shown that HVOF calcium phosphate coatings are more crystalline than plasma sprayed coatings. In addition, because the coatings are exposed to more complex loading profiles in vivo than standard ASTM tensile tests provide, a secondary objective of this study was to determine the applicability of four-point bend testing for these coatings. Coatings produced by HVOF and PS were analyzed by profilometry, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, four-point bend, and ASTM C633 tensile testing. HVOF coatings were found to have lower amorphous calcium phosphate content, higher roughness values, and lower ASTM C633 bond strengths than PS coatings; however, both coatings had similar crystal unit cell sizes, phases present (including hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, and tetracalcium phosphate), and four-point bend bond strengths. Thus, the chemical, structural, and mechanical results of this study, in general, indicate that the use of HVOF to produce calcium phosphate coatings is equivalent to those produced by plasma spraying. PMID:10556851

  13. The elevated temperature erosion behavior of HVOF tungsten carbide cermet coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.Q.

    1995-12-31

    A series of elevated temperature erosion tests was carried out on HVOF Wc-17Co cermet coating specimens at 300 C and 450 C at particle velocities of 30 m/s and 60 m/s and at impact angles of 30{degree} and 90{degree}, using bed ashes and fly ashes retrieved from operating CFBC boilers. The elevated temperature erosion behavior of HVOF WC-17Co coatings was compared with those of AISI 1018 steel, and other thermal sprayed coatings including a HVOF 75%Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-25%NiCr cermet coating, an arc-sprayed FeCrSiB metallic coating and a flame-sprayed Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-6SiO{sub 2}-4Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic coating. The morphologies of specimens were examined by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The microhardness of the surface of the specimens was measured. It was found that the hardness of the coatings had no direct relationship with erosion-corrosion wastage and the erosion behavior of coatings is closely related to their microstructure and composition. In general, the coatings with larger splat size, coarse and heterogeneous structure, higher porosity and the presence of craze cracks or inclusions have the higher erosion wastage. However, the effect of microstructure of coatings on the erosion behavior varied with erosion test conditions.

  14. Properties of ``Sonarc`` sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Steffens, H.D.; Wilden, J.; Nassenstein, K.

    1995-12-31

    The combination of electric arc and HVOF-spraying offers a lot of opportunities to enlarge the field of application for thermal spray technology. If hard material powders are processed by HVOF and simultaneously metal wires by arc spraying, metal matrix composites (MMC) can be formed out. NiCr8020 and aluminum coatings were reinforced by applying various contents of SiC and tested by a taber abraser device. Beside the investigations of the microstructure and the determination of the volume percentage of the hard particle content bond strength tests according European standard EN 582 were carried out. Furthermore, the coatings were tested by corrosion tests. The results are compared to other coating systems and discussed in relation to the obtained microstructure.

  15. Rolling contact fatigue characteristics of thermal sprayed tungsten carbide coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Nieminen, R.; Vuoristo, P.; Niemi, K.; Maentylae, T.

    1995-12-31

    The rolling contact fatigue (RCF) behavior of tungsten carbide (WC) based cermet coatings (WC-12% Co) deposited by plasma and HVOF spraying was studied. The RCF testing was carried out with a two-roll configuration testing machine under unlubricated rolling conditions without sliding. Loads applied in the tests resulted to Hertzian contact pressures of 420--600 MPa. The influence of spraying method on the RCF behavior of the coatings was studied as a function of Hertzian contact stress. Plasma sprayed coating showed severe surface roughening and subsurface cracking of the coating under all studied load levels. HVOF sprayed coating behavior was clearly different from the plasma coating with smaller structural changes. HVOF coating retained its original surface roughness but vertical cracks penetrating the coating appeared in this coating.

  16. Current Status and Future Prospects of Warm Spray Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Seiji; Watanabe, Makoto; Kim, Keehyun; Katanoda, Hiroshi

    2011-06-01

    A modification of high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process named as warm spray (WS) has been developed. By injecting room temperature inert gas into the combustion gas jet of HVOF, the temperature of the propellant gas can be controlled in a range approximately from 2300 to 1000 K so that many powder materials can be deposited in thermally softened state at high impact velocity. In this review, the characteristics of WS process were analyzed by using gas dynamic simulation of the flow field and heating/acceleration of powder particles in comparison with HVOF, cold spray (CS), and high-velocity air-fuel (HVAF) spray. Transmission electron microscopy of WS and CS titanium splats revealed marked differences in the microstructures stemming from the different impact temperatures. Mechanical properties of several metallic coatings formed under different WS and CS conditions were compared. Characteristics of WC-Co coatings made by WS were demonstrated for wear resistant applications.

  17. Synthesis and Microstructural Evolution of Amorphous/Nanocrystalline Steel Coatings by Different Thermal-Spray Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadaraajan, V.; Guduru, Ramesh K.; Mohanty, P. S.

    2013-04-01

    Amorphous/nanocrystalline coatings are useful in high strength and wear-resistant applications. In the present study, the microstructural evolution of a nanocrystalline high performance steel coatings developed by different spray processes along with a novel "hybrid thermal spray" technique was studied. The hybrid-spray process combines arc and high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) techniques, in which the molten metal at the arcing tip is atomized and rapidly propelled toward the substrate by HVOF jet. This so-called hybrid concept offers the benefits of productivity of electric arc spray combined with improved coating densities of HVOF. The microstructural characterization of the hybrid-spray coatings was performed by x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry, and then compared with coatings of the similar material developed by plasma-, HVOF-, and arc-spray processes individually. The HVOF- and plasma-spray coatings showed amorphous structures with very fine nanocrystals embedded, whereas hybrid- and arc-spray techniques yielded completely crystalline coatings with grain size in the range of several nanometers. The final microstructures in different spray processes could be attributed to the precursor materials employed, process temperatures, and cooling rates during the deposition process.

  18. HVOF gas flow field characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, W.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Haggard, D.C.; Irons, G.

    1994-12-31

    The effects of combustion chamber pressure and fuel/oxygen mixture ratio on the characteristics of a high pressure, supersonic HVOF gun are examined experimentally and theoretically. The measured temperature, velocity and entrained air fraction are obtained from an enthalpy probe/mass spectrometer system. Predictions of combustion chamber flame temperature and composition are calculated with an equilibrium combustion model. Nozzle and barrel exit conditions are calculated using a one-dimensional rocket performance model. The calculations are bounded by the assumption of frozen and equilibrium compositions. Comparisons between measurements and the predictions indicate that the flow field is far from chemical equilibrium. The aerodynamic force available for accelerating a particle is primarily controlled by the chamber pressure while the composition and temperature of the gas surrounding the particles is controlled by the mixture ratio.

  19. Method of producing thermally sprayed metallic coating

    DOEpatents

    Byrnes, Larry Edward; Kramer, Martin Stephen; Neiser, Richard A.

    2003-08-26

    The cylinder walls of light metal engine blocks are thermally spray coated with a ferrous-based coating using an HVOF device. A ferrous-based wire is fed to the HVOF device to locate a tip end of the wire in a high temperature zone of the device. Jet flows of oxygen and gaseous fuel are fed to the high temperature zone and are combusted to generate heat to melt the tip end. The oxygen is oversupplied in relation to the gaseous fuel. The excess oxygen reacts with and burns a fraction of the ferrous-based feed wire in an exothermic reaction to generate substantial supplemental heat to the HVOF device. The molten/combusted metal is sprayed by the device onto the walls of the cylinder by the jet flow of gases.

  20. Microfissuring of Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A tentative mathematical computer model of the microfissuring process during electron beam welding of Inconel 718 has been constructed. Predictions of the model are compatible with microfissuring tests on eight 0.25-in. thick test plates. The model takes into account weld power and speed, weld loss (efficiency), parameters and material characteristics. Besides the usual material characteristics (thermal and strength properties), a temperature and grain size dependent critical fracture strain is required by the model. The model is based upon fundamental physical theory (i.e., it is not a mere data interpolation system), and can be extended to other metals by suitable parameter changes.

  1. Effects of Laser Re-melting on the Corrosion Properties of HVOF Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Toor, I. H.; Patel, F.; Baig, M. A.

    2013-05-01

    HVOF coating of Inconel 625 powder on carbon steel is carried out. Laser melting of the resulting coating is realized to improve coating structural integrity. Morphological and microstructural changes are examined in the coating prior and after laser treatment process using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The residual stress developed is measured on the surface vicinity of the laser-treated coating using the XRD technique. The corrosion resistance of the laser-treated and untreated coating surfaces is measured, incorporating the potentiodynamic tests in 0.5 M NaCl aqueous solution. It is found that laser treatment reduces the pores and produces cellular structures with different sizes and orientations in the coating. Laser-controlled melting improves the corrosion resistance of the coating surface.

  2. Laser Treatment of HVOF Coating: Modeling and Measurement of Residual Stress in Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, A. F. M.; Yilbas, B. S.

    2008-10-01

    High-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) coating of diamalloy 1005 (similar to Inconel 625 alloy) onto the Ti-6Al-4V alloy is considered and laser-controlled melting of the coating is examined. The residual stress developed after the laser treatment process is modeled using the finite element method (FEM). The experiment is conducted to melt the coating using a laser beam. The residual stress measurement in the coating after the laser treatment process is realized using the XRD technique. The morphological and metallurgical changes in the coating are examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). It is found that the residual stress reduces at the coating-base material interface and the residual stress predicted agrees with the XRD measurements. A compact and crack-free coating is resulted after the laser treatment process.

  3. HVOF-Deposited WCCoCr as Replacement for Hard Cr in Landing Gear Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agüero, A.; Camón, F.; García de Blas, J.; Del Hoyo, J. C.; Muelas, R.; Santaballa, A.; Ulargui, S.; Vallés, P.

    2011-12-01

    WCCoCr coatings deposited by HVOF can replace hard Cr on landing gear components. Powders with two different WC particle sizes (micro and nano-) and geometries have been employed to study the effects on the coating's properties. Moreover, coatings produced employing two sets of parameters resulting in high and low flame temperatures have been evaluated. Minor differences in microstructure and morphology were observed for the two powders employing the same spraying parameters, but the nano-sized powder exhibited a higher spraying efficiency. However, more significant microstructural changes result when the low- and high-energy spray parameters are used. Moreover, results of various tests which include adhesion, wear, salt fog corrosion resistance, liquid immersion, and axial fatigue strength, indicate that the coatings produced with high-energy flame are similar in behavior. On the other hand, the nanostructured low-energy flame coating exhibited a significantly lower salt fog corrosion resistance.

  4. Deposition of WC-Co Coatings by a Novel High Pressure HVOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Fukanuma, Hirokata

    2013-03-01

    WC-Co coatings are primarily deposited using the high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray process. However, the decomposition and decarburization of carbides during spraying affects the wear performance and fracture toughness of the coatings. In this paper, a novel high pressure HVOF was developed to achieve lower particle temperature and higher particle velocity. It enables combustion chamber pressures up to 3.0 MPa. The influence of combustion chamber pressure and oxygen/fuel ratio on WC-Co particle velocity and temperature levels were analyzed by numerical simulation. The experimental results show that the combustion chamber pressure and the oxygen/fuel ratio have a significant influence on particle velocity and melting degree, as well as on the microstructure and microhardness of the coating. High velocity WC-Co particles in different states, i.e., molten, semi-molten, and non-molten can be readily obtained by changing the spraying conditions. A comparison to the conventional JP-5000 was also performed.

  5. The erosion-oxidation behavior of HVOF Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr cermet coating

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.Q.; Luer, K.

    1994-12-31

    DenSys DS-200 coating is a proprietary HVOF Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr cermet coating used in elevated temperature service environments including fluidized bed boilers, coal-fired boilers and municipal waste incinerators. The elevated temperature erosion-corrosion (oxidation) behavior of this HVOF Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coating was investigated using a range of test temperatures, impact angles, erodents, and particle velocities. The erosion-corrosion behavior of HVOF Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coatings was compared with 1018 steel and other thermal-spray coatings including FeCrSiB (Armacor M), Ni-base, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-6SiO{sub 2}-4Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Rokide C), Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-12SiO{sub 2}-2Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-4MgO (Rokide MBC), and WC-NiCrCo (SMI 712). It was found that the erosion-oxidation resistance of HVOF Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coating was higher than 1018 steel and other coatings at both impact angles 30{degree} and 90{degree}. The erosion-oxidation behavior of coatings was well related to their morphology. The high erosion-oxidation resistance of the HVOF Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coating was attributed to its low porosity, fine grain structure and homogeneous distribution of hard carbides/oxides which form a skeletal network within a ductile and corrosion-resistant metal binder.

  6. The future of thermal spray technology

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.W. ); Fast, R.D. )

    1994-07-01

    Thermal spray technology is emerging as an important processing tool for both surface protection and advanced materials forming. Despite the technology having been in use for over 100 years, much of its advancement, driven by aerospace applications, has occurred in the past 15 years. Increased understanding of process/structure/property relationships has resulted in the growing application of thermal spray coating technology resulting in new processes; for example, low-pressure plasma spray, high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) spray and reactive plasma spray. New equipment, automation and materials have been introduced. This article reviews many of the commercial thermal spray processes, borrowing from educational programs at ASM International and the Hobart Institute of Welding Technology, and reviews the applications and growth potential for emerging thermal spray processing technologies. A review of the needs in education and standardization and comparisons to programs on other countries is also presented.

  7. Strength of Rewelded Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E.; Lovoy, C. V.; Mcllwain, M. C.; Munafo, P.

    1982-01-01

    Inconel 718, nickel-based alloy used extensively for high-temperature structural service, welded repeatedly without detriment to its strength. According to NASA report, tests show 12 repairs on same weld joint do not adversely affect ultimate tensile strenth, yield strength, fatigue strength, metallurgical grain structures, or ability of weld joint to respond to post weld heat treatments.

  8. HVOF coatings of Diamalloy 2002 and Diamalloy 4010 onto steel: Tensile and bending response of coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Shehri, Y. A.; Hashmi, M. S. J.; Yilbas, B. S.

    2011-01-17

    HVOF coating of Diamalloy 2002 powders and Diamalloy 4010 powders as well as two-layered coatings consisting of these powders is carried out. In the two-layered structure, Diamalloy 4010 is sprayed at the substrate surface while Diamalloy 2002 is sprayed on the top of Diamalloy 4010 coating. The mechanical properties of the coatings are examined through tensile and three-point bending tests. The coating microstructure and morphology are examined using the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It is found that the coating produced is free from defects including voids and cracks. The failure mechanism of coating during tensile and three-point bending tests is mainly crack formation and propagation in the coating. The elastic modulus of coating produced from Diamalloy 2002 is higher than that of Diamalloy 4010 coating, which is due to the presence of 12% WC in the coating.

  9. The effect of gas parameters on HVOF coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Creffield, G.K.; Cole, M.A.; White, G.R.

    1995-12-31

    The use of propane as a fuel gas for HVOF has been investigated in a series of spray tests to determine the effect of gas related parameters on the performance of WC-Co coatings. The effects of total gas flow (oxygen plus fuel gas) and oxygen/fuel ratio have been related to coating microstructure, oxide content, microhardness and abrasive wear resistance. The use of alternative fuel gas supply options for propane (or propylene) i.e. vapor withdrawal and liquid withdrawal via a vaporizer unit, have demonstrated potential problems with the former system. Reduced pressures resulting from the temperature reduction caused during vaporization in the vapor withdrawal method would lead to inferior coating performance. Additionally, vapor withdrawal will result in a changing composition of the gas supply as the cylinder contents are used up. This would be especially relevant to mixed fuel gas systems or fuels containing significant levels of other hydrocarbon impurities such as in the case of butane in propane. The liquid withdrawal supply option ensures adequate and consistent fuel gas pressure and flow rate and constant composition.

  10. Wear and impact resistance of HVOF sprayedceramic matrix composites coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prawara, B.; Martides, E.; Priyono, B.; Ardy, H.; Rikardo, N.

    2016-02-01

    Ceramic coating has the mechanical properties of high hardness and it is well known for application on wear resistance, but on the other hand the resistance to impact load is low. Therefore its use is limited to applications that have no impact loading. The aim of this research was to obtain ceramic-metallic composite coating which has improved impact resistance compared to conventional ceramic coating. The high impact resistance of ceramic-metallic composite coating is obtained from dispersed metallic alloy phase in ceramic matrix. Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) powder with chrome carbide (Cr3C2) base and ceramic-metal NiAl-Al2O3 with various particle sizes as reinforced particle was deposited on mild steel substrate with High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coating. Repeated impact test showed that reinforced metallic phase size influenced impact resistance of CMC coating. The ability of CMC coating to absorb impact energy has improved eight times and ten times compared with original Cr3C2 and hard chrome plating respectively. On the other hand the high temperature corrosion resistance of CMC coating showed up to 31 cycles of heating at 800°C and water quenching cooling.

  11. Plasma spray processing of TBC`s

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, H.; Berndt, C.C.

    1995-10-01

    Thermal spray processing has been used for a number of years to cost-effectively apply TBC`s for a wide range of heat engine applications. In particular, bond coats are applied by vacuum plasma spray or HVOF techniques and partially-stabilized zirconia top coats are applied by plasma spray methods. Thermal spray involves melting and rapid transport of the molten particles to the substrate, where high-rate solidification and coating build-up occur. It is the very nature of this melt processing that leads to the unique layered microstructure, as well as the apparent imperfections, so readily identified with thermal spray. Therefore, although the plasma spray of TBCs has been largely successful, it is clear that a major step forward in terms of reliability and performance can be gained by a fundamental understanding of the TBC microstructure with respect to the processing technology and operating environment.

  12. Thermal spray processing

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, H.; Berndt, C.C.

    1995-03-01

    Thermal spray processing has been used for a number of years to cost-effecticely apply TBC`s for a wide range of heat engine applications. In particular, bond coats are applied by plasma spray and HVOF techniques and partially-stabilized zirconia top coats are applied by plasma spray methods. Thermal spray involves melting and rapid transport of the molten particles to the substrate, where high-rate solidification and coating build-up occur. It is the very nature of this melt processing that leads to the unique layered microstructure, as well as the apparent imperfections, so readily identified with thermal spray. Modeling the process, process-induced residual stresses, and thermal conductivity will be discussed in light of a new understanding of porosity and its anisotropy. Microcracking can be understood using new approaches, allowing a fuller view of the processing-performance connection. Detailed electron microscopic, novel neutron diffraction and fracture analysis of the deposits can lead to a better understanding of how overall microstructure can be controlled to influence critical properties of the deposited TBC system.

  13. Thermal spray processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, H.; Berndt, C. C.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal spray processing has been used for a number of years to cost-effecticely apply TBC's for a wide range of heat engine applications. In particular, bond coats are applied by plasma spray and HVOF techniques and partially-stabilized zirconia top coats are applied by plasma spray methods. Thermal spray involves melting and rapid transport of the molten particles to the substrate, where high-rate solidification and coating build-up occur. It is the very nature of this melt processing that leads to the unique layered microstructure, as well as the apparent imperfections, so readily identified with thermal spray. Modeling the process, process-induced residual stresses, and thermal conductivity will be discussed in light of a new understanding of porosity and its anisotropy. Microcracking can be understood using new approaches, allowing a fuller view of the processing-performance connection. Detailed electron microscopic, novel neutron diffraction and fracture analysis of the deposits can lead to a better understanding of how overall microstructure can be controlled to influence critical properties of the deposited TBC system.

  14. High-temperature corrosion and wear properties of HVOF coatings of cobalt-based (CoCr) surfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Raghu, D.; Lee, D.A.; Singh, P.M.

    1999-07-01

    High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying is extensively used in industry to produce high-density, low porosity functional coatings to resist severe wear and corrosion. Increasingly there is a need to provide high-quality coatings that resist both wear and corrosion at high temperatures at the same time. Very few engineering data exist on such coatings. In this paper, a study of HVOF coatings of Co-Cr-Mo alloys, that relies on Laves phases or on carbides for wear and corrosion resistance is reported. The paper covers the basic metallurgy of the alloys, their design and microstructure. The oxidation and sulfidation resistances of the coatings are evaluated at 600 C. The high-temperature hardness and the room-temperature abrasion resistance, hardness and bond strengths are compared to assess their utility in high-temperature corrosion and wear-resistant applications. The test results indicate that these alloys are strong candidate materials for providing protection in the form of HVOF coatings, in high-temperature wear and corrosion environments.

  15. Characterization of carbon deposits from jet fuel on Inconel 600 and Inconel X surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Altin, O.; Eser, S.

    2000-03-01

    Flow reactor experiments were conducted to study carbon deposit formation from decomposition of a jet fuel (JP-8) at 500 C and 500 psig for 5 h on the surface of two superalloys, Inconel 600 and Inconel X. The deposits collected on superalloy surfaces were characterized by temperature-programmed oxidation, size exclusion microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Significantly lower deposition on Inconel X compared to that on Inconel 600 was attributed to the presence of minor elemental compounds, such as Al, T, Nb, and Ta in the Inconel X alloy.

  16. Parameter study of HP/HVOF deposited WC-Co coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Villiers Lovelock, H. L.; Richter, P. W.; Benson, J. M.; Young, P. M.

    1998-03-01

    The deposition parameters of WC-17% Co coatings produced using the JP-5000 liquid-fuel HP/HVOF system (Eutectic TAFA) were investigated with the initial purpose of parameter improvement and optimization. The coating microstructures, porosities, phase compositions, and abrasion resistance were characterized. Preliminary work using the Taguchi statistical experimental design method aimed at optimizing the spray parameters in terms of the microstructure and phase composition was unsuccessful. The variations in the measured properties were too small to be correlated with the spray parameters. Subsequent experiments showed this was primarily due to the fact that the properties, particularly the abrasion resistance, of the WC-Co coatings were not primarily influenced by variations in the spray parameters, but were more dependent on the powder composition, particle size range, and manufacturing route. Hence, the application of Taguchi techniques would have been more effective over a much wider parameter space than was originally used. This result is valuable because it suggests that this process is robust and can be used for WC-Co coatings without large investments in spray parameter optimization and control once the coating and powder type have been fixed.

  17. FeAI and Mo-Si-B Intermetallic Coatings Prepared by Thermal Spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Terry C. Totemeier; Richard N. Wright; W. David Swank

    2004-12-01

    FeAl and Mo–Si–B intermetallic coatings for elevated temperature environmental resistance were prepared using high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and air plasma spray (APS) techniques. For both coating types, the effect of coating parameters (spray particle velocity and temperature) on the microstructure and physical properties of the coatings was assessed. Fe–24Al (wt%) coatings were prepared using HVOF thermal spraying at spray particle velocities varying from 540 to 700 m/s. Mo–13.4Si–2.6B coatings were prepared using APS at particle velocities of 180 and 350 m/s. Residual stresses in the HVOF FeAl coatings were compressive, while stresses in the APS Mo–Si–B coatings were tensile. In both cases, residual stresses became more compressive with increasing spray particle velocity due to increased peening imparted by the spray particles. The hardness and elastic moduli of FeAl coatings also increased with increasing particle velocity. For Mo–Si–B coatings, plasma spraying at 180 m/s resulted in significant oxidation of the spray particles and conversion of the T1 phase into amorphous silica and a-Mo. The T1 phase was retained after spraying at 350 m/s.

  18. FeAl and Mo-Si-B Intermetallic Coatings Prepared by Thermal Spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Totemeier, T.C.; Wright, R.N.; Swank, W.D.

    2003-04-22

    FeAl and Mo-Si-B intermetallic coatings for elevated temperature environmental resistance were prepared using high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and air plasma spray (APS) techniques. For both coating types, the effect of coating parameters (spray particle velocity and temperature) on the microstructure and physical properties of the coatings was assessed. Fe-24Al (wt.%) coatings were prepared using HVOF thermal spraying at spray particle velocities varying from 540 m/s to 700 m/s. Mo-13.4Si-2.6B coatings were prepared using APS at particle velocities of 180 and 350 m/s. Residual stresses in the HVOF FeAl coatings were compressive, while stresses in the APS Mo-Si-B coatings were tensile. In both cases, residual stresses became more compressive with increasing spray particle velocity due to increased peening imparted by the spray particles. The hardness and elastic moduli of FeAl coatings also increased with increasing particle velocity, again due to an increased peening effect. For Mo-Si-B coatings, plasma spraying at 180 m/s resulted in significant oxidation of the spray particles and conversion of the T1 phase into amorphous silica and {alpha}-Mo. The T1 phase was retained after spraying at 350 m/s.

  19. A Numerical Study on Gas Phase Dynamics of High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, Jae-Sang; Park, Sun-Kyu; Kim, Youn-Jea

    2008-08-01

    The high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spray is used for a particulate deposition process in which micro-sized particles are propelled and heated in a supersonic combusting gas stream. It is characterized by high gas velocity and high density and is being used in an increasing variety of coating applications, such as ceramic and composite coatings, to improve wear and abrasion resistance. The particle temperature and velocity are two of the most important parameters in HVOF thermal spraying, which affect the quality of the coatings. To understand the particle dynamics, it is necessary to study, first, the thermal flow characteristics in the HVOF system. In this study, a numerical analysis is performed to predict the gas dynamic behaviors, and the effect of the geometrical parameter is studied to optimize the nozzle design.

  20. Residual Strain and Fracture Response of Al2O3 Coatings Deposited via APS and HVOF Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, R.; Faisal, N. H.; Paradowska, A. M.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to nondestructively evaluate the residual stress profile in two commercially available alumina/substrate coating systems and relate residual stress changes with the fracture response. Neutron diffraction, due to its high penetration depth, was used to measure residual strain in conventional air plasma-sprayed (APS) and finer powder high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF (θ-gun))-sprayed Al2O3 coating/substrate systems. The purpose of this comparison was to ascertain if finer powder Al2O3 coatings deposited via θ-gun can provide improved residual stress and fracture response in comparison to conventional APS coatings. To obtain a through thickness residual strain profile with high resolution, a partially submerged beam was used for measurements near the coating surface, and a beam submerged in the coating and substrate materials near the coating-substrate interface. By using the fast vertical scanning method, with careful leveling of the specimen using theodolites, the coating surface and the coating/substrate interface were located with an accuracy of about 50 μm. The results show that the through thickness residual strain in the APS coating was mainly tensile, whereas the HVOF coating had both compressive and tensile residual strains. Further analysis interlinking Vickers indentation fracture behavior using acoustic emission (AE) was conducted. The microstructural differences along with the nature and magnitude of the residual strain fields had a direct effect on the fracture response of the two coatings during the indentation process.

  1. Measuring of residual stresses in thermal sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, O.C.

    1995-12-31

    The Modified Almen Method (MAM) uses the deformation of test samples for measuring the residual stress and with small mathematical expenditure it yields the distribution in the coating. This paper presents the basic theory of MAM and the boundary conditions for using this method for the classification of thermal sprayed coatings with respect to the residual stress. The residual stress distribution of different HVOF coatings are shown in this work. Typical spray parameters are compared. The results are also compared with the ones calculated with other methods for the determination of the residual stress in thermal sprayed coatings.

  2. Characterization of thermal spray coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Schorr, B.S.; Stein, K.J.; Marder, A.R.

    1999-02-01

    The ability to characterize fully the microstructure of a coating is paramount for understanding the in-service properties and eventual optimization of the coating. This article discusses sample preparation and subsequent analytical techniques (LOM, SEM, XRD, WDS, and QIA) for several cermet thermal spray coatings and provides a detailed analysis of as-sprayed microstructures in addition to processing trends for several FeCrAIY-carbide coatings. It was found that the splats produced in these high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) coatings tended to exhibit a predominantly dendritic structure most likely retained from the gas atomization process that produced the original powder. Chemical analysis showed that the carbides tend to break down during spraying producing a complex mixture of oxides and various carbides. Finally, image analysis revealed that as the carbides in the pre-sprayed powder were increased, more carbides and oxides with less FeCrAIY and thinner coatings were found. These techniques allow the thorough characterization of thermal spray cermet coatings, which in turn should further the understanding of the thermal spray processes and help provide superior coatings in the future.

  3. Method and apparatus for the application of thermal spray coatings onto aluminum engine cylinder bores

    SciTech Connect

    Byrnes, L.; Kramer, M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents background and detail information concerning the application of thermally sprayed metal alloy coatings onto the I.D. surfaces of aluminum block engine cylinder bores using a rotating extension HVOF spray gun. A fixturing method that provides block temperature stabilization and the elimination of fixture cleaning and part masking is described. A new approach and technique that replaces grit blasting for surface preparation is also discussed.

  4. Superior Performance of High-Velocity Oxyfuel-Sprayed Nanostructured TiO2 in Comparison to Air Plasma-Sprayed Conventional Al2O3-13TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, R. S.; Marple, B. R.

    2005-09-01

    Air plasma-sprayed conventional alumina-titania (Al2O3-13wt.%TiO2) coatings have been used for many years in the thermal spray industry for antiwear applications, mainly in the paper, printing, and textile industries. This work proposes an alternative to the traditional air plasma spraying of conventional aluminatitania by high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) spraying of nanostructured titania (TiO2). The microstructure, porosity, hardness (HV 300 g), crack propagation resistance, abrasion behavior (ASTM G65), and wear scar characteristics of these two types of coatings were analyzed and compared. The HVOF-sprayed nanostructured titania coating is nearly pore-free and exhibits higher wear resistance when compared with the air plasma-sprayed conventional alumina-titania coating. The nanozones in the nanostructured coating act as crack arresters, enhancing its toughness. By comparing the wear scar of both coatings (via SEM, stereoscope microscopy, and roughness measurements), it is observed that the wear scar of the HVOF-sprayed nanostructured titania is very smooth, indicating plastic deformation characteristics, whereas the wear scar of the air plasma-sprayed alumina-titania coating is very rough and fractured. This is considered to be an indication of a superior machinability of the nanostructured coating.

  5. Comparison of the Mechanical and Electrochemical Properties of WC-25Co Coatings Obtained by High Velocity Oxy-Fuel and Cold Gas Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto, M.; Dosta, S.; Fernández, J.; Guilemany, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Cold gas spray (CGS) coatings were previously produced by spraying WC-25Co cermet powders onto Al7075-T6 and low-carbon steel substrates. Unlike conventional flame spray techniques (e.g., high-velocity oxy-fuel; HVOF), no melting of the powder occurs; the particles are deformed and bond together after being sprayed by a supersonic jet of compressed gas, thereby building up several layers and forming a coating. WC-Co cermets are used in wear-resistant parts, because of their combination of mechanical, physical, and chemical properties. XRD tests were previously run on the initial powder and the coatings to determine possible phase changes during spraying. The bonding strength of the coatings was measured by adhesion tests. Here, WC-25Co coatings were also deposited on the same substrates by HVOF spraying. The wear resistance and fracture toughness of the coatings obtained previously by CGS and the HVOF coatings obtained here were studied. Their corrosion resistance was determined by electrochemical measurements. It was possible to achieve thick, dense, and hard CGS coatings on Al7075-T6 and low-carbon steel substrates, with better or the same mechanical and electrochemical properties as those of the HVOF coatings; making the former a highly competitive method for producing WC-25Co coatings.

  6. Effects of the Modification of Processing Parameters on Mechanical Properties of HVOF Cr2C3-25NiCr Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Báez, Israel; Poblano Salas, Carlos Agustín; Muñoz Saldaña, Juan; Trápaga Martínez, Luís Gerardo

    2015-08-01

    The present work shows that some mechanical properties of Cr2C3-25NiCr coatings processed by HVOF thermal spraying such as elastic modulus, hardness, fracture toughness, and wear resistance are closely linked to selected processing parameters as well as to chemistry, structure, and morphology of the feedstock material. Optimization of processing parameters was based on oxygen concentration measurements inside the flame, studied by a contour plot, and curvature data recorded during spraying. The increase in velocity of in-flight particles strongly affected the interfacial fracture toughness of the coatings, as a maximum K IC of 3.71 MPa m1/2 was reached when particle velocity increased to ~765 m/s. The micro-hardness of Cr2C3-25NiCr coatings was widely varied by changing the HVOF spray conditions, i.e., the amount of reinforcing phases and inter-splat adhesion were quite sensitive to any modification of the processing parameters. It was also found that coatings having a high inter-splat adhesion and/or low degradation of reinforcing hard phases showed reduced weight loss during erosive wear tests. Finally, from the experimental evidence reported in this work, a correlation between the elastic bending modulus of coatings and indentation crack length was also found.

  7. Effect of HVOF Processing Parameters on the Properties of NiCoCrAlY Coatings by Design of Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Luna, H.; Lozano-Mandujano, D.; Alvarado-Orozco, J. M.; Valarezo, A.; Poblano-Salas, C. A.; Trápaga-Martínez, L. G.; Espinoza-Beltrán, F. J.; Muñoz-Saldaña, J.

    2014-08-01

    The effect of three principal, independent, high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF)-processing parameters on the properties of NiCoCrAlY coatings deposited using commercial powders is reported here. The design of experiments (DoE) technique at a two-level factorial and a central composite rotatable design was used to analyze and optimize the HVOF spraying process. The deposition parameters investigated were (1) fuel flow, (2) oxygen flow, and (3) stand-off distance. The effect of these processing variables was evaluated using selected responses, including porosity and oxide content, residual stresses, and deposition efficiency. Coatings with low porosity as well as with low residual stress were obtained using high fuel-rich conditions at a stand-off distance between 250 and 300 mm. At shorter and longer stand-off distances, respectively, either excessive flattening of splats or un-molten condition occurred, resulting in high levels of porosity and residual stress. The response surface, the empirical relationships among the variables, and the response parameters allowed the selection of optimum deposition parameters and the improvement of coating properties.

  8. Introduction to High-Velocity Suspension Flame Spraying (HVSFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadow, Rainer; Killinger, Andreas; Rauch, Johannes

    2008-12-01

    High-velocity suspension flame spraying (HVSFS) has been developed to thermally spray suspensions containing micron, submicron, and nanoparticles with hypersonic speed. For this purpose, the suspension is introduced directly into the combustion chamber of a modified HVOF torch. The aim in mind is to achieve dense coatings with a refined microstructure. Especially from nanostructured coatings superior physical properties are expected for many potential applications. Direct spraying of suspensions offers flexibility in combining and processing different materials. It is a cost-saving process and allows the allocation of entirely new application fields. The paper gives an overview of the HVSFS spray method and will present some actual results that have been achieved by spraying the nanooxide ceramic materials Al2O3, TiO2, 3YSZ, and Cr2O3.

  9. Thermal Spray Coatings for High-Temperature Corrosion Protection in Biomass Co-Fired Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksa, M.; Metsäjoki, J.; Kärki, J.

    2015-01-01

    There are over 1000 biomass boilers and about 500 plants using waste as fuel in Europe, and the numbers are increasing. Many of them encounter serious problems with high-temperature corrosion due to detrimental elements such as chlorides, alkali metals, and heavy metals. By HVOF spraying, it is possible to produce very dense and well-adhered coatings, which can be applied for corrosion protection of heat exchanger surfaces in biomass and waste-to-energy power plant boilers. Four HVOF coatings and one arc sprayed coating were exposed to actual biomass co-fired boiler conditions in superheater area with a probe measurement installation for 5900 h at 550 and 750 °C. The coating materials were Ni-Cr, IN625, Fe-Cr-W-Nb-Mo, and Ni-Cr-Ti. CJS and DJ Hybrid spray guns were used for HVOF spraying to compare the corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr coating structures. Reference materials were ferritic steel T92 and nickel super alloy A263. The circulating fluidized bed boiler burnt a mixture of wood, peat and coal. The coatings showed excellent corrosion resistance at 550 °C compared to the ferritic steel. At higher temperature, NiCr sprayed with CJS had the best corrosion resistance. IN625 was consumed almost completely during the exposure at 750 °C.

  10. Thermal Spray Coatings for High-Temperature Corrosion Protection in Biomass Co-Fired Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksa, M.; Metsäjoki, J.; Kärki, J.

    2014-09-01

    There are over 1000 biomass boilers and about 500 plants using waste as fuel in Europe, and the numbers are increasing. Many of them encounter serious problems with high-temperature corrosion due to detrimental elements such as chlorides, alkali metals, and heavy metals. By HVOF spraying, it is possible to produce very dense and well-adhered coatings, which can be applied for corrosion protection of heat exchanger surfaces in biomass and waste-to-energy power plant boilers. Four HVOF coatings and one arc sprayed coating were exposed to actual biomass co-fired boiler conditions in superheater area with a probe measurement installation for 5900 h at 550 and 750 °C. The coating materials were Ni-Cr, IN625, Fe-Cr-W-Nb-Mo, and Ni-Cr-Ti. CJS and DJ Hybrid spray guns were used for HVOF spraying to compare the corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr coating structures. Reference materials were ferritic steel T92 and nickel super alloy A263. The circulating fluidized bed boiler burnt a mixture of wood, peat and coal. The coatings showed excellent corrosion resistance at 550 °C compared to the ferritic steel. At higher temperature, NiCr sprayed with CJS had the best corrosion resistance. IN625 was consumed almost completely during the exposure at 750 °C.

  11. Effect of Operating Parameters on a Dual-Stage High Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mohammed N.; Shamim, Tariq

    2014-08-01

    High velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spray systems are being used to apply coatings to prevent surface degradation. The coatings of temperature sensitive materials such as titanium and copper, which have very low melting points, cannot be applied using a single-stage HVOF system. Therefore, a dual-stage HVOF system has been introduced and modeled computationally. The dual-spray system provides an easy control of particle oxidation by introducing a mixing chamber. In addition to the materials being sprayed, the thermal spray coating quality depends to a large extent on flow behavior of reacting gases and the particle dynamics. The present study investigates the influence of various operating parameters on the performance of a dual-stage thermal spray gun. The objective is to develop a predictive understanding of various parameters. The gas flow field and the free jet are modeled by considering the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy with the turbulence and the equilibrium combustion sub models. The particle phase is decoupled from the gas phase due to very low particle volume fractions. The results demonstrate the advantage of a dual-stage system over a single-stage system especially for the deposition of temperature sensitive materials.

  12. Corrosion properties of stainless steel coatings made by different methods of thermal spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Siitonen, P.; Konos, T.; Kettunen, P.O.

    1994-12-31

    The corrosion protection ability of thermally sprayed stainless steel coatings in aggressive environments is considerably limited as compared to bulk materials of the same composition. The two main reasons for the decrease in corrosion resistance are the porosity in the coatings and the oxidation of elements, particularly chromium, during spraying process. The corrosion resistance and structure of stainless steel coatings, ANVAL 254 SMO, made by different methods of thermal spraying were evaluated in this work. The coatings were produced by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), atmospheric plasma spraying using gas shielding around the plasma (APS/S), low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS), detonation gun spraying (DGS) and high velocity oxyfuel spraying (HVOF). Electrochemical methods were used for determining the corrosion protection ability of coatings in 3.5% NaCl-solution and in sulfur acid solution (pH 3 and 1). The structure and composition of coatings were studied by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive analysator (SEM/EDS). The porosity of the coatings was determined by water impregnation method, optical microscopy and mercury porosimeter. The results showed that the best coating quality can be achieved by LPPS- and HVOF-coatings. Oxidation and porosity restrict the use of APS-coatings in corrosive environments. The oxidation can be avoided by using argon gas shield around the plasma flame during spraying. Due to porosity all studied coatings suffered crevice corrosion in chloride solution. Despite high Mo-alloying the best coatings reached only the corrosion resistance of AISI 316.

  13. Structure Property Relationship of Suspension Thermally Sprayed WC-Co Nanocomposite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, R.; Faisal, N. H.; Al-Anazi, Nayef M.; Al-Mutairi, S.; Toma, F.-L.; Berger, L.-M.; Potthoff, A.; Polychroniadis, E. K.; Sall, M.; Chaliampalias, D.; Goosen, M. F. A.

    2015-02-01

    Tribomechanical properties of nanostructured coatings deposited by suspension high velocity oxy-fuel (S-HVOF) and conventional HVOF (Jet Kote) spraying were evaluated. Nanostructured S-HVOF coatings were obtained via ball milling of the agglomerated and sintered WC-12Co feedstock powder, which were deposited via an aqueous-based suspension using modified HVOF (TopGun) process. Microstructural evaluations of these hardmetal coatings included transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The nanohardness and modulus of the coated specimens were investigated using a diamond Berkovich nanoindenter. Sliding wear tests were conducted using a ball-on-flat test rig. Results indicated that low porosity coatings with nanostructured features were obtained. High carbon loss was observed, but coatings showed a high hardness up to 1000 HV2.9N. S-HVOF coatings also showed improved sliding wear and friction behavior, which were attributed to nanosized particles reducing ball wear in three-body abrasion and support of metal matrix due to uniform distribution of nanoparticles in the coating microstructure.

  14. Tensile strength as a function of thermal history of Inconel 718 and Inconel 625 alloys for glass-ceramic headers

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, M.C.; Henderson, W.R.

    1982-06-11

    Tensile strength tests were conducted on Inconel 718 specimens following a variety of heat treatments, and on as-received and heat-treated specimens of Inconel 625. A heat treatment cycle for Inconel 718 was found that represents an acceptable compromise between a thermal cycle that yields the strongest metal and one that least taxes a glass-ceramic material to which the Inconel 718 is bonded. Heat treating resulted in a moderate decrease in the tensile strength of the as-received Inconel 625.

  15. Improved nickel plating of Inconel X-750

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, M. E.; Feeney, J. E.; Kuster, C. A.

    1969-01-01

    Electroplating technique with acid pickling provides a method of applying nickel plating on Inconel X-750 tubing to serve as a wetting agent during brazing. Low-stress nickel-plating bath contains no organic wetting agents that cause the nickel to blister at high temperatures.

  16. The Gas Dynamics of High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackett, Charles Marcou

    An experimental study of the gas dynamics of the High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process has been performed. With this process, a hot, combustion-driven, supersonic jet is used to propel particles onto a surface, thus forming metal coatings that provide wear, temperature, and corrosion resistance. The fundamental physics of the spray process were studied and several key areas of interest were identified for in-depth study. Optical diagnostic techniques, including microsecond -exposure schlieren and shadowgraph imaging, were used to visualize the hot supersonic jet produced during the spray process. Energetic turbulent mixing of the jet with the surrounding atmosphere was observed. Measurements of oxide levels in aluminum and mild steel coatings sprayed for a range of conditions indicated that the turbulent mixing influences coating oxidation. However, experiments conducted with a low-speed coaxial shroud of inert gas demonstrated that coating oxide formation can be effectively controlled during the spray process. A simple numerical model was developed to predict the behavior of a spray particle in the HVOF jet. The results of computations indicated that independent control of spray particle velocity and temperature was possible through systematic variations in combustion chamber pressure and particle injection location within the nozzle. This hypothesis was confirmed through a series of experiments in which stainless steel particle velocity and temperature were measured using trace velocimetry and two-color radiative pyrometry, respectively. Combustion chamber pressure had a strong effect on particle velocity. Injection location was used to control the residence time of a particle within the flow, thus allowing manipulation of particle temperature without a measurable effect on velocity. Thus, the results of these experiments revealed that the gas dynamics--the behavior of the compressible gas flow--of the HVOF spray process strongly influenced spray

  17. Characterization of Thermal Sprayed Aluminum and Stainless Steel Coatings for Clean Laser Enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R; Decker, T A; Gansert, R V; Gansert, D

    2000-04-06

    Surfaces of steel structures that enclose high-fluence, large-beam lasers have conventional and unconventional requirements. Aside from rust prevention, the surfaces must resist laser-induced degradation and the contamination of the optical components. The latter requires a surface that can be precision cleaned to low levels of particulate and organic residue. In addition, the surface treatment for the walls should be economical to apply because of the large surface areas involved, and accommodating with intricate joint geometries. Thermal sprayed coatings of aluminum (Al) and stainless steel are candidate surface materials. Coatings are produced and characterized for porosity, smoothness, and hardness. These properties have a bearing on the cleanliness of the coating. The laser resistance of Al and 3 16L coatings are given. The paper summarizes the characterization of twin-wire-arc deposited Al, high-velocity-oxygen-fueled (HVOF) deposited Al, flame-sprayed 316L, and HVOF deposited316L. The most promising candidate coating is that of HVOF Al. This Al coating has the lowest porosity (8%) compared the other three coatings and relatively low hardness (100 VHN). The as-deposited roughness (Ra) is 433 pinches, but after a quick sanding by hand, the roughness decreased to 166 pinches. Other post-coat treatments are discussed. HVOF aluminum coatings are demonstrated. Al coatings are corrosion barriers for steel, and this work shows promising resistance to laser damage and low particulation rates.

  18. Increased Lifetime for Biomass and Waste to Energy Power Plant Boilers with HVOF Coatings: High Temperature Corrosion Testing Under Chlorine-Containing Molten Salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksa, Maria; Tuurna, Satu; Varis, Tommi

    2013-06-01

    Heat exchanger surfaces of waste to energy and biomass power plant boilers experience often severe corrosion due to very aggressive components in the used fuels. High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) coatings offer excellent protection for boiler tubes against high temperature corrosion due to their high density and good adherence to the substrate material. Several thermal spray coatings with high chromium content were sprayed with HVOF technique. Their mechanical properties and high temperature corrosion resistance were tested and analyzed. The coating materials included NiCr, IN625, Ni-21Cr-10W-9Mo-4Cu, and iron-based partly amorphous alloy SHS9172 (Fe-25Cr-15W-12Nb-6Mo). High temperature corrosion testing was performed in NaCl-KCl-Na2SO4 salt with controlled H2O atmosphere at 575 and 625 °C. The corrosion test results of the coatings were compared to corrosion resistance of tube materials (X20, Alloy 263 and Sanicro 25).

  19. Parametric Study to Correlate the Applied Factors and Abrasive Wear Resistance of HVOF Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Satpal

    2012-12-01

    Co-Ni-base powder was modified with the addition of CeO2 to study the effect of CeO2 addition on microstructure, hardness, and abrasive wear behavior of the unmodified (without CeO2) and modified (with CeO2) HVOF sprayed coatings. To investigate the abrasive wear behavior of coatings statistical response surface methodology (RSM) with four factors such as load, abrasive size, sliding distance, and temperature with three levels of each factor were used. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was carried out to determine the significant factors and their interactions. Thus abrasive wear model was developed in terms of main factors and their significant interactions. The validity of the model was evaluated by conducting experiments under different wear conditions. A comparison of modeled and experimental results showed 2-8% error. The wear resistance of coatings increased with the addition of CeO2. This is due to increase in hardness with the addition of CeO2 in Co-Ni-base coatings.

  20. Cyclic Oxidation Behavior of HVOF Bond Coatings Deposited on La- and Y-doped Superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Bestor, Michael A; Haynes, James A

    2011-01-01

    One suggested strategy for improving the performance of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems used to protect hot section components in gas turbines is the addition of low levels of dopants to the Ni-base superalloy substrate. To quantify the benefit of these dopants, the oxidation behavior of three commercial superalloys with different Y and La contents was evaluated with and without a NiCoCrAlYHfSi bond coating deposited by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spraying. Cyclic oxidation experiments were conducted in dry O{sub 2} at 1050, 1100 and 1150 C. At the highest temperature, the bare superalloy without La showed more attack due to its lower Al content but no difference in oxidation rate or scale adhesion was noted at lower temperatures. With a bond coating, the alumina scale was non-uniform in thickness and spalled at each temperature. Among the three coated superalloys, no clear difference in oxide growth rate or scale adhesion was observed. Evaluations with a YSZ top coat and a bond coating without Hf are needed to better determine the effect of superalloy dopants on high temperature oxidation performance.

  1. Preliminary Tuft Testing of Metallic Bristles Versus PS212, PS300, and HVOF300

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fellenstein, James A.; DellaCorte, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    Turbine engine brush seals are designed with sacrificial brushes and hard shaft coatings to minimize shaft wear and reduce the cost of engine overhauls. Replacing a worm seal is more cost and time effective than refinishing an engine shaft. However, this tribological design causes excessive brush wear and reduces long term seal efficiency. An alternative approach is to coat the shaft with a solid lubricant and allow the bristles to wear into the shaft coating similar to traditional abradable labyrinth seals. This approach can result in reduced seal leakage by forcing the leakage to flow through the seal bristle pack or through a more tortuous shaft wear track. Key to this approach is limiting the shaft wear to an acceptable level were surface refinishing would not be required during every engine overhaul. Included in this paper are brush seal tuft test results for four metallic bristles (nickel-chrome or cobalt-chrome based superalloys) tested against three solid lubricant coatings (NASA's PS212, PS300, and HVOF300). These test results are also compared to previous baseline tests conducted with plasma sprayed chrome carbide. Compared to the baseline results, no tribological benefit was achieved with the metallic bristle/solid lubricant tribopairs tested. To improve the performance of the solid lubricant coatings, issues regarding lubricant phase sizes (homogeneity), and composition need to be addressed.

  2. A comparison of two laser-based diagnostics for analysis of particles in thermal spray streams

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.F.; O`Hern, T.J.; Brockmann, J.E.

    1995-07-01

    This paper discusses two commercially-available laser diagnostics that have been used in thermal spray research at Sandia National Laboratories: (1) a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) and (2) a Laser Two-Focus (L2F) velocimeter. The PDPA provides simultaneous, correlated measurements of particle velocity and particle size distributions; but, particle sizing doesn`t work well with non-spherical particles or particles with rough surfaces. The L2F is used to collect particle velocity and number density distributions, and it can readily distinguish and separately measure particles with off-axis velocity vectors. PDPA and L2F principles of operation are presented along with potential advantages and limitations for thermal spray research. Four experiments were conducted to validate and compare measurement results with the PDPA and L2F instruments: (1) spinning wire, (2) powder in a High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) jet, (3) powder in a cold jet, and (4) droplets in a wire-fed HVOF jet. TWO DIFFERENT TYPES of commercially-available laser velocimeter systems, a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer and a Laser-Two-Focus velocimeter have been used in the Thermal Spray Research Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories. Each of these techniques has inherent advantages and limitations for thermal spray, and each involves assumptions that may not be valid for some experimental conditions. This paper describes operating principles and possible sources of measurement error for these two diagnostic systems. Some potential advantages and limitations are also presented. Four types of experiments were also conducted to validate and compare PDPA and L2F measurement results: (1) spinning wire, (2) powder in a High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) jet, (3) powder in a cold jet, and (4) droplets in a wire-fed HVOF jet. We also offer a few observations related to practical issues such as ease-of-use, reliability, and effects of dust and vibration in a thermal spray lab.

  3. Optimal Substrate Preheating Model for Thermal Spray Deposition of Thermosets onto Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivosevic, M.; Knight, R.; Kalidindi, S. R.; Palmese, G. R.; Tsurikov, A.; Sutter, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed, functionally graded polyimide/WC-Co composite coatings on polymer matrix composites (PMC's) are being investigated for applications in turbine engine technologies. This requires that the polyimide, used as the matrix material, be fully crosslinked during deposition in order to maximize its engineering properties. The rapid heating and cooling nature of the HVOF spray process and the high heat flux through the coating into the substrate typically do not allow sufficient time at temperature for curing of the thermoset. It was hypothesized that external substrate preheating might enhance the deposition behavior and curing reaction during the thermal spraying of polyimide thermosets. A simple analytical process model for the deposition of thermosetting polyimide onto polymer matrix composites by HVOF thermal spray technology has been developed. The model incorporates various heat transfer mechanisms and enables surface temperature profiles of the coating to be simulated, primarily as a function of substrate preheating temperature. Four cases were modeled: (i) no substrate preheating; (ii) substrates electrically preheated from the rear; (iii) substrates preheated by hot air from the front face; and (iv) substrates electrically preheated from the rear and by hot air from the front.

  4. Gas detonation gun for thermal spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Kadyrov, E.; Kadyrov, V.

    1995-08-01

    High-velocity oxy-fuel and gas detonation are competing spray coating processes well known for providing premium quality coatings with low porosity and high adhesion. They are favored for applications in environments of extreme wear, heat, and aggressive corrosion. Nevertheless, they both have limitations. For the HVOF process, these include excessive gas consumption, high rate of heat transfer to the sprayed substrate, and the short life of the (supersonic) Laval nozzle. On the other hand, the traditional gas detonation gun also has drawbacks, and the purpose of this article is to outline some factors that led to the design of an improved gas detonation coating process called Demeton, produced by Demeton USA Inc., Garden City Park, N.Y.

  5. Microstructural Evolution of Inconel 625 and Inconel 686CPT Weld Metal for Clad Carbon Steel Linepipe Joints: A Comparator Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltin, Charles A.; Galloway, Alexander M.; Mweemba, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Microstructural evolution of Inconel 625 and Inconel 686CPT filler metals, used for the fusion welding of clad carbon steel linepipe, has been investigated and compared. The effects of iron dilution from the linepipe parent material on the elemental segregation potential of the filler metal chemistry have been considered. The results obtained provide significant evidence to support the view that, in Inconel 686CPT weld metal, the segregation of tungsten is a function of the level of iron dilution from the parent material. The data presented indicate that the incoherent phase precipitated in the Inconel 686CPT weld metal has a morphology that is dependent on tungsten enrichment and, therefore, iron dilution. Furthermore, in the same weld metal, a continuous network of finer precipitates was observed. The Charpy impact toughness of each filler metal was evaluated, and the results highlighted the superior impact toughness of the Inconel 625 weld metal over that of Inconel 686CPT.

  6. Mechanical property and wear performance dependence on processing condition for cold-sprayed WC-(nanoWC-Co)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guan-Jun; Gao, Pei-Hu; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2015-03-01

    WC-(nanoWC-Co) with micro-WC reinforcing particles in nanoWC-Co cermet matrix was cold-sprayed by using WC-Co with bimodal sized WC particles (with both micro-sized WC particles and nano-sized WC particles). The effect of spray powder property and post-spray treatment on the mechanical properties and wear performance of cold-sprayed WC-(nanoWC-Co) coating were examined in comparison to the conventional high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF)-sprayed WC-Co coating. Results showed that both hardness and toughness were influenced by the spray powder properties and the post-spray heat treatment. Compared to the HVOF-sprayed WC-Co coating with micro-sized WC particles, WC-(nanoWC-Co) exhibited much higher hardness and toughness and thereby much higher wear resistance. The further toughening of WC-(nanoWC-Co) by post-spray heat treatment significantly doubled the wear performance. The excellent wear resistance of WC-(nanoWC-Co) is attributed to the simultaneous strengthening and toughening effects resulting from the microstructure design of bimodal WC particle size distribution composed of both micro-sized and nano-sized WC particles.

  7. Particle In-Flight and Coating Properties of Fe-Based Feedstock Materials Sprayed with Modern Thermal Spray Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, Kirsten; Kopp, Nils; Warda, Thomas; Petkovic, Ivica; Schaefer, Marcel; Landes, Klaus Dieter; Forster, Guenter; Zimmermann, Stephan; Marques, Jose-Luis; Kirner, Stefan; Kauffeldt, Marina; Schein, Jochen

    2013-03-01

    New developments in the field of thermal spraying systems (increased particle velocities, enhanced process stability) are leading to improved coatings. Innovations in the field of feedstock materials are supporting this trend. The combination of both has led to a renaissance of Fe-based feedstocks. Using modern APS or HVOF systems, it is now possible to compete with classical materials for wear and corrosion applications like Ni-basis or metal-matrix composites. This study intends to give an analysis of the in-flight particle and spray jet properties achievable with two different modern thermal spraying systems using Fe-based powders. The velocity fields are measured with the Laser Doppler Anemometry. Resulting coatings are analyzed and a correlation with the particle in-flight properties is given. The experiments are accompanied by computational fluid dynamics simulations of spray jet and particle velocities, leading to a comprehensive analysis of the achievable particle properties with state-of-the-art HVOF and APS systems.

  8. Erosion Resistance of High Velocity Oxy-Fuel WC-Co-Cr Thermal Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imeson, Chris

    Thermal spray coatings have been incorporated in oil and gas extraction efforts for many years. Recently, High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) has become increasingly incorporated where erosive environments are present. This study investigates the microstructural and mechanical properties of HVOF WC-Co-Cr coatings deposited at SharkSkin Coatings ltd. The deposited coatings exhibited a low porosity with high adhesion strength, hardness, and superior erosion resistance. In this study, a recirculating solid particle erosion testing machine was designed and fabricated to simulate an erosive environment on a laboratory scale. This study was also aimed at improving microstructures and mechanical properties of the coatings by modifying the two coating deposition parameters e.g. standoff and pre-cycle heating. It was determined that pre-spray substrate heating negatively affected the coatings microstructures e.g. porosity, while reducing the stand-off distance positively influenced the coating microstructures and mechanical properties, e.g. erosion resistance.

  9. Development of WC-Co Coatings Deposited by Warm Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivavibul, Pornthep; Watanabe, Makoto; Kuroda, Seiji; Kawakita, Jin; Komatsu, Masayuki; Sato, Kazuto; Kitamura, Junya

    2008-12-01

    The high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) process is commonly used to deposit WC-Co coatings. There are some problems with this process; especially the decomposition and decarburization of WC during spraying make a coating brittle. To suppress such degradation, the warm spray (WS) process was applied to deposit WC-Co coatings, which is capable of controlling the flame temperature in the range of 500-2000 °C. The microstructure and phases of the deposited coatings were characterized by using SEM and XRD, and the mechanical properties such as hardness, fracture toughness, and wear properties were also investigated. WS process successfully suppressed the formation of the detrimental phases such as W2C and W, which are usually observed in HVOF coatings. The WS coatings showed the similar trend of the hardness variation for Co content with a sintered bulk material. Improvement of toughness and wear behavior was also observed in WS coatings.

  10. Sprayed coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffens, H. D.

    1980-03-01

    Thermal spraying is shown to be an efficient means for the protection of surface areas against elevated temperature, wear, corrosion, hot gas corrosion, and erosion in structural aircraft components. Particularly in jet engines, numerous parts are coated by flame, detonation, or plasma spraying techniques. The applied methods of flame, detonation, and plasma spraying are explained, as well as electric arc spraying. Possibilities for spray coatings which meet aircraft service requirements are discussed, as well as methods for quality control, especially nondestructive test methods. In particular, coating characteristics and properties obtained by different spray methods are described, and special attention is paid to low pressure plasma spraying.

  11. Corrosion Performance of Inconel 625 in High Sulphate Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Azzura

    2016-05-01

    Inconel 625 (UNS N06625) is a type of nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy with excellent corrosion resistance in a wide range of corrosive media, being especially resistant to pitting and crevice corrosion. However, in aggressive environment, Inconel 625 will suffer corrosion attack like other metals. This research compared the corrosion performance of Inconel 625 when exposed to higher sulphate content compared to real seawater. The results reveal that Inconel 625 is excellent in resist the corrosion attack in seawater. However, at increasing temperature, the corrosion resistance of this metal decrease. The performance is same in seawater with high sulphate content at increasing temperature. It can be concluded that sulphate promote perforation on Inconel 625 and become aggressive agents that accelerate the corrosion attack.

  12. Problems encountered in welding Inconel 625 bridgewire material

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, T.G.

    1982-05-10

    Welding problems occurred while resistance welding Inconel 625 to Inconel 600 pins in the MC3462A header at Unidynamics/Phoenix (UPI). The bridgewire showed transverse and longitudinal cracks, a condition called hot cracking, at the weld area. Welding studies at Mound confirmed a best effort could not produce welds without hot cracking. Two new bridgewire materials, Tophet C and Alloy 800, were then introduced to replace Inconel 625. Samples of both bridgewired headers welded at Unidynamics were studied at Mound to determine which was the better material. Results showed that Alloy 800 was subject to the same hot cracking phenomenon as Inconel 625, whereas all samples of Tophet C except one showed no cracks. The only Tophet C sample showing cracks showed only minor cracks. Langley tests performed with Tophet C as the bridgewire showed that the no-fire characteristics can be met. Tophet C was therefore chosen to replace Inconel 625.

  13. Influence of gaseous hydrogen on Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. J.; Chandler, W. T.

    1974-01-01

    The embrittlement of Inconel 718 by exposure to 34.5 MN/sq m hydrogen at ambient temperature was found to be a function of both forming operation and heat treatment. The embrittlement, as measured by reduction of notch strength in hydrogen as compared to helium, was decreased by a fine-grain size and was most severe for coarse-grained structures containing a continuous or nearly continuous precipitate tentatively identified as Ni3Cb. Tests performed on unnotched specimens showed that the strain at which surface cracks initiate in 34.5 MN/sq m hydrogen was approximately 3% and was independent of prior forming operation or heat treatment.

  14. Hot tensile tests of Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The physical metallurgy of near-solidus integranular cracking in Inconel 718 welds was investigated. The data, although inconclusive, suggest at least two mechanisms which might explain intergranular cracking (microfissuring) in the heat-affected zone of several high temperature alloys. One theory is based on the separation of intergranular liquid while the other involves mechanical failure of solid ligaments surrounded by intergranular liquid. Both mechanisms concentrate strain in the grain boundaries resulting in low strain (1%) intergranular brittleness. The mechanisms reported might also pertain to the physical metallurgy of casting, powder metallurgy sintering and hot isostatic pressing.

  15. Rolling contact fatigue testing of thermally sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Maekelae, A.; Vuoristo, P.; Lahdensuo, M.; Niemi, K.; Maentylae, T.

    1994-12-31

    Two Rolling Contact Fatigue (RCF) test systems have been developed in order to compare coatings according to their service lives under high-load rolling contact. Experimental testing facilities of the three-roller and the two-roller type RCF test equipment are presented and problems involved with testing of thermally sprayed coatings are discussed. The aim of this three-year-project is to study reasons for development of coating micropitting and delamination of high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) and detonation gun sprayed coatings. Some observations of rolling contact fatigue behavior of detonation gun sprayed WC+12% Co coating subjected to a nearly pure rolling line contact at cyclic Hertzian stress level of approximately 410 MPa are made, but interpreting the results requires still more work.

  16. High temperature sulfidation of Fe{sub 3}Al and NiCr thermal spray coatings at 600 C

    SciTech Connect

    Luer, K.; DuPont, J.; Marder, A.

    1999-11-01

    Three Fe{sub 3}Al and two Ni45Cr thermal spray coatings were tested in Ar-3.5H{sub 2}-0.1H{sub 2}S for 500h at 600 C and compared to AISI 1008 steel. The three Fe{sub 3}Al-type coatings were processed from the same lot of gas atomized Fe{sub 3}Al powder using a high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process and an air plasma spray (APS) process. In general, the Fe{sub 3}Al-type composition displayed excellent resistance to sulfidation corrosion at 600 C which correlated with the reported literature on wrought Fe{sub 3}Al alloys. HVOF processing did not significantly degrade the composition of the consumable and produced coatings with low porosity, low oxide content, high sulfidation resistance, and high resistance to sulfur penetration. In contrast, APS processing caused significant degradation to the particles which reduced the sulfidation resistance of the coating and enabled local sulfidation attack at alloy depleted regions. The APS processed Fe{sub 3}Al coating also contained high porosity which enabled sulfur to fully penetrate the splat boundaries of the coating to the substrate. The two Ni45Cr-type coatings were produced using different processes and different consumables. One of the Ni45Cr coatings was processed using a proprietary wire combustion arc-spray (CAS) process. The second Ni45Cr coating was processed using a HVOF spray process. Both NiCr-type coatings reacted moderately with the sulfidizing gas at 600 C to form a mixed chromium oxide-sulfide scale despite marked differences in coating structure and composition. CAS processing caused significant degradation of the Ni45Cr consumable and produced a coating with low porosity and high oxide content. In contrast, HVOF processing caused negligible degradation of the Ni45Cr consumable and produced a coating with low porosity and moderate oxide content.

  17. Fatigue Behavior of Inconel 718 TIG Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexopoulos, Nikolaos D.; Argyriou, Nikolaos; Stergiou, Vasillis; Kourkoulis, Stavros K.

    2014-08-01

    Mechanical behavior of reference and TIG-welded Inconel 718 specimens was examined in the present work. Tensile, constant amplitude fatigue, and fracture toughness tests were performed in ambient temperature for both, reference and welded specimens. Microstructure revealed the presence of coarse and fine-grained heat-affected zones. It has been shown that without any post-weld heat treatment, welded specimens maintained their tensile strength properties while their ductility decreased by more than 40%. It was found that the welded specimens had lower fatigue life and this decrease was a function of the applied fatigue maximum stress. A 30% fatigue life decrease was noticed in the high cycle fatigue regime for the welded specimens while this decrease exceeded 50% in the low cycle fatigue regime. Cyclic stress-strain curves showed that Inconel 718 experiences a short period of hardening followed by softening for all fatigue lives. Cyclic fatigue response of welded specimens' exhibited cyclically stable behavior. Finally, a marginal decrease was noticed in the Mode I fracture toughness of the welded specimens.

  18. Antistatic sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, James E.

    1989-01-01

    Antistatic sprays from several different manufacturers are examined. The sprays are examined for contamination potential (i.e., outgassing and nonvolatile residue), corrosiveness on an aluminum mirror surface, and electrostatic effectiveness. In addition, the chemical composition of the antistatic sprays is determined by infrared spectrophotometry, mass spectrometry, and ultraviolet spectrophotometry. The results show that 12 of the 17 antistatic sprays examined have a low contamination potential. Of these sprays, 7 are also noncorrosive to an aluminum surface. And of these, only 2 demonstrate good electrostatic properties with respect to reducing voltage accumulation; these sprays did not show a fast voltage dissipation rate however. The results indicate that antistatic sprays can be used on a limited basis where contamination potential, corrosiveness, and electrostatic effectiveness is not critical. Each application is different and proper evaluation of the situation is necessary. Information on some of the properties of some antistatic sprays is presented in this document to aid in the evaluation process.

  19. Abrasion and erosion wear resistance of Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coatings prepared by plasma, detonation and high-velocity oxyfuel spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Vuoristo, P.; Niemi, K.; Maekelae, A.; Maentylae, T.

    1994-12-31

    Chromium carbide based cermet coatings (Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr) deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), detonation gun spraying (DGS), and high-velocity oxyfuel flame spraying (HVOF) methods were evaluated with the microstructure, microhardness, phase structure, room temperature abrasion wear and particle erosion wear resistance. The influence of some spray parameters, e.g, the use of different plasma gases (Ar-H{sub 2}, Ar-He) in plasma spraying, and fuel gas-to-oxygen ratio (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}) and diluent gas content in detonation gun spraying, were studied in order to optimize the wear resistance of the coatings. The results showed that Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coatings had different wear properties depending on the spray parameters and spray methods used. Highest wear resistance was obtained with coatings prepared by the high-velocity combustion processes, i.e. by HVOF and detonation gun spraying.

  20. Microstructure and properties of tungsten carbide coatings sprayed with various high-velocity oxygen fuel spray systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwetzke, R.; Kreye, H.

    1999-09-01

    This article reports on a series of experiments with various high-velocity oxygen fuel spray systems (Jet Kote, Top Gun, Diamond Jet (DJ) Standard, DJ 2600 and 2700, JP-5000, Top Gun-K) using different WC-Co and WC-Co-Cr powders. The microstructure and phase composition of powders and coatings were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. Carbon and oxygen content of the coatings were determined to study the decarburization and oxidation of the material during the spray process. Coatings were also characterized by their hardness, bond strength, abrasive wear, and corrosion resistance. The results demonstrate that the powders exhibit various degrees of phase transformation during the spray process depending on type of powder, spray system, and spray parameters. Within a relatively wide range, the extent of phase transformation has only little effect on coating properties. Therefore, coatings of high hardness and wear resistance can be produced with all HVOF spray systems when the proper spray powder and process parameters are chosen.

  1. Vacuum plasma spray applications on liquid fuel rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckechnie, T. N.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Bryant, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process (VPS) has been developed by NASA and Rocketdyne for a variety of applications on liquid fuel rocket engines, including the Space Shuttle Main Engine. These applications encompass thermal barrier coatings which are thermal shock resistant for turbopump blades and nozzles; bond coatings for cryogenic titanium components; wear resistant coatings and materials; high conductivity copper, NaRloy-Z, combustion chamber liners, and structural nickel base material, Inconel 718, for nozzle and combustion chamber support jackets.

  2. Vacuum plasma spray applications on liquid fuel rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKechnie, T. N.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Bryant, M. A.

    1992-07-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process (VPS) has been developed by NASA and Rocketdyne for a variety of applications on liquid fuel rocket engines, including the Space Shuttle Main Engine. These applications encompass thermal barrier coatings which are thermal shock resistant for turbopump blades and nozzles; bond coatings for cryogenic titanium components; wear resistant coatings and materials; high conductivity copper, NaRloy-Z, combustion chamber liners, and structural nickel base material, Inconel 718, for nozzle and combustion chamber support jackets.

  3. Grain boundary niobium carbides in Inconel 718

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, M.; Wei, R.P.

    1997-12-15

    A coordinated, multidisciplinary investigation was conducted to determine the mechanisms and rate controlling processes for environmentally assisted crack growth under sustained (static) loading in Inconel 718 at elevated temperatures. The results showed that oxygen had a significant influence on crack growth, increasing the crack growth rate, for example, by nearly four orders of magnitude at 973 K. Based on results from the companion surface chemical and metallurgical studies, it was suggested that the mechanism for crack growth enhancement by oxygen was the formation and fracture of a brittle niobium oxide (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-type) film on the grain boundary surfaces. The Nb came principally from the oxidation and decomposition of NbC (or Nb-rich carbides) at the grain boundaries, and crack growth was controlled by the rate of oxidation and decomposition of these carbides. Because there was extensive oxidation of the primary NbC, these carbides were implicitly considered to be the primary source of Nb. Although these carbides were large and contained substantial amounts of Nb, they were too few and spaced too far apart to be of concern (averaging one NbC for two grain boundary facets and spaced about 25 {micro}m apart). To wit, whether the freed Nb could diffuse over such a large distance and be oxidized to support the postulated mechanism for crack growth? The presence of other Nb-rich carbides elsewhere on the grain boundaries, or other sources for Nb, therefore, needs to be re-examined and is the focus of this study. In this paper, the results of a study of grain boundary niobium carbides and their distribution in Inconel 718 are reported, and are discussed in terms of their contribution to crack growth.

  4. Process of high temperature synthesis in producing composite carbide powders for thermally sprayed coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymański, K.; Formanek, B.

    2011-05-01

    The paper presents the characterization of powders containing hard phases of chromium carbides in a NiCr matrix, intended for thermal spraying coatings. The synthesized composite powder containing hard phases and plastic matrix, produced in high-temperature synthesis with chosen powder metallurgy processes has been presented. Commercial materials, such as NiCr- CrxCy, are fabricated by means of agglomeration and sintering method. Processes of high temperature synthesis of Cr3C2, Cr7C3, Cr23C6 carbides combined with NiCr powder mechanical alloying are presented in the article. Parameters of the carbides synthesis were determined in the reactive -protective atmosphere. In the rotation- vibration mill, processes were conducted using grinding and appropriate mechanical alloying at variable amplitude. The standard and synthesized powders were thermally sprayed by HVOF method in Jet Kote II and Diamond Jet system. The structure and phase composition of the powders and coatings were determined by: light and scanning microscopy, X-ray phase analysis (RTG) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The structure and wear properties of HVOF sprayed coatings containing chromium carbides has been presented. The thermally sprayed coatings are characterized of wear resistance in abrasion and erosion tests. The sprayed coatings characterized high resistance in wear conditions.

  5. Increasing the Useful Life of Quench Reliefs with Inconel Bellows

    SciTech Connect

    Soyars, W. M.

    1999-01-01

    Reliable quench relief valves are an important part of superconducting magnet systems. Fermilab developed bellows-actuated cryogenic quench reliefs which have been in use since the early l 980's. The original design uses a stainless steel bellows. A high frequency, low amplitude vibration during relieving events has resulted in fatigue failures in the original design. To take advantage of the improved resistance to fatigue of Inconel, a nickel-chromium alloy, reliefs using Inconel 625 bellows were made. Design, development, and testing of the new version reliefs will be discussed. Tests show that relief valve lifetimes using Inconel bellows are more than five times greater than when using the original stainless steel bellows. Inconel bellows show great promise in increasing the lifetime of quench relief valves, and thus the reliability of accelerator cryogenic systems.

  6. Supersolidus Liquid Phase Sintering Modeling of Inconel 718 Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levasseur, David; Brochu, Mathieu

    2016-02-01

    Powder metallurgy of Inconel 718 superalloy is advantageous as a near-net shape process for complex parts to reduce the buy-to-fly ratio and machining cost. However, sintering Inconel 718 requires the assistance of supersolidus liquid formation to achieve near full density and involves the risk of distortion at high temperatures. The present work is focused on modeling the onset of sintering and distortion as a function of temperature, grain size, and part geometry for Inconel 718. Using experimental sintering results and data available in the literature, the supersolidus liquid phase sintering of Inconel 718 was modeled. The model was used to define a processing window where part distortion would be avoided.

  7. Elevated temperature creep behavior of Inconel alloy 625

    SciTech Connect

    Purohit, A.; Burke, W.F.

    1984-07-01

    Inconel 625 in the solution-annealed condition has been selected as the clad material for the fuel and control rod housing assemblies of the Upgraded Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT Upgrade or TU). The clad is expected to be subjected to temperatures up to about 1100/sup 0/C. Creep behavior for the temperature range of 800/sup 0/C to 1100/sup 0/C of Inconel alloy 625, in four distinct heat treated conditions, was experimentally evaluated.

  8. High-temperature sulfidation of Fe{sub 3}Al thermal spray coatings at 600 C

    SciTech Connect

    Luer, K.R.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    2000-02-01

    Sulfidation behavior of Fe{sub 3}Al thermal spray coatings was studied in Ar-3.5% H{sub 2}-0.1{degree} hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) at 600 C for 500 h. Coatings were processed from the same lot of gas atomized Fe{sub 3}Al powder using a high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) process and an air plasma spray (APS) process. In general, the Fe{sub 3}Al-type composition displayed excellent resistance to sulfidation corrosion at 600 C, which correlated with the reported literature on wrought Fe{sub 3}Al alloys. However, the method of processing affected the corrosion response. Particle degradation and porosity were two important factors that affected corrosion resistance. HVOF processing did not degrade significantly the composition of the powder and produced coatings with low porosity, low oxide content, high sulfidation resistance, and high resistance to sulfur penetration. HVOF coatings produced from finer sized powders exhibited slightly more corrosion damage because a greater percentage of the consumable was degraded. In contrast, APS processing caused significant degradation to the consumable and created coatings with a significant quantity of alloy-depleted regions, high oxide content, and high porosity. As a result, sulfur attached alloy-depleted regions within the splats and permeated through the porous splat boundaries to the coating-substrate interface.

  9. Theory and Apparatus for Measurement of Emissivity for Radiative Cooling of Hypersonic Aircraft with Data for Inconel and Inconel X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Sullivan, William J , Jr; Wade, William R

    1957-01-01

    The importance of radiation as a means of cooling high-supersonic- and hypersonic-speed aircraft is discussed to show the need for measurements of the total hemispherical emissivity of surfaces. The theory underlying the measurement of the total hemispherical emissivity of surfaces is presented, readily duplicable apparatus for performing the measurements is described, and measurements for stably oxidized Inconel and Inconel X are given for the temperature range from 600 F to 2,000 F.

  10. High-Temperature Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Studies on NiCrAlY Coatings Deposited by Flame-Spray Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Nidhi; Mahapatra, Manas Mohan; Jayaganthan, R.; Prakash, Satya

    2015-06-01

    The NiCrAlY coatings deposited by flame-spray technique on the superalloy substrate were oxidized in the presence of air and Na2SO4 + V2O5 salt at 900 °C for 100 cycles. The kinetics of oxidation showed that the coatings deposited by flame-spray technique possess better oxidation resistance compared with coatings deposited by high-velocity oxy fuel (HVOF)-sprayed technique. The oxidized coatings were further characterized by XRD, FESEM/EDS, and x-ray mapping techniques. The mechanisms of the oxidation and hot corrosion were substantiated by analyzing the results obtained from the various characterization techniques.

  11. Adapting of the Background-Oriented Schlieren (BOS) Technique in the Characterization of the Flow Regimes in Thermal Spraying Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Abdulgader, M.; Rademacher, H. G.; Anjami, N.; Hagen, L.

    2014-01-01

    In thermal spraying technique, the changes in the in-flight particle velocities are considered to be only a function of the drag forces caused by the dominating flow regimes in the spray jet. Therefore, the correct understanding of the aerodynamic phenomena occurred at nozzle out let and at the substrate interface is an important task in the targeted improvement in the nozzle and air-cap design as well as in the spraying process in total. The presented work deals with the adapting of an innovative technique for the flow characterization called background-oriented Schlieren. The flow regimes in twin wire arc spraying (TWAS) and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) were analyzed with this technique. The interfering of the atomization gas flow with the intersected wires causes in case of TWAS process a deformation of the jet shape. It leads also to areas with different aero dynamic forces. The configurations of the outlet air-caps in TWAS effect predominantly the outlet flow characteristics. The ratio between fuel and oxygen determine the dominating flow regimes in the HVOF spraying jet. Enhanced understanding of the aerodynamics at outlet and at the substrate interface could lead to a targeted improvement in thermal spraying processes.

  12. Aerodynamic study on supersonic flows in high-velocity oxy-fuel thermal spray process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katanoda, Hiroshi; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Kuroda, Seiji; Kawakita, Jin; Fukanuma, Hirotaka; Matsuo, Kazuyasu

    2005-06-01

    To clarify the characteristics of gas flow in high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun, aerodynamic research is performed using a special gun. The gun has rectangular cross-sectional area and sidewalls of optical glass to visualize the internal flow. The gun consists of a supersonic nozzle with the design Mach number of 2.0 followed by a straight passage called barrel. Compressed dry air up to 0.78 MPa is used as a process gas instead of combustion gas which is used in a commercial HVOF gun. The high-speed gas flows with shock waves in the gun and jets are visualized by schlieren technique. Complicated internal and external flow-fields containing various types of shock wave as well as expansion wave are visualized.

  13. Oxymetazoline Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

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  14. Effect of nano-crystallization of high velocity oxy-fuel-sprayed amorphous NiCrBSi alloy on properties of the coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chang-Jiu; Wang, Yu-Yue; Li, Hua

    2004-09-01

    NiCrBSi self-fluxing alloy coatings were deposited by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying. Annealing treatment was applied to the as-sprayed coatings to develop the microstructure of the Ni-based coating. The microstructure of the coating was characterized using optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The crystallization behavior of the amorphous coating was also characterized by differential scanning calorimetry. The properties of the coating were characterized by microhardness and abrasive wear tests. The results showed that the as-sprayed HVOF coating deposited by well melted spray particles exhibited a dense microstructure of amorphous phase. It was revealed that the crystallization of the amorphous phase in HVOF NiCrBSi coating occurs at a temperature of about 502°C. Annealing at temperature a little higher than recrystallization temperature leads to the formation of the nano-crystalline microstructure. The subsequent nanostructured Ni-based coating presents higher microhardness and excellent wear performance. With the further increase in annealing temperature, the growth of the nano-crystalline grains occurs and, accordingly, the microhardness of the coating and the wear performance decrease. Thereafter, the microstructure and properties of the Ni-based self-fluxing alloy coating can be controlled through postannealing treatment.

  15. Process gases for high velocity oxy-fuel thermal spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Creffield, G.K.; Chapman, I.F.; Cole, M.A.; Page, W.J.; McDonough, T.

    1994-12-31

    The importance of fuel and other process gases for high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying and especially the delivery of them to the point of use is well recognized. Problems associated with the supply of liquid fuel gases, at the high flow rates and pressures required by this process, have been addressed. Considerable development work has gone into designing an appropriate liquid withdrawal and vaporizer system for propylene, which overcomes these previous difficulties and enables users to maintain adequate fuel gas flow rates in order to ensure optimum operating conditions for the production of high quality coatings. A feature of the thermal spray process is that the temperature of the workpiece is kept low, typically below 150 C, in order to reduce residual stresses in the coating and to protect heat sensitive substrates. Traditionally this has been by compressed air, however, improved cooling has been achieved using carbon dioxide. Specially designed equipment is now available which provides and directs a cold mixture of carbon dioxide gas and solid particles (snow) via suitable nozzles, on the workpiece. The position of the cooling stream can be varied, depending on the application. These developments emphasize the importance now attached to providing dedicated gas installation packages for HVOF.

  16. APS TBC performance on directionally-solidified superalloy substrates with HVOF NiCoCrAlYHfSi bond coatings

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lance, Michael J.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Haynes, James A.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2015-09-04

    Directionally-solidified (DS) superalloy components with advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) to lower the metal operating temperature have the potential to replace more expensive single crystal superalloys for large land-based turbines. In order to assess relative TBC performance, furnace cyclic testing was used with superalloys 1483, X4 and Hf-rich DS 247 substrates and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF)-NiCoCrAlYHfSi bond coatings at 1100 °C with 1-h cycles in air with 10% H2O. With these coating and test conditions, there was no statistically-significant effect of substrate alloy on the average lifetime of the air plasma sprayed (APS) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coatings onmore » small coupons. Using photo-stimulated luminescence piezospectroscopy maps at regular cycling intervals, the residual compressive stress in the α-Al2O3 scale underneath the YSZ top coating and on a bare bond coating was similar for all three substrates and delaminations occurred at roughly the same rate and frequency. As a result, x-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements collected from the bare bond coating surface revealed higher Ti interdiffusion occurring with the 1483 substrate, which contained the highest Ti content.« less

  17. APS TBC performance on directionally-solidified superalloy substrates with HVOF NiCoCrAlYHfSi bond coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Lance, Michael J.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Haynes, James A.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2015-09-04

    Directionally-solidified (DS) superalloy components with advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) to lower the metal operating temperature have the potential to replace more expensive single crystal superalloys for large land-based turbines. In order to assess relative TBC performance, furnace cyclic testing was used with superalloys 1483, X4 and Hf-rich DS 247 substrates and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF)-NiCoCrAlYHfSi bond coatings at 1100 °C with 1-h cycles in air with 10% H2O. With these coating and test conditions, there was no statistically-significant effect of substrate alloy on the average lifetime of the air plasma sprayed (APS) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coatings on small coupons. Using photo-stimulated luminescence piezospectroscopy maps at regular cycling intervals, the residual compressive stress in the α-Al2O3 scale underneath the YSZ top coating and on a bare bond coating was similar for all three substrates and delaminations occurred at roughly the same rate and frequency. As a result, x-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements collected from the bare bond coating surface revealed higher Ti interdiffusion occurring with the 1483 substrate, which contained the highest Ti content.

  18. Process Control and Characterization of NiCr Coatings by HVOF-DJ2700 System: A Process Map Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valarezo, Alfredo; Choi, Wanhuk B.; Chi, Weiguang; Gouldstone, Andrew; Sampath, Sanjay

    2010-09-01

    The concept of ‘process maps’ has been utilized to study the fundamentals of process-structure-property relationships in high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) sprayed coatings. Ni-20%Cr was chosen as a representative material for metallic alloys. In this paper, integrated experiments including diagnostic studies, splat collection, coating deposition, and property characterization were carried out in an effort to investigate the effects of fuel gas chemistry (fuel/oxygen ratio), total gas flow, and energy input on particle states: particle temperature ( T) and velocity ( V), coating formation dynamics, and properties. Coatings were deposited on an in situ curvature sensor to study residual stress evolution. The results were reconciled within the framework of process maps linking torch parameters with particle states (1st order map) and relating particle state with deposit properties (2nd order map). A strong influence of particle velocity on induced compressive stresses through peening effect is discussed. The complete tracking of the coating buildup history including particle state, residual stress evolution and deposition temperature, in addition to single splat analysis, allows the interpretation of resultant coating microstructures and properties and enables coating design with desired properties.

  19. Microstructure characterization of WC-Ni coatings obtained by HVOF thermal spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Guilemany, J.M.; Nutting, J.; Miguel, J.R.; Dong, Z.

    1995-07-01

    The main purpose of this investigation was to characterize the structure of WC-Ni coatings, which have become of interest in recent years. The WC-Ni powders used in these experiments have been well characterized, but the microstructure of the WC-Ni coating was not well established. In this paper, different techniques, including light optical microscopy, SEM, TEM-STEM, EDS, HRTEM, EPMA, X-ray diffraction, Image analysis and Elemental analysis technique, were used to characterize the WC-Ni coatings. The substrate at the interfacial region also undergoes phase transformations because of the thermal shock from the hot splats. Fine crystal zone, martensite transformation zone and recrystallization zone have been found at different depths of the steel substrate, which is very similar to WC-Co/steel system. These zones have been very well characterized and will be discussed in detail elsewhere.

  20. The Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of HVOF-Sprayed WC: Metal Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Liam P.; Pilkington, Antony

    2014-09-01

    WC-based cermet coatings containing various metallic binders such as Ni, Co, and Cr are known for their superior tribological properties, particularly abrasion resistance and enhanced surface hardness. Consequently, these systems are considered as replacements for traditional hard chrome coatings in critical aircraft components such as landing gear. The purpose of this investigation was to conduct a comparative study on the dry sliding wear behavior of three WC-based cermet coatings (WC-12Ni, WC-20Cr2C3-7Ni, and WC-10Co-4Cr), when deposited on carbon steel substrates. Ball on disk wear tests were performed on the coatings using a CSEM Tribometer (pin-on-disk) with a 6-mm ruby ball at 20 N applied load, 0.2 m/s sliding velocity, and sliding distances up to 2000 m. Analysis of both the coating wear track and worn ruby ball was performed using optical microscopy and an Alphastep-250 profilometer. The results of the study revealed both wear of the ruby ball and coated disks allowed for a comparison of both the ball wear and coating wear for the systems considered. Generally, the use of Co and Cr as a binder significantly improved the sliding wear resistance of the coating compared to Ni and/or Cr2C3.

  1. Deposition and Characterization of HVOF Thermal Sprayed Functionally Graded Coatings Deposited onto a Lightweight Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, M.; Stokes, J.; Looney, L.; Hashmi, M. S. J.

    2009-02-01

    There is a significant interest in lightweight materials (like aluminum, magnesium, titanium, and so on) containing a wear resistance coating, in such industries as the automotive industry, to replace heavy components with lighter parts in order to decrease vehicle weight and increase fuel efficiency. Functionally graded coatings, in which the composition, microstructure, and/or properties vary gradually from the bond coat to the top coat, may be applied to lightweight materials, not only to decrease weight, but also to enhance components mechanical properties by ensuring gradual microstructural (changes) together with lower residual stress. In the current work, aluminum/tool-steel functionally graded coatings were deposited onto lightweight aluminum substrates. The graded coatings were then characterized in terms of residual stress and hardness. Results show that residual stress increased with an increase in deposition thickness and a decrease in number of layers. However, the hardness also increased with an increase in deposition thickness and decrease in number of layers. Therefore, an engineer must compromise between the hardness and stress values while designing a functionally graded coating-substrate system.

  2. Brazing Inconel 625 Using the Copper Foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Shiang; Wang, Cheng-Yen; Shiue, Ren-Kae

    2013-12-01

    Brazing Inconel 625 (IN-625) using the copper foil has been investigated in this research. The brazed joint is composed of nanosized CrNi3 precipitates and Cr/Mo/Nb/Ni quaternary compound in the Cu/Ni-rich matrix. The copper filler 50 μm in thickness is enough for the joint filling. However, the application of Cu foil 100 μm in thickness has little effect on the shear strength of the brazed joint. The specimen brazed at 1433 K (1160 °C) for 1800 seconds demonstrates the best shear strength of 470 MPa, and its fractograph is dominated by ductile dimple fracture with sliding marks. Decreasing the brazing temperature slightly decreases the shear strength of the brazed joint due to the presence of a few isolated solidification shrinkage voids smaller than 15 μm. Increasing the brazing temperature, especially for the specimen brazed at 1473 K (1200 °C), significantly deteriorates the shear strength of the joint below 260 MPa because of coalescence of isothermal solidification shrinkage voids in the joint. The Cu foil demonstrates potential in brazing IN-625 for industrial application.

  3. Circular Vibration Planing of Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hettiarachchi, Nandita Kalyanakumara; Moriwaki, Toshimichi; Shibasaka, Toshiro; Nakamoto, Keiichi

    Circular vibration milling (CVM) is achieved by vibrating a milling cutter about the machine tool spindle axis in a circular path, in addition to its rotary motion. CVM has been proven capable of producing better surface finishes on difficult to cut materials. However, the CVM process is far slower than conventional milling process. In circular vibration planing (CVP) process, the cutting tool is clamped without rotation and fed at a speed comparable to the feed speed of conventional milling. By superimposing circular vibration motion, necessary cutting speed could be achieved keeping the feed speed at realistic values. Inconel 718 was machined by CVP and conventional milling at a similar feed rate. It was observed that CVP could reduce tool wear and hence produce better surface finishes than conventional milling. A geometric simulation showed a major difference between uncut chip shapes of the two processes. The difference of uncut chip shapes suggests that in CVP process, less rubbing occurs between tool flank face and work before the tool penetrates in to the work to form a chip. The reduced rubbing of the flank face is proposed as the reson for reduced tool wear in CVP when compared with conventional milling.

  4. Magnetic susceptibility of Inconel alloys 718, 625, and 600 at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Ira B.; Mitchell, Michael R.; Murphy, Allan R.; Goldfarb, Ronald B.; Loughran, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    After a hydrogen fuel bleed valve problem on the Discovery Space Shuttle was traced to the strong magnetization of Inconel 718 in the armature of the linear variable differential transformer near liquid hydrogen temperatures, the ac magnetic susceptibility of three samples of Inconel 718 of slightly different compositions, one sample of Inconel 625, and on sample of Inconel 600 were measured as a function of temperature. Inconel 718 alloys are found to exhibit a spin glass state below 16 K. Inconel 600 exhibits three different magnetic phases, the lowest-temperature state (below 6 K) being somewhat similar to that of Inconel 718. The magnetic states of the Inconel alloys and their magnetic susceptibilities appear to be strongly dependent on the exact composition of the alloy.

  5. Mechanical and Thermal Transport Properties of Suspension Thermal-Sprayed Alumina-Zirconia Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberste Berghaus, Jörg; Legoux, Jean-Gabriel; Moreau, Christian; Tarasi, Fariba; Chráska, Tomas

    2008-03-01

    Micro-laminates and nanocomposites of Al2O3 and ZrO2 can potentially exhibit higher hardness and fracture toughness and lower thermal conductivity than alumina or zirconia alone. The potential of these improvements for abrasion protection and thermal barrier coatings is generating considerable interest in developing techniques for producing these functional coatings with optimized microstructures. Al2O3-ZrO2 composite coatings were deposited by suspension thermal spraying (APS and HVOF) of submicron feedstock powders. The liquid carrier employed in this approach allows for controlled injection of much finer particles than in conventional thermal spraying, leading to unique and novel fine-scaled microstructures. The suspensions were injected internally using a Mettech Axial III plasma torch and a Sulzer-Metco DJ-2700 HVOF gun. The different spray processes induced a variety of structures ranging from finely segregated ceramic laminates to highly alloyed amorphous composites. Mechanisms leading to these structures are related to the feedstock size and in-flight particle states upon their impact. Mechanical and thermal transport properties of the coatings were compared. Compositionally segregated crystalline coatings, obtained by plasma spraying, showed the highest hardness of up to 1125 VHN3 N, as well as the highest abrasion wear resistance (following ASTM G65). The HVOF coating exhibited the highest erosion wear resistance (following ASTM G75), which was related to the toughening effect of small dispersed zirconia particles in the alumina-zirconia-alloyed matrix. This microstructure also exhibited the lowest thermal diffusivity, which is explained by the amorphous phase content and limited particle bonding, generating local thermal resistances within the structure.

  6. High temperature stability of aluminide-coated Inconel 617

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyun; Lee, Byeong Woo

    2015-03-01

    Aluminum diffusion coatings were applied to the Inconel 617 by a pack cementation. The effect of coatings on the thermal stability and wear resistance of the Inconel alloy after heat-treatment under an air and a helium atmosphere at 1000°C, 48 h has been studied. The aluminide-coated Inconel specimens are prepared at 850°C and 1000°C for 1 h. An aluminiding layer indexed as AlxNi1-x (x = 0.4-0.6) was formed near the surface region and it played a role as a barrier layer against the surface diffusion of Cr. The thin Cr2O3 film formed in situ on the alloy surface is protective inhibiting further oxidation at moderate temperatures. As the temperature increases further, the thermal stability of the Inconel alloy is limited by the instability of the Cr2O3 scale. The aluminide-coated Inconel 617 samples showed the better performances, the enhanced thermal stability and improved wear resistance, most likely due to the barrier layer formation with the reduced amount of Cr2O3 scale formation.

  7. Spray automated balancing of rotors: Methods and materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Anthony J.; Baldwin, Richard M.; Schick, Wilbur R.

    1988-01-01

    The work described consists of two parts. In the first part, a survey is performed to assess the state of the art in rotor balancing technology as it applies to Army gas turbine engines and associated power transmission hardware. The second part evaluates thermal spray processes for balancing weight addition in an automated balancing procedure. The industry survey reveals that: (1) computerized balancing equipment is valuable to reduce errors, improve balance quality, and provide documentation; (2) slow-speed balancing is used exclusively, with no forseeable need for production high-speed balancing; (3) automated procedures are desired; and (4) thermal spray balancing is viewed with cautious optimism whereas laser balancing is viewed with concern for flight propulsion hardware. The FARE method (Fuel/Air Repetitive Explosion) was selected for experimental evaluation of bond strength and fatigue strength. Material combinations tested were tungsten carbide on stainless steel (17-4), Inconel 718 on Inconel 718, and Triballoy 800 on Inconel 718. Bond strengths were entirely adequate for use in balancing. Material combinations have been identified for use in hot and cold sections of an engine, with fatigue strengths equivalent to those for hand-ground materials.

  8. Corrosion Test Results for Inconel 600 vs Inconel-Stainless UG Bellows

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, P.E.

    2002-09-11

    The Conversion Project (CP) of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involves converting slightly less than 40 kg of {sup 233}U to a stable form for safe storage. The operation is performed within a few vessels interconnected by valves and 1/2-in. metal tubing. During this conversion, a particularly toxic and corrosive by-product is formed, namely aqueous hydrofluoric acid (HF). The production of HF is a result of the hydrolysis of UF{sub 6} and subsequent steam treatments of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}. For each mole of UF{sub 6} converted, 6 mol of HF are produced. The HF that forms during conversion combines with water to produce approximately 1.5 L of 33 wt % HF. As this mixture is transferred within the process system, the tubing and valves are exposed to high concentrations of HF in liquid and vapor form. Of particular concern in the system are the almost 30 valves that have the potential for exposure to HF. For these valves, a vendor-supplied UG valve was installed. UG valves consist of an Alloy 400 (Monel) body and stem tip and Alloy 600 (Inconel) bellows. These valves have been used under experimental conditions that simulate the CP. It has been established that they have a finite life when exposed to a HF and air environment. Most failures were seen around the flange at the bottom of the bellows, and it was suspected that this flange and the weld material were not Inconel. In December 2001, the vendor confirmed that this flange was not Inconel but instead was stainless steel 316. After discussions between the vendor and ORNL staff involved with the CP effort, it was decided that the entire wetted area of the bellows would be fabricated from Alloy 600. In March 2002, four newly fabricated bellows assemblies were received from the vendor for the purposes of corrosion testing in HF. This report presents results from the corrosion tests conducted to determine if the new design of the bellows would enhance their corrosion resistance.

  9. Optimization of the HOVF Spray Parameters by Taguchi Method for High Corrosion-Resistant Fe-Based Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yujiao; Wu, Yuping; Zhang, Jianfeng; Hong, Sheng; Guo, Wenmin; Chen, Liyan; Liu, Hao

    2015-07-01

    Taguchi method was used to optimize the parameters of the high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spray process and obtain the high corrosion-resistant Fe-based coatings. Based on the signal-to-noise ( S/ N) ratio and the analysis of variance, the significance of spray parameters in determining the porosity of the coatings was found to be in the order of spray distance, oxygen flow, and kerosene flow. Thus, the optimal parameters for the porosity of the HVOF sprayed Fe-based coating were determined as 280 mm for the spray distance, 963 scfh for the oxygen flow, and 28 gph for the kerosene flow. The potentiodynamic polarization and EIS tests indicated that the Fe-based coating prepared with the optimal parameters exhibited a higher corrosion potential ( E corr) of -196.14 mV, a lower corrosion current density ( i corr) of 0.14 μA/cm2, and a higher coating resistance ( R c) of 2.26 × 106 Ω cm2 than those of the hard chromium coating in 3.5% sodium chloride solution. This superior corrosion resistance could be attributed to the dense structure with low porosity and partially amorphous phases of the Fe-based coatings.

  10. Characterization of High-Velocity Solution Precursor Flame-Sprayed Manganese Cobalt Oxide Spinel Coatings for Metallic SOFC Interconnectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puranen, Jouni; Laakso, Jarmo; Kylmälahti, Mikko; Vuoristo, Petri

    2013-06-01

    A modified high-velocity oxy-fuel spray (HVOF) thermal spray torch equipped with liquid feeding hardware was used to spray manganese-cobalt solutions on ferritic stainless steel grade Crofer 22 APU substrates. The HVOF torch was modified in such a way that the solution could be fed axially into the combustion chamber through 250- and 300-μm-diameter liquid injector nozzles. The solution used in this study was prepared by diluting nitrates of manganese and cobalt, i.e., Mn(NO3)2·4H2O and Co(NO3)2·6H2O, respectively, in deionized water. The as-sprayed coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction and field-emission scanning electron microscopy operating in secondary electron mode. Chemical analyses were performed on an energy dispersive spectrometer. Coatings with remarkable density could be prepared by the novel high-velocity solution precursor flame spray (HVSPFS) process. Due to finely sized droplet formation in the HVSPFS process and the use of as delivered Crofer 22 APU substrate material having very low substrate roughness ( R a < 0.5 μm), thin and homogeneous coatings, with thicknesses lower than 10 μm could be prepared. The coatings were found to have a crystalline structure equivalent to MnCo2O4 spinel with addition of Co-oxide phases. Crystallographic structure was restored back to single-phase spinel structure by heat treatment.

  11. Studies on Laser Generated Ultrasonic Waves in Inconel Super Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Pramila, T.; Shukla, Anita; Raghuram, V.

    2010-05-28

    This paper deals with the generation, characterization and analysis of ultrasonic waves generated in a thick stepped sample of inconel super alloy using Laser Based Ultrasonic Technique. Nd-YAG pulsed laser is used for ultrasonic generation while He-Ne laser is used for heterodyne detection. Ultrasonic signals are analyzed using Fourier and wavelet transforms. Here the identification and estimation of velocity of pressure waves is presented. The mechanism of pressure wave generation is discussed in brief. Laser ultrasonics studies of inconel are being reported for the first time.

  12. Nitroglycerin Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... attacks. Your doctor will probably tell you to sit down and use one dose of nitroglycerin when ... dose.To use the spray, follow these steps: Sit down if possible, and hold the container without ...

  13. Numerical Investigation of Combustion and Flow Dynamics in a High Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Song, Qiuzhi; Yu, Zhiyi

    2016-02-01

    The combustion and flow behavior within a high velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun is very complex and involves multiphase flow, heat transfer, chemical reactions, and supersonic/subsonic transitions. Additionally, this behavior has a significant effect on the formation of a coating. Non-premixed combustion models have been developed and are able to provide insight into the underlying physics of the process. Therefore, this investigation employs a non-premixed combustion model and the SST k - ω turbulence model to simulate the flow field of the JP5000 (Praxair-TAFA, US) HVOF thermal spray gun. The predicted temperature and velocity have a high level of agreement with experimental data when using the non-premixed combustion model. The results are focused on the fuel combustion, the subsequent gas dynamics within the HVOF gun, and the development of a supersonic free jet outside the gun. Furthermore, the oxygen/fuel inlet turbulence intensity, the fuel droplet size, and the oxygen/fuel ratio are investigated to determine their effect on the supersonic flow characteristics of the combustion gas.

  14. Comparison of Oxidation and Microstructure of Warm-Sprayed and Cold-Sprayed Titanium Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, KeeHyun; Kuroda, Seiji; Watanabe, Makoto; Huang, RenZhong; Fukanuma, Hirotaka; Katanoda, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Thick titanium coatings were prepared by the warm spraying (WS) and cold spraying (CS) processes to investigate the oxidation and microstructure of the coating layers. Prior to the coating formations, the temperature and velocity of in-flight titanium powder particles were numerically calculated. Significant oxidation occurred in the WS process using higher gas temperature conditions with low nitrogen flow rate, which is mixed to the flame jet of a high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray gun in order to control the temperature of the propellant gas. Oxidation, however, decreased strikingly as the nitrogen flow rate increased. In the CS process using nitrogen or helium as a propellant gas, little oxidation was observed. Even when scanning electron microscopy or an x-ray diffraction method did not detect oxides in the coating layers produced by WS using a high nitrogen flow rate or by CS using helium, the inert gas fusion method revealed minor increases of oxygen content from 0.01 to 0.2 wt.%. Most of the cross-sections of the coating layers prepared by conventional mechanical polishing looked dense. However, the cross-sections prepared by an ion-milling method revealed the actual microstructures containing small pores and unbounded interfaces between deposited particles.

  15. Hair spray poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hair spray poisoning occurs when someone breathes in (inhales) hair spray or sprays it down their throat or ... The harmful ingredients in hair spray are: Carboxymethylcellulose ... Polyvinyl alcohol Propylene glycol Polyvinylpyrrolidone

  16. Flow Characteristics in Compact Thermal Spray Coating Systems with Minimum Length Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seung-Hyun, Kim; Youn-Jea, Kim

    2009-10-01

    In this study, numerical analysis is performed to adopt the equivalence ratio on the high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coating systems equipped with a minimum length nozzle. The analysis is applied to investigate the axisymmetric, steady-state, turbulent, and chemically combusting flow both within the torch and in a free jet region between the torch and the substrate to be coated. The combustion is modeled using a single-step and eddy-dissipation model which assumes that the reaction rate is limited by the turbulent mixing rate of the fuel and oxidant. As the diameter of the nozzle throat is increased, the location of the Mach shock disc moves backward from the nozzle exit. As the throat diameter and the divergent portion are 6 mm and 8 mm, respectively, the pressure in the HVOF system is the lowest at the chamber and the expanding gas is steadily maintained with both high velocity and high temperature for different equivalence ratios. Thus, relatively minor amendments of the equivalence ratio and the geometry of HVOF can lead to improved control over coating characteristics.

  17. Preparation of cross sections of thermal spray coatings for TEM investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H. )

    1992-03-01

    A technique for the preparation of cross sections for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of thermal spray coatings has been developed. The procedure is designed to minimize specimen damage during mechanical thinning and to reduce the effect of differential thinning during ion milling. Specimens were made by two different coating systems - WC-Co coating produced by the FARE Gun process on a mild steel substrate and Tribaloy T-800 sprayed by the HVOF process on a nickel-base superalloy. These specimens have large areas that are electron transparent on either side of the interface, and the results have shown the atomic scale microstructure of the interface between the thermal spray coating and the substrate. 9 refs.

  18. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Thermal Spray Coating Interface Quality By Eddy Current Method

    SciTech Connect

    B. Mi; G. Zhao; R. Bayles

    2006-08-10

    Thermal spray coating is usually applied through directing molten or softened particles at very high velocities onto a substrate. An eddy current non-destructive inspection technique is presented here for thermal spray coating interface quality characterization. Several high-velocity-oxy-fuel (HVOF) coated steel plates were produced with various surface preparation conditions or spray process parameters. A quad-frequency eddy current probe was used to manually scan over the coating surface to evaluate the bonding quality. Experimental results show that different surface preparation conditions and varied process parameters can be successfully differentiated by the impedance value observed from the eddy current probe. The measurement is fairly robust and consistent. This non-contact, nondestructive, easy-to-use technique has the potential for evaluating the coating quality immediately after its application so that any defects can be corrected immediately.

  19. Tensile and fatigue properties of Inconel 718 at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, C. O.; Schmidt, E. H.

    1969-01-01

    Tests to determine the tensile and fatigue properties of Inconel 718 at cryogenic temperatures show that the alloy increases in strength at low temperatures, with very little change in toughness. The effect of surface finish and grain size on the fatigue properties was also determined.

  20. Stainless steel 301 and Inconel 718 hydrogen embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgeier, R. K.; Forman, R.

    1970-01-01

    Conditions and results of tensile tests of 26 Inconel 718 and four cryoformed stainless steel specimens are presented. Conclusions determine maximum safe hydrogen operating pressure for cryogenic pressure vessels and provide definitive information concerning flaw growth characteristics under the most severe temperature and pressure conditions

  1. Weld microfissuring in Inconel 718 minimized by minor elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, T. J.; Shira, C. S.; Weisenberg, L. A.

    1968-01-01

    Manganese, silicon, and magnesium markedly reduce the tendency of Inconel 718 to weld microfissuring. By combining a manganese, 0.20 percent by content, with silicon, greater than 0.25 percent content, or by adding 20 ppm of magnesium, the weld microfissuring decreased in the standard alloy.

  2. Asbestos and Inconel combined to form hot-gas seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooster, C. W., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    Hot-gas seal prevents warpage tendencies in large flange joints exposed to high temperatures, such as those present in large space vehicle engine exhausts. Two Inconel wire mesh cores are held in place by an asbestos cloth cover that acts as a spacer to form the seal.

  3. Ultrafine Particulate Dispersed High-Temperature Coatings by Hybrid Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, P. S.; Roche, A. D.; Guduru, R. K.; Varadaraajan, V.

    2010-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened alloys (ODS), although not commonly used in coating applications, have long been used for high-temperature structural applications due to their superior creep properties. In this paper, we present the design, synthesis, and characterization of a new class of functionally engineered high-temperature coatings in which ultrafine oxide particulates are dispersed in the matrix alloy to achieve superior creep resistance along with improved high-temperature corrosion and erosion resistance. These coatings were fabricated using a novel technique called “hybrid spray process”. Hybrid spray technique combines arc spray and high-velocity oxy fuel (HVOF) spray processes; the metallic matrix alloys are fused by the wire arcing component of the process, whereas the ultrafine particles are synthesized in-flight by the HVOF component from liquid precursors. These particulate dispersed high-temperature composite coatings were fabricated using liquid precursors for SiO2, Cr2O3, Al2O3, and wire feed stock of 55/45 NiCr, in one step. The coatings were then characterized using electron microscopy (SEM/TEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). High-temperature erosion, oxidation, and corrosion performance of these coatings were also evaluated and compared with 304 stainless steel, arc sprayed NiCr coatings as well as Alloy 625 overlay cladding. The hybrid spray process produced dense coatings with uniform dispersion of the ultrafine oxide particles. Further, these coatings also demonstrated superior corrosion, erosion, and oxidation resistance; SiO2 particulate dispersion being most effective in terms of high-temperature corrosion resistance.

  4. Nondestructive Measurement Material Characterization of Thermal Sprayed Nickel Aluminum Coatings by using Laser Ultrasound Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Cheng Hung; Wu, Tai Chieh; Yang, Che Hua

    This research focused on characterization of mechanical properties in Nickel-Aluminum coating with different thermal technique and processing parameters at high temperature environment up to 295°C. With the laser ultrasound technique (LUT), guided acoustic waves are generated to propagate on the Ni-Al sprayed coatings. By measuring dispersive phase velocity followed by SCE-UA inversion algorithm. The Young's modulus of coatings which fabricated by HVOF technique is higher than APS technique. This technique is potentially useful to probe the material characterization at high temperature environment in a remote and non-destructive way.

  5. Investigation of wear and scuffing behaviour of ferrous thermal spray coatings for aluminum engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edrisy, Afsaneh

    The development of lightweight internal combustion engines using materials such as cast aluminum alloys represents one of the most significant technological developments in the automotive industry. These engines reduce weight, which in turn reduce fuel consumption and emission. However, poor wear resistance and low seizure load of unprotected Al-Si alloys are a major drawback for applications involving sliding contact in automotive engine blocks. The wear resistance of cast aluminum parts can be improved by depositing coatings on the sliding surfaces. In this respect, iron based coatings deposited through a thermal spray process may play an important role in improving wear resistances of aluminium parts used in the automotive industry. These coatings can be produced economically and be easily deposited on the curved surfaces in ambient air atmosphere. In this research, two promising thermal spray deposition processes were considered: These were (i) plasma transfer wire arc thermal spraying (PTWA) process, and (ii) high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) process. The research work presented in this dissertation primarily focussed on the wear behaviour of low carbon steel thermal spray coatings which were applied using PTWA and HVOF processes deposited on engine grade cast aluminum alloy substrates. The main objective of the work was to characterize the micromechanisms of wear that control the wear rates of the coatings. Several new wear mechanisms that were previously unknown in thermal spray coatings were identified. In addition, the effect of the environment on the wear performance of coatings was investigated. The importance of controlling the atmospheric conditions during the sliding contact of coated aluminum components was established. Detailed analyses of compositions and microstructures of iron based coatings that were produced using PTWA and HVOF thermal deposition processes showed that the wear resistances of the coatings were sensitive to the production method. A

  6. Quality control of thermal sprayed coatings with an optoelectric sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, H.; Brandt, O.; Kasper, A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reports on the development of a fully optoelectronic optical sensor that has been used for investigations concerning quality control of the high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) flame spraying process. The authors focused on the following parameters: WoC with Co, CoCr, Ni at T < 500 C, and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} with Ni-Cr, Ni at T < 900 C. Until recently, there was no non-destructive testing (NDT) approach for flame spraying available, which is a major drawback for many critical applications, like in the aerospace industry. For instance, while cooling down after spraying, cracks in the coatings may occur caused by strain. Furthermore, edges may cause similar damage to the coating. The idea was to provide the flame spraying industry with a measurement technology that is applicable in the workshop, has a contactless principle of operation and is fast compared to the commonly used metallography or scanning electron microscopy. The approach is designed for use close to the process, i.e. coating morphology was not the focus of the investigations. On the contrary, they tried to extract quality related information from surface microtopography which can be obtained in a non-destructive and affordable manner. Main points covered in this paper are theoretical considerations, the operational principles and construction of the sensor head, and quantitative metrology of surface damage such as variations in rms-roughness and cracks.

  7. Residual Stress Determination in Thermally Sprayed Coatings – A Comparison of Curvature Models and X-Ray Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    T.C. Totemeier; J.K. Wright

    2006-03-01

    Residual stresses were calculated from the curvature of coating-substrate coupons using three different models: a simple two-beam elastic model; the Tsui-Clyne progressive deposition model; and the Tsui-Clyne progressive deposition model with substrate plasticity. The coatings studied were metallic and prepared by high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying. The calculated stresses were compared to those measured on the same coupons using x-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Coating surface stresses calculated using the two-beam elastic model disagreed with those measured using XRD for coupons with significant curvature. Trends in residual stresses (with varying coating and substrate thickness, substrate material, and HVOF spray particle velocity) predicted by the elastic and elastic-plastic versions of the Tsui-Clyne progressive deposition model agreed with the trends measured by XRD. The magnitudes of stresses calculated using the Tsui-Clyne model agreed with the XRD measurements for coatings sprayed at low particle velocities but were significantly more compressive for coatings sprayed at higher velocities. Accounting for substrate plasticity in the Tsui-Clyne model improved the agreement with the XRD results, but only slightly.

  8. Microstructure and properties of thermally sprayed silicon nitride-based coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, S.; Berger, L.-M.; Herrmann, M.; Nebelung, M.; Heimann, R. B.; Schnick, T.; Wielage, B.; Vuoristo, P.; Schnick, T.

    2002-06-01

    The preparation of thermally sprayed, dense, Si3N4-based coatings can be accomplished using composite spray powders with Si3N4 embedded in a complex oxide binder matrix. Powders with excellent processability were developed and produced by agglomeration (spray drying) and sintering. Optimization of the heat transfer into the powder particles was found to be the most decisive factor necessary for the production of dense and well-adhering coatings. In the present work, different thermal spray processes such as detonation gun spraying (DGS), atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) with axial powder injection, and high-velocity oxyfuel spraying (HVOF) were used. The coatings were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and microhardness testing. The wear resistance was tested using a rubber wheel abrasion wear test (ASTM G65). In addition, thermoshock and corrosion resistances were determined. The microstructure and the performance of the best coatings were found to be sufficient, suggesting the technical applicability of this new type of coating.

  9. Nitroglycerin Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the hole, the container will no longer dispense full doses of medication. Do not try to open the container of nitroglycerin spray. This product may catch fire, so do not use near an open flame, and do not allow the container to be burned after use.

  10. Fiber laser welding of nickel based superalloy Inconel 625

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Damian M.

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes the application of single mode high power fiber laser (HPFL) for the welding of nickel based superalloy Inconel 625. Butt joints of Inconel 625 sheets 0,8 mm thick were laser welded without an additional material. The influence of laser welding parameters on weld quality and mechanical properties of test joints was studied. The quality and mechanical properties of the joints were determined by means of tensile and bending tests, and micro hardness tests, and also metallographic examinations. The results showed that a proper selection of laser welding parameters provides non-porous, fully-penetrated welds with the aspect ratio up to 2.0. The minimum heat input required to achieve full penetration butt welded joints with no defect was found to be 6 J/mm. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the joints are essentially equivalent to that for the base material.

  11. Nonlinear acoustics experimental characterization of microstructure evolution in Inconel 617

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Xiaochu; Liu, Yang; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2014-02-18

    Inconel 617 is a candidate material for the intermediate heat exchanger in a very high temperature reactor for the next generation nuclear power plant. This application will require the material to withstand fatigue-ratcheting interaction at temperatures up to 950°C. Therefore nondestructive evaluation and structural health monitoring are important capabilities. Acoustic nonlinearity (which is quantified in terms of a material parameter, the acoustic nonlinearity parameter, β) has been proven to be sensitive to microstructural changes in material. This research develops a robust experimental procedure to track the evolution of damage precursors in laboratory tested Inconel 617 specimens using ultrasonic bulk waves. The results from the acoustic non-linear tests are compared with stereoscope surface damage results. Therefore, the relationship between acoustic nonlinearity and microstructural evaluation can be clearly demonstrated for the specimens tested.

  12. Further Study of near Solidus Intergranular Cracking in Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    A series of tests, performed to determine the strain necessary to initiate intergranular cracking in Inconel 718 as a function of temperature, contained enough scatter near the melting temperature that questions remained as to the best curve of curves to fit to the data. Fracture surface analysis showed that the scatter was due to incipient melting in the grain boundary region. The melting contributed to low fracture strain but had only a small on the incipient cracking strain. Gleeble tests, which could be interrupted by water quenching, were used to study the incipient intergranular melting of Inconel 718. This modified weld simulation test provided a sufficiently rapid quench to preserve the intergranular microstructure created during incipient melting. This structure was studied both microscopically and with energy dispensive X-ray analysis. The implications of incipient melting and low-strain incipient cracking on the development of microfissuring envelopes are discussed.

  13. Tritium Permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617

    SciTech Connect

    Philip Winston; Pattrick Calderoni; Paul Humrickhouse

    2011-09-01

    Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor and its high-temperature components requires information regarding the permeation of fission generated tritium and hydrogen product through candidate heat exchanger alloys. Release of fission-generated tritium to the environment and the potential contamination of the helium coolant by permeation of product hydrogen into the coolant system represent safety basis and product contamination issues. Of the three potential candidates for high-temperature components of the NGNP reactor design, only permeability for Incoloy 800H has been well documented. Hydrogen permeability data have been published for Inconel 617, but only in two literature reports and for partial pressures of hydrogen greater than one atmosphere, far higher than anticipated in the NGNP reactor. To support engineering design of the NGNP reactor components, the tritium permeability of Inconel 617 and Incoloy 800H was determined using a measurement system designed and fabricated at Idaho National Laboratory. The tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617, was measured in the temperature range 650 to 950 C and at primary concentrations of 1.5 to 6 parts per million volume tritium in helium. (partial pressures of 10-6 atm) - three orders of magnitude lower partial pressures than used in the hydrogen permeation testing. The measured tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617 deviated substantially from the values measured for hydrogen. This may be due to instrument offset, system absorption, presence of competing quantities of hydrogen, surface oxides, or other phenomena. Due to the challenge of determining the chemical composition of a mixture with such a low hydrogen isotope concentration, no categorical explanation of this offset has been developed.

  14. Creep-rupture tests of internally pressurized Inconel 702 tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumto, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Seamless Inconel 702 tubes with 0.375-in. outside diameter and 0.025-in. wall thickness were tested to failure at temperatures from 1390 to 1575 F and internal helium pressures from 700 to 1800 psi. Lifetimes ranged from 29 to 1561 hr. The creep-rupture strength of the tubes was about 70 percent lower than that of sheet specimens. Larson-Miller correlations and photomicrographs of some specimens are presented.

  15. Effect of pulse duty cycle on Inconel 718 laser welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCay, M. H.; McCay, T. D.; Dahotre, N. B.; Sharp, C. M.; Sedghinasab, A.; Gopinathan, S.

    1989-01-01

    Crack sensitive Inconel 718 was laser pulse welded using a 3.0 kW CO2 laser. Weld shape, structure, and porosity were recorded as a function of the pulse duty cycle. Within the matrix studied, the welds were found to be optimized at a high (17 ms on, 7 ms off) duty cycle. These welds were superior in appearance and lack of porosity to both low duty cycle and CW welds.

  16. Tritium Permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617

    SciTech Connect

    Philip Winston; Pattrick Calderoni; Paul Humrickhouse

    2012-07-01

    Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor and its high-temperature components requires information regarding the permeation of fission generated tritium and hydrogen product through candidate heat exchanger alloys. Release of fission-generated tritium to the environment and the potential contamination of the helium coolant by permeation of product hydrogen into the coolant system represent safety basis and product contamination issues. Of the three potential candidates for high-temperature components of the NGNP reactor design, only permeability for Incoloy 800H has been well documented. Hydrogen permeability data have been published for Inconel 617, but only in two literature reports and for partial pressures of hydrogen greater than one atmosphere, far higher than anticipated in the NGNP reactor. To support engineering design of the NGNP reactor components, the tritium permeability of Inconel 617 and Incoloy 800H was determined using a measurement system designed and fabricated at Idaho National Laboratory. The tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617, was measured in the temperature range 650 to 950°C and at primary concentrations of 1.5 to 6 parts per million volume tritium in helium. (partial pressures of 10-6 atm)—three orders of magnitude lower partial pressures than used in the hydrogen permeation testing. The measured tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617 deviated substantially from the values measured for hydrogen. This may be due to instrument offset, system absorption, presence of competing quantities of hydrogen, surface oxides, or other phenomena. Due to the challenge of determining the chemical composition of a mixture with such a low hydrogen isotope concentration, no categorical explanation of this offset has been developed.

  17. Growth and characterization of nanocrystalline zirconium nitride-inconel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aouadi, S. M.; Maeruf, T.; Sodergren, M.; Mihut, D. M.; Rohde, S. L.; Xu, J.; Mishra, S. R.

    2005-07-01

    This paper reports on the investigation of the physical, chemical, optical, mechanical, and tribological properties of reactively sputtered zirconium nitride-inconel composite nanocrystalline mixture films. These films were co-sputtered from a Zr and an inconel targets onto Si (111) substrates at room temperature using a fixed power to the Zr target (PZr) and a fixed flow of nitrogen and argon. Two sets of samples were produced by (1) varying the power to the inconel target (Pinc) and using a fixed bias voltage Vb and (2) by varying Vb and keeping Pinc fixed. The elemental composition was deduced from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and was found to be influenced by Pinc and Vb. X-ray diffraction revealed the presence of nanocrystals of ZrN with a pattern typical of the NaCl structure. The grain size was found to decrease with the increase in ``inconel'' content in the film. The optical constants were measured using spectroscopic ellipsometry and were subsequently simulated using a Drude-Lorentz model. A correlation between film structure-composition and optical constants was established. The hardness and elastic modulus of each sample were measured by nanoindentation. The hardest films were produced using a Vb=-130 V bias voltage and Pinc=4 W. Microwear measurements were carried out using positive constant normal loads and the wear tracks were imaged and processed. The measured values for the friction coefficients, residual depth of tip indentations, wear volumes, and surface roughness were reported. The lowest recorded wear volume using a load of 4 mN was 10-3 μm. Finally, the coatings were worn against ball-bearing steel using a ball-on-disk tribotester. Characterization of the wear tracks were performed by profilometry. A low wear coefficient of 1.7×10-7 mm3/s was obtained for a load of 5 N.

  18. Industrial applications of thermal sprayed coatings in Venezuelan steelmaking industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liscano, S.; Nuñez, E.; Gil, L.; Zerpa, R.

    2013-11-01

    The metal components subjected to high temperature conditions, abrasive wear, corrosion, impact, etc.; tend to present degradation of manufacturing material, causing the failure imminent of the component. One of the alternatives to minimize or eliminate such effect is the application of ceramic coatings, which are thermal insulators and exhibit high mechanical strength. Its extreme hardness, coupled with the low friction properties and chemical stability, allowing its use in a wide variety of applications. Therefore, the following paper describes the application of thermal sprayed coatings obtained by HVOF and Plasma technologies like alternative to protect the metallic equipment in different venezuelan industrial sectors, such as to operate under aggressive conditions of service, such as the steelmaking nationals industries. This study presents applications cases of ceramic-based coatings, in order to minimize the sticking of metallic material in components of reduction reactor of FINMET® and MIDREXTM process.

  19. Interfaces in a modified Inconel 718 with compact precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.; Han, G.; Fukuyama, S.; Yokogawa, K.

    1997-12-19

    Interfaces in a modified Inconel 718 containing compact precipitates were investigated using high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Morphology configuration and crystallography of the compact precipitate were confirmed as cube-shaped {gamma}{prime} precipitate and all six faces were coated with a thin shell, these shells could be classified as three variants of disc-shaped {gamma}{double_prime} precipitates on {l_brace}001{r_brace} planes of the matrix, and the [001] orientations (c-axis) of the three variants of {gamma}{double_prime} precipitate shells were parallel to [001], [010] and [100] orientations of the matrix. The interfaces of {gamma}{double_prime} precipitate/matrix, {gamma}{prime} precipitate/matrix, and {gamma}{double_prime} precipitate/{gamma}{prime} precipitate were fully cube-cube coherent, and the atoms at both sides of the interfaces maintained a perfect match with no disordered structure transition region. It was suggested that the higher thermal stability of the modified Inconel 718 alloy than that of conventional Inconel 718 alloy was due to the morphology configuration of the compact precipitate and fully coherent interfaces among the {gamma}{prime} precipitate, {gamma}{double_prime} precipitate and matrix.

  20. Modeling the viscoplastic behavior of Inconel 718 at 1200 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Kader, M. S.; Eftis, J.; Jones, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    A large number of tests, including tensile, creep, fatigue, and creep-fatigue were performed to characterize the mechanical properties of Inconel 718 (a nickel based superalloy) at 1200 F, the operating temperature for turbine blades. In addition, a few attempts were made to model the behavior of Inconel 718 at 1200 F using viscoplastic theories. The Chaboche theory of viscoplasticity can model a wide variety of mechanical behavior, including monotonic, sustained, and cyclic responses of homogeneous, initially-isotropic, strain hardening (or softening) materials. It is shown how the Chaboche theory can be used to model the viscoplastic behavior of Inconel 718 at 1200 F. First, an algorithm was developed to systematically determine the material parameters of the Chaboche theory from uniaxial tensile, creep, and cyclic data. The algorithm is general and can be used in conjunction with similar high temperature materials. A sensitivity study was then performed and an optimal set of Chaboche's parameters were obtained. This study has also indicated the role of each parameter in modeling the response to different loading conditions.

  1. Agricultural Spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    AGDISP, a computer code written for Langley by Continuum Dynamics, Inc., aids crop dusting airplanes in targeting pesticides. The code is commercially available and can be run on a personal computer by an inexperienced operator. Called SWA+H, it is used by the Forest Service, FAA, DuPont, etc. DuPont uses the code to "test" equipment on the computer using a laser system to measure particle characteristics of various spray compounds.

  2. HVOF Coating Case Study for Power Plant Process Control Ball Valve Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernhes, Luc; Lee, David A.; Poirier, Dominique; Li, Duanjie; Klemberg-Sapieha, Jolanta E.

    2013-10-01

    This case study is the result of an investigation on HVOF 80/20 Cr3C2-NiCr coating failure of on-off metal-seated ball valve (MSBV) used in supercritical steam lines in a power plant and solution. HVOF 80/20 Cr3C2-NiCr coating is used to protect thousands of MSBVs without incident. However, in this case, the valves are challenged with exposure to rapid high-pressure and -temperature variations resulting in a unique situation where the coating experiences cracking and cohesive failure. It was found that carbide precipitation is a major factor causing embrittlement of the coating. Once the coating toughness and ductility is reduced, thermal, mechanical, and residual stresses can initiate and propagate cracks more easily, causing coating failure when exposed to thermal shock. To alleviate the above mentioned issues, possible coating alternatives were then evaluated.

  3. Effect of Heat Treatment on Wear Resistance of Nickel Aluminide Coatings Deposited by HVOF and PTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benegra, M.; Santana, A. L. B.; Maranho, O.; Pintaude, G.

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to compare the wear resistance of nickel aluminide coatings deposited using plasma transferred arc (PTA) and high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) processes. Wear resistance was measured in rubber wheel abrasion tests. In both deposition processes, the same raw material (nickel aluminide powder) was atomized and deposited on a 316L steel plate substrate. After deposition, specimens were subjected to thermal cycling, aiming solubilization and precipitation. Coatings deposited using PTA developed different microstructures as a result of the incorporation of substrate elements. However, despite the presence of these microstructures, they performed better than coatings processed using HVOF before the heat treatment. After thermal cycling, the superficial hardness after the wear tests for both processes was similar, resulting in similar mass losses.

  4. Fabrication and Characterization of Thermal-Sprayed Fe-Based Amorphous/Nanocrystalline Composite Coatings: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenmin; Wu, Yuping; Zhang, Jianfeng; Hong, Sheng; Li, Gaiye; Ying, Guobing; Guo, Ji; Qin, Yujiao

    2014-10-01

    This review focuses on the recent development of iron (Fe)-based amorphous/nanocrystalline composite coatings, which have attracted much attention due to their attractive combination of high hardness/strength, elevated abrasive wear resistance, and enhanced corrosion resistance. Accompanying the advancements in various thermal spray technologies, industrial application fields of Fe-based amorphous/nanocrystalline composite coatings are becoming more diverse. In the main part, the typical empirical rules for the design of amorphous alloys with high glass-forming ability are generalized and discussed at first. Then various thermal spray technologies for the fabrication of Fe-based amorphous/nanocrystalline composite coatings, such as high velocity oxygen/air spray (HVOF/HVAF), air plasma spray (APS), low-pressure plasma spray (LPPS), high-energy plasma spray (HPS), and high velocity arc spray (HVAS) processes, are introduced. The microstructures, hardness, wear resistance, and corrosion resistance of Fe-based amorphous/nanocrystalline composite coatings formed using these thermal spray technologies are reviewed and compared. Finally, the existing challenges and future prospects are proposed.

  5. Compositionally Graded Thermal Barrier Coating by Hybrid Thermal Spraying Route and its Non-isothermal Oxidation Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Subhasisa; Manna, Indranil; Dutta Majumdar, Jyotsna

    2013-08-01

    The present study concerns a detailed investigation of the characteristics and oxidation resistance property of a duplex and compositionally graded thermal barrier coating on Inconel 718. The duplex coating consists of a CoNiCrAlY bond coat layer sprayed on to sand-blasted Inconel 718 substrate (by high velocity oxy-fuel spraying) followed by deposition of a yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coat by plasma spraying. The compositionally graded coating consists of several layers deposited by plasma spraying of pre-mixed CoNiCrAlY and YSZ powders in the weight ratios of 70:30, 50:50, 30:70, and 0:100 varying from the bond coat to the top surface, respectively. A detailed investigation of the microstructure, composition, and phases in the coating and its non-isothermal oxidation behavior from room temperature to 1250°C was performed. Oxidation proceeds by three stages in the as-received Inconel 718 and the compositionally graded coating, but by two stages in the duplex coating with a maximum activation energy for oxidation in the compositionally graded coating at high temperature (stage III). The kinetics and mechanism of oxidation were established.

  6. Fabrication of High-Temperature Heat Exchangers by Plasma Spraying Exterior Skins on Nickel Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafeez, P.; Yugeswaran, S.; Chandra, S.; Mostaghimi, J.; Coyle, T. W.

    2016-05-01

    Thermal-sprayed heat exchangers were tested at high temperatures (750 °C), and their performances were compared to the foam heat exchangers made by brazing Inconel sheets to their surface. Nickel foil was brazed to the exterior surface of 10-mm-thick layers of 10 and 40 PPI nickel foam. A plasma torch was used to spray an Inconel coating on the surface of the foil. A burner test rig was built to produce hot combustion gases that flowed over exposed face of the heat exchanger. Cooling air flowed through the foam heat exchanger at rates of up to 200 SLPM. Surface temperature and air inlet/exit temperature were measured. Heat transfer to air flowing through the foam was significantly higher for the thermally sprayed heat exchangers than for the brazed heat exchangers. On an average, thermally sprayed heat exchangers show 36% higher heat transfer than conventionally brazed foam heat exchangers. At low flow rates, the convective resistance is large (~4 × 10-2 m2 K/W), and the effect of thermal contact resistance is negligible. At higher flow rates, the convective resistance decreases (~2 × 10-3 m2 K/W), and the lower contact resistance of the thermally sprayed heat exchanger provides better performance than the brazed heat exchangers.

  7. Fabrication of High-Temperature Heat Exchangers by Plasma Spraying Exterior Skins on Nickel Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafeez, P.; Yugeswaran, S.; Chandra, S.; Mostaghimi, J.; Coyle, T. W.

    2016-06-01

    Thermal-sprayed heat exchangers were tested at high temperatures (750 °C), and their performances were compared to the foam heat exchangers made by brazing Inconel sheets to their surface. Nickel foil was brazed to the exterior surface of 10-mm-thick layers of 10 and 40 PPI nickel foam. A plasma torch was used to spray an Inconel coating on the surface of the foil. A burner test rig was built to produce hot combustion gases that flowed over exposed face of the heat exchanger. Cooling air flowed through the foam heat exchanger at rates of up to 200 SLPM. Surface temperature and air inlet/exit temperature were measured. Heat transfer to air flowing through the foam was significantly higher for the thermally sprayed heat exchangers than for the brazed heat exchangers. On an average, thermally sprayed heat exchangers show 36% higher heat transfer than conventionally brazed foam heat exchangers. At low flow rates, the convective resistance is large (~4 × 10-2 m2 K/W), and the effect of thermal contact resistance is negligible. At higher flow rates, the convective resistance decreases (~2 × 10-3 m2 K/W), and the lower contact resistance of the thermally sprayed heat exchanger provides better performance than the brazed heat exchangers.

  8. Olopatadine Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve sneezing and a stuffy, runny or itchy nose caused by allergic rhinitis (hay fever). Olopatadine is ... comes as a liquid to spray in the nose. Olopatadine nasal spray is usually sprayed in each ...

  9. Application of thermal spray coatings using high deposition rate equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, H.L.

    1995-12-01

    Reusable launch vehicles located by the ocean are subject to harsh seacoast environments before launch and immersion after splashdown at sea and towback to the refurbishment facility. High strength aluminum and non-corrosion resistant steel alloys are prone to general corrosion and pitting due to galvanic couples and protective coating damage. Additional protection of structural materials with thermally sprayed pure aluminum coatings was evaluated for plasma, arc spray and high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) processes. Comparisons are made for corrosion rates of various coated aluminum alloy and steel substrates when exposed to ASTM B-117 neutral salt fog testing and also to beach exposure tests performed at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Recent development work involved the use of high deposition rate thermal arc-spray equipment. The use of an inverter power supply reduced powdering and enhanced operator visibility. Deposition rates of 45.36--68.04 kilograms/hour are obtainable using 4.76--6.35 millimeter diameter wire electrodes.

  10. Internal Diameter HVAF Spraying for Wear and Corrosion Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyphout, C.; Björklund, S.

    2015-01-01

    Electrolytic hard chrome (EHC) methods are still widely utilized in the printing, automotive and off-shore industries. Alternative methods to EHC have been widely developed in the past decade by conventional HVOF processes and more recently HVAF systems, which are processing at higher kinetic energy and more particularly at lower temperature, significantly increasing wear and corrosion resistance properties. A dedicated internal diameter HVAF system is here presented, and coatings characteristics are compared to the one obtained by standard HVAF coatings. Specially R&D designed fixtures with inside bore of 200 mm have been manufactured for this purpose, with a possibility to spray samples at increasing depth up to 400 mm while simulating closed bottom bore spraying. WC-based and Cr3C2-based powder feedstock materials have been deposited onto high-strength steel substrates. Respective coating microstructures, thermally induced stresses and corrosion resistance are discussed for further optimization of coating performances. The fact that the ID-HVAF system is utilized both for spraying and gritblasting procedures is also given a particular interest.

  11. In-flight particle pyrometer for thermal spray processes. Final report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-20

    The objective of the project was to produce an industrial hardened particle temperature sensor. In general the thermal spray community believes that the particle temperature and velocity prior to impact on the substrate are two of the predominant parameters which effect coating quality. Prior to the full scale prototyping of such an instrument it was necessary to firmly establish the relationship between operating parameters, particle temperature and coating characteristics. It was shown in the first year of this project that the characteristics and consistency of the coatings formed are directly determined by particle velocity and temperature at impact. For the HVOF spray process the authors have also shown that the particle velocity is determined primarily by chamber pressure, while stoichiometry (the ratio of oxygen to fuel) has a minor influence. Hence, particle velocity can be controlled by maintaining the chamber pressure at a set point. Particle temperature, on the other hand is primarily a function of stoichiometry. Therefore particle velocity and temperature can be independently controlled. In the second year (FY-94), an industrial hardened prototype particle temperature sensor (In-flight Particle Pyrometer) was produced. The IPP is a two-color radiation pyrometer incorporating improvements which make the device applicable to the measurement of in-flight temperature of particles over a wide range of operating conditions in thermal spray processes. The device is insensitive to particulate loading (particle feed rate), particle composition, particle size distribution, and provides an ensemble average particle temperature. The sensor head is compact and coupled to the electronics via a fiber optic cable. Fiber optic coupling allows maximum flexibility of deployment while providing isolation of the electronics from electromagnetic interference and the hot, particulate laden environment of a typical spray booth. The device is applicable to all thermal spray

  12. Influence of Bond Coats on the Microstructure and Mechanical Behaviors of HVOF-Deposited TiAlNb Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, H. J.; Zhang, L. Q.; Lin, J. P.; He, X. Y.; Zhang, Y. C.; Jia, P.

    2012-12-01

    Hot dip galvanizing has been extensively employed for corrosion protection of steel structures. However, during the process of galvanization, the corrosion in molten zinc brings many problems to galvanization industry. In this study, as a material of corrosion resistance to molten zinc intended for application in Hot-dip galvanization, HVOF Ti28.15Al63.4Nb8.25Y (at.%) coatings with different bond coats (NiCr5Al, NiCoCrAlY, CoCrAlYTaSi, and NiCr80/20) were deposited onto 316L stainless steel substrate, respectively. The influences of different bond coats on HVOF Ti28.15Al63.4Nb8.25Y coatings were investigated. The results showed that bond coat had an obvious influence on improving the mechanical properties of HVOF Ti28.15Al63.4Nb8.25Y coatings. HVOF Ti28.15Al63.4Nb8.25Y coatings with NiCoCrAlY bond coat displayed the best mechanical properties. However, bond coats had no obvious effects on the microstructure, porosity, and hardness of HVOF Ti28.15Al63.4Nb8.25Y top coatings. The effects of as-received powder morphology and grain size on the characteristics of coatings were also discussed.

  13. HVOF coatings for heavy wear, high impact applications

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, L.

    1994-12-31

    A-4 aircraft are used extensively for carrier training. The hook point used for grabbing the cable that arrests the aircraft during a carrier landing is relatively expensive to manufacture and can only be produced by a limited number of qualified vendors. For training, the aircraft lands on a concrete runway, then drags the hook for 100 to 1500 feet. A wear-resistant coating on the bottom of the hook point was desired to extend the life of parts used for training, especially if the coating could be reapplied several times. The coating sought had to be capable of withstanding the impact sustained when the hook point contacted the ground while moving at greater than 100 MPH, then survive the wear of rubbing across 1000 feet of concrete while moving at these speeds. A further restriction was that the coating had to be applied to an alloy steel heat treated to a hardness of RC 47--50, especially for recoat applications. Coating materials were selected on the basis of finding a material considered tough enough to withstand the initial impact, then hard enough to provide the wear resistance needed. It was felt that increased hardness and increased thickness would lower the ability to withstand impact, while increasing the ability to withstand the severe rubbing wear. Coating candidates included NiCrB systems at two hardnesses, each sprayed to three different thicknesses, 25%NiCr-CrC and Colmonoy 88A were selected for high hardness in a ductile matrix, Stellite compositions varying in as-sprayed hardness because of their ability to provide wear resistance by work hardening, molybdenum and Tribaloy for possible reduced friction, and an amorphous FeNiB alloy applied with twin arc wire. The coatings were first screened with simulated tests involving a drop weight for impact resistance and a spinning concrete wheel test developed by Dayton T. Brown Co. for wear resistance.

  14. On Electro Discharge Machining of Inconel 718 with Hollow Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesha, S.; Sharma, A. K.; Kumar, Pradeep

    2012-06-01

    Inconel 718 is a nickel-based alloy designed for high yield, tensile, and creep-rupture properties. This alloy has been widely used in jet engines and high-speed airframe parts in aeronautic application. In this study, electric discharge machining (EDM) process was used for machining commercially available Inconel 718. A copper electrode with 99.9% purity having tubular cross section was employed to machine holes of 20 mm height and 12 mm diameter on Inconel 718 workpieces. Experiments were planned using response surface methodology (RSM). Effects of five major process parameters—pulse current, duty factor, sensitivity control, gap control, and flushing pressure on the process responses—material removal rate (MRR) and surface roughness (SR) have been discussed. Mathematical models for MRR and SR have been developed using analysis of variance. Influences of process parameters on tool wear and tool geometry have been presented with the help of scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs. Analysis shows significant interaction effect of pulse current and duty factor on MRR yielding a wide range from 14.4 to 22.6 mm3/min, while pulse current remains the most contributing factor with approximate changes in the MRR and SR of 48 and 37%, respectively, corresponding to the extreme values considered. Interactions of duty factor and flushing pressure yield a minimum surface roughness of 6.2 μm. The thickness of the sputtered layer and the crack length were found to be functions of pulse current. The hollow tool gets worn out on both the outer and the inner edges owing to spark erosion as well as abrasion due to flow of debris.

  15. Cold-Worked Inconel(R) 718 Bars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montano, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    Cold working and double aging yield high strength without sacrifice of resistance to corrosion. Report presents data on mechanical properties and stress-corrosion resistance of triple-melted, solution-treated, work-strengthened, direct-double-aged Inconel(R) 718 alloy. Triple melting consists of vacuum induction melting, electro-slag remelting, and vacuum arm remelting. Data indicate advance in processing of large-diameter bars. New process increases yield strength without reducing the elongation, reduction of area, and grain size.

  16. Characterization of Strain-Induced Precipitation in Inconel 718 Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Jessica; Penalva, Mariluz; Cabrera, José María

    2016-06-01

    Inconel 718 presents excellent mechanical properties at high temperatures, as well as good corrosion resistance and weldability. These properties, oriented to satisfy the design requirements of gas turbine components, depend on microstructural features such as grain size and precipitation. In this work, precipitation-temperature-time diagrams have been derived based on a stress relaxation technique and the characterization of precipitates by scanning electron microscopy. By using this methodology, the effect of strain accumulation during processing on the precipitation kinetics can be determined. The results show that the characteristics of precipitation are significantly modified when plastic deformation is applied, and the kinetics are slightly affected by the amount of total plastic deformation.

  17. Diffusion of Hydrogen and Helium in Inconel 625

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Gillies, D.; Lehoczky, S.

    2006-01-01

    Diffusion parameters for hydrogen and helium in Inconel 625 were investigated. The dependence of permeability of hydrogen in the temperature range 310 - 750 C is given. Solubility of hydrogen at 1 atm in the range 640 - 860 C was determined and diffusivity of the gas was calculated. Experiments with diffusion and solubility at 0.09 atm suggest a molecular mechanism of solution of hydrogen in the material. Diffusivity of helium was estimated at less than 10(exp -18) sq cm/s (at 1040 C).

  18. Structure-Property Correlations in Microwave Joining of Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Amit; Sharma, Apurbba Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep; Das, Shantanu

    2015-09-01

    The butt joining of Inconel 718 plates at 981°C solution treated and aged (981STA) condition was carried out using the microwave hybrid heating technique with Inconel 718 powder as a filler material. The developed joints were free from any microfissures (cracks) and were metallurgically bonded through complete melting of the powder particles. The as-welded joints were subjected to postweld heat treatments, including direct-aged, 981STA and 1080STA. The microstructural features of the welded joints were investigated using a field emission-scanning electron microscope equipped with x-ray elemental analysis. Microhardness and room-temperature tensile properties of the welded joints were evaluated. The postweld heat-treated specimens exhibited higher microhardness and tensile strength than the as-welded specimens due to the formation of strengthening precipitates in the microstructure after postweld heat treatments. The microhardness of the fusion zone of the joint in 1080STA condition was higher than all welded conditions due to the complete dissolution of Laves phase after 1080STA treatment. However, the tensile strength of the welded specimen in 981STA condition was higher than all welded conditions. The tensile strength in 1080STA condition was lower than that in 981STA condition because of the grain coarsening that took place after 1080STA condition. The fractography of the fractured surfaces was carried out to determine the structure-property-fracture correlation.

  19. Investigating laser rapid manufacturing for Inconel-625 components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, C. P.; Ganesh, P.; Mishra, S. K.; Bhargava, P.; Negi, J.; Nath, A. K.

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents an investigation of laser rapid manufacturing (LRM) for Inconel-625 components. LRM is an upcoming rapid manufacturing technology, it is similar to laser cladding at process level with different end applications. In general, laser-cladding technique is used to deposit materials on the substrate either to improve the surface properties or to refurbish the worn out parts, while LRM is capable of near-net shaping the components by layer-by-layer deposition of the material directly from CAD model. In the present study, a high-power continuous wave (CW) CO 2 laser system, integrated with a co-axial powder-feeding system and a three-axis workstation were used. The effect of processing parameters during LRM of Inconel-625 was studied and the optimum set of parameters for the maximum deposition rate was established employing Orthogonal L9 array of Taguchi technique. Results indicated that the powder feed rate and the scan speed contributed about 56% and 26%, respectively to the deposition rate, while the influence of laser power was limited to 10% only. Fabricated components were subjected to non-destructive testing (like—ultrasonic testing, dye-penetrant testing), tensile testing, impact testing, metallographic examinations and micro-hardness measurement. The test results revealed defect-free material deposition with improved mechanical strength without sacrificing the ductility.

  20. Surface Integrity of Inconel 718 by Ball Burnishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sequera, A.; Fu, C. H.; Guo, Y. B.; Wei, X. T.

    2014-09-01

    Inconel 718 has wide applications in manufacturing mechanical components such as turbine blades, turbocharger rotors, and nuclear reactors. Since these components are subject to harsh environments such as high temperature, pressure, and corrosion, it is critical to improve the functionality to prevent catastrophic failure due to fatigue or corrosion. Ball burnishing as a low plastic deformation process is a promising technique to enhance surface integrity for increasing component fatigue and corrosion resistance in service. This study focuses on the experimental study on surface integrity of burnished Inconel 718. The effects of burnishing ball size and pressure on surface integrity factors such as surface topography, roughness, and hardness are investigated. The burnished surfaces are smoother than the as-machined ones. Surface hardness after burnishing is higher than the as-machined surfaces, but become stable over a certain burnishing pressure. There exists an optimal process space of ball sized and burnishing pressure for surface finish. In addition, surface hardness after burnishing is higher than the as-machined surfaces, which is confirmed by statistical analysis.

  1. Susceptibility of Inconel X-750 to stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, B.

    1986-01-01

    High strength, age hardenable Ni-base superalloy Inconel X-750 in susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) when used in the triple heat treated condition. In this research, constant strain rate technique was employed to evaluate the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of alloy X-750 under simulated pressurized water reactor conditions in a nuclear power plant using an automated autoclave system at 8 x 10/sup 6/ N/m/sup 2/ pressure and 289/sup 0/C temperature. The alloy produced via ESR and VAR processing routes containing .004% and .011% sulfur, respectively, were solution annealed at 1075 and 1240/sup 0/C for 2 hours and water quenched followed by aging in the 704 to 871/sup 0/C temperature range up to 200 hours and cooled in air as well as the furnace. Complete grain boundary chemistry and precipitation morphology was studied, supported by observations made using Charpy impact and modified Huey tests. Results showed Inconel X-750 processed through electroslag refining, solution annealed at 1240/sup 0/C for 2 hours and water quenched followed by aging at 871/sup 0/C for 200 hours and furnace cooling, provides the best combination of strength, ductility, and resistance to SCC.

  2. Considerations on repeated repairing of weldments in Inconel 718 alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E. O.; Lovoy, C. V.; Mcilwain, M. C.; Munafo, P.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of repeated weld repairs on the metallurgical characteristics, high cycle fatigue (HCF), and tensile properties of Inconel 718 butt weld joints were determined. A 1/4 in thick plate and a 1/2 in thick plate were used as well as tungsten inert gas welding, and Inconel 718 filler wire. Weld panels were subjected to 2, 6, and 12 repeated repairs and were made in a highly restrained condition. Post weld heat treatments were also conducted with the welded panel in the highly restrained condition. Results indicate that no significant metallurgical anomaly is evident as a result of up to twelve repeated weld repairs. No degradation in fatigue life is noted for up to twelve repeated repairs. Tensile results from specimens which contained up to twelve repeated weld repairs revealed no significant degradation in UTS and YS. However, a significant decrease in elongation is evident with specimens (solution treated and age hardened after welding) which contained twelve repeated repairs. The elongation loss is attributed to the presence of a severe notch on each side (fusion line) of the repair weld bead reinforcement.

  3. Characterization of microstructures and mechanical properties of Inconel 617/310 stainless steel dissimilar welds

    SciTech Connect

    Shah Hosseini, H. Shamanian, M.; Kermanpur, A.

    2011-04-15

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of Inconel 617/310 austenitic stainless steel dissimilar welds were investigated in this work. Three types of filler materials, Inconel 617, Inconel 82 and 310 austenitic stainless steels were used to obtain dissimilar joint using the gas tungsten arc welding process. Microstructural observations showed that there was no evidence of any possible cracking in the weldments achieved by the nickel-base filler materials. The welds produced by 617 and 310 filler materials displayed the highest and the lowest ultimate tensile strength and total elongation, respectively. The impact test results indicated that all specimens exhibited ductile fracture. Among the fillers, Inconel 617 exhibited superlative fracture toughness (205 J). The mechanical properties of the Inconel 617 filler material were much better than those of other fillers. - Research Highlights: {yields} A fine dendritic structure was seen for the Inconel 617 weld metal. {yields} A number of cracks were initiated when the 310 SS filler metal was used. {yields} All welded samples showed ductile fracture. {yields} The Inconel 617 filler material presents the optimum mechanical properties.

  4. Improved carbides and new borides for HVOF and their coating properties

    SciTech Connect

    Froning, M.J.; Keller, H.

    1995-12-31

    In the presented paper, investigations on HVOF coatings produced from a new family of powders will be discussed. The influence of microstructure, composition and production methods will be discussed in view of powder properties and resulting coating properties. New boride powders and coatings will be compared with regard to their properties deposition, efficiency, hardness, surface roughness, bond strength, and wear against commercial WC-Co and cr3C2-NiCr coatings. Additionally, improved WC- and CrC-based powders and coatings will be compared with regard to oxidation and erosion resistance.

  5. Experimental and numerical evaluation of the performance of supersonic two-stage high-velocity oxy-fuel thermal spray (Warm Spray) gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katanoda, H.; Morita, H.; Komatsu, M.; Kuroda, S.

    2011-03-01

    The water-cooled supersonic two-stage high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray gun was developed to make a coating of temperature-sensitive material, such as titanium, on a substrate. The gun has a combustion chamber (CC) followed by a mixing chamber (MC), in which the combustion gas is mixed with the nitrogen gas at room temperature. The mixed gas is accelerated to supersonic speed through a converging-diverging (C-D) nozzle followed by a straight passage called the barrel. This paper proposes an experimental procedure to estimate the cooling rate of CC, MC and barrel separately. Then, the mathematical model is presented to predict the pressure and temperature in the MC for the specific mass flow rates of fuel, oxygen and nitrogen by assuming chemical equilibrium with water-cooling in the CC and MC, and frozen flow with constant specific heat from stagnant condition to the throat in the CC and MC. Finally, the present mathematical model was validated by comparing the calculated and measured stagnant pressures of the CC of the two-stage HVOF gun.

  6. A Generalized Critical Velocity Window Based on Material Property for Cold Spraying by Eulerian Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W. Y.; Yu, M.; Wang, F. F.; Yin, S.; Liao, H. L.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, the previously developed Eulerian model (Yu et al., J Therm Spray Technol 21(3):745-752, 2012), which could well predict the critical velocity and erosion velocity, was extended to other commonly used materials such as aluminum, iron, nickel, stainless steel 316, and Inconel718 for studying the influence of material property and establishing a generalized window of critical velocity. Results show that the deformation behavior of the used materials could be classified as coordinated deformation (copper, iron, nickel) and uncoordinated deformation patterns (aluminum, stainless steel, and Inconel718). However, it was found that the steady maximum equivalent plastic strain values at the critical velocity for each material concentrate in the extent of 2.6-3.0 regardless of deformation pattern. Dimensionless analysis shows that, the calculated critical velocity increases with the increase of material characteristic velocity, and this relationship can be primarily used to predict the critical velocity.

  7. Performance of Inconel 739 Buckets in J33-9 Turbojet Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyorgak, C A; Johnston, J R

    1956-01-01

    Investigation of the performance of Inconel 739 (a nickel-base alloy of low critical-element content) buckets in a J33-9 engine showed that Inconel 739 had an engine life at least equivalent if not superior to S-816 buckets operated at 1500 degrees F. Inconel 739 buckets had a small scatter in life and exhibited lower total elongation than S-816. Bucket life was less than that predicted on; the basis of stress-rupture considerations alone. The failure mechanism was probably influenced by fatigue.

  8. Technical and Economical Aspects of Current Thermal Barrier Coating Systems for Gas Turbine Engines by Thermal Spray and EBPVD: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuerstein, Albert; Knapp, James; Taylor, Thomas; Ashary, Adil; Bolcavage, Ann; Hitchman, Neil

    2008-06-01

    The most advanced thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems for aircraft engine and power generation hot section components consist of electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) applied yttria-stabilized zirconia and platinum modified diffusion aluminide bond coating. Thermally sprayed ceramic and MCrAlY bond coatings, however, are still used extensively for combustors and power generation blades and vanes. This article highlights the key features of plasma spray and HVOF, diffusion aluminizing, and EBPVD coating processes. The coating characteristics of thermally sprayed MCrAlY bond coat as well as low density and dense vertically cracked (DVC) Zircoat TBC are described. Essential features of a typical EBPVD TBC coating system, consisting of a diffusion aluminide and a columnar TBC, are also presented. The major coating cost elements such as material, equipment and processing are explained for the different technologies, with a performance and cost comparison given for selected examples.

  9. Tribological properties of thermally sprayed TiAl-Al2O3 composite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, A.; Gabbitas, B.; Li, J.; Zhang, D.

    2009-08-01

    The use of thermal spray coatings provides protection to the surfaces operating in severe environments. The main goal of the current work is to investigate the possibility of using a high velocity oxy fuel (HVOF) thermally sprayed wear resistant TiAl/Al2O3 coating on tool steel (H13) which is used for making dies for aluminium high pressure die casting. A feedstock of TiAl/Al2O3 composite powder was produced from a mixture of Al and TiO2 powders by high energy mechanical milling, followed by a thermal reaction process. The feedstock was then thermally sprayed using a high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) technique onto H13 steel substrates to produce a composite coating. The present study describes and compares the tribological properties such as friction and sliding wear rate of the coating both at room and high temperature (700°C). The results showed that the composite coating has lower wear rate at high temperature (700°C) than the uncoated H13 sample. At Room temperature without using lubricant there is no much significant difference between the wear rate of the coated and uncoated samples. The experimental results showed that the composite coating has great potential for high temperature application due to its lower wear rate at high temperature in comparison with the uncoated sample at the same temperature. The composite coating was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). This paper reports the experimental observations and discusses the wear resistance performance of the coatings at room and high temperatures.

  10. Erosion-corrosion resistance of thermal sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.W.; Wang, B.Q.

    1996-11-01

    A series of laboratory erosion-corrosion experiments at the elevated temperature, 300 C and different impact velocities (2.5 m/s, 30 m/s) were carried on AISI 1018 low carbon steel and three different sprayed coating specimens. Angular silica quartz particles of 742 um were the erodent material for testing three different impact angles of 30{degree}, 45{degree}, and 90{degree}. Material wastage rates were determined from thickness loss measurements of the specimens. The morphologies of the specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The erosion-corrosion resistance of coating was found to be related to their composition and microstructure rather than to their hardness. The material wastage of the specimen was determined by weight and thickness loss measurements. The morphologies of the specimens were examined scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For the material wastage of the coating specimens, High Velocity Oxygen Fuel (HVOF) coatings (DS200) and the arc-sprayed coating at elevated temperature condition exhibited 2 to 3 times lower erosion wastage than that of AISI 1018 steel.

  11. High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray of Fe-Based Amorphous Alloy: a Numerical and Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajdelsztajn, L.; Dannenberg, J.; Lopez, J.; Yang, N.; Farmer, J.; Lavernia, E. J.

    2009-09-01

    The fabrication of dense coatings with appropriate properties using a high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spray process requires an in-depth understanding of the complete gas flow field and particle behavior during the process. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is implemented to investigate the gas flow behavior that occurs during the HVOF process and a simplified one-dimensional decoupled model of the in-flight thermal behavior of the amorphous Fe-based powder particles was developed and applied for three different spray conditions. The numerical results were used to rationalize the different coating microstructures described in the experimental results. Low porosity and amorphous coatings were produced using two different particle size distributions (16 to 25 μm and 25 to 53 μm). The amorphous characteristics of the powder were retained in the coating due to melting and rapid solidification in the case of very fine powder or ligaments (<16 μm) and to the fact that the crystallization temperature was not reached in the case of the large particles (16 to 53 μm).

  12. Grain boundary segregation of boron in Inconel 718

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Chaturvedi, M.C.; Richards, N.L.

    1998-07-01

    The segregation behavior of boron at grain boundaries in two INCONEL 718+ based alloys with different B concentrations was studied. The alloys, one containing 11 ppm of B and the other 43 ppm, were homogenized at 1,200 C for 2 hours followed by water quenching and air cooling. A strong segregation of boron at grain boundaries was observed using secondary ion mass spectrometry after the heat treatment in both the alloys. The segregation was found mainly to be of nonequilibrium type. The homogenized samples were also annealed at 1050 C for various lengths of time. During annealing, boride particles were observed to first form at grain boundaries and then to dissolve on continued annealing at 1050 C. The mechanisms of segregation and desegregation of B are discussed.

  13. Fiber laser welding of nickel-based superalloy inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshobe, Omudhohwo Emaruke

    Inconel 718 (IN 718) is widely used in applications, such as aircraft and power turbine components. Recently, fiber laser welding has become an attractive joining technique in industry for fabrication and repair of service-damaged components. However, a major limitation in the laser welding of IN 718 is that liquation cracking occurs. In the present work, autogenous fiber laser welding of IN 718 was used to study the effects of welding parameters and different pre-weld heat treatments on liquation cracking. Contrary to previous studies, a dual effect of heat input on cracking is observed. A rarely reported effect of heat input is attributed to process instability. Liquation cracking increases with pre-weld heat treatment temperatures that increase grain size and/or, possibly, intregranular boron segregation. The study shows that pre-weld heat treatment at 950oC can be used for repair welding of IN 718 without significant loss in cracking resistance.

  14. Grain boundary segregation of boron in INCONEL 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Chaturvedi, M. C.; Richards, N. L.; McMahon, G.

    1998-07-01

    The segregation behavior of boron at grain boundaries in two INCONEL 718+ based alloys with different B concentrations was studied. The alloys, one containing 11 ppm of B and the other 43 ppm, were homogenized at 1200 °C for 2 hours followed by water quenching and air cooling. A strong segregation of boron at grain boundaries was observed using secondary ion mass spectrometry after the heat treatment in both the alloys. The segregation was found mainly to be of nonequilibrium type. The homogenized samples were also annealed at 1050 °C for various lengths of time. During annealing, boride particles were observed to first form at grain boundaries and then to dissolve on continued annealing at 1050 °C. The mechanisms of segregation and desegregation of B are discussed.

  15. The effect of laser pulse tailored welding of Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, T. Dwayne; Mccay, Mary Helen; Sharp, C. Michael; Womack, Michael G.

    1990-01-01

    Pulse tailored laser welding has been applied to wrought, wrought grain grown, and cast Inconel 718 using a CO2 laser. Prior to welding, the material was characterized metallographically and the solid state transformation regions were identified using Differential Scanning Calorimetry and high temperature x-ray diffraction. Bead on plate welds (restrained and unrestrained) were then produced using a matrix of pulse duty cycles and pulsed average power. Subsequent characterization included heat affected zone width, penetration and underbead width, the presence of cracks, microfissures and porosity, fusion zone curvature, and precipitation and liquated region width. Pedigree welding on three selected processing conditions was shown by microstructural and dye penetrant analysis to produce no microfissures, a result which strongly indicates the viability of pulse tailored welding for microfissure free IN 718.

  16. Thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth in Inconel X-750

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchand, N.; Pelloux, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal-mechanical fatigue crack growth (TMFCG) was studied in a gamma-gamma' nickel base superalloy Inconel X-750 under controlled load amplitude in the temperature range from 300 to 650 C. In-phase (T sub max at sigma sub max), out-of-phase (T sub min at sigma sub max), and isothermal tests at 650 C were performed on single-edge notch bars under fully reversed cyclic conditions. A dc electrical potential method was used to measure crack length. The electrical potential response obtained for each cycle of a given wave form and R value yields information on crack closure and crack extension per cycle. The macroscopic crack growth rates are reported as a function of delta k and the relative magnitude of the TMFCG are discussed in the light of the potential drop information and of the fractographic observations.

  17. Thermo-Mechanical Processing Parameters for the INCONEL ALLOY 740

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, G.M.; Smith, G.

    2007-11-19

    In 2000, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Special Metals Corporation (SMC) to determine the mechanical property response of the IN740 alloy to help establish thermo-mechanical processing parameters for the use of this alloy in supercritical and ultra-critical boiler tubes with the potential for other end uses. SMC had developed an alloy, commercially known as INCONEL alloy 740, which exhibited various beneficial physical, mechanical, and chemical properties. As part of SMC's on-going efforts to optimize this alloy for targeted boiler applications there was a need to develop an understanding of the thermo-mechanical response of the material, characterize the resulting microstructure from this processing, and possibly, utilize models to develop the appropriate processing scheme for this product.

  18. Effects of Internal and External Hydrogen on Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. J.; Frandsen, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Internal hydrogen embrittlement (IHE) and hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE) tensile and bend crack growth tests were performed on Inconel 718. For the IHE tests, the specimens were precharged to approximately 90 ppm hydrogen by exposure to 34.5 MPa H2 at 650 C. The HEE tests were performed in 34.5 MPa H2. Parameters evaluated were test temperature, strain rate for smooth and notch specimen geometries. The strain rate effect was very significant at ambient temperature for both IHE and HEE and decreased with increasing temperatures. For IHE, the strain rate effect was neglible at 260'C, and for HEE the strain rate effect was neglible at 400 C. At low temperatures, IHE was more severe than HEE, and at high temperatures HEE was more severe than IHE with a cross over temperature about 350 C. At 350 C, the equilibrium hydrogen concentration in Inconel 718 is about 50% lower than the hydrogen content of the precharged IHE specimens. Dislocation hydrogen sweeping of surface absorbed hydrogen was the likely transport mechanism for increasing the hydrogen concentration in the HEE tests sufficiently to produce the same degree of embrittlement as that of the more highly hydrogen charged IHE specimens. The main IHE fracture characteristic was formation of large, brittle flat facets, which decreased with increasing test temperature. The IHE fracture matrix surrounding the large facets ranged between brittle fine faceted to microvoid ductility depending upon strain rate, specimen geometry as well as temperature. The HEE fractures were characteristically fine featured, transgranular and brittle with a significant portion forming a "saw tooth" crystallographic pattern. Both IHE and HEE fractures were predominantly along the {1 1 1) slip and twin boundaries. With respect to embrittlement mechanism, it was postulated that dislocation hydrogen sweeping and hydrogen enhanced localized plasticity were active in HEE and IHE for concentrating hydrogen along (1 1 1) slip and twin

  19. Structure of Vacuum Brazed BNi-5 Joint of Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grushko, B.; Weiss, B. Z.

    1984-04-01

    Structural investigations of the brazed joint of Inconel 718 with BNi-5 filler metal were carried out on specimens with geometries simulating a real joint. Three identification methods applied in parallel were used. Fused and solidified filler metal showed the presence of at least four microstructural components: the dominant γ-solid solution, two binary eutectics (G phase + γ) and (θ-phase + γ @#@), and prismatic objects identified as cr-phase. The influence of brazing time and temperature was studied with specimens heated in accordance with three different thermal regimes. The Ni-base γ-phase solidifies in dendritic form and contains Cr, Fe, Nb, and Mo, the concentrations of which are dependent on the thermal regime and on the distance from the former liquid-solid interface. The intermetallics (G, 0) and the matrix form binary and ternary eutectics. In overheated brazed joints the filler metal penetrates into the grain boundaries of the base metal, resulting in the formation of new phases. The dominant phase was identified as a hexagonal Laves phase (λ,). The diffusion zone in the base metal can be divided into two subregions. In subregion I the precipitating phase is a Nb-rich G-phase, while in subregion II, the depth of which can be directly related to the width of the gap, preferentially oriented carbides of Nb and Ti are formed. The phase formation in the BNi-5 brazing of Inconel 718 may be described by a quasi-quarternary diagram on the Ni-Cr-Nb-Si system.

  20. Corrosion potential behavior in high-temperature water of noble metal-doped alloy coatings deposited by underwater thermal spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.J.; Andresen, P.L.; Gray, D.M.; Lau, Y.C.; Offer, H.P.

    1996-06-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of sensitized stainless steel (SS) components in boiling water reactors (BWR) is a major concern. The SCC susceptibility of structural materials in high-temperature water is affected by the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP). The ECP of type 304 stainless steel coated under water by hyper-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) and plasma-spray (PS) techniques using noble metal-doped powders was measured to evaluate the catalytic behavior in high-temperature water under various water chemistry conditions. Thermal-spray coatings of noble metal-doped powders exhibited catalytic behavior for the recombination of oxygen and hydrogen in high-temperature water, which caused ECP to decrease well below a critical value of {minus}230 mV{sub SHE} for intergranular stress corrosion cracking protection in water. This was observed in water containing various amounts of oxygen and hydrogen peroxide when stoichiometric excess hydrogen was present.

  1. The Use of Acoustic Emission to Characterize Fracture Behavior During Vickers Indentation of HVOF Thermally Sprayed WC-Co Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, N. H.; Steel, J. A.; Ahmed, R.; Reuben, R. L.

    2009-12-01

    This paper describes how acoustic emission (AE) measurements can be used to supplement the mechanical information available from an indentation test. It examines the extent to which AE data can be used to replace time-consuming surface crack measurement data for the assessment of fracture toughness of brittle materials. AE is known to be sensitive to fracture events and so it was expected that features derived from the AE data may provide information on the processes (microscale and macroscale fracture events and densification) occurring during indentation. AE data were acquired during indentation tests on samples of a WC-12%Co coating of nominal thickness 300 μm at a variety of indentation loads. The raw AE signals were reduced to three stages and three features per stage, giving nine possible indicators per indentation. Each indicator was compared with the crack profile, measured both conventionally and using a profiling method which gives the total surface crack length around the indent. A selection of the indents was also sectioned in order to make some observations on the subsurface damage. It has been found that reproducible AE signals are generated during indentation involving three distinct stages, associated, respectively, with nonradial cracking, commencement of radial cracking, and continued descent of the indenter. It has been shown that AE can give at least as good a measure of cracking processes during indentation as is possible using crack measurement after indentation.

  2. High-temperature reverse-bend fatigue strength of Inconel Alloy 625

    SciTech Connect

    Purohit, A.; Greenfield, I.G.; Park, K.B.

    1983-06-01

    Inconel 625 has been selected as the clad material for Upgraded Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT Upgrade or TU) fuel assemblies. The range of temperatures investigated is 900 to 1100/sup 0/C. A reverse-bend fatigue test program was selected as the most-effective method of determining the fatigue characteristics of Inconel alloy 625 sheet metal. The paper describes the reverse bend fatigue experiments, the results obtained, and the analysis of data.

  3. Ciclesonide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    Ciclesonide nasal spray is used to treat the symptoms of seasonal (occurs only at certain times of the year), and perennial ( ... Ciclesonide comes as a solution (liquid) to spray in the nose. It is usually sprayed in each nostril once daily. Use ciclesonide at around the same time every day. Follow the ...

  4. Remotely controlled spray gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, William C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A remotely controlled spray gun is described in which a nozzle and orifice plate are held in precise axial alignment by an alignment member, which in turn is held in alignment with the general outlet of the spray gun by insert. By this arrangement, the precise repeatability of spray patterns is insured.

  5. Fast Regime Fluidized Bed Machining (FR-FBM) of Thermally Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, Massimiliano; Rubino, Gianluca; Bolelli, Giovanni; Lusvarghi, Luca

    2008-12-01

    Finishing of thermally sprayed metallic, ceramic, and cermet coatings is required to meet tolerances and requirements on surface roughness in most industrial applications. Conventional machining is a costly and time-consuming process, and is difficult to automate. Therefore, this study investigates and develops a new technique highly amenable for automation: fast regime—fluidized bed machining (FR-FBM). Atmospheric plasma sprayed TiO2, Cr2O3, and HVOF-sprayed WC-17%Co and Tribaloy-800 coatings, deposited on AISI 1040 steel substrates, were subjected to FR-FBM treatment. The effects of the leading operational parameters, namely, abrasive size, jet pressure, and processing time, were evaluated on all coatings by using a two/three-levels full factorial design of experiments. The FR-FBM treated surfaces were observed by FE-SEM and their surface finishing was evaluated by contact profilometry. Significant improvements in surface finishing of all the machined thermally sprayed coatings can always be detected, with FR-FBM being able to guarantee the precision and to ensure the closest geometrical tolerances.

  6. Erosion resistance of cooled thermal sprayed coatings under simulated erosion conditions at waterwall in FBCs

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.Q.; Lee, S.W.

    1997-12-31

    The erosion-corrosion (E-C) behavior of cooled 1018 steel and several thermal sprayed coatings by bed ash, retrieved from an operating circulating fluidized bed combustor (CFBC) boiler firing biomass, was determined in laboratory tests using a nozzle type elevated temperature erosion tester. Test conditions attempted but not exactly to simulate the erosion conditions found at the refractory/bare-tube interface at the combustor waterwall of FBC boilers. The specimens were water-cooled on the backside. Material wastage rates were determined from the thickness loss measurements of specimens. Test results were compared with erosion-corrosion test results for isothermal specimens. The morphology of specimens was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the cooled specimens demonstrated higher erosion-corrosion wastage than those of the isothermal specimens. At a shallow impact angle of 30{degree} the effect of cooling specimens on the erosion wastage for thermal sprayed coatings was less than that for 1018 steel, while at a steep impact angle of 90{degree} this effect for thermal sprayed coatings was greater than that for 1018 steel. The hypersonic velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} ceramic coating exhibited the highest E-C resistance due to its favorable composition and fine structure. The poor E-C resistance of arc-sprayed FeCrSiB coating was attributed to larger splat size, higher porosity and the presence of radial and tangential microcracks within the coating.

  7. The influence of cold rolling on the precipitation of delta phase in Inconel 718 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.C.; Xiao, F.R.; Yao, M.; Chen, Z.L.; Jiang, Z.Q.; Wang, S.G.

    1997-07-01

    The precipitation of intermetallic phases in Inconel 718 has been extensively studied. It has been found that the major intermetallic phases that precipitate in the austenite matrix are the metastable {gamma}{double_prime} (DO{sub 22} structure) and {gamma}{prime} (L1{sub 2} structure) phases and the equilibrium {delta} (DOa structure) phase. The {delta} phase can form during processing or during services. The precipitation of {delta} phase during aging has been studied in the solution treated Inconel 718. However, there are only a few studies on the precipitation of {delta} phase in cold rolled Inconel 718. R.P. Singh et al. found that more of the {delta} phase precipitated in the 50% cold rolled material compared to the 30% cold rolled material at lower temperatures, but they did not give information on the precipitation of {delta} phase in cold rolled Inconel 718 at higher temperature. The {delta} phase has a big influence on mechanical properties in Inconel 718. Therefore, it is necessary to measure the volume fraction of {delta} phase. Usually, the volume fraction of {delta} phase was measured by quantitative metallographic techniques and quantitative chemistry phase analysis. In the present work, the volume fraction of {delta} phase in cold rolled Inconel 718 at 910 C for different time is measured by X-ray diffraction techniques, and the influence of cold rolling on the morphology and the volume fraction of {delta} phase is investigated.

  8. Carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum based nanocomposite fabricated by thermal spray forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Tapas

    The present research concentrates on the fabrication of bulk aluminum matrix nanocomposite structures with carbon nanotube reinforcement. The objective of the work was to fabricate and characterize multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced hypereutectic Al-Si (23 wt% Si, 2 wt% Ni, 1 wt% Cu, rest Al) nanocomposite bulk structure with nanocrystalline matrix through thermal spray forming techniques viz. plasma spray forming (PSF) and high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray forming. This is the first research study, which has shown that thermal spray forming can be successfully used to synthesize carbon nanotube reinforced nanocomposites. Microstructural characterization based on quantitative microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and X ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms (i) retention and macro/sub-macro level homogenous distribution of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the Al-Si matrix and (ii) evolution of nanostructured grains in the matrix. Formation of ultrathin beta-SiC layer on MWCNT surface, due to chemical reaction of Si atoms diffusing from Al-Si alloy and C atoms from the outer walls of MWCNTs has been confirmed theoretically and experimentally. The presence of SiC layer at the interface improves the wettability and the interfacial adhesion between the MWCNT reinforcement and the Al-Si matrix. Sintering of the as-sprayed nanocomposites was carried out in an inert environment for further densification. As-sprayed PSF nanocomposite showed lower microhardness compared to HVOF, due to the higher porosity content and lower residual stress. The hardness of the nanocomposites increased with sintering time due to effective pore removal. Uniaxial tensile test on CNT-bulk nanocomposite was carried out, which is the first ever study of such nature. The tensile test results showed inconsistency in the data attributed to inhomogeneous

  9. Review on the Oxidation of Metallic Thermal Sprayed Coatings: A Case Study with Reference to Rare-Earth Permanent Magnetic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Jo Ann; Berndt, Christopher C.

    2013-10-01

    Thermal spray fabrication of rare-earth permanent magnetic coatings (PMCs) presents potential manufacturing routes for micro-magnetic devices. Despite this potential, thermal spray of PMCs is still not widely explored due to oxidation concerns. It was established that oxidation leads to the loss of ferromagnetic phases in these materials and results in deterioration of magnetic performance. Although this review focuses on a specific class of material, i.e., magnetic materials, there is significant technical crossover to all classes of feedstocks that are employed in thermal spray processing. The oxidation mechanisms and the associated influencing factors are explored in this work to implement effective processing techniques during the deposition process. This paper reviews the various stages and mechanisms of oxidation in thermal spray processes. The factors that influence the extent of oxidation depend on the type of oxidation that is dominant and rely on the type of spray system, powder injection position, and the particle size of feedstock. Among the aspects that are reviewed include the oxygen-fuel ratio for high velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF), current intensity, gas flow rate, particle size, spray distance, and substrate temperature. Protection strategies to minimize oxidation in thermal spray processes, such as gas shrouding and shielding, are presented.

  10. Characterization of sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigier, N.; Mao, C.-P.

    It is pointed out that most practical power generation and propulsion systems involve the burning of different types of fuel sprays, taking into account aircraft propulsion, industrial furnaces, boilers, gas turbines, and diesel engines. There has been a lack of data which can serve as a basis for spray model development and validation. A major aim of the present investigation is to fill this gap. Experimental apparatus and techniques for studying the characteristics of fuel sprays are discussed, taking into account two-dimensional still photography, cinematography, holography, a laser diffraction particle sizer, and a laser anemometer. The considered instruments were used in a number of experiments, taking into account three different types of fuel spray. Attention is given to liquid fuel sprays, high pressure pulsed diesel sprays, and coal-water slurry sprays.

  11. Characterization of sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chigier, N.; Mao, C.-P.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that most practical power generation and propulsion systems involve the burning of different types of fuel sprays, taking into account aircraft propulsion, industrial furnaces, boilers, gas turbines, and diesel engines. There has been a lack of data which can serve as a basis for spray model development and validation. A major aim of the present investigation is to fill this gap. Experimental apparatus and techniques for studying the characteristics of fuel sprays are discussed, taking into account two-dimensional still photography, cinematography, holography, a laser diffraction particle sizer, and a laser anemometer. The considered instruments were used in a number of experiments, taking into account three different types of fuel spray. Attention is given to liquid fuel sprays, high pressure pulsed diesel sprays, and coal-water slurry sprays.

  12. Fatigue Behavior and Deformation Mechanisms in Inconel 718 Superalloy Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The nickel-base superalloy Inconel 718 (IN 718) is used as a structural material for a variety of components in the space shuttle main engine (SSME) and accounts for more than half of the total weight of this engine. IN 718 is the bill-of-material for the pressure vessels of nickel-hydrogen batteries for the space station. In the case of the space shuttle main engine, structural components are typically subjected to startup and shutdown load transients and occasional overloads in addition to high-frequency vibratory loads from routine operation. The nickel-hydrogen battery cells are prooftested before service and are subjected to fluctuating pressure loads during operation. In both of these applications, the structural material is subjected to a monotonic load initially, which is subsequently followed by fatigue. To assess the life of these structural components, it is necessary to determine the influence of a prior monotonic load on the subsequent fatigue life of the superalloy. An insight into the underlying deformation and damage mechanisms is also required to properly account for the interaction between the prior monotonic load and the subsequent fatigue loading. An experimental investigation was conducted to establish the effect of prior monotonic straining on the subsequent fatigue behavior of wrought, double-aged, IN 718 at room temperature. First, monotonic strain tests and fully-reversed, strain-controlled fatigue tests were conducted on uniform-gage-section IN 718 specimens. Next, fully reversed fatigue tests were conducted under strain control on specimens that were monotonically strained in tension. Results from this investigation indicated that prior monotonic straining reduced the fatigue resistance of the superalloy particularly at the lowest strain range. Some of the tested specimens were sectioned and examined by transmission electron microscopy to reveal typical microstructures as well as the active deformation and damage mechanisms under each of

  13. Development, Processing, and Testing of High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant HVOF Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Wong, F; Haslam, J; Estill, J; Branagan, D; Yang, N; Blue, C

    2003-08-26

    New amorphous-metal and ceramic coatings applied by the high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) process may reduce the waste package materials cost of the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository by over $4 billion (cost reduction of 27 to 42%). Two critical requirements that have been determined from design analysis are protection in brines that may evolve from the evaporative concentration of pore waters and protection for waste package welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Our efforts are directed towards producing and evaluating these high-performance coatings for the development of lower cost waste packages, and will leverage a cost-effective collaboration with DARPA for applications involving marine corrosion.

  14. Graded plasma spraying of premixed metalceramic powders on metallic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, C. R. C.; Trevisan, R.-E.

    1997-06-01

    The mismatch between the thermal expansion coefficients of ceramics and metals and the differential stresses it causes at the interface create problems in metal to ceramic joining. Research has been con-ducted to solve this problem in thermal barrier coating technology. Previous studies have considered met-al-ceramic multilayers or graded-coatings, which include a metallic bond coat. In this study, a graded plasma-sprayed metal-ceramic coating is developed using the deposition of premixed metal and ceramic powders without the conventional metallic bond coat. Influences of thickness variations, number, and composition of the layers are investigated. Coatings are prepared by atmospheric plasma-spraying on In-conel 718 superalloy substrates. Ni-Cr-Al and ZrO2 -8 % Y2O3 powders are used for plasma spraying. Ad-hesive and cohesive strength of the coatings are determined. The concentration profile of the elements is determined by x-ray energy-dispersive analysis. The microstructure and morphology of the coatings are investigated by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results show that the mixed metal-ce-ramic coating obtained with the deposition of premixed powders is homogeneous. The morphology and microstructure of the coatings are considered satisfactory.

  15. Control of Phase Transformation and Growth of Primary Particle in Photocatalytic Coating Sprayed Using Agglomerated Anatase TiO2 Nano Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuoka, Junichi; Ohmori, Akira

    The phase transformation of anatase to rutile and the growth of nano primary particle in agglomerated TiO2 powder in heat treatment and HOVF spraying processes were investigated systematically. The 200nm, 30nm and 7nm primary particles were agglomerated by spray dry method for the feedstock powders of P200, P20 and P7, respectively. From the heat treatment results of feedstock powders, it was found that the phase transformation temperature of P7 was 100K and 150K lower than that of P30 and P200, respectively. The growth of primary particles of P7 and P30 happened earlier than their phase transformation, and increased drastically with increasing the heat treat temperature. Under various fuel pressure HVOF conditions, the anatase phase content was between 86% and 5% for sprayed P7 coating, whereas it was higher than 50% for P30 coating. The particle sizes of P7 and P30 grew during spraying processes. The anatase content of collected particles was lower than that of HVOF sprayed coatings in all conditions if phase transformation happened. Although the particle size had not significant change for P200, it grew obviously for P7 and P30. It was considered that the phase transformation and growth of primary particles were frozen for the rapid cooling effect due to the low temperature substrate. Therefore, it was concluded that the coating with high anatase ratio (approximately 100%) and primary particle size of single nano might be developed using the substrate with high thermal conductivity and large heat capacity.

  16. Mechanical properties of nanostructured nickel based superalloy Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhtarov, Sh; Ermachenko, A.

    2010-07-01

    This paper will describe the investigations of a nanostructured (NS) state of nickel based INCONEL® alloy 718. This structure was generated in bulk semiproducts by severe plastic deformation (SPD) via multiple isothermal forging (MIF) of a coarse-grained alloy. The initial structure consisted of γ-phase grains with disperse precipitations of γ"-phase in the forms of discs, 50-75 nm in diameter and 20 nm in thickness. The MIF generated structures possess a large quantity of non-coherent plates and rounded precipitations of δ-phase, primarily along grain boundaries. In the duplex (γ+δ) structure the grains have high dislocation density and a large number of nonequilibrium boundaries. Investigations to determine mechanical properties of the alloy in a nanostructured state were carried out. Nanocrystalline Inconel 718 (80 nm) possesses a very high room-temperature strength after SPD. Microcrystalline (MC) and NS states of the alloy were subjected to strengthening thermal treatment, and the obtained results were compared in order to determine their mechanical properties at room and elevated temperatures.

  17. Investigation of failure to separate an Inconel 718 frangible nut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, William C., III; Hohmann, Carl

    1994-01-01

    The 2.5-inch frangible nut is used in two places to attach the Space Shuttle Orbiter to the External Tank. It must be capable of sustaining structural loads and must also separate into two pieces upon command. Structural load capability is verified by proof loading each flight nut, while ability to separate is verified on a sample of a production lot. Production lots of frangible nuts beginning in 1987 experienced an inability to reliably separate using one of two redundant explosive boosters. The problems were identified in lot acceptance tests, and the cause of failure has been attributed to differences in the response of the Inconel 718. Subsequent tests performed on the frangible nuts resulted in design modifications to the nuts along with redesign of the explosive booster to reliably separate the frangible nut. The problem history along with the design modifications to both the explosive booster and frangible nut are discussed in this paper. Implications of this failure experience impact any pyrotechnic separation system involving fracture of materials with respect to design margin control and lot acceptance testing.

  18. Experimental Investigations during Dry EDM of Inconel - 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BHANDARE, A. S.; DABADE, U. A.

    2016-02-01

    Dry EDM is a modification of the conventional EDM process in which the liquid dielectric is replaced by a gaseous medium. Tubular tool electrodes are used and as the tool rotates, high velocity gas is supplied through it into the discharge gap. The flow of high velocity gas into the gap facilitates removal of debris and prevents excessive heating of the tool and work piece at the discharge spots. It is now known that apart from being an environment- friendly process, other advantages of the dry EDM process are low tool wear, lower discharge gap, lower residual stresses, smaller white layer and smaller heat affected zone. Keeping literature review into consideration, in this paper, an attempt has been made by selecting compressed air as a dielectric medium, with Inconel - 718 as a work piece material and copper as a tool electrode. Experiments are performed using Taguchi DoE orthogonal array to observe and analyze the effects of different process parameters to optimize the response variables such as material removal rate (MRR), surface roughness (Ra) and tool wear rate (TWR). In the current work, a unit has been developed to implement dry EDM process on existing oil based EDM machine.

  19. Ultrasonic guided wave inspection of Inconel 625 brazed lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comot, Pierre; Bocher, Philippe; Belanger, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The aerospace industry has been investigating the use of brazing for structural joints, as a mean of reducing cost and weight. There therefore is a need for a rapid, robust, and cost-effective non-destructive testing method for evaluating the structural integrity of the joints. The mechanical strength of brazed joints depends mainly on the amount of brittle phases in their microstructure. Ultrasonic guided waves offer the possibility of detecting brittle phases in joints using spatio-temporal measurements. Moreover, they offer the opportunity to inspect complex shape joints. This study focused on the development of a technique based on ultrasonic guided waves for the inspection of Inconel 625 lap joints brazed with BNi-2 filler metal. A finite element model of a lap joint was used to optimize the inspection parameters and assess the feasibility of detecting the amount of brittle phases in the joint. A finite element parametric study simulating the input signal shape, the center frequency, and the excitation direction was performed. The simulations showed that the ultrasonic guided wave energy transmitted through, and reflected from, the joints was proportional to the amount of brittle phases in the joint.

  20. [INVITED] Laser treatment of Inconel 718 alloy and surface characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Ali, H.; Al-Aqeeli, N.; Karatas, C.

    2016-04-01

    Laser surface texturing of Inconel 718 alloy is carried out under the high pressure nitrogen assisting gas. The combination of evaporation and melting at the irradiated surface is achieved by controlling the laser scanning speed and the laser output power. Morphological and metallurgical changes in the treated surface are analyzed using the analytical tools including optical, electron scanning, and atomic force microscopes, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Microhardnes and friction coefficient of the laser treated surface are measured. Residual stress formed in the surface region is determined from the X-ray diffraction data. Surface hydrophobicity of the laser treated layer is assessed incorporating the sessile drop method. It is found that laser treated surface is free from large size asperities including cracks and the voids. Surface microhardness increases significantly after the laser treatment process, which is attributed to the dense layer formation at the surface under the high cooling rates, dissolution of Laves phase in the surface region, and formation of nitride species at the surface. Residual stress formed is compressive in the laser treated surface and friction coefficient reduces at the surface after the laser treatment process. The combination of evaporation and melting at the irradiated surface results in surface texture composes of micro/nano-poles and pillars, which enhance the surface hydrophobicity.

  1. Hydrostatic Stress Effect On the Yield Behavior of Inconel 100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Wilson, Christopher D.

    2002-01-01

    Classical metal plasticity theory assumes that hydrostatic stress has no effect on the yield and postyield behavior of metals. Recent reexaminations of classical theory have revealed a significant effect of hydrostatic stress on the yield behavior of notched geometries. New experiments and nonlinear finite element analyses (FEA) of Inconel 100 (IN 100) equal-arm bend and double-edge notch tension (DENT) test specimens have revealed the effect of internal hydrostatic tensile stresses on yielding. Nonlinear FEA using the von Mises (yielding is independent of hydrostatic stress) and the Drucker-Prager (yielding is linearly dependent on hydrostatic stress) yield functions was performed. In all test cases, the von Mises constitutive model, which is independent of hydrostatic pressure, overestimated the load for a given displacement or strain. Considering the failure displacements or strains, the Drucker-Prager FEMs predicted loads that were 3% to 5% lower than the von Mises values. For the failure loads, the Drucker Prager FEMs predicted strains that were 20% to 35% greater than the von Mises values. The Drucker-Prager yield function seems to more accurately predict the overall specimen response of geometries with significant internal hydrostatic stress influence.

  2. Friction Freeform Fabrication of Superalloy Inconel 718: Prospects and Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilip, J. J. S.; Janaki Ram, G. D.

    2013-12-01

    Friction Freeform Fabrication is a new solid-state additive manufacturing process. The present investigation reports a detailed study on the prospects of this process for additive part fabrication in superalloy Inconel 718. Using a rotary friction welding machine and employing alloy 718 consumable rods in solution treated condition, cylindrical-shaped multi-layer friction deposits (10 mm diameter) were successfully produced. In the as-deposited condition, the deposits showed very fine grain size with no grain boundary δ phase. The deposits responded well to direct aging and showed satisfactory room-temperature tensile properties. However, their stress rupture performance was unsatisfactory because of their layered microstructure with very fine grain size and no grain boundary δ phase. The problem was overcome by heat treating the deposits first at 1353 K (1080 °C) (for increasing the grain size) and then at 1223 K (950 °C) (for precipitating the δ phase). Overall, the current study shows that Friction Freeform Fabrication is a very useful process for additive part fabrication in alloy 718.

  3. Hydrostatic Stress Effect on the Yield Behavior of Inconel 100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Wilson, Christopher D.

    2003-01-01

    Classical metal plasticity theory assumes that hydrostatic stress has negligible effect on the yield and postyield behavior of metals. Recent reexaminations of classical theory have revealed a significant effect of hydrostatic stress on the yield behavior of various geometries. Fatigue tests and nonlinear finite element analyses (FEA) of Inconel 100 (IN100) equal-arm bend specimens and new monotonic tests and nonlinear finite element analyses of IN100 smooth tension, smooth compression, and double-edge notch tension (DENT) test specimens have revealed the effect of internal hydrostatic tensile stresses on yielding. Nonlinear FEA using the von Mises (yielding is independent of hydrostatic stress) and the Drucker-Prager (yielding is linearly dependent on hydrostatic stress) yield functions were performed. A new FEA constitutive model was developed that incorporates a pressure-dependent yield function with combined multilinear kinematic and multilinear isotropic hardening using the ABAQUS user subroutine (UMAT) utility. In all monotonic tensile test cases, the von Mises constitutive model, overestimated the load for a given displacement or strain. Considering the failure displacements or strains for the DENT specimen, the Drucker-Prager FEM s predicted loads that were approximately 3% lower than the von Mises values. For the failure loads, the Drucker Prager FEM s predicted strains that were up to 35% greater than the von Mises values. Both the Drucker-Prager model and the von Mises model performed equally-well in simulating the equal-arm bend fatigue test.

  4. Bear Spray Safety Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blome, C.D.; Kuzniar, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    A bear spray safety program for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was officially initiated by the Firearms Safety Committee to address accident prevention and to promote personnel training in bear spray and its transportation, storage, and use for defense against wild animals. Used as part of a system including firearms, or used alone for those who choose not to carry a firearm, bear spray is recognized as an effective tool that can prevent injury in a wild animal attack.

  5. Improving the Surface Properties of Inconel 718 BY Applying a CO2 Laser Heat Treatment to a High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Coating of WC-CrCo Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, T. Y.; Yoon, J. H.; Joo, Y. K.; Zhang, S. H.; Cho, J. Y.; Kang, J. H.; Chun, H. G.; Kwon, S. C.; Li, Ming-Xi

    A micron-sized WC-CrCo powder was coated onto an IN718 substrate using high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying. To further improve the surface properties, the HVOF coating was heat-treated by a CO2 laser. The surface properties of both the coating and the laser-heated coating were then compared. The HVOF optimal coating process (OCP) for a coating with the highest surface hardness was determined with the Taguchi program. The friction and wear behaviors of the coating, an electrolytic hard chrome (EHC)-plated coating and IN718, were comparatively investigated via a reciprocating sliding wear test at both 25 and 450°C. The friction coefficient (FC) for all three samples decreased when the sliding surface temperature increased from 25 to 450°C. The FC of the coating decreased with increasing surface temperature: 0.33 ± 0.02 at 25°C to 0.26 ± 0.02 at 450°C the coating had the lowest FC among the three samples. At both temperatures, the coating wear depth (WD) was smaller than those of the EHC sample and IN718. At room temperature, WC-CrCo and the EHC coatings had good wear resistance and had only a shallow WD. IN718, however, had poor wear resistance with 50 μm deep grooves created from fretting corrosion that arose during the 1500 reciprocating slides (2.5 Hz, 10 min sliding wear test). At 450°C, the coating WDs were much shallower than those for the EHC coating and IN718: 0.5-μm deep grooves compared to 60-70-μm deep grooves. These results proved that the coating provided a protective coating for IN718 and other metal components. With the OCP coating fabricated from the powders on the IN718 surface, the surface hardness increased 316% from 399 Hv to 1260 Hv. Furthermore, by laser heating the coating surface for 0.6 s, the hardness increased 44% from 1260 ±30 Hv to 1820 ±100 Hv, porosity decreased more than five times from 2.2 ± 0.3% to 0.4 ± 0.1%, and the coating thickness decreased 17% from 300 to 250 μm. These results showed that both the WC

  6. Low-temperature embrittlement of Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel-718 by high pressure hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, W. T.; Walter, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    Notched specimens of titanium alloy and Inconel-718 exhibit little reduction of notch strength at certain low temperatures under 2000 lb/sq in. hydrogen, unnotched specimens are not embrittled at these temperatures. The degree of Inconel-718 embrittlement is lower than earlier observations under 1000 lb/sq in. hydrogen.

  7. In vitro performance of ceramic coatings obtained by high velocity oxy-fuel spray.

    PubMed

    Melero, H; Garcia-Giralt, N; Fernández, J; Díez-Pérez, A; Guilemany, J M

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings obtained by plasma-spraying have been used for many years to improve biological performance of bone implants, but several studies have drawn attention to the problems arising from high temperatures and the lack of mechanical properties. In this study, plasma-spraying is substituted by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray, with lower temperatures reached, and TiO2 is added in low amounts to hydroxyapatite in order to improve the mechanical properties. Four conditions have been tested to evaluate which are those with better biological properties. Viability and proliferation tests, as well as differentiation assays and morphology observation, are performed with human osteoblast cultures onto the studied coatings. The hydroxyapatite-TiO2 coatings maintain good cell viability and proliferation, especially the cases with higher amorphous phase amount and specific surface, and promote excellent differentiation, with a higher ALP amount for these cases than for polystyrene controls. Observation by SEM corroborates this excellent behaviour. In conclusion, these coatings are a good alternative to those used industrially, and an interesting issue would be improving biological behaviour of the worst cases, which in turn show the better mechanical properties. PMID:25201392

  8. Parameters Influencing the Photocatalytic Activity of Suspension-Sprayed TiO2 Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Filofteia-Laura; Berger, Lutz-Michael; Shakhverdova, Irina; Leupolt, Beate; Potthoff, Annegret; Oelschlägel, Kathrin; Meissner, Tobias; Gomez, José Antonio Ibáñez; de Miguel, Yolanda

    2014-10-01

    Photocatalytic properties of titania have been studied very intensively for a variety of applications, including air and water purification. In order to clarify the influence of the phase composition and other parameters, thermal spraying with suspensions was applied to produce photocatalytically active titania coatings starting from two commercially available anatase and rutile submicron powders. Aqueous suspensions containing 40% solids by weight were sprayed with an HVOF process using ethylene as the fuel gas. The spray parameters were chosen in order to produce mechanically stable coatings and to preserve a high content of the initial crystalline phases of the powders. The coating microstructures, phase compositions, and surface properties were characterized. The photocatalytic performance was evaluated by degradation of the pink dye Rhodamine B (RB) using two techniques: degradation of an aqueous solution of RB and discoloration of impregnated RB. All the coatings exhibited photocatalytic activity to varying degrees, depending on the phase composition as well as other factors, namely, the coating microstructure, surface morphology, surface hydroxylation, light absorption, and interaction with the pollutant.

  9. Sliding and abrasive wear resistance of thermal-sprayed WC-CO coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yunfei; Liu, Yourong; Fischer, Traugott E.

    2001-03-01

    We studied the resistance of the coatings to abrasive and unlubricated sliding wear of 40 WC/Co coatings applied by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF), high-energy plasma spray (HEPS), and high velocity plasma spray (HVPS), using commercial and nanostructured experimental powders. The hardness of the coatings varies from 3 to 13 GPA, which is much lower than that of sintered samples (10 to 23 GPA) because of the porosity of the coatings. Phase analysis by x-ray diffraction revealed various amounts of decarburization in the coatings, some of which contain WC, W2C, W, and η phase. The abrasive and sliding wear resistance is limited by the hardness of the samples. For a given hardness, the wear resistance is lowered by decarburization, which produces a hard but brittle phase. Nanocarb powders have the shape of thin-walled hollow spheres that heat up rapidly in the gun and are more prone to decarburization than commercial materials. The work shows that, in order to obtain the performance of nanostructured coatings, the powder and spray techniques must be modified.

  10. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Thermal Spray Coating Interface Quality by Eddy Current Method

    SciTech Connect

    B.Mi; X. Zhao; R. Bayles

    2006-05-26

    Thermal spray coating is usually applied through directing molten or softened particles at very high velocities onto a substrate. An eddy current non-destructive inspection technique is presented here for thermal spray coating interface quality characterization. Several high-velocity-oxy-fuel (HVOF) coated steel plates were produced with different surface preparation conditions before applying the coating, e.g., grit-blasted surface, wire-brush cleaned surface, and a dirty surface. A quad-frequency eddy current probe was used to manually scan over the coating surface to evaluate the bonding quality. Experimental results show that the three surface preparation conditions can be successfully differentiated by looking into the impedance difference observed from the eddy current probe. The measurement is fairly robust and consistent. More specimens are also prepared with variations of process parameters, such as spray angle, stand-off distance, and application of corrosion protective sealant, etc. They are blindly tested to evaluate the reliability of the eddy current system. Quantitative relations between the coating bond strength and the eddy current response are also established with the support of destructive testing. This non-contact, non-destructive, easy to use technique has the potential for evaluating the coating quality immediately after its application so that any defects can be corrected immediately.

  11. Demands, Potentials, and Economic Aspects of Thermal Spraying with Suspensions: A Critical Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Filofteia-Laura; Potthoff, Annegret; Berger, Lutz-Michael; Leyens, Christoph

    2015-10-01

    Research and development work for about one decade have demonstrated many unique thermal spray coating properties, particularly for oxide ceramic coatings by using suspensions of fine powders as feedstock in APS and HVOF processes. Some particular advantages are direct feeding of fine nano- and submicron-scale particles avoiding special feedstock powder preparation, ability to produce coating thicknesses ranging from 10 to 50 µm, homogeneous microstructure with less anisotropy and lower surface roughness compared to conventional coatings, possibility of retention of the initial crystalline phases, and others. This paper discusses the main aspects of thermal spraying with suspensions which have been taken into account in order to produce these coatings on an economical way. The economic efficiency of the process depends on the availability of suitable additional system components (suspension feeder, injectors), on the development and handling of stable suspensions, as well as on the high process stability for acceptance at industrial scale. Special focus is made on the development and processability of highly concentrated water-based suspensions. While costs and operational safety clearly speak for use of water as a liquid media for preparing suspensions on an industrial scale, its use is often critically discussed due to the required higher heat input during spraying compared to alcoholic suspensions.

  12. Tribological Properties of Hard Metal Coatings Sprayed by High-Velocity Air Fuel Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyphout, C.; Sato, K.; Houdkova, S.; Smazalova, E.; Lusvarghi, L.; Bolelli, G.; Sassatelli, P.

    2016-01-01

    Lowering the thermal energy and increasing the kinetic energy of hard metal particles sprayed by the newly developed HVAF systems can significantly reduce their decarburization, and increases the sliding wear and corrosion resistance of the resulting coatings, making the HVAF technique attractive, both economically and environmentally, over its HVOF predecessors. Two agglomerated and sintered feedstock powder chemistries, WC-Co (88/12) and WC-CoCr (86/10/4), respectively, with increasing primary carbides grain size from 0.2 to 4.0 microns, have been deposited by the latest HVAF-M3 process onto carbon steel substrates. Their dry sliding wear behaviors and friction coefficients were evaluated at room temperature via Ball-on-disk (ASTM G99-90) wear tests against Al2O3 counterparts, and via Pin-on-disk (ASTM G77-05) wear tests against modified martensitic steel counterparts in both dry and lubricated conditions. Sliding wear mechanisms, with the formation of wavy surface morphology and brittle cracking, are discussed regarding the distribution and size of primary carbides. Corrosion behaviors were evaluated via standard Neutral Salt Spray, Acetic Acid Salt Spray, accelerated corrosion test, and electrochemical polarization test at room temperature. The optimization of the tribological properties of the coatings is discussed, focusing on the suitable selection of primary carbide size for different working load applications.

  13. On relationship between microfissuring and microstructure in the HAZ of Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    Inconel 718, as well as many other metals, is susceptible to intergranular hot cracking in the weld heat-affected-zone (HAZ). These cracks form near the solidus temperature of the metal during the welding process. This problem is of particular concern to NASA/MSFC because the SSME is primarily constructed of welded Inconel 718. The present program studied microfissuring in the weld HAZ of Inconel 718 by simulating HAZ thermal cycles with the Gleeble machine. Previous researchers have studied the instantaneous mechanical properties of the HAZ using the Gleeble. The present study examines the instantaneous microstructure of the HAZ. This approach showed that second phase structures, high in niobium, melt and wet the grain boundaries in the HAZ during welding. It is postulated that the resultant HAZ grain boundaries, enriched in niobium, act as preferred sites for microfissure nucleation as the weld zone cools.

  14. Evaluation of the superplastic formability of SP-Inconel 718 superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, M.S.; Tsau, C.W.; Chuang, T.H.

    1996-02-01

    The superplastic formability of SP-Inconel 718 superalloy was evaluated using the argon blowing method. Relationships among superplastic forming parameters (forming temperature, argon pressure, and forming time) and specific dome height (dome height/workpiece diameter) were investigated, as were changes in material properties after superplastic forming. Experimental results showed the optimum forming temperature range for SP-Inconel 718 to be between 975 and 995 C. During the superplastic forming process, {delta}-phase precipitates formed at grain boundaries and limited the grain growth, which is considered beneficial for superplastic deformation. On the other hand, increasing the forming deformation also increased the formation of cavities, which can be attributed to the existence of niobium-rich inclusions. This degraded the superplasticity of the superalloy. Electrochemical tests showed that the corrosion resistance of SP-Inconel 718 after superplastic forming worsened because of the existence of both {delta}-phase precipitates and niobium-rich inclusions.

  15. Effects on stress rupture life and tensile strength of tin additions to Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Johnson, W.

    1982-01-01

    Because Inconel 718 represents a major use of columbium and a large potential source of columbium for aerospace alloys could be that of columbium derived from tin slags, the effects of tin additions to Inconel 718 at levels which might be typical of or exceed those anticipated if tin slag derived columbium were used as a melting stock were investigated. Tin was added to 15 pound Inconel 718 heats at levels varying from none added to approximately 10,000 ppm (1 wt%). Limited 1200 F stress rupture testing was performed at stresses from 68,000 to 115,000 psi and a few tensile tests were performed at room temperature, 800 and 1200 F. Additions of tin in excess of 800 ppm were detrimental to ductility and stress rupture life.

  16. Effects of Cations on Corrosion of Inconel 625 in Molten Chloride Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ming; Ma, Hongfang; Wang, Mingjing; Wang, Zhihua; Sharif, Adel

    2016-04-01

    Hot corrosion of Inconel 625 in sodium chloride, potassium chloride, magnesium chloride, calcium chloride and their mixtures with different compositions is conducted at 900°C to investigate the effects of cations in chloride salts on corrosion behavior of the alloy. XRD, SEM/EDS were used to analyze the compositions, phases, and morphologies of the corrosion products. The results showed that Inconel 625 suffers more severe corrosion in alkaline earth metal chloride molten salts than alkaline metal chloride molten salts. For corrosion in mixture salts, the corrosion rate increased with increasing alkaline earth metal chloride salt content in the mixture. Cations in the chloride molten salts mainly affect the thermal and chemical properties of the salts such as vapor pressure and hydroscopicities, which can affect the basicity of the molten salt. Corrosion of Inconel 625 in alkaline earth metal chloride salts is accelerated with increasing basicity.

  17. Effects of tin on microstructure and mechanical behavior of Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Johnson, W. A.; Maurer, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    Columbium, for which the United States is 100 percent import reliant, is of strategic importance to the U.S. aerospace industry. A major amount of the Cb is used in Inconel 718. Should Cb sources be disrupted, it may be desired to use a grade of Cb melting stock having greater Sn content then the preferred vacuum rade. Additions of Sn to Inconel 718 were varied from none added to 1 wt %. The Sn additions below 800 ppm had no detrimental effects on 650 C stress rupture behavior; however, 1-wt % Sn severely degraded both life and ductility. Additions of Sn in excess of 200 ppm were slightly detrimental to the 425 C tensile yield strength and ductility. The Sn additions had no effect on the microstructure of Inconel 718 even after stress rupture testing for over 6000 hr at 650 C.

  18. Detrimental effect of cellular precipitation on the creep strength of Inconel740H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Yan; Liu, Zhengdong; Godfrey, Andy; Liu, Wei; Weng, Yuqing

    2013-12-01

    Cellular precipitation (also known as discontinuous precipitation) has been observed at the grain boundaries of a newly developed nickel-based Inconel740H alloy designed for use at 700 °C in advanced ultrasupercritical coal-fired power plants. By means of element mapping and selected area diffraction, the cellular precipitates were identified as Cr-rich M23C6 carbides. The onset of cellular precipitation was found to follow a pucker mechanism in Inconel740H. The cellular precipitates at the grain boundaries, even at low volume fractions, were severely detrimental to the creep strength at 750 °C. The creep rupture life of Inconel740H containing cellular precipitates at grain boundaries was only one-tenth of that for the alloy without cellular precipitates. The reason for the drastically decreased creep rupture life is attributed to the poor resistance of cellular precipitates to crack propagation during creep.

  19. A joint computational and experimental study to evaluate Inconel-sheathed thermocouple performance in flames.

    SciTech Connect

    Brundage, Aaron L.; Nicolette, Vernon F.; Donaldson, A. Burl; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Gill, Walter

    2005-09-01

    A joint experimental and computational study was performed to evaluate the capability of the Sandia Fire Code VULCAN to predict thermocouple response temperature. Thermocouple temperatures recorded by an Inconel-sheathed thermocouple inserted into a near-adiabatic flat flame were predicted by companion VULCAN simulations. The predicted thermocouple temperatures were within 6% of the measured values, with the error primarily attributable to uncertainty in Inconel 600 emissivity and axial conduction losses along the length of the thermocouple assembly. Hence, it is recommended that future thermocouple models (for Inconel-sheathed designs) include a correction for axial conduction. Given the remarkable agreement between experiment and simulation, it is recommended that the analysis be repeated for thermocouples in flames with pollutants such as soot.

  20. Functionally graded Ti6Al4V and Inconel 625 by Laser Metal Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulugurtha, Syamala R.

    The objective of the current work was to fabricate a crack-free functionally graded Ti6Al4V and Inconel 625 thin wall structure by Laser Metal Deposition (LMD). One potential application for the current material system is the ability to fabricate a functionally graded alloy that can be used in a space heat exchanger. The two alloys, Inconel 625 and Ti6Al4V are currently used for aerospace applications. They were chosen as candidates for grading because functionally grading those combines the properties of high strength/weight ratio of Ti6Al4V and high temperature oxidation resistance of Inconel 625 into one multifunctional material for the end application. However, there were challenges associated with the presence of Ni-Ti intermetallic phases (IMPs). The study focused on several critical areas such as (1) understanding microstructural evolution, (2) reducing macroscopic cracking, and (3) reducing mixing between graded layers. Finite element analysis (FEA) was performed to understand the effect of process conditions on multilayer claddings for simplified material systems such as SS316L and Inconel 625 where complex microstructures did not form. The thermo-mechanical models were developed using Abaqus(TM) (and some of them experimentally verified) to predict temperature-gradients; remelt layer depths and residual stresses. Microstructure evolution along the functionally graded Ti6Al4V and Inconel 625 was studied under different processing and grading conditions. Thermodynamic modeling using Factsage (v 6.1) was used to construct phase diagrams and predict the possible equilibrium major/minor phases (verified experimentally by XRD) that may be present along the functionally graded Ti6Al4V and Inconel 625 thin wall structures.

  1. Microstructure and Properties of Porous Abradable Alumina Coatings Flame-Sprayed with Semi-molten Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chang-Jiu; Zou, Jiao; Huo, Hui-Bin; Yao, Jian-Tao; Yang, Guan-Jun

    2016-01-01

    High-efficiency gas turbines require high-temperature sealing by use of abradable porous ceramic coatings to increase engine efficiency. In this study, porous Al2O3 coatings were deposited by flame spraying; the coatings were applied in a semi-molten state by controlled melting of the sprayed powder particles. The effects of the degree of melting of the sprayed particles, which depends on spraying conditions, on coating microstructure and porosity were investigated. The degree of melting of the sprayed particles was characterized by use of 3D confocal laser microscopy. The porosity of the coating was estimated by image analysis. The results showed that the degree of melting of alumina particles can be changed from 70 to 30%, and thus coating porosity can be increased from 30% up to over 70%. The standard hardness test yielded no useful data for porous coatings deposited by use of sprayed particles with a degree of melting <60%, and a hardness of 32-75 HR15Y for Al2O3 coatings deposited by use of sprayed particles with a degree of melting >60%. Pin-on-disk abrasion tests, performed at room temperature by use of an Inconel 738 (IN738) nickel-based superalloy pin with a spherical tip 5 mm in diameter, were conducted on the porous alumina coating to evaluate its abrasion behavior. It was found that for coatings of hardness <32 HR15Y and porosity >40% the wear weight loss of the IN738 pin was negligible despite the high rate of wear of the coating. It is evident that flame-sprayed porous alumina coatings of high porosity prepared by this approach have potential for use as abradable coatings for gas turbines operating at high temperatures.

  2. Cold spray nozzle design

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Jeffrey D.; Sanders, Stuart A.

    2009-06-09

    A nozzle for use in a cold spray technique is described. The nozzle has a passageway for spraying a powder material, the passageway having a converging section and a diverging section, and at least the diverging section being formed from polybenzimidazole. In one embodiment of the nozzle, the converging section is also formed from polybenzimidazole.

  3. SPRAY ATOMIZATION MODELS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop protection product labels are now being written with spray droplet spectra classification terms that have specific definitions. Some of these terms are the same as previously used for generic descriptions such as fine or coarse sprays, but these terms used on new product labels have very speci...

  4. Spray momentum measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffield, E. W.

    1971-01-01

    Technique enables accurate prediction of erosion and cavitation produced by fluid spray. Method measures high velocity sprays produced by small orifices. Originally designed to determine oxidizer-injection patterns of liquid fueled rocket engines, technique is used with other liquids, or, with appropriate modification, with gases.

  5. Qualification Data for the Corrosion Behavior of Inconel and Steel Alloys in Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.I.

    2001-04-17

    During filling operations in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), melter inserts made of Inconel 690 (I690) have fallen into the canisters which are made of 304L stainless steel (304L). The consequences of possible galvanic corrosion between these materials were evaluated using two electrochemical techniques. Materials for other items which might fall into the canisters were also evaluated including Inconel MA758 (MA758) and A537 carbon steel (A537). The test solutions were concentrated nitric acid, used for validating literature data, and a 10 M nitric acid solution for simulating a possible environment, which may develop due to radiolysis inside the sealed canister.

  6. Qualification Data for the Corrosion Behavior of Inconel and Steel Alloys in Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.I.

    2001-05-02

    During filling operations in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), melter inserts made of Inconel 690 (I690) have fallen into the canisters which are made of 304L stainless steel (304L). The consequences of possible galvanic corrosion between these materials were evaluated using two electrochemical techniques. Materials for other items which might fall into the canisters were also evaluated including Inconel MA758 (MA758) and A537 carbon steel (A537). The test solutions were concentrated nitric acid, used for validating literature data, and a 10 M nitric acid solution for simulating a possible environment, which may develop due to radiolysis inside the sealed canister.

  7. Lattice Misfit Measurement in Inconel 625 BY X-Ray Diffraction Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, A.; Mukherjee, P.; Barat, P.; Jayakumar, T.; Mahadevan, S.; Rai, Sanjay K.

    Determination of lattice misfit and microstructural parameters of the coherent precipitates in Ni based alloy Inconel-625 is a challenging problem as the diffraction peaks of the precipitate and the matrix are completely overlapping. X-ray Diffraction Line Profile Analysis (XRDLPA) has been used to characterize the bulk samples of Inconel 625 at different heat-treated conditions to determine the lattice parameters of the parent phase and also the coherent precipitates by the separation of the overlapping peaks. The lattice misfits of the coherent precipitates with the matrix and their microstructural parameters like size and strain have also been determined.

  8. Proton irradiation creep of Inconel 718 at 300°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, R.; Matera, R.

    2000-12-01

    Torsional creep tests were conducted on Inconel 718 in the precipitation hardened condition under 17 MeV proton irradiation at 300°C upto a maximum dose of 0.35 dpa. The stress dependence of the irradiation creep rate was linear for the applied shear stresses which ranged from 150 to 450 MPa. The results are discussed in relation to the operating conditions of an ITER-like machine, where Inconel 718 bolts are used to mechanically attach the shielding blanket to the backplate. The irradiation creep induced stress relaxation amounted to about 30% after a dose of 0.35 dpa.

  9. Environmentally compatible spray cement

    SciTech Connect

    Loeschnig, P.

    1995-12-31

    Within the framework of a European research project, Heidelberger Zement developed a quickly setting and hardening binder for shotcrete, called Chronolith S, which avoids the application of setting accelerators. Density and strength of the shotcrete produced with this spray cement correspond to those of an unaccelerated shotcrete. An increased hazard for the heading team and for the environment, which may occur when applying setting accelerators, can be excluded here. Owing to the special setting properties of a spray cement, the process engineering for its manufacturing is of great importance. The treatment of a spray cement as a dry concrete with kiln-dried aggregates is possible without any problems. The use of a naturally damp pre-batched mixture is possible with Chronolith S but requires special process engineering; spray cement and damp aggregate are mixed with one another immediately before entering the spraying machinery.

  10. Plasma spray processing of TiC-based coatings for sliding wear resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Mahesh

    achieved by spraying under vacuum plasma spray conditions. VPS coating microstructures of synthesized 40, 60 and 80 v/o TiC in Ti10Ni10Cr5Al and 80 v/o TiC in Fe30Cr alloy matrices exhibited fine and uniform distributions of spheroidal carbides. High volume fraction carbides were also obtained with no segregation effects. It was also shown that coatings produced from mechanically blended powders of 50, 70 and 90 vol. % TiC and commercially pure (C.P.) Ti, using low pressure plasma spray process (VPS), had densities >98% and were well bonded to steel, aluminum alloy or titanium alloy substrates. Reductions in jet oxygen contents by the use of an inert gas shroud enabled Ti and TiC-based coatings to be produced which were cleaner and denser than air plasma sprayed and comparable to vacuum plasma sprayed coatings. Direct oxygen concentration measurements in shrouded plasma jets made using an enthalpy probe and a gas analyzer also showed significant reductions in the entrainment of atmospheric oxygen. VPS and shrouded plasma spraying minimized carbide-matrix interface oxidation and improved coating wear resistance. The sliding wear resistance of synthesized coatings was very high and comparable with standard HVOF sprayed WC/Co and Crsb3Csb2/NiCr coatings. Shrouded plasma spray deposits of Crsb3Csb2/NiCr also performed much better than similar air plasma sprayed coatings, as result of reduced oxidation.

  11. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip

    SciTech Connect

    Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

    2006-05-10

    Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

  12. An overview of spray drift reduction testing of spray nozzles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The importance of the development and testing of drift reduction technologies (DRTs) is increasing. Common spray drift reduction technologies include spray nozzles and spray adjuvants. Following draft procedures developed for a DRT program, three spray nozzles were tested under high air speed cond...

  13. Numerical Investigation of High Velocity Suspension Flame Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleby, M.; Hossainpour, S.

    2012-12-01

    High-velocity suspension flame spraying (HVSFS) has recently developed as a possible alternative to conventional HVOF-spraying employing liquid suspensions instead of dry powder feedstock enables the use of nanoparticles. From the fluid dynamics point of view, the HVSFS system is complex and involves three-phase (gas, liquid and solid particles) turbulent flow, heat transfer, evaporation of the suspension solvent, chemical reactions of main fuel (propane) and suspension solvent (ethanol) and supersonic/subsonic flow transitions. Computational fluid dynamic techniques were carried out to solve the mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations. The realizable k-ɛ turbulence model was used to account for the effect of turbulence. The HVSFS process involves two combustion reactions. A primary combustion process is the premixed oxygen-propane reaction and secondary process is the non-premixed oxygen-gaseous ethanol reaction. For each reaction, one step global reaction, which takes dissociations and intermediate reactions into account, was derived from the equilibrium chemistry code developed by Gordon and McBride and eddy dissipation model was used to calculate the rate of reactions based on the transport equations for all species (10 species) mass fractions. Droplets were tracked in the continuum in a Lagrangian approach. In this paper, flow field inside and outside the gun simulated to provide clear and complete insight about the HVSFS processes. Moreover, the effect of some operative parameters (oxy-fuel flow rate, ethanol flow rate, droplets injection velocity and droplets size) on the gas flow field along the centerline and droplets evaporation behavior was discussed.

  14. Spray drift mitigation with spray mix adjuvants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous drift reduction adjuvants and spray deposition aids are available to applicators of crop production and protection chemicals. Performance of many of the newly introduced drift control adjuvants has not been well documented for aerial application. Four new drift control adjuvants were sele...

  15. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  16. Plasma Spray System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Computer aided, fully-automatic TRW system sprays very hot plasma onto a turbine blade. Composed of gas into which metallic and ceramic powders have been injected, the plasma forms a two-layer coating which insulates the blade. Critical part of operation is controlling the thickness of the deposit which is measured in thousandths of an inch. This is accomplished by an optical detector which illuminates spots at various locations on the blade and determines thickness by measuring the light reflections. Optical sensor monitors spraying process until precise thickness is attained, then computer halts the spraying.

  17. Hot-cracking studies of Inconel 718 weld- heat-affected zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, E. G.

    1969-01-01

    Hot ductility tests, gas-tungsten-arc fillerless fusion tests, and circle patch-weld-restraint tests were conducted on Inconel 718 to better understand and correlate the weldability /resistance to hot cracking/ of the alloy. A correlation of the test results with composition, heat-treat condition, grain size, and microstructure was made.

  18. Effect of cold rolling on the precipitation behavior of {delta} phase in INCONEL 718

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.C.; Yao, M.; Chen, Z.L.

    1999-01-01

    Systematic research has been undertaken on the effect of cold rolling on the precipitation kinetics of {delta} phase in INCONEL 718. Above 910 C, cold rolling promotes the precipitation of {delta} phase. Below 910 C, the precipitation of {delta} phase is still preceded by the {gamma}{double_prime} precipitation in cold-rolled INCONEL 718. Cold rolling promotes not only the precipitation of {gamma}{double_prime} phase but also the {gamma}{double_prime} {r_arrow} {delta} transformation. The relationship between the weight percentage of {delta} phase and aging time follows the Avrami equation. Below 910 C, as cold rolling reduction and temperature increase, the time exponent (n) decreases, whereas the rate of {delta} precipitation increases. The apparent activation energy of {delta} precipitation varies in the range of 1113 to 577 kJ/mol for 25 to 65% cold-rolled INCONEL 718 and decreases as cold rolling reduction increases. Precipitation-time-temperature (PTT) diagrams have been determined for the four cold-rolled INCONEL 718. The noses of the PTT curves are located at about 910 C. These curves are shifted significantly to longer times as cold rolling reductions decrease.

  19. Measurement of spray combustion processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, C. E.; Arman, E. F.; Hornkohl, J. O.; Farmer, W. M.

    1984-01-01

    A free jet configuration was chosen for measuring noncombusting spray fields and hydrocarbon-air spray flames in an effort to develop computational models of the dynamic interaction between droplets and the gas phase and to verify and refine numerical models of the entire spray combustion process. The development of a spray combustion facility is described including techniques for laser measurements in spray combustion environments and methods for data acquisition, processing, displaying, and interpretation.

  20. Supersonic-Spray Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caimi, Raoul E. B.; Lin, Feng-Nan; Thaxton, Eric A.

    1995-01-01

    Spraying system for cleaning mechanical components uses less liquid and operates at pressures significantly lower. Liquid currently used is water. Designed to replace chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvent-based cleaning and cleanliness verification methods. Consists of spray head containing supersonic converging/diverging nozzles, source of gas at regulated pressure, pressurized liquid tank, and various hoses, fittings, valves, and gauges. Parameters of nozzles set so any of large variety of liquids and gases combined in desired ratio and rate of flow. Size and number of nozzles varied so system built in configurations ranging from small hand-held spray heads to large multinozzle cleaners. Also used to verify part adequately cleaned. Runoff liquid from spray directed at part collected. Liquid analyzed for presence of contaminants, and part recleaned if necessary.

  1. Bug spray poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... effective bug sprays contain pyrethrins. Pyrethrins are a pesticide made from the chrysanthemum flower. It is generally ... death. References Borron SW. Pyrethrins, repellants, and other pesticides. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. ...

  2. Mometasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... sneezing, stuffy, runny, itchy nose) caused by the common cold. Mometasone nasal spray is in a class of ... taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  3. Beclomethasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve symptoms of sneezing, runny, stuffy, or itchy nose (rhinitis) caused by hay fever, other allergies, or ... nasal polyps (swelling of the lining of the nose) after nasal polyp removal surgery. Beclomethasone nasal spray ...

  4. Budesonide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to relieve sneezing, runny, stuffy, or itchy nose caused by hay fever or other allergies (caused ... treat symptoms (e.g., sneezing, stuffy, runny, itchy nose) caused by the common cold. Budesonide nasal spray ...

  5. Mometasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve symptoms of sneezing, runny, stuffy, or itchy nose caused by hay fever or other allergies. It ... nasal polyps (swelling of the lining of the nose). Mometasone nasal spray should not be used to ...

  6. Bug spray poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... effective bug sprays contain pyrethrins. Pyrethrins are a pesticide made from the chrysanthemum flower. It is generally ... Borron SW. Pyrethrins, repellants, and other pesticides. In: Shannon ... of Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  7. Olopatadine Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... a stuffy, runny or itchy nose caused by allergic rhinitis (hay fever). Olopatadine is in a class of ... Olopatadine nasal spray controls the symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis, but does not cure these condition. Continue to ...

  8. Nasal corticosteroid sprays

    MedlinePlus

    ... Allergic rhinitis symptoms , such as congestion, runny nose, sneezing, itching, or swelling of the nasal passageway Nasal ... Repeat these steps for the other nostril. Avoid sneezing or blowing your nose right after spraying.

  9. Nicotine Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bottle in front of a tissue or paper towel. Pump the spray bottle six to eight times ... up the spill immediately with a cloth or paper towel. Avoid touching the liquid. Throw away the used ...

  10. Beclomethasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... the lining of the nose) after nasal polyp removal surgery. Beclomethasone nasal spray should not be used ... as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this ...

  11. Ciclesonide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to treat the symptoms of seasonal (occurs only at certain times of the year), and perennial ( ... prescribed by your doctor.Ciclesonide nasal spray is only for use in the nose. Do not swallow ...

  12. Fentanyl Sublingual Spray

    MedlinePlus

    Fentanyl sublingual spray is used to treat breakthrough pain (sudden episodes of pain that occur despite round ... effects of the medication) to narcotic pain medications. Fentanyl is in a class of medications called narcotic ( ...

  13. Fentanyl Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    Fentanyl nasal spray is used to treat breakthrough pain (sudden episodes of pain that occur despite round ... effects of the medication) to narcotic pain medications. Fentanyl is in a class of medications called narcotic ( ...

  14. Hydrogen Permeability of Incoloy 800H, Inconel 617, and Haynes 230 Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pattrick Calderoni

    2010-07-01

    A potential issue in the design of the NGNP reactor and high-temperature components is the permeation of fission generated tritium and hydrogen product from downstream hydrogen generation through high-temperature components. Such permeation can result in the loss of fission-generated tritium to the environment and the potential contamination of the helium coolant by permeation of product hydrogen into the coolant system. The issue will be addressed in the engineering design phase, and requires knowledge of permeation characteristics of the candidate alloys. Of three potential candidates for high-temperature components of the NGNP reactor design, the hydrogen permeability has been documented well only for Incoloy 800H, but at relatively high partial pressures of hydrogen. Hydrogen permeability data have been published for Inconel 617, but only in two literature reports and for partial pressures of hydrogen greater than one atmosphere, far higher than anticipated in the NGNP reactor. The hydrogen permeability of Haynes 230 has not been published. To support engineering design of the NGNP reactor components, the hydrogen permeability of Inconel 617 and Haynes 230 were determined using a measurement system designed and fabricated at the Idaho National Laboratory. The performance of the system was validated using Incoloy 800H as reference material, for which the permeability has been published in several journal articles. The permeability of Incoloy 800H, Inconel 617 and Haynes 230 was measured in the temperature range 650 to 950 °C and at hydrogen partial pressures of 10-3 and 10-2 atm, substantially lower pressures than used in the published reports. The measured hydrogen permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617 were in good agreement with published values obtained at higher partial pressures of hydrogen. The hydrogen permeability of Inconel 617 and Haynes 230 were similar, about 50% greater than for Incoloy 800H and with similar temperature dependence.

  15. Spray applicator for spraying coatings and other fluids in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuminecz, J. F.; Lausten, M. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A self contained spray application is developed for one handed operation in a zero gravity vacuum environment by a free flying astronaut not attached to any spacecraft. This spray applicator eliminates contamination of the operator by back spray. This applicator includes a rigid accumulator containment of a fluid within a flexible bladder the fluid being urged out of the accumulator under pressure through a spray gun. The spray gun includes a spring loaded lockable trigger which controls a valve. When in an open position, the fluid passes through the valve into the ambient environment in the form of a spray. A spray shield is provided which directs the flow of the spray from the applicator by trapping errant particles of spray yet allowing the passage of escaping gases through its material.

  16. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, Theodore J.

    1993-01-01

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal.

  17. Metal atomization spray nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Huxford, T.J.

    1993-11-16

    A spray nozzle for a magnetohydrodynamic atomization apparatus has a feed passage for molten metal and a pair of spray electrodes mounted in the feed passage. The electrodes, diverging surfaces which define a nozzle throat and diverge at an acute angle from the throat. Current passes through molten metal when fed through the throat which creates the Lorentz force necessary to provide atomization of the molten metal. 6 figures.

  18. Directed spray mast

    DOEpatents

    Nance, Thomas A.; Siddall, Alvin A.; Cheng, William Y.; Counts, Kevin T.

    2005-05-10

    Disclosed is an elongated, tubular, compact high pressure sprayer apparatus for insertion into an access port of vessels having contaminated interior areas that require cleaning by high pressure water spray. The invention includes a spray nozzle and a camera adjacent thereto with means for rotating and raising and lowering the nozzle so that areas identified through the camera may be cleaned with a minimum production of waste water to be removed.

  19. Portable Spray Booth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Timothy D.; Bardwell, Micheal J.

    1996-01-01

    Portable spray booth provides for controlled application of coating materials with high solvent contents. Includes contoured shroud and carbon filter bed limiting concentration of fumes in vicinity. Designed to substitute spraying for brush application of solvent-based adhesive prior to installing rubber waterproof seals over joints between segments of solid-fuel rocket motor. With minor adjustments and modifications, used to apply other solvent-based adhesives, paints, and like.

  20. Thermally sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, D.J.; Blann, G.A. )

    1991-05-01

    Standardization of specimen preparation for microstructural evaluation of thermally sprayed coatings is considered. Metallographic specimen preparation procedures including sectioning, encapsulation, planar grinding, and power lapping of thermally sprayed coatings are described. A Co-Ni-Cr-W coating on an AISI 410 stainless steel substrate is used as a control sample. Specimen-preparation techniques have been evaluated through scanning electron microscopy for determining the percentage of apparent porosity and energy dispersive spectroscopy for determining elemental composition.

  1. Measurements in liquid fuel sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chigier, N.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for studying the events directly preceding combustion in the liquid fuel sprays are being used to provide information as a function of space and time on droplet size, shape, number density, position, angle of flight and velocity. Spray chambers were designed and constructed for: (1) air-assist liquid fuel research sprays; (2) high pressure and temperature chamber for pulsed diesel fuel sprays; and (3) coal-water slurry sprays. Recent results utilizing photography, cinematography, and calibration of the Malvern particle sizer are reported. Systems for simultaneous measurement of velocity and particle size distributions using laser Doppler anemometry interferometry and the application of holography in liquid fuel sprays are being calibrated.

  2. Corrosion resistance of inconel 690 to borax, boric acid, and boron nitride at 1100{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, K.J.

    1996-12-12

    Significant general and localized corrosion was observed on Inconel 690 coupons following exposure to borax, boric acid and boron nitride at 1100{degrees}C. Severe localized attack at and below the melt line was observed on coupons exposed to borax. An intergranular attack at and below the melt line was observed on coupons exposed to borax. An intergranular attack (IGA) of the Inconel 690 was also observed. Severe internal void formation and IGA (30 mils penetration after 3 days) was observed in the coupon exposed to boric acid. Both borax and boric acid remove the protective chromium oxide; however, this layer can be reestablished by heating the Inconel 690 to 975 {degrees}C in air for several hours. Inconel 690 in direct contact with boron nitride resulted in the formation of a thick chromium borate layer, a general corrosion rate of 50 to 90 mils per year, and internal void formation of 1 mil per day.

  3. Silicate-Based Thermal Spray Coatings for Environmental Protection of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagiv, Ari Isaac

    Environmental barrier coatings are a key technology for implementing ceramics in high-temperature, high-moisture environments. One such ceramic, silicon carbide, is a material that can be used in gas turbines. However, silicon carbide oxidizes into silicon dioxide with exposure to oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor and would normally provide protection for the silicon carbide. However, silicon dioxide volatilizes in a gas turbine environment, which leads to the degradation of its mechanical properties, making it unfit for use in a gas turbine. Materials like yttria-monosilicate and barium-strontium doped aluminosilicate (BSAS) both have good environmental coating properties. However, sintered yttria-monosilicate does not bond well to silicon carbide, and thermally sprayed BSAS transforms very slowly from a metastable hexacelsian phase to the desired celsian phase that is necessary for it to bond well to silicon carbide. Coatings of these materials have been produced by plasma spray with some additional work using HVOF. Phase identification has been done by x-ray diffraction, and microstructural analysis has been done using scanning electron microscopy.

  4. Effect of Powder Characteristics on Properties of Warm-Sprayed WC-Co Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivavibul, Pornthep; Watanabe, Makoto; Kuroda, Seiji; Kawakita, Jin; Komatsu, Masayuki; Sato, Kazuto; Kitamura, Junya

    2010-01-01

    In high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying of WC-Co coatings, the decomposition and decarburization of WC during deposition are responsible for their much lower toughness compared with a sintered bulk WC-Co. In a previous study, Warm Spray (WS) process, which is capable to control the flame temperature used to propel powder particles, was successfully applied in an attempt to suppress such detrimental reactions by keeping particles’ temperature lower than their melting point. The coatings deposited by WS process showed no or little formation of W2C and η phases and demonstrated moderately improved fracture properties. However, there is still a gap in fracture toughness between WS coatings and the corresponding sintered bulk. In order to optimize the properties of the WS coatings, the effect of original powder sizes were investigated. Microstructural characterization and phase analysis were carried out on deposited coatings by SEM and XRD. The results show that the feedstock powder size has substantial effects on the properties of the coatings, i.e., the smaller powder showed improved properties.

  5. Investigation of thermal spray coatings on austenitic stainless steel substrate to enhance corrosion protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Daniel M.

    The research is aimed to evaluate thermal spray coatings to address material issues in supercritical and ultra-supercritical Rankine cycles. The primary purpose of the research is to test, evaluate, and eventually implement a coating to improve corrosion resistance and increase efficiency of coal fired power plants. The research is performed as part of a comprehensive project to evaluate the ability of titanium, titanium carbide, or titanium diboride powders to provide fireside corrosion resistance in supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam boilers, specifically, coal driven boilers in Illinois that must utilize high sulfur and high chlorine content coal. [1] The powder coatings that were tested are nano-sized titanium carbide (TiC) and titanium di-boride (TiB2) powders that were synthesized by a patented process at Southern Illinois University. The powders were then sent to Gas Technology Institute in Chicago to coat steel coupons by HVOF (High Velocity Oxy-Fuel) thermal spray technique. The powders were coated on an austenitic 304H stainless steel substrate which is commonly found in high temperature boilers, pipelines, and heat exchangers. The samples then went through various tests for various lengths of time under subcritical, supercritical, and ultra-supercritical conditions. The samples were examined using a scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction techniques to study microstructural changes and then determined which coating performed best.

  6. Effect of Residual Stress on the Wear Resistance of Thermal Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W.; Selvadurai, U.; Tillmann, W.

    2016-01-01

    The wear resistance of thermal spray coatings mainly depends on coating properties such as the microstructure, hardness, and porosity, as well as on the residual stress in the coating. The residual stress is induced by a variety of influences e.g., temperature gradients, difference of the thermal expansion coefficient of the coating/substrate materials, and the geometry of the components. To investigate the residual stress, the impulse excitation technique was employed to measure the Young's and shear moduli. The residual stress was determined by the hole-drilling method and x-ray diffraction. Pin-on-Disk and Pin-on-Tube tests were used to investigate the wear behavior. After the wear tests, the wear volume was measured by means of a 3D-profilometer. The results show that the value of the residual stress can be modified by varying the coating thickness and the substrate geometry. The compressive stress in the HVOF-sprayed WC-Co coatings has a significant positive influence on the wear resistance whereas the tensile stress has a negative effect.

  7. Strength Differential Measured in Inconel 718: Effects of Hydrostatic Pressure Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, John J.; Wesseling, Paul; Prabhu, Nishad S.; Larose, Joel; Lissenden, Cliff J.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2003-01-01

    Aeropropulsion components, such as disks, blades, and shafts, are commonly subjected to multiaxial stress states at elevated temperatures. Experimental results from loadings as complex as those experienced in service are needed to help guide the development of accurate viscoplastic, multiaxial deformation models that can be used to improve the design of these components. During a recent study on multiaxial deformation (ref. 1) on a common aerospace material, Inconel 718, it was shown that the material in the aged state exhibits a strength differential effect (SDE), whereby the uniaxial compressive yield and subsequent flow behavior are significantly higher than those in uniaxial tension. Thus, this material cannot be described by a standard von Mises yield formulation. There have been other formulations postulated (ref. 2) that involve other combinations of the stress invariants, including the effect of hydrostatic stress. The question remained as to which invariants are necessary in the flow model. To capture the physical mechanisms occurring during deformation and reflect them in the plasticity formulation, researchers examined the flow of Inconel 718 under various amounts of hydrostatic stress to determine whether or not hydrostatic stress is needed in the formulation. Under NASA Grant NCC3-464, monitored by the NASA Glenn Research Center, a series of tensile tests were conducted at Case Western Reserve University on aged (precipitation hardened) Inconel 718 at 650 C and with superimposed hydrostatic pressure. Dogbone shaped tensile specimens (3-mm-diameter gauge by 16-mm gauge length) and cylindrical compression specimens (3-mm-diameter gauge by 6-mm gauge length) were strain gauged and loaded in a high-pressure testing apparatus. Hydrostatic pressures were obtained with argon and ranged from 210 to 630 MPa. The aged Inconel 718 showed a pronounced difference in the tension and compression yield strength (i.e., an SDE), as previously observed. Also, there were

  8. Effect of Orientation on Tensile Properties of Inconel 718 Block Fabricated with Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, R. Keith; Atherton, Todd S.

    2010-01-01

    Electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) direct metal deposition processing was used to fabricate an Inconel 718 bulk block deposit. Room temperature tensile properties were measured as a function of orientation and location within the block build. This study is a follow-on activity to previous work on Inconel 718 EBF3 deposits that were too narrow to allow properties to be measured in more than one orientation

  9. Micro-structure and Mechanical Properties of Nano-TiC Reinforced Inconel 625 Deposited using LAAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, G.; Sun, C. N.; Nai, M. L.; Wei, J.

    In this paper, deposition of Ni-base Inconel 625 mixed with nano-TiC powders using laser aided additive manufacturing (LAAM) was studied. Micro-structure and mechanical properties were intensively investigated. The results showed that nano-size TiC distributed uniformly throughout the Ni- matrix. Inconel 625 can be reinforced by the strengthened grain boundaries with nano-size TiC. Improved micro-hardness and tensile properties were observed.

  10. A Comprehensive Pitting Study of High Velocity Oxygen Fuel Inconel 625 Coating by Using Electrochemical Testing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niaz, Akbar; Khan, Sajid Ullah

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, Inconel 625 was coated on a mild steel substrate using a high velocity oxygen fuel coating process. The pitting propensity of the coating was tested by using open circuit potential versus time, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation, and scanning electrochemical microscopy. The pitting propensity of the coating was compared with bulk Inconel 625 alloy. The results confirmed that there were regions of different electrochemical activities on the coating which have caused pitting corrosion.

  11. Development of self-lubricating coatings via cold spray process: Feedstock formulation and deformation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Gaurav

    Because of their low density, high specific strength and high stiffness, titanium alloys are one of the prime candidates for structural application often requiring specific tribological properties. However, their relatively high friction coefficients and low wear resistance are limiting their application over a wider temperature range. Various coatings deposited with technologies like high velocity oxy flame (HVOF), detonation gun (DGun), electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD), etc., can improve wear performance and decrease corrosion damage. These technologies require high processing temperatures precluding the integration of thermally vulnerable lubricants. This research looks at a relatively new coating process called Cold Spray for self-lubricating coatings on Ti-6Al-4V alloys. Cold Spray can produce coatings without significant heating of the sprayed powder or substrate. The particles are in solid state as they hit the substrate, and the formation of coatings occurs mainly due to the kinetic energy of the particles. Therefore, the impact velocity plays an important role. Below a critical value, the particles can cause densification and abrasion of the substrate. The focus of this study is to design composite coatings for the cold spray process and determination of the critical velocity through finite element modeling. Different powders and feedstock formulation techniques are discussed in order to find an optimum formulation for self-lubricating coatings. A composite powder (Ni coated hBN) was found to be the best candidate for the feedstock. The deformation of composite particles upon impact on the substrate was modeled and compared to the experiments. A number of approaches involving different modeling platforms, particle-substrate geometries, and material models have been tried. This work presents the results of ANSYS (version 10.0) analysis using an axisymmetric model of the particle impact. Stress and strain distributions in the particle

  12. Miniature spray-painting booth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fee, K. W.

    1970-01-01

    Transparent spray booth provides method for quality painting and repair of surfaces in clean room or other specialized environments. Overspray and virtually all contaminating vapor and odor can be eliminated. Touch-up painting is achieved with spray gun.

  13. Acoustic effects of sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Maciej Z.; Przekwas, Andrzej J.

    1994-01-01

    Since the early 1960's, it has been known that realistic combustion models for liquid fuel rocket engines should contain at least a rudimentary treatment of atomization and spray physics. This is of particular importance in transient operations. It has long been recognized that spray characteristics and droplet vaporization physics play a fundamental role in determining the stability behavior of liquid fuel rocket motors. This paper gives an overview of work in progress on design of a numerical algorithm for practical studies of combustion instabilities in liquid rocket motors. For flexibility, the algorithm is composed of semi-independent solution modules, accounting for different physical processes. Current findings are report and future work is indicated. The main emphasis of this research is the development of an efficient treatment to interactions between acoustic fields and liquid fuel/oxidizer sprays.

  14. Microstructure and residual stress of laser rapid formed Inconel 718 nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fencheng; Lin, Xin; Yang, Gaolin; Song, Menghua; Chen, Jing; Huang, Weidong

    2011-02-01

    The microstructure and residual stress of laser rapid formed (LRFed) nickel-base superalloy Inconel 718 was investigated. The as-deposited microstructure of an LRFed Inconel 718 alloy is composed of columnar dendrites growing epitaxially along the deposition direction, and the columnar dendrites transformed to unevenly distributed equiaxed grains after annealing treatment at high temperature. Residual stress evaluation in microstructure scale by Vickers micro-indentation method indicates that the residual thermal stress is unevenly distributed in the LRFed sample, and it has a significant effect on the recrystallization during solution annealing treatment. The residual stress is introduced by rapid heating and cooling during laser rapid forming. There is an alternative distribution between high residual stress regions and low residual stress regions, within a single deposited layer, resulting in a similar distribution of recrystallized grain size.

  15. Micromechanisms of fatigue crack growth in a single crystal Inconel 718 nickel-based superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, C.; Soboyejo, A.B.O.; Soboyejo, W.O. )

    1999-07-09

    The fatigue crack growth behavior of an experimental, single crystal alloy, of equivalent nominal chemical composition to Inconel 718 is presented. Fracture modes under cyclic loading were determined by scanning electron microscopy. The results of the fractographic analyses are presented on a fracture mechanism map that shows the dependence of the fatigue fracture mechanisms on the maximum stress intensity factor, K[sub max], and the stress intensity factor range, [Delta]K. Crack-tip deformation mechanisms associated with fatigue crack growth were studied using transmission electron microscopy. The relative effects of [Delta]K and K[sub max] on the fatigue crack growth behavior of this material are discussed within the context of a two-parameter crack growth law. The influence of grain boundaries on the fatigue crack growth resistance of materials such as Inconel 718 is also discussed in light of the results of this investigation.

  16. Grain boundary {gamma}{double_prime} precipitation and niobium segregation in Inconel 718

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, M.; Wei, R.P.

    1995-04-01

    In a previous study, the surface enrichment and grain boundary segregation of niobium in the Inconel 718 single crystal and polycrystals were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Considerable segregation of niobium, about three to four times higher than that in bulk, was observed at the grain boundaries of the polycrystalline alloy. The observed niobium segregation was thought to be associated with the preferential formation of {gamma}{double_prime}-Ni{sub 3}Nb precipitates at the boundaries during aging. In this paper, the results of a transmission electron microscopic (TEM) study of grain boundary {gamma}{double_prime} precipitates and their relation to niobium segregation in the Inconel 718 are reported.

  17. Diffusion bonding of a superplastic Inconel 718SPF superalloy by electroless nickel plating

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, M.S.; Chang, C.B.; Chuang, T.H.

    2000-02-01

    Although intimate contact can be obtained for diffusion bonding of a superplastic Inconel 718SPF superalloy under a low pressure of 7 MPa, the precipitates formed at the interface retarded achievement of a sound joint. The shear strength was only 41.5 MPa for an overlap length of 12 T (T = 1.3 mm, sheet thickness). The diffusion bondability of t his Inconel 718SPF superalloy was enhanced by electroless nickel plating. In this situation, the bonding shear strength increased to 70.4 MPa for the same overlap length of 12 T under the same bonding condition, regardless of the roughness of the surface to be bonded. Upon decreasing the overlap length from 12 to 6T, the bonding strength remained constant.

  18. Laser Additive Melting and Solidification of Inconel 718: Finite Element Simulation and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, John; Ladani, Leila; Sadowski, Magda

    2016-03-01

    The field of powdered metal additive manufacturing is experiencing a surge in public interest finding uses in aerospace, defense, and biomedical industries. The relative youth of the technology coupled with public interest makes the field a vibrant research topic. The authors have expanded upon previously published finite element models used to analyze the processing of novel engineering materials through the use of laser- and electron beam-based additive manufacturing. In this work, the authors present a model for simulating fabrication of Inconel 718 using laser melting processes. Thermal transport phenomena and melt pool geometries are discussed and validation against experimental findings is presented. After comparing experimental and simulation results, the authors present two correction correlations to transform the modeling results into meaningful predictions of actual laser melting melt pool geometries in Inconel 718.

  19. Influence Of The Laser Cladding Strategies On The Mechanical Properties Of Inconel 718

    SciTech Connect

    Lamikiz, A.; Tabernero, I.; Ukar, E.; Lopez de Lacalle, L. N.

    2011-01-17

    This work presents different experimental results of the mechanical properties of Inconel registered 718 test parts built-up by laser cladding. Recently, turbine manufacturers for aeronautical sector have presented high interest on laser cladding processes. This process allows building fully functional structures on superalloys, such as Inconel registered 718, with high flexibility on complex shapes. However, there is limited data on mechanical properties of the laser cladding structures. Moreover, the available data do not include the influence of process parameters and laser cladding strategies. Therefore, a complete study of the influence of the laser cladding parameters and mainly, the variation of the tensile strength with the laser cladding strategy is presented. The results show that there is a high directionality of mechanical properties, depending on the strategies of laser cladding process. In other words, the test parts show a fiber -like structure that should be considered on the laser cladding strategy selection.

  20. Nondestructive inspection assessment of eddy current and electrochemical analysis to separate inconel and stainless steel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.G.; Sorensen, N.R.

    1998-02-01

    This report presents a nondestructive inspection assessment of eddy current and electrochemical analysis to separate inconel alloys from stainless steel alloys as well as an evaluation of cleaning techniques to remove a thermal oxide layer on aircraft exhaust components. The results of this assessment are presented in terms of how effective each technique classifies a known exhaust material. Results indicate that either inspection technique can separate inconel and stainless steel alloys. Based on the experiments conducted, the electrochemical spot test is the optimum for use by airframe and powerplant mechanics. A spot test procedure is proposed for incorporation into the Federal Aviation Administration Advisory Circular 65-9A Airframe & Powerplant Mechanic - General Handbook. 3 refs., 70 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Precipitation and residual stress relaxation kinetics in shot-peened Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Dayong; Nie, Pulin; Shan, Jiaping; Liu, Wenchang; Yao, Mei; Gao, Yukui

    2006-10-01

    Mechanical surface treatment by shot peening followed by aging at 700 and 740 °C was performed on Inconel 718. A previously proposed XRD method (Ref 10) for the quantitative phase analysis of Inconel 718 allowed for the determination of the precipitation kinetics of the γ″ phase in the shot-peened layer and the matrix, respectively. The residual compressive stress field induced by shot peening and its relaxation behavior during aging were also determined. The relaxation process can be described by the Zener-Wert-Avrami function. The precipitation rate in the γ″ phase in the shot-peened layer is greatly accelerated, which causes differences in the γ″ phase amounts between the skin and the core during aging, especially during the initial stage. The high precipitation rate of the γ″ phase in the shot-peened layer can be interpreted by the nonequilibrium segregation of niobium.

  2. Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, and Two-Body Abrasive Wear Behavior of Cold-Sprayed 20 vol.% Cubic BN-NiCrAl Nanocomposite Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiao-Tao; Yang, Er-Juan; Shang, Fu-Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Chen-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2014-10-01

    20 vol.% cubic boron nitride (cBN) dispersoid reinforced NiCrAl matrix nanocomposite coating was prepared by cold spray using mechanically alloyed nanostructured composite powders. The as-sprayed nanocomposite coating was annealed at a temperature of 750 °C to enhance the inter-particle bonding. Microstructure of spray powders and coatings was characterized. Vickers microhardness of the coatings was measured. Two-body abrasive wear behavior of the coatings was examined on a pin-on-disk test. It was found that, in mechanically alloyed composite powders, nano-sized and submicro-sized cBN particles are uniformly distributed in nanocrystalline NiCrAl matrix. Dense coating was deposited by cold spray at a gas temperature of 650 °C with the same phases and grain size as those of the starting powder. Vickers hardness test yielded a hardness of 1063 HV for the as-sprayed 20 vol.% cBN-NiCrAl coating. After annealed at 750 °C for 5 h, unbonded inter-particle boundaries were partially healed and evident grain growth of nanocrystalline NiCrAl was avoided. Wear resistance of the as-sprayed 20 vol.% cBN-NiCrAl nanocomposite coating was comparable to the HVOF-sprayed WC-12Co coating. Annealing of the nanocomposite coating resulted in the improvement of wear resistance by a factor of ~33% owing to the enhanced inter-particle bonding. Main material removal mechanisms during the abrasive wear are also discussed.

  3. Controlled overspray spray nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasthofer, W. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A spray system for a multi-ingredient ablative material wherein a nozzle A is utilized for suppressing overspray is described. The nozzle includes a cyclindrical inlet which converges to a restricted throat. A curved juncture between the cylindrical inlet and the convergent portion affords unrestricted and uninterrupted flow of the ablative material. A divergent bell-shaped chamber and adjustable nozzle exit B is utilized which provides a highly effective spray pattern in suppressing overspray to an acceptable level and producing a homogeneous jet of material that adheres well to the substrate.

  4. Spray combustion stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Pak-Yan; Jeng, San-Mou; Litchford, Ronald

    1989-01-01

    The central purpose of this project is the improvement of liquid-fueled rocket motor design technology in order to assist the establishment of economical commercial access to space through the development of engines with enhanced performance and reliability. Specific research effort is focused on spray physics and associated combustion instability phenomena. Results concerning high pressure droplet gasification model, droplet turbulent dispersion model, and spray atomization model will contribute to the development of new computational tools for design of stable liquid propellant rocket engines.

  5. New techniques for spraying dust

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, S.K.

    1984-06-01

    Two recent developments for reducing airborne dust on longwall faces are described. One flushes foam through the drums of a shearer and also sprays foam onto the cutting drum. The other modifies the spray-head to produce different water spray patterns on continuous miners.

  6. Programable Plasma-Spray System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetheroff, C. W.; Derkacs, T.; Matay, I. M.; Toth, I.

    1982-01-01

    NASA-funded research led to development of automated plasma-spray system programable and reproducible. System utilizes standard plasma-spray equipment with noncoherent light-measuring system and microprocessor. System monitors and controls surface contours and coating thickness. Other advantages of system are consistant coating reproducibility, exact blending and feathering operations, ability to handle complex shapes and ease of changing spray parameters.

  7. Sprayed Coating Renews Butyl Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. B.

    1982-01-01

    Damaged butyl rubber products are renewed by spray technique originally developed for protective suits worn by NASA workers. A commercial two-part adhesive is mixed with Freon-113 (or equivalent) trichlorotrifluoroethane to obtain optimum viscosity for spraying. Mix is applied with an external-air-mix spray gun.

  8. High temperature environmental interactions of Inconel 617: A paper study for the TEF

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.S.

    2000-06-16

    Inconel alloy 617 has been selected as the material of choice for the retort of the furnace for the Tritium Extraction Facility. To monitor retort performance and suitability for continued service, representative sample coupons should be suspended on the inside (process side) and outside (annulus side) of the retort for periodic metallographic analysis or hardness testing. Surface dealloying and hardness could be used to monitor the ``health'' of the retort in this surveillance program.

  9. Fatigue Crack Growth Rate of Inconel 718 Sheet at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Douglas; Wright, Jonathan; Hastings, Keith

    2005-01-01

    Inconel 718 sheet material was tested to determine fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) at cryogenic conditions representative of a liquid hydrogen (LH2) environment at -423 degree F. Tests utilized M(T) and ESE(T) specimen geometries and environments were either cold gaseous helium or submersion in LH2. The test results support a significant improvement in the fatigue crack growth threshold at -423 degree F compared to -320 degree F or 70 degree F.

  10. Effects of Flux Precoating and Process Parameter on Welding Performance of Inconel 718 Alloy TIG Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsuan-Liang; Wu, Tong-Min; Cheng, Ching-Min

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of activating flux on the depth-to-width ratio (DWR) and hot cracking susceptibility of Inconel 718 alloy tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds. The Taguchi method is employed to investigate the welding parameters that affect the DWR of weld bead and to achieve optimal conditions in the TIG welds that are coated with activating flux in TIG (A-TIG) process. There are eight single-component fluxes used in the initial experiment to evaluate the penetration capability of A-TIG welds. The experimental results show that the Inconel 718 alloy welds precoated with 50% SiO2 and 50% MoO3 flux were provided with better welding performance such as DWR and hot cracking susceptibility. The experimental procedure of TIG welding process using mixed-component flux and optimal conditions not only produces a significant increase in DWR of weld bead, but also decreases the hot cracking susceptibility of Inconel 718 alloy welds.

  11. Microstructure Development in Electron Beam-Melted Inconel 718 and Associated Tensile Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirka, M. M.; Unocic, K. A.; Raghavan, N.; Medina, F.; Dehoff, R. R.; Babu, S. S.

    2016-03-01

    During the electron beam melting (EBM) process, builds occur at temperatures in excess of 800°C for nickel-base superalloys such as Inconel 718. When coupled with the temporal differences between the start and end of a build, a top-to-bottom microstructure gradient forms. Characterized in this study is a microstructure gradient and associated tensile property gradient common to all EBM Inconel 718 builds, the extent of which is dependent on build geometry and the specifics of a build's processing history. From the characteristic microstructure elements observed in EBM Inconel 718 material, the microstructure gradient can be classified into three distinct regions. Region 1 (top of a build) is comprised of a cored dendritic structure that includes carbides and Laves phase within the interdendritic regions. Region 2 is an intermediate transition zone characterized by a diffuse dendritic structure, dissolution of the Laves phase, and precipitation of δ needle networks within the interdendritic regions. The bulk structure (Region 3) is comprised of a columnar grain structure lacking dendritic characteristics with δ networks having precipitated within the grain interiors. Mechanically, at both 20°C and 650°C, the yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and elongation at failure exhibit the general trend of increasing with increasing build height.

  12. Recrystallization and aging effects associated with the high temperature deformation of waspaloy and inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimaraes, A. A.; Jonas, J. J.

    1981-09-01

    Cylindrical samples of Waspaloy and Inconel 718 were hot compressed, using a computerized Instron machine. The test program covered strain rates from 10•4 s•1 to 1 s•1 temperatures ranging from 875 °C to 1220 °C and deformations up to strains of 0.7. Interrupted tests were also carried out to determine the nature of the static softening and hardening processes. Dynamic recrystallization, partial or complete, was observed at temperatures above 950 °C. At 950 °C and below, dynamic recovery was the process controlling the deformation. Static softening was found to take place both by recovery and by recrystallization. Yield points were detected in Waspaloy under certain conditions as well as in Inconel 718. For Waspaloy the yield drops occurred in the vicinity of 1100 °C, and a deviation from the normal behavior in the stress-temperature curve was seen in the same temperature range. The mechanism responsible for the occurrence of the yield drops, which in turn is related to the deviation in the σ vsT curve, is believed to be short range ordering of the γ’ forming elements. For Inconel 718, elements such as Co, Cr and Fe may be causing short range ordering, but the locking mechanism may also be associated with the precipitation of carbides or other intermetallic phases on the dislocations.

  13. Microstructure Development in Electron Beam-Melted Inconel 718 and Associated Tensile Properties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kirka, M. M.; Unocic, K. A.; Raghavan, N.; Medina, F.; Dehoff, R. R.; Babu, S. S.

    2016-02-12

    During the electron beam melting (EBM) process, builds occur at temperatures in excess of 800°C for nickel-base superalloys such as Inconel 718. When coupled with the temporal differences between the start and end of a build, a top-to-bottom microstructure gradient forms. Characterized in this study is the microstructure gradient and associated tensile property gradient that are common to all EBM Inconel 718 builds. From the characteristic microstructure elements observed in EBM Inconel 718 material, the microstructure gradient can be classified into three distinct regions. Region 1 (top of a build) and is comprised of a cored dendritic structure that includesmore » carbides and Laves phase within the interdendritic regions. Region 2 is an intermediate transition zone characterized by a diffuse dendritic structure, dissolution of the Laves phase, and precipitation of δ needle networks within the interdendritic regions. The bulk structure (Region 3) is comprised of a columnar grain structure lacking dendritic characteristics with δ networks having precipitated within the grain interiors. Mechanically at both 20°C and 650° C, the yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and elongation at failure exhibit the general trend of increasing with increasing build height.« less

  14. Spray combustion stability project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, San-Mou; Litchford, Ron J.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes research activity on the Spray Combustion Stability Project, characterizes accomplishments and current status, and discusses projected future work. The purpose is to provide a concise conceptual overview of the research effort to date so the reader can quickly assimilate the gist of the research results and place them within the context of their potential impact on liquid rocket engine design technology.

  15. Ocean Spray Lubricates Winds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    According to a new study by two University of California, Berkeley, mathematicians and their Russian colleague, the water droplets kicked up by rough seas serve to lubricate the swirling winds of hurricanes and cyclones, letting them build to speeds approaching 200 miles per hour. Without the lubricating effect of the spray, the mathematicians…

  16. Oxymetazoline Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... is recommended by a doctor. Children 6 to 12 years of age should use oxymetazoline nasal spray carefully and under adult supervision. Oxymetazoline is in a class of medications called nasal decongestants. It works by narrowing the blood vessels in the nasal passages.

  17. Fluticasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... improve. Follow the directions on your prescription or product label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to ... ingredients in fluticasone nasal spray. Check the package label for a list of the ... and herbal products you are taking, or have recently taken, or ...

  18. Titanium Cold Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajaja, Jihane; Goldbaum, Dina; Chromik, Richard; Yue, Stephen; Rezaeian, Ahmad; Wong, Wilson; Irissou, Eric; Legoux, Jean-Gabriel

    Titanium Cold Spray Coatings Cold Spray is an emerging technology used for the deposition of coatings for many industries including aerospace. This technique allows the deposition of metallic materials at low temper-atures below their melting point. The aim of this research was to develop a test technique that can measure the degree to which a cold spray coating achieves mechanical properties similar to a traditional bulk material. Vickers hardness testing and nanoindentation were used as micro-and nano-scale measurement techniques to characterize the mechanical properties of titanium coatings, deposited at different deposition conditions, and bulk Ti. The mechanical properties of bulk titanium and titanium coatings were measured over a range of length scales, with the indentation size effect examined with Meyer's law. Hardness measurements are shown to be affected by material porosity, microstructure and coating particle bonding mechanism. Hard-ness measurements showed that Ti coatings deposited at higher gas pressures and temperatures demonstrate an indentation load response similar to bulk Ti. Key words: titanium, cold spray, Vickers hardness, nanoindentation, indentation size effect, microstructure, mechanical properties

  19. Picosecond imaging of sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breisacher, Kevin; Liou, Larry; Wang, L.; Liang, X.; Galland, P.; Ho, P. P.; Alfano, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary results from applying a Kerr-Fourier imaging system to a water/air spray produced by a shear coaxial element are presented. The physics behind ultrafast time-gated optical techniques is discussed briefly. A typical setup of a Kerr-Fourier time gating system is presented.

  20. Zolmitriptan Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... diarrhea and stomach pain caused by decreased blood flow to the intestines). Your doctor may tell you not to use zolmitriptan nasal spray.tell your doctor if you smoke or are overweight; if you have or have ever had high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, or liver or ...

  1. Naloxone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms, he or she should give you your first naloxone dose and then call 911 immediately. After receiving the naloxone nasal spray, ... the person on their side (recovery position) and call for emergency medical ... after giving the first naloxone dose. If the person does not respond ...

  2. Additive manufacturing of Inconel 718 using electron beam melting: Processing, post-processing, & mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sames, William James, V.

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) process parameters were studied for production of the high temperature alloy Inconel 718 using Electron Beam Melting (EBM) to better understand the relationship between processing, microstructure, and mechanical properties. Processing parameters were analyzed for impact on process time, process temperature, and the amount of applied energy. The applied electron beam energy was shown to be integral to the formation of swelling defects. Standard features in the microstructure were identified, including previously unidentified solidification features such as shrinkage porosity and non-equilibrium phases. The as-solidified structure does not persist in the bulk of EBM parts due to a high process hold temperature (˜1000°C), which causes in situ homogenization. The most significant variability in as-fabricated microstructure is the formation of intragranular delta-phase needles, which can form in samples produced with lower process temperatures (< 960°C). A novel approach was developed and demonstrated for controlling the temperature of cool down, thus providing a technique for in situ heat treatment of material. This technique was used to produce material with hardness of 478+/-7 HV with no post-processing, which exceeds the hardness of peak-aged Inconel 718. Traditional post-processing methods of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and solution treatment and aging (STA) were found to result in variability in grain growth and phase solution. Recrystallization and grain structure are identified as possible mechanisms to promote grain growth. These results led to the conclusion that the first step in thermal post-processing of EBM Inconel 718 should be an optimized solution treatment to reset phase variation in the as-fabricated microstructure without incurring significant grain growth. Such an optimized solution treatment was developed (1120°C, 2hr) for application prior to aging or HIP. The majority of as-fabricated tensile properties met ASTM

  3. Improved Orifice Plate for Spray Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, W.

    1986-01-01

    Erratic spray pattern of commercial spray gun changed to repeatable one by simple redesign of two parts. In modified spray gun orifice plate and polytetrafluoroethylene bushing redesigned to assure centering and alignment with nozzle. Such improvement useful in many industrial applications requiring repeatable spray patterns. Might include spraying of foam insulation, paint, other protective coatings, detergents, abrasives, adhesives, process chemicals, or fuels. Unmodified spray gun produces erratic spray because lateral misalignment between orifice plate and nozzle.

  4. OXIDATION OF INCONEL 718 IN AIR AT TEMPERATURES FROM 973K TO 1620K.

    SciTech Connect

    GREENE,G.A.; FINFROCK,C.C.

    2000-10-01

    As part of the APT project, it was necessary to quantify the release of tungsten from the APT spallation target during postulated accident conditions in order to develop accident source terms for accident consequence characterization. Experiments with tungsten rods at high temperatures in a flowing steam environment characteristic of postulated accidents revealed that considerable vaporization of the tungsten occurred as a result of reactions with the steam and that the aerosols which formed were readily transported away from the tungsten surfaces, thus exposing fresh tungsten to react with more steam. The resulting tungsten release fractions and source terms were undesirable and it was decided to clad the tungsten target with Inconel 718 in order to protect it from contact with steam during an accident and mitigate the accident source term and the consequences. As part of the material selection criteria, experiments were conducted with Inconel 718 at high temperatures to evaluate the rate of oxidation of the proposed clad material over as wide a temperature range as possible, as well as to determine the high-temperature failure limit of the material. Samples of Inconel 718 were inserted into a preheated furnace at temperatures ranging from 973 K to 1620 K and oxidized in air for varying periods of time. After oxidizing in air at a constant temperature for the prescribed time and then being allowed to cool, the samples would be reweighed to determine their weight gain due to the uptake of oxygen. From these weight gain measurements, it was possible to identify three regimes of oxidation for Inconel 718: a low-temperature regime in which the samples became passivated after the initial oxidation, an intermediate-temperature regime in which the rate of oxidation was limited by diffusion and exhibited a constant parabolic rate dependence, and a high-temperature regime in which material deformation and damage accompanied an accelerated oxidation rate above the parabolic

  5. Erosion-Corrosion Property of CeO2-Modified HVOF WC-Co Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Hang, Zongqiu; Chen, Hui; Ceng, Shengbo; Gou, Guoqing; Wang, Xiaomin; Tu, Mingjing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2016-04-01

    Rare-earth elements have been widely used in materials manufacturing to improve hardness and toughness. In this work, conventional, nanostructured, and CeO2-modified WC-12Co powders were sprayed using high-velocity oxygen flame spraying. The erosion-corrosion behavior and interaction of erosion and corrosion of the coatings in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution were investigated. In situ observation was employed to analyze the failure mechanism. The results showed that the CeO2-modified WC-12Co coating possessed the best erosion-corrosion resistance, while the lowest corrosion resistance was exhibited by the conventional WC-12Co coating. The results also suggested that the erosion-corrosion mechanism in the three coatings was dominated by corrosion-accelerated erosion. However, the extent of acceleration of erosion by corrosion differed.

  6. Optimisation of a vertical spray boom for greenhouse spraying applications.

    PubMed

    Nuyttens, D; Windey, S; Braekman, P; De Moor, A; Sonck, B

    2003-01-01

    The European Crop Protection Association (ECPA) and CLO-DVL joined forces in a project to stimulate a safe use of pesticides in Southern European countries. CLO-DVL optimised a method with mineral chelates to evaluate deposition tests. This quantitative method to evaluate spray deposits and to check spray distributions is used to assess two novel spraying techniques. Deposition tests with water-sensitive paper and mainly with the manganese and molybdenum chelates as tracer elements were performed with a manually pulled trolley and a motorised vehicle both equipped with vertical spray booms. Filter papers were attached to the tomato and pepper plants at several heights to obtain an indication of the spray distribution in the crop. Particular attention was paid to the effect on the spray distribution of the vertical nozzle distance (35 cm vs. 50 cm) and the spray distance to the crop. The tests proved that a nozzle spacing of 35 cm delivers a much better spray distribution than one of 50 cm. The optimal spray distance for flat fan nozzles with a spray angle of 80 degrees and a nozzle spacing of 35 cm is about 30 cm. PMID:15151329

  7. Corrosion Testing of Ni Alloy HVOF Coatings in High Temperature Environments for Biomass Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, S.; Harvey, M. D. F.

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports the corrosion behavior of Ni alloy coatings deposited by high velocity oxyfuel spraying, and representative boiler substrate alloys in simulated high temperature biomass combustion conditions. Four commercially available oxidation resistant Ni alloy coating materials were selected: NiCrBSiFe, alloy 718, alloy 625, and alloy C-276. These were sprayed onto P91 substrates using a JP5000 spray system. The corrosion performance of the coatings varied when tested at ~525, 625, and 725 °C in K2SO4-KCl mixture and gaseous HCl-H2O-O2 containing environments. Alloy 625, NiCrBSiFe, and alloy 718 coatings performed better than alloy C-276 coating at 725 °C, which had very little corrosion resistance resulting in degradation similar to uncoated P91. Alloy 625 coatings provided good protection from corrosion at 725 °C, with the performance being comparable to wrought alloy 625, with significantly less attack of the substrate than uncoated P91. Alloy 625 performs best of these coating materials, with an overall ranking at 725 °C as follows: alloy 625 > NiCrBSiFe > alloy 718 ≫ alloy C-276. Although alloy C-276 coatings performed poorly in the corrosion test environment at 725 °C, at lower temperatures (i.e., below the eutectic temperature of the salt mixture) it outperformed the other coating types studied.

  8. Degradation of TiN Coatings on Inconel 617 and Silicon Wafer Substrates Under Pulsed Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Seol; Lee, Heesoo; Jo, Ilguk; Shin, Dongwon; Lee, Ki-Seuk

    2014-05-01

    The degradation behavior of TiN coatings on Inconel 617 and silicon (Si) wafer substrates was compared following Nd:YAG pulsed laser ablation to apply thermomechanical stress. Surface cracks and pores were observed on the TiN coating on the Inconel 617 after five pulses, and melting of the coating was occurred over ten pulses. The TiN coating on the Si wafer also showed surface cracks and pores, but there was no surface melting. As the pulses were increased, the surface roughness of the TiN coating on Inconel 617 increased more than the TiN coating on the Si wafer, and interfacial cracking was the dominant degradation behavior on the Si wafer. The hardness of the TiN coating decreased below 50% of its initial value (2200 HK) after five pulses on the Inconel 617, whereas over 70% of the initial value (2400 HK) was maintained on the Si wafer. The TiN coating on Inconel 617 showed diffusion of substrate atoms to the surface, while Si was not found in the TiN coating on the Si wafer even after 25 pulses. It was determined that the decrease in hardness was influenced by the cracking behavior and the diffusion of atoms from the substrate.

  9. Surface Roughness and Tool Wear on Cryogenic Treated CBN Insert on Titanium and Inconel 718 Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamizhmanii, S.; Mohideen, R.; Zaidi, A. M. A.; Hasan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Machining of materials by super hard tools like cubic boron nitride (cbn) and poly cubic boron nitride (pcbn) is to reduce tool wear to obtain dimensional accuracy, smooth surface and more number of parts per cutting edge. wear of tools is inevitable due to rubbing action between work material and tool edge. however, the tool wear can be minimized by using super hard tools by enhancing the strength of the cutting inserts. one such process is cryogenic process. this process is used in all materials and cutting inserts which requires wear resistance. the cryogenic process is executed under subzero temperature -186° celsius for longer period of time in a closed chamber which contains liquid nitrogen. in this research, cbn inserts with cryogenically treated was used to turn difficult to cut metals like titanium, inconel 718 etc. the turning parameters used is different cutting speeds, feed rates and depth of cut. in this research, titanium and inconel 718 material were used. the results obtained are surface roughness, flank wear and crater wear. the surface roughness obtained on titanium was lower at high cutting speed compared with inconel 718. the flank wear was low while turning titanium than inconel 718. crater wear is less on inconel 718 than titanium alloy. all the two materials produced saw tooth chips.

  10. Electrochemical Study of Ni20Cr Coatings Applied by HVOF Process in ZnCl2-KCl at High Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Porcayo-Calderón, J; Sotelo-Mazón, O; Casales-Diaz, M; Ascencio-Gutierrez, J A; Salinas-Bravo, V M; Martinez-Gomez, L

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of Ni20Cr coatings deposited by HVOF (high velocity oxygen-fuel) process was evaluated in ZnCl2-KCl (1 : 1 mole ratio) molten salts. Electrochemical techniques employed were potentiodynamic polarization curves, open circuit potential, and linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements. Experimental conditions included static air and temperatures of 350, 400, and 450°C. 304-type SS was evaluated in the same conditions as the Ni20Cr coatings and it was used as a reference material to assess the coatings corrosion resistance. Coatings were evaluated as-deposited and with a grinded surface finished condition. Results showed that Ni20Cr coatings have a better corrosion performance than 304-type SS. Analysis showed that Ni content of the coatings improved its corrosion resistance, and the low corrosion resistance of 304 stainless steel was attributed to the low stability of Fe and Cr and their oxides in the corrosive media used. PMID:25210645

  11. Electrochemical Study of Ni20Cr Coatings Applied by HVOF Process in ZnCl2-KCl at High Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Porcayo-Calderón, J.; Sotelo-Mazón, O.; Casales-Diaz, M.; Ascencio-Gutierrez, J. A.; Salinas-Bravo, V. M.; Martinez-Gomez, L.

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of Ni20Cr coatings deposited by HVOF (high velocity oxygen-fuel) process was evaluated in ZnCl2-KCl (1 : 1 mole ratio) molten salts. Electrochemical techniques employed were potentiodynamic polarization curves, open circuit potential, and linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements. Experimental conditions included static air and temperatures of 350, 400, and 450°C. 304-type SS was evaluated in the same conditions as the Ni20Cr coatings and it was used as a reference material to assess the coatings corrosion resistance. Coatings were evaluated as-deposited and with a grinded surface finished condition. Results showed that Ni20Cr coatings have a better corrosion performance than 304-type SS. Analysis showed that Ni content of the coatings improved its corrosion resistance, and the low corrosion resistance of 304 stainless steel was attributed to the low stability of Fe and Cr and their oxides in the corrosive media used. PMID:25210645

  12. Structural and Tribological Properties of Nanostructured Supersonic Cold Sprayed Ni-20 wt.% Sn Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, E. P.; Dosta, S.; Fernández, J.; Matteazzi, P.; Kowalski, K.; Kusinski, J.; Piticescu, R. R.; Celis, J.-P.

    2016-05-01

    80-μm-thick nanostructured coatings consisting of a Ni solid solution, Ni3Sn, Ni3Sn2, and metastable NiSn intermetallic phases were deposited via supersonic cold spraying onto inconel 718 alloy substrates. These coatings have complex nanostructured metallurgical phases as revealed by transition electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Their mechanical properties were determined by nanoindentation measurements. Furthermore, the wear behavior of these nanostructured sprayed coatings was compared to the one of the industrial bulk or sprayed coated benchmark materials. It was found that the nanostructured coatings exhibit higher wear resistance than the industrial benchmarks, thanks to an appropriate balance of hard intermetallic phases and soft Ni matrix, as well as to their nanostructuring. Their frictional characteristics under reciprocating sliding are mainly determined by the formation of an oxide-based tribo-layer, which was analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The role of intermetallic phases in these coatings on the friction and wear is also discussed.

  13. Elastoplastic analysis of process induced residual stresses in thermally sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yongxiong; Liang Xiubing; Liu Yan; Xu Binshi

    2010-07-15

    The residual stresses induced from thermal spraying process have been extensively investigated in previous studies. However, most of such works were focused on the elastic deformation range. In this paper, an elastoplastic model for predicting the residual stresses in thermally sprayed coatings was developed, in which two main contributions were considered, namely the deposition induced stress and that due to differential thermal contraction between the substrate and coating during cooling. The deposition induced stress was analyzed based on the assumption that the coating is formed layer-by-layer, and then a misfit strain is accommodated within the multilayer structure after the addition of each layer (plastic deformation is induced consequently). From a knowledge of specimen dimensions, processing temperatures, and material properties, residual stress distributions within the structure can be determined by implementing the model with a simple computer program. A case study for the plasma sprayed NiCoCrAlY on Inconel 718 system was performed finally. Besides some similar phenomena observed from the present study as compared with previous elastic model reported in literature, the elastoplastic model also provides some interesting features for prediction of the residual stresses.

  14. Structural and Tribological Properties of Nanostructured Supersonic Cold Sprayed Ni-20 wt.% Sn Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, E. P.; Dosta, S.; Fernández, J.; Matteazzi, P.; Kowalski, K.; Kusinski, J.; Piticescu, R. R.; Celis, J.-P.

    2016-06-01

    80-μm-thick nanostructured coatings consisting of a Ni solid solution, Ni3Sn, Ni3Sn2, and metastable NiSn intermetallic phases were deposited via supersonic cold spraying onto inconel 718 alloy substrates. These coatings have complex nanostructured metallurgical phases as revealed by transition electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Their mechanical properties were determined by nanoindentation measurements. Furthermore, the wear behavior of these nanostructured sprayed coatings was compared to the one of the industrial bulk or sprayed coated benchmark materials. It was found that the nanostructured coatings exhibit higher wear resistance than the industrial benchmarks, thanks to an appropriate balance of hard intermetallic phases and soft Ni matrix, as well as to their nanostructuring. Their frictional characteristics under reciprocating sliding are mainly determined by the formation of an oxide-based tribo-layer, which was analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The role of intermetallic phases in these coatings on the friction and wear is also discussed.

  15. Performance of high-velocity oxy-fuel-sprayed chromium carbide-nickel chromium coating in an actual boiler environment of a thermal power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, T.S.; Prakash, S.; Agrawal, R.D.

    2007-09-15

    The present study aims to evaluate the performance of a high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF)-sprayed Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr (chromium carbide-nickel chromium) coating on a nickel-based super-alloy in an actual industrial environment of a coal-fired boiler, with the objective to protect the boiler super-heater and reheater tubes from hot corrosion. The tests were performed in the platen super heater zone of a coal-fired boiler for 1,000 h at 900 degrees C under cyclic conditions. The Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coating imparted the necessary protection to the nickel-based super alloy in the given environment. The dense and flat splat structure of the coating, and the formation of oxides of chromium and nickel and their spinels, might have protected the substrate super alloy from the inward permeation of corrosive species.

  16. Flame spraying of polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Zeek, D.P.; Couch, K.W.; Benson, D.M.; Kirk, S.M.

    1997-08-01

    Statistical design-of-experiment studies of the thermal spraying of polymer powders are presented. Studies of the subsonic combustion (i.e., Flame) process were conducted in order to determine the quality and economics of polyester and urethane coatings. Thermally sprayed polymer coatings are of interest to several industries for anticorrosion applications, including the chemical, automotive, and aircraft industries. In this study, the coating design has been optimized for a site-specific application using Taguchi-type fractional-factorial experiments. Optimized coating designs are presented for the two powder systems. A substantial range of thermal processing conditions and their effect on the resultant polymer coatings is presented. The coatings were characterized by optical metallography, hardness testing, tensile testing, and compositional analysis. Characterization of the coatings yielded the thickness, bond strength, Knoop microhardness, roughness, deposition efficiency, and porosity. Confirmation testing was accomplished to verify the coating designs.

  17. Spray combustion stability project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, San-Mou; Litchford, Ron J.

    1990-01-01

    This report summarizes research activity on the Spray Combustion Stability Project, characterizes accomplishments and current status, and discusses projected future work. The purpose is to provide a concise conceptual overview of the research effort so the reader can quickly assimilate the gist of the research results and place them within the context of their potential impact on liquid rocket engine design technology. Therefore, this report does not elaborate on many of the detailed technical aspects of the research program.

  18. Spray combustion stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Pak-Yan; Jeng, S. M.; Litchford, Ronald

    1995-01-01

    The central purpose of this project is the improvement of liquid-fueled rocket motor design technology in order to assist the establishment of economical commercial access to space through the development of engines with enhanced performance and reliability. Specific research effort in the project is focused on spray physics and associated combustion instability phenomena. Results garnered from this work will contribute to the development of new computational tools for design of stable liquid propellant rocket engines. The specific objectives of the research effort include identifying and evaluating physical submodels which pertain to spray combustion stability with the idea of enhancing or refining existing submodels with a more comprehensive approach. In particular, any refinements to the spray combustion physical submodels which are achieved during the project will be channeled back to Rocketdyne for incorporation in their ARICC liquid rocket combustor code as second generation improvements. Also, as the ARICC code forms the basis or future CFD development, some effort is devoted to an evaluation of the code's capability for modeling oscillating pressure waves within the combustor.

  19. Vacuum plasma spray coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

    1989-01-01

    Currently, protective plasma spray coatings are applied to space shuttle main engine turbine blades of high-performance nickel alloys by an air plasma spray process. Originally, a ceramic coating of yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2.12Y2O3) was applied for thermal protection, but was removed because of severe spalling. In vacuum plasma spray coating, plasma coatings of nickel-chromium-aluminum-yttrium (NiCrAlY) are applied in a reduced atmosphere of argon/helium. These enhanced coatings showed no spalling after 40 MSFC burner rig thermal shock cycles between 927 C (1700 F) and -253 C (-423 F), while current coatings spalled during 5 to 25 test cycles. Subsequently, a process was developed for applying a durable thermal barrier coating of ZrO2.8Y2O3 to the turbine blades of first-stage high-pressure fuel turbopumps utilizing the enhanced NiCrAlY bond-coating process. NiCrAlY bond coating is applied first, with ZrO2.8Y2O3 added sequentially in increasing amounts until a thermal barrier coating is obtained. The enchanced thermal barrier coating has successfully passed 40 burner rig thermal shock cycles.

  20. Investigation of corrosion experienced in a spray calciner/ceramic melter vitrification system

    SciTech Connect

    Dierks, R.D.; Mellinger, G.B.; Miller, F.A.; Nelson, T.A.; Bjorklund, W.J.

    1980-08-01

    After periodic testing of a large-scale spray calciner/ceramic melter vitrification system over a 2-yr period, sufficient corrosion was noted on various parts of the vitrification system to warrant its disassembly and inspection. A majority of the 316 SS sintered metal filters on the spray calciner were damaged by chemical corrosion and/or high temperature oxidation. Inconel-601 portions of the melter lid were attacked by chlorides and sulfates which volatilized from the molten glass. The refractory blocks, making up the walls of the melter, were attacked by the waste glass. This attack was occurring when operating temperatures were >1200/sup 0/C. The melter floor was protected by a sludge layer and showed no corrosion. Corrosion to the Inconel-690 electrodes was minimal, and no corrosion was noted in the offgas treatment system downstream of the sintered metal filters. It is believed that most of the melter corrosion occurred during one specific operating period when the melter was operated at high temperatures in an attempt to overcome glass foaming behavior. These high temperatures resulted in a significant release of volatile elements from the molten glass, and also created a situation where the glass was very fluid and convective, which increased the corrosion rate of the refractories. Specific corrosion to the calciner components cannot be proven to have occurred during a specific time period, but the mechanisms of attack were all accelerated under the high-temperature conditions that were experienced with the melter. A review of the materials of construction has been made, and it is concluded that with controlled operating conditions and better protection of some materials of construction corrosion of these systems will not cause problems. Other melter systems operating under similar strenuous conditions have shown a service life of 3 yr.

  1. Fundamental studies of spray combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.C.; Libby, P.A.; Williams, F.A.

    1997-12-31

    Our research on spray combustion involves both experiment and theory and addresses the characteristics of individual droplets and of sprays in a variety of flows: laminar and turbulent, opposed and impinging. Currently our focus concerns water and fuel sprays in two stage laminar flames, i.e., flames arising, for example from a stream of fuel and oxidizer flowing opposite to an air stream carrying a water spray. Our interest in these flames is motivated by the goals of reducing pollutant emissions and extending the range of stable spray combustion. There remains considerable research to be carried out in order to achieve these goals. Thus far our research on the characteristics of sprays in turbulent flows has been limited to nonreacting jets impinging on a plate but this work will be extended to opposed flows with and without a flame. In the following we discuss details of these studies and our plans for future work.

  2. Reaction of Inconel 690 and 693 in Iron Phosphate Melts: Alternative Glasses for Waste Vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Delbert E. Kim, Cheol-Woon

    2005-09-13

    The corrosion resistance of candidate materials used for the electrodes (Inconel 690 & 693) and the melt contact refractory (Monofrax K-3) in a Joule Heated Melter (JHM) has been investigated at the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR) during the period from June 1, 2004 to August 31, 2005. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (DE-FG02-04ER63831). The unusual properties and characteristics of iron phosphate glasses, as viewed from the standpoint of alternative glasses for vitrifying nuclear and hazardous wastes which contain components that make them poorly suited for vitrification in borosilicate glass, were recently discovered at UMR. The expanding national and international interest in iron phosphate glasses for waste vitrification stems from their rapid melting and chemical homogenization which results in higher furnace output, their high waste loading that varies from 32 wt% up to 75 wt% for the Hanford LAW and HLW, respectively, and the outstanding chemical durability of the iron phosphate wasteforms which meets all present DOE requirements (PCT and VHT). The higher waste loading in iron phosphate glasses, compared to the baseline borosilicate glass, can reduce the time and cost of vitrification considerably since a much smaller mass of glass will be produced, for example, about 43% less glass when the LAW at Hanford is vitrified in an iron phosphate glass according to PNNL estimates. In view of the promising performance of iron phosphate glasses, information is needed for how to best melt these glasses on the scale needed for practical use. Melting iron phosphate glasses in a JHM is considered the preferred method at this time because its design could be nearly identical to the JHM now used to melt borosilicate glasses at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Westinghouse Savannah River Co. Therefore, it is important to have information for the corrosion of candidate electrode

  3. Mechanical properties of Inconel 718 and Nickel 201 alloys after thermal histories simulating brazing and high temperature service

    SciTech Connect

    James, W.F.

    1985-09-01

    An experimental investigation was made to evaluate two nickel base alloys (Nickel-201 and Inconel-718) in three heat treated conditions. These conditions were: (1) annealed; (2) after thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle; and (3) after a thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle plus one operational lifetime of high temperature service. For the Nickel-201, two different braze cycle temperatures were evaluated. A braze cycle utilizing a lower braze temperature resulted in less grain growth for Nickel-201 than the standard braze cycle used for joining Nickel-201 to Inconel-718. It was determined, however, that Nickel-201, was marginal for temperatures investigated due to large grain growth. After the thermal exposures described above, the mechanical properties of Nickel-201 were degraded, whereas similar exposure on Inconel-718 actually strengthened the material compared with the annealed condition. The investigation included tensile tests at both room temperature and elevated temperatures, stress-rupture tests, and metallographic examination.

  4. Mechanical properties of Inconel 718 and Nickel 201 alloys after thermal histories simulating brazing and high temperature service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made to evaluate two nickel base alloys (Nickel-201 and Inconel-718) in three heat treated conditions. These conditions were: (1) annealed; (2) after thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle; and (3) after a thermal exposure simulating a braze cycle plus one operational lifetime of high temperature service. For the Nickel-201, two different braze cycle temperatures were evaluated. A braze cycle utilizing a lower braze temperature resulted in less grain growth for Nickel-201 than the standard braze cycle used for joining Nickel-201 to Inconel-718. It was determined, however, that Nickel-201, was marginal for temperatures investigated due to large grain growth. After the thermal exposures described above, the mechanical properties of Nickel-201 were degraded, whereas similar exposure on Inconel-718 actually strengthened the material compared with the annealed condition. The investigation included tensile tests at both room temperature and elevated temperatures, stress-rupture tests, and metallographic examination.

  5. Effect of grain structure on phase transformation events in Inconel 718

    SciTech Connect

    Dahotre, N.B.; McCay, M.H.; McCay, T.D. ); Hubbard, C.R.; Porter, W.D.; Cavin, O.B. )

    1993-06-01

    Nickel base superalloys generally obtain their maximum strength from [gamma][prime][Ni[sub 3](Al,Ti)] and [gamma][double prime][Ni[sub 3](Al,Ti,Nb)] age hardening precipitates. During welding the [gamma][prime] precipitation is very rapid and can lead to strain age cracking, which limits weldability. Thus, the weldable superalloys are limited in their Al and Ti content and hence in their ultimate strength. One method of increasing the ultimate strength of a superalloy, while avoiding strain age cracking, is the addition of Nb. This produces Ni[sub 3]Nb([delta]), and when used in conjunction with a limited amount of [gamma][prime], results in an increase in strength without strain age cracking problems. The [gamma][double prime] does not lead to strain age cracking because its transformation kinetics are too slow for formation during ordinary welding practice. This combination of [gamma][prime] and [gamma][double prime] strengthening is incorporated into the Inconel 718 alloys. The research reported herein was undertaken to determine the time-temperature response of Inconel 718 in the as-cast, wrought and wrought-grain-grown states, using differential thermal analysis (DTA). It is essential to locate the temperature regime of each phase transformation event and to study the transformation sequence in order to tailor sound laser welding techniques for Inconel 718. In the present research, a DTA technique was employed to study both the phase transformation events and the phase transformation sequence as a function of the pre-existing condition of the alloy.

  6. Microstructures and microhardness at fusion boundary of 316 stainless steel/Inconel 182 dissimilar welding

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Lu, Yonghao; Ding, Xianfei; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2015-09-15

    Microstructures and microhardness at fusion boundary of a weld joint were investigated in a 316 stainless steel/Inconel 182 dissimilar weldment. The results showed that there were two alternately distributed typical fusion boundaries, a narrow random boundary (possessed 15% in length) with a clear sharp interface and an epitaxial fusion one with (100){sub BM}//(100){sub WM} at the joint interface. The composition transition, microstructure and hardness across the fusion boundary strongly depended on the type of the fusion boundary. For the random boundary, there was a clear sharp interface and the composition transition with a width of 100 μm took place symmetrically across the grain boundary. For the epitaxial fusion one, however, there were Type-I and Type-II grain boundaries perpendicular and parallel to the epitaxial fusion boundary, respectively. The composition transition took place in the Inconel 182 weld side. Σ3 boundaries in the HAZ of 316SS side and Σ5 grain boundaries in weld metal were usually observed, despite the type of fusion boundary, however the former was much more in epitaxial fusion boundary. Microhardness was continuously decreased across the random fusion boundary from the side of Inconel 182 to 316SS, but a hardening phenomenon appeared in the epitaxial fusion boundary zone because of its fine cellular microstructure. - Highlights: • Two typical fusion boundaries alternately distributed in the fusion interface • The microstructure, composition and hardness across fusion boundary depended on its type. • Different regions in welded joint have different special CSL value boundaries. • Hardening phenomenon only appeared in the epitaxial fusion boundary.

  7. Vacuum Plasma Spraying Replaces Electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Power, Chris; Burns, David H.; Daniel, Ron; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

    1992-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spraying used to fabricate large parts with complicated contours and inner structures, without uninspectable welds. Reduces time, and expense of fabrication. Wall of combustion chamber built up inside of outer nickel-alloy jacket by plasma spraying. Particles of metal sprayed partially melted in plasma gun and thrown at supersonic speed toward deposition surface. Vacuum plasma-spray produces stronger bond between the grooves and covering layer completing channels and wall of combustion chamber. In tests, bond withstood pressure of 20 kpsi, three times allowable limit by old method.

  8. Photomicrographic Studies of Fuel Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W; Spencer, Robert C

    1934-01-01

    A large number of photomicrographs of fuel sprays were taken for the purpose of studying the spray structure and the process of spray formation. They were taken at magnifying powers of 2.5, 3.25, and 10, using a spark discharge of very short duration for illumination. Several types and sizes of nozzles were investigated, different liquids were used, and a wide range of injection pressures was employed. The sprays were photographed as they were injected into a glass-walled chamber in which the air density was varied from 14 atmospheres to 0.0013 atmosphere.

  9. Crack-growth behavior in thick welded plates of Inconel 718 at room and cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    Results of mechanical-properties and axial-load fatigue and fracture tests performed on thick welded plates of Inconel 718 superalloy are presented. The test objectives were to determine the tensile strength properties and the crack-growth behavior in electron-beam, plasma-arc, and gas tungsten are welds for plates 1.90 cm (0.75 in) thick. Base-metal specimens were also tested to determine the flaw-growth behavior. The tests were performed in room-temperature-air and liquid nitrogen environments. The experimental crack-growth-rate data are correlated with theoretical crack-growth-rate predictions for semielliptical surface flaws.

  10. Corrosion Resistance of Laser Clads of Inconel 625 and Metco 41C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němeček, Stanislav; Fidler, Lukáš; Fišerová, Pavla

    The present paper explores the impact of laser cladding parameters on the corrosion behaviour of the resulting surface. Powders of Inconel 625 and austenitic Metco 41C steel were deposited on steel substrate. It was confirmed that the level of dilution has profound impact on the corrosion resistance and that dilution has to be minimized. However, the chemical composition of the cladding is altered even in the course of the cladding process, a fact which is related to the increase in the substrate temperature. The cladding process was optimized to achieve maximum corrosion resistance. The results were verified and validated using microscopic observation, chemical analysis and corrosion testing.

  11. Experimental investigation of the SCC of Inconel 600 and a predictive model for evaluating service performance

    SciTech Connect

    Bulischeck, T.S.; Van Rooyen, D.

    1980-07-01

    A research program currently in progress at Brookhaven National Laboratory has produced quantitative data on the various factors which may influence the service life of Inconel 600 steam generator tubing. A basic model is presented to relate data produced using accelerated test methods to actual service conditions. The effects of temperature, environment, stress, strain and strain rate on a number of heats of mill annealed material and tubing with beneficial heat treatments are presented. The initiation and propagation stages of intergranular stress corrosion cracking are treated separately. Although crack initiation time is altered by different chemical environments or perhaps composition, the crack growth rates appear to be governed by a temperature dependent process.

  12. Spectral Emittance of Uncoated and Ceramic-Coated Inconel and Type 321 Stainless Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Joseph C.; Stewart, James E.

    1959-01-01

    The normal spectral emittance of Inconel and type 321 stainless steel with different surface treatments was measured at temperatures of 900, 1,200, 1,500, and 1,800 F over a wavelength range of 1.5 to 15 microns. The measurements involved comparison of the radiant energy emitted by the heated specimen with that emitted by a comparison standard at the same temperature by means of a recording double-beam infrared spectrophotometer. The silicon carbide comparison standard had previously been calibrated against a laboratory black-body furnace. Surface treatments included electropolishing, sandblasting, electro-polishing followed by oxidation in air for 1/2 hour at 1,800 F, sandblasting followed by oxidation in air for 1/2 hour at 1,800 F, application of National Bureau of Standards coating A-418, and application of NBS ceramic coating N-143. The normal spectral emittance of both alloys in the electropolished condition was low and decreased very slightly with increasing wavelength while in the sandblasted condition it was somewhat higher and did not vary appreciably with wavelength. The oxidation treatment greatly increased the normal spectral emittance of both the electropolished and sandblasted type 321 stainless steel specimens and of the electropolished Inconel specimens and introduced some spectral selectivity into the curves. The oxidation increased the normal spectral emittance of the sandblasted Inconel specimens only moderately. Of the specimens to which a coating about 0.002 inch thick was applied, those coated with A-418 had higher emittance at all wavelengths than did those coated with N-143, and the coated specimens of Inconel had higher spectral emittance at all wavelengths than did the corresponding specimens of type 321 stainless steel. Both coatings were found to be partially transparent to the emitted energy at this thickness but essentially opaque at a thickness of 0.005 inch. Coated specimens with 0.005 inch or more of coating did not show the effect

  13. A Comparison of Weld-Repaired and Base Metal for Inconel 718 and CRES 321 at Cryogenic and Room Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Willard, Scott A.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth tests were conducted to characterize the performance of Inconel 718 and CRES 321 welds, weld heat-affect-zone and parent metal at room temperature laboratory air and liquid nitrogen (-196oC) environments. The results of this study were required to predict the damage tolerance behavior of proposed orbiter main engine hydrogen fuel liner weld repairs. Experimental results show that the room and cryogenic temperature fatigue crack growth characteristics of both alloys are not significantly degraded by the weld repair process. However, both Inconel 718 and CRES 321 exhibited lower apparent toughness within the weld repair region compared to the parent metal.

  14. Hot corrosion resistance of high-velocity oxyfuel sprayed coatings on a nickel-base superalloy in molten salt environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, T. S.; Prakash, S.; Agrawal, R. D.

    2006-09-01

    No alloy is immune to hot corrosion attack indefinitely. Coatings can extend the lives of substrate materials used at higher temperatures in corrosive environments by forming protective oxides layers that are reasonably effective for long-term applications. This article is concerned with studying the performance of high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF) sprayed NiCrBSi, Cr3C2-NiCr, Ni-20Cr, and Stellite-6 coatings on a nickel-base superalloy at 900 °C in the molten salt (Na2SO4-60% V2O5) environment under cyclic oxidation conditions. The thermogravimetric technique was used to establish kinetics of corrosion. Optical microscope, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy/electron dispersive analysis by x-ray (SEM/EDAX), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) techniques were used to characterize the as-sprayed coatings and corrosion products. The bare superalloy suffered somewhat accelerated corrosion in the given environmental conditions. whereas hot corrosion resistance of all the coated superalloys was found to be better. Among the coating studied, Ni-20Cr coated superalloy imparted maximum hot corrosion resistance, whereas Stellite-6 coated indicated minimum resistance. The hot corrosion resistance of all the coatings may be attributed to the formation of oxides and spinels of nickel, chromium, or cobalt.

  15. FeAl and NbAl3 Intermetallic-HVOF Coatings: Structure and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilemany, J. M.; Cinca, N.; Dosta, S.; Cano, I. G.

    2009-12-01

    Transition metal aluminides in their coating form are currently being explored in terms of resistance to oxidation and mechanical behavior. This interest in transition metal aluminides is mainly due to the fact that their high Al content makes them attractive for high-temperature applications. This is also a reason to study their resistance to wear; they may be suitable for use in applications that produce a lot of wear in aggressive environments, thus replacing established coating materials. In this study, the microstructure, microhardness, and wear and oxidation performance of FeAl and NbAl3 coatings produced by high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying are evaluated with two main aims: (i) to compare these two coating systems—a commonly studied aluminide (FeAl) and, NbAl3, an aluminide whose deposition by thermal spraying has not been attempted to date—and (ii) to analyze the relationship between their microstructure, composition and properties, and so clarify their wear and oxidation mechanisms. In the present study, the higher hardness of niobium aluminide coatings did not correlate with a higher wear resistance and, finally, although pesting phenomena (disintegration in oxidizing environments) were already known of in bulk niobium aluminides, here their behavior in the coating form is examined. It was shown that such accelerated oxidation was inevitable with respect to the better resistance of FeAl, but further improvements are foreseen by addition of alloying elements in that alloy.

  16. Spray-formed tooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHugh, K. M.; Key, J. F.

    The United States Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) has formed a partnership with the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop a process for the rapid production of low-cost tooling based on spray forming technology developed at the INEL. Phase 1 of the program will involve bench-scale system development, materials characterization, and process optimization. In Phase 2, prototype systems will be designed, constructed, evaluated, and optimized. Process control and other issues that influence commercialization will be addressed during this phase of the project. Technology transfer to USCAR, or a tooling vendor selected by USCAR, will be accomplished during Phase 3. The approach INEL is using to produce tooling, such as plastic injection molds and stamping dies, combines rapid solidification processing and net-shape materials processing into a single step. A bulk liquid metal is pressure-fed into a de Laval spray nozzle transporting a high velocity, high temperature inert gas. The gas jet disintegrates the metal into fine droplets and deposits them onto a tool pattern made from materials such as plastic, wax, clay, ceramics, and metals. The approach is compatible with solid freeform fabrication techniques such as stereolithography, selective laser sintering, and laminated object manufacturing. Heat is extracted rapidly, in-flight, by convection as the spray jet entrains cool inert gas to produce undercooled and semi-solid droplets. At the pattern, the droplets weld together while replicating the shape and surface features of the pattern. Tool formation is rapid; deposition rates in excess of 1 ton/h have been demonstrated for bench-scale nozzles.

  17. Spray-formed tooling

    SciTech Connect

    McHugh, K.M.; Key, J.F.

    1994-12-31

    The United States Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) has formed a partnership with the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop a process for the rapid production of low-cost tooling based on spray forming technology developed at the INEL. Phase 1 of the program will involve bench-scale system development, materials characterization, and process optimization. In Phase 2, prototype systems will be de signed, constructed, evaluated, and optimized. Process control and other issues that influence commercialization will be addressed during this phase of the project. Technology transfer to USCAR, or a tooling vendor selected by USCAR, will be accomplished during Phase 3. The approach INEL is using to produce tooling, such as plastic injection molds and stamping dies, combines rapid solidification processing and net-shape materials processing into a single step. A bulk liquid metal is pressure-fed into a de Laval spray nozzle transporting a high velocity, high temperature inert gas. The gas jet disintegrates the metal into fine droplets and deposits them onto a tool pattern made from materials such as plastic, wax, clay, ceramics, and metals. The approach is compatible with solid freeform fabrication techniques such as stereolithography, selective laser sintering, and laminated object manufacturing. Heat is extracted rapidly, in-flight, by convection as the spray jet entrains cool inert gas to produce undercooled and semi-solid droplets. At the pattern, the droplets weld together while replicating the shape and surface features of the pattern. Tool formation is rapid; deposition rates in excess of 1 ton/h have been demonstrated for bench-scale nozzles.

  18. Surface Integrity and Structural Stability of Broached Inconel 718 at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Peng, R. Lin; Moverare, J.; Avdovic, P.; Zhou, J. M.; Johansson, S.

    2016-04-01

    The current study focused on the surface integrity issues associated with broaching of Inconel 718 and the structural stability of the broached specimen at high temperatures, mainly involving the microstructural changes and residual stress relaxation. The broaching operation was performed using similar cutting conditions as that used in turbo machinery industries for machining fir-tree root fixings on turbine disks. Thermal exposure was conducted at 723 K, 823 K, and 923 K (450 °C, 550 °C, and 650 °C) for 30, 300, and 3000 hours, respectively. Surface cavities and debris dragging, sub-surface cracks, high intensity of plastic deformation, as well as the generation of tensile residual stresses were identified to be the main issues in surface integrity for the broached Inconel 718. When a subsequent heating was applied, surface recrystallization and α-Cr precipitation occurred beneath the broached surface depending on the applied temperature and exposure time. The plastic deformation induced by the broaching is responsible for these microstructural changes. The surface tension was completely relaxed in a short time at the temperature where surface recrystallization occurred. The tensile layer on the sub-surface, however, exhibited a much higher resistance to the stress relief annealing. Oxidation is inevitable at high temperatures. The study found that the surface recrystallization could promote the local Cr diffusion on the broached surface.

  19. Discontinuous Dynamic Recrystallization of Inconel 718 Superalloy During the Superplastic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Linjie; Qi, Feng; Hua, Peitao; Yu, Lianxu; Liu, Feng; Sun, Wenru; Hu, Zhuangqi

    2015-09-01

    The superplastic behavior of Inconel 718 superalloy with particular emphasis on the microstructural evolution has been systematically investigated through tensile tests at the strain rate of 10-3 s-1 and the temperatures ranging from 1223 K to 1253 K (950 °C to 980 °C). Its elongations exceeded 300 pct under all of the experimental conditions and peaked a maximum value of 520 pct at 1223 K (950 °C). Moreover, the stress reached the top value at the strain of 0.3, and then declined until the tensile failure. In addition, we have found that the grain size reduced after deformation while the δ phase precipitation increased. Microstructural evolution during the superplasticity was characterized via transmission electron microscope, and the randomly distributed dislocation, dislocation network, dislocation arrays, low-angled subgrains, and high-angled recrystallized new grains were observed in sequence. These new grains were found to nucleate at the triple junction, twin boundary, and near the δ phase. Based on these results, it is deemed that the discontinuous dynamic recrystallization occurred as the main mechanism for the superplastic deformation of Inconel 718 alloy.

  20. Transient liquid phase metallic bonding of an Inconel 718SPF superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, M.S.; Chuang, T.H.

    1997-12-01

    The applicability of the transient liquid phase (TLP) metallic bonding method for joining fine-grained Inconel 718SPF{reg_sign} superalloy sheets by inserting a Ni-P or a Ni-Cr-P amorphous interlayer has been evaluated. The results show that a joint with uniform chemical composition could be obtained for the Inconel 718SPF superalloy with a Ni-P interlayer at 1,100 C for 8 h. When a Ni-Cr-P interlayer was used under the same metallic bonding conditions, the concentrations of nickel, iron and niobium in the bond region and in the base metal had a difference of more than 2 wt-%. This means that longer bonding time was required to homogenize the chemical compositions of bonds with a Ni-Cr-P interlayer. The joints with a Ni-P interlayer showed higher bond strength than did those with a Ni-Cr-P interlayer. Furthermore, many grain boundary precipitates were found.

  1. Effect of overlap rate on recrystallization behaviors of Laser Solid Formed Inconel 718 superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jun; Liu, Fencheng; Lin, Xin; Huang, Chunping; Chen, Jing; Huang, Weidong

    2013-02-01

    The effect of overlap rate on the residual stress, recrystallization nucleation location and the distribution of recrystallized grains of LSFed Inconel 718 superalloy were investigated. It is found that the as-deposited microstructures with different overlap rates have the similar characteristics including that columnar grains grow along the deposition direction. The overlap area possesses higher residual stress compared with the inner-pass area, and the position of peak residual stress is closer to previous pass. The increase in the overlap rate will broaden the variation range of the residual stress. During heat treatment, the recrystallization nucleation first occurs in the overlap area with the lower overlap rate, and then expands to both overlap area and inner-pass area paralleling with the increasing of the overlap rate. Although the overlap rate is only one of basic factors in the Laser Solid Forming process, it plays an important role in controlling residual stress distribution, material microstructure and mechanical properties. The higher overlap rate adopted, the finer and the more evenly distributed grains could be obtained through recrystallization for LSFed Inconel 718 superalloy.

  2. Laser post-processing of Inconel 625 made by selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkin, David; Helvajian, Henry; Steffeney, Lee; Hansen, William

    2016-04-01

    The effect of laser remelting of surfaces of as-built Selective Laser Melted (SLM) Inconel 625 was evaluated for its potential to improve the surface roughness of SLM parts. Many alloys made by SLM have properties similar to their wrought counterparts, but surface roughness of SLM-made parts is much higher than found in standard machine shop operations. This has implications for mechanical properties of SLM materials, such as a large debit in fatigue properties, and in applications of SLM, where surface roughness can alter fluid flow characteristics. Because complexity and netshape fabrication are fundamental advantages of Additive Manufacturing (AM), post-processing by mechanical means to reduce surface roughness detracts from the potential utility of AM. Use of a laser to improve surface roughness by targeted remelting or annealing offers the possibility of in-situ surface polishing of AM surfaces- the same laser used to melt the powder could be amplitude modulated to smooth the part during the build. The effects of remelting the surfaces of SLM Inconel 625 were demonstrated using a CW fiber laser (IPG: 1064 nm, 2-50 W) that is amplitude modulated with a pulse profile to induce remelting without spallation or ablation. The process achieved uniform depth of melting and improved surface roughness. The results show that with an appropriate pulse profile that meters the heat-load, surface features such as partially sintered powder particles and surface connected porosity can be mitigated via a secondary remelting/annealing event.

  3. Surface Integrity and Structural Stability of Broached Inconel 718 at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Peng, R. Lin; Moverare, J.; Avdovic, P.; Zhou, J. M.; Johansson, S.

    2016-07-01

    The current study focused on the surface integrity issues associated with broaching of Inconel 718 and the structural stability of the broached specimen at high temperatures, mainly involving the microstructural changes and residual stress relaxation. The broaching operation was performed using similar cutting conditions as that used in turbo machinery industries for machining fir-tree root fixings on turbine disks. Thermal exposure was conducted at 723 K, 823 K, and 923 K (450 °C, 550 °C, and 650 °C) for 30, 300, and 3000 hours, respectively. Surface cavities and debris dragging, sub-surface cracks, high intensity of plastic deformation, as well as the generation of tensile residual stresses were identified to be the main issues in surface integrity for the broached Inconel 718. When a subsequent heating was applied, surface recrystallization and α-Cr precipitation occurred beneath the broached surface depending on the applied temperature and exposure time. The plastic deformation induced by the broaching is responsible for these microstructural changes. The surface tension was completely relaxed in a short time at the temperature where surface recrystallization occurred. The tensile layer on the sub-surface, however, exhibited a much higher resistance to the stress relief annealing. Oxidation is inevitable at high temperatures. The study found that the surface recrystallization could promote the local Cr diffusion on the broached surface.

  4. Reduction of a thin chromium oxide film on Inconel surface upon treatment with hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesel, Alenka; Mozetic, Miran; Balat-Pichelin, Marianne

    2016-11-01

    Inconel samples with a surface oxide film composed of solely chromium oxide with a thickness of approximately 700 nm were exposed to low-pressure hydrogen plasma at elevated temperatures to determine the suitable parameters for reduction of the oxide film. The hydrogen pressure during treatment was set to 60 Pa. Plasma was created by a surfaguide microwave discharge in a quartz glass tube to allow for a high dissociation fraction of hydrogen molecules. Auger electron depth profiling (AES) was used to determine the decay of the oxygen in the surface film and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to measure structural modifications. During hydrogen plasma treatment, the oxidized Inconel samples were heated to elevated temperatures. The reduction of the oxide film started at temperatures of approximately 1300 K (considering the emissivity of 0.85) and the oxide was reduced in about 10 s of treatment as revealed by AES. The XRD showed sharper substrate peaks after the reduction. Samples treated in hydrogen atmosphere under the same conditions have not been reduced up to approximately 1500 K indicating usefulness of plasma treatment.

  5. An experimental assessment on the performance of different lubrication techniques in grinding of Inconel 751.

    PubMed

    Balan, A S S; Vijayaraghavan, L; Krishnamurthy, R; Kuppan, P; Oyyaravelu, R

    2016-09-01

    The application of emulsion for combined heat extraction and lubrication requires continuous monitoring of the quality of emulsion to sustain a desired grinding environment; this is applicable to other grinding fluids as well. Thus to sustain a controlled grinding environment, it is necessary to adopt an effectively lubricated wheel-work interface. The current study was undertaken to assess experimentally the ​ effects of different grinding environments such as dry, minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) and Cryo-MQL on performance, such as grinding force, temperature, surface roughness and chip morphology on Inconel 751, a higher heat resistance material posing thermal problems and wheel loading. The results show that grinding with the combination of both liquid nitrogen (LN2) and MQL lowers temperature, cutting forces, and surface roughness as compared with MQL and dry grinding. Specific cutting energy is widely used as an inverse measure of process efficiency in machining. It is found from the results that specific cutting energy of Cryo-MQL assisted grinding is 50-65% lower than conventional dry grinding. The grindability of Inconel 751 superalloy can be enhanced with Cryo-MQL condition. PMID:27621941

  6. Evolution of microstructure of Haynes 230 and Inconel 617 under mechanical testing at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrutkay, Kyle

    Haynes 230 and Inconel 617 are austenitic nickel based superalloys, which are candidate structural materials for next generation high temperature nuclear reactors. High temperature deformation behavior of Haynes 230 and Inconel 617 have been investigated at the microstructural level in order to gain a better understanding of mechanical properties. Tensile tests were performed at strain rates ranging from 10-3-10-5 s -1 at room temperature, 600 °C, 800 °C and 950 °C. Subsequent microstructural analysis, including Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, and X-Ray Diffraction were used to relate the microstructural evolution at high temperatures to that of room temperature samples. Grain sizes and precipitate morphologies were used to determine high temperature behavior and fracture mechanics. Serrated flow was observed at intermediate and high temperatures as a result of discontinuous slip and dynamic recrystallization. The amplitude of serration increased with a decrease in the strain rate and increase in the temperature. Dynamic strain ageing was responsible for serrations at intermediate temperatures by means of a locking and unlocking phenomenon between dislocations and solute atoms. Dynamic recrystallization nucleated by grain and twin bulging resulting in a refinement of grain size. Existing models found in the literature were discussed to explain both of these phenomena.

  7. A Study on Fretting Behavior in Room Temperature for Inconel Alloy 690

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jae Do; Chai, Young Suck; Bae, Yong Tak; Choi, Sung Jong

    The initial crack under fretting condition occurs at lower stress amplitude and lower cycles of cyclic loading than that under plain fatigue condition. The fretting damage, for example, can be observed in fossil and nuclear power plant, aircraft, automobile and petroleum chemical plants etc. INCONEL alloy 690 is a high-chromium nickel alloy having excellent resistance to many corrosive aqueous media and high-temperature atmospheres. This alloy is used extensively in the industries of nuclear power, chemicals, heat-treatment and electronics. In this paper, the effect of fretting damage on fatigue behavior for INCONEL alloy 690 was studied. Also, various kinds of tests on mechanical properties such as hardness, tension and plain fatigue tests are performed. Fretting fatigue tests were carried out with flat-flat contact configuration using a bridge type contact pad and plate type specimen. Through these experiments, it is found that the fretting fatigue strength decreased about 43% compared to the plain fatigue strength. In fretting fatigue, the wear debris is observed on the contact surface, and the oblique micro-cracks are initiated at an earlier stage. These results can be used as the basic data in a structural integrity evaluation of heat and corrosion resistant alloy considering fretting damages.

  8. Studies on the oxidation behavior of Inconel 625 between 873 and 1523 K

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, L.; Venkataramani, R.; Garg, S.P.

    1996-02-01

    The oxidation behavior of Inconel 625 during the early stages (<150 min) has been studied at oxygen pressures (P{sub O}{sub 2}) of 0.12 kPa (0.9 torr) and 101.3 kPa (760 torr) in the temperature range of 1323 K to 1523 K by using TGA and between 873 and 1523 K by using XPS, AES, and EDS. The TGA results correlated well with those obtained by surface analysis of the oxide films. The results of XPS and AES analysis suggested that two distinctly different oxidation mechanisms operate, depending on the temperature of oxidation. Enrichment of the oxide films with respect to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} occurs above 873 K, the degree of enrichment peaking at about 1200 K such that the oxide films formed at temperatures close to this consist almost exclusively of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. At temperatures above 1300 K, the oxides of two minor alloying components, Nb and Ti, have been found to be present in the oxide films in significant proportions. The results have been discussed on the basis of the relative thermodynamic stabilities of the competing oxide phases and the diffusivities of the alloying elements in Inconel 625.

  9. Interface microstructures in the diffusion bonding of a titanium alloy Ti 6242 to an Inconel 625

    SciTech Connect

    Aleman, B.; Gutierrez, I.; Urcola, J.J. . Dept. of Materials)

    1995-02-01

    Surveys carried out by some oil companies have shown a recent and clear trend toward drilling wells to greater depths. As the drilling for oil and gas gets deeper, the requirements of materials for tubing become more stringent, due to the rise in temperature and pressure and also because the tubes have to sustain their own weight. In this paper, Ti6242 alloy has been diffusion bonded to a superalloy INCONEL 625. The microstructures of the as-processed products have been analyzed using optical metallography, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) techniques. The interdiffusion of the different elements through the interface has been determined using energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) microanalysis in both a SEM and a STEM. Several regions around the original interface have been observed. Starting from the superalloy INCONEL 625, first a sigma phase (Cr[sub 4]Ni[sub 3]Mo[sub 2]), followed by several phases like NbNi[sub 3], [eta]Ni[sub 3]Ti, Cr(20 pct Mo), [beta] Cr[sub 2]Ti, NiTi, TiO, TiNi, and Ti[sub 2]Ni intermetallics, just before the Ti6242 have been identified. Because the diffusion of Ni in Ti is faster than the diffusion of Ti in the superalloy, a Kirkendall effect was produced. The sequence of formation of the different phases were in agreement with the ternary Ti-Cr-Ni diagram.

  10. Experimental Investigation into the Effect of Ball End Milling Parameters on Surface Integrity of Inconel 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhopale, Nandkumar N.; Joshi, Suhas S.; Pawade, Raju S.

    2015-02-01

    In machining of Inconel 718, various difficulties such as increased tool wear and poor machined surface quality are frequently encountered due to its high temperature strength and poor thermal properties. This work considers the effect of number of passes and the machining environment on the machined surface quality in ball end milling of Inconel 718, which hitherto has not been adequately understood. To this effect, extensive experimentation has been carried out to analyze machined surface quality and integrity in terms of surface roughness, surface damage, and microhardness variation in the machined surfaces. The machined surfaces show formation of distinct bands as a function of instantaneous machining parameters along the periphery of cutting tool edge. A distinct variation is also observed in the measured values of surface roughness and microhardness in these regions. The minimum surface roughness is obtained in the stable cutting zone and it increases toward the periphery of the cutter on band #2 and band #3. Microhardness of depth beneath the machined surface shows that the machining affected zone varies from 60 to 100 µm in ball end milling under various machining conditions.

  11. Relationship between ferromagnetic properties and grain size of Inconel alloy 600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, H.; Takahashi, H.; Yanagiwara, H.; Murakami, T.

    2015-05-01

    Inconel alloy 600 is widely used in steam generator tubings where sensitization due to chromium depletion occurs at grain boundaries and the sensitization induces tubing failures. Though the alloy usually exhibits paramagnetic properties, it shows ferromagnetic properties along grain boundaries when chromium depletion occurs. This means that magnetic nondestructive evaluation of sensitization is possible. Therefore, as a fundamental study to develop magnetic nondestructive evaluation technique for sensitization, the relationship between ferromagnetic properties and grain size in Inconel 600 was investigated using isothermal heat treatment. The grain was controlled using solution annealing, and then, specimens were heat treated at 873, 923, and 973 K within 400 h. The saturation magnetization increases as heat treatment time increases and eventually peaks. The peak time depends on the heat treatment temperature. The coercivity increases during the initial heat treatment stage, and decreases as the duration of heat treatment increases. The maximum saturation magnetization decreases as the grain diameter increases and is inversely proportional to the grain diameter squared, which is consistent with the fact that the ferromagnetic phase only formed along grain boundaries.

  12. Effect of Powder-Suspended Dielectric on the EDM Characteristics of Inconel 625

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talla, Gangadharudu; Gangopadhyay, S.; Biswas, C. K.

    2016-02-01

    The current work attempts to establish the criteria for powder material selection by investigating the influence of various powder-suspended dielectrics and machining parameters on various EDM characteristics of Inconel 625 (a nickel-based super alloy) which is nowadays regularly used in aerospace, chemical, and marine industries. The powders include aluminum (Al), graphite, and silicon (Si) that have significant variation in their thermo-physical characteristics. Results showed that powder properties like electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, density, and hardness play a significant role in changing the machining performance and the quality of the machined surface. Among the three powders, highest material removal rate was observed for graphite powder due to its high electrical and thermal conductivities. Best surface finish and least radial overcut (ROC) were attained using Si powder. Maximum microhardness was found for Si due to its low thermal conductivity and high hardness. It is followed by graphite and aluminum powders. Addition of powder to the dielectric has increased the crater diameter due to expansion of plasma channel. Powder-mixed EDM (PMEDM) was also effective in lowering the density of surface cracks with least number of cracks obtained with graphite powder. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated possible formation of metal carbides along with grain growth phenomenon of Inconel 625 after PMEDM.

  13. Control of the kerf size and microstructure in Inconel 738 superalloy by femtosecond laser beam cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, J.; Ye, Y.; Sun, Z.; Liu, L.; Zou, G.

    2016-05-01

    Femtosecond laser beam cutting is becoming widely used to meet demands for increasing accuracy in micro-machining. In this paper, the effects of processing parameters in femtosecond laser beam cutting on the kerf size and microstructure in Inconel 738 have been investigated. The defocus, pulse width and scanning speed were selected to study the controllability of the cutting process. Adjusting and matching the processing parameters was a basic enhancement method to acquire well defined kerf size and the high-quality ablation of microstructures, which has contributed to the intensity clamping effect. The morphology and chemical compositions of these microstructures on the cut surface have been characterized by a scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Additionally, the material removal mechanism and oxidation mechanism on the Inconel 738 cut surface have also been discussed on the basis of the femtosecond laser induced normal vaporization or phase explosion, and trapping effect of the dangling bonds.

  14. Analysis of Deformation in Inconel 718 When the Stress Anomaly and Dynamic Strain Aging Coexist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follansbee, Paul S.

    2016-09-01

    Deformation in Inconel 718 in the presence of combined effects of the stress anomaly and dynamic strain aging is analyzed according to an internal state variable model formulation. The analysis relies on the availability of experimental data in regimes of behavior where both the stress anomaly and dynamic strain aging are absent. A model that introduces two internal state variables—one characterizing interactions of dislocations with solute atoms and one characterizing interaction of dislocations with precipitates—is shown to adequately describe the temperature and strain-rate dependence of the yield stress in several superalloy systems. Strain hardening is then added with a third internal state variable to enable description of the full stress-strain curve. These equations are extrapolated into regimes where the stress anomaly and dynamic strain aging are present to identify signatures of their effects and to compare to similar analyses in a variety of metal systems. Dynamic strain aging in Inconel 718 follows similar trends to those observed previously. The magnitude of the stress anomaly tracks measurements of stress vs test temperature in pure Ni3Al. Several trends in the strain-rate sensitivity of elevated temperature deformation in superalloys are identified based on limited availability of measurements over a wide range of strain rates or tests using strain-rate changes.

  15. A New Way to Spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A NASA SBIR contract provided the funding for a new nozzle shape to be used in plasma spray techniques. The new design, a bell shape, reduces overspray. The result is a significant decrease in the cost of plasma spraying and a higher quality, more pure coating.

  16. Microstructure and Properties of Thermally Sprayed Functionally Graded Coatings for Polymeric Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivosevic, M.; Knight, R.; Kalidindi, S. R.; Palmese, G. R.; Sutter, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    The use of polymer matrix composites (PMCs) in the gas flow path of advanced turbine engines offers significant benefits for aircraft engine performance but their useful lifetime is limited by their poor erosion resistance. High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed polymer/cermet functionally graded (FGM) coatings are being investigated as a method to address this technology gap by providing erosion and oxidation protection to polymer matrix composites. The FGM coating structures are based on a polyimide matrix filled with varying volume fractions of WC-Co. The graded coating architecture was produced using a combination of internal and external feedstock injection, via two computer-controlled powder feeders and controlled substrate preheating. Porosity, coating thickness and volume fraction of the WC-Co filler retained in the coatings were determined using standard metallographic techniques and computer image analysis. The pull-off strength (often referred to as the adhesive strength) of the coatings was evaluated according to the ASTM D 4541 standard test method, which measured the greatest normal tensile force that the coating could withstand. Adhesive/cohesive strengths were determined for three different types of coating structures and compared based on the maximum indicated load and the surface area loaded. The nature and locus of the fractures were characterized according to the percent of adhesive and/or cohesive failure, and the tested interfaces and layers involved were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy.

  17. Substrate system for spray forming

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Men G.; Chernicoff, William P.

    2002-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  18. Substrate system for spray forming

    DOEpatents

    Chu, Men G.; Chernicoff, William P.

    2000-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  19. Microstructure, Processing, Performance Relationships for High Temperature Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas M. Lillo

    2011-04-01

    This work evaluates the suitability of iron aluminide coatings for use in high temperature fossil fuel combustion environments, such as boiler applications. The coatings are applied using High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray techniques. Iron aluminide coatings, with the nominal composition of Fe3Al, were applied to various high temperature structural materials (316 Stainless Steel, 9Cr-1Mo steel and Inconel 600) that typically lack inherent resistance to environmental degradation found in fossil fuel combustion atmospheres. Coating/substrate combinations were subjected to thermal cycling to evaluate the effect of HVOF parameters, coating thickness, substrate material and substrate surface roughness on the resistance to coating delamination and cracking. It was found that substrate surface roughness had a profound influence on the performance of a given substrate/coating system and that surface preparation techniques will need to be tailored to the specific substrate material. Also, higher particle velocity during HVOF thermal spray deposition of the iron aluminide coatings tended to result in better-performing coating/substrate systems with less delamination at the coating/substrate interface. Some combinations of HVOF parameters, coating thickness and substrate materials were found to perform extremely well even at temperatures up to 900oC. However, in some cases, substantial reactions at the interface were observed.

  20. Tensile Properties and Microstructure of Inconel 718 Fabricated with Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF(sup 3))

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, R. Keith; Hibberd, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    Electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) direct metal deposition processing was used to fabricate two Inconel 718 single-bead-width wall builds and one multiple-bead-width block build. Specimens were machined to evaluate microstructure and room temperature tensile properties. The tensile strength and yield strength of the as-deposited material from the wall and block builds were greater than those for conventional Inconel 718 castings but were less than those for conventional cold-rolled sheet. Ductility levels for the EBF3 material were similar to those for conventionally-processed sheet and castings. An unexpected result was that the modulus of the EBF3-deposited Inconel 718 was significantly lower than that of the conventional material. This low modulus may be associated with a preferred crystallographic orientation resultant from the deposition and rapid solidification process. A heat treatment with a high solution treatment temperature resulted in a recrystallized microstructure and an increased modulus. However, the modulus was not increased to the level that is expected for Inconel 718.